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Sample records for ac conducting coils

  1. AC Loss Measurements on a 2G YBCO Coil

    SciTech Connect

    Rey, Christopher M; Duckworth, Robert C; Schwenterly, S W

    2011-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is collaborating with Waukesha Electric Systems (WES) to continue development of HTS power transformers. For compatibility with the existing power grid, a commercially viable HTS transformer will have to operate at high voltages in the range of 138 kV and above, and will have to withstand 550-kV impulse voltages as well. Second-generation (2G) YBCO coated conductors will be required for an economically-competitive design. In order to adequately size the refrigeration system for these transformers, the ac loss of these HTS coils must be characterized. Electrical AC loss measurements were conducted on a prototype high voltage (HV) coil with co-wound stainless steel at 60 Hz in a liquid nitrogen bath using a lock-in amplifier technique. The prototype HV coil consisted of 26 continuous (without splice) single pancake coils concentrically centered on a stainless steel former. For ac loss measurement purposes, voltage tap pairs were soldered across each set of two single pancake coils so that a total of 13 separate voltage measurements could be made across the entire length of the coil. AC loss measurements were taken as a function of ac excitation current. Results show that the loss is primarily concentrated at the ends of the coil where the operating fraction of critical current is the highest and show a distinct difference in current scaling of the losses between low current and high current regimes.

  2. Superconductor coil geometry and ac losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, T. V., Jr.; Zapata, R. N.

    1976-01-01

    An empirical relation is presented which allows simple computation of volume-averaged winding fields from central fields for coils of small rectangular cross sections. This relation suggests that, in certain applications, ac-loss minimization can be accomplished by use of low winding densities, provided that hysteresis losses are independent of winding density. The ac-loss measurements on coils wound of twisted multifilamentary composite superconductors show no significant dependence on ac losses on winding density, thus permitting the use of winding density as an independent design parameter in loss minimization.

  3. AC loss measurements in HTS coil assemblies with hybrid coil structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhenan; Long, Nicholas J.; Staines, Mike; Badcock, Rodney A.; Bumby, Chris W.; Buckley, Robert G.; Amemiya, Naoyuki

    2016-09-01

    Both AC loss and wire cost in coil windings are critical factors for high temperature superconductor (HTS) AC machinery applications. We present AC loss measurement results in three HTS coil assemblies at 77 K and 65 K which have a hybrid coil structure comprising one central winding (CW) and two end windings (EWs) wound with ReBCO and BSCCO wires with different self-field I c values at 77 K. All AC loss results in the coil assemblies are hysteretic and the normalized AC losses in the coil assemblies at different temperatures can be scaled with the I c value of the coil assemblies. The normalised results show that AC loss in a coil assembly with BSCCO CW can be reduced by using EWs wound with high I c ReBCO wires, whilst further AC loss reduction can be achieved by replacing the BSCCO CW with ReBCO CW. The results imply that a flexible hybrid coil structure is possible which considers both AC loss and wire cost in coil assemblies.

  4. Quenching characteristics of a.c. superconducting coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akita, S.; Kasahara, H.; Torii, S.

    Quenching characteristics of two superconducting coils for a.c. use are investigated at different frequencies. One is impregnated with epoxy resin and the other is not. Both coils have experienced over 40 quenches in a.c. and d.c. The impregnated coil shows steady quenching currents for a.c. and the values are nearly the same as for d.c. On the other hand, quenching currents for a.c. in the non-impregnated coil are almost 80% of the trained-up d.c. quenching current and are scattered. Furthermore, the relationship between quenching currents and the estimated a.c. losses of the superconducting cable at the highest magnetic field point is investigated. According to the results of this investigation, the cause of quench in the impregnated coil is assumed to be the temperature rise of the winding due to a.c. losses, while the cause in the non-impregnated coil might be wire motion.

  5. Measurements and calculations of transport AC loss in second generation high temperature superconducting pancake coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Weijia; Coombs, T. A.; Kim, Jae-Ho; Han Kim, Chul; Kvitkovic, Jozef; Pamidi, Sastry

    2011-12-01

    Theoretical and experimental AC loss data on a superconducting pancake coil wound using second generation (2 G) conductors are presented. An anisotropic critical state model is used to calculate critical current and the AC losses of a superconducting pancake coil. In the coil there are two regions, the critical state region and the subcritical region. The model assumes that in the subcritical region the flux lines are parallel to the tape wide face. AC losses of the superconducting pancake coil are calculated using this model. Both calorimetric and electrical techniques were used to measure AC losses in the coil. The calorimetric method is based on measuring the boil-off rate of liquid nitrogen. The electric method used a compensation circuit to eliminate the inductive component to measure the loss voltage of the coil. The experimental results are consistent with the theoretical calculations thus validating the anisotropic critical state model for loss estimations in the superconducting pancake coil.

  6. Graphene-coated coupling coil for AC resistance reduction

    DOEpatents

    Miller, John M

    2014-03-04

    At least one graphene layer is formed to laterally surround a tube so that the basal plane of each graphene layer is tangential to the local surface of the tube on which the graphene layer is formed. An electrically conductive path is provided around the tube for providing high conductivity electrical path provided by the basal plane of each graphene layer. The high conductivity path can be employed for high frequency applications such as coupling coils for wireless power transmission to overcome skin depth effects and proximity effects prevalent in high frequency alternating current paths.

  7. Impedance of curved rectangular spiral coils around a conductive cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, S. K.; Ditchburn, R. J.; Theodoulidis, T. P.

    2008-07-01

    Eddy-current induction due to a thin conformable coil wrapped around a long conductive cylinder is examined using a second-order vector potential formalism. Compact closed-form expressions are derived for the self- and mutual impedances of curved rectangular spiral coils (i) in free space and (ii) when wrapped around the surface of the cylindrical rod. The validity of these expressions was tested against the results of a systematic series of experiments using a cylindrical Al-alloy rod and conformable coils manufactured using flexible printed-circuit-board technology. The theoretical expressions were in very good agreement with the experimental measurements. The significance of the results for eddy-current nondestructive inspection using flexible coils and flexible coil arrays is discussed.

  8. WITHDRAWN: Complex Study of Transport AC Loss in Various 2G HTS Racetrack Coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yiran; Zhang, Min; Chudy, Michal; Matsuda, Koichi; Coombs, Tim

    2013-06-01

    HTS racetrack coils are becoming important elements of an emerging number of superconducting devices such as generators or motors. In these devices the issue of AC loss is crucial, as performance and cooling power are derived from this quantity. This paper presents a comparative study of transport AC loss in two different types of 2G HTS racetrack coils. In this study, both experimental measurements and computer simulation approaches were employed. All the experiments were performed using classical AC electrical method. The finite-element computer model was used to estimate electromagnetic properties and calculate transport AC loss. The main difference between the characterized coils is covered inside tape architectures. While one coil uses tape based on RABITS magnetic substrate, the second coil uses a non-magnetic tape. Ferromagnetic loss caused by a magnetic substrate is an important issue involved in the total AC loss. As a result, the coil with the magnetic substrate surprised with high AC loss and rather low performance.

  9. Complex study of transport AC loss in various 2G HTS racetrack coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yiran; Zhang, Min; Chudy, Michal; Matsuda, Koichi; Coombs, Tim

    2013-04-01

    HTS racetrack coils are becoming important elements of an emerging number of superconducting devices such as generators or motors. In these devices the issue of AC loss is crucial, as performance and cooling power are derived from this quantity. This paper presents a comparative study of transport AC loss in two different types of 2G HTS racetrack coils. In this study, both experimental measurements and computer simulation approaches were employed. All the experiments were performed using classical AC electrical method. The finite-element computer model was used to estimate electromagnetic properties and calculate transport AC loss. The main difference between the characterized coils is covered inside tape architectures. While one coil uses tape based on RABITS magnetic substrate, the second coil uses a non-magnetic tape. Ferromagnetic loss caused by a magnetic substrate is an important issue involved in the total AC loss. As a result, the coil with the magnetic substrate surprised with high AC loss and rather low performance.

  10. Rod/Coil Block Copolyimides for Ion-Conducting Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Kinder, James D.

    2003-01-01

    Rod/coil block copolyimides that exhibit high levels of ionic conduction can be made into diverse products, including dimensionally stable solid electrolyte membranes that function well over wide temperature ranges in fuel cells and in lithium-ion electrochemical cells. These rod/coil block copolyimides were invented to overcome the limitations of polymers now used to make such membranes. They could also be useful in other electrochemical and perhaps some optical applications, as described below. The membranes of amorphous polyethylene oxide (PEO) now used in lithium-ion cells have acceptably large ionic conductivities only at temperatures above 60 C, precluding use in what would otherwise be many potential applications at lower temperatures. PEO is difficult to process, and, except at the highest molecular weights it is not very dimensionally stable. It would be desirable to operate fuel cells at temperatures above 80 C to take advantage of better kinetics of redox reactions and to reduce contamination of catalysts. Unfortunately, proton-conduction performance of a typical perfluorosulfonic polymer membrane now used as a solid electrolyte in a fuel cell decreases with increasing temperature above 80 C because of loss of water from within the membrane. The loss of water has been attributed to the hydrophobic nature of the polymer backbone. In addition, perfluorosulfonic polymers are expensive and are not sufficiently stable for long-term use. Rod/coil block copolyimides are so named because each molecule of such a polymer comprises short polyimide rod segments alternating with flexible polyether coil segments (see figure). The rods and coils can be linear, branched, or mixtures of linear and branched. A unique feature of these polymers is that the rods and coils are highly incompatible, giving rise to a phase separation with a high degree of ordering that creates nanoscale channels in which ions can travel freely. The conduction of ions can occur in the coil phase

  11. Total AC loss study of 2G HTS coils for fully HTS machine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Yuan, Weijia; Kvitkovic, Jozef; Pamidi, Sastry

    2015-11-01

    The application of HTS coils for fully HTS machines has become a new research focus. In the stator of an electrical machine, HTS coils are subjected to a combination of an AC applied current and AC external magnetic field. There is a phase shift between the AC current and AC magnetic field. In order to understand and estimate the total AC loss of HTS coils for electrical machines, we designed and performed a calorimetric measurement for a 2G HTS racetrack coil. Our measurement indicates that the total AC loss is greatly influenced by the phase shift between the applied current and the external magnetic field when the magnetic field is perpendicular to the tape surface. When the applied current and the external magnetic field are in phase, the total AC loss is the highest. When there is a 90 degree phase difference, the total AC loss is the lowest. In order to explain this phenomenon, we employ H formulation and finite element method to model the 2G HTS racetrack coil. Our calculation agrees well with experimental measurements. Two parameters are defined to describe the modulation of the total AC loss in terms of phase difference. The calculation further reveals that the influence of phase difference varies with magnetic field direction. The greatest influence of phase difference is in the perpendicular direction. The study provides key information for large-scale 2G HTS applications, e.g. fully HTS machines and superconducting magnetic energy storage, where the total AC loss subjected to both applied currents and external magnetic fields is a critical parameter for the design.

  12. Coil performances of superconducting cables for ac applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lacaze, A.; Laumond, Y.; Bonnet, P. ); Fevrier, A.; Verhaege, T. ); Ansart, A. )

    1992-01-01

    Multifilamentary superconducting wires with a greatly reduced level of losses have been produced with unit lengths of several tens of kilometers. The authors manufactured three industrial wires named L, T, and S, comprising respectively 377982, 597102 and 920304 filaments, 0.14 {mu}m in diameter with a 0.13 {mu}m spacing between filaments. The characteristics of these wires are already published and the authors have tested coils made with (6 + 1) cables of each kind of strands (L, T, and S), the results are also published in A.S.C.90. In this paper, the results of coil tests performed with a (6 + 1) of L strand from 0 to 100 Hz are given, as well as the first results of the tests of coils made with two stage cables (6 + 1){sup 2} with L, T and S strands.

  13. Development of an Nb{sub 3}Sn AC coil with react and wind method

    SciTech Connect

    Kasahara, H.; Torii, S.; Akita, S.; Kubota, Y.; Yasohama, K.; Kobayashi, H.; Ogasawara, T.; Kumano, T.; Miyake, S.

    1996-07-01

    The Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductor possesses a higher critical temperature than the NbTi strand. Therefore, it is now possible to make highly stable superconducting strands. The authors examined the manufacturing process of AC Nb{sub 3}Sn strands. The internal Sn diffusion process showed a higher critical current density than the conventional process. Nb{sub 3}Sn strands for AC use have a high Jc with low temperature reaction heat treatment, because they have fine filaments to decrease AC loss. They made a 400kVA class superconducting coil using the developed Nb{sub 3}Sn cable with the React and Wind method. The loss density of this coil was 25.7MW/m{sup 3} at the point just before the quench. In this case, the temperature of the cable increases about 3.39K. This means that the coil using Nb{sub 3}Sn cables has a very high stability in AC use.

  14. Study of AC electrical conduction mechanisms in an epoxy polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jilani, Wissal; Mzabi, Nissaf; Gallot-Lavallée, Olivier; Fourati, Najla; Zerrouki, Chouki; Zerrouki, Rachida; Guermazi, Hajer

    2015-11-01

    The AC conductivity of an epoxy resin was investigated in the frequency range 10^{-1} - 106 Hz at temperatures ranging from -100 to 120 °C. The frequency dependence of σ_{ac} was described by the law: σ_{ac}=ω \\varepsilon0\\varepsilon^''_{HN}+Aωs. The study of temperature variation of the exponent (s) reveals two conduction models: the AC conduction dependence upon temperature is governed by the small polaron tunneling mechanism (SPTM) at low temperature (-100 -60 °C) and the correlated barrier hopping (CHB) model at high temperature (80-120 °C).

  15. ac conductance of surface layer in lithium tetraborate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chung-Sik; Park, Jong-Ho; Moon, Byung Kee; Seo, Hyo-Jin; Choi, Byung-Chun; Hwang, Yoon-Hwae; Kim, Hyung Kook; Kim, Jung Nam

    2003-12-01

    ac conductance for the electrode effect in Li2B4O7 single crystal was investigated by use of a coplanar electrode applied on the surface of a (001) plate. A coplanar electrode in this material more clearly shows conduction of the electrode effect than a conventional parallel planar electrode. The electrode effect in ac conductance is likely to be controlled by the surface layer, which is a poorly conductive depletion layer possibly filled with vacancies of lithium ions. We found that the surface layer is not locally distributed near the electrodes, but, rather, on the broad area of the surface (001) plane of the material. So we conclude that the electrode effect in ac conduction of Li2B4O7 single crystal is mainly due to the poor conductive surface layer distributed over the whole surface of the (001) plane and is not a secondary phase formed by reaction with the electrode material.

  16. AC Conductivity Studies of Lithium Based Phospho Vanadate Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagendra, K.; Babu, G. Satish; Reddy, C. Narayana; Gowda, Veeranna

    2011-07-01

    Glasses in the system xLi2SO4-20Li2O-(80-x) [80P2O5-20V2O5] (5⩾x⩾20 mol%) has been prepared by melt quenching method. Dc and ac conductivity has been studied over a wide range of frequency (10 Hz to 10 MHz) and temperature (298 K-523 K). The dc conductivity found to increase with increase of Li2SO4 concentration. The ac conductivities have been fitted to the Almond-West type single power law equation σ(ω) = σ(0)+Aωs where `s' is the power law exponent. The ac conductivity found to increase with increase of Li2SO4 concentration. An attempt is made to elucidate the enhancement of lithium ion conduction in phosphor-vanadate glasses by considering the expansion of network structure.

  17. Dynamic conductivity of ac-dc-driven graphene superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukhar', E. I.; Kryuchkov, S. V.; Ionkina, E. S.

    2016-06-01

    The dynamic conductivity of graphene superlattice in the presence of ac electric field and dc electric field with longitudinal and transversal components with respect to superlattice axis was calculated. In the case of strong transversal component of dc field conductivity of graphene superlattice was shown to be such as if the electrons had got the effective mass. In the case of weak transversal component of dc field conductivity was shown to change its sign if the frequency of ac field was an integer multiple of half of Bloch frequency.

  18. Electrical and thermal characteristics of Bi2212/Ag HTS coils for conduction-cooled SMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, N.; Noguchi, S.; Kurupakorn, C.; Kojima, H.; Endo, F.; Hirano, N.; Nagaya, S.; Okubo, H.

    2006-06-01

    In this paper, we investigated the electrical and thermal performance of conduction-cooled Bi2212/Ag HTS coils with 4K-GM cryocooler system. First, we measured the critical current Ic for different ambient temperatures T0 at 4.2 K - 40 K. Experimental results revealed that Ic increased with the decrease in T0 and was saturated at T0 < 10 K. We carried out thermal analysis considering heat generation, conduction and transfer under conduction-cooling condition, and reproduced the electrical and thermal characteristics of the conduction-cooled HTS coil, taking account of temperature dependence of specific heat and thermal conductivity of the materials. We also measured the temperature rise of Bi2212/Ag HTS coil for different continuous current levels at T0 = 4.8 K. Experimental results revealed the criterion of thermal runaway, which was discussed in terms of heat generation and propagation in the test coil.

  19. Impedance, AC conductivity and dielectric behavior Adeninium Trichloromercurate (II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fersi, M. Amine; Chaabane, I.; Gargouri, M.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we report the measurements impedance spectroscopy technique for the organic-inorganic hybrid compound (C5H6N5) HgCl3, 11/2H2O measured in the 209 Hz-5 MHz frequency range from 378 to 428 K. Besides, the Cole-Cole (Z″ versus Z‧) plots were well fitted to an equivalent circuit built up by a parallel combination of resistance (R), fractal capacitance (CPE) and capacitance (C). Furthermore, the AC conductivity was investigated as a function of temperature and frequency in the same range. The experiment results indicated that AC conductivityac) was proportional to σdc + A ωS . The obtained results are discussed in terms of the correlated barrier hopping (CBH) model. An agreement between the experimental and theoretical results suggests that the AC conductivity behavior of Adeninium Trichloromercurate (II) can be successfully explained by CBH model. The contribution of single polaron hopping to AC conductivity in a present alloy was also studied.

  20. AC Conductivity Studies of Lithium Based Phospho Vanadate Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Nagendra, K.; Babu, G. Satish; Gowda, Veeranna; Reddy, C. Narayana

    2011-07-15

    Glasses in the system xLi{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-20Li{sub 2}O-(80-x) [80P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-20V{sub 2}O{sub 5}](5{>=}x{>=}20 mol%) has been prepared by melt quenching method. Dc and ac conductivity has been studied over a wide range of frequency (10 Hz to 10 MHz) and temperature (298 K-523 K). The dc conductivity found to increase with increase of Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} concentration. The ac conductivities have been fitted to the Almond-West type single power law equation {sigma}({omega}) = {sigma}(0)+A{omega}{sup s} where 's' is the power law exponent. The ac conductivity found to increase with increase of Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} concentration. An attempt is made to elucidate the enhancement of lithium ion conduction in phosphor-vanadate glasses by considering the expansion of network structure.

  1. AC Conductivity and Dielectric Properties of Borotellurite Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, T. A.; Azab, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    Borotellurite glasses with formula 60B2O3-10ZnO-(30 - x)NaF-xTeO2 (x = 0 mol.%, 5 mol.%, 10 mol.%, and 15 mol.%) have been synthesized by thermal melting. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed that the glasses were amorphous. The glass density (ρ) was determined by the Archimedes method at room temperature. The density (ρ) and molar volume (V m) were found to increase with increasing TeO2 content. The direct-current (DC) conductivity was measured in the temperature range from 473 K to 623 K, in which the electrical activation energy of ionic conduction increased from 0.27 eV to 0.48 eV with increasing TeO2 content from 0 mol.% to 15 mol.%. The dielectric parameters and alternating-current (AC) conductivityac) were investigated in the frequency range from 1 kHz to 1 MHz and temperature range from 300 K to 633 K. The AC conductivity and dielectric constant decreased with increasing TeO2 content from 0 mol.% to 15 mol.%.

  2. Stability test of conduction-cooled LTS/HTS composite coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Ying Min; Wang, Yin Shun; Lv, Gang; Pi, Wei

    2016-06-01

    A small LTS/HTS composite coil made of NbTi/Cu and YBCO, with an inner diameter of 80 mm, an outer diameter of 88mm, a height of 50 mm, and an inductance of 5.5 μH, was designed to test its heat disturbance performance in a GM cryocooler. For comparison, a conventional LTS coil of a similar size made of NbTi/Cu wire was also tested. Transport current was applied from 50 A to 700 A at 8 K and 8.5 K, respectively. The two coils’ heat disturbance, minimum quench energy and quench propagation velocity performance were investigated and simulated. The results indicate that the LTS/HTS composite coil shows better thermal stability and is more fit for operation in conductive cryocooler systems compared to LTS coils.

  3. Technique for reduction of mechanical losses in AC superconducting coils due to thermal expansion properties of various FRP bobbins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, N.; Tada, S.; Higuchi, T.; Furumura, Y.; Takao, T.; Yamanaka, A.

    2005-10-01

    We reported about reduction of mechanical losses in AC superconducting coils. The method is the use of FRP bobbins fabricated with special fibers. Since their FRPs have negative thermal expansion coefficient to the fiber direction, the FRP bobbins expand to the circumferential direction during cooling down. In case of the superconducting coils with such FRP bobbins, the winding tensions do not decrease during cooling down. Therefore, the mechanical losses are reduced by the suppression of wire's vibration. Their special FRPs are a Dyneema® fiber reinforced plastic (DFRP), a Dyneema and glass fiber reinforced plastic (DGFRP), and a Zylon® fiber reinforced plastic (ZFRP). These materials have negative thermal expansion coefficient to the fiber direction, however, the amplitudes of thermal expansion are various by the quantity or quality of the fiber. In this paper, the values of thermal expansion were actually measured, and it was discussed about the influence on the mechanical losses. At the experimental results, the mechanical loss was small, so that the thermal strain to the circumferential direction on the coil was large. Moreover, in case of the coils with sufficiently strong winding tensions at coil-operating temperature, the mechanical losses vanished.

  4. Use of Ionic Liquids in Rod-Coil Block Copolyimides for Improved Lithium Ion Conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Tigelaar, Dean M.; Chapin, Kara; Bennett, William R.

    2007-01-01

    Solvent-free, solid polymer electrolytes (SPE) have the potential to improve safety, increase design flexibility and enhance performance of rechargeable lithium batteries. Solution based electrolytes are flammable and typically incompatible with lithium metal anodes, limiting energy density. We have previously demonstrated use of polyimide rod coil block copolymers doped with lithium salts as electrolytes for lithium polymer batteries. The polyimide rod blocks provide dimensional stability while the polyethylene oxide (PEO) coil portions conduct ions. Phase separation of the rods and coils in these highly branched polymers provide channels with an order of magnitude improvement in lithium conduction over polyethylene oxide itself at room temperature. In addition, the polymers have been demonstrated in coin cells to be compatible with lithium metal. For practical use at room temperature and below, however, at least an order of magnitude improvement in ion conduction is still required. The addition of nonvolatile, room temperature ionic liquids has been shown to improve the ionic conductivity of high molecular weight PEO. Herein we describe use of these molten salts to improve ionic conductivity in the rod-coil block copolymers.

  5. Accelerated life ac conductivity measurements of CRT oxide cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, A. A.; Barratt, D. S.; Hassan, A. K.; Nabok, A.

    2006-07-01

    The ac conductivity measurements have been carried out for the activated Ba/SrO cathode with additional 5% Ni powder for every 100 h acceleration life time at the temperature around 1125 K. The ac conductivity was studied as a function of temperature in the range 300-1200 K after conversion and activation of the cathode at 1200 K for 1 h in two cathodes face to face closed configuration. The experimental results prove that the hopping conductivity dominate in the temperature range 625-770 K through the traps of the WO 3 associate with activation energy Ea = 0.87 eV, whereas from 500-625 K it is most likely to be through the traps of the Al 2O 3 with activation energy of Ea = 1.05 eV. The hopping conductivity at the low temperature range 300-500 K is based on Ni powder link with some Ba contaminants in the oxide layer stricture which indicates very low activation energy Ea = 0.06 eV.

  6. Microwave ac Conductivity Spectrum of a Coulomb Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Mark; Stutzmann, M. L.

    2001-07-30

    We report the first observation of the transition between interacting and noninteracting behavior in the ac conductivity spectrum {sigma}({omega}) of a doped semiconductor in its Coulomb glass state near T=0 K . The transition manifests itself as a crossover from approximately linear frequency dependence below {approx}10 GHz , to quadratic dependence above {approx}15 GHz . The sharpness of the transition and the magnitude of the crossover frequency strongly suggest that the transition is driven by photon-induced excitations across the Coulomb gap, in contrast to existing theoretical descriptions.

  7. ac conductivity and dielectric constant of conductor-insulator composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtanto, Tan Benny; Natori, Satoshi; Nakamura, Jun; Natori, Akiko

    2006-09-01

    We study the complex admittance (ac conductivity and dielectric constant) of conductor-insulator composite material, based on a two-dimensional square network consisting of randomly placed conductors and capacitors. We derived some exact analytical relations between the complex admittances of high and low frequencies and of complementary conductor concentrations. We calculate the complex admittance by applying a transfer-matrix method to a square network and study the dependence on both the frequency and the conductor concentration. The numerical results are compared with an effective-medium theory, and the range of applicability and limitation of the effective-medium theory are clarified.

  8. An improved FEM model for computing transport AC loss in coils made of RABiTS YBCO coated conductors for electric machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ainslie, Mark D.; Rodriguez-Zermeno, Victor M.; Hong, Zhiyong; Yuan, Weijia; Flack, Timothy J.; Coombs, Timothy A.

    2011-04-01

    AC loss can be a significant problem for any applications that utilize or produce an AC current or magnetic field, such as an electric machine. The authors investigate the electromagnetic properties of high temperature superconductors with a particular focus on the AC loss in superconducting coils made from YBCO coated conductors for use in an all-superconducting electric machine. This paper presents an improved 2D finite element model for the cross-section of such coils, based on the H formulation. The model is used to calculate the transport AC loss of a racetrack-shaped coil using constant and magnetic field-dependent critical current densities, and the inclusion and exclusion of a magnetic substrate, as found in RABiTS (rolling-assisted biaxially textured substrate) YBCO coated conductors. The coil model is based on the superconducting stator coils used in the University of Cambridge EPEC Superconductivity Group's all-superconducting permanent magnet synchronous motor design. To validate the modeling results, the transport AC loss of a stator coil is measured using an electrical method based on inductive compensation by means of a variable mutual inductance. Finally, the implications of the findings on the performance of the motor are discussed.

  9. Design and Manufacture of the Conduction Cooled Torus Coils for The Jefferson Laboratory 12-GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Wiseman, M.; Elementi, L.; Elouadhiri, L.; Gabrielli, G.; Gardner, T. J.; Ghoshal, P. K.; Kashy, D.; Kiemschies, O.; Krave, S.; Makarov, A.; Robotham, B.; Szal, J.; Velev, G.

    2015-01-01

    The design of the 12-GeV torus required the construction of six superconducting coils with a unique geometry required for the experimental needs of Jefferson Laboratory Hall B. Each of these coils consists of 234 turns of copper-stabilized superconducting cable conduction cooled by 4.6 K helium gas. The finished coils are each roughly 2 × 4 × 0.05 m and supported in an aluminum coil case. Because of its geometry, new tooling and manufacturing methods had to be developed for each stage of construction. The tooling was designed and developed while producing a practice coil at Fermi National Laboratory. This paper describes the tooling and manufacturing techniques required to produce the six production coils and two spare coils required by the project. Project status and future plans are also presented.

  10. Design and Manufacture of the Conduction Cooled Torus Coils for the Jefferson Lab 12GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Wiseman, M; Elouadhiri, L; Ghoshal, P K; Kashy, D; Elementi, L; Gabrielli, G; Gardner, T J; Kiemschies, O; Krave, S; Makarov, A; Robotham, B; Szal, J; Velev, G

    2015-06-01

    The design of the 12-GeV torus required the construction of six superconducting coils with a unique geometry required for the experimental needs of Jefferson Laboratory Hall B. Each of these coils consists of 234 turns of copper-stabilized superconducting cable conduction cooled by 4.6 K helium gas. The finished coils are each roughly 2 × 4 × 0.05 m and supported in an aluminum coil case. Because of its geometry, new tooling and manufacturing methods had to be developed for each stage of construction. The tooling was designed and developed while producing a practice coil at Fermi National Laboratory. This paper describes the tooling and manufacturing techniques required to produce the six production coils and two spare coils required by the project. Project status and future plans are also presented.

  11. A slowly rotating coil system for AC field measurements of Fermilab booster correctors

    SciTech Connect

    Velev, G.; DiMarco, J.; Harding, David J.; Kashikhin, V.; Lamm, Michael J.; Schlabach, P.; Tartaglia, Michael Albert; Tompkins, John C.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    A method for measurement of rapidly changing magnetic fields has been developed and applied to the testing of new room temperature corrector packages designed for the Fermilab Booster Synchrotron. The method is based on fast digitization of a slowly rotating tangential coil probe, with analysis combining the measured coil voltages across a set of successive magnet current cycles. This paper presents results on the field quality measured for the normal and skew dipole, quadrupole, and sextupole elements in several of these corrector packages.

  12. dc piezoresistance and ac conductance of niobium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Guerra Vela, C.

    1984-01-01

    The resistance, R, of monocrystalline n-type NbO/sub 2/ in the semiconducting, distorted rutile-structured phase was measured at temperatures from 196 to 410 K and hydrostatic pressures, P, from one to 6000 atm. R/T increases exponentially with 1/T, and ..delta..R/R increases linearly with P/T at different rates along the a- and c-axes. Conduction is apparently due to adiabatic hopping of small polarons; values were obtained for phonon, electron transfer, and polaron binding energies, the pressure dependences of these energies, and of the small polaron activation energy. An electronic phase diagram is presented also. The complex ac conductivity was also measured using frequencies from 5 to 92 kHz between 1.5 and 300 K along the a- and c-axes of NbO/sub 2/. Above 200 K the real part of the conductivity sigma/sub a/ and sigma/sub c/ were independent of frequency, f, and strongly activated like the dc conductivity. Below 200 K, sigma/sub a/ decreased ever less rapidly until 120 K where a weakly activated regime began in which sigma/sub a/ varied about like f/sup 0.5/ implying transitions of polarons between centers with a characteristic energy difference.

  13. Ac conduction in conducting poly pyrrole-poly vinyl methyl ether polymer composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, S.K.; Mandal, T.K.; Mandal, B.M.; Chakravorty, D.

    1997-03-01

    Composite materials containing conducting polypyrrole and insulating poly (vinyl methyl ether) (PVME) have been synthesized by oxidative polymerization of pyrrole in ethanol using FeCl{sub 3} oxidant in the presence of PVME. The ac conductivity measurements have been carried out in the frequency range of 100 Hz to 10 MHz and in the temperature range of 110 to 350 K. The frequency dependent conductivity has been explained on the basis of a small polaron tunnelling mechanism. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Development of 100kVA AC superconducting coil using NbTi cables with a CuSi alloy matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Kasahara, H.; Akita, S.; Torii, S.; Sugimoto, M.; Matsumoto, K.; Tanaka, Y.; Tachikawa, K.

    1996-07-01

    For implementation of AC superconducting equipment, it is imperative to develop low loss cables having highly stable characteristics. Here, newly developed NbTi superconducting cables using a CuSi alloy matrix are of low loss and are very promising as cables for practical application. However, since the CuSi alloy is a new material as a matrix for NbTi superconducting cables, many unknown factors as regards to optimum conditions for the manufacture of long cables, as well as superconducting characteristics are involved. For this new superconducting cable, a long strand (km class) was manufactured as a step for practical application, and a primary twisted cable was fabricated. Using this cable, a coil of the 100kVA class was fabricated for trial, and its performance characteristic with transport current was evaluated. This coil had no training phenomenon and had high stabilities. Furthermore, it permitted full AC current transmission of up to DCIc. Upon analysis of the coil loss, the hysteresis loss was smaller than coupling loss, and there was little increase of loss due to the current flow to the coil. consequently, by using CuSi alloy matrix superconducting cables, it was possible to provide an AC coil of low loss and high stability, and the present cable was found to be promising as a new AC superconducting cable in the future.

  15. Structural and AC conductivity study of CdTe nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sayantani; Banerjee, Sourish; Sinha, T. P.

    2016-04-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) nanomaterials have been synthesized by soft chemical route using mercapto ethanol as a capping agent. Crystallization temperature of the sample is investigated using differential scanning calorimeter. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope measurements show that the prepared sample belongs to cubic structure with the average particle size of 20 nm. Impedance spectroscopy is applied to investigate the dielectric relaxation of the sample in a temperature range from 313 to 593 K and in a frequency range from 42 Hz to 1.1 MHz. The complex impedance plane plot has been analyzed by an equivalent circuit consisting of two serially connected R-CPE units, each containing a resistance (R) and a constant phase element (CPE). Dielectric relaxation peaks are observed in the imaginary parts of the spectra. The frequency dependence of real and imaginary parts of dielectric permittivity is analyzed using modified Cole-Cole equation. The temperature dependence relaxation time is found to obey the Arrhenius law having activation energy ~0.704 eV. The frequency dependent conductivity spectra are found to follow the power law. The frequency dependence ac conductivity is analyzed by power law.

  16. Comparison of AC losses, magnetic field/current distributions and critical currents of superconducting circular pancake coils and infinitely long stacks using coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Weijia; Campbell, A. M.; Hong, Z.; Ainslie, M. D.; Coombs, T. A.

    2010-08-01

    A model is presented for calculating the AC losses, magnetic field/current density distribution and critical currents of a circular superconducting pancake coil. The assumption is that the magnetic flux lines will lie parallel to the wide faces of tapes in the unpenetrated area of the coil. Instead of using an infinitely long stack to approximate the circular coil, this paper gives an exact circular coil model using elliptic integrals. A new efficient numerical method is introduced to yield more accurate and fast computation. The computation results are in good agreement with the assumptions. For a small value of the coil radius, there is an asymmetry along the coil radius direction. As the coil radius increases, this asymmetry will gradually decrease, and the AC losses and penetration depth will increase, but the critical current will decrease. We find that if the internal radius is equal to the winding thickness, the infinitely long stack approximation overestimates the loss by 10% and even if the internal radius is reduced to zero, the error is still only 60%. The infinitely long stack approximation is therefore adequate for most practical purposes. In addition, the comparison result shows that the infinitely long stack approximation saves computation time significantly.

  17. RG flow of AC conductivity in soft wall model of QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, Neha; Siwach, Sanjay

    2016-03-01

    We study the Renormalization Group (RG) flow of AC conductivity in soft wall model of holographic QCD. We consider the charged black hole metric and the explicit form of AC conductivity is obtained at the cutoff surface. We plot the numerical solution of conductivity flow as a function of radial coordinate. The equation of gauge field is also considered and the numerical solution is obtained for AC conductivity as a function of frequency. The results for AC conductivity are also obtained for different values of chemical potential and Gauss-Bonnet couplings.

  18. Broadband AC Conductivity of XUV Excited Warm Dense Gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z.; Tsui, Y.; Toleikis, S.; Hering, P.; Brown, S.; Curry, C.; Tanikawa, T.; Hoeppner, H.; Levy, M.; Goede, S.; Ziaja-Motyka, B.; Rethfeld, B.; Recoules, Vanina; Ng, A.; Glenzer, S.

    2015-11-01

    The properties of ultrafast laser excited warm dense gold have been extensively studied in the past decade. In those studies, a 400nm ultrashort laser pulse was used to excite the 5 d electrons in gold to 6s/p state. Here we will present our recent study of warm dense gold with 245eV, 70fs pulses to selectively excite 4 f electrons using the XUV-FEL at FLASH. The AC conductivity of the warm dense gold was measured at different wavelengths (485nm, 520nm, 585nm, 640nm and 720nm) to cover the range from 5 d-6 s / p interband transitions to 6 s/ p intraband transitions. Preliminary result suggests that the onset of 5 d-6 s / p band transition shifts from 2.3eV to ~ 2eV, which is in agreement with the study of 400nm laser pulse excited warm dense gold. More detailed analysis of our data will also be presented.

  19. Design of Conduction-cooled HTS Coils for a Rotating Gantry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayama, Shigeki; Koyanagi, Kei; Yamaguchi, Akiko; Tasaki, Kenji; Kurusu, Tsutomu; Ishii, Yusuke; Amemiya, Naoyuki; Ogitsu, Toru; Noda, Koji

    Carbon ion cancer therapy is becoming more widespread due to its high curative effects and low burden on patients. Carbon ions are delivered to patients through electromagnets on a rotating gantry.A rotating gantry is attractive because it allows carbon ions to irradiate a tumor from any direction without changing the posture of the patient. On the other hand, because of the high magnetic rigidity of carbon ions, the weight of a rotating gantry for carbon cancer therapy is about three times higher than one for proton cancer therapy, according to our estimation. The use of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) magnets has been considered for reducing the size of the rotating gantry for carbon cancer therapy. The target weight is 200 t or less,which is equivalent to the weight of a typical rotating gantry for proton cancer therapy.In this study, the magnet layout of the rotating gantry and the superconducting magnets were designed from the viewpoint of beam optics.When applying high-temperature superconductors to accelerator magnets, there are some issues that should be considered, for example, the influence of tape magnetization and manufacturing accuracy on the field quality, the thermal stability of the conduction-cooled HTS coils under an alternating magnetic field, and methods to protect the coils from thermal runaway caused by an anomalous thermal input such as that due to beam loss. First, the thermal stability of the conduction-cooled HTS coils was simulated numerically, and the thermal runaway current was calculated in a static situation.

  20. Numerical analysis of ac loss in bifilar stacks and coils of ion beam assisted deposition YBCO coated conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Doan N.; Ashworth, Stephen P.; Willis, Jeffrey O.

    2009-03-15

    In this paper we present a finite element model using the commercial COMSOL software package for calculating the ac loss in bifilar stacks of high temperature superconducting tape. In the model, the current-voltage relationship characterizing the superconducting properties is assumed to follow a power law. The calculations were performed for infinite bifilar stacks with different values of layer-to-layer separation D. With appropriate settings for the boundary conditions, the numerical results agree well with the analytical data obtained from a recently proposed model [J. R. Clem, Phys. Rev. B 77, 134506 (2008)]. The numerical approach was also used to investigate the end effects in a bifilar stack to answer the following question: how many layers away from the end of a stack are required before the environment of a given layer is identical to that in an infinite stack? We find that the answer to this question depends strongly on the value of D. Based on this study, a model for calculating the ac loss in bifilar noninductively wound coils with a finite number of turns is proposed.

  1. AC field measurements of Fermilab Booster correctors using a rotating coil system

    SciTech Connect

    Velev, G.V.; DiMarco, J.; Harding, D.J.; Kashikhin, V.; Lamm, M.; Makulski, A.; Orris, D.; Schlabach, P.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.; /Fermilab

    2006-07-01

    The first prototype of a new corrector package for the Fermilab Booster Synchrotron is presently in production. This water-cooled package includes normal and skew dipole, quadrupole and sextupole elements to control orbit, tune and chromaticity of the beam over the full range of Booster energies (0.4-8 GeV). These correctors operate at the 15 Hz excitation cycle of the main synchrotron magnets, but must also make more rapid excursions, in some cases even switching polarity in approximately 1 ms at transition crossing. To measure the dynamic field changes during operation, a new method based on a relatively slow rotating coil system is proposed. The method pieces together the measured voltages from successive current cycles to reconstruct the field harmonics. This paper describes the method and presents initial field quality measurements from a Tevatron corrector.

  2. Stability mechanical considerations, and AC loss in HTSC monoliths, coils, and wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumption, M. D.; Collings, E. W.

    1995-01-01

    For monolithic high-T(sub c) superconductors (HTSC's) calculations are presented of: (1) the initial flux jump field, H(sub fj), in melt-processed YBCO based on a field and temperature dependent J(sub c), and (2) the radial and circumferential stresses in solid and hollow cylinders containing trapped magnetic flux. For model multi filamentary (MF) HTSC/Ag strands calculations are presented of: (1) the limiting filament diameters for adiabatic and dynamic stability, and (2) the hysteretic and eddy current components of AC loss. Again for MF HTSC/Ag composite strands the need for filamentary subdivision and twisting is discussed.

  3. Phonon-Induced Electron-Hole Excitation and ac Conductance in Molecular Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Akiko; Utsumi, Yasuhiro; Imamura, Hiroshi; Tokura, Yasuhiro

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the linear ac conductance of molecular junctions under a fixed dc bias voltage in the presence of an interaction between a transporting electron and a single local phonon in a molecule with energy ω0. The electron-phonon interaction is treated by the perturbation expansion. The ac conductance as a function of the ac frequency ωac decreases or increases compared with the noninteracting case depending on the magnitude of the dc bias voltage. Furthermore, a dip emerges at ωac ˜ 2ω0. The dip originates from the modification of electron-hole excitation by the ac field, which cannot be obtained by treating the phonon in the linear regime of a classical forced oscillation.

  4. Polaron conductivity mechanism in potassium acid phthalate crystal: AC-conductivity investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipič, Cene; Levstik, Iva; Levstik, Adrijan; Hadži, Dušan

    2016-08-01

    The complex dielectric constant, \\varepsilon *(ν ,T), of potassium acid phthalate monocrystal (KAP) was investigated over the broad frequency and temperature range. While the imaginary part of dielectric constant ε‧‧(ν) increases rapidly with increasing temperature in the studied temperature range, the real part of dielectric constant ε‧(ν) increases only at high temperatures; there is almost no change of ε‧(ν) below 200 K. Both values of ε‧ and ε‧‧ are frequency dependent; the values increase with decreasing frequencies. At temperatures below 450 K the ac electrical conductivity and dielectric constant follow simultaneously the universal dielectric response (UDR). The analysis of the temperature dependence of the UDR parameter s in terms of the theoretical model for small polarons revealed that this mechanism governs the charge transport in KAP crystal in the studied temperature range.

  5. AC conductivity and Dielectric Study of Chalcogenide Glasses of Se-Te-Ge System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, Fathy

    2004-01-01

    The ac conductivity and dielectric properties of glassy system SexTe79 - xGe21, with x = 11, 14, 17 at.%, has been studied at temperatures 300 to 450 K and over a wide range of frequencies (50 Hz to 500 kHz). Experimental results indicate that the ac conductivity and the dielectric constants depend on temperature, frequency and Se content. The conductivity as a function of frequency exhibited two components: dc conductivity s dc, and ac conductivity s ac, where s ac ˜ w s. The mechanism of ac conductivity can be reasonably interpreted in terms of the correlated barrier hopping model (CBH). The activation energies are estimated and discussed. The dependence of ac conductivity and dielectric constants on the Se content x can be interpreted as the effect of Se fraction on the positional disorder. The impedance plot at each temperature appeared as a semicircle passes through the origin. Each semicircle is represented by an equivalent circuit of parallel resistance Rb and capacitance Cb.

  6. AC motor controller with 180 degree conductive switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oximberg, Carol A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An ac motor controller is operated by a modified time-switching scheme where the switches of the inverter are on for electrical-phase-and-rotation intervals of 180.degree. as opposed to the conventional 120.degree.. The motor is provided with three-phase drive windings, a power inverter for power supplied from a dc power source consisting of six switches, and a motor controller which controls the current controlled switches in voltage-fed mode. During full power, each switch is gated continuously for three successive intervals of 60.degree. and modulated for only one of said intervals. Thus, during each 60.degree. interval, the two switches with like signs are on continuously and the switch with the opposite sign is modulated.

  7. Structural, dielectric and AC conductivity properties of Co2+ doped mixed alkali zinc borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhu, B. J.; Banu, Syed Asma; Harshitha, G. A.; Shilpa, T. M.; Shruthi, B.

    2013-02-01

    The Co2+ doped 19.9ZnO+5Li2CO3+25Na2CO3+50B2O3 (ZLNB) mixed alkali zinc borate glasses have been prepared by a conventional melt quenching method. The structural (XRD & FT-IR), dielectric and a.c. conductivityac) properties have been investigated. Amorphous nature of these glasses has been confirmed from their XRD pattern. The dielectric properties and electrical conductivityac) of these glasses have been studied from 100Hz to 5MHz at the room temperature. Based on the observed trends in the a.c. conductivities, the present glass samples are found to exhibit a non-Debye behavior.

  8. Structural, AC conductivity and dielectric properties of Sr-La hexaferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A.; Narang, S. B.; Singh, K.; Sharma, P.; Pandey, O. P.

    2006-03-01

    A series of M-type hexaferrite samples with composition Sr{1-x}La{x}Fe{12}O{19} (x = 0.00, 0.05, 0.15 and 0.25) were prepared by standard ceramic technique. AC electrical conductivity measurements were carried out at different frequencies (20 Hz 1 MHz) and at different temperatures. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss tangent were measured in the same range of frequencies. The experimental results indicate that AC electrical conductivity increases on increasing the frequency as well as the temperature, indicating magnetic semiconductor behavior of the samples. The increase in AC electrical conductivity with frequency and temperature has been explained on the basis of Koops Model whereas dielectric constant and dielectric loss tangent has been explained with the Maxwell Wagner type interfacial polarization in agreement with the Koops phenomenological theory.

  9. A 5.9 tesla conduction-cooled coil composed of a stack of four single pancakes wound with YBCO wide tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwai, Sadanori; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Tosaka, Taizo; Tasaki, Kenji; Urata, Masami; Ioka, Shigeru; Ishii, Yusuke

    2013-11-01

    We have been developing a conduction-cooled coil wound with YBCO-coated conductors for HTS applications. Previously, we have fabricated a coil composed of a stack of 12 single pancakes wound with 4 mm-wide YBCO tapes. This coil had a central magnetic field as high as 5.1 T at 10 K under conduction-cooled conditions. In the present study, we fabricated and tested a coil composed of a stack of four single pancakes wound with 12 mm-wide YBCO tapes. The total size of the coil and the Jc value of the tapes were almost the same as those of the former coil. At 77 K, the voltage-current characteristics showed a high n-value of 24, confirming that the coil had no degradation. Furthermore, in a conduction-cooled configuration at 20 K to 60 K, the coil showed a high n-value of over 20. At 20 K, the central magnetic field reached 5.9 T at 903 A, which is 1.3-times higher than that of the former coil.

  10. Modified Solenoid Coil That Efficiently Produces High Amplitude AC Magnetic Fields With Enhanced Uniformity for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Bordelon, David E.; Goldstein, Robert C.; Nemkov, Valentin S.; Kumar, Ananda; Jackowski, John K.; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Ivkov, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a modified solenoid coil that efficiently generates high amplitude alternating magnetic fields (AMF) having field uniformity (≤10%) within a 125-cm3 volume of interest. Two-dimensional finite element analysis (2D-FEA) was used to design a coil generating a targeted peak AMF amplitude along the coil axis of ~100 kA/m (peak-to-peak) at a frequency of 150 kHz while maintaining field uniformity to >90% of peak for a specified volume. This field uniformity was realized by forming the turns from cylindrical sections of copper plate and by adding flux concentrating rings to both ends of the coil. Following construction, the field profile along the axes of the coil was measured. An axial peak field value of 95.8 ± 0.4 kA/m was measured with 650 V applied to the coil and was consistent with the calculated results. The region of axial field uniformity, defined as the distance over which field ≥90% of peak, was also consistent with the simulated results. We describe the utility of such a device for calorimetric measurement of nanoparticle heating for cancer therapy and for magnetic fluid hyperthermia in small animal models of human cancer. PMID:25392562

  11. AC Conductivity and Dielectric Relaxation Behavior of Sb2S3 Bulk Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El-Rahman, K. F.; Darwish, A. A. A.; Qashou, Saleem I.; Hanafy, T. A.

    2016-04-01

    The Sb2S3 bulk material was used for next-generation anode for lithium-ion batteries. Alternative current (AC) conductivity, dielectric properties and electric modulus of Sb2S3 have been investigated. The measurements were carried out in the frequency range from 40 Hz to 5 MHz and temperature range from 293 K to 453 K. The direct current (DC) conductivity, σ DC, shows an activated behavior and the calculated activation energy is 0.50 eV. The AC conductivity, σ AC, was found to increase with the increase of temperature and frequency. The conduction mechanism of σ AC was controlled by the correlated barrier hopping model. The behavior of the dielectric constant, ɛ', and dielectric loss index, ɛ'', reveal that the polarization process of Sb2S3 is dipolar in nature. The behavior of both ɛ' and ɛ'' reveals that bulk Sb2S3 has no ferroelectric or piezoelectric phase transition. The dielectric modulus, M, gives a simple method for evaluating the activation energy of the dielectric relaxation. The calculated activation energy from M is 0.045 eV.

  12. Analytic formulation for the ac electrical conductivity in two- temperature, strongly coupled, overdense plasma: FORTRAN subroutine

    SciTech Connect

    Cauble, R.; Rozmus, W.

    1993-10-21

    A FORTRAN subroutine for the calculation of the ac electrical conductivity in two-temperature, strongly coupled, overdense plasma is presented. The routine is the result of a model calculation based on classical transport theory with application to plasmas created by the interaction of short pulse lasers and solids. The formulation is analytic and the routine is self-contained.

  13. AC Conductivity and Dielectric Relaxation Behavior of Sb2S3 Bulk Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El-Rahman, K. F.; Darwish, A. A. A.; Qashou, Saleem I.; Hanafy, T. A.

    2016-07-01

    The Sb2S3 bulk material was used for next-generation anode for lithium-ion batteries. Alternative current (AC) conductivity, dielectric properties and electric modulus of Sb2S3 have been investigated. The measurements were carried out in the frequency range from 40 Hz to 5 MHz and temperature range from 293 K to 453 K. The direct current (DC) conductivity, σ DC, shows an activated behavior and the calculated activation energy is 0.50 eV. The AC conductivity, σ AC, was found to increase with the increase of temperature and frequency. The conduction mechanism of σ AC was controlled by the correlated barrier hopping model. The behavior of the dielectric constant, ɛ', and dielectric loss index, ɛ'', reveal that the polarization process of Sb2S3 is dipolar in nature. The behavior of both ɛ' and ɛ'' reveals that bulk Sb2S3 has no ferroelectric or piezoelectric phase transition. The dielectric modulus, M, gives a simple method for evaluating the activation energy of the dielectric relaxation. The calculated activation energy from M is 0.045 eV.

  14. Charging in the ac Conductance of a Double Barrier Resonant Tunneling Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantram, M. P.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    There have been many studies of the linear response ac conductance of a double barrier resonant tunneling structure (DBRTS), both at zero and finite dc biases. While these studies are important, they fail to self consistently include the effect of the time dependent charge density in the well. In this paper, we calculate the ac conductance at both zero and finite do biases by including the effect of the time dependent charge density in the well in a self consistent manner. The charge density in the well contributes to both the flow of displacement currents in the contacts and the time dependent potential in the well. We find that including these effects can make a significant difference to the ac conductance and the total ac current is not equal to the simple average of the non-selfconsistently calculated conduction currents in the two contacts. This is illustrated by comparing the results obtained with and without the effect of the time dependent charge density included correctly. Some possible experimental scenarios to observe these effects are suggested.

  15. AC Conductivity Studies in Lithium-Borate Glass Containing Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivaprakash, Y.; Anavekar, R. V.

    2011-07-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been synthesized in a base glass with composition 30Li2O-70B2O3 using gold chloride (HAuCl4.3H2O) as a dopant. The samples are characterized using XRD, ESR, SEM and optical absorption in the visible range. AC conductivity studies have been performed at RT over a frequency range 100 to 10 MHz. The dc conductivity is calculated from the complex impedence plot. The dc conductivity is found to be increasing with the increase of dopant concentration. AC conductivity data is fitted with Almond-West law with power exponent `s'. The values of `s' is found to lie in the range of 0.70-0.73.

  16. ac and dc percolative conductivity of magnetite-cellulose acetate composites

    SciTech Connect

    Chiteme, C.; McLachlan, D. S.; Sauti, G.

    2007-03-01

    ac and dc conductivity results for a percolating system, which consists of a conducting powder (magnetite) combined with an 'insulating' powder (cellulose acetate), are presented. Impedance and modulus spectra are obtained in a percolation system. The temperature dependence of the resistivity of the cellulose acetate is such that at 170 deg. C, it is essentially a conductor at frequencies below 0.059{+-}0.002 Hz, and a dielectric above. The percolation parameters, from the dc conductivity measured at 25 and 170 deg. C, are determined and discussed in relation to the ac results. The experimental results scale as a function of composition, temperature, and frequency. An interesting result is the correlation observed between the scaling parameter (f{sub ce}), obtained from a scaling of the ac measurements, and the peak frequency (f{sub cp}) of the arcs, obtained from impedance spectra, above the critical volume fraction. Scaling at 170 deg. C is not as good as at 25 deg. C, probably indicating a breakdown in scaling at the higher temperature. The modulus plots show the presence of two materials: a conducting phase dominated by the cellulose acetate and the isolated conducting clusters below the critical volume fraction {phi}{sub c}, as well as the interconnected conducting clusters above {phi}{sub c}. These results are confirmed by computer simulations using the two exponent phenomenological percolation equation. These results emphasize the need to analyze ac conductivity results in terms of both impedance and modulus spectra in order to get more insight into the behavior of composite materials.

  17. Simulation Study to Improve Focalization of a Figure Eight Coil by Using a Conductive Shield Plate and a Ferromagnetic Block.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chen; Zhang, Shunqi; Liu, Zhipeng; Yin, Tao

    2015-07-01

    A new method to improve the focalization and efficiency of the Figure of Eight (FOE) coil in rTMS is discussed in this paper. In order to decrease the half width of the distribution curve (HWDC), as well to increase the ratio of positive peak value to negative peak value (RPN) of the induced electric field, a shield plate with a window and a ferromagnetic block are assumed to enhance the positive peak value of the induced electrical field. The shield is made of highly conductive copper, and the block is made of highly permeable soft magnetic ferrite. A computer simulation is conducted on ANSYS® software to conduct the finite element analysis (FEA). Two comparing coefficients were set up to optimize the sizes of the shield window and the block. Simulation results show that a shield with a 60 mm × 30 mm sized window, together with a block 40 mm thick, can decrease the focal area of a FOE coil by 46.7%, while increasing the RPN by 135.9%. The block enhances the peak value of the electrical field induced by a shield-FOE by 8.4%. A real human head model was occupied in this paper to further verify our method. PMID:25594972

  18. AC conductivity and dielectric measurements of metal-free phthalocyanine thin films dispersed in polycarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riad, A. S.; Korayem, M. T.; Abdel-Malik, T. G.

    1999-10-01

    The dielectric constant and the dielectric loss of thin films of metal-free phthalocyanine dispersed in polycarbonate using ohmic gold electrodes are investigated in the frequency range 20-10 5 Hz and within the temperature range 300-388 K. The frequency dependence of the impedance spectra plotted in the complex plane shows semicircles. The Cole-Cole diagrams have been used to determine the molecular relaxation time, τ, The temperature dependence of τ is expressed by thermally activated process. The AC conductivity σ AC (ω) is found to vary as ωs with the index s⩽1, indicating a dominant hopping process at low temperatures. From the temperature dependence of AC conductivity, free carrier conduction with mean activation energy of 0.33 eV is observed at higher temperatures. Capacitance and loss tangent are found to decrease with increasing frequency and increase with increasing temperature. Such characteristics are found to be in good qualitative agreement with existing equivalent circuit model assuming ohmic contacts.

  19. Temperature and frequency dependence of AC conductivity of new quaternary Se-Te-Bi-Pb chalcogenide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Preeti; Sharma, Ambika

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the temperature and frequency dependence of ac conductivity of new quaternary Se84-xTe15Bi1.0Pbx chalcogenide glasses. The Se84-xTe15Bi1.0Pbx (x = 2, 6) glassy alloys are prepared by using melt quenching technique. The temperature and frequency dependent behavior of ac conductivity σac(ω) has been carried out in the frequency range 42 Hz to 5 MHz and in the temperature range of 298-323 K below glass transition temperature. The behavior of ac conductivity is described in terms of the power law ωs. The obtained temperature dependence behavior of ac conductivity and frequency component (s) are explained by means of correlated barrier hopping model recommended by Elliot.

  20. Microwave a.c. conductivity of domain walls in ferroelectric thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tselev, Alexander; Yu, Pu; Cao, Ye; Dedon, Liv R.; Martin, Lane W.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-05-01

    Ferroelectric domain walls are of great interest as elementary building blocks for future electronic devices due to their intrinsic few-nanometre width, multifunctional properties and field-controlled topology. To realize the electronic functions, domain walls are required to be electrically conducting and addressable non-destructively. However, these properties have been elusive because conducting walls have to be electrically charged, which makes them unstable and uncommon in ferroelectric materials. Here we reveal that spontaneous and recorded domain walls in thin films of lead zirconate and bismuth ferrite exhibit large conductance at microwave frequencies despite being insulating at d.c. We explain this effect by morphological roughening of the walls and local charges induced by disorder with the overall charge neutrality. a.c. conduction is immune to large contact resistance enabling completely non-destructive walls read-out. This demonstrates a technological potential for harnessing a.c. conduction for oxide electronics and other materials with poor d.c. conduction, particularly at the nanoscale.

  1. Microwave a.c. conductivity of domain walls in ferroelectric thin films.

    PubMed

    Tselev, Alexander; Yu, Pu; Cao, Ye; Dedon, Liv R; Martin, Lane W; Kalinin, Sergei V; Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-01-01

    Ferroelectric domain walls are of great interest as elementary building blocks for future electronic devices due to their intrinsic few-nanometre width, multifunctional properties and field-controlled topology. To realize the electronic functions, domain walls are required to be electrically conducting and addressable non-destructively. However, these properties have been elusive because conducting walls have to be electrically charged, which makes them unstable and uncommon in ferroelectric materials. Here we reveal that spontaneous and recorded domain walls in thin films of lead zirconate and bismuth ferrite exhibit large conductance at microwave frequencies despite being insulating at d.c. We explain this effect by morphological roughening of the walls and local charges induced by disorder with the overall charge neutrality. a.c. conduction is immune to large contact resistance enabling completely non-destructive walls read-out. This demonstrates a technological potential for harnessing a.c. conduction for oxide electronics and other materials with poor d.c. conduction, particularly at the nanoscale. PMID:27240997

  2. Microwave a.c. conductivity of domain walls in ferroelectric thin films

    PubMed Central

    Tselev, Alexander; Yu, Pu; Cao, Ye; Dedon, Liv R.; Martin, Lane W.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-01-01

    Ferroelectric domain walls are of great interest as elementary building blocks for future electronic devices due to their intrinsic few-nanometre width, multifunctional properties and field-controlled topology. To realize the electronic functions, domain walls are required to be electrically conducting and addressable non-destructively. However, these properties have been elusive because conducting walls have to be electrically charged, which makes them unstable and uncommon in ferroelectric materials. Here we reveal that spontaneous and recorded domain walls in thin films of lead zirconate and bismuth ferrite exhibit large conductance at microwave frequencies despite being insulating at d.c. We explain this effect by morphological roughening of the walls and local charges induced by disorder with the overall charge neutrality. a.c. conduction is immune to large contact resistance enabling completely non-destructive walls read-out. This demonstrates a technological potential for harnessing a.c. conduction for oxide electronics and other materials with poor d.c. conduction, particularly at the nanoscale. PMID:27240997

  3. Random free energy barrier hopping model for ac conduction in chalcogenide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murti, Ram; Tripathi, S. K.; Goyal, Navdeep; Prakash, Satya

    2016-03-01

    The random free energy barrier hopping model is proposed to explain the ac conductivityac) of chalcogenide glasses. The Coulomb correlation is consistently accounted for in the polarizability and defect distribution functions and the relaxation time is augmented to include the overlapping of hopping particle wave functions. It is observed that ac and dc conduction in chalcogenides are due to same mechanism and Meyer-Neldel (MN) rule is the consequence of temperature dependence of hopping barriers. The exponential parameter s is calculated and it is found that s is subjected to sample preparation and measurement conditions and its value can be less than or greater than one. The calculated results for a - Se, As2S3, As2Se3 and As2Te3 are found in close agreement with the experimental data. The bipolaron and single polaron hopping contributions dominates at lower and higher temperatures respectively and in addition to high energy optical phonons, low energy optical and high energy acoustic phonons also contribute to the hopping process. The variations of hopping distance with temperature is also studied. The estimated defect number density and static barrier heights are compared with other existing calculations.

  4. Effect of nanosilica on optical, electric modulus and AC conductivity of polyvinyl alcohol/polyaniline films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sayed, Somyia; Abel-Baset, Tarob; Elfadl, Azza Abou; Hassen, Arafa

    2015-05-01

    Nanosilica (NS) was synthesized by a sol-gel method and mixed with 0.98 polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/0.02 polyaniline (PANI) in different amounts to produce nanocomposite films. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) revealed the average particle size of the NS to be ca. 15 nm. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the NS was well-dispersed on the surface of the PVA/PNAI films. The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of the samples showed a significant change in the intensity of the characteristic peak of the functional groups in the composite films with the amount of NS added. The absorbance and refractive index (n) of the composites were studied in the UV-vis range, and the optical energy band gap, Eg, and different optical parameters were calculated. The dielectric loss modulus, M″ and ac conductivity, σac, of the samples were studied within 300-425 K and 0.1 kHz-5 MHz, respectively. Two relaxation peaks were observed in the frequency dependence of the dielectric loss modulus, M″. The behavior of σac(f) for the composite films indicated that the conduction mechanism was correlated barrier hopping (CBH). The results of this work are discussed and compared with those of previous studies of similar composites.

