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Sample records for ac current density

  1. Angular Dependence of Transport AC Losses in Superconducting Wire with Position-Dependent Critical Current Density in a DC Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xing-liang; Xiong, Li-ting; Gao, Yuan-wen; Zhou, You-he

    2013-07-01

    Transport AC losses play a very important role in high temperature superconductors (HTSs), which usually carry AC transport current under applied magnetic field in typical application-like conditions. In this paper, we propose the analytical formula for transport AC losses in HTS wire by considering critical current density of both inhomogeneous and anisotropic field dependent. The angular dependence of critical current density is described by effective mass theory, and the HTS wire has inhomogeneous distribution cross-section of critical current density. We calculate the angular dependence of normalized AC losses under different DC applied magnetic fields. The numerical results of this formula agree well with the experiment data and are better than the results of Norris formula. This analytical formula can explain the deviation of experimental transport current losses from the Norris formula and apply to calculate transport AC losses in realistic practical condition.

  2. Superconducting-magnetic heterostructures: a method of decreasing AC losses and improving critical current density in multifilamentary conductors.

    PubMed

    Glowacki, B A; Majoros, M

    2009-06-24

    Magnetic materials can help to improve the performance of practical superconductors on the macroscale/microscale as magnetic diverters and also on the nanoscale as effective pinning centres. It has been established by numerical modelling that magnetic shielding of the filaments reduces AC losses in self-field conditions due to decoupling of the filaments and, at the same time, it increases the critical current of the composite. This effect is especially beneficial for coated conductors, in which the anisotropic properties of the superconductor are amplified by the conductor architecture. However, ferromagnetic coatings are often chemically incompatible with YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7) and (Pb,Bi)(2)Sr(2)Ca(2)Cu(3)O(9) conductors, and buffer layers have to be used. In contrast, in MgB(2) conductors an iron matrix may remain in direct contact with the superconducting core. The application of superconducting-magnetic heterostructures requires consideration of the thermal and electromagnetic stability of the superconducting materials used. On one hand, magnetic materials reduce the critical current gradient across the individual filaments but, on the other hand, they often reduce the thermal conductivity between the superconducting core and the cryogen, which may cause destruction of the conductor in the event of thermal instability. A possible nanoscale method of improving the critical current density of superconducting conductors is the introduction of sub-micron magnetic pinning centres. However, the volumetric density and chemical compatibility of magnetic inclusions has to be controlled to avoid suppression of the superconducting properties. PMID:21828430

  3. Influence of Critical Current Density on Guidance Force Decay of HTS Bulk Exposed to AC Magnetic Field Perturbation in a Maglev Vehicle System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longcai, Zhang; Jianguo, Kong

    2012-07-01

    Superconducting maglev vehicle is one of the most promising applications of HTS bulks. In such a system, the HTS bulks are always exposed to AC external magnetic field, which is generated by the inhomogeneous surface magnetic field of the NdFeB guideway. In our previous work, we studied the guidance force decay of the YBCO bulk over the NdFdB guideway used in the High-temperature superconducting maglev vehicle system with the application of the AC external magnetic field, and calculated the guidance force decay as a function of time based on an analytic model. In this paper, we investigated the influence of the critical current density on the guidance force decay of HTS bulk exposed to AC field perturbation in the maglev vehicle system and try to adopt a method to suppress the decay. From the results, it was found that the guidance force decay rate was higher for the bulk with lower critical current density. Therefore, we could suppress the guidance force decay of HTS bulk exposed to AC external magnetic field perturbation in the maglev vehicle system by improving critical current density of the bulk.

  4. Effect of the magnetic material on AC losses in HTS conductors in AC magnetic field carrying AC transport current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xing-Xing; Huang, Chen-Guang; Yong, Hua-Dong; Zhou, You-He

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the AC losses in several typical superconducting composite conductors using the H-formulation model. A single superconducting strip with ferromagnetic substrate or cores and a stack of coated conductors with ferromagnetic substrates are studied. We consider all the coated conductors carrying AC transport currents and simultaneously exposed to perpendicular AC magnetic fields. The influences of the amplitude, frequency, phase difference and ferromagnetic materials on the AC losses are investigated. The results show that the magnetization losses of single strip and stacked strips have similar characteristics. The ferromagnetic substrate can increase the magnetization loss at low magnetic field, and decrease the loss at high magnetic field. The ferromagnetic substrate can obviously increase the transport loss in stacked strips. The trends of total AC losses of single strip and stacked strips are similar when they are carrying current or exposed to a perpendicular magnetic field. The effect of the frequency on the total AC losses of single strip is related to the amplitude of magnetic field. The AC losses decrease with increasing frequency in low magnetic field region while increase in high magnetic field region. As the phase difference changes, there is a periodic variation for the AC losses. Moreover, when the strip is under only the transport current and magnetic field, the ferromagnetic cores will increase the AC losses for large transport current or field.

  5. n value and Jc distribution dependence of AC transport current losses in HTS conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Jun; Sawai, Yusuke; Nakayama, Haruki; Tsukamoto, Osami; Miyagi, Daisuke

    2004-01-01

    Compared with LTS materials, HTS materials have some peculiarities affecting AC loss characteristics of the conductors. We measured the AC transport current losses in YBCO thin film coated conductors and a Bi2223/Ag sheathed tape. Comparing the measured data with analytical calculations, the dependence of the AC transport current losses on the n value and critical current density distributions are studied. It is shown that, considering the n values and Jc distributions, the peculiarities in the HTS materials can be taken into consideration and the transport current losses in HTS conductors can be calculated by the same analytical method used for LTS.

  6. Ag incorporated Mn3O4/AC nanocomposite based supercapacitor devices with high energy density and power density.

    PubMed

    Nagamuthu, S; Vijayakumar, S; Muralidharan, G

    2014-12-14

    Silver incorporated Mn3O4/amorphous carbon (AC) nanocomposites are synthesized by a green chemistry method. X-ray diffraction studies revealed the structural changes in Mn3O4/AC nanocomposites attributable to the addition of silver. Cyclic voltammetry, charge-discharge and ac-impedance studies indicated that the Ag-Mn3O4/AC-5 electrode was the most suitable candidate for supercapacitor applications. From the galvanostatic charge-discharge studies, a higher specific capacitance of 981 F g(-1) at a specific current of 1 A g(-1) was obtained. An Ag-Mn3O4/AC-symmetric supercapacitor consisting of an Ag-incorporated Mn3O4/AC composite as an anode as well as a cathode, and an asymmetric supercapacitor consisting of an Ag-incorporated Mn3O4/AC composite as a cathode and an activated carbon as an anode have been fabricated. The symmetric device exhibits a specific cell capacitance of 72 F g(-1) at a specific current of 1 A g(-1) whereas the asymmetric device delivers a specific cell capacitance of 180 F g(-1) at a high current rate of 10 A g(-1). The asymmetric supercapacitor device yields a high energy density of 81 W h kg(-1). This is higher than that of lead acid batteries and comparable with that of nickel hydride batteries.

  7. Current density distribution in PEFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhixiang; Mao, Zongqiang; Wu, Bing; Wang, Lisheng; Schmidt, Volkmar M.

    The determination of the current distribution in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) is of great practical importance to optimize the process parameter such as the flow field design, the humidification of reaction gases and the utilization of the fuel gas. In this paper, subcells approach is used to measure current density distribution in PEFC with an active electrode area of 30 cm 2. Fuel cell performances determined under different operation conditions clearly indicate that the water balance influences the cell performance most significantly. Furthermore, it is interesting to note that under certain condition both membrane drying and electrode flooding are shown simultaneously inducing performance decaying.

  8. Effect of ac on current-induced domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W. J.; Lee, T. D.; Choa, S. H.; Seo, S. M.; Lee, K. J.

    2007-05-01

    Saitoh et al. [Nature (London) 432, 203 (2004)] have reported the experimental result showing the interplay of a transverse domain wall with an electrical ac of megahertz-range frequencies. They observed a single peak of resistance in the frequency range and interpreted it with a nonadiabatic spin torque. It was argued that an ac current can induce a micrometer-range displacement of domain wall. We reconstructed the experiment in micromagnetic simulations considering the local nonzero nonadiabatic spin torque. We could not observe either an explicit single peak in the frequency-dependent resistance or an eventual displacement of domain wall by use of an ac. It indicates the local nonadiabatic torque is inappropriate to explain the experimental results of ac-induced domain wall motion. Other approaches such as the nonlocal nonadiabatic spin torque may be needed.

  9. Modelling ac ripple currents in HTS coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhihan; Grilli, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    Dc transmission using high temperature superconducting (HTS) coated conductors (CCs) offers a promising solution to the globally growing demand for effective, reliable and economic transmission of green energy up to the gigawatt level over very long distances. The credible estimation of the losses and thereby the heat dissipation involved, where ac ripples (introduced in rectification/ac-dc conversion) are viewed as a potential source of notable contribution, is highly essential for the rational design of practical HTS dc transmission cables and corresponding cryogenic systems to fulfil this demand. Here we report a targeted modelling study into the ac losses in a HTS CC subject to dc and ac ripple currents simultaneously, by solving Maxwell’s equations using the finite element method (FEM) in the commercial software package COMSOL. It is observed that the instantaneous loss exhibits only one peak per cycle in the HTS CC subject to sinusoidal ripples, given that the amplitude of the ac ripples is smaller than approximately 20% of that of the dc current. This is a distinct contrast to the usual observation of two peaks per cycle in a HTS CC subject to ac currents only. The unique mechanism is also revealed, which is directly associated with the finding that, around any local minima of the applied ac ripples, the critical state of -J c is never reached at the edges of the HTS CC, as it should be according to the Bean model. When running further into the longer term, it is discovered that the ac ripple loss of the HTS CC in full-wave rectification decays monotonically, at a speed which is found to be insensitive to the frequency of the applied ripples within our targeted situations, to a relatively low level of approximately 1.38 × 10-4 W m-1 in around 1.7 s. Comparison between this level and other typical loss contributions in a HTS dc cable implies that ac ripple currents in HTS CCs should only be considered as a minor source of dissipation in superconducting dc

  10. Input current shaped ac-to-dc converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Input current shaping techniques for ac-to-dc converters were investigated. Input frequencies much higher than normal, up to 20 kHz were emphasized. Several methods of shaping the input current waveform in ac-to-dc converters were reviewed. The simplest method is the LC filter following the rectifier. The next simplest method is the resistor emulation approach in which the inductor size is determined by the converter switching frequency and not by the line input frequency. Other methods require complicated switch drive algorithms to construct the input current waveshape. For a high-frequency line input, on the order of 20 kHz, the simple LC cannot be discarded so peremptorily, since the inductor size can be compared with that for the resistor emulation method. In fact, since a dc regulator will normally be required after the filter anyway, the total component count is almost the same as for the resistor emulation method, in which the filter is effectively incorporated into the regulator.

  11. Input-current shaped ac to dc converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The problem of achieving near unity power factor while supplying power to a dc load from a single phase ac source of power is examined. Power processors for this application must perform three functions: input current shaping, energy storage, and output voltage regulation. The methods available for performing each of these three functions are reviewed. Input current shaping methods are either active or passive, with the active methods divided into buck-like and boost-like techniques. In addition to large reactances, energy storage methods include resonant filters, active filters, and active storage schemes. Fast voltage regulation can be achieved by post regulation or by supplementing the current shaping topology with an extra switch. Some indications of which methods are best suited for particular applications concludes the discussion.

  12. Enhancing critical current density of cuprate superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Chaudhari, Praveen

    2015-06-16

    The present invention concerns the enhancement of critical current densities in cuprate superconductors. Such enhancement of critical current densities include using wave function symmetry and restricting movement of Abrikosov (A) vortices, Josephson (J) vortices, or Abrikosov-Josephson (A-J) vortices by using the half integer vortices associated with d-wave symmetry present in the grain boundary.

  13. Current density and state density in diluted magnetic semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Merchancano, S. T.; Paredes Gutiérrez, H.; Zuñiga, J. A.

    2016-02-01

    We study in this paper the spin-polarized current density components in diluted magnetic semiconductor tunnelling diodes with different sample geometries. We calculate the resonant JxV and the density of states. The differential conductance curves are analyzed as functions of the applied voltage and the magnetic potential strength induced by the magnetic ions.

  14. Maps of current density using density-functional methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soncini, A.; Teale, A. M.; Helgaker, T.; de Proft, F.; Tozer, D. J.

    2008-08-01

    The performance of several density-functional theory (DFT) methods for the calculation of current densities induced by a uniform magnetic field is examined. Calculations are performed using the BLYP and KT3 generalized-gradient approximations, together with the B3LYP hybrid functional. For the latter, both conventional and optimized effective potential (OEP) approaches are used. Results are also determined from coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles (CCSD) electron densities by a DFT constrained search procedure using the approach of Wu and Yang (WY). The current densities are calculated within the CTOCD-DZ2 distributed origin approach. Comparisons are made with results from Hartree-Fock (HF) theory. Several small molecules for which correlation is known to be especially important in the calculation of magnetic response properties are considered-namely, O3, CO, PN, and H2CO. As examples of aromatic and antiaromatic systems, benzene and planarized cyclooctatetraene molecules are considered, with specific attention paid to the ring current phenomenon and its Kohn-Sham orbital origin. Finally, the o-benzyne molecule is considered as a computationally challenging case. The HF and DFT induced current maps show qualitative differences, while among the DFT methods the maps show a similar qualitative structure. To assess quantitative differences in the calculated current densities with different methods, the maximal moduli of the induced current densities are compared and integration of the current densities to yield shielding constants is performed. In general, the maximal modulus is reduced in moving from HF to B3LYP and BLYP, and further reduced in moving to KT3, OEP(B3LYP), and WY(CCSD). The latter three methods offer the most accurate shielding constants in comparison with both experimental and ab initio data and hence the more reliable route to DFT calculation of induced current density in molecules.

  15. Eddy Current Rail Inspection Using AC Bridge Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ze; Koffman, Andrew D; Waltrip, Bryan C; Wang, Yicheng

    2013-01-01

    AC bridge techniques commonly used for precision impedance measurements have been adapted to develop an eddy current sensor for rail defect detection. By using two detection coils instead of just one as in a conventional sensor, we can balance out the large baseline signals corresponding to a normal rail. We have significantly enhanced the detection sensitivity of the eddy current method by detecting and demodulating the differential signal of the two coils induced by rail defects, using a digital lock-in amplifier algorithm. We have also explored compensating for the lift-off effect of the eddy current sensor due to vibrations by using the summing signal of the detection coils to measure the lift-off distance. The dominant component of the summing signal is a constant resulting from direct coupling from the excitation coil, which can be experimentally determined. The remainder of the summing signal, which decreases as the lift-off distance increases, is induced by the secondary eddy current. This dependence on the lift-off distance is used to calibrate the differential signal, allowing for a more accurate characterization of the defects. Simulated experiments on a sample rail have been performed using a computer controlled X-Y moving table with the X-axis mimicking the train’s motion and the Y-axis mimicking the train’s vibrational bumping. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the new detection method. PMID:26401427

  16. Burnout current density of bismuth nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelius, T. W.; Picht, O.; Müller, S.; Neumann, R.; Völklein, F.; Karim, S.; Duan, J. L.

    2008-05-01

    Single bismuth nanowires with diameters ranging from 100nmto1μm were electrochemically deposited in ion track-etched single-pore polycarbonate membranes. The maximum current density the wires are able to carry was investigated by ramping up the current until failure occurred. It increases by three to four orders of magnitude for nanowires embedded in the template compared to bulk bismuth and rises with diminishing diameter. Simulations show that the wires are heated up electrically to the melting temperature. Since the surface-to-volume ratio rises with diminishing diameter, thinner wires dissipate the heat more efficiently to the surrounding polymer matrix and, thus, can tolerate larger current densities.

  17. Electrodialysis simulation to achieve optimum current density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, Cal C.

    1993-01-01

    Electrodialysis is used to remove salts from waste or other water streams, to yield a concentrated brine and a substatially deionized product water. During the electrodialysis process, the boundary layer adjacent to the ion selective membrane can become depleted of ions, resulting in severe pH changes sometimes accompanied by precipitation, and power losses, by a process known as water splitting. In order to optimize the applied electric current density, to achieve maximum deionization without exceeding the limiting current at any point along the path, a simulation program has been created to plot ion concentrations and fluxes, and cell current densities and voltages along the electrodialysis path. A means for tapering the current density along the path is recommended.

