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Sample records for ac conductivity measurements

  1. Interlayer thermal conductivity of rubrene measured by ac-calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Brill, J. W.

    2013-07-01

    We have measured the interlayer thermal conductivity of crystals of the organic semiconductor rubrene, using ac-calorimetry. Since ac-calorimetry is most commonly used for measurements of the heat capacity, we include a discussion of its extension for measurements of the transverse thermal conductivity of thin crystals of poor thermal conductors, including the limitations of the technique. For rubrene, we find that the interlayer thermal conductivity, ≈0.7 mW/cm . K, is several times smaller than the (previously measured) in-layer value, but its temperature dependence indicates that the interlayer mean free path is at least a few layers.

  2. AC-Conductivity Measure from Heat Production of Free Fermions in Disordered Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bru, J.-B.; de Siqueira Pedra, W.; Hertling, C.

    2016-05-01

    We extend (Bru et al. in J Math Phys 56:051901-1-51, 2015) in order to study the linear response of free fermions on the lattice within a (independently and identically distributed) random potential to a macroscopic electric field that is time- and space-dependent. We obtain the notion of a macroscopic AC-conductivity measure which only results from the second principle of thermodynamics. The latter corresponds here to the positivity of the heat production for cyclic processes on equilibrium states. Its Fourier transform is a continuous bounded function which is naturally called (macroscopic) conductivity. We additionally derive Green-Kubo relations involving time-correlations of bosonic fields coming from current fluctuations in the system. This is reminiscent of non-commutative central limit theorems.

  3. Ion-pair formation in aqueous strontium chloride and strontium hydroxide solutions under hydrothermal conditions by AC conductivity measurements.

    PubMed

    Arcis, H; Zimmerman, G H; Tremaine, P R

    2014-09-01

    Frequency-dependent electrical conductivities of solutions of aqueous strontium hydroxide and strontium chloride have been measured from T = 295 K to T = 625 K at p = 20 MPa, over a very wide range of ionic strength (3 × 10(-5) to 0.2 mol kg(-1)), using a high-precision flow AC conductivity instrument. Experimental values for the concentration-dependent equivalent conductivity, Λ, of the two electrolytes were fitted with the Turq-Blum-Bernard-Kunz ("TBBK") ionic conductivity model, to determine ionic association constants, K(A,m). The TBBK fits yielded statistically significant formation constants for the species SrOH(+) and SrCl(+) at all temperatures, and for Sr(OH)2(0) and SrCl2(0) at temperatures above 446 K. The first and second stepwise association constants for the ion pairs followed the order K(A1)(SrOH(+)) > K(A1)(SrCl(+)) > K(A2)[Sr(OH)2(0)] > K(A2)[SrCl2(0)], consistent with long-range solvent polarization effects associated with the lower static dielectric constant and high compressibility of water at elevated temperatures. The stepwise association constants to form SrCl(+) agree with previously reported values for CaCl(+) to within the combined experimental error at high temperatures and, at temperatures below ∼375 K, the values of log10 KA1 for strontium are lower than those for calcium by up to ∼0.3-0.4 units. The association constants for the species SrOH(+) and Sr(OH)2(0) are the first accurate values to be reported for hydroxide ion pairs with any divalent cation under these conditions.

  4. A single-shot spatial chirp method for measuring initial AC conductivity evolution of femtosecond laser pulse excited warm dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z.; Hering, P.; Brown, S. B.; Curry, C.; Tsui, Y. Y.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-11-01

    To study the rapid evolution of AC conductivity from ultrafast laser excited warm dense matter (WDM), a spatial chirp single-shot method is developed utilizing a crossing angle pump-probe configuration. The pump beam is shaped individually in two spatial dimensions so that it can provide both sufficient laser intensity to excite the material to warm dense matter state and a uniform time window of up to 1 ps with sub-100 fs FWHM temporal resolution. Temporal evolution of AC conductivity in laser excited warm dense gold was also measured.

  5. AC resistance measuring instrument

    DOEpatents

    Hof, P.J.

    1983-10-04

    An auto-ranging AC resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an AC excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance. After the auto-ranging and auto-compensation functions are complete, the microprocessor calculates the resistance of the load from the selected range resistance, the excitation signal, and the load voltage signal, and displays of the measured resistance on a digital display of the instrument. 8 figs.

  6. AC Resistance measuring instrument

    DOEpatents

    Hof, Peter J.

    1983-01-01

    An auto-ranging AC resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an AC excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance. After the auto-ranging and auto-compensation functions are complete, the microprocessor calculates the resistance of the load from the selected range resistance, the excitation signal, and the load voltage signal, and displays of the measured resistance on a digital display of the instrument.

  7. AC-conductance and capacitance measurements for ethanol vapor detection using carbon nanotube-polyvinyl alcohol composite based devices.

    PubMed

    Greenshields, Márcia W C C; Meruvia, Michelle S; Hümmelgen, Ivo A; Coville, Neil J; Mhlanga, Sabelo D; Ceragioli, Helder J; Quispe, Jose C Rojas; Baranauskas, Vitor

    2011-03-01

    We report the preparation of inexpensive ethanol sensor devices using multiwalled carbon nanotube-polyvinyl alcohol composite films deposited onto interdigitated electrodes patterned on phenolite substrates. We investigate the frequency dependent response of the device conductance and capacitance showing that higher sensitivity is obtained at higher frequency if the conductance is used as sensing parameter. In the case of capacitance measurements, higher sensitivity is obtained at low frequency. Ethanol detection at a concentration of 300 ppm in air is demonstrated. More than 80% of the sensor conductance and capacitance variation response occurs in less than 20 s.

  8. Impedance, AC conductivity and dielectric behavior Adeninium Trichloromercurate (II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fersi, M. Amine; Chaabane, I.; Gargouri, M.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we report the measurements impedance spectroscopy technique for the organic-inorganic hybrid compound (C5H6N5) HgCl3, 11/2H2O measured in the 209 Hz-5 MHz frequency range from 378 to 428 K. Besides, the Cole-Cole (Z″ versus Z‧) plots were well fitted to an equivalent circuit built up by a parallel combination of resistance (R), fractal capacitance (CPE) and capacitance (C). Furthermore, the AC conductivity was investigated as a function of temperature and frequency in the same range. The experiment results indicated that AC conductivityac) was proportional to σdc + A ωS . The obtained results are discussed in terms of the correlated barrier hopping (CBH) model. An agreement between the experimental and theoretical results suggests that the AC conductivity behavior of Adeninium Trichloromercurate (II) can be successfully explained by CBH model. The contribution of single polaron hopping to AC conductivity in a present alloy was also studied.

  9. AC Conductivity and Dielectric Properties of Borotellurite Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, T. A.; Azab, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    Borotellurite glasses with formula 60B2O3-10ZnO-(30 - x)NaF- xTeO2 ( x = 0 mol.%, 5 mol.%, 10 mol.%, and 15 mol.%) have been synthesized by thermal melting. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed that the glasses were amorphous. The glass density ( ρ) was determined by the Archimedes method at room temperature. The density ( ρ) and molar volume ( V m) were found to increase with increasing TeO2 content. The direct-current (DC) conductivity was measured in the temperature range from 473 K to 623 K, in which the electrical activation energy of ionic conduction increased from 0.27 eV to 0.48 eV with increasing TeO2 content from 0 mol.% to 15 mol.%. The dielectric parameters and alternating-current (AC) conductivity ( σ ac) were investigated in the frequency range from 1 kHz to 1 MHz and temperature range from 300 K to 633 K. The AC conductivity and dielectric constant decreased with increasing TeO2 content from 0 mol.% to 15 mol.%.

  10. AC Conductivity and Dielectric Properties of Borotellurite Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, T. A.; Azab, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    Borotellurite glasses with formula 60B2O3-10ZnO-(30 - x)NaF-xTeO2 (x = 0 mol.%, 5 mol.%, 10 mol.%, and 15 mol.%) have been synthesized by thermal melting. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed that the glasses were amorphous. The glass density (ρ) was determined by the Archimedes method at room temperature. The density (ρ) and molar volume (V m) were found to increase with increasing TeO2 content. The direct-current (DC) conductivity was measured in the temperature range from 473 K to 623 K, in which the electrical activation energy of ionic conduction increased from 0.27 eV to 0.48 eV with increasing TeO2 content from 0 mol.% to 15 mol.%. The dielectric parameters and alternating-current (AC) conductivityac) were investigated in the frequency range from 1 kHz to 1 MHz and temperature range from 300 K to 633 K. The AC conductivity and dielectric constant decreased with increasing TeO2 content from 0 mol.% to 15 mol.%.

  11. AC conductivity of a niobium thin film in a swept magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Tsindlekht, M I; Genkin, V M; Gazi, S; Chromik, S

    2013-02-27

    We report results of measurements of the ac conductivity of a Nb superconducting thin film in a swept dc magnetic field. In the mixed state the swept dc field creates vortices at the film surface which pass through the film and form the observed ac conductivity. Vortex rate generation does not depend on the value of the dc field and there is a large plateau-like region of dc magnetic fields where the dissipation is approximately constant. A proposed phenomenological model describes quite well the main features of the ac response in these fields, including its dependency on the sweep rate, ac amplitude, frequency, and value of the second and third harmonics.

  12. AC Conductivity Studies of Lithium Based Phospho Vanadate Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagendra, K.; Babu, G. Satish; Reddy, C. Narayana; Gowda, Veeranna

    2011-07-01

    Glasses in the system xLi2SO4-20Li2O-(80-x) [80P2O5-20V2O5] (5⩾x⩾20 mol%) has been prepared by melt quenching method. Dc and ac conductivity has been studied over a wide range of frequency (10 Hz to 10 MHz) and temperature (298 K-523 K). The dc conductivity found to increase with increase of Li2SO4 concentration. The ac conductivities have been fitted to the Almond-West type single power law equation σ(ω) = σ(0)+Aωs where `s' is the power law exponent. The ac conductivity found to increase with increase of Li2SO4 concentration. An attempt is made to elucidate the enhancement of lithium ion conduction in phosphor-vanadate glasses by considering the expansion of network structure.

  13. Tevatron optics measurements using an AC dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.; Kopp, S.E.; Jansson, A.; Syphers, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The AC dipole is a device to study beam optics of hadron synchrotrons. It can produce sustained large amplitude oscillations with virtually no emittance growth. A vertical AC dipole for the Tevatron is recently implemented and a maximum oscillation amplitude of 2{sigma} (4{sigma}) at 980 GeV (150 GeV) is achieved [1]. When such large oscillations are measured with the BPM system of the Tevatron (20 {micro}m resolution), not only linear but even nonlinear optics can be directly measured. This paper shows how to measure {beta} function using an AC dipole and the result is compared to the other measurement. The paper also shows a test to detect optics changes when small changes are made in the Tevatron. Since an AC dipole is nondestructive, it allows frequent measurements of the optics which is necessary for such an test.

  14. Structural and AC conductivity study of CdTe nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sayantani; Banerjee, Sourish; Sinha, T. P.

    2016-04-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) nanomaterials have been synthesized by soft chemical route using mercapto ethanol as a capping agent. Crystallization temperature of the sample is investigated using differential scanning calorimeter. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope measurements show that the prepared sample belongs to cubic structure with the average particle size of 20 nm. Impedance spectroscopy is applied to investigate the dielectric relaxation of the sample in a temperature range from 313 to 593 K and in a frequency range from 42 Hz to 1.1 MHz. The complex impedance plane plot has been analyzed by an equivalent circuit consisting of two serially connected R-CPE units, each containing a resistance (R) and a constant phase element (CPE). Dielectric relaxation peaks are observed in the imaginary parts of the spectra. The frequency dependence of real and imaginary parts of dielectric permittivity is analyzed using modified Cole-Cole equation. The temperature dependence relaxation time is found to obey the Arrhenius law having activation energy ~0.704 eV. The frequency dependent conductivity spectra are found to follow the power law. The frequency dependence ac conductivity is analyzed by power law.

  15. AC Conductivity Studies of Lithium Based Phospho Vanadate Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Nagendra, K.; Babu, G. Satish; Gowda, Veeranna; Reddy, C. Narayana

    2011-07-15

    Glasses in the system xLi{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-20Li{sub 2}O-(80-x) [80P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-20V{sub 2}O{sub 5}](5{>=}x{>=}20 mol%) has been prepared by melt quenching method. Dc and ac conductivity has been studied over a wide range of frequency (10 Hz to 10 MHz) and temperature (298 K-523 K). The dc conductivity found to increase with increase of Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} concentration. The ac conductivities have been fitted to the Almond-West type single power law equation {sigma}({omega}) = {sigma}(0)+A{omega}{sup s} where 's' is the power law exponent. The ac conductivity found to increase with increase of Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} concentration. An attempt is made to elucidate the enhancement of lithium ion conduction in phosphor-vanadate glasses by considering the expansion of network structure.

  16. Pairing fluctuation ac conductivity of disordered thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petković, Aleksandra; Vinokur, Valerii M.

    2013-09-01

    We study temperature T and frequency ω dependence of the in-plane fluctuation conductivity of a disordered superconducting film above the critical temperature. Our calculation is based on the nonlinear sigma model within the Keldysh technique. The fluctuation contributions of different physical origin are found and analyzed in a wide frequency range. In the low-frequency range, ω ≪ T, we reproduce the known leading terms and find additional subleading ones in the Aslamazov-Larkin and the Maki-Thompson contributions to the ac conductivity. We also calculate the density of states ac correction. In the dc case these contributions logarithmically depend on the Ginzburg-Landau rate and are considerably smaller that the leading ones. However, in the ac case an external finite-frequency electromagnetic field strongly suppresses the known Aslamazov-Larkin and Maki-Thompson ac contributions, while the corresponding new terms and the density of states contribution are weakly suppressed and therefore become relevant at finite frequencies.

  17. Broadband AC Conductivity of XUV Excited Warm Dense Gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z.; Tsui, Y.; Toleikis, S.; Hering, P.; Brown, S.; Curry, C.; Tanikawa, T.; Hoeppner, H.; Levy, M.; Goede, S.; Ziaja-Motyka, B.; Rethfeld, B.; Recoules, Vanina; Ng, A.; Glenzer, S.

    2015-11-01

    The properties of ultrafast laser excited warm dense gold have been extensively studied in the past decade. In those studies, a 400nm ultrashort laser pulse was used to excite the 5 d electrons in gold to 6s/p state. Here we will present our recent study of warm dense gold with 245eV, 70fs pulses to selectively excite 4 f electrons using the XUV-FEL at FLASH. The AC conductivity of the warm dense gold was measured at different wavelengths (485nm, 520nm, 585nm, 640nm and 720nm) to cover the range from 5 d-6 s / p interband transitions to 6 s/ p intraband transitions. Preliminary result suggests that the onset of 5 d-6 s / p band transition shifts from 2.3eV to ~ 2eV, which is in agreement with the study of 400nm laser pulse excited warm dense gold. More detailed analysis of our data will also be presented.

  18. Dielectric relaxation analysis and Ac conductivity of polyvinyl alcohol/polyacrylonitrile film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Baset, T. A.; Hassen, A.

    2016-10-01

    A film of 0.98 polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/0.02 Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) has been prepared using casting method. The dielectric properties were measured as function of temperature and frequency. The dielectric permittivity of PVA is considerably enhanced by doping with PAN. Different relaxation processes have been recognized within the studied ranges of temperature and frequency. The frequency temperature superposition (FTS) is well verified. Frequency and temperature dependence of Ac conductivity, σac, were studied. The conduction mechanism of pure PVA and PVA doped with PAN are discussed. The activation energy either for relaxation or conduction was calculated. Comparison with similar polymeric materials is discussed.

  19. Structural, AC conductivity and dielectric properties of Sr-La hexaferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A.; Narang, S. B.; Singh, K.; Sharma, P.; Pandey, O. P.

    2006-03-01

    A series of M-type hexaferrite samples with composition Sr{1-x}La{x}Fe{12}O{19} (x = 0.00, 0.05, 0.15 and 0.25) were prepared by standard ceramic technique. AC electrical conductivity measurements were carried out at different frequencies (20 Hz 1 MHz) and at different temperatures. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss tangent were measured in the same range of frequencies. The experimental results indicate that AC electrical conductivity increases on increasing the frequency as well as the temperature, indicating magnetic semiconductor behavior of the samples. The increase in AC electrical conductivity with frequency and temperature has been explained on the basis of Koops Model whereas dielectric constant and dielectric loss tangent has been explained with the Maxwell Wagner type interfacial polarization in agreement with the Koops phenomenological theory.

  20. AC Loss Measurements on a 2G YBCO Coil

    SciTech Connect

    Rey, Christopher M; Duckworth, Robert C; Schwenterly, S W

    2011-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is collaborating with Waukesha Electric Systems (WES) to continue development of HTS power transformers. For compatibility with the existing power grid, a commercially viable HTS transformer will have to operate at high voltages in the range of 138 kV and above, and will have to withstand 550-kV impulse voltages as well. Second-generation (2G) YBCO coated conductors will be required for an economically-competitive design. In order to adequately size the refrigeration system for these transformers, the ac loss of these HTS coils must be characterized. Electrical AC loss measurements were conducted on a prototype high voltage (HV) coil with co-wound stainless steel at 60 Hz in a liquid nitrogen bath using a lock-in amplifier technique. The prototype HV coil consisted of 26 continuous (without splice) single pancake coils concentrically centered on a stainless steel former. For ac loss measurement purposes, voltage tap pairs were soldered across each set of two single pancake coils so that a total of 13 separate voltage measurements could be made across the entire length of the coil. AC loss measurements were taken as a function of ac excitation current. Results show that the loss is primarily concentrated at the ends of the coil where the operating fraction of critical current is the highest and show a distinct difference in current scaling of the losses between low current and high current regimes.

  1. AC Conductivity and Dielectric Relaxation Behavior of Sb2S3 Bulk Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El-Rahman, K. F.; Darwish, A. A. A.; Qashou, Saleem I.; Hanafy, T. A.

    2016-07-01

    The Sb2S3 bulk material was used for next-generation anode for lithium-ion batteries. Alternative current (AC) conductivity, dielectric properties and electric modulus of Sb2S3 have been investigated. The measurements were carried out in the frequency range from 40 Hz to 5 MHz and temperature range from 293 K to 453 K. The direct current (DC) conductivity, σ DC, shows an activated behavior and the calculated activation energy is 0.50 eV. The AC conductivity, σ AC, was found to increase with the increase of temperature and frequency. The conduction mechanism of σ AC was controlled by the correlated barrier hopping model. The behavior of the dielectric constant, ɛ', and dielectric loss index, ɛ'', reveal that the polarization process of Sb2S3 is dipolar in nature. The behavior of both ɛ' and ɛ'' reveals that bulk Sb2S3 has no ferroelectric or piezoelectric phase transition. The dielectric modulus, M, gives a simple method for evaluating the activation energy of the dielectric relaxation. The calculated activation energy from M is 0.045 eV.

  2. ac and dc percolative conductivity of magnetite-cellulose acetate composites

    SciTech Connect

    Chiteme, C.; McLachlan, D. S.; Sauti, G.

    2007-03-01

    ac and dc conductivity results for a percolating system, which consists of a conducting powder (magnetite) combined with an 'insulating' powder (cellulose acetate), are presented. Impedance and modulus spectra are obtained in a percolation system. The temperature dependence of the resistivity of the cellulose acetate is such that at 170 deg. C, it is essentially a conductor at frequencies below 0.059{+-}0.002 Hz, and a dielectric above. The percolation parameters, from the dc conductivity measured at 25 and 170 deg. C, are determined and discussed in relation to the ac results. The experimental results scale as a function of composition, temperature, and frequency. An interesting result is the correlation observed between the scaling parameter (f{sub ce}), obtained from a scaling of the ac measurements, and the peak frequency (f{sub cp}) of the arcs, obtained from impedance spectra, above the critical volume fraction. Scaling at 170 deg. C is not as good as at 25 deg. C, probably indicating a breakdown in scaling at the higher temperature. The modulus plots show the presence of two materials: a conducting phase dominated by the cellulose acetate and the isolated conducting clusters below the critical volume fraction {phi}{sub c}, as well as the interconnected conducting clusters above {phi}{sub c}. These results are confirmed by computer simulations using the two exponent phenomenological percolation equation. These results emphasize the need to analyze ac conductivity results in terms of both impedance and modulus spectra in order to get more insight into the behavior of composite materials.

  3. Calibration-free electrical conductivity measurements for highly conductive slags

    SciTech Connect

    MACDONALD,CHRISTOPHER J.; GAO,HUANG; PAL,UDAY B.; VAN DEN AVYLE,JAMES A.; MELGAARD,DAVID K.

    2000-05-01

    This research involves the measurement of the electrical conductivity (K) for the ESR (electroslag remelting) slag (60 wt.% CaF{sub 2} - 20 wt.% CaO - 20 wt.% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) used in the decontamination of radioactive stainless steel. The electrical conductivity is measured with an improved high-accuracy-height-differential technique that requires no calibration. This method consists of making continuous AC impedance measurements over several successive depth increments of the coaxial cylindrical electrodes in the ESR slag. The electrical conductivity is then calculated from the slope of the plot of inverse impedance versus the depth of the electrodes in the slag. The improvements on the existing technique include an increased electrochemical cell geometry and the capability of measuring high precision depth increments and the associated impedances. These improvements allow this technique to be used for measuring the electrical conductivity of highly conductive slags such as the ESR slag. The volatilization rate and the volatile species of the ESR slag measured through thermogravimetric (TG) and mass spectroscopy analysis, respectively, reveal that the ESR slag composition essentially remains the same throughout the electrical conductivity experiments.

  4. RG flow of AC conductivity in soft wall model of QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, Neha; Siwach, Sanjay

    2016-03-01

    We study the Renormalization Group (RG) flow of AC conductivity in soft wall model of holographic QCD. We consider the charged black hole metric and the explicit form of AC conductivity is obtained at the cutoff surface. We plot the numerical solution of conductivity flow as a function of radial coordinate. The equation of gauge field is also considered and the numerical solution is obtained for AC conductivity as a function of frequency. The results for AC conductivity are also obtained for different values of chemical potential and Gauss-Bonnet couplings.

  5. Measuring Salinity by Conductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapworth, C. J.

    1981-01-01

    Outlines procedures for constructing an instrument which uses an electrode and calibration methods to measure the salinity of waters in environments close to and affected by a saline estuary. (Author/DC)

  6. Influence of temperature on AC conductivity of nanocrystalline CuAlO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, T.

    2012-07-01

    Nanocrystalline CuAlO2 was synthesized by mechanical alloying of Cu2O and α-Al2O3 powders in the molar ratio of 1:1 for 20 h in toluene medium with tungsten carbide balls and vials using planetary ball mill. The ball milling was carried out at 300 rpm with a ball to powder weight ratio of 10:1 and then annealed at 1373 K in a platinum crucible for 20 h to get CuAlO2 phase with average crystallite size 45 nm. Complex impedance spectroscopic measurement in the frequency region 1 Hz to 10 MHz between the temperatures 333 to 473 K was carried out for nanocrystalline CuAlO2 sample. The obtained complex impedance data was analyzed for AC conductivities, DC and AC conductivities correlations and crossover frequencies ( f co ). The BNN (Barton, Nakajima and Namikawa) relation was applied to understand the correlation between DC and AC conductivities. The observed experimental results were discussed in the paper.

  7. Random free energy barrier hopping model for ac conduction in chalcogenide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murti, Ram; Tripathi, S. K.; Goyal, Navdeep; Prakash, Satya

    2016-03-01

    The random free energy barrier hopping model is proposed to explain the ac conductivityac) of chalcogenide glasses. The Coulomb correlation is consistently accounted for in the polarizability and defect distribution functions and the relaxation time is augmented to include the overlapping of hopping particle wave functions. It is observed that ac and dc conduction in chalcogenides are due to same mechanism and Meyer-Neldel (MN) rule is the consequence of temperature dependence of hopping barriers. The exponential parameter s is calculated and it is found that s is subjected to sample preparation and measurement conditions and its value can be less than or greater than one. The calculated results for a - Se, As2S3, As2Se3 and As2Te3 are found in close agreement with the experimental data. The bipolaron and single polaron hopping contributions dominates at lower and higher temperatures respectively and in addition to high energy optical phonons, low energy optical and high energy acoustic phonons also contribute to the hopping process. The variations of hopping distance with temperature is also studied. The estimated defect number density and static barrier heights are compared with other existing calculations.

  8. Polaron conductivity mechanism in potassium acid phthalate crystal: AC-conductivity investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipič, Cene; Levstik, Iva; Levstik, Adrijan; Hadži, Dušan

    2016-08-01

    The complex dielectric constant, \\varepsilon *(ν ,T), of potassium acid phthalate monocrystal (KAP) was investigated over the broad frequency and temperature range. While the imaginary part of dielectric constant ε‧‧(ν) increases rapidly with increasing temperature in the studied temperature range, the real part of dielectric constant ε‧(ν) increases only at high temperatures; there is almost no change of ε‧(ν) below 200 K. Both values of ε‧ and ε‧‧ are frequency dependent; the values increase with decreasing frequencies. At temperatures below 450 K the ac electrical conductivity and dielectric constant follow simultaneously the universal dielectric response (UDR). The analysis of the temperature dependence of the UDR parameter s in terms of the theoretical model for small polarons revealed that this mechanism governs the charge transport in KAP crystal in the studied temperature range.

  9. AC conductivity and Dielectric Study of Chalcogenide Glasses of Se-Te-Ge System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, Fathy

    2004-01-01

    The ac conductivity and dielectric properties of glassy system SexTe79 - xGe21, with x = 11, 14, 17 at.%, has been studied at temperatures 300 to 450 K and over a wide range of frequencies (50 Hz to 500 kHz). Experimental results indicate that the ac conductivity and the dielectric constants depend on temperature, frequency and Se content. The conductivity as a function of frequency exhibited two components: dc conductivity s dc, and ac conductivity s ac, where s ac ˜ w s. The mechanism of ac conductivity can be reasonably interpreted in terms of the correlated barrier hopping model (CBH). The activation energies are estimated and discussed. The dependence of ac conductivity and dielectric constants on the Se content x can be interpreted as the effect of Se fraction on the positional disorder. The impedance plot at each temperature appeared as a semicircle passes through the origin. Each semicircle is represented by an equivalent circuit of parallel resistance Rb and capacitance Cb.

  10. Measurement of coupling resonance driving terms with the AC dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.

    2010-10-01

    Resonance driving terms for linear coupled betatron motion in a synchrotron ring can be determined from corresponding spectral lines of an excited coherent beam motion. An AC dipole is one of instruments to excite such a motion. When a coherent motion is excited with an AC dipole, measured Courant-Snyder parameters and betatron phase advance have apparent modulations, as if there is an additional quadrupole field at the location of the AC dipole. Hence, measurements of these parameters using the AC dipole require a proper interpretation of observed quantities. The situation is similar in measurements of resonance driving terms using the AC dipole. In this note, we derive an expression of coupled betatron motion excited with two AC dipoles in presence of skew quadrupole fields, discuss an impact of this quadrupole like effect of the AC dipole on a measurement of coupling resonance driving terms, and present an analytical method to determine the coupling resonance driving terms from quantities observed using the AC dipole.

  11. Characteristics of ac capillary discharge produced in electrically conductive water solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBaerdemaeker, F.; Simek, M.; Schmidt, J.; Leys, C.

    2007-05-01

    Basic electrical, optical and calorimetric characteristics of an ac (50 Hz) driven capillary discharge produced in a water solution were studied for initial water solution conductivity in the range 50-1000 µS cm-1. Typical current and voltage waveforms and emission intensities produced by several electronically excited species were recorded with high time resolution. The evolution of the electrical current, power and capillary resistance was inspected during positive ac half-cycle for various operational regimes. A fast relaxation of the discharge following a breakdown event was observed. Optical measurements indicate that radiative species are mostly generated during the first few hundreds of nanoseconds of plasma generation and that the average duration of plasma emission induced by a discharge pulse is of the order of a few microseconds. Results of calorimetric measurements are in good agreement with average electrical measurements and support the assumption that the discharge is a constant source of heat delivered to the liquid. Assuming that only a fraction of the heat released inside the capillary can be transported by conduction through the capillary wall and via its orifices, the processes of bubble formation, expulsion and re-filling the capillary with 'fresh' water must play a key role in maintaining a thermal balance during long-time steady-state operation of the device. Furthermore, a simplified numerical model and a first order energy deposition calculation prove the plausibility of the bubble breakdown mechanism.

  12. Temperature characterization of dielectric permittivity and AC conductivity of nano copper oxide-doped polyaniline composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubha, L. N.; Madhusudana Rao, P.

    2016-06-01

    The polyaniline/copper oxide (PANI/CuO) nanocomposite was prepared by mixing solutions of polyaniline and copper oxide nanoparticles in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The synthesized polymer nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and UV-visible spectroscopy. The characteristic peaks in XRD and UV-visible spectra confirmed the presence of CuO in the polymer structure. SEM images indicated morphological changes in the composite matrix as compared to the pristine PANI. The DC conductivity measurements were performed using two-probe method for various temperatures. AC conductivity and dielectric response of the composites were investigated in the frequency range of 102-106Hz using LCR meter. Dielectric permittivity ɛ‧(w) and dielectric loss factor ɛ‧‧(w) were investigated. It was observed that ɛ‧(w) and ɛ‧‧(w) decrease with increase in frequency at all temperatures. At a particular frequency it is observed that both ɛ‧(w) and ɛ‧‧(w) increase with increase in temperature. It was also observed that AC conductivity increased with increase in frequency and temperature.

  13. Temperature correction in conductivity measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Stanford H.

    1962-01-01

    Electrical conductivity has been widely used in freshwater research but usual methods employed by limnologists for converting measurements to conductance at a given temperature have not given uniformly accurate results. The temperature coefficient used to adjust conductivity of natural waters to a given temperature varies depending on the kinds and concentrations of electrolytes, the temperature at the time of measurement, and the temperature to which measurements are being adjusted. The temperature coefficient was found to differ for various lake and stream waters, and showed seasonal changes. High precision can be obtained only by determining temperature coefficients for each water studied. Mean temperature coefficients are given for various temperature ranges that may be used where less precision is required.

  14. A Comparative Study on AC Conductivity and Dielectric Behavior of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes and Polyaniline Coated Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Filled High Density Polyethylene-Carbon Black Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Dinesh, P.; Renukappa, N. M.; Siddaramaiah; Lee, J. H.; Jeevananda, T.

    2010-10-04

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on AC conductivity and dielectric behavior of carbon black reinforced high density polyethylene (HDPE-CB) and HDPE-CB filled with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs-CB-HDPE) and Polyaniline (PAni) coated MWNTs-CB-HDPE nanocomposites. The electrical properties such as dielectric constant ({epsilon}'), dissipation factor (tan {delta}) and AC conductivity ({sigma}{sub ac}) of nanocomposites have been measured with reference to the weight fraction (0.5 and 1 wt% MWNTs), frequency (75 KHz-30 MHz), temperature (25-90 deg. C) and sea water ageing. The experimental results showed that the increased AC conductivity and dielectric constant of the nanocomposites were influenced by PAni coated MWNTs in HDPE-CB nanocomposites. The value of dielectric constant and tan {delta} decreased with increasing frequency. Further more, above 5 MHz the AC conductivity increases drastically whereas significant effect on tan {delta} was observed in less than 1 MHz.

  15. Ac-conductivity and dielectric response of new zinc-phosphate glass/metal composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maaroufi, A.; Oabi, O.; Lucas, B.

    2016-07-01

    The ac-conductivity and dielectric response of new composites based on zinc-phosphate glass with composition 45 mol%ZnO-55 mol%P2O5, filled with metallic powder of nickel (ZP/Ni) were investigated by impedance spectroscopy in the frequency range from 100 Hz to 1 MHz at room temperature. A high percolating jump of seven times has been observed in the conductivity behavior from low volume fraction of filler to the higher fractions, indicating an insulator - semiconductor phase transition. The measured conductivity at higher filler volume fraction is about 10-1 S/cm and is frequency independent, while, the obtained conductivity for low filler volume fraction is around 10-8 S/cm and is frequency dependent. Moreover, the elaborated composites are characterized by high dielectric constants in the range of 105 for conductive composites at low frequencies (100 Hz). In addition, the distribution of the relaxation processes was also evaluated. The Debye, Cole-Cole, Davidson-Cole and Havriliak-Negami models in electric modulus formalism were used to model the observed relaxation phenomena in ZP/Ni composites. The observed relaxation phenomena are fairly simulated by Davidson-Cole model, and an account of the interpretation of results is given.

  16. Ac conductance and capacitance of carbon black polymer composites during thermal cycling and isothermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, K.-M.; McQueen, D. H.; Vilcáková, J.

    2002-05-01

    The ac electrical properties of acetylene black composites mixed into ethylene butylacrylate copolymer (EBA) and into poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) have been measured in thermal cycling and isothermal annealing experiments. The results show that changes in electrical properties are due to rearrangement of gaps between the carbon black aggregates. This has been concluded using an exponent z that relates the critical frequency ωc denoting the crossover of the conductivity from the dc-plateau to its frequency-dependent part to the dc conductivity, σdc, according to ωc ∝σdcz. Below the melting range of EBA and the glass transition of PMMA z is about one corresponding to strong variation of the conductivity and weak dependence of the permittivity on the gaps. Above the melting range of EBA z is about 1.5, indicating strong dependence of both the conductivity and the permittivity on the gaps, as predicted by percolation theory. This was not found in the PMMA composites above the glass transition. We conclude that the polymer matrix affects the nature of the gaps between carbon black aggregates, either allowing their size to vary continuously (z about 1) or letting them open and close (z about 1.5).

  17. ac conductance in granular insulating Co-ZrO{sub 2} thin films: A universal response

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinovic, Zorica; Garcia del Muro, Montserrat; Kovylina, Miroslavna; Batlle, Xavier; Labarta, Amilcar

    2009-03-01

    The ac conductance in granular insulating Co-ZrO{sub 2} thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition is systematically studied as a function of the Co volume content x. An absorption phenomenon at low frequencies that mimics the universal response of disordered dielectric materials is observed in the range of metal content below the Co percolation threshold x{sub p}{approx_equal}0.35 in the so-called dielectric regime. The temperature and frequency dependences of this absorption phenomenon are successfully analyzed in terms of random competing conduction channels between Co particles through thermally assisted tunneling and capacitive conductance. The ac conductance is well correlated with the nanostructure of the samples obtained by the transmission electron microscopy and perfectly matches the calculated ac response for a random resistor-capacitor network. We also show the occurrence of fractional power-law dependences on the frequency of the ac conductance taking place at very low frequencies as compared to the typical ranges at which dispersive behavior is observed in classical-disordered dielectric materials.

  18. Hydraulic Conductivity Measurements Barrow 2014

    DOE Data Explorer

    Katie McKnight; Tim Kneafsey; Craig Ulrich; Jil Geller

    2015-02-22

    Six individual ice cores were collected from Barrow Environmental Observatory in Barrow, Alaska, in May of 2013 as part of the Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment (NGEE). Each core was drilled from a different location at varying depths. A few days after drilling, the cores were stored in coolers packed with dry ice and flown to Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, CA. 3-dimensional images of the cores were constructed using a medical X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner at 120kV. Hydraulic conductivity samples were extracted from these cores at LBNL Richmond Field Station in Richmond, CA, in February 2014 by cutting 5 to 8 inch segments using a chop saw. Samples were packed individually and stored at freezing temperatures to minimize any changes in structure or loss of ice content prior to analysis. Hydraulic conductivity was determined through falling head tests using a permeameter [ELE International, Model #: K-770B]. After approximately 12 hours of thaw, initial falling head tests were performed. Two to four measurements were collected on each sample and collection stopped when the applied head load exceeded 25% change from the original load. Analyses were performed between 2 to 3 times for each sample. The final hydraulic conductivity calculations were computed using methodology of Das et al., 1985.

  19. Analytic formulation for the ac electrical conductivity in two- temperature, strongly coupled, overdense plasma: FORTRAN subroutine

    SciTech Connect

    Cauble, R.; Rozmus, W.

    1993-10-21

    A FORTRAN subroutine for the calculation of the ac electrical conductivity in two-temperature, strongly coupled, overdense plasma is presented. The routine is the result of a model calculation based on classical transport theory with application to plasmas created by the interaction of short pulse lasers and solids. The formulation is analytic and the routine is self-contained.

  20. AC Conductivity Studies in Lithium-Borate Glass Containing Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivaprakash, Y.; Anavekar, R. V.

    2011-07-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been synthesized in a base glass with composition 30Li2O-70B2O3 using gold chloride (HAuCl4.3H2O) as a dopant. The samples are characterized using XRD, ESR, SEM and optical absorption in the visible range. AC conductivity studies have been performed at RT over a frequency range 100 to 10 MHz. The dc conductivity is calculated from the complex impedence plot. The dc conductivity is found to be increasing with the increase of dopant concentration. AC conductivity data is fitted with Almond-West law with power exponent `s'. The values of `s' is found to lie in the range of 0.70-0.73.

  1. Measurement of the 225Ac half-life.

    PubMed

    Pommé, S; Marouli, M; Suliman, G; Dikmen, H; Van Ammel, R; Jobbágy, V; Dirican, A; Stroh, H; Paepen, J; Bruchertseifer, F; Apostolidis, C; Morgenstern, A

    2012-11-01

    The (225)Ac half-life was determined by measuring the activity of (225)Ac sources as a function of time, using various detection techniques: α-particle counting with a planar silicon detector at a defined small solid angle and in a nearly-2π geometry, 4πα+β counting with a windowless CsI sandwich spectrometer and with a pressurised proportional counter, gamma-ray spectrometry with a HPGe detector and with a NaI(Tl) well detector. Depending on the technique, the decay was followed for 59-141 d, which is about 6-14 times the (225)Ac half-life. The six measurement results were in good mutual agreement and their mean value is T(1/2)((225)Ac)=9.920 (3)d. This half-life value is more precise and better documented than the currently recommended value of 10.0 d, based on two old measurements lacking uncertainty evaluations.

  2. Measurement of the 225Ac half-life.

    PubMed

    Pommé, S; Marouli, M; Suliman, G; Dikmen, H; Van Ammel, R; Jobbágy, V; Dirican, A; Stroh, H; Paepen, J; Bruchertseifer, F; Apostolidis, C; Morgenstern, A

    2012-11-01

    The (225)Ac half-life was determined by measuring the activity of (225)Ac sources as a function of time, using various detection techniques: α-particle counting with a planar silicon detector at a defined small solid angle and in a nearly-2π geometry, 4πα+β counting with a windowless CsI sandwich spectrometer and with a pressurised proportional counter, gamma-ray spectrometry with a HPGe detector and with a NaI(Tl) well detector. Depending on the technique, the decay was followed for 59-141 d, which is about 6-14 times the (225)Ac half-life. The six measurement results were in good mutual agreement and their mean value is T(1/2)((225)Ac)=9.920 (3)d. This half-life value is more precise and better documented than the currently recommended value of 10.0 d, based on two old measurements lacking uncertainty evaluations. PMID:22940415

  3. Ionic ac and dc conductivities of NaCrP2O7 compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassi, M.; Oueslati, A.; Gargouri, M.

    2015-05-01

    The NaCrP2O7 compound was prepared by the solid-state reaction method. The formation of a single-phase material was confirmed by the X-ray diffraction studies and found to be a monoclinic system. The electrical properties of this compound have been measured in the temperature range from 523 to 673 K and the frequency range from 209 Hz to 5 MHz. The Nyquist plots are well fitted to an equivalent circuit consisting of a series of combination of grains and grain boundary elements. The ac conductivity of NaCrP2O7 has been analyzed as a function of temperature and frequency. The scaling behavior of the imaginary part of the complex modulus suggests that the relaxation describes the same mechanism at various temperatures. The conductivity and modulus formalisms provide nearly the same activation energies for electrical relaxation of mobile ions suggesting that the ion transport is probably due to a hopping mechanism dominated by the motion of the monovalent ions Na+ along tunnels presented in the structure of the investigated material.

  4. Gas sensing properties of magnesium doped SnO{sub 2} thin films in relation to AC conduction

    SciTech Connect

    Deepa, S.; Skariah, Benoy Thomas, Boben; Joseph, Anisha

    2014-01-28

    Conducting magnesium doped (0 to 1.5 wt %) tin oxide thin films prepared by Spray Pyrolysis technique achieved detection of 1000 ppm of LPG. The films deposited at 304 °C exhibit an enhanced response at an operating temperature of 350 °C. The microstructural properties are studied by means of X-ray diffraction. AC conductivity measurements are carried out using precision LCR meter to analyze the parameters that affect the variation in sensing. The results are correlated with compositional parameters and the subsequent modification in the charge transport mechanism facilitating an enhanced LPG sensing action.

  5. Heat Capacity Measurements by Simultaneous Relaxation and AC-Calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashuri, H.; Kashuri, K.; Iannacchione, G. S.

    2012-02-01

    A high-resolution method for measuring the heat capacity Cp using simultaneously AC and Relaxation Calorimetry techniques has been developed. This technique is useful for both first and second-order phase transitions of liquids and complex fluids. The difference of the Cp's measured by the Relaxation and AC calorimetry is a direct measurement of a phase transitions' latent heat. As a test, the Cp of two cyanobiphenyl liquid crystals, 5CB and 8CB, were measured using a square wave modulation pulse train over a base temperature range from 300 to 320 K in which 5CB exhibits a first-order phase transition and 8CB exhibits a first and second-order phase transition. Fourier transform analysis allows for the direct Cp measurement at the fundamental frequency of the square wave pulse train (as well as higher frequency orders) as function of temperature (i.e., AC-mode). The heating and cooling relaxations at the beginning and end of the square pulse heating allows for a relaxation analysis of Cp by applying the dual slope-method that includes all enthalpic conversions.

  6. Microwave a.c. conductivity of domain walls in ferroelectric thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tselev, Alexander; Yu, Pu; Cao, Ye; Dedon, Liv R.; Martin, Lane W.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-05-01

    Ferroelectric domain walls are of great interest as elementary building blocks for future electronic devices due to their intrinsic few-nanometre width, multifunctional properties and field-controlled topology. To realize the electronic functions, domain walls are required to be electrically conducting and addressable non-destructively. However, these properties have been elusive because conducting walls have to be electrically charged, which makes them unstable and uncommon in ferroelectric materials. Here we reveal that spontaneous and recorded domain walls in thin films of lead zirconate and bismuth ferrite exhibit large conductance at microwave frequencies despite being insulating at d.c. We explain this effect by morphological roughening of the walls and local charges induced by disorder with the overall charge neutrality. a.c. conduction is immune to large contact resistance enabling completely non-destructive walls read-out. This demonstrates a technological potential for harnessing a.c. conduction for oxide electronics and other materials with poor d.c. conduction, particularly at the nanoscale.

  7. Dielectric relaxation and ac conductivity behaviour of polyvinyl alcohol-HgSe quantum dot hybrid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Subhojyoti; Chatterjee, Sanat Kumar; Ghosh, Jiten; Meikap, Ajit Kumar

    2014-07-01

    Here we report a comparative study on the dielectric relaxation and ac conductivity behaviour of pure polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and PVA-mercury selenide (HgSe) quantum dot hybrid films in the temperature range 298 K ⩽ T ⩽ 420 K and in the frequency range 100 Hz ⩽ f ⩽ 1 MHz. The prepared nanocomposite exhibits a larger dielectric constant as compared to the pure PVA. The real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constants were found to fit appreciably with the modified Cole-Cole equation, from which temperature-dependent values of the relaxation times, free charge carrier conductivity and space charge carrier conductivity were calculated. The relaxation time decreases with the quantum dot's inclusion in the PVA matrix and with an increase in temperature, whereas free charge carrier conductivity and space charge carrier conductivity increases with an increase in temperature. An increase in ac conductivity for the nanocomposites has also been observed, while the charge transport mechanism was found to follow the correlated barrier hopping model in both cases. An easy-path model with a suitable electrical equivalent circuit has been employed to analyse the temperature-dependent impedance spectra. The imaginary part of the complex electric modulus spectra exhibit an asymmetric nature and a non-Debye type of behaviour, which has been elucidated considering a generalized susceptibility function. The electric modulus spectra of the nanocomposite demonstrate a smaller amplitude and broader width, as compared to the pure PVA sample.

  8. Microwave a.c. conductivity of domain walls in ferroelectric thin films

    PubMed Central

    Tselev, Alexander; Yu, Pu; Cao, Ye; Dedon, Liv R.; Martin, Lane W.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-01-01

    Ferroelectric domain walls are of great interest as elementary building blocks for future electronic devices due to their intrinsic few-nanometre width, multifunctional properties and field-controlled topology. To realize the electronic functions, domain walls are required to be electrically conducting and addressable non-destructively. However, these properties have been elusive because conducting walls have to be electrically charged, which makes them unstable and uncommon in ferroelectric materials. Here we reveal that spontaneous and recorded domain walls in thin films of lead zirconate and bismuth ferrite exhibit large conductance at microwave frequencies despite being insulating at d.c. We explain this effect by morphological roughening of the walls and local charges induced by disorder with the overall charge neutrality. a.c. conduction is immune to large contact resistance enabling completely non-destructive walls read-out. This demonstrates a technological potential for harnessing a.c. conduction for oxide electronics and other materials with poor d.c. conduction, particularly at the nanoscale. PMID:27240997

  9. Measured losses in superconductor magnets for 60-Hertz ac operation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamlet, I. L.; Kilgore, R. A.

    1971-01-01

    Results of an experimental study of electrical losses in superconductor magnets. Preliminary 60-Hz ac loss data are presented for coils constructed of Nb3Sn ribbon, Nb-Ti cable, and multifilament Nb-Ti. Losses have been measured for different size coils up to approximately 20 cm in diameter. Of the conductor types tested, Nb3Sn ribbon has the lowest losses for ac operation. In Nb3Sn-ribbon coils of different sizes, the loss per unit length of conductor is shown to decrease with a decrease in the rate of change of current and to increase, in general, with increase in coil size. An important aspect of the study is the high degree of repeatability of the data.

  10. Temperature and frequency dependence of AC conductivity of new quaternary Se-Te-Bi-Pb chalcogenide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Preeti; Sharma, Ambika

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the temperature and frequency dependence of ac conductivity of new quaternary Se84-xTe15Bi1.0Pbx chalcogenide glasses. The Se84-xTe15Bi1.0Pbx (x = 2, 6) glassy alloys are prepared by using melt quenching technique. The temperature and frequency dependent behavior of ac conductivity σac(ω) has been carried out in the frequency range 42 Hz to 5 MHz and in the temperature range of 298-323 K below glass transition temperature. The behavior of ac conductivity is described in terms of the power law ωs. The obtained temperature dependence behavior of ac conductivity and frequency component (s) are explained by means of correlated barrier hopping model recommended by Elliot.

  11. Effect of nanosilica on optical, electric modulus and AC conductivity of polyvinyl alcohol/polyaniline films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sayed, Somyia; Abel-Baset, Tarob; Elfadl, Azza Abou; Hassen, Arafa

    2015-05-01

    Nanosilica (NS) was synthesized by a sol-gel method and mixed with 0.98 polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/0.02 polyaniline (PANI) in different amounts to produce nanocomposite films. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) revealed the average particle size of the NS to be ca. 15 nm. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the NS was well-dispersed on the surface of the PVA/PNAI films. The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of the samples showed a significant change in the intensity of the characteristic peak of the functional groups in the composite films with the amount of NS added. The absorbance and refractive index (n) of the composites were studied in the UV-vis range, and the optical energy band gap, Eg, and different optical parameters were calculated. The dielectric loss modulus, M″ and ac conductivity, σac, of the samples were studied within 300-425 K and 0.1 kHz-5 MHz, respectively. Two relaxation peaks were observed in the frequency dependence of the dielectric loss modulus, M″. The behavior of σac(f) for the composite films indicated that the conduction mechanism was correlated barrier hopping (CBH). The results of this work are discussed and compared with those of previous studies of similar composites.

  12. Instabilities across the isotropic conductivity point in a nematic phenyl benzoate under AC driving.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pramoda; Patil, Shivaram N; Hiremath, Uma S; Krishnamurthy, K S

    2007-08-01

    We characterize the sequence of bifurcations generated by ac fields in a nematic layer held between unidirectionally rubbed ITO electrodes. The material, which possesses a negative dielectric anisotropy epsilona and an inversion temperature for electrical conductivity anisotropy sigmaa, exhibits a monostable tilted alignment near TIN, the isotropic-nematic point. On cooling, an anchoring transition to the homeotropic configuration occurs close to the underlying smectic phase. The field experiments are performed for (i) negative sigmaa and homeotropic alignment, and (ii) weakly positive sigmaa and nearly homeotropic alignment. Under ac driving, the Freedericksz transition is followed by bifurcation into various patterned states. Among them are the striped states that seem to belong to the dielectric regime and localized hybrid instabilities. Very significantly, the patterned instabilities are not excited by dc fields, indicating their possible gradient flexoelectric origin. The Carr-Helfrich mechanism-based theories that take account of flexoelectric terms can explain the observed electroconvective effects only in part. PMID:17616118

  13. Conductivity (ac and dc) in III-V amorphous semiconductors and chalcogenide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauser, J. J.

    1985-02-01

    Variable-range hopping, as evidenced by a resistivity proportional to exp(T-1/4), has been induced in many III-V amorphous semiconductors (InSb, AlSb, and GaAs) and even in chalcogenide glasses (As2Te3, As2Te3-xSex, and GeTe) by depositing films at 77 K. It is therefore remarkable that the same procedure failed to generate variable-range hopping in GaSb, which is one of the less ionic III-V semiconductors. Besides differences in the dc conductivity, there are also different behaviors in the ac conductivity of amorphous semiconductors. The low-temperature ac conductivity of all amorphous semiconductors is proportional to ωsTn with s~=1 and n<1, which is consistent with a model of correlated barrier hopping of electron pairs between paired and random defects. However, in the case of a-SiO2 and a-GeSe2 one finds, in addition, that the capacitance obeys the scaling relation C=A ln(Tω-1), which would suggest a conduction mechanism by tunneling relaxation. Furthermore, this scaling relation cannot be fitted to the data for a-As2Te3, a-InSb, and a-GaSb although the functional dependence of C on T and ω are similar.

  14. Temperature dependence of conductivity measurement for conducting polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, Leandro; Duran, Jesus; Isah, Anne; Albers, Patrick; McDougall, Michael; Wang, Weining

    2014-03-01

    Conducting polymer-based solar cells are the newest generation solar cells. While research on this area has been progressing, the efficiency is still low because certain important parameters of the solar cell are still not well understood. It is of interest to study the temperature dependence of the solar cell parameters, such as conductivity of the polymer, open circuit voltage, and reverse saturation current to gain a better understanding on the solar cells. In this work, we report our temperature dependence of conductivity measurement using our in-house temperature-varying apparatus. In this project, we designed and built a temperature varying apparatus using a thermoelectric cooler module which gives enough temperature range as we need and costs much less than a cryostat. The set-up of the apparatus will be discussed. Temperature dependence of conductivity measurements for PEDOT:PSS films with different room-temperature conductivity will be compared and discussed. NJSGC-NASA Fellowship grant

  15. Study on AC-DC Electrical Conductivities in Warm Dense Matter Generated by Pulsed-power Discharge with Isochoric Vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Toru; Ohuchi, Takumi; Takahashi, Takuya; Kawaguchi, Yoshinari; Saito, Hirotaka; Miki, Yasutoshi; Takahashi, Kazumasa; Kikuchi, Takashi; Aso, Tsukasa; Harada, Nob.

    2016-03-01

    To observe AC and DC electrical conductivity in warm dense matter (WDM), we have demonstrated to apply the spectroscopic ellipsometry for a pulsed-power discharge with isochoric vessel. At 10 μs from the beginning of discharge, the generated parameters by using pulsed-power discharge with isochoric vessel are 0.1 ρ s (ρ s: solid density) of density and 4000 K of temperature, respectively. The DC electrical conductivity for above parameters is estimated to be 104 S/m. In order to measure the AC electrical conductivity, we have developed a four-detector spectroscopic ellipsometer with a multichannel spectrometer. The multichannel spectrometer, in which consists of a 16-channel photodiode array, a two-stages voltage adder, and a flat diffraction grating, has 10 MHz of the frequency response with covered visible spectrum. For applying the four-detector spectroscopic ellipsometer, we observe the each observation signal evolves the polarized behavior compared to the ratio as I 1/I 2.

  16. Do dialysate conductivity measurements provide conductivity clearance or ionic dialysance?

    PubMed

    Petitclerc, T

    2006-11-01

    Dialysate conductivity measurements allow on-line estimation of urea clearance during hemodialysis session. Conductivity measurements provide a value of 'conductivity clearance' for some authors, but a value of 'ionic dialysance' for others. This paper aims at explaining which term should be the more appropriate. Clearance is a parameter defined for measuring the power of a mechanism, which aims at 'clearing' a solution by depurating some solutes. In hemodialysis, clearance measures the efficacy of patient's depuration. In contrast, dialysance measures the capability of transferring solutes between blood and dialysate. The conventional definition of dialysance, requiring the absence of convective transfer, should be generalized to the case of the usual presence of ultrafiltration during the hemodialysis session. For a solute (as urea) absent from the dialysate delivered to the dialyzer inlet, the clearance is equal to its dialysance. In order to avoid a dramatic fall in ionic concentrations during hemodialysis treatment, the clearance of ions is reduced by adding these ions in the dialysate and becomes lower than their dialysance. Conductivity measurements provide a value of electrolytes dialysance. Thus the term of 'ionic dialysance' is more appropriate than the term of 'conductivity clearance'. Nevertheless ionic dialysance represents a good estimation of urea clearance.

  17. ac impedance measurements of molten salt thermal batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Pritpal; Guidotti, Ronald A.; Reisner c, David

    Non-destructive testing of thermal batteries without activating them is a challenging proposition. Molten salt thermal batteries are activated by raising their temperature to above the melting point of the salt constituting the electrolyte. One approach that we have considered is to raise the temperature of the molten salt electrolyte to a temperature below the melting point so that the battery does not get activated yet may provide sufficient mobility of the ionic species to be able to obtain some useful ac impedance measurements. This hypothesis was put to the test for two Li(Si)/FeS 2 molten salt batteries with two electrolytes of different melting points—a standard LiCl-KCl eutectic that melts at 352 °C and a LiBr-KBr-LiCl eutectic with a melting point of 319 °C. ac impedance measurements as a function of frequency and temperature below the melting point are presented for single cells and batteries.

  18. Iterative Precise Conductivity Measurement with IDEs.

    PubMed

    Hubálek, Jaromír

    2015-05-22

    The paper presents a new approach in the field of precise electrolytic conductivity measurements with planar thin- and thick-film electrodes. This novel measuring method was developed for measurement with comb-like electrodes called interdigitated electrodes (IDEs). Correction characteristics over a wide range of specific conductivities were determined from an interface impedance characterization of the thick-film IDEs. The local maximum of the capacitive part of the interface impedance is used for corrections to get linear responses. The measuring frequency was determined at a wide range of measured conductivity. An iteration mode of measurements was suggested to precisely measure the conductivity at the right frequency in order to achieve a highly accurate response. The method takes precise conductivity measurements in concentration ranges from 10(-6) to 1 M without electrode cell replacement.

  19. AC and DC conductivity of ionic liquid containing polyvinylidene fluoride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frübing, Peter; Wang, Feipeng; Kühle, Till-Friedrich; Gerhard, Reimund

    2016-01-01

    Polarisation processes and charge transport in polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) with a small amount (0.01-10 wt%) of the ionic liquid (IL) 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium nitrate ({[EMIM]}^+[{NO}_3]^-) are investigated by means of dielectric spectroscopy. The response of PVDF that contains more than 0.01 wt% IL is dominated by a low-frequency relaxation which shows typical signatures of electrode polarisation. Furthermore, the α a relaxation, related to the glass transition, disappears for IL contents of more than 1 wt%, which indicates that the amorphous phase loses its glass-forming properties and undergoes structural changes. The DC conductivity is determined from the low-frequency limit of the AC conductivity and from the dielectric loss peak related to the electrode polarisation. DC conductivities of 10^{-10} to 10^{-2} {S}/{m} are obtained—increasing with IL content and temperature. The dependence of the DC conductivity on the IL content follows a power law with an exponent greater than one, indicating an increase in the ion mobility. The temperature dependence of the DC conductivity shows Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann behaviour, which implies that charge transport is coupled to polymer chain motion. Mobile ion densities and ion mobilities are calculated from the DC conductivity and the dielectric loss related to electrode polarisation, with the results that less than one per cent of the total ion concentration contributes to the conductivity and that the strong increase in conductivity with temperature is mainly caused by a strong increase in ion mobility. This leads to the conclusion that in particular the ion mobility must be reduced in order to decrease the DC conductivity.

  20. Electric properties of carbon nano-onion/polyaniline composites: a combined electric modulus and ac conductivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papathanassiou, Anthony N.; Mykhailiv, Olena; Echegoyen, Luis; Sakellis, Ilias; Plonska-Brzezinska, Marta E.

    2016-07-01

    The complex electric modulus and the ac conductivity of carbon nano-onion/polyaniline composites were studied from 1 mHz to 1 MHz at isothermal conditions ranging from 15 K to room temperature. The temperature dependence of the electric modulus and the dc conductivity analyses indicate a couple of hopping mechanisms. The distinction between thermally activated processes and the determination of cross-over temperature were achieved by exploring the temperature dependence of the fractional exponent of the dispersive ac conductivity and the bifurcation of the scaled ac conductivity isotherms. The results are analyzed by combining the granular metal model (inter-grain charge tunneling of extended electron states located within mesoscopic highly conducting polyaniline grains) and a 3D Mott variable range hopping model (phonon assisted tunneling within the carbon nano-onions and clusters).

  1. AC conductivity and dielectric behavior of CoAl xFe 2- xO 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abo El Ata, A. M.; Attia, S. M.; Meaz, T. M.

    2004-01-01

    AC conductivity and dielectric properties have been studied for a series of polycrystalline spinel ferrite with composition CoAl xFe 2- xO 4, as a function of frequency and temperature. The results of AC conductivity were discussed in terms of the quantum mechanical tunneling and small polaron tunneling models. The dispersion of the dielectric constant was discussed in the light of Koops model and hopping conduction mechanism. The dielectric loss tangent tan δ curves exhibits a dielectric relaxation peaks which are attributed to the coincidence of the hopping frequency of the charge carriers with that of the external fields. The AC conductivity, dielectric constant, and dielectric loss tangent were found to increase with increasing the temperature due to the increase of the hopping frequency, while they decrease with increasing Al ion content due to the reduction of iron ions available for the conduction process at the octahedral sites.

  2. Absorption and Attenuation Coefficients Using the WET Labs ac-s in the Mid-Atlantic Bight: Field Measurements and Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohi, Nobuaki; Makinen, Carla P.; Mitchell, Richard; Moisan, Tiffany A.

    2008-01-01

    Ocean color algorithms are based on the parameterization of apparent optical properties as a function of inherent optical properties. WET Labs underwater absorption and attenuation meters (ac-9 and ac-s) measure both the spectral beam attenuation [c (lambda)] and absorption coefficient [a (lambda)]. The ac-s reports in a continuous range of 390-750 nm with a band pass of 4 nm, totaling approximately 83 distinct wavelengths, while the ac-9 reports at 9 wavelengths. We performed the ac-s field measurements at nine stations in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from water calibrations to data analysis. Onboard the ship, the ac-s was calibrated daily using Milli Q-water. Corrections for the in situ temperature and salinity effects on optical properties of water were applied. Corrections for incomplete recovery of the scattered light in the ac-s absorption tube were performed. The fine scale of spectral and vertical distributions of c (lambda) and a (lambda) were described from the ac-s. The significant relationships between a (674) and that of spectrophotometric analysis and chlorophyll a concentration of discrete water samples were observed.

  3. Transport ac losses of a second-generation HTS tape with a ferromagnetic substrate and conducting stabilizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuo; Chen, Du-Xing; Fang, Jin

    2015-12-01

    The current-voltage curve and transport ac loss of a second-generation HTS tape with a ferromagnetic NiW substrate and brass stabilizer are measured. It is found that the ac loss is up to two orders of magnitude larger than what is expected by the power-law E(J) determined by the current-voltage curve and increases with increasing frequency. Modeling results show that the overly large ac loss is contributed by the ac loss in the HTS strip enhanced by the NiW substrate and the magnetic hysteresis loss in the substrate, and the frequency-dependent loss occurs in the brass layer covering the substrate but not in the ferromagnetic substrate itself as assumed previously. The ac loss in the brass layer is associated with transport currents but not eddy currents, and it has some features similar to ordinary eddy-current loss with significant differences.

  4. AC conductivity and its scaling behavior in MgO-Li2O-B2O3-Bi2O3 glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purnima, M.; Bale, Shashidhar; Samee, M. A.; Ahmmad, Shaik Kareem; Rahman, Syed

    2013-02-01

    In the present work, the compositional dependence of density, refractive index and glass transition temperature of xMgO-(25-x)Li2O-50B2O3-25Bi2O3 glasses is studied. Impedance spectroscopy technique is employed on these samples and the data are analyzed using Cole-Cole type impedance response function. The AC conductivity behavior of the present glasses has been investigated in the frequency range from 100 Hz to 1 MHz and as a function of temperature the measured AC data are analyzed using the Jonscher’s universal power law to explain the observed dispersive behavior of the electrical conductivity. The temperature and composition dependence scaling behavior in the AC conductivity are satisfactorily explained by scaling the AC conductivity σ‧(ω) by hopping frequency ωp. The frequency response of dielectric constant ɛ‧ and dielectric loss tanδ as a function of temperature were studied. The tanδ peak shifts to higher frequency with increasing temperature, indicating dipolar relaxation character of dielectric loss in the present glasses.

  5. Measuring the electrical conductivity of the earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avants, Brian; Soodak, Dustin; Ruppeiner, George

    1999-07-01

    We describe an undergraduate experiment for measuring the electrical conductivity of the earth with a four-electrode Wenner array, at scales approaching tens of meters. When analyzed in the context of a simple two-layer model of the earth, such measurements yield information about what is underground. In our case, this is the depth of the water table and the electrical conductivity of both the upper dry layer and the lower water-saturated layer. We also performed conductivity measurements in a water tank, to test the theory in a known situation. The experiments are discussed in the context of several boundary value problems in electricity and magnetism.

  6. Ac-loss measurement of a DyBCO-Roebel assembled coated conductor cable (RACC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuller, S.; Goldacker, W.; Kling, A.; Krempasky, L.; Schmidt, C.

    2007-10-01

    Low ac-loss HTS cables for transport currents well above 1 kA are required for application in transformers and generators and are taken into consideration for future generations of fusion reactor coils. Coated conductors (CC) are suitable candidates for high field application at an operation temperature around 50-77 K, which is a crucial precondition for economical cooling costs. We prepared a short length of a Roebel bar cable made of industrial DyBCO coated conductor (Theva Company, Germany). Meander shaped tapes of 4 mm width with a twist pitch of 122 mm were cut from 10 mm wide CC tapes using a specially designed tool. Eleven of these strands were assembled to a cable. The electrical and mechanical connection of the tapes was achieved using a silver powder filled conductive epoxy resin. Ac-losses of a short sample in an external ac field were measured as a function of frequency and field amplitude in transverse and parallel field orientations. In addition, the coupling current time constant of the sample was directly measured.

  7. Using Sun Spikes to Measure Mesospheric Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimogawa, M. R.; Holzworth, R. H.

    2005-12-01

    Our payload was designed to study the electrodynamics of noctilucent clouds (NLCs) using double Langmuir probes. Sun spikes in the probe voltage, which occur naturally when a probe is shadowed by the rocket body, were two to three times larger when the rocket was above the NLC than when below it, on both the upleg and downleg portions of the flight. In the low conductivity found below the NLC, the sun spikes did not saturate, so a rough conductivity measurement could be made using these sun spike data. We found the conductivity to be about 8×10-10>S/m at 80 km altitude, which is in agreement with measurements made of the positive ion conductivity during the flight. This is effectively the same as the relaxation method for measuring conductivity in the lower atmosphere, shown here to work in the mesosphere.

  8. Effect of an AC electric field on the conductance of single-wall semiconductor-type carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Belonenko, M. B.; Glazov, S. Yu.; Mescheryakova, N. E.