  5. Instabilities across the isotropic conductivity point in a nematic phenyl benzoate under AC driving.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pramoda; Patil, Shivaram N; Hiremath, Uma S; Krishnamurthy, K S

    2007-08-01

    We characterize the sequence of bifurcations generated by ac fields in a nematic layer held between unidirectionally rubbed ITO electrodes. The material, which possesses a negative dielectric anisotropy epsilona and an inversion temperature for electrical conductivity anisotropy sigmaa, exhibits a monostable tilted alignment near TIN, the isotropic-nematic point. On cooling, an anchoring transition to the homeotropic configuration occurs close to the underlying smectic phase. The field experiments are performed for (i) negative sigmaa and homeotropic alignment, and (ii) weakly positive sigmaa and nearly homeotropic alignment. Under ac driving, the Freedericksz transition is followed by bifurcation into various patterned states. Among them are the striped states that seem to belong to the dielectric regime and localized hybrid instabilities. Very significantly, the patterned instabilities are not excited by dc fields, indicating their possible gradient flexoelectric origin. The Carr-Helfrich mechanism-based theories that take account of flexoelectric terms can explain the observed electroconvective effects only in part. PMID:17616118

  6. Conceptual design of contactless power transfer into HTS receiver coil using normal conducting resonance antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyoung Ku; Chung, Yoon Do; Yim, Seong Woo

    2014-09-01

    The contactless power transfer (CPT) technology based on strongly coupled electromagnetic resonators has been recently explored to realize the large power delivery and storage without any cable or wire across a large air gap. As the CPT technology makes possible the process of connector-free charging, it has been studied for practical applications to a variety of power applications. In the superconducting magnet system, a widespread method of electric energy supply is realized by the current lead which is one of indispensable subsystems in the power transfer equipment; however, it causes energy losses. To overcome such a problem, the combination CPT technology with HTS receiver coils has been proposed. It is called as, superconducting contactless power transfer (SUCPT) system. Such a technique has been expected a reasonable approach to provide a safe and convenient way of charging or storage without connecting joints in the superconducting applications. In this study, we presented the feasibility and various effects of transmission property from room temperature to very low temperature vessel within 40 cm under different material’s cooling vessels using radio frequency (RF) generator is 370 KHz.

  7. Coil bobbin for stable superconducting coils

    SciTech Connect

    Kashima, T.; Yamanaka, A.; Nishijima, S.; Okada, T.

    1996-12-31

    The coil bobbin for a.c. coils have been prepared with the high strength polyethylene fiber (DF) reinforced plastics (DFRP) or with hybrid composites reinforced by DF and glass fiber (GF). The coils with the bobbin were found to be markedly stable. The DF has a large negative thermal expansion coefficient and hence the circumferential thermal strain of bobbin can be designed by changing the ratio of DF to GF layer thickness (DF/GF). It was found that the thermal expansion coefficient in the circumferential direction of the outer surface changed from negative to positive with increasing DF/GF and became nearly zero at a DF/GF of approximately 5.1 kA rms class a.c. coils having a bobbin with a negative thermal expansion coefficient or small thermal contraction in the circumferential direction were fabricated and were confirmed to show higher quench current than that with a GFRP bobbin.

  8. Conductivity (ac and dc) in III-V amorphous semiconductors and chalcogenide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauser, J. J.

    1985-02-01

    Variable-range hopping, as evidenced by a resistivity proportional to exp(T-1/4), has been induced in many III-V amorphous semiconductors (InSb, AlSb, and GaAs) and even in chalcogenide glasses (As2Te3, As2Te3-xSex, and GeTe) by depositing films at 77 K. It is therefore remarkable that the same procedure failed to generate variable-range hopping in GaSb, which is one of the less ionic III-V semiconductors. Besides differences in the dc conductivity, there are also different behaviors in the ac conductivity of amorphous semiconductors. The low-temperature ac conductivity of all amorphous semiconductors is proportional to ωsTn with s~=1 and n<1, which is consistent with a model of correlated barrier hopping of electron pairs between paired and random defects. However, in the case of a-SiO2 and a-GeSe2 one finds, in addition, that the capacitance obeys the scaling relation C=A ln(Tω-1), which would suggest a conduction mechanism by tunneling relaxation. Furthermore, this scaling relation cannot be fitted to the data for a-As2Te3, a-InSb, and a-GaSb although the functional dependence of C on T and ω are similar.

  9. AC conductivity scaling behavior in grain and grain boundary response regime of fast lithium ionic conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariappan, C. R.

    2014-05-01

    AC conductivity spectra of Li-analogues NASICON-type Li1.5Al0.5Ge1.5P3O12 (LAGP), Li-Al-Ti-P-O (LATP) glass-ceramics and garnet-type Li7La2Ta2O13 (LLTO) ceramic are analyzed by universal power law and Summerfield scaling approaches. The activation energies and pre-exponential factors of total and grain conductivities are following the Meyer-Neldel (M-N) rule for NASICON-type materials. However, the garnet-type LLTO material deviates from the M-N rule line of NASICON-type materials. The frequency- and temperature-dependent conductivity spectra of LAGP and LLTO are superimposed by Summerfield scaling. The scaled conductivity curves of LATP are not superimposed at the grain boundary response region. The superimposed conductivity curves are observed at cross-over frequencies of grain boundary response region for LATP by incorporating the exp ( {{{ - (EAt - EAg )} {{{ - (EAt - EAg )} {kT}}} ) factor along with Summerfield scaling factors on the frequency axis, where EAt and EAg are the activation energies of total and grain conductivities, respectively.

  10. AC-Conductivity Measure from Heat Production of Free Fermions in Disordered Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bru, J.-B.; de Siqueira Pedra, W.; Hertling, C.

    2016-05-01

    We extend (Bru et al. in J Math Phys 56:051901-1-51, 2015) in order to study the linear response of free fermions on the lattice within a (independently and identically distributed) random potential to a macroscopic electric field that is time- and space-dependent. We obtain the notion of a macroscopic AC-conductivity measure which only results from the second principle of thermodynamics. The latter corresponds here to the positivity of the heat production for cyclic processes on equilibrium states. Its Fourier transform is a continuous bounded function which is naturally called (macroscopic) conductivity. We additionally derive Green-Kubo relations involving time-correlations of bosonic fields coming from current fluctuations in the system. This is reminiscent of non-commutative central limit theorems.

  11. AC and DC conductivity of ionic liquid containing polyvinylidene fluoride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frübing, Peter; Wang, Feipeng; Kühle, Till-Friedrich; Gerhard, Reimund

    2016-01-01

    Polarisation processes and charge transport in polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) with a small amount (0.01-10 wt%) of the ionic liquid (IL) 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium nitrate ({[EMIM]}^+[{NO}_3]^-) are investigated by means of dielectric spectroscopy. The response of PVDF that contains more than 0.01 wt% IL is dominated by a low-frequency relaxation which shows typical signatures of electrode polarisation. Furthermore, the α a relaxation, related to the glass transition, disappears for IL contents of more than 1 wt%, which indicates that the amorphous phase loses its glass-forming properties and undergoes structural changes. The DC conductivity is determined from the low-frequency limit of the AC conductivity and from the dielectric loss peak related to the electrode polarisation. DC conductivities of 10^{-10} to 10^{-2} {S}/{m} are obtained—increasing with IL content and temperature. The dependence of the DC conductivity on the IL content follows a power law with an exponent greater than one, indicating an increase in the ion mobility. The temperature dependence of the DC conductivity shows Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann behaviour, which implies that charge transport is coupled to polymer chain motion. Mobile ion densities and ion mobilities are calculated from the DC conductivity and the dielectric loss related to electrode polarisation, with the results that less than one per cent of the total ion concentration contributes to the conductivity and that the strong increase in conductivity with temperature is mainly caused by a strong increase in ion mobility. This leads to the conclusion that in particular the ion mobility must be reduced in order to decrease the DC conductivity.

  12. Ac-conductivity and dielectric response of new zinc-phosphate glass/metal composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maaroufi, A.; Oabi, O.; Lucas, B.

    2016-07-01

    The ac-conductivity and dielectric response of new composites based on zinc-phosphate glass with composition 45 mol%ZnO-55 mol%P2O5, filled with metallic powder of nickel (ZP/Ni) were investigated by impedance spectroscopy in the frequency range from 100 Hz to 1 MHz at room temperature. A high percolating jump of seven times has been observed in the conductivity behavior from low volume fraction of filler to the higher fractions, indicating an insulator - semiconductor phase transition. The measured conductivity at higher filler volume fraction is about 10-1 S/cm and is frequency independent, while, the obtained conductivity for low filler volume fraction is around 10-8 S/cm and is frequency dependent. Moreover, the elaborated composites are characterized by high dielectric constants in the range of 105 for conductive composites at low frequencies (100 Hz). In addition, the distribution of the relaxation processes was also evaluated. The Debye, Cole-Cole, Davidson-Cole and Havriliak-Negami models in electric modulus formalism were used to model the observed relaxation phenomena in ZP/Ni composites. The observed relaxation phenomena are fairly simulated by Davidson-Cole model, and an account of the interpretation of results is given.

  13. AC conductivity and dielectric behavior of CoAl xFe 2- xO 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abo El Ata, A. M.; Attia, S. M.; Meaz, T. M.

    2004-01-01

    AC conductivity and dielectric properties have been studied for a series of polycrystalline spinel ferrite with composition CoAl xFe 2- xO 4, as a function of frequency and temperature. The results of AC conductivity were discussed in terms of the quantum mechanical tunneling and small polaron tunneling models. The dispersion of the dielectric constant was discussed in the light of Koops model and hopping conduction mechanism. The dielectric loss tangent tan δ curves exhibits a dielectric relaxation peaks which are attributed to the coincidence of the hopping frequency of the charge carriers with that of the external fields. The AC conductivity, dielectric constant, and dielectric loss tangent were found to increase with increasing the temperature due to the increase of the hopping frequency, while they decrease with increasing Al ion content due to the reduction of iron ions available for the conduction process at the octahedral sites.

  14. Electric properties of carbon nano-onion/polyaniline composites: a combined electric modulus and ac conductivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papathanassiou, Anthony N.; Mykhailiv, Olena; Echegoyen, Luis; Sakellis, Ilias; Plonska-Brzezinska, Marta E.

    2016-07-01

    The complex electric modulus and the ac conductivity of carbon nano-onion/polyaniline composites were studied from 1 mHz to 1 MHz at isothermal conditions ranging from 15 K to room temperature. The temperature dependence of the electric modulus and the dc conductivity analyses indicate a couple of hopping mechanisms. The distinction between thermally activated processes and the determination of cross-over temperature were achieved by exploring the temperature dependence of the fractional exponent of the dispersive ac conductivity and the bifurcation of the scaled ac conductivity isotherms. The results are analyzed by combining the granular metal model (inter-grain charge tunneling of extended electron states located within mesoscopic highly conducting polyaniline grains) and a 3D Mott variable range hopping model (phonon assisted tunneling within the carbon nano-onions and clusters).

  15. AC conductivity and structural properties of Mg-doped ZnO ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, Zayani Jaafar; Hafef, Olfa; Matoussi, Adel; Rossi, Francesca; Salviati, Giancarlo

    2015-11-01

    Undoped ZnO and Zn1- x Mg x O ceramic pellets were synthesized by the standard sintering method at the temperature of 1200 °C. The influence of Mg doping on the morphological, structural and electrical properties was studied. The scanning electron microscopy images revealed rough surface textured by grain boundaries and compacted grains having different shapes and sizes. Indeed, the X-ray diffraction reveals the alloying of hexagonal ZnMgO phase and the segregation of cubic MgO phase. The crystallite size, strain and stress were studied using Williamson-Hall (W-H) method. The results of mean particle size of Zn1- x Mg x O composites showed an inter-correlation with W-H analysis and Sherrer method. The electrical conductivity of the films was measured from 173 to 373 K in the frequency range of 0.1 Hz-1 MHz to identify the dominant conductivity mechanism. The DC conductivity is thermally activated by electron traps having activation energy of about 0.09 to 0.8 eV. The mechanisms of AC conductivity are controlled by the correlated barrier hopping model for the ZnO sample and the small polaron tunneling (SPT) model for Zn0.64Mg0.36O and Zn0.60Mg0.40O composites.

  16. Low frequency ac conduction and dielectric relaxation in pristine poly(3-octylthiophene) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ramadhar; Kumar, Jitendra; Singh, Rajiv K.; Rastogi, Ramesh C.; Kumar, Vikram

    2007-02-01

    The ac conductivity σ(ω)m, dielectric constant ɛ'(ω) and loss ɛ''(ω) of pristine poly(3-octylthiophene) (P3OT) films (thickness ~ 20 μm) have been measured in wide temperature (77 350 K) and frequency (100 Hz 10 MHz) ranges. At low temperatures, σ(ω)m can be described by the relation σ(ω)m = Aωs, where s is ~ 0.61 at 77 K and decreases with increasing temperature. A clear Debye-type loss peak is observed by subtracting the contribution of σdc from σ(ω)m. The frequency dependence of conductivity indicates that there is a distribution of relaxation times. This is confirmed by measurement of the dielectric constant as a function of frequency and temperature. Reasonable estimates of various electrical parameters such as effective dielectric constant (ɛp), phonon frequency (νph), Debye temperature (θD), polaron radius (rp), small-polaron coupling constant (\\Upsilon ), effective polaron mass (mp), the density of states at the Fermi level N(EF), average hopping distance (R) and average hopping energy (W) from dc conductivity measurements suggest the applicability of Mott's variable range hopping model in this system.

  17. Ac-electrical conductivity of poly(propylene) before and after X-ray irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaafar, M.

    2001-05-01

    Study on the ac-electrical conductivity of poly(propylene), before and after X-ray irradiation within the temperature range 300-360 K are reported. The measurements have been performed in a wide range of frequencies (from 0 to 10 5 Hz) and under the effect of different X-ray irradiation doses (from 0 to 15 Gy). Cole-Cole diagrams have been used to show the frequency dependence of the complex impedance at different temperatures. The results exhibit semicircles which are consistent with existing equivalent circuit model. Analysis of the results reveal semiconducting features based mainly on a hopping mechanism. The study shows a pronounced effect of X-ray irradiation on the electrical conductivity at zero frequency σDC. At the early stage of irradiation, σDC increased as a result of free radical formation. As the irradiation progressed, it decreased as a result of crosslinking, then it increased again due to irradiation induced degradation, which motivates the generation of mobile free radicals. The study shows that this polymer is one among other polymers which its electrical conductivity is modified by irradiation.

  18. Origin of DC and AC conductivity anisotropy in iron-based superconductors: Scattering rate versus spectral weight effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütt, Michael; Schmalian, Jörg; Fernandes, Rafael M.

    2016-08-01

    To shed light on the transport properties of electronic nematic phases, we investigate the anisotropic properties of the AC and DC conductivities. Based on the analytical properties of the former, we show that the anisotropy of the effective scattering rate behaves differently than the actual scattering rate anisotropy and even changes sign as a function of temperature. Similarly, the effective spectral weight acquires an anisotropy even when the plasma frequency is isotropic. These results are illustrated by an explicit calculation of the AC conductivity due to the interaction between electrons and spin fluctuations in the nematic phase of the iron-based superconductors and shown to be in agreement with recent experiments.

  19. Analytic formulation for the ac electrical conductivity in two-temperature, strongly coupled, overdense plasma: FORTRAN subroutine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauble, R.; Rozmus, W.

    1993-10-01

    A FORTRAN subroutine for the calculation of the ac electrical conductivity in two-temperature, strongly coupled, overdense plasma is presented. The routine is the result of a model calculation based on classical transport theory with application to plasmas created by the interaction of short pulse lasers and solids. The formulation is analytic and the routine is self-contained.

  20. Transport properties of random and nonrandom substitutionally disordered alloys. I. Exact numerical calculation of the ac conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, M.; Gonis, A.; Freeman, A. J.

    1987-06-01

    Results of exact computer simulations for the zero-temperature ac conductivity of one-dimensional substitutionally disordered alloys are reported. These results are obtained by (i) solving for the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a Hamiltonian associated with a specific configuration of 500 atoms on a linear chain, (ii) evaluating the ac conductivity of this configuration by using the Kubo-Greenwood formula, and (iii) averaging the resulting conductivities over 20 to 50 different configurations (the number of configurations depends on the type of disorder). In all cases convergence (i.e., a stable result) was obtained and confirmed by another independent approach (the recursive method). For not too weak disorder (defined precisely in the text), these results exhibit a great deal of fine structure that includes high peaks and gaps where the conductivity vanishes. These features are reminiscent of, and are correlated with, the similar kind of behavior of the densities of states of one-dimensional substitutionally disordered alloys. Thus we find that the fine structure in the ac-conductivity spectra of one-dimensional systems provides a rigorous testing ground for judging the validity of analytic theories for calculating the transport properties of substitutionally disordered systems.

  1. Studies on the activation energy from the ac conductivity measurements of rubber ferrite composites containing manganese zinc ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, Mohd.; Alimuddin; Kumar, Shalendra; Shirsath, Sagar E.; Mohammed, E. M.; Chung, Hanshik; Kumar, Ravi

    2012-11-01

    Manganese zinc ferrites (MZF) have resistivities between 0.01 and 10 Ω m. Making composite materials of ferrites with either natural rubber or plastics will modify the electrical properties of ferrites. The moldability and flexibility of these composites find wide use in industrial and other scientific applications. Mixed ferrites belonging to the series Mn(1-x)ZnxFe2O4 were synthesized for different ‘x’ values in steps of 0.2, and incorporated in natural rubber matrix (RFC). From the dielectric measurements of the ceramic manganese zinc ferrite and rubber ferrite composites, ac conductivity and activation energy were evaluated. A program was developed with the aid of the LabVIEW package to automate the measurements. The ac conductivity of RFC was then correlated with that of the magnetic filler and matrix by a mixture equation which helps to tailor properties of these composites.

  2. The change in dielectric constant, AC conductivity and optical band gaps of polymer electrolyte film: Gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Raghu, S. Subramanya, K. Sharanappa, C. Mini, V. Archana, K. Sanjeev, Ganesh Devendrappa, H.

    2014-04-24

    The effects of gamma (γ) irradiation on dielectric and optical properties of polymer electrolyte film were investigated. The dielectric constant and ac conductivity increases with γ dose. Also optical band gap decreased from 4.23 to 3.78ev after irradiation. A large dependence of the polymer properties on the irradiation dose was noticed. This suggests that there is a possibility of improving polymer electrolyte properties on gamma irradiation.

  3. Magnetic field dependent stability and quench behavior and degradation limits in conduction-cooled MgB2 wires and coils

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Liyang; Cruciani, Davide; Xu, Minfeng; Mine, Susumu; Amm, Kathleen; Schwartz, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Long lengths of metal/MgB2 composite conductors with high critical current density (Jc), fabricated by the power-in-tube (PIT) process, have recently become commercially available. Owing to its electromagnetic performance in the 20 K – 30 K range and relatively low cost, MgB2 may be attractive for a variety of applications. One of the key issues for magnet design is stability and quench protection, so the behavior of MgB2 wires and magnets must be understood before large systems can emerge. In this work, the stability and quench behavior of several conduction-cooled MgB2 wires are studied. Measurements of the minimum quench energy and normal zone propagation velocity are performed on short samples in a background magnetic field up to 3 T and on coils in self-field and the results are explained in terms of variations in the conductor architecture, electrical transport behavior, operating conditions (transport current and background magnetic field) and experimental setup (short sample vs small coil). Furthermore, one coil is quenched repeatedly with increasing hot-spot temperature until Jc is decreased. It is found that degradation during quenching correlates directly with temperature and not with peak voltage; a safe operating temperature limit of 260 K at the surface is identified. PMID:25883414

  4. Design and modelling of a SMES coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Weijia; Campbell, A. M.; Coombs, T. A.

    2010-06-01

    The design of a Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) coil wound by coated conductors has been presented. Based on an existing model for coated conductor pancake coils, this paper analysed the magnetic field and current density distribution of the coil at two different operation temperatures, 77K and 22K. A comparison table of the critical currents and AC losses at these two temperatures has been presented. Several steps to improve the transport current of the coil have been suggested as well.

  5. Gas sensing properties of magnesium doped SnO{sub 2} thin films in relation to AC conduction

    SciTech Connect

    Deepa, S.; Skariah, Benoy Thomas, Boben; Joseph, Anisha

    2014-01-28

    Conducting magnesium doped (0 to 1.5 wt %) tin oxide thin films prepared by Spray Pyrolysis technique achieved detection of 1000 ppm of LPG. The films deposited at 304 °C exhibit an enhanced response at an operating temperature of 350 °C. The microstructural properties are studied by means of X-ray diffraction. AC conductivity measurements are carried out using precision LCR meter to analyze the parameters that affect the variation in sensing. The results are correlated with compositional parameters and the subsequent modification in the charge transport mechanism facilitating an enhanced LPG sensing action.

  6. Dielectric behavior and ac conductivity study of NiO /Al2O3 nanocomposites in humid atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Mohamad M.; Makhlouf, Salah A.; Khalil, Kamal M. S.

    2006-11-01

    Humidity sensing characteristics of NiO /Al2O3 nanocomposites, prepared by sol-gel method, are studied by impedance spectroscopy. Modeling of the obtained impedance spectra with an appropriate equivalent circuit enables us to separate the electrical responses of the tightly bound chemisorbed water molecules on the grain surfaces and the loosely associated physisorbed water layers. Dependence of the dielectric properties and ac conductivity of the nanocomposites on relative humidity (RH) were studied as a function of the frequency of the applied ac signal in the frequency range of 0.1-105Hz. The electrical relaxation behavior of the investigated materials is presented in the conductivity formalism, where the conductivity spectra at different RHs are analyzed by the Almond-West formalism [D. P. Almond et al., Solid State Ionics 8, 159 (1983)]. The dc conductivity and the hopping rate of charge carriers, determined from this analysis, show similar dependences on RH, indicating that the concentration of mobile ions is independent of RH and is primarily determined by the chemisorption process of water molecules. Finally, the results are discussed in view of a percolation-type conduction mechanism, where mobile ions are provided by the chemisorbed water molecules and the percolation network is formed by the physisorbed water layers.

  7. Calculation of the ac to dc resistance ratio of conductive nonmagnetic straight conductors by applying FEM simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riba, Jordi-Roger

    2015-09-01

    This paper analyzes the skin and proximity effects in different conductive nonmagnetic straight conductor configurations subjected to applied alternating currents and voltages. These effects have important consequences, including a rise of the ac resistance, which in turn increases power loss, thus limiting the rating for the conductor. Alternating current (ac) resistance is important in power conductors and bus bars for line frequency applications, as well as in smaller conductors for high frequency applications. Despite the importance of this topic, it is not usually analyzed in detail in undergraduate and even in graduate studies. To address this, this paper compares the results provided by available exact formulas for simple geometries with those obtained by means of two-dimensional finite element method (FEM) simulations and experimental results. The paper also shows that FEM results are very accurate and more general than those provided by the formulas, since FEM models can be applied in a wide range of electrical frequencies and configurations.

  8. Development of the Exams Data Analysis Spreadsheet as a Tool to Help Instructors Conduct Customizable Analyses of Student ACS Exam Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandriet, Alexandra; Holme, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The American Chemical Society Examinations Institute (ACS-EI) has recently developed the Exams Data Analysis Spread (EDAS) as a tool to help instructors conduct customizable analyses of their student data from ACS exams. The EDAS calculations allow instructors to analyze their students' performances both at the total score and individual item…

  9. Development of a nano-tesla magnetic field shielded chamber and highly precise AC-susceptibility measurement coil at μK temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Anil; Prakash, Om; Ramakrishanan, S.

    2014-04-01

    A special sample measurement chamber has been developed to perform experiments at ultralow temperatures and ultralow magnetic field. A high permeability material known as cryoperm 10 and Pb is used to shield the measurement space consisting of the signal detecting set-up and the sample. The detecting setup consists of a very sensitive susceptibility coil wound on OFHC Cu bobbin.

  10. Experimental study to improve the focalization of a figure-eight coil of rTMS by using a highly conductive and highly permeable medium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shunqi; Yin, Tao; Liu, Zhipeng; Li, Ying; Jin, Jingna; Ma, Ren

    2013-05-01

    A method to improve the focalization of the repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation figure-eight coil in a magnetic stimulation is presented in this paper. For the purpose of reducing the half width of the distribution curve, while improving the ratio of positive to negative electric field, a shield plate with a window and a magnetic conductor were adopted. The shield plate, which was made of highly conductive copper, focused the magnetic field into a smaller area. The magnetic inductor, which was made of highly permeable soft magnetic ferrite, strengthened the magnetic field. A group of experiments was conducted to validate the focalizing effect. Experimental results showed that the negative peak and the half width of the distribution curve reduced by using the shield plate and the magnetic conductor. Especially for to the Magstim 70 mm double coil, when the shield window was 30 × 60 mm, the ratio of positive to negative electric field could be increased 109%, while the half width of the distribution curve could be reduced about 55%. PMID:22531823

  11. Study on AC-DC Electrical Conductivities in Warm Dense Matter Generated by Pulsed-power Discharge with Isochoric Vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Toru; Ohuchi, Takumi; Takahashi, Takuya; Kawaguchi, Yoshinari; Saito, Hirotaka; Miki, Yasutoshi; Takahashi, Kazumasa; Kikuchi, Takashi; Aso, Tsukasa; Harada, Nob.

    2016-03-01

    To observe AC and DC electrical conductivity in warm dense matter (WDM), we have demonstrated to apply the spectroscopic ellipsometry for a pulsed-power discharge with isochoric vessel. At 10 μs from the beginning of discharge, the generated parameters by using pulsed-power discharge with isochoric vessel are 0.1 ρ s (ρ s: solid density) of density and 4000 K of temperature, respectively. The DC electrical conductivity for above parameters is estimated to be 104 S/m. In order to measure the AC electrical conductivity, we have developed a four-detector spectroscopic ellipsometer with a multichannel spectrometer. The multichannel spectrometer, in which consists of a 16-channel photodiode array, a two-stages voltage adder, and a flat diffraction grating, has 10 MHz of the frequency response with covered visible spectrum. For applying the four-detector spectroscopic ellipsometer, we observe the each observation signal evolves the polarized behavior compared to the ratio as I 1/I 2.

  12. AC Conduction and Time-Temperature Superposition Scaling in a Reduced Graphene Oxide-Zinc Sulfide Nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Koushik; Das, Poulomi; Chakrabarty, Sankalpita; Pal, Tanusri; Ghosh, Surajit

    2016-05-18

    We report, herein, the results of an in depth study and concomitant analysis of the AC conduction [σ'(ω): f=20 Hz to 2 MHz] mechanism in a reduced graphene oxide-zinc sulfide (RGO-ZnS) composite. The magnitude of the real part of the complex impedance decreases with increase in both frequency and temperature, whereas the imaginary part shows an asymptotic maximum that shifts to higher frequencies with increasing temperature. On the other hand, the conductivity isotherm reveals a frequency-independent conductivity at lower frequencies subsequent to a dispersive conductivity at higher frequencies, which follows a power law [σ'(ω)∝ω(s) ] within a temperature range of 297 to 393 K. Temperature-independent frequency exponent 's' indicates the occurrence of phonon-assisted simple quantum tunnelling of electrons between the defects present in RGO. Finally, this sample follows the "time-temperature superposition principle", as confirmed from the universal scaling of conductivity isotherms. These outcomes not only pave the way for increasing our elemental understanding of the transport mechanism in the RGO system, but will also motivate the investigation of the transport mechanism in other order-disorder systems. PMID:26864678

  13. α/β coiled coils

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Marcus D; Mendler, Claudia T; Bassler, Jens; Karamichali, Ioanna; Ridderbusch, Oswin; Lupas, Andrei N; Hernandez Alvarez, Birte

    2016-01-01

    Coiled coils are the best-understood protein fold, as their backbone structure can uniquely be described by parametric equations. This level of understanding has allowed their manipulation in unprecedented detail. They do not seem a likely source of surprises, yet we describe here the unexpected formation of a new type of fiber by the simple insertion of two or six residues into the underlying heptad repeat of a parallel, trimeric coiled coil. These insertions strain the supercoil to the breaking point, causing the local formation of short β-strands, which move the path of the chain by 120° around the trimer axis. The result is an α/β coiled coil, which retains only one backbone hydrogen bond per repeat unit from the parent coiled coil. Our results show that a substantially novel backbone structure is possible within the allowed regions of the Ramachandran space with only minor mutations to a known fold. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11861.001 PMID:26771248

  14. Magnet Coil Shorted Turn Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Dinkel, J.A.; Biggs, J.E.

    1994-03-01

    The Magnet Coil Shorted Turn Detector has been developed to facilitate the location of shorted turns in magnet coils. Finding these shorted turns is necessary to determine failure modes that are a necessary step in developing future production techniques. Up to this point, coils with shorted turns had the insulation burned off without the fault having been located. This disassembly process destroyed any chance of being able to find the fault. In order to maintain a flux balance in a coupled system such as a magnet coil, the current in a shorted turn must be opposed to the incident current. If the direction of the current in each conductor can be measured relative to the incident current, then the exact location of the short can be determined. In this device, an AC voltage is applied to the magnet under test. A small hand held B-dot pickup coil monitors the magnetic field produced by current in the individual magnet conductors. The relative phase of this pickup coil voltage is compared to a reference signal derived from the input current to detect a current reversal as the B-dot pickup coil is swept over the conductors of the coil under test. This technique however, is limited to only those conductors that are accessible to the hand held probe.

  15. AC conductivity and electrochemical studies of PVA/PEG based polymer blend electrolyte films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polu, Anji Reddy; Kumar, Ranveer; Dehariya, Harsha

    2012-06-01

    Polymer blend electrolyte films based on Polyvinyl alcohol(PVA)/Poly(ethylene glycol)(PEG) and magnesium nitrate (Mg(NO3)2) were prepared by solution casting technique. Conductivity in the temperature range 303-373 K and transference number measurements have been employed to investigate the charge transport in this polymer blend electrolyte system. The highest conductivity is found to be 9.63 × 10-5 S/cm at 30°C for sample with 30 weight percent of Mg(NO3)2 in PVA/PEG blend matrix. Transport number data shows that the charge transport in this polymer electrolyte system is predominantly due to ions. Using this electrolyte, an electrochemical cell with configuration Mg/(PVA+PEG+Mg(NO3)2)/(I2+C+electrolyte) was fabricated and its discharge characteristics profile has been studied.

  16. Finding the asymmetric parasitic source and drain resistances from the a.c. conductances of a single MOS transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raychaudhuri, A.; Deen, M. J.; King, M. I. H.; Kolk, J.

    1996-06-01

    Layout asymmetry, processing, or hot-carrier stressing can give rise to unequal source and drain parasitic resistances in a MOSFET. In these cases, it is necessary to extract these resistances separately without the aid of other transistors. In this paper, we present a simple method to extract the source and drain parasitic resistances separately. This method, unlike earlier ones that depend on the measurements of the d.c. resistances of several MOSFETs, is based on accurate formulations and measurements of the a.c. conductances with respect to the gate and drain terminals of a single transistor. This allows us to get reasonably accurate estimates of these resistances in a more straightforward manner. We also discuss the main error terms in detail.

  17. Determination of the Si-conducting polymer interfacial properties using A-C impedance techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagasubramanian, G.; Di Stefano, Salvador; Moacanin, Jovan

    1985-01-01

    A study was made of the interfacial properties of poly(pyrrole) (PP) deposited electrochemically onto single crystal p-Si surfaces. The interfacial properties are dependent upon the counterions. The formation of 'quasi-ohmic' and 'nonohmic' contacts, respectively, of PP(ClO4) and PP films doped with other counterions (BF4 and para-toluene sulfonate) with p-Si, are explained in terms of the conductivity of these films and the flat band potential, V(fb), of PP relative to that of p-Si. The PP film seems to passivate or block intrinsic surface states present on the p-Si surface. The differences in the impedance behavior of para-toluene sulfonate doped and ClO4 doped PP are compared.

  18. Studies of structural, optical, dielectric relaxation and ac conductivity of different alkylbenzenesulfonic acids doped polypyrrole nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazarika, J.; Kumar, A.

    2016-01-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) nanofibers doped with alkylbenzenesulfonic acids (ABSA) have been synthesized using interfacial polymerization method. HRTEM studies confirm the formation of PPy nanofibers with average diameter ranging from 13 nm to 25 nm. Broad X-ray diffraction peak in 2 θ range 20-23.46° reveals amorphous structure of PPy nanofibers. The ordering or crystallinity of polymer chains increases, while their interplanar spacing (d) and interchain separation (R) decreases for short alkyl chain ABSA doped PPy nanofibers. FTIR studies reveal that short alkyl chain ABSA doped PPy nanofibers show higher value of "effective conjugation length". PPy nanofibers doped with short alkyl chain ABSA dopant exhibit smaller optical band gap. TGA studies show enhanced thermal stability of short alkyl chain ABSA doped PPy nanofibers. Decrease in dielectric permittivity ε ‧ (ω) with increasing frequency suggests presence of electrode polarization effects. Linear decrease in dielectric loss ε ″ (ω) with increasing frequency suggests dominant effect of dc conductivity process. Low value of non-exponential exponent β (<1) reveals non-Debye relaxation of charge carriers. Scaling of imaginary modulus (M ″) reveals that the charge carriers follow the same relaxation mechanism. Moreover, the charge carriers in PPy nanofibers follow the correlated barrier hopping (CBH) transport mechanism.

  19. Transport ac losses of a second-generation HTS tape with a ferromagnetic substrate and conducting stabilizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuo; Chen, Du-Xing; Fang, Jin

    2015-12-01

    The current-voltage curve and transport ac loss of a second-generation HTS tape with a ferromagnetic NiW substrate and brass stabilizer are measured. It is found that the ac loss is up to two orders of magnitude larger than what is expected by the power-law E(J) determined by the current-voltage curve and increases with increasing frequency. Modeling results show that the overly large ac loss is contributed by the ac loss in the HTS strip enhanced by the NiW substrate and the magnetic hysteresis loss in the substrate, and the frequency-dependent loss occurs in the brass layer covering the substrate but not in the ferromagnetic substrate itself as assumed previously. The ac loss in the brass layer is associated with transport currents but not eddy currents, and it has some features similar to ordinary eddy-current loss with significant differences.

  20. Eddy Current Loss Induced in Aluminum Thermal Conduction Strips for ASPCS Coils Indirectly Cooled by Liquid Hydrogen through Thermo-siphon System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Narumi; Katsura, Masashi; Ando, Kennosuke; Takao, Tomoaki; Shintomi, Takakazu; Makida, Yasuhiro; Hamajima, Takataro; Tsuda, Makoto; Miyagi, Daisuke; Tsujigami, Hiroshi; Fujikawa, Shizuichi; Semba, Toshiaki; Iwaki, Katsuya

    To promote renewable energy sources, we proposed a new system called the Advanced Superconducting Power Conditioning System (ASPCS), which consists of Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage-system (SMES), Electrolyzer, and Fuel Cell, and is also combined with a liquid hydrogen station for vehicles. The SMES plays a role to compensate the fast fluctuations generated by the renewable energies. In case of the ASPCS with a capacity of 5 MW, we designed the 50 MJ-class SMES composed of 4 solenoid coils. The winding of the solenoid coils is double pancake and a basic coil is 2 m in diameter and 0.5 m in height. Each SMES coil is wound with MgB2 conductor and indirectly cooled at 20 K by liquid hydrogen flowing through a thermo-siphon cooling system. Pure aluminum strips are inserted between the double-pancake coils and the pure aluminum plates gathering the strips lead to liquid hydrogen pipes. This scheme enables the strips and the plates to transfer the heat load in the coils to the cooling pipes and keep the coils at low temperature. On the other hand, we must consider that the strips generate eddy current loss which is strongly affected by a width of the strips. At the same time as the primary study of the SMES coils, we experimented on the thermo-siphon cooling system and investigated the relationship between the heat load and the heat extraction ability of the cooling system. The experiments showed that the cooling system could proficiently function. The estimation of eddy current loss from the particular cooling aluminum strips for the SMES in the ASPCS is reported with the results of the thermo-siphon driving experiment.

  1. AC conductivity and dielectric relaxation of tris(N,N-dimethylanilinium) hexabromidostannate(IV) bromide: (C8H12N)3SnBr6.Br

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouaib, H.; Kamoun, S.

    2015-10-01

    The X-ray powder analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry analysis and complex impedance spectroscopic data have been carried out on (C8H12N)3SnBr6.Br compound. The results show that this compound exhibits a phase transition at (T=365±2 K) which has been characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), AC conductivity and dielectric measurements. The AC conductivity, the modulus analysis, the dielectric constants and the polarizability have been studied using impedance in the temperature range from 334 K to 383 K and in the frequency range between 20 Hz and 2 MHz. The temperature dependence of DC conductivity follows the Arrhenius law. Moreover, the frequency dependence of conductivity follows Jonscher's dynamical law with the relation: σ(ω , T) =σDC + B(T)ω s(T) . Relaxation peaks can be observed in the complex modulus analysis and after a transformation of the complex permittivity ε* to the complex polarizability α*.

  2. Pulse Coil Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Richard A.

    1988-01-01

    Set of relays tested easily and repeatedly. Pulse coil tester causes coil under test to generate transient voltage; waveform indicates condition of coil. Tester accommodates assembly of up to four coils at a time.

  3. CCBuilder: an interactive web-based tool for building, designing and assessing coiled-coil protein assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Christopher W.; Bruning, Marc; Ibarra, Amaurys Á.; Bartlett, Gail J.; Thomson, Andrew R.; Sessions, Richard B.; Brady, R Leo; Woolfson, Derek N.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: The ability to accurately model protein structures at the atomistic level underpins efforts to understand protein folding, to engineer natural proteins predictably and to design proteins de novo. Homology-based methods are well established and produce impressive results. However, these are limited to structures presented by and resolved for natural proteins. Addressing this problem more widely and deriving truly ab initio models requires mathematical descriptions for protein folds; the means to decorate these with natural, engineered or de novo sequences; and methods to score the resulting models. Results: We present CCBuilder, a web-based application that tackles the problem for a defined but large class of protein structure, the α-helical coiled coils. CCBuilder generates coiled-coil backbones, builds side chains onto these frameworks and provides a range of metrics to measure the quality of the models. Its straightforward graphical user interface provides broad functionality that allows users to build and assess models, in which helix geometry, coiled-coil architecture and topology and protein sequence can be varied rapidly. We demonstrate the utility of CCBuilder by assembling models for 653 coiled-coil structures from the PDB, which cover >96% of the known coiled-coil types, and by generating models for rarer and de novo coiled-coil structures. Availability and implementation: CCBuilder is freely available, without registration, at http://coiledcoils.chm.bris.ac.uk/app/cc_builder/ Contact: D.N.Woolfson@bristol.ac.uk or Chris.Wood@bristol.ac.uk PMID:25064570

  4. Mutation Glu82Lys in lamin A/C gene is associated with cardiomyopathy and conduction defect

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Hu; Wang Jizheng; Zheng Weiyue; Wang Xiaojian; Wang Shuxia; Song Lei; Zou Yubao; Yao Yan; Hui Rutai . E-mail: huirutai@sglab.org

    2006-05-26

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is a form of heart muscle disease characterized by impaired systolic function and ventricular dilation. The mutations in lamin A/C gene have been linked to dilated cardiomyopathy. We screened genetic mutations in a large Chinese family of 50 members including members with dilated cardiomyopathy and found a Glu82Lys substitution mutation in the rod domain of the lamin A/C protein in eight family members, three of them have been diagnosed as dilated cardiomyopathy, one presented with heart dilation. The pathogenic mechanism of lamin A/C gene defect is poorly understood. Glu82Lys mutated lamin A/C and wild type protein was transfected into HEK293 cells. The mutated protein was not properly localized at the inner nuclear membrane and the emerin protein, which interacts with lamin A/C, was also aberrantly distributed. The nuclear membrane structure was disrupted and heterochromatin was aggregated aberrantly in the nucleus of the HEK293 cells stably transfected with mutated lamin A/C gene as determined by transmission electron microscopy.

  5. Triple Halo Coil: Development and Comparison with Other TMS Coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Priyam; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive stimulation technique that can be used for the treatment of various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's Disease, PTSD, TBI and anxiety by regulating synaptic activity. TMS is FDA approved for the treatment of major depressive disorder. There is a critical need to develop deep TMS coils that can stimulate deeper regions of the brain without excessively stimulating the cortex in order to provide an alternative to surgical methods. We have developed a novel multi-coil configuration called ``Triple Halo Coil'' (THC) that can stimulate deep brain regions. Investigation of induced electric and magnetic field in these regions have been achieved by computer modelling. Comparison of the results due to THC configuration have been conducted with other TMS coils such as ``Halo Coil'', circular coil and ``Figure of Eight'' coil. There was an improvement of more than 15 times in the strength of magnetic field, induced by THC configuration at 10 cm below the vertex of the head when compared with the ``Figure of Eight'' coil alone. Carver Charitable Trust.

  6. Molecular basis of coiled-coil formation.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Michel O; Jelesarov, Ilian; Matousek, William M; Honnappa, Srinivas; Jahnke, Wolfgang; Missimer, John H; Frank, Sabine; Alexandrescu, Andrei T; Kammerer, Richard A

    2007-04-24

    Coiled coils have attracted considerable interest as design templates in a wide range of applications. Successful coiled-coil design strategies therefore require a detailed understanding of coiled-coil folding. One common feature shared by coiled coils is the presence of a short autonomous helical folding unit, termed "trigger sequence," that is indispensable for folding. Detailed knowledge of trigger sequences at the molecular level is thus key to a general understanding of coiled-coil formation. Using a multidisciplinary approach, we identify and characterize here the molecular determinants that specify the helical conformation of the monomeric early folding intermediate of the GCN4 coiled coil. We demonstrate that a network of hydrogen-bonding and electrostatic interactions stabilize the trigger-sequence helix. This network is rearranged in the final dimeric coiled-coil structure, and its destabilization significantly slows down GCN4 leucine zipper folding. Our findings provide a general explanation for the molecular mechanism of coiled-coil formation. PMID:17438295

  7. Method and apparatus for identifying conductive objects by monitoring the true resistive component of impedance change in a coil system caused by the object

    DOEpatents

    Gregory, William D.; Capots, Larry H.; George, James P.; Janik, Richard

    1981-01-01

    The type of conductor, its property, and if a metal, its type and cross-sectional area can be obtained from measurements made at different frequencies for the amount of unbalance created in a previously balanced stable coil detection system. The true resistive component is accurately measured and thus reflects only the voltage loss attributable to eddy currents caused by introduction of the test sample to the coil system. This voltage divided by corresponding applied frequency gives a curve which peaks at a frequency dependent upon type of conductor. For a metal this peak frequency is proportional to the samples resistivity divided by its cross-sectional area.

  8. Estimation of charge-carrier concentration and ac conductivity scaling properties near the V-I phase transition of polycrystalline Na2 S O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Mohamad M.

    2005-11-01

    The conductivity spectra of polycrystalline Na2SO4 have been investigated in the frequency range 42Hz-1MHz at different temperatures below and above the V-I phase transition temperature. The conductivity data have been analyzed using Almond-West formalism. The dc conductivity, the hopping frequency of the charge carriers, and their respective activation energies have been obtained from the analysis of the ac conductivity data, and the concentration of charge carriers was calculated at different temperatures. The power-law exponent n of the conductivity spectra has average values of 0.43 and 0.61 in phases V and I , respectively, which indicates different conduction properties in the two phases. Moreover, scaling of the conductivity spectra at the low- and high-temperature phases was performed in accord with Ghosh’s scaling approach. It is found that the scaling properties depend on the structure of the investigated material.

  9. Frequency and voltage dependent profile of dielectric properties, electric modulus and ac electrical conductivity in the PrBaCoO nanofiber capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirezen, S.; Kaya, A.; Yerişkin, S. A.; Balbaşı, M.; Uslu, İ.

    In this study, praseodymium barium cobalt oxide nanofiber interfacial layer was sandwiched between Au and n-Si. Frequency and voltage dependence of ε‧, ε‧, tanδ, electric modulus (M‧ and M″) and σac of PrBaCoO nanofiber capacitor have been investigated by using impedance spectroscopy method. The obtained experimental results show that the values of ε‧, ε‧, tanδ, M‧, M″ and σac of the PrBaCoO nanofiber capacitor are strongly dependent on frequency of applied bias voltage. The values of ε‧, ε″ and tanδ show a steep decrease with increasing frequency for each forward bias voltage, whereas the values of σac and the electric modulus increase with increasing frequency. The high dispersion in ε‧ and ε″ values at low frequencies may be attributed to the Maxwell-Wagner and space charge polarization. The high values of ε‧ may be due to the interfacial effects within the material, PrBaCoO nanofibers interfacial layer and electron effect. The values of M‧ and M″ reach a maximum constant value corresponding to M∞ ≈ 1/ε∞ due to the relaxation process at high frequencies, but both the values of M‧ and M″ approach almost to zero at low frequencies. The changes in the dielectric and electrical properties with frequency can be also attributed to the existence of Nss and Rs of the capacitors. As a result, the change in the ε‧, ε″, tanδ, M‧, M″ and ac electric conductivityac) is a result of restructuring and reordering of charges at the PrBaCoO/n-Si interface under an external electric field or voltage and interface polarization.

  10. An Optimized Air-Core Coil Sensor with a Magnetic Flux Compensation Structure Suitable to the Helicopter TEM System

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Liu, Fei; Lin, Jun; Zhu, Kaiguang; Wang, Yanzhang

    2016-01-01

    The air-core coil sensor (ACS) is widely used as a transducer to measure the variation in magnetic fields of a helicopter transient electromagnetic (TEM) system. A high periodic emitting current induces the magnetic field signal of the underground medium. However, such current also generates a high primary field signal that can affect the received signal of the ACS and even damage the receiver. To increase the dynamic range of the received signal and to protect the receiver when emitting current rises/falls, the combination of ACS with magnetic flux compensation structure (bucking coil) is necessary. Moreover, the optimized ACS, which is composed of an air-core coil and a differential pre-amplifier circuit, must be investigated to meet the requirements of the helicopter TEM system suited to rapid surveying for shallow buried metal mine in rough topography. Accordingly, two ACSs are fabricated in this study, and their performance is verified and compared inside a magnetic shielding room. Using the designed ACSs, field experiments are conducted in Baoqing County. The field experimental data show that the primary field response can be compensated when the bucking coil is placed at an appropriate point in the range of allowed shift distance beyond the center of the transmitting coil and that the damage to the receiver induced by the over-statured signal can be solved. In conclusion, a more suitable ACS is adopted and is shown to have better performance, with a mass of 2.5 kg, resultant effective area of 11.6 m2 (i.e., diameter of 0.496 m), 3 dB bandwidth of 66 kHz, signal-to-noise ratio of 4 (i.e., varying magnetic field strength of 0.2 nT/s), and normalized equivalent input noise of 3.62 nV/m2. PMID:27077862

  11. An Optimized Air-Core Coil Sensor with a Magnetic Flux Compensation Structure Suitable to the Helicopter TEM System.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Liu, Fei; Lin, Jun; Zhu, Kaiguang; Wang, Yanzhang

    2016-01-01

    The air-core coil sensor (ACS) is widely used as a transducer to measure the variation in magnetic fields of a helicopter transient electromagnetic (TEM) system. A high periodic emitting current induces the magnetic field signal of the underground medium. However, such current also generates a high primary field signal that can affect the received signal of the ACS and even damage the receiver. To increase the dynamic range of the received signal and to protect the receiver when emitting current rises/falls, the combination of ACS with magnetic flux compensation structure (bucking coil) is necessary. Moreover, the optimized ACS, which is composed of an air-core coil and a differential pre-amplifier circuit, must be investigated to meet the requirements of the helicopter TEM system suited to rapid surveying for shallow buried metal mine in rough topography. Accordingly, two ACSs are fabricated in this study, and their performance is verified and compared inside a magnetic shielding room. Using the designed ACSs, field experiments are conducted in Baoqing County. The field experimental data show that the primary field response can be compensated when the bucking coil is placed at an appropriate point in the range of allowed shift distance beyond the center of the transmitting coil and that the damage to the receiver induced by the over-statured signal can be solved. In conclusion, a more suitable ACS is adopted and is shown to have better performance, with a mass of 2.5 kg, resultant effective area of 11.6 m² (i.e., diameter of 0.496 m), 3 dB bandwidth of 66 kHz, signal-to-noise ratio of 4 (i.e., varying magnetic field strength of 0.2 nT/s), and normalized equivalent input noise of 3.62 nV/m². PMID:27077862

  12. FIRST 100 T NON-DESTRUCTIVE MAGNET OUTER COIL SET

    SciTech Connect

    J. BACON; A. BACA; ET AL

    1999-09-01

    The controlled power outer coil set of the first 100 T non-destructive (100 T ND) magnet is described. This magnet will be installed as part of the user facility research equipment at the National High Magnetic Field laboratory (NHMFL) Pulsed Field Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The 100 T ND controlled power outer coil set consists of seven nested, mechanically independent externally reinforced coils. These coils, in combination, will produce a 47 T platform field in a 225-mm diameter bore. Using inertial energy storage a synchronous motor/generator provides ac power to a set of seven ac-dc converters rated at 64 MW/80 MVA each. These converters energize three independent coil circuits to create 170 MJ of field energy in the outer coil set at the platform field of 47 T. Each coil consists of a multi-layer winding of high strength conductor supported by an external high strength stainless steel shell. Coils with the highest magnetic loads will utilize a reinforcing shell fabricated from highly cold worked 301 stainless steel strip. The autofrettage conditioning method will be used to pre-stress the coils and thereby limit conductor and reinforcement strains to the elastic range. The purpose of pre-stressing the coils is to attain a design life of 10,000 full field pulses. The operation and conditioning of the coil set will be described along with special features of its design, magnetic and structural analyses and construction.

  13. Critical evaluation of in silico methods for prediction of coiled-coil domains in proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Ching Han Chang, Catherine; Nagel, Jeremy; Porebski, Benjamin T; Hayashida, Morihiro; Akutsu, Tatsuya; Song, Jiangning; Buckle, Ashley M

    2016-03-01

    Coiled-coils refer to a bundle of helices coiled together like strands of a rope. It has been estimated that nearly 3% of protein-encoding regions of genes harbour coiled-coil domains (CCDs). Experimental studies have confirmed that CCDs play a fundamental role in subcellular infrastructure and controlling trafficking of eukaryotic cells. Given the importance of coiled-coils, multiple bioinformatics tools have been developed to facilitate the systematic and high-throughput prediction of CCDs in proteins. In this article, we review and compare 12 sequence-based bioinformatics approaches and tools for coiled-coil prediction. These approaches can be categorized into two classes: coiled-coil detection and coiled-coil oligomeric state prediction. We evaluated and compared these methods in terms of their input/output, algorithm, prediction performance, validation methods and software utility. All the independent testing data sets are available at http://lightning.med.monash.edu/coiledcoil/. In addition, we conducted a case study of nine human polyglutamine (PolyQ) disease-related proteins and predicted CCDs and oligomeric states using various predictors. Prediction results for CCDs were highly variable among different predictors. Only two peptides from two proteins were confirmed to be CCDs by majority voting. Both domains were predicted to form dimeric coiled-coils using oligomeric state prediction. We anticipate that this comprehensive analysis will be an insightful resource for structural biologists with limited prior experience in bioinformatics tools, and for bioinformaticians who are interested in designing novel approaches for coiled-coil and its oligomeric state prediction. PMID:26177815

  14. Dielectric properties and study of AC electrical conduction mechanisms by non-overlapping small polaron tunneling model in Bis(4-acetylanilinium) tetrachlorocuprate(II) compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abkari, A.; Chaabane, I.; Guidara, K.

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, the synthesis and characterization of the Bis(4-acetylanilinium) tetrachlorocuprate(II) compound are presented. The structure of this compound is analyzed by X-ray diffraction which confirms the formation of single phase and is in good agreement the literature. Indeed, the Thermo gravimetric Analysis (TGA) shows that the decomposition of the compound is observed in the range of 420-520 K. However, the differential thermal analysis (DTA) indicates the presence of a phase transition at T=363 k. Furthermore, the dielectric properties and AC conductivity were studied over a temperature range (338-413 K) and frequency range (200 Hz-5 MHz) using complex impedance spectroscopy. Dielectric measurements confirmed such thermal analyses by exhibiting the presence of an anomaly in the temperature range of 358-373 K. The complex impedance plots are analyzed by an electrical equivalent circuit consisting of resistance, constant phase element (CPE) and capacitance. The activation energy values of two distinct regions are obtained from log σT vs 1000/T plot and are found to be E=1.27 eV (T<363 K) and E=1.09 eV (363 Kac conductivity, σac, has been analyzed by Jonscher's universal power law σ(ω)=σdc+Aωs. The value of s is to be temperature-dependent, which has a tendency to increase with temperature and the non-overlapping small polaron tunneling (NSPT) model is the most applicable conduction mechanism in the title compound. Complex impedance spectra of [C8H10NO]2CuCl4 at different temperatures.

  15. Coil Welding Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiesenbach, W. T.; Clark, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    Positioner holds coil inside cylinder during tack welding. Welding aid spaces turns of coil inside cylinder and applies contact pressure while coil is tack-welded to cylinder. Device facilitates fabrication of heat exchangers and other structures by eliminating hand-positioning and clamping of individual coil turns.

  16. Starfire poloidal coil systems

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, K. Jr.; Kim, S.H.; Turner, L.R.; Wang, S.T.

    1980-01-01

    The poloidal coils for STARFIRE consists of three systems: (1) equilibrium field (EF) coils; (2) ohmic heating (OH) coils; and (3) correction field (CF) coils. The EF coils are superconducting and lie outside the toroidal field (TF) coils. These coils provide the bulk of the equilibrium field necessary to keep the plasma positioned in the vacuum chamber with the desired cross sectional shape and pressure and current distributions. Having these coils outside of the TF coils requires that they have a larger stored energy and larger currents but eases the assembly, maintenance, and reliability of the coils. The STARFIRE OH system is relatively small compared to tokamaks in which the current is entirely ohmically driven. It is designed to provide sufficient flux in the early startup to raise the plasma current to the point (1 to 2 MA) where the rf current drive can take over.

  17. Crystal structure, NMR study, dielectric relaxation and AC conductivity of a new compound [Cd3(SCN)2Br6(C2H9N2)2]n

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidi, K.; Kamoun, S.; Ayedi, H. Ferid; Arous, M.

    2013-11-01

    The crystal structure, the 13C NMR spectroscopy and the complex impedance have been carried out on [Cd3(SCN)2Br6(C2H9N2)2]n. Crystal structure shows a 2D polymeric network built up of two crystallographically independent cadmium atoms with two different octahedral coordinations. This compound exhibits a phase transition at (T=355±2 K) which has been characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-rays powder diffraction, AC conductivity and dielectric measurements. Examination of 13C CP/MAS line shapes shows indirect spin-spin coupling (14N and 13C) with a dipolar coupling constant of 1339 Hz. The AC conductivity of this compound has been carried out in the temperature range 325-376 K and the frequency range from 10-2 Hz to 10 MHz. The impedance data were well fitted to two equivalent electrical circuits. The results of the modulus study reveal the presence of two distinct relaxation processes. One, at low frequency side, is thermally activated due to the ionic conduction of the crystal and the other, at higher frequency side, gradually disappears when temperature reaches 355 K which is attributed to the localized dipoles in the crystal. Moreover, the temperature dependence of DC-conductivity in both phases follows the Arrhenius law and the frequency dependence of σ(ω,T) follows Jonscher's universal law. The near values of activation energies obtained from the conductivity data and impedance confirm that the transport is through the ion hopping mechanism.

  18. Rod-Coil Block Polyimide Copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor); Kinder, James D. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    This invention is a series of rod-coil block polyimide copolymers that are easy to fabricate into mechanically resilient films with acceptable ionic or protonic conductivity at a variety of temperatures. The copolymers consist of short-rigid polyimide rod segments alternating with polyether coil segments. The rods and coil segments can be linear, branched or mixtures of linear and branched segments. The highly incompatible rods and coil segments phase separate, providing nanoscale channels for ion conduction. The polyimide segments provide dimensional and mechanical stability and can be functionalized in a number of ways to provide specialized functions for a given application. These rod-coil black polyimide copolymers are particularly useful in the preparation of ion conductive membranes for use in the manufacture of fuel cells and lithium based polymer batteries.

  19. Protective link for superconducting coil

    DOEpatents

    Umans, Stephen D.

    2009-12-08

    A superconducting coil system includes a superconducting coil and a protective link of superconducting material coupled to the superconducting coil. A rotating machine includes first and second coils and a protective link of superconducting material. The second coil is operable to rotate with respect to the first coil. One of the first and second coils is a superconducting coil. The protective link is coupled to the superconducting coil.

  20. Immune responses to coiled coil supramolecular biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Rudra, Jai S.; Tripathi, Pulak; Hildeman, David A.; Jung, Jangwook P.; Collier, Joel H.

    2010-01-01

    Self-assembly has been increasingly utilized in recent years to create peptide-based biomaterials for 3D cell culture, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine, but the molecular determinants of these materials' immunogenicity have remained largely unexplored. In this study, a set of molecules that self-assembled through coiled coil oligomerization was designed and synthesized, and immune responses against them were investigated in mice. Experimental groups spanned a range of oligomerization behaviors and included a peptide from the coiled coil region of mouse fibrin that did not form supramolecular structures, an engineered version of this peptide that formed coiled coil bundles, and a peptide-PEG-peptide triblock bioconjugate that formed coiled coil multimers and supramolecular aggregates. In mice, the native peptide and engineered peptide did not produce any detectable antibody response, and none of the materials elicited detectable peptide-specific T cell responses, as evidenced by the absence of IL-2 and interferon-gamma in cultures of peptide-challenged splenocytes or draining lymph node cells. However, specific antibody responses were elevated in mice injected with the multimerizing peptide-PEG-peptide. Minimal changes in secondary structure were observed between the engineered peptide and the triblock peptide-PEG-peptide, making it possible that the triblock's multimerization was responsible for this antibody response. PMID:20708258

  1. AC impedance analysis of ionic and electronic conductivities in electrode mixture layers for an all-solid-state lithium-ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siroma, Zyun; Sato, Tomohiro; Takeuchi, Tomonari; Nagai, Ryo; Ota, Akira; Ioroi, Tsutomu

    2016-06-01

    The ionic and electronic effective conductivities of an electrode mixture layers for all-solid-state lithium-ion batteries containing Li2Ssbnd P2S5 as a solid electrolyte were investigated by AC impedance measurements and analysis using a transmission-line model (TLM). Samples containing graphite (graphite electrodes) or LiNi0.5Co0.2Mn0.3O2 (NCM electrodes) as the active material were measured under a "substrate | sample | bulk electrolyte | sample | substrate" configuration (ion-electron connection) and a "substrate | sample | substrate" configuration (electron-electron connection). Theoretically, if the electronic resistance is negligibly small, which is the case with our graphite electrodes, measurement with the ion-electron connection should be effective for evaluating ionic conductivity. However, if the electronic resistance is comparable to the ionic resistance, which is the case with our NCM electrodes, the results with the ion-electron connection may contain some inherent inaccuracy. In this report, we theoretically and practically demonstrate the advantage of analyzing the results with the electron-electron connection, which gives both the ionic and electronic conductivities. The similarity of the behavior of ionic conductivity with the graphite and NCM electrodes confirms the reliability of this analysis.