  18. Thermionic current densities from first principles.

    PubMed

    Voss, Johannes; Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Chou, Sharon H; Howe, Roger T; Bargatin, Igor; Abild-Pedersen, Frank

    2013-05-28

    We present a density functional theory-based method for calculating thermionic emission currents from a cathode into vacuum using a non-equilibrium Green's function approach. It does not require semi-classical approximations or crude simplifications of the electronic structure used in previous methods and thus provides quantitative predictions of thermionic emission for adsorbate-coated surfaces. The obtained results match well with experimental measurements of temperature-dependent current densities. Our approach can thus enable computational design of composite electrode materials.

  19. Ac losses for the self field of an ac transport current with a dc transport current offset in high {Tc} superconducting magnet coils for MagLev application

    SciTech Connect

    Koosh, V.F.

    1993-10-01

    Although much research has been conducted concerning the losses of high-{Tc} superconductors, very little has concentrated on the self-field losses in an actual magnet arrangement. The coils studied in this work were designed for use as actual magnets in an industrial application. Self field loss measurements were made upon tape-wound 2223 superconducting helix coils. The self-field losses were produced by an AC transport current with a DC transport current offset. Losses were taken for single, double and triple tape windings, giving essentially monofilament, dual, and three filament cases. The losses measured here were varied over a range of AC current values for several different DC values, and over a range of frequencies. The currents were all AC sinusoids with a DC offset. All measurements were made at T = 77K.

  20. Electron-radiation effects on the ac and dc electrical properties and unpaired electron densities of three aerospace polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Sheila Ann T.; Long, Edward R., Jr.; Ries, Heidi R.; Harries, Wynford L.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of gigarad-level total absorbed doses from 1-MeV electrons on the post-irradiation alternating-current (ac) and direct-current (dc) electrical properties and the unpaired electron densities have been studied for Kapton, Ultem, and Mylar. The unpaired electron densities (determined from electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy) and the dc electrical conductivities of the irradiated materials were monitored as functions of time following the exposures to determine their decay characteristics at room temperature. The elevated-temperature ac electrical dissipations of the Ultem and Mylar were affected by the radiation. The dc conductivity of the Kapton increased by five orders of magnitude, while the dc conductivities of the Ultem and Mylar increased by less than an order of magnitude, due to the radiation. The observed radiation-generated changes in the ac electrical dissipations are explained in terms of known radiation-generated changes in the molecular structures of the three materials. A preliminary model relating the dc electrical conductivity and the unpaired electron density in the Kapton is proposed.

  1. Josephson junctions with alternating critical current density

    SciTech Connect

    Mints, R.G.; Kogan, V.G.

    1997-04-01

    The magnetic-field dependence of the critical current I{sub c}(H) is considered for a short Josephson junction with the critical current density j{sub c} alternating along the tunnel contact. Two model cases, periodic and randomly alternating j{sub c}, are treated in detail. Recent experimental data on I{sub c}(H) for grain-boundary Josephson junctions in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Steadiness in Dilute Pyroclastic Density Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) are often unsteady, as evidenced by direct observations of dilute lobes or jets emerging from the fronts of larger currents and by deposits that indicate transient transport and depositional regimes. We used scaled experiments to investigate unsteadiness in dilute PDCs. The experimental currents were run in an 8.5x6.1x2.6 m tank and comprised heated or ambient temperature 20-μm talc powder turbulently suspended in air. Experiments were scaled such that densimetric and thermal Richardson numbers, Froude number, and particle Stokes and settling numbers were dynamically similar to natural dilute PDCs. Although the experiment Reynolds numbers are substantially lower than those of natural PDCs, the experiments are fully turbulent. Experiments were observed with video and high-speed cameras and high-frequency thermocouples. Currents were generated with total eruption durations of 100 s. Unsteadiness in source conditions was produced by interrupting supply for intervals, t, with durations of 1, 2.5, 5, and 10 s in the experimental runs at 35 and 70 s. When t<2.5 s, the currents are indistinguishable from currents with steady supply. In runs with t=2.5-5 s, the individual pulses comprising each current are readily apparent near the source, but decay with distance downstream until the currents appear as single (e.g. steady) flows. In experiments with t=10 s, the 3 pulses comprising each run never merge and the currents remain unsteady. Comparison with the integral turbulent timescale, τ, and current velocity, U, show that unsteadiness is persistent when t>3<τ but currents are steady when t<τ. In currents with 3τ>t>τ, unsteadiness decays such that at a distance of ~4Ut, the currents are again steady. Applied to natural dilute PDCs, our results suggest that currents and their resulting deposits, will only show evidence of unsteadiness if they are disrupted for many seconds and those breaks may "heal" over distances of 100s of meters.

  3. Current density compression of intense ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefkow, Adam Bennett

    Current density compression of intense ion beams in space and time is required for heavy ion fusion, in order to achieve the necessary intensities to implode an inertial confinement fusion target. Longitudinal compression to high current in a short pulse is achieved by imposing a velocity tilt upon the space-charge-dominated charge bunch, and a variety of means exist for simultaneous transverse focusing to a coincident focal plane. Compression to the desired levels requires sufficient neutralization of the beam by a pre-formed plasma during final transport. The physics of current density compression is studied in scaled experiments relevant for the operating regime of a heavy ion driver, and related theory and advanced particle-in-cell simulations provide valuable insight into the physical and technological limitations involved. A fast Faraday cup measures longitudinal compression ratios greater than 50 with pulse durations less than 5 ns, in excellent agreement with reduced models and sophisticated simulations, which account for many experimental parameters and effects. The detailed physics of achieving current density compression in the laboratory is reviewed. Quantitative examples explore the dependency of longitudinal compression on effects such as the finite-size acceleration gap, voltage waveform accuracy, variation in initial beam temperature, pulse length, intended fractional velocity tilt, and energy uncertainty, as well as aberration within focusing elements and plasma neutralization processes. In addition, plasma evolution in experimental sources responsible for the degree of beam neutralization is studied numerically, since compression stagnation occurs under inadequate neutralization conditions, which may excite nonlinear collective excitations due to beam-plasma interactions. The design of simultaneous focusing experiments using both existing and upgraded hardware is provided, and parametric variations important for compression physics are

  4. Concurrent Electroencephalography Recording During Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation (tACS)

    PubMed Central

    Fehér, Kristoffer D.; Morishima, Yosuke

    2016-01-01

    Oscillatory brain activities are considered to reflect the basis of rhythmic changes in transmission efficacy across brain networks and are assumed to integrate cognitive neural processes. Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) holds the promise to elucidate the causal link between specific frequencies of oscillatory brain activity and cognitive processes. Simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG) recording during tACS would offer an opportunity to directly explore immediate neurophysiological effects of tACS. However, it is not trivial to measure EEG signals during tACS, as tACS creates a huge artifact in EEG data. Here we explain how to set up concurrent tACS-EEG experiments. Two necessary considerations for successful EEG recording while applying tACS are highlighted. First, bridging of the tACS and EEG electrodes via leaking EEG gel immediately saturates the EEG amplifier. To avoid bridging via gel, the viscosity of the EEG gel is the most important parameter. The EEG gel must be viscous to avoid bridging, but at the same time sufficiently fluid to create contact between the tACS electrode and the scalp. Second, due to the large amplitude of the tACS artifact, it is important to consider using an EEG system with a high resolution analog-to-digital (A/D) converter. In particular, the magnitude of the tACS artifact can exceed 100 mV at the vicinity of a stimulation electrode when 1 mA tACS is applied. The resolution of the A/D converter is of importance to measure good quality EEG data from the vicinity of the stimulation site. By following these guidelines for the procedures and technical considerations, successful concurrent EEG recording during tACS will be realized. PMID:26862814

  5. Roebel assembled coated conductor cables (RACC): Ac-Losses and current carrying potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, A.; Heller, R.; Goldacker, W.; Kling, A.; Schmidt, C.

    2008-02-01

    Low ac-loss HTS cables for transport currents well above 1 kA are required for application in transformers and generators and are taken into consideration for future generations of fusion reactor coils. Coated conductors (CC) are suitable candidates for high field application at an operation temperature in the range 50-77 K. Ac-field applications require cables with low ac-losses and hence twisting of the individual strands. We solved this problem using the Roebel technique. Short lengths of Roebel bar cables were prepared from industrial DyBCO and YBCO-CC. Meander shaped tapes of 4 or 5 mm width with twist pitches of 123 or 127 mm were cut from the 10 or 12 mm wide CC tapes using a specially designed tool. Eleven or twelve of these strands were assembled to a cable. The electrical and mechanical connection of the tapes was achieved using a silver powder filled conductive epoxy resin. Ac-losses of a short sample in an external ac-field were measured as a function of frequency and field amplitude as well as the coupling current decay time constant. We discuss the results in terms of available theories and compare measured time constants in transverse field with measured coupling losses. Finally the potential of this cable type for ac-use is discussed with respect to ac-losses and current carrying capability.

  6. Current Density Scaling in Electrochemical Flow Capacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyt, NC; Wainright, JS; Savinell, RF

    2015-02-18

    Electrochemical flow capacitors (EFCs) are a recently developed energy storage technology. One of the principal performance metrics of an EFC is the steady-state electrical current density that it can accept or deliver. Numerical models exist to predict this performance for specific cases, but here we present a study of how the current varies with respect to the applied cell voltage, flow rate, cell dimensions, and slurry properties using scaling laws. The scaling relationships are confirmed by numerical simulations and then subsequently by comparison to results from symmetric cell EFC experiments. This modeling approach permits the delimitation of three distinct operational regimes dependent on the values of two nondimensional combinations of the pertinent variables (specifically, a capacitive Graetz number and a conductivity ratio). Lastly, the models and nondimensional numbers are used to provide design guidance in terms of criteria for proper EFC operation. (C) The Author(s) 2015. Published by ECS. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License (CC BY, http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse of the work in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. All rights reserved.

  7. Critical current density: Measurements vs. reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, A. V.; Golovchanskiy, I. A.; Fedoseev, S. A.

    2013-07-01

    Different experimental techniques are employed to evaluate the critical current density (Jc), namely transport current measurements and two different magnetisation measurements forming quasi-equilibrium and dynamic critical states. Our technique-dependent results for superconducting YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO) film and MgB2 bulk samples show an extremely high sensitivity of Jc and associated interpretations, such as irreversibility fields and Kramer plots, which lose meaning without a universal approach. We propose such approach for YBCO films based on their unique pinning features. This approach allows us to accurately recalculate the magnetic-field-dependent Jc obtained by any technique into the Jc behaviour, which would have been measured by any other method without performing the corresponding experiments. We also discovered low-frequency-dependent phenomena, governing flux dynamics, but contradicting the considered ones in the literature. The understanding of these phenomena, relevant to applications with moving superconductors, can clarify their dramatic impact on the electric-field criterion through flux diffusivity and corresponding measurements.

  8. Demodulation circuit for AC motor current spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Hendrix, Donald E.; Smith, Stephen F.

    1990-12-18

    A motor current analysis method for the remote, noninvasive inspection of electric motor-operated systems. Synchronous amplitude demodulation and phase demodulation circuits are used singly and in combination along with a frequency analyzer to produce improved spectral analysis of load-induced frequencies present in the electric current flowing in a motor-driven system.

  9. AC and DC transport currents in melt-grown YBCO

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Z.; Ashworth, S.; Becluz, C.; Scurlock, R.G. )

    1991-03-01

    It has been suggested that the transport J{sub c} in multi-grain samples of bulk YBCO are limited by the intergrain links. This paper reports on preliminary measurements of intergrain currents. The intergrain critical currents in melt grown YBCO do not appear to be as sensitive to the precise crystallographic alignment of adjacent grains a has been reported for thin films. The measured critical current of similar grain boundaries varies widely, between 15000 A/cm{sup 2} and 200A/Cm{sub 2} for adjacent boundaries in the same sample.

  10. Development of a 10 kW High Temperature High Power Density Three-Phase AC-DC-AC SiC Converter

    SciTech Connect

    Ning, Puqi

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the development and experimental performance of a 10 kW, all SiC, 250 C junction temperature high-power-density three-phase ac-dc-ac converter. The electromagnetic interference filter, thermal system, high temperature package, and gate drive design are discussed in detail. Finally, tests confirming the feasibility and validating the theoretical basis of the prototype converter system are described.

  11. Anode current density distribution in a cusped field thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Huan Liu, Hui Meng, Yingchao; Zhang, Junyou; Yang, Siyu; Hu, Peng; Chen, Pengbo; Yu, Daren

    2015-12-15

    The cusped field thruster is a new electric propulsion device that is expected to have a non-uniform radial current density at the anode. To further study the anode current density distribution, a multi-annulus anode is designed to directly measure the anode current density for the first time. The anode current density decreases sharply at larger radii; the magnitude of collected current density at the center is far higher compared with the outer annuli. The anode current density non-uniformity does not demonstrate a significant change with varying working conditions.

  12. Methods, systems and apparatus for controlling operation of two alternating current (AC) machines

    DOEpatents

    Gallegos-Lopez, Gabriel; Nagashima, James M.; Perisic, Milun; Hiti, Silva

    2012-06-05

    A system is provided for controlling two alternating current (AC) machines via a five-phase PWM inverter module. The system comprises a first control loop, a second control loop, and a current command adjustment module. The current command adjustment module operates in conjunction with the first control loop and the second control loop to continuously adjust current command signals that control the first AC machine and the second AC machine such that they share the input voltage available to them without compromising the target mechanical output power of either machine. This way, even when the phase voltage available to either one of the machines decreases, that machine outputs its target mechanical output power.

  13. The effects of theta transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) on fluid intelligence.

    PubMed

    Pahor, Anja; Jaušovec, Norbert

    2014-09-01

    The objective of the study was to explore the influence of transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) on resting brain activity and on measures of fluid intelligence. Theta tACS was applied to the left parietal and left frontal brain areas of healthy participants after which resting electroencephalogram (EEG) data was recorded. Following sham/active stimulation, the participants solved two tests of fluid intelligence while their EEG was recorded. The results showed that active theta tACS affected spectral power in theta and alpha frequency bands. In addition, active theta tACS improved performance on tests of fluid intelligence. This influence was more pronounced in the group of participants that received stimulation to the left parietal area than in the group of participants that received stimulation to the left frontal area. Left parietal tACS increased performance on the difficult test items of both tests (RAPM and PF&C) whereas left frontal tACS increased performance only on the easy test items of one test (RAPM). The observed behavioral tACS influences were also accompanied by changes in neuroelectric activity. The behavioral and neuroelectric data tentatively support the P-FIT neurobiological model of intelligence.

  14. The effects of theta transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) on fluid intelligence.

    PubMed

    Pahor, Anja; Jaušovec, Norbert

    2014-09-01

    The objective of the study was to explore the influence of transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) on resting brain activity and on measures of fluid intelligence. Theta tACS was applied to the left parietal and left frontal brain areas of healthy participants after which resting electroencephalogram (EEG) data was recorded. Following sham/active stimulation, the participants solved two tests of fluid intelligence while their EEG was recorded. The results showed that active theta tACS affected spectral power in theta and alpha frequency bands. In addition, active theta tACS improved performance on tests of fluid intelligence. This influence was more pronounced in the group of participants that received stimulation to the left parietal area than in the group of participants that received stimulation to the left frontal area. Left parietal tACS increased performance on the difficult test items of both tests (RAPM and PF&C) whereas left frontal tACS increased performance only on the easy test items of one test (RAPM). The observed behavioral tACS influences were also accompanied by changes in neuroelectric activity. The behavioral and neuroelectric data tentatively support the P-FIT neurobiological model of intelligence. PMID:24998643

  15. BOLD signal effects of transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) in the alpha range: A concurrent tACS-fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Vosskuhl, Johannes; Huster, René J; Herrmann, Christoph S

    2016-10-15

    Many studies have proven transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) to manipulate brain activity. Until now it is not known, however, how these manipulations in brain activity are represented in brain metabolism or how spatially specific these changes are. Alpha-tACS has been shown to enhance the amplitude of the individual alpha frequency (IAF) and a negative correlation between alpha amplitude and occipital BOLD signal was reported in numerous EEG/fMRI experiments. Thus, alpha-tACS was chosen to test the effects of tACS on the BOLD signal. A reduction thereof was expected during alpha-tACS which shows the spatial extent of tACS effects beyond modeling studies. Three groups of subjects were measured in an MRI scanner, receiving tACS at either their IAF (N=11), 1Hz (control; N=12) or sham (i.e., no stimulation - a second control; N=11) while responding to a visual vigilance task. Stimulation was administered in an interleaved pattern of tACS-on runs and tACS-free baseline periods. The BOLD signal was analyzed in response to tACS-onset during resting state and in response to seldom target stimuli. Alpha-tACS at 1.0mA reduced the task-related BOLD response to visual targets in the occipital cortex as compared to tACS-free baseline periods. The deactivation was strongest in an area where the BOLD signal was shown to correlate negatively with alpha amplitude. A direct effect of tACS on resting state BOLD signal levels could not be shown. Our findings suggest that tACS-related changes in BOLD activity occur only as a modulation of an existing BOLD response.