    2010-09-15

    The effect of an ac electric field on the conductance of a system of single-wall semiconductor-type carbon nanotubes placed in a dc electric field is considered. The strength vectors of dc and ac electric fields are directed along the nanotube axis. The electronic system of carbon nanotubes is considered in the context of the Boltzmann kinetic equation in the relaxation-time approximation. The dependence of the current density in the system on the characteristics of applied fields is studied. The effect of absolute negative conductance is detected.

  9. Origin of DC and AC conductivity anisotropy in iron-based superconductors: Scattering rate versus spectral weight effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütt, Michael; Schmalian, Jörg; Fernandes, Rafael M.

    2016-08-01

    To shed light on the transport properties of electronic nematic phases, we investigate the anisotropic properties of the AC and DC conductivities. Based on the analytical properties of the former, we show that the anisotropy of the effective scattering rate behaves differently than the actual scattering rate anisotropy and even changes sign as a function of temperature. Similarly, the effective spectral weight acquires an anisotropy even when the plasma frequency is isotropic. These results are illustrated by an explicit calculation of the AC conductivity due to the interaction between electrons and spin fluctuations in the nematic phase of the iron-based superconductors and shown to be in agreement with recent experiments.

  10. Conductance measurement circuit with wide dynamic range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, Bruce E. (Inventor); Von Esch, Myron (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A conductance measurement circuit to measure conductance of a solution under test with an output voltage proportional to conductance over a 5-decade range, i.e., 0.01 uS to 1000 uS or from 0.1 uS to 10,000 uS. An increase in conductance indicates growth, or multiplication, of the bacteria in the test solution. Two circuits are used each for an alternate half-cycle time periods of an alternate squarewave in order to cause alternate and opposite currents to be applied to the test solution. The output of one of the two circuits may be scaled for a different range optimum switching frequency dependent upon the solution conductance and to enable uninterrupted measurement over the complete 5-decade range. This circuitry provides two overlapping ranges of conductance which can be read simultaneously without discontinuity thereby eliminating range switching within the basic circuitry. A VCO is used to automatically change the operating frequency according to the particular value of the conductance being measured, and comparators indicate which range is valid and also facilitate computer-controlled data acquisition. A multiplexer may be used to monitor any number of solutions under test continuously.

  11. Thermal conductivity measurements of Summit polycrystalline silicon.

    SciTech Connect

    Clemens, Rebecca; Kuppers, Jaron D.; Phinney, Leslie Mary

    2006-11-01

    A capability for measuring the thermal conductivity of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) materials using a steady state resistance technique was developed and used to measure the thermal conductivities of SUMMiT{trademark} V layers. Thermal conductivities were measured over two temperature ranges: 100K to 350K and 293K to 575K in order to generate two data sets. The steady state resistance technique uses surface micromachined bridge structures fabricated using the standard SUMMiT fabrication process. Electrical resistance and resistivity data are reported for poly1-poly2 laminate, poly2, poly3, and poly4 polysilicon structural layers in the SUMMiT process from 83K to 575K. Thermal conductivity measurements for these polysilicon layers demonstrate for the first time that the thermal conductivity is a function of the particular SUMMiT layer. Also, the poly2 layer has a different variation in thermal conductivity as the temperature is decreased than the poly1-poly2 laminate, poly3, and poly4 layers. As the temperature increases above room temperature, the difference in thermal conductivity between the layers decreases.

  12. Local measurement of thermal conductivity and diffusivity

    DOE PAGES

    Hurley, David H.; Schley, Robert S.; Khafizov, Marat; Wendt, Brycen L.

    2015-12-01

    Simultaneous measurement of local thermal diffusivity and conductivity is demonstrated on a range of ceramic samples. This was accomplished by measuring the temperature field spatial profile of samples excited by an amplitude modulated continuous wave laser beam. A thin gold film is applied to the samples to ensure strong optical absorption and to establish a second boundary condition that introduces an expression containing the substrate thermal conductivity. The diffusivity and conductivity are obtained by comparing the measured phase profile of the temperature field to a continuum based model. A sensitivity analysis is used to identify the optimal film thickness formore » extracting the both substrate conductivity and diffusivity. Proof of principle studies were conducted on a range of samples having thermal properties that are representative of current and advanced accident tolerant nuclear fuels. It is shown that by including the Kapitza resistance as an additional fitting parameter, the measured conductivity and diffusivity of all the samples considered agree closely with literature values. Lastly, a distinguishing feature of this technique is that it does not require a priori knowledge of the optical spot size which greatly increases measurement reliability and reproducibility.« less

  13. Local measurement of thermal conductivity and diffusivity

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, David H.; Schley, Robert S.; Khafizov, Marat; Wendt, Brycen L.

    2015-12-01

    Simultaneous measurement of local thermal diffusivity and conductivity is demonstrated on a range of ceramic samples. This was accomplished by measuring the temperature field spatial profile of samples excited by an amplitude modulated continuous wave laser beam. A thin gold film is applied to the samples to ensure strong optical absorption and to establish a second boundary condition that introduces an expression containing the substrate thermal conductivity. The diffusivity and conductivity are obtained by comparing the measured phase profile of the temperature field to a continuum based model. A sensitivity analysis is used to identify the optimal film thickness for extracting the both substrate conductivity and diffusivity. Proof of principle studies were conducted on a range of samples having thermal properties that are representative of current and advanced accident tolerant nuclear fuels. It is shown that by including the Kapitza resistance as an additional fitting parameter, the measured conductivity and diffusivity of all the samples considered agree closely with literature values. Lastly, a distinguishing feature of this technique is that it does not require a priori knowledge of the optical spot size which greatly increases measurement reliability and reproducibility.

  14. Local measurement of thermal conductivity and diffusivity

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, David H.; Schley, Robert S.; Khafizov, Marat; Wendt, Brycen L.

    2015-12-15

    Simultaneous measurement of local thermal diffusivity and conductivity is demonstrated on a range of ceramic samples. This was accomplished by measuring the temperature field spatial profile of samples excited by an amplitude modulated continuous wave laser beam. A thin gold film is applied to the samples to ensure strong optical absorption and to establish a second boundary condition that introduces an expression containing the substrate thermal conductivity. The diffusivity and conductivity are obtained by comparing the measured phase profile of the temperature field to a continuum based model. A sensitivity analysis is used to identify the optimal film thickness for extracting the both substrate conductivity and diffusivity. Proof of principle studies were conducted on a range of samples having thermal properties that are representatives of current and advanced accident tolerant nuclear fuels. It is shown that by including the Kapitza resistance as an additional fitting parameter, the measured conductivity and diffusivity of all the samples considered agreed closely with the literature values. A distinguishing feature of this technique is that it does not require a priori knowledge of the optical spot size which greatly increases measurement reliability and reproducibility.

  15. Analytic formulation for the ac electrical conductivity in two-temperature, strongly coupled, overdense plasma: FORTRAN subroutine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauble, R.; Rozmus, W.

    1993-10-01

    A FORTRAN subroutine for the calculation of the ac electrical conductivity in two-temperature, strongly coupled, overdense plasma is presented. The routine is the result of a model calculation based on classical transport theory with application to plasmas created by the interaction of short pulse lasers and solids. The formulation is analytic and the routine is self-contained.

  16. Dielectric spectroscopy studies and ac electrical conductivity on (AuZn)/TiO2/p-GaAs(110) MIS structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şafak Asar, Yasemin; Asar, Tarık; Altındal, Şemsettin; Özçelik, Süleyman

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we investigated temperature and voltage dependence of dielectric properties and ac electrical conductivityac) of (AuZn)/TiO2/p-GaAs(110) metal-insulator-semiconductor structures in the temperature range of 80-290 K using the capacitance-voltage ? and conductance-voltage ? measurements at 1 MHz. The intersection/crossing behaviour of C-V plots at sufficiently high forward biases and the increase in σac with increasing temperature was attributed to the lack of sufficient number of enough free charge carriers at low temperatures. The values of the dielectric constant (ε‧), dielectric loss (ε″), loss tangent ?, ac electrical conductivityac), the real and imaginary parts of electric modulus (?) were found to be strong functions of temperature and applied bias voltage. The Cole-Cole plots between ? have shown only one semicircle for each temperature. This indicates one of the relaxation processes was suppressed and this can be attributed to the surface polarization effect. On the other hand, ? plot has a peak for each temperature. The ? plots revealed two linear regions with different slopes for sufficiently high forward biases (0.0, 0.5, and 1.0 V) which correspond to low (80-200 K) and moderate/intermediate (230-290 K) temperatures. Thus, the values of activation energy (Ea) were obtained from the slope of these Arrhenius plots for two linear regions as 87.3 and 3.4 meV, respectively, at 1.0 V. On the other hand, Mott plots have only one linear region except for 260 and 290 K and Mott parameters were determined from these plots at 0.0, 0.5 and 1.0 V.

  17. Inductive Measurement of Plasma Jet Electrical Conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Matthew W.; Hawk, Clark W.; Litchford, Ron J.

    2005-01-01

    An inductive probing scheme, originally developed for shock tube studies, has been adapted to measure explosive plasma jet conductivities. In this method, the perturbation of an applied magnetic field by a plasma jet induces a voltage in a search coil, which, in turn, can be used to infer electrical conductivity through the inversion of a Fredholm integral equation of the first kind. A 1-inch diameter probe was designed and constructed, and calibration was accomplished by firing an aluminum slug through the probe using a light-gas gun. Exploratory laboratory experiments were carried out using plasma jets expelled from 15-gram high explosive shaped charges. Measured conductivities were in the range of 3 kS/m for unseeded octol charges and 20 kS/m for seeded octol charges containing 2% potassium carbonate by mass.

  18. Measuring Soil Hydraulic Conductivity With Microwaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, B. J.; Oneill, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    Soil mapping for large or small areas done rapidly. Technique requires simple radiometric measurements of L-band (15 to 30 cm) and thermal infrared emissions from ground within 2 days after saturation of surface. Technique based on observation that correlation exists between L-band emissivity and hydraulic conductivity of soil.

  19. AC Conductance of a multi-probe conductor and the Generalized Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekete, Paula; Gumbs, Godfrey

    2004-03-01

    We extend the work of Baranger and Stone^1 as well as Stone and Safer^2 by expressing the total current Im through lead m in terms of the AC voltages Vn applied to the leads of a phase coherent multi-probe conductor in an arbitrary static magnetic field and an alternating electric field of frequency ω . Using linear response theory, we obtain the non-local response function σ ( x, x'; ω ) in terms of the eigenfunctions of the unperturbed system as well as the retarded and advanced Green's functions. With the use of perturbation theory to perform impurity averaging, the conductance fluctuations (CF) in mesoscopic systems are evaluated at finite frequency. It is shown that the CF decrease monotonically as ω increases. Also, the frequency scale over which this decrease occurs is given in terms of the diffusion time for an electron to diffuse across the sample. We show that the universality of the CF at zero frequency is not preserved at finite frequency. We present numerical results for six leads attached to the faces of a 3D rectangular prism as well as four leads connected to a 2D sample. It is also shown that at finite frequency, the sample-to-sample CF have the same size as the fluctuations of a given sample as a function of frequency. H.U. Baranger and A.D. Stone, Phys. Rev. B, 40, 8169 (1989) A.D. Stone andA. Safer, IBM Journal of Research and Development, 32, 384 (1988) .

  20. Flow rate measurement in aggressive conductive fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovikova, Nataliia; Kolesnikov, Yuri; Karcher, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Two non-contact experimental methods of flow rate measurements for aggressive conductive liquids are described. The techniques are based on electromagnetic forces and Faraday's law: Lorentz force is induced inside moving conductive liquid under influence of variable magnetic field of permanent magnets. They are mounted along a liquid metal channel or (in case of the second method) inserted into rotated metal wheels. The force acts in the opposite of fluids' velocity direction and hence it is possible to measure reaction force of it that takes place according to Newton's law on magnetic field source - permanent magnets. And by knowing the force, which linearly depends on velocity, one can calculate mean flow rate of liquid. In addition experimental "dry" calibration and its results are described for one of the measurements' techniques.

  1. Measurement and modeling of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perkins, Kim S.; Elango, Lakshmanan

    2011-01-01

    The unsaturated zone plays an extremely important hydrologic role that influences water quality and quantity, ecosystem function and health, the connection between atmospheric and terrestrial processes, nutrient cycling, soil development, and natural hazards such as flooding and landslides. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is one of the main properties considered to govern flow; however it is very difficult to measure accurately. Knowledge of the highly nonlinear relationship between unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (K) and volumetric water content is required for widely-used models of water flow and solute transport processes in the unsaturated zone. Measurement of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of sediments is costly and time consuming, therefore use of models that estimate this property from more easily measured bulk-physical properties is common. In hydrologic studies, calculations based on property-transfer models informed by hydraulic property databases are often used in lieu of measured data from the site of interest. Reliance on database-informed predicted values with the use of neural networks has become increasingly common. Hydraulic properties predicted using databases may be adequate in some applications, but not others. This chapter will discuss, by way of examples, various techniques used to measure and model hydraulic conductivity as a function of water content, K. The parameters that describe the K curve obtained by different methods are used directly in Richards’ equation-based numerical models, which have some degree of sensitivity to those parameters. This chapter will explore the complications of using laboratory measured or estimated properties for field scale investigations to shed light on how adequately the processes are represented. Additionally, some more recent concepts for representing unsaturated-zone flow processes will be discussed.

  2. Quantitative Thermal Microscopy Measurement with Thermal Probe Driven by dc+ac Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodzenta, Jerzy; Juszczyk, Justyna; Kaźmierczak-Bałata, Anna; Firek, Piotr; Fleming, Austin; Chirtoc, Mihai

    2016-07-01

    Quantitative thermal measurements with spatial resolution allowing the examination of objects of submicron dimensions are still a challenging task. The quantity of methods providing spatial resolution better than 100 nm is very limited. One of them is scanning thermal microscopy (SThM). This method is a variant of atomic force microscopy which uses a probe equipped with a temperature sensor near the apex. Depending on the sensor current, either the temperature or the thermal conductivity distribution at the sample surface can be measured. However, like all microscopy methods, the SThM gives only qualitative information. Quantitative measuring methods using SThM equipment are still under development. In this paper, a method based on simultaneous registration of the static and the dynamic electrical resistances of the probe driven by the sum of dc and ac currents, and examples of its applications are described. Special attention is paid to the investigation of thin films deposited on thick substrates. The influence of substrate thermal properties on the measured signal and its dependence on thin film thermal conductivity and film thickness are analyzed. It is shown that in the case where layer thicknesses are comparable or smaller than the probe-sample contact diameter, a correction procedure is required to obtain actual thermal conductivity of the layer. Experimental results obtained for thin SiO2 and BaTiO_{3 }layers with thicknesses in the range from 11 nm to 100 nm are correctly confirmed with this approach.

  3. Measurement of heat conduction through stacked screens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, M. A.; Kuriyama, T.; Kuriyama, F.; Radebaugh, R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental apparatus for the measurement of heat conduction through stacked screens as well as some experimental results taken with the apparatus. Screens are stacked in a fiberglass-epoxy cylinder, which is 24.4 mm in diameter and 55 mm in length. The cold end of the stacked screens is cooled by a Gifford-McMahon (GM) cryocooler at cryogenic temperature, and the hot end is maintained at room temperature. Heat conduction through the screens is determined from the temperature gradient in a calibrated heat flow sensor mounted between the cold end of the stacked screens and the GM cryocooler. The samples used for these experiments consisted of 400-mesh stainless steel screens, 400-mesh phosphor bronze screens, and two different porosities of 325-mesh stainless steel screens. The wire diameter of the 400-mesh stainless steel and phosphor bronze screens was 25.4 micrometers and the 325-mesh stainless steel screen wire diameters were 22.9 micrometers and 27.9 micrometers. Standard porosity values were used for the experimental data with additional porosity values used on selected experiments. The experimental results showed that the helium gas between each screen enhanced the heat conduction through the stacked screens by several orders of magnitude compared to that in vacuum. The conduction degradation factor is the ratio of actual heat conduction to the heat conduction where the regenerator material is assumed to be a solid rod of the same cross sectional area as the metal fraction of the screen. This factor was about 0.1 for the stainless steel and 0.022 for the phosphor bronze, and almost constant for the temperature range of 40 to 80 K at the cold end.

  4. Measurement of heat conduction through stacked screens.

    PubMed

    Lewis, M A; Kuriyama, T; Kuriyama, F; Radebaugh, R

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental apparatus for the measurement of heat conduction through stacked screens as well as some experimental results taken with the apparatus. Screens are stacked in a fiberglass-epoxy cylinder, which is 24.4 mm in diameter and 55 mm in length. The cold end of the stacked screens is cooled by a Gifford-McMahon (GM) cryocooler at cryogenic temperature, and the hot end is maintained at room temperature. Heat conduction through the screens is determined from the temperature gradient in a calibrated heat flow sensor mounted between the cold end of the stacked screens and the GM cryocooler. The samples used for these experiments consisted of 400-mesh stainless steel screens, 400-mesh phosphor bronze screens, and two different porosities of 325-mesh stainless steel screens. The wire diameter of the 400-mesh stainless steel and phosphor bronze screens was 25.4 micrometers and the 325-mesh stainless steel screen wire diameters were 22.9 micrometers and 27.9 micrometers. Standard porosity values were used for the experimental data with additional porosity values used on selected experiments. The experimental results showed that the helium gas between each screen enhanced the heat conduction through the stacked screens by several orders of magnitude compared to that in vacuum. The conduction degradation factor is the ratio of actual heat conduction to the heat conduction where the regenerator material is assumed to be a solid rod of the same cross sectional area as the metal fraction of the screen. This factor was about 0.1 for the stainless steel and 0.022 for the phosphor bronze, and almost constant for the temperature range of 40 to 80 K at the cold end.

  5. Thermal Conductivity Measurements on consolidated Soil Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiferlin, K.; Heimberg, M.; Thomas, N.

    2007-08-01

    Heat transport in porous media such as soils and regolith is significantly reduced compared to the properties of compact samples of the same material. The bottle neck for solid state heat transport is the contact area between adjacent grains. For "dry" and unconsolidated materials the contact areas and thus the thermal conductivity are extremely small. Sintering and cementation are two processes that can increase the cross section of interstitial bonds signifcantly. On Mars, cementation can be caused by condensation of water or carbon dioxide ice from the vapor phase, or from salts and minerals that fall out from aqueous solutions. We produced several artificially cemented samples, using small glass beads of uniform size as soil analog. The cementation is achieved by initially molten wax that is mixed with the glass beads while liqiud. The wax freezes preferably at the contact points between grains, thus minimizing surface energy, and consolidates the samples. The thermal conductivity of these samples is then measured in vacuum. We present the results of these measurements and compare them with theoretical models. The observed range of thermal conductivity values can explain some, but not all of the variations in thermal intertia that can be seen in TES remote sensing data.

  6. AC loss measurements in HTS coil assemblies with hybrid coil structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhenan; Long, Nicholas J.; Staines, Mike; Badcock, Rodney A.; Bumby, Chris W.; Buckley, Robert G.; Amemiya, Naoyuki

    2016-09-01

    Both AC loss and wire cost in coil windings are critical factors for high temperature superconductor (HTS) AC machinery applications. We present AC loss measurement results in three HTS coil assemblies at 77 K and 65 K which have a hybrid coil structure comprising one central winding (CW) and two end windings (EWs) wound with ReBCO and BSCCO wires with different self-field I c values at 77 K. All AC loss results in the coil assemblies are hysteretic and the normalized AC losses in the coil assemblies at different temperatures can be scaled with the I c value of the coil assemblies. The normalised results show that AC loss in a coil assembly with BSCCO CW can be reduced by using EWs wound with high I c ReBCO wires, whilst further AC loss reduction can be achieved by replacing the BSCCO CW with ReBCO CW. The results imply that a flexible hybrid coil structure is possible which considers both AC loss and wire cost in coil assemblies.

  7. The change in dielectric constant, AC conductivity and optical band gaps of polymer electrolyte film: Gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Raghu, S. Subramanya, K. Sharanappa, C. Mini, V. Archana, K. Sanjeev, Ganesh Devendrappa, H.

    2014-04-24

    The effects of gamma (γ) irradiation on dielectric and optical properties of polymer electrolyte film were investigated. The dielectric constant and ac conductivity increases with γ dose. Also optical band gap decreased from 4.23 to 3.78ev after irradiation. A large dependence of the polymer properties on the irradiation dose was noticed. This suggests that there is a possibility of improving polymer electrolyte properties on gamma irradiation.

  8. Measuring thermal diffusivity of mechanical and optical grades of polycrystalline diamond using an AC laser calorimetry method

    SciTech Connect

    Rule, Toby D.; Cai, Wei; Wang, Hsin

    2013-01-01

    Because of its extremely high thermal conductivity, measuring the thermal conductivity or diffusivity of optical-grade diamond can be challenging. Various methods have been used to measure the thermal conductivity of thick diamond films. For the purposes of commercial quality control, the AC laser calorimetry method is appealing because it enables fairly rapid and convenient sample preparation and measurement. In this paper, the method is used to measure the thermal diffusivity of optical diamond. It is found that sample dimensions and measurement parameters are critical, and data analysis must be performed with great care. The results suggest that the method as it is applied to optical-grade diamond could be enhanced by a more powerful laser, higher frequency beam modulation, and post-processing based on 2D thermal simulation.

  9. Reflectometer distance measurement between parallel conductive plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hearn, Chase P.; Neece, Robert T.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents an analytic and experimental investigation of the measurement problem in which a reflectometer is used to determine the distance to a target that is a highly conductive surface parallel to the reflectometer antenna ground plane. These parallel surfaces constitute a waveguide (WG) which can contribute parasitic perturbations that seriously degrade the accuracy of the measurements. Two distinct parallel-plate-waveguide (PPWG) phenomena are described, and their effects on both frequency and time-domain reflectometers are considered. The time-domain processing approach was found to be superior to a representative frequency-domain phase-measurement approach because of less susceptibility to perturbations produced by edge reflections and immunity to phase capture. Experimental results are presented which show that a simple radiating system modification can suppress parallel-plate (PP) propagation. The addition of a thin layer of lossy mu-metal 'magnetic absorber' to the antenna ground plane allowed a measurement accuracy of 0.025 cm (0.01 in.) when a vector network analyzer (VNA) is used as a time-domain reflectometer.

  10. Calculation of the ac to dc resistance ratio of conductive nonmagnetic straight conductors by applying FEM simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riba, Jordi-Roger

    2015-09-01

    This paper analyzes the skin and proximity effects in different conductive nonmagnetic straight conductor configurations subjected to applied alternating currents and voltages. These effects have important consequences, including a rise of the ac resistance, which in turn increases power loss, thus limiting the rating for the conductor. Alternating current (ac) resistance is important in power conductors and bus bars for line frequency applications, as well as in smaller conductors for high frequency applications. Despite the importance of this topic, it is not usually analyzed in detail in undergraduate and even in graduate studies. To address this, this paper compares the results provided by available exact formulas for simple geometries with those obtained by means of two-dimensional finite element method (FEM) simulations and experimental results. The paper also shows that FEM results are very accurate and more general than those provided by the formulas, since FEM models can be applied in a wide range of electrical frequencies and configurations.

  11. Measuring Thermal Conductivity at LH2 Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selvidge, Shawn; Watwood, Michael C.

    2004-01-01

    For many years, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) produced reference materials for materials testing. One such reference material was intended for use with a guarded hot plate apparatus designed to meet the requirements of ASTM C177-97, "Standard Test Method for Steady-State Heat Flux Measurements and Thermal Transmission Properties by Means of the Guarded-Hot-Plate Apparatus." This apparatus can be used to test materials in various gaseous environments from atmospheric pressure to a vacuum. It allows the thermal transmission properties of insulating materials to be measured from just above ambient temperature down to temperatures below liquid hydrogen. However, NIST did not generate data below 77 K temperature for the reference material in question. This paper describes a test method used at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to optimize thermal conductivity measurements during the development of thermal protection systems. The test method extends the usability range of this reference material by generating data at temperatures lower than 77 K. Information provided by this test is discussed, as are the capabilities of the MSFC Hydrogen Test Facility, where advanced methods for materials testing are routinely developed and optimized in support of aerospace applications.

  12. The Wechsler ACS Social Perception Subtest: A Preliminary Comparison with Other Measures of Social Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kandalaft, Michelle R.; Didehbani, Nyaz; Cullum, C. Munro; Krawczyk, Daniel C.; Allen, Tandra T.; Tamminga, Carol A.; Chapman, Sandra B.

    2012-01-01

    Relative to other cognitive areas, there are few clinical measures currently available to assess social perception. A new standardized measure, the Wechsler Advanced Clinical Solutions (ACS) Social Perception subtest, addresses some limitations of existing measures; however, little is known about this new test. The first goal of this investigation…

  13. Human/Nonhuman Primate AC-PC Ratio - Considerations for Translational Brain Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Fiandaca, Massimo S.; Salegio, Ernesto Aguilar; Yin, Dali; Richardson, R. Mark; Valles, Francisco E.; Larson, Paul S.; Starr, Philip A.; Lonser, Russell R.; Bankiewicz, Krystof S.

    2011-01-01

    This comparative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analysis evaluated the ratio of AC-PC (anterior commissure to posterior commissure) distance measures in selected groups of humans and nonhuman primates (NHPs). An understanding of the basis of this ratio between primate species may allow more accurate translation of NHP stereotactic targeting measurements to upcoming human trials. MRI datasets of adult humans [n=21], and juvenile and adult NHPs (Macaca fascicularis [n=40], and Macaca mulatta [n=32]), were evaluated in a mid-sagittal plane to obtain the AC-PC distance measure for each examined subject. Two trained evaluators, blinded to each other’s results, carried out three separate measurements of the AC-PC length for each subject. Each observer carried out measurements of the entire dataset [n=93] before repeating the measurements two additional times. Previous dataset measures were not available for review at the time of subsequent measures. Inter- and intra-observer variabilities were not statistically significant. Minimal intraspecies variation was found in the AC-PC measurement of our human and NHP groups. We found significant interspecies differences, however, more between humans and NHPs, and less between the NHP groups. Regression analysis confirms the strong linear relationship of AC-PC distance based primarily on species in our study groups. Human/NHP AC-PC ratios varied between 2.1 to 2.3 based on the compared NHP species groups. We conclude that the scale differences in brain measurements between NHPs and humans described in this study allows improved translation of stereotactic targeting coordinates in future human clinical trials, which may lead to improved efficacy and safety. PMID:21185868

  14. Development of the Exams Data Analysis Spreadsheet as a Tool to Help Instructors Conduct Customizable Analyses of Student ACS Exam Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandriet, Alexandra; Holme, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The American Chemical Society Examinations Institute (ACS-EI) has recently developed the Exams Data Analysis Spread (EDAS) as a tool to help instructors conduct customizable analyses of their student data from ACS exams. The EDAS calculations allow instructors to analyze their students' performances both at the total score and individual item…

  15. Sensitive bridge circuit measures conductance of low-conductivity electrolyte solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, K.

    1967-01-01

    Compact bridge circuit measures sensitive and accurate conductance of low-conductivity electrolyte solutions. The bridge utilizes a phase sensitive detector to obtain a linear deflection of the null indicator relative to the measured conductance.

  16. Dielectric properties and study of AC electrical conduction mechanisms by non-overlapping small polaron tunneling model in Bis(4-acetylanilinium) tetrachlorocuprate(II) compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abkari, A.; Chaabane, I.; Guidara, K.

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, the synthesis and characterization of the Bis(4-acetylanilinium) tetrachlorocuprate(II) compound are presented. The structure of this compound is analyzed by X-ray diffraction which confirms the formation of single phase and is in good agreement the literature. Indeed, the Thermo gravimetric Analysis (TGA) shows that the decomposition of the compound is observed in the range of 420-520 K. However, the differential thermal analysis (DTA) indicates the presence of a phase transition at T=363 k. Furthermore, the dielectric properties and AC conductivity were studied over a temperature range (338-413 K) and frequency range (200 Hz-5 MHz) using complex impedance spectroscopy. Dielectric measurements confirmed such thermal analyses by exhibiting the presence of an anomaly in the temperature range of 358-373 K. The complex impedance plots are analyzed by an electrical equivalent circuit consisting of resistance, constant phase element (CPE) and capacitance. The activation energy values of two distinct regions are obtained from log σT vs 1000/T plot and are found to be E=1.27 eV (T<363 K) and E=1.09 eV (363 Kac conductivity, σac, has been analyzed by Jonscher's universal power law σ(ω)=σdc+Aωs. The value of s is to be temperature-dependent, which has a tendency to increase with temperature and the non-overlapping small polaron tunneling (NSPT) model is the most applicable conduction mechanism in the title compound. Complex impedance spectra of [C8H10NO]2CuCl4 at different temperatures.

  17. Development of Low-Frequency AC Voltage Measurement System Using Single-Junction Thermal Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amagai, Yasutaka; Nakamura, Yasuhiro

    Accurate measurement of low-frequency AC voltage using a digital multimeter at frequencies of 4-200Hz is a challenge in the mechanical engineering industry. At the National Metrology Institute of Japan, we developed a low-frequency AC voltage measurement system for calibrating digital multimeters operating at frequencies down to 1 Hz. The system uses a single-junction thermal converter and employs a theoretical model and a three-parameter sine wave fitting algorithm based on the least-square (LS) method. We calibrated the AC voltage down to 1Hz using our measurement system and reduced the measurement time compared with that using thin-film thermal converters. Our measurement results are verified by comparison with those of a digital sampling method using a high-resolution analog-to-digital converter; our data are in agreement to within a few parts in 105. Our proposed method enables us to measure AC voltage with an uncertainty of 25 μV/V (k = 1) at frequencies down to 4 Hz and a voltage of 10 V.

  18. A Preliminary Inclusive Measurement of Ac Using the SLD Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K

    2004-01-29

    We report a new measurement of A{sub c} using data obtained by SLD in 1993-1995. This measurement uses a vertex tag technique, where the selection of a c hemisphere is based on the reconstructed mass of the charm hadron decay vertex. The method uses the 3D vertexing capabilities of SLD's CCD vertex detector and the small and stable SLC beams to obtain a high hemisphere c-tagging efficiency and purity of 13% and 69%, respectively. Charged kaons identified by the CRID detector and the charge of the reconstructed vertex provide an efficient quark-antiquark tag. We obtain a preliminary 93-95 result of A{sub c} = 0.662 {+-} 0.068 {+-} 0.042.

  19. Fiber - Optic Devices as Temperature Sensors for Temperature Measurements in AC Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rablau, Corneliu; Lafrance, Joseph; Sala, Anca

    2007-10-01

    We report on the investigation of several fiber-optic devices as potential sensors for temperature measurements in AC magnetic fields. Common temperature sensors, such as thermocouples, thermistors or diodes, will create random and/or systematic errors when placed in a magnetic field. A DC magnetic field is susceptible to create a systematic offset to the measurement, while in an AC magnetic field of variable frequency random errors which cannot be corrected for can also be introduced. Fiber-Bragg-gratings and thin film filters have an inherent temperature dependence. Detrimental for their primary applications, the same dependence allows one to use such devices as temperature sensors. In an AC magnetic field, they present the advantage of being immune to electromagnetic interference. Moreover, for fiber-Bragg-gratings, the shape factor and small mass of the bare-fiber device make it convenient for temperature measurements on small samples. We studied several thin-film filters and fiber-Bragg-gratings and compared their temperature measurement capabilities in AC magnetic fields of 0 to 150 Gauss, 0 to 20 KHz to the results provided by off-the-shelf thermocouples and thermistor-based temperature measurement systems.

  20. Crystal structure, NMR study, dielectric relaxation and AC conductivity of a new compound [Cd3(SCN)2Br6(C2H9N2)2]n

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidi, K.; Kamoun, S.; Ayedi, H. Ferid; Arous, M.

    2013-11-01

    The crystal structure, the 13C NMR spectroscopy and the complex impedance have been carried out on [Cd3(SCN)2Br6(C2H9N2)2]n. Crystal structure shows a 2D polymeric network built up of two crystallographically independent cadmium atoms with two different octahedral coordinations. This compound exhibits a phase transition at (T=355±2 K) which has been characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-rays powder diffraction, AC conductivity and dielectric measurements. Examination of 13C CP/MAS line shapes shows indirect spin-spin coupling (14N and 13C) with a dipolar coupling constant of 1339 Hz. The AC conductivity of this compound has been carried out in the temperature range 325-376 K and the frequency range from 10-2 Hz to 10 MHz. The impedance data were well fitted to two equivalent electrical circuits. The results of the modulus study reveal the presence of two distinct relaxation processes. One, at low frequency side, is thermally activated due to the ionic conduction of the crystal and the other, at higher frequency side, gradually disappears when temperature reaches 355 K which is attributed to the localized dipoles in the crystal. Moreover, the temperature dependence of DC-conductivity in both phases follows the Arrhenius law and the frequency dependence of σ(ω,T) follows Jonscher's universal law. The near values of activation energies obtained from the conductivity data and impedance confirm that the transport is through the ion hopping mechanism.

  1. AC impedance analysis of ionic and electronic conductivities in electrode mixture layers for an all-solid-state lithium-ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siroma, Zyun; Sato, Tomohiro; Takeuchi, Tomonari; Nagai, Ryo; Ota, Akira; Ioroi, Tsutomu

    2016-06-01

    The ionic and electronic effective conductivities of an electrode mixture layers for all-solid-state lithium-ion batteries containing Li2Ssbnd P2S5 as a solid electrolyte were investigated by AC impedance measurements and analysis using a transmission-line model (TLM). Samples containing graphite (graphite electrodes) or LiNi0.5Co0.2Mn0.3O2 (NCM electrodes) as the active material were measured under a "substrate | sample | bulk electrolyte | sample | substrate" configuration (ion-electron connection) and a "substrate | sample | substrate" configuration (electron-electron connection). Theoretically, if the electronic resistance is negligibly small, which is the case with our graphite electrodes, measurement with the ion-electron connection should be effective for evaluating ionic conductivity. However, if the electronic resistance is comparable to the ionic resistance, which is the case with our NCM electrodes, the results with the ion-electron connection may contain some inherent inaccuracy. In this report, we theoretically and practically demonstrate the advantage of analyzing the results with the electron-electron connection, which gives both the ionic and electronic conductivities. The similarity of the behavior of ionic conductivity with the graphite and NCM electrodes confirms the reliability of this analysis.

  2. Measuring system for magnetostriction of silicon steel sheet under ac excitation using optical methods

    SciTech Connect

    Nakase, Tomoya; Nakano, Masanori; Fujiwara, Koji; Takahashi, Norio

    1998-07-01

    A measuring system for magnetostriction of silicon steel sheet using optical methods and a single sheet tester has been developed to establish a standard test method for IEC and JIS. Various factors affecting measurement accuracy and reproducibility of the developed system are examined.s Two optical instruments, such as a laser Doppler vibrometer and a heterodyne displacement meter, are compared. 3-D characteristics of magnetostriction under ac excitation in the rolling direction are measured up to 2.0 T.

  3. Monitoring colloidal stability of polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles using AC susceptibility measurements.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Adriana P; Barrera, Carola; Zayas, Yashira; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2010-02-15

    The application of the response of magnetic nanoparticles to oscillating magnetic fields to probe transitions in colloidal state and structure of polymer-coated nanoparticles is demonstrated. Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with narrow size distribution were prepared and shown to respond to oscillating magnetic fields through a Brownian relaxation mechanism, which is dependent on the mechanical coupling between the particle dipoles and the surrounding matrix. These nanoparticles were coated with covalently-attached poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM) or poly(N-isopropylmethacrylamide) (pNIPMAM) through free radical polymerization. The temperature induced transitions of colloidal suspensions of these nanoparticles were studied through a combination of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and AC susceptibility measurements. In the pNIPAM coated nanoparticles excellent agreement was found for a transition temperature of approximately 30 degrees C by all three methods, although the AC susceptibility measurements indicated aggregation which was not evident from the DLS results. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) results obtained for pNIPAM coated nanoparticles confirmed that aggregation indeed occurs above the lower critical transition temperature of pNIPAM. For the pNIPMAM coated nanoparticles DLS and AC susceptibility measurements indicated aggregation at a temperature of approximately 33-35 degrees C, much lower than the transition temperature peak at 40 degrees C observed by DSC. However, the transition observed by DSC is very broad, hence it is possible that aggregation begins to occur at temperatures lower than the peak, as indicated by the AC susceptibility and DLS results. These experiments and observations demonstrate the possibility of using AC susceptibility measurements to probe transitions in colloidal suspensions induced by external stimuli. Because magnetic measurements do not require optical transparency, these

  4. Electrical conductivity of lunar surface rocks - Laboratory measurements and implications for lunar interior temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwerer, F. C.; Huffman, G. P.; Fisher, R. M.; Nagata, T.

    1974-01-01

    Results are reported for laboratory measurements of the dc and low-frequency ac electrical conductivity of three lunar rocks with ferrous iron contents of 5 to 26 wt %. The measurements were made at temperatures ranging from 20 to 1000 C, and Mossbauer spectroscopy was used to determine the dependence of electrical conductivity on furnace atmosphere. It is found that the magnitude of electrical conductivity generally increases with increasing iron content. A comparison of the data on these samples with data on terrestrial olivines and pyroxenes shows that the electrical conductivity of anhydrous silicate minerals is influenced primarily by the concentration, oxidation state, and distribution of iron, while the silicate crystal structure is only of secondary importance. Lunar interior temperatures are deduced from experimental lunar conductivity profiles, and the resulting temperature-depth profiles are found to be consistent with those calculated for two different lunar evolutionary models as well as with various experimental constraints.

  5. Synthesis, crystal structure, NMR study and AC conductivity of [(C3H7)4N]2Cd2ClF5 compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajji, Rachid; Oueslati, Abderrazak; Body, Monique; Hlel, Faouzi

    2015-08-01

    The [(C3H7)4N]2Cd2ClF5 compound was crystallized in the triclinic system with space group P1. The crystal structure consists of organic-inorganic layers, stacked along direction. The organic part consists of two cations types. The inorganic layer is made up of Cd2ClF5 dimmers composed of two in-equivalent irregular tetrahedra sharing one edge (Cl-F). The MAS NMR spectra showed two, three and five isotropic resonances relative to 111Cd, 13C and 19F nuclei, respectively. DSC measurement disclosed a phase transition at around 380 K. The impedance spectroscopy and AC electrical conductivity measurements of our compound were taken from 209 Hz to 5 MHz over the temperature range of 350-381 K. Nyquist plots ( Z″ vs Z') show semicircle arcs at different temperatures, and an electrical equivalent circuit has been proposed to explain the impedance results. The circuits consist of the parallel combination of bulk resistance ( R), capacitance ( C) and fractal capacitance (CPE). The conductivity σ p follows the Arrhenius relation. The near value of activation energies obtained from the conductivity data and circuit equivalent confirms that the transport is through hopping mechanism. The analysis of the experimental data shows that the reorientation motion of [N(C3H7)4]+ cations and/or [Cd2ClF5]2- anions is probably responsible for the observed conductivity.

  6. Electrical conductivity measurements from the STRATCOM 8 experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. D.; Ho, K. J.; Half, L. C.; Croskey, C. L.; Olsen, R. O.

    1978-01-01

    A blunt probe experiment for measuring electrical conductivity was flown with the STRATCOM 8 instrument package. Data were obtained by the instrument throughout the entire measurement period. A preliminary analysis of the data indicates an enhancement in conductivity associated with the krypton discharge ionization lamp, particularly in negative conductivity. The conductivity values and their altitude dependence are consistent with previous balloon and rocket results.

  7. AC ionic conductivity and DC polarization method of lithium ion transport in PMMA-LiBF4 gel polymer electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, Z.; Mohd Ghazali, M. I.; Othman, L.; Md Isa, K. B.

    2012-01-01

    Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)-based gel polymer electrolytes comprising ethylene carbonate-propylene carbonate (EC/PC) mixed solvent plasticizer and various concentrations of lithium tetrafluoroborate (LiBF4) salt are prepared using a solvent casting technique. Electrical conductivity and transference number measurements were carried out to investigate conductivity and charge transport in the gel polymer electrolytes. The conductivity results show that the ionic conductivity of the samples increases when the amount of salt is increased, however decreases after reaching the optimum value. This result is consistent with the transference number measurements. The conductivity-frequency dependence plots show two distinct regions; i.e. at lower frequencies the conductivity increases with increasing frequency and the frequency independent plateau region at higher frequencies. The temperature-dependence conductivity of the films seems to obey the Arrhenius rule.

  8. 21 CFR 882.1550 - Nerve conduction velocity measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. 882.1550 Section 882.1550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... conduction velocity measurement device. (a) Identification. A nerve conduction velocity measurement device...

  9. 21 CFR 882.1550 - Nerve conduction velocity measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. 882.1550 Section 882.1550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... conduction velocity measurement device. (a) Identification. A nerve conduction velocity measurement device...

  10. 21 CFR 882.1550 - Nerve conduction velocity measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. 882.1550 Section 882.1550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... conduction velocity measurement device. (a) Identification. A nerve conduction velocity measurement device...

  11. 21 CFR 882.1550 - Nerve conduction velocity measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. 882.1550 Section 882.1550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... conduction velocity measurement device. (a) Identification. A nerve conduction velocity measurement device...

  12. 21 CFR 882.1550 - Nerve conduction velocity measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. 882.1550 Section 882.1550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... conduction velocity measurement device. (a) Identification. A nerve conduction velocity measurement device...

  13. Determination of the Si-conducting polymer interfacial properties using A-C impedance techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagasubramanian, G.; Di Stefano, Salvador; Moacanin, Jovan

    1985-01-01

    A study was made of the interfacial properties of poly(pyrrole) (PP) deposited electrochemically onto single crystal p-Si surfaces. The interfacial properties are dependent upon the counterions. The formation of 'quasi-ohmic' and 'nonohmic' contacts, respectively, of PP(ClO4) and PP films doped with other counterions (BF4 and para-toluene sulfonate) with p-Si, are explained in terms of the conductivity of these films and the flat band potential, V(fb), of PP relative to that of p-Si. The PP film seems to passivate or block intrinsic surface states present on the p-Si surface. The differences in the impedance behavior of para-toluene sulfonate doped and ClO4 doped PP are compared.

  14. Note: Development of a microfabricated sensor to measure thermal conductivity of picoliter scale liquid samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Byoung Kyoo; Yi, Namwoo; Park, Jaesung; Kim, Dongsik

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a thermal analysis device, which can measure thermal conductivity of picoliter scale liquid sample. We employ the three omega method with a microfabricated AC thermal sensor with nanometer width heater. The liquid sample is confined by a micro-well structure fabricated on the sensor surface. The performance of the instrument was verified by measuring the thermal conductivity of 27-picoliter samples of de-ionized (DI) water, ethanol, methanol, and DI water-ethanol mixtures with accuracies better than 3%. Furthermore, another analytical scheme allows real-time thermal conductivity measurement with 5% accuracy. To the best of our knowledge, this technique requires the smallest volume of sample to measure thermal property ever.

  15. Studies of structural, optical, dielectric relaxation and ac conductivity of different alkylbenzenesulfonic acids doped polypyrrole nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazarika, J.; Kumar, A.

    2016-01-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) nanofibers doped with alkylbenzenesulfonic acids (ABSA) have been synthesized using interfacial polymerization method. HRTEM studies confirm the formation of PPy nanofibers with average diameter ranging from 13 nm to 25 nm. Broad X-ray diffraction peak in 2 θ range 20-23.46° reveals amorphous structure of PPy nanofibers. The ordering or crystallinity of polymer chains increases, while their interplanar spacing (d) and interchain separation (R) decreases for short alkyl chain ABSA doped PPy nanofibers. FTIR studies reveal that short alkyl chain ABSA doped PPy nanofibers show higher value of "effective conjugation length". PPy nanofibers doped with short alkyl chain ABSA dopant exhibit smaller optical band gap. TGA studies show enhanced thermal stability of short alkyl chain ABSA doped PPy nanofibers. Decrease in dielectric permittivity ε ‧ (ω) with increasing frequency suggests presence of electrode polarization effects. Linear decrease in dielectric loss ε ″ (ω) with increasing frequency suggests dominant effect of dc conductivity process. Low value of non-exponential exponent β (<1) reveals non-Debye relaxation of charge carriers. Scaling of imaginary modulus (M ″) reveals that the charge carriers follow the same relaxation mechanism. Moreover, the charge carriers in PPy nanofibers follow the correlated barrier hopping (CBH) transport mechanism.

  16. In situ conductance measurements of copper phthalocyanine thin film growth on sapphire [0001].

    PubMed

    Murdey, Richard; Sato, Naoki

    2011-06-21

    The current flowing through a thin film of copper phthalocyanine vacuum deposited on a single crystal sapphire [0001] surface was measured during film growth from 0 to 93 nm. The results, expressed as conductance vs. nominal film thickness, indicate three distinct film growth regions. Conductive material forms below about 5 nm and again above 35 nm, but in the intermediate thicknesses the film conductance was observed to decrease with increasing film thickness. With the aid of ac-AFM topology images taken ex situ, the conductance results are explained based on the Stranski-Krastanov (2D + 3D) film growth mechanism, in which the formation of a thin wetting layer is followed by the growth of discrete islands that eventually coalesce into an interpenetrating, conductive network.

  17. Non-Contact Electrical Conductivity Measurement Technique for Molten Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, W. K.; Ishikawa, T.

    1998-01-01

    A non-contact technique of measuring the electrical conductivity (or resistivity) of conducting liquids while they are levitated by the high temperature electrostatic levitator in a high vacuum is reported.

  18. Crystal structure and AC conductivity mechanism of [N(C3H7)4]2CoCl4 compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutia, N.; Oueslati, A.; Ben Gzaiel, M.; Khirouni, K.

    2016-09-01

    We found that the new organic-inorganic compound [N(C3H7)4]2 CoCl4, crystallizes at room temperature in the centrosymmetric monoclinic system with P21/c space group. The atomic arrangement can be described by an alternation of organic and organic-inorganic layers parallel to the (001) plan. Indeed, the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies indicate a presence of three order-disorder phase transitions located at 332, 376 and 441 K. Furthermore, the conductivity was measured in the frequency range from 200 MHz to 5 MHz and temperatures between 318 K and 428 K using impedance spectroscopy. Analysis of the AC conductivity experimental data obtained, and the frequency exponent s with theoretical models reveals that the correlated barrier hopping (CBH) model is the appropriate mechanism for conduction in the title compound. The analysis of the dielectric constants ε ‧ and ε ″ versus temperature, at several frequencies, shows a distribution of relaxation times. This relaxation is probably due to the reorientational dynamics of [N(C3H7)4]+ cations.

  19. Direct Detection of Pure ac Spin Current by X-Ray Pump-Probe Measurements.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Shelford, L R; Shafer, P; Tan, A; Deng, J X; Keatley, P S; Hwang, C; Arenholz, E; van der Laan, G; Hicken, R J; Qiu, Z Q

    2016-08-12

    Despite recent progress in spin-current research, the detection of spin current has mostly remained indirect. By synchronizing a microwave waveform with synchrotron x-ray pulses, we use the ferromagnetic resonance of the Py (Ni_{81}Fe_{19}) layer in a Py/Cu/Cu_{75}Mn_{25}/Cu/Co multilayer to pump a pure ac spin current into the Cu_{75}Mn_{25} and Co layers, and then directly probe the spin current within the Cu_{75}Mn_{25} layer and the spin dynamics of the Co layer by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. This element-resolved pump-probe measurement unambiguously identifies the ac spin current in the Cu_{75}Mn_{25} layer. PMID:27563981

  20. Direct Detection of Pure ac Spin Current by X-Ray Pump-Probe Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Shelford, L. R.; Shafer, P.; Tan, A.; Deng, J. X.; Keatley, P. S.; Hwang, C.; Arenholz, E.; van der Laan, G.; Hicken, R. J.; Qiu, Z. Q.

    2016-08-01

    Despite recent progress in spin-current research, the detection of spin current has mostly remained indirect. By synchronizing a microwave waveform with synchrotron x-ray pulses, we use the ferromagnetic resonance of the Py (Ni81Fe19 ) layer in a Py /Cu /Cu75Mn25/Cu /Co multilayer to pump a pure ac spin current into the Cu75Mn25 and Co layers, and then directly probe the spin current within the Cu75Mn25 layer and the spin dynamics of the Co layer by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. This element-resolved pump-probe measurement unambiguously identifies the ac spin current in the Cu75Mn25 layer.

  1. Broadband Interferometer for Measuring Transmitted Wavefronts of Optical Bandpass Filters for HST (ACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boucarut, R. A.; Leviton, D. B.

    1998-01-01

    The transmitted wavefronts of optical filters for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) are characterized using the Wildly and Openly Modified Broadband Achromatic Twyman Green (WOMBAT) Interferometer developed in the NASA/GSFC Optics Branch's Diffraction Grating Evaluation Facility (DGEF). Because only four of thirty-three of ACS's optical bandpass filters transmit the 633 nm light of most commercial interferometers, a broadband interferometer is required to verify specified transmitted wavefront of ACS filters. WOMBAT's design is a hybrid of the BAT interferometer developed by JPL used for HST Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC-2) filters and a WYKO 400 phase shifting interferometer. It includes a broadband light source, monochromator, off-axis, parabolic collimating and camera mirrors, an aluminum-coated fused silica beam splitter, flat retroreflecting mirrors for the test and reference arms, and a LTV-sensitive CCD camera. An outboarded, piezo-electric phase shifter holds the flat mirror in the interferometer's reference arm. The interferometer is calibrated through interaction between the WYKO system's software and WONMAT hardware for the test wavelength of light entering the beam splitter. Phase-shifted interferograms of the filter mounted in the test arm are analyzed using WYKO's Vision' software. Filters as large as 90 mm in diameter have been measured over a wavelength range from 200 to 1100 nm with a sensitivity of lambda/200 rms at lambda = 633 nm. Results of transmitted wavefront measurements are shown for ACS fixed band pass and spatially-variable bandpass filters for a variety of wavelengths.

  2. Probe for measurements of density/conductivity in flows of conducting fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xuejun; Brown, Garry L.

    2006-04-01

    A probe utilizing the bipolar pulse method to measure the density of a conducting fluid has been developed. The probe is specially designed such that the concentration of a stream tube can be sampled continuously. The density was determined indirectly from the measurement of solution conductivity. The probe was calibrated using standard NaCl solutions of varying molarity and was able to rapidly determine the density of a fluid with continuously varying conductance. Measurements of the conductivity profiles, corresponding density profiles, and their fluctuation levels are demonstrated in a channel flow with an electrolyte injected from a slot in one wall.

  3. Recent Advances in AC-DC Transfer Measurements Using Thin-Film Thermal Converters

    SciTech Connect

    WUNSCH,THOMAS F.; KINARD,JOSEPH R.; MANGINELL,RONALD P.; LIPE,THOMAS E.; SOLOMON JR.,OTIS M.; JUNGLING,KENNETH C.

    2000-12-08

    New standards for ac current and voltage measurements, thin-film multifunction thermal converters (MJTCS), have been fabricated using thin-film and micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Improved sensitivity and accuracy over single-junction thermoelements and targeted performance will allow new measurement approaches in traditionally troublesome areas such as the low frequency and high current regimes. A review is presented of new microfabrication techniques and packaging methods that have resulted from a collaborative effort at Sandia National Laboratories and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (MHZ).

  4. Ultrafast thermoreflectance techniques for measuring thermal conductivity and interface thermal conductance of thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jie; Tang, Dawei; Wang, Wei; Liu, Jun; Holub, Kristopher W.; Yang, Ronggui

    2010-11-01

    The thermal conductivity of thin films and interface thermal conductance of dissimilar materials play a critical role in the functionality and the reliability of micro/nanomaterials and devices. The ultrafast laser-based thermoreflectance techniques, including the time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) and the frequency-domain thermoreflectance (FDTR) techniques are excellent approaches for the challenging measurements of interface thermal conductance of dissimilar materials. Both TDTR and FDTR signals on a trilayer structure which consists of a thin film metal transducer, a target thin film, and a substrate are studied by a thermal conduction model. The sensitivity of TDTR signals to the thermal conductivity of thin films is analyzed to show that the modulation frequency needs to be selected carefully for a high precision TDTR measurement. However, such a frequency selection, which is closely related to the unknown thermal properties and consequently hard to make before TDTR measurement, can be avoided in FDTR measurement. We also found out that in FDTR method, the heat transport in a trilayer structure could be divided into three regimes, and the thermal conductivity of thin films and interface thermal conductance can be obtained subsequently by fitting the data in different frequency range of one FDTR measurement, based on the regime map. Both TDTR and FDTR measurements are then conducted along with the analysis to obtain the thermal conductivity of SiO2 thin films and interface thermal conductance between SiO2 and Si. FDTR measurement results agree well with the TDTR measurements, but promises to be a much easier implementation than TDTR measurements.

  5. Electrical conductivity measurements of nanofluids and development of new correlations.

    PubMed

    Konakanchi, Hanumantharao; Vajjha, Ravikanth; Misra, Debasmita; Das, Debendra

    2011-08-01

    In this study the electrical conductivity of aluminum oxide (Al2O3), silicon dioxide (SiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles dispersed in propylene glycol and water mixture were measured in the temperature range of 0 degrees C to 90 degrees C. The volumetric concentration of nanoparticles in these fluids ranged from 0 to 10% for different nanofluids. The particle sizes considered were from 20 nm to 70 nm. The electrical conductivity measuring apparatus and the measurement procedure were validated by measuring the electrical conductivity of a calibration fluid, whose properties are known accurately. The measured electrical conductivity values agreed within +/- 1% with the published data reported by the manufacturer. Following the validation, the electrical conductivities of different nanofluids were measured. The measurements showed that electrical conductivity of nanofluids increased with an increase in temperature and also with an increase in particle volumetric concentration. For the same nanofluid at a fixed volumetric concentration, the electrical conductivity was found to be higher for smaller particle sizes. From the experimental data, empirical models were developed for three nanofluids to express the electrical conductivity as functions of temperature, volumetric concentration and the size of the nanoparticles.

  6. Mutation Glu82Lys in lamin A/C gene is associated with cardiomyopathy and conduction defect

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Hu; Wang Jizheng; Zheng Weiyue; Wang Xiaojian; Wang Shuxia; Song Lei; Zou Yubao; Yao Yan; Hui Rutai . E-mail: huirutai@sglab.org

    2006-05-26

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is a form of heart muscle disease characterized by impaired systolic function and ventricular dilation. The mutations in lamin A/C gene have been linked to dilated cardiomyopathy. We screened genetic mutations in a large Chinese family of 50 members including members with dilated cardiomyopathy and found a Glu82Lys substitution mutation in the rod domain of the lamin A/C protein in eight family members, three of them have been diagnosed as dilated cardiomyopathy, one presented with heart dilation. The pathogenic mechanism of lamin A/C gene defect is poorly understood. Glu82Lys mutated lamin A/C and wild type protein was transfected into HEK293 cells. The mutated protein was not properly localized at the inner nuclear membrane and the emerin protein, which interacts with lamin A/C, was also aberrantly distributed. The nuclear membrane structure was disrupted and heterochromatin was aggregated aberrantly in the nucleus of the HEK293 cells stably transfected with mutated lamin A/C gene as determined by transmission electron microscopy.

  7. Rapid thermal conductivity measurements for combinatorial thin films.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Matthew G; Hill, Ian G

    2013-05-01

    A simple and inexpensive automated method for determining the thermal conductivity of a combinatorial library of thin films is demonstrated by measuring the thermal conductivity of a sputtered silicon dioxide film of varying thickness deposited on single crystal silicon. Using 3ω measurements, two methods for calculating the substrate thermal conductivity and two methods for determining the film thermal conductivity are demonstrated and compared. The substrate thermal conductivity was found to be 139 ± 3 W/m·K. Using the measured variation in film thickness, the film thermal conductivity was found to be 1.11 ± 0.05 W/m·K, in excellent agreement with published values for sputtered SiO2, demonstrating the accuracy of the method.

  8. Mechanism and flow measurement of AC electrowetting propulsion on free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Junqi; Cho, Sung Kwon

    2015-03-01

    A free surface in contact with a floating object can be vertically oscillated by applying an alternating current electrowetting-on-dielectric (AC EWOD). The oscillation of the free surface generates a propelling force on the centimeter-sized floating object. This paper describes a propulsion mechanism in free-surface oscillation along with its experimental results. Flow visualizations, wave patterns measured by the free-surface synthetic schlieren method, and PIV measurements show that the oscillation generates a capillary Stokes drift on the water surface and two counter-rotating spiral underwater vortices, leading to an ejecting flow (streaming flow) normal to the wall of the boat. The momentum of the ejecting flow produces a reaction force on the wall and ultimately propels the floating boat. The propulsion speed of the boat highly depends on the amplitude, frequency, and shape of the AC EWOD signal. Curve fittings based on the Stokes drift well match the experimental measurements of propulsion speed. The width of the EWOD electrode also has significant effects on the boat speed.

  9. Measurement of thermal conductivity in proton irradiated silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khafizov, Marat; Yablinsky, Clarissa; Allen, Todd R.; Hurley, David H.

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the influence of proton irradiation on thermal conductivity in single crystal silicon. We apply a laser based modulated thermoreflectance technique to measure the change in conductivity of the thin layer damaged by proton irradiation. Unlike time domain thermoreflectance techniques that require application of a metal film, we perform our spatial domain measurement on uncoated samples. This provides greater sensitivity to the change in conductivity of the thin damaged layer. Using sample temperature as a parameter provides a means to deduce the primary defect structures that limit thermal transport. We find that under high temperature irradiation the degradation of thermal conductivity is caused primarily by extended defects.

  10. Dielectric Properties and AC Conduction of 5 wt % ZnBO Doped (Ba,Sr)TiO3 Ceramics for Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramics Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Se-Ho; Koh, Jung-Hyuk

    2009-04-01

    ZnBO doped (Ba0.5Sr0.5)TiO3 (BST) ceramic was synthesized by conventional mixed oxide method. 5 wt % ZnBO addition to the BST has lowered the sintering temperature of BST from 1350 to 1100 °C. From the X-ray diffraction analysis, we found that the 5 wt % ZnBO doped BST has the perovskite structure, and any pryo phase was not observed. The dielectric properties and ac conductivity have been investigated at temperature range from 30 to 130 °C with various frequencies (1-100 kHz). The real part of relative dielectric permittivity ɛr' was decreased with increasing the temperature and the frequency. The activation energy for conduction process was calculated from the slope of ac conductivity at 1 kHz. The activation energy calculated through the Arrhenius law was 0.42 eV. In this paper, we will discuss the low-frequency dielectric relaxation and ac conductivity of 5 wt % ZnBO doped BST ceramics in relation to the electrical conduction.

  11. Granular Responses of GdBa2Cu3O7-δ Using ac Magnetic Susceptibility Measurement under ac and dc Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namuco, S. B.; Lao, M. L.; Sarmago, R. V.

    Granularity of bulk materials has a great impact on the characterization of superconductors as well as its path towards room temperature applications. Bulk GdBCO that has crystal formation and Tc close to YBCO were fabricated using the conventional solid state route method. AC magnetic susceptibility measurement is done on the sample to observe the granular responses brought about by small magnetic field values that is superimposed with DC magnetic field. Results show that compared to YBCO, GdBCO show more sensitive behaviour with the addition of DC magnetic field. It is shown in the results that abrupt response in the AC loss peaks observed in χ" is more prominent in GdBCO even at lower applied magnetic fields.

  12. Surface conductivity measurements in nanometric to micrometric foam films.

    PubMed

    Bonhomme, Oriane; Mounier, Anne; Simon, Gilles; Biance, Anne-Laure

    2015-05-20

    Foam films (a liquid lamella in air covered by surfactants) are tools of choice for nanofluidic characterization as they are intrinsically nanometric. Their size is indeed fixed by a balance between external pressure and particular molecular interactions in the vicinity of interfaces. To probe the exact nature of these interfaces, different characterizations can be performed. Among them, conductivity in confined systems is a direct probe of the electrostatic environment in the vicinity of the surface. Therefore, we designed a dedicated experiment to measure this conductivity in a cylindrical bubble coupled to interferometry for film thickness characterization. We then show that this conductivity depends on the surfactant nature. These conductivity measurements have been performed in an extremely confined system, the so called Newton black foam films. Unexpectedly in this case, a conductivity close to surface conductivity is recovered.

  13. AC photovoltaic module magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, C.; Chang, G.J.; Reyes, A.B.; Whitaker, C.M.

    1997-12-31

    Implementation of alternating current (AC) photovoltaic (PV) modules, particularly for distributed applications such as PV rooftops and facades, may be slowed by public concern about electric and magnetic fields (EMF). This paper documents magnetic field measurements on an AC PV module, complementing EMF research on direct-current PV modules conducted by PG and E in 1993. Although not comprehensive, the PV EMF data indicate that 60 Hz magnetic fields (the EMF type of greatest public concern) from PV modules are comparable to, or significantly less than, those from household appliances. Given the present EMF research knowledge, AC PV module EMF may not merit considerable concern.

  14. Quantum conductance in electrodeposited nanocontacts and magnetoresistance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhoussine, F.; Encinas, A.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, S.; Piraux, L.

    2003-05-01

    We present conductance and magnetoresistance measurements in magnetic Ni-Ni and Co-Ni nanocontacts prepared by electrodeposition within the pores of a track-etched polymer membrane. At room temperature, Ni-Ni constrictions show broad quantization plateaus of conductance during their dissolution into units of e2/h, as expected for ferromagnetic ballistic nanocontacts. Additionally, positive and negative magnetoresistance has been measured in Co-Ni nanocontacts.

  15. In situ measurement of conductivity during nanocomposite film deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blattmann, Christoph O.; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.

    2016-05-01

    Flexible and electrically conductive nanocomposite films are essential for small, portable and even implantable electronic devices. Typically, such film synthesis and conductivity measurement are carried out sequentially. As a result, optimization of filler loading and size/morphology characteristics with respect to film conductivity is rather tedious and costly. Here, freshly-made Ag nanoparticles (nanosilver) are made by scalable flame aerosol technology and directly deposited onto polymeric (polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate)) films during which the resistance of the resulting nanocomposite is measured in situ. The formation and gas-phase growth of such flame-made nanosilver, just before incorporation onto the polymer film, is measured by thermophoretic sampling and microscopy. Monitoring the nanocomposite resistance in situ reveals the onset of conductive network formation by the deposited nanosilver growth and sinternecking. The in situ measurement is much faster and more accurate than conventional ex situ four-point resistance measurements since an electrically percolating network is detected upon its formation by the in situ technique. Nevertheless, general resistance trends with respect to filler loading and host polymer composition are consistent for both in situ and ex situ measurements. The time lag for the onset of a conductive network (i.e., percolation) depends linearly on the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the host polymer. This is attributed to the increased nanoparticle-polymer interaction with decreasing Tg. Proper selection of the host polymer in combination with in situ resistance monitoring therefore enable the optimal preparation of conductive nanocomposite films.

  16. Time-resolved Measurements of Spontaneous Magnetic Deflagration of Mn12 tBuAc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yizhang; Kent, A. D.; Zhang, Qing; Sarachik, M. P.; Baker, M. L.; Garanin, D. A.; Mhesn, Najah; Lampropoulos, Christos

    Magnetic deflagration in molecular magnets has been triggered by heat pulses and acoustic waves. In this work we report spontaneous magnetic deflagration (i.e. deflagration that occurs without an external trigger) in the axially symmetric single molecule magnet Mn12 tBuAc . Magnetic hysteresis measurements show steps due to resonant quantum tunneling (RQT) below 1K, confirming the spin-Hamiltonian parameters for this material and previous results. Deflagration speeds measured with a newly constructed higher bandwidth (2MHz) setup will be presented as a function of transverse and longitudinal fields Hx ⊗Hz both on and off resonance. A large increase in front velocity near RQT steps is observed in experiments with swept transverse fields and will be discussed in light of models of deflagration. Work supported by NSF-DMR-1309202 (NYU); ARO W911NF-13-1-0125 (CCNY); DMR-1161571(Lehman); Cottrell College Science Award (UNF).