  2. Defect-Free Carbon Nanotube Coils.

    PubMed

    Shadmi, Nitzan; Kremen, Anna; Frenkel, Yiftach; Lapin, Zachary J; Machado, Leonardo D; Legoas, Sergio B; Bitton, Ora; Rechav, Katya; Popovitz-Biro, Ronit; Galvão, Douglas S; Jorio, Ado; Novotny, Lukas; Kalisky, Beena; Joselevich, Ernesto

    2016-04-13

    Carbon nanotubes are promising building blocks for various nanoelectronic components. A highly desirable geometry for such applications is a coil. However, coiled nanotube structures reported so far were inherently defective or had no free ends accessible for contacting. Here we demonstrate the spontaneous self-coiling of single-wall carbon nanotubes into defect-free coils of up to more than 70 turns with identical diameter and chirality, and free ends. We characterize the structure, formation mechanism, and electrical properties of these coils by different microscopies, molecular dynamics simulations, Raman spectroscopy, and electrical and magnetic measurements. The coils are highly conductive, as expected for defect-free carbon nanotubes, but adjacent nanotube segments in the coil are more highly coupled than in regular bundles of single-wall carbon nanotubes, owing to their perfect crystal momentum matching, which enables tunneling between the turns. Although this behavior does not yet enable the performance of these nanotube coils as inductive devices, it does point a clear path for their realization. Hence, this study represents a major step toward the production of many different nanotube coil devices, including inductors, electromagnets, transformers, and dynamos. PMID:26708150

  3. Kinking the coiled coil--negatively charged residues at the coiled-coil interface.

    PubMed

    Straussman, Ravid; Ben-Ya'acov, Ami; Woolfson, Derek N; Ravid, Shoshana

    2007-03-01

    The coiled coil is one of the most common protein-structure motifs. It is believed to be adopted by 3-5% of all amino acids in proteins. It comprises two or more alpha-helical chains wrapped around one another. The sequences of most coiled coils are characterized by a seven-residue (heptad) repeat, denoted (abcdefg)(n). Residues at the a and d positions define the helical interface (core) and are usually hydrophobic, though about 20% are polar or charged. We show that parallel coiled-coils have a unique pattern of their negatively charged residues at the core positions: aspartic acid is excluded from these positions while glutamic acid is not. In contrast the antiparallel structures are more permissive in their amino acid usage. We show further, and for the first time, that incorporation of Asp but not Glu into the a positions of a parallel coiled coil creates a flexible hinge and that the maximal hinge angle is being directly related to the number of incorporated mutations. These new computational and experimental observations will be of use in improving protein-structure predictions, and as rules to guide rational design of novel coiled-coil motifs and coiled coil-based materials. PMID:17207815

  4. AC conductivity and relaxation mechanism in (Nd1/2Li1/2)(Fe1/2V1/2)O3 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Susmita; Barik, Subrat Kumar; Choudhary, R. N. P.

    2016-05-01

    In the present study we have synthesized polycrystalline sample of (Nd1/2Li1/2)(Fe1/2V1/2)O3 ceramic by a standard high-temperature solid-state reaction technique. Studies of dielectric and electrical properties of the compound have been carried out in a wide range of temperature (RT - 400 °C) and frequency (1kHz - 1MHz) using complex impedance spectroscopic technique. The imaginary vs. real component of the complex impedance plot (Nyquist plot) of the prepared sample exhibits the existence of grain, grain boundary contributions in the complex electrical parameters and negative temperature coefficient of resistance (NTCR) type behavior like semiconductor. Details study of ac conductivity plot reveals that the material obeys universal Jonscher's power law.

  5. Complex AC impedance, transference number and vibrational spectroscopy studies of proton conducting PVAc-NH 4SCN polymer electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvasekarapandian, S.; Baskaran, R.; Hema, M.

    2005-03-01

    The polymer electrolytes composed of poly (vinyl acetate) (PVAc) with various stoichiometric ratios of ammonium thiocyanate (NH 4SCN) salt have been prepared by solution casting method. The polymer-salt complex formation and the polymer-proton interactions have been analysed by FT-IR spectroscopy. The conductivity and dielectric measurements are carried out on these films as a function of frequency at various temperatures. The complex impedance spectroscopy results reveal that the high-frequency semicircle is due to the bulk effect of the material. The conductivity is found to increase in the order of 10 -8-10 -4 S cm -1 at 303 K with the increase in salt concentration. The ionic transference number of mobile ions has been estimated by Wagner's polarization method and the results reveal that the conducting species are predominantly due to ions. The transient ionic current (TIC) measurement technique has been used to detect the type of mobile species and to evaluate their mobilities. The dielectric spectra show the low-frequency dispersion, which is due to the space charge effects arising from the electrodes.

  6. NCSX Trim Coil Design

    SciTech Connect

    M. Kalish, A. Brooks, J. Rushinski, R. Upcavage

    2009-05-29

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) was being constructed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory in partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory before work was stopped in 2008. The objective of this experiment was to develop the stellarator concept and evaluate it's potential as a model for future fusion power plants. Stellarator design requires very precisely positioned Modular Coils of complex shape to form 3D plasmas. In the design of NCSX, Trim Coils were required to compensate for both the positioning of the coils during assembly and the fabrication tolerances of the Modular Coils. Use of the Trim Coils allowed for larger tolerances increasing ease of assembly and decreasing overall cost. A set of Trim coils was developed to suppress the toroidal flux in island regions due to misalignment, magnetic materials, and eddy currents. The requirement imposed upon the design forced the toroidal flux in island regions below 10% of the total toroidal flux in the plasma. An analysis was first performed to evaluate candidate Trim Coil configurations iterating both the size, number, and position of the coils. The design was optimized considering both performance and cost while staying within the tight restraints presented by the space limited geometry. The final design of the Trim Coils incorporated a 48 Coil top bottom symmetric set. Fabrication costs were minimized by having only two coil types and using a planar conventional design with off the shelf commercial conductor. The Trim Coil design incorporated supports made from simple structural shapes assembled together in a way which allowed for adjustment as well as accommodation for the tolerance build up on the mating surfaces. This paper will summarize the analysis that led to the optimization of the Trim Coils set, the trim coil mechanical design, thermal and stress analysis, and the design of the supporting Trim Coil structure.

  7. Electromagnetic pump stator coil

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Dahl, Leslie R.

    1996-01-01

    An electrical stator coil for an electromagnetic pump includes a continuous conductor strip having first and second terminals at opposite ends thereof and an intermediate section disposed therebetween. The strip is configured in first and second coil halves, with the first coil half including a plurality of windings extending from the first terminal to the intermediate section, and the second coil half including a plurality of windings extending from the second terminal to the intermediate section. The first and second coil halves are disposed coaxially, and the first and second terminals are disposed radially inwardly therefrom with the intermediate section being disposed radially outwardly therefrom.

  8. Electromagnetic pump stator coil

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Dahl, L.R.

    1996-06-25

    An electrical stator coil for an electromagnetic pump includes a continuous conductor strip having first and second terminals at opposite ends thereof and an intermediate section disposed therebetween. The strip is configured in first and second coil halves, with the first coil half including a plurality of windings extending from the first terminal to the intermediate section, and the second coil half including a plurality of windings extending from the second terminal to the intermediate section. The first and second coil halves are disposed coaxially, and the first and second terminals are disposed radially inwardly therefrom with the intermediate section being disposed radially outwardly therefrom. 9 figs.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of cancrinite-type zeolite, and its ionic conductivity study by AC impedance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriaa, A.; Ben Saad, K.; Hamzaoui, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    The synthesis of cancrinite in the system NaOH-SiO2-Al2O3-NaHCO3-H2O was performed, according to methods described in the literature, in an autoclave under hydrothermal conditions at T = 473 K. The electrical properties of cancrinite-type zeolite pellets were investigated by complex impedance spectroscopy in the temperature range 465-800°C. The effect of temperature on impedance parameters was studied using an impedance analyzer in a wide frequency range (1 Hz to 13 MHz). The real and imaginary parts of complex impedance trace semicircles in the complex plane are plotted. The bulk resistance of the material decreases with rise in temperature. This exhibits a typical negative temperature coefficient of resistance (NTCR) behavior of the material. The results of bulk electrical conductivity and its activation energy are presented. The modulus analysis suggests that the electrical transport processes in the material are very likely to be of electronic nature. Relaxation frequencies follow an Arrhenius behavior with activation energy values not comparable to those found for the electrical conductivity.

  10. Crystal structure and AC conductivity mechanism of [N(C3H7)4]2CoCl4 compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutia, N.; Oueslati, A.; Ben Gzaiel, M.; Khirouni, K.

    2016-09-01

    We found that the new organic-inorganic compound [N(C3H7)4]2 CoCl4, crystallizes at room temperature in the centrosymmetric monoclinic system with P21/c space group. The atomic arrangement can be described by an alternation of organic and organic-inorganic layers parallel to the (001) plan. Indeed, the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies indicate a presence of three order-disorder phase transitions located at 332, 376 and 441 K. Furthermore, the conductivity was measured in the frequency range from 200 MHz to 5 MHz and temperatures between 318 K and 428 K using impedance spectroscopy. Analysis of the AC conductivity experimental data obtained, and the frequency exponent s with theoretical models reveals that the correlated barrier hopping (CBH) model is the appropriate mechanism for conduction in the title compound. The analysis of the dielectric constants ε ‧ and ε ″ versus temperature, at several frequencies, shows a distribution of relaxation times. This relaxation is probably due to the reorientational dynamics of [N(C3H7)4]+ cations.

  11. Biplanar Radiofrequency Coil Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, D. A.; Insko, E. K.; Bolinger, L.; Leigh, J. S.

    A novel geometry for radiofrequency coil design is described. In this geometry, longitudinal wires of the coil lie on two parallel planes. The currents in the wires of one plane run in the direction opposite to those of the other plane. An analytic solution is provided for the field produced by infinite surface currents running in the biplanar geometry. For the case of discrete wires, computer-generated field maps imply that the homogeneity and sensitivity of the biplanar design are superior to those of a saddle coil, but worse than those obtained in an equivalent discrete cosine or birdcage coil design. Optimization of this coil design was performed using computer simulations. The measured B1 map of an optimized, single-tuned biplanar coil compares favorably to that of an equivalent discrete cosine coil, demonstrating excellent homogeneity in the central region of the coil. A 30 × 24 × 40 cm biplanar coil has been coupled to a 1.5 T imaging system. Images of the human abdomen generated with this coil demonstrate a high degree of homogeneity across nearly all of the sensitive region of the coil.

  12. Three-dimensional coil inductor

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.; Malba, Vincent

    2002-01-01

    A three-dimensional coil inductor is disclosed. The inductor includes a substrate; a set of lower electrically conductive traces positioned on the substrate; a core placed over the lower traces; a set of side electrically conductive traces laid on the core and the lower traces; and a set of upper electrically conductive traces attached to the side traces so as to form the inductor. Fabrication of the inductor includes the steps of forming a set of lower traces on a substrate; positioning a core over the lower traces; forming a set of side traces on the core; connecting the side traces to the lower traces; forming a set of upper traces on the core; and connecting the upper traces to the side traces so as to form a coil structure.

  13. Experimental and theoretical study of AC electrical conduction mechanisms of Organic-inorganic hybrid compound Bis (4-acetylanilinium) tetrachlorocadmiate (II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jellibi, A.; Chaabane, I.; Guidara, K.

    2016-06-01

    A new organic-inorganic bis (4-acetylaniline) tetrachlorocadmate [C8H10NO]2[CdCl4] can be obtained by slow evaporation at room temperature and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction. It crystallized in an orthorhombic system (Cmca space group). The material electrical properties were characterized by impedance spectroscopy technique in the frequency range from 209 Hz-5 MHz and temperature 413 to 460 K. Besides, the impedance plots show semicircle arcs at different temperatures and an electrical equivalent circuit has been proposed to interpret the impedance results. The circuits consist of the parallel combination of a resistance (R), capacitance (C) and fractal capacitance (CPE). The variation of the exponent s as a function of temperature suggested that the conduction mechanism in Bis (4-acetylanilinium) tetrachlorocadmiate compound is governed by two processes which can be ascribed to a hopping transport mechanism: correlated barrier hopping (CBH) model below 443 K and the small polaron tunneling (SPT) model above 443 K.

  14. Raman, dielectric and AC-conductivity behavior of Dy2O3 contained K0.5Na0.5NbO3 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahesh, P.; Pamu, D.

    2016-05-01

    Lead-free piezoelectric (K0.5Na0.5)NbO3+ x wt% Dy2O3 (x = 0 - 1.5) (KNND) ceramics have been prepared by solid state reaction method. The effect of Dy2O3 on the dielectric and electrical conductivity responses of KNN ceramics were investigated in a broad temperature (from 133 K to 673 K) and frequency (106 Hz to 108 Hz) range. Temperature dependent dielectric analysis revealed that the polymorphic phase transition orthorhombic to tetragonal transition temperature (TO-T) shifted from 199°C to room temperature with enhanced dielectric permittivity (ɛ' = 994) with the addition of Dy2O3. The effect of Dy2O3 on structural properties of KNND ceramics are analyzed interms of changes in the internal modes of NbO6 octahedra by using Raman spectroscopy. Temperature dependent (133 K - 306 K) AC-conductivity follows the variable range hopping mechanism in different temperature regimes.

  15. Impedance and AC conductivity study of nano crystalline, fine grained multiferroic bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3), synthesized by microwave sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolte, Jayant; Salame, Paresh H.; Daryapurkar, A. S.; Gopalan, P.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, major reduction in sintering time,temperautre and significant improvement over final density of sitnered sample is reported for the microwave sintered nanocrystalline BiFeO3 (BFO) ceramic. Also, different sintering time and temperatures have been used to tailor the grain size and the final density of the resulting BFO ceramics synthesized from phase pure BFO nanoparticles ( d ¯ ≈ 10 n m ). Microwave sintering resulted in reducing the sintering time substantially (by 1h), and has resulted in submicron sized grains and high resistivity ˜1.8 GΩ-cm. The AC conductivity is seen to follow the Jonscher's power law behavior, suggesting correlated barrier hopping (CBH) mechanism in the sample. The role of oxygen vacancies at high temperature, due to volatility of bismuth, in dielectric and conductivity behavior is also discussed. Further, the sample displayed dielectric anomaly near magnetic transition temperature (˜180 °C) indicating bearing of magnetic moments on the dielectric properties. Using Impedance Spectroscopy (IS) we have established, the electrical heterogeneity of the ceramic BFO reavealing semiconducting nature of grains and insulating nature of grain boundary. This, formation of network of insulating grain boundaries and semiconducting grains could lead to formation of internal barrier layer capacitance (IBLC) leading to high dielectric constant in microwave sintered BFO.

  16. Operator coil monitoring Acceptance Test Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Erhart, M.F.

    1995-05-16

    The readiness of the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) to provide monitoring and control of the Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) abort coils from the Master and RSS stations will be systematically tested during performance of this procedure. It should be noted that these are not physical abort coils but software coils controlled by the software`s ladder logic. The readiness of the DACS to properly interface with the ENRAF wire level gauge installed in the SY-101 storage tank will also be tested. During this test, a verification of all abort coil indications will be conducted at the DACS Development Facility in the 306E Building by injecting an input signal for each DACS sensor that has an associated abort coil until the abort coil actuates, and then ensuring that the status of the abort coil indicated at the Master and RSS stations is correct. Each abort coil will also be tested to ensure that the ``ENABLE`` and ``DISABLE`` controls from the Master and RSS stations function correctly, and only with the use of proper passwords.

  17. Operator coil monitoring acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Erhart, M.F.

    1995-06-05

    The readiness of the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) to provide monitoring and control of the Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) abort coils from the Master and RSS stations will be systematically tested during performance of this procedure. It should be noted that these are not physical abort coils but software coils controlled by the software`s ladder logic. The readiness of the DACS to properly interface with the ENRAF wire level gauge installed in the SY101 storage tank will also be tested. During this test, a verification of all abort coil indications will be conducted at the DACS Development Facility in the 306E Building by injecting an input signal for each DACS sensor that has an associated abort coil until the abort coil actuates, and then ensuring that the status of the abort coil indicated at the Master and RSS stations correct. Each abort coil will also be tested to ensure that the ``ENABLE`` and ``DISABLE`` controls from the Master and RSS stations function correctly, and only with the use of proper passwords.

  18. Superconducting magnetic coil

    DOEpatents

    Aized, Dawood; Schwall, Robert E.

    1999-06-22

    A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil.

  19. Superconducting magnetic coil

    DOEpatents

    Aized, D.; Schwall, R.E.

    1999-06-22

    A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil. 15 figs.

  20. Superconducting magnetic coil

    DOEpatents

    Aized, Dawood; Schwall, Robert E.

    1996-06-11

    A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil.

  1. MINIMARS choke coil design

    SciTech Connect

    Gurol, H.; Parmer, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    The choke coil is one of the most advanced of all the magnets in the MINIMARS tandem mirror reactor. Recent developments have enabled the high-field choke coil to be much more compact and consume less power than past designs. There are three main technology areas that have had the greatest impact on the choke coil design: (1) superfluid helium (He-II) at 1.8 K; (2) Nb/sub 3/Sn superconductor; and (3) high-strength alloys for conductor reinforcement. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the 24-T MINIMARS choke coil configuration. It is a hybrid design consisting of a superconducting (S/C) background coil and a normal (N/C) insert coil.

  2. Wedding ring shaped excitation coil

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Tsai, Peter

    2001-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and/or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency.

  3. Coil system for plasmoid thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eskridge, Richard H. (Inventor); Lee, Michael H. (Inventor); Martin, Adam K. (Inventor); Fimognari, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A coil system for a plasmoid thruster includes a bias coil, a drive coil and field coils. The bias and drive coils are interleaved with one another as they are helically wound about a conical region. A first field coil defines a first passage at one end of the conical region, and is connected in series with the bias coil. A second field coil defines a second passage at an opposing end of the conical region, and is connected in series with the bias coil.

  4. Reduction of Common-Mode Conducted Noise Emissions in PWM Inverter-fed AC Motor Drive Systems using Optimized Passive EMI Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jettanasen, C.; Ngaopitakkul, A.

    2010-10-01

    Conducted electromagnetic interference (EMI) generated by PWM inverter-fed induction motor drive systems, which are currently widely used in many industrial and/or avionic applications, causes severe parasitic current problems, especially at high frequencies (HF). These restrict power electronic drive's evolution. In order to reduce or minimize these EMI problems, several techniques can be applied. In this paper, insertion of an optimized passive EMI filter is proposed. This filter is optimized by taking into account real impedances of each part of a considered AC motor drive system contrarily to commercial EMI filters designed by considering internal impedance of disturbance source and load, equal to 50Ω. Employing the latter EMI filter would make EMI minimization less effective. The proposed EMI filter optimization is mainly dedicated to minimize common mode (CM) currents due to its most dominant effects in this kind of system. The efficiency of the proposed optimization method using two-port network approach is deduced by comparing the minimized CM current spectra to an applied normative level (ex. DO-160D in aeronautics).

  5. Influence of temperature on the electric, dielectric and AC conductivity properties of nano-crystalline zinc substituted cobalt ferrite synthesized by solution combustion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Ritu; Kumar, Gagan; Batoo, Khalid M.; Singh, M.

    2014-06-01

    Cobalt-zinc nanoferrites with formulae Co ZnFeO, where x = 0.0, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3, have been synthesized by solution combustion technique. The variation of DC resistivity with temperature shows the semiconducting behavior of all nanoferrites. The dielectric properties such as dielectric constant (') and dielectric loss tangent (tan are investigated as a function of temperature and frequency. Dielectric constant and loss tangent are found to be increasing with an increase in temperature while with an increase in frequency both, ' and tan , are found to be decreasing. The dielectric properties have been explained on the basis of space charge polarization according to Maxwell-Wagner's two-layer model and the hopping of charge between Fe and Fe. Further, a very high value of dielectric constant and a low value of tan are the prime achievements of the present work. The AC electrical conductivity ( is studied as a function of temperature as well as frequency and is observed to be increasing with the increase in temperature and frequency.

  6. Heterogeneous Superconducting Low-Noise Sensing Coils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob; Penanen, Konstantin I.; Ho Eom, Byeong

    2008-01-01

    A heterogeneous material construction has been devised for sensing coils of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers that are subject to a combination of requirements peculiar to some advanced applications, notably including low-field magnetic resonance imaging for medical diagnosis. The requirements in question are the following: The sensing coils must be large enough (in some cases having dimensions of as much as tens of centimeters) to afford adequate sensitivity; The sensing coils must be made electrically superconductive to eliminate Johnson noise (thermally induced noise proportional to electrical resistance); and Although the sensing coils must be cooled to below their superconducting- transition temperatures with sufficient cooling power to overcome moderate ambient radiative heat leakage, they must not be immersed in cryogenic liquid baths. For a given superconducting sensing coil, this combination of requirements can be satisfied by providing a sufficiently thermally conductive link between the coil and a cold source. However, the superconducting coil material is not suitable as such a link because electrically superconductive materials are typically poor thermal conductors. The heterogeneous material construction makes it possible to solve both the electrical- and thermal-conductivity problems. The basic idea is to construct the coil as a skeleton made of a highly thermally conductive material (typically, annealed copper), then coat the skeleton with an electrically superconductive alloy (typically, a lead-tin solder) [see figure]. In operation, the copper skeleton provides the required thermally conductive connection to the cold source, while the electrically superconductive coating material shields against Johnson noise that originates in the copper skeleton.

  7. Switching transients in a superconducting coil

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, E.W.; Shimer, D.W.

    1983-11-18

    A study is made of the transients caused by the fast dump of large superconducting coils. Theoretical analysis, computer simulation, and actual measurements are used. Theoretical analysis can only be applied to the simplest of models. In the computer simulations two models are used, one in which the coil is divided into ten segments and another in which a single coil is employed. The circuit breaker that interrupts the current to the power supply, causing a fast dump, is represented by a time and current dependent conductance. Actual measurements are limited to measurements made incidental to performance tests on the MFTF Yin-yang coils. It is found that the breaker opening time is the critical factor in determining the size and shape of the transient. Instantaneous opening of the breaker causes a lightly damped transient with large amplitude voltages to ground. Increasing the opening time causes the transient to become a monopulse of decreasing amplitude. The voltages at the external terminals are determined by the parameters of the external circuit. For fast opening times the frequency depends on the dump resistor inductance, the circuit capacitance, and the amplitude on the coil current. For slower openings the dump resistor inductance and the current determine the amplitude of the voltage to ground at the terminals. Voltages to ground are less in the interior of the coil, where transients related to the parameters of the coil itself are observed.

  8. Coil in coil - components for the high voltage superconducting resistive current limiter CULT 110

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elschner, S.; Stemmle, M.; Breuer, F.; Walter, H.; Frohne, C.; Noe, M.; Bock, J.

    2008-02-01

    The German government (BMBF/VDI) funded project CULT 110 is presently the largest European current limiter project and aims at the development of a one-phase resistive limiter for the voltage level of 110 kV. The contribution presents the actual state of development of the superconducting components. As in the successful predecessor project CURL 10 these are made of melt cast processed BSCCO 2212 bulk material, however monofilar instead of bifilar coils are used. The electrical protection concept is based on a normal conducting coil arranged around a superconducting coil and connected in parallel. Simultaneously this coil serves as an electrical bypass and, under fault conditions, generates a magnetic field for quench homogenisation. Since no continuously connected shunt is needed, a much higher voltage during faults can be applied. The rules for an optimum superconductor and coil design are given and the viability of the whole concept is demonstrated by both, experiment and numerical simulation.

  9. Open coil traction system.

    PubMed

    Vibhute, Pavankumar Janardan

    2012-01-01

    Sliding mechanics have become a popular method for space closure, with the development of preadjusted edgewise appliances. Furthermore, various space closing auxiliaries have been developed and extensively evaluated for their clinical efficiency. Their effectiveness is enhanced with optimum force magnitude and low load deflection rate/force decay. With the advent of nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) springs in orthodontics, load deflection rates have been markedly reduced. To use Ni-Ti springs, clinicians have to depend upon prefabricated closed coil springs. The open coil traction system, or open coil retraction spring, is developed utilizing Ni-Ti open coil springs for orthodontic space closure. This article describes the fabrication and clinical application of the open coil traction system, which has a number of advantages. It sustains a low load deflection rate with optimum force magnitude, and its design is adjustable for a desired length and force level. It is fail-safe for both activation and deactivation (ie, it cannot be overactivated, and the decompression limit of the open coil is controlled by the operator). The open coil traction system can be offset from the mucosa to help reduce soft tissue impingement. PMID:22567645

  10. Commercial applications for COIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Wayne C.; Carroll, David L.; King, D. M.; Fockler, L. A.; Stromberg, D. S.; Sexauer, M.; Milmoe, A.; Sentman, Lee H.

    2000-01-01

    The chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) is a high power, fiber deliverable tool, which can be used for a number of different industrial applications. COIL is of particular interest because of its short fiber deliverable wavelength, high scaleable continuous wave power, and excellent material interaction properties. In past research the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign identified and decommissioning and decontamination (DD) of nuclear facilities as a primary focus for COIL technology. DD will be a major challenge in the coming decades. The use of a robotically driven fiber delivered cutting/ablation tool in contaminated areas promises to lower risks to workers for the DD mission. Further, the high cutting speed of COIL will significantly reduce the time required to cut contaminated equipment, reducing costs. The high power of COIL will permit the dismantling of thick stacks of piping and equipment as well as reactor vessels. COIL is very promising for the removal of material from contaminated surfaces, perhaps to depths thicker than an inch. Laser cutting and ablation minimizes dust and fumes, which reduces the required number of high efficiency particulate accumulator filters, thus reducing costly waste disposal. Other potential industrial applications for COIL are shipbuilding, automotive manufacturing, heavy machinery manufacturing, tasks requiring underwater cutting or welding, and there appear to be very promising applications for high powers lasers in the oil industry.

  11. Roebel assembled coated conductor cables (RACC): Ac-Losses and current carrying potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, A.; Heller, R.; Goldacker, W.; Kling, A.; Schmidt, C.

    2008-02-01

    Low ac-loss HTS cables for transport currents well above 1 kA are required for application in transformers and generators and are taken into consideration for future generations of fusion reactor coils. Coated conductors (CC) are suitable candidates for high field application at an operation temperature in the range 50-77 K. Ac-field applications require cables with low ac-losses and hence twisting of the individual strands. We solved this problem using the Roebel technique. Short lengths of Roebel bar cables were prepared from industrial DyBCO and YBCO-CC. Meander shaped tapes of 4 or 5 mm width with twist pitches of 123 or 127 mm were cut from the 10 or 12 mm wide CC tapes using a specially designed tool. Eleven or twelve of these strands were assembled to a cable. The electrical and mechanical connection of the tapes was achieved using a silver powder filled conductive epoxy resin. Ac-losses of a short sample in an external ac-field were measured as a function of frequency and field amplitude as well as the coupling current decay time constant. We discuss the results in terms of available theories and compare measured time constants in transverse field with measured coupling losses. Finally the potential of this cable type for ac-use is discussed with respect to ac-losses and current carrying capability.

  12. Correction coil cable

    DOEpatents

    Wang, S.T.

    1994-11-01

    A wire cable assembly adapted for the winding of electrical coils is taught. A primary intended use is for use in particle tube assemblies for the Superconducting Super Collider. The correction coil cables have wires collected in wire array with a center rib sandwiched therebetween to form a core assembly. The core assembly is surrounded by an assembly housing having an inner spiral wrap and a counter wound outer spiral wrap. An alternate embodiment of the invention is rolled into a keystoned shape to improve radial alignment of the correction coil cable on a particle tube in a particle tube assembly. 7 figs.

  13. Coil spring venting arrangement

    DOEpatents

    McCugh, R.M.

    1975-10-21

    A simple venting device for trapped gas pockets in hydraulic systems is inserted through a small access passages, operated remotely, and removed completely. The device comprises a small diameter, closely wound coil spring which is pushed through a guide temporarily inserted in the access passage. The guide has a central passageway which directs the coil spring radially upward into the pocket, so that, with the guide properly positioned for depth and properly oriented, the coil spring can be pushed up into the top of the pocket to vent it. By positioning a seal around the free end of the guide, the spring and guide are removed and the passage is sealed.

  14. ELECTRICAL COIL STRUCTURE

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.; Hartwig, A.

    1962-09-25

    A compactly wound electrical coil is designed for carrying intense pulsed currents such as are characteristic of controlled thermonuclear reaction devices. A flat strip of conductor is tightly wound in a spiral with a matching flat strip of insulator. To provide for a high fluid coolant flow through the coil with minimum pumping pressure, a surface of the conductor is scored with parallel transverse grooves which form short longitudinal coolant pasaages when the conductor is wound in the spiral configuration. Owing to this construction, the coil is extremely resistant to thermal and magnetic shock from sudden high currents. (AEC)

  15. Magnetic microhelix coil structures.

    PubMed

    Smith, Elliot J; Makarov, Denys; Sanchez, Samuel; Fomin, Vladimir M; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2011-08-26

    Together with the well-known ferro- and antiferromagnetic ordering, nature has created a variety of complex helical magnetic configurations. Here, we design and investigate three-dimensional microhelix coil structures that are radial-, corkscrew-, and hollow-bar-magnetized. The magnetization configurations of the differently magnetized coils are experimentally revealed by probing their specific dynamic response to an external magnetic field. Helix coils offer an opportunity to realize microscale geometries of the magnetic toroidal moment, observed so far only in bulk multiferroic materials. PMID:21929266

  16. Magnetic Microhelix Coil Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Elliot J.; Makarov, Denys; Sanchez, Samuel; Fomin, Vladimir M.; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2011-08-01

    Together with the well-known ferro- and antiferromagnetic ordering, nature has created a variety of complex helical magnetic configurations. Here, we design and investigate three-dimensional microhelix coil structures that are radial-, corkscrew-, and hollow-bar-magnetized. The magnetization configurations of the differently magnetized coils are experimentally revealed by probing their specific dynamic response to an external magnetic field. Helix coils offer an opportunity to realize microscale geometries of the magnetic toroidal moment, observed so far only in bulk multiferroic materials.

  17. Protein destabilization by electrostatic repulsions in the two-stranded alpha-helical coiled-coil/leucine zipper.

    PubMed Central

    Kohn, W. D.; Kay, C. M.; Hodges, R. S.

    1995-01-01

    The destabilizing effect of electrostatic repulsions on protein stability has been studied by using synthetic two-stranded alpha-helical coiled-coils as a model system. The native coiled-coil consists of two identical 35-residue polypeptide chains with a heptad repeat QgVaGbAcLdQeKf and a Cys residue at position 2 to allow formation of an interchain disulfide bridge. This peptide, designed to contain no intrahelical or interhelical electrostatic interactions, forms a stable coiled-coil structure at 20 degrees C in benign medium (50 mM KCl, 25 mM PO4, pH 7) with a [urea]1/2 value of 6.1 M. Four mutant coiled-coils were designed to contain one or two Glu substitutions for Gln per polypeptide chain. The resulting coiled-coils contained potential i to i' + 5 Glu-Glu interchain repulsions (denoted as peptide E2(15,20)), i to i' + 2 Glu-Glu interchain repulsions (denoted E2(20,22)), or no interchain ionic interactions (denoted E2(13,22) and E1(20)). The stabilities of the coiled-coils were determined by measuring the ellipticities at 222 nm as a function of urea or guanidine hydrochloride concentration at 20 degrees C in the presence and absence of an interchain disulfide bridge. At pH 7, in the presence of urea, the stabilities of E2(13,22) and E2(20,22) were identical suggesting that the potential i to i' + 2 interchain Glu-Glu repulsion in the E2(20,22) coiled-coil does not occur. In contrast, the mutant E2(15,20) is substantially less stable than E2(13,22) or E2(15,20) by 0.9 kcal/mol due to the presence of two i to i' + 5 interchain Glu-Glu repulsions, which destabilize the coiled-coil by 0.45 kcal/mol each. At pH 3 the coiled-coils were found to increase in stability as the number of Glu substitutions were increased. This, combined with reversed-phase HPLC results at pH 7 and pH 2, supports the conclusion that the protonated Glu side chains present at low pH are significantly more hydrophobic than Gln side chains which are in turn more hydrophobic than the ionized

  18. Disruption of Bcr-Abl Coiled Coil Oligomerization by Design*

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Andrew S.; Pendley, Scott S.; Bruno, Benjamin J.; Woessner, David W.; Shimpi, Adrian A.; Cheatham, Thomas E.; Lim, Carol S.

    2011-01-01

    Oligomerization is an important regulatory mechanism for many proteins, including oncoproteins and other pathogenic proteins. The oncoprotein Bcr-Abl relies on oligomerization via its coiled coil domain for its kinase activity, suggesting that a designed coiled coil domain with enhanced binding to Bcr-Abl and reduced self-oligomerization would be therapeutically useful. Key mutations in the coiled coil domain of Bcr-Abl were identified that reduce homo-oligomerization through intermolecular charge-charge repulsion yet increase interaction with the Bcr-Abl coiled coil through additional salt bridges, resulting in an enhanced ability to disrupt the oligomeric state of Bcr-Abl. The mutations were modeled computationally to optimize the design. Assays performed in vitro confirmed the validity and functionality of the optimal mutations, which were found to exhibit reduced homo-oligomerization and increased binding to the Bcr-Abl coiled coil domain. Introduction of the mutant coiled coil into K562 cells resulted in decreased phosphorylation of Bcr-Abl, reduced cell proliferation, and increased caspase-3/7 activity and DNA segmentation. Importantly, the mutant coiled coil domain was more efficacious than the wild type in all experiments performed. The improved inhibition of Bcr-Abl through oligomeric disruption resulting from this modified coiled coil domain represents a viable alternative to small molecule inhibitors for therapeutic intervention. PMID:21659527

  19. Theory of myelin coiling.

    PubMed

    Huang, J-R

    2006-04-01

    A new model is proposed to explain coiling of myelins composed of fluid bilayers. This model allows the constituent bilayer cylinders of a myelin to be non-coaxial and the bilayer lateral tension to vary from bilayer to bilayer. The calculations show that a myelin would bend or coil to lower its free energy when the bilayer lateral tension is sufficiently large. From a mechanical point of view, the proposed coiling mechanism is analogous to the classical Euler buckling of a thin elastic rod under axial compression. The analysis of a simple two-bilayer case suggests that a bilayer lateral tension of about 1 dyne/cm can easily induce coiling of myelins of typical lipid bilayers. This model signifies the importance of bilayer lateral tension in determining the morphology of myelinic structures. PMID:16465468

  20. Borehole induction coil transmitter

    DOEpatents

    Holladay, Gale; Wilt, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    A borehole induction coil transmitter which is a part of a cross-borehole electromagnetic field system that is used for underground imaging applications. The transmitter consists of four major parts: 1) a wound ferrite or mu-metal core, 2) an array of tuning capacitors, 3) a current driver circuit board, and 4) a flux monitor. The core is wound with several hundred turns of wire and connected in series with the capacitor array, to produce a tuned coil. This tuned coil uses internal circuitry to generate sinusoidal signals that are transmitted through the earth to a receiver coil in another borehole. The transmitter can operate at frequencies from 1-200 kHz and supplies sufficient power to permit the field system to operate in boreholes separated by up to 400 meters.

  1. NCSX Toroidal Field Coil Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kalish, M.; Rushinski, J.; Myatt, L.; Brooks, A.; Dahlgren, F.; Chrzanowski, J.; Reiersen, W.; Freudenberg, K.

    2005-10-07

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is an experimental device whose design and construction is underway at the Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The primary coil systems for the NCSX device consist of the twisted plasma-shaping Modular Coils, the Poloidal Field Coils, and the Toroidal Field (TF) Coils. The TF Coils are D-shaped coils wound from hollow copper conductor, and vacuum impregnated with a glass-epoxy resin system. There are 18 identical, equally spaced TF coils providing 1/R field at the plasma. They operate within a cryostat, and are cooled by LN2, nominally, to 80K. Wedge shaped castings are assembled to the inboard face of these coils, so that inward radial loads are reacted via the nesting of each of the coils against their adjacent partners. This paper outlines the TF Coil design methodology, reviews the analysis results, and summarizes how the design and analysis support the design requirements.

  2. Hierarchical Cascades of Instability Govern the Mechanics of Coiled Coils: Helix Unfolding Precedes Coil Unzipping

    PubMed Central

    Hamed, Elham; Keten, Sinan

    2014-01-01

    Coiled coils are a fundamental emergent motif in proteins found in structural biomaterials, consisting of α-helical secondary structures wrapped in a supercoil. A fundamental question regarding the thermal and mechanical stability of coiled coils in extreme environments is the sequence of events leading to the disassembly of individual oligomers from the universal coiled-coil motifs. To shed light on this phenomenon, here we report atomistic simulations of a trimeric coiled coil in an explicit water solvent and investigate the mechanisms underlying helix unfolding and coil unzipping in the assembly. We employ advanced sampling techniques involving steered molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations to obtain the free-energy landscapes of single-strand unfolding and unzipping in a three-stranded assembly. Our comparative analysis of the free-energy landscapes of instability pathways shows that coil unzipping is a sequential process involving multiple intermediates. At each intermediate state, one heptad repeat of the coiled coil first unfolds and then unzips due to the loss of contacts with the hydrophobic core. This observation suggests that helix unfolding facilitates the initiation of coiled-coil disassembly, which is confirmed by our 2D metadynamics simulations showing that unzipping of one strand requires less energy in the unfolded state compared with the folded state. Our results explain recent experimental findings and lay the groundwork for studying the hierarchical molecular mechanisms that underpin the thermomechanical stability/instability of coiled coils and similar protein assemblies. PMID:25028889

  3. Test data from the US-Demonstration Poloidal Coil experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Painter, T.A.; Steeves, M.M.; Takayasu, M.; Gung, C.; Hoenig, M.O. . Plasma Fusion Center); Tsuji, H.; Ando, T.; Hiyama, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Nishi, M.; Yoshida, K.; Okuno, K.; Nakajima, H.; Kato, T.; Sugimoto, M.; Isono, T.; Kawano, K.; Koizumi, N.; Osikiri, M.; Hanawa, H.; Ouchi, H.; Ono, M.; Ishida, H.; Hiue, H.; Yoshida, J.; Kamiyauchi, Y.; Ouchi, T.; Tajiri, F.

    1992-01-01

    The US Demonstration Poloidal Field Coil (US-DPC) experiment took place successfully at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) in late 1990. The 8 MJ niobium-tin coil was leak tight; it performed very well in DC tests; it performed well in AC tests, achieving approximately 70% of its design goal. An unexpected ramp-rate barrier at high currents was identified. The barrier could not be explored in the regime of higher fields and slower ramp rates due to limitations of the background-field coils. This document presents the results of the experiment with as little editing as possible. The coil, conductor, and operating conditions are given. The intent is to present data in a form that can be used by magnet analysts and designers.

  4. Application of superconducting coils to the NASA prototype magnetic balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haldeman, C. W.; Kraemer, R. A.; Phey, S. W.; Alishahi, M. M.; Covert, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    Application of superconducting coils to a general purpose magnetic balance was studied. The most suitable currently available superconducting cable for coils appears to be a bundle of many fine wires which are transposed and are mechanically confined. Sample coils were tested at central fields up to .5 Tesla, slewing rates up to 53 Tesla/ sec and frequencies up to 30 Hz. The ac losses were measured from helium boil-off and were approximately 20% higher than those calculated. Losses were dominated by hysteresis and a model for loss calculation which appears suitable for design purposes is presented along with computer listings. Combinations of two coils were also tested and interaction losses are reported. Two feasible geometries are also presented for prototype magnetic balance using superconductors.

  5. A novel approach to quench detection for high temperature superconducting coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, W. J.; Fang, X. Y.; Fang, J.; Wei, B.; Hou, J. Z.; Liu, L. F.; Lu, K. K.; Li, Shuo

    2015-11-01

    A novel approach to quench detection for high temperature superconducting (HTS) coils is proposed, which is mainly based on phase angle between voltage and current of two coils to detect the quench resistance voltage. The approach is analyzed theoretically, verified experimentally and analytically by MATLAB Simulink and LabVIEW. An analog quench circuit is built on Simulink and a quench alarm system program is written in LabVIEW. Experiment of quench detection is further conducted. The sinusoidal AC currents ranging from 19.9 A to 96 A are transported to the HTS coils, whose critical current is 90 A at 77 K. The results of analog simulation and experiment are analyzed and they show good consistency. It is shown that with the increase of current, the phase undergoes apparent growth, and it is up to 60° and 15° when the current reaches critical value experimentally and analytically, respectively. It is concluded that the approach proposed in this paper can meet the need of precision and quench resistance voltage can be detected in time.

  6. Switching transients in the MFTF yin-yang coils

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, E.W.; Shimer, D.W.

    1982-11-02

    This report is a study of the transients caused by the fast dump of large superconducting coils. Theoretical analysis, computer simulation, and actual measurements are used. Theoretical analysis can only be applied to the simplest of models. In the computer simulations two models are used, one in which the coil is divided into ten segments and another in which a single coil is employed. The circuit breaker that interrupts the current to the power supply, causing a fast dump, is represented by a time and current dependent conductance. Actual measurements are limited to measurements made incidental to the coils' performance tests.

  7. AAFreqCoil: a new classifier to distinguish parallel dimeric and trimeric coiled coils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Yuan; Yan, Renxiang

    2015-07-01

    Coiled coils are characteristic rope-like protein structures, constituted by one or more heptad repeats. Native coiled-coil structures play important roles in various biological processes, while the designed ones are widely employed in medicine and industry. To date, two major oligomeric states (i.e. dimeric and trimeric states) of a coiled-coil structure have been observed, plausibly exerting different biological functions. Therefore, exploration of the relationship between heptad repeat sequences and coiled coil structures is highly important. In this paper, we develop a new method named AAFreqCoil to classify parallel dimeric and trimeric coiled coils. Our method demonstrated its competitive performance when benchmarked based on 10-fold cross validation and jackknife cross validation. Meanwhile, the rules that can explicitly explain the prediction results of the test coiled coil can be extracted from the AAFreqCoil model for a better explanation of user predictions. A web server and stand-alone program implementing the AAFreqCoil algorithm are freely available at . PMID:25918905

  8. Performance verification tests of JT-60SA CS model coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obana, Tetsuhiro; Murakami, Haruyuki; Takahata, Kazuya; Hamaguchi, Shinji; Chikaraishi, Hirotaka; Mito, Toshiyuki; Imagawa, Shinsaku; Kizu, Kaname; Natsume, Kyohei; Yoshida, Kiyoshi

    2015-11-01

    As a final check of the coil manufacturing method of the JT-60 Super Advanced (JT-60SA) central solenoid (CS), we verified the performance of a CS model coil. The model coil comprised a quad-pancake wound with a Nb3Sn cable-in-conduit conductor. Measurements of the critical current, joint resistance, pressure drop, and magnetic field were conducted in the verification tests. In the critical-current measurement, the critical current of the model coil coincided with the estimation derived from a strain of -0.62% for the Nb3Sn strands. As a result, critical-current degradation caused by the coil manufacturing process was not observed. The results of the performance verification tests indicate that the model coil met the design requirements. Consequently, the manufacturing process of the JT-60SA CS was established.

  9. Toroid cavity/coil NMR multi-detector

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Meadows, Alexander D.; Gregar, Joseph S.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2007-09-18

    An analytical device for rapid, non-invasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of multiple samples using a single spectrometer is provided. A modified toroid cavity/coil detector (TCD), and methods for conducting the simultaneous acquisition of NMR data for multiple samples including a protocol for testing NMR multi-detectors are provided. One embodiment includes a plurality of LC resonant circuits including spatially separated toroid coil inductors, each toroid coil inductor enveloping its corresponding sample volume, and tuned to resonate at a predefined frequency using a variable capacitor. The toroid coil is formed into a loop, where both ends of the toroid coil are brought into coincidence. Another embodiment includes multiple micro Helmholtz coils arranged on a circular perimeter concentric with a central conductor of the toroid cavity.

  10. Correction coil cable

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Sou-Tien

    1994-11-01

    A wire cable assembly (10, 310) adapted for the winding of electrical coils is taught. A primary intended use is for use in particle tube assemblies (532) for the superconducting super collider. The correction coil cables (10, 310) have wires (14, 314) collected in wire arrays (12, 312) with a center rib (16, 316) sandwiched therebetween to form a core assembly (18, 318 ). The core assembly (18, 318) is surrounded by an assembly housing (20, 320) having an inner spiral wrap (22, 322) and a counter wound outer spiral wrap (24, 324). An alternate embodiment (410) of the invention is rolled into a keystoned shape to improve radial alignment of the correction coil cable (410) on a particle tube (733) in a particle tube assembly (732).

  11. Forces on a magnet moving past figure-eight coils

    SciTech Connect

    Mulcahy, T.M.; He, J.; Rote, D.M. ); Rossing, T.D. . Dept. of Physics)

    1993-11-01

    Considerable attention has been given to the magnetic levitation of vehicles over guideways consisting of periodically-spaced conducting coils. Examples of proposed guideway configurations include arrays of independent coils (''loop track''), interconnected coils (''ladder track''), two layers of coils (double-layer ''null-flux'' track), and figure-eight coils (single-layer ''null-flux'' track). Typically, widely-separated superconducting magnets are mounted in the vehicle. A system that achieves both lift and guidance from vertical figure-eight coils in the guideway sidewalls has been developed in Japan. This system, when well designed, can have a very large lift-to-drag ratio. The authors conducted an experimental and theoretical investigation of the lift, drag, and guidance forces on a permanent magnet moving close to various arrays of figure-eight coils. The measured time-histories of the forces provide a basis for the evaluation of electrodynamic models and codes developed to analyze the magnetic levitation of vehicles using the discrete suspension coils of the null-flux type. Good correlation was found between the experimental data and the predictions of the code COIL GDWY. The authors report some of the results and discuss their application to the design of maglev systems.

  12. Coiling of Elastic Ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, M.; Ribe, N. M.; Bonn, Daniel

    2007-10-01

    A rope falling onto a solid surface typically forms a series of regular coils. Here, we study this phenomenon using laboratory experiments (with cotton threads and softened spaghetti) and an asymptotic “slender-rope” numerical model. The excellent agreement between the two with no adjustable parameters allows us to determine a complete phase diagram for elastic coiling comprising three basic regimes involving different force balances (elastic, gravitational, and inertial) together with resonant “whirling string” and “whirling shaft” eigenmodes in the inertial regime.

  13. Comparison of an Electromagnetic Energy Harvester Performance using Wound Coil Wire and PCB Coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resali, MSM; Salleh, H.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents the performance of two types of electromagnetic energy harvester, one using manually wound coil wire (EH-EC) and the other one using printed circuit board (PCB) coil (EH-EP). The objective of the study is to measure the corresponding output voltage and power by varying the number of coils and the position of the magnet. The experiment was conducted at a fix 50 Hz of frequency and at 0.25g of acceleration. The EH-EP was found to be more effective than the 350 turns of the wound coil wire, with maximum power of 26 μW. Overall, the performance of the EH-EC showed better result with maximum power of 125 μW for 1050 turns when compared to the EH-EP.

  14. Calorimetric AC loss measurement of MgB2 superconducting tape in an alternating transport current and direct magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See, K. W.; Xu, X.; Horvat, J.; Cook, C. D.; Dou, S. X.

    2012-11-01

    Applications of MgB2 superconductors in electrical engineering have been widely reported, and various studies have been made to define their alternating current (AC) losses. However, studies on the transport losses with an applied transverse DC magnetic field have not been conducted, even though this is one of the favored conditions in applications of practical MgB2 tapes. Methods and techniques used to characterize and measure these losses have so far been grouped into ‘electrical’ and ‘calorimetric’ approaches with external conditions set to resemble the application conditions. In this paper, we present a new approach to mounting the sample and employ the calorimetric method to accurately determine the losses in the concurrent application of AC transport current and DC magnetic fields that are likely to be experienced in practical devices such as generators and motors. This technique provides great simplification compared to the pickup coil and lock-in amplifier methods and is applied to a long length (˜10 cm) superconducting tape. The AC loss data at 20 and 30 K will be presented in an applied transport current of 50 Hz under external DC magnetic fields. The results are found to be higher than the theoretical predictions because of the metallic fraction of the tape that contributes quite significantly to the total losses. The data, however, will allow minimization of losses in practical MgB2 coils and will be used in the verification of numerical coil models.

  15. Comparison of DC and AC Transport in 1.5-7.5 nm Oligophenylene Imine Molecular Wires across Two Junction Platforms: Eutectic Ga-In versus Conducting Probe Atomic Force Microscope Junctions.

    PubMed

    Sangeeth, C S Suchand; Demissie, Abel T; Yuan, Li; Wang, Tao; Frisbie, C Daniel; Nijhuis, Christian A

    2016-06-15

    We have utilized DC and AC transport measurements to measure the resistance and capacitance of thin films of conjugated oligophenyleneimine (OPI) molecules ranging from 1.5 to 7.5 nm in length. These films were synthesized on Au surfaces utilizing the imine condensation chemistry between terephthalaldehyde and 1,4-benzenediamine. Near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy yielded molecular tilt angles of 33-43°. To probe DC and AC transport, we employed Au-S-OPI//GaOx/EGaIn junctions having contact areas of 9.6 × 10(2) μm(2) (10(9) nm(2)) and compared to previously reported DC results on the same OPI system obtained using Au-S-OPI//Au conducting probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM) junctions with 50 nm(2) areas. We found that intensive observables agreed very well across the two junction platforms. Specifically, the EGaIn-based junctions showed: (i) a crossover from tunneling to hopping transport at molecular lengths near 4 nm; (ii) activated transport for wires >4 nm in length with an activation energy of 0.245 ± 0.008 eV for OPI-7; (iii) exponential dependence of conductance with molecular length with a decay constant β = 2.84 ± 0.18 nm(-1) (DC) and 2.92 ± 0.13 nm(-1) (AC) in the tunneling regime, and an apparent β = 1.01 ± 0.08 nm(-1) (DC) and 0.99 ± 0.11 nm(-1) (AC) in the hopping regime; (iv) previously unreported dielectric constant of 4.3 ± 0.2 along the OPI wires. However, the absolute resistances of Au-S-OPI//GaOx/EGaIn junctions were approximately 100 times higher than the corresponding CP-AFM junctions due to differences in metal-molecule contact resistances between the two platforms. PMID:27172452

  16. Imprinted Clay Coil Vessels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohr, Tresa Rae

    2006-01-01

    The author teaches clay vessel construction in the fifth grade, and it is amazing what can be accomplished in one forty-five minute period when the expectations are clarified in the initial lesson. The author introduces clay coil vessels with a discussion of the sources of clay and how clay relates to fifth-grade science curriculum concepts such…

  17. Analytical Model and Optimized Design of Power Transmitting Coil for Inductively Coupled Endoscope Robot.

    PubMed

    Ke, Quan; Luo, Weijie; Yan, Guozheng; Yang, Kai

    2016-04-01

    A wireless power transfer system based on the weakly inductive coupling makes it possible to provide the endoscope microrobot (EMR) with infinite power. To facilitate the patients' inspection with the EMR system, the diameter of the transmitting coil is enlarged to 69 cm. Due to the large transmitting range, a high quality factor of the Litz-wire transmitting coil is a necessity to ensure the intensity of magnetic field generated efficiently. Thus, this paper builds an analytical model of the transmitting coil, and then, optimizes the parameters of the coil by enlarging the quality factor. The lumped model of the transmitting coil includes three parameters: ac resistance, self-inductance, and stray capacitance. Based on the exact two-dimension solution, the accurate analytical expression of ac resistance is derived. Several transmitting coils of different specifications are utilized to verify this analytical expression, being in good agreements with the measured results except the coils with a large number of strands. Then, the quality factor of transmitting coils can be well predicted with the available analytical expressions of self- inductance and stray capacitance. Owing to the exact estimation of quality factor, the appropriate coil turns of the transmitting coil is set to 18-40 within the restrictions of transmitting circuit and human tissue issues. To supply enough energy for the next generation of the EMR equipped with a Ø9.5×10.1 mm receiving coil, the coil turns of the transmitting coil is optimally set to 28, which can transfer a maximum power of 750 mW with the remarkable delivering efficiency of 3.55%. PMID:26292335

  18. Improved Coil for Hydrogen Dissociators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, R.

    1984-01-01

    Flat coil has rigid printed circuit substrate. New coil structure minimizes RF electric field near glass walls of plasma vessel; therefore reduces direct electron bombardment of glass. Design lends itself well to high production and standardized dimensions.

  19. Pulse Test of Coil Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroy, Ralph E.

    1987-01-01

    Waveform of back-electromotive force reveals defects. Simple pulse test reveals defects in inductor coils. Devised for use on servovalve solenoid coils on Space Shuttle, test also applicable to transformer windings, chokes, relays, and the like.

  20. Dual Frequency Coil Array for MR Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amador-Baheza, R.; Sacristan-Rock, E.; Rodríguez, A. O.

    2002-08-01

    An array coil to perform in vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy was developed to study the intestinal wall. It consisted of two surface rectangular-shaped coils mounted on cylindrical structure forming an orthogonal assembly. Since this design is intended to generate images and spectra, each element was tuned to a different resonant frequency: a) imaging: 200 MHz (1H) and b) spectroscopy: 81 MHz (31P). However, at this stage of the research, imaging experiments were only conducted on a Bruker 4.7 Tesla animal system. High-resolution images were obtained from a saline filled phantom and from the intestinal wall of a fully anaesthetised rabbit. The dual frequency coil array can be used to study the pathophysiology of intestinal ischemia.

  1. Residual Stress Measurement Using Rectangular Spiral Coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Haiyan; Plotnikov, Yuri

    2008-02-01

    Shot peening process provides compressive residual stress within a depth of about 150˜200 um from the surface. It has been demonstrated that multi-frequency eddy current measurement can be effectively used for the residual stress estimation on Ni-based superalloys. In order to measure the stress profile over the entire compressive zone, the probe needs to work in a wide frequency range from 0.1 MHz to above 50 MHz. Due to its wide bandwidth and high precision fabrication process, spiral coils fabricated on flexible substrate using photolithographic technology are good candidate for this task It is useful to develop a coil model in order to optimize coil design, minimize liftoff effect and maximize coil gauge factor. In this work, a 3D analytical model was used to simulate rectangular spiral coil response on a half-space conductor. The results were compared with commercial available 3D finite element software and experimental results. The analytical model was also used to simulate 4-point calibration process that was used to calculate apparent eddy current conductivity (AECC). The experimental setup was described and AECC profile was obtained for shot-peening samples with different peening intensity and different heat treatment.

  2. Magnetic Coil Design and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulatowicz, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Modified magnetic field coil geometries as described in U.S. Patent Applications US20100194506 and US20110247414 can produce substantially greater magnetic field homogeneity as compared to the traditional realized versions of idealized magnetic coil geometries such as spherical or Helmholtz. The new coil geometries will be described in detail and will be compared and contrasted to realized versions of idealized geometries, including discussion of errors not typically accounted for in traditional coil design and analysis.

  3. Wet Winding Improves Coil Encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, A. J.

    1987-01-01

    Wet-winding process encapsulates electrical coils more uniformily than conventional processes. Process requires no vacuum pump and adapts easily to existing winding machines. Encapsulant applied to each layer of wire as soon as added to coil. Wet-winding process eliminates voids, giving more uniformly encapsulated coil.

  4. Design of printed circuit coils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higgins, W. T.

    1969-01-01

    Spiral-like coil is printed with several extra turns which increase the realizable coil inductance. Included are shorting connections which not only short the extra turns, but also short out several turns of the main body. Coil tuning is accomplished by removing the shorts until the desired inductance is obtained.

  5. Thermionic triode generates ac power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kniazzeh, A. G. F.; Scharz, F. C.

    1970-01-01

    Electrostatic grid controls conduction cycle of thermionic diode to convert low dc output voltages to high ac power without undesirable power loss. An ac voltage applied to the grid of this new thermionic triode enables it to convert heat directly into high voltage electrical power.

  6. Leveraging intrinsic chain anisotropy to align coil-coil block copolymers with magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokhlenko, Yekaterina; Zhang, Kai; Gopinadhan, Manesh; Larson, Steve; Majewski, Pawel; Yager, Kevin; Gopalan, Padma; O'Hern, Corey; Osuji, Chinedum

    Magnetic field alignment of block copolymers (BCPs) has typically relied on the presence of liquid crystalline or crystalline assemblies to provide sufficient magnetic anisotropy to drive alignment. Recent experiments however show that alignment is also possible in simple coil-coil BCPs. In particular, alignment of lamellae was observed in poly(styrene-b-4-vinylpyridine) (PS-P4VP) on cooling across the order-disorder transition at field strengths as low as 1 T, with alignment improving markedly with increasing field strength and decreasing cooling rate. Here we discuss the intrinsic chain anisotropy which drives the observed alignment, and its display as a net microdomain anisotropy due to chain tethering at the block interface. We use in-situ X-ray scattering to study the phase behavior and temperature-, time-, and field- dependent dynamics of magnetic alignment in coil-coil BCPs, highlighting the important roles of chain anisotropy and grain size in alignment. For the right combination of field strength and grain size, we can leverage intrinsic chain anisotropy to magnetically direct self-assembly in other coil-coil systems, including cylinder-forming poly(styrene-b-dimethylsiloxane). Field alignment of PS-P4VP with PEO and other blends provides a route to form functional materials such as nanoporous films and ion conducting polymers.

  7. High field volume coil with unbalance current distribution for MRI applications of rodents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrufo, O. R.; Hernández, J.; Rodríguez, A. O.

    2010-12-01

    The development of transceiver volume coils for high field MRI is still a very dynamic field of investigation and development Temnikov has been recently proposed a new volume coil design, similar to the to the gradiometer coil. It is also claimed that it is possible to individually tune it with a single chip capacitor. This motivated the development of a coil prototype based on this idea for whole-body MRI of rodents at 7 Tesla. Electromagnetic simulations of the RF field generated by this coil design were previously performed to study its properties. Electromagnetic simulations were also conducted for a standard birdcage coil with similar dimensions for fare comparison. In all numerical simulations, an unbalanced currents distribution was assumed by applying half the current intensity to designated legs. This coil design operated in the transceiver mode and was linear-driven. The coil size was manufactured to accommodate small rodents. Numerical simulations showed a field uniformity improvement of our coil over the standard birdcage coil. A popular birdcage coil was also constructed to compare their performances. Phantom and rat images were acquired for both volume coils to prove the viability of this coil design for high field MRI applications and standard spin echo pulse sequences Thus, these preliminary results make this coil design a good candidate for MRI and MRS applications of high magnetic fields.

  8. Single-coil magnetic induction tomographic three-dimensional imaging

    PubMed Central

    Feldkamp, Joseph R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Previously, magnetic induction tomography (MIT) has been considered for noncontact imaging of human tissue electrical properties. Commonly, multiple coils are used, with any one serving as the source while others detect eddy currents generated in the specimen. Here, imaging of low conductivity objects is shown feasible with a single coil acting simultaneously as source and detector, provided that the coil is repeatedly relocated while collecting coil loss data. To enable such “scanning,” an analytical coil loss formula is derived in the quasistatic limit for a single coil consisting of several concentric circular wire loops, all within a common plane. Conductivity may vary arbitrarily in space, whereas permittivity and permeability are treated as uniform. The analytical form is used to build an algorithm for imaging electrical conductivity in human tissues. A practical device operating at 12.5 MHz is described and used in a clinical trial that “scans” the region between the scapulae while collecting coil loss data. Inversion of data leads to electrical conductivity distribution images for the thoracic spinal column which are the first of their kind to correctly distinguish such basic features as size and depth of spinal canal, as well as size, depth, and spacing of transverse spinal processes. PMID:26158078

  9. Coiled-coil networking shapes cell molecular machinery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongqiang; Zhang, Xinlei; Zhang, Hong; Lu, Yi; Huang, Haolong; Dong, Xiaoxi; Chen, Jinan; Dong, Jiuhong; Yang, Xiao; Hang, Haiying; Jiang, Taijiao

    2012-01-01

    The highly abundant α-helical coiled-coil motif not only mediates crucial protein–protein interactions in the cell but is also an attractive scaffold in synthetic biology and material science and a potential target for disease intervention. Therefore a systematic understanding of the coiled-coil interactions (CCIs) at the organismal level would help unravel the full spectrum of the biological function of this interaction motif and facilitate its application in therapeutics. We report the first identified genome-wide CCI network in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which consists of 3495 pair-wise interactions among 598 predicted coiled-coil regions. Computational analysis revealed that the CCI network is specifically and functionally organized and extensively involved in the organization of cell machinery. We further show that CCIs play a critical role in the assembly of the kinetochore, and disruption of the CCI network leads to defects in kinetochore assembly and cell division. The CCI network identified in this study is a valuable resource for systematic characterization of coiled coils in the shaping and regulation of a host of cellular machineries and provides a basis for the utilization of coiled coils as domain-based probes for network perturbation and pharmacological applications. PMID:22875988

  10. Study on elimination of screening-current-induced field in pancake-type non-insulated HTS coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. L.; Song, J. B.; Yang, D. G.; Kim, Y. G.; Kim, T. H.; Kim, S. K.; Park, M. W.; Lee, H. G.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents the details of a recent study on the removal of the screening-current-induced field (SCIF) in a pancake-type non-insulated high-temperature superconductor coil (NI coil). To determine the SCIF in the NI coil, the magnetic flux density (B z ) was calculated using the equivalent circuit model of the coil and compared to the B z obtained empirically. The experimental results indicate that the SCIF elimination in the NI coil was enhanced upon increasing the amplitude and frequency of the AC current being supplied to the background coil. Moreover, the SCIF in the NI coil was successfully removed by applying the appropriate external AC magnetic field intensity. This is because the magnetization direction of the SCIF changed completely from radial to spiral, a phenomenon termed the ‘vortex shaking effect.’ Overall, this study confirmed that the SCIF in a pancake-type NI coil can be effectively removed by exposing the coil to an external AC magnetic field.

  11. The cryogenic performance of moving coil linear actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stier, Mark T.; Stewart, Sandra H.; Leombruno, R. L.; Neuner, Jeffrey W.