  16. Targeting the neurophysiology of cognitive systems with transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS)

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Flavio; Sellers, Kristin K.; Cordle, Asa L.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive impairment represents one of the most debilitating and most difficult symptom to treat of many psychiatric illnesses. Human neurophysiology studies have suggested specific pathologies of cortical network activity correlate with cognitive impairment. However, we lack (1) demonstration of causal relationships between specific network activity patterns and cognitive capabilities and (2) treatment modalities that directly target impaired network dynamics of cognition. Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS), a novel non-invasive brain stimulation approach, may provide a crucial tool to tackle these challenges. We here propose that tACS can be used to elucidate the causal role of cortical synchronization in cognition and, eventually, to enhance pathologically weakened synchrony that may underlie cognitive deficits. To accelerate such development of tACS as a treatment for cognitive deficits, we discuss studies on tACS and cognition (all performed in healthy participants) according to the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) of the National Institute of Mental Health. PMID:25547149

  17. Particle Image Velocimetry Study of Density Current Fronts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Juan Ezequiel

    2009-01-01

    Gravity currents are flows that occur when a horizontal density difference causes fluid to move under the action of gravity; density currents are a particular case, for which the scalar causing the density difference is conserved. Flows with a strong effect of the horizontal density difference, even if only partially driven by it--such as the…

  18. High current density cathode for electrorefining in molten electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Li, Shelly X.

    2010-06-29

    A high current density cathode for electrorefining in a molten electrolyte for the continuous production and collection of loose dendritic or powdery deposits. The high current density cathode eliminates the requirement for mechanical scraping and electrochemical stripping of the deposits from the cathode in an anode/cathode module. The high current density cathode comprises a perforated electrical insulated material coating such that the current density is up to 3 A/cm.sup.2.

  19. Current density partitioning in time-dependent current density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Mosquera, Martín A.; Wasserman, Adam

    2014-05-14

    We adapt time-dependent current density functional theory to allow for a fragment-based solution of the many-electron problem of molecules in the presence of time-dependent electric and magnetic fields. Regarding a molecule as a set of non-interacting subsystems that individually evolve under the influence of an auxiliary external electromagnetic vector-scalar potential pair, the partition 4-potential, we show that there are one-to-one mappings between this auxiliary potential, a sharply-defined set of fragment current densities, and the total current density of the system. The partition electromagnetic (EM) 4-potential is expressed in terms of the real EM 4-potential of the system and a gluing EM 4-potential that accounts for exchange-correlation effects and mutual interaction forces between fragments that are required to yield the correct electron dynamics. We prove the zero-force theorem for the fragmented system, establish a variational formulation in terms of action functionals, and provide a simple illustration for a charged particle in a ring.

  20. Relationship between critical charge density, holding current, and maximum current density in optically triggered silicon carbide thyristors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuferev, V. S.; Levinshtein, M. E.; Palmour, J. W.

    2013-10-01

    Relationship between critical charge density, holding current, and maximum current density has been studied by using an adequate numerical model for the axisymmetric configuration characteristic of the optical triggering of power silicon carbide thyristors. It is shown that the holding current Ih depends only weakly on the critical charge density of a thyristor, pc. At the same time, the maximum current density in the state corresponding to holding current grows very steeply with increasing pc. It is shown that the maximum current density can substantially increase with decreasing current in the axisymmetric configuration if the switched-on state occupies only a part of the total area of a thyristor.

  1. ac current generation in chiral magnetic insulators and Skyrmion motion induced by the spin Seebeck effect.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shi-Zeng; Batista, Cristian D; Reichhardt, Charles; Saxena, Avadh

    2014-05-01

    We show that a temperature gradient induces an ac electric current in multiferroic insulators when the sample is embedded in a circuit. We also show that a thermal gradient can be used to move magnetic Skyrmions in insulating chiral magnets: the induced magnon flow from the hot to the cold region drives the Skyrmions in the opposite direction via a magnonic spin transfer torque. Both results are combined to compute the effect of Skyrmion motion on the ac current generation and demonstrate that Skyrmions in insulators are a promising route for spin caloritronics applications.

  2. ac current generation in chiral magnetic insulators and Skyrmion motion induced by the spin Seebeck effect.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shi-Zeng; Batista, Cristian D; Reichhardt, Charles; Saxena, Avadh

    2014-05-01

    We show that a temperature gradient induces an ac electric current in multiferroic insulators when the sample is embedded in a circuit. We also show that a thermal gradient can be used to move magnetic Skyrmions in insulating chiral magnets: the induced magnon flow from the hot to the cold region drives the Skyrmions in the opposite direction via a magnonic spin transfer torque. Both results are combined to compute the effect of Skyrmion motion on the ac current generation and demonstrate that Skyrmions in insulators are a promising route for spin caloritronics applications. PMID:24856718

  3. The effect of 10 Hz transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) on corticomuscular coherence

    PubMed Central

    Wach, Claudia; Krause, Vanessa; Moliadze, Vera; Paulus, Walter; Schnitzler, Alfons; Pollok, Bettina

    2013-01-01

    Synchronous oscillatory activity at alpha (8–12 Hz), beta (13–30 Hz), and gamma (30–90 Hz) frequencies is assumed to play a key role for motor control. Corticomuscular coherence (CMC) represents an established measure of the pyramidal system's integrity. Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) offers the possibility to modulate ongoing oscillatory activity. Behaviorally, 20 Hz tACS in healthy subjects has been shown to result in movement slowing. However, the neurophysiological changes underlying these effects are not entirely understood yet. The present study aimed at ascertaining the effects of tACS at 10 and 20 Hz in healthy subjects on CMC and local power of the primary sensorimotor cortex. Neuromagnetic activity was recorded during isometric contraction before and at two time points (2–10 min and 30–38 min) after tACS of the left primary motor cortex (M1), using a 306 channel whole head magnetoencephalography (MEG) system. Additionally, electromyography (EMG) of the right extensor digitorum communis (EDC) muscle was measured. TACS was applied at 10 and 20 Hz, respectively, for 10 min at 1 mA. Sham stimulation served as control condition. The data suggest that 10 Hz tACS significantly reduced low gamma band CMC during isometric contraction. This implies that tACS does not necessarily cause effects at stimulation frequency. Rather, the findings suggest cross-frequency interplay between alpha and low gamma band activity modulating functional interaction between motor cortex and muscle. PMID:24009573

  4. Numerical and theoretical evaluations of AC losses for single and infinite numbers of superconductor strips with direct and alternating transport currents in external AC magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajikawa, K.; Funaki, K.; Shikimachi, K.; Hirano, N.; Nagaya, S.

    2010-11-01

    AC losses in a superconductor strip are numerically evaluated by means of a finite element method formulated with a current vector potential. The expressions of AC losses in an infinite slab that corresponds to a simple model of infinitely stacked strips are also derived theoretically. It is assumed that the voltage-current characteristics of the superconductors are represented by Bean’s critical state model. The typical operation pattern of a Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) coil with direct and alternating transport currents in an external AC magnetic field is taken into account as the electromagnetic environment for both the single strip and the infinite slab. By using the obtained results of AC losses, the influences of the transport currents on the total losses are discussed quantitatively.

  5. Direct Detection of Pure ac Spin Current by X-Ray Pump-Probe Measurements.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Shelford, L R; Shafer, P; Tan, A; Deng, J X; Keatley, P S; Hwang, C; Arenholz, E; van der Laan, G; Hicken, R J; Qiu, Z Q

    2016-08-12

    Despite recent progress in spin-current research, the detection of spin current has mostly remained indirect. By synchronizing a microwave waveform with synchrotron x-ray pulses, we use the ferromagnetic resonance of the Py (Ni_{81}Fe_{19}) layer in a Py/Cu/Cu_{75}Mn_{25}/Cu/Co multilayer to pump a pure ac spin current into the Cu_{75}Mn_{25} and Co layers, and then directly probe the spin current within the Cu_{75}Mn_{25} layer and the spin dynamics of the Co layer by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. This element-resolved pump-probe measurement unambiguously identifies the ac spin current in the Cu_{75}Mn_{25} layer. PMID:27563981

  6. Direct Detection of Pure ac Spin Current by X-Ray Pump-Probe Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Shelford, L. R.; Shafer, P.; Tan, A.; Deng, J. X.; Keatley, P. S.; Hwang, C.; Arenholz, E.; van der Laan, G.; Hicken, R. J.; Qiu, Z. Q.

    2016-08-01

    Despite recent progress in spin-current research, the detection of spin current has mostly remained indirect. By synchronizing a microwave waveform with synchrotron x-ray pulses, we use the ferromagnetic resonance of the Py (Ni81Fe19 ) layer in a Py /Cu /Cu75Mn25/Cu /Co multilayer to pump a pure ac spin current into the Cu75Mn25 and Co layers, and then directly probe the spin current within the Cu75Mn25 layer and the spin dynamics of the Co layer by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. This element-resolved pump-probe measurement unambiguously identifies the ac spin current in the Cu75Mn25 layer.

  7. The equilibrium geometry of A@C60: A test case for conventional density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yong; Ai, Yuejie; Song, Xiuneng; Wang, Chuankui; Luo, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Potential energy surfaces (PESs) along the reaction pathway towards the center of CC bond between two six membered rings for ten different endohedral fullerenes A@C60 (A = H, C, O, S, N, P, He, Ne, Ar, Kr) have been studied by density functional theory (DFT) and Hartree-Fock (HF) method. The results show that no suitable method can consistently describe the interaction between atom A and carbon cage. The dispersion corrected DFT methods fail to describe the equilibrium geometry and PES of the complexes with light atoms. Nevertheless, the inclusion of the dispersion stabilizes the system as reflected by interaction energies (IEs) between atom A and C60.

  8. AC-field-induced quantum phase transitions in density of states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kai-Hua; Liu, Kai-Di; Wang, Huai-Yu; Qin, Chang-Dong

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the joint effects of the intralead electron interaction and an external alternating gate voltage on the time-averaged local density of states (DOSs) of a quantum dot coupled to two Luttinger-liquid leads in the Kondo regime. A rich dependence of the DOSs on the driving amplitude and intralead interaction is demonstrated. We show that the feature is quite different for different interaction strengths in the presence of the ac field. It is shown that the photon-assisted transport processes cause an additional splitting of the Kondo peak or dip, which exhibits photon-assisted single-channel (1CK) or two-channel Kondo (2CK) physics behavior. The phase transition between photon-assisted 1CK and 2CK physics occurs when the interaction strength is moderately strong. The inelastic channels associated with photon-assisted electron tunneling can dominate electron transport for weak interaction when the ac amplitude is greater than the frequency by one order of magnitude. In the limit of strong interaction the DOSs scale as a power-law behavior which is strongly affected by the ac field.

  9. Electrical transport properties and current density - voltage characteristic of PVA-Ag nanocomposite film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, A. K.; Dutta, B.; Sinha, S.; Mukherjee, A.; Basu, S.; Meikap, A. K.

    2016-05-01

    Silver (Ag) nanoparticle and Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) - Silver (Ag) composite have been prepared and its dielectric constant, ac conductivity, and current density-voltage characteristics have been studied, at and above room temperature. Here correlated barrier hopping found to be the dominant charge transport mechanism with maximum barrier height of 0.11 eV. The sample, under ±5 V applied voltage, show back to back Schottky diode behaviour.

  10. Statistical evaluation of telephone noise interference caused by AC power line harmonic currents

    SciTech Connect

    Kuussaari, M. )

    1993-04-01

    A statistical approach is applied for the evaluation of the limits for harmonic currents in AC power lines, the goal being to prevent excessive telephone noise interference voltages in subscriber cables in rural areas. The analysis is based on Monte-Carlo simulation which takes into account the effect of the experiental probability distributions of the relevant parameters. In the Finnish conditions, the properties of communication cables permit equivalent disturbing phase currents of 8 to 10 A. The digital exchanges permit approximately the same currents. Some new telephone types that have a low balance may make it necessary to limit the currents to a level that is somewhat lower.

  11. Finite element analysis of current flowing patterns and AC loss in the multifilament strand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ta, Wurui; Li, Yingxu; Gao, Yuanwen

    2013-12-01

    Intrinsic current flow and field distribution scheme under the imposed low current injection and the applied weak field is meaningful to interpret Ic degradation and AC loss in a strand that performs as a normal composite conductor. A 2D finite element (FE) transport model is built in COMSOL to identify the various transverse resistance components and reveal the interrelation among them. Then the transverse resistivity components are taken as the basic electrical components in a 3D composite strand model. The 3D model follows the realistic trajectories of twisted filaments in strand composite and experimental material properties. To address the potential/current map in the stationary transport, the FE model is thoroughly analyzed for the short-sample and long-sample strand, imposed by two in-plane steady current injections and a potential boundary condition at one strand end with the other end grounded, respectively. The results show that the short-sample longitudinal current is uniform with little resistivity loss, and flows from the positive source and converges to the negative one in the cross section with different paths and current proportions between filaments and matrix. However, for the long-sample, there is a serious reduction in electric potential along the strand axis and the currents mostly concentrate on filaments. The time-varying problem is also implemented by computing AC loss induced by a relatively far-away alternating line current. It is discussed where appropriate that the effect of the twist pitch and contact resistivity on the pattern and magnitude of the current flow and AC loss.

  12. Switch contact device for interrupting high current, high voltage, AC and DC circuits

    DOEpatents

    Via, Lester C.; Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Ryan, John M.

    2005-01-04

    A high voltage switch contact structure capable of interrupting high voltage, high current AC and DC circuits. The contact structure confines the arc created when contacts open to the thin area between two insulating surfaces in intimate contact. This forces the arc into the shape of a thin sheet which loses heat energy far more rapidly than an arc column having a circular cross-section. These high heat losses require a dramatic increase in the voltage required to maintain the arc, thus extinguishing it when the required voltage exceeds the available voltage. The arc extinguishing process with this invention is not dependent on the occurrence of a current zero crossing and, consequently, is capable of rapidly interrupting both AC and DC circuits. The contact structure achieves its high performance without the use of sulfur hexafluoride.

  13. An Annotated Bibliography of High-Voltage Direct-Current Transmission and Flexible AC Transmission (FACTS) Devices, 1991-1993.

    SciTech Connect

    Litzenberger, Wayne; Lava, Val

    1994-08-01

    References are contained for HVDC systems, converter stations and components, overhead transmission lines, cable transmission, system design and operations, simulation of high voltage direct current systems, high-voltage direct current installations, and flexible AC transmission system (FACTS).

  14. Correlation of ion and beam current densities in Kaufman thrusters.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    In the absence of direct impingement erosion, electrostatic thruster accelerator grid lifetime is defined by the charge exchange erosion that occurs at peak values of the ion beam current density. In order to maximize the thrust from an engine with a specified grid lifetime, the ion beam current density profile should therefore be as flat as possible. Knauer (1970) has suggested this can be achieved by establishing a radial plasma uniformity within the thruster discharge chamber; his tests with the radial field thruster provide an example of uniform plasma properties within the chamber and a flat ion beam profile occurring together. It is shown that, in particular, the ion density profile within the chamber determines the beam current density profile, and that a uniform ion density profile at the screen grid end of the discharge chamber should lead to a flat beam current density profile.