  17. Test Results of the AC Field Measurements of Fermilab Booster Corrector Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    DiMarco, E.Joseph; Harding, D.J.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Lamm, M.J.; Makulski, A.; Nehring, R.; Orris, D.F.; Schlabach, P.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, Michael Albert; /Fermilab

    2008-06-25

    Multi-element corrector magnets are being produced at Fermilab that enable correction of orbits and tunes through the entire cycle of the Booster, not just at injection. The corrector package includes six different corrector elements--normal and skew orientations of dipole, quadrupole, and sextupole--each independently powered. The magnets have been tested during typical AC ramping cycles at 15Hz using a fixed coil system to measure the dynamic field strength and field quality. The fixed coil is comprised of an array of inductive pick-up coils around the perimeter of a cylinder which are sampled simultaneously at 100 kHz with 24-bit ADC's. The performance of the measurement system and a summary of the field results are presented and discussed.

  18. Measurement of volume resistivity/conductivity of metallic alloy in inhibited seawater by optical interferometry techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Habib, K.

    2011-03-15

    Optical interferometry techniques were used for the first time to measure the volume resistivity/conductivity of carbon steel samples in seawater with different concentrations of a corrosion inhibitor. In this investigation, the real-time holographic interferometry was carried out to measure the thickness of anodic dissolved layer or the total thickness, U{sub total}, of formed oxide layer of carbon steel samples during the alternating current (ac) impedance of the samples in blank seawater and in 5-20 ppm TROS C-70 inhibited seawater, respectively. In addition, a mathematical model was derived in order to correlate between the ac impedance (resistance) and the surface (orthogonal) displacement of the surface of the samples in solutions. In other words, a proportionality constant [resistivity ({rho}) or conductivity ({sigma})= 1/{rho}] between the determined ac impedance [by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique] and the orthogonal displacement (by the optical interferometry techniques) was obtained. The value of the resistivity of the carbon steel sample in the blank seawater was found similar to the value of the resistivity of the carbon steel sample air, around 1 x 10{sup -5}{Omega} cm. On the contrary, the measured values of the resistivity of the carbon steel samples were 1.85 x 10{sup 7}, 3.35 x 10{sup 7}, and 1.7 x 10{sup 7}{Omega} cm in 5, 10, and 20 ppm TROS C-70 inhibited seawater solutions, respectively. Furthermore, the determined value range of {rho} of the formed oxide layers, from 1.7 x 10{sup 7} to 3.35 x 10{sup 7}{Omega} cm, is found in a reasonable agreement with the one found in literature for the Fe oxide-hydroxides, i.e., goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH) and for the lepidocrocite ({gamma}-FeOOH), 1 x 10{sup 9}{Omega} cm. The {rho} value of the Fe oxide-hydroxides, 1 x 10{sup 9}{Omega} cm, was found slightly higher than the {rho} value range of the formed oxide layer of the present study. This is because the former value was determined

  19. Measurement of thermal conductivity in proton irradiated silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Marat Khafizov; Clarissa Yablinsky; Todd Allen; David Hurley

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the influence of proton irradiation on thermal conductivity in single crystal silicon. We apply laser based modulated thermoreflectance technique to extract the change in conductivity of the thin layer damaged by proton irradiation. Unlike time domain thermoreflectance techniques that require application of a metal film, we perform our measurement on uncoated samples. This provides greater sensitivity to the change in conductivity of the thin damaged layer. Using sample temperature as a parameter provides a means to deduce the primary defect structures that limit thermal transport. We find that under high temperature irradiation the degradation of thermal conductivity is caused primarily by extended defects.

  20. Measurements of prompt radiation induced conductivity of Kapton.

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, Eric F.; Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Hartman, E. Frederick; Stringer, Thomas Arthur

    2010-10-01

    We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity in thin samples of Kapton (polyimide) at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Three mil samples were irradiated with a 0.5 {mu}s pulse of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E9 to 1E10 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 2 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Analysis rendered prompt conductivity coefficients between 6E-17 and 2E-16 mhos/m per rad/s, depending on the dose rate and the pulse width.

  1. Indirect measurement of thermal conductivity in silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Pennelli, Giovanni Nannini, Andrea; Macucci, Massimo

    2014-02-28

    We report indirect measurements of thermal conductivity in silicon nanostructures. We have exploited a measurement technique based on the Joule self-heating of silicon nanowires. A standard model for the electron mobility has been used to determine the temperature through the accurate measurement of the nanowire resistance. We have applied this technique to devices fabricated with a top-down process that yields nanowires together with large silicon areas used both as electrical and as thermal contacts. As there is crystalline continuity between the nanowires and the large contact areas, our thermal conductivity measurements are not affected by any temperature drop due to the contact thermal resistance. Our results confirm the observed reduction of thermal conductivity in nanostructures and are comparable with those previously reported in the literature, achieved with more complex measurement techniques.

  2. Estimation of Ionospheric Conductivity Based on the Measurements by Superdarn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eun-Ah; An, Byung-Ho; Yi, Yu

    2002-06-01

    The ionosphere plays an important role in the electrodynamics of space environment. In particular, the information on the ionospheric conductivity distribution is indispensable in understanding the electrodynamics of the magnetosphere and ionosphere coupling study. To meet such a requirement, several attempts have been made to estimate the conductivity distribution over the polar ionosphere. As one of such attempts we compare the ionospheric plasma convection patterns obtained from the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN), from which the electric field distribution is estimated, and the simultaneously measured ground magnetic disturbance. Specifically, the electric field measured from the Goose Bay and Stokkseyri radars and magnetic disturbance data obtained from the west coast chain of Greenland are compared. In order to estimate ionospheric conductivity distribution with these information, the overhead infinite sheet current approximation is employed. As expected, the Hall conductance, height-integrated conductivity, shows a wide enhancement along the center of the auroral electrojet. However, Pedersen conductance shows negative values over a wide portion of the auroral oval region, a physically unacceptable situation. To alleviate this problem, the effect of the field-aligned current is taken into account. As a result, the region with negative Pedersen conductance disappears significantly, suggesting that the effect of the field-aligned current should be taken into account, when one wants to estimate ionospheric conductance based on ground magnetic disturbance and electric field measurements by radars.

  3. Non-Contact Conductivity Measurement for Automated Sample Processing Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beegle, Luther W.; Kirby, James P.

    2012-01-01

    A new method has been developed for monitoring and control of automated sample processing and preparation especially focusing on desalting of samples before analytical analysis (described in more detail in Automated Desalting Apparatus, (NPO-45428), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 34, No. 8 (August 2010), page 44). The use of non-contact conductivity probes, one at the inlet and one at the outlet of the solid phase sample preparation media, allows monitoring of the process, and acts as a trigger for the start of the next step in the sequence (see figure). At each step of the muti-step process, the system is flushed with low-conductivity water, which sets the system back to an overall low-conductivity state. This measurement then triggers the next stage of sample processing protocols, and greatly minimizes use of consumables. In the case of amino acid sample preparation for desalting, the conductivity measurement will define three key conditions for the sample preparation process. First, when the system is neutralized (low conductivity, by washing with excess de-ionized water); second, when the system is acidified, by washing with a strong acid (high conductivity); and third, when the system is at a basic condition of high pH (high conductivity). Taken together, this non-contact conductivity measurement for monitoring sample preparation will not only facilitate automation of the sample preparation and processing, but will also act as a way to optimize the operational time and use of consumables

  4. Atomic Force Microscope Conductivity Measurements on Single Ferritin Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Degao; Watt, Gerald D.; Harb, John N.; Davis, Robert C.

    2003-10-01

    We will present electrical measurement on the conductivity of ferritin molecules by conductive AFM. The high stability of ferritin relative to other proteins makes them attractive for nanotechnology applications such as nanoscale batteries. Ferritins are very stable, biological molecules found widely distributed in nature that are responsible for metabolic control of iron in living systems. Ferritins consist of 24 protein subunits that are arrayed to form spherical molecules 12 nm in external diameter with a hollow interior about 8 nm in diameter. The hollow ferritin interior can be filled with up to 4500 iron atoms as Fe(OH)3. Ferritin molecules were self assembled on gold surfaces to form a single ferritin monolayer. AFM was used to study this assembly on atomically flat gold surfaces. Conductivity of the ferritin protein shell of single ferritin molecule was investigated by conductive AFM and compared to conductivity measurements on films of ferritin molecules.

  5. Analytic approach to the a.c. conductance method for rapid characterization of interface states in MOS structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadava, R. D. S.

    1990-01-01

    Nicollian and Goetzberger's well known integral expression for the equivalent parallel conductance due to interface states Gp/ ω has been given a simple analytical representation which is valid under the condition that interface potential fluctuation parameter σ > 1.5. Previous methods of conductance analysis based upon numerical and/or graphical construction are provided with alternative analytic relations. The earlier parametric numerical relations like ξ p, fw, fD and ln( ξ+/ ξ-) vsσ are described very well by analytic expressions in this paper. A new relation is presented to determine interface state time constant from the width of conductance peak. A new method is presented to determine dependence of σ on interface band bending from Gp/ ω vs bias measurements at just two frequencies. The expedient method of Nicollian, Goetzberger and Lopez utilises the same two curves to determine distribution of interface state density Nss and capture cross section σ p across the band gap. Therefore using the present new method for σ determination and other analytical relations for N ss and σ p determination, the expediency of their method is greatly enhanced. Complete conductance analysis for rapid characterization of the interface is shown to become now a simple straight forward affair, and the amount of data required is also substantially reduced.

  6. Conductive probe AFM measurements of conjugated molecular wires.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Takao; Mizutani, Wataru; Liang, Tien-Tzu; Azehara, Hiroaki; Miyake, Koji; Sasaki, Shinya; Tokumoto, Hiroshi

    2003-12-01

    The electrical conduction of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) made from conjugated molecules was measured using conductive probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM), with a focus on the molecular structural effect on conduction. First, the electrical conduction of SAMs made from phenylene oligomer SAMs was measured. The resistances through the monolayers increased exponentially with an increase in molecular length and the decay constants of transconductance beta were about 0.45 to 0.61 A(-1) measured at lower bias region. We further investigated the influence of applied load on the resistances. The resistances through terphenyl SAMs increased with an increase in the applied load up to 14 nN. Second, using an insertion technique into insulating alkanethiol SAMs, the electrical conduction of single conjugated terphenyl methanethiol and oligo(para-phenylenevinylene) (OPV) molecules embedded into insulating alkanethiol SAMs were measured. Electrical currents through these single molecules of OPVs were estimated to be larger than those through single terphenyl molecules, suggesting that the OPV structure can increase the electrical conduction of single molecules. Third, apparent negative differential resistance (NDR) was observed at higher bias measurements of SAMs. The appearance of NDR might be related to roughness of SAM surface, because apparent NDR was often observed on rough surfaces. In any case, the tip-molecule contact condition strongly affected carrier transport through metal tip/SAM/metal junction.

  7. In vivo electrical conductivity measurements during and after tumor electroporation: conductivity changes reflect the treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Ivorra, Antoni; Al-Sakere, Bassim; Rubinsky, Boris; Mir, Lluis M

    2009-10-01

    Electroporation is the phenomenon in which cell membrane permeability is increased by exposing the cell to short high-electric-field pulses. Reversible electroporation treatments are used in vivo for gene therapy and drug therapy while irreversible electroporation is used for tissue ablation. Tissue conductivity changes induced by electroporation could provide real-time feedback of the treatment outcome. Here we describe the results from a study in which fibrosarcomas (n = 39) inoculated in mice were treated according to different electroporation protocols, some of them known to cause irreversible damage. Conductivity was measured before, within the pulses, in between the pulses and for up to 30 min after treatment. Conductivity increased pulse after pulse. Depending on the applied electroporation protocol, the conductivity increase after treatment ranged from 10% to 180%. The most significant conclusion from this study is the fact that post-treatment conductivity seems to be correlated with treatment outcome in terms of reversibility.

  8. Ion Channel Conductance Measurements on a Silicon-Based Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilk, S. J.; Aboud, S.; Petrossian, L.; Goryll, M.; Tang, J. M.; Eisenberg, R. S.; Saraniti, M.; Goodnick, S. M.; Thornton, T. J.

    2006-05-01

    Conductance measurements of the transmembrane porin protein OmpF as a function of pH and bath concentration have been made with both a microfabricated silicon substrate device and a commercially available polystyrene aperture. Ion transport through the channel was simulated in atomic detail: the measured current was compared with theoretically calculated current, using a Brownian Dynamics kernel coupled to the Poisson equation by a P3M force field. The explicit protein structure and fixed charge distribution in the protein are calculated using the molecular dynamics code, GROMACS. Reasonable agreement is obtained in the simulated versus measured conductance over the range of experimental concentrations studied.

  9. Optical sensor for heat conduction measurement in biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez-Arroyo, A.; Sanchez-Perez, C.; Aleman-Garcia, N.

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents the design of a heat flux sensor using an optical fiber system to measure heat conduction in biological tissues. This optoelectronic device is based on the photothermal beam deflection of a laser beam travelling in an acrylic slab this deflection is measured with a fiber optic angle sensor. We measure heat conduction in biological samples with high repeatability and sensitivity enough to detect differences in tissues from three chicken organs. This technique could provide important information of vital organ function as well as the detect modifications due to degenerative diseases or physical damage caused by medications or therapies.

  10. pH measurement of low-conductivity waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Busenberg, Eurybiades; Plummer, L.N.

    1987-01-01

    pH is an important and commonly measured parameter of precipitation and other natural waters. The various sources of errors in pH measurement were analyzed and procedures for improving the accuracy and precision of pH measurements in natural waters with conductivities of < 100 uS/cm at 25 C are suggested. Detailed procedures are given for the preparation of dilute sulfuric acid standards to evaluate the performance of pH electrodes in low conductivity waters. A daily check of the pH of dilute sulfuric acid standards and deionized water saturated with a gas mixture of low carbon dioxide at partial pressure (air) prior to the measurement of the pH of low conductivity waters is suggested. (Author 's abstract)

  11. Sensitivity of EEG and MEG measurements to tissue conductivity.

    PubMed

    Gençer, Nevzat G; Acar, Can E

    2004-03-01

    Monitoring the electrical activity inside the human brain using electrical and magnetic field measurements requires a mathematical head model. Using this model the potential distribution in the head and magnetic fields outside the head are computed for a given source distribution. This is called the forward problem of the electro-magnetic source imaging. Accurate representation of the source distribution requires a realistic geometry and an accurate conductivity model. Deviation from the actual head is one of the reasons for the localization errors. In this study, the mathematical basis for the sensitivity of voltage and magnetic field measurements to perturbations from the actual conductivity model is investigated. Two mathematical expressions are derived relating the changes in the potentials and magnetic fields to conductivity perturbations. These equations show that measurements change due to secondary sources at the perturbation points. A finite element method (FEM) based formulation is developed for computing the sensitivity of measurements to tissue conductivities efficiently. The sensitivity matrices are calculated for both a concentric spheres model of the head and a realistic head model. The rows of the sensitivity matrix show that the sensitivity of a voltage measurement is greater to conductivity perturbations on the brain tissue in the vicinity of the dipole, the skull and the scalp beneath the electrodes. The sensitivity values for perturbations in the skull and brain conductivity are comparable and they are, in general, greater than the sensitivity for the scalp conductivity. The effects of the perturbations on the skull are more pronounced for shallow dipoles, whereas, for deep dipoles, the measurements are more sensitive to the conductivity of the brain tissue near the dipole. The magnetic measurements are found to be more sensitive to perturbations near the dipole location. The sensitivity to perturbations in the brain tissue is much greater when

  12. Electrical conductivity measurements on disk-shaped samples.

    PubMed

    de Boor, J; Zabrocki, K; Frohring, J; Müller, E

    2014-07-01

    We have developed a sample holder design that allows for electrical conductivity measurements on a disk-shaped sample. The sample holder design is based on and compatible with popular measurement systems that are currently restricted to bar-shaped samples. The geometrical correction factors which account for the adjusted measurement configuration were calculated using finite element modeling for a broad range of sample and measurement geometries. We also show that the modeling results can be approximated by a simple analytical fit function with excellent accuracy. The proposed sample holder design is compatible with a concurrent measurement of the Seebeck coefficient. The chosen sample geometry is furthermore compatible with a thermal conductivity measurement using a laser flash apparatus. A complete thermoelectric characterization without cutting the sample is thus possible.

  13. Comparison of DC and AC Transport in 1.5-7.5 nm Oligophenylene Imine Molecular Wires across Two Junction Platforms: Eutectic Ga-In versus Conducting Probe Atomic Force Microscope Junctions.

    PubMed

    Sangeeth, C S Suchand; Demissie, Abel T; Yuan, Li; Wang, Tao; Frisbie, C Daniel; Nijhuis, Christian A

    2016-06-15

    We have utilized DC and AC transport measurements to measure the resistance and capacitance of thin films of conjugated oligophenyleneimine (OPI) molecules ranging from 1.5 to 7.5 nm in length. These films were synthesized on Au surfaces utilizing the imine condensation chemistry between terephthalaldehyde and 1,4-benzenediamine. Near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy yielded molecular tilt angles of 33-43°. To probe DC and AC transport, we employed Au-S-OPI//GaOx/EGaIn junctions having contact areas of 9.6 × 10(2) μm(2) (10(9) nm(2)) and compared to previously reported DC results on the same OPI system obtained using Au-S-OPI//Au conducting probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM) junctions with 50 nm(2) areas. We found that intensive observables agreed very well across the two junction platforms. Specifically, the EGaIn-based junctions showed: (i) a crossover from tunneling to hopping transport at molecular lengths near 4 nm; (ii) activated transport for wires >4 nm in length with an activation energy of 0.245 ± 0.008 eV for OPI-7; (iii) exponential dependence of conductance with molecular length with a decay constant β = 2.84 ± 0.18 nm(-1) (DC) and 2.92 ± 0.13 nm(-1) (AC) in the tunneling regime, and an apparent β = 1.01 ± 0.08 nm(-1) (DC) and 0.99 ± 0.11 nm(-1) (AC) in the hopping regime; (iv) previously unreported dielectric constant of 4.3 ± 0.2 along the OPI wires. However, the absolute resistances of Au-S-OPI//GaOx/EGaIn junctions were approximately 100 times higher than the corresponding CP-AFM junctions due to differences in metal-molecule contact resistances between the two platforms.

  14. Noninvasive measurement of conductivity anisotropy at larmor frequency using MRI.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joonsung; Song, Yizhuang; Choi, Narae; Cho, Sungmin; Seo, Jin Keun; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Anisotropic electrical properties can be found in biological tissues such as muscles and nerves. Conductivity tensor is a simplified model to express the effective electrical anisotropic information and depends on the imaging resolution. The determination of the conductivity tensor should be based on Ohm's law. In other words, the measurement of partial information of current density and the electric fields should be made. Since the direct measurements of the electric field and the current density are difficult, we use MRI to measure their partial information such as B1 map; it measures circulating current density and circulating electric field. In this work, the ratio of the two circulating fields, termed circulating admittivity, is proposed as measures of the conductivity anisotropy at Larmor frequency. Given eigenvectors of the conductivity tensor, quantitative measurement of the eigenvalues can be achieved from circulating admittivity for special tissue models. Without eigenvectors, qualitative information of anisotropy still can be acquired from circulating admittivity. The limitation of the circulating admittivity is that at least two components of the magnetic fields should be measured to capture anisotropic information.

  15. The investigation of dielectric properties and ac conductivity of new ceramic diphosphate Ag0.6Na0.4FeP2O7 using impedance spectroscopy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasri, S.; Megdiche, M.; Gargouri, M.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, Ag0.6Na0.4FeP2O7 has been synthesized by solid state reaction method. The ceramic compound was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), vibrational spectroscopy and impedance measurements. In fact, the investigated sample has shown single phase type monoclinic structure with P21/C space group. The frequency-dependent electrical data are analyzed in the frame-work of conductivity and electric modulus formalisms. The real and imaginary parts of complex impedance are well fitted to equivalent circuit model based on the Z-View-software. Besides, the observed frequency dependence of conductivity is found to obey Jonscher's universal law. The temperature dependence of both ac conductivity and the parameter s is reasonably well interpreted by the correlated barrier hopping (CBH). The theoretical fitting between the proposed model and the experimental data showed good agreement. The contribution of single polaron and bipolaron hopping to a.c. conductivity in present compound is also studied. The ionic conductivity is discussed on the basis of the structural characteristics of the sample.

  16. Analytical estimation of skeleton thermal conductivity of a geopolymer foam from thermal conductivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henon, J.; Alzina, A.; Absi, J.; Smith, D. S.; Rossignol, S.

    2015-07-01

    The geopolymers are alumino-silicate binders. The addition of a high pores volume fraction, gives them a thermal insulation character desired in the building industry. In this work, potassium geopolymer foams were prepared at room temperature (< 70 ∘C) by a process of in situ gas release. The porosity distribution shows a multiscale character. However, the thermal conductivity measurements gave values from 0.35 to 0.12 Wm-1.K-1 for a pore volume fraction values between 65 and 85%. In the aim to predict the thermal properties of these foams and focus on the relationship "thermal-conductivity/microstructure", knowledge of the thermal conductivity of their solid skeleton (λ s ) is paramount. However, there is rare work on the determination of this value depending on the initial composition. By the formulation used, the foaming agent contributes to the final network, and it is not possible to obtain a dense material designate to make a direct measurement of λ s . The objective of this work is to use inverse analytical methods to identify the value of λ s . Measurements of thermal conductivity by the fluxmetre technique were performed. The obtained value of the solid skeleton thermal conductivity by the inverse numerical technique is situated in a framework between 0.95 and 1.35 Wm-1.K-1 and is in agreement with one issue from the literature.

  17. Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Measurements of CDA 510 Phosphor Bronze

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, James E.; Canavan, Edgar; DiPirro, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Many cryogenic systems use electrical cables containing phosphor bronze wire. While phosphor bronze's electrical and thermal conductivity values have been published, there is significant variation among different phosphor bronze formulations. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will use several phosphor bronze wire harnesses containing a specific formulation (CDA 510, annealed temper). The heat conducted into the JWST instrument stage is dominated by these harnesses, and approximately half of the harness conductance is due to the phosphor bronze wires. Since the JWST radiators are expected to just keep the instruments at their operating temperature with limited cooling margin, it is important to know the thermal conductivity of the actual alloy being used. We describe an experiment which measured the electrical and thermal conductivity of this material between 4 and 295 Kelvin.

  18. Method for Measuring Thermal Conductivity of Small Samples Having Very Low Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.; Kuczmarski, Maria a.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a hot plate method capable of using air as a standard reference material for the steady-state measurement of the thermal conductivity of very small test samples having thermal conductivity on the order of air. As with other approaches, care is taken to ensure that the heat flow through the test sample is essentially one-dimensional. However, unlike other approaches, no attempt is made to use heated guards to block the flow of heat from the hot plate to the surroundings. It is argued that since large correction factors must be applied to account for guard imperfections when sample dimensions are small, it may be preferable to simply measure and correct for the heat that flows from the heater disc to directions other than into the sample. Experimental measurements taken in a prototype apparatus, combined with extensive computational modeling of the heat transfer in the apparatus, show that sufficiently accurate measurements can be obtained to allow determination of the thermal conductivity of low thermal conductivity materials. Suggestions are made for further improvements in the method based on results from regression analyses of the generated data.

  19. Frequency and voltage dependent profile of dielectric properties, electric modulus and ac electrical conductivity in the PrBaCoO nanofiber capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirezen, S.; Kaya, A.; Yerişkin, S. A.; Balbaşı, M.; Uslu, İ.

    In this study, praseodymium barium cobalt oxide nanofiber interfacial layer was sandwiched between Au and n-Si. Frequency and voltage dependence of ε‧, ε‧, tanδ, electric modulus (M‧ and M″) and σac of PrBaCoO nanofiber capacitor have been investigated by using impedance spectroscopy method. The obtained experimental results show that the values of ε‧, ε‧, tanδ, M‧, M″ and σac of the PrBaCoO nanofiber capacitor are strongly dependent on frequency of applied bias voltage. The values of ε‧, ε″ and tanδ show a steep decrease with increasing frequency for each forward bias voltage, whereas the values of σac and the electric modulus increase with increasing frequency. The high dispersion in ε‧ and ε″ values at low frequencies may be attributed to the Maxwell-Wagner and space charge polarization. The high values of ε‧ may be due to the interfacial effects within the material, PrBaCoO nanofibers interfacial layer and electron effect. The values of M‧ and M″ reach a maximum constant value corresponding to M∞ ≈ 1/ε∞ due to the relaxation process at high frequencies, but both the values of M‧ and M″ approach almost to zero at low frequencies. The changes in the dielectric and electrical properties with frequency can be also attributed to the existence of Nss and Rs of the capacitors. As a result, the change in the ε‧, ε″, tanδ, M‧, M″ and ac electric conductivityac) is a result of restructuring and reordering of charges at the PrBaCoO/n-Si interface under an external electric field or voltage and interface polarization.

  20. An AC phase measuring interferometer for measuring dn/dT of fused silica and calcium fluoride at 193 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Shagam, R.N.

    1998-09-01

    A novel method for the measurement of the change in index of refraction vs. temperature (dn/dT) of fused silica and calcium fluoride at the 193 nm wavelength has been developed in support of thermal modeling efforts for the development of 193 nm-based photolithographic exposure tools. The method, based upon grating lateral shear interferometry, uses a transmissive linear grating to divide a 193 nm laser beam into several beam paths by diffraction which propagate through separate identical material samples. One diffracted order passing through one sample overlaps the undiffracted beam from a second sample and forms interference fringes dependent upon the optical path difference between the two samples. Optical phase delay due to an index change from heating one of the samples causes the interference fringes to change sinusoidally with phase. The interferometer also makes use of AC phase measurement techniques through lateral translation of the grating. Results for several samples of fused silica and calcium fluoride are demonstrated.

  1. Electrical conduction measurement of thiol modified DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, J. S.; Hwang, S. W.; Ahn, D.

    2003-09-01

    We present a novel transport measurement of 60 base pairs of poly(dG)-poly(dC) DNA molecules. Thiol-terminated DNA molecules are chemically anchored at the surface of a Au nanoparticle and this DNA attached Au nanoparticle is self-trapped in between Au nanoelectrodes to make an electrical conduction channel. It provides an automatic electrical conduction channel consisting of electrode-DNA-nanoparticle-DNA-electrode. Due to robust bonding of thiol and Au, this transport channel is stable and reliable. The current-voltage characteristics measured from our device show a nonlinear behavior with voltage gaps comparable to previous experiment using the same molecules.

  2. Measurements of prompt radiation induced conductivity in Teflon (PTFE).

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, E. Frederick; Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Preston, E.

    2013-05-01

    We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity (RIC) in thin samples of Teflon (PTFE) at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Three mil (76.2 microns) samples were irradiated with a 0.5 %CE%BCs pulse of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E9 to 1E11 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 2 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Details of the experimental apparatus and analysis are reported in this report on prompt RIC in Teflon.

  3. Simultaneous specific heat and thermal conductivity measurement of individual nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jianlin; Wingert, Matthew C.; Moon, Jaeyun; Chen, Renkun

    2016-08-01

    Fundamental phonon transport properties in semiconductor nanostructures are important for their applications in energy conversion and storage, such as thermoelectrics and photovoltaics. Thermal conductivity measurements of semiconductor nanostructures have been extensively pursued and have enhanced our understanding of phonon transport physics. Specific heat of individual nanostructures, despite being an important thermophysical parameter that reflects the thermodynamics of solids, has remained difficult to characterize. Prior measurements were limited to ensembles of nanostructures in which coupling and sample inhomogeneity could play a role. Herein we report the first simultaneous specific heat and thermal conductivity measurements of individual rod-like nanostructures such as nanowires and nanofibers. This technique is demonstrated by measuring the specific heat and thermal conductivity of single ˜600-700 nm diameter Nylon-11 nanofibers (NFs). The results show that the thermal conductivity of the NF is increased by 50% over the bulk value, while the specific heat of the NFs exhibits bulk-like behavior. We find that the thermal diffusivity obtained from the measurement, which is related to the phonon mean free path (MFP), decreases with temperature, indicating that the intrinsic phonon Umklapp scattering plays a role in the NFs. This platform can also be applied to one- and two- dimensional semiconductor nanostructures to probe size effects on the phonon spectra and other transport physics.

  4. VALIDATION OF A THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY MEASUREMENT SYSTEM FOR FUEL COMPACTS

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Phillips; Colby Jensen; Changhu Xing; Heng Ban

    2011-03-01

    A high temperature guarded-comparative-longitudinal heat flow measurement system has been built to measure the thermal conductivity of a composite nuclear fuel compact. It is a steady-state measurement device designed to operate over a temperature range of 300 K to 1200 K. No existing apparatus is currently available for obtaining the thermal conductivity of the composite fuel in a non-destructive manner due to the compact’s unique geometry and composite nature. The current system design has been adapted from ASTM E 1225. As a way to simplify the design and operation of the system, it uses a unique radiative heat sink to conduct heat away from the sample column. A finite element analysis was performed on the measurement system to analyze the associated error for various operating conditions. Optimal operational conditions have been discovered through this analysis and results are presented. Several materials have been measured by the system and results are presented for stainless steel 304, inconel 625, and 99.95% pure iron covering a range of thermal conductivities of 10 W/m*K to 70 W/m*K. A comparison of the results has been made to data from existing literature.

  5. Simultaneous specific heat and thermal conductivity measurement of individual nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jianlin; Wingert, Matthew C.; Moon, Jaeyun; Chen, Renkun

    2016-08-01

    Fundamental phonon transport properties in semiconductor nanostructures are important for their applications in energy conversion and storage, such as thermoelectrics and photovoltaics. Thermal conductivity measurements of semiconductor nanostructures have been extensively pursued and have enhanced our understanding of phonon transport physics. Specific heat of individual nanostructures, despite being an important thermophysical parameter that reflects the thermodynamics of solids, has remained difficult to characterize. Prior measurements were limited to ensembles of nanostructures in which coupling and sample inhomogeneity could play a role. Herein we report the first simultaneous specific heat and thermal conductivity measurements of individual rod-like nanostructures such as nanowires and nanofibers. This technique is demonstrated by measuring the specific heat and thermal conductivity of single ∼600–700 nm diameter Nylon-11 nanofibers (NFs). The results show that the thermal conductivity of the NF is increased by 50% over the bulk value, while the specific heat of the NFs exhibits bulk-like behavior. We find that the thermal diffusivity obtained from the measurement, which is related to the phonon mean free path (MFP), decreases with temperature, indicating that the intrinsic phonon Umklapp scattering plays a role in the NFs. This platform can also be applied to one- and two- dimensional semiconductor nanostructures to probe size effects on the phonon spectra and other transport physics.

  6. Measurements of oceanic temperature microstructure using a small conductivity sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Washburn, L.; Gibson, C.H.

    1982-05-20

    A small, high frequency response conductivity probe has been constructed and used at sea. Measurements were made from an instrument platform towed at 35 m depth in the seasonal thermocline at ocean station P during the 1977 Mixed Layer Experiment (MILE). The microconductivity probe consists of four parallel electrodes plated on one side of a 0.5 mm x 3 mm x 3 mm ceramic chip with the electrodes aligned in the direction of flow. Comparisons with a microbead thermistor signal show that the conductivity signal was dominated by temperature up to the maximum frequency response of the thermistor, about 25 Hz. Therefore, under the conditions of the experiment, the conductivity probe signal measured temperature, but to smaller scales and higher frequencies than the microbead thermistor. Conductivity gradient spectra peaked in regions of different microstructure activity at frequencies between 11 and 96 Hz corresponding to temperature diffusive cut-off wavelengths between 16 and 1.85 cm. The estimated frequency response of the probe based on flushing of the conductivity cell volume is 700 Hz at the 1.78 m/s average towing speed during MILE. Spatial resolution of the probe appears to be adequate to resolve the smallest scale temperature gradients encountered during the experiment. Conductivity gradient spectral levels in some regions of microstructure activity were 10--1000 times larger than spectral levels of the noise.

  7. Measurement of the anisotropic thermal conductivity of the porcine cornea.

    PubMed

    Barton, Michael D; Trembly, B Stuart

    2013-10-01

    Accurate thermal models for the cornea of the eye support the development of thermal techniques for reshaping the cornea and other scientific purposes. Heat transfer in the cornea must be quantified accurately so that a thermal treatment does not destroy the endothelial layer, which cannot regenerate, and yet is responsible for maintaining corneal transparency. We developed a custom apparatus to measure the thermal conductivity of ex vivo porcine corneas perpendicular to the surface and applied a commercial apparatus to measure thermal conductivity parallel to the surface. We found that corneal thermal conductivity is 14% anisotropic at the normal state of corneal hydration. Small numbers of ex vivo feline and human corneas had a thermal conductivity perpendicular to the surface that was indistinguishable from the porcine corneas. Aqueous humor from ex vivo porcine, feline, and human eyes had a thermal conductivity nearly equal to that of water. Including the anisotropy of corneal thermal conductivity will improve the predictive power of thermal models of the eye.

  8. Measurement of soil hydraulic conductivity in relation with vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Cheng, Qinbo

    2010-05-01

    Hydraulic conductivity is a key parameter which influences hydrological processes of infiltration, surface and subsurface runoff. Vegetation alters surface characteristics (e.g., surface roughness, litter absorption) or subsurface characteristics (e.g. hydraulic conductivity). Field infiltration experiment of a single ring permeameter is widely used for measuring soil hydraulic conductivity. Measurement equipment is a simple single-ring falling head permeameter which consists of a hollow cylinder that is simply inserted into the top soil. An optimization method on the basis of objective of minimum error between the measured and simulated water depths in the single-ring is developed for determination of the soil hydraulic parameters. Using the single ring permeameter, we measured saturated hydraulic conductivities (Ks) of the red loam soil with and without vegetation covers on five hillslopes at Taoyuan Agro-Ecology Experimental Station, Hunan Province of China. For the measurement plots without vegetation roots, Ks value of the soil at 25cm depth is much smaller than that of surface soil (1.52×10-4 vs. 1.10×10-5 m/s). For the measurement plots with vegetation cover, plant roots significantly increase Ks of the lower layer soil but this increase is not significant for the shallow soil. Moreover, influences of vegetation root on Ks depend on vegetation species and ages. Ks value of the Camellia is about three times larger than that of seeding of Camphor (2.62×10-4 vs. 9.82×10-5 m/s). Ks value of the matured Camellia is 2.72×10-4 m/s while Ks value of the young Camellia is only 2.17×10-4 m/s. Key words: single ring permeameter; soil hydraulic conductivity; vegetation

  9. Measurement of Electrical Conductivity for a Biomass Fire

    PubMed Central

    Mphale, Kgakgamatso; Heron, Mal

    2008-01-01

    A controlled fire burner was constructed where various natural vegetation species could be used as fuel. The burner was equipped with thermocouples to measure fuel surface temperature and used as a cavity for microwaves with a laboratory quality 2-port vector network analyzer to determine electrical conductivity from S-parameters. Electrical conductivity for vegetation material flames is important for numerical prediction of flashover in high voltage power transmission faults research. Vegetation fires that burn under high voltage transmission lines reduce flashover voltage by increasing air electrical conductivity and temperature. Analyzer determined electrical conductivity ranged from 0.0058 - 0.0079 mho/m for a fire with a maximum temperature of 1240 K. PMID:19325812

  10. Electrical Conductivity Measurements on Hydrous Carbonate Melts at Mantle Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sifre, D.; Gaillard, F.

    2012-04-01

    Electromagnetic methods image mantle regions in the asthenosphere with elevated conductivity (0.1 to 1 S.m-1), which constrasts with the conductivity of dry olivine (10-2 to 10-3 S.m-1). A correct interpretation of the petrological nature of the conductive mantle is critical for our understanding of mantle geodynamics because such conductive regions indicate mantle rocks with physical and chemical properties that importantly deviates from the canonical peridotites. For decades, such anomalously high mantle conductivities have been attributed to mineralogical defects associated to few tens of ppm water incorporated in olivine. Most recent experimental surveys, however, refute this hydrous olivine model. Conductive mantle regions could then reflect partial melting. The presence of melts in the Earth's mantle has long been proved by geochemical observations and experimental petrology on peridotite rocks. The requirement for melting in the asthenospheric mantle is the presence of volatile species (water, carbon dioxide, halogens). Small melt fractions are then produced by small volatile contents and they are the first liquids produced by melting magma. This study reports electrical conductivity measurements on such melts at mantle pressure and temperature. We investigated on melt chemical compositions produced by melting of peridotite that would interact with CO2-H2O and Cl. Such melts are carbonatite melts, carbonated silicate melts, hydrous carbonate melts, hydrous basalts. A new system allowing in situ electrical conductivity measurements in piston cylinder has been deployed. This design has been specifically adapted to perfom measurements on liquid samples with elevated electrical conductivities. The chemical compositions investigated are pure liquid CaCO3 and CaMg(CO3)2, to which, cloride (as salts), silicate (as basalts) and water (as brucite) have been added. Experiments have been realized at 1.5 and 2.7 GPa pressure and temperature of 1000-1700° C. Impedance

  11. Measurements of prompt radiation induced conductivity of alumina and sapphire.

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, E. Frederick; Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Preston, Eric F.

    2011-04-01

    We performed measurements of the prompt radiation induced conductivity in thin samples of Alumina and Sapphire at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. Five mil thick samples were irradiated with pulses of 20 MeV electrons, yielding dose rates of 1E7 to 1E9 rad/s. We applied variable potentials up to 1 kV across the samples and measured the prompt conduction current. Analysis rendered prompt conductivity coefficients between 1E10 and 1E9 mho/m/(rad/s), depending on the dose rate and the pulse width for Alumina and 1E7 to 6E7 mho/m/(rad/s) for Sapphire.

  12. Absolute specific heat measurements of a microgram Pb crystal using ac nanocalorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliati, S.; Rydh, A.

    2012-12-01

    Heat capacity measurements using the ac steady state method are often considered difficult to provide absolute accuracy. By adjusting the working frequency to maintain a constant phase and using the phase information to obtain the heat capacity, we have found that it is possible to achieve good absolute accuracy. Here we present a thermodynamic study of a ~ 2.6 μg Pb superconducting crystal to demonstrate the newly opened capabilities. The sample is measured using a differential membrane-based calorimeter. The custom-made calorimetric cell is a pile of thin film Ti heater, insulation layer and Ge1-xAux thermometer fabricated in the center of two Si3N4 membranes. It has a background heat capacity < 100 nJ/K at 300 K, decreasing to 9 pJ/K at 1 K. The sample is characterized at temperatures down to 0.5 K. The zero field transition at Tc = 7.21 K has a width asymp 20 mK and displays no upturn in C. From the heat capacity jump at Tc and the extrapolated Sommerfeld term we find ΔC/γTc = 2.68. The latent heat curve obtained from the zero field heat capacity measurement, and the deviations of the thermodynamic critical field from the empirical expression Hc = Hc (0) [1 - (T/Tc)2] are discussed. Both analyses give results in good agreement with literature.

  13. Measuring Impulsivity in Adolescents with Serious Substance and Conduct Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Laetitia L.; Whitmore, Elizabeth A.; Raymond, Kristen M.; Crowley, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    Adolescents with substance use and conduct disorders have high rates of aggression and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), all of which have been characterized in part by impulsivity. Developing measures that capture impulsivity behaviorally and correlate with self-reported impulsivity has been difficult. One promising behavioral…

  14. Determining aerodynamic conductance of spar chambers from energy balance measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aerodynamic conductance (gA) of SPAR chambers was determined from measurements of energy balance and canopy temperature over a peanut canopy. gA was calculated from the slope of sensible heat flux (H) versus canopy-to-air temperature difference. H and the canopy-to-air temperature were varied by...

  15. Anisotropies in the Optical ac and dc Conductivities in Lightly Doped La2−xSrxCuO4: The Role of Deep and Shallow Acceptor States

    SciTech Connect

    Gozar, A.; Silva Neto, M.B.; Blumberg, G.; Komiya, S.; Ando, Y.

    2011-06-01

    We investigate the origin of the optical ac and dc conductivity anisotropies observed in the low temperature orthorhombic phase of lightly doped, untwinned La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}NiO{sub 4} single crystals. We show that these anisotropies can be naturally ascribed to the emergence of two odd parity, rotational-symmetry-broken, localized impurity acceptor states, one deeper and one shallower, resulting from the trapping of doped holes by the Coulomb potential provided by the Sr ions. These two lowest-energy, p-wave-like states are split by orthorhombicity and are partially filled with holes. This leaves a unique imprint in the optical ac conductivity, which shows two distinct far-infrared continuum absorption energies corresponding to the photoionization of the deep and shallow acceptor states. Furthermore, we argue that the existence of two independent and orthogonal channels for hopping conductivity, directly associated with the two orthorhombic directions, also quantitatively explains the observed low temperature anisotropies in the dc conductivity.

  16. High pressure differential conductance measurements of (Pb,Sn)Se

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Tiffany; Vangennep, Derrick; Jackson, Daniel; Biswas, Amlan; Hamlin, James

    Topological transitions have been recognized as a new type of quantum phase transition. Recently, a number of papers have reported scanning tunneling microscope (STM) measurements of the Landau level spectra of topologically non-trivial materials. Such measurements can offer substantial insight into the nature of the transition between topologically distinct phases. Although applied pressure represents an attractive means to drive a topological quantum phase transition, STM measurements can not be performed under high pressure conditions. In this talk, I will discuss our recent attempts to observe Landau level spectra in compressed (Pb,Sn)Se using differential conductance measurements. Acknowledgements: TAP supported by REU NSF DMR-1461019. Pressure cell development and measurements at high magnetic fields supported by the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory User Collaboration Grants Program. Synthesis, characterization, and high pressure measurements supported by NSF DMR-1453752.

  17. Improved apparatus for measuring hydraulic conductivity at low water content

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimmo, J.R.; Akstin, K.C.; Mello, K.A.

    1992-01-01

    A modification of the steady-state centrifuge method for unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (K) measurement improves the range and adjustability of this method. The modified apparatus allows mechanical adjustment to vary the measured K by a factor of 360. In addition, the use of different flow-regulation ceramic materials can give a total K range covering about six orders of magnitude. The range extension afforded has led to the lowest steady-state K measurement to date, for a sandy soil of the Delhi series (Typic Xeropsamment). -from Authors

  18. Comparison of different methods for measuring thermal conductivities

    SciTech Connect

    Hartung, D.; Gather, F.; Klar, P. J.

    2012-06-26

    Two different methods for the measurement of the thermal conductivity have been applied to a glass (borosilicate) bulk sample. The first method was in the steady-state using an arrangement of gold wires on the sample to create a thermal gradient and to measure the temperatures locally. This allows one to calculate the in-plane thermal conductivity of the sample. The same wire arrangement was also used for a 3{omega}-measurement of the direction-independent bulk thermal conductivity. The 3{omega}-approach is based on periodical heating and a frequency dependent analysis of the temperature response. The results of both methods are in good agreement with each other for this isotropic material, if thermal and radiative losses are accounted for. Our results demonstrate that especially in the case of thin-film measurements, finite element analysis has to be applied to correct for heat losses due to geometry and radiation. In this fashion, the wire positions can be optimized in order to minimize measurement errors.

  19. Error and uncertainty in Raman thermal conductivity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Edwin Beechem; Yates, Luke; Graham, Samuel

    2015-04-22

    We investigated error and uncertainty in Raman thermal conductivity measurements via finite element based numerical simulation of two geometries often employed -- Joule-heating of a wire and laser-heating of a suspended wafer. Using this methodology, the accuracy and precision of the Raman-derived thermal conductivity are shown to depend on (1) assumptions within the analytical model used in the deduction of thermal conductivity, (2) uncertainty in the quantification of heat flux and temperature, and (3) the evolution of thermomechanical stress during testing. Apart from the influence of stress, errors of 5% coupled with uncertainties of ±15% are achievable for most materials under conditions typical of Raman thermometry experiments. Error can increase to >20%, however, for materials having highly temperature dependent thermal conductivities or, in some materials, when thermomechanical stress develops concurrent with the heating. A dimensionless parameter -- termed the Raman stress factor -- is derived to identify when stress effects will induce large levels of error. Together, the results compare the utility of Raman based conductivity measurements relative to more established techniques while at the same time identifying situations where its use is most efficacious.

  20. Error and uncertainty in Raman thermal conductivity measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Thomas Edwin Beechem; Yates, Luke; Graham, Samuel

    2015-04-22

    We investigated error and uncertainty in Raman thermal conductivity measurements via finite element based numerical simulation of two geometries often employed -- Joule-heating of a wire and laser-heating of a suspended wafer. Using this methodology, the accuracy and precision of the Raman-derived thermal conductivity are shown to depend on (1) assumptions within the analytical model used in the deduction of thermal conductivity, (2) uncertainty in the quantification of heat flux and temperature, and (3) the evolution of thermomechanical stress during testing. Apart from the influence of stress, errors of 5% coupled with uncertainties of ±15% are achievable for most materialsmore » under conditions typical of Raman thermometry experiments. Error can increase to >20%, however, for materials having highly temperature dependent thermal conductivities or, in some materials, when thermomechanical stress develops concurrent with the heating. A dimensionless parameter -- termed the Raman stress factor -- is derived to identify when stress effects will induce large levels of error. Together, the results compare the utility of Raman based conductivity measurements relative to more established techniques while at the same time identifying situations where its use is most efficacious.« less

  1. Device and method for measuring thermal conductivity of thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amer, Tahani R. (Inventor); Subramanian, Chelakara (Inventor); Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Alderfer, David W. (Inventor); Sealey, Bradley S. (Inventor); Burkett, Jr., Cecil G. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A device and method are provided for measuring the thermal conductivity of rigid or flexible, homogeneous or heterogeneous, thin films between 50 .mu.m and 150 .mu.m thick with relative standard deviations of less than five percent. The specimen is sandwiched between like material, highly conductive upper and lower slabs. Each slab is instrumented with six thermocouples embedded within the slab and flush with their corresponding surfaces. A heat source heats the lower slab and a heat sink cools the upper slab. The heat sink also provides sufficient contact pressure onto the specimen. Testing is performed within a vacuum environment (bell-jar) between 10.sup.-3 to 10.sup.-6 Torr. An anti-radiant shield on the interior surface of the bell-jar is used to avoid radiation heat losses. Insulation is placed adjacent to the heat source and adjacent to the heat sink to prevent conduction losses. A temperature controlled water circulator circulates water from a constant temperature bath through the heat sink. Fourier's one-dimensional law of heat conduction is the governing equation. Data, including temperatures, are measured with a multi-channel data acquisition system. On-line computer processing is used for thermal conductivity calculations.

  2. The use of electrical conductivity measurements in the prediction of hydraulic conductivity of unsaturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Qifei; Fratta, Dante; Wang, Yu-Hsing

    2015-03-01

    Statistical models have been widely used in soil science, hydrogeology and geotechnical engineering to predict the hydraulic conductivity of unsaturated soils. However, no effective method is available yet for the determination of the associated model parameters such as the tortuosity factor q. Considering the analogy between water flow and electrical current flow in a porous medium, in this study, we proposed to improve the predictive capability of statistical models by determining the tortuosity factor q using electrical conductivity (EC) measurements. We first developed a theoretical hydraulic-electrical conductivity (K-EC) relationship for unsaturated soils based on the bundle of capillary tubes model. This K-EC relationship was then used to form a new unsaturated soil EC model, which was verified using published experimental data. The tortuosity factor q can then be determined by fitting the new EC model to soil EC measurements. Experimental data of six soils were used to test the effectiveness of this method and it was shown that the prediction was significantly improved when compared with the one using the commonly suggested value q = 0.5. The associated root-mean-square-deviation (RMSD) between measurements and predictions is only 0.28 when q is obtained by using our proposed method. In contrast, the RMSD is 0.97 when q is simply assumed as 0.5.

  3. Heat transfer in nuclear fuels: Measurements of gap conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Chun Hyung

    Heat transfer in the fuel-clad gap in a nuclear reactor impacts the overall temperature distribution, stored energy and the mechanical properties of a nuclear fuel rod. Therefore, an accurate estimation of the gap conductance between the fuel and the clad is critically important for reactor design and operations. To obtain the requisite accuracy in the gap conductance estimation, it is important to understand the effects of the convective heat transfer coefficient, the gas composition, pressure and temperature, and so forth. The objectives of this study are to build a bench-scale experimental apparatus for the measurement of thermal gap conductances and to develop a better understanding of the differences that have been previously observed between such measured values and those predicted theoretically. This is accomplished by employing improved analyses of the experiments and improved theoretical models. Using laser heating of slightly separated stainless-steel plates, the gap conductance was measured using a technique that compares the theoretical and experimental time dependent temperatures at the back surface of the second plate. To consider the effects of surface temperature and gas pressure, the theoretical temperatures were calculated using a convective heat transfer coefficient that was dependent upon both the temperature and the gas pressure.

  4. Measurement of Fracture Geometry for Accurate Computation of Hydraulic Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, B.; Ichikawa, Y.; Kim, Y.

    2003-12-01

    Fluid flow in rock mass is controlled by geometry of fractures which is mainly characterized by roughness, aperture and orientation. Fracture roughness and aperture was observed by a new confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM; Olympus OLS1100). The wavelength of laser is 488nm, and the laser scanning is managed by a light polarization method using two galvano-meter scanner mirrors. The system improves resolution in the light axis (namely z) direction because of the confocal optics. The sampling is managed in a spacing 2.5 μ m along x and y directions. The highest measurement resolution of z direction is 0.05 μ m, which is the more accurate than other methods. For the roughness measurements, core specimens of coarse and fine grained granites were provided. Measurements were performed along three scan lines on each fracture surface. The measured data were represented as 2-D and 3-D digital images showing detailed features of roughness. Spectral analyses by the fast Fourier transform (FFT) were performed to characterize on the roughness data quantitatively and to identify influential frequency of roughness. The FFT results showed that components of low frequencies were dominant in the fracture roughness. This study also verifies that spectral analysis is a good approach to understand complicate characteristics of fracture roughness. For the aperture measurements, digital images of the aperture were acquired under applying five stages of uniaxial normal stresses. This method can characterize the response of aperture directly using the same specimen. Results of measurements show that reduction values of aperture are different at each part due to rough geometry of fracture walls. Laboratory permeability tests were also conducted to evaluate changes of hydraulic conductivities related to aperture variation due to different stress levels. The results showed non-uniform reduction of hydraulic conductivity under increase of the normal stress and different values of

  5. Assembly for electrical conductivity measurements in the piston cylinder device

    DOEpatents

    Watson, Heather Christine; Roberts, Jeffrey James

    2012-06-05

    An assembly apparatus for measurement of electrical conductivity or other properties of a sample in a piston cylinder device wherein pressure and heat are applied to the sample by the piston cylinder device. The assembly apparatus includes a body, a first electrode in the body, the first electrode operatively connected to the sample, a first electrical conductor connected to the first electrode, a washer constructed of a hard conducting material, the washer surrounding the first electrical conductor in the body, a second electrode in the body, the second electrode operatively connected to the sample, and a second electrical conductor connected to the second electrode.

  6. Electrical conductivity measurements on silicate melts using the loop technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waff, H. S.

    1976-01-01

    A new method is described for measurement of the electrical conductivity of silicate melts under controlled oxygen partial pressure at temperatures to 1550 C. The melt samples are suspended as droplets on platinum-rhodium loops, minimizing iron loss from the melt due to alloying with platinum, and providing maximum surface exposure of the melt to the oxygen-buffering gas atmosphere. The latter provides extremely rapid equilibration of the melt with the imposed oxygen partial pressure. The loop technique involves a minimum of setup time and cost, provides reproducible results to within + or - 5% and is well suited to electrical conductivity studies on silicate melts containing redox cations.

  7. System to Measure Thermal Conductivity and Seebeck Coefficient for Thermoelectrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyun-Jung; Skuza, Jonathan R.; Park, Yeonjoon; King, Glen C.; Choi, Sang H.; Nagavalli, Anita

    2012-01-01

    The Seebeck coefficient, when combined with thermal and electrical conductivity, is an essential property measurement for evaluating the potential performance of novel thermoelectric materials. However, there is some question as to which measurement technique(s) provides the most accurate determination of the Seebeck coefficient at elevated temperatures. This has led to the implementation of nonstandardized practices that have further complicated the confirmation of reported high ZT materials. The major objective of the procedure described is for the simultaneous measurement of the Seebeck coefficient and thermal diffusivity within a given temperature range. These thermoelectric measurements must be precise, accurate, and reproducible to ensure meaningful interlaboratory comparison of data. The custom-built thermal characterization system described in this NASA-TM is specifically designed to measure the inplane thermal diffusivity, and the Seebeck coefficient for materials in the ranging from 73 K through 373 K.

  8. Conductivity measurements in a shear-banding wormlike micellar system.

    PubMed

    Photinos, Panos J; López-González, M R; Hoven, Corey V; Callaghan, Paul T

    2010-07-01

    Shear banding in the cetylpyridinium chloride/sodium salicylate micellar system is investigated using electrical conductivity measurements parallel to the velocity and parallel to the vorticity in a cylindrical Couette cell. The measurements show that the conductivity parallel to the velocity (vorticity) increases (decreases) monotonically with applied shear rate. The shear-induced anisotropy is over one order of magnitude lower than the anisotropy of the N(c) nematic phase. The steady-state conductivity measurements indicate that the anisotropy of the shear induced low-viscosity (high shear rate) phase is not significantly larger than the anisotropy of the high viscosity (low shear rate) phase. We estimate that the micelles in the shear induced low viscosity band are relatively short, with a characteristic length to diameter ratio of 5-15. The relaxation behavior following the onset of shear is markedly different above and below the first critical value γ1, in agreement with results obtained by other methods. The transient measurements show that the overall anisotropy of the sample decreases as the steady state is approached, i.e., the micellar length/the degree of order decrease.

  9. Application of inverse heat conduction problem on temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Zhou, G.; Dong, B.; Li, Q.; Liu, L. Q.

    2013-09-01

    For regenerative cooling devices, such as G-M refrigerator, pulse tube cooler or thermoacoustic cooler, the gas oscillating bring about temperature fluctuations inevitably, which is harmful in many applications requiring high stable temperatures. To find out the oscillating mechanism of the cooling temperature and improve the temperature stability of cooler, the inner temperature of the cold head has to be measured. However, it is difficult to measure the inner oscillating temperature of the cold head directly because the invasive temperature detectors may disturb the oscillating flow. Fortunately, the outer surface temperature of the cold head can be measured accurately by invasive temperature measurement techniques. In this paper, a mathematical model of inverse heat conduction problem is presented to identify the inner surface oscillating temperature of cold head according to the measured temperature of the outer surface in a GM cryocooler. Inverse heat conduction problem will be solved using control volume approach. Outer surface oscillating temperature could be used as input conditions of inverse problem and the inner surface oscillating temperature of cold head can be inversely obtained. A simple uncertainty analysis of the oscillating temperature measurement also will be provided.

  10. Thermal conductivity measurements of particulate materials under Martian conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Presley, M. A.; Christensen, P. R.

    1993-01-01

    The mean particle diameter of surficial units on Mars has been approximated by applying thermal inertia determinations from the Mariner 9 Infrared Radiometer and the Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper data together with thermal conductivity measurement. Several studies have used this approximation to characterize surficial units and infer their nature and possible origin. Such interpretations are possible because previous measurements of the thermal conductivity of particulate materials have shown that particle size significantly affects thermal conductivity under martian atmospheric pressures. The transfer of thermal energy due to collisions of gas molecules is the predominant mechanism of thermal conductivity in porous systems for gas pressures above about 0.01 torr. At martian atmospheric pressures the mean free path of the gas molecules becomes greater than the effective distance over which conduction takes place between the particles. Gas particles are then more likely to collide with the solid particles than they are with each other. The average heat transfer distance between particles, which is related to particle size, shape and packing, thus determines how fast heat will flow through a particulate material.The derived one-to-one correspondence of thermal inertia to mean particle diameter implies a certain homogeneity in the materials analyzed. Yet the samples used were often characterized by fairly wide ranges of particle sizes with little information about the possible distribution of sizes within those ranges. Interpretation of thermal inertia data is further limited by the lack of data on other effects on the interparticle spacing relative to particle size, such as particle shape, bimodal or polymodal mixtures of grain sizes and formation of salt cements between grains. To address these limitations and to provide a more comprehensive set of thermal conductivities vs. particle size a linear heat source apparatus, similar to that of Cremers, was assembled to

  11. Thermal conductivity measurements of proton-heated warm dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKelvey, A.; Fernandez-Panella, A.; Hua, R.; Kim, J.; King, J.; Sio, H.; McGuffey, C.; Kemp, G. E.; Freeman, R. R.; Beg, F. N.; Shepherd, R.; Ping, Y.

    2015-06-01

    Accurate knowledge of conductivity characteristics in the strongly coupled plasma regime is extremely important for ICF processes such as the onset of hydrodynamic instabilities, thermonuclear burn propagation waves, shell mixing, and efficient x-ray conversion of indirect drive schemes. Recently, an experiment was performed on the Titan laser platform at the Jupiter Laser Facility to measure the thermal conductivity of proton-heated warm dense matter. In the experiment, proton beams generated via target normal sheath acceleration were used to heat bi-layer targets with high-Z front layers and lower-Z back layers. The stopping power of a material is approximately proportional to Z2 so a sharp temperature gradient is established between the two materials. The subsequent thermal conduction from the higher-Z material to the lower-Z was measured with time resolved streaked optical pyrometry (SOP) and Fourier domain interferometry (FDI) of the rear surface. Results will be used to compare predictions from the thermal conduction equation and the Wiedemann-Franz Law in the warm dense matter regime. Data from the time resolved diagnostics for Au/Al and Au/C Targets of 20-200 nm thickness will be presented.

  12. Thermal Conductivity Based on Modified Laser Flash Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bochuan; Ban, Heng; Li, Chao; Scripa, Rosalia N.; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    2005-01-01

    The laser flash method is a standard method for thermal diffusivity measurement. It employs single-pulse heating of one side of a thin specimen and measures the temperature response of the other side. The thermal diffusivity of the specimen can be obtained based on a one-dimensional transient heat transfer analysis. This paper reports the development of a theory that includes a transparent reference layer with known thermal property attached to the back of sample. With the inclusion of heat conduction from the sample to the reference layer in the theoretical analysis, the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of sample can be extracted from the temperature response data. Furthermore, a procedure is established to select two points from the data to calculate these properties. The uncertainty analysis indicates that this method can be used with acceptable levels of uncertainty.

  13. Heating rate controller for thermally stimulated conductivity and thermoluminescence measurements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, E. G.; Littlejohn, M. A.; Oakley, E. M.; Hutchby , J. A.

    1972-01-01

    A temperature controller is described which enables the temperature of a sample mounted on a cold finger to be varied linearly with time. Heating rates between 0.5 and 10 K/min can be achieved for temperatures between 90 and 300 K. Provision for terminating the sample heating at any temperature between these extremes is available. The temperature can be held at the terminating temperature or be reduced to the starting temperature in a matter of minutes. The controller has been used for thermally stimulated conductivity measurements and should be useful for thermoluminescence measurements as well.

  14. Measurement and modeling of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity: Chapter 21

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perkins, Kim S.; Elango, Lakshmanan

    2011-01-01

    This chapter will discuss, by way of examples, various techniques used to measure and model hydraulic conductivity as a function of water content, K(). The parameters that describe the K() curve obtained by different methods are used directly in Richards’ equation-based numerical models, which have some degree of sensitivity to those parameters. This chapter will explore the complications of using laboratory measured or estimated properties for field scale investigations to shed light on how adequately the processes are represented. Additionally, some more recent concepts for representing unsaturated-zone flow processes will be discussed.

  15. The role of probe oxide in local surface conductivity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, C. J.; Kryvchenkova, O.; Wilson, L. S. J.; Maffeis, T. G. G.; Cobley, R. J.; Kalna, K.

    2015-05-07

    Local probe methods can be used to measure nanoscale surface conductivity, but some techniques including nanoscale four point probe rely on at least two of the probes forming the same low resistivity non-rectifying contact to the sample. Here, the role of probe shank oxide has been examined by carrying out contact and non-contact I V measurements on GaAs when the probe oxide has been controllably reduced, both experimentally and in simulation. In contact, the barrier height is pinned but the barrier shape changes with probe shank oxide dimensions. In non-contact measurements, the oxide modifies the electrostatic interaction inducing a quantum dot that alters the tunneling behavior. For both, the contact resistance change is dependent on polarity, which violates the assumption required for four point probe to remove probe contact resistance from the measured conductivity. This has implications for all nanoscale surface probe measurements and macroscopic four point probe, both in air and vacuum, where the role of probe oxide contamination is not well understood.

  16. Validation of conducting wall models using magnetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, J. M.; Bialek, J.; Turco, F.; King, J.; Navratil, G. A.; Strait, E. J.; Turnbull, A.

    2016-10-01

    The impact of conducting wall eddy currents on perturbed magnetic field measurements is a key issue for understanding the measurement and control of long-wavelength MHD stability in tokamak devices. As plasma response models have growth in sophistication, the need to understand and resolve small changes in these measurements has become more important, motivating increased fidelity in simulations of externally applied fields and the wall eddy current response. In this manuscript, we describe thorough validation studies of the wall models in the mars-f and valen stability codes, using coil-sensor vacuum coupling measurements from the DIII-D tokamak (Luxon et al 2005 Fusion Sci. Technol. 48 807). The valen formulation treats conducting structures with arbitrary three-dimensional geometries, while mars-f uses an axisymmetric wall model and a spectral decomposition of the problem geometry with a fixed toroidal harmonic n. The vacuum coupling measurements have a strong sensitivity to wall eddy currents induced by time-changing coil currents, owing to the close proximities of both the sensors and coils to the wall. Measurements from individual coil and sensor channels are directly compared with valen predictions. It is found that straightforward improvements to the valen model, such as refining the wall mesh and simulating the vertical extent of the DIII-D poloidal field sensors, lead to good agreement with the experimental measurements. In addition, couplings to multi-coil, n  =  1 toroidal mode perturbations are calculated from the measurements and compared with predictions from both codes. The toroidal mode comparisons favor the fully three-dimensional simulation approach, likely because this approach naturally treats n  >  1 sidebands generated by the coils and wall eddy currents, as well as the n  =  1 fundamental.

  17. TRISO fuel compact thermal conductivity measurement instrument development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Colby

    Thermal conductivity is an important thermophysical property needed for effectively predicting fuel performance. As part of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program, the thermal conductivity of tri-isotropic (TRISO) fuel needs to be measured over a temperature range characteristic of its usage. The composite nature of TRISO fuel requires that measurement be performed over the entire length of the compact in a non-destructive manner. No existing measurement system is capable of performing such a measurement. A measurement system has been designed based on the steady-state, guarded-comparative-longitudinal heat flow technique. The system as currently designed is capable of measuring cylindrical samples with diameters ˜12.3-mm (˜0.5″) with lengths ˜25-mm (˜1″). The system is currently operable in a temperature range of 400 K to 1100 K for materials with thermal conductivities on the order of 10 W/m/K to 70 W/m/K. The system has been designed, built, and tested. An uncertainty analysis for the determinate errors of the system has been performed finding a result of 5.5%. Finite element modeling of the system measurement method has also been accomplished demonstrating optimal design, operating conditions, and associated bias error. Measurements have been performed on three calibration/validation materials: SS304, 99.95% pure iron, and inconel 625. In addition, NGNP graphite with ZrO2 particles and NGNP AGR-2 graphite matrix only, both in compact form, have been measured. Results from the SS304 sample show agreement of better than 3% for a 300--600°C temperature range. For iron between 100--600°C, the difference with published values is <8% for all temperatures. The maximum difference from published data for inconel 625 is 5.8%, near 600°C. Both NGNP samples were measured from 100--800°C. All results are presented and discussed. Finally, a discussion of ongoing work is included as well as a brief discussion of implementation under other operating

  18. Frequency and voltage dependence dielectric properties, ac electrical conductivity and electric modulus profiles in Al/Co3O4-PVA/p-Si structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilkan, Çiğdem; Azizian-Kalandaragh, Yashar; Altındal, Şemsettin; Shokrani-Havigh, Roya

    2016-11-01

    In this research a simple microwave-assisted method have been used for preparation of cobalt oxide nanostructures. The as-prepared sample has been investigated by UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM). On the other hand, frequency and voltage dependence of both the real and imaginary parts of dielectric constants (ε‧, ε″) and electric modulus (M‧ and M″), loss tangent (tanδ), and ac electrical conductivityac) values of Al/Co3O4-PVA/p-Si structures were obtained in the wide range of frequency and voltage using capacitance (C) and conductance (G/ω) data at room temperature. The values of ε‧, ε″ and tanδ were found to decrease with increasing frequency almost for each applied bias voltage, but the changes in these parameters become more effective in the depletion region at low frequencies due to the charges at surface states and their relaxation time and polarization effect. While the value of σ is almost constant at low frequency, increases almost as exponentially at high frequency which are corresponding to σdc and σac, respectively. The M‧ and M″ have low values at low frequencies region and then an increase with frequency due to short-range mobility of charge carriers. While the value of M‧ increase with increasing frequency, the value of M″ shows two peak and the peaks positions shifts to higher frequency with increasing applied voltage due to the decrease of the polarization and Nss effects with increasing frequency.