    Results of an investigation of the performance of electromagnetic linear actuators at temperatures as low as 2 K are presented. The coil assembly is 1 cm long and 2 cm in diameter and consists of either NbTi superconductor wire or annealed ultrahigh purity copper wire wound on either 6061-T6 aluminum or G-10 bases. The temperature dependence of the dc force per unit current is described, and room, liquid nitrogen, and liquid helium temperature measurements of ac power dissipation and damping are presented. The present 4 K measurements show that the use of either superconducting NbTi wire or vanadium permendur steel reduces the energy efficiency of voice coils operating in an AC mode at liquid helium temperatures.

  12. Structural characterization, thermal, ac conductivity and dielectric properties of (C7H12N2)2[SnCl6]Cl2.1.5H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajji, Rachid; Oueslati, Abderrazek; Hajlaoui, Fadhel; Bulou, Alain; Hlel, Faouzi

    2016-05-01

    (C7H12N2)2[SnCl6]Cl2.1.5H2O is crystallized at room temperature in the monoclinic system (space group P21/n). The isolated molecules form organic and inorganic layers parallel to the (a, b) plane and alternate along the c-axis. The inorganic layer is built up by isolated SnCl6 octahedrons. Besides, the organic layer is formed by 2,4-diammonium toluene cations, between which the spaces are filled with free Cl- ions and water molecules. The crystal packing is governed by means of the ionic N-H...Cl and Ow-H...Cl hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional network. The thermal study of this compound is reported, revealing two phase transitions around 360(±3) and 412(±3) K. The electrical and dielectric measurements were reported, confirming the transition temperatures detected in the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The frequency dependence of ac conductivity at different temperatures indicates that the correlated barrier hopping (CBH) model is the probable mechanism for the ac conduction behavior.

  13. Design and optimization of efficient magnetic coils for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram Rakhyani, Anil Kumar

    Magnetic fields are permeable to the biological tissues and can induce electric field in the conductive structures. Some medical devices take advantage of this ability to transfer energy from the source to the receiving site without direct contact. Prosthetic devices such as retinal implants use time-varying magnetic field to achieve wireless power transfer to the implanted magnetic coil. However, devices such as magnetic stimulators use the induction principle to create an electric field at the stimulation site. Efficiency of these devices is primarily dependent on the design of the magnetic coils. Therefore, in this work, we designed and validated efficient magnetic coils for wireless power transfer to implanted devices and magnetic stimulation of the peripheral nerves. Typical wireless power transfer (WPT) systems uses two-coil based design to achieve contactless power transfer to the implanted electronics. These systems achieve low power transfer efficiency (< 30%) and frequency bandwidth. Moreover, efficient wireless system requires high coupling and load variation tolerance during device operation. To design an electromagnetic safe WPT system, the power absorbed by the tissue and radiated field due to the proximal magnetic coils needs to be minimized. In this work, we proposed a multi-coil power transfer system which solves some of the current challenges. The proposed multi-coil WPT system achieves more than twice the power transfer efficiency, controllable voltage gain, wider frequency bandwidth, higher tolerance to coupling and load variations, lower absorbed power in the tissue and lower radiated field from the magnetic coil than a comparable two-coil system. In this work, we have developed analytic models of the multi-coil WPT system and validated the accuracy of the solutions using experiments. Magnetic coils play an important role in controlling the distribution of induced electric field inside the nerve during magnetic stimulation. In the past

  14. Electromagnetic modeling of REBCO high field coils by the H-formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jing; Bai, Hongyu; Lu, Jun; Gavrilin, Andrew V.; Zhou, Youhe; Weijers, Hubertus W.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we employ the anisotropic bulk approximation to successfully implement the electromagnetic modeling of superconducting coils wound with rare-earth-barium-copper-oxide (REBCO) tapes based on the H-formulation, in which the field-dependent critical current density and highly nonlinear E-J characteristic are considered. The total number of turns in the stacks of REBCO pancake coils is up to several thousand. We validate the anisotropic bulk model by comparing the ac loss of a small four-pancake coil between the bulk model and the original model which takes the actual thickness of the superconducting layer into account. Then, the anisotropic bulk model is used to investigate the self-field problem of the REBCO prototype coils of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory 32 {{T}} all-superconducting magnet. The field and current density distributions are obtained, and an obvious shielding effect is observed at the top and bottom of the coils. The ac losses in the first and second cycles are calculated. The former is crucial to the design of the cooling system and the latter relates to the routine consumption of the liquid helium. It is found that the ac loss in the first cycle is 2.6 times as large as that in the second cycle. We also study the ac loss dependences on some key parameters (the critical current, n-value and ramp rate of the applied current). It is found that both in the first and second cycles, the ac loss increases with decreasing critical current. Moreover, the influence of the n-value on the ac loss is negligible. In addition, the ac loss decreases logarithmically with increasing ramp rate. However, the average power loss increases linearly with increasing ramp rate. We also compare some analytical estimates with the simulation result for the ac loss of the dual prototype coils. It is found that the results of Bean’s slab model are closer to the simulation result. The presented model is a useful tool to help us understand

  15. The Automotive Ignition Coil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darnell, T H

    1932-01-01

    This report gives the results of a series of measurements on the secondary voltage induced in an ignition coil of typical construction under a variety of operating conditions. These results show that the theoretical predictions hitherto made as to the behavior of this type of apparatus are in satisfactory agreement with the observed facts. The large mass of data obtained is here published both for the use of other investigators who may wish to compare them with other theoretical predictions and for the use of automotive engineers who will here find definite experimental results showing the effect of secondary capacity and resistance on the crest voltage produced by ignition apparatus.

  16. Designing with null flux coils

    SciTech Connect

    Davey, K.R.

    1997-09-01

    Null flux were suggested by Danby and Powell in the late 1960`s as a useful means for realizing induced lift with little drag. As an array of alternating magnets is translated past a set of null flux coils, the currents induced in these coils act to vertically center the magnets on those coils. At present, one Japanese MAGLEV system company and two American-based companies are employing either null flux or flux eliminating coils in their design for high speed magnetically levitated transportation. The principle question addressed in paper is: what is the proper choice of coil length to magnet length in a null flux system? A generic analysis in the time and frequency domain is laid out with the intent of showing the optimal design specification in terms of coil parameters.

  17. Solid-state circuit breaker with current limiting characteristic using a superconducting coil

    DOEpatents

    Boenig, Heinrich J.

    1984-01-01

    A thyristor bridge interposes an ac source and a load. A series connected DC source and superconducting coil within the bridge biases the thyristors thereof so as to permit bidirectional ac current flow therethrough under normal operating conditions. Upon a fault condition a control circuit triggers the thyristors so as to reduce ac current flow therethrough to zero in less than two cycles and to open the bridge thereafter. Upon a temporary overload condition the control circuit triggers the thyristors so as to limit ac current flow therethrough to an acceptable level.

  18. Solid-state circuit breaker with current-limiting characteristic using a superconducting coil

    DOEpatents

    Boenig, H.J.

    1982-08-16

    A thyristor bridge interposes an ac source and a load. A series connected DC source and superconducting coil within the bridge biases the thyristors thereof so as to permit bidirectional ac current flow therethrough under normal operating conditions. Upon a fault condition a control circuit triggers the thyristors so as to reduce ac current flow therethrough to zero in less than two eyeles and to open the bridge thereafter. Upon a temporary overload condition the control circuit triggers the thyristors so as to limit ac current flow therethrough to an acceptable level.

  19. Radio-frequency coil selection for MR imaging of the carotid vessel wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mat Isa, S.; Shuaib, I. L.; Bauk, S.

    2014-11-01

    This aim of this study was to identify the radiofrequency coil that will produce optimum image quality for scanning the carotid vessel wall using magnetic resonance imaging. A comparative cross-sectional study was conducted using 10 volunteers. Each volunteer was scanned three times using a 1.5T Signa HDxt machine equipped with one of three different coils: a neurovascular array (NV) coil, an 8-channel CTL spine array coil, and a 3-inch surface coil. A qualitative image quality rating was assigned to each image. The images were also evaluated by measuring the signal to noise ratio (SNR) using Osirix 4.2.3 software. The noise was estimated from the mean intensities of the region of interest in the background of the images and the signal was measured in the muscle adjacent to the vessel wall. The SNRs of the three coils were compared using one-way ANOVA, with 104 images used for the data analysis. The mean image quality scores for the NV head coil, CTL coil, and 3-inch coil were 3.4, 3.33, and 1.67, respectively. In addition, the SNRs differed significantly (p < 0.05). The mean SNR for the 3-inch coil was significantly higher (56.21 ± 25.06) than those for the NV head coil (27.34 ± 15.47) and CTL coil (21.77 ± 13.14). The Bonferroni post-hoc test revealed that there was no significant difference between the NV head coil and the CTL coil (p = 0.21). The optimum SNR value was 20-27. These results indicate that the NV head coil and CTL coil can be used to evaluate the carotid arterial wall with optimum image quality and higher resolution. These coil can deliver fast and robust data to image the carotid vessel wall in vivo.

  20. Design and Analysis of the ITER Vertical Stability Coils

    SciTech Connect

    Peter H. Titus, et. al.

    2012-09-06

    The ITER vertical stability (VS) coils have been developed through the preliminary design phase by Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). Final design, prototyping and construction will be carried out by the Chinese Participant Team contributing lab, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (ASIPP). The VS coils are a part of the in-vessel coil systems which include edge localized mode (ELM) coils as well as the VS coils. An overview of the ELM coils is provided in another paper at this conference. 15 The VS design employs four turns of stainless steel jacketed mineral insulated copper (SSMIC) conductors The mineral insulation is Magnesium Oxide (MgO). Joule and nuclear heat is removed by water flowing at 3 m/s through the hollow copper conductor. A key element in the design is that slightly elevated temperatures in the conductor and its support spine during operation impose compressive stresses that mitigate fatigue damage. Away from joints, and break-outs, conductor thermal stresses are low because of the axisymmetry of the winding (there are no corner bends as in the ELM coils).The 120 degree segment joint, and break-out or terminal regions are designed with similar but imperfect constraint compared with the ring coil portion of the VS. The support for the break-out region is made from a high strength copper alloy, CuCrZr. This is needed to conduct nuclear heat to the actively cooled conductor and to the vessel wall. The support "spine" for the ring coil portion of the VS is 316 stainless steel, held to the vessel with preloaded 718 bolts. Lorentz loads resulting from normal operating loads, disruption loads and loads from disruption currents in the support spine shared with vessel, are applied to the VS coil. The transmission of the Lorentz and thermal expansion loads from the "spine" to the vessel rails is via friction augmented with a restraining "lip" to ensure the coil frictional slip is minimal and acceptable. Stresses in the coil

  1. Method of preloading superconducting coils by using materials with different thermal expansion coefficients

    DOEpatents

    Heim, Joseph R.

    1993-01-01

    The invention provides a high magnetic field coil. The invention provides a preloaded compressive force to the coil maintain the integrity of the coil. The compressive force is obtained by reinforcing the coil with two materials of different thermal expansion rates and then heating the coil to 700.degree. C. to obtain the desired compression. The embodiment of the invention uses Nb.sub.3 Sn as the conducting wire, since Nb.sub.3 Sn must be heated to 700.degree. C. to cause a reaction which makes Nb.sub.3 Sn superconducting.

  2. Numerical characterization of a flexible circular coil for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bautista, T.; Hernandez, R.; Solis-Najera, S. E.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2012-10-01

    Numerical simulations of the magnetic field generated by a flexible surface coil were conducted to study its behavior for applications of animal models at 7 Tesla. This coil design is able to fully cover a volume of interest. The Finite Difference Method in Time Domain (FDTD) was used because of its ability to accurately model complex problems in electromagnetism. This particular coil design is best suited for regions of interests with a spherical shape, since B1 uniformity is not significantly attenuated as in the case of a circular-loop coil. It still remains to investigate the feasibility to actually construct a coil prototype.

  3. Method of preloading superconducting coils by using materials with different thermal expansion coefficients

    DOEpatents

    Heim, J.R.

    1993-02-23

    The invention provides a high magnetic field coil. The invention provides a preloaded compressive force to the coil maintain the integrity of the coil. The compressive force is obtained by reinforcing the coil with two materials of different thermal expansion rates and then heating the coil to 700 C to obtain the desired compression. The embodiment of the invention uses Nb[sub 3]Sn as the conducting wire, since Nb[sub 3]Sn must be heated to 700 C to cause a reaction which makes Nb[sub 3]Sn superconducting.

  4. Development of the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) trim coil beam tube assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Skaritka, J.; Kelly, E.; Schneider, W.; Shutt, R.; Thompson, P.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Bintinger, D.; Coluccio, R.; Schieber, L.

    1987-01-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider uses approx. =9600 dipole magnets. The magnets have been carefully designed to exhibit minimal magnetic field harmonics. However, because of superconductor magnetization effects, iron saturation and conductor/coil positioning errors, certain harmonic errors are possible and must be corrected by use of multipole correctors called trim coils. For the most efficient use of axial space in the magnet, and lowest possible current, a distributed internal correction coil design is planned. The trim coil assembly is secured to the beam tube, a uhv tube with special strength, size, conductivity and vacuum. The report details the SSC trim coil/beam tube assembly specifications, history, and ongoing development.

  5. A Parallel Coiled-Coil Tetramer with Offset Helices

    SciTech Connect

    Liu,J.; Deng, Y.; Zheng, Q.; Cheng, C.; Kallenbach, N.; Lu, M.

    2006-01-01

    Specific helix-helix interactions are fundamental in assembling the native state of proteins and in protein-protein interfaces. Coiled coils afford a unique model system for elucidating principles of molecular recognition between {alpha} helices. The coiled-coil fold is specified by a characteristic seven amino acid repeat containing hydrophobic residues at the first (a) and fourth (d) positions. Nonpolar side chains spaced three and four residues apart are referred to as the 3-4 hydrophobic repeat. The presence of apolar amino acids at the e or g positions (corresponding to a 3-3-1 hydrophobic repeat) can provide new possibilities for close-packing of {alpha}-helices that includes examples such as the lac repressor tetramerization domain. Here we demonstrate that an unprecedented coiled-coil interface results from replacement of three charged residues at the e positions in the dimeric GCN4 leucine zipper by nonpolar valine side chains. Equilibrium circular dichroism and analytical ultracentrifugation studies indicate that the valine-containing mutant forms a discrete {alpha}-helical tetramer with a significantly higher stability than the parent leucine-zipper molecule. The 1.35 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the tetramer reveals a parallel four-stranded coiled coil with a three-residue interhelical offset. The local packing geometry of the three hydrophobic positions in the tetramer conformation is completely different from that seen in classical tetrameric structures yet bears resemblance to that in three-stranded coiled coils. These studies demonstrate that distinct van der Waals interactions beyond the a and d side chains can generate a diverse set of helix-helix interfaces and three-dimensional supercoil structures.

  6. Design of Tokamak ELM Coil Support in High Nuclear Heat Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shanwen; Song, Yuntao; Wang, Zhongwei; Ji, Xiang; Daly, E.; Kalish, M.; Lu, Su; Du, Shuangsong; Liu, Xufeng; Feng, Changle; Yang, Hong; Wang, Songke

    2014-03-01

    In Tokomak, the support of the ELM coil, which is close to the plasma and subject to high radiation level, high temperature and high magnetic field, is used to transport and bear the thermal load due to thermal expansion and the alternating electromagnetic force generated by high magnetic field and AC current in the coil. According to the feature of ITER ELM coil, the mechanical performance of rigid and flexible supports under different high nuclear heat levels is studied. Results show that flexible supports have more excellent performance in high nuclear heat condition than rigid supports. Concerning thermal and electromagnetic (EM) loads, optimized results further prove that flexible supports have better mechanical performance than rigid ones. Through these studies, reasonable support design can be provided for the ELM coils or similar coils in Tokamak based on the nuclear heat level.

  7. Replaceable Sleeve Protects Welder Coil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, W. L.; Simpson, C., E.

    1983-01-01

    New replaceable carbon insert for deflection coil in electron-beam welder promises to decrease maintenance costs. Inserts made from materials other than carbon (not yet tried) are less expensive, thus reducing costs even further. With carbon insert, deflection coils last longer and are easier to maintain.

  8. AC photovoltaic module magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, C.; Chang, G.J.; Reyes, A.B.; Whitaker, C.M.

    1997-12-31

    Implementation of alternating current (AC) photovoltaic (PV) modules, particularly for distributed applications such as PV rooftops and facades, may be slowed by public concern about electric and magnetic fields (EMF). This paper documents magnetic field measurements on an AC PV module, complementing EMF research on direct-current PV modules conducted by PG and E in 1993. Although not comprehensive, the PV EMF data indicate that 60 Hz magnetic fields (the EMF type of greatest public concern) from PV modules are comparable to, or significantly less than, those from household appliances. Given the present EMF research knowledge, AC PV module EMF may not merit considerable concern.

  9. Studies on structural, thermal and AC conductivity scaling of PEO-LiPF6 polymer electrolyte with added ionic liquid [BMIMPF6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaurasia, S. K.; Saroj, A. L.; Shalu, Singh, V. K.; Tripathi, A. K.; Gupta, A. K.; Verma, Y. L.; Singh, R. K.

    2015-07-01

    Preparation and characterization of polymer electrolyte films of PEO+10wt.% LiPF6 + xwt.% BMIMPF6 (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate) containing dopant salt lithium hexafluorophosphate (LiPF6) and ionic liquid (BMIMPF6) having common anion PF6 - are reported. The ionic conductivity of the polymer electrolyte films has been found to increase with increasing concentration of BMIMPF6 in PEO+10 wt.% LiPF6 due to the plasticization effect of ionic liquid. DSC and XRD results show that the crystallinity of polymer electrolyte decreases with BMIMPF6 concentration which, in turn, is responsible for the increase in ionic conductivity. FTIR spectroscopic study shows the complexation of salt and/or ionic liquid cations with the polymer backbone. Ion dynamics behavior of PEO+LiPF6 as well as PEO+LiPF6 + BMIMPF6 polymer electrolytes was studied by frequency dependent conductivity, σ(f) measurements. The values σ(f) at various temperatures have been analyzed in terms of Jonscher power law (JPL) and scaled with respect to frequency which shows universal power law characteristics at all temperatures.

  10. Overview of torus magnet coil production at Fermilab for the Jefferson Lab 12-GeV Hall B upgrade

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Krave, S.; Velev, G.; Makarov, A.; Nobrega, F.; Kiemschies, O.; Robotham, B.; Elementi, L.; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Luongo, Cesar; Kashy, David H.; et al

    2016-02-29

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) fabricated the torus magnet coils for the 12 GeV Hall B upgrade at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The production consisted of 6 large superconducting coils for the magnet and 2 spare coils. The toroidal field coils are approximately 2 m x 4 m x 5 cm thick. Each of these coils consists of two layers, each of which has 117 turns of copper-stabilized superconducting cable which will be conduction cooled by helium gas. Due to the size of the coils and their unique geometry, Fermilab designed and fabricated specialized tooling and, together with JLab, developed uniquemore » manufacturing techniques for each stage of the coil construction. In conclusion, this paper describes the tooling and manufacturing techniques required to produce the six production coils and two spare coils needed by the project.« less

  11. The Coil Method in Contemporary Ceramics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nigrosh, Leon I.

    1976-01-01

    For centuries coil building has been the primary method of making pottery the world over. Many classrooms still reflect this preference for symmetrical coil building. Describes coil building and what forms can be made from it. (Author/RK)

  12. Coiled-coil intermediate filament stutter instability and molecular unfolding.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Melis; Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J

    2011-05-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) are the key components of cytoskeleton in eukaryotic cells and are critical for cell mechanics. The building block of IFs is a coiled-coil alpha-helical dimer, consisting of several domains that include linkers and other structural discontinuities. One of the discontinuities in the dimer's coiled-coil region is the so-called 'stutter' region. The stutter is a region where a variation of the amino acid sequence pattern from other parts of the alpha-helical domains of the protein is found. It was suggested in earlier works that due to this sequence variation, the perfect coiled-coil arrangement ceases to exist. Here, we show using explicit water molecular dynamics and well-tempered metadynamics that for the coil2 domain of vimentin IFs the stutter is more stable in a non-alpha-helical, unfolded state. This causes a local structural disturbance in the alpha helix, which has a global effect on the nanomechanics of the structure. Our analysis suggests that the stutter features an enhanced tendency to unfolding even under the absence of external forces, implying a much greater structural instability than previously assumed. As a result it features a smaller local bending stiffness than other segments and presents a seed for the initiation of molecular bending and unfolding at large deformation. PMID:21516532

  13. Results of the international large coil task: a milestone for superconducting magnets in fusion power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dresner, L.; Fietz, W. A.; Gauss, S.; Haubenreich, P. N.; Jakob, B.; Kato, T.; Komarek, P.; Lubell, M. S.; Lue, J. W.; Luton, J. N.; Maurer, W.; Okuno, K.; Schwenterly, S. W.; Shimamoto, S.; Takahashi, Y.; Ulbricht, A.; Vécsey, G.; Wüchner, F.; Zichy, J. A.

    The aim of the Large Coil Task (LCT) was to demonstrate the reliable operation of large superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils and to prove the design principles and fabrication techniques to be applied for the magnets in a tokamak experimental power reactor. This has been achieved by an outstanding international development effort during more than ten years of cooperation within an IEA agreement. Parties were the US DOE, EURATOM, JAERI and the Swiss government. Six different D-shaped test coils were separately designed, developed and constructed by the LCT participants, then extensively tested together in a compact toroidal array. The ORNL acted for DOE as the LCT operating agent, building and operating the required test facility. The US also provided three test coils; the other three participants one coil each. Detailed information on coil design and manufacture and all test data were shared among the LCT participants. After facility shakedown operations and preliminary coil tests, the full six-coil array tests were carried out in a continuous period from the beginning of 1986 until September 1987. Beside the originally planned tests to reach an 8 T design point performance, the tests went well beyond this goal, reaching 9 T peak field in each coil. The experiments also delineated the limits of operability and demonstrated the coil safety under abnormal conditions. For fusion application the transient a.c. field behaviour in the coils was also of great interest. Three of the coils have been tested in this respect and showed excellent performance, with loss values in agreement with the theoretical predictions. At the time of International Experimental Reactor (ITER) activities, it might be worthwhile to mention that LCT demonstrated an effective multinational collaboration in an advanced technology project, involving large scale hardware produced in several countries then assembled and operated as a tightly integrated system.

  14. Optimized quadrature surface coil designs

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ananda; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Quadrature surface MRI/MRS detectors comprised of circular loop and figure-8 or butterfly-shaped coils offer improved signal-to-noise-ratios (SNR) compared to single surface coils, and reduced power and specific absorption rates (SAR) when used for MRI excitation. While the radius of the optimum loop coil for performing MRI at depth d in a sample is known, the optimum geometry for figure-8 and butterfly coils is not. Materials and methods The geometries of figure-8 and square butterfly detector coils that deliver the optimum SNR are determined numerically by the electromagnetic method of moments. Figure-8 and loop detectors are then combined to create SNR-optimized quadrature detectors whose theoretical and experimental SNR performance are compared with a novel quadrature detector comprised of a strip and a loop, and with two overlapped loops optimized for the same depth at 3 T. The quadrature detection efficiency and local SAR during transmission for the three quadrature configurations are analyzed and compared. Results The SNR-optimized figure-8 detector has loop radius r8 ∼ 0.6d, so r8/r0 ∼ 1.3 in an optimized quadrature detector at 3 T. The optimized butterfly coil has side length ∼ d and crossover angle of ≥ 150° at the center. Conclusions These new design rules for figure-8 and butterfly coils optimize their performance as linear and quadrature detectors. PMID:18057975

  15. An active homopolar magnetic bearing with high temperature superconductor (HTS) coils and ferromagnetic cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.; Dirusso, E.; Provenza, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    A proof-of-feasibility demonstration showed that high temperature superconductor (HTS) coils can be used in a high-load, active magnetic bearing in liquid nitrogen. A homopolar radial bearing with commercially wound HTS (Bi 2223) bias and control coils produced over 200 lb (890 N) radial load capacity (measured non-rotating) and supported a shaft to 14000 rpm. The goal was to show that HTS coils can operate stably with ferromagnetic cores in a feedback controlled system at a current density similar to that in Cu in liquid nitrogen. Design compromises permitted use of circular coils with rectangular cross section. Conductor improvements will eventually permit coil shape optimization, higher current density and higher bearing load capacity. The bias coil, wound with non-twisted, multifilament HTS conductor, required negligible power to carry its direct current. The control coils were wound with monofilament HTS sheathed in Ag. These dissipated negligible power for direct current (i.e. for steady radial load components). When an alternating current (AC) was added, the AC component dissipated power which increased rapidly with frequency and quadratically with AC amplitude. In fact at frequencies above about 2 hz, the effective resistance of the control coil conductor actually exceeds that of the silver which is in electrical parallel with the oxide superconductor. This is at least qualitatively understandable in the context of a Bean-type model of flux and current penetration into a Type II superconductor. Fortunately the dynamic currents required for bearing stability are of small amplitude. These results show that while twisted multifilament conductor is not needed for stable levitation, twisted multifilaments will be required to reduce control power for sizable dynamic loads, such as those due to unbalance.

  16. Dielectric behavior and ac conductivity in Aurivillius Bi4Ti3O12 doped by antiferromagnetic BiFeO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, M. S.; Tian, Z. M.; Yuan, S. L.; Duan, H. N.; Qiu, Y.

    2012-06-01

    Bi5Ti3FeO15 ceramics were synthesized by the solid state reaction. XRD analysis shows a single phase perovskite structure with no impurities identified. Two obvious dielectric anomalies around 1007 and 1090 K were exhibited by this material, indicating that there are two phase transitions. While no peak was found in the tan δ-T curve. In addition, the conduction loss activation energies calculated at 476-639 K, 652-966 K, and 980-1095 K are 0.156, 0.262, and 0.707 eV, respectively. Polarization versus electric field hysteresis loops associated with 2Pr of 6.08 μC/cm2 and 2Ec of 59 kV/cm were obtained.

  17. Improved Sensing Coils for SQUIDs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob; Eom, Byeong Ho

    2007-01-01

    An improvement in the design and fabrication of sensing coils of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers has been proposed to increase sensitivity. It has been estimated that, in some cases, it would be possible to increase sensitivity by about half or to reduce measurement time correspondingly. The pertinent aspects of the problems of design and fabrication can be summarized as follows: In general, to increase the sensitivity of a SQUID magnetometer, it is necessary to maximize the magnetic flux enclosed by the sensing coil while minimizing the self-inductance of this coil. It is often beneficial to fabricate the coil from a thicker wire to reduce its self-inductance. Moreover, to optimize the design of the coil with respect to sensitivity, it may be necessary to shape the wire to other than a commonly available circular or square cross-section. On the other hand, it is not practical to use thicker superconducting wire for the entire superconducting circuit, especially if the design of a specific device requires a persistent-current loop enclosing a remotely placed SQUID sensor. It may be possible to bond a thicker sensing-coil wire to thinner superconducting wires leading to a SQUID sensor, but it could be difficult to ensure reliable superconducting connections, especially if the bonded wires are made of different materials. The main idea is to mold the sensing coil in place, to more nearly optimum cross sectional shape, instead of making the coil by winding standard pre-fabricated wire. For this purpose, a thin superconducting wire loop that is an essential part of the SQUID magnetometer would be encapsulated in a form that would serve as a mold. A low-melting-temperature superconducting metal (e.g., indium, tin, or a lead/tin alloy) would be melted into the form, which would be sized and shaped to impart the required cross section to the coil thus formed.

  18. The toroidal field coil design for ARIES-ST

    SciTech Connect

    Reiersen, W.; Dahlgren, F.; Fan, H.M.; Neumeyer, C.; Zatz, I.

    2000-01-21

    An evolutionary process was used to develop the toroidal field (TF) coil design for the ARIES-ST (Spherical Tokamak). Design considerations included fabricability, assembly, maintenance, energy efficiency, and structural robustness. The design addresses a number of the concerns (complexity) and criticisms (high cost, high recirculating power) of fusion. It does this by: (1) Applying advanced, but available laser forming and spray casting techniques for manufacturing the TF coil system; (2) Adopting a simple single toroidal field coil system to make assembly and maintenance much easier, the single turn design avoids the necessity of using the insulation as a structural component of the TF coils, and hence is much more robust than multi-turn designs; and (3) Using a high conductivity copper alloy and modest current densities to keep the recirculating power modest.

  19. A Modified Alderman-Grant Coil makes possible an efficient cross-coil probe for high field solid-state NMR of lossy biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Christopher V.; Yang, Yuan; Glibowicka, Mira; Wu, Chin H.; Park, Sang Ho; Deber, Charles M.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2009-11-01

    The design, construction, and performance of a cross-coil double-resonance probe for solid-state NMR experiments on lossy biological samples at high magnetic fields are described. The outer coil is a Modified Alderman-Grant Coil (MAGC) tuned to the 1H frequency. The inner coil consists of a multi-turn solenoid coil that produces a B 1 field orthogonal to that of the outer coil. This results in a compact nested cross-coil pair with the inner solenoid coil tuned to the low frequency detection channel. This design has several advantages over multiple-tuned solenoid coil probes, since RF heating from the 1H channel is substantially reduced, it can be tuned for samples with a wide range of dielectric constants, and the simplified circuit design and high inductance inner coil provides excellent sensitivity. The utility of this probe is demonstrated on two electrically lossy samples of membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers (bicelles) that are particularly difficult for conventional NMR probes. The 72-residue polypeptide embedding the transmembrane helices 3 and 4 of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) (residues 194-241) requires a high salt concentration in order to be successfully reconstituted in phospholipid bicelles. A second application is to paramagnetic relaxation enhancement applied to the membrane-bound form of Pf1 coat protein in phospholipid bicelles where the resistance to sample heating enables high duty cycle solid-state NMR experiments to be performed.

  20. Coiling of a viscous filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel, A. D. T.; Ryu, W. S.; Mahadevan, L.

    1997-11-01

    A classic demonstration of fluid buckling is a daily occurence at the breakfast table, where a continuous stream of viscous fluid (honey) is often poured onto a flat surface (toast) from a sufficient height. The thin fluid filament quickly settles into a steady state; near the surface it bends into a helical shape while simultaneously rotating about the vertical and is laid out in a regular coil. This behavior is reminiscent of the coiling of a falling flexible rope. We derive a simple scaling law that predicts the coiling frequency in terms of the filament radius and the flow rate. We also verify this scaling law with the results of experiments.

  1. Laminated magnet field coil sheath

    DOEpatents

    Skaritka, John R.

    1987-12-01

    a method for manufacturing a magnet cable trim coil in a sheath assembly for use in a cryogenic particle accelerator. A precisely positioned pattern of trim coil turns is bonded to a flexible substrate sheath that is capable of withstanding cryogenic operating conditions. In the method of the invention the flexible sheath, with the trim coil pattern precisely positioned thereon, is accurately positioned at a precise location relative to a bore tube assembly of an accelerator and is then bonded to the bore tube with a tape suitable for cryogenic application. The resultant assembly can be readily handled and installed within an iron magnet yoke assembly of a suitable cryogenic particle accelerator.

  2. Laminated magnet field coil sheath

    DOEpatents

    Skaritka, J.R.

    1987-05-15

    A method for manufacturing a magnetic cable trim coil in a sheath assembly for use in a cryogenic particle accelerator. A precisely positioned pattern of trim coil turns is bonded to a flexible substrate sheath that is capable of withstanding cryogenic operating conditions. In the method of the invention the flexible substrate sheath, with the trim coil pattern precisely location relative to a bore tube assembly of an accelerator and is then bonded to the bore tube with a tape suitable for cryogenic application. The resultant assembly can be readily handled and installed within an iron magnet yoke assembly of a suitable cryogenic particle accelerator. 1 fig.

  3. ASTROMAG coil cooling study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maytal, Ben-Zion; Vansciver, Steven W.

    1990-01-01

    ASTROMAG is a planned particle astrophysics magnetic facility. Basically it is a large magnetic spectrometer outside the Earth's atmosphere for an extended period of time in orbit on a space station. A definition team summarized its scientific objectives assumably related to fundamental questions of astrophysics, cosmology, and elementary particle physics. Since magnetic induction of about 7 Tesla is desired, it is planned to be a superconducting magnet cooled to liquid helium 2 temperatures. The general structure of ASTROMAG is based on: (1) two superconducting magnetic coils, (2) dewar of liquid helium 2 to provide cooling capability for the magnets; (3) instrumentation, matter-anti matter spectrometer (MAS) and cosmic ray isotope spectrometer (CRIS); and (4) interfaces to the shuttle and space station. Many configurations of the superconducting magnets and the dewar were proposed and evaluated, since those are the heart of the ASTROMAG. Baseline of the magnet configuration and cryostat as presented in the phase A study and the one kept in mind while doing the present study are presented. ASTROMAG's development schedule reflects the plan of launching to the space station in 1995.

  4. Growth factor identity is encoded by discrete coiled coil rotamers in the EGFR juxtamembrane region

    PubMed Central

    Doerner, Amy; Scheck, Rebecca; Schepartz, Alanna

    2015-01-01

    Summary Binding of the growth factor TGF-α to the EGFR extracellular domain is encoded through the formation of a unique anti-parallel coiled coil within the juxtamembrane segment. This new coiled coil is an ‘inside-out’ version of the coiled coil formed in the presence of EGF. A third, intermediary coiled coil interface is formed in the juxtamembrane segment when EGFR is stimulated with betacellulin. The seven growth factors that activate EGFR in mammalian systems (EGF, TGF-α, epigen, epiregulin, betacellulin, heparin-binding EGF, and amphiregulin) fall into distinct categories in which the structure of the coiled coil induced within the juxtamembrane segment correlates with cell state. The observation that coiled coil state tracks with the downstream signaling profiles for each ligand provides evidence for growth factor functional selectivity by EGFR. Encoding growth factor identity in alternative coiled coil rotamers provides a simple and elegant method for communicating chemical information across the plasma membrane. PMID:26091170

  5. High-resolution structures of a heterochiral coiled coil

    PubMed Central

    Mortenson, David E.; Steinkruger, Jay D.; Kreitler, Dale F.; Perroni, Dominic V.; Sorenson, Gregory P.; Huang, Lijun; Mittal, Ritesh; Yun, Hyun Gi; Travis, Benjamin R.; Mahanthappa, Mahesh K.; Forest, Katrina T.; Gellman, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between polypeptide chains containing amino acid residues with opposite absolute configurations have long been a source of interest and speculation, but there is very little structural information for such heterochiral associations. The need to address this lacuna has grown in recent years because of increasing interest in the use of peptides generated from d amino acids (d peptides) as specific ligands for natural proteins, e.g., to inhibit deleterious protein–protein interactions. Coiled–coil interactions, between or among α-helices, represent the most common tertiary and quaternary packing motif in proteins. Heterochiral coiled–coil interactions were predicted over 50 years ago by Crick, and limited experimental data obtained in solution suggest that such interactions can indeed occur. To address the dearth of atomic-level structural characterization of heterochiral helix pairings, we report two independent crystal structures that elucidate coiled-coil packing between l- and d-peptide helices. Both structures resulted from racemic crystallization of a peptide corresponding to the transmembrane segment of the influenza M2 protein. Networks of canonical knobs-into-holes side-chain packing interactions are observed at each helical interface. However, the underlying patterns for these heterochiral coiled coils seem to deviate from the heptad sequence repeat that is characteristic of most homochiral analogs, with an apparent preference for a hendecad repeat pattern. PMID:26460035

  6. Analyses of temperature-dependent interface states, series resistances, and AC electrical conductivities of Al/p—Si and Al/Bi4Ti3O12/p—Si structures by using the admittance spectroscopy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mert, Yıldırım; Perihan, Durmuş; Şemsettin, Altındal

    2013-10-01

    In this study, Al/p—Si and Al/Bi4Ti3O12/p—Si structures are fabricated and their interface states (Nss), the values of series resistance (Rs), and AC electrical conductivityac) are obtained each as a function of temperature using admittance spectroscopy method which includes capacitance—voltage (C—V) and conductance—voltage (G—V) measurements. In addition, the effect of interfacial Bi4Ti3O12 (BTO) layer on the performance of the structure is investigated. The voltage-dependent profiles of Nss and Rs are obtained from the high-low frequency capacitance method and the Nicollian method, respectively. Experimental results show that Nss and Rs, as strong functions of temperature and applied bias voltage, each exhibit a peak, whose position shifts towards the reverse bias region, in the depletion region. Such a peak behavior is attributed to the particular distribution of Nss and the reordering and restructuring of Nss under the effect of temperature. The values of activation energy (Ea), obtained from the slope of the Arrhenius plot, of both structures are obtained to be bias voltage-independent, and the Ea of the metal-ferroelectric-semiconductor (MFS) structure is found to be half that of the metal—semiconductor (MS) structure. Furthermore, other main electrical parameters, such as carrier concentration of acceptor atoms (NA), built-in potential (Vbi), Fermi energy (EF), image force barrier lowering (Δ Φb), and barrier height (Φb), are extracted using reverse bias C-2—V characteristics as a function of temperature.

  7. Design and Construction of Test Coils for the MICE Coupling Solenoid Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Xu, F.Y.; Liu, XioaKun; Chen, AnBin; Li, LanKai; Gou, XingLong; Wu, Hong; Green, Michael; Li, Darun; Strauss, Bruce

    2008-08-08

    The superconducting coupling solenoid to be applied in the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is made from copper matrix Nb-Ti conductors with inner radius of 750 mm, length of 285 mm and thickness of 102.5 mm at room temperature. The magnetic field up to 2.6 T at the magnet centerline is to keep the muons within the MICE RF cavities. Its self inductance is around 592 H and its magnet stored energy is about 13 MJ at a full current of 210 A for the worst operation case of the MICE channel. The stress induced inside the coil during cool down and charging is relatively high. Two test coils are to build and test in order to validate the design method and develop the fabrication technique required for the coupling coil winding, one is 350 mm inner diameter and full length same as the coupling coil, and the other is one-quarter length and 1.5 m diameter. The 1.5 m diameter coil will be charged to strain conditions that are greater than would be encountered in the coupling coil. This paper presents detailed design of the test coils as well as developed winding skills. The analyses on stress in coil assemblies, AC loss, and quench process are carried out.

  8. Adjustable Induction-Heating Coil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Rod; Bartolotta, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Improved design for induction-heating work coil facilitates optimization of heating in different metal specimens. Three segments adjusted independently to obtain desired distribution of temperature. Reduces time needed to achieve required temperature profiles.

  9. Zero-angle helical coil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troendle, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Device is constructed of bimetallic stock material formed into segments of small diameters and fastened together by metal strips. Coil is useful in various types of actuators, such as temperature controls.

  10. Numerical dosimetry of transcranial magnetic stimulation coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowther, Lawrence; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2014-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive neuromodulation technique capable of stimulating neurons by means of electromagnetic induction. TMS can be used to map brain function and shows promise for the diagnosis and treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Calculation of fields induced in the brain are necessary to accurately identify stimulated neural tissue during TMS. This allows the development of novel TMS coil designs capable of stimulating deeper brain regions and increasing the localization of stimulation that can be achieved. We have performed numerical calculations of magnetic and electric field with high-resolution anatomically realistic human head models to find these stimulated brain regions for a variety of proposed TMS coil designs. The realistic head models contain heterogeneous tissue structures and electrical conductivities, yielding superior results to those obtained from the simplified homogeneous head models that are commonly employed. The attenuation of electric field as a function of depth in the brain and the localization of stimulating field have been methodically investigated. In addition to providing a quantitative comparison of different TMS coil designs the variation of induced field between subjects has been investigated. We also show the differences in induced fields between adult, adolescent and child head models to preemptively identify potential safety issues in the application of pediatric TMS.

  11. Dynamics of liquid rope coiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, Mehdi; Maleki, Maniya; Golestanian, Ramin; Ribe, Neil M.; Bonn, Daniel

    2006-12-01

    We present a combined experimental and numerical investigation of the coiling of a liquid “rope” falling on a solid surface, focusing on three little-explored aspects of the phenomenon: The time dependence of “inertio-gravitational” coiling, the systematic dependence of the radii of the coil and the rope on the experimental parameters, and the “secondary buckling” of the columnar structure generated by high-frequency coiling. Inertio-gravitational coiling is characterized by oscillations between states with different frequencies, and we present experimental observations of four distinct branches of such states in the frequency-fall height space. The transitions between coexisting states have no characteristic period, may take place with or without a change in the sense of rotation, and usually (but not always) occur via an intermediate “figure of eight” state. We present extensive laboratory measurements of the radii of the coil and of the rope within it, and show that they agree well with the predictions of a “slender-rope” numerical model. Finally, we use dimensional analysis to reveal a systematic variation of the critical column height for secondary buckling as a function of (dimensionless) flow rate and surface tension parameters.

  12. Nylon screws make inexpensive coil forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aucoin, G.; Rosenthal, C.

    1978-01-01

    Standard nylon screws act as coil form copper wire laid down in spiral thread. Completed coil may be bonded to printed-circuit board. However, it is impossible to tune coil by adjusting spacing between windings, technique sometimes used with air-core coils.

  13. An active magnetic bearing with high T(sub c) superconducting coils and ferromagnetic cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.; Dirusso, E.; Provenza, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    A proof-of-feasibility demonstration showed that high-T(sub c) superconductor (HTS) coils can be used in a high-load, active magnetic bearing in LN2. A homopolar radial bearing with commercially wound HTS (Bi 2223) bias and control coils produced over 890 N (200 lb) radial load capacity (measured non-rotatings) and supported a shaft to 14,000 rpm. The goal was to show that HTS coils can operate stably with ferromagnetic cores in a feedback controlled system at a current density similar to that for Cu in LN2. The bias coil, wound with non-twisted, multifilament HTS conductor, dissipated negligible power for its direct current. The control coils, wound with monofilament HTS sheathed in Ag, dissipated negligible power for direct current. AC losses increased rapidly with frequency and quadratically with AC amplitude. Above about 2 Hz, the effective resistance of the control coils exceeds that of the silver which is in electrical parallel with the oxide superconductor. These results show that twisted multifilament conductor is not needed for stable levitation but may be desired to reduce control power for sizable dynamic loads.

  14. Experimental and numerical study of a YBCO pancake coil with a magnetic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Kvitkovic, J.; Pamidi, S. V.; Coombs, T. A.

    2012-12-01

    A finite element model for a YBCO pancake coil with a magnetic substrate is developed in this paper. An axial symmetrical H formulation and the E-J power law are used to construct the model, with the magnetic substrate considered by introducing an extra time-dependent term in the formula. A pancake coil is made and tested. The measurement of critical current and transport loss is compared to the model result, showing good consistency. The influence of magnetic substrate in the condition of AC and DC current is studied. The AC loss decreases without a magnetic substrate. It is observed that when the applied DC current approaches the critical current the coil turn loss profile changes completely in the presence of magnetic substrate due to the change of magnetic field distribution.

  15. Retrieval of Distally Migrated Coils with Detachable Intracranial Stent during Coil Embolization of Cerebral Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Devendra Pal; Huang, Lijin; Lee, Won Joo

    2016-01-01

    Migration of coils during endovascular procedures is a rare, but well-known complication. We are reporting two cases of successfully retrieving migrated coil using detachable intracranial stent. In both of our cases there was distal migration of coil during the intracranial aneurysm coiling procedure. The Solitaire® AB stent (Covidien, Irvine, CA, USA) was used to retrieve those coils. The stent was passed distal to the migrated coil using standard technique. It was then partially deployed and gradually withdrawn along with the entangled coil. Coil retrieval using the fully retrievable intracranial stent is a very simple, safe and easily available alternative for retrieval of distally migrated coil. PMID:27114967

  16. AC magnetic measurements of the ALS Booster Dipole Engineering Model Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.I.; Keller, R.; Nelson, D.H.; Hoyer, E.

    1989-03-01

    10 Hz sine wave and 2 Hz sawtooth AC magnetic measurements of he curved ALS Booster Dipole Engineering Model Magnet have been accomplished. Long curved coils were utilized to measure the integral transfer function and uniformity. Point coils and a Hall Probe were used to measure magnetic induction and its uniformity. The data were logged and processed by a Tektronix 11401 digital oscilloscope. The dependence of the effective length on the field was determined from the ratio of the integral coil signals to the point coil signals. Quadrupole and sextupole harmonics were derived from the point and integral uniformity measurements. 5 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Eddy current gauge for monitoring displacement using printed circuit coil

    DOEpatents

    Visioli, Jr., Armando J.

    1977-01-01

    A proximity detection system for non-contact displacement and proximity measurement of static or dynamic metallic or conductive surfaces is provided wherein the measurement is obtained by monitoring the change in impedance of a flat, generally spiral-wound, printed circuit coil which is excited by a constant current, constant frequency source. The change in impedance, which is detected as a corresponding change in voltage across the coil, is related to the eddy current losses in the distant conductive material target. The arrangement provides for considerable linear displacement range with increased accuracies, stability, and sensitivity over the entire range.

  18. JET divertor coils, manufacture, assembly and testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgetta, N.; Bertolini, E.; D'Urzo, C.; Last, J. R.; Laurenti, A.; Presle, P.; Sannazzaro, G.; Tait, J.; Tesini, A.

    1994-07-01

    Four coils have been built and installed in the JET vacuum vessel to produce divertor plasmas. The coils are copper with glass epoxy insulation and are enclosed in vacuum tight Inconel cases. At the coil contractor's factory, the coil parts were manufactured and process techniques qualified. In the JET vacuum vessel the conductor bars were brazed to form the coils, which were inserted in the casings and impregnated and cured with epoxy resin.

  19. Development and testing of the cooling coil cleaning end effector

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.I.; Mullen, O.D.; Powell, M.R.; Daly, D.S.; Engel, D.W.

    1997-09-30

    The Retrieval Process Development and Enhancement (KPD{ampersand}E) program has developed and tested an end effector to support the waste retrieval mission at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The end effector was developed specifically to remove a sticky waste material from the cooling coils in the High Level Liquid Waste (HLLW) tank, and to vacuum up a sediment layer that has settled beneath the cooling coils. An extensive testing program was conducted in the hydraulic test bed (HTB) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to evaluate the performance of the end effector under simulated in-tank conditions. A mock up of the cooling coils was installed in the test bed tank, and simulated waste materials were included to represent the sticky waste on the tubes and the particulate waste settled beneath them. The testing program focused on assessing long-duration mining strategies for cleaning the cooling coils and removing the particulate waste forms. The report describes the results of the end effector testing program at PNNL. Section 2 describes the physical characteristics of the HLLW tanks, including the layout of the cooling coils, and it also describes what is known of the waste forms in the tanks. Section 3 describes the cleaning and retrieval strategy that was used in developing the end effector design. Section 4 describes the cooling coil mockup in the hydraulic test bed. Section 5 discusses the rationale used in selecting the simulants for the tarry waste and particulate waste forms. Section 6 describes the tests that were performed to evaluate cleaning of the cooling coils and retrieval of the particulate simulant. Section 7 summarizes the cleaning and retrieval tests, assesses the relative importance of cleaning the cooling coils and retrieving the particulate waste, and suggests modifications that would simplify the end effector design.

  20. Crystal structures of the coil 2B fragment and the globular tail domain of human lamin B1

    SciTech Connect

    Ruan, Jianbin; Xu, Chao; Bian, Chuanbing; Lam, Robert; Wang, Jia-Pey; Kania, Joanna; Min, Jinrong; Zang, Jianye

    2012-07-18

    We present here the crystal structures of human lamin B1 globular tail domain and coiled 2B domain, which adopt similar folds to Ig-like domain and coiled-coil domain of lamin A, respectively. Despite the overall similarity, we found an extra intermolecular disulfide bond in the lamin B1 coil 2B domain, which does not exist in lamin A/C. In addition, the structural analysis indicates that interactions at the lamin B1 homodimer interface are quite different from those of lamin A/C. Thus our research not only reveals the diversely formed homodimers among lamin family members, but also sheds light on understanding the important roles of lamin B1 in forming the nuclear lamina matrix.

  1. Tropomyosin lysine reactivities and relationship to coiled-coil structure.

    PubMed

    Hitchcock-DeGregori, S E; Lewis, S F; Chou, T M

    1985-06-18

    We have carried out a detailed analysis of tropomyosin structure using lysines as specific probes for the protein surface in regions of the molecule that have not been investigated by other methods. We have measured the relative reactivities of lysines in rabbit skeletal muscle alpha, alpha-tropomyosin with acetic anhydride using a competitive labeling procedure. We have identified 37 of 39 lysines and find that they range 20-fold in reactivity. The observed reactivities are related to the coiled-coil model of the tropomyosin molecule [Crick, F.H.C. (1953) Acta Crystallogr. 6, 689-697; McLachlan, A.D., Stewart, M., & Smillie, L.B. (1975) J. Mol. Biol. 98, 281-291] and other available chemical and physical information about the structure. In most cases, the observed lysine reactivities can be explained by allowable interactions with neighboring amino acid side chains on the same or facing alpha-helix. However, we found no correlation between reactivity and helical position of a given lysine. For example, lysines in the outer helical positions included lysines of low as well as high reactivity, indicating that they vary widely in their accessibility to solvent and that the coiled coil is heterogeneous along its length. Furthermore, the middle of the molecule (residues 126-182) that is susceptible to proteolysis and known to be the least stable region of the protein also contains some of the least and most reactive lysines. We have discussed the implications of our results on our understanding the structures of tropomyosin and other coiled-coil proteins as well as globular proteins containing helical regions. PMID:3927977

  2. Designed coiled coils promote folding of a recombinant bacterial collagen.

    PubMed

    Yoshizumi, Ayumi; Fletcher, Jordan M; Yu, Zhuoxin; Persikov, Anton V; Bartlett, Gail J; Boyle, Aimee L; Vincent, Thomas L; Woolfson, Derek N; Brodsky, Barbara

    2011-05-20

    Collagen triple helices fold slowly and inefficiently, often requiring adjacent globular domains to assist this process. In the Streptococcus pyogenes collagen-like protein Scl2, a V domain predicted to be largely α-helical, occurs N-terminal to the collagen triple helix (CL). Here, we replace this natural trimerization domain with a de novo designed, hyperstable, parallel, three-stranded, α-helical coiled coil (CC), either at the N terminus (CC-CL) or the C terminus (CL-CC) of the collagen domain. CD spectra of the constructs are consistent with additivity of independently and fully folded CC and CL domains, and the proteins retain their distinctive thermal stabilities, CL at ∼37 °C and CC at >90 °C. Heating the hybrid proteins to 50 °C unfolds CL, leaving CC intact, and upon cooling, the rate of CL refolding is somewhat faster for CL-CC than for CC-CL. A construct with coiled coils on both ends, CC-CL-CC, retains the ∼37 °C thermal stability for CL but shows less triple helix at low temperature and less denaturation at 50 °C. Most strikingly however, in CC-CL-CC, the CL refolds slower than in either CC-CL or CL-CC by almost two orders of magnitude. We propose that a single CC promotes folding of the CL domain via nucleation and in-register growth from one end, whereas initiation and growth from both ends in CC-CL-CC results in mismatched registers that frustrate folding. Bioinformatics analysis of natural collagens lends support to this because, where present, there is generally only one coiled-coil domain close to the triple helix, and it is nearly always N-terminal to the collagen repeat. PMID:21454493

  3. Current-Voltage Measurements in a 2G YBCO Coil

    SciTech Connect

    Rey, Christopher M; Duckworth, Robert C

    2007-01-01

    Abstract- The Oak Ridge National Laboratory in collaboration with American Superconductor Corporation and Cryomagnetics Inc. has designed, fabricated, and tested an HTS coil wound with second-generation (2G) YBCO coated conductor tape. The purpose of the HTS coil project was to study the quench characteristics in 2G YBCO coils at 77 K and lower temperatures (~ 30-45 K). These quench characteristics were investigated in both a pool boiling LN2 environment and in a conduction cooled configuration at ~ 30 K and 45 K. Transport critical current (Ic) measurements taken on the very first thermal cycle of the YBCO coil in pool boiling LN2 showed an Ic ~ 31 A corresponding to a central magnetic field of 0.32 T. The measured Ic value was consistent with the calculated value using the calculated maximum perpendicular B-field component and the measured short sample Ic at 77 K. Subsequent Ic measurements taken in the conduction cooling configuration at 34 K and 45 K, showed a steady-state Ic ~ 45-49 A and 38-44 A, respectively. These Ic values were significantly lower than the calculated value assuming a literature derived temperature dependent Ic of the 2G YBCO tape. A steady degradation was observed in the Ic of the coil with each successive thermal cycle. In addition, the coil was also pulse tested up to 1-T in non-steady state transient conditions and for ramp rates varying between 0.01 and 5 A/s. The problems and limitations encountered during testing of this new type of 2G coil is briefly discussed.

  4. Superconducting shielded core reactor with reduced AC losses

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Yung S.; Hull, John R.

    2006-04-04

    A superconducting shielded core reactor (SSCR) operates as a passive device for limiting excessive AC current in a circuit operating at a high power level under a fault condition such as shorting. The SSCR includes a ferromagnetic core which may be either closed or open (with an air gap) and extends into and through a superconducting tube or superconducting rings arranged in a stacked array. First and second series connected copper coils each disposed about a portion of the iron core are connected to the circuit to be protected and are respectively wound inside and outside of the superconducting tube or rings. A large impedance is inserted into the circuit by the core when the shielding capability of the superconducting arrangement is exceeded by the applied magnetic field generated by the two coils under a fault condition to limit the AC current in the circuit. The proposed SSCR also affords reduced AC loss compared to conventional SSCRs under continuous normal operation.

  5. Further tests of the Argonne 3. 3-MJ pulsed superconducting coil and its nonmetallic cryostat

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Krieger, C.; McGhee, D.

    1983-05-01

    A split-pair superconducting coil of the Pulsed Cable Test Facility (PCTF) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has been successfully tested both in DC and pulsing modes. At a peak operating current of 11 kA, the peak magnetic field and stored energy of the coil are 6.5 T and 3.3 MJ, respectively. In the pulsing test, the coil was charged to 10.55 kA in 1.0 s and discharged to zero in 1.6 s. The ac losses of the coil in this mode were 7.5 kJ/pulse. The coil is composed of two solenoids each with 22 layers and 9.14 turns per layer. The cable for the coil consists of 24, 19-strand NbTi subcables. The nonmetallic cryostat of the PCTF consists of two fiberglass reinforced polyester resin vessels. Developmental high current conductors can be tested under the PCTF pulsing magnetic fields in a form of pancake coils or as a short sample for the studies of pulsing effects.

  6. Transient voltage oscillations in coils

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhuri, P.

    1985-01-01

    Magnet coils may be excited into internal voltage oscillations by transient voltages. Such oscillations may electrically stress the magnet's dielectric components to many times its normal stress. This may precipitate a dielectric failure, and the attendant prolonged loss of service and costly repair work. Therefore, it is important to know the natural frequencies of oscillations of a magnet during the design stage, and to determine whether the expected switching transient voltages can excite the magnet into high-voltage internal oscillations. The series capacitance of a winding significantly affects its natural frequencies. However, the series capacitance is difficult to calculate, because it may comprise complex capacitance network, consisting of intra- and inter-coil turn-to-turn capacitances of the coil sections. A method of calculating the series capacitance of a winding is proposed. This method is rigorous but simple to execute. The time-varying transient voltages along the winding are also calculated.

  7. Induction logging device with a pair of mutually perpendicular bucking coils

    DOEpatents

    Koelle, Alfred R.; Landt, Jeremy A.

    1981-01-01

    An instrument is disclosed for mapping vertical conductive fractures in a resistive bedrock, magnetically inducing eddy currents by a pair of vertically oriented, mutually perpendicular, coplanar coils. The eddy currents drive magnetic fields which are picked up by a second, similar pair of coils.

  8. The structure of the GemC1 coiled coil and its interaction with the Geminin family of coiled-coil proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Caillat, Christophe; Fish, Alexander; Pefani, Dafni-Eleftheria; Taraviras, Stavros; Lygerou, Zoi; Perrakis, Anastassis

    2015-10-31

    The GemC1 coiled-coil structure has subtle differences compared with its homologues Geminin and Idas. Co-expression experiments in cells and biophysical stability analysis of the Geminin-family coiled coils suggest that the GemC1 coiled coil alone is unstable. GemC1, together with Idas and Geminin, an important regulator of DNA-replication licensing and differentiation decisions, constitute a superfamily sharing a homologous central coiled-coil domain. To better understand this family of proteins, the crystal structure of a GemC1 coiled-coil domain variant engineered for better solubility was determined to 2.2 Å resolution. GemC1 shows a less typical coiled coil compared with the Geminin homodimer and the Geminin–Idas heterodimer structures. It is also shown that both in vitro and in cells GemC1 interacts with Geminin through its coiled-coil domain, forming a heterodimer that is more stable that the GemC1 homodimer. Comparative analysis of the thermal stability of all of the possible superfamily complexes, using circular dichroism to follow the unfolding of the entire helix of the coiled coil, or intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of a unique conserved N-terminal tryptophan, shows that the unfolding of the coiled coil is likely to take place from the C-terminus towards the N-terminus. It is also shown that homodimers show a single-state unfolding, while heterodimers show a two-state unfolding, suggesting that the dimer first falls apart and the helices then unfold according to the stability of each protein. The findings argue that Geminin-family members form homodimers and heterodimers between them, and this ability is likely to be important for modulating their function in cycling and differentiating cells.

  9. Electromagnetic Gun With Commutated Coils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, David G.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed electromagnetic gun includes electromagnet coil, turns of which commutated in sequence along barrel. Electrical current fed to two armatures by brushes sliding on bus bars in barrel. Interaction between armature currents and magnetic field from coil produces force accelerating armature, which in turn, pushes on projectile. Commutation scheme chosen so magnetic field approximately coincides and moves with cylindrical region defined by armatures. Scheme has disadvantage of complexity, but in return, enables designer to increase driving magnetic field without increasing armature current. Attainable muzzle velocity increased substantially.

  10. Differential-Coil Eddy-Current Material Sorter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nummelin, J.; Buckley, D.

    1985-01-01

    Small metal or other electrically conductive parts of same shape but different composition quickly sorted with differential-coil eddy-current sorter. Developed to distinguish between turbine blades of different alloys, hardnesses, and residual stress, sorter generally applicable to parts of simple and complex shape.

  11. Electrical and Quench Performance of the First MICE Coupling Coil

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tartaglia, M. A.; Carcagno, R.; Makulski, A.; Nogiec, Jerzy; Orris, D.; Pilipenko, R.; Sylvester, C.; Caspi, S.; Pan, H.; Prestemon, S.; et al

    2014-11-10

    The first MICE Coupling Coil has been tested in a conduction-cooled environment in the new Solenoid Test Facility at Fermilab. We present an overview of the power and quench protection scheme, and report on the electrical and quench performance results obtained during cold power tests of the magnet.

  12. [Two Cases of Ruptured Cerebral Aneurysm Complicated with Delayed Coil Protrusion after Coil Embolization].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Takashi; Ogata, Atsushi; Ebashi, Ryo; Takase, Yukinori; Masuoka, Jun; Kawashima, Masatou; Abe, Tatsuya

    2016-07-01

    We report two cases of delayed coil protrusion after coil embolization for ruptured cerebral aneurysms. Case 1:An 82-year-old woman with a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured small anterior communicating artery aneurysm underwent successful coil embolization. Eighteen days after the procedure, coil protrusion from the aneurysm into the right anterior cerebral artery was observed without any symptoms. Further coil protrusion did not develop after 28 days. Case 2:A 78-year-old woman with a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured small left middle cerebral artery aneurysm underwent successful coil embolization. Twenty days after the procedure, coil protrusion from the aneurysm into the left middle cerebral artery was observed, with a transient ischemic attack. Further coil protrusion did not develop. Both patients recovered with antithrombotic treatment. Even though delayed coil protrusion after coil embolization is rare, it should be recognized as a long-term complication of coil embolization for cerebral aneurysms. PMID:27384117

  13. Ac-loss measurement of a DyBCO-Roebel assembled coated conductor cable (RACC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuller, S.; Goldacker, W.; Kling, A.; Krempasky, L.; Schmidt, C.

    2007-10-01

    Low ac-loss HTS cables for transport currents well above 1 kA are required for application in transformers and generators and are taken into consideration for future generations of fusion reactor coils. Coated conductors (CC) are suitable candidates for high field application at an operation temperature around 50-77 K, which is a crucial precondition for economical cooling costs. We prepared a short length of a Roebel bar cable made of industrial DyBCO coated conductor (Theva Company, Germany). Meander shaped tapes of 4 mm width with a twist pitch of 122 mm were cut from 10 mm wide CC tapes using a specially designed tool. Eleven of these strands were assembled to a cable. The electrical and mechanical connection of the tapes was achieved using a silver powder filled conductive epoxy resin. Ac-losses of a short sample in an external ac field were measured as a function of frequency and field amplitude in transverse and parallel field orientations. In addition, the coupling current time constant of the sample was directly measured.