  15. Mapping entrained brain oscillations during transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS).

    PubMed

    Witkowski, Matthias; Garcia-Cossio, Eliana; Chander, Bankim S; Braun, Christoph; Birbaumer, Niels; Robinson, Stephen E; Soekadar, Surjo R

    2016-10-15

    Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS), a non-invasive and well-tolerated form of electric brain stimulation, can influence perception, memory, as well as motor and cognitive function. While the exact underlying neurophysiological mechanisms are unknown, the effects of tACS are mainly attributed to frequency-specific entrainment of endogenous brain oscillations in brain areas close to the stimulation electrodes, and modulation of spike timing dependent plasticity reflected in gamma band oscillatory responses. tACS-related electromagnetic stimulator artifacts, however, impede investigation of these neurophysiological mechanisms. Here we introduce a novel approach combining amplitude-modulated tACS during whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) allowing for artifact-free source reconstruction and precise mapping of entrained brain oscillations underneath the stimulator electrodes. Using this approach, we show that reliable reconstruction of neuromagnetic low- and high-frequency oscillations including high gamma band activity in stimulated cortical areas is feasible opening a new window to unveil the mechanisms underlying the effects of stimulation protocols that entrain brain oscillatory activity.

  16. Note: A real-time beam current density meter

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Junliang; Yu Deyang; Ruan Fangfang; Xue Yingli; Wang Wei

    2013-03-15

    We have developed a real-time beam current density meter for charged particle beams. It measures the mean current density by collimating a uniform and large diameter primary beam. The suppression of the secondary electrons and the deflection of the beam were simulated, and it was tested with a 105 keV Ar{sup 7+} ion beam.

  17. SIM regional comparison of ac-dc current transfer difference SIM.EM-K12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Lillo, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    The ac-dc current transfer difference identified as SIM.EM.K-12 began in July 2010 and was completed in September 2012. Six NMIs in the SIM region and one NMI in the AFRIMET region took part: NRC (Canada), NIST (United States of America), CENAM (Mexico), INTI (Argentina), UTE (Uruguay), INMETRO (Brazil) and NIS (Egypt). The comparisons were proposed to assess the measurement capabilities in ac-dc current transfer difference of the participants NMIs. The ac-dc current transfer differences of the travelling standard had been measured at 10 mA and 5 A at 10 Hz, 55 Hz, 1 kHz, 10 kHz, 20 kHz, 50 kHz and 100 kHz. The test points were selected to link the results with the equivalent CCEM Key Comparisons (CCEM-K12), through three NMIs participating in both SIM and CCEM key comparisons (INTI, NRC and NIST). The report shows the degree of equivalence in the SIM region and also the degree of equivalence with the corresponding CCEM reference value. The results of all participants support the values and uncertainties of the applicable CMC entries for ac-dc current transfer difference in the Key Comparison Database held at the BIPM. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCEM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  18. Diameter dependent failure current density of gold nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, S.; Maaz, K.; Ali, G.; Ensinger, W.

    2009-09-01

    Failure current density of single gold nanowires is investigated in this paper. Single wires with diameters ranging from 80 to 720 nm and length 30 µm were electrochemically deposited in ion track-etched single-pore polycarbonate membranes. The maximum current density was investigated while keeping the wires embedded in the polymer matrix and ramping up the current until failure occurred. The current density is found to increase with diminishing diameter and the wires with a diameter of 80 nm withstand 1.2 × 1012 A m-2 before undergoing failure. Possible reasons for these results are discussed in this paper.

  19. Individual differences in transcranial electrical stimulation current density

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Michael J; Goodman, Theodore; Pierson, Ronald; Shepherd, Shane; Wang, Qiang; Groshong, Bennett; Wiley, David F

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial electrical stimulation (TCES) is effective in treating many conditions, but it has not been possible to accurately forecast current density within the complex anatomy of a given subject's head. We sought to predict and verify TCES current densities and determine the variability of these current distributions in patient-specific models based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. Two experiments were performed. The first experiment estimated conductivity from MRIs and compared the current density results against actual measurements from the scalp surface of 3 subjects. In the second experiment, virtual electrodes were placed on the scalps of 18 subjects to model simulated current densities with 2 mA of virtually applied stimulation. This procedure was repeated for 4 electrode locations. Current densities were then calculated for 75 brain regions. Comparison of modeled and measured external current in experiment 1 yielded a correlation of r = .93. In experiment 2, modeled individual differences were greatest near the electrodes (ten-fold differences were common), but simulated current was found in all regions of the brain. Sites that were distant from the electrodes (e.g. hypothalamus) typically showed two-fold individual differences. MRI-based modeling can effectively predict current densities in individual brains. Significant variation occurs between subjects with the same applied electrode configuration. Individualized MRI-based modeling should be considered in place of the 10-20 system when accurate TCES is needed. PMID:24285948

  20. Simulation analysis of three-phase current type AC-to-DC converter with high power factor

    SciTech Connect

    Okui, Yoshiaki; Yamada, Hajime

    1997-03-01

    A new three-phase current type AC-to-DC converter has been developed by the authors. This paper describes the principle of the circuit operation and the circuit configuration of the AC-to-DC converter controlled by PWM. Simulation analysis of each waveform, such as AC and DC voltages and currents, are calculated by Euler`s method. The simulated values of the total power factor agreed with the measured values within the difference of 5.8% on the condition of full load, 10kW. When the AC side voltage is unbalanced, it is found by simulation that the total harmonic distortion controlled by both feedforward control and AC side current feedback control (proportion gain, k{sub 4} = 1) is restrained at only 38% compared with only feedforward control (k{sub 4} = 0).

  1. On bottom density currents on the continental shelves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anuchin, V. N.; Gusev, A. M.; Pyrkin, Y. G.; Khapayev, M. M.

    1975-01-01

    The turbulent characteristics of bottom density currents on the continental shelves and their influence on the vertical profiles of current velocities are studied by considering plane parallel flows of a liquid with one density in a motionless liquid and with lighter density along an inclined plane. The motion of the liquid is a result of gravitational force directed along the parallel plane. Vertical distribution of turbulent stress is determined from a known average velocity profile and is used to obtain the vertical profile of the average current velocity.

  2. Spin Hall voltages from a.c. and d.c. spin currents

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Dahai; Obstbaum, Martin; Ribow, Mirko; Back, Christian H.; Woltersdorf, Georg

    2014-01-01

    In spin electronics, the spin degree of freedom is used to transmit and store information. To this end the ability to create pure spin currents—that is, without net charge transfer—is essential. When the magnetization vector in a ferromagnet–normal metal junction is excited, the spin pumping effect leads to the injection of pure spin currents into the normal metal. The polarization of this spin current is time-dependent and contains a very small d.c. component. Here we show that the large a.c. component of the spin currents can be detected efficiently using the inverse spin Hall effect. The observed a.c.-inverse spin Hall voltages are one order of magnitude larger than the conventional d.c.-inverse spin Hall voltages measured on the same device. Our results demonstrate that ferromagnet–normal metal junctions are efficient sources of pure spin currents in the gigahertz frequency range. PMID:24780927

  3. Choice of basic variables in current-density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellgren, Erik I.; Kvaal, Simen; Sagvolden, Espen; Ekström, Ulf; Teale, Andrew M.; Helgaker, Trygve

    2012-12-01

    The selection of basic variables in current-density-functional theory and formal properties of the resulting formulations are critically examined. Focus is placed on the extent to which the Hohenberg-Kohn theorem, constrained-search approach, and Lieb's formulation (in terms of convex and concave conjugation) of standard density-functional theory can be generalized to provide foundations for current-density-functional theory. For the well-known case with the gauge-dependent paramagnetic current density as a basic variable, we find that the resulting total energy functional is not concave. It is shown that a simple redefinition of the scalar potential restores concavity and enables the application of convex analysis and convex (or concave) conjugation. As a result, the solution sets arising in potential-optimization problems can be given a simple characterization. We also review attempts to establish theories with the physical current density as a basic variable. Despite the appealing physical motivation behind this choice of basic variables, we find that the mathematical foundations of the theories proposed to date are unsatisfactory. Moreover, the analogy to standard density-functional theory is substantially weaker as neither the constrained-search approach nor the convex analysis framework carry over to a theory making use of the physical current density.

  4. Correcting magnetic probe perturbations on current density measurements of current carrying plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Knoblauch, P.; Raspa, V.; Di Lorenzo, F.; Lazarte, A.; Moreno, C.; Clausse, A.

    2010-09-15

    A method to infer the current density distribution in the current sheath of a plasma focus discharge from a magnetic probe is formulated and then applied to experimental data obtained in a 1.1 kJ device. Distortions on the magnetic probe signal caused by current redistribution and by a time-dependent total discharge current are considered simultaneously, leading to an integral equation for the current density. Two distinct, easy to implement, numerical procedures are given to solve such equation. Experimental results show the coexistence of at least two maxima in the current density structure of a nitrogen sheath.

  5. Casimir effect for scalar current densities in topologically nontrivial spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellucci, S.; Saharian, A. A.; Saharyan, N. A.

    2015-08-01

    We evaluate the Hadamard function and the vacuum expectation value (VEV) of the current density for a charged scalar field, induced by flat boundaries in spacetimes with an arbitrary number of toroidally compactified spatial dimensions. The field operator obeys the Robin conditions on the boundaries and quasiperiodicity conditions with general phases along compact dimensions. In addition, the presence of a constant gauge field is assumed. The latter induces Aharonov-Bohm-type effect on the VEVs. There is a region in the space of the parameters in Robin boundary conditions where the vacuum state becomes unstable. The stability condition depends on the lengths of compact dimensions and is less restrictive than that for background with trivial topology. The vacuum current density is a periodic function of the magnetic flux, enclosed by compact dimensions, with the period equal to the flux quantum. It is explicitly decomposed into the boundary-free and boundary-induced contributions. In sharp contrast to the VEVs of the field squared and the energy-momentum tensor, the current density does not contain surface divergences. Moreover, for Dirichlet condition it vanishes on the boundaries. The normal derivative of the current density on the boundaries vanish for both Dirichlet and Neumann conditions and is nonzero for general Robin conditions. When the separation between the plates is smaller than other length scales, the behavior of the current density is essentially different for non-Neumann and Neumann boundary conditions. In the former case, the total current density in the region between the plates tends to zero. For Neumann boundary condition on both plates, the current density is dominated by the interference part and is inversely proportional to the separation.

  6. Rf Gun with High-Current Density Field Emission Cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2005-12-19

    High current-density field emission from an array of carbon nanotubes, with field-emission-transistor control, and with secondary electron channel multiplication in a ceramic facing structure, have been combined in a cold cathode for rf guns and diode guns. Electrodynamic and space-charge flow simulations were conducted to specify the cathode configuration and range of emission current density from the field emission cold cathode. Design of this cathode has been made for installation and testing in an existing S-band 2-1/2 cell rf gun. With emission control and modulation, and with current density in the range of 0.1-1 kA/cm2, this cathode could provide performance and long-life not enjoyed by other currently-available cathodes

  7. Magneto-optical imaging of transport current densities in superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, G.W.; Welp, U.; Gunter, D.O.; Zhong, W.; Balachandran, U.; Haldar, P.; Sokolowski, R.S.; Vlasko-Vlasov, V.K.; Nikitenko, V.I.

    1995-12-31

    Direct imaging of the paths of transport currents in superconductors creates many new possibilities for exploring the basic features of vortex pinning mechanisms and for improving the performance of superconducting materials. A technique for imaging the path and magnitude of the transport current density flowing in superconductors is described. Results are given for a 37-filament BSCCO 2223 powder-in-tube wire, showing a highly inhomogeneous current path within the filaments.

  8. The AC (Alternating Current) Electrical Behavior of Multi-layered Thermoelectric Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alim, Mohammad A.; Budak, Satilmis; Bhattacharjee, Sudip

    2016-08-01

    In this study the ac (alternating current) small-signal electrical data in the frequency range 5 Hz ≤ f ≤ 13 MHz are obtained for the multi-layered thermoelectric (TE) devices to extract underlying operative mechanisms via an equivalent circuit model. This model is developed from the complex plane plots in conjunction with the Bode plot. It is observed that the inductive behavior is prevalent for both unbombarded and bombarded TE devices regardless of the doses as both types are observed as somewhat weak in thermoelectric properties. The bombarded multi-layered devices followed a systematic pattern in ac behavior via semicircular relaxation both in the impedance and admittance planes for the same measured data. This pattern is attributed to the transition from one lumped behavior to two distinct mechanisms. It is observed that the␣conductive nature of the equivalent circuit model via non-blocking (non-capacitive) elements, attributed to the underlying operative electrical paths between the two opposite electrodes across the multi-layered device exists, satisfying direct current conditions of the equivalent circuit model. The inductive behavior at high frequencies originates from the conductive aspect of the lumped response of the device in addition to the contribution of the electrode leads. Thus, the proposed equivalent circuit model contains external inductance that verifies a meaningful representation of the multi-layered TE device, though weak in thermoelectric properties.

  9. Effect of the combined action of Faradaic currents and mobility differences in ac electro-osmosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, A.; Ramos, A.; García-Sánchez, P.; Castellanos, A.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we extend previous analyses of ac electro-osmosis to account for the combined action of two experimentally relevant effects: (i) Faradaic currents from electrochemical reactions at the electrodes and (ii) differences in ion mobilities of the electrolyte. In previous works, the ac electro-osmotic motion has been analyzed theoretically under the assumption that only forces in the diffuse (Debye) layer are relevant. Here, we first show that if the ion mobilities of a 1-1 aqueous solution are different, the charged zone expands from the Debye layer to include the diffusion layer. We later include the Faradaic currents and, as an attempt to explore both factors simultaneously, we perform a thin-layer, low-frequency, linear analysis of the system. Finally, the model is applied to the case of an electrolyte actuated by a traveling-wave signal. A steady liquid motion in opposite direction to the applied signal is predicted for some ranges of the parameters. This could serve as a partial explanation for the observed flow reversal in some experiments.

  10. The AC (Alternating Current) Electrical Behavior of Multi-layered Thermoelectric Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alim, Mohammad A.; Budak, Satilmis; Bhattacharjee, Sudip

    2016-11-01

    In this study the ac (alternating current) small-signal electrical data in the frequency range 5 Hz ≤ f ≤ 13 MHz are obtained for the multi-layered thermoelectric (TE) devices to extract underlying operative mechanisms via an equivalent circuit model. This model is developed from the complex plane plots in conjunction with the Bode plot. It is observed that the inductive behavior is prevalent for both unbombarded and bombarded TE devices regardless of the doses as both types are observed as somewhat weak in thermoelectric properties. The bombarded multi-layered devices followed a systematic pattern in ac behavior via semicircular relaxation both in the impedance and admittance planes for the same measured data. This pattern is attributed to the transition from one lumped behavior to two distinct mechanisms. It is observed that the conductive nature of the equivalent circuit model via non-blocking (non-capacitive) elements, attributed to the underlying operative electrical paths between the two opposite electrodes across the multi-layered device exists, satisfying direct current conditions of the equivalent circuit model. The inductive behavior at high frequencies originates from the conductive aspect of the lumped response of the device in addition to the contribution of the electrode leads. Thus, the proposed equivalent circuit model contains external inductance that verifies a meaningful representation of the multi-layered TE device, though weak in thermoelectric properties.