  19. Measurement of bone conduction levels for high frequencies.

    PubMed

    Lenhardt, Martin L; Richards, Douglas G; Madsen, Alan G; Goldstein, Barbara A; Shulman, Abraham; Guinta, Robert

    2002-01-01

    For assessment of safety, it is necessary to measure the maximum possible force exerted by a bone conduction device coupled to the human head. Calibration of bone conduction hearing aids and vibrators in the audiometric range is based on measurement of acceleration and force using an artificial mastoid. Extending the measurement to the high audio range was accomplished using a live head. To assess safety of the UltraQuiet tinnitus treatment system, as an example, acceleration was measured from 5 to 20 kHz on a live human head as compared with calibrated levels at 6 kHz on an artificial mastoid and the live head. Using head acceleration and anchoring it to established calibration levels is a means of establishing clinical safety. Stimulation in the high audio frequencies at low levels was found to be safe. In contrast, stimulation with ultrasound requires more energy (approximately 75-90 dB re 6 kHz), which may increase the risk of damage to the car.

  20. The Measurement of Surface Cracks in Metals by Using a.c. Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, D. H.; Waechter, R. T.; Collins, R.

    1982-05-01

    This paper describes some recent studies associated with the development of an instrument, the Crack Microgauge, at University College London, for the detection and measurement of surface cracks in metals by using a.c. electric currents in the metal surface. The design of the instrument has enhanced the accuracy of measurement of surface voltages in the neighbourhood of surface-breaking cracks to the point where it is now advantageous to consider the distribution of surface voltages by mathematical analysis. This enables better use to be made of the instrument since measurements can then be more accurately interpreted in terms of crack size and geometry. In contrast, earlier applications of the method relied on the calibration of the instruments against test blocks. The first generation of users of the Crack Microgauge interpreted their readings according to a simple one-dimensional normal crack model. This, however, is an oversimplification for cracks of finite aspect ratio and it leads to underestimates of centre-line crack depth typically of the order of 30-40<%> when the aspect ratio is about 3. The first major contribution of the theory was therefore to provide a model for surface current flow around cracks of finite aspect ratio. For this purpose a useful unfolding theorem was deduced in cases in which the current skin depth is small compared with crack dimensions. This allows the surface field to be unfolded into a plane distribution of potential satisfying Laplace's equation, and it enables us to obtain solutions for many different crack shapes by using standard mathematical methods. An account of these developments is given in ξ 2 of this paper. The unfolding of the surface field gives the global distribution of surface current around a crack, that is, on the length scale of the crack dimensions. On the length scale of the skin depth, however, the solutions need modification in the neighbourhood of the surface and interior edges of the crack. In

  1. CONDUCTIVITY AS A MEASURE OF THE PERMEABILITY OF SUSPENDED CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, S. C.

    1925-01-01

    The problem of determining by means of measurements of electrolytic conductance the permeability of living cells in suspension is considered in some detail and it is pointed out that several factors, usually neglected, have an important influence on the interpretation of such studies. These are: 1. The relative volume and the shape of cells, which are responsive to changes in osmotic pressure and constitution of the surrounding solution. The sources of error in various methods of determining the true volume of red blood cells in a suspension are explained. The hematocrit method appears to be the most reliable method in this case. 2. The proportion of living cells, which is especially to be regarded in the case of suspensions of bacteria. It is shown that this may be very high when appropriate cultural methods are used. The conductance of the dead cells must also be taken into account. 3. The progressive nature of the changes occurring during the course of an experiment. Approximate accuracy may be obtained by proper interpolation. 4. The conductivity of the protoplasm itself, which varies in response to variations is that of the surrounding fluid. It is emphasized that cells, and in particular red blood cells, are not to be regarded as stable non-conducting particles, but rather as labile and as permeable to electrolytes. It is shown that the available data support this interpretation. PMID:19872142

  2. Analysis of measurements of the thermal conductivity of liquid urania

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, J.K.; Leibowitz, L.

    1984-09-17

    An analysis was performed of the three existing measurements of the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of molten uranium dioxide. A transient heat transfer code (THTB) was used for this analysis. A much smaller range of values for thermal conductivity than originally reported was found: the original values ranged from 2.4 to 11 W . m/sup -1/ . K/sup -1/, with a mean of 7.3 W . m/sup -1/ . K/sup -1/, whereas the recalculated values ranged from 4.5 to 6.75 W . m/sup -1/ . K/sup -1/, with a mean of 5.6 W . m/sup -1/ . K/sup -1/.

  3. Heat conduction nanocalorimeter for pl-scale single cell measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannessen, E. A.; Weaver, J. M. R.; Cobbold, P. H.; Cooper, J. M.

    2002-03-01

    An ultrasensitive nanocalorimeter for use with pl-scale biological samples using silicon microfabrication technology has been developed in which a 720 pl reaction vessel, a calibration heater, and a thermoelectric transducer of 125 μK sensitivity were integrated into a single multilayer thin-film configuration. The resolution of the system ranged from 10 to 25 nW depending on the heat capacity, conductance and power density of the samples studied. The device has been used in heat conduction measurements of the energy released from the enzyme catalyzed hydrolysis of hydrogen peroxide using purified catalase, and for the determination of the catalase activity within a single mouse hepatocyte. The nanocalorimeter has the potential for integration in a high-density array format, where the change in temperature from ultralow volume cellular assays could be used as a generic analytical tool for high throughput screening of bioactive compounds.

  4. Evaluation of DC electric field distribution of PPLP specimen based on the measurement of electrical conductivity in LN2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jae-Sang; Seong, Jae-Kyu; Shin, Woo-Ju; Lee, Jong-Geon; Cho, Jeon-Wook; Ryoo, Hee-Suk; Lee, Bang-Wook

    2013-11-01

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) cable has been paid much attention due to its high efficiency and high current transportation capability, and it is also regarded as eco-friendly power cable for the next generation. Especially for DC HTS cable, it has more sustainable and stable properties compared to AC HTS cable due to the absence of AC loss in DC HTS cable. Recently, DC HTS cable has been investigated competitively all over the world, and one of the key components of DC HTS cable to be developed is a cable joint box considering HVDC environment. In order to achieve the optimum insulation design of the joint box, analysis of DC electric field distribution of the joint box is a fundamental process to develop DC HTS cable. Generally, AC electric field distribution depends on relative permittivity of dielectric materials but in case of DC, electrical conductivity of dielectric material is a dominant factor which determines electric field distribution. In this study, in order to evaluate DC electric field characteristics of the joint box for DC HTS cable, polypropylene laminated paper (PPLP) specimen has been prepared and its DC electric field distribution was analyzed based on the measurement of electrical conductivity of PPLP in liquid nitrogen (LN2). Electrical conductivity of PPLP in LN2 has not been reported yet but it should be measured for DC electric field analysis. The experimental works for measuring electrical conductivity of PPLP in LN2 were presented in this paper. Based on the experimental works, DC electric field distribution of PPLP specimen was fully analyzed considering the steady state and the transient state of DC. Consequently, it was possible to determine the electric field distribution characteristics considering different DC applying stages including DC switching on, DC switching off and polarity reversal conditions.

  5. Thermal conductivity and emissivity measurements of uranium carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradetti, S.; Manzolaro, M.; Andrighetto, A.; Zanonato, P.; Tusseau-Nenez, S.

    2015-10-01

    Thermal conductivity and emissivity measurements on different types of uranium carbide are presented, in the context of the ActiLab Work Package in ENSAR, a project within the 7th Framework Program of the European Commission. Two specific techniques were used to carry out the measurements, both taking place in a laboratory dedicated to the research and development of materials for the SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) target. In the case of thermal conductivity, estimation of the dependence of this property on temperature was obtained using the inverse parameter estimation method, taking as a reference temperature and emissivity measurements. Emissivity at different temperatures was obtained for several types of uranium carbide using a dual frequency infrared pyrometer. Differences between the analyzed materials are discussed according to their compositional and microstructural properties. The obtainment of this type of information can help to carefully design materials to be capable of working under extreme conditions in next-generation ISOL (Isotope Separation On-Line) facilities for the generation of radioactive ion beams.

  6. Thermal conductivity measurements of CH and Be by refraction-enhanced x-ray radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Yuan; King, Jim; Landen, Otto; Whitley, Heather; London, Rich; Hamel, Sebastien; Sterne, Phil; Panella, Amalia; Freeman, Rick; Collins, Gilbert

    2015-06-01

    Transport properties of warm dense matter are important for modeling the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities near the fuel-ablator interface in an ICF capsule, which determines the mix level in the fuel and thus is critical for successful ignition. A novel technique, time-resolved refraction-enhanced x-ray radiography, has been developed to study thermal conductivity at an interface. Experiments using OMEGA laser have been carried out for CH/Be targets isochorically heated by x-rays to measure the evolution of the density gradient at the interface due to thermal conduction. The sensitivity of this radiographic technique to discontinuities enabled observation of shock/rarefraction waves propagating away from the interface. The radiographs provide enough constraints on the temperatures, densities and scale lengths in CH and Be, respectively. Preliminary data analysis suggests that the thermal conductivities of CH and Be at near solid density and a few eV temperature are higher than predictions by the commonly used Lee-More model. Detailed analysis and comparison with various models will be presented. The work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. Effects of Copper Doping on Dielectric and A.C. Conductivity in Layered Sodium Tri-Titanate Ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shripal; Dwivedi, Shailja; Singh, Rakesh; Tandon, R. P.

    2013-09-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of 0.01, 0.1 and 1.0 molar percentage (mp) of CuO doped derivatives of layered Na2Ti3O7 ceramic have been reported. The results show that copper substitutes as Cu2+ at Ti4+ octahedral sites. From the dependence of loss tangent (tan δ) and the relative permittivity (ɛ‧) on temperature and frequency, it is concluded that all the derivatives are of polar nature. The relaxation peaks at lower temperatures have been attributed to the presence of different types of dipoles, whereas peaks in the higher temperature region indicate possible ferroelectric phase transition. The dependence of conductivity on temperature show that electron hopping (polaron) conduction exists in a wide span of temperature range. However, the associated interlayer ionic conduction exists in a small temperature range. Interlayer alkali ion hopping mechanism of conduction has been proposed toward higher temperatures. The conductivity versus frequency plots reveal that the polaron conduction plays a prominent role toward the lower temperature side that diminishes with the rise in temperature. The most probable relaxation times for 0.01 and 0.1 mp CuO doped derivatives are almost same but it records an increased value for 1.0 mp doped material. This again attributes to the possible change in the symmetry of copper environment.

  8. Structural characterization, thermal, ac conductivity and dielectric properties of (C7H12N2)2[SnCl6]Cl2.1.5H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajji, Rachid; Oueslati, Abderrazek; Hajlaoui, Fadhel; Bulou, Alain; Hlel, Faouzi

    2016-05-01

    (C7H12N2)2[SnCl6]Cl2.1.5H2O is crystallized at room temperature in the monoclinic system (space group P21/n). The isolated molecules form organic and inorganic layers parallel to the (a, b) plane and alternate along the c-axis. The inorganic layer is built up by isolated SnCl6 octahedrons. Besides, the organic layer is formed by 2,4-diammonium toluene cations, between which the spaces are filled with free Cl- ions and water molecules. The crystal packing is governed by means of the ionic N-H...Cl and Ow-H...Cl hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional network. The thermal study of this compound is reported, revealing two phase transitions around 360(±3) and 412(±3) K. The electrical and dielectric measurements were reported, confirming the transition temperatures detected in the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The frequency dependence of ac conductivity at different temperatures indicates that the correlated barrier hopping (CBH) model is the probable mechanism for the ac conduction behavior.

  9. Quantitative measurements of root water uptake and root hydraulic conductivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Javaux, Mathieu; Meunier, Felicien; Couvreur, Valentin; Carminati, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    How is root water uptake distributed along the root system and what root properties control this distribution? Here we present a method to: 1) measure root water uptake and 2) inversely estimate the root hydraulic conductivities. The experimental method consists in using neutron radiography to trace deuterated water (D2O) in soil and roots. The method was applied to lupines grown aluminium containers filled with a sandy soil. When the lupines were 4 weeks old, D2O was locally injected in a selected soil regions and its transport was monitored in soil and roots using time-series neutron radiography. By image processing, we quantified the concentration of D2O in soil and roots. We simulated the transport of D2O into roots using a diffusion-convection numerical model. The diffusivity of the roots tissue was inversely estimated by simulating the transport of D2O into the roots during night. The convective fluxes (i.e. root water uptake) were inversely estimating by fitting the experiments during day, when plants were transpiring, and assuming that root diffusivity did not change. The results showed that root water uptake was not uniform along the roots. Water uptake was higher at the proximal parts of the lateral roots and it decreased by a factor of 10 towards the distal parts. We used the data of water fluxes to inversely estimate the profile of hydraulic conductivities along the roots of transpiring plants growing in soil. The water fluxes in the lupine roots were simulated using the Hydraulic Tree Model by Doussan et al. (1998). The fitting parameters to be adjusted were the radial and axial hydraulic conductivities of the roots. The results showed that by using the root architectural model of Doussan et al. (1998) and detailed information of water fluxes into different root segments we could estimate the profile of hydraulic conductivities along the roots. We also found that: 1) in a tap-rooted plant like lupine water is mostly taken up by lateral roots; (2) water

  10. Incorporating residential AC load control into ancillary service markets: Measurement and settlement

    SciTech Connect

    Bode, Josh L.; Sullivan, Michael J.; Berghman, Dries; Eto, Joseph H.

    2013-05-01

    Many pre-existing air conditioner load control programs can provide valuable operational flexibility but have not been incorporated into electricity ancillary service markets or grid operations. Multiple demonstrations have shown that residential air conditioner (AC) response can deliver resources quickly and can provide contingency reserves. A key policy hurdle to be overcome before AC load control can be fully incorporated into markets is how to balance the accuracy, cost, and complexity of methods available for the settlement of load curtailment. Overcoming this hurdle requires a means for assessing the accuracy of shorter-term AC load control demand reduction estimation approaches in an unbiased manner. This paper applies such a method to compare the accuracy of approaches varying in cost and complexity ? including regression analysis, load matching and control group approaches ? using feeder data, household data and AC end-use data. We recommend a practical approach for settlement, relying on an annually updated set of tables, with pre-calculated reduction estimates. These tables allow users to look up the demand reduction per device based on daily maximum temperature, geographic region and hour of day, simplifying settlement and providing a solution to the policy problem presented in this paper.

  11. Contactless electrical conductivity measurement of metallic submicron-grain material: Application to the study of aluminum with severe plastic deformation.

    PubMed

    Mito, M; Matsui, H; Yoshida, T; Anami, T; Tsuruta, K; Deguchi, H; Iwamoto, T; Terada, D; Miyajima, Y; Tsuji, N

    2016-05-01

    We measured the electrical conductivity σ of aluminum specimen consisting of submicron-grains by observing the AC magnetic susceptibility resulting from the eddy current. By using a commercial platform for magnetic measurement, contactless measurement of the relative electrical conductivity σn of a nonmagnetic metal is possible over a wide temperature (T) range. By referring to σ at room temperature, obtained by the four-terminal method, σn(T) was transformed into σ(T). This approach is useful for cylinder specimens, in which the estimation of the radius and/or volume is difficult. An experiment in which aluminum underwent accumulative roll bonding, which is a severe plastic deformation process, validated this method of evaluating σ as a function of the fraction of high-angle grain boundaries. PMID:27250440

  12. Contactless electrical conductivity measurement of metallic submicron-grain material: Application to the study of aluminum with severe plastic deformation.

    PubMed

    Mito, M; Matsui, H; Yoshida, T; Anami, T; Tsuruta, K; Deguchi, H; Iwamoto, T; Terada, D; Miyajima, Y; Tsuji, N

    2016-05-01

    We measured the electrical conductivity σ of aluminum specimen consisting of submicron-grains by observing the AC magnetic susceptibility resulting from the eddy current. By using a commercial platform for magnetic measurement, contactless measurement of the relative electrical conductivity σn of a nonmagnetic metal is possible over a wide temperature (T) range. By referring to σ at room temperature, obtained by the four-terminal method, σn(T) was transformed into σ(T). This approach is useful for cylinder specimens, in which the estimation of the radius and/or volume is difficult. An experiment in which aluminum underwent accumulative roll bonding, which is a severe plastic deformation process, validated this method of evaluating σ as a function of the fraction of high-angle grain boundaries.

  13. Analyzing the Effects of Capacitances-to-Shield in Sample Probes on AC Quantized Hall Resistance Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Cage, M. E.; Jeffery, A.

    1999-01-01

    We analyze the effects of the large capacitances-to-shields existing in all sample probes on measurements of the ac quantized Hall resistance RH. The object of this analysis is to investigate how these capacitances affect the observed frequency dependence of RH. Our goal is to see if there is some way to eliminate or minimize this significant frequency dependence, and thereby realize an intrinsic ac quantized Hall resistance standard. Equivalent electrical circuits are used in this analysis, with circuit components consisting of: capacitances and leakage resistances to the sample probe shields; inductances and resistances of the sample probe leads; quantized Hall resistances, longitudinal resistances, and voltage generators within the quantum Hall effect device; and multiple connections to the device. We derive exact algebraic equations for the measured RH values expressed in terms of the circuit components. Only two circuits (with single-series “offset” and quadruple-series connections) appear to meet our desired goals of measuring both RH and the longitudinal resistance Rx in the same cool-down for both ac and dc currents with a one-standard-deviation uncertainty of 10−8 RH or less. These two circuits will be further considered in a future paper in which the effects of wire-to-wire capacitances are also included in the analysis.

  14. AC conductivity and relaxation mechanism in (Nd1/2Li1/2)(Fe1/2V1/2)O3 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Susmita; Barik, Subrat Kumar; Choudhary, R. N. P.

    2016-05-01

    In the present study we have synthesized polycrystalline sample of (Nd1/2Li1/2)(Fe1/2V1/2)O3 ceramic by a standard high-temperature solid-state reaction technique. Studies of dielectric and electrical properties of the compound have been carried out in a wide range of temperature (RT - 400 °C) and frequency (1kHz - 1MHz) using complex impedance spectroscopic technique. The imaginary vs. real component of the complex impedance plot (Nyquist plot) of the prepared sample exhibits the existence of grain, grain boundary contributions in the complex electrical parameters and negative temperature coefficient of resistance (NTCR) type behavior like semiconductor. Details study of ac conductivity plot reveals that the material obeys universal Jonscher's power law.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of cancrinite-type zeolite, and its ionic conductivity study by AC impedance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriaa, A.; Ben Saad, K.; Hamzaoui, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    The synthesis of cancrinite in the system NaOH-SiO2-Al2O3-NaHCO3-H2O was performed, according to methods described in the literature, in an autoclave under hydrothermal conditions at T = 473 K. The electrical properties of cancrinite-type zeolite pellets were investigated by complex impedance spectroscopy in the temperature range 465-800°C. The effect of temperature on impedance parameters was studied using an impedance analyzer in a wide frequency range (1 Hz to 13 MHz). The real and imaginary parts of complex impedance trace semicircles in the complex plane are plotted. The bulk resistance of the material decreases with rise in temperature. This exhibits a typical negative temperature coefficient of resistance (NTCR) behavior of the material. The results of bulk electrical conductivity and its activation energy are presented. The modulus analysis suggests that the electrical transport processes in the material are very likely to be of electronic nature. Relaxation frequencies follow an Arrhenius behavior with activation energy values not comparable to those found for the electrical conductivity.

  16. Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy for living cell membrane potential measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panday, Namuna

    Recently, the existence of multiple micro-domains of extracellular potential around individual cells have been revealed by voltage reporter dye using fluorescence microscopy. One hypothesis is that these long lasting potential patterns play a vital role in regulating important cell activities such as embryonic patterning, regenerative repair and reduction of cancerous disorganization. We used multifunctional Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy (SICM) to study these extracellular potential patterns of single cell with higher spatial resolution. To validate this novel technique, we compared the extracellular potential distribution on the fixed HeLa cell surface and Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface and found significant difference. We then measured the extracellular potential distributions of living melanocytes and melanoma cells and found both the mean magnitude and spatial variation of extracellular potential of the melanoma cells are bigger than those of melanocytes. As compared to the voltage reporter dye based fluorescence microscope method, SICM can achieve quantitative potential measurements of non-labeled living cell membranes with higher spatial resolution.

  17. Electrical conductivity measurements of bacterial nanowires from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruthupandy, Muthusamy; Anand, Muthusamy; Maduraiveeran, Govindhan; Sait Hameedha Beevi, Akbar; Jeeva Priya, Radhakrishnan

    2015-12-01

    The extracellular appendages of bacteria (flagella) that transfer electrons to electrodes are called bacterial nanowires. This study focuses on the isolation and separation of nanowires that are attached via Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial culture. The size and roughness of separated nanowires were measured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. The obtained bacterial nanowires indicated a clear image of bacterial nanowires measuring 16 nm in diameter. The formation of bacterial nanowires was confirmed by microscopic studies (AFM and TEM) and the conductivity nature of bacterial nanowire was investigated by electrochemical techniques. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), which are nondestructive voltammetry techniques, suggest that bacterial nanowires could be the source of electrons—which may be used in various applications, for example, microbial fuel cells, biosensors, organic solar cells, and bioelectronic devices. Routine analysis of electron transfer between bacterial nanowires and the electrode was performed, providing insight into the extracellular electron transfer (EET) to the electrode. CV revealed the catalytic electron transferability of bacterial nanowires and electrodes and showed excellent redox activities. CV and EIS studies showed that bacterial nanowires can charge the surface by producing and storing sufficient electrons, behave as a capacitor, and have features consistent with EET. Finally, electrochemical studies confirmed the development of bacterial nanowires with EET. This study suggests that bacterial nanowires can be used to fabricate biomolecular sensors and nanoelectronic devices.

  18. Dual AC Dipole Excitation for the Measurement of Magnetic Multipole Strength from Beam Position Monitor Data

    SciTech Connect

    M. Spata, G.A. Krafft

    2011-09-01

    An experiment was conducted at Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility to develop a technique for characterizing the nonlinear fields of the beam transport system. Two air-core dipole magnets were simultaneously driven at two different frequencies to provide a time-dependent transverse modulation of the electron beam. Fourier decomposition of beam position monitor data was then used to measure the amplitude of these frequencies at different positions along the beamline. For a purely linear transport system one expects to find solely the frequencies that were applied to the dipoles with amplitudes that depend on the phase advance of the lattice. In the presence of nonlinear fields one expects to also find harmonics of the driving frequencies that depend on the order of the nonlinearity. The technique was calibrated using one of the sextupole magnets in a CEBAF beamline and then applied to a dipole to measure the sextupole and octupole strength of the magnet. A comparison is made between the beam-based measurements, results from TOSCA and data from our Magnet Measurement Facility.

  19. Vertical hydraulic conductivity measurements in the Denver Basin, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barkmann, P.E.

    2004-01-01

    The Denver Basin is a structural basin on the eastern flank of the Rocky Mountain Front Range, Colorado, containing approximately 3000 ft of sediments that hold a critical groundwater resource supplying many thousands of households with water. Managing this groundwater resource requires understanding how water gets into and moves through water-bearing layers in a complex multiple-layered sedimentary sequence. The Denver Basin aquifer system consists of permeable sandstone interbedded with impermeable shale that has been subdivided into four principle aquifers named, in ascending order, the Laramie-Fox Hills, Arapahoe, Denver, and Dawson aquifers. Although shale can dominate the stratigraphic interval containing the aquifers, there is very little empirical data regarding the hydrogeologic properties of the shale layers that control groundwater flow in the basin. The amount of water that flows vertically within the basin is limited by the vertical hydraulic conductivity through the confining shale layers. Low vertical flow volumes translate to low natural recharge rates and can have a profound negative impact on long-term well yields and the economic viability of utilizing the resource. To date, direct measurements of vertical hydraulic conductivity from cores of fine-grained sediments have been published from only five locations; and the data span a wide range from 1??10-3 to 1??10-11 cm/sec. This range may be attributable, in part, to differences in sample handling and analytical methods; however, it may also reflect subtle differences in the lithologic characteristics of the fine-grained sediments such as grain-size, clay mineralogy, and compaction that relate to position in the basin. These limited data certainly call for the collection of additional data.

  20. Experimental and theoretical study of AC electrical conduction mechanisms of Organic-inorganic hybrid compound Bis (4-acetylanilinium) tetrachlorocadmiate (II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jellibi, A.; Chaabane, I.; Guidara, K.

    2016-06-01

    A new organic-inorganic bis (4-acetylaniline) tetrachlorocadmate [C8H10NO]2[CdCl4] can be obtained by slow evaporation at room temperature and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction. It crystallized in an orthorhombic system (Cmca space group). The material electrical properties were characterized by impedance spectroscopy technique in the frequency range from 209 Hz-5 MHz and temperature 413 to 460 K. Besides, the impedance plots show semicircle arcs at different temperatures and an electrical equivalent circuit has been proposed to interpret the impedance results. The circuits consist of the parallel combination of a resistance (R), capacitance (C) and fractal capacitance (CPE). The variation of the exponent s as a function of temperature suggested that the conduction mechanism in Bis (4-acetylanilinium) tetrachlorocadmiate compound is governed by two processes which can be ascribed to a hopping transport mechanism: correlated barrier hopping (CBH) model below 443 K and the small polaron tunneling (SPT) model above 443 K.

  1. Interpreting equilibrium-conductivity and conductivity-relaxation measurements to establish thermodynamic and transport properties for multiple charged defect conducting ceramics.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huayang; Ricote, Sandrine; Coors, W Grover; Kee, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    A model-based interpretation of measured equilibrium conductivity and conductivity relaxation is developed to establish thermodynamic, transport, and kinetics parameters for multiple charged defect conducting (MCDC) ceramic materials. The present study focuses on 10% yttrium-doped barium zirconate (BZY10). In principle, using the Nernst-Einstein relationship, equilibrium conductivity measurements are sufficient to establish thermodynamic and transport properties. However, in practice it is difficult to establish unique sets of properties using equilibrium conductivity alone. Combining equilibrium and conductivity-relaxation measurements serves to significantly improve the quantitative fidelity of the derived material properties. The models are developed using a Nernst-Planck-Poisson (NPP) formulation, which enables the quantitative representation of conductivity relaxations caused by very large changes in oxygen partial pressure.

  2. Impedance and AC conductivity study of nano crystalline, fine grained multiferroic bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3), synthesized by microwave sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolte, Jayant; Salame, Paresh H.; Daryapurkar, A. S.; Gopalan, P.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, major reduction in sintering time,temperautre and significant improvement over final density of sitnered sample is reported for the microwave sintered nanocrystalline BiFeO3 (BFO) ceramic. Also, different sintering time and temperatures have been used to tailor the grain size and the final density of the resulting BFO ceramics synthesized from phase pure BFO nanoparticles ( d ¯ ≈ 10 n m ). Microwave sintering resulted in reducing the sintering time substantially (by 1h), and has resulted in submicron sized grains and high resistivity ˜1.8 GΩ-cm. The AC conductivity is seen to follow the Jonscher's power law behavior, suggesting correlated barrier hopping (CBH) mechanism in the sample. The role of oxygen vacancies at high temperature, due to volatility of bismuth, in dielectric and conductivity behavior is also discussed. Further, the sample displayed dielectric anomaly near magnetic transition temperature (˜180 °C) indicating bearing of magnetic moments on the dielectric properties. Using Impedance Spectroscopy (IS) we have established, the electrical heterogeneity of the ceramic BFO reavealing semiconducting nature of grains and insulating nature of grain boundary. This, formation of network of insulating grain boundaries and semiconducting grains could lead to formation of internal barrier layer capacitance (IBLC) leading to high dielectric constant in microwave sintered BFO.

  3. Raman, dielectric and AC-conductivity behavior of Dy2O3 contained K0.5Na0.5NbO3 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahesh, P.; Pamu, D.

    2016-05-01

    Lead-free piezoelectric (K0.5Na0.5)NbO3+ x wt% Dy2O3 (x = 0 - 1.5) (KNND) ceramics have been prepared by solid state reaction method. The effect of Dy2O3 on the dielectric and electrical conductivity responses of KNN ceramics were investigated in a broad temperature (from 133 K to 673 K) and frequency (106 Hz to 108 Hz) range. Temperature dependent dielectric analysis revealed that the polymorphic phase transition orthorhombic to tetragonal transition temperature (TO-T) shifted from 199°C to room temperature with enhanced dielectric permittivity (ɛ' = 994) with the addition of Dy2O3. The effect of Dy2O3 on structural properties of KNND ceramics are analyzed interms of changes in the internal modes of NbO6 octahedra by using Raman spectroscopy. Temperature dependent (133 K - 306 K) AC-conductivity follows the variable range hopping mechanism in different temperature regimes.

  4. Steady heat conduction-based thermal conductivity measurement of single walled carbon nanotubes thin film using a micropipette thermal sensor

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, R.; Lee, K. M.; Chang, W. S.; Kim, D. S.; Rhee, G. H.; Choi, T. Y.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the thermal conductivity measurement of single-walled carbon nanotubes thin film using a laser point source-based steady state heat conduction method. A high precision micropipette thermal sensor fabricated with a sensing tip size varying from 2 μm to 5 μm and capable of measuring thermal fluctuation with resolution of ±0.01 K was used to measure the temperature gradient across the suspended carbon nanotubes (CNT) film with a thickness of 100 nm. We used a steady heat conduction model to correlate the temperature gradient to the thermal conductivity of the film. We measured the average thermal conductivity of CNT film as 74.3 ± 7.9 W m−1 K−1 at room temperature. PMID:23556837

  5. Reconstruction from boundary measurements for less regular conductivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Andoni; Zhang, Guo

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, following Nachman’s idea (1988 Ann. Math. 128 531–76) and Haberman and Tataru’s idea (2013 Duke Math. J. 162 497–516), we reconstruct C 1 conductivity γ or Lipchitz conductivity γ with small enough value of | {{\

  6. SPHINX Measurements of Radiation Induced Conductivity of Foam

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, W.P.; Beutler, D.E.; Burt, M.; Dudley, K.J.; Stringer, T.A.

    1998-12-14

    Experiments on the SPHINX accelerator studying radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) in foam indicate that a field-exclusion boundary layer model better describes foam than a Maxwell-Garnett model that treats the conducting gas bubbles in the foam as modifying the dielectric constant. In both cases, wall attachment effects could be important but were neglected.

  7. Electroanalytical measurements without electrolytes: conducting polymers as probes for redox titration in non-conductive organic media.

    PubMed

    Lange, Ulrich; Mirsky, Vladimir M

    2012-09-26

    Electroanalytical methods have been applied only in conducting media. An application of conducting polymers allows to overcome this limitation. If such material is in electrochemical equilibrium with dissolved redox active species, its electrical conductivity depends on the redox potential of these species. Therefore, conductometric measurements with conducting polymers can provide about the same information as classical redox electrodes. The approach was applied for redox titration. Equivalent points obtained by this titration in aqueous and organic electrolytes were identical. Then the approach was applied for determination of bromine number by redox titration in non-conducting organic phase.

  8. Physical and electrical models for interpreting AC and DC transport measurements in polymer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, Max; Tzolov, Marian; Cossel, Raquel; Peeler, Seth

    We have fabricated and studied bulk heterojunction solar cells using a mixture of the low bandgap material PCPDTBT and PCBM-C60. Our transport studies show that the devices in dark have good rectification and they respond to AC voltage as a simple RC circuit. The illumination causes an additional contribution to the impedance, which varies with the level of illumination. One proposed model is that photo-generated charges can become trapped in potential wells. These charges then follow a Debye relaxation process, which contributes to a varying dielectric constant. Another proposed model is based on a RC circuit model with two capacitors which can describe the varying capacitance behavior. The physical mechanism for this model is that photo-generated charges become accumulated at the interface between PCPDTBT and PCBM-C60 and form an additional layer of charge. We will show that our circuit models and their analogous physical models can predict the AC and DC responses of polymer solar cells.

  9. Size-Dependent Relaxation Properties of Monodisperse Magnetite Nanoparticles Measured Over Seven Decades of Frequency by AC Susceptometry.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, R Matthew; Khandhar, Amit P; Jonasson, Christian; Blomgren, Jakob; Johansson, Christer; Krishnan, Kannan M

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic relaxation is exploited in innovative biomedical applications of magnetic particles such as magnetic particle imaging (MPI), magnetic fluid hyperthermia, and bio-sensing. Relaxation behavior should be optimized to achieve high performance imaging, efficient heating, and good SNR in bio-sensing. Using two AC susceptometers with overlapping frequency ranges, we have measured the relaxation behavior of a series of monodisperse magnetic particles and demonstrated that this approach is an effective way to probe particle relaxation characteristics from a few Hz to 10 MHz, the frequencies relevant for MPI, hyperthermia, and sensing. PMID:25473124

  10. In vivo measurements of electrical conductivity of porcine organs at low frequency: new method of measurement.

    PubMed

    Spottorno, J; Multigner, M; Rivero, G; Alvarez, L; de la Venta, J; Santos, M

    2012-10-01

    Calculations of the induced currents created in the human body by external electromagnetic fields would be more accurate provided that more realistic experimental values of the electrical properties of the body were available. The purpose of this work is to experimentally obtain values for the conductivity of living organs in conditions close to the real situation. Two-electrode in vivo measurements of the bioimpedance of some porcine organs have been performed. From these measurements and taking into account geometrical considerations, the electrical conductivity for the kidney, liver, heart, and spinal cord has been obtained and were found to be higher than the values reported in the literature. Furthermore, a new experimental procedure is proposed where the conductivity is determined from the values of the electrical potential and currents that are induced by an external electromagnetic field created by a coil placed close to the organ under study.

  11. Simultaneous ac and dc magnetic field measurements in residential areas: Implications for resonance theories of biological effects

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, P.S.; Sastre, A.

    1995-10-01

    The goal of this study was to obtain data that could be used to evaluate the applicability of ``resonance`` theories of biological effects in residential settings. The authors first describe a measurement system which allows the study of ac and dc magnetic fields simultaneously in space and in time. Sample measurements were taken near two power lines, two objects and in two residential homes. The results show that the earth`s (dc) magnetic field was unaffected near power lines. The compass orientation of the power line influenced the relative values of the ac components parallel and perpendicular to the dc field. The electric heating system greatly affected the ac field levels in the home, causing the levels to increase from less than 1 mG to a maximum of 7.5 mG during heating. The magnitudes of the dc field in the two homes varied from about 380 to 650 mG, with the larger variations near metallic or magnetic objects such as the refrigerator or a metallic air duct. The earth`s field was elevated above its natural level within a distance of 8 feet from a subcompact passenger car, e.g., the level changed from about 540 to 1,100 mG beside the headlight. A steel chair changed the earth`s field by up to 60 mG within a distance of one foot. These results suggest that some of the narrow ``resonances`` described in laboratory studies may be difficult to observe against the variations in do field amplitude and direction resulting from the presence of everyday metallic objects.

  12. Measurement of Thermal Conductivity of Anisotropic SiC Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Guo-Ping; Zheng, Xing-Hua; Qiu, Lin; Tang, Da-Wei; Zhu, Jie

    2013-12-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) crystals with excellent heat conduction and thermal stability can be widely used in microelectronic devices and integrated circuits. It is important for the study of a functional type SiC material to have accurate thermal-conductivity and thermal-diffusivity values of SiC crystal. A 3 ω technique is employed to determine the anisotropic thermal conductivity of SiC crystal. Three micrometal probes with different widths are deposited by chemical-vapor deposition on the surface of SiC crystal. Each micrometal probe is used as a heater, and also as a thermometer. The temperature fluctuation signals of a micrometal probe represent heat conduction in different directions in the specimen. Thermal conductivities both in the cross-plane and in-plane directions of SiC crystal are achieved through fitted values. The results indicate that thermal conductivities in three different directions of SiC crystal can be characterized using the metal heater construction.

  13. Influence of temperature on the electric, dielectric and AC conductivity properties of nano-crystalline zinc substituted cobalt ferrite synthesized by solution combustion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Ritu; Kumar, Gagan; Batoo, Khalid M.; Singh, M.

    2014-06-01

    Cobalt-zinc nanoferrites with formulae Co ZnFeO, where x = 0.0, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3, have been synthesized by solution combustion technique. The variation of DC resistivity with temperature shows the semiconducting behavior of all nanoferrites. The dielectric properties such as dielectric constant (') and dielectric loss tangent (tan are investigated as a function of temperature and frequency. Dielectric constant and loss tangent are found to be increasing with an increase in temperature while with an increase in frequency both, ' and tan , are found to be decreasing. The dielectric properties have been explained on the basis of space charge polarization according to Maxwell-Wagner's two-layer model and the hopping of charge between Fe and Fe. Further, a very high value of dielectric constant and a low value of tan are the prime achievements of the present work. The AC electrical conductivity ( is studied as a function of temperature as well as frequency and is observed to be increasing with the increase in temperature and frequency.

  14. Electric characterization of (Sr, Sr-Ba, Ba) M-type ferrites by AC measurements[Alternating Current

    SciTech Connect

    Huanosta-Tera, A.; Lira-Hueso, R. de; Perez-Orta, O.; Palomares-Sanchez, S.A.; Ponce-Castaneda, S.; Mirabal-Garcia, M.

    2000-02-01

    Considering the electrical conductivity in ceramics, necessary reference should be given to dynamic processes occurring as a function of frequency and temperature. Although the most immediate interest in ferrites lies in their magnetic properties, technological applications require a wider knowledge of general physical properties as well. This is especially applicable when the materials are studied as a function of composition or when adding different modifiers. In this report, the authors present results of the ac and dc electric characteristics of a family of magneto-plumbite-type hexaferrites, where Ba gradually substitutes Sr in the Ba{sub x}Sr{sub 1{minus}x}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 19} compound (0 {le} x {le} 1). The results were determined over a wide range of frequencies and temperatures.

  15. EVALUATION OF HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITIES CALCULATED FROM MULTIPORT-PERMEAMETER MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A multiport permeameter was developed for use in estimating hydraulic conductivity over intact sections of aquifer core using the core liner as the permeameter body. Six cores obtained from one borehole through the upper 9 m of a stratified glacial-outwash aquifer were used to ev...

  16. Contactless measurement of alternating current conductance in quantum Hall structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drichko, I. L.; Diakonov, A. M.; Malysh, V. A.; Smirnov, I. Yu.; Galperin, Y. M.; Ilyinskaya, N. D.; Usikova, A. A.; Kummer, M.; von Känel, H.

    2014-10-01

    We report a procedure to determine the frequency-dependent conductance of quantum Hall structures in a broad frequency domain. The procedure is based on the combination of two known probeless methods—acoustic spectroscopy and microwave spectroscopy. By using the acoustic spectroscopy, we study the low-frequency attenuation and phase shift of a surface acoustic wave in a piezoelectric crystal in the vicinity of the electron (hole) layer. The electronic contribution is resolved using its dependence on a transverse magnetic field. At high frequencies, we study the attenuation of an electromagnetic wave in a coplanar waveguide. To quantitatively calibrate these data, we use the fact that in the quantum-Hall-effect regime the conductance at the maxima of its magnetic field dependence is determined by extended states. Therefore, it should be frequency independent in a broad frequency domain. The procedure is verified by studies of a well-characterized p-SiGe/Ge/SiGe heterostructure.

  17. Contactless measurement of alternating current conductance in quantum Hall structures

    SciTech Connect

    Drichko, I. L.; Diakonov, A. M.; Malysh, V. A.; Smirnov, I. Yu.; Ilyinskaya, N. D.; Usikova, A. A.; Galperin, Y. M.; Kummer, M.; Känel, H. von

    2014-10-21

    We report a procedure to determine the frequency-dependent conductance of quantum Hall structures in a broad frequency domain. The procedure is based on the combination of two known probeless methods—acoustic spectroscopy and microwave spectroscopy. By using the acoustic spectroscopy, we study the low-frequency attenuation and phase shift of a surface acoustic wave in a piezoelectric crystal in the vicinity of the electron (hole) layer. The electronic contribution is resolved using its dependence on a transverse magnetic field. At high frequencies, we study the attenuation of an electromagnetic wave in a coplanar waveguide. To quantitatively calibrate these data, we use the fact that in the quantum-Hall-effect regime the conductance at the maxima of its magnetic field dependence is determined by extended states. Therefore, it should be frequency independent in a broad frequency domain. The procedure is verified by studies of a well-characterized p-SiGe/Ge/SiGe heterostructure.

  18. Airborne VLF measurements and mapping of ground conductivity in Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Laust B.; Persson, Lena; Bastani, Mehrdad; Byström, Sören

    2009-03-01

    Airborne VLF data are routinely collected by The Geological Survey of Sweden (SGU) as part of its bedrock mapping programme. In this paper we demonstrate that the novel Tensor VLF technique developed at Uppsala University and SGU can provide useful qualitative and quantitative information about the electrical conductivity distribution in the upper few hundred meters. Single transmitter scalar VLF maps emphasize those conductive structures that have dominant strikes in the direction of the transmitter. The tensor tipper (essentially the vertical magnetic field from currents along the strike direction) calculated from multiple transmitters is dependent only upon the underlying conductivity structure. Transformation of the tipper into the peaker (the horizontal divergence) has proven to enhance the lateral resolution while the transformation to the apparent resistivity can be used to discriminate different rock types. Two case histories from the application of VLF data are presented in this study. Two dimensional structures can be quantitatively modelled by modern inversion methods developed originally for deep electromagnetic MT soundings. Direct inversion of the real and imaginary parts of the tipper provides more quantitative information about the subsurface resistivity distribution.

  19. Astronaut Mike Fincke Conducts Fluid Merging Viscosity Measurement (FMVM) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Astronaut Mike Fincke places droplets of honey onto the strings for the Fluid Merging Viscosity Measurement (FMVM) investigation onboard the International Space Station (ISS). The FMVM experiment measures the time it takes for two individual highly viscous fluid droplets to coalesce or merge into one droplet. Different fluids and droplet size combinations were tested in the series of experiments. By using the microgravity environment, researchers can measure the viscosity or 'thickness' of fluids without the influence of containers and gravity using this new technique. Understanding viscosity could help scientists understand industrially important materials such as paints, emulsions, polymer melts and even foams used to produce pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetic products.

  20. Fluctuation spectroscopy with the ACS ramp filters: a new way to measure the IMF in elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dokkum, Pieter

    2014-10-01

    Images of old stellar populations show pixel-to-pixel fluctuations due to Poisson variations in the number of giant stars. These surface brightness fluctuations can be used to study the spectra of stars as a function of their luminosity, by obtaining differential spectroscopy of pixels with high and low fluctuations. If the average number of stars per pixel is sufficiently low, there will be individual pixels that have almost no light from luminous giants, providing sightlines that are dominated by main sequence stars. In this regime the observed spectral response is strongly dependent on the number of cool, low mass stars, and hence the stellar initial mass function (IMF). We propose to observe the nearest elliptical galaxy, Centaurus A, through four narrowband ACS ramp filters tuned to the 0.8 - 0.9 micron range. From the relation between ACS narrowband indices and the amplitude of the surface brightness fluctuation we will be able to obtain quantitative constraints on the IMF from 0.1-1 Solar masses, and distinguish between a Kroupa-like IMF or a bottom-heavy, Salpeter-like IMF, with ~5 sigma significance. We have demonstrated the feasibility of the technique used in this proposal in a Cycle 19 program, where we used the same observational strategy to measure the properties of luminous giants in the Virgo galaxy NGC 4472.

  1. Measurement of surface resistivity/conductivity of different organic thin films by a combination of optical shearography and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, Khaled

    2013-11-01

    Shearography techniques were applied again to measure the surface resistivity/conductivity of different organic thin films on a metallic substrate. The coatings were ACE premium-grey enamel (spray coating), a yellow Acrylic lacquer, and a gold nail polish on a carbon steel substrate. The investigation was focused on determining the in-plane displacement of the coatings by shearography between 20 and 60 °C. Then, the alternating current (AC) impedance (resistance) of the same coated samples was determined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in 3.0% NaCl solution at room temperature. As a result, the proportionality constant (resistivity or conductivity = 1/surface resistivity) between the determined AC impedance and the in-plane displacement was obtained. The obtained resistivity of all investigated coatings, 40:15 × 106-24:6 × 109Ωcm, was found in the insulator range.

  2. Analyses of temperature-dependent interface states, series resistances, and AC electrical conductivities of Al/p—Si and Al/Bi4Ti3O12/p—Si structures by using the admittance spectroscopy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mert, Yıldırım; Perihan, Durmuş; Şemsettin, Altındal

    2013-10-01

    In this study, Al/p—Si and Al/Bi4Ti3O12/p—Si structures are fabricated and their interface states (Nss), the values of series resistance (Rs), and AC electrical conductivityac) are obtained each as a function of temperature using admittance spectroscopy method which includes capacitance—voltage (C—V) and conductance—voltage (G—V) measurements. In addition, the effect of interfacial Bi4Ti3O12 (BTO) layer on the performance of the structure is investigated. The voltage-dependent profiles of Nss and Rs are obtained from the high-low frequency capacitance method and the Nicollian method, respectively. Experimental results show that Nss and Rs, as strong functions of temperature and applied bias voltage, each exhibit a peak, whose position shifts towards the reverse bias region, in the depletion region. Such a peak behavior is attributed to the particular distribution of Nss and the reordering and restructuring of Nss under the effect of temperature. The values of activation energy (Ea), obtained from the slope of the Arrhenius plot, of both structures are obtained to be bias voltage-independent, and the Ea of the metal-ferroelectric-semiconductor (MFS) structure is found to be half that of the metal—semiconductor (MS) structure. Furthermore, other main electrical parameters, such as carrier concentration of acceptor atoms (NA), built-in potential (Vbi), Fermi energy (EF), image force barrier lowering (Δ Φb), and barrier height (Φb), are extracted using reverse bias C-2—V characteristics as a function of temperature.

  3. Promising anchoring groups for single-molecule conductance measurements.

    PubMed

    Kaliginedi, Veerabhadrarao; Rudnev, Alexander V; Moreno-García, Pavel; Baghernejad, Masoud; Huang, Cancan; Hong, Wenjing; Wandlowski, Thomas

    2014-11-21

    The understanding of the charge transport through single molecule junctions is a prerequisite for the design and building of electronic circuits based on single molecule junctions. However, reliable and robust formation of such junctions is a challenging task to achieve. In this topical review, we present a systematic investigation of the anchoring group effect on single molecule junction conductance by employing two complementary techniques, namely scanning tunneling microscopy break junction (STM-BJ) and mechanically controllable break junction (MCBJ) techniques, based on the studies published in the literature and important results from our own work. We compared conductance studies for conventional anchoring groups described earlier with the molecular junctions formed through π-interactions with the electrode surface (Au, Pt, Ag) and we also summarized recent developments in the formation of highly conducting covalent Au-C σ-bonds using oligophenyleneethynylene (OPE) and an alkane molecular backbone. Specifically, we focus on the electron transport properties of diaryloligoyne, oligophenyleneethynylene (OPE) and/or alkane molecular junctions composed of several traditional anchoring groups, (dihydrobenzo[b]thiophene (BT), 5-benzothienyl analogue (BTh), thiol (SH), pyridyl (PY), amine (NH2), cyano (CN), methyl sulphide (SMe), nitro (NO2)) and other anchoring groups at the solid/liquid interface. The qualitative and quantitative comparison of the results obtained with different anchoring groups reveals structural and mechanistic details of the different types of single molecular junctions. The results reported in this prospective may serve as a guideline for the design and synthesis of molecular systems to be used in molecule-based electronic devices.

  4. Instrument for Measuring Thermal Conductivity of Materials at Low Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, James; Sass, Jared; Johnson, Wesley

    2010-01-01

    With the advance of polymer and other non-metallic material sciences, whole new series of polymeric materials and composites are being created. These materials are being optimized for many different applications including cryogenic and low-temperature industrial processes. Engineers need these data to perform detailed system designs and enable new design possibilities for improved control, reliability, and efficiency in specific applications. One main area of interest is cryogenic structural elements and fluid handling components and other parts, films, and coatings for low-temperature application. An important thermal property of these new materials is the apparent thermal conductivity (k-value).

  5. Nanoscale Electromechanics To Measure Thermal Conductivity, Expansion, and Interfacial Losses.

    PubMed

    Mathew, John P; Patel, Raj; Borah, Abhinandan; Maliakkal, Carina B; Abhilash, T S; Deshmukh, Mandar M

    2015-11-11

    We study the effect of localized Joule heating on the mechanical properties of doubly clamped nanowires under tensile stress. Local heating results in systematic variation of the resonant frequency; these frequency changes result from thermal stresses that depend on temperature dependent thermal conductivity and expansion coefficient. The change in sign of the linear expansion coefficient of InAs is reflected in the resonant response of the system near a bath temperature of 20 K. Using finite element simulations to model the experimentally observed frequency shifts, we show that the thermal conductivity of a nanowire can be approximated in the 10-60 K temperature range by the empirical form κ = bT W/mK, where the value of b for a nanowire was found to be b = 0.035 W/mK(2), significantly lower than bulk values. Also, local heating allows us to independently vary the temperature of the nanowire relative to the clamping points pinned to the bath temperature. We suggest a loss mechanism (dissipation ~10(-4)-10(-5)) originating from the interfacial clamping losses between the metal and the semiconductor nanostructure. PMID:26479952

  6. Thermal conductivity of silver loaded conductive epoxy from cryogenic to ambient temperature and its application for precision cryogenic noise measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amils, Ricardo I.; Gallego, Juan Daniel; Sebastián, José Luis; Muñoz, Sagrario; Martín, Agustín; Leuther, Arnulf

    2016-06-01

    The pressure to increase the sensitivity of instrumentation has pushed the use of cryogenic Low Noise Amplifier (LNA) technology into a growing number of fields. These areas range from radio astronomy and deep space communications to fundamental physics. In this context manufacturing for cryogenic environments requires a proper thermal knowledge of the materials to be able to achieve adequate design behavior. In this work, we present experimental measurements of the thermal conductivity of a silver filled conductive epoxy (EPO-TEK H20E) which is widely used in cryogenic electronics applications. The characterization has been made using a sample preparation which mimics the practical use of this adhesive in the fabrication of cryogenic devices. We apply the data obtained to a detailed analysis of the effects of the conductive epoxy in a monolithic thermal noise source used for high accuracy cryogenic microwave noise measurements. In this application the epoxy plays a fundamental role since its limited thermal conductivity allows heating the chip with relatively low power. To our knowledge, the cryogenic thermal conductivity data of this epoxy has not been reported before in the literature in the 4-300 K temperature range. A second non-conductive epoxy (Gray Scotch-Weld 2216 B/A), also widely used in cryogenic applications, has been measured in order to validate the method by comparing with previous published data.

  7. Measurements Conducted on an Unknown Object Labeled Pu-239

    SciTech Connect

    Hoteling, Nathan

    2013-11-18

    Measurements were carried out on 12 November 2013 to determine whether Pu-239 was present on an object discovered in a plastic bag with label “Pu-­239 6 uCi.” Following initial survey measurements to verify that the object was not leaking or contaminated, spectra were collected with a High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector with object positioned in two different configurations. Analysis of the spectra did not yield any direct evidence of Pu-­239. From the measured spectra, minimum detectable activity (MDA) was determined to be approximately 2 uCi for the gamma-­ray measurements. Although there was no direct evidence of Pu-239, a peak at 60 keV characteristic of Am-­241 decay was observed. Since it is very likely that Am-­241 would be present in aged plutonium samples, this was interpreted as indirect evidence for the presence of plutonium on the object. Analysis of this peak led to an estimated Pu-­239 activity of 0.02–0.04 uCi, or <1x10-6 grams.

  8. MEASUREMENT OF HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY DISTRIBUTIONS: A MANUAL OF PRACTICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of hydrologists to perform field measurements of aquifer hydraulic properties must be enhanced in order to significantly improve the capacity to solve groundwater contamination problems at Superfund and other sites. The primary purpose of this manual is to provide ne...

  9. Conducting Art Therapy Research Using Quantitative EEG Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belkofer, Christopher M.; Konopka, Lukasz M.

    2008-01-01

    This study presents a modified, single subject design that measured the patterns of electrical activity of a participant's brain following an hour spent painting and drawing. Paired t tests were used to compare pre and post art-making electroencephalograph (EEG) data. The results indicated that neurobiological activity after drawing and painting…

  10. Measuring Thermal Conductivity of a Small Insulation Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    2009-01-01

    A multiple-throat venturi system has been invented for measuring laminar flow of air or other gas at low speed (1 to 30 cm/s) in a duct while preserving the laminar nature of the flow and keeping the velocity profile across the duct as nearly flat as possible. While means for measuring flows at higher speeds are well established, heretofore, there have been no reliable means for making consistent, accurate measurements in this speed range. In the original application for which this system was invented, the duct leads into the test section of a low-speed wind tunnel wherein uniform, low-speed, laminar flow is required for scientific experiments. The system could also be used to monitor a slow flow of gas in an industrial process like chemical vapor deposition. In the original application, the multiple- throat venturi system is mounted at the inlet end of the duct having a rectangular cross section of 19 by 14 cm, just upstream of an assembly of inlet screens and flow straighteners that help to suppress undesired flow fluctuations (see Figure 1). The basic venturi measurement principle is well established: One measures the difference in pressure between (1) a point just outside the inlet, where the pressure is highest and the kinetic energy lowest; and (2) the narrowest part (the throat) of the venturi passage, where the kinetic energy is highest and the pressure is lowest. Then by use of Bernoulli s equation for the relationship between pressure and kinetic energy, the volumetric flow speed in the duct can be calculated from the pressure difference and the inlet and throat widths. The design of this system represents a compromise among length, pressure recovery, uniformity of flow, and complexity of assembly. Traditionally, venturis are used to measure faster flows in narrower cross sections, with longer upstream and downstream passages to maintain accuracy. The dimensions of the passages of the present venturi system are sized to provide a readily measurable

  11. Evaluation of the electrode performance for PAFC by using acid absorption, acceleration and ac-impedance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chang-Soo; Song, Rak-Hyun; Choi, Byung-Woo

    1996-12-31

    In PAFC, the degradation on cathode electrode caused by carbon corrosion, platinum dissolution and growth is especially severe. An acceleration test is a good technique for evaluating the degradation of electrode performance, because it does not need long time. Coleman et al used thermal cycling and on-off cycling as an acceleration test. Song et al showed that hydrogen shortage decreased the electrode performance more rapidly than that of air shortage in gas shortage test. Honji et al reported that the rate of coarsening of Pt particle is rapid in open circuit potential and this is one of major causes on the performance degradation of electrode. The cathode performance has been studied by using acid absorption, acceleration and ac-impedance measurements as functions of the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) contents and sintering temperatures of the electrode.

  12. Microfabricated AC impedance sensor

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter; Ackler, Harold D.; Becker, Frederick; Boser, Bernhard E.; Eldredge, Adam B.; Fuller, Christopher K.; Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Hamilton, Julie K.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Wang, Xiao-Bo

    2002-01-01

    A microfabricated instrument for detecting and identifying cells and other particles based on alternating current (AC) impedance measurements. The microfabricated AC impedance sensor includes two critical elements: 1) a microfluidic chip, preferably of glass substrates, having at least one microchannel therein and with electrodes patterned on both substrates, and 2) electrical circuits that connect to the electrodes on the microfluidic chip and detect signals associated with particles traveling down the microchannels. These circuits enable multiple AC impedance measurements of individual particles at high throughput rates with sufficient resolution to identify different particle and cell types as appropriate for environmental detection and clinical diagnostic applications.

  13. Results from the LADCP measurements conducted in the Eurasian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goszczko, Ilona; Pnyushkov, Andrey; Polyakov, Igor; Rember, Robert; Thurnherr, Andreas M.

    2015-04-01

    Preliminary results from 114 dual headed LADCP (Lowered Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler) measurements performed during the NABOS (Nansen and Amundsen Basin Observational System) 2013 cruise in the Eurasian Basin of the Arctic Ocean are discussed. Calculated horizontal magnetic field strength for that specific study area and cruise time span equals to 1500-4200 nT which is a critically low value. This affected the heading usability of instruments' compasses, thereby making the obtained ocean currents velocities and directions difficult to assess. Additional data post-processing performed with the LDEO Software (Version IX_9) and dedicated Matlab routines have so far allowed to obtain reasonable velocity profiles only in several cases (with additional information from the SeaBird 911plus CTD, GPS and bottom tracking). Thus, doubts concerning the feasibility of compasses, confirmed by difficulties encountered previously in similar polar locations, rise the necessity of providing an additional heading source which should be mounted together with the Teledyne RDI instruments to gain an unquestionable velocity field.

  14. Optimization of the AC-gradient method for velocity profile measurement and application to slow flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartäusch, Ralf; Helluy, Xavier; Jakob, Peter Michael; Fidler, Florian

    2014-11-01

    This work presents a spectroscopic method to measure slow flow. Within a single shot the velocity distribution is acquired. This allows distinguishing rapidly between single velocities within the sampled volume with a high sensitivity. The technique is based on signal acquisition in the presence of a periodic gradient and a train of refocussing RF pulses. The theoretical model for trapezoidal bipolar pulse shaped gradients under consideration of diffusion and the outflow effect is introduced. A phase correction technique is presented that improves the spectral accuracy. Therefore, flow phantom measurements are used to validate the new sequence and the simulation based on the theoretical model. It was demonstrated that accurate parabolic flow profiles can be acquired and flow variations below 200 μm/s can be detected. Three post-processing methods that eliminate static background signal are also presented for applications in which static background signal dominates. Finally, this technique is applied to flow measurement of a small alder tree demonstrating a typical application of in vivo plant measurements.

  15. Atmospheric chemistry suite (ACS): a set of infrared spectrometers for atmospheric measurements on board ExoMars trace gas orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korablev, Oleg; Grigoriev, Alexei V.; Trokhimovsky, Alexander; Ivanov, Yurii S.; Moshkin, Boris; Shakun, Alexei; Dziuban, Ilia; Kalinnikov, Yurii K.; Montmessin, Franck

    2013-09-01

    The ACS package for ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter is a part of Russian contribution to ExoMars ESA-Roscosmos mission. On the Orbiter it complements NOMAD investigation and is intended to recover in much extent the science lost with the cancellation of NASA MATMOS and EMCS infrared sounders. ACS includes three separate spectrometers, sharing common mechanical, electrical, and thermal interfaces. NIR is a versatile spectrometer for the spectral range of 0.7-1.6 μm with resolving power of ~20000. It is conceived on the principle of RUSALKA/ISS or SOIR/Venus Express experiments combining an echelle spectrometer and an AOTF (Acousto-Optical Tuneable Filter) for order selection. Up to 8 diffraction orders, each 10-20 nm wide can be measured in one sequence record. NIR will be operated principally in nadir, but also in solar occultations, and possibly on the limb. MIR is a high-resolution echelle instrument exclusively dedicated to solar occultation measurements in the range of 2.2-4.4 μm targeting the resolving power of 50000. The order separation is done by means of a steerable grating cross-disperser, allowing instantaneous coverage of up to 300-nm range of the spectrum for one or two records per second. MIR is dedicated to sensitive measurements of trace gases, approaching MATMOS detection thresholds for many species. TIRVIM is a 2- inch double pendulum Fourier-transform spectrometer for the spectral range of 1.7-17 μm with apodized resolution varying from 0.2 to 1.6 cm-1. TIRVIM is primarily dedicated to monitoring of atmospheric temperature and aerosol state in nadir, and would contribute in solar occultation to detection/reducing of upper limits of some components absorbing beyond 4 μm, complementing MIR and NOMAD. Additionally, TIRVIM targets the methane mapping in nadir, using separate detector optimized for 3.3-μm range. The concept of the instrument and in more detail the optical design and the expected parameters of its three parts, channel by channel are

  16. [Estimation of biological tissue conductivity with contact-free magnetic impedance measurements].

    PubMed

    Cordes, Axel; Steffen, Matthias; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2010-04-01

    At present, there are several methods that utilize electrical conductivity of biological tissue, such as biological impedance spectroscopy (BIS). Because these techniques use conductivity values for further analysis (e.g., body water distribution, etc.), accuracy of conductivity measurement is crucial. Traditionally, most impedance-based techniques rely on conductive interaction between tissue and external electrical measurement devices. Thus, electrode properties can influence the results of conductivity measurements. In this study, a contact-free measurement technique is presented, which is based on magnetic induction of eddy currents and measurement of the tiny reinduced voltages in external measurement coils. Our results indicate that it is principally possible to determine conductivity of biological tissue with this technique.

  17. Direct Measurement of Ab and Ac Using Vertex/Kaon Charge Tags at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.

    2004-10-13

    Exploiting the manipulation of the SLC electron-beam polarization, we present precise direct measurements of the parity violation parameters A{sub c} and A{sub b} in the Z boson-c quark and Z boson-b quark coupling. Quark/antiquark discrimination is accomplished via a unique algorithm that takes advantage of the precise SLD CCD vertex detector, employing the net charge of displaced vertices as well as the charge of kaons that emanate from those vertices. From the 1996-98 sample of 400,000 Z decays, produced with an average beam polarization of 73.4%, we find A{sub c} = 0.673 {+-} 0.029(stat.) {+-} 0.023(syst.) and A{sub b} = 0.919 {+-} 0.018(stat.) {+-} 0.017(syst.).

  18. Measurement of Electrical Conductivity into Tomato Cultivation Beds using Small Insertion Type Electrical Conductivity Sensor Designed for Agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Kazuko; Futagawa, Masato; Ban, Yoshihiro; Asano, Yoshiyuki; Sawada, Kazuaki

    Our group has studied on-site monitoring sensor for agricultural field. An electrical conductivity (EC) sensor had been fabricated using Si integrated circuit technology. EC information of solutions shows ion concentrations dissolving in water, and can be used as the index of nutrient concentration for plants. So, it is important to measure EC in real time and on site. Because our EC sensor (5mm×5mm in size) is smaller than other commercial ones (several centimeters), it is easy to insert and achieve measurement in rock wool. In this study, our sensor measured long term EC values in tomato cultivation soil and rock wool medium. At first, we calibrated a relationship between output voltages and EC values on the sensor. The sensor was confirmed about enough EC measurement range from 8 to 969mS/m. In long period measurement, the sensor was confirmed about continuous operation for over five months, and intermittent measurement for over a year. In measurement in the cultivation soil, the sensor indicated that water was kept and diffused in the soil. In contrast, it was found that water diffused without keeping in it in rock wool medium. We confirmed our small EC sensor is useful for on-site monitoring and analysis of solution concentration distribution in several kinds of cultivation bed in real time.

  19. Analysis of variance on thickness and electrical conductivity measurements of carbon nanotube thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min-Yang; Yang, Mingchia; Vargas, Emily; Neff, Kyle; Vanli, Arda; Liang, Richard

    2016-09-01

    One of the major challenges towards controlling the transfer of electrical and mechanical properties of nanotubes into nanocomposites is the lack of adequate measurement systems to quantify the variations in bulk properties while the nanotubes were used as the reinforcement material. In this study, we conducted one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) on thickness and conductivity measurements. By analyzing the data collected from both experienced and inexperienced operators, we found some operation details users might overlook that resulted in variations, since conductivity measurements of CNT thin films are very sensitive to thickness measurements. In addition, we demonstrated how issues in measurements damaged samples and limited the number of replications resulting in large variations in the electrical conductivity measurement results. Based on this study, we proposed a faster, more reliable approach to measure the thickness of CNT thin films that operators can follow to make these measurement processes less dependent on operator skills.