  14. AC loss in high-temperature superconducting conductors, cables and windings for power devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oomen, M. P.; Rieger, J.; Hussennether, V.; Leghissa, M.

    2004-05-01

    High-temperature superconducting (HTS) transformers and reactor coils promise decreased weight and volume and higher efficiency. A critical design parameter for such devices is the AC loss in the conductor. The state of the art for AC-loss reduction in HTS power devices is described, starting from the loss in the single HTS tape. Improved tape manufacturing techniques have led to a significant decrease in the magnetization loss. Transport-current loss is decreased by choosing the right operating current and temperature. The role of tape dimensions, filament twist and resistive matrix is discussed and a comparison is made between state-of-the-art BSCCO and YBCO tapes. In transformer and reactor coils the AC loss in the tape is influenced by adjacent tapes in the coil, fields from other coils, overcurrents and higher harmonics. These factors are accounted for by a new AC-loss prediction model. Field components perpendicular to the tape are minimized by optimizing the coil design and by flux guidance pieces. High-current windings are made of Roebel conductors with transposed tapes. The model iteratively finds the temperature distribution in the winding and predicts the onset of thermal instability. We have fabricated and tested several AC windings and used them to validate the model. Now we can confidently use the model as an engineering tool for designing HTS windings and for determining the necessary tape properties.

  15. Finite element coiled cochlea model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isailovic, Velibor; Nikolic, Milica; Milosevic, Zarko; Saveljic, Igor; Nikolic, Dalibor; Radovic, Milos; Filipović, Nenad

    2015-12-01

    Cochlea is important part of the hearing system, and thanks to special structure converts external sound waves into neural impulses which go to the brain. Shape of the cochlea is like snail, so geometry of the cochlea model is complex. The simplified cochlea coiled model was developed using finite element method inside SIFEM FP7 project. Software application is created on the way that user can prescribe set of the parameters for spiral cochlea, as well as material properties and boundary conditions to the model. Several mathematical models were tested. The acoustic wave equation for describing fluid in the cochlea chambers - scala vestibuli and scala timpani, and Newtonian dynamics for describing vibrations of the basilar membrane are used. The mechanical behavior of the coiled cochlea was analyzed and the third chamber, scala media, was not modeled because it does not have a significant impact on the mechanical vibrations of the basilar membrane. The obtained results are in good agreement with experimental measurements. Future work is needed for more realistic geometry model. Coiled model of the cochlea was created and results are compared with initial simplified coiled model of the cochlea.

  16. Coupled Coils, Magnets and Lenz's Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Great scientists in the past have experimented with coils and magnets. Here we have a variation where coupling occurs between two coils and the oscillatory motion of two magnets to give somewhat surprising results. (Contains 6 figures and 1 footnote.)

  17. E-coil: an inverse boundary element method for a quasi-static problem.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Clemente Cobos; Garcia, Salvador Gonzalez; Power, Henry

    2010-06-01

    Boundary element methods represent a valuable approach for designing gradient coils; these methods are based on meshing the current carrying surface into an array of boundary elements. The temporally varying magnetic fields produced by gradient coils induce electric currents in conducting tissues and so the exposure of human subjects to these magnetic fields has become a safety concern, especially with the increase in the strength of the field gradients used in magnetic resonance imaging. Here we present a boundary element method for the design of coils that minimize the electric field induced in prescribed conducting systems. This work also details some numerical examples of the application of this coil design method. The reduction of the electric field induced in a prescribed region inside the coils is also evaluated. PMID:20463375

  18. Voice Coil Percussive Mechanism Concept for Hammer Drill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okon, Avi

    2009-01-01

    A hammer drill design of a voice coil linear actuator, spring, linear bearings, and a hammer head was proposed. The voice coil actuator moves the hammer head to produce impact to the end of the drill bit. The spring is used to store energy on the retraction and to capture the rebound energy after each impact for use in the next impact. The maximum actuator stroke is 20 mm with the hammer mass being 200 grams. This unit can create impact energy of 0.4 J with 0.8 J being the maximum. This mechanism is less complex than previous devices meant for the same task, so it has less mass and less volume. Its impact rate and energy are easily tunable without changing major hardware components. The drill can be driven by two half-bridges. Heat is removed from the voice coil via CO2 conduction.

  19. Bow-shaped toroidal field coils

    SciTech Connect

    Bonanos, P.

    1981-05-01

    Design features of Bow-Shaped Toroidal Field Coils are described and compared with circular and D shaped coils. The results indicate that bow coils can produce higher field strengths, store more energy and be made demountable. The design offers the potential for the production of ultrahigh toroidal fields. Included are representative coil shapes and their engineering properties, a suggested structural design and an analysis of a specific case.

  20. Multi-Canted Coils, Tubes, and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaster, Mark L. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Coil, tube, and other structures configured with a plurality of individual coils, internal structures, legs or extensions with each having multiple cants per coil, internal structure, leg or extension, and wherein the cants formed therein allow for a load-deflection force when each is compressed. In addition, any horizontal or moment forces are substantially reduced and/or eliminated when a downward vertical force is applied, as minimal or no torsion is created in the individual coils, legs or extensions.

  1. Rotor assembly including superconducting magnetic coil

    DOEpatents

    Snitchler, Gregory L.; Gamble, Bruce B.; Voccio, John P.

    2003-01-01

    Superconducting coils and methods of manufacture include a superconductor tape wound concentrically about and disposed along an axis of the coil to define an opening having a dimension which gradually decreases, in the direction along the axis, from a first end to a second end of the coil. Each turn of the superconductor tape has a broad surface maintained substantially parallel to the axis of the coil.

  2. Construction of a Floating Internal Coil Device for Studying High Beta Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Yuichi; Morikawa, Junji; Ohkuni, Kohtarou; Nihei, Hitoshi; Hori, Dan; Yoshida, Zensho; Mito, Toshiyuki; Yanagi, Nagato; Iwakuma, Narushige

    2001-10-01

    Mahajan-Yoshida has proposed a new relaxation theory, and found a new high-beta plasma configuration with the help of dynamic pressure induced by a strong plasma flow. For exploring this new relaxed configuration, the internal coil device is suitable. Now we are constructing the internal coil device with a floating super-conductor for studying high beta plasmas; the major radius of the internal coil is 15 cm and the coil current is 50 kA, and planning to produce a high density neutral plasma with 2.45 GHz Electron Cyclotron Heating system. The strong plasma flow in toroidal direction is expected by producing non-neutral plasmas. We have adopted to use high temperature superconductor (HTS) tape for the floating coil, expecting easy and reliable operation and maintenance of a super-conducting coil. In addition, the HTS coil is preferable for plasma experiments, because long pulse and/or high power heating experiments might be available due to the high thermal stability property and large heat capacity of the HTS coil. We have fabricated a small HTS coil and succeeded to levitate it with an accuracy of a few tens micrometers.

  3. Split Coil Forms for Rotary Transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, C. W. T.

    1982-01-01

    Split cores for rotor and stator windings of rotary transformer mounted around their respective coils (which are in bobbins) and cemented together. This arrangement simplifies winding of stator coil to go in a slot in inner diameter of stator coil. One practical application of rotary transformers fabricated according to this technique is for centrifuges, in which conventional sliprings are of uncertain reliability.

  4. Inductively coupled wireless RF coil arrays.

    PubMed

    Bulumulla, S B; Fiveland, E; Park, K J; Foo, T K; Hardy, C J

    2015-04-01

    As the number of coils increases in multi-channel MRI receiver-coil arrays, RF cables and connectors become increasingly bulky and heavy, degrading patient comfort and slowing workflow. Inductive coupling of signals provides an attractive "wireless" approach, with the potential to reduce coil weight and cost while simplifying patient setup. In this work, multi-channel inductively coupled anterior arrays were developed and characterized for 1.5T imaging. These comprised MR receiver coils inductively (or "wirelessly") linked to secondary or "sniffer" coils whose outputs were transmitted via preamps to the MR system cabinet. The induced currents in the imaging coils were blocked by passive diode circuits during RF transmit. The imaging arrays were totally passive, obviating the need to deliver power to the coils, and providing lightweight, untethered signal reception with easily positioned coils. Single-shot fast spin echo images were acquired from 5 volunteers using a 7-element inductively coupled coil array and a conventionally cabled 7-element coil array of identical geometry, with the inductively-coupled array showing a relative signal-to-noise ratio of 0.86 +/- 0.07. The concept was extended to a larger 9-element coil array to demonstrate the effect of coil element size on signal transfer and RF-transmit blocking. PMID:25523607

  5. Liquid nitrogen tests of a Torus coil for the Jefferson Lab 12GeV accelerator upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Fair, Ruben J.; Ghoshal, Probir K.; Bruhwel, Krister B.; Kashy, David H.; Machie, Danny; Bachimanchi, Ramakrishna; Taylor, William; Fischer, John W.; Legg, Robert A.; Powers, Jacob R.

    2015-06-01

    A magnet system consisting of six superconducting trapezoidal racetrack-type coils is being built for the Jefferson Lab 12-GeV accelerator upgrade project. The magnet coils are wound with Superconducting Super Collider-36 NbTi strand Rutherford cable soldered into a copper channel. Each superconducting toroidal coil is force cooled by liquid helium, which circulates in a tube that is in good thermal contact with the inside of the coil. Thin copper sheets are soldered to the helium cooling tube and enclose the superconducting coil, providing cooling to the rest of the coil pack. As part of a rigorous risk mitigation exercise, each of the six coils is cooled with liquid nitrogen (LN2) to 80 K to validate predicted thermal stresses, verify the robustness and integrity of electrical insulation, and evaluate the efficacy of the employed conduction cooling method. This paper describes the test setup, the tests performed, and the findings.

  6. Offset cooling coil fin

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, C.K.; McCabe, M.P.

    1993-06-29

    An improved plate fin heat exchanger of the type having a plurality of longitudinally stacked plate fin members with each having a plurality of transversely spaced rows of openings formed therein, and tubes being disposed through successive aligned holes for conducting the flow of coolant therethrough for cooling air as it passes transversely between the plate fin members from a leading edge to a trailing edge thereof, wherein the improvement is described comprises: the plate fin leading edges being spaced from the nearest row of openings by one distance; the plate fin trailing edges being spaced from the nearest row of openings by another distance substantially greater than the one distance, such that when the trailing edges are oriented in a vertical disposition there is sufficient plate fin surface area near the trailing edge such that condensate residing thereon will tend to run vertically down the plate fin trailing edges rather than being blown off by the flow of air; and condensate collection means disposed below the plate fin trailing edges for receiving condensate flow from the lower ends thereof.

  7. ACS Quicklook PDF products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchkov, Anatoly

    1999-12-01

    This report details the features of the ACS quicklook PDF products produced by the HST data pipeline. The requirements closely follow the design of paper products recommended by the Data Quality Committee, with appropriate changes required to fully support ACS.

  8. Anisotropy of 2G HTS racetrack coils in external magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudy, Michal; Chen, Yiran; Zhang, Min; Coombs, T. A.

    2013-07-01

    Pancake or racetrack coils wound with second generation high-temperature superconductors (2G HTSs) are important elements for numerous applications of HTS. The applications of these coils are primarily in rotating machines such as motors and generators where they must withstand external magnetic fields from various orientations. The characterization of 2G HTS coils is mostly focused on AC loss assessment, critical current and maximum magnetic field evaluation. In this study, racetrack coils will be placed in different orientations of external magnetic fields—Jc (Ic) versus angle measurements will be performed and interpreted. Full attention is paid to studies of anisotropy Jc versus angle curves for short samples of 2G HTS tapes. As will be shown, the shape of the Jc versus angle curves for tapes has a strong influence on the Jc (Ic) versus angle curves for coils. In this work, a unique and unpredicted behavior of the Jc versus angle curves for the 2G HTS racetrack coils was found. This will be analyzed and fully explained.

  9. Method and apparatus for connecting high voltage leads to a high temperature super-conducting transformer

    DOEpatents

    Golner, Thomas M.; Mehta, Shirish P.

    2005-07-26

    A method and apparatus for connecting high voltage leads to a super-conducting transformer is provided that includes a first super-conducting coil set, a second super-conducting coil set, and a third super-conducting coil set. The first, second and third super-conducting coil sets are connected via an insulated interconnect system that includes insulated conductors and insulated connectors that are utilized to connect the first, second, and third super-conducting coil sets to the high voltage leads.

  10. Coil Embolization for Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of coil embolization compared with surgical clipping to treat intracranial aneurysms. The Technology Endovascular coil embolization is a percutaneous approach to treat an intracranial aneurysm from within the blood vessel without the need of a craniotomy. In this procedure, a microcatheter is inserted into the femoral artery near the groin and navigated to the site of the aneurysm. Small helical platinum coils are deployed through the microcatheter to fill the aneurysm, and prevent it from further expansion and rupture. Health Canada has approved numerous types of coils and coil delivery systems to treat intracranial aneurysms. The most favoured are controlled detachable coils. Coil embolization may be used with other adjunct endovascular devices such as stents and balloons. Background Intracranial Aneurysms Intracranial aneurysms are the dilation or ballooning of part of a blood vessel in the brain. Intracranial aneurysms range in size from small (<12 mm in diameter) to large (12–25 mm), and to giant (>25 mm). There are 3 main types of aneurysms. Fusiform aneurysms involve the entire circumference of the artery; saccular aneurysms have outpouchings; and dissecting aneurysms have tears in the arterial wall. Berry aneurysms are saccular aneurysms with well-defined necks. Intracranial aneurysms may occur in any blood vessel of the brain; however, they are most commonly found at the branch points of large arteries that form the circle of Willis at the base of the brain. In 85% to 95% of patients, they are found in the anterior circulation. Aneurysms in the posterior circulation are less frequent, and are more difficult to treat surgically due to inaccessibility. Most intracranial aneurysms are small and asymptomatic. Large aneurysms may have a mass effect, causing compression on the brain and cranial nerves and neurological deficits. When an intracranial aneurysm ruptures and bleeds

  11. Segmented Coil Fails In Steps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stedman, Ronald S.

    1990-01-01

    Electromagnetic coil degrades in steps when faults occur, continues to operate at reduced level instead of failing catastrophically. Made in segments connected in series and separated by electrically insulating barriers. Fault does not damage adjacent components or create hazard. Used to control valves in such critical applications as cooling systems of power generators and chemical process equipment, where flammable liquids or gases handled. Also adapts to electrical control of motors.

  12. Equations determine coiled tubing collapse pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Avakov, V.; Taliaferro, W.

    1995-07-24

    A set of equations has been developed for calculating pipe collapse pressure for oval tubing such as coiled tubing. When coiled tubing is placed onto a reel, the tubing is forced into an oval shape and never again returns to perfect roundness because the coiling process exceeds the plasticity limits of the tubing. Straightening the tubing for the trip into the well does not restore roundness. The consequence of this physical property is that all coiled tubing collapse pressure calculations should be made considering oval tubing, not round tubing. Tubing collapse can occur when formation pressure against the coiled tubing exceeds the collapse resistance inherent in the coiled tubing. As coiled tubing becomes more oval in shape, it becomes more oval in shape, it becomes more susceptible to collapse from outside pressure.

  13. Coiled transmission line pulse generators

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, Kenneth Fox

    2010-11-09

    Methods and apparatus are provided for fabricating and constructing solid dielectric "Coiled Transmission Line" pulse generators in radial or axial coiled geometries. The pour and cure fabrication process enables a wide variety of geometries and form factors. The volume between the conductors is filled with liquid blends of monomers, polymers, oligomers, and/or cross-linkers and dielectric powders; and then cured to form high field strength and high dielectric constant solid dielectric transmission lines that intrinsically produce ideal rectangular high voltage pulses when charged and switched into matched impedance loads. Voltage levels may be increased by Marx and/or Blumlein principles incorporating spark gap or, preferentially, solid state switches (such as optically triggered thyristors) which produce reliable, high repetition rate operation. Moreover, these Marxed pulse generators can be DC charged and do not require additional pulse forming circuitry, pulse forming lines, transformers, or an a high voltage spark gap output switch. The apparatus accommodates a wide range of voltages, impedances, pulse durations, pulse repetition rates, and duty cycles. The resulting mobile or flight platform friendly cylindrical geometric configuration is much more compact, light-weight, and robust than conventional linear geometries, or pulse generators constructed from conventional components. Installing additional circuitry may accommodate optional pulse shape improvements. The Coiled Transmission Lines can also be connected in parallel to decrease the impedance, or in series to increase the pulse length.

  14. A thermodynamic model for the helix-coil transition coupled to dimerization of short coiled-coil peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Qian, H

    1994-01-01

    A simple thermodynamic formalism is presented to model the conformational transition between a random-coil monomeric peptide and a coiled-coil helical dimer. The coiled-coil helical dimer is the structure of a class of proteins also called leucine zipper, which has been studied intensively in recent years. Our model, which is appropriate particularly for short peptides, is an alternative to the theory developed by Skolnick and Holtzer. Using the present formalism, we discuss the multi-equilibriatory nature of this transition and provide an explanation for the apparent two-state behavior of coiled-coil formation when the helix-coil transition is coupled to dimerization. It is found that such coupling between multi-equilibria and a true two-state transition can simplify the data analysis, but care must be taken in using the overall association constant to determine helix propensities (w) of single residues. Successful use of the two-state model does not imply that the helix-coil transition is all-or-none. The all-or-none assumption can provide good numerical estimates when w is around unity (0.35 < or = w < or = 1.35), but when w is small (w < 0.01), similar estimations can lead to large errors. The theory of the helix-coil transition in denaturation experiments is also discussed. PMID:7919005

  15. Induction and Conduction Thermography: Optimizing the Electromagnetic Excitation Towards Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrana, J.; Goldammer, M.; Bailey, K.; Rothenfusser, M.; Arnold, W.

    2009-03-01

    Active thermography, using electromagnetic excitation, allows detecting defects like cracks which distort the flow of current in the component under examination. Like other thermography techniques it is rapid and reliably utilizing infrared imaging. Electric current can be used in two ways for thermography: In induction thermography a current is coupled to the component by passing an AC current through a coil which is in close proximity to the component inspected, while in conduction thermography the current is coupled directly into the component. In this paper, the specific advantages of both coupling methods are discussed, including the efficiency of the coupling and optimization strategies for testing and also the necessary algorithms required to analyze the data. Taking these considerations into account a number of different systems for laboratory and practical application were developed.

  16. A comparison of coupling efficiencies for a Stix coil and an m equals 1 coil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigman, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    This theoretical and experimental study compares the ion-cyclotron wave generating characteristics of a Stix coil (which generates waves with azimuthal mode number m = 0) with those of a coil which produces primarily m = + or -1 ion-cyclotron modes. The theoretical work of J.E. Hipp, which predicted very good coupling for the m = 1 coil, was extended to determine the scaling laws for plasma column radius and coil wavelength. Experimentally, an m = 1 coil and an m = 0 coil were used to generate ion-cyclotron waves on a beam generated plasma column with electron density = 10 to the 12th power/cu cm. Coupling resonances with peak efficiencies of approximately 40 to 50 percent were measured for both coils in low power (approximately 10k W) experiments. For equal power transfer to the plasma, the m = 0 coil voltage was more than a factor of two greater than that for the m = 1 coil.

  17. A comparison of ASTROMAG coils made with aluminum and copper based superconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, M. A.

    1991-01-01

    The use of an aluminum matrix superconductor in the coils for the ASTROMAG magnet will increase the integrated field for conducting particle astrophysics experiments in space as compared to equal mass coils made with a copper matrix superconductor. The increased ability to detect charged particles can be achieved without decreasing the current margin of the superconductor in the coils. The use of a low-resistivity aluminum matrix conductor increases the energy needed to initiate a quench by two orders or magnitude. The current decay time constant during a quench is substantially increased. As a result, the quench energy dumped into the helium tank is reduced (the ASTROMAG coils are thermally decoupled from the helium tank), and the forces on the shield and shells due to eddy currents will be lower. A description is also given of the problems associated with the use of an aluminum matrix superconductor in the coils.

  18. Design and preliminary tests of a twin coil HTS SMES for pulse power operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badel, Arnaud; Tixador, Pascal; Berger, Kevin; Deleglise, Marc

    2011-05-01

    The design of a twin coil 2 × 200 kJ-1 MW pulse power high temperature superconductor (HTS) superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) demonstrator is presented. Its aim is to test at small scale various possibilities of electromagnetic launcher powering. The foreseen operation modes include high voltage discharge in power capacitors, sequential discharges of identical energies from two coupled coils, and XRAM current multiplication. Special attention was paid to the arrangement of the coils for the energies discharged to be equal. The coils are cooled by conduction from three cryocoolers; the thermal design was optimized in order to maintain the coils around 15 K in spite of the high number of current leads required for XRAM operation (eight). Preliminary tests of the demonstrator are also presented, showing that the thermal and electrical characteristics are in very good agreement with the design objectives.

  19. A microfabricated coil for implantable applications of magnetic spinal cord stimulation.

    PubMed

    Yu-Min Fu; Che-Yu Chen; Xin-Hong Qian; Yu-Ting Cheng; Chung-Yu Wu; Jui-Sheng Sun; Chien-Chun Huang; Chao-Kai Hu

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a microfabricated inductive coil comprising of 125-turn coil windings and a MnZn-based magnetic core in a volume of 200 mm(3) is presented for the magnetic neural stimulation in a spinal cord. The coil winding with the parallel-linkage design instead of the typical serial-linkage one is proposed not only to provide better design flexibility to the current mode driving circuit but also to simplify the fabrication process of the 3-D inductive coil, which can further advance the coil miniaturization. Experimental results show the microcoil with a 1.5 A, 1 kHz square-wave current input can induce a voltages of ~220 μV on the conducting wire with an impedance of ~0.2 Ω @ 1 kHz, 1 mm separation. PMID:26737882

  20. A Mechanical Coil Insertion System for Endovascular Coil Embolization of Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Haraguchi, K.; Miyachi, S.; Matsubara, N.; Nagano, Y.; Yamada, H.; Marui, N.; Sano, A.; Fujimoto, H.; Izumi, T.; Yamanouchi, T.; Asai, T.; Wakabayashi, T.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Like other fields of medicine, robotics and mechanization might be introduced into endovascular coil embolization of intracranial aneurysms for effective treatment. We have already reported that coil insertion force could be smaller and more stable when the coil delivery wire is driven mechanically at a constant speed. Another background is the difficulty in synchronizing operators' minds and hands when two operators control the microcatheter and the coil respectively. We have therefore developed a mechanical coil insertion system enabling a single operator to insert coils at a fixed speed while controlling the microcatheter. Using our new system, the operator manipulated the microcatheter with both hands and drove the coil using foot switches simultaneously. A delivery wire force sensor previously reported was used concurrently, allowing the operator to detect excessive stress on the wire. In vitro coil embolization was performed using three methods: simple mechanical advance of the coil; simple mechanical advance of the coil with microcatheter control; and driving (forward and backward) of the coil using foot switches in addition to microcatheter control. The system worked without any problems, and did not interfere with any procedures. In experimental coil embolization, delivery wire control using the foot switches as well as microcatheter manipulation helped to achieve successful insertion of coils. This system could offer the possibility of developing safer and more efficient coil embolization. Although we aim at total mechanization and automation of procedures in the future, microcatheter manipulation and synchronized delivery wire control are still indispensable using this system. PMID:23693038

  1. A mechanical coil insertion system for endovascular coil embolization of intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, K; Miyachi, S; Matsubara, N; Nagano, Y; Yamada, H; Marui, N; Sano, A; Fujimoto, H; Izumi, T; Yamanouchi, T; Asai, T; Wakabayashi, T

    2013-06-01

    Like other fields of medicine, robotics and mechanization might be introduced into endovascular coil embolization of intracranial aneurysms for effective treatment. We have already reported that coil insertion force could be smaller and more stable when the coil delivery wire is driven mechanically at a constant speed. Another background is the difficulty in synchronizing operators' minds and hands when two operators control the microcatheter and the coil respectively. We have therefore developed a mechanical coil insertion system enabling a single operator to insert coils at a fixed speed while controlling the microcatheter. Using our new system, the operator manipulated the microcatheter with both hands and drove the coil using foot switches simultaneously. A delivery wire force sensor previously reported was used concurrently, allowing the operator to detect excessive stress on the wire. In vitro coil embolization was performed using three methods: simple mechanical advance of the coil; simple mechanical advance of the coil with microcatheter control; and driving (forward and backward) of the coil using foot switches in addition to microcatheter control. The system worked without any problems, and did not interfere with any procedures. In experimental coil embolization, delivery wire control using the foot switches as well as microcatheter manipulation helped to achieve successful insertion of coils. This system could offer the possibility of developing safer and more efficient coil embolization. Although we aim at total mechanization and automation of procedures in the future, microcatheter manipulation and synchronized delivery wire control are still indispensable using this system. PMID:23693038

  2. Effect of Branching on Rod-coil Polyimides as Membrane Materials for Lithium Polymer Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Cubon, Valerie A.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Bennett, William R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a series of rod-coil block co-polymers that produce easy to fabricate, dimensionally stable films with good ionic conductivity down to room temperature for use as electrolytes for lithium polymer batteries. The polymers consist of short, rigid rod polyimide segments, alternating with flexible, polyalkylene oxide coil segments. The highly incompatible rods and coils should phase separate, especially in the presence of lithium ions. The coil phase would allow for conduction of lithium ions, while the rigid rod phase would provide a high degree of dimensional stability. An optimization study was carried out to study the effect of four variables (degree of branching, formulated molecular weight, polymerization solvent and lithium salt concentration) on ionic conductivity, glass transition temperature and dimensional stability in this system.

  3. Optimized Geometry for Superconducting Sensing Coils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Pananen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2008-01-01

    An optimized geometry has been proposed for superconducting sensing coils that are used in conjunction with superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetoencephalography (MEG), and related applications in which magnetic fields of small dipoles are detected. In designing a coil of this type, as in designing other sensing coils, one seeks to maximize the sensitivity of the detector of which the coil is a part, subject to geometric constraints arising from the proximity of other required equipment. In MRI or MEG, the main benefit of maximizing the sensitivity would be to enable minimization of measurement time. In general, to maximize the sensitivity of a detector based on a sensing coil coupled with a SQUID sensor, it is necessary to maximize the magnetic flux enclosed by the sensing coil while minimizing the self-inductance of this coil. Simply making the coil larger may increase its self-inductance and does not necessarily increase sensitivity because it also effectively increases the distance from the sample that contains the source of the signal that one seeks to detect. Additional constraints on the size and shape of the coil and on the distance from the sample arise from the fact that the sample is at room temperature but the coil and the SQUID sensor must be enclosed within a cryogenic shield to maintain superconductivity.

  4. Coiled-coil protein composition of 22 proteomes – differences and common themes in subcellular infrastructure and traffic control

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Annkatrin; Schraegle, Shannon J; Stahlberg, Eric A; Meier, Iris

    2005-01-01

    Background Long alpha-helical coiled-coil proteins are involved in diverse organizational and regulatory processes in eukaryotic cells. They provide cables and networks in the cyto- and nucleoskeleton, molecular scaffolds that organize membrane systems and tissues, motors, levers, rotating arms, and possibly springs. Mutations in long coiled-coil proteins have been implemented in a growing number of human diseases. Using the coiled-coil prediction program MultiCoil, we have previously identified all long coiled-coil proteins from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and have established a searchable Arabidopsis coiled-coil protein database. Results Here, we have identified all proteins with long coiled-coil domains from 21 additional fully sequenced genomes. Because regions predicted to form coiled-coils interfere with sequence homology determination, we have developed a sequence comparison and clustering strategy based on masking predicted coiled-coil domains. Comparing and grouping all long coiled-coil proteins from 22 genomes, the kingdom-specificity of coiled-coil protein families was determined. At the same time, a number of proteins with unknown function could be grouped with already characterized proteins from other organisms. Conclusion MultiCoil predicts proteins with extended coiled-coil domains (more than 250 amino acids) to be largely absent from bacterial genomes, but present in archaea and eukaryotes. The structural maintenance of chromosomes proteins and their relatives are the only long coiled-coil protein family clearly conserved throughout all kingdoms, indicating their ancient nature. Motor proteins, membrane tethering and vesicle transport proteins are the dominant eukaryote-specific long coiled-coil proteins, suggesting that coiled-coil proteins have gained functions in the increasingly complex processes of subcellular infrastructure maintenance and trafficking control of the eukaryotic cell. PMID:16288662

  5. De Novo Design of Ln(III) Coiled Coils for Imaging Applications

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A new peptide sequence (MB1) has been designed which, in the presence of a trivalent lanthanide ion, has been programmed to self-assemble to form a three stranded metallo-coiled coil, Ln(III)(MB1)3. The binding site has been incorporated into the hydrophobic core using natural amino acids, restricting water access to the lanthanide. The resulting terbium coiled coil displays luminescent properties consistent with a lack of first coordination sphere water molecules. Despite this the gadolinium coiled coil, the first to be reported, displays promising magnetic resonance contrast capabilities. PMID:24405157

  6. Magneto-inductive conductivity sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floume, Timmy

    2011-12-01

    Multi-element inductive coil systems are used to measure locally resolved conductivity profile. Usually such sensors rely on the separate interrogation of each coil. In addition, the coils must generally be magnetically decoupled for accurate signal processing. Here we demonstrate a metamaterial conductivity sensor that uses broadband interrogation of a line of coupled resonators. No decoupling is needed, which allows a transmission measurement to be carried out. The resonant elements of the metamaterial are coupled with each other and their neighbourhood which affects their quality factor. We derive analytically an algorithm to extract the local perturbation in each element from the modal measurement. We investigate numerically the performance of the sensor and derive an optimal configuration in terms of nearest neighbour coupling and the initial non-uniformity. Finally we implement a four-element magneto inductive conductivity sensor and show that a conductive perturbation along the line can be accurately reconstructed. Generalisation to higher number of elements is also discussed.

  7. Demonstration Model Development of the Force-Balanced Coil for SMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Shinichi; Kasuya, Koji; Tanaka, Norihiro; Tsuboi, Kenji; Tsutsui, Hiroaki; Shimada, Ryuichi; Ninomiya, Akira; Ishigohka, Takashi

    In large-scale SMES, the superconducting coils require special considerations for induced electromagnetic forces to limit allowable tensile stress. Force-balanced coil (FBC) is a helically wound hybrid coil of toroidal field coils and a solenoid. The FBC can significantly reduce the required mass of the structure for induced electromagnetic forces. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of the FBC concept for SMES, the authors have developed a superconducting model coil. The outer diameter of the model FBC is 0.53m. The hand-made winding, using NbTi/Cu composite strands with a diameter of 1.17mm, was finished with 10584 poloidal turns after four months. The helical windings of the model FBC were neither impregnated with epoxy resin nor reinforced with stainless steel wires. Three test runs were conducted with liquid helium cooling at intervals of several months. The number of quench tests was 81 in total. The first quench current was 293A, which was 53% of the critical coil current. The training phenomena could be observed even after the coil was warmed up to room temperature. After successive quenches the quench current was improved to 476A, corresponding to 86% of the critical coil current, and it was successfully excited up to 6.1T.

  8. The Golgin Family of Coiled-Coil Tethering Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Witkos, Tomasz M.; Lowe, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The golgins are a family of predominantly coiled-coil proteins that are localized to the Golgi apparatus. Golgins are present in all eukaryotes, suggesting an evolutionary conserved function. Golgins are anchored to the Golgi membrane by their carboxy terminus and are predicted to adopt an extended conformation that projects into the surrounding cytoplasm. This arrangement is ideal for the capture or tethering of nearby membranes or cytoskeletal elements. Golgin-mediated tethering is thought to be important for vesicular traffic at the Golgi apparatus, the maintenance of Golgi architecture, as well as the positioning of the Golgi apparatus within cells. In addition to acting as tethers, some golgins can also sequester various factors at the Golgi membrane, allowing for the spatiotemporal regulation of downstream cellular functions. Although it is now established that golgins are membrane and cytoskeleton tethers, the mechanisms underlying tethering remain poorly defined. Moreover, the importance of golgin-mediated tethering in a physiological context remains to be fully explored. This review will describe our current understanding of golgin function, highlighting recent progress that has been made, and goes on to discuss outstanding questions and potential avenues for future research with regard to this family of conserved Golgi-associated proteins. PMID:26793708

  9. Thermal Analysis and Experimental Verification for DIII-D Ohmic Heating Coil Repair

    SciTech Connect

    C.B. Baxi; P.M. Anderson

    1999-11-01

    The DIII-D ohmic heating (OH) coil solenoid consists of two parallel windings of 48 turns cooled by water. Each winding is made up of four parallel conductors. Desired thermal capability of the coil is 80 MJ at a repetition rate of 10 minutes. One of the conductors started leaking water in July 1995. Between July 1995 and December 1997 the coil was operated at a reduced thermal load using one winding. An experiment followed by analysis was undertaken to determine if the OH-coil could be operated at full capacity by relying on conduction heat transfer to the neighboring cooled conductors without actively cooling the leaking segment. The analysis took into consideration the transient energy equations, including the effect of conduction between neighboring conductors. An experiment was performed on the undamaged coil winding to determine the thermal conductance between neighboring conductors. The experiment consisted of passing hot water through cooling channels of two conductors and cold water through the cooling channels of the remaining two conductors of the same winding. The flow rate, inlet and outlet temperatures from each circuit were measured during the transient. From the experimental data and analysis, an average thermal conductance between the conductors was determined to be about 800 W/m{sup 2}-C. Using the experimentally determined value of the thermal conductance, an analysis was performed on a coil winding consisting of two uncooled conductors and two cooled conductors. Results show that it is possible to operate the full OH-coil to the desired thermal load of 80 MJ per pulse without actively cooling the damaged conductor. During an operational test, the coil was instrumented to measure the outlet water temperature from the conductors before operating it at full current capacity. The coil was operated at 80% energy level and outlet coolant temperatures were compared with analytical results. The comparison between analysis and measured coolant outlet

  10. Current COIL research in Samara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, Valeri D.

    1996-02-01

    Development of the high pressure singlet oxygen generator (SOG) is a very important aspect for chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL). Increasing of oxygen pressure up to 30 torr and more at conserving high O2(1(Delta) ) yield and maintaining BHP temperature at minus (10 divided by 20) degrees Celsius permits us to decrease ration [H2O]/[O2] to 5% and less. In this case COIL can operate successfully without a water vapor trap. With raising the total pressure Reynolds number increases too, diminishing boundary layers in supersonic nozzles and improving pressure recovery. The weight and dimensions of the SOG and laser become reduced for the same gas flow rate. For solving these problems the jet SOG has been suggested and developed in Lebedev Physical Institute, Samara Branch. The advantages of the jet SOG consist of the following: (1) Large and controlled specific surface of contact liquid-gas provides for high mass transfer efficiency. (2) High jets velocity guarantees fast basic hydrogen peroxide (BHP) surface renovation. (3) High gas velocity in the reaction zone diminishes O2(1(Delta) ) quenching. (4) Efficient gas-liquid heat exchange eliminates the gas heating and generation water vapor due O2(1(Delta) ) quenching. (5) Counterflowing design of the jet SOG produces the best conditions for self-cleaning gas flow of droplets in the reaction zone and gives the possibility of COIL operation without droplets separator. High pressure jet SOG has some features connected with intrachannel jet formation, free space jets reconstruction, interaction jets ensemble with counter moving gas flow and drag part of gas by jets, disintegrating jets, generation and separation of droplets, heat effects, surface renovation, impoverishment BHP surface by HO2- ions, moving solution film on the reaction zone walls, etc. In this communication our current understanding of the major processes in the jet SOG is set forth. The complex gas and hydrodynamic processes with heat and mass transfer

  11. Development of a new error field correction coil (C-coil) for DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.I.; Scoville, J.T.

    1995-12-01

    The C-coil recently installed on the DIII-D tokamak was developed to reduce the error fields created by imperfections in the location and geometry of the existing coils used to confine, heat, and shape the plasma. First results from C-coil experiments include stable operation in a 1.6 MA plasma with a density less than 1.0 {times} 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3}, nearly a factor of three lower density than that achievable without the C-coil. The C-coil has also been used in magnetic braking of the plasma rotation and high energy particle confinement experiments. The C-coil system consists of six individual saddle coils, each 60{degree} wide toroidally, spanning the midplane of the vessel with a vertical height of 1.6 m. The coils are located at a major radius of 3.2 m, just outside of the toroidal field coils. The actual shape and geometry of each coil section varied somewhat from the nominal dimensions due to the large number of obstructions to the desired coil path around the already crowded tokamak. Each coil section consists of four turns of 750 MCM insulated copper cable banded with stainless steel straps within the web of a 3 in. x 3 in. stainless steel angle frame. The C-coil structure was designed to resist peak transient radial forces (up to 1,800 Nm) exerted on the coil by the toroidal and ploidal fields. The coil frames were supported from existing poloidal field coil case brackets, coil studs, and various other structures on the tokamak.

  12. Crystal Structure of a Super Leucine Zipper an Extended Two-Stranded Super Long Coiled Coil

    SciTech Connect

    J Diao

    2011-12-31

    Coiled coil is a ubiquitous structural motif in proteins, with two to seven alpha helices coiled together like the strands of a rope, and coiled coil folding and assembly is not completely understood. A GCN4 leucine zipper mutant with four mutations of K3A, D7A, Y17W, and H18N has been designed, and the crystal structure has been determined at 1.6 {angstrom} resolution. The peptide monomer shows a helix trunk with short curved N- and C-termini. In the crystal, two monomers cross in 35{sup o} and form an X-shaped dimer, and each X-shaped dimer is welded into the next one through sticky hydrophobic ends, thus forming an extended two-stranded, parallel, super long coiled coil rather than a discrete, two-helix coiled coil of the wild-type GCN4 leucine zipper. Leucine residues appear at every seventh position in the super long coiled coil, suggesting that it is an extended super leucine zipper. Compared to the wild-type leucine zipper, the N-terminus of the mutant has a dramatic conformational change and the C-terminus has one more residue Glu 32 determined. The mutant X-shaped dimer has a large crossing angle of 35{sup o} instead of 18{sup o} in the wild-type dimer. The results show a novel assembly mode and oligomeric state of coiled coil, and demonstrate that mutations may affect folding and assembly of the overall coiled coil. Analysis of the formation mechanism of the super long coiled coil may help understand and design self-assembling protein fibers.

  13. Electromagnetic levitation coil fabrication technique for MSFC containerless processing facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, E. C.; Theiss, J.; Curreri, P. A.; Abbaschian, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    A technique is described for more reproducible fabrication of electromagnetic levitation coils. A split mandrel was developed upon which the coil is wound. After fabrication the mandrel can be disassembled to remove it from the coil. Previously, a full day was required to fabricate a levitation coil and the success rate for a functional coil was only 50 percent. About eight coils may be completed in one day using the technique developed and 95 percent of them are good levitation coils.

  14. High frequency volume coils for clinical NMR imaging and spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, J T; Hetherington, H P; Otu, J O; Pan, J W; Pohost, G M

    1994-08-01

    A tuned transmission line resonator has been developed in theory and in practical design for the clinical NMR volume coil application at 4.1 tesla. The distributed circuit transmission line resonator was designed for high frequency, large conductive volume applications where conventional lumped element coil designs perform less efficiently. The resonator design has made use of a resonant coaxial cavity, which could be variably tuned to the Larmor frequency of interest by tunable transmission line elements. Large head- and body-sized volumes, high efficiencies, and broad tuning ranges have been shown to be characteristic of the transmission line resonator to frequencies of 500 MHz. The B1 homogeneity of the resonator has been demonstrated to be a function of the electromagnetic properties of the load itself. By numerically solving Maxwell's equations for the fully time-dependent B1 field, coil homogeneity was predicted with finite-element models of anatomic structure, and inhomogeneities corrected for. A how-to exposition of coil design and construction has been included. Simple methods of quadrature driving and double tuning the transmission line resonator have also been presented. Human head images obtained with a tuned transmission line resonator at 175 MHz have clearly demonstrated uncompromised high field advantages of signal-to-noise and spatial resolution. PMID:7968443

  15. Coil optimization for electromagnetic levitation using a genetic like algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, Z. L.; Tackes, C.; LeSar, R.; Napolitano, R. E.

    2013-06-01

    The technique of electromagnetic levitation (EML) provides a means for thermally processing an electrically conductive specimen in a containerless manner. For the investigation of metallic liquids and related melting or freezing transformations, the elimination of substrate-induced nucleation affords access to much higher undercooling than otherwise attainable. With heating and levitation both arising from the currents induced by the coil, the performance of any EML system depends on controlling the balance between lifting forces and heating effects, as influenced by the levitation coil geometry. In this work, a genetic algorithm is developed and utilized to optimize the design of electromagnetic levitation coils. The optimization is targeted specifically to reduce the steady-state temperature of the stably levitated metallic specimen. Reductions in temperature of nominally 70 K relative to that obtained with the initial design are achieved through coil optimization, and the results are compared with experiments for aluminum. Additionally, the optimization method is shown to be robust, generating a small range of converged results from a variety of initial starting conditions. While our optimization criterion was set to achieve the lowest possible sample temperature, the method is general and can be used to optimize for other criteria as well.

  16. The structure of the GemC1 coiled coil and its interaction with the Geminin family of coiled-coil proteins

    PubMed Central

    Caillat, Christophe; Fish, Alexander; Pefani, Dafni-Eleftheria; Taraviras, Stavros; Lygerou, Zoi; Perrakis, Anastassis

    2015-01-01

    GemC1, together with Idas and Geminin, an important regulator of DNA-replication licensing and differentiation decisions, constitute a superfamily sharing a homologous central coiled-coil domain. To better understand this family of proteins, the crystal structure of a GemC1 coiled-coil domain variant engineered for better solubility was determined to 2.2 Å resolution. GemC1 shows a less typical coiled coil compared with the Geminin homodimer and the Geminin–Idas heterodimer structures. It is also shown that both in vitro and in cells GemC1 interacts with Geminin through its coiled-coil domain, forming a heterodimer that is more stable that the GemC1 homodimer. Comparative analysis of the thermal stability of all of the possible superfamily complexes, using circular dichroism to follow the unfolding of the entire helix of the coiled coil, or intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of a unique conserved N-terminal tryptophan, shows that the unfolding of the coiled coil is likely to take place from the C-terminus towards the N-terminus. It is also shown that homodimers show a single-state unfolding, while heterodimers show a two-state unfolding, suggesting that the dimer first falls apart and the helices then unfold according to the stability of each protein. The findings argue that Geminin-family members form homodimers and heterodimers between them, and this ability is likely to be important for modulating their function in cycling and differentiating cells. PMID:26527144

  17. Design, fabrication, and calibration of curved integral coils for measuring transfer function, uniformity, and effective length of LBL ALS (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Advanced Light Source) Booster Dipole Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.I.; Nelson, D.; Marks, S.; Gee, B.; Wong, W.; Meneghetti, J.

    1989-03-01

    A matched pair of curved integral coils has been designed, fabricated and calibrated at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for measuring Advanced Light Source (ALS) Booster Dipole Magnets. Distinctive fabrication and calibration techniques are described. The use of multifilar magnet wire in fabrication integral search coils is described. Procedures used and results of AC and DC measurements of transfer function, effective length and uniformity of the prototype booster dipole magnet are presented in companion papers. 8 refs.

  18. Bucking Coil Efficiency Correction for 5'' PMT Exposed to an External Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llodra, Anthony; Reinhold, Joerg

    2014-03-01

    This research was conducted in support of the Hall C upgrade activities at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). We propose to employ bucking coils in order to maximize the collection efficiency of the 5'' PMTs installed on the Cherenkov detector, which could potentially be exposed to external magnetic field produced by the Super Conducting Super High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) magnet. In this research project a 5'' PMT was placed in a light tight cylinder with a fiber optic cable. The cylinder was centered within a set of Helmholtz coils to produce a constant external magnetic field. Furthermore, the cylinder was wrapped with 20 coils of standard 12 gauge cable to act as the bucking coil. With the intensity of the LED source, and the magnitude of the external magnetic field fixed at a carefully determined value, data was taken to determine if the collection efficiency of the PMT was indeed affected. With a decrease in collection efficiency confirmed, further data were taken. A range of current (0-6 A) was applied to the bucking coils, while ADC spectra were analyzed in intervals of 0.25 A. The data indicated that in an external magnetic field of approximately 3 Gauss, the 5'' PMT collection efficiency is maximized with the bucking coil current set to approximately 3.5 A. Thus, the data conclusively indicates that the bucking coil system will indeed maximize the collection efficiency of the 5'' PMT. Florida International University.

  19. Transient response of coaxial pulse coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifton, S.; Mongeau, P.

    1984-03-01

    Of central importance in designing coaxial launcher systems is understanding the mechanical response and structural limits of the magnetic pulse coils. In normal operation the driving frequency can vary from static conditions through the lowest natural modes to well beyond the highest frequencies. By using a lumped parameter model the transient behavior of a magnetic pulse coil can be readily characterized. In an effort to understand the failure mechanism of coaxial pulse coils the results of this model are compared to the experimental performance of several thin build coils.

  20. A precise technique for manufacturing correction coil

    SciTech Connect

    Schieber, L.

    1992-11-01

    An automated method of manufacturing correction coils has been developed which provides a precise embodiment of the coil design. Numerically controlled machines have been developed to accurately position coil windings on the beam tube. Two types of machines have been built. One machine bonds the wire to a substrate which is wrapped around the beam tube after it is completed while the second machine bonds the wire directly to the beam tube. Both machines use the Multiwire{reg_sign} technique of bonding the wire to the substrate utilizing an ultrasonic stylus. These machines are being used to manufacture coils for both the SSC and RHIC.

  1. A precise technique for manufacturing correction coil

    SciTech Connect

    Schieber, L.

    1992-01-01

    An automated method of manufacturing correction coils has been developed which provides a precise embodiment of the coil design. Numerically controlled machines have been developed to accurately position coil windings on the beam tube. Two types of machines have been built. One machine bonds the wire to a substrate which is wrapped around the beam tube after it is completed while the second machine bonds the wire directly to the beam tube. Both machines use the Multiwire[reg sign] technique of bonding the wire to the substrate utilizing an ultrasonic stylus. These machines are being used to manufacture coils for both the SSC and RHIC.

  2. Helical axis stellarator with noninterlocking planar coils

    DOEpatents

    Reiman, Allan; Boozer, Allen H.

    1987-01-01

    A helical axis stellarator using only noninterlocking planar, non-circular coils, generates magnetic fields having a magnetic well and large rotational transform with resultant large equilibrium beta.

  3. Self-correction coil: Operation mechanism of self-correction coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoyama, K.

    1983-06-01

    The operation mechanism of self-correction coil is extended with a simple model. For the ideal self-correction coil case, The self-inductance L of the self-correction coil is calculated. This calculation method is extended to a non-ideal self-correction coil case. For measure of completeness of self-correction coil is measured by the ratio of induced magnetic field by the self-correction coil and error field. Examples are L, M and N calculated for two cases; one is a single block approximation of self-correction coil winding and the other is a two block approximation case. By choosing the adequate angles of self-correction coil winding, one can get about 98% efficiency for single block approximation case and 99.8% for two block approximation case.

  4. Transport Vesicle Tethering at the Trans Golgi Network: Coiled Coil Proteins in Action

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Pak-yan P.; Pfeffer, Suzanne R.

    2016-01-01

    The Golgi complex is decorated with so-called Golgin proteins that share a common feature: a large proportion of their amino acid sequences are predicted to form coiled-coil structures. The possible presence of extensive coiled coils implies that these proteins are highly elongated molecules that can extend a significant distance from the Golgi surface. This property would help them to capture or trap inbound transport vesicles and to tether Golgi mini-stacks together. This review will summarize our current understanding of coiled coil tethers that are needed for the receipt of transport vesicles at the trans Golgi network (TGN). How do long tethering proteins actually catch vesicles? Golgi-associated, coiled coil tethers contain numerous binding sites for small GTPases, SNARE proteins, and vesicle coat proteins. How are these interactions coordinated and are any or all of them important for the tethering process? Progress toward understanding these questions and remaining, unresolved mysteries will be discussed. PMID:27014693

  5. pH sensitive coiled coils: a strategy for enhanced liposomal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Reja, Rahi M; Khan, Mohsina; Singh, Sumeet K; Misra, Rajkumar; Shiras, Anjali; Gopi, Hosahudya N

    2016-03-01

    Stimuli responsive controlled release from liposome based vesicles is a promising strategy for the site specific delivery of drugs. Herein, we report the design of pH sensitive coiled coils and their incorporation into the liposome as triggers for the controlled release of encapsulated drugs. The designed coiled coil peptides with the incorporation of environment sensitive fluorescent amino acids were found to be stable at physiological pH and unstructured while changing the pH of the environment to either acidic or basic. This pH dependent conformational switch of the coiled-coil polypeptides was exploited as triggers for the enhanced release of the encapsulated drug molecules from liposomes. The SEM, DLS and TEM analysis revealed the uniform morphology of the peptide liposome hybrid vesicles. Further, the drug encapsulated liposome internalization experiments with cancer cells revealed the enhanced release and accumulation of drugs in the acidic lysosomal compartments in comparison with liposomes without coiled coils. PMID:26876788

  6. Compact stellarators with modular coils

    PubMed Central

    Garabedian, P. R.

    2000-01-01

    Compact stellarator designs with modular coils and only two or three field periods are now available; these designs have both good stability and quasiaxial symmetry providing adequate transport for a magnetic fusion reactor. If the bootstrap current assumes theoretically predicted values a three field period configuration is optimal, but if that net current turns out to be lower, a device with two periods and just 12 modular coils might be better. There are also attractive designs with quasihelical symmetry and four or five periods whose properties depend less on the bootstrap current. Good performance requires that there be a satisfactory magnetic well in the vacuum field, which is a property lacking in a stellarator-tokamak hybrid that has been proposed for a proof of principle experiment. In this paper, we present an analysis of stability for these configurations that is based on a mountain pass theorem asserting that, if two solutions of the problem of magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium can be found, then there has to be an unstable solution. We compare results of our theory of equilibrium, stability, and transport with recently announced measurements from the large LHD experiment in Japan. PMID:10899993

  7. A Non-perturbing Probe of Coiled Coil Formation Based on Electron Transfer Mediated Fluorescence Quenching.

    PubMed

    Watson, Matthew D; Peran, Ivan; Raleigh, Daniel P

    2016-07-01

    Coiled coils are abundant in nature, occurring in ∼3% of proteins across sequenced genomes, and are found in proteins ranging from transcription factors to structural proteins. The motif continues to be an important model system for understanding protein-protein interactions and is finding increased use in bioinspired materials and synthetic biology. Knowledge of the thermodynamics of self-assembly, particularly the dissociation constant KD, is essential for the application of designed coiled coils and for understanding the in vivo specificity of natural coiled coils. Standard methods for measuring KD typically rely on concentration dependent circular dichroism (CD). Fluorescence methods are an attractive alternative; however Trp is rarely found in an interior position of a coiled coil, and appending unnatural fluorophores can perturb the system. We demonstrate a simple, non-perturbing method to monitor coiled coil formation using p-cyanophenylalanine (FCN) and selenomethionine (MSe), the Se analogue of Met. FCN fluorescence can be selectively excited and is effectively quenched by electron transfer with MSe. Both FCN and MSe represent minimally perturbing substitutions in coiled coils. MSe quenching of FCN fluorescence is shown to offer a non-perturbing method for following coiled coil formation and for accurately determining dissociation constants. The method is validated using a designed heterodimeric coiled coil. The KD deduced by fluorescence monitored titration is in excellent agreement with the value deduced from concentration dependent CD measurements to within the uncertainty of the measurement. However, the fluorescence approach requires less protein, is less time-consuming, can be applied to lower concentrations and could be applied to high throughput screens. PMID:27258904

  8. CLOSURE OF HLW TANKS FORMULATION FOR A COOLING COIL GROUT

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J; Vickie Williams, V; Erich Hansen, E

    2008-05-23

    lower water to solids ratio. Nevertheless, the higher viscosity grout may still meet the requirements for the cooling coil grout under certain pumping conditions or alternatively, the mix may be made more fluid by a short period of high shear mixing during production. The mixes have not been optimized for large scale production. It may be possible, for example, to adjust the water to cementitious materials ratio to provide improved performance of these mixes based on the results and conclusions of the large scale testing at CETL. Recommendations from this task include incorporation of a backup mixing/pumping system that is either integrated into the system or is available for immediate use in case of a pump or mixer failure of the primary system. A second recommendation is to conduct a laboratory scale investigation to determine the impact of operational variation on the properties of the grout. This effort would be initiated after feedback is received from the large scale testing at CETL. The purpose of this proposed variability testing is to better understand the limits of the operational variations (such as temperature and mixing time), and to identify possible approaches for remediation to ensure that the grout produced will flow effectively in the coils while still meeting the performance requirements.

  9. Structural Characteristics of the Redox-sensing Coiled Coil in the Voltage-gated H+ Channel*

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Yuichiro; Takeshita, Kohei; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Okamura, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    Oxidation is an important biochemical defense mechanism, but it also elicits toxicity; therefore, oxidation must be under strict control. In phagocytotic events in neutrophils, the voltage-gated H+ (Hv) channel is a key regulator of the production of reactive oxygen species against invading bacteria. The cytoplasmic domain of the Hv channel forms a dimeric coiled coil underpinning a dimerized functional unit. Importantly, in the alignment of the coiled-coil core, a conserved cysteine residue forms a potential intersubunit disulfide bond. In this study, we solved the crystal structures of the coiled-coil domain in reduced, oxidized, and mutated (Cys → Ser) states. The crystal structures indicate that a pair of Cys residues forms an intersubunit disulfide bond dependent on the redox conditions. CD spectroscopy revealed that the disulfide bond increases the thermal stability of the coiled-coil protein. We also reveal that two thiol modifier molecules are able to bind to Cys in a redox-dependent manner without disruption of the dimeric coiled-coil assembly. Thus, the biochemical properties of the cytoplasmic coiled-coil domain in the Hv channel depend on the redox condition, which may play a role in redox sensing in the phagosome. PMID:23667254

  10. Accommodation of structural rearrangements in the huntingtin-interacting protein 1 coiled-coil domain

    SciTech Connect

    Wilbur, Jeremy D.; Hwang, Peter K.; Brodsky, Frances M.; Fletterick, Robert J.

    2010-03-01

    Variable packing interaction related to the conformational flexibility within the huntingtin-interacting protein 1 coiled coil domain. Huntingtin-interacting protein 1 (HIP1) is an important link between the actin cytoskeleton and clathrin-mediated endocytosis machinery. HIP1 has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of Huntington’s disease. The binding of HIP1 to actin is regulated through an interaction with clathrin light chain. Clathrin light chain binds to a flexible coiled-coil domain in HIP1 and induces a compact state that is refractory to actin binding. To understand the mechanism of this conformational regulation, a high-resolution crystal structure of a stable fragment from the HIP1 coiled-coil domain was determined. The flexibility of the HIP1 coiled-coil region was evident from its variation from a previously determined structure of a similar region. A hydrogen-bond network and changes in coiled-coil monomer interaction suggest that the HIP1 coiled-coil domain is uniquely suited to allow conformational flexibility.

  11. Natural templates for coiled-coil biomaterials from praying mantis egg cases.

    PubMed

    Walker, Andrew A; Weisman, Sarah; Kameda, Tsunenori; Sutherland, Tara D

    2012-12-10

    Whereas there is growing interest in producing biomaterials containing coiled-coils, relatively few studies have made use of naturally occurring fibrous proteins. In this study, we have characterized fibrous proteins used by mother praying mantises to produce an extensive covering for their eggs called an ootheca and demonstrate the production of artificial ootheca using recombinantly produced proteins. Examination of natural oothecae by infrared spectroscopy and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance revealed the material to consist of proteins organized predominately as coiled-coils. Two structural proteins, Mantis Fibroin 1 and Mantis Fibroin 2, were identified in ootheca from each of three species. Between species, the primary sequences of both proteins had diverged considerably, but other features were tightly conserved, including low molecular weight, high abundance of Ala, Glu, Lys, and Ser, and a triblock-like architecture with extensive central coiled-coil domain. Mantis fibroin hydrophobic cores had an unusual composition containing high levels of alanine and aromatic residues. Recombinantly produced mantis fibroins folded into coiled-coils in solution and could be fabricated into solid materials with high coiled-coil content. The structural features of mantis fibroins and their straightforward recombinant production make them promising templates for the production of coiled-coil biomimetics materials. PMID:23137042

  12. A comparative study of flat coil and coil sensor for landslide detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanjaya, Edi; Muslimin, Ahmad Novi; Djamal, Mitra; Suprijadi, Handayani, Gunawan; Ramli

    2016-03-01

    The landslide is one of the most costly catastrophic events in terms of human lives and infrastructure damage, thus an early warning monitoring for landslides becomes more and more important. Currently existing monitoring systems for early warning are available in terms of monolithic systems. This is a very cost-intensive way, considering installation as well as operational and personal expenses. We have been developing a landslide detection system based on flat coil and coil sensor. The flat coil element being developed is an inductive proximity sensor for detection mass of soil movement. The simple method of flat coil manufactures and low cost, is an attraction that is still inspired to develop flat coil sensors. Meanwhile, although it has a drawback in terms of their size, the coil sensor is still required in many fields due to their sensitivity and robustness. The simple method of coil manufacture and the materials are commonly available and low cost, is an attraction that is still inspired to develop induction coil sensors. A comparative study of alternative configuration of sensor based on flat coil elements and a coil in application to landslide detection has been discussed in this paper. The purpose of this comparison is to show the ideal conditions and the challenges for each sensor. Furthermore, a comparison between flat coil and coil sensor is presented.

  13. An efficient calibration method for SQUID measurement system using three orthogonal Helmholtz coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Li; Shu-Lin, Zhang; Chao-Xiang, Zhang; Xiang-Yan, Kong; Xiao-Ming, Xie

    2016-06-01

    For a practical superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) based measurement system, the Tesla/volt coefficient must be accurately calibrated. In this paper, we propose a highly efficient method of calibrating a SQUID magnetometer system using three orthogonal Helmholtz coils. The Tesla/volt coefficient is regarded as the magnitude of a vector pointing to the normal direction of the pickup coil. By applying magnetic fields through a three-dimensional Helmholtz coil, the Tesla/volt coefficient can be directly calculated from magnetometer responses to the three orthogonally applied magnetic fields. Calibration with alternating current (AC) field is normally used for better signal-to-noise ratio in noisy urban environments and the results are compared with the direct current (DC) calibration to avoid possible effects due to eddy current. In our experiment, a calibration relative error of about 6.89 × 10‑4 is obtained, and the error is mainly caused by the non-orthogonality of three axes of the Helmholtz coils. The method does not need precise alignment of the magnetometer inside the Helmholtz coil. It can be used for the multichannel magnetometer system calibration effectively and accurately. Project supported by the “Strategic Priority Research Program (B)” of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB04020200) and the Shanghai Municipal Science and Technology Commission Project, China (Grant No. 15DZ1940902).

  14. Analysis of Options for Resistive Wall Mode Control Coils for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrickson, M.

    2006-10-01

    Several fusion devices have found improvement in plasma performance from the application of either static or dynamic magnetic perturbations from a set of coils. DIII-D has found that static fields can prevent formation of locked modes and create ergodic structures in the plasma edge that decrease the size of ELMS. They have also used such coils in a feedback loop to control the growth of resistive wall modes. Similar effects have been observed on NSTX, C-Mod, ASDEX, and JET. In all cases, the coils were placed close to the plasma either inside the vessel or immediately outside a thin vessel. Because ITER is a burning plasma device with a long pulse length, thick nuclear shielding must be placed between the plasma and the vacuum vessel. If ITER is to realize the confinement and operation benefits of resistive wall mode control coils, locations and coil designs must be found where such coils can be deployed. Two generic locations have been identified. The most accessible location is immediately outside the vessel and around the mid-plane ports. An alternative location closer to the plasma is inside the mid-plane ports but behind the port shield module. We have used an electromagnetic modeling code to evaluate both the static and dynamic field perturbations at the plasma edge for both of these coil options for frequencies from 1 Hz to 6kHz. *Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  15. 4C code analysis of thermal-hydraulic transients in the KSTAR PF1 superconducting coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savoldi Richard, L.; Bonifetto, R.; Chu, Y.; Kholia, A.; Park, S. H.; Lee, H. J.; Zanino, R.

    2013-01-01

    The KSTAR tokamak, in operation since 2008 at the National Fusion Research Institute in Korea, is equipped with a full superconducting magnet system including the central solenoid (CS), which is made of four symmetric pairs of coils PF1L/U-PF4L/U. Each of the CS coils is pancake wound using Nb3Sn cable-in-conduit conductors with a square Incoloy jacket. The coils are cooled with supercritical He in forced circulation at nominal 4.5 K and 5.5 bar inlet conditions. During different test campaigns the measured temperature increase due to AC losses turned out to be higher than expected, which motivates the present study. The 4C code, already validated against and applied to different types of thermal-hydraulic transients in different superconducting coils, is applied here to the thermal-hydraulic analysis of a full set of trapezoidal current pulses in the PF1 coils, with different ramp rates. We find the value of the coupling time constant nτ that best fits, at each current ramp rate, the temperature increase up to the end of the heating at the coil outlet. The agreement between computed results and the whole set of measured data, including temperatures, pressures and mass flow rates, is then shown to be very good both at the inlet and at the outlet of the coil. The nτ values needed to explain the experimental results decrease at increasing current ramp rates, consistently with the results found in the literature.