  11. Fractional Modeling of the AC Large-Signal Frequency Response in Magnetoresistive Current Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Sergio Iván Ravello; Muñoz, Diego Ramírez; Moreno, Jaime Sánchez; Cardoso, Susana; Ferreira, Ricardo; de Freitas, Paulo Jorge Peixeiro

    2013-01-01

    Fractional calculus is considered when derivatives and integrals of non-integer order are applied over a specific function. In the electrical and electronic domain, the transfer function dependence of a fractional filter not only by the filter order n, but additionally, of the fractional order α is an example of a great number of systems where its input-output behavior could be more exactly modeled by a fractional behavior. Following this aim, the present work shows the experimental ac large-signal frequency response of a family of electrical current sensors based in different spintronic conduction mechanisms. Using an ac characterization set-up the sensor transimpedance function Zt(if) is obtained considering it as the relationship between sensor output voltage and input sensing current, Zt(jf)=Vo,sensor(jf)/Isensor(jf). The study has been extended to various magnetoresistance sensors based in different technologies like anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR), giant magnetoresistance (GMR), spin-valve (GMR-SV) and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR). The resulting modeling shows two predominant behaviors, the low-pass and the inverse low-pass with fractional index different from the classical integer response. The TMR technology with internal magnetization offers the best dynamic and sensitivity properties opening the way to develop actual industrial applications. PMID:24351648

  12. Fractional modeling of the AC large-signal frequency response in magnetoresistive current sensors.

    PubMed

    Ravelo Arias, Sergio Iván; Ramírez Muñoz, Diego; Moreno, Jaime Sánchez; Cardoso, Susana; Ferreira, Ricardo; de Freitas, Paulo Jorge Peixeiro

    2013-01-01

    Fractional calculus is considered when derivatives and integrals of non-integer order are applied over a specific function. In the electrical and electronic domain, the transfer function dependence of a fractional filter not only by the filter order n, but additionally, of the fractional order α is an example of a great number of systems where its input-output behavior could be more exactly modeled by a fractional behavior. Following this aim, the present work shows the experimental ac large-signal frequency response of a family of electrical current sensors based in different spintronic conduction mechanisms. Using an ac characterization set-up the sensor transimpedance function Z(t)(JF) is obtained considering it as the relationship between sensor output voltage and input sensing current, Z(t)(jf)= V(o, sensor)(jf)/I(sensor)(jf). The study has been extended to various magnetoresistance sensors based in different technologies like anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR), giant magnetoresistance (GMR), spin-valve (GMR-SV) and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR). The resulting modeling shows two predominant behaviors, the low-pass and the inverse low-pass with fractional index different from the classical integer response. The TMR technology with internal magnetization offers the best dynamic and sensitivity properties opening the way to develop actual industrial applications. PMID:24351648

  13. Characteristics of density currents over regular and irregular rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaganagar, K.

    2013-12-01

    Direct numerical simulation is used as a tool to understand the effect of surface roughness on the propagation of density currents. Simulations have been performed for lock-exchange flow with gate separating the dense and the lighter fluid. As the lock is released the dense fluid collapses with the lighter fluid on the top, resulting in formation of horizontally evolving density current. The talk will focus on the fundamental differences between the propagation of the density current over regular and irregular rough surfaces. The flow statistics and the flow structures are discussed. The results have revealed the spacing between the roughness elements is an important factor in classifying the density currents. The empirical relations of the front velocity and location for the dense and sparse roughness have been evaluated in terms of the roughness height, spacing between the elements and the initial amount of lock fluid. DNS results for a dense current flowing over a (a) smooth and (b) rough bottom with egg-carton roughness elements in a regular configuration. In these simulations the lock-exchange box is located in the middle of the channel and has two gates which allow two dense currents to be generated, one moving to the right and one to the left side of the channel. Note how the dense current interface presents smaller structures when over a rough bottom (right).

  14. TFCX current density and nuclear heating limitations for superconducting tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Kalsi, S.S.

    1985-01-01

    A major goal of the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) study was to minimize the size of the device and achieve lowest cost. Two key factors influencing the size of the device employing superconducting magnets are toroidal field (TF) winding current density and its nuclear heat load withstand capability. Lower winding current density requires larger radial build of the winding pack. Likewise, lower allowable nuclear heating in the winding requires larger shield thickness between the plasma and coil. To achieve a low-cost device, it is essential to maximize the winding's current density and nuclear heating withstand capability. To meet this objective, the TFCX design specification adopted as goals a nominal winding current density of 3500 A/cm/sup 2/ with 10-T peak field at the winding, peak nuclear heat load limits of 1 mW/cm/sup 3/ for the nominal design and 50 mW/cm/sup 3/ for an advanced design. This study developed justification for these current density and nuclear heat load limits.

  15. Superconducting toroidal field coil current densities for the TFCX

    SciTech Connect

    Kalsi, S.S.; Hooper, R.J.

    1985-04-01

    A major goal of the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) study was to minimize the size of the device and achieve lowest cost. Two key factors influencing the size of the device employing superconducting magnets are toroidal field (TF) winding current density and its nuclear heat load withstand capability. Lower winding current density requires larger radial build of the winding pack. Likewise, lower allowable nuclear heating in the winding requires larger shield thickness between the plasma and coil. In order to achieve a low-cost device, it is essential to maximize the winding's current density and nuclear heating withhstand capability. To meet the above objective, the TFCX design specification adopted as goals a nominal winding current density of 3500 A/cm/sup 2/ with 10-T peak field at the winding and peak nuclear heat load limits of 1 MW/cm/sup 3/ for the nominal design and 50 MW/cm/sup 3/ for an advanced design. This study developed justification for these current density and nuclear heat load limits.

  16. Dispersal and air entrainment in unconfined dilute pyroclastic density currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Benjamin J.

    2014-09-01

    Unconfined scaled laboratory experiments show that 3D structures control the behavior of dilute pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) during and after liftoff. Experiments comprise heated and ambient temperature 20 μm talc powder turbulently suspended in air to form density currents within an unobstructed 8.5 × 6 × 2.6-m chamber. Comparisons of Richardson, thermal Richardson, Froude, Stokes, and settling numbers and buoyant thermal to kinetic energy densities show good agreement between experimental currents and dilute PDCs. The experimental Reynolds numbers are lower than those of PDCs, but the experiments are fully turbulent; thus, the large-scale dynamics are similar between the two systems. High-frequency, simultaneous observation in three orthogonal planes shows that the currents behave very differently than previous 2D (i.e., confined) currents. Specifically, whereas ambient temperature currents show radial dispersal patterns, buoyancy reversal, and liftoff of heated currents focuses dispersal along narrow axes beneath the rising plumes. The aspect ratios, defined as the current length divided by a characteristic width, are typically 2.5-3.5 in heated currents and 1.5-2.5 in ambient temperature currents, reflecting differences in dispersal between the two types of currents. Mechanisms of air entrainment differ greatly between the two currents: entrainment occurs primarily behind the heads and through the upper margins of ambient temperature currents, but heated currents entrain air through their lateral margins. That lateral entrainment is much more efficient than the vertical entrainment, >0.5 compared to ˜0.1, where entrainment is defined as the ratio of cross-stream to streamwise velocity. These experiments suggest that generation of coignimbrite plumes should focus PDCs along narrow transport axes, resulting in elongate rather than radial deposits.

  17. Regional absolute conductivity reconstruction using projected current density in MREIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Kim, Hyung Joong; In Kwon, Oh; Woo, Eung Je

    2012-09-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is a non-invasive technique for imaging the internal conductivity distribution in tissue within an MRI scanner, utilizing the magnetic flux density, which is introduced when a current is injected into the tissue from external electrodes. This magnetic flux alters the MRI signal, so that appropriate reconstruction can provide a map of the additional z-component of the magnetic field (Bz) as well as the internal current density distribution that created it. To extract the internal electrical properties of the subject, including the conductivity and/or the current density distribution, MREIT techniques use the relationship between the external injection current and the z-component of the magnetic flux density B = (Bx, By, Bz). The tissue studied typically contains defective regions, regions with a low MRI signal and/or low MRI signal-to-noise-ratio, due to the low density of nuclear magnetic resonance spins, short T2 or T*2 relaxation times, as well as regions with very low electrical conductivity, through which very little current traverses. These defective regions provide noisy Bz data, which can severely degrade the overall reconstructed conductivity distribution. Injecting two independent currents through surface electrodes, this paper proposes a new direct method to reconstruct a regional absolute isotropic conductivity distribution in a region of interest (ROI) while avoiding the defective regions. First, the proposed method reconstructs the contrast of conductivity using the transversal J-substitution algorithm, which blocks the propagation of severe accumulated noise from the defective region to the ROI. Second, the proposed method reconstructs the regional projected current density using the relationships between the internal current density, which stems from a current injection on the surface, and the measured Bz data. Combining the contrast conductivity distribution in the entire imaging slice and

  18. Current drive at plasma densities required for thermonuclear reactors.

    PubMed

    Cesario, R; Amicucci, L; Cardinali, A; Castaldo, C; Marinucci, M; Panaccione, L; Santini, F; Tudisco, O; Apicella, M L; Calabrò, G; Cianfarani, C; Frigione, D; Galli, A; Mazzitelli, G; Mazzotta, C; Pericoli, V; Schettini, G; Tuccillo, A A

    2010-08-10

    Progress in thermonuclear fusion energy research based on deuterium plasmas magnetically confined in toroidal tokamak devices requires the development of efficient current drive methods. Previous experiments have shown that plasma current can be driven effectively by externally launched radio frequency power coupled to lower hybrid plasma waves. However, at the high plasma densities required for fusion power plants, the coupled radio frequency power does not penetrate into the plasma core, possibly because of strong wave interactions with the plasma edge. Here we show experiments performed on FTU (Frascati Tokamak Upgrade) based on theoretical predictions that nonlinear interactions diminish when the peripheral plasma electron temperature is high, allowing significant wave penetration at high density. The results show that the coupled radio frequency power can penetrate into high-density plasmas due to weaker plasma edge effects, thus extending the effective range of lower hybrid current drive towards the domain relevant for fusion reactors.

  19. Scaling rules for critical current density in anisotropic biaxial superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingxu; Kang, Guozheng; Gao, Yuanwen

    2016-06-01

    Recent researches highlight the additional anisotropic crystallographic axis within the superconducting plane of high temperature superconductors (HTS), demonstrating the superconducting anisotropy of HTS is better understood in the biaxial frame than the previous uniaxial coordinates within the superconducting layer. To quantitatively evaluate the anisotropy of flux pinning and critical current density in HTS, we extend the scaling rule for single-vortex collective pinning in uniaxial superconductors to account for flux-bundle collective pinning in biaxial superconductors. The scaling results show that in a system of random uncorrected point defects, the field dependence of the critical current density is described by a unified function with the scaled magnetic field of the isotropic superconductor. The obtained angular dependence of the critical current density depicts the main features of experimental observations, considering possible corrections due to the strong-pinning interaction.

  20. Validation challenge of density-functional theory for peptides-example of Ac-Phe-Ala5-LysH(+).

    PubMed

    Rossi, Mariana; Chutia, Sucismita; Scheffler, Matthias; Blum, Volker

    2014-09-01

    We assess the performance of a group of exchange-correlation functionals for predicting the secondary structure of peptide chains, up to a new many-body dispersion corrected hybrid density functional, dubbed PBE0+MBD* by its original authors. For the purpose of validation, we first compare to published, high-level benchmark conformational energy hierarchies (coupled cluster at the singles, doubles, and perturbative triples level, CCSD(T)) for 73 conformers of small three-residue peptides, establishing that the van der Waals corrected PBE0 functional yields an average error of only ∼20 meV (∼0.5 kcal/mol). This compares to ∼40-50 meV for nondispersion corrected PBE0 and 40-100 meV for different empirical force fields (estimated for the alanine tetrapeptide). For longer peptide chains that form a secondary structure, CCSD(T) level benchmark data are currently unaffordable. We thus turn to the experimentally well studied Ac-Phe-Ala5-LysH(+) peptide, for which four closely competing conformers were established by infrared spectroscopy. For comparison, an exhaustive theoretical conformational space exploration yields at least 11 competing low energy minima. We show that (i) the many-body dispersion correction, (ii) the hybrid functional nature of PBE0+MBD*, and (iii) zero-point corrections are needed to reveal the four experimentally observed structures as the minima that would be populated at low temperature. PMID:24405171

  1. Validation challenge of density-functional theory for peptides-example of Ac-Phe-Ala5-LysH(+).

    PubMed

    Rossi, Mariana; Chutia, Sucismita; Scheffler, Matthias; Blum, Volker

    2014-09-01

    We assess the performance of a group of exchange-correlation functionals for predicting the secondary structure of peptide chains, up to a new many-body dispersion corrected hybrid density functional, dubbed PBE0+MBD* by its original authors. For the purpose of validation, we first compare to published, high-level benchmark conformational energy hierarchies (coupled cluster at the singles, doubles, and perturbative triples level, CCSD(T)) for 73 conformers of small three-residue peptides, establishing that the van der Waals corrected PBE0 functional yields an average error of only ∼20 meV (∼0.5 kcal/mol). This compares to ∼40-50 meV for nondispersion corrected PBE0 and 40-100 meV for different empirical force fields (estimated for the alanine tetrapeptide). For longer peptide chains that form a secondary structure, CCSD(T) level benchmark data are currently unaffordable. We thus turn to the experimentally well studied Ac-Phe-Ala5-LysH(+) peptide, for which four closely competing conformers were established by infrared spectroscopy. For comparison, an exhaustive theoretical conformational space exploration yields at least 11 competing low energy minima. We show that (i) the many-body dispersion correction, (ii) the hybrid functional nature of PBE0+MBD*, and (iii) zero-point corrections are needed to reveal the four experimentally observed structures as the minima that would be populated at low temperature.

  2. High-density turbidity currents: Are they sandy debris flows?

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugam, G.

    1996-01-01

    Conventionally, turbidity currents are considered as fluidal flows in which sediment is supported by fluid turbulence, whereas debris flows are plastic flows in which sediment is supported by matrix strength, dispersive pressure, and buoyant lift. The concept of high-density turbidity current refers to high-concentration, commonly non-turbulent, flows of fluids in which sediment is supported mainly by matrix strength, dispersive pressure, and buoyant lift. The conventional wisdom that traction carpets with entrained turbulent clouds on top represent high-density turbidity currents is a misnomer because traction carpets are neither fluidal nor turbulent. Debris flows may also have entrained turbulent clouds on top. The traction carpet/debris flow and the overriding turbulent clouds are two separate entities in terms of flow rheology and sediment-support mechanism. In experimental and theoretical studies, which has linked massive sands and floating clasts to high-density turbidity currents, the term high-density turbidity current has actually been used for laminar flows. In alleviating this conceptual problem, sandy debris flow is suggested as a substitute for high-density turbidity current. Sandy debris flows represent a continuous spectrum of processes between cohesive and cohesionless debris flows. Commonly they are rheologically plastic. They may occur with or without entrained turbulent clouds on top. Their sediment-support mechanisms include matrix strength, dispersive pressure, and buoyant lift. They are characterized by laminar flow conditions, a moderate to high grain concentration, and a low to moderate mud content. Although flows evolve and transform during the course of transport in density-stratified flows, the preserved features in a deposit are useful to decipher only the final stages of deposition. At present, there are no established criteria to decipher transport mechanism from the depositional record.

  3. Noise distribution and denoising of current density images

    PubMed Central

    Beheshti, Mohammadali; Foomany, Farbod H.; Magtibay, Karl; Jaffray, David A.; Krishnan, Sridhar; Nanthakumar, Kumaraswamy; Umapathy, Karthikeyan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Current density imaging (CDI) is a magnetic resonance (MR) imaging technique that could be used to study current pathways inside the tissue. The current distribution is measured indirectly as phase changes. The inherent noise in the MR imaging technique degrades the accuracy of phase measurements leading to imprecise current variations. The outcome can be affected significantly, especially at a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). We have shown the residual noise distribution of the phase to be Gaussian-like and the noise in CDI images approximated as a Gaussian. This finding matches experimental results. We further investigated this finding by performing comparative analysis with denoising techniques, using two CDI datasets with two different currents (20 and 45 mA). We found that the block-matching and three-dimensional (BM3D) technique outperforms other techniques when applied on current density (J). The minimum gain in noise power by BM3D applied to J compared with the next best technique in the analysis was found to be around 2 dB per pixel. We characterize the noise profile in CDI images and provide insights on the performance of different denoising techniques when applied at two different stages of current density reconstruction. PMID:26158100

  4. Current Density Measurements of an Annular-Geometry Ion Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastry, Rohit; Patterson, Michael J.; Herman, Daniel A.; Foster, John E.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of the annular-geometry ion engine, or AGI-Engine, has been shown to have many potential benefits when scaling electric propulsion technologies to higher power. However, the necessary asymmetric location of the discharge cathode away from thruster centerline could potentially lead to non-uniformities in the discharge not present in conventional geometry ion thrusters. In an effort to characterize the degree of this potential nonuniformity, a number of current density measurements were taken on a breadboard AGI-Engine. Fourteen button probes were used to measure the ion current density of the discharge along a perforated electrode that replaced the ion optics during conditions of simulated beam extraction. Three Faraday probes spaced apart in the vertical direction were also used in a separate test to interrogate the plume of the AGI-Engine during true beam extraction. It was determined that both the discharge and the plume of the AGI-Engine are highly uniform, with variations under most conditions limited to 10% of the average current density in the discharge and 5% of the average current density in the plume. Beam flatness parameter measured 30 mm from the ion optics ranged from 0.85 0.95, and overall uniformity was shown to generally increase with increasing discharge and beam currents. These measurements indicate that the plasma is highly uniform despite the asymmetric location of the discharge cathode.