  20. Lorentz force sigmometry: a novel technique for measuring the electrical conductivity of solid and liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkhalil, Shatha; Kolesnikov, Yurii; Thess, André

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, a novel method to measure the electrical conductivity of solid and molten metals is described. We term the method ‘Lorentz force sigmometry’, where the term ‘sigmometry’ refers to the letter sigma σ, often used to denote the electrical conductivity. The Lorentz force sigmometry method is based on the phenomenon of eddy currents generation in a moving conductor exposed to a magnetic field. Based on Ampere’s law, the eddy currents in turn generate a secondary magnetic field; as a result, the Lorentz force acts to brake the conductor. Owing to Newton’s third law, a measurable force, which is equal to the Lorentz force and is directly proportional to the electrical conductivity of the conductive fluid or solid, acts on the magnet. We present the results of the measurements performed on solids along with the initial measurements on fluids with a eutectic alloy composition of Ga67In20.5Sn12.5; detailed measurements on molten metals are still in progress and will be published in the future. We conducted a series of experiments and measured the properties of known electrical conductive metals, including aluminum and copper, to compute the calibration factor of the device, and then used the same calibration factor to estimate the unknown electrical conductivity of a brass bar. The predicted electrical conductivity of the brass bar was compared with the conductivity measured with a commercial device called ‘SigmaTest’ the observed error was less than 0.5%.

  1. Apparatus and method for detecting and/or measuring flaws in conductive material

    DOEpatents

    Hockey, Ronald L.; Riechers, Douglas M.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention uses a magnet and sensor coil unilaterial and in relative motion to a conductive material, to measure perturbation or variation in the magnetic field in the presence of a flaw. A liftoff compensator measures a distance between the conductive material and the magnet.

  2. A Novel Method for Measuring Electrical Conductivity of High Insulating Oil Using Charge Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. Q.; Qi, P.; Wang, D. S.; Wang, Y. D.; Zhou, W.

    2016-05-01

    For the high insulating oil, it is difficult to measure the conductivity precisely using voltammetry method. A high-precision measurementis proposed for measuring bulk electrical conductivity of high insulating oils (about 10-9--10-15S/m) using charge decay. The oil is insulated and charged firstly, and then grounded fully. During the experimental procedure, charge decay is observed to show an exponential law according to "Ohm" theory. The data of time dependence of charge density is automatically recorded using an ADAS and a computer. Relaxation time constant is fitted from the data using Gnuplot software. The electrical conductivity is calculated using relaxation time constant and dielectric permittivity. Charge density is substituted by electric potential, considering charge density is difficult to measure. The conductivity of five kinds of oils is measured. Using this method, the conductivity of diesel oil is easily measured to beas low as 0.961 pS/m, as shown in Fig. 5.

  3. Sodium concentration measurement during hemodialysis through ion-exchange resin and conductivity measure approach: in vitro experiments.

    PubMed

    Tura, Andrea; Sbrignadello, Stefano; Mambelli, Emanuele; Ravazzani, Paolo; Santoro, Antonio; Pacini, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Sodium measurement during hemodialysis treatment is important to preserve the patient from clinical events related to hypo- or hyper-natremia Usually, sodium measurement is performed through laboratory equipment which is typically expensive, and requires manual intervention. We propose a new method, based on conductivity measurement after treatment of dialysate solution through ion-exchange resin. To test this method, we performed in vitro experiments. We prepared 40 ml sodium chloride (NaCl) samples at 280, 140, 70, 35, 17.5, 8.75, 4.375 mEq/l, and some "mixed samples", i.e., with added potassium chloride (KCl) at different concentrations (4.375-17.5 mEq/l), to simulate the confounding factors in a conductivity-based sodium measurement. We measured the conductivity of all samples. Afterwards, each sample was treated for 1 min with 1 g of Dowex G-26 resin, and conductivity was measured again. On average, the difference in the conductivity between mixed samples and corresponding pure NaCl samples (at the same NaCl concentration) was 20.9%. After treatment with the exchange resin, it was 14.7%, i.e., 42% lower. Similar experiments were performed with calcium chloride and magnesium chloride as confounding factors, with similar results. We also performed some experiments on actual dialysate solution during hemodialysis sessions in 15 patients, and found that the correlation between conductivity measures and sodium concentration improved after resin treatment (R=0.839 before treatment, R=0.924 after treatment, P<0.0001). We conclude that ion-exchange resin treatment coupled with conductivity measures may improve the measurement of sodium compared to conductivity measures alone, and may become a possible simple approach for continuous and automatic sodium measurement during hemodialysis.

  4. Development of an in situ thermal conductivity measurement system for exploration of the shallow subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirila, Marian Andrei; Christoph, Benjamin; Vienken, Thomas; Dietrich, Peter; Bumberger, Jan

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we attempted to develop an in situ thermal conductivity measurement system that can be used for subsurface thermal exploration. A new thermal probe was developed for mapping both the spatial and temporal variability of thermal conductivity, via direct push methods in the unconsolidated shallow subsurface. A robust, hollow cylindrical probe was constructed and its performance was tested by carrying out thermal conductivity measurements on materials with known properties. The thermal conductivity of the investigated materials can be worked out by measuring the active power consumption (in alternating current system) and temperature of the probe over fixed time intervals. A calibration method was used to eliminate any undesired thermal effects regarding the size of the probe, based on mobile thermal analyzer thermal conductivity values. Using the hollow cylindrical probe, the thermal conductivity results obtained had an error of less than 2.5% for solid samples (such as Teflon, Agar Jelly and Nylatron).

  5. Conductivity of individual particles measured by a microscopic four-point-probe method

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ling; Wang, Jianjun; Bonaccurso, Elmar

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a technique for measuring the conductivity of individual hybrid metal, semiconducting core-shell and full-metal conducting particles by a microscopic four-point probe (μ-4PP) method. The four-point probe geometry allows for minimizing contact resistances between electrodes and particles. By using a focused ion beam we fabricate platinum nanoleads between four microelectrodes on a silicon chip and an individual particle, and determine the particle's conductivity via sensitive current and voltage measurements. Up to sixteen particles can be taken up by each chip, which allows for multiple conductivity measurements by simply multiplexing the electric contacts connected to a multimeter. Although, for demonstration, we used full Au (conducting) and Ag-coated latex particles (semiconducting) of a few micrometers in diameter, the method can be applied to other types of conducting or semiconducting particles of different diameters. PMID:23771149

  6. Investigation of mouse conductance catheter position deviation effects on volume measurements by finite element models.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chia-Ling; Wu, Po-Yi

    2008-01-01

    The conductance catheter system is used to measure the instantaneous ventricular conductance, and real-time ventricular volumes is then determined by converting the measured conductance to volume. In fact, two different conductance-to-volume conversion equations for conductance catheters have been proposed, the Baan's classic equation and Wei's nonlinear equation. The accuracy of this volume estimation method is limited by several factors, such as the deviation of the catheter position inside the ventricle. The effects of the mouse catheter radial and longitudinal position deviations on the measured conductance are investigated with finite element models. Moreover, the capacities of the two conversion equations to calibrate the error induced by the catheter position variation are evaluated and compared. According to the simulation results, the error-calibrated capacity of the nonlinear conversion equation is better.

  7. Microbial growth and biofilm formation in geologic media is detected with complex conductivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Caroline A.; Atekwana, Estella; Atekwana, Eliot; Slater, Lee D.; Rossbach, Silvia; Mormile, Melanie R.

    2006-09-01

    Complex conductivity measurements (0.1-1000 Hz) were obtained from biostimulated sand-packed columns to investigate the effect of microbial growth and biofilm formation on the electrical properties of porous media. Microbial growth was verified by direct microbial counts, pH measurements, and environmental scanning electron microscope imaging. Peaks in imaginary (interfacial) conductivity in the biostimulated columns were coincident with peaks in the microbial cell concentrations extracted from sands. However, the real conductivity component showed no discernible relationship to microbial cell concentration. We suggest that the observed dynamic changes in the imaginary conductivity (σ″) arise from the growth and attachment of microbial cells and biofilms to sand surfaces. We conclude that complex conductivity techniques, specifically imaginary conductivity measurements are a proxy indicator for microbial growth and biofilm formation in porous media. Our results have implications for microbial enhanced oil recovery, CO2 sequestration, bioremediation, and astrobiology studies.

  8. Thermal-Conductivity Apparatus for Steady-State, Comparative Measurement of Ceramic Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Slifka, A. J.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus has been developed to measure the thermal conductivity of ceramic coatings. Since the method uses an infrared microscope for temperature measurement, coatings as thin as 20 μm can, in principle, be measured using this technique. This steady-state, comparative measurement method uses the known thermal conductivity of the substrate material as the reference material for heat-flow measurement. The experimental method is validated by measuring a plasma-sprayed coating that has been previously measured using an absolute, steady-state measurement method. The new measurement method has a relative standard uncertainty of about 10 %. The measurement of the plasma-sprayed coating gives 0.58 W·m−1·K−l which compares well with the 0.62 W·m−1·K−l measured using the absolute method. PMID:27551628

  9. Lack of correlation of glucose levels in filtered blood plasma to density and conductivity measurements.

    PubMed

    Gordon, David M; Ash, Stephen R

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research project was to determine whether the glucose level of a blood plasma sample from a diabetic patient could be predicted by measuring the density and conductivity of ultrafiltrate of plasma created by a 30,000 m.w. cutoff membrane. Conductivity of the plasma filtrate measures electrolyte concentration and should correct density measurements for changes in electrolytes and water concentration. In vitro studies were performed measuring conductivity and density of solutions of varying glucose and sodium chloride concentrations. Plasma from seven hospitalized patients with diabetes was filtered across a 30,000 m.w. cutoff membrane. The filtrate density and conductivity were measured and correlated to glucose levels. In vitro studies confirmed the ability to predict glucose from density and conductivity measurements, in varying concentrations of glucose and saline. In plasma filtrate, the conductivity and density measurements of ultrafiltrate allowed estimation of glucose in some patients with diabetes but not others. The correlation coefficient for the combined patient data was 0.45 which was significant but only explained 20% of the variability in the glucose levels. Individually, the correlation was significant in only two of the seven patients with correlation coefficients of 0.79 and 0.88. The reasons for lack of correlation are not clear, and cannot be explained by generation of idiogenic osmoles, effects of alcohol dehydrogenase, water intake, etc. This combination of physical methods for glucose measurement is not a feasible approach to measuring glucose in plasma filtrate.

  10. Measurement of 3-D hydraulic conductivity in aquifer cores at in situ effective stresses.

    PubMed

    Wright, Martin; Dillon, Peter; Pavelic, Paul; Peter, Paul; Nefiodovas, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    An innovative and nondestructive method to measure the hydraulic conductivity of drill core samples in horizontal and vertical directions within a triaxial cell has been developed. This has been applied to characterizing anisotropy and heterogeneity of a confined consolidated limestone aquifer. Most of the cores tested were isotropic, but hydraulic conductivity varied considerably and the core samples with lowest values were also the most anisotropic. Hydraulic conductivity decreased with increasing effective stress due to closure of microfractures caused by sampling for all core samples. This demonstrates the importance of replicating in situ effective stresses when measuring hydraulic conductivity of cores of deep aquifers in the laboratory. PMID:12236264

  11. Length dependent thermal conductivity measurements yield phonon mean free path spectra in nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hang; Hua, Chengyun; Ding, Ding; Minnich, Austin J

    2015-03-13

    Thermal conductivity measurements over variable lengths on nanostructures such as nanowires provide important information about the mean free paths (MFPs) of the phonons responsible for heat conduction. However, nearly all of these measurements have been interpreted using an average MFP even though phonons in many crystals possess a broad MFP spectrum. Here, we present a reconstruction method to obtain MFP spectra of nanostructures from variable-length thermal conductivity measurements. Using this method, we investigate recently reported length-dependent thermal conductivity measurements on SiGe alloy nanowires and suspended graphene ribbons. We find that the recent measurements on graphene imply that 70% of the heat in graphene is carried by phonons with MFPs longer than 1 micron.

  12. Detecting Microbial Growth and Metabolism in Geologic Media with Complex Conductivity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, C. A.; Atekwana, E. A.; Slater, L. D.; Bottrell, P. M.; Chasten, L. E.; Heidenreich, J. D.

    2006-05-01

    Complex conductivity measurements between 0.1-1000 Hz were obtained from biostimulated sand-packed (coarse and mixed fine and medium grain) columns to investigate microbial growth, biofilm formation, and microbial metabolism on the electrical properties of porous media. Microbial growth and metabolism was verified by direct microbial counts, pH changes, and environmental scanning electron microscope imaging. Peaks in imaginary (interfacial) conductivity in the coarse grain columns occurred concurrently with peaks in the microbial cell concentrations. The magnitude of the imaginary conductivity response in the mixed fine and medium grain columns, however, was low compared to the coarse grain sand columns, consistent with lower microbial cell concentrations. It is possible that the pore size in the mixed fine and medium grain sand restricted bacteria cell division, inhibiting microbial growth, and thus the smaller magnitude imaginary conductivity response. The biostimulated columns for both grain sizes displayed similar trends and showed an increase in the real (electrolytic) conductivity and decrease in pH over time. Dynamic changes in the imaginary conductivity arises from the growth and attachment of microbial cells and biofilms to surfaces, whereas, changes in the real conductivity arises from the release of byproducts (ionic species) of microbial metabolism. We conclude that complex conductivity techniques are feasible sensors for detecting microbial growth (imaginary conductivity measurements) and metabolism (real conductivity measurements) with implications for bioremediation and astrobiology studies.

  13. Differential heating: A versatile method for thermal conductivity measurements in high-energy-density matter

    SciTech Connect

    Ping, Y.; Fernandez-Panella, A.; Correa, A.; Shepherd, R.; Landen, O.; London, R. A.; Sterne, P. A.; Whitley, H. D.; Fratanduono, D.; Collins, G. W.; Sio, H.; Boehly, T. R.

    2015-09-15

    We propose a method for thermal conductivity measurements of high energy density matter based on differential heating. A temperature gradient is created either by surface heating of one material or at an interface between two materials by different energy deposition. The subsequent heat conduction across the temperature gradient is observed by various time-resolved probing techniques. Conceptual designs of such measurements using laser heating, proton heating, and x-ray heating are presented. The sensitivity of the measurements to thermal conductivity is confirmed by simulations.

  14. Differential heating: A versatile method for thermal conductivity measurements in high-energy-density matter

    SciTech Connect

    Ping, Y.; Fernandez-Panella, A.; Sio, H.; Correa, A.; Shepherd, R.; Landen, O.; London, R. A.; Sterne, P. A.; Whitley, H. D.; Fratanduono, D.; Boehly, T. R.; Collins, G. W.

    2015-09-04

    We propose a method for thermal conductivity measurements of high energy density matter based on differential heating. A temperature gradient is created either by surface heating of one material or at an interface between two materials by different energy deposition. The subsequent heat conduction across the temperature gradient is observed by various time-resolved probing techniques. Conceptual designs of such measurements using laser heating, proton heating, and x-ray heating are presented. As a result, the sensitivity of the measurements to thermal conductivity is confirmed by simulations.

  15. Thickness measurement of multi-layer conductive coatings using multifrequency eddy current techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dejun; Yu, Yating; Lai, Chao; Tian, Guiyun

    2016-07-01

    To ensure the key structural performance in high-temperature and high-stress environments, thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are often adopted in engineering. The thickness of these multi-layer conductive coatings is an important quality indicator. In order to measure the thickness of multi-layer conductive coatings, a new measurement approach is presented using eddy current testing techniques, and then, an inversion algorithm is proposed and proved efficient and applicable, of which the maximum experimental relative error is within 10%. Therefore, the new approach can be effectively applied to thickness measurement of multi-layer conductive coatings such as TBCs.

  16. Perceptions of breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) levels among a sample of bar patrons with BrAC values of 0.08% or higher.

    PubMed

    Martin, Ryan J; Chaney, Beth H; Cremeens-Matthews, Jennifer; Vail-Smith, Karen

    2016-09-01

    Breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) is a commonly used measure of alcohol intoxication. Because of the potential negative consequences of excessive alcohol consumption, it is important to examine how accurately intoxicated individuals can estimate their BrAC values, especially individuals over the legal BrAC driving threshold (i.e., 0.08%). To better understand perceptions of BrAC values among intoxicated individuals, this field study examined actual BrAC values and BrAC range estimates (0.08% and above, 0.02-0.07%, less than 0.02%) among a sample of bar patrons (N = 454) with BrAC levels at 0.08% or higher. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to examine the relationship between actual BrAC values and perceived BrAC levels. We also examined whether the following demographic and drinking variables were associated with underestimating BrAC in this sample: gender, age, race, college student status, plans to get home, and hazardous drinking. Results indicated that the majority (60.4%) of participants underestimated their BrAC (i.e., less than 0.08%) and lower BrAC values correlated with underestimating BrAC ranges (p < .001, 95% CI[0.2, 0.6]). Further, females (p = .001, 95% CI[1.3, 3.3]) and participants under 21 (p = .039, 95% CI = 1.0, 2.6) were significantly more likely to estimate their BrAC to be less than 0.08%, which is concerning given that young (less than 21) intoxicated females are a group at high risk for sexual assault on college campuses. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27631614

  17. [An impulse device for measuring electric conductivity with thermostatic skin electrodes for determining ovulation time].

    PubMed

    Stupnitskiĭ, I F

    1989-01-01

    A device for realization of a new method of ovulation definition in women by conductance measurement in breast nipples is suggested. Thermostatic epicutaneous electrodes for reducing the vascular reaction in nipples and measured electric charge are used in the device. That permits to reduce the routine fest-induced stress on the object of measurement.

  18. On the van der Pauw's method applied to the measurement of low thermal conductivity materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, C.; Flores, E.; Bodega, J.; Leardini, F.; Ferrer, I. J.; Ares, J. R.; Sánchez, C.

    2016-08-01

    The electrical van der Pauw's method has recently been extended to measure the thermal conductivity of different elements and compounds. This technique provides an easy way to determine the sample in-plane thermal conductivity by avoiding the influence of the thermal contact resistances. However, the reported calculated error values appear to be underestimated when dealing with the materials with low thermal conductivity (<5 W/Km) at room temperature. The causes of this underestimation are investigated in this communication and it has been found that they are due to the drastic influence of conduction heat losses through the thermo-resistance wires as well as the resulting modification of the sample temperature map. Both phenomena lead to experimental values of the sample thermal conductivity, which are systematically higher than the tabulated ones. The magnitude of this systematic error is ˜100% dealing with the samples of macroscopic dimensions, and low thermal conductivity indicated that the obtained accurate measurements can be quite challenging.

  19. On the van der Pauw's method applied to the measurement of low thermal conductivity materials.

    PubMed

    Morales, C; Flores, E; Bodega, J; Leardini, F; Ferrer, I J; Ares, J R; Sánchez, C

    2016-08-01

    The electrical van der Pauw's method has recently been extended to measure the thermal conductivity of different elements and compounds. This technique provides an easy way to determine the sample in-plane thermal conductivity by avoiding the influence of the thermal contact resistances. However, the reported calculated error values appear to be underestimated when dealing with the materials with low thermal conductivity (<5 W/Km) at room temperature. The causes of this underestimation are investigated in this communication and it has been found that they are due to the drastic influence of conduction heat losses through the thermo-resistance wires as well as the resulting modification of the sample temperature map. Both phenomena lead to experimental values of the sample thermal conductivity, which are systematically higher than the tabulated ones. The magnitude of this systematic error is ∼100% dealing with the samples of macroscopic dimensions, and low thermal conductivity indicated that the obtained accurate measurements can be quite challenging.

  20. Measurements of Electrical and Thermal Conductivity of Iron Under Earth's Core Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, K.; Kuwayama, Y.; Shimizu, K.; Yagi, T.; Hirose, K.; Ohishi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Secular cooling of the Earth's core induces the convection of the conductive liquid outer core, which generates the geomagnetic field, and the growth of the solid inner core. Since iron is the primary component of the Earth's core, the electrical and thermal conductivity of iron in both solid and liquid states are key pieces of information for estimating the transport properties of the core. We performed electrical and thermal conductivity measurements on iron under core conditions in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Our electrical conductivity measurements on iron clearly show resistivity saturation phenomena in iron under high pressure and high temperature conditions as predicted in a recent laboratory-based model for the core conductivity (Gomi et al., 2013). Direct measurements of thermal diffusivity of iron have been also preformed at high pressures by using the pulsed light heating thermoreflectance technique, which enable us to confirm the validity of the Wiedemann-Franz law toward transition metal under high pressure.

  1. Molecular origins of conduction channels observed in shot-noise measurements.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Gemma C; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro; Frauenheim, Thomas; Di Carlo, Aldo; Reimers, Jeffrey R; Hush, Noel S

    2006-11-01

    Measurements of shot noise from single molecules have indicated the presence of various conduction channels. We present three descriptions of these channels in molecular terms showing that the number of conduction channels is limited by bottlenecks in the molecule and that the channels can be linked to transmission through different junction states. We introduce molecular-conductance orbitals, which allow the transmission to be separated into contributions from individual orbitals and contributions from interference between pairs of orbitals.

  2. 3ω slope comparative method for fluid and powder thermal conductivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, X. H.; Qiu, L.; Yue, P.; Wang, G.; Tang, D. W.

    2016-09-01

    By analyzing the relationship among the heat penetration depth, measurement frequency and detector characteristic parameters, a simple and practical 3ω slope comparative method has been proposed. The corresponding measurement system for measuring the thermal properties of fluids and powder materials was established and verified using several specimens with known thermophysical parameters, such as alcohol, distilled water, and air. Compared to the two-dimensional model, the data processing of the method is relatively simple and quick. Due to the elimination of errors introduced by the detector parameter measurement, the measurement accuracy of the method is higher than the conventional one-dimensional model. By using an appropriate frequency range, the new method is time saving and convenient for measuring the thermal conductivity of fluids and powders with low thermal conductivity. Based on the analysis, the effective thermal conductivity of nano-SiO2 powder is accurately determined.

  3. DYNAMIC CONDUCTIVITY MEASUREMENTS IN HUMIC AND FULVIC ACID SOLUTIONS. (R828158)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conductivity changes of dilute aqueous humic and fulvic acids solutions were monitored after the addition of small quantities of Cu, Cd, Pb, and Zn. The solutions were stirred at a constant and reproducible rate, and measurements proceeded until stable conductivities were atta...

  4. MEASURING VERTICAL PROFILES OF HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY WITH IN SITU DIRECT-PUSH METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    U.S. EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) staff developed a field procedure to measure hydraulic conductivity using a direct-push system to obtain vertical profiles of hydraulic conductivity. Vertical profiles were obtained using an in situ field device-composed of a
    Geopr...

  5. IN SITU APPARENT CONDUCTIVITY MEASUREMENTS AND MICROBIAL POPULATION DISTRIBUTION AT A HYDROCARBON CONTAMINATED SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We investigated the bulk electrical conductivity and microbial population distribution in sediments at a site contaminated with light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL). The bulk conductivity was measured using in situ vertical resistivity probes, while the most probable number met...

  6. Measuring the sedimentation rate in a magnetorheological fluid column via thermal conductivity monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Haibin; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Liu, Guizhen; Ma, Wentao; Wereley, Norman M.

    2016-05-01

    Measuring sedimentation rate of magnetorheological fluids (MRFs) is of great importance when designing and synthesizing MRFs for engineering applications. A method of characterizing sedimentation rate in an MRF column is proposed utilizing thermal conductivity correlated with particle concentration. A series of MRF samples composed of carbonyl iron particles suspended in silicone oil were prepared, and their concentrations (measured as volume fraction, ∅) and thermal conductivities, k, were tested. A calibration curve was developed to relate particle concentration, ∅, to thermal conductivity, k, using this set of MRF samples with known concentration. The particle concentration, ∅, in the MRF column was then monitored by measuring thermal conductivities (k) at a fixed location and using this calibration relationship. Finally, sedimentation rate in the MRF column was determined by examining how particle concentration varied with time. The sedimentation rate measured in the MRF column was validated using visual observation of mudline (boundary between the topmost clarified fluid zone and MRF below).

  7. Electronic energy gap of molecular hydrogen from electrical conductivity measurements at high shock pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nellis, W. J.; Mitchell, A. C.; Mccandless, P. C.; Erskine, D. J.; Weir, S. T.

    1992-01-01

    Electrical conductivities were measured for liquid D2 and H2 shock compressed to pressures of 10-20 GPa (100-200 kbar), molar volumes near 8 cu cm/mol, and calculated temperatures of 2900-4600 K. The semiconducting energy gap derived from the conductivities is 12 eV, in good agreement with recent quasi-particle calculations and with oscillator frequencies measured in diamond-anvil cells.

  8. In situ recording of particle network formation in liquids by ion conductivity measurements.

    PubMed

    Pfaffenhuber, Christian; Sörgel, Seniz; Weichert, Katja; Bele, Marjan; Mundinger, Tabea; Göbel, Marcus; Maier, Joachim

    2011-09-21

    The formation of fractal silica networks from a colloidal initial state was followed in situ by ion conductivity measurements. The underlying effect is a high interfacial lithium ion conductivity arising when silica particles are brought into contact with Li salt-containing liquid electrolytes. The experimental results were modeled using Monte Carlo simulations and tested using confocal fluorescence laser microscopy and ζ-potential measurements.

  9. Electrical conductivity and equation of state measurements on planetary fluids at high pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, D.C.; Nellis, W.J.; Holmes, N.C.; Radousky, H.B.; Ree, F.H.; Nicol, M.

    1987-07-01

    Hugoniot equation-of-state, shock temperature, and electrical conductivity measurements are reported for fluids believed to be the primary constituents of the planets Uranus and Neptune. The equation-of-state results are compared with calculations performed using a statistical mechanical, chemical equilibrium computer code and electrical conductivities are discussed in terms of the recently measured magnetic field of Uranus. 4 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Hot wire needle probe for in-reactor thermal conductivity measurement

    SciTech Connect

    JE Daw; JL Rempe; DL Knudson

    2012-08-01

    Thermal conductivity is a key property that must be known for proper design, test, and application of new fuels and structural materials in nuclear reactors. Thermal conductivity is highly dependent on the physical structure, chemical composition, and the state of the material. Typically, thermal conductivity changes that occur during irradiation are measured out-of-pile by Post Irradiated Examination (PIE) using a “cook and look” approach in hot-cells. Repeatedly removing samples from a test reactor to make out-of-pile measurements is expensive, has the potential to disturb phenomena of interest, and only provides understanding of the sample's end state at the time each measurement is made. There are also limited thermophysical property data for advanced fuels. Such data are needed for simulation design codes, the development of next generation reactors, and advanced fuels for existing nuclear plants. Being able to quickly characterize fuel thermal conductivity during irradiation can improve the fidelity of data, reduce costs of post-irradiation examinations, increase understanding of how fuels behave under irradiation, and confirm or improve existing thermal conductivity measurement techniques. This paper discusses recent efforts to develop and evaluate an in-pile thermal conductivity sensor based on a hot wire needle probe. Testing has been performed on samples with thermal conductivities ranging from 0.2 W/m-K to 22 W-m-K in temperatures ranging from 20 °C to 600 °C. Thermal conductivity values measured using the needle probe match data found in the literature to within 5% for samples tested at room temperature, 5.67% for low thermal conductivity samples tested at high temperatures, and 10% for high thermal conductivity samples tested at high temperatures. Experimental results also show that this sensor is capable of operating in various test conditions and of surviving long duration irradiations.

  11. Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography for measuring electrical conductivity during electroporation.

    PubMed

    Kranjc, M; Bajd, F; Serša, I; Miklavčič, D

    2014-06-01

    The electroporation effect on tissue can be assessed by measurement of electrical properties of the tissue undergoing electroporation. The most prominent techniques for measuring electrical properties of electroporated tissues have been voltage-current measurement of applied pulses and electrical impedance tomography (EIT). However, the electrical conductivity of tissue assessed by means of voltage-current measurement was lacking in information on tissue heterogeneity, while EIT requires numerous additional electrodes and produces results with low spatial resolution and high noise. Magnetic resonance EIT (MREIT) is similar to EIT, as it is also used for reconstruction of conductivity images, though voltage and current measurements are not limited to the boundaries in MREIT, hence it yields conductivity images with better spatial resolution. The aim of this study was to investigate and demonstrate the feasibility of the MREIT technique for assessment of conductivity images of tissues undergoing electroporation. Two objects were investigated: agar phantoms and ex vivo liver tissue. As expected, no significant change of electrical conductivity was detected in agar phantoms exposed to pulses of all used amplitudes, while a considerable increase of conductivity was measured in liver tissue exposed to pulses of different amplitudes.

  12. DESIGN NOTE: The measurement of thermal conductivities of solid fruits and vegetables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xin-Gang; Zhang, Yinping; Ge, Xinshi

    1999-07-01

    A thermal conductivity probe consisting of a heating cell, a thermocouple and a guard tube over the heating cell was developed and is described here. Analyses demonstrate that the guard tube acts as a thermal contact resistance. This resistance does not influence measurements of thermal conductivity significantly, but it must be considered in an accurate measurement of thermal diffusivity, especially when there is a gap between the heater and the guard tube. Calibration of the probe with glycerine in this work exhibits an accuracy of 1.4% for thermal conductivity measurements. The probe was used to measure the thermal conductivities of some solid fruits and vegetables. The sizes of both specimen and probe were analysed and their influences controlled to be under 1.0%. Each measurement was completed within two minutes and the temperature rise was less than under 6 °C. The water content of fruits and vegetables was found to be the dominant factor in determining their thermal conductivities. An empirical relationship between thermal conductivity and mass density is proposed based on the measurements. It is shown that this relation gives a deviation from experimental data of only 11%.

  13. Spectroscopic determination of electrical conductivity in an MHD duct from absolute intensity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. Y.; Smith, M.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of the electrical conductivity in the NASA Lewis cesium seeded, H2-O2 MHD duct have been previously reported. In order to corroborate the above measurements and to analyze the possibility of nonuniform seed injection as a cause of the deviations, a spectroscopic investigation of the plasma conductivity has been undertaken. Transverse profiles of the absolute integrated intensity were measured from the optically thin lines of CSI-.5664 microns and .5636 microns. Radial profiles of emission coefficient were obtained from the measured transverse profiles of intensity by Abel inversion. Radial profiles of electrical conductivity were then obtained under two different assumptions. In the first, the Cs seed fraction is assumed uniform and equal to the measured flow rate at the time when the temperature and conductivity were obtained. In the second method, the local temperature and pressure are taken to be those given by a one-dimensional channel calculation including heat transfer and friction. In this case profiles of conductivity and seed fractions are obtained. The results of the two methods are compared to the previously measured conductivity.

  14. Design and Use of a Novel Apparatus for Measuring Capsule Fill Hole Conductance

    SciTech Connect

    Seugling, R M; Nederbragt, W W; Klingmann, J L; Edson, S; Reynolds, J; Cook, R

    2006-11-27

    Description and results of a novel apparatus for determining the flow conductance through a laser drilled hole in a spherical shell for inertial confinement fusion experiments are described. The instrument monitors the pressure of an enclosed volume containing the laser pressure drilled capsule as air bleeds through the hole into the shell. From these measurements one obtains the conductance of the fill hole. This system has proven to be a valuable tool for verifying the conduct conductance into the capsule in a timely and nondestructive manner.

  15. Simultaneous measurements of the torsional oscillator anomaly and thermal conductivity in solid 4He.

    PubMed

    Zmeev, D E; Golov, A I

    2011-08-01

    In these torsional oscillator experiments, the samples of solid (4)He were characterized by measuring their thermal conductivity. Polycrystalline samples of helium of either high isotopic purity or natural concentration of (3)He were grown in an annular container by the blocked-capillary method and investigated before and after annealing. No correlation has been found between the magnitude of the low-temperature shift of the torsional oscillator frequency and the amount of crystalline defects as measured by the thermal conductivity. In samples with the natural (3)He concentration, a substantial excess thermal conductivity over the usual T(3) dependence was observed below 120 mK.

  16. In-core measurements of U-5 wt % fissium alloy thermal conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Betten, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    Instrumented subassemblies have inserted into the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) in order to monitor thermal-hydraulic phenomena. For one such subassembly, a time history of the in-core themocouples was evaluated and used to determine the fuel thermal conductivity. Although several researchers have evaluated fuel conductivity for unirradiated conditions, little data is available for long term irradiation. Further, most of the data has been evaluated under laboratory conditions which, while providing exact measurements, may be missing important facets of in-core behavior. The purpose of this paper is to present the in-situ measurements of thermal conductivity over the subassembly lifetime. 7 refs.

  17. Online estimation of assimilable nitrogen by electrical conductivity measurement during alcoholic fermentation in enological conditions.

    PubMed

    Colombié, Sophie; Latrille, Eric; Sablayrolles, Jean-Marie

    2007-03-01

    The monitoring of alcoholic fermentation under enological conditions is currently poor due to the lack of sensors for online measurements. Such monitoring is currently limited to the measurement of CO(2) production or changes in density. In this study, we determined the potential value of measuring electrical conductivity. We showed that this measurement is related to the assimilation of nitrogen, which is typically the limiting nutrient, and directly correlated to ammoniacal nitrogen assimilation at any percentage of ammoniacal nitrogen in the medium. We also used electrical conductivity for the very precise monitoring of the kinetics of nitrogen assimilation after the addition of a pulse of diammonium hydrogen phosphate (DAP) during fermentation. The impact of initial conditions (e.g., must composition, grape variety, pH) remains unclear, but the robustness, precision and low price of the sensor used justify further studies of the potential value of measuring electrical conductivity on the pilot and industrial scales. PMID:17434425

  18. Estimation of electrical conductivity distribution within the human head from magnetic flux density measurement.

    PubMed

    Gao, Nuo; Zhu, S A; He, Bin

    2005-06-01

    We have developed a new algorithm for magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT), which uses only one component of the magnetic flux density to reconstruct the electrical conductivity distribution within the body. The radial basis function (RBF) network and simplex method are used in the present approach to estimate the conductivity distribution by minimizing the errors between the 'measured' and model-predicted magnetic flux densities. Computer simulations were conducted in a realistic-geometry head model to test the feasibility of the proposed approach. Single-variable and three-variable simulations were performed to estimate the brain-skull conductivity ratio and the conductivity values of the brain, skull and scalp layers. When SNR = 15 for magnetic flux density measurements with the target skull-to-brain conductivity ratio being 1/15, the relative error (RE) between the target and estimated conductivity was 0.0737 +/- 0.0746 in the single-variable simulations. In the three-variable simulations, the RE was 0.1676 +/- 0.0317. Effects of electrode position uncertainty were also assessed by computer simulations. The present promising results suggest the feasibility of estimating important conductivity values within the head from noninvasive magnetic flux density measurements.

  19. Design and Validation of a High-Temperature Comparative Thermal-Conductivity Measurement System

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Phillips; Colby Jensen; C Xing; H. Ban

    2012-02-01

    A measurement system has been designed and built for the specific application of measuring the effective thermal conductivity of a composite, nuclear-fuel compact (small cylinder) over a temperature range of 100 C to 800 C. Because of the composite nature of the sample as well as the need to measure samples pre- and postirradiation, measurement must be performed on the whole compact non-destructively. No existing measurement system is capable of obtaining its thermal conductivity in a non-destructive manner. The designed apparatus is an adaptation of the guardedcomparative-longitudinal heat flow technique. The system uniquely demonstrates the use of a radiative heat sink to provide cooling which greatly simplifies the design and setup of such high-temperature systems. The design was aimed to measure thermalconductivity values covering the expected range of effective thermal conductivity of the composite nuclear fuel from 10W {center_dot} m{sup -1} {center_dot} K{sup -1} to 70W {center_dot} m{sup -1} {center_dot} K{sup -1}. Several materials having thermal conductivities covering this expected range have been measured for system validation, and results are presented. A comparison of the results has been made to data from existing literature.Additionally, an uncertainty analysis is presented finding an overall uncertainty in sample thermal conductivity to be 6%, matching well with the results of the validation samples.

  20. Analytical interpretation of nondiffusive phonon transport in thermoreflectance thermal conductivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regner, K. T.; McGaughey, A. J. H.; Malen, J. A.

    2014-08-01

    We derive an analytical solution to the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) to relate nondiffusive thermal conductivity measurements by thermoreflectance techniques to the bulk thermal conductivity accumulation function, which quantifies cumulative contributions to thermal conductivity from different mean free path energy carriers (here, phonons). Our solution incorporates two experimentally defined length scales: thermal penetration depth and heating laser spot radius. We identify two thermal resistances based on the predicted spatial temperature and heat flux profiles. The first resistance is associated with the interaction between energy carriers and the surface of the solution domain. The second resistance accounts for transport of energy carriers through the solution domain and is affected by the experimentally defined length scales. Comparison of the BTE result with that from conventional heat diffusion theory enables a mapping of mean-free-path-specific contributions to the measured thermal conductivity based on the experimental length scales. In general, the measured thermal conductivity will be influenced by the smaller of the two length scales and the surface properties of the system. The result is used to compare nondiffusive thermal conductivity measurements of silicon with first-principles-based calculations of its thermal conductivity accumulation function.

  1. Thermal conductivity and diffusivity of biomaterials measured with self-heated thermistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valvano, J. W.; Cochran, J. R.; Diller, K. R.

    1985-05-01

    This paper presents an experimental method to measure the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of biomaterials. Self-heated thermistor probes, inserted into the tissue of interest, are used to deliver heat as well as to monitor the rate of heat removal. An empirical calibration procedure allows accurate thermal-property measurements over a wide range of tissue temperatures. Operation of the instrument in three media with known thermal properties shows the uncertainty of measurements to be about 2%. The reproducibility is 0.5% for the thermal-conductivity measurements and 2% for the thermal-diffusivity measurements. Thermal properties were measured in dog, pig, rabbit, and human tissues. The tissues included kidney, spleen, liver, brain, heart, lung, pancreas, colon cancer, and breast cancer. Thermal properties were measured for 65 separate tissue samples at 3, 10, 17, 23, 30, 37, and 45°C. The results show that the temperature coefficient of biomaterials approximates that of water.

  2. Interface state density measurement in MOS structures by analysis of the thermally stimulated conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Dios, A.; Castán, E.; Bailón, L.; Barbolla, J.; Lozano, M.; Lora-Tamayo, E.

    1990-08-01

    The analysis of thermally stimulated conductance is a modification of the Nicollian-Goetzberger conductance technique for interface state density measurement in MOS structures. This technique relies on the measurement of the MOS structure conductance as a function of temperature, at a constant frequency. The conductance as a function of temperature shows a maximum which allows the interface state density to be determined. It is a simple method for measuring the interface state density because it is carried out at a constant frequency. In addition, the frequency can be taken low enough to prevent side effects, like those due to possible resistances in series with the MOS structures. The results obtained by this technique agree with those obtained by standard techniques like DLTS.

  3. Thermal Conductivity Measurement of an Electron-Beam Physical-Vapor-Deposition Coating

    PubMed Central

    Slifka, A. J.; Filla, B. J.

    2003-01-01

    An industrial ceramic thermal-barrier coating designated PWA 266, processed by electron-beam physical-vapor deposition, was measured using a steady-state thermal conductivity technique. The thermal conductivity of the mass fraction 7 % yttria-stabilized zirconia coating was measured from 100 °C to 900 °C. Measurements on three thicknesses of coatings, 170 μm, 350 μm, and 510 μm resulted in thermal conductivity in the range from 1.5 W/(m·K) to 1.7 W/(m·K) with a combined relative standard uncertainty of 20 %. The thermal conductivity is not significantly dependent on temperature. PMID:27413601

  4. Mathematical model of a double-coil inductive transducer for measuring electrical conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kusmierz, Jozef

    2007-08-15

    A technique for the contactless measurement of the electrical conductivity of conducting materials using a double-coil inductive transducer is presented. A mathematical model of the transducer has been created and it consists of two cylindrical coils and a tested sample in the form of a cylinder coaxial with the coils. A processing function of the transducer is defined as the ratio of voltages between terminals of the measurement coil with and without the test sample. This processing function depends on the conductivity of the test sample, the dimensions of the sample and of both coils of the transducer (the measurement coil and the excitation coil), and the frequency of the current supplied to the excitation coil. An analytical formula for the processing function is derived; analysis of graphs of this function in different formats enables us to evaluate the influence of all the essential parameters of the transducer. This is a necessary step for both transducer optimization and carrying out of the conductivity measurement of the investigated materials. In order to verify the theoretical predictions, experimental investigations have been performed using a computerized data acquisition system. First, an experimental validation of the obtained analytical formula has been completed using an aluminum sample of known conductivity. Then, the conductivity measurements of a sample made of brass have been carried out. The obtained experimental results confirm the high accuracy of the theoretical analysis.

  5. Instrumentation of broadband frequency domain thermoreflectance for measuring thermal conductivity accumulation functions.

    PubMed

    Regner, K T; Majumdar, S; Malen, J A

    2013-06-01

    This paper describes the instrumentation for broadband frequency domain thermoreflectance (BB-FDTR), a novel, continuous wave laser technique for measuring the thermal conductivity accumulation function. The thermal conductivity accumulation function describes cumulative contributions to the bulk thermal conductivity of a material from energy carriers with different mean free paths. It can be used to map reductions in thermal conductivity in nano-devices, which arise when the dimensions of the device are commensurate to the mean free path of energy carriers. BB-FDTR uses high frequency surface temperature modulation to generate non-diffusive phonon transport realized through a reduction in the perceived thermal conductivity. By controlling the modulation frequency it is possible to reconstruct the thermal conductivity accumulation function. A unique heterodyning technique is used to down-convert the signal, therein improving our signal to noise ratio and enabling results over a broader range of modulation frequencies (200 kHz-200 MHz) and hence mean free paths.

  6. Thermal conductivity of particulate materials: A summary of measurements taken at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fountain, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Thermal conductivity measurements of particulate materials in vacuum are presented in summary. Particulate basalt and soda lime glass beads of various size ranges were used as samples. The differentiated line heat source method was used for the measurements. A comprehensive table is shown giving all pertinent experimental conditions. Least-squares curve fits to the data are presented.

  7. Development of a Handmade Conductivity Measurement Apparatus and Application to Vegetables and Fruits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Set, Seng; Kita, Masakazu

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a simple handmade conductivity measurement apparatus based on a Kohlrausch bridge with inexpensive materials. We have examined the reliability of this apparatus with standard solutions and then measured juices of vegetables and fruits as well as a sports drink. Comparisons to total alkali content as…

  8. Measurements of the vertical atmospheric electric field and of the electrical conductivity with stratospheric balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iversen, I. B.; Madsen, M. M.; Dangelo, N.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of the atmospheric (vertical) electric field with balloons in the stratosphere are reported. The atmospheric electrical conductivity is also measured and the current density inferred. The average vertical current shows the expected variation with universal time and is also seen to be influenced by external (magnetospheric) electric fields.

  9. Estimation of hydraulic conductivities of Yucca Mountain tuffs from sorptivity and water retention measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.W.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1995-06-01

    The hydraulic conductivity functions of the matrix rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, are among the most important data needed as input for the site-scale hydrological model of the unsaturated zone. The difficult and time-consuming nature of hydraulic conductivity measurements renders it infeasible to directly measure this property on large numbers of cores. Water retention and sorptivity measurements, however, can be made relatively rapidly. The sorptivity is, in principle, a unique functional of the conductivity and water retention functions. It therefore should be possible to invert sorptivity and water retention measurements in order to estimate the conductivity; the porosity is the only other parameter that is required for this inversion. In this report two methods of carrying out this inversion are presented, and are tested against a limited data set that has been collected by Flint et al. at the USGS on a set of Yucca Mountain tuffs. The absolute permeability is usually predicted by both methods to within an average error of about 0.5 - 1.0 orders of magnitude. The discrepancy appears to be due to the fact that the water retention curves have only been measured during drainage, whereas the imbibition water retention curve is the one that is relevant to sorptivity measurements. Although the inversion methods also yield predictions of the relative permeability function, there are yet no unsaturated hydraulic conductivity data against which to test these predictions.

  10. Spectroscopic determination of electrical conductivity in an MHD duct from absolute intensity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. Y.; Smith, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of the electrical conductivity in the NASA Lewis cesium seeded, H2-O2 MHD duct made by applying a voltage across the channel from one end electrode to the other, measuring the current, and using the inner electrodes as probes to monitor the voltage distribution along the channel were found to be in good agreement with theory except at low combustion pressures and/or high ratios of seed/oxygen mass flows. To corroborate these measurements and to analyze the possibility of nonuniform seed injection as a cause of the above deviations, a spectroscopic investigation of the plasma conductivity was undertaken. Radial profiles of emission coefficient were obtained from measured transverse profiles of the absolute integrated intensity by Abel inversion. Radial profiles of electrical conductivity were then obtained under two different assumptions. In the first the Cs seed fraction is assumed uniform and equal to the measured flow rate at the time when the temperature and conductivity were obtained. In the second method the local temperature and pressure are taken to be those given by a one-dimensional channel calculation including heat transfer and friction. The results of the two methods are compared to the previously measured conductivity.

  11. Simultaneous measurements of thermal expansion and thermal conductivity of FRPs by employing a hybrid measuring head on a GM refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanagaraj, S.; Pattanayak, S.

    2003-08-01

    This paper describes a setup for the simultaneous measurements of thermal expansion and thermal conductivity at temperatures down to 20 K. The sample holder is an integrated compartment of two cells--one for the measurement of thermal expansion coefficient and another for that of thermal conductivity. The sample holder is thermally isolated from all modes of heat inleak using 130 μPa vacuum and sufficient number of aluminized mylar layer. Linear thermal expansion coefficient and thermal conductivity are measured by 3-terminal capacitance technique and double-specimen guarded-hot-plate method respectively. Experiments are carried out under steady state condition with a set of stability criteria. The effect of addendum, stray capacitance and frequencies, non-uniformity of electric flux on the measurement of capacitance, the effects on heat inleak by gaseous conduction, radiation, copper lead wires and contact resistance on this measurement are made to minimum. The setup is calibrated with standard teflon as sample. The experimental values of teflon show the deviation of about -9% for thermal expansion and about -8% for thermal conductivity from the published values.

  12. Tevatron AC dipole system

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.; Kopp, S.E.; Jansson, A.; Syphers, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The AC dipole is an oscillating dipole magnet which can induce large amplitude oscillations without the emittance growth and decoherence. These properties make it a good tool to measure optics of a hadron synchrotron. The vertical AC dipole for the Tevatron is powered by an inexpensive high power audio amplifier since its operating frequency is approximately 20 kHz. The magnet is incorporated into a parallel resonant system to maximize the current. The use of a vertical pinger magnet which has been installed in the Tevatron made the cost relatively inexpensive. Recently, the initial system was upgraded with a more powerful amplifier and oscillation amplitudes up to 2-3{sigma} were achieved with the 980 GeV proton beam. This paper discusses details of the Tevatron AC dipole system and also shows its test results.

  13. A robust and well shielded thermal conductivity device for low temperature measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Toews, W. H.; Hill, R. W.

    2014-04-15

    We present a compact mechanically robust thermal conductivity measurement apparatus for measurements at low temperatures (<1 K) and high magnetic fields on small high-purity single crystal samples. A high-conductivity copper box is used to enclose the sample and all the components. The box provides protection for the thermometers, heater, and most importantly the sample increasing the portability of the mount. In addition to physical protection, the copper box is also effective at shielding radio frequency electromagnetic interference and thermal radiation, which is essential for low temperature measurements. A printed circuit board in conjunction with a braided ribbon cable is used to organize the delicate wiring and provide mechanical robustness.

  14. A robust and well shielded thermal conductivity device for low temperature measurements.

    PubMed

    Toews, W H; Hill, R W

    2014-04-01

    We present a compact mechanically robust thermal conductivity measurement apparatus for measurements at low temperatures (<1 K) and high magnetic fields on small high-purity single crystal samples. A high-conductivity copper box is used to enclose the sample and all the components. The box provides protection for the thermometers, heater, and most importantly the sample increasing the portability of the mount. In addition to physical protection, the copper box is also effective at shielding radio frequency electromagnetic interference and thermal radiation, which is essential for low temperature measurements. A printed circuit board in conjunction with a braided ribbon cable is used to organize the delicate wiring and provide mechanical robustness.

  15. Performance measurements and operational characteristics of the Storage Tek ACS 4400 tape library with the Cray Y-MP EL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, Gary; Ranade, Sanjay

    1993-01-01

    With over 5000 units sold, the Storage Tek Automated Cartridge System (ACS) 4400 tape library is currently the most popular large automated tape library. Based on 3480/90 tape technology, the library is used as the migration device ('nearline' storage) in high-performance mass storage systems. In its maximum configuration, one ACS 4400 tape library houses sixteen 3480/3490 tape drives and is capable of holding approximately 6000 cartridge tapes. The maximum storage capacity of one library using 3480 tapes is 1.2 TB and the advertised aggregate I/O rate is about 24 MB/s. This paper reports on an extensive set of tests designed to accurately assess the performance capabilities and operational characteristics of one STK ACS 4400 tape library holding approximately 5200 cartridge tapes and configured with eight 3480 tape drives. A Cray Y-MP EL2-256 was configured as its host machine. More than 40,000 tape jobs were run in a variety of conditions to gather data in the areas of channel speed characteristics, robotics motion, time taped mounts, and timed tape reads and writes.

  16. Calibration of EMI derived apparent electrical conductivity based on ERT measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, S.; Mester, A.; van der Kruk, J.; Weihermüller, L.; Zimmermann, E.; Vereecken, H.

    2012-04-01

    Soil electrical conductivity (ECa) is an indirect measure for various soil physical and chemical parameters. Among non-invasive geophysical methods, electromagnetic induction (EMI) appears to be the most efficient one that is able to measure ECa over large areas in short time. However, this method currently does not provide quantitative values of ECa due to calibration problems. In the calibration approach of Lavoué et al. (2010) inverted electrical conductivity data from a 120 m long ERT (electrical resistivity tomography) calibration transect were used as input parameter for an electromagnetic forward model to predict ECa measured with EMI. To further improve this calibration method we conducted a field survey within an agricultural field for crop breeding studies. The entire field (60x100 m) was mapped with the EM38-MK2 (Geonics, Ontario, Canada), an EMI system with multiple coil spacing which measures the weighted average of ECa over four depth ranges, immediately after the harvest of sugar beet. On the basis of high-resolution ECa distribution maps, an area with high contrast in ECa was selected for calibrating the EMI sensor with ERT. Along a 30 m long transect EMI measurements with two different internal calibration settings were carried out. A Syscal Pro System (IRIS Instruments, Orleans France) and 120 electrodes with an electrode spacing of 0.25 m were used to measure the apparent resistivity of soil. Post processed ERT measurements were inverted using the robust inversion method of the RES2DINV software. Quantitative EM inductions measurements were derived by linear regression between measured and predicted ECa measurements. The observed offset between the repeated EMI measurements could be removed successfully. Furthermore, shortening and focusing the ERT measurements to a specific area of interest could reduce the measurement time for calibration significantly. Prospectively, the application of a quantitative multi-layer inversion of multi

  17. The thermal conductivity of rock under hydrothermal conditions: measurements and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Colin F.; Sass, John H.

    1996-01-24

    The thermal conductivities of most major rock-forming minerals vary with both temperature and confining pressure, leading to substantial changes in the thermal properties of some rocks at the high temperatures characteristic of geothermal systems. In areas with large geothermal gradients, the successful use of near-surface heat flow measurements to predict temperatures at depth depends upon accurate corrections for varying thermal conductivity. Previous measurements of the thermal conductivity of dry rock samples as a function of temperature were inadequate for porous rocks and susceptible to thermal cracking effects in nonporous rocks. We have developed an instrument for measuring the thermal conductivity of water-saturated rocks at temperatures from 20 to 350 °C and confining pressures up to 100 MPa. A transient line-source of heat is applied through a needle probe centered within the rock sample, which in turn is enclosed within a heated pressure vessel with independent controls on pore and confining pressure. Application of this technique to samples of Franciscan graywacke from The Geysers reveals a significant change in thermal conductivity with temperature. At reservoir-equivalent temperatures of 250 °C, the conductivity of the graywacke decreases by approximately 25% relative to the room temperature value. Where heat flow is constant with depth within the caprock overlying the reservoir, this reduction in conductivity with temperature leads to a corresponding increase in the geothermal gradient. Consequently, reservoir temperature are encountered at depths significantly shallower than those predicted by assuming a constant temperature gradient with depth. We have derived general equations for estimating the thermal conductivity of most metamorphic and igneous rocks and some sedimentary rocks at elevated temperature from knowledge of the room temperature thermal conductivity. Application of these equations to geothermal exploration should improve estimates

  18. Conductivity Measurements of Synthesized Heteropoly Acid Membranes for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Record, K.A.; Haley, B.T.; Turner, J.

    2006-01-01

    Fuel cell technology is receiving attention due to its potential to be a pollution free method of electricity production when using renewably produced hydrogen as fuel. In a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell H2 and O2 react at separate electrodes, producing electricity, thermal energy, and water. A key component of the PEM fuel cell is the membrane that separates the electrodes. DuPont’s Nafion® is the most commonly used membrane in PEM fuel cells; however, fuel cell dehydration at temperatures near 100°C, resulting in poor conductivity, is a major hindrance to fuel cell performance. Recent studies incorporating heteropoly acids (HPAs) into membranes have shown an increase in conductivity and thus improvement in performance. HPAs are inorganic materials with known high proton conductivities. The primary objective of this work is to measure the conductivity of Nafion, X-Ionomer membranes, and National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Developed Membranes that are doped with different HPAs at different concentrations. Four-point conductivity measurements using a third generation BekkTech conductivity test cell are used to determine membrane conductivity. The effect of multiple temperature and humidification levels is also examined. While the classic commercial membrane, Nafion, has a conductivity of approximately 0.10 S/cm, measurements for membranes in this study range from 0.0030 – 0.58 S/cm, depending on membrane type, structure of the HPA, and the relative humidity. In general, the X-ionomer with H6P2W21O71 HPA gave the highest conductivity and the Nafion with the 12-phosphotungstic (PW12) HPA gave the lowest. The NREL composite membranes had conductivities on the order of 0.0013 – 0.025 S/cm.

  19. A multi-electrode array and inversion technique for retrieving six conductivities from heart potential measurements.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Barbara M; Johnston, Peter R

    2013-12-01

    A method for accurately finding cardiac bidomain conductivity parameters is a crucial part of efforts to study and understand the electrical functioning of the heart. The bidomain model considers current flowing along (longitudinal) and across (transverse) sheets of cardiac fibres, as well as between these sheets (normal), in both the extracellular and intracellular domains, which leads to six conductivity values. To match experimental studies, such a method must be able to determine these six conductivity values, not just the four where it is assumed that the transverse and normal conductivities are equal. This study presents a mathematical model, solution technique, multi-electrode array and two-pass inversion method, which can be used to retrieve all six conductivities from measurements of electrical potential made on the array. Simulated measurements of potential, to which noise is added, are used to demonstrate the ability of the method to retrieve the conductivity values. It is found that not only is it possible to accurately retrieve all six conductivity values, as well as a value for fibre rotation angle, but that the accuracy of such retrievals is comparable to the accuracy found in a previous study when only four conductivities (and fibre rotation) were retrieved.

  20. Measurement of submilliwatt, picosecond terahertz emission from a femtosecond-laser-pumped solid-state dc to ac radiation converter based on a ZnSe crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Yugami, Noboru; Ohata, Nobuo; Yaegashi, Kenta; Kawanago, Hiroshi

    2006-11-15

    We measured the terahertz pulse emission from a femtosecond-laser-pumped solid-state dc to ac radiation converter using a 150 fs Ti:sapphire laser pulse for dense plasma diagnostics. The laser-produced ionization front was directly modulated from a periodic electrostatic field to pulsed emission. The central frequency of the emission was measured to be 0.13 THz having a bandwidth of 0.1 THz and a peak power of 0.2 mW. This emission source is suitable for use in various novel diagnostic techniques, such as dense plasma diagnostics.

  1. Specific conductance measurements in central and western New York streams - A retrospective characterization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kappel, William M.; Sinclair, Gaylen J.; Reddy, James E.; Eckhardt, David A.; deVries, M. Peter; Phillips, Margaret E.

    2012-01-01

    U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Data Rescue Program funds were used to recover data from paper records for 139 streamgages across central and western New York State; 6,133 different streamflow measurement forms, collected between 1970-80, contained field water-quality measurements. The water-quality data were entered, reviewed, and uploaded into the USGS National Water Information System. In total, 4,285 unique site visits were added to the database. The new values represent baseline water quality from which to measure change and will lead to a comparison of water-quality change over the last 40 years and into the future. Specific conductance was one of the measured properties and represents a simple way to determine if ambient inorganic water quality has been altered by anthropogenic (road salt runoff, wastewater discharges, or natural gas development) or natural sources. The objective of this report is to describe ambient specific conductance characteristics of surface water across the central and western part of New York. This report presents median specific conductance of stream discharge for the period 1970-80 and a description of the relation between specific conductance and concentrations of total dissolved solids (TDS) retrieved from the USGS National Water Information System (NWIS) database from 1955 to present. The data descriptions provide a baseline of surface-water specific conductance data that can used for comparison to current and future measurements in New York streams.

  2. Measurement of the thermal conductivity of thin insulating anisotropic material with a stationary hot strip method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jannot, Yves; Degiovanni, Alain; Félix, Vincent; Bal, Harouna

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a method dedicated to the thermal conductivity measurement of thin insulating anisotropic materials. The method is based on three hot-strip-type experiments in which the stationary temperature is measured at the center of the hot strip. A 3D model of the heat transfer in the system is established and simulated to determine the validity of a 2D transfer hypothesis at the center of the hot strip. A simplified 2D model is then developed leading to the definition of a geometrical factor calculable from a polynomial expression. A very simple calculation method enabling the estimation of the directional thermal conductivities from the three stationary temperature measurements and from the geometrical factor is presented. The uncertainties on each conductivity are estimated. The method is then validated by measurements on polyethylene foam and Ayous (anistropic low-density tropical wood); the estimated values of the thermal conductivities are in good agreement with the values estimated using the hot plate and the flash method. The method is finally applied on a thin super-insulating fibrous material for which no other method is able to measure the in-plane conductivity.

  3. Measurements of the Radiation Induced Conductivity of Insulating Polymeric Materials for the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbridge, J.; Dennison, J. R.; Hodges, J.; Hoffmann, R. C.; Abbott, J.; Hunt, A.; Spaulding, R.

    2006-10-01

    We report on initial measurements of Radiation Induced Conductivity (RIC) for twelve thin film polymer materials that are used in the cabling of the James Webb Space Telescope. Results will be used to model possible detrimental arching due to space craft charging effects. RIC occurs when incident ionizing radiation deposits energy in a material and excites electrons into the conduction band of insulators. RIC is determined using a constant voltage test method as the difference in the equilibrium sample conductivity under no incident radiation and sample conductivity under an incident flux. An accelerator beam at the Idaho Accelerator Center provides the 2-5 MeV incident flux over a range of 10^2 to 10^+1 rad/sec. Measurements are made for a range of applied voltages and radiation dose rates.

  4. Experimental measurement of the plasma conductivity of Z93 and Z93P thermal control paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillard, G. Barry

    1993-01-01

    Two samples each of Z93 and Z93P thermal control paint were exposed to a simulated space environment in a plasma chamber. The samples were biased through a series of voltages ranging from -200 volts to +300 volts and electron and ion currents measured. By comparing the currents to those of pure metal samples of the same size and shape, the conductivity of the samples was calculated. Measured conductivity was dependent on the bias potential in all cases. For Z93P, conductivity was approximately constant over much of the bias range and we find a value of 0.5 micro-mhos per square meter for both electron and ion current. For Z93, the dependence on bias was much more pronounced but conductivity can be said to be approximately one order of magnitude larger. In addition to presenting these results, this report documents all of the experimental data as well as the statistical analyses performed.

  5. Experimental Measurement and Numerical Modeling of the Effective Thermal Conductivity of TRISO Fuel Compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Folsom, Charles; Xing, Changhu; Jensen, Colby; Ban, Heng; Marshall, Douglas W.

    2015-03-01

    Accurate modeling capability of thermal conductivity of tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) fuel compacts is important to fuel performance modeling and safety of Generation IV reactors. To date, the effective thermal conductivity (ETC) of tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) fuel compacts has not been measured directly. The composite fuel is a complicated structure comprised of layered particles in a graphite matrix. In this work, finite element modeling is used to validate an analytic ETC model for application to the composite fuel material for particle-volume fractions up to 40%. The effect of each individual layer of a TRISO particle is analyzed showing that the overall ETC of the compact is most sensitive to the outer layer constituent. In conjunction with the modeling results, the thermal conductivity of matrix-graphite compacts and the ETC of surrogate TRISO fuel compacts have been successfully measured using a previously developed measurement system. The ETC of the surrogate fuel compacts varies between 50 and 30 W m-1 K-1 over a temperature range of 50-600°C. As a result of the numerical modeling and experimental measurements of the fuel compacts, a new model and approach for analyzing the effect of compact constituent materials on ETC is proposed that can estimate the fuel compact ETC with approximately 15-20% more accuracy than the old method. Using the ETC model with measured thermal conductivity of the graphite matrix-only material indicate that, in the composite form, the matrix material has a much greater thermal conductivity, which is attributed to the high anisotropy of graphite thermal conductivity. Therefore, simpler measurements of individual TRISO compact constituents combined with an analytic ETC model, will not provide accurate predictions of overall ETC of the compacts emphasizing the need for measurements of composite, surrogate compacts.

  6. Influence of probe geometry on measurement results of non-ideal thermal conductivity sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiefenbacher, Patrick; Kömle, Norbert I.; Macher, Wolfgang; Kargl, Günter

    2016-09-01

    The thermal properties of the surface and subsurface layers of planets and planetary objects yield important information that allows us to better understand the thermal evolution of the body itself and its interactions with the environment. Various planetary bodies of our Solar System are covered by so-called regolith, a granular and porous material. On such planetary bodies the dominant heat transfer mechanism is heat conduction via IR radiation and contact points between particles. In this case the energy balance is mainly controlled by the effective thermal conductivity of the top surface layers, which can be directly measured by thermal conductivity probes. A traditionally used method for measuring the thermal conductivity of solid materials is the needle-probe method. Such probes consist of thin steel needles with an embedded heating wire and temperature sensors. For the evaluation of the thermal conductivity of a specific material the temperature change with time is determined by heating a resistance wire with a well-defined electrical current flowing through it and simultaneously measuring the temperature increase inside the probe over a certain time. For thin needle probes with a large length-to-diameter ratio it is mathematically easy to derive the thermal conductivity, while this is not so straightforward for more rugged probes with a larger diameter and thus a smaller length-to-diameter ratio. Due to the geometry of the standard thin needle probes they are mechanically weak and subject to bending when driven into a soil. Therefore, using them for planetary missions can be problematic. In this paper the thermal conductivity values determined by measurements with two non-ideal, ruggedized thermal conductivity sensors, which only differ in length, are compared to each other. Since the theory describing the temperature response of non-ideal sensors is highly complicated, those sensors were calibrated with an ideal reference sensor in various solid and

  7. The thermal conductivity of rock under hydrothermal conditions: Measurements and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C.F.; Sass, J.H.

    1996-12-31

    The thermal conductivities of most major rock-forming minerals vary with both temperature and confining pressure, leading to substantial changes in the thermal properties of some rocks at the high temperatures characteristic of geothermal systems. In areas with large geothermal gradients, the successful use of near-surface heat flow measurements to predict temperatures at depth depends upon accurate corrections for varying thermal conductivity. Previous measurements of the thermal conductivity of dry rock samples as a function of temperature were inadequate for porous rocks and susceptible to thermal cracking effects m nonporous rocks. We have developed an instrument for measuring the thermal conductivity of water-saturated rocks at temperatures from 20 to 350{degrees}C and confining pressures up to 100 MPa. A transient line-source of heat is applied through a needle probe centered within the rock sample, which in turn is enclosed within a heated pressure vessel with independent controls on pore and confining pressure. Application of this technique to samples of Franciscan graywacke from The Geysers reveals a significant change in thermal conductivity with temperature. At reservoir-equivalent temperatures of 250{degrees}C, the conductivity of the graywacke decreases by approximately 25 % relative to the room temperature value. Where heat how is constant with depth within the caprock overlying the reservoir, this reduction in conductivity with temperature leads to a corresponding increase in the geothermal gradient. Consequently, reservoir temperatures are encountered at depths significantly shallower than those predicted by assuming a constant temperature gradient with depth. We have derived general equations for estimating the thermal conductivity of most metamorphic and igneous rocks and some sedimentary rocks at elevated temperature from knowledge of the room temperature thermal conductivity.