  16. Designed Coiled-Coil Peptides Inhibit the Type Three Secretion System of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Larzábal, Mariano; Mercado, Elsa C.; Vilte, Daniel A.; Salazar-González, Hector; Cataldi, Angel; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Background Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) are two categories of E. coli strains associated with human disease. A major virulence factor of both pathotypes is the expression of a type three secretion system (TTSS), responsible for their ability to adhere to gut mucosa causing a characteristic attaching and effacing lesion (A/E). The TTSS translocates effector proteins directly into the host cell that subvert mammalian cell biochemistry. Methods/Principal Findings We examined synthetic peptides designed to inhibit the TTSS. CoilA and CoilB peptides, both representing coiled-coil regions of the translocator protein EspA, and CoilD peptide, corresponding to a coiled–coil region of the needle protein EscF, were effective in inhibiting the TTSS dependent hemolysis of red blood cells by the EPEC E2348/69 strain. CoilA and CoilB peptides also reduced the formation of actin pedestals by the same strain in HEp-2 cells and impaired the TTSS-mediated protein translocation into the epithelial cell. Interestingly, CoilA and CoilB were able to block EspA assembly, destabilizing the TTSS and thereby Tir translocation. This blockage of EspA polymerization by CoilA or CoilB peptides, also inhibited the correct delivery of EspB and EspD as detected by immunoblotting. Interestingly, electron microscopy of bacteria incubated with the CoilA peptide showed a reduction of the length of EspA filaments. Conclusions Our data indicate that coiled-coil peptides can prevent the assembly and thus the functionality of the TTSS apparatus and suggest that these peptides could provide an attractive tool to block EPEC and EHEC pathogenesis. PMID:20140230

  17. Undulator Long Coil Measurement System Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zachary; Levashov, Yurii; /SLAC

    2010-11-24

    The first and second field integrals in the LCLS undulators must be below a specified limit. To accurately measure the field integrals, a long coil system is used. This note describes a set of tests which were used to check the performance of the long coil system. A long coil system was constructed to measure the first and second field integrals of the LCLS undulators. The long coil measurements of the background fields were compared to field integrals obtained by sampling the background fields and numerically calculating the integrals. This test showed that the long coil has the sensitivity required to measure at the levels specified for the field integrals. Tests were also performed by making long coil measurements of short magnets of known strength placed at various positions The long coil measurements agreed with the known field integrals obtained by independent measurements and calculation. Our tests showed that the long coil measurements are a valid way to determine whether the LCLS undulator field integrals are below the specified limits.

  18. Magnetic Fields at the Center of Coils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binder, Philippe; Hui, Kaleonui; Goldman, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    In this note we synthesize and extend expressions for the magnetic field at the center of very short and very long current-carrying coils. Elementary physics textbooks present the following equation for the magnetic field inside a very long current-carrying coil (solenoid): B[subscript sol] = µ[subscript 0] (N/L) I, (1) where I is the current, N…

  19. Precise Fabrication of Electromagnetic-Levitation Coils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, E.; Curreri, P.; Theiss, J.; Abbaschian, G.

    1985-01-01

    Winding copper tubing on jig ensures reproducible performance. Sequence of steps insures consistent fabrication of levitation-and-melting coils. New method enables technician to produce eight coils per day, 95 percent of them acceptable. Method employs precise step-by-step procedure on specially designed wrapping and winding jig.

  20. Novel transcranial magnetic stimulation coil for mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    March, Stephen; Stark, Spencer; Crowther, Lawrence; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2014-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) shows potential for non-invasive treatment of various neurological disorders. Significant work has been performed on the design of coils used for TMS on human subjects but few reports have been made on the design of coils for use on the brains of animals such as mice. This work is needed as TMS studies utilizing mice can allow rapid preclinical development of TMS for human disorders but the coil designs developed for use on humans are inadequate for optimal stimulation of the much smaller mouse brain. A novel TMS coil has been developed with the goal of inducing strong and focused electric fields for the stimulation of small animals such as mice. Calculations of induced electric fields were performed utilizing an MRI derived inhomogeneous model of an adult male mouse. Mechanical and thermal analysis of this new TMS helmet-coil design have also been performed at anticipated TMS operating conditions to ensure mechanical stability of the new coil and establish expected linear attraction and rotational force values. Calculated temperature increases for typical stimulation periods indicate the helmet-coil system is capable of operating within established medical standards. A prototype of the coil has been fabricated and characterization results are presented.

  1. Optimal Coil Orientation for Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Lars; Neumann, Gunnar; Oung, Stephen; Schweikard, Achim; Trillenberg, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We study the impact of coil orientation on the motor threshold (MT) and present an optimal coil orientation for stimulation of the foot. The result can be compared to results of models that predict this orientation from electrodynamic properties of the media in the skull and from orientations of cells, respectively. We used a robotized TMS system for precise coil placement and recorded motor-evoked potentials with surface electrodes on the abductor hallucis muscle of the right foot in 8 healthy control subjects. First, we performed a hot-spot search in standard (lateral) orientation and then rotated the coil in steps of 10° or 20°. At each step we estimated the MT. For navigated stimulation and for correlation with the underlying anatomy a structural MRI scan was obtained. Optimal coil orientation was 33.1±18.3° anteriorly in relation to the standard lateral orientation. In this orientation the threshold was 54±18% in units of maximum stimulator output. There was a significant difference of 8.0±5.9% between the MTs at optimal and at standard orientation. The optimal coil orientations were significantly correlated with the direction perpendicular to the postcentral gyrus (). Robotized TMS facilitates sufficiently precise coil positioning and orientation to study even small variations of the MT with coil orientation. The deviations from standard orientation are more closely matched by models based on field propagation in media than by models based on orientations of pyramidal cells. PMID:23593200

  2. Completion of the Polo model coil

    SciTech Connect

    Bourquard, A.; Plat, X.; Bonnet, P.; Semal, D.; Personeni, G.; Bernaudat, M.; Hacquard, A.; Salvador, R.; Dombrowski, D.

    1996-07-01

    A superconducting poloidal field model coil as needed for tokamaks has been constructed by GEC Alsthom within the Polo project in effective collaboration with Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Technische Physik, Germany. The manufacturing procedures for the coil and its terminals are described.

  3. Helical axis stellarator with noninterlocking planar coils

    DOEpatents

    Reiman, A.; Boozer, A.H.

    1984-03-06

    The present invention generates stellarator fields having favorable properties (magnetic well and large rotational transform) by a simple coil system consisting only of unlinked planar non-circular coils. At large rotational transform toroidal effects on magnetic well and rotational transform are small and can be ignored. We do so herein, specializing in straight helical systems.

  4. The AC-120: The advanced commercial transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duran, David; Griffin, Ernest; Mendoza, Saul; Nguyen, Son; Pickett, Tim; Noernberg, Clemm

    1993-01-01

    The main objective of this design was to fulfill a need for a new airplane to replace the aging 100 to 150 passenger, 1500 nautical mile range aircraft such as the Douglas DC9 and Boeing 737-100 airplanes. After researching the future aircraft market, conducting extensive trade studies, and analysis on different configurations, the AC-120 Advanced Commercial Transport final design was achieved. The AC-120's main design features include the incorporation of a three lifting surface configuration which is powered by two turboprop engines. The AC-120 is an economically sensitive aircraft which meets the new FM Stage Three noise requirements, and has lower NO(x) emissions than current turbofan powered airplanes. The AC-120 also improves on its contemporaries in passenger comfort, manufacturing, and operating cost.

  5. MIT 12 Tesla Coil test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steeves, M. M.; Hoenig, M. O.

    1985-07-01

    Test results from the MIT 12 Tesla Coil experiment are presented. The coil was tested in the High Field Test Facility (HFTF) of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in October 1984 and January 1985. The experiment measured the performance of an Internally Cooled, Cabled Superconductor (ICCS) of practical size, intended for use in magnetic fusion experiments. The MIT coil carried 15 kA at 11 T for 5 min with no sign of instability. A half turn length in a 10 T field was able to absorb a heat load in 4 msec of more than 200 mJ sub cm of cable volume while carrying a current of 12 kA. The MIT coil successfully met the performance requirements of the Department of Energy's 12 Tesla Coil Program.

  6. Recent advances in helix-coil theory.

    PubMed

    Doig, Andrew J

    2002-12-10

    Peptide helices in solution form a complex mixture of all helix, all coil or, most frequently, central helices with frayed coil ends. In order to interpret experiments on helical peptides and make theoretical predictions on helices, it is therefore essential to use a helix-coil theory that takes account of this equilibrium. The original Zimm-Bragg and Lifson-Roig helix-coil theories have been greatly extended in the last 10 years to include additional interactions. These include preferences for the N-cap, N1, N2, N3 and C-cap positions, capping motifs, helix dipoles, side chain interactions and 3(10)-helix formation. These have been applied to determine energies for these preferences from experimental data and to predict the helix contents of peptides. This review discusses these newly recognised structural features of helices and how they have been included in helix-coil models. PMID:12488008

  7. NMR local coil with adjustable spacing

    SciTech Connect

    Dembinski, G.T.

    1988-03-22

    A local coil assembly for use in NMR imaging is described which comprises: a base; a first local coil module mounted to the base and extending upward therefrom; sockets disposed in the base, each at a different distance from the first local coil module; a second local coil module having a connector therein which mates with each of the sockets to enable the second local coil module to be connected to the base at any one of the sockets; and a set of reactive components. The values of the respective reactive components are selected such that the second local oil module may be connected to any of the sockets without any substantial change in the resonant frequency of the assembly.

  8. Thermal analysis and testing for DIII-D ohmic heating coil repair

    SciTech Connect

    Baxi, C.B.; Anderson, P.M.; Gootgeld, A.M.

    1997-11-01

    The DIII-D ohmic heating (OH) coil solenoid consists of two parallel windings of 48 turns each cooled by water. Each winding is made up of four parallel conductors. Desired thermal capacity of the coil is 20 MJ at a repetition rate of 10 min. One of the conductors started leaking water in July 1995. Since then, the coil has been operated at a reduced thermal load using one winding. An experiment followed by an analysis was undertaken to determine if the OH-coil could be operated at full capacity without cooling the leaking segment by relying on conduction heat transfer to the neighboring cooled conductors. The analysis took into consideration the transient energy equations, including the effect of conduction between neighboring conductors. The axial conduction was modeled in the conductor, but was ignored in the coolant. An experiment was performed on the undamaged coil winding to determine the thermal conductance between neighboring conductors. The experiment consisted of passing hot water through adjacent cooling channels of two conductors and cold water through the cooling channels of the remaining two conductors of the same winding. The flow rate, inlet and outlet temperatures from each circuit were measured during the transient. From the experimental data and analysis an average thermal conductance between the conductors was determined to be about 0.1 W/cm{sup 2}-C. Using the experimentally determined value of the thermal conductance, an analysis was performed on a coil winding consisting of one uncooled conductor and three cooled conductors. Results show that it is possible to operate the full OH-coil without cooling the damaged conductor to the desired thermal load of 20 MJ per pulse.

  9. Intra-coil interactions in split gradient coils in a hybrid MRI-LINAC system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Fangfang; Freschi, Fabio; Sanchez Lopez, Hector; Repetto, Maurizio; Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    An MRI-LINAC system combines a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system with a medical linear accelerator (LINAC) to provide image-guided radiotherapy for targeting tumors in real-time. In an MRI-LINAC system, a set of split gradient coils is employed to produce orthogonal gradient fields for spatial signal encoding. Owing to this unconventional gradient configuration, eddy currents induced by switching gradient coils on and off may be of particular concern. It is expected that strong intra-coil interactions in the set will be present due to the constrained return paths, leading to potential degradation of the gradient field linearity and image distortion. In this study, a series of gradient coils with different track widths have been designed and analyzed to investigate the electromagnetic interactions between coils in a split gradient set. A driving current, with frequencies from 100 Hz to 10 kHz, was applied to study the inductive coupling effects with respect to conductor geometry and operating frequency. It was found that the eddy currents induced in the un-energized coils (hereby-referred to as passive coils) positively correlated with track width and frequency. The magnetic field induced by the eddy currents in the passive coils with wide tracks was several times larger than that induced by eddy currents in the cold shield of cryostat. The power loss in the passive coils increased with the track width. Therefore, intra-coil interactions should be included in the coil design and analysis process.

  10. A study on geometry effect of transmission coil for micro size magnetic induction coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyung Hwa; Jun, Byoung Ok; Kim, Seunguk; Lee, Gwang Jun; Ryu, Mingyu; Choi, Ji-Woong; Jang, Jae Eun

    2016-05-01

    The effects of transmission (Tx) coil structure have been studied for micro-size magnetic induction coil. The size of the receiving (Rx) coil should be shrunk to the micrometer level for the various new applications such as micro-robot and wireless body implanted devices. In case of the macro-scale magnetic induction coil, the power transmission efficiency is generally considered to be higher as the inductance of the transmission coil became larger; however, the large size difference between macro-size Tx coil and micro-size Rx coil can decrease the power transmission efficiency due to the difference of resonance frequency. Here, we study a correlation of the power transmission with the size and distance between the macro-size Tx and micro-size Rx coils using magnetic induction technique. The maximum power efficiency was 0.28/0.23/0.13/0.12% at the distance of 0.3/1/3/5 cm between Rx and Tx coil. In addition, more efficient wireless power transferring method is suggested with a floating coil for the body implantable devices. The voltage output increased up to 5.4 mV than the original one Tx coil system. The results demonstrated the foundational wireless power transferring system with enhanced power efficiency.

  11. Intra-coil interactions in split gradient coils in a hybrid MRI-LINAC system.

    PubMed

    Tang, Fangfang; Freschi, Fabio; Sanchez Lopez, Hector; Repetto, Maurizio; Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    An MRI-LINAC system combines a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system with a medical linear accelerator (LINAC) to provide image-guided radiotherapy for targeting tumors in real-time. In an MRI-LINAC system, a set of split gradient coils is employed to produce orthogonal gradient fields for spatial signal encoding. Owing to this unconventional gradient configuration, eddy currents induced by switching gradient coils on and off may be of particular concern. It is expected that strong intra-coil interactions in the set will be present due to the constrained return paths, leading to potential degradation of the gradient field linearity and image distortion. In this study, a series of gradient coils with different track widths have been designed and analyzed to investigate the electromagnetic interactions between coils in a split gradient set. A driving current, with frequencies from 100Hz to 10kHz, was applied to study the inductive coupling effects with respect to conductor geometry and operating frequency. It was found that the eddy currents induced in the un-energized coils (hereby-referred to as passive coils) positively correlated with track width and frequency. The magnetic field induced by the eddy currents in the passive coils with wide tracks was several times larger than that induced by eddy currents in the cold shield of cryostat. The power loss in the passive coils increased with the track width. Therefore, intra-coil interactions should be included in the coil design and analysis process. PMID:26852418

  12. Performance improvement of a high-temperature superconducting coil by separating and grading the coil edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiguri, Shinichi; Funamoto, Taisuke

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we establish a model to analyze the transport current performance of a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) coil, considering the dependencies of critical current and n-value of an HTS tape on magnetic field and magnetic field angles. This analysis shows that relatively large electric fields appear at the coil’s edges, preventing improvement in the transport current performance of the coil. To solve this problem, in this paper, we propose a graded coil in which several coil edges of different heights are separated and graded. Analysis of its performance shows that the coil’s critical current increases, thus confirming that there exists an optimum coil cross section at which the stored energy and central magnetic field improve 2.1 times and 45%, respectively, compared with a typical rectangular coil that employs the same total length of the HTS tape. It is recommended that these results of the coil should be applied to SMES.

  13. Improved Plasma Properties in RT-1 with a Levitated Coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, Haruhiko; Yoshida, Zensho; Ogawa, Yuichi; Morikawa, Junji; Watanabe, Sho; Yano, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Junko

    2007-11-01

    Ring Trap-1 (RT-1) is a novel device to confine plasmas in a magnetosphere-like configuration generated by a superconducting internal conductor. The ring coil is excited with a permanent current of Ic=250kAT that is magnetically levitated in the chamber to minimize disturbances to the plasmas. The main scientific objective of RT-1 is to realize self-organized states of flowing plasmas with a very high beta value, where the thermal pressure of plasmas is balanced by the hydrodynamic pressure of a fast flow (S. M. Mahajan & Z. Yoshida, PRL 81, 4863 (1998), Z. Yoshida & S. M. Mahajan, PRL 88, 095001 (2002)). We have started a series of initial plasma experiments since 2006, and in this study, we focused on the improvements of plasma properties by the coil levitation. Hydrogen plasmas were generated by an 8.2GHz ECH system. When the coil was levitated, a line integrated electron density increased to ne=4x10^17m-2 and the peak density was close to the O-mode cut off density of the microwave. The beta value of the plasma was ˜3% and the pressure was mainly sustained by a high energy component of electrons. The magnetic surface configuration of RT-1 is also suitable for the confinement of non-neutral plasmas. Experiments on electron plasmas were conducted in RT-1 expanding the previous work in a normal conducting device.

  14. A study of the electromagnetic characteristics of no-insulation GdBCO racetrack coils under an external magnetic ripple field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y. H.; Yang, D. G.; Kim, Y. G.; Kim, S. G.; Song, J. B.; Lee, H. G.

    2016-04-01

    Here we report the effect of an external magnetic ripple field on the electromagnetic characteristics of GdBCO racetrack coils being operated with a constant DC current. Two types of GdBCO racetrack coils, one wound without turn-to-turn insulation (NI) and the other wound with Kapton tape (INS), were examined under external ripple fields generated by a permanent magnet mounted on a rotor, which was driven by a separate AC motor. The voltage fluctuations and magnetic field variations were measured with respect to the external ripple field intensity (B ERF), rotating speed, and the operating condition. When the INS and NI coils were exposed to an external ripple field (herein, I op = 80 A, B ERF = 2 mT, and 5 rpm), a voltage fluctuation occurred because a time-varying magnetic field interacted with an electric circuit creating an electromotive force. The peak-to-peak voltage (V pp = 0.29 mV) of the NI coil was ∼1.86 times lower than that (0.54 mV) of the INS coil, because the voltage response of the NI coil lagged behind dB/dt due to the existence of turn-to-turn contact. Furthermore, the V pp of the INS coil increased with increasing B ERF and rotating speed, while those of the NI coil were barely affected due to the delay of electromagnetic induction. In excessive current and ripple field conditions (I op = 1.125 I c, B ERF = 8 mT, and 50 rpm) the INS coil eventually quenched while the NI coil did not, implying that the electromagnetic stability of the NI coil in excessive time-varying field conditions was superior to that of the INS coil.

  15. Method and apparatus for detecting flaws in conductive material

    DOEpatents

    Hockey, Ronald L.; Riechers, Douglas M.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention uses a magnet in relative motion to a conductive material, and a coil that is stationary with respect to the magnet to measure perturbation or variation in the magnetic field in the presence of an inclusion. The magnet and coil sensor may be on the same side of the conductive material.

  16. Method and apparatus for detecting flaws in conductive material

    DOEpatents

    Hockey, R.L.; Riechers, D.M.

    1998-07-07

    The present invention uses a magnet in relative motion to a conductive material, and a coil that is stationary with respect to the magnet to measure perturbation or variation in the magnetic field in the presence of an inclusion. The magnet and coil sensor may be on the same side of the conductive material. 18 figs.

  17. Optimization of coil design for near uniform interrogating field generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Z.; Efremov, A.; Safdarnejad, M.; Tamburrino, A.; Udpa, L.; Udpa, S. S.

    2015-03-01

    The detection of a crack under fastener heads (CUF) in a multi-layered aircraft structure remains a challenge in non-destructive evaluation (NDE). An EC-GMR system using a linear eddy current (EC) coil with giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors located on the axis of symmetry is proposed for detecting discontinuities in conducting materials. The signal received from sensors is greatly influenced by the interrogating field. This paper describes a detailed parametric study, using a finite element model predicted signals in conjunction with a multi-parameter optimization problem for coil design. The sensor performance is assessed using quantitative measures based on Probability of detection (POD) with respect to different crack geometries.

  18. Optimization of guideway coil dimensions for a magnetic levitation system

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.J.; Feng, J.

    1997-09-01

    A fast computer code that generates currents and forces for multiple magnetic levitation (MAGLEV) vehicle coils over a discrete guideway of arbitrary geometry has been developed, tested, and verified. A study of coil dimensions for overlapping loops, ladders, and discrete loops has been conducted to determine the optimal guideway design. A parameter known as figure of merit has been defined to assist in evaluating the level of merit for a particular track configuration. From this, it has been discovered that, for most cases, ladder tracks are a better configuration over both overlapping and discrete loops. On closer inspection, it was also discovered that an aspect ratio of unity for the dimensions of a ladder track yields the best overall results.

  19. Magntohydrodynamic behavior of capacitor-coil target toward alternative inertial confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, T.; Oyama, S.; Sugimoto, Y.; Takahashi, K.; Kikuchi, T.; Harada, N.; Nagatomo, H.; Fujioka, S.; Sunahara, A.

    2016-05-01

    To understand its magnetohydrodynamic behaviors and the electrical properties, we proposed to evaluate both experimental observations and numerical simulations. Electrical conductivity for nickel in warm dense matter (WDM) state has been measured with an exploding wire in a quasi-isochoric vessel. The result shows that the electrical conductivity for nickel in WDM is relatively high from the comparison of the electrical conductivities for several materials in WDM state. However, the skin effect in the capacitor-coil target will be neglected from the estimation. A two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation for the capacitor-coil target has been demonstrated. The results shows that the distribution of B-field in the capacitor-coil target depends on the electrical conductivity model.

  20. Optimization of RMP Coils for ELM Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Someswar; Evans, T. E.; Orlov, D. M.

    2015-11-01

    Advanced DIII-D RMP coils with improved capabilities are studied using a vacuum island overlap width (VIOW) criterion. Changes in characteristics of the RMP field produced by different geometrical parameters using both ex-vessel (C- and O-) and in-vessel (I- and CP-) coils are discussed. By reducing the poloidal span of each coil, the spacing between them and varying the geometric angle between the coils and the plasma, the resonant field can be adjusted to optimize the edge VIOW criterion while minimizing core resonances. Three separate phase scans using a combination of the as built I-coils and proposed CP-coils are compared for three different equilibria. Two of these equilibria have different edge safety factors and the third one has a different gap between plasma and wall than the standard equilibrium scenario of DIII D. The scan results show that the VIOW correlation criterion is well satisfied in all three cases, resulting in a new way to optimize the RMP coils for the future reactors in order to achieve the ELM suppression criterion over a significantly wider range of fusion plasma operating scenarios. Work supported by the U.S. DOE under DE-FG02-05ER54809 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  1. ENGINEERING OF THE AGS SNAKE COIL ASSEMBLY.

    SciTech Connect

    ANERELLA,M.GUPTA,R.KOVACH,P.MARONE,A.PLATE,S.POWER,K.SCHMALZLE,J.WILLEN,E.

    2003-05-12

    A 30% Snake superconducting magnet is proposed to maintain polarization in the AGS proton beam, the magnetic design of which is described elsewhere. The required helical coils for this magnet push the limits of the technology developed for the RHIC Snake coils. First, fields must be provided with differing pitch along the length of the magnet. To accomplish this, a new 3-D CAD system (''Pro/Engineer'' from PTC), which uses parametric techniques to enable fast iterations, has been employed. Revised magnetic field calculations are then based on the output of the mechanical model. Changes are made in turn to the model on the basis of those field calculations. To ensure that accuracy is maintained, the final solid model is imported directly into the CNC machine programming software, rather than by the use of graphics translating software. Next, due to the large coil size and magnetic field, there was concern whether the structure could contain the coil forces. A finite element analysis was performed, using the 3-D model, to ensure that the stresses and deflections were acceptable. Finally, a method was developed using ultrasonic energy to improve conductor placement during coil winding, in an effort to minimize electrical shorts due to conductor misplacement, a problem that occurred in the RHIC helical coil program. Each of these activities represents a significant improvement in technology over that which was used previously for the RHIC snake coils.

  2. Microsensor coils for miniature fiber optic gyroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffin, Paul B.; Baeder, Janet S.

    2004-10-01

    Depolarized Interferometric Fiber Optic Gyroscopes (D-IFOGs) that are constructed with inexpensive single mode (SM) fiber have provided an opportunity for developers to meet Army emerging missions goals for affordable, small volume, reliable inertial guidance systems for use in small missiles, munitions, and future micro-unmanned autonomous vehicles. However, there remain several vital issues associated with substantially reducing the diameter of the sensor coil. Optical fiber that is precision-wound onto a micro coil experiences increased stress due to small radius bending, fiber distortions at crossover sites, and increased interlayer pressures as a result of multiple layers of fiber wound under tension. Tension and small radius bending stresses can have a detrimental effect on the performance of D-IFOGs. Therefore, other scenarios for the application of SM fiber to a micro-sensor coil must be considered. One scheme involves taking advantage of the bending-induced birefringence and employing the low cost SM fiber as a polarization-maintaining (PM) fiber. The mechanics of how a substantial reduction in the coil radius produces PM fiber properties in SM fiber is investigated under this research effort. Conventional and specialty SM fibers are characterized to identify optimal fibers for the development of micro-sensor coils. The results from extinction ratio measurements on the SM fibers and micro-sensor coils are presented in this paper. The significant cross coupling suggests that scattering centers are present in very small radius bending. Also, measurements show that optical loss is significant in micro IFOG coils.

  3. Microfabricated AC impedance sensor

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter; Ackler, Harold D.; Becker, Frederick; Boser, Bernhard E.; Eldredge, Adam B.; Fuller, Christopher K.; Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Hamilton, Julie K.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Wang, Xiao-Bo

    2002-01-01

    A microfabricated instrument for detecting and identifying cells and other particles based on alternating current (AC) impedance measurements. The microfabricated AC impedance sensor includes two critical elements: 1) a microfluidic chip, preferably of glass substrates, having at least one microchannel therein and with electrodes patterned on both substrates, and 2) electrical circuits that connect to the electrodes on the microfluidic chip and detect signals associated with particles traveling down the microchannels. These circuits enable multiple AC impedance measurements of individual particles at high throughput rates with sufficient resolution to identify different particle and cell types as appropriate for environmental detection and clinical diagnostic applications.

  4. Phase reconstruction from multiple coil data using a virtual reference coil

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Dennis L.; Payne, Allison; Todd, Nick; Hadley, J. Rock

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This paper develops a method to obtain optimal estimates of absolute magnetization phase from multiple-coil MRI data. Methods The element-specific phases of a multi-element receiver coil array are accounted for by using the phase of a real or virtual reference coil that is sensitive over the entire imaged volume. The virtual-reference coil is generated as a weighted combination of measurements from all receiver coils. The phase-corrected multiple coil complex images are combined using the inverse covariance matrix. These methods are tested on images of an agar phantom, an in vivo breast, and an anesthetized rabbit obtained using combinations of four, nine, and three receiver channels, respectively. Results The four- and three- channel acquisitions require formation of a virtual-reference receiver coil while one channel of the nine-channel receive array has a sensitivity profile covering the entire imaged volume. Referencing to a real or virtual coil gives receiver phases that are essentially identical except for the individual receiver channel noise. The resulting combined images, which account for receiver channel noise covariance, show the expected reduction in phase variance. Conclusions The proposed virtual reference coil method determines a phase distribution for each coil from which an optimal phase map can be obtained. PMID:24006172

  5. Crystal Structure of the Central Coiled-Coil Domain from Human Liprin-[beta]2

    SciTech Connect

    Stafford, Ryan L.; Tang, Ming-Yun; Sawaya, Michael R.; Phillips, Martin L.; Bowie, James U.

    2012-02-07

    Liprins are a conserved family of scaffolding proteins important for the proper regulation and development of neuronal synapses. Humans have four liprin-{alpha}s and two liprin-{beta}s which all contain long coiled-coil domains followed by three tandem SAM domains. Complex interactions between the coiled-coil and SAM domains are thought to create liprin scaffolds, but the structural and biochemical properties of these domains remain largely uncharacterized. In this study we find that the human liprin-{beta}2 coiled-coil forms an extended dimer. Several protease-resistant subdomains within the liprin-{beta}1 and liprin-{beta}2 coiled-coils were also identified. A 2.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of the central, protease-resistant core of the liprin-{beta}2 coiled-coil reveals a parallel helix orientation. These studies represent an initial step toward determining the overall architecture of liprin scaffolds and understanding the molecular basis for their synaptic functions.

  6. Crystal Structure of a Coiled-Coil Domain from Human ROCK I

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Daqi; Li, Yiqun; Song, Hyun Kyu; Toms, Angela V.; Gould, Christopher J.; Ficarro, Scott B.; Marto, Jarrod A.; Goode, Bruce L.; Eck, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    The small GTPase Rho and one of its targets, Rho-associated kinase (ROCK), participate in a variety of actin-based cellular processes including smooth muscle contraction, cell migration, and stress fiber formation. The ROCK protein consists of an N-terminal kinase domain, a central coiled-coil domain containing a Rho binding site, and a C-terminal pleckstrin homology domain. Here we present the crystal structure of a large section of the central coiled-coil domain of human ROCK I (amino acids 535–700). The structure forms a parallel α-helical coiled-coil dimer that is structurally similar to tropomyosin, an actin filament binding protein. There is an unusual discontinuity in the coiled-coil; three charged residues (E613, R617 and D620) are positioned at what is normally the hydrophobic core of coiled-coil packing. We speculate that this conserved irregularity could function as a hinge that allows ROCK to adopt its autoinhibited conformation. PMID:21445309

  7. A Synthetic Coiled-Coil Interactome Provides Heterospecific Modules for Molecular Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Reinke, Aaron W.; Grant, Robert A.; Keating, Amy E.

    2010-06-21

    The versatile coiled-coil protein motif is widely used to induce and control macromolecular interactions in biology and materials science. Yet the types of interaction patterns that can be constructed using known coiled coils are limited. Here we greatly expand the coiled-coil toolkit by measuring the complete pairwise interactions of 48 synthetic coiled coils and 7 human bZIP coiled coils using peptide microarrays. The resulting 55-member protein 'interactome' includes 27 pairs of interacting peptides that preferentially heteroassociate. The 27 pairs can be used in combinations to assemble sets of 3 to 6 proteins that compose networks of varying topologies. Of special interest are heterospecific peptide pairs that participate in mutually orthogonal interactions. Such pairs provide the opportunity to dimerize two separate molecular systems without undesired crosstalk. Solution and structural characterization of two such sets of orthogonal heterodimers provide details of their interaction geometries. The orthogonal pair, along with the many other network motifs discovered in our screen, provide new capabilities for synthetic biology and other applications.

  8. Progress on the Design of the Coupling coils for MICE andMUCOOL

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Li, D.; Virostek, Steve P.; Wang, L.; Wu, H.; Li,L.K.; Li, S.Y.; Xu, F.Y.; Guo, X.L.; Liu, C.S.; Han, G.; Liu, X.K.; Jia,L.X.

    2007-06-20

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) [1]willdemonstrate ionization cooling in a short section of a realistic coolingchannel using a muon beam at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in theUK. The MICE RF and Coupling Coil (RFCC) Module consists of asuperconducting solenoid mounted around four normal conducting 201.25-MHzRF cavities. The coil package that surrounds the RF cavities is to bemounted in a 1.4 m diameter vacuum vessel. The coupling coil confines thebeam in the RFCC module within the radius of the RF cavity beam windows.Each coupling magnet will be powered by a 300 A, 10 V power supply. Themaximum design longitudinal force that will be carried by the cold masssupport system is 0.5 MN. The detailed design and analysis of thecoupling magnet has been completed by ICST. The primary magnetic andmechanical design features of the coils are presented in thispaper.

  9. Evaluation of the Magnetic Fields and Mutual Inductance between Circular Coils Arbitrarily Positioned in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anele, A. O.; Hamam, Y.; Chassagne, L.; Linares, J.; Alayli, Y.; Djouani, K.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the evaluation of the magnetic fields and mutual inductance between circular coils arbitrarily positioned in space. Firstly, based on an advanced and relevant model available in the literature, MATLAB code is implemented to evaluate the mutual inductance between circular coils arbitrarily positioned with respect to each other. The computed results are compared with the numerical results previously published in the literature and a detailed clarification regarding the huge computational errors made are presented. In the second part, a complex and relevant model available in the literature for evaluating the magnetic fields due to a circular coil is presented. Based on the useful information, the model for computing the magnetic fields between two circular coils is formulated. The computed results are validated with experimental measurements. The comparison of the results shows that the developed model and the experimental measurements conducted are accurate and effective.

  10. Making an Inexpensive Electromagnetic Wiggler Using Sheet Materials for the Coils

    SciTech Connect

    George Herman Biallas; Stephen Vincent Benson; Thomas Hiatt; George Neil; Michael Snyder

    2004-08-01

    An inexpensive electromagnetic wiggler, made with twenty-eight, 8 cm periods with a K of 1 and gap of 2.6 cm was made within 11 weeks after receipt of order by an industrial machine shop. The coil design used sheet and plate materials cut to shapes using water jet cutting and was assembled in a simple stack design. The coil design extends the serpentine conductor design of the Duke OK4 to more and smaller conductors. The coils are conduction cooled with imbedded cooling plates. The wiggler features graded end pole fields, trim coil compensation for end field errors, and mirror plates on the ends to avoid three dimensional end field effects. Details of the methods used in construction and the wiggler performance are presented.

  11. A new AC susceptibility instrument for detecting frequency dependence over a wide range of frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, K.

    2008-12-01

    A unique equipment was developed for measuring low-field AC susceptibility over a frequency spectrum ranging from 10 Hz to 4 kHz. The coil system consists of a primary coil for applying an excitation field, and a set of pickup coils linked in series and wound oppositely for compensation. The number of turns for the primary coil is 6,000 and that for the pickup coils is 4,400, using 0.1 mm thick copper wire, wound around a quartz-glass tube of 36 mm in diameter, allowing to measure conventional 10cc samples. The excitation field is produced by a commercial function generator with two independent outputs, capable of generating sinusoidal current with frequencies of 0 to 10 MHz. A mutual inductor coil is connected in series, to which the wave generator supplies, through the second output, a small current that can be adjusted in phase and magnitude to compensate the out-of-balance of the pickup coils. The resulting signal output voltage is fed to a digital rock-in amplifier. The AC frequency spans practically from 10 Hz to 4 kHz due to the limitation of the lock-in amplifier, but can be swept over the entire range with a constant amplitude of the applied field, which is changeable from 0.4 to 1.0 Oe. The outputs from the lock-in amplifier, in both magnitude and phase, are transferred to a PC to obtain the frequency dependence spectrum of both real and imaginary parts of AC susceptibility. The system calibration was made using a paramagnetic Gd2O3 powder as well as several natural samples that have ever been used for inter-laboratory calibrations.

  12. ITER coils insulation R and D program

    SciTech Connect

    Vieira, R.F.; Sugimoto, M.; Osaki, O.; Fujioka, T.; Korsunsky, V.; Reed, R.P.; Katheder, H.; Broadbent, A.

    1995-12-31

    The ITER coil insulation systems are required for operating voltages up to 10 KV and to support shear and normal compression loads through the winding pack. Manufacturing considerations and nuclear radiation resistance also influence the choice of suitable systems. A screening program of candidate systems is being conducted in stages. The first stage is reported in this paper. Present R and D data based on small samples indicate a static shear strength of about 85 MPa for a glass or alumina and epoxy resin vacuum pressure impregnation system and 50 MPa for a pre-impregnated glass/epoxy resin system with polyimide interleaved at a temperature of 4K. The preliminary irradiation results show that coating the steel surface with inorganic materials such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} or ZrO{sub 2}/8 Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} is beneficial in increasing the radiation resistance as far as shear strength is concerned. In addition Tetrafunctional epoxy (TGDM) systems appear to be more radiation resistant than Diglycidyl Ether of Bisphenol-A (DGEBA) systems. Further R and D work will focus on prototypical samples to continue evaluation of the performance of the insulation systems.

  13. Comparison of Coil and Kiil Dialysers

    PubMed Central

    Down, P. F.; Farrand, D. E.; Wood, S. E.; Lee, H. A.

    1970-01-01

    To assess the comparative efficiency, safety, and cost of maintenance dialysis, the treatment of 13 patients with a Kiil dialyser (representing 1,477 hospital and 735 home dialyses) was compared with that of 11 patients using a coil dialyser (898 hospital and 396 home dialyses). Kiil and coil dialysers proved equally satisfactory from a medical standpoint and equally acceptable to the patients. The capital costs of home dialysis were considerably reduced without any threat to safety or efficiency. The running costs of coil dialysers approximate to those of Kiil dialysers. ImagesFig. 3 PMID:4320676

  14. Modelling and measurement of ac loss in BSCCO/Ag-tape windings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oomen, M. P.; Nanke, R.; Leghissa, M.

    2003-03-01

    High-temperature superconducting (HTS) transformers promise decreased weight and volume and higher efficiency. A 1 MVA HTS railway transformer was built and tested at Siemens AG. This paper deals with the prediction of ac loss in the BSCCO/Ag-tape windings. In a railway transformer the tape carries ac current in alternating field, the temperature differs from 77 K, tapes are stacked or cabled and overcurrents and higher harmonics occur. In ac-loss literature these issues are treated separately, if at all. We have developed a model that predicts the ac loss in sets of BSCCO/Ag-tape coils, and deals with the above-mentioned issues. The effect of higher harmonics on the loss in HTS tapes is considered for the first time. The paper gives a complete overview of the model equations and required input parameters. The model is validated over a wide range of the input parameters, using the measured critical current and ac loss of single tapes, single coils and sets of coils in the 1 MVA transformer. An accuracy of around 25% is achieved in all relevant cases. Presently the model is developed further, in order to describe other HTS materials and other types of applications.

  15. Coiled Fiber Pulsed Laser Simulator

    2009-01-29

    This suite of codes simulates the transient output pulse from an optically-pumped coiled fiber amplifier. The input pulse is assumed to have a Gaussian time dependence and a spatial dependence that may be Gaussian or an eigenmode of the straight of bent fiber computed using bend10 or bend20. Only one field component is used (semivectorial approximation). The fully-spatially-dependent fiber gain profile is specified is subroutines "inversion" and "interp_inversion" and is presently read from a datamore » file, although other means of specifying fiber gain could be reallized through modification of these subroutines. The input pulse is propagated through the fiber, including the following physical effects: spatial and temporal gain saturation, self-focusing, bend losses, and confinement from a user-defined fiber index profile. The user can follow the propagation progress with 3D graphics that show an intensity profile via user-modifiable cutting planes through the time space axes. A restart capability is also included. Approximate solutions in the frequency domain may be obtained much faster using the auxilliary codes bendbpm10 (full vector), bendbpm20 (semivectoral), and bendbpm21 (semivectoral with gain sheet spproximation for gain and self-focusing). These codes all include bend loss and spatial (but not temporal) gain saturation.« less

  16. Helical coil thermal hydraulic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caramello, M.; Bertani, C.; De Salve, M.; Panella, B.

    2014-11-01

    A model has been developed in Matlab environment for the thermal hydraulic analysis of helical coil and shell steam generators. The model considers the internal flow inside one helix and its associated control volume of water on the external side, both characterized by their inlet thermodynamic conditions and the characteristic geometry data. The model evaluates the behaviour of the thermal-hydraulic parameters of the two fluids, such as temperature, pressure, heat transfer coefficients, flow quality, void fraction and heat flux. The evaluation of the heat transfer coefficients as well as the pressure drops has been performed by means of the most validated literature correlations. The model has been applied to one of the steam generators of the IRIS modular reactor and a comparison has been performed with the RELAP5/Mod.3.3 code applied to an inclined straight pipe that has the same length and the same elevation change between inlet and outlet of the real helix. The predictions of the developed model and RELAP5/Mod.3.3 code are in fairly good agreement before the dryout region, while the dryout front inside the helical pipes is predicted at a lower distance from inlet by the model.

  17. Coiled Fiber Pulsed Laser Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, G. Ronald

    2009-01-29

    This suite of codes simulates the transient output pulse from an optically-pumped coiled fiber amplifier. The input pulse is assumed to have a Gaussian time dependence and a spatial dependence that may be Gaussian or an eigenmode of the straight of bent fiber computed using bend10 or bend20. Only one field component is used (semivectorial approximation). The fully-spatially-dependent fiber gain profile is specified is subroutines "inversion" and "interp_inversion" and is presently read from a data file, although other means of specifying fiber gain could be reallized through modification of these subroutines. The input pulse is propagated through the fiber, including the following physical effects: spatial and temporal gain saturation, self-focusing, bend losses, and confinement from a user-defined fiber index profile. The user can follow the propagation progress with 3D graphics that show an intensity profile via user-modifiable cutting planes through the time space axes. A restart capability is also included. Approximate solutions in the frequency domain may be obtained much faster using the auxilliary codes bendbpm10 (full vector), bendbpm20 (semivectoral), and bendbpm21 (semivectoral with gain sheet spproximation for gain and self-focusing). These codes all include bend loss and spatial (but not temporal) gain saturation.

  18. Effects of tissue heterogeneity on single-coil, scanning MIT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldkamp, J. R.; Quirk, S.

    2016-03-01

    We recently reported on the use of a single induction coil to accomplish imaging of the electrical conductivity in human tissues via magnetic induction tomography (MIT). A key to the method was the development of a mapping equation that quantitatively relates an arbitrary electrical conductivity distribution to ohmic loss in a coil consisting of concentric circular loops in a plane. By making multiple coil loss measurements at a number of locations in the vicinity of the target (scan), this mapping equation can be used to build an algorithm for 3D image construction of electrical conductivity. Important assumptions behind the mathematical formula included uniform relative permittivity throughout all space and continuous variation in conductivity. In this paper, these two assumptions were tested in a series of experiments involving the use of human tissue phantoms created from agarose, doped with sufficient sodium chloride to yield physiological conductivities. Inclusions of doped agarose were scanned both while isolated and also while embedded in a matrix of agarose gel having lowered conductivity - to help evaluate the effects of abrupt permittivity change. The effects of discontinuous conductivity change were simulated by filling 5 cm diameter petri dishes with 1.4% aqueous KCl and placing them in a much larger, 14 cm diameter petri dish - gap distance varied from about 3 mm to 30 mm. In either case, we will show that these effects are minimal on resultant images, helping to further validate the mapping equation used to construct MIT images. Because of their simplicity, scans reported here did not include coil rotation. To acknowledge the importance of rotation, however, we have devoted a section of this work to illustrate the profound benefits of coil rotation during a scan - though virtual data are used, where coil rotation is more easily specified.

  19. AC magnetohydrodynamic microfluidic switch

    SciTech Connect

    Lemoff, A V; Lee, A P

    2000-03-02

    A microfluidic switch has been demonstrated using an AC Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pumping mechanism in which the Lorentz force is used to pump an electrolytic solution. By integrating two AC MHD pumps into different arms of a Y-shaped fluidic circuit, flow can be switched between the two arms. This type of switch can be used to produce complex fluidic routing, which may have multiple applications in {micro}TAS.

  20. ACS Symposium Support

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth D. Jordan

    2010-02-20

    The funds from this DOE grant were used to help cover the travel costs of five students and postdoctoral fellows who attended a symposium on 'Hydration: From Clusters to Aqueous Solutions' held at the Fall 2007 American Chemical Society Meeting in Boston, MA, August 19-23. The Symposium was sponsored by the Physical Chemistry Division, ACS. The technical program for the meeting is available at http://phys-acs.org/fall2007.html.

  1. Testing of a First Order AC Magnetic Susceptometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Ryan; Sunny, Smitha; Ho, Pei-Chun

    2011-11-01

    A first-order AC magnetic susceptometer has been constructed and tested to find the magnetic response of strongly correlated electron materials. The instrument works by using a primary coil to apply a small AC magnetic field of .104 Oe to a sample with a cylindrical coil space of length .635 cm and diameter .355 cm. A lock-in amplifier is used to monitor the induced voltage from a set of secondary coils. By coupling a temperature-controlled system with this instrument, the change in the magnetic signal with respect to temperature is measured. Monitoring the signal changes may indicate the temperature that causes the material to transition to either a ferromagnetic, anti-ferromagnetic, or superconducting state. A 122.47 mg Gd polycrystal was used to test our susceptometer. The data qualitatively agrees with the previous results of magnetization vs. temperature of Gd single crystals by Nigh et al. [1]: there is a steep increase in the pick-up signal at 300 K where Gd becomes ferromagnetic and a peak at 210 K [1]. This susceptometer will be used for our future investigation of magnetic properties of rare earth compounds and nanoparticles in the temperature range of 10 K to 300 K. [4pt] [1] H. E. Nigh, S. Legvold, and F. H. Spedding, Physical Review 132, 1092 (1963)

  2. Conducting hybrid polymeric systems

    SciTech Connect

    Aldissi, M.; White, J.W.; Agnew, S.; Jorgensen, B.S.

    1987-09-01

    The studies took advantage of the opportunities offered by copolymerization for gaining insight into electrical conduction, morphology, phase separation, polymer-polymer interfaces, and solubility. Copolymerization is technologically important for it allows one to tailor-make products with specifically desired properties. However, the utility of copolymerization involving conjugated, rigid components could be different from that of conventional polymers. This paper is focused on the synthesis and properties of various materials: Rod-coil systems such as polyisoprene/polyacetylene diblock copolymers (resonance raman and small angle neutron scattering studies correlated to conductivity); and alternating copolymers such as poly (arylpyrroles) (electrochemical synthesis and characterization). 8 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Electrical wire insulation and electromagnetic coil

    DOEpatents

    Bich, George J.; Gupta, Tapan K.

    1984-01-01

    An electromagnetic coil for high temperature and high radiation application in which glass is used to insulate the electrical wire. A process for applying the insulation to the wire is disclosed which results in improved insulation properties.

  4. Screen-printed flexible MRI receive coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corea, Joseph R.; Flynn, Anita M.; Lechêne, Balthazar; Scott, Greig; Reed, Galen D.; Shin, Peter J.; Lustig, Michael; Arias, Ana C.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is an inherently signal-to-noise-starved technique that limits the spatial resolution, diagnostic image quality and results in typically long acquisition times that are prone to motion artefacts. This limitation is exacerbated when receive coils have poor fit due to lack of flexibility or need for padding for patient comfort. Here, we report a new approach that uses printing for fabricating receive coils. Our approach enables highly flexible, extremely lightweight conforming devices. We show that these devices exhibit similar to higher signal-to-noise ratio than conventional ones, in clinical scenarios when coils could be displaced more than 18 mm away from the body. In addition, we provide detailed material properties and components performance analysis. Prototype arrays are incorporated within infant blankets for in vivo studies. This work presents the first fully functional, printed coils for 1.5- and 3-T clinical scanners.

  5. Coiling Temperature Control in Hot Strip Mill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanari, Hiroyuki; Fujiyama, Hiroaki

    Coiling temperature is one of the most significant factors in products of hot strip mill to determine material properties such as strength, toughness of steel, so it is very important to achieve accurate coiling temperature control (CTC). Usually there are a few pyrometers on the run out table in hot strip mill, therefore temperature model and its adapting system have large influences on the accuracy of CTC. Also unscheduled change of rolling speed has a bad effect to keep coiling temperature as its target. Newly developed CTC system is able to get very accurate coiling temperature against uncertain factors and disturbances by adopting easily identified temperature model, learning method and dynamic set up function. The features of the CTC system are discussed with actual data, and the effectiveness of the system is shown by actual control results.

  6. Electrical Wire Insulation and Electromagnetic Coil

    SciTech Connect

    Bich, G. J.; Gupta, T. K.

    1984-01-31

    An electromagnetic coil for high temperature and high radiation application in which glass is used to insulate the electrical wire. A process for applying the insulation to the wire is disclosed which results in improved insulation properties.

  7. Screen-printed flexible MRI receive coils.

    PubMed

    Corea, Joseph R; Flynn, Anita M; Lechêne, Balthazar; Scott, Greig; Reed, Galen D; Shin, Peter J; Lustig, Michael; Arias, Ana C

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is an inherently signal-to-noise-starved technique that limits the spatial resolution, diagnostic image quality and results in typically long acquisition times that are prone to motion artefacts. This limitation is exacerbated when receive coils have poor fit due to lack of flexibility or need for padding for patient comfort. Here, we report a new approach that uses printing for fabricating receive coils. Our approach enables highly flexible, extremely lightweight conforming devices. We show that these devices exhibit similar to higher signal-to-noise ratio than conventional ones, in clinical scenarios when coils could be displaced more than 18 mm away from the body. In addition, we provide detailed material properties and components performance analysis. Prototype arrays are incorporated within infant blankets for in vivo studies. This work presents the first fully functional, printed coils for 1.5- and 3-T clinical scanners. PMID:26961073

  8. Improved transcranial magnetic stimulation coil design with realistic head modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowther, Lawrence; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2013-03-01

    We are investigating Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) as a noninvasive technique based on electromagnetic induction which causes stimulation of the neurons in the brain. TMS can be used as a pain-free alternative to conventional electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) which is still widely implemented for treatment of major depression. Development of improved TMS coils capable of stimulating subcortical regions could also allow TMS to replace invasive deep brain stimulation (DBS) which requires surgical implantation of electrodes in the brain. Our new designs allow new applications of the technique to be established for a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic applications of psychiatric disorders and neurological diseases. Calculation of the fields generated inside the head is vital for the use of this method for treatment. In prior work we have implemented a realistic head model, incorporating inhomogeneous tissue structures and electrical conductivities, allowing the site of neuronal activation to be accurately calculated. We will show how we utilize this model in the development of novel TMS coil designs to improve the depth of penetration and localization of stimulation produced by stimulator coils.

  9. Magnetic propulsion of a magnetic device using three square-Helmholtz coils and a square-Maxwell coil.

    PubMed

    Ha, Yong H; Han, Byung H; Lee, Soo Y

    2010-02-01

    We introduce a square coil system for remote magnetic navigation of a magnetic device without any physical movements of the coils. We used three square-Helmholtz coils and a square-Maxwell coil for magnetic propulsion of a small magnet along the desired path. All the square coils are mountable on a cubic frame that has an opening to accommodate a living subject. The square-Helmholtz coils control the magnetic propulsion direction by generating uniform magnetic field along the desired direction while the square-Maxwell coil controls the propulsion force by generating magnetic gradient field. We performed magnetic propulsion experiments with a down-scaled coil set and a three-channel coil driver. Experimental results demonstrate that we can use the square coil set for magnetic navigation of a magnetic device without any physical movements of the coils. PMID:20054666

  10. Apparatus and method for detecting flaws in conductive material

    DOEpatents

    Hockey, Ronald L.; Riechers, Douglas M.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is an improved sensing unit for detecting flaws in conductive material wherein the sensing coil is positioned away from a datum of either the datum point, the datum orientation, or a combination thereof. Position of the sensing coil away from a datum increases sensitivity for detecting flaws having a characteristic volume less than about 1 mm.sup.3, and further permits detection of subsurface flaws. Use of multiple sensing coils permits quantification of flaw area or volume.

  11. Passive energy dump for superconducting coil protection

    DOEpatents

    Luton, J.N. Jr.

    1973-01-16

    The patent describes a passive resistance type energy dump for the protection of the coils of a superconducting magnet. Insertion heaters are immersed in a rigid container filled with a fusible alloy. The energy dump is connected across the coils of the superconducting magnet wherein individual heater elements are connected singly to the windings or otherwise according to the energy dumping requirements upon transition of the magnet to a normal state.

  12. Nanopottery: coiling of electrospun polymer nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ho-Young; Lee, Minhee; Park, Kun Joong; Kim, Sungho; Mahadevan, L

    2010-06-01

    We show that a nanoscale polymer solution electrojet can coil to form free-standing hollow pottery as the jet is focused onto a sharp electrode tip. A scaling law is given based on the balance of the electrostatic compression force and the elastic resistance to predict the coil radius and frequency as the functions of relevant physical parameters. The structures formed by the nanofibers can be used in diverse fields of nanotechnology, for example, as nanomagnets, bioscaffolds, and nanochannels. PMID:20486713

  13. pH sensitive coiled coils: a strategy for enhanced liposomal drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reja, Rahi M.; Khan, Mohsina; Singh, Sumeet K.; Misra, Rajkumar; Shiras, Anjali; Gopi, Hosahudya N.

    2016-02-01

    Stimuli responsive controlled release from liposome based vesicles is a promising strategy for the site specific delivery of drugs. Herein, we report the design of pH sensitive coiled coils and their incorporation into the liposome as triggers for the controlled release of encapsulated drugs. The designed coiled coil peptides with the incorporation of environment sensitive fluorescent amino acids were found to be stable at physiological pH and unstructured while changing the pH of the environment to either acidic or basic. This pH dependent conformational switch of the coiled-coil polypeptides was exploited as triggers for the enhanced release of the encapsulated drug molecules from liposomes. The SEM, DLS and TEM analysis revealed the uniform morphology of the peptide liposome hybrid vesicles. Further, the drug encapsulated liposome internalization experiments with cancer cells revealed the enhanced release and accumulation of drugs in the acidic lysosomal compartments in comparison with liposomes without coiled coils.Stimuli responsive controlled release from liposome based vesicles is a promising strategy for the site specific delivery of drugs. Herein, we report the design of pH sensitive coiled coils and their incorporation into the liposome as triggers for the controlled release of encapsulated drugs. The designed coiled coil peptides with the incorporation of environment sensitive fluorescent amino acids were found to be stable at physiological pH and unstructured while changing the pH of the environment to either acidic or basic. This pH dependent conformational switch of the coiled-coil polypeptides was exploited as triggers for the enhanced release of the encapsulated drug molecules from liposomes. The SEM, DLS and TEM analysis revealed the uniform morphology of the peptide liposome hybrid vesicles. Further, the drug encapsulated liposome internalization experiments with cancer cells revealed the enhanced release and accumulation of drugs in the acidic

  14. Thermal Performance of the LDX Floating Coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukovsky, A.; Garnier, D. T.; Radovinsky, A. L.

    2006-04-01

    The Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) is an innovative facility to study plasma confinement in a dipole magnetic field, created by a superconducting solenoid (floating coil), which is magnetically levitated in the center of a 5 m diameter by 3 m tall vacuum chamber. The floating coil (F-coil) consists of a Nb3Sn magnet installed inside a strong vessel filled with high-pressure helium gas at room temperature. It is surrounded by a fiberglass-lead composite radiation shield and by a toroidal vacuum shell. The cryostat design provides the ability to operate the magnet for several hours of wanning while suspended in the middle of the vacuum chamber without electric and cryogenic connections to the coil. For this reason the magnet is charged/discharged inductively in a lower part of the vacuum chamber. The retractable cryogenic transfer lines serve to cool down the magnet to 4.5 K before it is lifted to the operating position. The F-coil can be re-cooled multiple times while maintaining its field and current. This paper describes the thermal performance of the F-coil.

  15. Image reconstructions with the rotating RF coil.

    PubMed

    Trakic, A; Wang, H; Weber, E; Li, B K; Poole, M; Liu, F; Crozier, S

    2009-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that rotating a single RF transceive coil (RRFC) provides a uniform coverage of the object and brings a number of hardware advantages (i.e. requires only one RF channel, averts coil-coil coupling interactions and facilitates large-scale multi-nuclear imaging). Motion of the RF coil sensitivity profile however violates the standard Fourier Transform definition of a time-invariant signal, and the images reconstructed in this conventional manner can be degraded by ghosting artifacts. To overcome this problem, this paper presents Time Division Multiplexed-Sensitivity Encoding (TDM-SENSE), as a new image reconstruction scheme that exploits the rotation of the RF coil sensitivity profile to facilitate ghost-free image reconstructions and reductions in image acquisition time. A transceive RRFC system for head imaging at 2 Tesla was constructed and applied in a number of in vivo experiments. In this initial study, alias-free head images were obtained in half the usual scan time. It is hoped that new sequences and methods will be developed by taking advantage of coil motion. PMID:19800824

  16. Image reconstructions with the rotating RF coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trakic, A.; Wang, H.; Weber, E.; Li, B. K.; Poole, M.; Liu, F.; Crozier, S.

    2009-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that rotating a single RF transceive coil (RRFC) provides a uniform coverage of the object and brings a number of hardware advantages (i.e. requires only one RF channel, averts coil-coil coupling interactions and facilitates large-scale multi-nuclear imaging). Motion of the RF coil sensitivity profile however violates the standard Fourier Transform definition of a time-invariant signal, and the images reconstructed in this conventional manner can be degraded by ghosting artifacts. To overcome this problem, this paper presents Time Division Multiplexed — Sensitivity Encoding (TDM-SENSE), as a new image reconstruction scheme that exploits the rotation of the RF coil sensitivity profile to facilitate ghost-free image reconstructions and reductions in image acquisition time. A transceive RRFC system for head imaging at 2 Tesla was constructed and applied in a number of in vivo experiments. In this initial study, alias-free head images were obtained in half the usual scan time. It is hoped that new sequences and methods will be developed by taking advantage of coil motion.

  17. Divertor Coil Design and Implementation on Pegasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shriwise, P. C.; Bongard, M. W.; Cole, J. A.; Fonck, R. J.; Kujak-Ford, B. A.; Lewicki, B. T.; Winz, G. R.

    2012-10-01

    An upgraded divertor coil system is being commissioned on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment in conjunction with power system upgrades in order to achieve higher β plasmas, reduce impurities, and possibly achieve H-mode operation. Design points for the divertor coil locations and estimates of their necessary current ratings were found using predictive equilibrium modeling based upon a 300 kA target plasma. This modeling represented existing Pegasus coil locations and current drive limits. The resultant design calls for 125 kA-turns from the divertor system to support the creation of a double null magnetic topology in plasmas with Ip<=300 kA. Initial experiments using this system will employ 900 V IGBT power supply modules to provide IDIV<=4 kA. The resulting 20 kA-turn capability of the existing divertor coil will be augmented by a new coil providing additional A-turns in series. Induced vessel wall current modeling indicates the time response of a 28 turn augmentation coil remains fast compared to the poloidal field penetration rate through the vessel. First results operating the augmented system are shown.

  18. ac electroosmosis in rectangular microchannels.

    PubMed

    Campisi, Michele; Accoto, Dino; Dario, Paolo

    2005-11-22

    Motivated by the growing interest in ac electroosmosis as a reliable no moving parts strategy to control fluid motion in microfluidic devices for biomedical applications, such as lab-on-a-chip, we study transient and steady-state electrokinetic phenomena (electroosmosis and streaming currents) in infinitely extended rectangular charged microchannels. With the aid of Fourier series and Laplace transforms we provide a general formal solution of the problem, which is used to study the time-dependent response to sudden ac applied voltage differences in case of finite electric double layer. The Debye-Huckel approximation has been adopted to allow for an algebraic solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann problem in Fourier space. We obtain the expressions of flow velocity profiles, flow rates, streaming currents, as well as expressions of the complex hydraulic and electrokinetic conductances. We analyze in detail the dependence of the electrokinetic conductance on the extension of linear dimensions relative to the Debye length, with an eye on finite electric double layer effects. PMID:16351310

  19. Auxiliary coil controls temperature of RF induction heater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Auxiliary coil controls the temperature of an RF induction furnace that is powered by a relatively unstable RF generator. Manual or servoed adjustments of the relative position of the auxiliary coil, which is placed in close proximity to the RF coil, changes the looseness of the RF coil and hence the corresponding heating effect of its RF field.

  20. Development of a Field Concentrator Coil by Finite Element Modeling for Power Efficiency Optimization in Eddy Current Thermography Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenier, M.; Ibarra-Castanedo, C.; Luneau, F.; Bendada, H.; Maldague, X.

    2010-02-01

    Eddy current thermography is a relatively new inspection technique that takes advantage of the electromagnetic induction phenomenon to generate heat in electro conductive materials during inspection. An interesting advantage of eddy current heating compared to classical optical or ultrasonic heating is that the excitation source is smaller and can be conveniently shaped in order to provide energy efficient localized heating. Such excitation source is more suitable for the development of portable instruments and to perform field inspections. In this paper, finite element modeling (FEM) is used to optimize the eddy current coil configuration in terms of heating power efficiency. The performances of air-core coils, normally used in eddy current thermography, and a new field concentrator coil are compared and discussed. FEM results demonstrate that the proposed field concentrator coil improves the magnetic coupling with the inspected material and requires less energy than air-core coils to generate the same temperature variation.