  5. Current Density Measurements of an Annular-Geometry Ion Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastry, Rohit; Patterson, Michael J.; Herman, Daniel A.; Foster, John E.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of the annular-geometry ion engine, or AGI-Engine, has been shown to have many potential benefits when scaling electric propulsion technologies to higher power. However, the necessary asymmetric location of the discharge cathode away from thruster centerline could potentially lead to non-uniformities in the discharge not present in conventional geometry ion thrusters. In an effort to characterize the degree of this potential non-uniformity, a number of current density measurements were taken on a breadboard AGI-Engine. Fourteen button probes were used to measure the ion current density of the discharge along a perforated electrode that replaced the ion optics during conditions of simulated beam extraction. Three Faraday probes spaced apart in the vertical direction were also used in a separate test to interrogate the plume of the AGI-Engine during true beam extraction. It was determined that both the discharge and the plume of the AGI-Engine are highly uniform, with variations under most conditions limited to +/-10% of the average current density in the discharge and +/-5% of the average current density in the plume. Beam flatness parameter measured 30 mm from the ion optics ranged from 0.85 - 0.95, and overall uniformity was shown to generally increase with increasing discharge and beam currents. These measurements indicate that the plasma is highly uniform despite the asymmetric location of the discharge cathode.

  6. Three-dimensional structure of dilute pyroclastic density currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    Unconfined experimental density currents dynamically similar to pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) suggest that cross-stream motions of the currents and air entrainment through currents' lateral margins strongly affects PDC behavior. Experiments are conducted within an air-filled tank 8.5 m long by 6.1 m wide by 2.6 m tall. Currents are generated by feeding heated powders down a chute into the tank at controlled rates to form dilute, particle-laden, turbulent gravity currents that are fed for 30 to 600 seconds. Powders include 5 μm aluminum oxide, 25 μm talc, 27 μm walnut, 76 μm glass beads and mixtures thereof. Experiments are scaled such that Froude, densimetric and thermal Richardson, particle Stokes and Settling numbers, and thermal to kinetic energy densities are all in agreement with dilute PDCs; experiments have lower Reynolds numbers that natural currents, but the experiments are fully turbulent, thus the large scale structures should be similar. The experiments are illuminated with 3 orthogonal laser sheets (650, 532, and 450 nm wavelengths) and recorded with an array of HD video cameras and a high speed camera (up to 3000 fps); this system provides synchronous observation of a vertical streamwise and cross-stream planes, and a horizontal plane. Ambient temperature currents tend to spread out radially from the source and have long run out distances, whereas warmer currents tend to focus along narrow sectors and have shorter run outs. In addition, when warm currents lift off to form buoyant plumes, lateral spreading ceases. The behavior of short duration currents are dominated by the current head; as eruption duration increases, current transport direction tends to oscillate back and forth (this is particularly true for ambient temperature currents). Turbulent structures in the horizontal plane show air entrainment and advection downstream. Eddies illuminated by the vertical cross-stream laser sheet often show vigorous mixing along the current margins

  7. Electric fields and current densities under small Florida thunderstorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deaver, Lance E.; Krider, E. P.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of measurements of the electric field E and Maxwell current density that were performed simultaneously under and near small Florida thunderstorms. It is shown that the amplitude of JM is of the order of 1 nA/sq cm or less in the absence of precipitation and that there are regular time variations in JM during the intervals between lightning discharges that tend to have the same shapes after different discharges in different storms. It is argued that the major causes of time variations in JM between lightning discharges are currents that flow in the finitely conducting atmosphere in response to the field changes rather than rapid time variations in the strength of cloud current sources. The displacement current densities that are computed from the E records dominate JM except when there is precipitation, when E is large and steady, or when E is unusually noisy.

  8. Hybrid superconducting a.c. current limiter extrapolation 63 kV-1 250 A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tixador, P.; Levêque, J.; Brunet, Y.; Pham, V. D.

    1994-04-01

    Following the developement of a.c. superconducting wires a.c. current superconducting limiters have emerged. These limiters limit the fault currents nearly instantaneously, without detection nor order giver and may be suitable for high voltages. They are based on the natural transition from the superconducting state to the normal resistive state by overstepping the critical current of a superconducting coil which limits or triggers the limitation. Our limiter device consists essentially of two copper windings coupled through a saturable magnetic circuit and of a non inductively wound superconducting coil with a reduced current compared to the line current. This design allows a simple superconducting cable and reduced cryogenic losses but the dielectric stresses are high during faults. A small model (150 V/50 A) has experimentally validated our design. An industrial scale current limiter is designed and the comparisons between this design and other superconducting current limiters are given. Les courants de court-circuit sur les grands réseaux électriques ne cessent d'augmenter. Dans ce contexte sont apparus les limiteurs supraconducteurs de courant suite au développement des brins supraconducteurs alternatifs. Ces limiteurs peuvent limiter les courants de défaut presque instantanément, sans détection de défaut ni donneur d'ordre et ils sont extrapolables aux hautes tensions. Ils sont fondés sur la transition naturelle de l'état supraconducteur à l'état normal très résistif par dépassement du courant critique d'un enroulement supraconducteur qui limite ou déclenche la limitation. Notre limiteur est composé de deux enroulements en cuivre couplés par un circuit magnétique saturable et d'une bobine supraconductrice à courant réduit par rapport au courant de la ligne. Cette conception permet un câble supraconducteur simple et des pertes cryogéniques réduites mais les contraintes diélectriques en régime de défaut sont importantes. Une maquette

  9. Irreversibility line in superconductor as line of constant shielding current density

    SciTech Connect

    Goemoery, F.; Takacs, S.; Holubar, T.

    1997-06-01

    The irreversibility of magnetic properties of superconductors is due to the existence of macroscopic shielding currents persisting for some period of time. The same currents offer nearly lossless electricity transport. Thus, the extent of magnetic irreversibility is directly proportional to the current-carrying capacity of a superconductor. Because the current-carrying capacity is an intrinsic property of the material, various experimental techniques should give the same irreversibility line corresponding to the same macroscopic shielding current density. Following this approach, the authors compared the irreversibility lines obtained from AC susceptibility measurement with those determined from quasistatic magnetization loops recorded with the help of a SQUID susceptometer. An additional parameter which has to be comparable is the electrical field characterizing the rate of change of the magnetic field. Fulfilling these conditions of equivalency, the authors found that it is possible to explain the irreversibility lines obtained by various techniques and at different conditions by the same physical model. They demonstrate that for the data, taken within two orders of magnitude for the current density and more than seven orders of magnitude for the electrical field, a consistent picture expressing all the observed features by the same model can be found. Measurements are presented from YBCO samples.

  10. Magnetically modulated critical current densities of Co/Nb hybrid

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhigang; Wang, Weike; Zhang, Li; Yang, Zhaorong; Tian, Mingliang; Zhang, Yuheng

    2015-01-01

    By tuning morphology and size of magnetic subsystem, ferromagnet-superconductor (F/S) hybrid system provides an effective way to modulate superconductivity due to the interaction between superconducting and magnetic-order parameters at the mesoscopic length scale. In this work, we report on investigations of critical current density in a large-area Co/Nb hybrid via facile colloidal lithography. Here, Co hexagon shell array as a magnetic template build on Nb film to modulate the critical current density. A novel superconducting transition has been observed in I-V curve with two metastable transition states: double-transition and binary-oscillation-transition states. Importantly, such unusual behavior can be adjusted by temperature, magnetic field and contact area of F/S. Such hybrid film has important implications for understanding the role of magnetic subsystem modulating superconductivity, as well as applied to low-energy electronic devices such as superconducting current fault limiters. PMID:26678595

  11. Transport and sedimentation in unconfined experimental dilute pyroclastic density currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, G.; Andrews, B. J.; Dennen, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    We present results from experiments conducted in a new facility that permits the study of large, unconfined particle laden density currents that are dynamically similar to natural dilute pyroclastic density currents (PDCs). Experiments were run in a sealed, air-filled tank measuring 8.5 m long by 6.1 m wide by 2.6 m tall. Currents were generated by feeding mixture of heated particles (5 μm aluminum oxide, 25 μm talc, 27 μm walnut shell, 76 μm glass beads) down a chute at controlled rates to produce dilute, turbulent gravity currents. Comparison of experimental currents with natural PDCs shows good agreement between Froude, densimetric and thermal Richardson, and particle Stokes and settling numbers; experimental currents have lower Reynolds numbers than natural PDCs, but are fully turbulent. Currents were illuminated with 3 orthogonal laser sheets (650, 532, and 450 nm wavelengths) and recorded with an array of HD video cameras and a high speed camera (up to 3000 fps). Deposits were mapped using a grid of sedimentation traps. We observe distinct differences between ambient temperature and warm currents: * warm currents have shorter run out distances, narrow map view distributions of currents and deposits, thicken with distance from the source, and lift off to form coignimbrite plumes; * ambient temperature currents typically travel farther, spread out radially, do not thicken greatly with transport distance, and do not form coignimbrite plumes. Long duration currents (600 s compared to 30-100 s) oscillate laterally with time (e.g. transport to the right, then the left, and back); this oscillation happens prior to any interaction with the tank walls. Isopach maps of the deposits show predictable trends in sedimentation versus distance in response to eruption parameters (eruption rate, duration, temperature, and initial current mass), but all sedimentation curves can be fit with 2nd order polynomials (R2>.9). Proximal sedimentation is similar in comparable warm

  12. High dislocation density of tin induced by electric current

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Yi-Han; Liang, Chien-Lung; Lin, Kwang-Lung; Wu, Albert T.

    2015-12-15

    A dislocation density of as high as 10{sup 17} /m{sup 2} in a tin strip, as revealed by high resolution transmission electron microscope, was induced by current stressing at 6.5 x 10{sup 3} A/ cm{sup 2}. The dislocations exist in terms of dislocation line, dislocation loop, and dislocation aggregates. Electron Backscattered Diffraction images reflect that the high dislocation density induced the formation of low deflection angle subgrains, high deflection angle Widmanstätten grains, and recrystallization. The recrystallization gave rise to grain refining.

  13. Evidence for explosive volcanic density currents on certain Martian volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reimers, C. E.; Komar, P. D.

    1979-01-01

    The morphologies of certain of the smaller Martian volcanoes are discussed as possible results of explosive volcanic density currents. An examination of newly-photographed flank and caldera features of the Martian volcanoes Ceraunius Tholus, Uranius Tholus, Uranius Patera and Hecates Tholus, including steep slope angles, Krakatoa-type caldera morphologies, erosional features (radial channels and anastamosing gullies) and constructional features (blanketed flanks and possible lava deltas) reveals their similarity to terrestrial cones and composite volcanoes such as Barcena Volcano. Crater age data from the surface of Martian domes and shields indicates that such explosive activity occurred more frequently early in Martian geologic history, consistent with the view that the volcanic density currents were base surges rather than nuees ardentes, with the melting of permafrost supplying the water required in base surge generation.

  14. Enhancement of Current Density by dc Electric Concentrator

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei Xiang; Luo, Chen Yang; Ma, Hui Feng; Mei, Zhong Lei; Cui, Tie Jun

    2012-01-01

    We investigate a dc electric concentrator for steady current fields theoretically and experimentally. Based on the transformation electrostatics, we show that the dc concentrator can focus electric currents into the central concentrated region and enhance the electric field and current density. Outside the concentrator, the current lines are distributed as the same as those in a homogeneous conducting material. Hence, such a dc electric concentrator has no impact on other external devices. Using the analogy between electrically conducting materials and resistor networks, we design, fabricate, and test a dc concentrator using the circuit theory. The measured results agree very well with the theoretical predictions and numerical simulations, demonstrating the perfect concentrating performance. PMID:23233875

  15. Quantitative Thermal Microscopy Measurement with Thermal Probe Driven by dc+ac Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodzenta, Jerzy; Juszczyk, Justyna; Kaźmierczak-Bałata, Anna; Firek, Piotr; Fleming, Austin; Chirtoc, Mihai

    2016-07-01

    Quantitative thermal measurements with spatial resolution allowing the examination of objects of submicron dimensions are still a challenging task. The quantity of methods providing spatial resolution better than 100 nm is very limited. One of them is scanning thermal microscopy (SThM). This method is a variant of atomic force microscopy which uses a probe equipped with a temperature sensor near the apex. Depending on the sensor current, either the temperature or the thermal conductivity distribution at the sample surface can be measured. However, like all microscopy methods, the SThM gives only qualitative information. Quantitative measuring methods using SThM equipment are still under development. In this paper, a method based on simultaneous registration of the static and the dynamic electrical resistances of the probe driven by the sum of dc and ac currents, and examples of its applications are described. Special attention is paid to the investigation of thin films deposited on thick substrates. The influence of substrate thermal properties on the measured signal and its dependence on thin film thermal conductivity and film thickness are analyzed. It is shown that in the case where layer thicknesses are comparable or smaller than the probe-sample contact diameter, a correction procedure is required to obtain actual thermal conductivity of the layer. Experimental results obtained for thin SiO2 and BaTiO_{3 }layers with thicknesses in the range from 11 nm to 100 nm are correctly confirmed with this approach.

  16. Thin-film Josephson junctions with alternating critical current density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshe, Maayan; Kogan, V. G.; Mints, R. G.

    2009-01-01

    We study the field dependence of the maximum current Im(H) in narrow edge-type thin-film Josephson junctions with alternating critical current density. Im(H) is evaluated within nonlocal Josephson electrodynamics taking into account the stray fields that affect the difference of the order-parameter phases across the junction and therefore the tunneling currents. We find that the phase difference along the junction is proportional to the applied field, depends on the junction geometry, but is independent of the Josephson critical current density gc , i.e., it is universal. An explicit form for this universal function is derived for small currents through junctions of the width W≪Λ , the Pearl length. The result is used to calculate Im(H) . It is shown that the maxima of Im(H)∝1/H and the zeros of Im(H) are equidistant but only in high fields. We find that the spacing between zeros is proportional to 1/W2 . The general approach is applied to calculate Im(H) for a superconducting quantum interference device with two narrow edge-type junctions. If gc changes sign periodically or randomly, as it does in grain boundaries of high- Tc materials and superconductor-ferromagnet-superconductor heterostructures, Im(H) not only acquires the major side peaks, but due to nonlocality the following peaks decay much slower than in bulk junctions.

  17. Dynamics of uniform quantum gases, I: Density and current correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosse, J.; Pathak, K. N.; Singh, G. S.

    2010-02-01

    A unified approach valid for any wavenumber q, frequency ω, and temperature T is presented for uniform ideal quantum gases allowing for a comprehensive study of number density and particle-current density response functions. Exact analytical expressions are obtained for spectral functions in terms of polylogarithms. Also, particle-number and particle-current static susceptibilities are presented which, for fugacity less than unity, additionally involve Kummer functions. The q- and T-dependent transverse-current static susceptibility is used to show explicitly that current correlations are of long range in a Bose-condensed uniform ideal gas but for bosons at T>Tc and for Fermi and Boltzmann gases at all temperatures these correlations are of short range. Contact repulsive interactions for systems of neutral quantum particles are considered within the random phase approximation. The expressions for particle-number and transverse-current susceptibilities are utilized to discuss the existence or nonexistence of superfluidity in the systems under consideration.