  8. Rolling ball algorithm as a multitask filter for terrain conductivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashed, Mohamed

    2016-09-01

    Portable frequency domain electromagnetic devices, commonly known as terrain conductivity meters, have become increasingly popular in recent years, especially in locating underground utilities. Data collected using these devices, however, usually suffer from major problems such as complexity and interference of apparent conductivity anomalies, near edge local spikes, and fading of conductivity contrast between a utility and the surrounding soil. This study presents the experience of adopting the rolling ball algorithm, originally designed to remove background from medical images, to treat these major problems in terrain conductivity measurements. Applying the proposed procedure to data collected using different terrain conductivity meters at different locations and conditions proves the capability of the rolling ball algorithm to treat these data both efficiently and quickly.

  9. In situ electrical conductivity measurements of H2O under static pressure up to 28 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bao; Gao, Yang; Han, Yonghao; Ma, Yanzhang; Gao, Chunxiao

    2016-08-01

    The in situ electrical conductivity measurements on water in both solid state and liquid state were performed under pressure up to 28 GPa and temperature from 77 K to 300 K using a microcircuit fabricated on a diamond anvil cell (DAC). Water chemically ionization mainly contributes to electrical conduction in liquid state, which is in accord with the results obtained under dynamic pressure. Energy band theory of liquid water was used to understand effect of static pressure on electrical conduction of water. The electric conductivity of H2O decreased discontinuously by four orders of magnitude at 0.7-0.96 GPa, indicating water frozen at this P-T condition. Correspondingly, the conduction of H2O in solid state is determined by arrangement and bending of H-bond in ice VI and ice VII. Based on Jaccard theory, we have concluded that the charge carriers of ice are already existing ions and Bjerrum defects.

  10. Thermal conductivity measurement in clay dominant consolidated material by Transient Hot-Wire method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, J. P.; Gallier, J.; Mercx, B.; Dudoignon, P.; Milcent, D.

    2010-06-01

    The transient hot-wire (THW) technique is widely used for measurements of the thermal-conductivity of most fluids and some attempts have also been carried out for simultaneous measurements of the thermal-diffusivity with the same hot wire. This technique was also tried to determine thermal properties of soils by the mean of probes which can be considered as wire with some assumptions. The purpose of this paper is to validate the thermal conductivity measurement by the THW technique in geomaterials, composed of compacted sand + clay mineral that can be used for earth construction (Compacted Earth Brick). The thermal transfer behaviors are mainly governed by the texture and moisture of the geomaterials. Thus the investigations were performed (1) in media made of glass beads of different diameters in dry and saturated state in order to observe the role of grain sizes and saturation state on the wire temperature (Δt) measurements and (2) in the compacted clay-geomaterial at different moisture states. The Δt / ln(t) diagrams allow the calculation of two thermal conductivities. The first one, measured in the short time acquisition (< 1s), characterizes the microtexture of the material and its hydrated state. The second one, measured for longer time acquisitions, characterizes the mean thermal conductivity of the material.

  11. PCB glass-fibre laminates: Thermal conductivity measurements and their effect on simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvar, F.; Poole, N. J.; Witting, P. A.

    1990-12-01

    Accurate values of thermal conductivity are required for the simulation of temperature phenomena in electronic circuits. This paper presents the results of measurements carried out to determine the thermal conductivity along and normal to the plane of fibre glass laminates used in the manufacture of printed circuit boards. It has been found that the reinforced fibre-glass substrates used in PCBs are strongly anisotropic with the conductivity normal to the boards being much smaller than tangential to it. The test samples were type FR4 epoxy/glass laminates. An experiment has been designed which determines the thermal conductivity in-the-plane of the laminates by matching the measured temperature distribution along a heated specimen with a finite difference solution. An electrically heated Lees’ disc apparatus is also used to measure the thermal conductivity of these boards in a direction normal to their plane. The samples tested yielded values of 0.343 W/mK and 1.059 W/mK for thermal conductivity through and along the plane of the boards, respectively.

  12. Thermal conductivity measurements in Porous mixtures of methane hydrate and quartz sand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waite, W.F.; deMartin, B.J.; Kirby, S.H.; Pinkston, J.; Ruppel, C.D.

    2002-01-01

    Using von Herzen and Maxwell's needle probe method, we measured thermal conductivity in four porous mixtures of quartz sand and methane gas hydrate, with hydrate composing 0, 33, 67 and 100% of the solid volume. Thermal conductivities were measured at a constant methane pore pressure of 24.8 MPa between -20 and +15??C, and at a constant temperature of -10??C between 3.5 and 27.6 MPa methane pore pressure. Thermal conductivity decreased with increasing temperature and increased with increasing methane pore pressure. Both dependencies weakened with increasing hydrate content. Despite the high thermal conductivity of quartz relative to methane hydrate, the largest thermal conductivity was measured in the mixture containing 33% hydrate rather than in hydrate-free sand. This suggests gas hydrate enhanced grain-to-grain heat transfer, perhaps due to intergranular contact growth during hydrate synthesis. These results for gas-filled porous mixtures can help constrain thermal conductivity estimates in porous, gas hydrate-bearing systems.

  13. Electrical conductivity measurements in sewage sludge pellets: innovative techniques for environmental management.

    PubMed

    Camilla, S; Jordan, M M

    2009-09-15

    This paper presents research on the behaviour of electrical conductivity of sludge pellets resulting from the treatment of urban wastewater at the drying grounds of the El Trebal wastewater processing plant, located in the Mapocho river basin of the Metropolitana Region, Santiago, Chile. In the methodology used samples were taken that correspond to three horizons of the sewage sludge pile. The first horizon made up the upper portion of the pile (the surface), the second the central portion (mesophilous), and the third the lower one (thermophilous). Electrical conductivity measurements were taken in sewage sludge pellets under pressures on the order of 15-50 MPa with currents of 10(-15)A. Electrical conductivity measurements were also taken for different horizons, and innovative techniques and methodologies for sludge samples presented in the form of pellets are used for this purpose. Such pellets are easily reproduced with sufficient precision, and at the same time allow modifying other variables like mass, sample dimensions and compaction levels. The trends of the conductivity curves are similar for the sludge from the isolation surface horizon (H1) as well as for the mesophilous area horizon (H2). In the case of the thermophilous area horizon (H3), the electrical conductivity shows extremely high values when compared to horizons H1 and H2. This paper could be useful in establishing a general rule for taking electrical conductivity measurements in sewage sludge samples. Such a rule could bring accurate reproducible values, and be used for other types of dry wastes.

  14. Microengineered Conductive Elastomeric Electrodes for Long-Term Electrophysiological Measurements with Consistent Impedance under Stretch.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dinglong; Cheng, Tin Kei; Xie, Kai; Lam, Raymond H W

    2015-01-01

    In this research, we develop a micro-engineered conductive elastomeric electrode for measurements of human bio-potentials with the absence of conductive pastes. Mixing the biocompatible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) silicone with other biocompatible conductive nano-particles further provides the material with an electrical conductivity. We apply micro-replica mold casting for the micro-structures, which are arrays of micro-pillars embedded between two bulk conductive-PDMS layers. These micro-structures can reduce the micro-structural deformations along the direction of signal transmission; therefore the corresponding electrical impedance under the physical stretch by the movement of the human body can be maintained. Additionally, we conduct experiments to compare the electrical properties between the bulk conductive-PDMS material and the microengineered electrodes under stretch. We also demonstrate the working performance of these micro-engineered electrodes in the acquisition of the 12-lead electrocardiographs (ECG) of a healthy subject. Together, the presented gel-less microengineered electrodes can provide a more convenient and stable bio-potential measurement platform, making tele-medical care more achievable with reduced technical barriers for instrument installation performed by patients/users themselves. PMID:26512662

  15. Microengineered Conductive Elastomeric Electrodes for Long-Term Electrophysiological Measurements with Consistent Impedance under Stretch

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Dinglong; Cheng, Tin Kei; Xie, Kai; Lam, Raymond H. W.

    2015-01-01

    In this research, we develop a micro-engineered conductive elastomeric electrode for measurements of human bio-potentials with the absence of conductive pastes. Mixing the biocompatible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) silicone with other biocompatible conductive nano-particles further provides the material with an electrical conductivity. We apply micro-replica mold casting for the micro-structures, which are arrays of micro-pillars embedded between two bulk conductive-PDMS layers. These micro-structures can reduce the micro-structural deformations along the direction of signal transmission; therefore the corresponding electrical impedance under the physical stretch by the movement of the human body can be maintained. Additionally, we conduct experiments to compare the electrical properties between the bulk conductive-PDMS material and the microengineered electrodes under stretch. We also demonstrate the working performance of these micro-engineered electrodes in the acquisition of the 12-lead electrocardiographs (ECG) of a healthy subject. Together, the presented gel-less microengineered electrodes can provide a more convenient and stable bio-potential measurement platform, making tele-medical care more achievable with reduced technical barriers for instrument installation performed by patients/users themselves. PMID:26512662

  16. On the variation in the electrical properties and ac conductivity of through-thickness nano-porous anodic alumina with temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Mahmood; Mehmood, Mazhar; Nadeem, Muhammad; Waheed, Abdul; Tanvir, Muhammad Tauseef

    2013-09-01

    The electrical response of self-organized through-thickness anodic alumina with hexagonal arrangement of cylindrical pores has been studied as a function of temperature. Mechanically stable thick porous anodic alumina was prepared, by through-thickness anodic oxidation of aluminum sheet in sulfuric acid, with extremely high aspect ratio pores exhibiting fairly uniform diameter and interpore distance. It was observed that the electrical properties of through-thickness anodic alumina are very sensitive to minute changes in temperature and the role of surface conductivity in governing its electrical response cannot be overlooked. At high frequencies, intrinsic dielectric response of anodic alumina was dominant. The frequency-dependent conductivity behavior at low and intermediate frequencies was explained on the basis of correlated barrier hopping (CBH) and quantum mechanical tunneling (QMT) models, respectively. Experimental data was modeled using an equivalent circuit consisting of Debye circuit, for bulk alumina, parallel to surface conduction path. The surface conduction was primarily based on two circuits in series, each with a parallel arrangement of a resistor and a constant phase element. This suggested heterogeneity in alumina pore surface, possibly related with islands of physisorbed water separated by the regions of chemisorbed water. Temperature dependence of some circuit elements has been analyzed to express different charge migration phenomena occurring in nano-porous anodic alumina.

  17. Direct measurement of thermal conductivity in solid iron at planetary core conditions.

    PubMed

    Konôpková, Zuzana; McWilliams, R Stewart; Gómez-Pérez, Natalia; Goncharov, Alexander F

    2016-06-01

    The conduction of heat through minerals and melts at extreme pressures and temperatures is of central importance to the evolution and dynamics of planets. In the cooling Earth's core, the thermal conductivity of iron alloys defines the adiabatic heat flux and therefore the thermal and compositional energy available to support the production of Earth's magnetic field via dynamo action. Attempts to describe thermal transport in Earth's core have been problematic, with predictions of high thermal conductivity at odds with traditional geophysical models and direct evidence for a primordial magnetic field in the rock record. Measurements of core heat transport are needed to resolve this difference. Here we present direct measurements of the thermal conductivity of solid iron at pressure and temperature conditions relevant to the cores of Mercury-sized to Earth-sized planets, using a dynamically laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. Our measurements place the thermal conductivity of Earth's core near the low end of previous estimates, at 18-44 watts per metre per kelvin. The result is in agreement with palaeomagnetic measurements indicating that Earth's geodynamo has persisted since the beginning of Earth's history, and allows for a solid inner core as old as the dynamo. PMID:27251283

  18. New portable instrument for the measurement of thermal conductivity in gas process conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queirós, C. S. G. P.; Lourenço, M. J. V.; Vieira, S. I.; Serra, J. M.; Nieto de Castro, C. A.

    2016-06-01

    The development of high temperature gas sensors for the monitoring and determination of thermophysical properties of complex process mixtures at high temperatures faces several problems, related with the materials compatibility, active sensing parts sensitivity, and lifetime. Ceramic/thin metal films based sensors, previously developed for the determination of thermal conductivity of molten materials up to 1200 °C, were redesigned, constructed, and applied for thermal conductivity measuring sensors. Platinum resistance thermometers were also developed using the same technology, to be used in the temperature measurement, which were also constructed and tested. A new data acquisition system for the thermal conductivity sensors, based on a linearization of the transient hot-strip model, including a portable electronic bridge for the measurement of the thermal conductivity in gas process conditions was also developed. The equipment is capable of measuring the thermal conductivity of gaseous phases with an accuracy of 2%-5% up to 840 °C (95% confidence level). The development of sensors up to 1200 °C, present at the core of the combustion chambers, will be done in a near future.

  19. Direct measurement of thermal conductivity in solid iron at planetary core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konôpková, Zuzana; McWilliams, R. Stewart; Gómez-Pérez, Natalia; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2016-06-01

    The conduction of heat through minerals and melts at extreme pressures and temperatures is of central importance to the evolution and dynamics of planets. In the cooling Earth’s core, the thermal conductivity of iron alloys defines the adiabatic heat flux and therefore the thermal and compositional energy available to support the production of Earth’s magnetic field via dynamo action. Attempts to describe thermal transport in Earth’s core have been problematic, with predictions of high thermal conductivity at odds with traditional geophysical models and direct evidence for a primordial magnetic field in the rock record. Measurements of core heat transport are needed to resolve this difference. Here we present direct measurements of the thermal conductivity of solid iron at pressure and temperature conditions relevant to the cores of Mercury-sized to Earth-sized planets, using a dynamically laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. Our measurements place the thermal conductivity of Earth’s core near the low end of previous estimates, at 18-44 watts per metre per kelvin. The result is in agreement with palaeomagnetic measurements indicating that Earth’s geodynamo has persisted since the beginning of Earth’s history, and allows for a solid inner core as old as the dynamo.

  20. Direct measurement of thermal conductivity in solid iron at planetary core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konôpková, Zuzana; McWilliams, R. Stewart; Gómez-Pérez, Natalia; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2016-06-01

    The conduction of heat through minerals and melts at extreme pressures and temperatures is of central importance to the evolution and dynamics of planets. In the cooling Earth’s core, the thermal conductivity of iron alloys defines the adiabatic heat flux and therefore the thermal and compositional energy available to support the production of Earth’s magnetic field via dynamo action. Attempts to describe thermal transport in Earth’s core have been problematic, with predictions of high thermal conductivity at odds with traditional geophysical models and direct evidence for a primordial magnetic field in the rock record. Measurements of core heat transport are needed to resolve this difference. Here we present direct measurements of the thermal conductivity of solid iron at pressure and temperature conditions relevant to the cores of Mercury-sized to Earth-sized planets, using a dynamically laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. Our measurements place the thermal conductivity of Earth’s core near the low end of previous estimates, at 18–44 watts per metre per kelvin. The result is in agreement with palaeomagnetic measurements indicating that Earth’s geodynamo has persisted since the beginning of Earth’s history, and allows for a solid inner core as old as the dynamo.

  1. New portable instrument for the measurement of thermal conductivity in gas process conditions.

    PubMed

    Queirós, C S G P; Lourenço, M J V; Vieira, S I; Serra, J M; Nieto de Castro, C A

    2016-06-01

    The development of high temperature gas sensors for the monitoring and determination of thermophysical properties of complex process mixtures at high temperatures faces several problems, related with the materials compatibility, active sensing parts sensitivity, and lifetime. Ceramic/thin metal films based sensors, previously developed for the determination of thermal conductivity of molten materials up to 1200 °C, were redesigned, constructed, and applied for thermal conductivity measuring sensors. Platinum resistance thermometers were also developed using the same technology, to be used in the temperature measurement, which were also constructed and tested. A new data acquisition system for the thermal conductivity sensors, based on a linearization of the transient hot-strip model, including a portable electronic bridge for the measurement of the thermal conductivity in gas process conditions was also developed. The equipment is capable of measuring the thermal conductivity of gaseous phases with an accuracy of 2%-5% up to 840 °C (95% confidence level). The development of sensors up to 1200 °C, present at the core of the combustion chambers, will be done in a near future.

  2. An affordable and accurate conductivity probe for density measurements in stratified flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carminati, Marco; Luzzatto-Fegiz, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    In stratified flow experiments, conductivity (combined with temperature) is often used to measure density. The probes typically used can provide very fine spatial scales, but can be fragile, expensive to replace, and sensitive to environmental noise. A complementary instrument, comprising a low-cost conductivity probe, would prove valuable in a wide range of applications where resolving extremely small spatial scales is not needed. We propose using micro-USB cables as the actual conductivity sensors. By removing the metallic shield from a micro-B connector, 5 gold-plated microelectrodes are exposed and available for 4-wire measurements. These have a cell constant ~550m-1, an intrinsic thermal noise of at most 30pA/Hz1/2, as well as sub-millisecond time response, making them highly suitable for many stratified flow measurements. In addition, we present the design of a custom electronic board (Arduino-based and Matlab-controlled) for simultaneous acquisition from 4 sensors, with resolution (in conductivity, and resulting density) exceeding the performance of typical existing probes. We illustrate the use of our conductivity-measuring system through stratified flow experiments, and describe plans to release simple instructions to construct our complete system for around 200.

  3. Direct measurement of thermal conductivity in solid iron at planetary core conditions.

    PubMed

    Konôpková, Zuzana; McWilliams, R Stewart; Gómez-Pérez, Natalia; Goncharov, Alexander F

    2016-06-01

    The conduction of heat through minerals and melts at extreme pressures and temperatures is of central importance to the evolution and dynamics of planets. In the cooling Earth's core, the thermal conductivity of iron alloys defines the adiabatic heat flux and therefore the thermal and compositional energy available to support the production of Earth's magnetic field via dynamo action. Attempts to describe thermal transport in Earth's core have been problematic, with predictions of high thermal conductivity at odds with traditional geophysical models and direct evidence for a primordial magnetic field in the rock record. Measurements of core heat transport are needed to resolve this difference. Here we present direct measurements of the thermal conductivity of solid iron at pressure and temperature conditions relevant to the cores of Mercury-sized to Earth-sized planets, using a dynamically laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. Our measurements place the thermal conductivity of Earth's core near the low end of previous estimates, at 18-44 watts per metre per kelvin. The result is in agreement with palaeomagnetic measurements indicating that Earth's geodynamo has persisted since the beginning of Earth's history, and allows for a solid inner core as old as the dynamo.

  4. Measurement of cardiac output in small laboratory animals using recordings of blood conductivity.

    PubMed

    Vogel, J

    1997-11-01

    No method exists which enables easy, frequent, and, at the same time, reliable cardiac output (CO) measurements in mice. To validate a simple indicator-dilution method suitable for frequent measurements of CO in small laboratory animals, a 5% glucose solution was injected as a bolus into femoral veins of mice and rats. The corresponding blood conductivity was measured continuously between an intra-aortic and a rectal electrode. The resulting conductivity-dilution curves were used to calculate CO in mice during hypervolemia and hypovolemia and in conscious as well as halothane-anesthetized mice and rats. In rats, conductivity-dilution curves and time courses of plasma glucose concentration were recorded simultaneously. Compared with CO in awake animals, CO in both species was slightly, but not significantly, reduced during halothane anesthesia. CO was significantly and gradually reduced in hypovolemic mice (up to 58 ml blood/kg body wt), whereas hypervolemia (23 ml saline/kg body wt) had no significant effect. Simultaneous recordings of conductivity-dilution curves and time courses of plasma glucose concentration yielded corresponding values of CO (P < 0.001). Measurement of blood conductivity appears to be a reliable, simple, and convenient method for quantification of CO in small animals. PMID:9374792

  5. Inductive Measurement of Plasma Jet Electrical Conductivity (MSFC Center Director's discretionary Fund). Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, M. W.; Hawk, C. W.; Litchford, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Measurement of plasma jet electrical conductivity has utility in the development of explosively driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy converters as well as magnetic flux compression reaction chambers for nuclear/chemical pulse propulsion and power. Within these types of reactors, the physical parameter of critical importance to underlying MHD processes is the magnetic Reynolds number, the value of which depends upon the product of plasma electrical conductivity and velocity. Therefore, a thorough understanding of MHD phenomena at high magnetic Reynolds number is essential, and methods are needed for the accurate and reliable measurement of electrical conductivity in high-speed plasma jets. It is well known that direct measurements using electrodes suffer from large surface resistance, and an electrodeless technique is desired. To address this need, an inductive probing scheme, originally developed for shock tube studies, has been adapted. In this method, the perturbation of an applied magnetic field by a plasma jet induces a voltage in a search coil, which, in turn, can be used to infer electrical conductivity through the inversion of a Fredholm integral equation of the first kind. A 1-in.-diameter probe using a light-gas gun. Exploratory laboratory experiments were carried out using plasma jets expelled from 15-g shaped charges. Measured conductivities were in the range of 4 kS/m for unseeded octol charges and 26 kS/m for seeded octol charges containing 2-percent potassium carbonate by mass.

  6. New portable instrument for the measurement of thermal conductivity in gas process conditions.

    PubMed

    Queirós, C S G P; Lourenço, M J V; Vieira, S I; Serra, J M; Nieto de Castro, C A

    2016-06-01

    The development of high temperature gas sensors for the monitoring and determination of thermophysical properties of complex process mixtures at high temperatures faces several problems, related with the materials compatibility, active sensing parts sensitivity, and lifetime. Ceramic/thin metal films based sensors, previously developed for the determination of thermal conductivity of molten materials up to 1200 °C, were redesigned, constructed, and applied for thermal conductivity measuring sensors. Platinum resistance thermometers were also developed using the same technology, to be used in the temperature measurement, which were also constructed and tested. A new data acquisition system for the thermal conductivity sensors, based on a linearization of the transient hot-strip model, including a portable electronic bridge for the measurement of the thermal conductivity in gas process conditions was also developed. The equipment is capable of measuring the thermal conductivity of gaseous phases with an accuracy of 2%-5% up to 840 °C (95% confidence level). The development of sensors up to 1200 °C, present at the core of the combustion chambers, will be done in a near future. PMID:27370495

  7. Note: Electrical resolution during conductive atomic force microscopy measurements under different environmental conditions and contact forces

    SciTech Connect

    Lanza, M.; Porti, M.; Nafria, M.; Aymerich, X.; Whittaker, E.; Hamilton, B.

    2010-10-15

    Conductive atomic force microscopy experiments on gate dielectrics in air, nitrogen, and UHV have been compared to evaluate the impact of the environment on topography and electrical measurements. In current images, an increase of the lateral resolution and a reduction of the conductivity were observed in N{sub 2} and, especially, in UHV (where current depends also on the contact force). Both effects were related to the reduction/elimination of the water layer between the tip and the sample in N{sub 2}/UHV. Therefore, since current measurements are very sensitive to environmental conditions, these factors must be taken into consideration when comparisons between several experiments are performed.

  8. Measurement of the thermal conductivity of dielectric thin solid films with a thermal comparator

    SciTech Connect

    Amsden, C.A.; Gilman, S.E.; Jacobs, S.D.; Torok, J.S.

    1988-04-01

    Low thermal conductivity has important implications for electric and optical applications, where heat deposited in a thin layer must be dissipated to prevent damage. Models which account for thermal transport in thin film structures may have no predictive value if they employ bulk conductivity data. Most techniques utilized to measure the thermal conductivity of thin solid films are difficult and time consuming. The method we have developed is relatively rapid, nondestructive, and is capable of evaluating the samples in a conventional film on substrate geometry. Our thermal conductivity apparatus consists of a control and readout module, signal processing equipment, and an environmentally isolated sample chamber enclosing a sample stage. The commercial unit was converted into a high precision device by temperature controlling both the samples and the sample stage, and by performing averaging of the output signal. The thermal conductivity values obtained are below those of bulk solids. In addition, the conductivities seem to increase with increasing film thickness. Titania seems to have a higher thermal conductivity when deposited by ion-beam sputtering rather than electron-beam evaporation. Some of the electron-beam films were crazed, indicating high levels of stress. The effect of stress and crazing on thermal conductivity is not readily apparent. 11 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. Study of AC/RF properties of SRF ingot niobium

    SciTech Connect

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Tsindlekht, Menachem I; Genkin, Valery M; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2013-09-01

    In an attempt to correlate the performance of superconducting radiofrequency cavities made of niobium with the superconducting properties, we present the results of the magnetization and ac susceptibility of the niobium used in the superconducting radiofrequency cavity fabrication. The samples were subjected to buffer chemical polishing (BCP) surface and high temperature heat treatments, typically applied to the cavities fabrications. The analysis of the results show the different surface and bulk ac conductivity for the samples subjected to BCP and heat treatment. Furthermore, the RF surface impedance is measured on the sample using a TE011 microwave cavity for a comparison to the low frequency measurements.

  10. Development of a direct push based in-situ thermal conductivity measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirla, Marian Andrei; Vienken, Thomas; Dietrich, Peter; Bumberger, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Heat pump systems are commonly utilized in Europe, for the exploitation of the shallow geothermal potential. To guarantee a sustainable use of the geothermal heat pump systems by saving resources and minimizing potential negative impacts induced by temperature changes within soil and groundwater, new geothermal exploration methods and tools are required. The knowledge of the underground thermal properties is a necessity for a correct and optimum design of borehole heat exchangers. The most important parameter that indicates the performance of the systems is thermal conductivity of the ground. Mapping the spatial variability of thermal conductivity, with high resolution in the shallow subsurface for geothermal purposes, requires a high degree of technical effort to procure adequate samples for thermal analysis. A collection of such samples from the soil can disturb sample structure, so great care must be taken during collection to avoid this. Factors such as transportation and sample storage can also influence measurement results. The use of technologies like Thermal Response Test (TRT) require complex mechanical and electrical systems for convective heat transport in the subsurface and longer monitoring times, often three days. Finally, by using thermal response tests, often only one integral value is obtained for the entire coupled subsurface with the borehole heat exchanger. The common thermal conductivity measurement systems (thermal analyzers) can perform vertical thermal conductivity logs only with the aid of sample procurement, or by integration into a drilling system. However, thermal conductivity measurements using direct push with this type of probes are not possible, due to physical and mechanical limitations. Applying vertical forces using direct push technology, in order to penetrate the shallow subsurface, can damage the probe and the sensors systems. The aim of this study is to develop a new, robust thermal conductivity measurement probe, for direct

  11. Method and apparatus for measuring thermal conductivity of small, highly insulating specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A. (Inventor); Kuczmarski, Maria A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A hot plate method and apparatus for the measurement of thermal conductivity combines the following capabilities: 1) measurements of very small specimens; 2) measurements of specimens with thermal conductivity on the same order of that as air; and, 3) the ability to use air as a reference material. Care is taken to ensure that the heat flow through the test specimen is essentially one-dimensional. No attempt is made to use heated guards to minimize the flow of heat from the hot plate to the surroundings. Results indicate that since large correction factors must be applied to account for guard imperfections when specimen dimensions are small, simply measuring and correcting for heat from the heater disc that does not flow into the specimen is preferable. The invention is a hot plate method capable of using air as a standard reference material for the steady-state measurement of the thermal conductivity of very small test samples having thermal conductivity on the order of air.

  12. Measurement uncertainty for the Uniform Engine Testing Program conducted at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelwahab, Mahmood; Biesiadny, Thomas J.; Silver, Dean

    1987-01-01

    An uncertainty analysis was conducted to determine the bias and precision errors and total uncertainty of measured turbojet engine performance parameters. The engine tests were conducted as part of the Uniform Engine Test Program which was sponsored by the Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development (AGARD). With the same engines, support hardware, and instrumentation, performance parameters were measured twice, once during tests conducted in test cell number 3 and again during tests conducted in test cell number 4 of the NASA Lewis Propulsion Systems Laboratory. The analysis covers 15 engine parameters, including engine inlet airflow, engine net thrust, and engine specific fuel consumption measured at high rotor speed of 8875 rpm. Measurements were taken at three flight conditions defined by the following engine inlet pressure, engine inlet total temperature, and engine ram ratio: (1) 82.7 kPa, 288 K, 1.0, (2) 82.7 kPa, 288 K, 1.3, and (3) 20.7 kPa, 288 K, 1.3. In terms of bias, precision, and uncertainty magnitudes, there were no differences between most measurements made in test cells number 3 and 4. The magnitude of the errors increased for both test cells as engine pressure level decreased. Also, the level of the bias error was two to three times larger than that of the precision error.

  13. G-Plus report to Owens Corning-thermal conductivity Measurements of Fiberglass

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H

    2003-04-15

    . Among the many methods of measuring thermal conductivity, only a few can be used for glass fibers. The traditional heat flow meter is used in testing thermal insulations near room temperature. At higher temperatures this method cannot be used due to material and instrument limitations. Our plan is to use a transient plane source (TPS) method to measure thermal conductivity directly. The advantage of the TPS method is that measurements can be taken at over 700 C, and covers the temperature of the automobile exhausts. The following is a report for the G-Plus project conducted at ORNL to apply the TPS method to characterizing the thermal conductivity of two types of fiberglass and also the effect of packing density.

  14. Observations of Spacecraft Bearing Lubricant Redistribution Based on Thermal Conductance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeuchi, Yoshimi R.; Frantz, Peter P.; Hilton, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    The performance and life of precision ball bearings are critically dependent on maintaining a quantity of oil at the ball/race interface that is sufficient to support a robust protective film. In space applications, where parched conditions are intentionally the norm, harsh operating conditions can displace the small reserves of oil, resulting in reduced film thickness and premature wear. In the past, these effects have proven difficult to model or to measure experimentally. This paper describes a study addressing this challenge, where bearing thermal conductance measurements are employed to infer changes in lubricant quantity at the critical rolling interfaces. In the first part of the paper, we explain how the lubricant's presence and its quantity impacts bearing thermal conductance measurements. For a stationary bearing, we show that conductance is directly related to the lubricant quantity in the ball/race contacts. Hence, aspects of bearing performance related to oil quantity can be understood and insights improved with thermal conductance data. For a moving bearing, a different mechanism of heat transfer dominates and is dependent on lubricant film thickness on the ball. In the second part of the report, we discuss lubricant quantity observations based on bearing thermal conductance measurements. Lubricant quantity, and thus bearing thermal conductance, depends on various initial and operating conditions and is impacted further by the run-in process. A significant effect of maximum run-in speed was also observed, with less oil remaining after obtaining higher speeds. Finally, we show that some of the lubricant that is displaced between the ball and race during run-in operation can be recovered during rest, and we measure the rate of recovery for one example.

  15. A measurement technique for circumventing hysteresis and conductance drift in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Tunnell, Andrew; Ballarotto, Vincent; Cumings, John

    2014-01-31

    We present a measurement protocol that effectively eliminates both the hysteresis and the temporal drift typically observed in the channel conductance of single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (SWNT FETs) during the application of gate voltages. Before each resistance measurement, the gate is first stepped through a series of alternating positive and negative voltages to produce a neutral charge distribution within the device. This process is highly effective at removing the hysteresis in the channel conductance, and time-dependent measurements further demonstrate that the drain current is stable and single-valued, independent of the prior measurement history. The effectiveness of this method can be understood within the Preisach hysteresis model, which we demonstrate as a useful framework to predict the observed results. PMID:24394672

  16. A measurement technique for circumventing hysteresis and conductance drift in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunnell, Andrew; Ballarotto, Vincent; Cumings, John

    2014-01-01

    We present a measurement protocol that effectively eliminates both the hysteresis and the temporal drift typically observed in the channel conductance of single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (SWNT FETs) during the application of gate voltages. Before each resistance measurement, the gate is first stepped through a series of alternating positive and negative voltages to produce a neutral charge distribution within the device. This process is highly effective at removing the hysteresis in the channel conductance, and time-dependent measurements further demonstrate that the drain current is stable and single-valued, independent of the prior measurement history. The effectiveness of this method can be understood within the Preisach hysteresis model, which we demonstrate as a useful framework to predict the observed results.

  17. Method and Apparatus for Measuring Thermal Conductivity of Small, Highly Insulating Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A (Inventor); Kuczmarski, Maria A (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the measurement of thermal conductivity combines the following capabilities: 1) measurements of very small specimens; 2) measurements of specimens with thermal conductivity on the same order of that as air; and, 3) the ability to use air as a reference material. Care is taken to ensure that the heat flow through the test specimen is essentially one-dimensional. No attempt is made to use heated guards to minimize the flow of heat from the hot plate to the surroundings. Results indicate that since large correction factors must be applied to account for guard imperfections when specimen dimensions are small, simply measuring and correcting for heat from the heater disc that does not flow into the specimen is preferable.

  18. AC Electrokinetics of Physiological Fluids for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Liu, Tingting; Lamanda, Ariana C; Sin, Mandy L Y; Gau, Vincent; Liao, Joseph C; Wong, Pak Kin

    2015-12-01

    Alternating current (AC) electrokinetics is a collection of processes for manipulating bulk fluid mass and embedded objects with AC electric fields. The ability of AC electrokinetics to implement the major microfluidic operations, such as pumping, mixing, concentration, and separation, makes it possible to develop integrated systems for clinical diagnostics in nontraditional health care settings. The high conductivity of physiological fluids presents new challenges and opportunities for AC electrokinetics-based diagnostic systems. In this review, AC electrokinetic phenomena in conductive physiological fluids are described followed by a review of the basic microfluidic operations and the recent biomedical applications of AC electrokinetics. The future prospects of AC electrokinetics for clinical diagnostics are presented.

  19. On the van der Pauw's method applied to the measurement of low thermal conductivity materials.

    PubMed

    Morales, C; Flores, E; Bodega, J; Leardini, F; Ferrer, I J; Ares, J R; Sánchez, C

    2016-08-01

    The electrical van der Pauw's method has recently been extended to measure the thermal conductivity of different elements and compounds. This technique provides an easy way to determine the sample in-plane thermal conductivity by avoiding the influence of the thermal contact resistances. However, the reported calculated error values appear to be underestimated when dealing with the materials with low thermal conductivity (<5 W/Km) at room temperature. The causes of this underestimation are investigated in this communication and it has been found that they are due to the drastic influence of conduction heat losses through the thermo-resistance wires as well as the resulting modification of the sample temperature map. Both phenomena lead to experimental values of the sample thermal conductivity, which are systematically higher than the tabulated ones. The magnitude of this systematic error is ∼100% dealing with the samples of macroscopic dimensions, and low thermal conductivity indicated that the obtained accurate measurements can be quite challenging. PMID:27587145

  20. Estimation of thermal conductivity of amorphous silicon thin films from the optical reflectivity measurement.

    PubMed

    Moon, Seung-Jae; Choi, Jung Hyun

    2013-09-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin film material is widely used in liquid crystal display and solar cell applications. Knowledge of its properties is important in enhancing device performance. The properties of a-Si thin film have not been well understood due to the lack of periodicity of the structure. Furthermore, thermal conductivity of a-Si thin film is a key parameter to understand the complex phase transformation mechanism from a-Si thin film to polysilicon thin film by analyzing the transient temperature during the laser recrystallization process. In this work, thermal conductivity of a-Si thin film was determined by measuring optical reflectivity. A-Si thin film was irradiated with a KrF excimer laser beam to raise its temperature. The raised film temperature affects temperature-dependent optical properties such as refractive indices and extinction coefficients. The temperature-dependent optical properties of refractive indices and extinction coefficients of a-Si thin film were measured by ellipsometry. In-situ transient reflectivity at the wavelength of 633 nm was obtained during the excimer laser irradiation. The numerical simulation of one-dimensional conduction equation was solved so that transient reflectivities were calculated with temperature-dependent optical properties combined with thin film optics. Therefore, a well-fitted thermal conductivity was determined by comparing the numerically obtained transient reflectivity with the experimentally measured reflectivity data. The determined thermal conductivity of a-Si thin films was 1.5 W/mK.

  1. Estimation of thermal conductivity of amorphous silicon thin films from the optical reflectivity measurement.

    PubMed

    Moon, Seung-Jae; Choi, Jung Hyun

    2013-09-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin film material is widely used in liquid crystal display and solar cell applications. Knowledge of its properties is important in enhancing device performance. The properties of a-Si thin film have not been well understood due to the lack of periodicity of the structure. Furthermore, thermal conductivity of a-Si thin film is a key parameter to understand the complex phase transformation mechanism from a-Si thin film to polysilicon thin film by analyzing the transient temperature during the laser recrystallization process. In this work, thermal conductivity of a-Si thin film was determined by measuring optical reflectivity. A-Si thin film was irradiated with a KrF excimer laser beam to raise its temperature. The raised film temperature affects temperature-dependent optical properties such as refractive indices and extinction coefficients. The temperature-dependent optical properties of refractive indices and extinction coefficients of a-Si thin film were measured by ellipsometry. In-situ transient reflectivity at the wavelength of 633 nm was obtained during the excimer laser irradiation. The numerical simulation of one-dimensional conduction equation was solved so that transient reflectivities were calculated with temperature-dependent optical properties combined with thin film optics. Therefore, a well-fitted thermal conductivity was determined by comparing the numerically obtained transient reflectivity with the experimentally measured reflectivity data. The determined thermal conductivity of a-Si thin films was 1.5 W/mK. PMID:24205662

  2. Contact-independent measurement of electrical conductance of a thin film with a nanoscale sensor.

    PubMed

    Mentzel, Tamar S; Maclean, Kenneth; Kastner, Marc A

    2011-10-12

    Contact effects are a common impediment to electrical measurements throughout the fields of nanoelectronics, organic electronics, and the emerging field of graphene electronics. We demonstrate a novel method of measuring electrical conductance in a thin film of amorphous germanium that is insensitive to contact effects. The measurement is based on the capacitive coupling of a nanoscale metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) to the thin film so that the MOSFET senses charge diffusion in the film. We tune the contact resistance between the film and contact electrodes and show that our measurement is unaffected. With the MOSFET, we measure the temperature and field dependence of the conductance of the amorphous germanium, which are fit to a model of variable-range hopping. The device structure enables both a contact-independent and a conventional, contact-dependent measurement, which makes it possible to discern the effect of the contacts in the latter measurement. This measurement method can be used for reliable electrical characterization of new materials and to determine the effect of contacts on conventional electron transport measurements, thus guiding the choice of optimal contact materials.

  3. Development and application of diagnostic instrumentation for measurement of electron density and conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, L.E.

    1990-05-01

    The purpose of this contract was to assemble and demonstrate in the laboratory a Faraday rotation system for measurement of electron density and conductivity, with the intent to produce a system suitable for diagnostic support of the development of pulsed, space-based magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power systems. Two system configurations were tested: (1) a rotating polarizer and (2) a beam splitting polarizer. Due to the short path length plasma produced in the laboratory flame, the long wavelength 496 {mu}m methyl fluoride laser line was used and only the more sensitive rotating polarizer configuration was used for the demonstration experiments. Electron number densities from 2 {times} 10{sup 19} to 9 {times} 10{sup 19} were measured with good agreement to statistical equilibrium (Saha) calculations using emission absorption-measured flame temperatures and neutral seed atom number seed atom nuclear densities. The electron collision frequencies were measured by transmission measurements. Combining these two measurements gave measured electron conductivities of between 4 and 12 mohs/m. These results compared reasonably well with those found with an electron collision frequency model combined with chemical equilibrium calculations and the emission absorption measurements. Ellipticity measurements of electron collision frequency were not possible due to the short path length of the laboratory plasma. 46 refs., 25 figs., 9 tabs.

  4. Total body electrical conductivity measurements: an evaluation of current instrumentation for infants.

    PubMed

    Fiorotto, M L; de Bruin, N C; Brans, Y W; Degenhart, H J; Visser, H K

    1995-01-01

    Quantitation of the body's fat and learn masses is an important component of nutritional assessment. Such measurements, however, are difficult to conduct routinely in infants due to the numerous limitations of traditional methods. The application of total body electrical conductivity measurements for quantitating fat-free mass (FFM) overcomes many of these limitations. The instruments required to perform these measurements in pediatric patients (HP-2) have recently become commercially available, but their measurement performance has not been evaluated. In these studies, we compared the precision, day-to-day variability, and magnetic field profile of three HP-2 instruments. We also derived a new calibration equation that relates the FFM to the total body electrical conductivity measurement in piglets, and compared it with an equation (provided currently by the manufacturer) derived on a prototype instrument. The performance of the instruments was generally similar, although a significant difference in the magnetic field of one instrument was identified. The coefficient of variation of inanimate phantom measurements varied from +/- 0.2 to +/- 0.5%, and the day-to-day variability was generally similar. Such measurement error is significant (+/- 0.035 to +/- 0.078 kg FFM) for small subjects. The new calibration equation was similar to the original equation; therefore, all the data were pooled to generate a new equation that is linear at least to 10 kg. Thus, the HP-2 total body electrical conductivity instruments, which can be safely and easily used to measure FFM and fat in infants through 1 y of age, proved to be reliable and precise, and results obtained from different instruments can be confidently compared. PMID:7700740

  5. Self-consistent magnetic properties of magnetite tracers optimized for magnetic particle imaging measured by ac susceptometry, magnetorelaxometry and magnetic particle spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Frank; Remmer, Hilke; Kuhlmann, Christian; Wawrzik, Thilo; Arami, Hamed; Ferguson, R. Mathew; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2015-01-01

    Sensitivity and spatial resolution in Magnetic Particle Imaging are affected by magnetic properties of the nanoparticle tracers used during imaging. Here, we have carried out a comprehensive magnetic characterization of single-core iron oxide nanoparticles that were designed for MPI. We used ac susceptometry, fluxgate magnetorelaxometry, and magnetic particle spectroscopy to evaluate the tracer’s magnetic core size, hydrodynamic size, and magnetic anisotropy. Our results present a self-consistent set of magnetic and structural parameters for the tracers that is consistent with direct measurements of size using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering and that can be used to better understand their MPI performance. PMID:25729125

  6. Self-consistent magnetic properties of magnetite tracers optimized for magnetic particle imaging measured by ac susceptometry, magnetorelaxometry and magnetic particle spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Frank; Remmer, Hilke; Kuhlmann, Christian; Wawrzik, Thilo; Arami, Hamed; Ferguson, R. Mathew; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2014-06-01

    Sensitivity and spatial resolution in magnetic particle imaging are affected by magnetic properties of the nanoparticle tracers used during imaging. Here, we have carried out a comprehensive magnetic characterization of single-core iron oxide nanoparticles that were designed for MPI. We used ac susceptometry, fluxgate magnetorelaxometry, and magnetic particle spectroscopy to evaluate the tracer's magnetic core size, hydrodynamic size, and magnetic anisotropy. Our results present a self-consistent set of magnetic and structural parameters for the tracers that is consistent with direct measurements of size using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering and that can be used to better understand their MPI performance.

  7. Positron annihilation and conductivity measurements on poly(pyrrole tosylate) and poly(pyrrole fluoride)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S. C.; Krishnamoorthy, S.; Naidu, S. V.; Eom, C. I.; Krichene, S.; Reynolds, J. R.

    1990-03-01

    Positron lifetimes, Doppler broadening of the annihilation γ energy, and electrical conductivities have been measured for two conducting polymers, poly(pyrrole tosylate) and poly(pyrrole fluoride), as functions of temperature in the range 10-295 K. The positron-lifetime spectra have been resolved into two exponentials. Positrons are localized in shallow traps, and the lifetime data suggest thermally induced detrapping of positrons at low temperatures. The temperature dependence of the conductivity has been analyzed following the variable-range-hopping model which provides results for the density of states at the Fermi energy [N(EF)] and bipolaron localization length α-1. Whereas the temperature dependence of the conductivity qualitatively follows this model, it provides incorrect results for N(EF) and α-1. .AE

  8. Measurement of Apparent Thermal Conductivity of JSC-1A Under Ambient Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Zeng-Guang; Kleinhenz, Julie E.

    2011-01-01

    The apparent thermal conductivity of JSC-1A lunar regolith simulant was measured experimentally using a cylindrical apparatus. Eleven thermocouples were embedded in the simulant bed to obtain the steady state temperature distribution at various radial, axial, and azimuthal locations. The high aspect ratio of a cylindrical geometry was proven to provide a one-dimensional, axisymmetric temperature field. A test series was performed at atmospheric pressure with varying heat fluxes. The radial temperature distribution in each test fit a logarithmic function, indicating a constant thermal conductivity throughout the soil bed. However, thermal conductivity was not constant between tests at different heat fluxes. This variation is attributed to stresses created by thermal expansion of the simulant particles against the rigid chamber wall. Under stress-free conditions (20 deg C), the data suggest a temperature independent apparent conductivity of 0.1961 +/- 0.0070 W/m/ deg C

  9. Measurements of middle-atmosphere electric fields and associated electrical conductivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, L. C.; Croskey, C. L.; Mitchell, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    A simple antenna for measuring the vertical electric field in the 'middle atmosphere' has been flown on a number of rocket-launched parachute-borne payloads. The data from the first nine such flights, launched under a variety of geophysical conditions, are presented, along with electrical conductivities measured simultaneously. The data include indications of layered peaks of several volts per meter in the mesospheric field at high and low latitudes in situations of relatively low conductivity. During an auroral 'REP' event the electric field reversed direction in the lower stratosphere, accompanied by a substantial enhancement in conductivity. The data generally do not confirm speculations based only on the extension of the thunderstorm circuit from below or the mapping of ionospheric and magnetospheric fields from above, but seem to require, in addition, internal generation processes in the middle atmosphere.

  10. A steady-state high-temperature method for measuring thermal conductivity of refractory materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzolaro, M.; Corradetti, S.; Andrighetto, A.; Ferrari, L.

    2013-05-01

    A new methodology and an instrumental setup for the thermal conductivity estimation of isotropic bulk graphite and different carbides at high temperatures are presented. The method proposed in this work is based on the direct measurement of temperature and emissivity on the top surface of a sample disc of known dimensions. Temperatures measured under steady-state thermal equilibrium are then used to estimate the thermal conductivity of the sample by making use of the inverse parameter estimation technique. Thermal conductivity values obtained in this way are then compared to the material data sheets and values found in literature. The reported work has been developed within the Research and Development framework of the SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) project at INFN-LNL (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro).

  11. Dielectric and conductivity measurements as proxy method to monitor contamination in sandstone.

    PubMed

    Saltas, V; Vallianatos, F; Soupios, P; Makris, J P; Triantis, D

    2007-04-01

    The present work investigates whether dielectric spectroscopy can be used to detect contamination, which may leach in a natural porous material, due to the spreading of contaminants. For this purpose, dielectric and conductivity measurements, in the frequency range from 10 mHz to 1 MHz, were carried out in sandstone samples, partially filled or saturated with solutions of leachates, at different concentrations. The experimental results suggest the dominant role of free water to the measured electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity in contaminated samples with high water content. On the other hand, various relaxation mechanisms were observed in dried samples at different leachate concentrations. Experimental data were fitted using the Havriliak-Negami dielectric relaxation function, superimposed with a conductivity term. The determined parameters of the fitting function may serve to distinguish between different amounts of leachate in sandstone samples.

  12. Using Conductivity Measurements to Determine the Identities and Concentrations of Unknown Acids: An Inquiry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, K. Christopher; Garza, Ariana

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a student designed experiment using titrations involving conductivity measurements to identify unknown acids as being either HCl or H[subscript 2]SO[subscript 4], and to determine the concentrations of the acids, thereby improving the utility of standard acid-base titrations. Using an inquiry context, students gain experience…

  13. Temperature and electrical conductivity of the lunar interior from magnetic transient measurements in the geomagnetic tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyal, P.; Parkin, C. W.; Daily, W. D.

    1974-01-01

    Magnetometers were deployed at four Apollo sites on the moon to measure remanent and induced lunar magnetic fields. Measurements from this network of instruments were used to calculate the electrical conductivity, temperature, magnetic permeability, and iron abundance of the lunar interior. Global lunar fields due to eddy currents, induced in the lunar interior by magnetic transients in the geomagnetic tail field, were analyzed to calculate an electrical conductivity profile for the moon: the conductivity increases rapidly with depth from 10 to the minus 9 power mhos/meter at the lunar surface to .0001 mhos/meter at 200 km depth, then less rapidly to .02 mhos/meter at 1000 km depth. A temperature profile is calculated from conductivity: temperature rises rapidly with depth to 1100 K at 200 km depth, then less rapidly to 1800 K at 1000 km depth. Velocities and thicknesses of the earth's magnetopause and bow shock are estimated from simultaneous magnetometer measurements. Average speeds are determined to be about 50 km/sec for the magnetopause and 70 km/sec for the bow shock, although there are large variations in the measurements for any particular boundary crossing.

  14. Analysis of Thermal-Conductivity Measurement Data from International Comparison of National Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, B.; Zarr, R.; Stacey, C.; Lira-Cortes, L.; Hammerschmidt, U.; Sokolov, N.; Zhang, J.; Filtz, J.-R.; Fleurence, N.

    2013-05-01

    For the first time under the auspices of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM), seven national metrology institutes (NMIs) participated in an international interlaboratory comparison on thermal-conductivity measurements by the guarded hot-plate method. Measurements were conducted successively by all participants on the same set of specimens of insulating materials (mineral wool and expanded polystyrene) at temperatures ranging from 10 °C to 40 °C, according to the International Standard ISO 8302. This protocol aims to minimize issues of material variability by circulating the same pairs of specimens among the laboratories following the strict format of a round-robin test program. This comparison is a pilot study which is intended as a first stage for future key comparisons between NMIs. The descriptive analysis of obtained results shows good agreement between laboratories for the mineral wool (MW) specimens and the thicker specimens of expanded polystyrene (EPS), with relative deviations within the uncertainties of measurement. A positive drift of thermal-conductivity values, which has appeared progressively during the comparison process, seems to be correlated with the size of the metering area of the guarded hot plates used. A statistical analysis was applied to repeated thermal-conductivity measurements at 23 °C, to identify anomalous and outlying data, to assess the within- and between-laboratory variability, and to evaluate the participant laboratories' performance.

  15. A Hot-Wire Method Based Thermal Conductivity Measurement Apparatus for Teaching Purposes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarado, S.; Marin, E.; Juarez, A. G.; Calderon, A.; Ivanov, R.

    2012-01-01

    The implementation of an automated system based on the hot-wire technique is described for the measurement of the thermal conductivity of liquids using equipment easily available in modern physics laboratories at high schools and universities (basically a precision current source and a voltage meter, a data acquisition card, a personal computer…

  16. A study of rock matrix diffusion properties by electrical conductivity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ohlsson, Y.; Neretnieks, I.

    1999-07-01

    Traditional rock matrix diffusion experiments on crystalline rock are very time consuming due to the low porosity and extensive analysis requirements. Electrical conductivity measurements are, on the other hand, very fast and larger samples can be used than are practical in ordinary diffusion experiments. The effective diffusivity of a non-charged molecule is readily evaluated from the measurements, and influences from surface conductivity on diffusion of cations can be studied. A large number of samples of varying thickness can be measured within a short period, and the changes in transport properties with position in a rock core can be examined. In this study the formation factor of a large number of Aespoe diorite samples is determined by electrical conductivity measurements. The formation factor is a geometric factor defined as the ratio between the effective diffusivity of a non-charged molecule, to that of the same molecule in free liquid. The variation of this factor with position among a borecore and with sample length, and its coupling to the porosity of the sample is studied. Also the surface conductivity is studied. This was determined as the residual conductivity after leaching of the pore solution ions. The formation factor of most of the samples is in the range 1E-5 to 1E-4, with a mean value of about 5E-5. Even large samples (4--13 cm) give such values. The formation factor increases with increasing porosity and the change in both formation factor and porosity with position in the borecore can be large, even for samples close to each other. The surface conductivity increases with increasing formation factor for the various samples but the influence on the pore diffusion seems to be higher for samples of lower formation factor. This suggests that the relation between the pore surface area and the pore volume is larger for samples of low formation factor.

  17. Reliability of AcuGraph system for measuring skin conductance at acupoints

    PubMed Central

    Mist, Scott D; Aickin, Mikel; Kalnins, Paul; Cleaver, Jim; Batchelor, Roger; Thorne, Tracy; Chamberlin, Steve; Tippens, Kim; Colbert, Agatha P

    2012-01-01

    Objective There are many commercially available instruments for measuring electrical conductance, but there is little information about their reliability. The aim of this study was to quantify measurement variability and assess reliability of the AcuGraph system—a commonly used electrodermal screening device. Methods Four experiments were conducted to measure variability in electrical conductance readings obtained by the AcuGraph system. The fi rst involved measuring known resistors. The second measured non-human organic matter. The third was a test–retest assessment of the Yuan-Source and Jing-Well points in 30 healthy volunteers who were measured by a single operator. The fourth was an interoperator reliability evaluation of seven acupuncturists at the Yuan-Source and Jing-Well acupoints on four individuals at two time points. Results Against known resistors, the AcuGraph had an average coeffi cient of variability (CV) of 1.8% between operators and test–retests. On non-human organic material the AcuGraph had an average CV of 0.9% and 2.8%. When a single operator tested 30 participants, the average reliability for the Yuan-Source points was 0.86 and 0.76 for Jing-Well points with a CV of 23.2% and 25.9% respectively. The average CV for the seven acupuncturists was 24.5% on Yuan-Source points and 23.7% on Jing-Well points. Conclusions The AcuGraph measures known resistors and organic matter accurately and reliably. Skin conductance at acupoints recorded by one operator was also reliable. There was less consistency in electrodermal recordings obtained by seven different operators. Operator training and technical improvements to the AcuGraph may improve consistency among operators. PMID:21602233

  18. Thermal boundary conductance accumulation and interfacial phonon transmission: Measurements and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheaito, Ramez; Gaskins, John T.; Caplan, Matthew E.; Donovan, Brian F.; Foley, Brian M.; Giri, Ashutosh; Duda, John C.; Szwejkowski, Chester J.; Constantin, Costel; Brown-Shaklee, Harlan J.; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2015-01-01

    The advances in phonon spectroscopy in homogeneous solids have unveiled extremely useful physics regarding the contribution of phonon energies and mean-free paths to the thermal transport in solids. However, as material systems decrease to length scales less than the phonon mean-free paths, thermal transport can become much more impacted by scattering and transmission across interfaces between two materials than the intrinsic relaxation in the homogeneous solid. To elucidate the fundamental interactions driving this thermally limiting interfacial phonon scattering process, we analytically derive and experimentally measure a thermal boundary conductance accumulation function. We develop a semiclassical theory to calculate the thermal boundary conductance accumulation function across interfaces using the diffuse mismatch model, and validate this derivation by measuring the interface conductance between eight different metals on native oxide/silicon substrates and four different metals on sapphire substrates. Measurements were performed at room temperature using time-domain thermoreflectance and represent the first-reported values for interface conductance across several metal/native oxide/silicon and metal/sapphire interfaces. The various metal films provide a variable bandwidth of phonons incident on the metal/substrate interface. This method of varying phonons' cutoff frequency in the film while keeping the same substrate allows us to mimic the accumulation of thermal boundary conductance and thus provides a direct method to experimentally validate our theory. We show that the accumulation function can be written as the product of a weighted average of the interfacial phonon transmission function and the accumulation of the temperature derivative of the phonon flux incident on the interface; this provides the framework to extract an average, spectrally dependent phonon transmissivity from a series of thermal boundary conductance measurements. Our approach provides

  19. Thermal conductance measurements of bolted copper to copper joints at sub-Kelvin temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didschuns, I.; Woodcraft, A. L.; Bintley, D.; Hargrave, P. C.

    2004-05-01

    We have measured the thermal contact conductance of several demountable copper joints below 1 K. Joints were made by bolting together either two flat surfaces or a clamp around a rod. Surfaces were gold plated, and no intermediate materials were used. A linear dependence on temperature was seen. Most of the measured conductance values fell into a narrow range: 0.1-0.2 W K -1 at 1 K. Results in the literature for similar joints consist of predictions based on electrical resistance measurements using the Wiedemann-Franz law. There is little evidence of the validity of this law in the case of joints. Nevertheless, our results are in good agreement with the literature predictions, suggesting that such predictions are a reasonable approximation.

  20. Indirect measurement of sinoatrial conduction time in patients with sinoatrial disease and in controls.

    PubMed Central

    Crook, B; Kitson, D; McComish, M; Jewitt, D

    1977-01-01

    Clinical recognition of sinoatrial disease currently depends on the presence of transient sinus bradycardia, sinoatrial block, or supraventricular tachyarrhythmias. The value of clinical electrophysiological assessment in these patients is not clear. Using intracardiac electrophysiological recordings and programmed stimulation we have examined 14 patients with sinoatrial disease and 11 control patients undergoing investigation for chest pain. Intracardiac conduction times were normal in all patients. There was no significant difference of sinus node recovery times between the sinoatrial disease and control groups. Sinoatrial conduction times were measured by the indirect method and two populations were identified. However, the mean values of 128 +/- 27 ms in patients and 112 +/- 30 ms in controls were not significantly different and major overlap rendered this measurement clinically valueless. It is concluded that no current electrophysiological measurement has diagnostic value in patients with sinoatrial disease. PMID:884027

  1. Thermal conductivity measurements of suspended graphene with and without wrinkles by micro-Raman mapping.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shanshan; Li, Qiongyu; Zhang, Qimin; Qu, Yan; Ji, Hengxing; Ruoff, Rodney S; Cai, Weiwei

    2012-09-14

    The thermal conductivity (κ) of suspended graphene membranes made by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was measured by micro-Raman mapping. Cracks and wrinkles present in these suspended graphene membranes were identified by micro-Raman mapping, and κ values and their statistics were obtained on membranes free of such imperfections in a single mapping. Based on this new technique, an average κ value of 1875 ± 220 W m(-1) K(-1) at 420 K was measured on 26 suspended graphene membranes that were free of wrinkles, ~27% higher than the average value measured from 12 graphene membranes with wrinkles. These results suggest that the variation in published thermal conductivity values for suspended graphene samples could, at least in part, be due to the presence or absence of wrinkles.

  2. Dielectric behavior and ac conductivity in Aurivillius Bi4Ti3O12 doped by antiferromagnetic BiFeO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, M. S.; Tian, Z. M.; Yuan, S. L.; Duan, H. N.; Qiu, Y.

    2012-06-01

    Bi5Ti3FeO15 ceramics were synthesized by the solid state reaction. XRD analysis shows a single phase perovskite structure with no impurities identified. Two obvious dielectric anomalies around 1007 and 1090 K were exhibited by this material, indicating that there are two phase transitions. While no peak was found in the tan δ-T curve. In addition, the conduction loss activation energies calculated at 476-639 K, 652-966 K, and 980-1095 K are 0.156, 0.262, and 0.707 eV, respectively. Polarization versus electric field hysteresis loops associated with 2Pr of 6.08 μC/cm2 and 2Ec of 59 kV/cm were obtained.

  3. Measurements of the temperature dependence of radiation induced conductivity in polymeric dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, Jodie

    This study measures Radiation Induced Conductivity (RIC) in five insulating polymeric materials over temperatures ranging from ~110 K to ~350 K: polyimide (PI or Kapton HN(TM) and Kapton E(TM)), polytetraflouroethylene (PTFE or Teflon(TM)), ethylene-tetraflouroethylene (ETFE or Tefzel(TM)), and Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE). RIC occurs when incident ionizing radiation deposits energy and excites electrons into the conduction band of insulators. Conductivity was measured when a voltage was applied across vacuum-baked, thin film polymer samples in a parallel plate geometry. RIC was calculated as the difference in sample conductivity under no incident radiation and under an incident ~4 MeV electron beam at low incident dose rates of 0.01 rad/sec to 10 rad/sec. The steady-state RIC was found to agree well with the standard power law relation, sigmaRIC(D˙) = kRIC(T) D˙Delta(T) between conductivity, sigmaRIC and adsorbed dose rate, D˙. Both the proportionality constant, kRIC, and the power, Delta, were found to be temperature-dependent above ~250 K, with behavior consistent with photoconductivity models developed for localized trap states in disordered semiconductors. Below ~250 K, kRIC and Delta exhibited little change in any of the materials.

  4. A 3 omega method to measure an arbitrary anisotropic thermal conductivity tensor.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Vivek; Hardin, Corey L; Garay, Javier E; Dames, Chris

    2015-05-01

    Previous use of the 3 omega method has been limited to materials with thermal conductivity tensors that are either isotropic or have their principal axes aligned with the natural cartesian coordinate system defined by the heater line and sample surface. Here, we consider the more general case of an anisotropic thermal conductivity tensor with finite off-diagonal terms in this coordinate system. An exact closed form solution for surface temperature has been found for the case of an ideal 3 omega heater line of finite width and infinite length, and verified numerically. We find that the common slope method of data processing yields the determinant of the thermal conductivity tensor, which is invariant upon rotation about the heater line's axis. Following this analytic result, an experimental scheme is proposed to isolate the thermal conductivity tensor elements. Using two heater lines and a known volumetric heat capacity, the arbitrary 2-dimensional anisotropic thermal conductivity tensor can be measured with a low frequency sweep. Four heater lines would be required to extend this method to measure all 6 unknown tensor elements in 3 dimensions. Experiments with anisotropic layered mica are carried out to demonstrate the analytical results.

  5. Invited Review Article: Error and uncertainty in Raman thermal conductivity measurements.

    PubMed

    Beechem, Thomas; Yates, Luke; Graham, Samuel

    2015-04-01

    Error and uncertainty in Raman thermal conductivity measurements are investigated via finite element based numerical simulation of two geometries often employed—Joule-heating of a wire and laser-heating of a suspended wafer. Using this methodology, the accuracy and precision of the Raman-derived thermal conductivity are shown to depend on (1) assumptions within the analytical model used in the deduction of thermal conductivity, (2) uncertainty in the quantification of heat flux and temperature, and (3) the evolution of thermomechanical stress during testing. Apart from the influence of stress, errors of 5% coupled with uncertainties of ±15% are achievable for most materials under conditions typical of Raman thermometry experiments. Error can increase to >20%, however, for materials having highly temperature dependent thermal conductivities or, in some materials, when thermomechanical stress develops concurrent with the heating. A dimensionless parameter—termed the Raman stress factor—is derived to identify when stress effects will induce large levels of error. Taken together, the results compare the utility of Raman based conductivity measurements relative to more established techniques while at the same time identifying situations where its use is most efficacious.

  6. A 3 omega method to measure an arbitrary anisotropic thermal conductivity tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Vivek; Hardin, Corey L.; Garay, Javier E.; Dames, Chris

    2015-05-01

    Previous use of the 3 omega method has been limited to materials with thermal conductivity tensors that are either isotropic or have their principal axes aligned with the natural cartesian coordinate system defined by the heater line and sample surface. Here, we consider the more general case of an anisotropic thermal conductivity tensor with finite off-diagonal terms in this coordinate system. An exact closed form solution for surface temperature has been found for the case of an ideal 3 omega heater line of finite width and infinite length, and verified numerically. We find that the common slope method of data processing yields the determinant of the thermal conductivity tensor, which is invariant upon rotation about the heater line's axis. Following this analytic result, an experimental scheme is proposed to isolate the thermal conductivity tensor elements. Using two heater lines and a known volumetric heat capacity, the arbitrary 2-dimensional anisotropic thermal conductivity tensor can be measured with a low frequency sweep. Four heater lines would be required to extend this method to measure all 6 unknown tensor elements in 3 dimensions. Experiments with anisotropic layered mica are carried out to demonstrate the analytical results.