  1. Eddy Current Rail Inspection Using AC Bridge Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ze; Koffman, Andrew D; Waltrip, Bryan C; Wang, Yicheng

    2013-01-01

    AC bridge techniques commonly used for precision impedance measurements have been adapted to develop an eddy current sensor for rail defect detection. By using two detection coils instead of just one as in a conventional sensor, we can balance out the large baseline signals corresponding to a normal rail. We have significantly enhanced the detection sensitivity of the eddy current method by detecting and demodulating the differential signal of the two coils induced by rail defects, using a digital lock-in amplifier algorithm. We have also explored compensating for the lift-off effect of the eddy current sensor due to vibrations by using the summing signal of the detection coils to measure the lift-off distance. The dominant component of the summing signal is a constant resulting from direct coupling from the excitation coil, which can be experimentally determined. The remainder of the summing signal, which decreases as the lift-off distance increases, is induced by the secondary eddy current. This dependence on the lift-off distance is used to calibrate the differential signal, allowing for a more accurate characterization of the defects. Simulated experiments on a sample rail have been performed using a computer controlled X-Y moving table with the X-axis mimicking the train’s motion and the Y-axis mimicking the train’s vibrational bumping. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the new detection method. PMID:26401427

  2. Eddy Current Rail Inspection Using AC Bridge Techniques.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ze; Koffman, Andrew D; Waltrip, Bryan C; Wang, Yicheng

    2013-01-01

    AC bridge techniques commonly used for precision impedance measurements have been adapted to develop an eddy current sensor for rail defect detection. By using two detection coils instead of just one as in a conventional sensor, we can balance out the large baseline signals corresponding to a normal rail. We have significantly enhanced the detection sensitivity of the eddy current method by detecting and demodulating the differential signal of the two coils induced by rail defects, using a digital lock-in amplifier algorithm. We have also explored compensating for the lift-off effect of the eddy current sensor due to vibrations by using the summing signal of the detection coils to measure the lift-off distance. The dominant component of the summing signal is a constant resulting from direct coupling from the excitation coil, which can be experimentally determined. The remainder of the summing signal, which decreases as the lift-off distance increases, is induced by the secondary eddy current. This dependence on the lift-off distance is used to calibrate the differential signal, allowing for a more accurate characterization of the defects. Simulated experiments on a sample rail have been performed using a computer controlled X-Y moving table with the X-axis mimicking the train's motion and the Y-axis mimicking the train's vibrational bumping. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the new detection method. PMID:26401427

  3. Radiation-hard electrical coil and method for its fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Grieggs, R.J.; Blake, R.D.; Gac, F.D.

    1982-06-29

    A radiation-hard insulated electrical coil and method for making the same are disclosed. In accordance with the method, a conductor, preferably copper, is wrapped with an aluminum strip and then tightly wound into a coil. The aluminum-wrapped coil is then annealed to relax the conductor in the coiled configuration. The annealed coil is then immersed in an alkaline solution to dissolve the aluminum strip, leaving the bare conductor in a coiled configuration with all of the windings closely packed yet uniformly spaced from one another. The coil is then insulated with a refractory insulating material. In the preferred embodiment, the coil is insulated by coating it with a vitreous enamel and subsequently potting the enamelled coil in a castable ceramic concrete. The resulting coil is substantially insensitive to radiation and may be operated continuously in high radiation environments for long periods of time.

  4. Transient Heat Transfer in TCAP Coils

    SciTech Connect

    Steimke, J.L.

    1999-03-09

    The Thermal Cycling Absorption Process (TCAP) is used to separate isotopes of hydrogen. TCAP involves passing a stream of mixed hydrogen isotopes through palladium deposited on kieselguhr (Pd/k) while cycling the temperature of the Pd/k. Kieselguhr is a silica mineral also called diatomite. To aid in the design of a full scale facility, the Thermal Fluids Laboratory was used by the Chemical and Hydrogen Technology Section to compare the heat transfer properties of three different configurations of stainless steel coils containing kieselguhr and helium. Testing of coils containing Pd/k and hydrogen isotopes would have been more prototypical but would have been too expensive. Three stainless steel coils filled with kieselguhr were tested; one made from 2.0 inch diameter tubing, one made from 2.0 inch diameter tubing with foam copper embedded in the kieselguhr and one made from 1.25 inch diameter tubing. It was known prior to testing that increasing the tubing diameter from 1.25 inch to 2.0 inch would slow the rate of temperature change. The primary purpose of the testing was to measure to what extent the presence of copper foam in a 2.0" tubing coil would compensate for the effect of larger diameter. Each coil was connected to a pressure gage and the coil was evacuated and backfilled with helium gas. Helium was used instead of a mixture of hydrogen isotopes for reasons of safety. Each coil was quickly immersed in a stirred bath of ethylene glycol at a temperature of approximately 100 degrees Celsius. The coil pressure increased, reflecting the increase in average temperature of its contents. The pressure transient was recored as a function of time after immersion. Because of the actual process will use Pd/k instead of kieselguhr, additional tests were run to determine the differences in thermal properties between the two materials. The method was to position a thermocouple at the center of a hollow sphere and pack the sphere with Pd/k. The sphere was sealed, quickly

  5. Transient Heat Transfer in TCAP Coils

    SciTech Connect

    Steimke, J.L.

    1999-03-09

    The Thermal Cycling Absorption Process (TCAP) is used to separate isotopes of hydrogen. TCAP involves passing a stream of mixed hydrogen isotopes through palladium deposited on kieselguhr (Pd/k) while cycling the temperature of the Pd/k. Kieselguhr is a silica mineral also called diatomite. To aid in the design of a full scale facility, the Thermal Fluids Laboratory was used by the Chemical and Hydrogen Technology Section to compare the heat transfer properties of three different configurations of stainless steel coils containing kieselguhr and helium. Testing of coils containing Pd/k and hydrogen isotopes would have been more prototypical but would have been too expensive. Three stainless steel coils filled with kieselguhr were tested; one made from 2.0 inch diameter tubing, one made from 2.0 inch diameter tubing with foam copper embedded in the kieselguhr and one made from 1.25 inch diameter tubing. It was known prior to testing that increasing the tubing diameter from 1.25 inch to 2.0 inch would slow the rate of temperature change. The primary purpose of the testing was to measure to what extent the presence of copper foam in a 2.0 tubing coil would compensate for the effect of larger diameter. Each coil was connected to a pressure gage and the coil was evacuated and backfilled with helium gas. Helium was used instead of a mixture of hydrogen isotopes for reasons of safety. Each coil was quickly immersed in a stirred bath of ethylene glycol at a temperature of approximately 100 degrees Celsius. The coil pressure increased, reflecting the increase in average temperature of its contents. The pressure transient was recored as a function of time after immersion. Because of the actual process will use Pd/k instead of kieselguhr, additional tests were run to determine the differences in thermal properties between the two materials. The method was to position a thermocouple at the center of a hollow sphere and pack the sphere with Pd/k. The sphere was sealed, quickly

  6. Numerical and theoretical evaluations of AC losses for single and infinite numbers of superconductor strips with direct and alternating transport currents in external AC magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajikawa, K.; Funaki, K.; Shikimachi, K.; Hirano, N.; Nagaya, S.

    2010-11-01

    AC losses in a superconductor strip are numerically evaluated by means of a finite element method formulated with a current vector potential. The expressions of AC losses in an infinite slab that corresponds to a simple model of infinitely stacked strips are also derived theoretically. It is assumed that the voltage-current characteristics of the superconductors are represented by Bean’s critical state model. The typical operation pattern of a Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) coil with direct and alternating transport currents in an external AC magnetic field is taken into account as the electromagnetic environment for both the single strip and the infinite slab. By using the obtained results of AC losses, the influences of the transport currents on the total losses are discussed quantitatively.

  7. Structural Correlation of the Neck Coil with the Coiled-coil (CC1)-Forkhead-associated (FHA) Tandem for Active Kinesin-3 KIF13A.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jinqi; Huo, Lin; Wang, Wenjuan; Zhang, Yong; Li, Wei; Lou, Jizhong; Xu, Tao; Feng, Wei

    2016-02-12

    Processive kinesin motors often contain a coiled-coil neck that controls the directionality and processivity. However, the neck coil (NC) of kinesin-3 is too short to form a stable coiled-coil dimer. Here, we found that the coiled-coil (CC1)-forkhead-associated (FHA) tandem (that is connected to NC by Pro-390) of kinesin-3 KIF13A assembles as an extended dimer. With the removal of Pro-390, the NC-CC1 tandem of KIF13A unexpectedly forms a continuous coiled-coil dimer that can be well aligned into the CC1-FHA dimer. The reverse introduction of Pro-390 breaks the NC-CC1 coiled-coil dimer but provides the intrinsic flexibility to couple NC with the CC1-FHA tandem. Mutations of either NC, CC1, or the FHA domain all significantly impaired the motor activity. Thus, the three elements within the NC-CC1-FHA tandem of KIF13A are structurally interrelated to form a stable dimer for activating the motor. This work also provides the first direct structural evidence to support the formation of a coiled-coil neck by the short characteristic neck domain of kinesin-3. PMID:26680000

  8. Comparison of Devices Used for Stent-Assisted Coiling of Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Izar, Benjamin; Rai, Ansaar; Raghuram, Karthikram; Rotruck, Jill; Carpenter, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Two self-expandable stents, the Neuroform and the Enterprise stent, are widely used for stent-assisted coiling (SAC) of complex shaped intracranial aneurysms. However, comparative knowledge about technical feasibility, peri- and post-procedural morbidity and mortality, packing densities as well as follow-up data is limited. Material and Methods We conducted a retrospective study to investigate differences in aneurysms stented with the Enterprise or Neuroform stents. Angiographic follow-up (mean 19.42 months) was available in 72.6% (61/84) of aneurysms treated with stent-assisted coiling. We further sought to compare stent-assisted coiling to a matched patient population with aneurysms treated by conventional coil embolization. Results The stenting success rate of the Enterprise was higher compared to the Neuroform stent (46/48 and 42/51, respectively). In 5 of 9 cases in which the Neuroform stent was not navigable to the landing zone, we successfully deployed an Enterprise stent instead. Eventually, 42 aneurysms were coiled after stenting in each group. We observed no significant differences in peri-procedural complication rate, post-procedural hospital stay, packing density, recurrence rate or number of in-stent stenosis. Strikingly, 36.1% of followed aneurysms in the SAC group showed progressive occlusion on angiographic follow-up imaging. The packing density was significantly higher in aneurysms treated by SAC as compared to conventionally coiled aneurysms, while recanalization rate was significantly lower in the SAC group. Conclusion The procedural success rate is higher using the Enterprise, but otherwise both stents exhibited similar characteristics. Lower recurrence frequency and complication rates comparable to conventional coil embolization emphasize the importance of stent-assisted coiling in the treatment of complex aneurysms. Progressive occlusion on angiographic follow-up was a distinct and frequent observation in the SAC group and may in

  9. Skin and proximity effects in the conductors of split gradient coils for a hybrid Linac-MRI scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Fangfang; Lopez, Hector Sanchez; Freschi, Fabio; Smith, Elliot; Li, Yu; Fuentes, Miguel; Liu, Feng; Repetto, Maurizio; Crozier, Stuart

    2014-05-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), rapidly changing gradient fields are applied to encode the magnetic resonance signal with spatial position; however eddy currents are induced in the surrounding conducting structures depending on the geometry of the conductor and the excitation waveform. These alternating fields change the spatial profile of the current density within the coil track with the applied frequencies of the input waveform and by their proximity to other conductors. In this paper, the impact of the conductor width and the excited frequency over the parameters that characterise the performance of split transverse and longitudinal gradient coils are studied. Thirty x-gradient coils were designed using a “free-surface” coil design method and the track width was varied from 1 mm to 30 mm with an increment value of 1 mm; a frequency sweep analysis in the range of 100 Hz to 10 kHz was performed using the multi-layer integral method (MIM) and parameters such as power loss produced by the coil and generated in the cryostat, inductance, coil efficiency (field strength/operating current), magnetic field profile produced by the coil and the eddy currents were studied. An experimental validation of the theoretical model was performed on an example coil. Coils with filamentary conductor segments were also studied to compare the simulated parameters with those produced by coils with a finite track. There was found to be a significant difference between the parameters calculated using filamentary coils and those obtained when the coil is simulated using finite size tracks. A wider track width produces coil with superior efficiency and low resistance; however, due to the skin effect, the power loss increases faster in wider tracks than in those generated in coils with narrow tracks. It was demonstrated that rapidly changing current paths must be avoided in order to mitigate the power loss and the spatial asymmetry in the current density profile. The decision of

  10. The Influence of Eddy Effect of Coils on Flow and Temperature Fields of Molten Droplet in Electromagnetic Levitation Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lin; Shi, Wan-Yuan

    2015-08-01

    In this work, the influence of eddy effect of coils on magnetic, flow, and temperature fields in an electromagnetically levitated molten droplet was investigated by a serial of axisymmetric numerical simulations. In an electromagnetic levitation device, both metal droplet and coils are conductive materials, therefore the distributions of current density in them should be non-uniform as a result of the eddy effect. However, in previous works, the eddy effect was considered alone in metal droplet but ignored in coils usually. As the distance of coils and metal droplet is several millimetres in general, the non-uniform distribution of current density in coils actually gives important influences on calculations of magnetic, flow, and temperature fields. Here, we consider the eddy effect both in metal droplet as well as that in coils simultaneously. Lifting force, absorbed power, fluid flow, and temperature field inside a 4-mm radius molten copper droplet as a typical example are then calculated and analyzed carefully under such condition. The results show that eddy effect leads to higher magnetic force, velocity, and temperature in both levitating and melting processes than those when the eddy effect is ignored. What is more, such influence increases as the distance of droplet and coils becomes closer, which corresponds to experimental measurement. Therefore, we suggest that eddy effect of coils should be considered in numerical simulation on this topic to obtain more reliable result.

  11. Gradient coil system for nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Frese, G.; Siebold, H.

    1984-08-28

    A gradient coil system for an image-generating, nuclear magnetic resonance tomographic apparatus, particularly a zeugmatographic apparatus. The gradient coil system is arranged on a support body of rotational symmetry, illustratively a hollow cylindrical support body, having an axis which extends along the z-direction of an x, y, z coordinate system which has an origin in the center of imaging region. The gradient coil system contains two pairs of toroidal individual coils which are arranged symmetrically with respect to an x-y plane which extends through the center of the imaging region and which are arranged perpendicular to the z-axis. The direction of current flow in the individual coils of a coil pair is opposite to the direction of flow in the individual coils of the other coil pair. Moreover, further sets of coils are provided for generating field gradient Gx in the x-direction, and Gy in the y-direction. The hollow cylindrical shape of the support body on which the individual coils are arranged permit an imaging region having a substantially spherical volume with a substantially constant field gradient Gz to be achieved. Each of the coils has a predetermined linkage factor which corresponds to the product of the current flowing through the number of coil turns of the coil. Those coils which are arranged further from the plane of symmetry have a substantially larger linkage factor than the coils which are nearer to the plane of symmetry.

  12. Tevatron AC dipole system

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.; Kopp, S.E.; Jansson, A.; Syphers, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The AC dipole is an oscillating dipole magnet which can induce large amplitude oscillations without the emittance growth and decoherence. These properties make it a good tool to measure optics of a hadron synchrotron. The vertical AC dipole for the Tevatron is powered by an inexpensive high power audio amplifier since its operating frequency is approximately 20 kHz. The magnet is incorporated into a parallel resonant system to maximize the current. The use of a vertical pinger magnet which has been installed in the Tevatron made the cost relatively inexpensive. Recently, the initial system was upgraded with a more powerful amplifier and oscillation amplitudes up to 2-3{sigma} were achieved with the 980 GeV proton beam. This paper discusses details of the Tevatron AC dipole system and also shows its test results.

  13. Self-Assembling Peptide-Polymer Hydrogels Designed From the Coiled Coil Region of Fibrin

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Peng; Rudra, Jai S.; Herr, Andrew B.; Collier, Joel H.

    2010-01-01

    Biomaterials constructed from self-assembling peptides, peptide derivatives, and peptide-polymer conjugates are receiving increasing attention as defined matrices for tissue engineering, controlled therapeutic release, and in vitro cell expansion, but many are constructed from peptide structures not typically found in the human extracellular matrix. Here we report a self-assembling biomaterial constructed from a designed peptide inspired by the coiled coil domain of human fibrin, the major protein constituent of blood clots and the provisional scaffold of wound healing. Targeted substitutions were made in the residues forming the interface between coiled coil strands for a 37-amino acid peptide from human fibrinogen to stabilize the coiled coil peptide bundle, while the solvent-exposed residues were left unchanged to provide a surface similar to that of the native protein. This peptide, which self-assembled into coiled coil dimers and tetramers, was then used to produce triblock peptide-PEG-peptide bioconjugates that self-assembled into viscoelastic hydrogel biomaterials. PMID:18712921

  14. Antiparallel Four-Stranded Coiled Coil Specified by a 3-3-1 Hyrdrophobic Heptad Repeat

    SciTech Connect

    Deng,Y.; Liu, J.; Zheng, Q.; Eliezer, D.; Kallenbach, N.; Lu, M.

    2006-01-01

    Coiled-coil sequences in proteins commonly share a seven-amino acid repeat with nonpolar side chains at the first (a) and fourth (d) positions. We investigate here the role of a 3-3-1 hydrophobic repeat containing nonpolar amino acids at the a, d, and g positions in determining the structures of coiled coils using mutants of the GCN4 leucine zipper dimerization domain. When three charged residues at the g positions in the parental sequence are replaced by nonpolar alanine or valine side chains, stable four-helix structures result. The X-ray crystal structures of the tetramers reveal antiparallel, four-stranded coiled coils in which the a, d, and g side chains interlock in a combination of knobs-into-knobs and knobs-into-holes packing. Interfacial interactions in a coiled coil can therefore be prescribed by hydrophobic-polar patterns beyond the canonical 3-4 heptad repeat. The results suggest that the conserved, charged residues at the g positions in the GCN4 leucine zipper can impart a negative design element to disfavor thermodynamically more stable, antiparallel tetramers.

  15. Self-sorting heterodimeric coiled coil peptides with defined and tuneable self-assembly properties

    PubMed Central

    Aronsson, Christopher; Dånmark, Staffan; Zhou, Feng; Öberg, Per; Enander, Karin; Su, Haibin; Aili, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Coiled coils with defined assembly properties and dissociation constants are highly attractive components in synthetic biology and for fabrication of peptide-based hybrid nanomaterials and nanostructures. Complex assemblies based on multiple different peptides typically require orthogonal peptides obtained by negative design. Negative design does not necessarily exclude formation of undesired species and may eventually compromise the stability of the desired coiled coils. This work describe a set of four promiscuous 28-residue de novo designed peptides that heterodimerize and fold into parallel coiled coils. The peptides are non-orthogonal and can form four different heterodimers albeit with large differences in affinities. The peptides display dissociation constants for dimerization spanning from the micromolar to the picomolar range. The significant differences in affinities for dimerization make the peptides prone to thermodynamic social self-sorting as shown by thermal unfolding and fluorescence experiments, and confirmed by simulations. The peptides self-sort with high fidelity to form the two coiled coils with the highest and lowest affinities for heterodimerization. The possibility to exploit self-sorting of mutually complementary peptides could hence be a viable approach to guide the assembly of higher order architectures and a powerful strategy for fabrication of dynamic and tuneable nanostructured materials. PMID:26370878

  16. The tripartite motif coiled-coil is an elongated antiparallel hairpin dimer

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Jacint G.; Okreglicka, Katarzyna; Chandrasekaran, Viswanathan; Welker, Jordan M.; Sundquist, Wesley I.; Pornillos, Owen

    2014-01-01

    Tripartite motif (TRIM) proteins make up a large family of coiled-coil-containing RING E3 ligases that function in many cellular processes, particularly innate antiviral response pathways. Both dimerization and higher-order assembly are important elements of TRIM protein function, but the atomic details of TRIM tertiary and quaternary structure have not been fully understood. Here, we present crystallographic and biochemical analyses of the TRIM coiled-coil and show that TRIM proteins dimerize by forming interdigitating antiparallel helical hairpins that position the N-terminal catalytic RING domains at opposite ends of the dimer and the C-terminal substrate-binding domains at the center. The dimer core comprises an antiparallel coiled-coil with a distinctive, symmetric pattern of flanking heptad and central hendecad repeats that appear to be conserved across the entire TRIM family. Our studies reveal how the coiled-coil organizes TRIM25 to polyubiquitylate the RIG-I/viral RNA recognition complex and how dimers of the TRIM5α protein are arranged within hexagonal arrays that recognize the HIV-1 capsid lattice and restrict retroviral replication. PMID:24550273

  17. A coiled-coil domain acts as a molecular ruler in LPS chain length regulation

    PubMed Central

    Tuukkanen, Anne; Danciu, Iulia; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Hussain, Rohanah; Liu, Huanting; Whitfield, Chris; Naismith, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Long-chain bacterial polysaccharides play important roles in pathogenicity. In Escherichia coli O9a, a model for ABC transporter dependent polysaccharide assembly, a large extracellular carbohydrate with a narrow distribution of size is polymerized from monosaccharides by a complex of two proteins, WbdA (polymerase) and WbdD (terminating protein). Such careful control of polymerization is recurring theme in biology. Combining crystallography and small angle X-ray scattering, we show that the C-terminal domain of WbdD contains an extended coiled-coil that physically separates WbdA from the catalytic domain of WbdD. The effects of insertions and deletions within the coiled-coil region were analyzed in vivo, revealing that polymer size is controlled by varying the length of the coiled-coil domain. Thus, the coiled-coil domain of WbdD functions as a molecular ruler that, along with WbdA:WbdD stoichiometry, controls the chain length of a model bacterial polysaccharide. PMID:25504321

  18. Forced Unfolding of the Coiled-Coils of Fibrinogen by Single-Molecule AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Andre; Litvinov, Rustem; Discher, Dennis; Weisel, John

    2007-03-01

    A blood clot needs to have the right degree of stiffness and plasticity for hemostasis, but the origin of these mechanical properties is unknown. Here we report the first measurements using single molecule atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the forced unfolding of fibrinogen to begin addressing this problem. To generate longer reproducible curves than are possible using monomer, factor XIIIa cross-linked, single chain fibrinogen oligomers were used. When extended under force, these oligomers showed sawtooth shaped force-extension patterns characteristic of unfolding proteins with a peak-to-peak separation of approximately 26 nm, consistent with the independent unfolding of the coiled-coils. These results were then reproduced using a Monte Carlo simulation with parameters in the same range as those previously used for unfolding globular domains. In particular, we found that the refolding time was negligible on experimental time and force scales in contrast to previous work on simpler coiled-coils. We suggest that this difference may be due to fibrinogen's structurally and topologically more complex coiled-coils and that an interaction between the alpha C and central domains may be involved. These results suggest a new functional property of fibrinogen and that the coiled-coil is more than a passive structural element of this molecule.

  19. ac bidirectional motor controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiner, K.

    1988-01-01

    Test data are presented and the design of a high-efficiency motor/generator controller at NASA-Lewis for use with the Space Station power system testbed is described. The bidirectional motor driver is a 20 kHz to variable frequency three-phase ac converter that operates from the high-frequency ac bus being designed for the Space Station. A zero-voltage-switching pulse-density-modulation technique is used in the converter to shape the low-frequency output waveform.

  20. Pathophysiological Evaluation of Cerecyte Coil Embolization for Experimental Broad Neck Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Kazuhisa; Kurata, Akira; Suzuki, Sachio; Ohmomo, Taketomo; Nakayama, Shigenobu; Maruyama, Shigeyoshi; Takagi, Mamoru; Konno, Shingo; Nakahara, Kuniaki; Fujii, Kiyotaka; Yasui, Yoshie; Iwabuchi, Keiichi

    2012-01-01

    Cerecyte second-generation coils feature inner surfaces coated with an absorbable polyglycolic acid (PGA) polymer. Their use is expected to accelerate aneurysm organization, but time course data are limited. The present experimental study was therefore conducted to clarify the processes by pathological examination. Methods. Two types of experimental aneurysms were initially generated in adult mongrel dogs, one bifurcation and another of lateral wall type. Long-term persistence of each was defined by follow-up angiography for more than 1 year. Embolization of the aneurysms was then performed using only cerecyte coils, and follow-up angiography was conducted after 2 and 4 weeks followed by pathological examination. Results. Organization of both types of broad neck aneurysm was apparent 4 weeks after embolization, which is earlier as compared with already reported data for bare coils. PMID:22792483

  1. Computer modeling and experimental verification of figure-eight-shaped null-flux coil suspension system

    SciTech Connect

    He, J.L.; Mulcahey, T.M.; Rote, D.M.; Kelly, T.

    1994-12-01

    This report discusses the computer modeling and experimental verification of the magnetic forces associated with a figure-eight-shaped null-flux coil suspension system. A set of computer codes called COILGDWY, were developed on the basis of the dynamic circuit model and verified by means of a laboratory model. The experimental verification was conducted with a rotating PVC drum, the surface of which held various types of figure-eight-shaped null-flux coils that interacted with a stationary permanent magnet. The transient and dynamic magnetic forces between the stationary magnet and the rotating conducting coils were measured and compared with results obtained from the computer model. Good agreement between the experimental results and computer simulations was obtained. The computer model can also be used to calculate magnetic forces in a large-scale magnetic-levitation system.

  2. AC/RF Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  3. AC solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Schutten, H.P.; Benjamin, J.A.; Lade, R.W.

    1986-03-18

    An AC solar cell is described comprising: a pair of PN junction type solar cells connected in antiparallel between a pair of main terminals; and means for electrically directing light alternatingly without mechanical movement on the PN junctions to generate an alternating potential across the main terminals.

  4. AC 67 Launch Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Live footage of the Unmanned Atlas Centaur (AC) 67 launch is presented on March 26, 1987 at the WESH television station in Florida. Lightning is shown after 49 seconds into the flight. The vehicle is totally destroyed due to a cloud-to-ground lightning flash.

  5. Acoustic rainbow trapping by coiling up space.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xu; Wu, Ying; Chen, Ze-Guo; Zheng, Li-Yang; Xu, Ye-Long; Nayar, Priyanka; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2014-01-01

    We numerically realize the acoustic rainbow trapping effect by tapping an air waveguide with space-coiling metamaterials. Due to the high refractive-index of the space-coiling metamaterials, our device is more compact compared to the reported trapped-rainbow devices. A numerical model utilizing effective parameters is also calculated, whose results are consistent well with the direct numerical simulation of space-coiling structure. Moreover, such device with the capability of dropping different frequency components of a broadband incident temporal acoustic signal into different channels can function as an acoustic wavelength division de-multiplexer. These results may have potential applications in acoustic device design such as an acoustic filter and an artificial cochlea. PMID:25392033

  6. Output beam analysis of high power COIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Deli; Sang, Fengting; Jin, Yuqi; Sun, Yizhu

    2003-03-01

    As the output power of a chemical oxygen iodine laser (COIL) increases, the output laser beam instability appears as the far-field beam spot drift and deformation for the large Fresnel number unstable resonator. In order to interpret this phenomenon, an output beam mode simulation code was developed with the fast Fourier transform method. The calculation results show that the presence of the nonuniform gain in COIL produces a skewed output intensity distribution, which causes the mirror tilt and bulge due to the thermal expansion. With the output power of COIL increases, the mirror surfaces, especially the back surface of the scraper mirror, absorb more and more heat, which causes the drift and deformation of far field beam spot seriously. The initial misalignment direction is an important factor for the far field beam spot drifting and deformation.

  7. Gas Filled Coaxial Accelerator with Compression Coil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espy, Patrick N. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A self-energized plasma compressor which compresses plasma discharged from a coaxial plasma generator. The device includes a helical shaped coil which is coaxially aligned with the center axis of the coaxial plasma generator. The plasma generator creates a current through the helical coil which, in turn, generates a time varying magnetic field that generates a force which acts radially upon the plasma. A seal is carried on the end of the coaxial plasma generator for containing gas therein. As the plasma is accelerated out the outer end of the generator, it forces the gas outwardly also compressing such. Beads are carried adjacent the small end of the helical shaped coil for being accelerated to hypervelocities by the plasma and gas. As a result of utilizing gas in the coaxial plasma generator, such minimizes ablation of the beads as well as accelerates such to higher velocities.

  8. Coupled wave model for large magnet coils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabriel, G. J.

    1980-01-01

    A wave coupled model based on field theory is evolved for analysis of fast electromagnetic transients on superconducting coils. It is expected to play a useful role in the design of protection methods against damage due to high voltages or any adverse effects that might arise from unintentional transients. The significant parameters of the coil are identified to be the turn to turn wave coupling coefficients and the travel time of an electromagnetic disturbance around a single turn. Unlike circuit theoretic inductor, the coil response evolves in discrete steps having durations equal to this travel time. It is during such intervals that high voltages are likely to occur. The model also bridges the gap between the low and high ends of the frequency spectrum.

  9. Measuring the orthogonality error of coil systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heilig, B.; Csontos, A.; Pajunpää, K.; White, Tim; St. Louis, B.; Calp, D.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a simple method was proposed for the determination of pitch angle between two coil axes by means of a total field magnetometer. The method is applicable when the homogeneous volume in the centre of the coil system is large enough to accommodate the total field sensor. Orthogonality of calibration coil systems used for calibrating vector magnetometers can be attained by this procedure. In addition, the method can be easily automated and applied to the calibration of delta inclination–delta declination (dIdD) magnetometers. The method was tested by several independent research groups, having a variety of test equipment, and located at differing geomagnetic observatories, including: Nurmijärvi, Finland; Hermanus, South Africa; Ottawa, Canada; Tihany, Hungary. This paper summarizes the test results, and discusses the advantages and limitations of the method.

  10. Acoustic rainbow trapping by coiling up space

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Xu; Wu, Ying; Chen, Ze-Guo; Zheng, Li-Yang; Xu, Ye-Long; Nayar, Priyanka; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2014-01-01

    We numerically realize the acoustic rainbow trapping effect by tapping an air waveguide with space-coiling metamaterials. Due to the high refractive-index of the space-coiling metamaterials, our device is more compact compared to the reported trapped-rainbow devices. A numerical model utilizing effective parameters is also calculated, whose results are consistent well with the direct numerical simulation of space-coiling structure. Moreover, such device with the capability of dropping different frequency components of a broadband incident temporal acoustic signal into different channels can function as an acoustic wavelength division de-multiplexer. These results may have potential applications in acoustic device design such as an acoustic filter and an artificial cochlea. PMID:25392033

  11. Locating of normal transitions in a Bi2223 high temperature superconducting coil by non-contact voltage measurement method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanato, N.; Nishiyama, K.

    2015-12-01

    Locating of normal transitions in high temperature superconducting (HTS) coils is important for protection and safety design of HTS apparatus. A general method to locate the normal transitions is to measure resistive voltages along HTS windings by many voltage taps directly soldered to the HTS coils. However, electrical insulation characteristics of the HTS coils are deteriorated because it is necessary to remove electrical insulations of the HTS wires for the soldering. It is a serious problem especially for AC HTS coils to which high voltages are applied. Therefore the authors have presented a non-contact voltage measurement method that can detect the resistive voltages without removing the insulations by voltage dividing capacitors. So far the authors have verified the principle of the non-contact method. In this paper, a method to locate the normal transitions in a Bi2223 HTS coil based on the non-contact method is proposed. The proposed method can not only detect the normal transitions but also locate their positions. It is experimentally confirmed that the proposed method is useful for locating the normal transitions.

  12. Coiled coil interactions for the targeting of liposomes for nucleic acid delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oude Blenke, Erik E.; van den Dikkenberg, Joep; van Kolck, Bartjan; Kros, Alexander; Mastrobattista, Enrico

    2016-04-01

    Coiled coil interactions are strong protein-protein interactions that are involved in many biological processes, including intracellular trafficking and membrane fusion. A synthetic heterodimeric coiled-coil forming peptide pair, known as E3 (EIAALEK)3 and K3 (KIAALKE)3 was used to functionalize liposomes encapsulating a splice correcting oligonucleotide or siRNA. These peptide-functionalized vesicles are highly stable in solution but start to cluster when vesicles modified with complementary peptides are mixed together, demonstrating that the peptides quickly coil and crosslink the vesicles. When one of the peptides was anchored to the cell membrane using a hydrophobic cholesterol anchor, vesicles functionalized with the complementary peptide could be docked to these cells, whereas non-functionalized cells did not show any vesicle tethering. Although the anchored peptides do not have a downstream signaling pathway, microscopy pictures revealed that after four hours, the majority of the docked vesicles were internalized by endocytosis. Finally, for the first time, it was shown that the coiled coil assembly at the interface between the vesicles and the cell membrane induces active uptake and leads to cytosolic delivery of the nucleic acid cargo. Both the siRNA and the splice correcting oligonucleotide were functionally delivered, resulting respectively in the silencing or recovery of luciferase expression in the appropriate cell lines. These results demonstrate that the docking to the cell by coiled coil interaction can induce active uptake and achieve the successful intracellular delivery of otherwise membrane impermeable nucleic acids in a highly specific manner.Coiled coil interactions are strong protein-protein interactions that are involved in many biological processes, including intracellular trafficking and membrane fusion. A synthetic heterodimeric coiled-coil forming peptide pair, known as E3 (EIAALEK)3 and K3 (KIAALKE)3 was used to functionalize liposomes

  13. Coiled coil interactions for the targeting of liposomes for nucleic acid delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oude Blenke, Erik E.; van den Dikkenberg, Joep; van Kolck, Bartjan; Kros, Alexander; Mastrobattista, Enrico

    2016-04-01

    Coiled coil interactions are strong protein-protein interactions that are involved in many biological processes, including intracellular trafficking and membrane fusion. A synthetic heterodimeric coiled-coil forming peptide pair, known as E3 (EIAALEK)3 and K3 (KIAALKE)3 was used to functionalize liposomes encapsulating a splice correcting oligonucleotide or siRNA. These peptide-functionalized vesicles are highly stable in solution but start to cluster when vesicles modified with complementary peptides are mixed together, demonstrating that the peptides quickly coil and crosslink the vesicles. When one of the peptides was anchored to the cell membrane using a hydrophobic cholesterol anchor, vesicles functionalized with the complementary peptide could be docked to these cells, whereas non-functionalized cells did not show any vesicle tethering. Although the anchored peptides do not have a downstream signaling pathway, microscopy pictures revealed that after four hours, the majority of the docked vesicles were internalized by endocytosis. Finally, for the first time, it was shown that the coiled coil assembly at the interface between the vesicles and the cell membrane induces active uptake and leads to cytosolic delivery of the nucleic acid cargo. Both the siRNA and the splice correcting oligonucleotide were functionally delivered, resulting respectively in the silencing or recovery of luciferase expression in the appropriate cell lines. These results demonstrate that the docking to the cell by coiled coil interaction can induce active uptake and achieve the successful intracellular delivery of otherwise membrane impermeable nucleic acids in a highly specific manner.Coiled coil interactions are strong protein-protein interactions that are involved in many biological processes, including intracellular trafficking and membrane fusion. A synthetic heterodimeric coiled-coil forming peptide pair, known as E3 (EIAALEK)3 and K3 (KIAALKE)3 was used to functionalize liposomes

  14. Dynamics of the coiled-coil unfolding transition of myosin rod probed by dissipation force spectrum.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yukinori; Khatri, Bhavin S; Brockwell, David J; Paci, Emanuele; Kawakami, Masaru

    2010-07-01

    The motor protein myosin II plays a crucial role in muscle contraction. The mechanical properties of its coiled-coil region, the myosin rod, are important for effective force transduction during muscle function. Previous studies have investigated the static elastic response of the myosin rod. However, analogous to the study of macroscopic complex fluids, how myosin will respond to physiological time-dependent loads can only be understood from its viscoelastic response. Here, we apply atomic force microscopy using a magnetically driven oscillating cantilever to measure the dissipative properties of single myosin rods that provide unique dynamical information about the coiled-coil structure as a function of force. We find that the friction constant of the single myosin rod has a highly nontrivial variation with force; in particular, the single-molecule friction constant is reduced dramatically and increases again as it passes through the coiled-uncoiled transition. This is a direct indication of a large free-energy barrier to uncoiling, which may be related to a fine-tuned dynamic mechanosignaling response to large and unexpected physiological loads. Further, from the critical force at which the minimum in friction occurs we determine the asymmetry of the bistable landscape that controls uncoiling of the coiled coil. This work highlights the sensitivity of the dissipative signal in force unfolding to dynamic molecular structure that is hidden to the elastic signal. PMID:20655854

  15. Resistive demountable toroidal-field coils for tokamak reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Jassby, D.L.; Jacobsen, R.A.; Kalnavarns, J.; Masson, L.S.; Sekot, J.P.

    1981-07-01

    Readily demountable TF (toroidal-field) coils allow complete access to the internal components of a tokamak reactor for maintenance of replacement. The requirement of readily demountable joints dictates the use of water-cooled resistive coils, which have a host of decisive advantages over superconducting coils. Previous papers have shown that resistive TF coils for tokamak reactors can operate in the steady state with acceptable power dissipation (typically, 175 to 300 MW). This paper summarizes results of parametric studies of size optimization of rectangular TF coils and of a finite-element stress analysis, and examines several candidate methods of implementing demountable joints for rectangular coils constructed of plate segments.

  16. Characteristics of bowl-shaped coils for transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Keita; Suyama, Momoko; Takiyama, Yoshihiro; Kim, Dongmin; Saitoh, Youichi; Sekino, Masaki

    2015-05-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has recently been used as a method for the treatment of neurological and psychiatric diseases. Daily TMS sessions can provide continuous therapeutic effectiveness, and the installation of TMS systems at patients' homes has been proposed. A figure-eight coil, which is normally used for TMS therapy, induces a highly localized electric field; however, it is challenging to achieve accurate coil positioning above the targeted brain area using this coil. In this paper, a bowl-shaped coil for stimulating a localized but wider area of the brain is proposed. The coil's electromagnetic characteristics were analyzed using finite element methods, and the analysis showed that the bowl-shaped coil induced electric fields in a wider area of the brain model than a figure-eight coil. The expanded distribution of the electric field led to greater robustness of the coil to the coil-positioning error. To improve the efficiency of the coil, the relationship between individual coil design parameters and the resulting coil characteristics was numerically analyzed. It was concluded that lengthening the outer spherical radius and narrowing the width of the coil were effective methods for obtaining a more effective and more uniform distribution of the electric field.

  17. Neuronal Tracing with Magnetic Labels: NMR Imaging Methods, Preliminary Results, and New Optimized Coils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pratik

    1992-01-01

    The investigations focussed on in vivo NMR imaging studies of magnetic particles with and within neural cells. NMR imaging methods, both Fourier transform and projection reconstruction, were implemented and new protocols were developed to perform "Neuronal Tracing with Magnetic Labels" on small animal brains. Having performed the preliminary experiments with neuronal tracing, new optimized coils and experimental set-up were devised. A novel gradient coil technology along with new rf-coils were implemented, and optimized for future use with small animals in them. A new magnetic labelling procedure was developed that allowed labelling of billions of cells with ultra -small magnetite particles in a short time. The relationships among the viability of such cells, the amount of label and the contrast in the images were studied as quantitatively as possible. Intracerebral grafting of magnetite labelled fetal rat brain cells made it possible for the first time to attempt monitoring in vivo the survival, differentiation, and possible migration of both host and grafted cells in the host rat brain. This constituted the early steps toward future experiments that may lead to the monitoring of human brain grafts of fetal brain cells. Preliminary experiments with direct injection of horse radish peroxidase-conjugated magnetite particles into neurons, followed by NMR imaging, revealed a possible non-invasive alternative, allowing serial study of the dynamic transport pattern of tracers in single living animals. New gradient coils were built by using parallel solid-conductor ribbon cables that could be wrapped easily and quickly. Rapid rise times provided by these coils allowed implementation of fast imaging methods. Optimized rf-coil circuit development made it possible to understand better the sample-coil properties and the associated trade -offs in cases of small but conducting samples.

  18. Dipole antennas for ultrahigh-field body imaging: a comparison with loop coils.

    PubMed

    Raaijmakers, A J E; Luijten, P R; van den Berg, C A T

    2016-09-01

    Although the potential of dipole antennas for ultrahigh-field (UHF) MRI is largely recognized, they are still relatively unknown to the larger part of the MRI community. This article intends to provide electromagnetic insight into the general operating principles of dipole antennas by numerical simulations. The major part focuses on a comparison study of dipole antennas and loop coils at frequencies of 128, 298 and 400 MHz. This study shows that dipole antennas are only efficient radiofrequency (RF) coils in the presence of a dielectric and/or conducting load. In addition, the conservative electric fields (E-fields) at the ends of a dipole are negligible in comparison with the induced E-fields in the center. Like loop coils, long dipole antennas perform better than short dipoles for deeply located imaging targets and vice versa. When the optimal element is chosen for each depth, loop coils have higher B1 (+) efficiency for shallow depths, whereas dipole antennas have higher B1 (+) efficiency for large depths. The cross-over point depth decreases with increasing frequency: 11.6, 6.2 and 5.0 cm for 128, 298 and 400 MHz, respectively. For single elements, loop coils demonstrate a better B1 (+) /√SARmax ratio for any target depth and any frequency. However, one example study shows that, in an array setup with loop coil overlap for decoupling, this relationship is not straightforward. The overlapping loop coils may generate increased specific absorption rate (SAR) levels under the overlapping parts of the loops, depending on the drive phase settings. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26278544

  19. Optimal Design of Litz Wire Coils With Sandwich Structure Wirelessly Powering an Artificial Anal Sphincter System.

    PubMed

    Ke, Lei; Yan, Guozheng; Yan, Sheng; Wang, Zhiwu; Li, Xiaoyang

    2015-07-01

    Transcutaneous energy transfer system (TETS) is widely used to energize implantable biomedical devices. As a key part of the TETS, a pair of applicable coils with low losses, high unloaded Q factor, and strong coupling is required to realize an efficient TETS. This article presents an optimal design methodology of planar litz wire coils sandwiched between two ferrite substrates wirelessly powering a novel mechanical artificial anal sphincter system for treating severe fecal incontinence, with focus on the main parameters of the coils such as the wire diameter, number of turns, geometry, and the properties of the ferrite substrate. The theoretical basis of optimal power transfer efficiency in an inductive link was analyzed. A set of analytical expressions are outlined to calculate the winding resistance of a litz wire coil on ferrite substrate, taking into account eddy-current losses, including conduction losses and induction losses. Expressions that describe the geometrical dimension dependence of self- and mutual inductance are derived. The influence of ferrite substrate relative permeability and dimensions is also considered. We have used this foundation to devise an applicable coil design method that starts with a set of realistic constraints and ends with the optimal coil pair geometries. All theoretical predictions are verified with measurements using different types of fabricated coils. The results indicate that the analysis is useful for optimizing the geometry design of windings and the ferrite substrate in a sandwich structure as part of which, in addition to providing design insight, allows speeding up the system efficiency-optimizing design process. PMID:25808086

  20. Design, Construction and Test of Cryogen-Free HTS Coil Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Hocker, H.; Anerella, M.; Gupta, R.; Plate, S.; Sampson, W.; Schmalzle, J.; Shiroyanagi, Y.

    2011-03-28

    This paper will describe design, construction and test results of a cryo-mechanical structure to study coils made with the second generation High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). A magnet comprised of HTS coils mounted in a vacuum vessel and conduction-cooled with Gifford-McMahon cycle cryocoolers is used to develop and refine design and construction techniques. The study of these techniques and their effect on operations provides a better understanding of the use of cryogen free magnets in future accelerator projects. A cryogen-free, superconducting HTS magnet possesses certain operational advantages over cryogenically cooled, low temperature superconducting magnets.

  1. DESIGN OF AN AC-DIPOLE FOR USE IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    PARKER,B.; BAI,M.; JAIN,A.; MCINTYRE,G.; METH,M.; PEGGS,S.; ROSER,T.; SANDERS,R.; TRBOJEVIC,D.

    1999-03-29

    We present two options for implementing a pair of AC-dipoles in RHIC for spin flipping, measuring linear optical functions and nonlinear diagnostics. AC-dipoles are magnets that can be adiabatically excited and de-excited with a continuous sine-wave in order to coherently move circulating beam out to large betatron amplitudes without incurring emittance blow up [1]. The AGS already uses a similar device for getting polarized proton beams through depolarizing resonances [2]. By placing the magnets in the IP4 common beam region, two AC-dipoles are sufficient to excite both horizontal and vertical motion in both RHIC rings. While we initially investigated an iron-dominated magnet design using available steel tape cores; we now favor a new air coil plus ferrite design featuring mechanical frequency tuning, in order to best match available resources to demanding frequency sweeping requirements. Both magnet designs are presented here along with model magnet test results. The challenge is to make AC-dipoles available for year 2000 RHIC running.

  2. Tool Removes Coil-Spring Thread Inserts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Gerald J., Jr.; Swenson, Gary J.; Mcclellan, J. Scott

    1991-01-01

    Tool removes coil-spring thread inserts from threaded holes. Threads into hole, pries insert loose, grips insert, then pulls insert to thread it out of hole. Effects essentially reverse of insertion process to ease removal and avoid further damage to threaded inner surface of hole.

  3. Simplified deflection-coil linearity testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, G. P.

    1976-01-01

    Mask placed over face of image-dissecting photomultiplier tube has precision array of pinholes that permit light to impinge on tube at known points. Signals are fed to deflection coil which sweeps beam across each point without complex operator procedures.

  4. High-field superconducting nested coil magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laverick, C.; Lobell, G. M.

    1970-01-01

    Superconducting magnet, employed in conjunction with five types of superconducting cables in a nested solenoid configuration, produces total, central magnetic field strengths approaching 70 kG. The multiple coils permit maximum information on cable characteristics to be gathered from one test.

  5. Transcatheter Coil Embolization of Splenic Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Satoshi Hirota, Shozo; Maeda, Hiroaki; Achiwa, Sachiko Arai, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Nakao, Norio

    2008-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical results and technical problems of transcatheter coil embolization for splenic artery aneurysm. Subjects were 16 patients (8 men, 8 women; age range, 40-80 years) who underwent transcatheter embolization for splenic artery aneurysm (14 true aneurysms, 2 false aneurysms) at one of our hospitals during the period January 1997 through July 2005. Two aneurysms (12.5%) were diagnosed at the time of rupture. Multiple splenic aneurysms were found in seven patients. Aneurysms were classified by site as proximal (or strictly ostial) (n = 3), middle (n = 3), or hilar (n = 10). The indication for transcatheter arterial embolization was a false or true aneurysm 20 mm in diameter. Embolic materials were fibered coils and interlocking detachable coils. Embolization was performed by the isolation technique, the packing technique, or both. Technically, all aneurysms were devascularized without severe complications. Embolized aneurysms were 6-40 mm in diameter (mean, 25 mm). Overall, the primary technical success rate was 88% (14 of 16 patients). In the remaining 2 patients (12.5%), partial recanalization occurred, and re-embolization was performed. The secondary technical success rate was 100%. Seven (44%) of the 16 study patients suffered partial splenic infarction. Intrasplenic branching originating from the aneurysm was observed in five patients. We conclude that transcatheter coil embolization should be the initial treatment of choice for splenic artery aneurysm.

  6. COMPACT COILED DENUDER FOR ATMOSPHERIC SAMPLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A compact coiled denuder has been designed and its performance evaluated both theoretically and experimentally. he design is based on special features of laminar flow in a curved tube, which significantly enhance the mass transfer Sherwood number governing gas collection at the w...

  7. 49 CFR 236.730 - Coil, receiver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.730 Coil, receiver. Concentric layers of insulated wire wound around the core of a receiver of an automatic train stop, train control or cab signal device on a locomotive....

  8. Stellarator Coil Design and Plasma Sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Long-Poe Ku and Allen H. Boozer

    2010-11-03

    The rich information contained in the plasma response to external magnetic perturbations can be used to help design stellarator coils more effectively. We demonstrate the feasibility by first devel- oping a simple, direct method to study perturbations in stellarators that do not break stellarator symmetry and periodicity. The method applies a small perturbation to the plasma boundary and evaluates the resulting perturbed free-boundary equilibrium to build up a sensitivity matrix for the important physics attributes of the underlying configuration. Using this sensitivity information, design methods for better stellarator coils are then developed. The procedure and a proof-of-principle application are given that (1) determine the spatial distributions of external normal magnetic field at the location of the unperturbed plasma boundary to which the plasma properties are most sen- sitive, (2) determine the distributions of external normal magnetic field that can be produced most efficiently by distant coils, (3) choose the ratios of the magnitudes of the the efficiently produced magnetic distributions so the sensitive plasma properties can be controlled. Using these methods, sets of modular coils are found for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) that are either smoother or can be located much farther from the plasma boundary than those of the present design.

  9. Investigation and Optimization of the Performance of an Air-Coil Sensor with a Differential Structure Suited to Helicopter TEM Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Liu, Fei; Lin, Jun; Wang, Yanzhang

    2015-01-01

    An air-coil sensor (ACS) is a type of induction magnetometer used as a transducer to measure the variations of a magnetic field. This device is widely applied in helicopter transient electromagnetic method (TEM) exploration. Most helicopter TEM explorations generate common-mode noise and require extreme ACS specifications, both of which inevitably challenge geophysical explorations. This study proposes a differential air-core coil combined with a differential pre-amplifier to reduce the common-mode noise induced in exploration surveys. To satisfy the stringent performance requirements, including the geometric parameters and electrical specifications, the physical calculations in theory and the equivalent schematic of an ACS with noise location are investigated, respectively. The theory calculation and experimental result for the optimized ACS are then compared on the basis of a differential structure. Correspondingly, an ACS is constructed with a mass, resultant effective area, 3 dB bandwidth, signal-to-noise ratio, and normalized equivalent input noise of 2.5 kg, 5.5 m2 (diameter is 0.5 m), 71 kHz, 20 (the varying magnetic field strength is 1 nT/s), and 5.43 nV/m2, respectively. These data are superior to those of the traditional induction sensor 3D-3. Finally, a field experiment is performed with a fabricated sensor to show a valid measurement of the time-varying magnetic field of a helicopter TEM system based on the designed ACS. PMID:26389908

  10. Investigation and Optimization of the Performance of an Air-Coil Sensor with a Differential Structure Suited to Helicopter TEM Exploration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Liu, Fei; Lin, Jun; Wang, Yanzhang

    2015-01-01

    An air-coil sensor (ACS) is a type of induction magnetometer used as a transducer to measure the variations of a magnetic field. This device is widely applied in helicopter transient electromagnetic method (TEM) exploration. Most helicopter TEM explorations generate common-mode noise and require extreme ACS specifications, both of which inevitably challenge geophysical explorations. This study proposes a differential air-core coil combined with a differential pre-amplifier to reduce the common-mode noise induced in exploration surveys. To satisfy the stringent performance requirements, including the geometric parameters and electrical specifications, the physical calculations in theory and the equivalent schematic of an ACS with noise location are investigated, respectively. The theory calculation and experimental result for the optimized ACS are then compared on the basis of a differential structure. Correspondingly, an ACS is constructed with a mass, resultant effective area, 3 dB bandwidth, signal-to-noise ratio, and normalized equivalent input noise of 2.5 kg, 5.5 m² (diameter is 0.5 m), 71 kHz, 20 (the varying magnetic field strength is 1 nT/s), and 5.43 nV/m², respectively. These data are superior to those of the traditional induction sensor 3D-3. Finally, a field experiment is performed with a fabricated sensor to show a valid measurement of the time-varying magnetic field of a helicopter TEM system based on the designed ACS. PMID:26389908

  11. AC power systems handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, J.

    1991-01-01

    Transient disturbances are what headaches are made of. Whatever you call them-spikes, surges, are power bumps-they can take your equipment down and leave you with a complicated and expensive repair job. Protection against transient disturbances is a science that demands attention to detail. This book explains how the power distribution system works, what can go wrong with it, and how to protect a facility against abnormalities. system grounding and shielding are covered in detail. Each major method of transient protection is analyzed and its relative merits discussed. The book provides a complete look at the critical elements of the ac power system. Provides a complete look at the ac power system from generation to consumption. Discusses the mechanisms that produce transient disturbances and how to protect against them. Presents diagrams to facilitate system design. Covers new areas, such as the extent of the transient disturbance problem, transient protection options, and stand-by power systems.

  12. Simultaneous recordings of human microsaccades and drifts with a contemporary video eye tracker and the search coil technique.

    PubMed

    McCamy, Michael B; Otero-Millan, Jorge; Leigh, R John; King, Susan A; Schneider, Rosalyn M; Macknik, Stephen L; Martinez-Conde, Susana

    2015-01-01

    Human eyes move continuously, even during visual fixation. These "fixational eye movements" (FEMs) include microsaccades, intersaccadic drift and oculomotor tremor. Research in human FEMs has grown considerably in the last decade, facilitated by the manufacture of noninvasive, high-resolution/speed video-oculography eye trackers. Due to the small magnitude of FEMs, obtaining reliable data can be challenging, however, and depends critically on the sensitivity and precision of the eye tracking system. Yet, no study has conducted an in-depth comparison of human FEM recordings obtained with the search coil (considered the gold standard for measuring microsaccades and drift) and with contemporary, state-of-the art video trackers. Here we measured human microsaccades and drift simultaneously with the search coil and a popular state-of-the-art video tracker. We found that 95% of microsaccades detected with the search coil were also detected with the video tracker, and 95% of microsaccades detected with video tracking were also detected with the search coil, indicating substantial agreement between the two systems. Peak/mean velocities and main sequence slopes of microsaccades detected with video tracking were significantly higher than those of the same microsaccades detected with the search coil, however. Ocular drift was significantly correlated between the two systems, but drift speeds were higher with video tracking than with the search coil. Overall, our combined results suggest that contemporary video tracking now approaches the search coil for measuring FEMs. PMID:26035820

  13. Simultaneous Recordings of Human Microsaccades and Drifts with a Contemporary Video Eye Tracker and the Search Coil Technique

    PubMed Central

    McCamy, Michael B.; Otero-Millan, Jorge; Leigh, R. John; King, Susan A.; Schneider, Rosalyn M.; Macknik, Stephen L.; Martinez-Conde, Susana

    2015-01-01

    Human eyes move continuously, even during visual fixation. These “fixational eye movements” (FEMs) include microsaccades, intersaccadic drift and oculomotor tremor. Research in human FEMs has grown considerably in the last decade, facilitated by the manufacture of noninvasive, high-resolution/speed video-oculography eye trackers. Due to the small magnitude of FEMs, obtaining reliable data can be challenging, however, and depends critically on the sensitivity and precision of the eye tracking system. Yet, no study has conducted an in-depth comparison of human FEM recordings obtained with the search coil (considered the gold standard for measuring microsaccades and drift) and with contemporary, state-of-the art video trackers. Here we measured human microsaccades and drift simultaneously with the search coil and a popular state-of-the-art video tracker. We found that 95% of microsaccades detected with the search coil were also detected with the video tracker, and 95% of microsaccades detected with video tracking were also detected with the search coil, indicating substantial agreement between the two systems. Peak/mean velocities and main sequence slopes of microsaccades detected with video tracking were significantly higher than those of the same microsaccades detected with the search coil, however. Ocular drift was significantly correlated between the two systems, but drift speeds were higher with video tracking than with the search coil. Overall, our combined results suggest that contemporary video tracking now approaches the search coil for measuring FEMs. PMID:26035820

  14. Modular Coils and Plasma Configurations for Quasi-axisymmetric Stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    L.P. Ku and A.H. Boozer

    2010-09-10

    Characteristics of modular coils for quasi-axisymmetric stellarators that are related to the plasma aspect ratio, number of field periods and rotational transform have been examined systematically. It is observed that, for a given plasma aspect ratio, the coil complexity tends to increase with the increased number of field periods. For a given number of field periods, the toroidal excursion of coil winding is reduced as the plasma aspect ratio is increased. It is also clear that the larger the coil-plasma separation is, the more complex the coils become. It is further demonstrated that it is possible to use other types of coils to complement modular coils to improve both the physics and the modular coil characteristics.

  15. Mechanical design of a high field common coil magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Chow, K.; Dietderich, D.; Gourlay, S.; Gupta, R.; McInturff, A.; Millos, G.; Scanlan, R.

    1999-03-18

    A common coil design for high field 2-in-1 accelerator magnets has been previously presented as a 'conductor-friendly' option for high field magnets applicable for a Very Large Hadron Collider. This paper presents the mechanical design for a 14 tesla 2-in-1 dipole based on the common coil design approach. The magnet will use a high current density Nb{sub 3}Sn conductor. The design addresses mechanical issues particular to the common coil geometry: horizontal support against coil edges, vertical preload on coil faces, end loading and support, and coil stresses and strains. The magnet is the second in a series of racetrack coil magnets that will provide experimental verification of the common coil design approach.

  16. Noise properties of a NMR transceiver coil array.

    PubMed

    Pinkerton, Robert G; Barberi, Enzo A; Menon, Ravi S

    2004-11-01

    The use of multiple radiofrequency (RF) surface coil elements has applications in both fast parallel imaging and conventional imaging techniques. Through implementation of a simple magnetic decoupling network, 50 Omega matching can be achieved in both the transmitter and receiver chains, enabling the use of conventional RF power amplifiers and preamplifiers for transceive applications. Unlike phased array coil arrangements using low impedance preamplifiers for decoupling, the noise correlation between 50 Omega coils decoupled with discrete components has not been characterized. We have measured the dependence of coil quality factor (Q-factor) and noise correlation on coil separation and shown these quantities to be consistent with theoretical arguments, at least at 4 T (170 MHz). Our results suggest that a coil system for transmission and reception of NMR signals with 50 Omega coils can be built to take advantage of all the benefits of conventional array coils and with the added advantages of using conventional amplifiers. PMID:15504694

  17. Particle confinement in EBT reactors with noncircular mirror coils

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, L.W.; Uckan, N.A.

    1983-01-01

    Methods of improving single particle confinement in the vacuum magnetic field of an ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) reactor have heretofore focused on enhancement of the effective magnetic aspect ratio through the addition of relatively low current supplementary coils to the basic EBT configuration of toroidally linked circular mirror coils. This method of aspect ratio enhancement is reviewed and compared to the use of noncircular, D-shaped mirror coils. A critical parameter in this evaluation is the required radial thickness delta of the blanket-shield assembly in the coil throat. Results indicate that D-coils represent an attractive alternative to the supplementary coil configurations if future neutronics calculations show that delta coils. D-coils are shown to be extremely effective in symmetrizing mod-B in the midplane, thereby giving good trapped particle confinement, hot electron ring centering, and reactor volume utilization.

  18. Coiled-Coil Irregularities and Instabilities in Group A Streptococcus M1 Are Required for Virulence

    SciTech Connect

    McNamara, Case; Zinkernagel, Annelies S.; Macheboeuf, Pauline; Cunningham, Madeleine W.; Nizet, Victor; Ghosh, Partho

    2008-07-21

    Antigenically variable M proteins are major virulence factors and immunogens of the human pathogen group A Streptococcus (GAS). Here, we report the -3 angstrom resolution structure of a GAS M1 fragment containing the regions responsible for eliciting type-specific, protective immunity and for binding fibrinogen, which promotes M1 proinflammatory and antiphagocytic functions. The structure revealed substantial irregularities and instabilities throughout the coiled coil of the M1 fragment. Similar structural irregularities occur in myosin and tropomyosin, explaining the patterns of cross-reactivity seen in autoimmune sequelae of GAS infection. Sequence idealization of a large segment of the M1 coiled coil enhanced stability but diminished fibrinogen binding, proinflammatory effects, and antibody cross-reactivity, whereas it left protective immunogenicity undiminished. Idealized M proteins appear to have promise as vaccine immunogens.

  19. Short peptide tag for covalent protein labeling based on coiled coils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianpeng; Yu, Yongsheng; Xia, Jiang

    2014-01-15

    To label proteins covalently, one faces a trade-off between labeling a protein specifically and using a small tag. Often one must compromise one parameter for the other or use additional components, such as an enzyme, to satisfy both requirements. Here, we report a new reaction that covalently labels proteins by using engineered coiled-coil peptides. Harnessing the concept of "proximity-induced reactivity", the 21-amino-acid three-heptad peptides CCE/CCK were modified with a nucleophilic cysteine and an α-chloroacetyl group at selected positions. When pairs of coiled coils associated, an irreversible covalent bond spontaneously formed between the peptides. The specificity of the cross-linking reaction was characterized, the probes were improved by making them bivalent, and the system was used to label a protein in vitro and receptors on the surface of mammalian cells. PMID:24341800

  20. GBNV encoded movement protein (NSm) remodels ER network via C-terminal coiled coil domain

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Pratibha; Savithri, H.S.