  18. Magnetic topology and current channels in plasmas with toroidal current density inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciro, D.; Caldas, I. L.

    2013-10-01

    The equilibrium magnetic field inside axisymmetric plasmas with inversions on the toroidal current density is considered. Previous works have shown that internal regions with negative current density lead to non-nested magnetic surfaces inside the plasma. Following these results, we derive a general expression relating the positive and negative currents inside the non-nested surfaces. This is done in terms of an anisotropy parameter that is model-independent and is based in very general properties of the magnetic field. We demonstrate that the positive currents in axisymmetric islands screen the negative one in the plasma center by reaching about twice its magnitude. Further, we illustrate these results by developing a family of analytical local solutions for the poloidal magnetic field in a region of interest that contains the inverted current. These local solutions exhibit non-nested magnetic surfaces with a combined current of at least twice the magnitude of the negative one, as prescribed from the topological arguments, and allow to study topological transitions driven by geometrical changes in the current profile. To conclude, we discuss the signatures of internal current density inversions in a confinement device and show that magnetic pitch measurements may be inappropriate to differentiate current reversals and small current holes in plasmas.

  19. Morphology and Density Structure of Post-CME Current Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrsnak, B.; Poletto, G.; Vujic, E.; Vourlidas, A.

    2009-01-01

    Eruption of a coronal mass ejection (CME) is believed to drag and open the coronal magnetic field, presumably leading to the formation of a large-scale current sheet and field relaxation by magnetic reconnection. This paper analyzes the physical characteristics of ray-like coronal features formed in the aftermath of CMEs, to confirm whether interpreting such phenomena in terms of a reconnecting current sheet is consistent with observations. Methods: The study focuses on UVCS/SOHO and LASCO/SOHO measurements of the ray width, density excess, and coronal velocity field as a function of the radial distance. The morphology of the rays implies that they are produced by Petschek-like reconnection in the large-scale current sheet formed in the wake of CME. The hypothesis is supported by the flow pattern, often showing outflows along the ray, and sometimes also inflows into the ray. The inferred inflow velocities range from 3 to 30 km/s, and are consistent with the narrow opening-angle of rays, which add up to a few degrees. The density of rays is an order of magnitude higher than in the ambient corona. The model results are consistent with the observations, revealing that the main cause of the density excess in rays is a transport of the dense plasma from lower to higher heights by the reconnection outflow.

  20. Lower hybrid current drive in a high density diverted tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, G. M.; Hubbard, A. E.; Shiraiwa, S.; Bonoli, P. T.; Faust, I. C.; Harvey, R. W.; Hughes, J. W.; LaBombard, B. L.; Lau, C.; Meneghini, O.; Parker, R. R.; Reinke, M. L.; Schmidt, A. E.; Smirnov, A. P.; Terry, J. L.; Whyte, D. G.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    Experimental observations of LHCD at high density (n¯e>1020m˜3) on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak are presented in this paper. Bremsstrahlung emission from relativistic fast electrons in the core plasma drops sharply in single null discharges well below the density limit previously observed on limited tokamaks (ω/ωLH˜2). Modeling and experimental evidence suggest that the absence of LH driven fast electrons at high density may be due to collisional absorption in the scrape off layer. Experiments show that the expected current drive density dependence is recovered for inner wall limited discharges across the range of densities scanned (0.5×1020m-3

  1. Magnetohydrodynamically stable plasma with supercritical current density at the axis

    SciTech Connect

    Burdakov, A. V.; Postupaev, V. V. Sudnikov, A. V.

    2014-05-15

    In this work, an analysis of magnetic perturbations in the GOL-3 experiment is given. In GOL-3, plasma is collectively heated in a multiple-mirror trap by a high-power electron beam. During the beam injection, the beam-plasma interaction maintains a high-level microturbulence. This provides an unusual radial profile of the net current (that consists of the beam current, current of the preliminary discharge, and the return current). The plasma core carries supercritical current density with the safety factor well below unity, but as a whole, the plasma is stable with q(a) ≈ 4. The net plasma current is counter-directed to the beam current; helicities of the magnetic field in the core and at the edge are of different signs. This forms a system with a strong magnetic shear that stabilizes the plasma core in good confinement regimes. We have found that the most pronounced magnetic perturbation is the well-known n = 1, m = 1 mode for both stable and disruptive regimes.

  2. High current density, cryogenically cooled sliding electrical joint development

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, H.

    1986-09-01

    In the past two years, conceptual designs for fusion energy research devices have focussed on compact, high magnetic field configurations. The concept of sliding electrical joints in the large magnets allows a number of technical advantages including enhanced mechanical integrity, remote maintainability, and reduced project cost. The rationale for sliding electrical joints is presented. The conceptual configuration for this generation of experimental devices is highlghted by an approx. 20 T toroidal field magnet with a flat top conductor current of approx. 300 kA and a sliding electrical joint with a gross current density of approx. 0.6 kA/cm/sup 2/. A numerical model was used to map the conductor current distribution as a function of time and position in the conductor. A series of electrical joint arrangements were produced against the system code envelope constraints for a specific version of the Ignition Studies Project (ISP) which is designated as 1025.

  3. High-speed low-current-density 850 nm VCSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Anders; Westbergh, Petter; Gustavsson, Johan; Haglund, Åsa

    2010-02-01

    The design of an oxide confined 850 nm VCSEL has been engineered for high speed operation at low current density. Strained InGaAs/AlGaAs QWs, with a careful choice of In and Al concentrations based on rigorous band structure and gain calculations, were used to increase differential gain and reduce threshold carrier density. Various measures, including multiple oxide layers and a binary compound in the lower distributed Bragg reflector, were implemented for reducing capacitance and thermal impedance. Modulation bandwidths > 20 GHz at 25°C and > 15 GHz at 85°C were obtained. At room temperature, the bandwidth was found to be limited primarily by the still relatively large oxide capacitance, while at 85°C the bandwidth was also limited by the thermal saturation of the resonance frequency. Transmission up to 32 Gb/s (on-off keying) over multimode fiber was successfully demonstrated with the VCSEL biased at a current density of only 11 kA/cm2. In addition, using a more spectrally efficient modulation format (16 QAM subcarrier multiplexing), transmission at 40 Gb/s over 200 m multimode fiber was demonstrated.

  4. Incorporation Of Air Into The Campanian Ignimbrite Pyroclastic Density Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ort, M. H.; Giordano, G.; Zanella, E.; Isaia, R.

    2015-12-01

    Knowing the temperature of emplacement of an ignimbrite can tell us how much cooling air it incorporated during eruption and transport. Currents that incorporate cool matter (air, water, cold clasts) cool more than those that do not. Lithic fragments record the maximum temperature they reached, up to their maximum unblocking temperature. Studies of large ignimbrites (e.g. Cerro Galan Ignimbrite) emplaced by dense currents show they do not cool very much, with emplacement temperatures often above 580 oC. Smaller currents, such as those from Vesuvius and Colima, lose significant heat in the eruption column, and then lose some, but less, heat as they travel laterally. The amount of atmosphere incorporated by large dilute currents is not known. The ~40 ka Campanian Ignimbrite (CI) erupted from the Campi Flegrei caldera near Naples, Italy, and extends to ~75 km from the caldera. The CI was emplaced from a density-stratified current with a dilute transport system and a denser depositional system that overtopped 1600-m-high ridges, with the depositional system re-forming on the far side. Modeling of dilute currents shows that they can pass over obstacles ~1.5 times their thickness without losing momentum, which implies the CI current was >1 km thick. Much of that dilute current was gas, but how much was atmospheric? Partial thermal demagnetization of lithic clasts allows the identification of the temperature of emplacement. We sampled lithic fragments from the CI in 13 locations from proximal to distal along several azimuths. The current passed over 30-35 km of sea to get to two sites. Partial thermal demagnetization of 10 specimens from each site show that they were heated and deposited above 580 oC, the unblocking temperature of magnetite, implying the temperature of emplacement was at or above this temperature. The CI is poor in lithic clasts (<1% in most places) and evidence of non-magmatic water in the outflow sheet is absent. We suggest the CI current was a large

  5. Advances in time-dependent current-density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Arjan

    In this work we solve the problem of the gauge dependence of molecular magnetic properties (magnetizabilities, circular dichroism) using time-dependent current-density functional theory [1]. We also present a new functional that accurately describes the optical absorption spectra of insulators, semiconductors and metals [2] N. Raimbault, P.L. de Boeij, P. Romaniello, and J.A. Berger Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 066404 (2015) J.A. Berger, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 137402 (2015) This study has been partially supported through the Grant NEXT No. ANR-10-LABX-0037 in the framework of the Programme des Investissements d'Avenir.

  6. The current density in quantum electrodynamics in external potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlemmer, Jan; Zahn, Jochen

    2015-08-01

    We review different definitions of the current density for quantized fermions in the presence of an external electromagnetic field. Several deficiencies in the popular prescription due to Schwinger and the mode sum formula for static external potentials are pointed out. We argue that Dirac's method, which is the analog of the Hadamard point-splitting employed in quantum field theory in curved space-times, is conceptually the most satisfactory. As a concrete example, we discuss vacuum polarization and the stress-energy tensor for massless fermions in 1+1 dimension. Also a general formula for the vacuum polarization in static external potentials in 3+1 dimensions is derived.

  7. Discretizing Transient Current Densities in the Maxwell Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Stowell, M L

    2008-11-25

    We will briefly discuss a technique for applying transient volumetric current sources in full-wave, time-domain electromagnetic simulations which avoids the need for divergence cleaning. The method involves both 'edge-elements' and 'face-elements' in conjunction with a particle-in-cell scheme to track the charge density. Results from a realistic, 6.7 million element, 3D simulation are shown. While the author may have a finite element bias the technique should be applicable to finite difference methods as well.

  8. The current density in quantum electrodynamics in external potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Schlemmer, Jan; Zahn, Jochen

    2015-08-15

    We review different definitions of the current density for quantized fermions in the presence of an external electromagnetic field. Several deficiencies in the popular prescription due to Schwinger and the mode sum formula for static external potentials are pointed out. We argue that Dirac’s method, which is the analog of the Hadamard point-splitting employed in quantum field theory in curved space–times, is conceptually the most satisfactory. As a concrete example, we discuss vacuum polarization and the stress–energy tensor for massless fermions in 1+1 dimension. Also a general formula for the vacuum polarization in static external potentials in 3+1 dimensions is derived.

  9. Experimental study of bedforms formed by Froude supercritical density currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naruse, H.; Izumi, N.; Yokokawa, M.; Muto, T.

    2013-12-01

    This study reveals characteristics and formative conditions of plane bed and cyclic steps formed by saline density flows with suspended sediments in supercritical flow condition. Experimental density flows were produced by mixtures of salt water (1.01-1.04 in density) and plastic particles (1.5 in specific density, 140 or 240 mm in diameter). Salt water and plastic particles are analogue materials of muddy water and sand particles in turbidity currents respectively. Acrylic flume (4.0 m long, 2.0 cm wide and 0.5 m deep) was submerged in an experimental tank (6.0 m long, 1.8 m wide and 1.2 m deep) that was filled by clear water. Features of bedforms were observed when the bed state in the flume reached equilibrium condition. The experimental conditions range 1.5-4.2 in densimetric Froude number and 0.2-0.8 in Shields dimensionless stress. We reports two major discoveries as a result of the flume experiments: (1) Plane bed under Froude-supercritical flows and (2) Geometrical characteristics of cyclic steps formed by density flows. (1) Plane bed was formed under the condition of supercritical flow regime. In previous studies, plane bed has been known that plane bed can be formed by subcritical unidirectional flows. However, this study implies that plane bed can also be formed by supercritical conditions with high Shields dimensionless stress (>0.4) and very high Froude number (> 4.0). This discovery may suggest that previous estimations of paleo-hydraulic conditions of parallel lamination in turbidites should be reconsidered. (2) This study also revealed geometrical characteristics of cyclic steps. Cyclic step is a type of bedform that is frequently observed in flanks of submarine levees. This study proved that cyclic steps of density flows show different geometry to those formed by open channel flows. Cyclic steps formed by open channel flows have generally asymmetrical geometry in which lee side is short, whereas cyclic steps formed by density flows are relatively

  10. The dynamics of pyroclastic density currents on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, B. D.; Clarke, A. B.

    2010-12-01

    The products of explosive volcanism have long been observed on the surface of Mars, and their corresponding dynamics, associated with phenomenon such as dike propagation, magma fragmentation, and eruption columns under Martian conditions, have been modeled with significant success (e.g., Wilson, L., J. W. Head (1994), Mars- Review and analysis of volcanic eruption theory and relationships to observed landforms, Rev. Geophy, 32, 221-263). However, the dynamics of pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) under Martian conditions is still poorly constrained. Our increasing capability to image the surface at high resolution, both from orbit and from rovers, presents an opportunity for more rigorous deposit observations and descriptions. For example, observations and measurements from Orbiters identify what have been interpreted as extensive aprons of volcanic ash deposits in several volcanic regions, namely those surrounding several southern highland patera, which have been interpreted as the deposits of PDCs. In addition the bedded deposits identified by the Spirit rover at “Home Plate,” an outcrop within the Columbia Hills in Gusev Crater, have been interpreted by many as the deposits of dilute pyroclastic density currents. This demonstrates that the need to understand the role of the Martian atmosphere on flow dynamics and depositional processes is much more important and relevant than it has been in the past. We have developed a quantitative, axi-symmetric model for flow of and sedimentation from a steady-state, vertically uniform dilute density current for application to PDCs on Earth and Mars (following Bursik, M. I., A. W. Woods, 1996, The dynamics and thermodynamics of large ash flows, Bull Volcan, 58, 175-193). The conservation of mass, momentum, and energy are solved simultaneously, and include the effects of atmospheric entrainment, particle sedimentation, basal friction, temperature changes, and variations in current thickness and density. For a given set of

  11. Local density of states and scanning tunneling currents in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ling; Peres, Nuno; Tsai, Shan-Wen

    2010-03-01

    Graphene consists of an atom-thick layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice, and its low-energy electronic excitations are well described as massless Dirac fermions with spin half and an additional pseudospin degree of freedom. We study local properties of graphene with isolated impurities (diagonal and non-diagonal impurity potential) such as the local electronic spectra and real-space and k-space local density of state (LDOS) maps. Using a multimode description for an scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip, we calculate STM currents and find that strong resonances in the LDOS at finite energies lead to the presence of steps in the STM current and suppression of the Fano factor. [Ref: N. M. R. Peres, L. Yang, and S.-W. Tsai, New J. Phys. 11, 095007, (2009)

  12. Tokamak equilibria with strong toroidal current density reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, G. O.; Rodrigues, Paulo; Bizarro, João P. S.

    2013-05-01

    The equilibrium of large magnetic islands in the core of a tokamak under conditions of strong toroidal current density reversal is investigated by a new method. The method uses distinct spectral representations to describe each simply connected region as well as the containing shell geometry. This ideal conducting shell may substitute for the plasma edge region or take a virtual character representing the external equilibrium field effect. The internal equilibrium of the islands is solved within the framework of the variational moment method. Equivalent surface current densities are defined on the boundaries of the islands and on the thin containing shell, giving a straightforward formulation to the interaction between regions. The equilibrium of the island-shell system is determined by matching moments of the Dirichlet boundary conditions. Finally, the macroscopic stability against a class of tilting displacements is examined by means of an energy principle. It is found out that the up-down symmetric islands are stable to this particular perturbation and geometry but the asymmetric system presents a bifurcation in the equilibrium.

  13. MHD Modeling of Conductors at Ultra-High Current Density

    SciTech Connect

    ROSENTHAL,STEPHEN E.; DESJARLAIS,MICHAEL P.; SPIELMAN,RICK B.; STYGAR,WILLIAM A.; ASAY,JAMES R.; DOUGLAS,M.R.; HALL,C.A.; FRESE,M.H.; MORSE,R.L.; REISMAN,D.B.