  7. A transient divided-bar method for simultaneous measurements of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bording, Thue S.; Nielsen, Søren B.; Balling, Niels

    2016-04-01

    Accurate information on thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of materials is of central importance in relation to geoscience and engineering problems involving the transfer of heat. Within the geosciences, this applies to all aspects regarding the determination of terrestrial heat flow and subsurface temperature modelling. Several methods, including the classical divided-bar technique, are available for laboratory measurements of thermal conductivity, and much fewer for thermal diffusivity. We have generalized the divided-bar technique to the transient case, in which thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity, and thereby also thermal diffusivity, are measured simultaneously. As the density of samples is easily determined independently, specific heat capacity may also be determined. Finite element formulation provides a flexible forward solution for heat transfer across the bar and thermal properties are estimated by inverse Monte Carlo modelling. This methodology enables a proper quantification of experimental uncertainties on measured thermal properties. The developed methodology was applied to laboratory measurements of various materials, including a standard ceramic material and different rock samples, and measuring results were compared with results applying traditional steady-state divided-bar and an independent line-source method. All measurements show highly consistent results and with excellent reproducibility and high accuracy. For conductivity, uncertainty is typically 1-3 %, and for diffusivity uncertainty may be reduced to about 3-5 %. The main uncertainty originates from the presence of thermal contact resistance associated with the internal interfaces of the bar. They are not resolved during inversion, and it is highly important that they are minimized by careful sample preparation.

  8. Pump-probe measurements of the thermal conductivity tensor for materials lacking in-plane symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Feser, Joseph P.; Liu, Jun; Cahill, David G.

    2014-10-15

    We previously demonstrated an extension of time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) which utilizes offset pump and probe laser locations to measure in-plane thermal transport properties of multilayers. However, the technique was limited to systems of transversely isotropic materials studied using axisymmetric laser intensities. Here, we extend the mathematics so that data reduction can be performed on non-transversely isotropic systems. An analytic solution of the diffusion equation for an N-layer system is given, where each layer has a homogenous but otherwise arbitrary thermal conductivity tensor and the illuminating spots have arbitrary intensity profiles. As a demonstration, we use both TDTR and time-resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect measurements to obtain thermal conductivity tensor elements of <110> α-SiO{sub 2}. We show that the out-of-phase beam offset sweep has full-width half-maxima that contains nearly independent sensitivity to the in-plane thermal conductivity corresponding to the scanning direction. Also, we demonstrate a Nb-V alloy as a low thermal conductivity TDTR transducer layer that helps improve the accuracy of in-plane measurements.

  9. Pump-probe measurements of the thermal conductivity tensor for materials lacking in-plane symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feser, Joseph P.; Liu, Jun; Cahill, David G.

    2014-10-01

    We previously demonstrated an extension of time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) which utilizes offset pump and probe laser locations to measure in-plane thermal transport properties of multilayers. However, the technique was limited to systems of transversely isotropic materials studied using axisymmetric laser intensities. Here, we extend the mathematics so that data reduction can be performed on non-transversely isotropic systems. An analytic solution of the diffusion equation for an N-layer system is given, where each layer has a homogenous but otherwise arbitrary thermal conductivity tensor and the illuminating spots have arbitrary intensity profiles. As a demonstration, we use both TDTR and time-resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect measurements to obtain thermal conductivity tensor elements of <110> α-SiO2. We show that the out-of-phase beam offset sweep has full-width half-maxima that contains nearly independent sensitivity to the in-plane thermal conductivity corresponding to the scanning direction. Also, we demonstrate a Nb-V alloy as a low thermal conductivity TDTR transducer layer that helps improve the accuracy of in-plane measurements.

  10. Room temperature screening of thermal conductivity by means of thermal transient measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Cañadas, Jorge; Cheng, Shudan; Márquez-García, Lourdes; Prest, Martin J.; Akbari-Rahimabadi, Ahmad; Min, Gao

    2016-10-01

    A proof of concept of the possibility to estimate thermal conductivity of bulk disc samples at room temperature by means of thermal decays is demonstrated. An experimental set-up was designed and fabricated, which is able to perform thermal transient measurements by using a specially designed multifunctional probe that has the ability to measure temperature at its tip. Initially, the probe is heated by a heater coil located in its interior until the tip temperature reaches a steady state. Then, the probe is contacted with a disc sample which produces a temperature decay until a new state is reached. The difference between the initial and final states temperatures shows a correlation with the thermal conductivity of the sample. Employing a calibration equation, obtained using reference materials, the thermal conductivity can be calculated. Reasonably good random and systematic errors (<13% and ~9% respectively) are obtained. Theoretical simulations performed using COMSOL show a good qualitative agreement with experimental results. This new method involves an inexpensive and simple set-up which can be especially useful for thermal conductivity screening and high-throughput measurements.

  11. Pump-probe measurements of the thermal conductivity tensor for materials lacking in-plane symmetry.

    PubMed

    Feser, Joseph P; Liu, Jun; Cahill, David G

    2014-10-01

    We previously demonstrated an extension of time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) which utilizes offset pump and probe laser locations to measure in-plane thermal transport properties of multilayers. However, the technique was limited to systems of transversely isotropic materials studied using axisymmetric laser intensities. Here, we extend the mathematics so that data reduction can be performed on non-transversely isotropic systems. An analytic solution of the diffusion equation for an N-layer system is given, where each layer has a homogenous but otherwise arbitrary thermal conductivity tensor and the illuminating spots have arbitrary intensity profiles. As a demonstration, we use both TDTR and time-resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect measurements to obtain thermal conductivity tensor elements of <110> α-SiO2. We show that the out-of-phase beam offset sweep has full-width half-maxima that contains nearly independent sensitivity to the in-plane thermal conductivity corresponding to the scanning direction. Also, we demonstrate a Nb-V alloy as a low thermal conductivity TDTR transducer layer that helps improve the accuracy of in-plane measurements.

  12. Time- and Space-Domain Measurements of the Thermal Conductivity in Diamond Anvil Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, A. F.

    2011-12-01

    I will give an overview of recent developments of experimental techniques to measure the thermal conductivity in diamond anvil cell (DAC) under conditions of high pressure and high temperature (P-T) which are relevant for the planetary interiors. To measure the lattice contributions to the thermal conductivity, we developed a transient heating technique (THT) in the diamond anvil cell (DAC) [1]. This technique utilizes a periodic front surface temperature variation (measured by the spectroradiometry) of a metallic absorber surrounded by the material of interest and exposed to a pulsed laser radiation (10 nanoseconds pulses). We extract the thermal diffusivity of minerals by fitting the experimental results to the model finite element (FE) calculations. We have recently modified this technique for microseconds laser pulses as this allows avoiding nonequilibrium heat transfer processes. We have measured the thermal conductivity of Ar up to 50 GPa and 2500 K; the results are in agreement with the theoretical calculations [2] in the limit of high temperatures. In collaboration with a group from the University of Illinois we have utilized a time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR)- ultrafast (femtosecond) laser pump-probe technique for measurement of the lattice thermal conductivity at high P-T conditions. We have measured the thermal conductivity of MgO up to 60 GPa and 300 K and up to 45 GPa at 600 K. The detailed results of this study will be presented in a separate paper at this Meeting. Finally, we have combined static and pulsed laser techniques to determine the thermal conductivity of Fe and its temperature dependence at high pressures up to 70 GPa and 2000 K [3]. A thin plate of Fe was positioned in an Ar medium, laser heated from one side and the temperature is being measured from both sides of the sample radiometrically. The thermal conductivity has been determined by fitting the results of FE calculations to the experimental results. These examples demonstrate

  13. Spatial relationship between the productivity of cane sugar and soil electrical conductivity measured by electromagnetic induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira, Glecio; Silva, Jucicléia; Bezerra, Joel; Silva, Enio; Montenegro, Abelardo

    2013-04-01

    The cultivation of sugar cane in Brazil occupies a prominent place in national production chain, because the country is the main world producer of sugar and ethanol. Accordingly, studies are needed that allow an integrated production and technified, and especially that estimates of crops are consistent with the actual production of each region. The objective of this study was to determine the spatial relationship between the productivity of cane sugar and soil electrical conductivity measured by electromagnetic induction. The field experiment was conducted at an agricultural research site located in Goiana municipality, Pernambuco State, north-east of Brazil (Latitude 07 ° 34 '25 "S, Longitude 34 ° 55' 39" W). The surface of the studied field is 6.5 ha, and its mean height 8.5 m a.s.l. This site has been under sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum sp.) monoculture during the last 24 years and it was managed burning the straw each year after harvesting, renewal of plantation was performed every 7 years. Studied the field is located 10 km east from Atlantic Ocean and it is representative of the regional landscape lowlands, whose soils are affected by salinity seawater, sugarcane plantations with the main economical activity. Soil was classified an orthic the Podsol. The productivity of cane sugar and electrical conductivity were measured in 90 sampling points. The productivity of cane sugar was determined in each of the sampling points in plots of 9 m2. The Apparent soil electrical conductivity (ECa, mS m-1) was measured with an electromagnetic induction device EM38-DD (Geonics Limited). The equipment consists of two units of measurement, one in a horizontal dipole (ECa-H) to provide effective measurement distance of 1.5 m approximately and other one in vertical dipole (ECa-V) with an effective measurement depth of approximately 0.75 m. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and geostatistical tools. The results showed that productivity in the study area

  14. Broadband phonon mean free path contributions to thermal conductivity measured using frequency domain thermoreflectance.

    PubMed

    Regner, Keith T; Sellan, Daniel P; Su, Zonghui; Amon, Cristina H; McGaughey, Alan J H; Malen, Jonathan A

    2013-01-01

    Non-metallic crystalline materials conduct heat by the transport of quantized atomic lattice vibrations called phonons. Thermal conductivity depends on how far phonons travel between scattering events-their mean free paths. Due to the breadth of the phonon mean free path spectrum, nanostructuring materials can reduce thermal conductivity from bulk by scattering long mean free path phonons, whereas short mean free path phonons are unaffected. Here we use a breakdown in diffusive phonon transport generated by high-frequency surface temperature modulation to identify the mean free path-dependent contributions of phonons to thermal conductivity in crystalline and amorphous silicon. Our measurements probe a broad range of mean free paths in crystalline silicon spanning 0.3-8.0 μm at a temperature of 311 K and show that 40±5% of its thermal conductivity comes from phonons with mean free path >1 μm. In a 500 nm thick amorphous silicon film, despite atomic disorder, we identify propagating phonon-like modes that contribute >35±7% to thermal conductivity at a temperature of 306 K.

  15. Broadband phonon mean free path contributions to thermal conductivity measured using frequency domain thermoreflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regner, Keith T.; Sellan, Daniel P.; Su, Zonghui; Amon, Cristina H.; McGaughey, Alan J. H.; Malen, Jonathan A.

    2013-03-01

    Non-metallic crystalline materials conduct heat by the transport of quantized atomic lattice vibrations called phonons. Thermal conductivity depends on how far phonons travel between scattering events—their mean free paths. Due to the breadth of the phonon mean free path spectrum, nanostructuring materials can reduce thermal conductivity from bulk by scattering long mean free path phonons, whereas short mean free path phonons are unaffected. Here we use a breakdown in diffusive phonon transport generated by high-frequency surface temperature modulation to identify the mean free path-dependent contributions of phonons to thermal conductivity in crystalline and amorphous silicon. Our measurements probe a broad range of mean free paths in crystalline silicon spanning 0.3-8.0 μm at a temperature of 311 K and show that 40±5% of its thermal conductivity comes from phonons with mean free path >1 μm. In a 500 nm thick amorphous silicon film, despite atomic disorder, we identify propagating phonon-like modes that contribute >35±7% to thermal conductivity at a temperature of 306 K.

  16. Estimation of in-situ thermal conductivities from temperature gradient measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, V.T.

    1980-12-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to study the effect of variable thermal conductivity of the formations, and the wellbore characteristics, on the fluid temperature behavior inside the wellbore during injection or production and after shut-in. During the injection or production period the wellbore fluid temperature is controlled mainly by the fluid flow rate and the heat lost from the fluid to the formation. During the shut-in period, the fluid temperature is strongly affected by differences in the formation thermal conductivities. Based on the results of the present analysis, two methods for estimating in-situ thermal conductivity were derived. First, the line source concept is extended to estimate values of the formation thermal conductivities utilizing the fluid temperature record during the transient period of injection or production and shut-in. The second method is applied when a well is under thermal equilibrium conditions. Values of the formation thermal conductivities can also be estimated by using a continuous temperature gradient log and by measuring the thermal conductivity of the formation at a few selected wellbore locations.

  17. A hot-wire method based thermal conductivity measurement apparatus for teaching purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, S.; Marín, E.; Juárez, A. G.; Calderón, A.; Ivanov, R.

    2012-07-01

    The implementation of an automated system based on the hot-wire technique is described for the measurement of the thermal conductivity of liquids using equipment easily available in modern physics laboratories at high schools and universities (basically a precision current source and a voltage meter, a data acquisition card, a personal computer and a high purity platinum wire). The wire, which is immersed in the investigated sample, is heated by passing a constant electrical current through it, and its temperature evolution, ΔT, is measured as a function of time, t, for several values of the current. A straightforward methodology is then used for data processing in order to obtain the liquid thermal conductivity. The start point is the well known linear relationship between ΔT and ln(t) predicted for long heating times by a model based on a solution of the heat conduction equation for an infinite lineal heat source embedded in an infinite medium into which heat is conducted without convective and radiative heat losses. A criterion is used to verify that the selected linear region is the one that matches the conditions imposed by the theoretical model. As a consequence the method involves least-squares fits in linear, semi-logarithmic (semi-log) and log-log graphs, so that it becomes attractive not only to teach about heat transfer and thermal properties measurement techniques, but also as a good exercise for students of undergraduate courses of physics and engineering learning about these kinds of mathematical functional relationships between variables. The functionality of the experiment was demonstrated by measuring the thermal conductivity in samples of liquids with well known thermal properties.

  18. Experimental Investigation of Electrical Conductivity and Permittivity of SC-TiO 2 -EG Nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fal, Jacek; Barylyak, Adriana; Besaha, Khrystyna; Bobitski, Yaroslav V.; Cholewa, Marian; Zawlik, Izabela; Szmuc, Kamil; Cebulski, Józef; żyła, Gaweł

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents experimental studies of dielectric properties of nanofluids based on ethylene glycol and SC-TiO2 nanoparticles with average size of 15-40 nm with various mass concentrations. The dielectric permittivity both real part and imaginary part as a function of temperature and frequency were measured. Also, dependence ac conductivity on frequency, temperature, and mass concentration were investigated. Based on the curves of ac conductivity, dc conductivity was calculated, and 400 % enhancement in dc conductivity was exposed.

  19. Experimental Investigation of Electrical Conductivity and Permittivity of SC-TiO 2 -EG Nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Fal, Jacek; Barylyak, Adriana; Besaha, Khrystyna; Bobitski, Yaroslav V; Cholewa, Marian; Zawlik, Izabela; Szmuc, Kamil; Cebulski, Józef; Żyła, Gaweł

    2016-12-01

    The paper presents experimental studies of dielectric properties of nanofluids based on ethylene glycol and SC-TiO2 nanoparticles with average size of 15-40 nm with various mass concentrations. The dielectric permittivity both real part and imaginary part as a function of temperature and frequency were measured. Also, dependence ac conductivity on frequency, temperature, and mass concentration were investigated. Based on the curves of ac conductivity, dc conductivity was calculated, and 400 % enhancement in dc conductivity was exposed.

  20. Predicting thermal conductivity of rocks from the Los Azufres geothermal field, Mexico, from easily measurable properties

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Alfonso; Contreras, Enrique; Dominquez, Bernardo A.

    1988-01-01

    A correlation is developed to predict thermal conductivity of drill cores from the Los Azufres geothermal field. Only andesites are included as they are predominant. Thermal conductivity of geothermal rocks is in general scarce and its determination is not simple. Almost all published correlations were developed for sedimentary rocks. Typically, for igneous rocks, chemical or mineral analyses are used for estimating conductivity by using some type of additive rule. This requires specialized analytical techniques and the procedure may not be sufficiently accurate if, for instance, a chemical analysis is to be changed into a mineral analysis. Thus a simple and accurate estimation method would be useful for engineering purposes. The present correlation predicts thermal conductivity from a knowledge of bulk density and total porosity, properties which provide basic rock characterization and are easy to measure. They may be determined from drill cores or cuttings, and the procedures represent a real advantage given the cost and low availability of cores. The multivariate correlation proposed is a quadratic polynomial and represents a useful tool to estimate thermal conductivity of igneous rocks since data on this property is very limited. For porosities between 0% and 25%, thermal conductivity is estimated with a maximum deviation of 22% and a residual mean square deviation of 4.62E-3 n terms of the log{sub 10}(k{rho}{sub b}) variable. The data were determined as part of a project which includes physical, thermal and mechanical properties of drill cores from Los Azufres. For the correlation, sixteen determinations of thermal conductivity, bulk density and total porosity are included. The conductivity data represent the first determinations ever made on these rocks.

  1. A simulation of the measurement of electrical conductivity in randomly generated two-phase rocks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandolesi, Eric; Moorkamp, Max; Jones, Alan G.

    2014-05-01

    Geological models of the subsurface require detailed data, often unavailable from direct observation or well logs. Hence imaging the subsurface relies on models obtained by interpretation of geophysical data. Several electromagnetic (EM) geophysical methods focus on the EM properties of rocks and sediments to determine a reliable image of the subsurface, while the same electromagnetic properties are directly measured in laboratories. Often these laboratory measurements return equivocal results that are difficult to reconcile with field observations. Recently different numerical approaches have been investigated in order to understand the effects of the geometry and continuity of interconnected pathways of conductors on EM field measurements, often restricting the studies to direct current (DC) sources. Bearing in mind the time-varying nature of the natural electromagnetic sources that play a role in field measurements, we numerically simulate the effects of such EM sources on the conductivity measured on the surface of a randomly generated three-dimensional body embedded in a uniform host by using electromagnetic induction equations, thus simulating a magnetotelluric (MT) survey. A key point in such a simulation is the scalability of the problem: the deeper the target, the longer the period of the EM source is needed. On the other hand, a long period signal ignores small heterogeneous conductors in the target bulk of the material, averaging the different conductivities in a median value. Since most real rocks are poor conductors, we have modeled a two-phase mixture of rock and interconnected conductive elements (representing melts, saline fluids, sulphidic, carbonitic, or metallic sediments, etc.), randomly generated within the background host. We have compared the results from the simulated measurements with the target rock embedded at different depths with electrical conductivity predicted by both Hashin-Shtrikman (HS) bounds and an updated multi-phase Archie

  2. Effective Thermal-Conductivity Measurements on Supporting Structures of the Mercury Probe Bepi Colombo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidi, S.; Rausch, S.; Ebert, H. P.; Löhberg, A.; Petry, D.

    2013-05-01

    Measurements were done on a carbon fiber reinforced composite (CFC) sample tested for the space probe Bepi Colombo by using the guarded hot-plate (GHP) method. The values of interest were the thermal transmittance through the samples, (56.3 ± 3.6) W · m-2 · K-1, and the effective thermal conductivity (1.06 ± 0.07) W · m-1 · K-1. The samples consist of a light honeycomb core attached to thicker surface plates. Due to this construction, the effective thermal conductivity parallel to the face plates is higher than the effective thermal conductivity through the sample. This leads to lateral heat gains or losses during the GHP measurement, which in return can lead to erroneous results. Furthermore, due to the high rigidity of the CFC material, there will be high contact resistances between the samples and the GHP apparatus plates. The separation of these thermal contact resistances from the total measured thermal resistance is essential in order to achieve correct results. Good results were achieved using a special measurement setup and a lateral correction method designed to reduce errors due to lateral heat flows.

  3. Role of geometric parameters in electrical measurements of insulating thin films deposited on a conductive substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Gerhardt, R. A.

    2012-03-01

    The effects of film thickness, electrode size and substrate thickness on the impedance parameters of alternating frequency dielectric measurements of insulating thin films deposited on conductive substrates were studied through parametric finite-element simulations. The quasi-static forms of Maxwell's electromagnetic equations in a time harmonic mode were solved using COMSOL Multiphysics® for several types of 2D models (linear and axisymmetric). The full 2D model deals with a configuration in which the impedance is measured between two surface electrodes on top of a film deposited on a conductive substrate. For the simplified 2D models, the conductive substrate is ignored and the two electrodes are placed on the top and bottom of the film. By comparing the full model and the simplified models, approximations and generalizations are deduced. For highly insulating films, such as the case of insulating SiO2 films on a conducting Si substrate, even the simplified models predict accurate capacitance values at all frequencies. However, the edge effects on the capacitance are found to be significant when the film thickness increases and/or the top electrode contact size decreases. The thickness of the substrate affects predominantly the resistive components of the dielectric response while having no significant effect on the capacitive components. Changing the electrode contact size or the film thickness determines the specific values of the measured resistance or capacitance while the material time constant remains the same, and thus this affects the frequency dependence that is able to be detected. This work highlights the importance of keeping in mind the film thickness and electrode contact size for the correct interpretation of the measured dielectric properties of micro/nanoscale structures that are often investigated using nanoscale capacitance measurements.

  4. Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy for conducting gas tracer tests and measuring water saturations in landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Yoojin; Han, Byunghyun; Mostafid, M. Erfan; Chiu, Pei; Yazdani, Ramin; Imhoff, Paul T.

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy tested for measuring tracer gas in landfills. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurement errors for tracer gases were 1-3% in landfill gas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Background signals from landfill gas result in elevated limits of detection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Technique is much less expensive and easier to use than GC. - Abstract: Gas tracer tests can be used to determine gas flow patterns within landfills, quantify volatile contaminant residence time, and measure water within refuse. While gas chromatography (GC) has been traditionally used to analyze gas tracers in refuse, photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) might allow real-time measurements with reduced personnel costs and greater mobility and ease of use. Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of PAS for conducting gas tracer tests in landfills. Two tracer gases, difluoromethane (DFM) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}), were measured with a commercial PAS instrument. Relative measurement errors were invariant with tracer concentration but influenced by background gas: errors were 1-3% in landfill gas but 4-5% in air. Two partitioning gas tracer tests were conducted in an aerobic landfill, and limits of detection (LODs) were 3-4 times larger for DFM with PAS versus GC due to temporal changes in background signals. While higher LODs can be compensated by injecting larger tracer mass, changes in background signals increased the uncertainty in measured water saturations by up to 25% over comparable GC methods. PAS has distinct advantages over GC with respect to personnel costs and ease of use, although for field applications GC analyses of select samples are recommended to quantify instrument interferences.

  5. Optical layer development for thin films thermal conductivity measurement by pulsed photothermal radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Martan, J.

    2015-01-15

    Measurement of thermal conductivity and volumetric specific heat of optically transparent thin films presents a challenge for optical-based measurement methods like pulsed photothermal radiometry. We present two approaches: (i) addition of an opaque optical layer to the surface and (ii) approximate correction of the mathematical model to incorporate semitransparency of the film. Different single layer and multilayer additive optical layers were tested. The materials of the optical layers were chosen according to analysis and measurement of their optical properties: emissivity and absorption coefficient. Presented are thermal properties’ measurement results for 6 different thin films with wide range of thermal conductivity in three configurations of surface: as deposited, added Ti layer, and added Ti/TiAlSiN layer. Measurements were done in dependence on temperature from room temperature to 500 °C. The obtained thermal effusivity evolution in time after the laser pulse shows different effects of the surface layers: apparent effusivity change and time delay. Suitability of different measurement configurations is discussed and results of high temperature testing of different optical layers are presented.

  6. ac Stark shift measurements of the clock transition in cold Cs atoms: Scalar and tensor light shifts of the D2 transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanzo, G. A.; Micalizio, S.; Godone, A.; Camparo, J. C.; Levi, F.

    2016-06-01

    The ac Stark shift, or light shift, is a physical phenomenon that plays a fundamental role in many applications ranging from basic atomic physics to applied quantum electronics. Here, we discuss experiments testing light-shift theory in a cold-atom cesium fountain clock for the Cs D2 transition (i.e., 6 2S1 /2→6 2P3 /2 at 852 nm). Cold-atom fountains represent a nearly ideal system for the study of light shifts: (1) The atoms can be perturbed by a field of arbitrary character (e.g., coherent field or nonclassical field); (2) there are no trapping fields to complicate data interpretation; (3) the probed atoms are essentially motionless in their center-of-mass reference frame, T ˜ 1 μK; and (4) the atoms are in an essentially collisionless environment. Moreover, in the present work the resolution of the Cs excited-state hyperfine splittings implies that the D2 ac Stark shift contains a nonzero tensor polarizability contribution, which does not appear in vapor phase experiments due to Doppler broadening. Here, we test the linearity of the ac Stark shift with field intensity, and measure the light shift as a function of field frequency, generating a "light-shift curve." We have improved on the previous best test of theory by a factor of 2, and after subtracting the theoretical scalar light shift from the experimental light-shift curves, we have isolated and tested the tensor light shift for an alkali D2 transition.

  7. Fabrication, characterization and measurement of thermal conductivity of Fe 3O 4 nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abareshi, Maryam; Goharshadi, Elaheh K.; Mojtaba Zebarjad, Seyed; Khandan Fadafan, Hassan; Youssefi, Abbas

    2010-12-01

    Magnetite Fe 3O 4 nanoparticles were synthesized by a co-precipitation method at different pH values. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and transmission electronic microscopy. Their magnetic properties were evaluated on a vibrating sample magnetometer. The results show that the shape of the particles is cubic and they are superparamagnetic at room temperature. Magnetic nanofluids were prepared by dispersing the Fe 3O 4 nanoparticles in water as a base fluid in the presence of tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide as a dispersant. The thermal conductivity of the nanofluids was measured as a function of volume fraction and temperature. The results show that the thermal conductivity ratio of the nanofluids increases with increase in temperature and volume fraction. The highest enhancement of thermal conductivity was 11.5% in the nanofluid of 3 vol% of nanoparticles at 40 °C. The experimental results were also compared with the theoretical models.

  8. Insulator-protected mechanically controlled break junctions for measuring single-molecule conductance in aqueous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthusubramanian, N.; Galan, E.; Maity, C.; Eelkema, R.; Grozema, F. C.; van der Zant, H. S. J.

    2016-07-01

    We present a method to fabricate insulated gold mechanically controlled break junctions (MCBJ) by coating the metal with a thin layer of aluminum oxide using plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition. The Al2O3 thickness deposited on the MCBJ devices was varied from 2 to 15 nm to test the suppression of leakage currents in deionized water and phosphate buffered saline. Junctions coated with a 15 nm thick oxide layer yielded atomically sharp electrodes and negligible conductance counts in the range of 1 to 10-4 G0 (1 G0 = 77 μS), where single-molecule conductances are commonly observed. The insulated devices were used to measure the conductance of an amphiphilic oligophenylene ethynylene derivative in deionized water.

  9. Measurements of the partial electronic conductivity in lithium chloride - potassium chloride molten salts

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, G.J.; Huggins, R.A.; Lee, M.C.Y.

    1983-05-01

    The partial electronic conductivity of the lithium chloride-potassium chloride eutectic molten salt electrolyte has been studied as a function of lithium activity, temperature and melt composition using the Wagner asymmetric d-c polarization technique. Measurements were made over the temperature range 383-465/sup 0/C and at lithium activities extending from 1.95 X 10/sup -7/ to unity. The results confirmed the applicability of this technique to molten salt systems. The partial electronic conductivity was shown to be much greater than the partial hole conductivity over the range of lithium activities investigated, and was found to increase monotonically with temperature and lithium activity, but decreased on addition of excess LiCl to the eutectic composition. Approximate values of self-discharge currents for cells utilizing an ''Al/LiAl'' negative electrode and a LiCl-KCl molten salt electrolyte have been calculated.

  10. Electrical conductivity measurements of aqueous fluids under pressure with a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell.

    PubMed

    Ni, Huaiwei; Chen, Qi; Keppler, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Electrical conductivity data of aqueous fluids under pressure can be used to derive the dissociation constants of electrolytes, to assess the effect of ionic dissociation on mineral solubility, and to interpret magnetotelluric data of earth's interior where a free fluid phase is present. Due to limitation on the tensile strength of the alloy material of hydrothermal autoclaves, previous measurements of fluid conductivity were mostly restricted to less than 0.4 GPa and 800 °C. By adapting a Bassett-type hydrothermal diamond anvil cell, we have developed a new method for acquiring electrical conductivity of aqueous fluids under pressure. Our preliminary results for KCl solutions using the new method are consistent with literature data acquired with the conventional method, but the new method has great potential for working in a much broader pressure range.

  11. Electrical conductivity measurements of aqueous fluids under pressure with a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell.

    PubMed

    Ni, Huaiwei; Chen, Qi; Keppler, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Electrical conductivity data of aqueous fluids under pressure can be used to derive the dissociation constants of electrolytes, to assess the effect of ionic dissociation on mineral solubility, and to interpret magnetotelluric data of earth's interior where a free fluid phase is present. Due to limitation on the tensile strength of the alloy material of hydrothermal autoclaves, previous measurements of fluid conductivity were mostly restricted to less than 0.4 GPa and 800 °C. By adapting a Bassett-type hydrothermal diamond anvil cell, we have developed a new method for acquiring electrical conductivity of aqueous fluids under pressure. Our preliminary results for KCl solutions using the new method are consistent with literature data acquired with the conventional method, but the new method has great potential for working in a much broader pressure range. PMID:25430149

  12. Electronmagnetic induction probe calibration for electrical conductivity measurements and moisture content determination of Hanford high level waste

    SciTech Connect

    Wittekind, W.D., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-23

    Logic of converting EMI measured electrical conductivity to moisture with expected uncertainty. Estimates from present knowledge, assumptions, and measured data. Archie`s Law has been used since the 1940`s to relate electrical conductivity in porous media to liquid volume fraction. Measured electrical conductivity to moisture content uses: Porosity, Interstitial liquid electrical conductivity, Solid particle density,Interstitial liquid density, and interstitial liquid water content. The uncertainty of assumed values is calculated to determine the final moisture wt.% result uncertainty.

  13. 47 CFR 15.107 - Conducted limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the public utility (AC) power line, the radio frequency voltage that is conducted back onto the AC... device that is designed to be connected to the public utility (AC) power line, the radio frequency voltage that is conducted back onto the AC power line on any frequency or frequencies within the band...

  14. Electrical conductivity measurement of MgCO3 up to 6 GPa and 1000 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mibe, K.; Ono, S.

    2012-04-01

    Magnesite, MgCO3, is a naturally occurring carbonate mineral and is stable over a wide range of pressure and temperature. It is known that magnesite is one of the important host phases of carbon in the Earth's deep interior. A knowledge of how magnesite's electrical properties vary as a function of pressure and temperature will be important in interpreting the observed electrical conductivity map of the Earth's interior. We, therefore, measured the electrical conductivity of polycrystalline magnesite at pressures 3-6 GPa at high temperatures using complex impedance spectroscopy in a multi-anvil high-pressure apparatus. Synthetic powdered magnesite (MgCO3)(purity > 99.5%) was used as the starting material. The measured electrical conductivity increased with increasing pressure. The activation enthalpy calculated in the temperature range 650-1000 K also increased with increasing pressure. The effect of pressure was interpreted as being the activation volume in the Arrhenius equation, and the fitted data gave an activation energy and volume of 1.76 ± 0.03 eV and -3.95 ± 0.78 cm3/mole, respectively. The negative activation volume and relatively large activation energy observed in this study suggests that the hopping of large polarons is the dominant mechanism for the electrical conductivity over the pressure and temperature range investigated.

  15. Effects of coupling between sample and electrode on the electrical resistivity measurements of conductive samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T. J.; Lee, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    A resistivity measurement system for conductive core samples has been setup using a high resolution nano-voltmeter. Using the system, in this study, various coupling effects between electrodes and the samples are discussed including contact resistance, lead resistance, temperature dependence, and heat produced within the samples by applied current. The lead resistance was over 10 times higher than the resistance of the conductive samples such as graphite or nichrome, even though the electrodes and lead lines were made of silver. Furthermore, lead resistance itself showed very strong temperature dependence, so that it is essential to subtract the lead resistance from the measured values at corresponding temperature. Minimization of contact resistance is very important, so that the axial loads are needed as big as possible unless the deformation of sample occurs.

  16. Effects of Contact Resistance on Electrical Conductivity Measurements of SiC-Based Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, Gerald E.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Henager, Charles H.

    2012-04-17

    A combination 2/4-probe method was used to measure electrical resistances across a pure, monolithic CVD-SiC disc sample with contact resistance at the SiC/metallic electrode interfaces. By comparison of the almost simultaneous 2/4-probe measurements, the specific contact resistance and its temperature dependence were determined for two types (sputtered gold and porous nickel) electrodes from RT to ~700°C. The specific contact resistance values (Rc) behaved similarly for each type of metallic electrode: Rc >~1000 Ω-cm2 at RT, decreasing continuously to ~1-10 Ω-cm2 at 700°C. The temperature dependence of the inverse Rc indicated thermally activated electrical conduction across the SiC/metallic interface with an apparent activation energy of ~0.3 eV. For the flow channel insert application in a fusion reactor blanket, contact resistance potentially could reduce the transverse electrical conductivity by ~1/2.

  17. A comparison of two transient methods of measuring thermal conductivity of particulate samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, R. W.; Fountain, J. A.; West, E. A.

    1973-01-01

    A comparison is made of the line source (LS) method and the differential line source (DLS) method of measuring thermal conductivity of particulate materials in vacuum. The DLS method requires more instrumentation in the measuring circuitry (an additional amplifier and a differentiating circuit), but since it does not require a stable temperature to initiate a test, it does not need a sample temperature control system. DLS tests can be taken as the temperature in the samples is rising from liquid nitrogen temperature to room temperature. This eliminates the practice of extrapolating thermal conductivity over this large temperature range. Also, the advantages of reduced test time, data reduction time, and small sample temperature rise enable the experimenter to take about 7-12 DLS tests in the time of 2 LS tests. Test data from the two methods agree very well.

  18. Measurement of temperature-dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity of alumina and titania thermal oil nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieśliński, Janusz T.; Ronewicz, Katarzyna; Smoleń, Sławomir

    2015-12-01

    In this study the results of simultaneous measurements of dynamic viscosity, thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity and pH of two nanofluids, i.e., thermal oil/Al2O3 and thermal oil/TiO2 are presented. Thermal oil is selected as a base liquid because of possible application in ORC systems as an intermediate heating agent. Nanoparticles were tested at the concentration of 0.1%, 1%, and 5% by weight within temperature range from 20 °C to 60 °C. Measurement devices were carefully calibrated by comparison obtained results for pure base liquid (thermal oil) with manufacturer's data. The results obtained for tested nanofluids were compared with predictions made by use of existing models for liquid/solid particles mixtures.

  19. Electrical conductivity measurements of aqueous electrolyte solutions at high temperatures and high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, P.C.; Palmer, D.A.

    1995-02-01

    In aqueous solutions all electrolytes tend to associate at high temperatures (low dielectric constants). Ion association results in the formation of uncharged substrates, which are substantially more volatile than their precursor ions. Thus knowledge of the association constants is important in interpreting the thermodynamics of the partitioning of electrolytes to the vapor phase in a fully speciated approach. Electrical conductance measurements provide a unique window into ionic interactions of solutions at high temperatures and pressures. In this study, the electrical conductivities of dilute (<0.1 molal) aqueous solutions of NaCl (100-600{degrees}C to 300 MPa) and sodium and potassium hydroxides (0-600 and 100-600{degrees}C, respectively, and to 300 MPa) were measured. The results show that the extent of association of Na{sup +} and Cl{sup -} is similar to those for Na{sup +} and K{sup +} with OH{sup -} in solution from subcritical to supercritical conditions.

  20. Plant hydraulic conductance measured by the high pressure flow meter in crop plants.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, M; Tyree, M T

    2000-04-01

    A new high pressure flow meter (HPFM) method for measuring plant hydraulic conductances (K) was investigated to examine whether its results are comparable to those from a conventional evaporative flux (EF) method in crops. Hydraulic conductance (K) was measured by the two methods under quasi-steady-state conditions in six crops grown in pots: soybean (Glycine max L. Merr. cv. Tsurunoko daizu), sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. cv. Russian mammoth), kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Tsurunashi morocco), tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Sekai-ichi), green pepper (Capsicum annuum L. cv. shishitou), and eggplant (Solanum melongena L. cv. Seiguro chunaga nasu). There was a 1:1 agreement between K values measured by the two methods for K values of whole plant, root and stem, and leaf under quasi-steady-state conditions. Leaf water potential (psi leaf) and evaporative flux density (E) in sunflower was curvilinear, indicating whole plant K estimated by the EF method increased with increase of E. Predicted psi leaf (= E divided by whole plant K measured by the HPFM method) agreed with measured psi leaf. Diurnal changes were also found in K measured by the HPFM confirming that K changed in response to temperature and E. The HPFM revealed that variable conductance was located in all organs: roots, stems, petioles, and leaves. These observations indicated that the HPFM is valid for crops as well as for trees (as previously established by Tsuda and Tyree) and has advantages over the EF method because of the speed and ease of the HPFM method.

  1. Thermal conductivity and viscosity measurements of ethylene glycol-based Al2O3 nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastoriza-Gallego, María José; Lugo, Luis; Legido, José Luis; Piñeiro, Manuel M.

    2011-12-01

    The dispersion and stability of nanofluids obtained by dispersing Al2O3 nanoparticles in ethylene glycol have been analyzed at several concentrations up to 25% in mass fraction. The thermal conductivity and viscosity were experimentally determined at temperatures ranging from 283.15 K to 323.15 K using an apparatus based on the hot-wire method and a rotational viscometer, respectively. It has been found that both thermal conductivity and viscosity increase with the concentration of nanoparticles, whereas when the temperature increases the viscosity diminishes and the thermal conductivity rises. Measured enhancements on thermal conductivity (up to 19%) compare well with literature values when available. New viscosity experimental data yield values more than twice larger than the base fluid. The influence of particle size on viscosity has been also studied, finding large differences that must be taken into account for any practical application. These experimental results were compared with some theoretical models, as those of Maxwell-Hamilton and Crosser for thermal conductivity and Krieger and Dougherty for viscosity.

  2. Thermal conductivity and viscosity measurements of ethylene glycol-based Al2O3 nanofluids

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The dispersion and stability of nanofluids obtained by dispersing Al2O3 nanoparticles in ethylene glycol have been analyzed at several concentrations up to 25% in mass fraction. The thermal conductivity and viscosity were experimentally determined at temperatures ranging from 283.15 K to 323.15 K using an apparatus based on the hot-wire method and a rotational viscometer, respectively. It has been found that both thermal conductivity and viscosity increase with the concentration of nanoparticles, whereas when the temperature increases the viscosity diminishes and the thermal conductivity rises. Measured enhancements on thermal conductivity (up to 19%) compare well with literature values when available. New viscosity experimental data yield values more than twice larger than the base fluid. The influence of particle size on viscosity has been also studied, finding large differences that must be taken into account for any practical application. These experimental results were compared with some theoretical models, as those of Maxwell-Hamilton and Crosser for thermal conductivity and Krieger and Dougherty for viscosity. PMID:21711737

  3. Thermal conductivity of a film of single walled carbon nanotubes measured with infrared thermal imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ya; Inoue, Taiki; Xiang, Rong; Chiashi, Shohei; Maruyama, Shigeo

    Heat dissipation has restricted the modern miniaturization trend with the development of electronic devices. Theoretically proven to be with high axial thermal conductivity, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) have long been expected to cool down the nanoscale world. Even though the tube-tube contact resistance limits the capability of heat transfer of the bulk film, the high intrinsic thermal conductivity of SWNT still glorify the application of films of SWNT network as a thermal interface material. In this work, we proposed a new method to straightly measure the thermal conductivity of SWNT film. We bridged two cantilevered Si thin plate with SWNT film, and kept a steady state heat flow in between. With the infrared camera to record the temperature distribution, the Si plates with known thermal conductivity can work as a reference to calculate the heat flux going through the SWNT film. Further, the thermal conductivity of the SWNT film can be obtained through Fourier's law after deducting the effect of thermal radiation. The sizes of the structure, the heating temperature, the vacuum degree and other crucial impact factors are carefully considered and analyzed. The author Y. F. was supported through the Advanced Integration Science Innovation Education and Research Consortium Program by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sport, Science and Technology.

  4. Thermal conductivity and viscosity measurements of ethylene glycol-based Al2O3 nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Pastoriza-Gallego, María José; Lugo, Luis; Legido, José Luis; Piñeiro, Manuel M

    2011-03-15

    The dispersion and stability of nanofluids obtained by dispersing Al2O3 nanoparticles in ethylene glycol have been analyzed at several concentrations up to 25% in mass fraction. The thermal conductivity and viscosity were experimentally determined at temperatures ranging from 283.15 K to 323.15 K using an apparatus based on the hot-wire method and a rotational viscometer, respectively. It has been found that both thermal conductivity and viscosity increase with the concentration of nanoparticles, whereas when the temperature increases the viscosity diminishes and the thermal conductivity rises. Measured enhancements on thermal conductivity (up to 19%) compare well with literature values when available. New viscosity experimental data yield values more than twice larger than the base fluid. The influence of particle size on viscosity has been also studied, finding large differences that must be taken into account for any practical application. These experimental results were compared with some theoretical models, as those of Maxwell-Hamilton and Crosser for thermal conductivity and Krieger and Dougherty for viscosity.

  5. Estimating Concentrations of Road-Salt Constituents in Highway-Runoff from Measurements of Specific Conductance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granato, Gregory E.; Smith, Kirk P.

    1999-01-01

    Discrete or composite samples of highway runoff may not adequately represent in-storm water-quality fluctuations because continuous records of water stage, specific conductance, pH, and temperature of the runoff indicate that these properties fluctuate substantially during a storm. Continuous records of water-quality properties can be used to maximize the information obtained about the stormwater runoff system being studied and can provide the context needed to interpret analyses of water samples. Concentrations of the road-salt constituents calcium, sodium, and chloride in highway runoff were estimated from theoretical and empirical relations between specific conductance and the concentrations of these ions. These relations were examined using the analysis of 233 highwayrunoff samples collected from August 1988 through March 1995 at four highway-drainage monitoring stations along State Route 25 in southeastern Massachusetts. Theoretically, the specific conductance of a water sample is the sum of the individual conductances attributed to each ionic species in solution-the product of the concentrations of each ion in milliequivalents per liter (meq/L) multiplied by the equivalent ionic conductance at infinite dilution-thereby establishing the principle of superposition. Superposition provides an estimate of actual specific conductance that is within measurement error throughout the conductance range of many natural waters, with errors of less than ?5 percent below 1,000 microsiemens per centimeter (?S/cm) and ?10 percent between 1,000 and 4,000 ?S/cm if all major ionic constituents are accounted for. A semi-empirical method (adjusted superposition) was used to adjust for concentration effects-superposition-method prediction errors at high and low concentrations-and to relate measured specific conductance to that calculated using superposition. The adjusted superposition method, which was developed to interpret the State Route 25 highway-runoff records, accounts for

  6. A Novel Measurement Method for the Simultaneous Estimation of Specific Heat Capacity and Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Yoichi; Okada, Ryo; Nemoto, Takashi; Ohta, Hiromichi; Takiguchi, Hiroaki

    2012-07-01

    A novel method is proposed for the simultaneous calculation of thermal conductivity κ and specific heat capacity C. The new method is a combination of two established techniques. One is the photopyroelectric method for thermal diffusivity α and the other is the front-heat front-detection photothermoreflectance method for thermal effusivity b. After α, b, and density ρ measurements, C and κ are easily calculated as C = b α -1/2 ρ -1 and κ = α 1/2 b. Test measurements on a commercial Si single-crystal wafer were performed to demonstrate that the method is sufficiently accurate.

  7. Summary of round robin measurements of radiation induced conductivity in Wesgo AL995 alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.

    1996-10-01

    This existing data on radiation induced conductivity (RIC) measurements performed on the same heat of the IEA reference ceramic insulator are summarized. Six different sets of RIC measurements have been performed on Wesgo AL995 at dose rates between 10 Gy/s and 1 MGy/s. In general, good agreement was obtained between the different groups of researchers. The data indicate that the RIC at a test temperature of 400-500{degrees}C is approximately linear with ionizing dose rate up to {approximately}1000 Gy/s, and exhibits an approximately square root dependence on dose rate between 1 kGy/s and 1 MGy/s.

  8. A new TDR multiplexing system for reliable electrical conductivity and soil water content measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weihermueller, Lutz; Huisman, Sander; Hermes, Normen; Pickel, Stefanie; Vereecken, Harry

    2013-04-01

    Time domain reflectometry (TDR) is a standard method to estimate soil water content and bulk soil electrical conductivity. In many applications, several TDR probes are installed in soil columns or field setups, and they are measured using a multiplexing system. It has been reported that commercially available multiplexers share a common ground, which might lead to inaccurate TDR measurements when probes are installed close together or at sites with high electromagnetic noise. Therefore, a new eight-channel differential multiplexer (50C81-SDM) was developed that allows communication with standard TDR equipment. The 50C81-SDM multiplexer was tested using measurement in electrolyte solutions and a sand tank. In contrast to multiplexers with a common ground, they showed no interference of closely spaced TDR probes. Measurements at a test site also showed the applicability of the 50C81-SDM multiplexer in an environment contaminated with high electromagnetic noise.

  9. Surface-sensitive conductivity measurement using a micro multi-point probe approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Edward; Barreto, Lucas; Wells, Justin; Hofmann, Philip

    2013-03-01

    An instrument for microscale electrical transport measurements in ultra-high vacuum is presented. The setup is constructed around collinear lithographically-created multi-point probes with a contact spacing down to 500 nm. Most commonly, twelve-point probes are used. These probes are approached to the surface via piezoelectric positioners. Standard four-point resistance measurements can be performed using any combination of contacts out of the twelve available. Current/voltage measurements are taken semi-automatically for a variety of the possible contact configurations, effectively emulating measurements with an equidistant four-point probe for a wide range of contact spacings. In this way, it is possible to distinguish between bulk-like and surface-like conduction. The paper describes the design of the instrument and the approach to data and error analysis. Application examples are given for epitaxial graphene on SiC and degenerately doped Bi2Se3.

  10. Enabling measurements of low-conductance single molecules using gold nanoelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, K.; Blom, T.; Leifer, K.; Strømme, M.

    2011-03-01

    A high resistance nanogap platform was used to trap and electrically characterize 30 nm thiolated double-stranded DNA molecules. High resolution scanning electron microscopy was also used to image the trapped DNA strands. It was found that the surface state of the electrodes and underlying substrate could influence the measurements of trapped molecules when the measured resistances were on the order of TΩ or greater. Hydrophilic surfaces gave rise to larger leakage currents that could potentially mask the underlying signals from molecules positioned in the nanogap. Finally, the careful handling of the samples and control of the environment is essential to avoid surface charging of the oxide substrate layer as these parasitic charges affect electrical measurements of the nanogap. The presented results thus outline some important considerations when making low-conductance measurements on molecules and should prove useful for the characterization of molecules in molecular electronics or sensors employing nanogap platforms.

  11. Enabling measurements of low-conductance single molecules using gold nanoelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Welch, K; Blom, T; Leifer, K; Strømme, M

    2011-03-25

    A high resistance nanogap platform was used to trap and electrically characterize 30 nm thiolated double-stranded DNA molecules. High resolution scanning electron microscopy was also used to image the trapped DNA strands. It was found that the surface state of the electrodes and underlying substrate could influence the measurements of trapped molecules when the measured resistances were on the order of TΩ or greater. Hydrophilic surfaces gave rise to larger leakage currents that could potentially mask the underlying signals from molecules positioned in the nanogap. Finally, the careful handling of the samples and control of the environment is essential to avoid surface charging of the oxide substrate layer as these parasitic charges affect electrical measurements of the nanogap. The presented results thus outline some important considerations when making low-conductance measurements on molecules and should prove useful for the characterization of molecules in molecular electronics or sensors employing nanogap platforms.

  12. Measurement of Apparent Thermal Conductivity and Laser Absorptivity of Individual Carbon Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin-hui; Wang, Hai-dong; Hu, Yu-dong; Ma, Wei-gang; Zhang, Xing

    2015-11-01

    The apparent thermal conductivity (ATC) and laser absorptivity (α ) are important properties of miro/nano materials but a challenge to measure due to their small size. In this paper, a simple and effective method employing Raman spectroscopy together with electrical heating is developed to measure thermal properties of micro/nano wires. The sample used in the experiment is very simple and easy to fabricate. The ATC is obtained by measuring the temperature difference induced by changing the electrical heating power; the laser heating power is neither neglected nor needed. Using the laser heating temperature rise and the measured ATC, the absorbed laser power can be calculated. Three individual carbon fibers were studied using the presented method.

  13. Technique for direct measurement of thermal conductivity of elastomers and a detailed uncertainty analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralphs, Matthew I.; Smith, Barton L.; Roberts, Nicholas A.

    2016-11-01

    High thermal conductivity thermal interface materials (TIMs) are needed to extend the life and performance of electronic circuits. A stepped bar apparatus system has been shown to work well for thermal resistance measurements with rigid materials, but most TIMs are elastic. This work studies the uncertainty of using a stepped bar apparatus to measure the thermal resistance and a tensile/compression testing machine to estimate the compressed thickness of polydimethylsiloxane for a measurement on the thermal conductivity, k eff. An a priori, zeroth order analysis is used to estimate the random uncertainty from the instrumentation; a first order analysis is used to estimate the statistical variation in samples; and an a posteriori, Nth order analysis is used to provide an overall uncertainty on k eff for this measurement method. Bias uncertainty in the thermocouples is found to be the largest single source of uncertainty. The a posteriori uncertainty of the proposed method is 6.5% relative uncertainty (68% confidence), but could be reduced through calibration and correlated biases in the temperature measurements.

  14. A setup for simultaneously measureing the thermopower and electrical conductivity of μm-thickness specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Ting; Lee, P. C.; Chen, Y. Y.; Harutyungyan, Sergey

    2008-03-01

    We report the concept and configuration of our new setup for measurement of thermopower and electrical conductivity for μm-thickness specimens, especially for thermoelectric materials. It is very difficult and tedious to accurately measure the thermopower for specimens with thickness less than ˜100 μm due to the limitations of smallest size ˜25μm of thermocouples. Such are obvious when applied to the measurement of nanowire arrays and multilayer . In order to resolve these difficulties, we developed a new setup with integration of Pt-film thermometers and electrical electrodes on two sapphire chips used to clamp specimens with thickness >40 μm and cross section 2 x 3 mm^2. Use this setup the thermopower and electric conductivity can be measured simultaneously for temperature range 20-400 K. The advantages of the setup are (1) accuracy: the real temperatures of both sides of the sample can be obtained. (2) convenience for loading samples: just assemble the sample between the two microchips and make sure of a good thermal and electrical contacts. A Bi2Te3 nanowire array in AAO template was tested, the thermopower ˜ 50μV/K was measured for diameter ˜ 60 nm of nanowires.

  15. Conductive shield for ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging: Theory and measurements of eddy currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zevenhoven, Koos C. J.; Busch, Sarah; Hatridge, Michael; Öisjöen, Fredrik; Ilmoniemi, Risto J.; Clarke, John

    2014-03-01

    Eddy currents induced by applied magnetic-field pulses have been a common issue in ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging. In particular, a relatively large prepolarizing field—applied before each signal acquisition sequence to increase the signal—induces currents in the walls of the surrounding conductive shielded room. The magnetic-field transient generated by the eddy currents may cause severe image distortions and signal loss, especially with the large prepolarizing coils designed for in vivo imaging. We derive a theory of eddy currents in thin conducting structures and enclosures to provide intuitive understanding and efficient computations. We present detailed measurements of the eddy-current patterns and their time evolution in a previous-generation shielded room. The analysis led to the design and construction of a new shielded room with symmetrically placed 1.6-mm-thick aluminum sheets that were weakly coupled electrically. The currents flowing around the entire room were heavily damped, resulting in a decay time constant of about 6 ms for both the measured and computed field transients. The measured eddy-current vector maps were in excellent agreement with predictions based on the theory, suggesting that both the experimental methods and the theory were successful and could be applied to a wide variety of thin conducting structures.

  16. Measures of skin conductance and heart rate in alcoholic men and women during memory performance

    PubMed Central

    Poey, Alan; Ruiz, Susan Mosher; Marinkovic, Ksenija; Oscar-Berman, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    We examined abnormalities in physiological responses to emotional stimuli associated with long-term chronic alcoholism. Skin conductance responses (SCR) and heart rate (HR) responses were measured in 32 abstinent alcoholic (ALC) and 30 healthy nonalcoholic (NC) men and women undergoing an emotional memory task in an MRI scanner. The task required participants to remember the identity of two emotionally-valenced faces presented at the onset of each trial during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanning. After viewing the faces, participants saw a distractor image (an alcoholic beverage, nonalcoholic beverage, or scrambled image) followed by a single probe face. The task was to decide whether the probe face matched one of the two encoded faces. Skin conductance measurements (before and after the encoded faces, distractor, and probe) were obtained from electrodes on the index and middle fingers on the left hand. HR measurements (beats per minute before and after the encoded faces, distractor, and probe) were obtained by a pulse oximeter placed on the little finger on the left hand. We expected that, relative to NC participants, the ALC participants would show reduced SCR and HR responses to the face stimuli, and that we would identify greater reactivity to the alcoholic beverage stimuli than to the distractor stimuli unrelated to alcohol. While the beverage type did not differentiate the groups, the ALC group did have reduced skin conductance and HR responses to elements of the task, as compared to the NC group. PMID:26020002

  17. Thermal conductivity measurements via time-domain thermoreflectance for the characterization of radiation induced damage

    SciTech Connect

    Cheaito, Ramez; Gorham, Caroline S.; Misra, Amit; Hattar, Khalid; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2015-05-01

    The progressive build up of displacement damage and fission products inside different systems and components of a nuclear reactor can lead to significant defect formation, degradation, and damage of the constituent materials. This structural modification can highly influence the thermal transport mechanisms and various mechanical properties of solids. In this paper we demonstrate the use of time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR), a non-destructive method capable of measuring the thermal transport in material systems from nano to bulk scales, to study the effect of radiation damage and the subsequent changes in the thermal properties of materials. We use TDTR to show that displacement damage from ion irradiation can significantly reduce the thermal conductivity of Optimized ZIRLO, a material used as fuel cladding in several current nuclear reactors. We find that the thermal conductivity of copper-niobium nanostructured multilayers does not change with helium ion irradiation doses of up to 1015 cm-2 and ion energy of 200 keV suggesting that these structures can be used and radiation tolerant materials in nuclear reactors. We compare the effect of ion doses and ion beam energies on the measured thermal conductivity of bulk silicon. Results demonstrate that TDTR thermal measurements can be used to quantify depth dependent damage.

  18. Conductive shield for ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging: Theory and measurements of eddy currents.

    PubMed

    Zevenhoven, Koos C J; Busch, Sarah; Hatridge, Michael; Oisjöen, Fredrik; Ilmoniemi, Risto J; Clarke, John

    2014-03-14

    Eddy currents induced by applied magnetic-field pulses have been a common issue in ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging. In particular, a relatively large prepolarizing field-applied before each signal acquisition sequence to increase the signal-induces currents in the walls of the surrounding conductive shielded room. The magnetic-field transient generated by the eddy currents may cause severe image distortions and signal loss, especially with the large prepolarizing coils designed for in vivo imaging. We derive a theory of eddy currents in thin conducting structures and enclosures to provide intuitive understanding and efficient computations. We present detailed measurements of the eddy-current patterns and their time evolution in a previous-generation shielded room. The analysis led to the design and construction of a new shielded room with symmetrically placed 1.6-mm-thick aluminum sheets that were weakly coupled electrically. The currents flowing around the entire room were heavily damped, resulting in a decay time constant of about 6 ms for both the measured and computed field transients. The measured eddy-current vector maps were in excellent agreement with predictions based on the theory, suggesting that both the experimental methods and the theory were successful and could be applied to a wide variety of thin conducting structures. PMID:24753629

  19. Conductive shield for ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging: Theory and measurements of eddy currents

    PubMed Central

    Zevenhoven, Koos C. J.; Busch, Sarah; Hatridge, Michael; Öisjöen, Fredrik; Ilmoniemi, Risto J.; Clarke, John

    2014-01-01

    Eddy currents induced by applied magnetic-field pulses have been a common issue in ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging. In particular, a relatively large prepolarizing field—applied before each signal acquisition sequence to increase the signal—induces currents in the walls of the surrounding conductive shielded room. The magnetic-field transient generated by the eddy currents may cause severe image distortions and signal loss, especially with the large prepolarizing coils designed for in vivo imaging. We derive a theory of eddy currents in thin conducting structures and enclosures to provide intuitive understanding and efficient computations. We present detailed measurements of the eddy-current patterns and their time evolution in a previous-generation shielded room. The analysis led to the design and construction of a new shielded room with symmetrically placed 1.6-mm-thick aluminum sheets that were weakly coupled electrically. The currents flowing around the entire room were heavily damped, resulting in a decay time constant of about 6 ms for both the measured and computed field transients. The measured eddy-current vector maps were in excellent agreement with predictions based on the theory, suggesting that both the experimental methods and the theory were successful and could be applied to a wide variety of thin conducting structures. PMID:24753629

  20. Thermal conductivity measurements via time-domain thermoreflectance for the characterization of radiation induced damage

    DOE PAGES

    Cheaito, Ramez; Gorham, Caroline S.; Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA; Misra, Amit; Hattar, Khalid; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2015-05-01

    The progressive build up of displacement damage and fission products inside different systems and components of a nuclear reactor can lead to significant defect formation, degradation, and damage of the constituent materials. This structural modification can highly influence the thermal transport mechanisms and various mechanical properties of solids. In this paper we demonstrate the use of time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR), a non-destructive method capable of measuring the thermal transport in material systems from nano to bulk scales, to study the effect of radiation damage and the subsequent changes in the thermal properties of materials. We use TDTR to show that displacementmore » damage from ion irradiation can significantly reduce the thermal conductivity of Optimized ZIRLO, a material used as fuel cladding in several current nuclear reactors. We find that the thermal conductivity of copper-niobium nanostructured multilayers does not change with helium ion irradiation doses of up to 1015 cm-2 and ion energy of 200 keV suggesting that these structures can be used and radiation tolerant materials in nuclear reactors. We compare the effect of ion doses and ion beam energies on the measured thermal conductivity of bulk silicon. Results demonstrate that TDTR thermal measurements can be used to quantify depth dependent damage.« less

  1. On-chip electrochemical microsystems for measurements of copper and conductivity in artificial seawater.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Grégoire; Moujahid, Waleed; Twomey, Karen; Lyons, Conor; Ogurtsov, Vladimir I

    2013-11-15

    The fabrication and characterisation of microelectrochemical sensors for Cu(2+) and conductivity suitable for operation in the marine environment are presented. The impact of the designs on sensor performance and their adequacy to operate in real conditions are discussed. The sensors, tailored to voltammetric and impedimetric measurements, are fabricated on silicon using photolithographic and thin film deposition techniques. The impedimetric sensor is made of Pt interdigitated electrodes which are used for the measurement of conductivity. The voltammetric sensors are based on a three electrode electrochemical cell with on-chip Ag|AgCl reference and Pt counter and working electrodes, used for detection of copper by underpotential deposition-stripping voltammetry at microelectrode array. The sensors operated in the Cu(2+) concentrations ranging from 0.48 to 3.97 µM with a limit of detection of 0.115 μM. The impact of the temperature, the pH and the salinity of the artificial seawater on the sensitivity for Cu(2+) detection are also considered. Measurements of copper concentration and conductivity are validated using certified reference materials and standard solutions.

  2. Uncertainty evaluation in the measurement of power frequency electric and magnetic fields from AC overhead power lines.

    PubMed

    Ztoupis, I N; Gonos, I F; Stathopulos, I A

    2013-11-01

    Measurements of power frequency electric and magnetic fields from alternating current power lines are carried out in order to evaluate the exposure levels of the human body on the general public. For any electromagnetic field measurement, it is necessary to define the sources of measurement uncertainty and determine the total measurement uncertainty. This paper is concerned with the problems of measurement uncertainty estimation, as the measurement uncertainty budget calculation techniques recommended in standardising documents and research studies are barely described. In this work the total uncertainty of power frequency field measurements near power lines in various measurement sites is assessed by considering not only all available equipment data, but also contributions that depend on the measurement procedures, environmental conditions and characteristics of the field source, which are considered to increase the error of measurement. A detailed application example for power frequency field measurements is presented here by accredited laboratory.

  3. Time-domain reflectometry: Simultaneous measurement of soil water content and electrical conductivity with a single probe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalton, F.N.; Herkelrath, W.N.; Rawlins, D.S.; Rhoades, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    Two parallel metallic rods were used as a wave guide to measure the dielectric constant and electrical conductivity of soils having different electrical conductivities but the same water content. Measurements showed that the two parameters were sufficiently independent to permit simultaneous determinations of water content and bulk electrical conductivity.

  4. Getting saturated hydraulic conductivity from surface Ground-Penetrating Radar measurements inside a ring infiltrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leger, E.; Saintenoy, A.; Coquet, Y.

    2013-12-01

    fixed time steps, during an infiltration of 5 cm of water, inside a ring infiltrometer. We used the ring to demarcate the infiltration area, and to create reflexions at known depths. GPR reflexions coming from the wetting front as well as the buried edges of the cylinder were recorded. Modeling of the infiltration were made using SWMS-2D, GPR data of the infiltration were computed using GprMax suite programs. We generated 2D water content profiles associated with a saturated hydraulic conductivity value, at each experimental time step with SWMS-2D. Then we convert those profiles to 2D permittivity profiles using the Complex Refractive Index Method relation, to compute the reflexion time of the wetting front. We found the saturated hydraulic conductivity of soil by minimizing the differences between experimental and simulated data. Our retrieved saturated hydraulic conductivity from GPR data was compared to disk infiltrometer measurements.

  5. Fluid flow volume measurements using a capacitance/conductance probe system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, T. X.; Arndt, G. D.; Carl, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    A probe system has been developed to measure the flow volume of a single fluid passing through an orifice or flow line. The system employs both capacitance and a conductance probe at the orifice, together with phase detection and data acquisition circuitry to measure flow volume and salinity under low or zero gravity conditions. A wide variety of frequencies can be used for the radio frequency (RF) signal source which is chosen primarily by the capacitance of the orifice probe and the fluid passing through the orifice. Rapid measurements are made using the reflected signal from the orifice probe to determine the 'instantaneous' permittivity of the fluid/gas mixture passing through. The 'instantaneous' measurements are integrated over time to determine flow volume. Analysis reveals that a narrow orifice helps to reduce non-linearities caused by differing flow rates. The geometry of 'deflectors' and 'directors' for the flowing fluid are important in obtaining linearity. Measured data shows that a volume measurement accuracy of approximately four percent can be consistently achieved. The prototype hardware system and associated software have been optimized and are available for further applications. The system has immediate application in low or zero gravity environments for measurements of urine or other liquid volumes.

  6. In-situ measurement of the temporal evolution of the thermal conductivity of alpine snow layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, S.; Domine, F.; Arnaud, L.; Picard, G.; Jacobi, H.; Willemet, J.

    2009-12-01

    We report on a 3-months long time series of in-situ measurements of the thermal conductivity (kT) of snow in 6 different layers in an alpine snowpack in the Mont-Blanc moutain range, France, at an altitude of 2400 m. Automatic measurements were carried out every two days using the heated-needle probe technique. Results show consistent patterns of thermal conductivity increase throughout the measurements campaign. The temporal rate of change of kTvaries up to 0.01 W m-1 K-1 dy-1, with maximum values just after snowfall. Temporal rates of kTincrease are compared with results from laboratory experiments under controlled conditions and with published theoretical assessments. A case where kT decreased over time in a given snow layer was documented both in the field and in the laboratory. Possible reasons for such a behaviour are discussed. A cursory comparison of the field measured kTvalues with the prediction of the snowpack model CROCUS shows that at first order the model performs satisfactorily. However, a quantitative understanding and modeling of the variations of kT over time would require an in-depth assessment of physical processes occurring during snow metamorphism.