    2015-08-15

    Plant viruses exploit the host machinery for targeting the viral genome–movement protein complex to plasmodesmata (PD). The mechanism by which the non-structural protein m (NSm) of Groundnut bud necrosis virus (GBNV) is targeted to PD was investigated using Agrobacterium mediated transient expression of NSm and its fusion proteins in Nicotiana benthamiana. GFP:NSm formed punctuate structures that colocalized with mCherry:plasmodesmata localized protein 1a (PDLP 1a) confirming that GBNV NSm localizes to PD. Unlike in other movement proteins, the C-terminal coiled coil domain of GBNV NSm was shown to be involved in the localization of NSm to PD, as deletion of this domain resulted in the cytoplasmic localization of NSm. Treatment with Brefeldin A demonstrated the role of ER in targeting GFP NSm to PD. Furthermore, mCherry:NSm co-localized with ER–GFP (endoplasmic reticulum targeting peptide (HDEL peptide fused with GFP). Co-expression of NSm with ER–GFP showed that the ER-network was transformed into vesicles indicating that NSm interacts with ER and remodels it. Mutations in the conserved hydrophobic region of NSm (residues 130–138) did not abolish the formation of vesicles. Additionally, the conserved prolines at positions 140 and 142 were found to be essential for targeting the vesicles to the cell membrane. Further, systematic deletion of amino acid residues from N- and C-terminus demonstrated that N-terminal 203 amino acids are dispensable for the vesicle formation. On the other hand, the C-terminal coiled coil domain when expressed alone could also form vesicles. These results suggest that GBNV NSm remodels the ER network by forming vesicles via its interaction through the C-terminal coiled coil domain. Interestingly, NSm interacts with NP in vitro and coexpression of these two proteins in planta resulted in the relocalization of NP to PD and this relocalization was abolished when the N-terminal unfolded region of NSm was deleted. Thus, the NSm

  1. Simulation of concomitant magnetic fields on fast switched gradient coils used in advanced application of MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas-Muciño, G.; Torres-García, E.; Hidalgo-Tobon, S.

    2012-10-01

    The process to produce an MR image includes nuclear alignment, RF excitation, spatial encoding, and image formation. To form an image, it is necessary to perform spatial localization of the MR signals, which is achieved using gradient coils. MRI requires the use of gradient coils that generate magnetic fields, which vary linearly with position over the imaging volume. Safety issues have been a motivation to study deeply the relation between the interaction of gradient magnetic field and the peripheral nerve stimulation. In this work is presented a numerical modeling between the concomitant magnetic fields produced by the gradient coils and the electric field induced in a cube with σ conductivity by the gradient field switching in pulse sequences as Eco planar Imaging (EPI), due to this kind of sequence is the most used in advance applications of magnetic resonance imaging as functional MRI, cardiac imaging or diffusion.

  2. Optimization of data coils in a multiband wireless link for neuroprosthetic implantable devices.

    PubMed

    Uei-Ming Jow; Ghovanloo, M

    2010-10-01

    We have presented the design methodology along with detailed simulation and measurement results for optimizing a multiband transcutaneous wireless link for high-performance implantable neuroprosthetic devices. We have utilized three individual carrier signals and coil/antenna pairs for power transmission, forward data transmission from outside into the body, and back telemetry in the opposite direction. Power is transmitted at 13.56 MHz through a pair of printed spiral coils (PSCs) facing each other. Two different designs have been evaluated for forward data coils, both of which help to minimize power carrier interference in the received data carrier. One is a pair of perpendicular coils that are wound across the diameter of the power PSCs. The other design is a pair of planar figure-8 coils that are in the same plane as the power PSCs. We have compared the robustness of each design against horizontal misalignments and rotations in different directions. Simulation and measurements are also conducted on a miniature spiral antenna, designed to operate with impulse-radio ultra-wideband (IR-UWB) circuitry for back telemetry. PMID:21918679

  3. IMPROVED COILED-COIL DESIGN ENHANCES INTERACTION WITH BCR-ABL AND INDUCES APOPTOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Andrew S.; Miller, Geoffrey D.; Bruno, Benjamin J.; Constance, Jonathan E.; Woessner, David W.; Fidler, Trevor P.; Robertson, James C.; Cheatham, Thomas E.; Lim, Carol S.

    2012-01-01

    The oncoprotein Bcr-Abl drives aberrant downstream activity through trans-autophosphorylation of homo-oligomers in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML).1,2 The formation of Bcr-Abl oligomers is achieved through the coiled-coil domain at the N-terminus of Bcr.3, 4 We have previously reported a modified version of this coiled-coil domain, CCmut2, which exhibits disruption of Bcr-Abl oligomeric complexes and results in decreased proliferation of CML cells and induction of apoptosis.5 A major contributing factor to these enhanced capabilities is the destabilization of the CCmut2 homo-dimers, increasing the availability to interact with and inhibit Bcr-Abl. Here, we included an additional mutation (K39E) that could in turn further destabilize the mutant homo-dimer. Incorporation of this modification into CCmut2 (C38A, S41R, L45D, E48R, Q60E) generated what we termed CCmut3, and resulted in further improvements in the binding properties with the wild-type coiled-coil domain representative of Bcr-Abl. A separate construct containing one revert mutation, CCmut4, did not demonstrate improved oligomeric properties and indicated the importance of the L45D mutation. CCmut3 demonstrated improved oligomerization via a two-hybrid assay as well as through colocalization studies, in addition to showing similar biologic activity as CCmut2. The improved binding between CCmut3 and the Bcr-Abl coiled-coil may be used to redirect Bcr-Abl to alternative subcellular locations with interesting therapeutic implications. PMID:22136227

  4. Data-Driven Prediction and Design of bZIP Coiled-Coil Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Potapov, Vladimir; Kaplan, Jenifer B.; Keating, Amy E.

    2015-01-01

    Selective dimerization of the basic-region leucine-zipper (bZIP) transcription factors presents a vivid example of how a high degree of interaction specificity can be achieved within a family of structurally similar proteins. The coiled-coil motif that mediates homo- or hetero-dimerization of the bZIP proteins has been intensively studied, and a variety of methods have been proposed to predict these interactions from sequence data. In this work, we used a large quantitative set of 4,549 bZIP coiled-coil interactions to develop a predictive model that exploits knowledge of structurally conserved residue-residue interactions in the coiled-coil motif. Our model, which expresses interaction energies as a sum of interpretable residue-pair and triplet terms, achieves a correlation with experimental binding free energies of R = 0.68 and significantly out-performs other scoring functions. To use our model in protein design applications, we devised a strategy in which synthetic peptides are built by assembling 7-residue native-protein heptad modules into new combinations. An integer linear program was used to find the optimal combination of heptads to bind selectively to a target human bZIP coiled coil, but not to target paralogs. Using this approach, we designed peptides to interact with the bZIP domains from human JUN, XBP1, ATF4 and ATF5. Testing more than 132 candidate protein complexes using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay confirmed the formation of tight and selective heterodimers between the designed peptides and their targets. This approach can be used to make inhibitors of native proteins, or to develop novel peptides for applications in synthetic biology or nanotechnology. PMID:25695764

  5. Application of Coiled Coil Peptides in Liposomal Anticancer Drug Delivery Using a Zebrafish Xenograft Model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Shimada, Yasuhito; Olsthoorn, René C L; Snaar-Jagalska, B Ewa; Spaink, Herman P; Kros, Alexander

    2016-08-23

    The complementary coiled coil forming peptides E4 [(EIAALEK)4] and K4 [(KIAALKE)4] are known to trigger liposomal membrane fusion when tethered to lipid vesicles in the form of lipopeptides. In this study, we examined whether these coiled coil forming peptides can be used for drug delivery applications. First, we prepared E4 peptide modified liposomes containing the far-red fluorescent dye TO-PRO-3 iodide (E4-Lipo-TP3) and confirmed that E4-liposomes could deliver TP3 into HeLa cells expressing K4 peptide on the membrane (HeLa-K) under cell culture conditions in a selective manner. Next, we prepared doxorubicin-containing E4-liposomes (E4-Lipo-DOX) and confirmed that E4-liposomes could also deliver DOX into HeLa-K cells. Moreover, E4-Lipo-DOX showed enhanced cytotoxicity toward HeLa-K cells compared to free doxorubicin. To prove the suitability of E4/K4 coiled coil formation for in vivo drug delivery, we injected E4-Lipo-TP3 or E4-Lipo-DOX into zebrafish xenografts of HeLa-K. As a result, E4-liposomes delivered TP3 to the implanted HeLa-K cells, and E4-Lipo-DOX could suppress cancer proliferation in the xenograft when compared to nontargeted conditions (i.e., zebrafish xenograft with free DOX injection). These data demonstrate that coiled coil formation enables drug selectivity and efficacy in vivo. It is envisaged that these findings are a step forward toward biorthogonal targeting systems as a tool for clinical drug delivery. PMID:27504667

  6. Multiple-Coil, Pulse-Induction Metal Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesky, Edward S.; Reid, Alan M.; Bushong, Wilton E.; Dickey, Duane P.

    1988-01-01

    Multiple-head, pulse-induction metal detector scans area of 72 feet squared with combination of eight detector heads, each 3 ft. square. Head includes large primary coil inducing current in smaller secondary coils. Array of eight heads enables searcher to cover large area quickly. Pulses applied to primary coil, induced in secondary coils measured to determine whether metal present within range of detector head. Detector designed for recovery of Space Shuttle debris.

  7. Structural characterization and AC conductivity of bis tetrapropylammonium hexachlorado-dicadmate, [N(C{sub 3}H{sub 7}){sub 4}]{sub 2}Cd{sub 2}Cl{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect

    Hannachi, N.; Guidara, K.; Bulou, A.; Hlel, F.

    2010-11-15

    Synthesis, crystal structure, vibrational study, {sup 13}C, {sup 111}Cd CP-MAS-NMR analysis and electrical properties of the compound [N(C{sub 3}H{sub 7}){sub 4}]{sub 2}Cd{sub 2}Cl{sub 6}, are reported. The latter crystallizes in the triclinic system (space group P1-bar, Z = 2) with the following unit cell dimensions: a = 9.530(1) A, b = 11.744(1) A, c = 17.433(1) A, {alpha} = 79.31(1){sup o}, {beta} = 84.00(1){sup o} and {gamma} = 80.32(1){sup o}. Besides, its structure was solved using 6445 independent reflections down to R = 0.037. The atomic arrangement can be described by alternating organic and inorganic layers parallel to the (11-bar 0) plan, made up of tetrapropylammonium groups and Cd{sub 2}Cl{sub 6} dimers, respectively. In crystal structure, the inorganic layer, built up by Cd{sub 2}Cl{sub 6} dimers, is connected to the organic ones through van der Waals interaction in order to build cation-anion-cation cohesion. Impedance spectroscopy study, reported in the sample, reveals that the conduction in the material is due to a hopping process. The temperature and frequency dependence of dielectric constants of the single crystal sample has been investigated to determine some related parameters to the dielectric relaxation.

  8. A coiled-coil interaction mediates cauliflower mosaic virus cell-to-cell movement

    PubMed Central

    Stavolone, Livia; Villani, Maria Elena; Leclerc, Denis; Hohn, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The function of the virion-associated protein (VAP) of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) has long been only poorly understood. VAP is associated with the virion but is dispensable for virus morphogenesis and replication. It mediates virus transmission by aphids through simultaneous interaction with both the aphid transmission factor and the virion. However, although insect transmission is not fundamental to CaMV survival, VAP is indispensable for spreading the virus infection within the host plant. We used a GST pull-down technique to demonstrate that VAP interacts with the viral movement protein through coiled-coil domains and surface plasmon resonance to measure the interaction kinetics. We mapped the movement protein coiled-coil to the C terminus of the protein and proved that it self-assembles as a trimer. Immunogold labeling/electron microscopy revealed that the VAP and viral movement protein colocalize on CaMV particles within plasmodesmata. These results highlight the multifunctional potential of the VAP protein conferred by its efficient coiled-coil interaction system and show a plant virus possessing a surface-exposed protein (VAP) mediating viral entry into host cells. PMID:15837934

  9. A coiled-coil interaction mediates cauliflower mosaic virus cell-to-cell movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavolone, Livia; Villani, Maria Elena; Leclerc, Denis; Hohn, Thomas

    2005-04-01

    The function of the virion-associated protein (VAP) of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) has long been only poorly understood. VAP is associated with the virion but is dispensable for virus morphogenesis and replication. It mediates virus transmission by aphids through simultaneous interaction with both the aphid transmission factor and the virion. However, although insect transmission is not fundamental to CaMV survival, VAP is indispensable for spreading the virus infection within the host plant. We used a GST pull-down technique to demonstrate that VAP interacts with the viral movement protein through coiled-coil domains and surface plasmon resonance to measure the interaction kinetics. We mapped the movement protein coiled-coil to the C terminus of the protein and proved that it self-assembles as a trimer. Immunogold labeling/electron microscopy revealed that the VAP and viral movement protein colocalize on CaMV particles within plasmodesmata. These results highlight the multifunctional potential of the VAP protein conferred by its efficient coiled-coil interaction system and show a plant virus possessing a surface-exposed protein (VAP) mediating viral entry into host cells. movement protein | virion-associated protein | Biacore

  10. A Thrombus Generation Model Applied to Aneurysms Treated with Shape Memory Polymer Foam and Metal Coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, John; Ortega, Jason; Hartman, Jonathan; Maitland, Duncan

    2015-11-01

    To prevent their rupture, intracranial aneurysms are often treated with endovascular metal coils which fill the aneurysm sac and isolate it from the arterial flow. Despite its widespread use, this method can result in suboptimal outcomes leading to aneurysm recurrence. Recently, shape memory polymer foam has been proposed as an alternative aneurysm filler. In this work, a computational model has been developed to predict thrombus formation in blood in response to such cardiovascular implantable devices. The model couples biofluid and biochemical phenomena present as the blood interacts with a device and stimulates thrombus formation. This model is applied to simulations of both metal coil and shape memory polymer foam treatments within an idealized 2D aneurysm geometry. Using the predicted thrombus responses, the performance of these treatments is evaluated and compared. The results suggest that foam-treated aneurysms may fill more quickly and more completely with thrombus than coil-filled aneurysms, potentially leading to improved long-term aneurysm healing. This work was performed in part under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. Numerical optimization of three-dimensional coils for NSTX-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazerson, S. A.; Park, J.-K.; Logan, N.; Boozer, A.

    2015-10-01

    A tool for the calculation of optimal three-dimensional (3D) perturbative magnetic fields in tokamaks has been developed. The IPECOPT code builds upon the stellarator optimization code STELLOPT to allow for optimization of linear ideal magnetohydrodynamic perturbed equilibrium (IPEC). This tool has been applied to NSTX-U equilibria, addressing which fields are the most effective at driving NTV torques. The NTV torque calculation is performed by the PENT code. Optimization of the normal field spectrum shows that fields with n  =  1 character can drive a large core torque. It is also shown that fields with n  =  3 features are capable of driving edge torque and some core torque. Coil current optimization (using the planned in-vessel and existing RWM coils) on NSTX-U suggest the planned coils set is adequate for core and edge torque control. Comparison between error field correction experiments on DIII-D and the optimizer show good agreement. Notice: This manuscript has been authored by Princeton University under Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The publisher, by accepting the article for publication acknowledges, that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive,paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  12. Open coil structure for bubble-memory-device packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, T. T.; Ypma, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    Concept has several important advantages over close-wound system: memory and coil chips are separate and interchangeable; interconnections in coil level are eliminated by packing memory chip and electronics in single structure; and coil size can be adjusted to optimum value in terms of power dissipation and field uniformity.

  13. Embolization of Large Aneurysms with Long Wire Coils

    SciTech Connect

    Golzarian, Jafar; Dussaussois, Luc; Ait Said, Kamel; Abada, Hicham T.; Dereume, Jean P.; Struyven, Julien

    2002-01-15

    The authors report the experience of using long coils of 2 m length in the management of large aneurysms. Knowledge of the characteristics of these coils is of value for correct placement. These coils are safe and cost-effective for excluding large aneurysms.

  14. New Retrievable Coil Anchors: Preliminary In Vivo Experiences in Swine

    SciTech Connect

    Konya, A. Wright, K.C.

    2005-04-15

    Purpose. To design and test retrievable coil anchors to improve the safety and efficacy of coil embolization. Methods. Fifty-two 0.038-inch homemade retrievable stainless steel coils were equipped with one of four different pre-shaped nitinol anchors and tested in 38 pigs. All coils with the anchor were completely retrieved and redeployed 3-18 times (median 7 times) prior to release. Types 1 and 2 anchored coils were acutely deployed in the external iliac arteries (n = 10 each), and chronically tested (1 week) in the common carotid arteries (n = 6 each). Larger type 1 (n = 4), type 3 (n = 6), and type 4 (n = 4) anchored coils were acutely deployed in the abdominal aorta. The largest type 1 anchors (n = 6) were acutely tested in the inferior vena cava. Results. All anchored coils were successfully retrieved and repositioned several times. All but two coils formed a compact plug and there was no coil migration except with two mechanically defective type 3 anchors. Conclusion. The use of retrievable anchors allowed the coils to be retrieved and repositioned, prevented coil migration, and enabled compact coil configuration.

  15. Test Results of the AC Field Measurements of Fermilab Booster Corrector Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    DiMarco, E.Joseph; Harding, D.J.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Lamm, M.J.; Makulski, A.; Nehring, R.; Orris, D.F.; Schlabach, P.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, Michael Albert; /Fermilab

    2008-06-25

    Multi-element corrector magnets are being produced at Fermilab that enable correction of orbits and tunes through the entire cycle of the Booster, not just at injection. The corrector package includes six different corrector elements--normal and skew orientations of dipole, quadrupole, and sextupole--each independently powered. The magnets have been tested during typical AC ramping cycles at 15Hz using a fixed coil system to measure the dynamic field strength and field quality. The fixed coil is comprised of an array of inductive pick-up coils around the perimeter of a cylinder which are sampled simultaneously at 100 kHz with 24-bit ADC's. The performance of the measurement system and a summary of the field results are presented and discussed.

  16. SURFACE AND BOREHOLE ELECTROMAGNETIC IMAGING OF CONDUCTING CONTAMINANT PLUMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electromagnetic induction tomography is a promising new tool for imaging electrical conductivity variations in the earth. The EM source field is produced by induction coil (magnetic dipole) transmitters deployed at the surface or in boreholes. Vertical and horizontal component ma...

  17. Ceramic electrical insulation for electrical coils, transformers, and magnets

    DOEpatents

    Rice, John A.; Hazelton, Craig S.; Fabian, Paul E.

    2002-01-01

    A high temperature electrical insulation is described, which is suitable for electrical windings for any number of applications. The inventive insulation comprises a cured preceramic polymer resin, which is preferably a polysiloxane resin. A method for insulating electrical windings, which are intended for use in high temperature environments, such as superconductors and the like, advantageously comprises the steps of, first, applying a preceramic polymer layer to a conductor core, to function as an insulation layer, and second, curing the preceramic polymer layer. The conductor core preferably comprises a metallic wire, which may be wound into a coil. In the preferred method, the applying step comprises a step of wrapping the conductor core with a sleeve or tape of glass or ceramic fabric which has been impregnated by a preceramic polymer resin. The inventive insulation system allows conducting coils and magnets to be fabricated using existing processing equipment, and maximizes the mechanical and thermal performance at both elevated and cryogenic temperatures. It also permits co-processing of the wire and the insulation to increase production efficiencies and reduce overall costs, while still remarkably enhancing performance.

  18. Replacement inhibitors for high level waste tank cooling coils

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.J.; Hsu, T.C.

    1996-10-01

    Sodium chromate has been an effective corrosion inhibitor for the cooling coil systems in Savannah River Site (SRS) waste tanks for over 40 years. Due to age and operating history, cooling coils occasionally fail allowing chromated water to leak into the environment. The costs of reporting and cleaning up chromate spills became significant enough for SRS to consider alternate inhibitors. Confirmatory tests were performed to assess the effectiveness of three alternative corrosion inhibitor systems for the waste tank cooling water systems: (1) sodium molybdate (250 ppm as Mo)/sodium hydroxide (pH 10), (2) sodium molybdate (50 ppm as Mo)/sodium silicate (50 ppm as Si), and (3) sodium nitrite (500 ppm)/ sodium hydroxide (0.01 M). The tests were conducted under stagnant conditions to simulate a worst-case scenario. The results showed that these inhibitors were as effective as chromate at minimizing general corrosion at solution temperatures between 30--70 C. However, the initiation of localized attack in crevice regions, in solutions containing the alternative inhibitors at 70 C, was observed. Also, for the nitrite and the molybdate systems to be effective, suitable biocide is needed. On the other hand, interval coupon tests showed that the molybdate inhibitor systems prevented significant propagation of the localized attack.

  19. Cloning and expression analysis of mouse Cclp1, a new gene encoding a coiled-coil-like protein.

    PubMed

    Noben-Trauth, K; Naggert, J K; Nishina, P M

    1997-05-30

    Here we describe the nucleotide sequence and expression pattern of a novel gene termed Coiled-coil-like protein 1 (Cclp1). A 2646bp open reading frame encodes a 882 amino acid protein with a predicted coiled-coil domain at the amino terminus. Cclp1 is expressed in a variety of adult tissues and during different stages of embryogenesis. The broad expression pattern suggests a general cellular function of CCLP1. PMID:9199242

  20. Domain organization, folding and stability of bacteriophage T4 fibritin, a segmented coiled-coil protein.

    PubMed

    Boudko, Sergei P; Londer, Yuri Y; Letarov, Andrei V; Sernova, Natalia V; Engel, Juergen; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V

    2002-02-01

    Fibritin is a segmented coiled-coil homotrimer of the 486-residue product of phage T4 gene wac. This protein attaches to a phage particle by the N-terminal region and forms fibrous whiskers of 530 A, which perform a chaperone function during virus assembly. The short C-terminal region has a beta-annulus-like structure. We engineered a set of fibritin deletion mutants sequentially truncated from the N-termini, and the mutants were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and CD measurements. The analysis of DSC curves indicates that full-length fibritin exhibits three thermal-heat-absorption peaks centred at 321 K (Delta H=1390 kJ x mol trimer(-1)), at 336 K (Delta H=7600 kJ x mol trimer(-1)), and at 345 K (Delta H=515 kJ x mol trimer(-1)). These transitions were assigned to the N-terminal, segmented coiled-coil, and C-terminal functional domains, respectively. The coiled-coil region, containing 13 segments, melts co-operatively as a single domain with a mean enthalpy Delta Hres=21 kJ x mol residue(-1). The ratio of Delta HVH/Delta Hcal for the coiled-coil part of the 120-, 182-, 258- and 281-residue per monomer mutants, truncated from the N-termini, and for full-length fibritin are 0.91, 0.88, 0.42, 0.39, and 0.13, respectively. This gives an indication of the decrease of the 'all-or-none' character of the transition with increasing protein size. The deletion of the 12-residue-long loop in the 120-residue fibritin increases the thermal stability of the coiled-coil region. According to CD data, full-length fibritin and all the mutants truncated from the N-termini refold properly after heat denaturation. In contrast, fibritin XN, which is deleted for the C-terminal domain, forms aggregates inside the cell. The XN protein can be partially refolded by dilution from urea and does not refold after heat denaturation. These results confirm that the C-terminal domain is essential for correct fibritin assembly both in vivo and in vitro and acts as a foldon. PMID

  1. Subunit b-Dimer of the Escherichia coli ATP Synthase Can Form Left-Handed Coiled-Coils

    PubMed Central

    Wise, John G.; Vogel, Pia D.

    2008-01-01

    One remaining challenge to our understanding of the ATP synthase concerns the dimeric coiled-coil stator subunit b of bacterial synthases. The subunit b-dimer has been implicated in important protein interactions that appear necessary for energy conservation and that may be instrumental in energy conservation during rotary catalysis by the synthase. Understanding the stator structure and its interactions with the rest of the enzyme is crucial to the understanding of the overall catalytic mechanism. Controversy exists on whether subunit b adopts a classic left-handed or a presumed right-handed dimeric coiled-coil and whether or not staggered pairing between nonhomologous residues in the homodimer is required for intersubunit packing. In this study we generated molecular models of the Escherichia coli subunit b-dimer that were based on the well-established heptad-repeat packing exhibited by left-handed, dimeric coiled-coils by employing simulated annealing protocols with structural restraints collected from known structures. In addition, we attempted to create hypothetical right-handed coiled-coil models and left- and right-handed models with staggered packing in the coiled-coil domains. Our analyses suggest that the available structural and biochemical evidence for subunit b can be accommodated by classic left-handed, dimeric coiled-coil quaternary structures. PMID:18326648

  2. Change in the coil distribution of electrodynamic suspension system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, Hisashi

    1992-01-01

    At the Miyazaki Maglev Test Center, the initial test runs were completed using a system design that required the superconducting coils to be parallel with the ground levitation coils. Recently, the coil distribution was changed to a system such that the two types of coils were perpendicular to each other. Further system changes will lead to the construction of a side wall levitation system. It is hoped that the development will culminate in a system whereby a superconducting coil will maintain all the functions: levitation, propulsion, and guidance.

  3. Radial and tangential winding coil probes for sextupole magnet measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.

    1995-08-01

    Rotating coil probes of radial and tangential winding geometries for the measurements of the magnetic center, main field integral and multipole coefficients of sextupole magnets are describes. Two sets of coils are sufficient for a probe of radial winding geometry. For a tangential winding probe, however, typically several sets of coils are required to measure the above magnetic parameters. The tangential coil geometry in this note is described with three sets of coils. The main sextupole field coefficients are defined as b{sub 2} = 1.0cm{sup {minus}2} and a{sub 2} = 0 for the expression of the multipole field coefficients.

  4. SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) dipole coil production tooling

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, J.A.; Barczak, E.J.; Bossert, R.C.; Brandt, J.S.; Smith, G.A.

    1989-03-01

    Superconducting Super Collider dipole coils must be produced to high precision to ensure uniform prestress and even conductor distribution within the collared coil assembly. Tooling is being prepared at Fermilab for the production of high precision 1M and 16.6M SSC dipole coils suitable for mass production. The design and construction methods builds on the Tevatron tooling and production experience. Details of the design and construction methods and measured coil uniformity of 1M coils will be presented. 4 refs., 10 figs.

  5. The scaling of transport AC losses in Roebel cables with varying strand parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhenan; Staines, Mike; Long, Nicholas J.; Badcock, Rodney A.; Bumby, Chris; Talantsev, Evgeny; Hamilton, Kent; Buckley, Robert G.; Amemiya, Naoyuki

    2014-07-01

    A Roebel cable is a good candidate for low-voltage windings in a high-temperature superconductor (HTS) transformer because of its high current-carrying capability and low AC loss. Transport AC loss measurements were carried out in 1.8 m long 15/5 (fifteen 5 mm wide strands) and 15/4 Roebel cables. The results were compared with those in many Roebel cables composed of 2 mm wide Roebel strands. Comparison of the AC losses hinted that the intrinsic difference in normalized transport AC losses is due to differences in the g/w (ratio of the horizontal gap between the Roebel strands over the Roebel strand width) values. The intrinsic difference was confirmed by measuring transport AC loss in a series of horizontally arranged parallel conductor pairs with various g values. A method to scale transport AC losses in Roebel cables with varying strand parameters was developed. The scaling method will be useful for a rough assessment of AC loss in one-layer solenoid winding coils, such as in a HTS transformer.

  6. Magnetically Damped Furnace Bitter Magnet Coil 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, M. D.

    1997-01-01

    A magnet has been built by the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory for NASA on a cost reimbursement contract. The magnet is intended to demonstrate the technology and feasibility of building a magnet for space based crystal growth. A Bitter magnet (named after Francis Bitter, its inventor) was built consisting of four split coils electrically in series and hydraulically in parallel. The coils are housed in a steel vessel to reduce the fringe field and provide some on-axis field enhancement. The steel was nickel plated and Teflon coated to minimize interaction with the water cooling system. The magnet provides 0.14 T in a 184 mm bore with 3 kW of power.

  7. Common Coil Magnet System for VLHC

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.

    1999-02-12

    This paper introduces the common coil magnet system for the proposed very large hadron collider (VLHC). In this system, the high energy booster (HEB), the injector to VLHC, is integrated as the iron dominated low field aperture within the coldmass of the common coil magnet design introduced earlier. This 4-in-1 magnet concept for a 2-in-1 machine should provide a major cost reduction in building and operating VLHC. Moreover, the proposed design reduces the field quality problems associated with the large persistent currents in Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets. The paper also shows that the geometric field harmonics can be made small. In this preliminary magnetic design. the current dependence in harmonics is significant but not umnanageable.

  8. Choice of coils for a fusion reactor

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Romeo; Garabedian, Paul R.

    2007-01-01

    In a fusion reactor a hot plasma of deuterium and tritium is confined by a strong magnetic field to produce helium ions and release energetic neutrons. The 3D geometry of a stellarator provides configurations for such a device that reduce net toroidal current that might lead to disruptions. We construct smooth coils generating an external magnetic field designed to prevent the plasma from deteriorating. PMID:17640879

  9. Acute lung injury following refrigeration coil deicing.

    PubMed

    McKeown, Nathanael J; Burton, Brent T

    2012-03-01

    We report a case of a worker who developed ALI requiring mechanical ventilatory support after attempting to melt ice condensate by applying the flame of an oxy-acetylene torch to refrigeration coils charged with a halocarbon refrigerant in a closed environment. A discussion of possible etiologies are discussed, including phosgene, carbonyl fluoride, and nitrogen oxides. Primary prevention with adequate respiratory protection is recommended whenever deicing is performed in a closed space environment. PMID:22372791

  10. Choice of coils for a fusion reactor.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Romeo; Garabedian, Paul R

    2007-07-24

    In a fusion reactor a hot plasma of deuterium and tritium is confined by a strong magnetic field to produce helium ions and release energetic neutrons. The 3D geometry of a stellarator provides configurations for such a device that reduce net toroidal current that might lead to disruptions. We construct smooth coils generating an external magnetic field designed to prevent the plasma from deteriorating. PMID:17640879

  11. Stress relaxation in SSC 50mm dipole coils

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, D.; Markley, F.

    1992-04-01

    We are measuring the stress relaxation of SSC 50mm outer coils with the goal of predicting how much of the coil prestress will be lost while the coils are warehoused between manufacture and cooldown. We manufacture 3 inch (76.2mm) long segments of coil with the same materials and techniques that have been used for prototype coils. We are running four simultaneous tests in an attempt to separate the contributions of the different coil materials. Test one is a completely insulated coil section where the insulation is the all polyamide system being tested at Brookhaven; test two is a wire stack insulated only with the normal Kapton overwrap; test three is a stack of bare cable; and test four is a completely insulated normal coil section. All, except for the bare cable, include the ground insulation. The insulated coil sections are carefully dried before loading and testing in order to eliminate stress changes due to varying moisture content. The temperature dependence of the stress relaxation is being studied separately. Three companion papers presented at this conference will be: (1) Temperature dependence of the viscoelastic properties of SSC coil insulation'' (2) Measurement of the elastic modulus of Kapton perpendicular to the plane of the film at room and cryogenic temperatures'' (3) Theoretical methods for creep and stress relaxation studies of SSC coil.''

  12. Deep brain transcranial magnetic stimulation using variable "Halo coil" system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Y.; Hadimani, R. L.; Crowther, L. J.; Xu, Z.; Qu, J.; Jiles, D. C.

    2015-05-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation has the potential to treat various neurological disorders non-invasively and safely. The "Halo coil" configuration can stimulate deeper regions of the brain with lower surface to deep-brain field ratio compared to other coil configurations. The existing "Halo coil" configuration is fixed and is limited in varying the site of stimulation in the brain. We have developed a new system based on the current "Halo coil" design along with a graphical user interface system that enables the larger coil to rotate along the transverse plane. The new system can also enable vertical movement of larger coil. Thus, this adjustable "Halo coil" configuration can stimulate different regions of the brain by adjusting the position and orientation of the larger coil on the head. We have calculated magnetic and electric fields inside a MRI-derived heterogeneous head model for various positions and orientations of the coil. We have also investigated the mechanical and thermal stability of the adjustable "Halo coil" configuration for various positions and orientations of the coil to ensure safe operation of the system.

  13. Practical Feasibility and Packing Density of Endovascular Coiling Using Target® Nano™ Coils in Small Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hae Woong

    2015-01-01

    Objective Based on the use of Nano™ coils, we retrospectively compared the proportion of the coils (≤ 1.5 mm) and packing density in two patient groups with small cerebral aneurysms (< 4 mm diameter) who were treated with or without Nano™ coils. Materials and Methods Between January 2012 and November 2013, in 548 cerebral aneurysms treated by endovascular coiling, 143 patients with 148 small cerebral aneurysms underwent endovascular coiling. After March 2013, coiling with Nano™ coils was performed on 45 small cerebral aneurysms (30.4%). Results There were no significant differences in the size and locations of the cerebral aneurysms, the age of the patients, and the procedural modalities between the two groups. The proportion of the coil (≤ 1.5 mm) of the group treated with Nano™ coils (53.6%) was higher than the proportion of the coil (≤ 1.5 mm) of the group treated without Nano™ coils (14.7%) with statistical significance (p < 0.001). The packing density of the group treated with Nano™ coils (31.3 ± 9.69%) was higher than the packing density of the group treated without Nano™ coils (29.49 ± 7.84%), although the difference was not significant. Procedural complications developed in 3 lesions (2 thromboembolisms and 1 carotid dissection) (2.0%). Treatment-related transient neurological deficits due to thromboembolism developed in 1 lesion, which had not been treated with Nano™ coils. There was no treatment-related permanent morbidity or mortality in either of the groups. Conclusion In our series, the small cerebral aneurysms treated with Nano™ coils showed more packing density with no additive procedural risk or difficulty. PMID:27064999

  14. Endovascular coil trapping of a ruptured dissecting aneurysm of the vertebral artery using detachable coils and micro-tornado® coils.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myeong-Soo

    2013-06-01

    We experienced a patient with a ruptured dissecting aneurysm of the vertebral artery who was treated by trapping of the lesion using Guglielmi detachable coils (GDCs) with micro-tornado® coils (MTCs). An 80-year-old male was transferred with a ruptured left vertebral artery dissecting aneurysm (VADA). The dissected portion of the vertebral artery was effectively trapped using GDCs and MTCs. The MTCs used for neurointervention were comprised of various types of coils and we successfully placed them into the parent artery of the dissected segment. The author suggests that this case demonstrates the usefulness of endovascular coil trapping of VADAs using MTCs in achievement of embolization. PMID:23844353

  15. Endovascular Coil Trapping of a Ruptured Dissecting Aneurysm of the Vertebral Artery Using Detachable Coils and Micro-Tornado® Coils

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We experienced a patient with a ruptured dissecting aneurysm of the vertebral artery who was treated by trapping of the lesion using Guglielmi detachable coils (GDCs) with micro-tornado® coils (MTCs). An 80-year-old male was transferred with a ruptured left vertebral artery dissecting aneurysm (VADA). The dissected portion of the vertebral artery was effectively trapped using GDCs and MTCs. The MTCs used for neurointervention were comprised of various types of coils and we successfully placed them into the parent artery of the dissected segment. The author suggests that this case demonstrates the usefulness of endovascular coil trapping of VADAs using MTCs in achievement of embolization. PMID:23844353

  16. In situ calibration of rotating sensor coils for magnet testing

    SciTech Connect

    Arpaia, P.; Golluccio, G.; Buzio, M.; Walckiers, L.

    2012-01-15

    An in situ procedure for calibrating equivalent magnetic area and rotation radius of rotating coils is proposed for testing accelerator magnets shorter than the measuring coil. The procedure exploits measurements of magnetic field and mechanical displacement inside a reference quadrupole magnet. In a quadrupole field, an offset between the magnet and coil rotation axes gives rise to a dipole component in the field series expansion. The measurements of the focusing strength, the displacement, and the resulting dipole term allow the equivalent area and radius of the coil to be determined analytically. The procedure improves the accuracy of coils with large geometrical irregularities in the winding. This is essential for short magnets where the coil dimensions constrain the measurement accuracy. Experimental results on different coils measuring small-aperture permanent magnets are shown.

  17. Application & testing of high temperature materials for solenoid coils

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, R.O.; Archer, W.E.; Zich, J.L.

    1997-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has designed and proven-in two new Solenoid coils for a highly-reliable electromechanical switch. Mil-Spec Magnetics Inc., Walnut CA manufactured the coils. The new design utilizes two new materials: Liquid Crystal Polymer (Vectra C130) for the bobbin and Thermal Barrier Silicone (VI-SIL V-658) for the encapsulant. The use of these two new materials solved most of the manufacturing problems inherent in the old Sandia design. The coils are easier to precision wind and more robust for handling, testing, and storage. The coils have some unique weapon related safety requirements. The most severe of these requirements is the 400{degrees}C, 1600 V test. The coils must not, and did not, produce any outgassing products to affect the voltage breakdown between contacts in the switch at these temperatures and voltages. Actual coils in switches were tested under these conditions. This paper covers the prove-in of this new coil design.

  18. Carbon footprint of automotive ignition coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Huey-Ling; Chen, Chih-Ming; Sun, Chin-Huang; Lin, Hung-Di

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, environmental issues, such as climate change and global warming due to the excessive development of industry, have attracted increasing attention of citizens worldwide. It is known that CO2 accounts for the largest proportion of greenhouse gases. Therefore, how to reduce CO2 emissions during the life cycle of a product to lessen its impact on environment is an important topic in the industrial society. Furthermore, it is also of great significance to cut down the required energy so as to lower its production costs during the manufacturing process nowadays. This study presents the carbon footprint of an automotive ignition coil and its partial materials are defined to explore their carbon emissions and environmental impact. The model IPCC GWP100a calculates potential global greenhouse effect by converting them into CO2 equivalents. In this way, the overall carbon footprint of an ignition coil can be explored. By using IPCC GWP100a, the results display that the shell has the most carbon emissions. The results can help the industry reduce the carbon emissions of an ignition coil product.

  19. Throttle coil operation of TMX-U

    SciTech Connect

    Correll, D.L.; Byers, J.A.; Casper, T.A.

    1983-01-01

    A tandem-mirror configuration with an axisymmetric central cell, similar to the geometry of MARS (Mirror Advanced Reactor Study) or the Kelley-TDF mode of MFTB-B, can be generated by inserting a 6-tesla, throttle coil in each end of the TMX-U central cell. The throttle coil geometry of TMX-U will test the physics issues associated with axisymmetric tandem-mirror reactors, such issues as: (1) increased radial confinement time for central-cell ions confined by axisymmetric mirror cells and electrostatic potentials; (2) theoretical limits set by the trapped particle instability for the required passing density between the central cell and the end-cell anchor; and (3) pumping of trapped particles within the thermal barrier and transition regions with methods other than neutral beams. The central-cell plasma parameters for the throttle coil geometry are evaluated for two operating points. The first requires heating hardware (neutral beams and ECRH) and vacuum performance at the TMX-U proposal level, yielding plasma parameters, central-cell betas, and plasma confinement exceeding those of the original TMX-U proposal. The second operating point, requiring approximately half the ECRH end-cell performance of the first, is predicted to equal the beta and to exceed the plasma pressure and confinement time of the central cell in the standard TMX-U geometry.

  20. Mechanical resonances of helically coiled carbon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Saini, D; Behlow, H; Podila, R; Dickel, D; Pillai, B; Skove, M J; Serkiz, S M; Rao, A M

    2014-01-01

    Despite their wide spread applications, the mechanical behavior of helically coiled structures has evaded an accurate understanding at any length scale (nano to macro) mainly due to their geometrical complexity. The advent of helically coiled micro/nanoscale structures in nano-robotics, nano-inductors, and impact protection coatings has necessitated the development of new methodologies for determining their shear and tensile properties. Accordingly, we developed a synergistic protocol which (i) integrates analytical, numerical (i.e., finite element using COMSOL) and experimental (harmonic detection of resonance; HDR) methods to obtain an empirically validated closed form expression for the shear modulus and resonance frequency of a singly clamped helically coiled carbon nanowire (HCNW), and (ii) circumvents the need for solving 12th order differential equations. From the experimental standpoint, a visual detection of resonances (using in situ scanning electron microscopy) combined with HDR revealed intriguing non-planar resonance modes at much lower driving forces relative to those needed for linear carbon nanotube cantilevers. Interestingly, despite the presence of mechanical and geometrical nonlinearities in the HCNW resonance behavior the ratio of the first two transverse modes f₂/f₁ was found to be similar to the ratio predicted by the Euler-Bernoulli theorem for linear cantilevers. PMID:24986377

  1. Single coil bistable, bidirectional micromechanical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Tabat, Ned; Guckel, Henry

    1998-09-15

    Micromechanical actuators capable of bidirectional and bistable operation can be formed on substrates using lithographic processing techniques. Bistable operation of the microactuator is obtained using a single coil and a magnetic core with a gap. A plunger having two magnetic heads is supported for back and forth linear movement with respect to the gap in the magnetic core, and is spring biased to a neutral position in which the two heads are on each side of the gap in the core. The single electrical coil is coupled to the core and is provided with electrical current to attract one of the heads toward the core by reluctance action to drive the plunger to a limit of travel in one direction. The current is then cut off and the plunger returns by spring action toward the gap, whereafter the current is reapplied to the coil to attract the other head of the plunger by reluctance action to drive the plunger to its other limit of travel. This process can be repeated at a time when switching of the actuator is required.

  2. Coiling of elastic rods on rigid substrates.

    PubMed

    Jawed, Mohammad K; Da, Fang; Joo, Jungseock; Grinspun, Eitan; Reis, Pedro M

    2014-10-14

    We investigate the deployment of a thin elastic rod onto a rigid substrate and study the resulting coiling patterns. In our approach, we combine precision model experiments, scaling analyses, and computer simulations toward developing predictive understanding of the coiling process. Both cases of deposition onto static and moving substrates are considered. We construct phase diagrams for the possible coiling patterns and characterize them as a function of the geometric and material properties of the rod, as well as the height and relative speeds of deployment. The modes selected and their characteristic length scales are found to arise from a complex interplay between gravitational, bending, and twisting energies of the rod, coupled to the geometric nonlinearities intrinsic to the large deformations. We give particular emphasis to the first sinusoidal mode of instability, which we find to be consistent with a Hopf bifurcation, and analyze the meandering wavelength and amplitude. Throughout, we systematically vary natural curvature of the rod as a control parameter, which has a qualitative and quantitative effect on the pattern formation, above a critical value that we determine. The universality conferred by the prominent role of geometry in the deformation modes of the rod suggests using the gained understanding as design guidelines, in the original applications that motivated the study. PMID:25267649

  3. Coiling and Folding of Viscoelastic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majmudar, Trushant; Varagnat, Matthieu; McKinley, Gareth

    2007-11-01

    The study of fluid jets impacting on a flat surface has industrial applications in many areas, including processing of foods and consumer goods, bottle filling, and polymer melt processing. Previous studies have focused primarily on purely viscous, Newtonian fluids, which exhibit a number of different dynamical regimes including dripping, steady jetting, folding, and steady coiling. Here we add another dimension to the problem by focusing on mobile (low viscosity) viscoelastic fluids, with the study of two wormlike-micellar fluids, a cetylpyridinum-salicylic acid salt (CPyCl/NaSal) solution, and an industrially relevant shampoo base. We investigate the effects of viscosity and elasticity on the dynamics of axi-symmetric jets. The viscoelasticity of the fluids is systematically controlled by varying the concentration of salt counterions. Experimental methods include shear and extensional rheology measurements to characterize the fluids, and high-speed digital video imaging. In addition to the regimes observed in purely viscous systems, we also find a novel regime in which the elastic jet buckles and folds on itself, and alternates between coiling and folding behavior. We suggest phase diagrams and scaling laws for the coiling and folding frequencies through a systematic exploration of the experimental parameter space (height of fall, imposed flow rate, elasticity of the solution).

  4. Designing HTS coils for magnetic circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, R.G.; Jones, H.; Goodall, R.M.

    1996-07-01

    The authors discuss some of the main considerations involved in the design of HTS coils to operate in liquid nitrogen and provide ampere-turns for magnetic circuits in general, and then in particular for a small-scale electromagnetic (i.e, attractive) maglev demonstrator. The most important factor affecting design is the sensitive and strongly anisotropic dependence of HTS tape`s critical current on magnetic field. Any successful design must limit the field in the windings, especially components perpendicular to the tape`s surface (radial components in the case of solenoids), to acceptably low levels such that local critical currents nowhere fall below the operating current. This factor is relevant to the construction of HTS coils for all applications. A second important factor is that the presence of an iron magnetic circuit can greatly alter the flux distribution within the coils from that found when they are in free space. FE modelling has been used to calculate accurate field profiles in proposed designs for comparison with short sample I{sub c}(B) data. They present a design for a maglev demonstrator, illustrating how some of the problems, in particular the reduction of radial field components, may be addressed, and describe its predicted performance.

  5. Electrodynamic Maglev coil design and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Davey, K.R.

    1997-09-01

    Electrodynamic Maglev systems are distinguished from electromagnetic systems in that the currents yielding lift and guidance forces are induced by the movement of the vehicle. Above a threshold speed, such a system is inherently stable, and has the additional benefit of having greater flexibility to system construction tolerances in that the magnet vertical position can change by as much as 5 cm. A stacked magnet design is considered which couples into a set of interleave coils which are interconnected in such a way as to yield both lift and guidance forces. A mutual coupling analysis is embraced wherein the mutual inductance between the permanent magnets on board the vehicle and the coils are computed using closed form analytical expressions for filaments. The derivatives of these expressions are then averaged to compute both the induced current and the forces on the coils as a function of the system geometry and speed. A full transient analysis must be performed to accurately account for entry and exit effects. The results are compared to those experimentally measured on a test track and extrapolations are offered to suggest future design considerations.

  6. Coiling of elastic rods on rigid substrates

    PubMed Central

    Jawed, Mohammad K.; Da, Fang; Joo, Jungseock; Grinspun, Eitan; Reis, Pedro M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the deployment of a thin elastic rod onto a rigid substrate and study the resulting coiling patterns. In our approach, we combine precision model experiments, scaling analyses, and computer simulations toward developing predictive understanding of the coiling process. Both cases of deposition onto static and moving substrates are considered. We construct phase diagrams for the possible coiling patterns and characterize them as a function of the geometric and material properties of the rod, as well as the height and relative speeds of deployment. The modes selected and their characteristic length scales are found to arise from a complex interplay between gravitational, bending, and twisting energies of the rod, coupled to the geometric nonlinearities intrinsic to the large deformations. We give particular emphasis to the first sinusoidal mode of instability, which we find to be consistent with a Hopf bifurcation, and analyze the meandering wavelength and amplitude. Throughout, we systematically vary natural curvature of the rod as a control parameter, which has a qualitative and quantitative effect on the pattern formation, above a critical value that we determine. The universality conferred by the prominent role of geometry in the deformation modes of the rod suggests using the gained understanding as design guidelines, in the original applications that motivated the study. PMID:25267649

  7. Mechanical Resonances of Helically Coiled Carbon Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, D.; Behlow, H.; Podila, R.; Dickel, D.; Pillai, B.; Skove, M. J.; Serkiz, S. M.; Rao, A. M.

    2014-07-01

    Despite their wide spread applications, the mechanical behavior of helically coiled structures has evaded an accurate understanding at any length scale (nano to macro) mainly due to their geometrical complexity. The advent of helically coiled micro/nanoscale structures in nano-robotics, nano-inductors, and impact protection coatings has necessitated the development of new methodologies for determining their shear and tensile properties. Accordingly, we developed a synergistic protocol which (i) integrates analytical, numerical (i.e., finite element using COMSOL®) and experimental (harmonic detection of resonance; HDR) methods to obtain an empirically validated closed form expression for the shear modulus and resonance frequency of a singly clamped helically coiled carbon nanowire (HCNW), and (ii) circumvents the need for solving 12th order differential equations. From the experimental standpoint, a visual detection of resonances (using in situ scanning electron microscopy) combined with HDR revealed intriguing non-planar resonance modes at much lower driving forces relative to those needed for linear carbon nanotube cantilevers. Interestingly, despite the presence of mechanical and geometrical nonlinearities in the HCNW resonance behavior the ratio of the first two transverse modes f2/f1 was found to be similar to the ratio predicted by the Euler-Bernoulli theorem for linear cantilevers.

  8. Identification of /sup 233/Ac

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Y.Y.; Zhou, M.L.

    1983-09-01

    We report in this paper identification of the new isotope /sup 233/Ac. Uranium targets were irradiated with 28 GeV protons; after rapid retrieval of the target and separation of actinium from thorium, /sup 233/Ac was allowed to decay into the known /sup 233/Th daughter. Exhaustive chemical purification was employed to permit the identification of /sup 233/Th via its characteristic ..gamma.. radiations. The half-life derived for /sup 233/Ac from several experiments is 2.3 +- 0.3 min. The production cross section for /sup 233/Ac is 100 ..mu..b.

  9. AC resistance measuring instrument

    DOEpatents

    Hof, P.J.

    1983-10-04

    An auto-ranging AC resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an AC excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance. After the auto-ranging and auto-compensation functions are complete, the microprocessor calculates the resistance of the load from the selected range resistance, the excitation signal, and the load voltage signal, and displays of the measured resistance on a digital display of the instrument. 8 figs.

  10. AC Resistance measuring instrument

    DOEpatents

    Hof, Peter J.

    1983-01-01

    An auto-ranging AC resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an AC excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance. After the auto-ranging and auto-compensation functions are complete, the microprocessor calculates the resistance of the load from the selected range resistance, the excitation signal, and the load voltage signal, and displays of the measured resistance on a digital display of the instrument.

  11. Evidence of α-helical coiled coils and β-sheets in hornet silk.

    PubMed

    Kameda, Tsunenori; Nemoto, Takashi; Ogawa, Tetsuya; Tosaka, Masatoshi; Kurata, Hiroki; Schaper, Andreas K

    2014-03-01

    α-Helical coiled coil and β-sheet complexes are essential structural building elements of silk proteins produced by different species of the Hymenoptera. Beside X-ray scattering at wide and small angles we applied cryo-electron diffraction and microscopy to demonstrate the presence and the details of such structures in silk of the giant hornet Vespa mandarinia japonica. Our studies on the assembly of the fibrous silk proteins and their internal organization in relation to the primary chain structure suggest a 172 Å pitch supercoil consisting of four intertwined alanine-rich α-helical strands. The axial periodicity may adopt even multiples of the pitch value. Coiled coil motifs form the largest portion of the hornet silk structure and are aligned nearly parallel to the cocoon fiber axis in the same way as the membrane-like parts of the cocoon are molecularly orientated in the spinning direction. Supercoils were found to be associated with β-crystals, predominantly localized in the l-serine-rich chain sequences terminating each of the four predominant silk proteins. Such β-sheet blocks are considered resulting from transformation of random coil molecular sequences due to the action of elongational forces during the spinning process. PMID:24345346

  12. Experimental validation of an eddy current probe for defect detection in thick conducting specimen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahesh Raja, P.; Arunachalam, Kavitha; Balasubramanian, Krishnan

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents numerical modeling and experimental measurements of eddy current (EC) probe for detecting subsurface defects in 10 mm to 15 mm thick conducting specimen. Measurements are presented for a pancake air core coil to detect subsurface defect in 10 mm thick aluminum slab. EC coil parameters namely inner radius(r1), and outer radius(r2), and operating frequency (f) are optimized for deeper penetration in the conducting plate (35 MS/m) for a given coil height(h), and lift off distance (d). Preliminary simulation results are presented for a subsurface defect in 15 mm thick aluminium plate for the optimized EC coil parameters.

  13. Fuel cell crimp-resistant cooling device with internal coil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wittel, deceased, Charles F. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A cooling assembly for fuel cells having a simplified construction whereby coolant is efficiently circulated through a conduit arranged in serpentine fashion in a channel within a member of such assembly. The channel is adapted to cradle a flexible, chemically inert, conformable conduit capable of manipulation into a variety of cooling patterns without crimping or otherwise restricting of coolant flow. The conduit, when assembled with the member, conforms into intimate contact with the member for good thermal conductivity. The conduit is non-corrodible and can be constructed as a single, manifold-free, continuous coolant passage means having only one inlet and one outlet. The conduit has an internal coil means which enables it to be bent in small radii without crimping.

  14. Design and power conditioning for the coil-gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabar, Z.; Naot, Y.; Burenbaum, L.; Levi, E.; Joshi, P. N.

    This paper describes the power conditioning scheme for a contactless coilgun called the Linear Induction Launcher (LIL) as an open-loop integrated system. The barrel of the LIL consists of a linear array of coils carrying polyphase currents. These create an electromagnetic wave packet which moves with increasing velocity from breech to muzzle, smoothly accelerating a conductive sleeve which carries a set of azimuthal currents sinusoidally distributed along its length, and which encloses the projectile payload. The power conditioner provides high utilization of energy by transferring energy from capacitor to capacitor simultaneously with the projectile movement. A modular construction of the barrel is described together with laboratory results obtained with a breadboard model of the power conditioner circuit.

  15. Application of the Liquid Coil as an Embolic Material for Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Kurata, A.; Suzuki, S.; Ozawa, H.; Yuzawa, I.; Yamda, M.; Fujii, K.; Kan, S.; Kitahara, T.; Ohmomo, T.; Miyasaka, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Summary The purpose of this paper is to clarify advantages and disadvantages of platinum liquid coils as an embolic material for AVMs. During the last eight years, 50 endovascular procedures using liquid coils were conducted in our institute for 19 cases with AVMs, 15 of which were located in the eloquent area. All but one presented with haemorrhage, the exception demonstrating repeated ischemic symptoms. Only liquid coils were used as the embolic material to obliterate the nidus and feeders. In ten of the 15 patients with AVMs located in the eloquent area and one case rejecting surgery, liquid coil embolization was applied one to 11 times (average 3.5 times) to achieve decrease in size and this was then followed by radiosurgery. The remaining eight AVM patients underwent total removal after liquid coil embolization. No complications were encountered during the peri-embolization period. In all cases, the purpose of embolization was to diminish the size to facilitate radiosurgery and decrease bleeding during surgery. The liquid coil has advantages as a material for embolization of AVMs; it is non-toxic and bioinart material; it seldom occludes normal minute vascular channels; when it used in a nidus, it seldom to migrates in the venous direction, and it has good radio-opacity and offers good marking for surgery. Appropriate applications include preoperative embolization or pre-radiosurgical embolization of AVMs, especially when staged embolizations are performed to reduce risk of perfusion pressure breakthrough in patients which are large or located in the eloquent area. PMID:20584489

  16. Development of Radar Navigation and Radio Data Transmission for Microhole Coiled Tubing Bottom Hole Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Larry G. Stolarczyk; Gerald L. Stolarczyk; Larry Icerman; John Howard; Hooman Tehrani

    2007-03-25

    This Final Technical Report summarizes the research and development (R&D) work performed by Stolar Research Corporation (Stolar) under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Contract Number DE-FC26-04NT15477. This work involved the development of radar navigation and radio data transmission systems for integration with microhole coiled tubing bottom hole assemblies. Under this contract, Stolar designed, fabricated, and laboratory and field tested two advanced technologies of importance to the future growth of the U.S. oil and gas industry: (1) real-time measurement-while-drilling (MWD) for guidance and navigation of coiled tubing drilling in hydrocarbon reservoirs and (2) two-way inductive radio data transmission on coiled tubing for real-time, subsurface-to-surface data transmission. The operating specifications for these technologies are compatible with 3.5-inch boreholes drilled to a true vertical depth (TVD) of 5,000 feet, which is typical of coiled tubing drilling applications. These two technologies (i.e., the Stolar Data Transmission System and Drill String Radar) were developed into pre-commercial prototypes and tested successfully in simulated coiled tubing drilling conditions. Integration of these two technologies provides a real-time geosteering capability with extremely quick response times. Stolar is conducting additional work required to transition the Drill String Radar into a true commercial product. The results of this advanced development work should be an important step in the expanded commercialization of advanced coiled tubing microhole drilling equipment for use in U.S. hydrocarbon reservoirs.

  17. ac losses and field and current density distribution during a full cycle of a stack of superconducting tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Weijia; Campbell, A. M.; Coombs, T. A.

    2010-05-01

    Starting from an existing model by Clem et al., this paper has analyzed how the current density and magnetic field distribution of a stack of superconducting tapes with ac transport currents or applied fields will change in a full cycle. This paper assumes when the ac current or field starts to change in the other direction, a new penetrated region will begin to penetrate from the superconductor surface. If we assume Jc is constant in the critical region, this paper demonstrates that the Claassen formula (7) can be used to calculate the exact ac losses. If Jc depends on local Bz, we can use Eq. (9) to quickly predict the ac losses. This approach does not need to calculate a complete ac cycle. This saves considerably computation time while gives a result which is in close agreement with that calculated from a complete ac cycle. The calculation method can be applied for calculating a superconducting pancake coil if the coil radius is much larger than the tape width.

  18. Linear free-energy analysis of mercury(II) and cadmium(II) binding to three-stranded coiled coils.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debdip; Lee, Kyung-Hoon; Demeler, Borries; Pecoraro, Vincent L

    2005-08-01

    Investigators have studied how proteins enforce nonstandard geometries on metal centers to assess the question of how protein structures can define the coordination geometry and binding affinity of an active-site metal cofactor. We have shown that cysteine-substituted versions of the TRI peptide series [AcG-(LKALEEK)(4)G-NH(2)] bind Hg(II) and Cd(II) in geometries that are different from what is normally found with thiol ligands in aqueous solution. A fundamental question has been whether this structural perturbation is due to protein influence or a change in the metal geometry preference. To address this question, we have completed linear free-energy analyses that correlate the association of three-stranded coiled coils in the absence of a metal with the binding affinity of the peptides to the heavy metals, Hg(II) and Cd(II). In this paper, six new members of this family have been synthesized, replacing core leucine residues with smaller and less hydrophobic residues, consequently leading to varying degrees of self-association affinities. At the same time, studies with some smaller and longer sequenced peptides have also been examined. All of these peptides are seen to sequester Hg(II) and Cd(II) in an uncommon trigonal environment. For both metals, the binding is strong with micromolar dissociation constants. For binding of Hg(II) to the peptides, the dissociation constants range from 2.4 x 10(-)(5) M for Baby L12C to 2.5 x 10(-)(9) M for Grand L9C for binding of the third thiolate to a linear Hg(II)(pep)(2) species. The binding of Hg(II) to the peptide Grand L9C is similar in energetics for metal binding in the metalloregulatory protein, mercury responsive (merR), displaying approximately 50% trigonal Hg(II) formation at nanomolar metal concentrations. Approximately, 11 kcal/mol of the Hg(II)(Grand L9C)(3)(-) stability is due to peptide interactions, whereas only 1-4 kcal/mol stabilization results from Hg(II)(RS)(2) binding the third thiolate ligand. This

  19. Calculating transport AC losses in stacks of high temperature superconductor coated conductors with magnetic substrates using FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ainslie, Mark D.; Flack, Tim J.; Campbell, Archie M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the authors investigate the electromagnetic properties of stacks of high temperature superconductor (HTS) coated conductors with a particular focus on calculating the total transport AC loss. The cross-section of superconducting cables and coils is often modeled as a two-dimensional stack of coated conductors, and these stacks can be used to estimate the AC loss of a practical device. This paper uses a symmetric two dimensional (2D) finite element model based on the H formulation, and a detailed investigation into the effects of a magnetic substrate on the transport AC loss of a stack is presented. The number of coated conductors in each stack is varied from 1 to 150, and three types of substrate are compared: non-magnetic weakly magnetic and strongly magnetic. The non-magnetic substrate model is comparable with results from existing models for the limiting cases of a single tape (Norris) and an infinite stack (Clem). The presence of a magnetic substrate increases the total AC loss of the stack, due to an increased localized magnetic flux density, and the stronger the magnetic material, the further the flux penetrates into the stack overall. The AC loss is calculated for certain tapes within the stack, and the differences and similarities between the losses throughout the stack are explained using the magnetic flux penetration and current density distributions in those tapes. The ferromagnetic loss of the substrate itself is found to be negligible in most cases, except for small magnitudes of current. Applying these findings to practical applications, where AC transport current is involved, superconducting coils should be wound where possible using coated conductors with a non-magnetic substrate to reduce the total AC loss in the coil.

  20. Theoretical design of gradient coils with minimum power dissipation: accounting for the discretization of current density into coil windings.

    PubMed

    While, Peter T; Korvink, Jan G; Shah, N Jon; Poole, Michael S

    2013-10-01

    Gradient coil windings are typically constructed from either variable width copper tracks or fixed width wires. Excessive power dissipation within these windings during gradient coil operation limits the maximum drive current or duty cycle of the coil. It is common to design gradient coils in terms of a continuous minimum power current density and to perform a discretization to obtain the locations of the coil tracks or wires. However, the existence of finite gaps between these conductors and a maximum conductor width leads to an underestimation of coil resistance when calculated using the continuous current density. Put equivalently, the actual current density within the tracks or wires is higher than that used in the optimization and this departure results in suboptimal coil designs. In this work, a mapping to an effective current density is proposed to account for these effects and provide the correct contribution to the power dissipation. This enables the design of gradient coils that are genuinely optimal in terms of power minimization, post-discretization. The method was applied to the theoretical design of a variety of small x- and z-gradient coils for use in small animal imaging and coils for human head imaging. Computer-driven comparisons were made between coils designed with and without the current density mapping, in terms of simulated power dissipation. For coils to be built using variable width tracks, the method provides slight reductions in power dissipation in most cases and substantial gains only in cases where the minimum separation between track centre-lines is less than twice the gap size. However, for coils to be built using fixed width wires, very considerable reductions in dissipated power are consistently attainable (up to 60%) when compared to standard approaches of coil optimization. PMID:23994605