  7. Automated Dual-Head Infiltrometer for Measuring Field Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity (Kfs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Leonardo; Cobos, Doug; Campbell, Gaylon

    2016-04-01

    Traditional methods for determining field saturated hydraulic conductivity (Kfs) based on infiltration measurements require numerous factors to correct for three-dimensional flow. Analysis for determining Kfs employs numerically determined shape factors for ring radius, depth of ring insertion, ponding depth, and soil hydraulic properties. The correction factors for soil hydraulic properties are typically taken from a table based on soil capillary length. Significant error can occur in the calculation of Kfs when the correction factor is large and infiltration is low. Using a dual-head infiltration measurement and methods proposed by Reynolds and Elrick (1990) for analysis of steady flow from a ponded infiltration in a single ring, we can reduce the error by eliminating the need to use soil capillary length as a correction factor in analysis. This method has traditionally required constant monitoring and user intervention to change the water levels and can take hours to complete a single measurement. There is also a lag time after changing the water head setting, especially in low conductivity soils. An automated infiltrometer capable of producing variable hydraulic head conditions without actually varying the water depth has been developed in our lab. The infiltrometer has been used successfully to determine Kfs under field conditions and shows great promise to be an easy to use, accurate tool for measuring Kfs.

  8. Thermal conductivity measurements of high and low thermal conductivity films using a scanning hot probe method in the 3ω mode and novel calibration strategies.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Adam A; Muñoz Rojo, Miguel; Abad, Begoña; Perez, Jaime Andrés; Maiz, Jon; Schomacker, Jason; Martín-Gonzalez, Marisol; Borca-Tasciuc, Diana-Andra; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian

    2015-10-01

    This work discusses measurement of thermal conductivity (k) of films using a scanning hot probe method in the 3ω mode and investigates the calibration of thermal contact parameters, specifically the thermal contact resistance (R(th)C) and thermal exchange radius (b) using reference samples with different thermal conductivities. R(th)C and b were found to have constant values (with b = 2.8 ± 0.3 μm and R(th)C = 44,927 ± 7820 K W(-1)) for samples with thermal conductivity values ranging from 0.36 W K(-1) m(-1) to 1.1 W K(-1) m(-1). An independent strategy for the calibration of contact parameters was developed and validated for samples in this range of thermal conductivity, using a reference sample with a previously measured Seebeck coefficient and thermal conductivity. The results were found to agree with the calibration performed using multiple samples of known thermal conductivity between 0.36 and 1.1 W K(-1) m(-1). However, for samples in the range between 16.2 W K(-1) m(-1) and 53.7 W K(-1) m(-1), calibration experiments showed the contact parameters to have considerably different values: R(th)C = 40,191 ± 1532 K W(-1) and b = 428 ± 24 nm. Finally, this work demonstrates that using these calibration procedures, measurements of both highly conductive and thermally insulating films on substrates can be performed, as the measured values obtained were within 1-20% (for low k) and 5-31% (for high k) of independent measurements and/or literature reports. Thermal conductivity results are presented for a SiGe film on a glass substrate, Te film on a glass substrate, polymer films (doped with Fe nano-particles and undoped) on a glass substrate, and Au film on a Si substrate. PMID:26335503

  9. Thermal conductivity measurements of high and low thermal conductivity films using a scanning hot probe method in the 3ω mode and novel calibration strategies.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Adam A; Muñoz Rojo, Miguel; Abad, Begoña; Perez, Jaime Andrés; Maiz, Jon; Schomacker, Jason; Martín-Gonzalez, Marisol; Borca-Tasciuc, Diana-Andra; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian

    2015-10-01

    This work discusses measurement of thermal conductivity (k) of films using a scanning hot probe method in the 3ω mode and investigates the calibration of thermal contact parameters, specifically the thermal contact resistance (R(th)C) and thermal exchange radius (b) using reference samples with different thermal conductivities. R(th)C and b were found to have constant values (with b = 2.8 ± 0.3 μm and R(th)C = 44,927 ± 7820 K W(-1)) for samples with thermal conductivity values ranging from 0.36 W K(-1) m(-1) to 1.1 W K(-1) m(-1). An independent strategy for the calibration of contact parameters was developed and validated for samples in this range of thermal conductivity, using a reference sample with a previously measured Seebeck coefficient and thermal conductivity. The results were found to agree with the calibration performed using multiple samples of known thermal conductivity between 0.36 and 1.1 W K(-1) m(-1). However, for samples in the range between 16.2 W K(-1) m(-1) and 53.7 W K(-1) m(-1), calibration experiments showed the contact parameters to have considerably different values: R(th)C = 40,191 ± 1532 K W(-1) and b = 428 ± 24 nm. Finally, this work demonstrates that using these calibration procedures, measurements of both highly conductive and thermally insulating films on substrates can be performed, as the measured values obtained were within 1-20% (for low k) and 5-31% (for high k) of independent measurements and/or literature reports. Thermal conductivity results are presented for a SiGe film on a glass substrate, Te film on a glass substrate, polymer films (doped with Fe nano-particles and undoped) on a glass substrate, and Au film on a Si substrate.

  10. Determination of water saturation using gas phase partitioning tracers and time-lapse electrical conductivity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Oostrom, Martinus; Truex, Michael J.; Thomle, Jonathan N.; Wietsma, Thomas W.

    2013-05-21

    Water saturation is an important indicator of contaminant distribution and plays a governing role in contaminant transport within the vadose zone. Understanding the water saturation distribution is critical for both remediation and contaminant flux monitoring in unsaturated environments. In this work we propose and demonstrate a method of remotely determining water saturation levels using gas phase partitioning tracers and time-lapse bulk electrical conductivity measurements. The theoretical development includes the partitioning chemistry for the tracers we demonstrate (ammonia and carbon dioxide), as well as a review of the petrophysical relationship governing how these tracers influence bulk conductivity. We also investigate methods of utilizing secondary information provided by electrical conductivity breakthrough magnitudes induced by the tracers. We test the method on clean, well characterized, intermediate-scale sand columns under controlled conditions. Results demonstrate the capability to predict partitioning coefficients and accurately monitor gas breakthrough curves along the length of the column according to the corresponding electrical conductivity response, leading to accurate water saturation estimates. This work is motivated by the need to develop effective characterization and monitoring techniques for contaminated deep vadose zone environments, and provides a proof-of-concept toward uniquely characterizing and monitoring water saturation levels at the field scale and in three-dimensions using electrical resistivity tomography.

  11. Integrating Multiple Scales of Hydraulic Conductivity Measurements in Training Image-Based Stochastic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmud, K.; Mariethoz, G.; Baker, A.

    2013-12-01

    It has been widely demonstrated that the hydraulic conductivity of an aquifer increases with a larger portion of the aquifer tested. This poses a challenge when different hydraulic conductivity measurements coexist in a field study and have to be integrated simultaneously (e.g. core analysis, slug tests and well tests). While the scaling of hydraulic conductivity can be analytically derived in multiGaussian media, there is no general methodology to simultaneously integrate hydraulic conductivity measurements taken at different scales in highly heterogeneous media. Here we address this issue in the context of multiple-point statistics simulations (MPS). In MPS, the spatial continuity is based on a training image (TI) that contains the variability, connectivity, and structural properties of the medium. The key principle of our methodology is to consider the different scales of hydraulic conductivity as joint variables which are simulated together. Based on a TI that represents the fine-scale spatial variability, we use a classical upscaling method to obtain a series of upscaled TIs that correspond to the different scales at which measurements are available. In our case, the renormalization method is used for this upscaling step, but any upscaling method could be employed. Considered together, the different scales obtained are considered a single multi-scale representation of the initial TI, in a similar fashion as the multiscale pyramids used in image processing. We then use recent MPS simulation methods that allow dealing with multivariate TIs to generate conditional realizations of the different scales together. One characteristic of these realizations is that the possible non-linear relationships between the different simulated scales are statistically similar to the relationships observed in the multiscale TI. Therefore these relationships are considered a reasonable approximation of the renormalization results that were used on the TI. Another characteristic of

  12. Electrical Conductivity of Organic and Inorganic Nanowires Measured by Multi-probe Scanning Tunneling Microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aono, Masakazu

    2006-03-01

    Since 1998 [1], the authors and co-workers have developed multi-probe scanning tunneling microscopes (MPSTMs), in which two, three or four probes are operated independently. All probes of the MPSTMs can observe STM images independently, but the main role of the multiple probes is to be used as nanoscale electrodes that can contact any points selected in an observed STM image. It is therefore possible to measure electrical conductivity at the nanoscale through the multiple probes. By using MPSTMs and related methods, we measured the electrical conductivity of organic and inorganic nanowires, i.e., single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), erbium disilicide (ErSi2) metallic nanowires, and single polydiacetylene (PDA) molecular wires. For a SWCNT and an ErSi2 nanowire, ballistic conduction was observed at lengths less than about 500 and 20 nm, respectively, at room temperature. For a PDA molecular wire, polaron formation due to charge injection caused by applying a voltage to an STM tip placed close to the PDA molecular wire was observed, and when the voltage exceeded a critical value, the PDA molecular wire changed into a metallic state. [1] M. Aono, C.-S. Jiang, T. Nakayama, T. Okuda, S. Qiao, M. Sakurai, C. Thirstrup, Z.-H. Wu: Oyo Buturi (Applied Physics) 67, 1361 (1998) (in Japanese); A brief English abstract is available on INSPEC.

  13. Process control of laser conduction welding by thermal imaging measurement with a color camera.

    PubMed

    Bardin, Fabrice; Morgan, Stephen; Williams, Stewart; McBride, Roy; Moore, Andrew J; Jones, Julian D C; Hand, Duncan P

    2005-11-10

    Conduction welding offers an alternative to keyhole welding. Compared with keyhole welding, it is an intrinsically stable process because vaporization phenomena are minimal. However, as with keyhole welding, an on-line process-monitoring system is advantageous for quality assurance to maintain the required penetration depth, which in conduction welding is more sensitive to changes in heat sinking. The maximum penetration is obtained when the surface temperature is just below the boiling point, and so we normally wish to maintain the temperature at this level. We describe a two-color optical system that we have developed for real-time temperature profile measurement of the conduction weld pool. The key feature of the system is the use of a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor standard color camera leading to a simplified low-cost optical setup. We present and discuss the real-time temperature measurement and control performance of the system when a defocused beam from a high power Nd:YAG laser is used on 5 mm thick stainless steel workpieces.

  14. UNSATURATED FLOW IN A CENTRIFUGAL FIELD: MEASUREMENT OF HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY AND TESTING OF DARCY'S LAW.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimmo, J.R.; Rubin, J.; Hammermeister, D.P.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been developed to establish steady flow of water in unsaturated soil sample spinning in a centrifuge. Theoretical analysis predicts moisture conditions in the sample that depend strongly on soil type and certain operating parameter. For Oakley sand, measurements of flux, water content, and matric potential during and after centrifugation verify that steady state flow can be achieved. Experiments have confirmed the theoretical prediction of a nearly uniform moisture distribution for this medium and have demonstrated that the flow can be effectively one-dimensional. The method was used for steady state measurements of hydraulic conductivity K for relatively dry soil, giving values at low as 7. 6 multiplied by 10** minus **1**1 m/s with data obtained in a few hours. Darcy's law was tested by measuring K for different centrifugal driving forces but with the same water content.

  15. G-300: The first French Getaway Special microgravity measurements of fluid thermal conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perron, J. C.; Chretien, P.; Garnier, C.; Lecaude, N.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal conductivity measurements on liquids are difficult to perform on Earth because of thermal motions due to convection. In microgravity, the convection due to buoyancy is evanescent, and a strong reduction of Rayleigh and Nusselt numbers can be expected. Three low viscosity liquids are selected to carry out the measurements; distilled water (standard) and two silicone oils. A modified hot plate method with a simplified guard ring is used; the reduction of convective motions permitted the use in the experimental cells of larger interplate distances and/or temperature differences than in Earth measurements, improving the accuracy. Comparisons between Earth and orbit results may help to understand the convection occurrence in the cells. Thermal, vibrational, and EMI tests have proved that the design satisfies the NASA requirements.

  16. G-300: The first French Getaway Special microgravity measurements of fluid thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perron, J. C.; Chretien, P.; Garnier, C.; Lecaude, N.

    1987-02-01

    Thermal conductivity measurements on liquids are difficult to perform on Earth because of thermal motions due to convection. In microgravity, the convection due to buoyancy is evanescent, and a strong reduction of Rayleigh and Nusselt numbers can be expected. Three low viscosity liquids are selected to carry out the measurements; distilled water (standard) and two silicone oils. A modified hot plate method with a simplified guard ring is used; the reduction of convective motions permitted the use in the experimental cells of larger interplate distances and/or temperature differences than in Earth measurements, improving the accuracy. Comparisons between Earth and orbit results may help to understand the convection occurrence in the cells. Thermal, vibrational, and EMI tests have proved that the design satisfies the NASA requirements.

  17. An apparatus for measurements of thermal conductivity and thermal expansion based on GM cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huiming; Xu, Dong; Xu, Peng; Huang, Rongjin; Xu, Xiangdong; Li, Laifeng; Gong, Linghui

    2012-12-01

    The thermophysical properties of matters are extremely important for engineering and materials science. This paper describes a multifunctional apparatus based on GM cryocooler for measurement of thermal conductivity and thermal expansion via steady-state longitudinal heat flow method and strain gauge technique respectively. The apparatus consists of a removable sample test rod on which bulk samples can easily be mounted and placed in the measurement device. Besides, the sample holder is easy to be replaced so that it suits various needs. All measurements are efficiently and accurately carried out at different temperatures by following a set of stability criteria the setup of the apparatus has been calibrated with sample stainless steel and copper, which gives an error within 6% around the published results in the literatures.

  18. Critical Review of Industrial Techniques for Thermal-Conductivity Measurements of Thermal Insulation Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerschmidt, Ulf; Hameury, Jacques; Strnad, Radek; Turzó-Andras, Emese; Wu, Jiyu

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a critical review of current industrial techniques and instruments to measure the thermal conductivity of thermal insulation materials, especially those insulations that can operate at temperatures above and up to . These materials generally are of a porous nature. The measuring instruments dealt with here are selected based on their maximum working temperature that should be higher than at least . These instruments are special types of the guarded hot-plate apparatus, the guarded heat-flow meter, the transient hot-wire and hot-plane instruments as well as the laser/xenon flash devices. All technical characteristics listed are quoted from the generally accessible information of the relevant manufacturers. The paper includes rankings of the instruments according to their standard retail price, the maximum sample size, and maximum working temperature, as well as the minimum in their measurement range.

  19. Measurement of the conductance properties of single organic molecules using gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordin, Yoav

    In this work we describe the development and application of a new method for the electrical conductance measurement of single molecules. The issue of reliable theoretical modeling of molecular electronic transport is still very much in debate. The experimental methods used in the field are difficult to realize and interpret; most have very low yield, preventing proper statistical analysis and many have problems in the researchers' ability to characterize the system properly. We address this issue by using self assembly of gold nanoparticle-molecule-gold nanoparticle objects called dimers. This method allows fabrication of molecular junctions with greater ease; moreover it allows individual characterization of the various elements of the junction, removing much of the uncertainties that exist in this kind of measurements. We make use of home grown gold nanoparticles with a few tens of nanometer diameter to form the hybrid dimers. The dimers are large enough to connect between electrodes fabricated using electron beam lithography and to measure the electric properties of the molecule. We have invested significant effort in the characterization of the system, ensuring that the dimers are indeed bridged by the molecules, and that the chances that more than a single molecule exists in a dimer are negligibly small. We have made measurements on single gold nanoparticles, to characterize their properties separately from those of the molecule. These measurements have allowed us to observe single electron transistor (SET) behavior, resulting from the requirement that electrons charge the nanoparticle during transport. We have shown that the energy associated with this charging scales with nanoparticle size as expected. We have performed measurements on single organic molecules, showing that there is a very strong influence of molecular conjugation (the way electronic orbitals are spread along the molecular backbone) on its conductance. The molecules with broken conjugation

  20. Repeatability and Reproducibility of Compression Strength Measurements Conducted According to ASTM E9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luecke, William E.; Ma, Li; Graham, Stephen M.; Adler, Matthew A.

    2010-01-01

    Ten commercial laboratories participated in an interlaboratory study to establish the repeatability and reproducibility of compression strength tests conducted according to ASTM International Standard Test Method E9. The test employed a cylindrical aluminum AA2024-T351 test specimen. Participants measured elastic modulus and 0.2 % offset yield strength, YS(0.2 % offset), using an extensometer attached to the specimen. The repeatability and reproducibility of the yield strength measurement, expressed as coefficient of variations were cv(sub r)= 0.011 and cv(sub R)= 0.020 The reproducibility of the test across the laboratories was among the best that has been reported for uniaxial tests. The reported data indicated that using diametrically opposed extensometers, instead of a single extensometer doubled the precision of the test method. Laboratories that did not lubricate the ends of the specimen measured yield stresses and elastic moduli that were smaller than those measured in laboratories that lubricated the specimen ends. A finite element analysis of the test specimen deformation for frictionless and perfect friction could not explain the discrepancy, however. The modulus measured from stress-strain data were reanalyzed using a technique that finds the optimal fit range, and applies several quality checks to the data. The error in modulus measurements from stress-strain curves generally increased as the fit range decreased to less than 40 % of the stress range.

  1. Separation of conductivity and distance measurements for eddy current nondestructive inspection of graphite composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, Isabelle; Placko, Dominique

    1993-06-01

    This article deals with the study of a process based on the principle of eddy current sensors for the nondestructive evaluation of graphite composite plates. This research has been carried out in the Laboratoire d'Electricitd Signaux et Robotique by the team working on datacollecting sensors for robotics in collaboration with Aerospatiale. Eddy current sensors are characterized by their impedance, which varies when a conducting material is approached in their sensitive area. For a given sensor, the output signal depends directly on the electrical and geometrical properties of the object. In the case discussed here, the interesting data are the distance between the sensor and the object, and its local conductivity. In order to invert the relationships between the sensor signal and the properties of the material, an external parametrical model has been developed. A scanning of the surface with a sensor designed for good spatial resolution measurements gives two accurate maps of the useful data.

  2. Measuring the Complex Optical Conductivity of Graphene by Fabry-Pérot Reflectance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ghamsari, Behnood G.; Tosado, Jacob; Yamamoto, Mahito; Fuhrer, Michael S.; Anlage, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    We have experimentally studied the dispersion of optical conductivity in few-layer graphene through reflection spectroscopy at visible wavelengths. A laser scanning microscope (LSM) with a supercontinuum laser source measured the frequency dependence of the reflectance of exfoliated graphene flakes, including monolayer, bilayer and trilayer graphene, loaded on a Si/SiO2 Fabry-Pérot resonator in the 545–700 nm range. The complex refractive index of few-layer graphene, n − ik, was extracted from the reflectance contrast to the bare substrate. It was found that each few-layer graphene possesses a unique dispersionless optical index. This feature indicates that the optical conductivity does not simply scale with the number of layers, and that inter-layer electrodynamics are significant at visible energies. PMID:27682974

  3. Study on the response of the full-bore conductance sensor for water cut measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ronghua; Liu, Xingbin; Hu, Jinhai; Dai, Xuefei; Shan, Fujun; Xu, Wenfeng

    2009-02-01

    This paper has proposed a new structure of full-bore conductance sensor, which is designed for measuring water cut of the oil-water two-phase flow. The structure of the full-bore conductance sensor and the measurement principle are introduced in the paper. The mental ring-shaped electrode is mounted on the outside wall of the cylindrical insulation body. When the electrode is provided with constant current, according to the electrical theory, the electrode generates a voltage, the value of which is inversely proportional to the conductivity of fluid flowing between the sensor and the casing. The electrostatic field simulations of the sensor are accomplished by using ANSYS software. The results of the potential distribution simulation show that the potential decays quickly from the electrode along r direction (radial) and z direction (axial)to both sides, and the potential only distributes in a very narrow area near the electrode. A series of static experiments on the sensor are carried out in laboratory. The experiment results agree with the simulation results. In radial direction, the closer the rod is to the sensor, the more sensitive the sensor becomes and the greater the relative response becomes. In axial direction, the electrode only responds in a certain region on both sides of the electrode and decays rapidly from the electrode to both sides. And the salinity experiment is conducted in salt solution (3000 ppm), which shows that within the allowable range of experiment error, there is no effect of salinity on the sensor response. response.

  4. Measurement of thermal boundary conductance at sintered Si-Si interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Masanori; Hori, Takuma; Oyake, Takafumi; Maire, Jeremie; Nomura, Masahiro; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2015-03-01

    Performance of thermoelectric materials is enhanced by reducing thermal conductivity (TC) without appreciably decreasing electrical properties. Recently, nanocrystalline formed by compaction of nanopowder by sintering has been shown to be a promising solution for low TC and high scalability However, little is known about the thermal boundary conductance (TBC) of the grain boundaries, which dominantly affect the TC, because of the difficulty to directly measure the TBC of the local boundaries. We have therefore developed a process to fabricate a highly planer and uniform bonded-interface between Si thin film and Si substrate, which is suitable for measuring the TBC of the interfaces with time-domain thermoreflectance method. We have found that sintering temperature and HF removal of native oxide on the wafers can change the interface structures from uniform to local SiOx structures, which alter the TBC from 0.1 to 1 GWm-2K-1 order. Moreover, crystal orientation mismatch can change the TBC by several times. Together with theoretical calculation that relates the TBC and TC of nanocrystalline Si, the measurement results identify the route to reduce the TC less than the state-of-art value. This research is partially supported by KAKENHI 2679009.

  5. Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM): from measuring cell mechanical properties to guiding neuron growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrino, Mario; Orsini, Paolo; Pellegrini, Monica; Tognoni, Elisabetta; Ascoli, Cesare; Baschieri, Paolo; Dinelli, Franco

    2013-04-01

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is a type of scanning probe microscopy based on the continuous measurement of an ion current flowing through a pipette filled with an electrolyte solution, while the pipette apex approaches a non-conductive sample. This technique can be operated in environmental conditions such as those of cell cultures and does not require a direct contact between probe and sample. It is therefore particularly suitable for the investigation of living specimens. SICM was initially proposed as an instrument that could obtain topographic 3D images with high resolution. Later, simple modifications have been devised to apply a mechanical stimulus to the specimen via a solution flux coming out from the pipette aperture. This modified setup has been employed to measure cell membrane elasticity and to guide the growth cones of neurons for tens of micrometers, by means of repeated non-contact scanning. Both these applications require an accurate measurement of the mechanical forces acting on the cell surface, which can be obtained by combining SICM, Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and inverted optical microscopy in the same apparatus. In this configuration, a SICM pipette is approached to an AFM cantilever while monitoring the cantilever deflection as a function of the pressure applied to the pipette and the relative distance. In addition, the pipette aperture can be imaged in situ by exploiting the AFM operation, so that all the experimental parameters can be effectively controlled in the investigation of pressure effects on living cells.

  6. AC magnetic measurement of LiFeAs at pressures up to 5.2 GPa: The relation between T c and the structural parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Yamaguchi, Nobuhiro; Mito, Masaki; Deguchi, Hiroyuki; Baker, Peter. J.; Blundell, Stephen. J.; Pitcher, Michael. J.; Parker, Dinah. R.; Clarke, Simon. J.

    2013-08-01

    The pressure effects on the 111-type Fe-based superconductor LiFeAs were investigated through AC susceptibility measurements and X-ray diffraction experiments, and revealed a correlation between the superconducting transition temperature ( T c ) and the As-Fe-As bond angle ( α) rather than the height of As from the Fe layers ( h As). As the pressure was increased, T c of 17 K at P = 0 GPa decreased down to 10 K at P = 5.2 GPa. According to a previous report from an X-ray diffraction experiment, α changes from 101.5° at 0 GPa to 97.8° at 17 GPa. The obtained change in T c is consistent with Lee et al.'s plot of T c as a function of α, and from this result, we conclude that T c will fall to zero at around α = 98°.

  7. Mind the bubbles: achieving stable measurements of maximum hydraulic conductivity through woody plant samples

    PubMed Central

    Espino, Susana; Schenk, H. Jochen

    2011-01-01

    The maximum specific hydraulic conductivity (kmax) of a plant sample is a measure of the ability of a plants’ vascular system to transport water and dissolved nutrients under optimum conditions. Precise measurements of kmax are needed in comparative studies of hydraulic conductivity, as well as for measuring the formation and repair of xylem embolisms. Unstable measurements of kmax are a common problem when measuring woody plant samples and it is commonly observed that kmax declines from initially high values, especially when positive water pressure is used to flush out embolisms. This study was designed to test five hypotheses that could potentially explain declines in kmax under positive pressure: (i) non-steady-state flow; (ii) swelling of pectin hydrogels in inter-vessel pit membranes; (iii) nucleation and coalescence of bubbles at constrictions in the xylem; (iv) physiological wounding responses; and (v) passive wounding responses, such as clogging of the xylem by debris. Prehydrated woody stems from Laurus nobilis (Lauraceae) and Encelia farinosa (Asteraceae) collected from plants grown in the Fullerton Arboretum in Southern California, were used to test these hypotheses using a xylem embolism meter (XYL'EM). Treatments included simultaneous measurements of stem inflow and outflow, enzyme inhibitors, stem-debarking, low water temperatures, different water degassing techniques, and varied concentrations of calcium, potassium, magnesium, and copper salts in aqueous measurement solutions. Stable measurements of kmax were observed at concentrations of calcium, potassium, and magnesium salts high enough to suppress bubble coalescence, as well as with deionized water that was degassed using a membrane contactor under strong vacuum. Bubble formation and coalescence under positive pressure in the xylem therefore appear to be the main cause for declining kmax values. Our findings suggest that degassing of water is essential for achieving stable and precise

  8. Mind the bubbles: achieving stable measurements of maximum hydraulic conductivity through woody plant samples.

    PubMed

    Espino, Susana; Schenk, H Jochen

    2011-01-01

    The maximum specific hydraulic conductivity (k(max)) of a plant sample is a measure of the ability of a plants' vascular system to transport water and dissolved nutrients under optimum conditions. Precise measurements of k(max) are needed in comparative studies of hydraulic conductivity, as well as for measuring the formation and repair of xylem embolisms. Unstable measurements of k(max) are a common problem when measuring woody plant samples and it is commonly observed that k(max) declines from initially high values, especially when positive water pressure is used to flush out embolisms. This study was designed to test five hypotheses that could potentially explain declines in k(max) under positive pressure: (i) non-steady-state flow; (ii) swelling of pectin hydrogels in inter-vessel pit membranes; (iii) nucleation and coalescence of bubbles at constrictions in the xylem; (iv) physiological wounding responses; and (v) passive wounding responses, such as clogging of the xylem by debris. Prehydrated woody stems from Laurus nobilis (Lauraceae) and Encelia farinosa (Asteraceae) collected from plants grown in the Fullerton Arboretum in Southern California, were used to test these hypotheses using a xylem embolism meter (XYL'EM). Treatments included simultaneous measurements of stem inflow and outflow, enzyme inhibitors, stem-debarking, low water temperatures, different water degassing techniques, and varied concentrations of calcium, potassium, magnesium, and copper salts in aqueous measurement solutions. Stable measurements of k(max) were observed at concentrations of calcium, potassium, and magnesium salts high enough to suppress bubble coalescence, as well as with deionized water that was degassed using a membrane contactor under strong vacuum. Bubble formation and coalescence under positive pressure in the xylem therefore appear to be the main cause for declining k(max) values. Our findings suggest that degassing of water is essential for achieving stable and

  9. Indirect measurements of field-scale hydraulic conductivity of waste from two landfill sites.

    PubMed

    Fleming, I R

    2011-12-01

    Management and prediction of the movement and distribution of fluids in large landfills is important for various reasons. Bioreactor landfill technology shows promise, but in arid or semi-arid regions, the natural content of landfilled waste may be low, thus requiring addition of significant volumes of water. In more humid locations, landfills can become saturated, flooding gas collection systems and causing sideslope leachate seeps or other undesirable occurrences. This paper compares results from two different approaches to monitoring water in waste. At the Brock West Landfill in eastern Canada, positive pore pressures were measured at various depths in saturated waste. The downward seepage flux through the waste is known, thus the vertical saturated hydraulic conductivity of the waste at this landfill was determined to be 3 × 10(-7)cm/s. By comparison, the Spadina Landfill in western Canada is predominantly unsaturated. The infiltration of moisture into the waste was measured using moisture sensors installed in boreholes which determined arrival time for moisture fronts resulting from major precipitation events as well as longer-term change in moisture content resulting from unsaturated drainage during winter when frozen ground prevented infiltration. The unsaturated hydraulic conductivity calculated from these data ranged from approximately 10(-6)cm/s for the slow winter drainage in the absence of significant recharge to 10(-2)cm/s or higher for shallow waste subject to high infiltration through apparent preferential pathways. These two very different approaches to field-scale measurements of vertical hydraulic conductivity provide insight into the nature of fluid movement in saturated and unsaturated waste masses. It is suggested that the principles of unsaturated seepage apply reasonably well for landfilled waste and that the hydraulic behavior of waste is profoundly influenced by the nature and size of voids and by the degree of saturation prevailing in the

  10. Humidity sensing of an epoxy/MWCNT composite by electrical conductivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neitzert, Heinz C.; Sorrentino, Andrea; Vertuccio, Luigi

    2013-05-01

    An epoxy/CNT composite material with a low concentration of multiwall carbon nanotubes (0.5wt%) in a diglycidilether bisphenol-A based epoxy matrix has been shown to be applicable, when maintained at a constant temperature, as humidity sensing element. An almost linear decrease of the electrical conductivity with increase of the sample humidity has been measured. The investigated samples with vaporated gold contacts exhibited a perfect ohmic behavior and an excellent long-term stability, even after prolonged immersion of the sample into distilled water.

  11. Factor of 2 error in balloon-borne atmospheric conduction current measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Few, A. A.; Weinheimer, A. J.

    1986-01-01

    An exact expression is derived for the atmospheric current to a prolate spheroidal antenna. The effective collection area is considered, obtaining a solution for a spherical antenna and the vertical wire antenna. A factor of two error in the studies of the effective area of an antenna of arbitrary geometry by Kasemir and Ruhnke (1958) and Ogawa (1973) is discussed. The effects of the instrument-atmospheric interaction as they apply to the atmospheric conduction current measurement are considered. Electric field enhancement factors for spheroids and approximate solutions for spheroids and other elongated objects are given.

  12. Inversion layer on the Ge(001) surface from the four-probe conductance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtaszek, Mateusz; Lis, Jakub Zuzak, Rafal; Such, Bartosz; Szymonski, Marek

    2014-07-28

    We report four-probe conductance measurements with sub-micron resolution on atomically clean Ge(001) surfaces. A qualitative difference between n-type and p-type crystals is observed. The scaling behavior of the resistance on n-type samples indicates two-dimensional current flow, while for the p-type crystal a three-dimensional description is appropriate. We interpret this in terms of the formation of an inversion layer at the surface. This result points to the surface states, i.e., dangling bonds, as the driving force behind band bending in germanium. It also explains the intrinsic character of band bending in germanium.

  13. An instrument for spatial conductivity measurements of high Tc superconducting (HTSC) materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vansant, T.

    1991-01-01

    High T(sub c) Superconducting (HTSC) thin films are suggested for use in a number of aerospace applications such as an IR bolometer and as electromagnetic shielding. As part of its flight assurance role, the Materials Branch of the Goddard Space Flight Center has initiated development of an instrument capable of measuring variations in conductivity for flat samples using an eddy current testing device and an X-Y positioning table. This instrument was used to examine bulk HTSC samples. System changes that would enable characterization of thin film materials are discussed.

  14. Noncontact conductivity and dielectric measurement for high throughput roll-to-roll nanomanufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Orloff, Nathan D.; Long, Christian J.; Obrzut, Jan; Maillaud, Laurent; Mirri, Francesca; Kole, Thomas P.; McMichael, Robert D.; Pasquali, Matteo; Stranick, Stephan J.; Alexander Liddle, J.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in roll-to-roll processing of graphene and carbon nanotubes have at last led to the continuous production of high-quality coatings and filaments, ushering in a wave of applications for flexible and wearable electronics, woven fabrics, and wires. These applications often require specific electrical properties, and hence precise control over material micro- and nanostructure. While such control can be achieved, in principle, by closed-loop processing methods, there are relatively few noncontact and nondestructive options for quantifying the electrical properties of materials on a moving web at the speed required in modern nanomanufacturing. Here, we demonstrate a noncontact microwave method for measuring the dielectric constant and conductivity (or geometry for samples of known dielectric properties) of materials in a millisecond. Such measurement times are compatible with current and future industrial needs, enabling real-time materials characterization and in-line control of processing variables without disrupting production. PMID:26592441

  15. Noncontact conductivity and dielectric measurement for high throughput roll-to-roll nanomanufacturing.

    PubMed

    Orloff, Nathan D; Long, Christian J; Obrzut, Jan; Maillaud, Laurent; Mirri, Francesca; Kole, Thomas P; McMichael, Robert D; Pasquali, Matteo; Stranick, Stephan J; Liddle, J Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Advances in roll-to-roll processing of graphene and carbon nanotubes have at last led to the continuous production of high-quality coatings and filaments, ushering in a wave of applications for flexible and wearable electronics, woven fabrics, and wires. These applications often require specific electrical properties, and hence precise control over material micro- and nanostructure. While such control can be achieved, in principle, by closed-loop processing methods, there are relatively few noncontact and nondestructive options for quantifying the electrical properties of materials on a moving web at the speed required in modern nanomanufacturing. Here, we demonstrate a noncontact microwave method for measuring the dielectric constant and conductivity (or geometry for samples of known dielectric properties) of materials in a millisecond. Such measurement times are compatible with current and future industrial needs, enabling real-time materials characterization and in-line control of processing variables without disrupting production. PMID:26592441

  16. Noncontact conductivity and dielectric measurement for high throughput roll-to-roll nanomanufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orloff, Nathan D.; Long, Christian J.; Obrzut, Jan; Maillaud, Laurent; Mirri, Francesca; Kole, Thomas P.; McMichael, Robert D.; Pasquali, Matteo; Stranick, Stephan J.; Alexander Liddle, J.

    2015-11-01

    Advances in roll-to-roll processing of graphene and carbon nanotubes have at last led to the continuous production of high-quality coatings and filaments, ushering in a wave of applications for flexible and wearable electronics, woven fabrics, and wires. These applications often require specific electrical properties, and hence precise control over material micro- and nanostructure. While such control can be achieved, in principle, by closed-loop processing methods, there are relatively few noncontact and nondestructive options for quantifying the electrical properties of materials on a moving web at the speed required in modern nanomanufacturing. Here, we demonstrate a noncontact microwave method for measuring the dielectric constant and conductivity (or geometry for samples of known dielectric properties) of materials in a millisecond. Such measurement times are compatible with current and future industrial needs, enabling real-time materials characterization and in-line control of processing variables without disrupting production.

  17. Scale effect of hydraulic conductivity measurements in Pre-Illinoian and Wisconsinan tills in Iowa

    SciTech Connect

    Bruner, D.R. . Geological Survey Bureau)

    1993-03-01

    Two long-term study sites have been established as the basis for a multi-year study of the hydrogeologic properties of glacial tills in Iowa. One is located in Eastern Iowa in Pre-Illinoian till and has had laboratory permeameter tests conducted on Shelby tube samples, collected during construction of piezometers, from the zone to be screen. These piezometers were used to run bailer tests and perform a pumping test. The other site is located in North-Central Iowa in Wisconsinan till and has piezometers constructed to run bailer and pumping tests. Results from both sites has shown that the bulk hydraulic conductivity increases as larger volumes of till are tested. There is consistently at least one order of magnitude increase between bailer and pumping test results. There is also at least three orders of magnitude increase between laboratory permeameter and pumping test results. A system is proposed to conduct pumping tests using vibrating wire transducers hydraulically pushed into the ground to monitor water levels before, during and after the test, and record the measurements to a datalogger.

  18. Room temperature differential conductance measurements of triethylamine molecules adsorbed on Si(001).

    PubMed

    Naitabdi, Ahmed; Rochet, François; Carniato, Stéphane; Bournel, Fabrice; Gallet, Jean-Jacques

    2016-08-17

    We have measured the differential conductance of the triethylamine molecule (N(CH2CH3)3) adsorbed on Si(001)-2 × 1 at room temperature using scanning tunneling spectroscopy. Triethylamine can be engaged in a dative bonding with a silicon dimer, forming a Si-Si-N(CH2CH3)3 unit. We have examined the datively bonded adduct, either as an isolated molecule, or within an ordered molecular domain (reconstructed 4 × 2). The differential conductance curves, supported by DFT calculations, show that in the explored energy window (±2.5 near the Fermi level) the main features stem from the uncapped dangling bonds of the reacted dimer and of the adjacent unreacted ones that are electronically coupled The formation of a molecular domain, in which one dimer in two is left unreacted, is reflected in a shift of the up dimer atom occupied level away from the Fermi level, likely due to an increased π-bonding strength. In stark contrast with the preceding, pairs of dissociated molecule (a minority species) are electronically decoupled from the dimer dangling bond states. DFT calculation show that the lone-pair of the Si-N(CH2CH3)2 is a shallow level, that is clearly seen in the differential conductance curve. PMID:27499070

  19. Measurement and Simulation of Thermal Conductivity of Hafnium-Aluminum Thermal Neutron Absorber Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillen, Donna Post; Harris, William H.

    2016-09-01

    A metal matrix composite (MMC) material composed of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) intermetallic particles in an aluminum matrix has been identified as a promising material for fast flux irradiation testing applications. This material can filter thermal neutrons while simultaneously providing high rates of conductive cooling for experiment capsules. The purpose of this work is to investigate effects of Hf-Al material composition and neutron irradiation on thermophysical properties, which were measured before and after irradiation. When performing differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) on the irradiated specimens, a large exotherm corresponding to material annealment was observed. Therefore, a test procedure was developed to perform DSC and laser flash analysis (LFA) to obtain the specific heat and thermal diffusivity of pre- and post-annealment specimens. This paper presents the thermal properties for three states of the MMC material: (1) unirradiated, (2) as-irradiated, and (3) irradiated and annealed. Microstructure-property relationships were obtained for the thermal conductivity. These relationships are useful for designing components from this material to operate in irradiation environments. The ability of this material to effectively conduct heat as a function of temperature, volume fraction Al3Hf, radiation damage, and annealing is assessed using the MOOSE suite of computational tools.

  20. Measurements of Prompt Radiation-Induced Conductivity of Pyralux®

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, E. Frederick; Zarick, Thomas Andrew; McLain, Michael Lee; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Preston, Eric F.; Stringer, Thomas Arthur

    2014-01-01

    In this report, measurements of the prompt radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) in 3 mil samples of Pyralux® are presented as a function of dose rate, pulse width, and applied bias. The experiments were conducted with the Medusa linear accelerator (LINAC) located at the Little Mountain Test Facility (LMTF) near Ogden, UT. The nominal electron energy for the LINAC is 20 MeV. Prompt conduction current data were obtained for dose rates ranging from ~2 x 109 rad(Si)/s to ~1.1 x 1011 rad(Si)/s and for nominal pulse widths of 50 ns and 500 ns. At a given dose rate, the applied bias across the samples was stepped between -1500 V and 1500 V. Calculated values of the prompt RIC varied between 1.39x10-8 Ω-1 · m-1 and 2.67x10-7 Ω-1 · m-1 and the prompt RIC coefficient varied between 1.25x10-18 Ω-1 · m-1/rad/s and 1.93x10-17 Ω-1 · m-1/rad/s.

  1. Measurement of effective thermal conductivity of wheat as a function of moisture content

    SciTech Connect

    Tavman, S.; Tavman, I.H.

    1998-07-01

    Grain drying and storage are one of the main activities of agricultural industry. Increasing energy costs have stressed the importance of calculation of heat and mass transfer in a grain bulk in order to be able to optimize drying facilities. Another limitation during drying is the preservation of grain structure and its nutritional values, Muehlbauer and Christ have shown that damage to the grain structure and grain nutritional value is dependent upon grain temperature and drying time. Therefore, proper conditions during drying and storage of cereal grains require the knowledge of the thermophysical properties of the grains. The effective thermal conductivity of two varieties of Triticum durum wheat and a wheat product, bulgur, is determined at different moisture contents and at ambient temperature by the transient lime heat source method. The moisture contents of the samples ranged from 9.17 to 38.65% wet basis and the bulk densities ranged from 675 to 827 kg/m{sup 3}. Under those conditions, the measured effective thermal conductivities ranged from 0.159 to 0.201 W/m.K. The effective thermal conductivity is found to be linearly increasing with moisture content. The results are also in good agreement with literature values.

  2. Estimation of submarine groundwater discharge from bulk ground electrical conductivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stieglitz, Thomas; Rapaglia, John; Bokuniewicz, Henry

    2008-08-01

    The utility of bulk ground conductivity (BGC) measurements in the estimation of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) was investigated at four sites covering a range of hydrogeological settings, namely Cockburn Sound (Australia); Shelter Island (USA); Ubatuba Bay (Brazil) and Flic-en-Flac Bay (Mauritius). At each of the sites, BGC was surveyed in the intertidal zone, and seepage meters were used for direct measurements of SGD flow rates. In the presence of detectable salinity gradients in the sediment, a negative correlation between SGD and BGC was recorded. The correlation is site-specific and is dependent on both the type of sediment and the mixing processes. For example, at Shelter Island the maximum mean flow rates were 65 cm d-1 at a BGC of ˜0 mS cm-1 while at Mauritius maximum mean flow rates were 364 cm d-1 at a BGC of ˜0 mS cm-1. BGC measurements are used to estimate SGD over a large scale, and to separate its fresh and saline components. Extrapolating BGC measurements throughout the study sites yields a total discharge of 2.91, 1.59, 7.16, and 25.4 103 m3 d-1 km-1 of shoreline with a freshwater fraction of 41, 24, 29, and 63% at Cockburn Sound, Shelter Island, Ubatuba Bay, and Flic-en-Flac Bay respectively. The results demonstrate that ground conductivity is a useful tracer to survey and separate freshwater and recirculated seawater component of SGD. The presented investigation is a subset within a series of experiments designed to compare different methods to investigate SGD co-organized and carried out by SCOR, LOICZ, IOC and IAEA.

  3. Magnetic induction spectroscopy: non-contact measurement of the electrical conductivity spectra of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barai, A.; Watson, S.; Griffiths, H.; Patz, R.

    2012-08-01

    Measurement of the electrical conductivity of biological tissues as a function of frequency, often termed ‘bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy (BIS)’, provides valuable information on tissue structure and composition. In implementing BIS though, there can be significant practical difficulties arising from the electrode-sample interface which have likely limited its deployment in industrial applications. In magnetic induction spectroscopy (MIS) these difficulties are eliminated through the use of fully non-contacting inductive coupling between the sensors and sample. However, inductive coupling introduces its own set of technical difficulties, primarily related to the small magnitudes of the induced currents and their proportionality with frequency. This paper describes the design of a practical MIS system incorporating new, highly-phase-stable electronics and compares its performance with that of electrode-based BIS in measurements on biological samples including yeast suspensions in saline (concentration 50-400 g l-1) and solid samples of potato, cucumber, tomato, banana and porcine liver. The shapes of the MIS spectra were in good agreement with those for electrode-based BIS, with a residual maximum discrepancy of 28%. The measurement precision of the MIS was 0.05 S m-1 at 200 kHz, improving to 0.01 S m-1 at a frequency of 20 MHz, for a sample volume of 80 ml. The data-acquisition time for each MIS measurement was 52 s. Given the value of spectroscopic conductivity information and the many advantages of obtaining these data in a non-contacting manner, even through electrically-insulating packaging materials if necessary, it is concluded that MIS is a technique with considerable potential for monitoring bio-industrial processes and product quality.

  4. Effects of contact resistance on electrical conductivity measurements of SiC-based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, G. E.; Thomsen, E. C.; Henager, C. H.

    2013-11-01

    A combination 2/4-probe method was used to measure electrical resistances across a pure, monolithic CVD-SiC disc sample with contact resistance at the SiC/metallic electrode interfaces. By comparison of the almost simultaneous 2/4-probe measurements, the specific contact resistance (Rc) and its temperature dependence were determined for two types (sputtered gold and porous nickel) electrodes from room temperature (RT) to ~973 K. The Rc-values behaved similarly for each type of metallic electrode: Rc > ~1000 Ω cm2 at RT, decreasing continuously to ~1–10 Ω cm2 at 973 K. The temperature dependence of the inverse Rc indicated thermally activated electrical conduction across the SiC/metallic interface with an apparent activation energy of ~0.3 eV. Finally, for the flow channel insert application in a fusion reactor blanket, contact resistance potentially could reduce the transverse electrical conductivity by about 50%.

  5. Electrical Conductivity through a Single Atomic Step Measured with the Proximity-Induced Superconducting Pair Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Howon; Lin, Shi-Zeng; Graf, Matthias J.; Miyata, Yoshinori; Nagai, Yuki; Kato, Takeo; Hasegawa, Yukio

    2016-09-01

    Local disordered nanostructures in an atomically thick metallic layer on a semiconducting substrate play significant and decisive roles in transport properties of two-dimensional (2D) conductive systems. We measured the electrical conductivity through a step of monoatomic height in a truly microscopic manner by using as a signal the superconducting pair correlation induced by the proximity effect. The transport property across a step of a one-monolayer Pb surface metallic phase, formed on a Si(111) substrate, was evaluated by inducing the pair correlation around the local defect and measuring its response, i.e., the reduced density of states at the Fermi energy using scanning tunneling microscopy. We found that the step resistance has a significant contribution to the total resistance on a nominally flat surface. Our study also revealed that steps in the 2D metallic layer terminate the propagation of the pair correlation. Superconductivity is enhanced between the first surface step and the superconductor-normal-metal interface by reflectionless tunneling when the step is located within a coherence length.

  6. An Electromagnetic Gauge Technique for Measuring Shocked Particle Velocity in Electrically Conductive Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, David; Yoshinaka, Akio

    2014-10-01

    Electromagnetic velocity (EMV) gauges are a class of film gauges which permit the direct in-situ measurement of shocked material flow velocity. The active sensing element, typically a metallic foil, requires exposure to a known external magnetic field in order to produce motional electromotive force (emf). Due to signal distortion caused by mutual inductance between sample and EMV gauge, this technique is typically limited to shock waves in non-conductive materials. In conductive samples, motional emf generated in the EMV gauge has to be extracted from the measured signal which results from the combined effects of both motional emf and voltage changes from induced currents. An electromagnetic technique is presented which analytically models the dynamics of induced current between a copper disk moving as a rigid body with constant 1D translational velocity toward an EMV gauge, where both disk and gauge are exposed to a uniform external static magnetic field. The disk is modelled as a magnetic dipole loop where its Foucault current is evaluated from the characteristics of the fields, whereas the EMV gauge is modelled as a circuit loop immersed in the field of the magnetic dipole loop, the intensity of which is calculated as a function of space and, implicitly, time. Equations of mutual induction are derived and the current induced in the EMV gauge loop is solved, allowing discrimination of the motional emf. Numerical analysis is provided for the step response of the induced EMV gauge current with respect to the Foucault current in the moving copper sample.

  7. An Electromagnetic Gauge Technique for Measuring Shocked Particle Velocity in Electrically Conductive Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, David; Yoshinaka, Akio

    2014-11-01

    Electromagnetic velocity (EMV) gauges are a class of film gauges which permit the direct in-situ measurement of shocked material flow velocity. The active sensing element, typically a metallic foil, requires exposure to a known external magnetic field in order to produce motional electromotive force (emf). Due to signal distortion caused by mutual inductance between sample and EMV gauge, this technique is typically limited to shock waves in non-conductive materials. In conductive samples, motional emf generated in the EMV gauge has to be extracted from the measured signal which results from the combined effects of both motional emf and voltage changes from induced currents. An electromagnetic technique is presented which analytically models the dynamics of induced current between a copper disk moving as a rigid body with constant 1D translational velocity toward an EMV gauge, where both disk and gauge are exposed to a uniform external static magnetic field. The disk is modelled as a magnetic dipole loop where its Foucault current is evaluated from the characteristics of the fields, whereas the EMV gauge is modelled as a circuit loop immersed in the field of the magnetic dipole loop, the intensity of which is calculated as a function of space and, implicitly, time. Equations of mutual induction are derived and the current induced in the EMV gauge loop is solved, allowing discrimination of the motional emf. Numerical analysis is provided for the step response of the induced EMV gauge current with respect to the Foucault current in the moving copper sample.

  8. Electrical Conductivity through a Single Atomic Step Measured with the Proximity-Induced Superconducting Pair Correlation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Howon; Lin, Shi-Zeng; Graf, Matthias J; Miyata, Yoshinori; Nagai, Yuki; Kato, Takeo; Hasegawa, Yukio

    2016-09-01

    Local disordered nanostructures in an atomically thick metallic layer on a semiconducting substrate play significant and decisive roles in transport properties of two-dimensional (2D) conductive systems. We measured the electrical conductivity through a step of monoatomic height in a truly microscopic manner by using as a signal the superconducting pair correlation induced by the proximity effect. The transport property across a step of a one-monolayer Pb surface metallic phase, formed on a Si(111) substrate, was evaluated by inducing the pair correlation around the local defect and measuring its response, i.e., the reduced density of states at the Fermi energy using scanning tunneling microscopy. We found that the step resistance has a significant contribution to the total resistance on a nominally flat surface. Our study also revealed that steps in the 2D metallic layer terminate the propagation of the pair correlation. Superconductivity is enhanced between the first surface step and the superconductor-normal-metal interface by reflectionless tunneling when the step is located within a coherence length. PMID:27661710

  9. The 24 GHz measurements of 2.2 lambda conical horn antennas illuminating a conducting sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, A. E.; Marshall, R. E.; Hearn, C. P.; Neece, R. T.

    1993-01-01

    Monostatic reflection-coefficient magnitude, absolute value of Gamma, measurements occurring between a radiating horn and a metal reflecting plate are presented for a family of three 2.2 lambda diameter conical horn antennas. The three horns have different aperture phase deviations: 6 deg, 22.5 deg, and 125 deg. Measurements of the magnitude of absolute value of Gamma as a function of horn-plate separation (d) extend from an effective antenna aperture short (d = O) to beyond the far-field boundary (d = 2D(sup 2)/lambda, where D is the antenna diameter). Measurement data are presented with various physical environments for each of the horns. Measured scalar data are compared with theoretical data from two models, a numerical model for a circular waveguide aperture in a ground plane and a scalar diffraction theory model. This work was conducted in support of the development effort for a spaceborne multifrequency microwave reflectometer designed to accurately determine the distance from a space vehicle's surface to a reflecting plasma boundary. The metal reflecting plate was used to simulate the RF reflectivity of a critically dense plasma. The resulting configuration, a ground plane mounted aperture facing a reflecting plane in close proximity, produces a strong interaction between the ground plane and the reflecting plate, especially at integral half-wavelength separations. The transition coefficient is characterized by large amplitude variations.

  10. Measuring the thermal conductivity of liquids using photo-thermal radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusiak, A.; Pradere, Ch; Battaglia, J. L.

    2010-01-01

    A method for the estimation of thermal conductivity of liquids is proposed. The measurement is based on the front face-modulated photothermal radiometry usually used for studies of solid deposit (thin film) on substrate systems. The system considered here is in the three-layer form, the intermediate layer being the investigated liquid. An experimental setup has been developed in order to avoid the drawbacks of the classical methods such as flash or hot wire measurement. The measurement is carried out with low-temperature oscillations, and the studied liquid is confined in a specific (low thickness) container. This configuration leads to very low Rayleigh number and permits us to eliminate the convection phenomenon during the experiment and to characterize a very small (~1 µl) volume of liquid. This is an important feature for metrology of expensive or hazardous samples. According to the knowledge of the thermophysical properties of two solid layers external to a liquid, the phase lag between the thermal perturbation and the response of the sample is used as the experimental data. The measurement was validated using two well-known liquids: water and sunflower oil.

  11. Comparative Analysis of two Methods for High-Resolution Differential Conductance Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusick, David; Naito, Michio; Ramos, Roberto

    We compare two methods of differential conductance measurement. The first is a traditional method in which current and voltage data is acquired via four-wire measurement, then averaged and differentiated numerically. The second method calculates dI / dV in real time by superimposing a small DC signal dI on the input step function, alternating between addition and subtraction of the signal with each step, then averaging the small signal voltage response over three steps to obtain dV . This requires two instruments: a DC current source and a high-resolution voltmeter. Keithley Instruments has commercially promoted the Keithley 622x current source and 2182A nanovoltmeter as means to achieve this measurement; we therefore refer to it as the Keithley method. We compare the two methods by performing high-resolution measurements of the energy gap of MgB2 thin film Josephson junctions. We show that the Keithley method has advantages of cleaner data, easier implementation, and overall faster data collection, but may lack the traditional method's high resolution. R.C.R. acknowledges support from National Science Foundation Grant # DMR-1555775.

  12. Study of a guarded electrode system in the dc conductivity measurement of insulating liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuan; Hao, Miao; Chen, George; Wilson, Gordon; Jarman, Paul

    2014-07-01

    The design and choice of an electrode system is important in dc conductivity measurement of insulating liquid. In this paper, the electric field distribution of an electrode system which consists of two parallel circular metallic electrodes and a guard electrode has been studied using Comsol Multiphysics software. A new parameter, which is not yet involved in current standards, the edge radius, has been mentioned in the literature formerly and is currently discussed in a CIGRE working group. In this paper, the influence of this parameter has been investigated by means of field calculation. As seen from the simulating result, there are regions in the vicinity of the edges of the guard and measuring electrode that are under high electric field. If the edges of these two electrodes are sharp, the maximum electric field in the test cell will be much higher than the average field between the measuring electrode and the high voltage electrode. An empirical equation has been proposed to calculate this maximum field. The classic correction expression for an effective radius has been re-evaluated with the edge radius being taken into account. Experimental work has been performed to confirm this conclusion. Three kinds of mineral oils with different ageing times have been tested under the dc field using a guarded electrode system and the electric strengths of these oils have been estimated. A recommendation has been made to current standards in insulating liquid measurement.

  13. Roebel assembled coated conductor cables (RACC): Ac-Losses and current carrying potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, A.; Heller, R.; Goldacker, W.; Kling, A.; Schmidt, C.

    2008-02-01

    Low ac-loss HTS cables for transport currents well above 1 kA are required for application in transformers and generators and are taken into consideration for future generations of fusion reactor coils. Coated conductors (CC) are suitable candidates for high field application at an operation temperature in the range 50-77 K. Ac-field applications require cables with low ac-losses and hence twisting of the individual strands. We solved this problem using the Roebel technique. Short lengths of Roebel bar cables were prepared from industrial DyBCO and YBCO-CC. Meander shaped tapes of 4 or 5 mm width with twist pitches of 123 or 127 mm were cut from the 10 or 12 mm wide CC tapes using a specially designed tool. Eleven or twelve of these strands were assembled to a cable. The electrical and mechanical connection of the tapes was achieved using a silver powder filled conductive epoxy resin. Ac-losses of a short sample in an external ac-field were measured as a function of frequency and field amplitude as well as the coupling current decay time constant. We discuss the results in terms of available theories and compare measured time constants in transverse field with measured coupling losses. Finally the potential of this cable type for ac-use is discussed with respect to ac-losses and current carrying capability.

  14. Measurements of electrical conductivity for characterizing and monitoring nuclear waste repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, H.F.; Becker, A.; Lee, K.H.

    1986-11-01

    The detection of major fractures is one topic of this study but another equally important problem is to develop quantitative relationships between large scale resistivity and fracture systems in rock. There has been very little work done on this central issue. Empirical relations between resistivity and porosity have been derived on the basis of laboratory samples or from well logging, but there are no comparable 'laws' for rock masses with major fracture or joint patterns. Hydrologic models for such rocks have been recently been derived but the corresponding resistivity models have not been attempted. Resistivity due to fracture distributions with preferred orientation could be determined with such models, as could quantitative interpretation of changes as fracture aperature varies with load. This study is not only important for the assessment of a repository site, but has far ranging implications in reservoir studies for oil, gas, and geothermal resources. The electrical conductivity can be measured in two ways. Current can be injected into the ground through pairs of electrodes and corresponding voltage drops can be measured in the vicinity with other pairs of electrodes. The electrical conductivity can also be measured inductively. Instead of injecting current into the ground as described in the dc resistivity method, currents can be induced to flow by a changing magnetic field. In these inductive or electromagnetic (em) methods the interpretation depends both on transmitter-receiver geometry and frequency of operation. In principle the interpretation should be more definitive than with the dc resistivity methods. Rigorous confirmation of this statement in inhomogeneous media awaits the development of generalized inversion techniques for em methods.

  15. Thermal conductivity measurement of individual Bi2Se3 nano-ribbon by self-heating three-ω method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guodong; Liang, Dong; Qiu, Richard L. J.; Gao, Xuan P. A.

    2013-01-01

    We report thermal conductivity measurements of individual single crystalline Bi2Se3 nano-ribbon (NR) synthesized via the gold nanoparticle catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid mechanism. By using the four-probe third harmonic method, thermal conductivity of Bi2Se3 NRs was obtained in the temperature range of 10 K to 300 K. It is found that the measured thermal conductivities are nearly two orders of magnitude smaller than the bulk value and have a maximum thermal conductivity at temperature (around 200 K) greater than the bulk. The significant reduced thermal conductivity of NRs is attributed to enhanced phonon boundary scattering in nanostructured material.

  16. In situ detection method for obtaining permeability of Fe-based amorphous alloys: ac resistance measurement for Fe{sub 84}Nb{sub 7}B{sub 9}

    SciTech Connect

    Ichitsubo, Tetsu; Matsubara, Eiichiro; Tanaka, Satoshi; Nishiyama, Nobuyuki; Amiya, Kenji

    2005-01-17

    In this letter, we propose an in situ detection method for obtaining permeability of soft magnetic Fe-based amorphous alloys. The temperature dependence of ac resistance was measured at different frequencies during heat treatment of Fe{sub 84}Nb{sub 7}B{sub 9} amorphous alloys. A significant increase in the ac ({approx}1000 kHz) resistance appears at around 920 K during the heating process, which arises from the skin effect caused by a marked increase in sample permeability. This skin effect diminishes when the sample is heated to approximately 1100 K, which corresponds to the decrease in its permeability. Consequently, we note that the ac resistance measurement is useful for quick in situ assessment to achieve the soft magnetic property of an Fe-based amorphous alloy.

  17. Nonlinear alternating current conduction in polycrystalline manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, T. N.; Nandi, U. N.; Jana, D.; Dey, K.; Giri, S.

    2014-06-01

    The real part of ac conductance Σ(T, f) of yttrium-doped mixed-valent polycrystalline manganite systems La1-x -yYyCaxMnO3 with x = 0.33 and 0.05 and y = 0.07 and iron doped LaMn1-xFexO3 with x = 0.15 is measured as a function of frequency f by varying zero-frequency Ohmic conductance Σ0 by T. The former shows a metal-insulator transition, whereas the latter exhibits insulating character throughout the measured temperature range. At a fixed temperature T, Σ(T, f) remains almost constant to the value Σ0 up to a certain frequency, known as the onset frequency fc and increases from Σ0 as frequency is increased from fc. Scaled appropriately, the data for Σ(T, f) at different T fall on the same universal curve, indicating the existence of a general scaling formalism for the ac conductance. fc scales with Σ0 as fc˜Σ0xf, where xf is the nonlinearity exponent characterising the onset. With the help of data for ac conduction, it is shown that xf is very much phase sensitive and can be used to characterize the different phases in a manganite system originated due to change in temperature or disorder. Scaling theories and existing theoretical models are used to analyze the results of ac conduction and the nonlinearity exponent xf.

  18. Investigating bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons through landfarming using apparent electrical conductivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van De Vijver, Ellen; Van Meirvenne, Marc; Seuntjens, Piet

    2015-04-01

    Bioremediation of soil contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons through landfarming has been widely applied commercially at large scale. Biodegradation is one of the dominant pollutant removal mechanisms involved in landfarming, but strongly depends on the environmental conditions (e.g. presence of oxygen, moisture content). Conventionally the biodegradation process is monitored by the installation of field monitoring equipment and repeated sample collection and analysis. Because the presence of petroleum hydrocarbons and their degradation products can affect the electrical properties of the soil, proximal soil sensors such as electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensors may provide an alternative to investigate the biodegradation process of these contaminants. We investigated the relation between the EMI-based apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) of a landfarm soil and the presence and degradation status of petroleum hydrocarbons. The 3 ha study area was located in an oil refinery complex contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons, mainly composed of diesel. At the site, a landfarm was constructed in 1999. The most recent survey of the petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations was conducted between 2011 and 2013. The sampling locations were defined by a grid with a 10 m by 10 m cell size and on each location a sample was taken from four successive soil layers with a thickness of 0.5 m each. Because the survey was carried out in phases using different georeferencing methods, the final dataset suffered from uncertainty in the coordinates of the sampling locations. In September 2013 the landfarm was surveyed for ECa with a multi-receiver electromagnetic induction sensor (DUALEM-21S) using motorized conveyance. The horizontal measurement resolution was 1 m by 0.25 m. On each measurement location the sensor recorded four ECa values representative of measurement depths of 0.5 m, 1.0 m, 1.6 m and 3.2 m. After the basic processing, the ECa measurements were filtered to remove

  19. Variations in hydraulic conductivity with scale of measurement during aquifer tests in heterogeneous, porous carbonate rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze-Makuch, Dirk; Cherkauer, Douglas S.

    Previous studies have shown that hydraulic conductivity of an aquifer seems to increase as the portion of the aquifer tested increases. To date, such studies have all relied on different methods to determine hydraulic conductivity at each scale of interest, which raises the possibility that the observed increase in hydraulic conductivity is due to the measurement method, not to the scale. This study analyzes hydraulic conductivity with respect to scale during individual aquifer tests in porous, heterogeneous carbonate rocks in southeastern Wisconsin, USA. Results from this study indicate that hydraulic conductivity generally increases during an individual test as the volume of aquifer impacted increases, and the rate of this increase is the same as the rate of increase determined by using different measurement methods. Thus, scale dependence of hydraulic conductivity during single tests does not depend on the method of measurement. This conclusion is supported by 22 of 26 aquifer tests conducted in porous-flow-dominated carbonate units within the aquifer. Instead, scale dependency is probably caused by heterogeneities within the aquifer, a conclusion supported by digital simulation. All of the observed types of hydraulic-conductivity variations with scale during individual aquifer tests can be explained by a conceptual model of a simple heterogeneous aquifer composed of high-conductivity zones within a low-conductivity matrix. Résumé Certaines études ont montré que la conductivité hydraulique d'un aquifère semble augmenter en même temps que la partie testée de l'aquifère s'étend. Jusqu'à présent, ces études ont toutes reposé sur des méthodes de détermination de la conductivité hydraulique différentes pour chaque niveau d'échelle, ce qui a conduit à penser que l'augmentation observée de la conductivité hydraulique pouvait être due aux méthodes de mesure et non à l'effet d'échelle. Cette étude analyse la conductivité hydraulique par

  20. Development of a Laboratory Experiment to Derivate the Thermal Conductivity based on Electrical Resistivity Measurments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vienken, T.; Firmbach, L.; Dietrich, P.

    2014-12-01

    In the course of the energy transition, the number of shallow geothermal systems is constantly growing. These systems allow the exploitation of renewable energy from the subsurface, reduced CO2 emission and additionally, energy storage. An efficient performance of geothermal systems strongly depends upon the availability of exploration data (e.g. thermal conductivity distribution). However, due to high exploration costs, the dimensioning of smaller plants (< 30 kW) is generally based on literature values. While standard in-situ-tests are persistent for larger scale projects, they yield only integral values, e.g. entire length of a borehole heat exchanger. Hence, exploring the distribution of the thermal conductivity as important soil parameter requires the development of new cost-efficient technologies. The general relationship between the electrical (RE) and the thermal resistivity (RT) can be described as log(RE) = CR log(RT) with CRas a multiplier depending on additional soil parameter (e.g. water content, density, porosity, grain size and distribution). Knowing the influencing factor of these additional determining parameters, geoelectrical measurements could provide a cost-efficient exploration strategy of the thermal conductivity for shallow geothermal sites. The aim of this study now is to define the multiplier CRexperimentally to conclude the exact correlation of the thermal and electrical behavior. The set-up consists of an acrylic glass tube with two current electrodes installed at the upper and lower end of the tube. Four electrode chains (each with eight electrodes) measure the potential differences in respect to an induced heat flux initiated by a heat plate. Additional, eight temperature sensors measure the changes of the temperature differences. First, we use this set-up to analyze the influence of soil properties based on differing homogenous sediments with known chemical and petro-physical properties. Further, we analyze the influence of the water