    2000-08-29

    In conjunction with ongoing high-current experiments on Sandia National Laboratories' Z accelerator, the authors have revisited a problem first described in detail by Heinz Knoepfel. Unlike the 1-Tesla MITLs of pulsed power accelerators used to produce intense particle beams, Z's disc transmission line (downstream of the current addition) is in a 100--1,200 Tesla regime, so its conductors cannot be modeled simply as static infinite conductivity boundaries. Using the MHD code MACH2 they have been investigating the conductor hydrodynamics, characterizing the joule heating, magnetic field diffusion, and material deformation, pressure, and velocity over a range of current densities, current rise-times, and conductor materials. Three purposes of this work are (1) to quantify power flow losses owing to ultra-high magnetic fields, (2) to model the response of VISAR diagnostic samples in various configurations on Z, and (3) to incorporate the most appropriate equation of state and conductivity models into the MHD computations. Certain features are strongly dependent on the details of the conductivity model.

  14. Dynamic Harris current sheet thickness from Cluster current density and plasma measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, S. M.; Kivelson, M. G.; Khurana, K. K.; McPherron, R. L.; Weygand, J. M.; Balogh, A.; Reme, H.; Kistler, L. M.

    2005-01-01

    We use the first accurate measurements of current densities in the plasma sheet to calculate the half-thickness and position of the current sheet as a function of time. Our technique assumes a Harris current sheet model, which is parameterized by lobe magnetic field B(o), current sheet half-thickness h, and current sheet position z(sub o). Cluster measurements of magnetic field, current density, and plasma pressure are used to infer the three parameters as a function of time. We find that most long timescale (6-12 hours) current sheet crossings observed by Cluster cannot be described by a static Harris current sheet with a single set of parameters B(sub o), h, and z(sub o). Noting the presence of high-frequency fluctuations that appear to be superimposed on lower frequency variations, we average over running 6-min intervals and use the smoothed data to infer the parameters h(t) and z(sub o)(t), constrained by the pressure balance lobe magnetic field B(sub o)(t). Whereas this approach has been used in previous studies, the spatial gnuhen& now provided by the Cluster magnetometers were unavailable or not well constrained in earlier studies. We place the calculated hdf&cknessa in a magnetospheric context by examining the change in thickness with substorm phase for three case study events and 21 events in a superposed epoch analysis. We find that the inferred half-thickness in many cases reflects the nominal changes experienced by the plasma sheet during substorms (i.e., thinning during growth phase, thickening following substorm onset). We conclude with an analysis of the relative contribution of (Delta)B(sub z)/(Delta)X to the cross-tail current density during substorms. We find that (Delta)B(sub z)/(Delta)X can contribute a significant portion of the cross-tail c m n t around substorm onset.

  15. Critical current density and current distribution in field cooled superconducting disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Pierre; Noudem, Jacques; Dupont, Louis

    2016-07-01

    Applications of bulk superconductors concern superconducting motors and generators, the levitation of vehicles, the generation of high magnetic fields with small size cryo-magnets, the shielding of magnetic fields and other applications. For all of them, it is essential to determine the critical current density, and to understand the effect of the shape and size of the bulks on the properties of interest. In this contribution, we show how the combination of levitation force and trapped field measurements allow one to determine the characteristics and the potential performances of superconducting disks using analytical modeling. As examples of applications we detail the effects of the magnetizing field and of the bulk sheet critical current density on the levitation force. An important result of the reported measurements is that in field-cooled samples, the shielding currents possibly do not flow along the whole thickness of the disks.

  16. Ionosphere-Earth current density affecting clouds and atmospheric dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinsley, Brian; Burns, Gary

    Ionosphere-Earth current density affecting clouds and atmospheric dynamics Correlations of atmospheric dynamics, cloud cover, and precipitation with changes in external and internal inputs that affect the downward ionosphere-earth current density, Jz, through the atmosphere have been reported on day-to-day, decadal, century and longer timescales. Such inputs are changes in the cosmic ray flux; in the interplanetary electric field; in solar energetic particles; in relativistic electron precipitation; and in the upward current output of global thunderstorm activity. The interplanetary electric field and relativistic electron and thunderstorm inputs affect Jz while not changing the tropospheric ionization rate, thus ruling out ion-mediated nucleation as the mechanism affecting the cloud processes. Modeling suggests that charge modulation of aerosol scavenging (CMAS) in clouds affects cloud microphysics and can account for the correlations. The CMAS effects are different for cold clouds as compared to warm clouds, and vary with the size of the condensation nuclei and ice-forming nuclei. CMAS effects on cold and warm cloud lifetimes can account for observed changes in cloud cover on day-to-day and decadal time scales. CMAS effects on precipitation from cold clouds can account for increases in winter storm vorticity in cyclogenesis regions. Increases in cyclonic vorticity in these regions generates anticyclonic blocking a half Rossby wavelength downstream. These affect storm tracks and the advection of cold Arctic air in winter onto the continents. Observations, theory and modeling of cloud microphysics supporting these chains of processes will be reviewed, but the needed modeling of resolved clouds and their insertion into GCMs is complex and demanding, and has yet to be undertaken.

  17. Methods, systems and apparatus for controlling operation of two alternating current (AC) machines

    DOEpatents

    Gallegos-Lopez, Gabriel; Nagashima, James M.; Perisic, Milun; Hiti, Silva

    2012-02-14

    A system is provided for controlling two AC machines. The system comprises a DC input voltage source that provides a DC input voltage, a voltage boost command control module (VBCCM), a five-phase PWM inverter module coupled to the two AC machines, and a boost converter coupled to the inverter module and the DC input voltage source. The boost converter is designed to supply a new DC input voltage to the inverter module having a value that is greater than or equal to a value of the DC input voltage. The VBCCM generates a boost command signal (BCS) based on modulation indexes from the two AC machines. The BCS controls the boost converter such that the boost converter generates the new DC input voltage in response to the BCS. When the two AC machines require additional voltage that exceeds the DC input voltage required to meet a combined target mechanical power required by the two AC machines, the BCS controls the boost converter to drive the new DC input voltage generated by the boost converter to a value greater than the DC input voltage.

  18. A Comparative Study on AC Conductivity and Dielectric Behavior of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes and Polyaniline Coated Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Filled High Density Polyethylene-Carbon Black Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Dinesh, P.; Renukappa, N. M.; Siddaramaiah; Lee, J. H.; Jeevananda, T.

    2010-10-04

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on AC conductivity and dielectric behavior of carbon black reinforced high density polyethylene (HDPE-CB) and HDPE-CB filled with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs-CB-HDPE) and Polyaniline (PAni) coated MWNTs-CB-HDPE nanocomposites. The electrical properties such as dielectric constant ({epsilon}'), dissipation factor (tan {delta}) and AC conductivity ({sigma}{sub ac}) of nanocomposites have been measured with reference to the weight fraction (0.5 and 1 wt% MWNTs), frequency (75 KHz-30 MHz), temperature (25-90 deg. C) and sea water ageing. The experimental results showed that the increased AC conductivity and dielectric constant of the nanocomposites were influenced by PAni coated MWNTs in HDPE-CB nanocomposites. The value of dielectric constant and tan {delta} decreased with increasing frequency. Further more, above 5 MHz the AC conductivity increases drastically whereas significant effect on tan {delta} was observed in less than 1 MHz.

  19. Ultra-high current density thin-film Si diode

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Qi

    2008-04-22

    A combination of a thin-film .mu.c-Si and a-Si:H containing diode structure characterized by an ultra-high current density that exceeds 1000 A/cm.sup.2, comprising: a substrate; a bottom metal layer disposed on the substrate; an n-layer of .mu.c-Si deposited the bottom metal layer; an i-layer of .mu.c-Si deposited on the n-layer; a buffer layer of a-Si:H deposited on the i-layer, a p-layer of .mu.c-Si deposited on the buffer layer; and a top metal layer deposited on the p-layer.

  20. Identifying Distinguishing Characteristics of Secondary Pyroclastic Density Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isom, S. L.; Brand, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    Pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) are ground-hugging mixtures of volcanic particles and gas that travel down the slopes of erupting volcanoes. The combination of high velocities, high bulk densities (due to particles in the current) and high temperatures make PDCs the most dangerous and deadly hazard associated with explosive volcanism. Secondary explosive phenomenon associated with PDCs, such as inland-directed surges (e.g., Montserrat, 2003) and phreatic explosions (e.g., Mt St Helens 1980) can increase the area affected and duration of the hazard. However, little work has been done on distinguishing the deposits of secondary explosive phenomenon from primary phenomenon. Samples have been acquired from the 1980 Mt St Helens phreatic explosion crater deposits and the 2003 eruptive event at Montserrat where a PDC flowed into the ocean, causing an inland-directed surge (Edmonds and Herd, 2005. Geology 33.4:245-248). The samples will be analyzed via depositional characteristics, granulometry, componentry, microscopic analysis and scanning electron microscope imaging. We hypothesize that thermal cracking or vesicle distortion (e.g., compression or hindered expansion) may occur in hot pyroclasts that enter a body of water, leading to a difference between the ash textures of primary PDCs, phreatic surges and inland-directed surge deposits. Analyzing granulometry and componentry from parent flows and secondary flows may also reveal distinguishing characteristics that will allow us to constrain differences in segregation mechanisms of particles for each phenomenon. Determining distinguishing depositional characteristics of these secondary phenomena is important for assessing their occurrence during past eruptions and identifying conditions conducive to the formation of secondary explosions. This will result in the ability to make more accurate hazard maps for volcanoes prone to explosive activity.

  1. Sparse imaging of cortical electrical current densities via wavelet transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ke; Zhu, Min; Ding, Lei; Valette, Sébastien; Zhang, Wenbo; Dickens, Deanna

    2012-11-01

    While the cerebral cortex in the human brain is of functional importance, functions defined on this structure are difficult to analyze spatially due to its highly convoluted irregular geometry. This study developed a novel L1-norm regularization method using a newly proposed multi-resolution face-based wavelet method to estimate cortical electrical activities in electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) inverse problems. The proposed wavelets were developed based on multi-resolution models built from irregular cortical surface meshes, which were realized in this study too. The multi-resolution wavelet analysis was used to seek sparse representation of cortical current densities in transformed domains, which was expected due to the compressibility of wavelets, and evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations. The EEG/MEG inverse problems were solved with the use of the novel L1-norm regularization method exploring the sparseness in the wavelet domain. The inverse solutions obtained from the new method using MEG data were evaluated by Monte Carlo simulations too. The present results indicated that cortical current densities could be efficiently compressed using the proposed face-based wavelet method, which exhibited better performance than the vertex-based wavelet method. In both simulations and auditory experimental data analysis, the proposed L1-norm regularization method showed better source detection accuracy and less estimation errors than other two classic methods, i.e. weighted minimum norm (wMNE) and cortical low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (cLORETA). This study suggests that the L1-norm regularization method with the use of face-based wavelets is a promising tool for studying functional activations of the human brain.

  2. High current density sheet-like electron beam generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow-Miller, Cora; Korevaar, Eric; Schuster, John

    Sheet electron beams are very desirable for coupling to the evanescent waves in small millimeter wave slow-wave circuits to achieve higher powers. In particular, they are critical for operation of the free-electron-laser-like Orotron. The program was a systematic effort to establish a solid technology base for such a sheet-like electron emitter system that will facilitate the detailed studies of beam propagation stability. Specifically, the effort involved the design and test of a novel electron gun using Lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) as the thermionic cathode material. Three sets of experiments were performed to measure beam propagation as a function of collector current, beam voltage, and heating power. The design demonstrated its reliability by delivering 386.5 hours of operation throughout the weeks of experimentation. In addition, the cathode survived two venting and pump down cycles without being poisoned or losing its emission characteristics. A current density of 10.7 A/sq cm. was measured while operating at 50 W of ohmic heating power. Preliminary results indicate that the nearby presence of a metal plate can stabilize the beam.

  3. Control of the current density profile with lower hybrid current drive on PBX-M

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, R.E.; Bernabei, S.; Chu, T.K.; Gettelfinger, G.; Greenough, N.; Hatcher, R.; Ignat, D.; Jardin, S.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kozub, T.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Okabayashi, M.; Paul, S.; Sauthoff, N.; Sesnic, S.; Sun, Y.; Takahashi, H.; Tighe, W.; Valeo, E.; von Goeler, S.; Blush, L.; Doerner, R.; Schmitz, L.; Tynan, G.; Dunlap, J.; England, A.; Harris, J.; Hirshman, S.; Isler, R.; Lee, D.; Jones, S.; Kesner, J.; Luckhardt, S.; Paoletti, F.; Levinton, F.; Timini, F.

    1993-07-01

    Lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) is being explored as a means to control the current density profile on PBX-M with the goal of raising the central safety factor q(O) to values of 1.5-2 to facilitate access to a full-volume second stable regime. Initial experiments have been conducted with up to 400 kW of 4.6 GHz LH power in circular and indented plasmas with modest parameters. A tangential-viewing two-dimensional hard x-ray imaging diagnostic has been used to observe the bremsstrahlung emission from the suprathermal electrons generated during LHCD. Hollow hard x-ray images have indicated off-axis localization of the driven current. A serious obstacle to the control of the current density profile with LHCD is the concomitant generation of MHD activity, which can seriously degrade the confinement of suprathermal electrons. By combining neutral beam injection with LHCD, an MHD-free condition has been obtained where q(O) is raised above 1.

  4. Radial current density effects on rotating magnetic field current drive in field-reversed configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Clemente, R. A.; Gilli, M.; Farengo, R.

    2008-10-15

    Steady state solutions, suitable for field-reversed configurations (FRCs) sustained by rotating magnetic fields (RMFs) are obtained by properly including three-dimensional effects, in the limit of large FRC elongation, and the radial component of Ohm's law. The steady electrostatic potential, necessary to satisfy Ohm's law, is considered to be a surface function. The problem is analyzed at the midplane of the configuration and it is reduced to the solution of two coupled nonlinear differential equations for the real and imaginary parts of the phasor associated to the longitudinal component of the vector potential. Additional constraints are obtained by requesting that the steady radial current density and poloidal magnetic flux vanish at the plasma boundary which is set at the time-averaged separatrix. The results are presented in terms of the degree of synchronism of the electrons with the RMF and compared with those obtained when radial current effects are neglected. Three important differences are observed when compared with the case without radial current density. First, at low penetration of the RMF into the plasma there is a significant increase in the driven azimuthal current. Second, the RMF amplitude necessary to access the high synchronism regime, starting from low synchronism, is larger and the difference appears to increase as the separatrix to classical skin depth ratio increases. Third, the minimum RMF amplitude necessary to sustain almost full synchronism is reduced.

  5. Alpha Power Increase After Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation at Alpha Frequency (α-tACS) Reflects Plastic Changes Rather Than Entrainment

    PubMed Central

    Vossen, Alexandra; Gross, Joachim; Thut, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Background Periodic stimulation of occipital areas using transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) at alpha (α) frequency (8–12 Hz) enhances electroencephalographic (EEG) α-oscillation long after tACS-offset. Two mechanisms have been suggested to underlie these changes in oscillatory EEG activity: tACS-induced entrainment of brain oscillations and/or tACS-induced changes in oscillatory circuits by spike-timing dependent plasticity. Objective We tested to what extent plasticity can account for tACS-aftereffects when controlling for entrainment “echoes.” To this end, we used a novel, intermittent tACS protocol and investigated the strength of the aftereffect as a function of phase continuity between successive tACS episodes, as well as the match between stimulation frequency and endogenous α-frequency. Methods 12 healthy participants were stimulated at around individual α-frequency for 11–15 min in four sessions using intermittent tACS or sham. Successive tACS events were either phase-continuous or phase-discontinuous, and either 3 or 8 s long. EEG α-phase and power changes were compared after and between episodes of α-tACS across conditions and against sham. Results α-aftereffects were successfully replicated after intermittent stimulation using 8-s but not 3-s trains. These aftereffects did not reveal any of the characteristics of entrainment echoes in that they were independent of tACS phase-continuity and showed neither prolonged phase alignment nor frequency synchronization to the exact stimulation frequency. Conclusion Our results indicate that plasticity mechanisms are sufficient to explain α-aftereffects in response to α-tACS, and inform models of tACS-induced plasticity in oscillatory circuits. Modifying brain oscillations with tACS holds promise for clinical applications in disorders involving abnormal neural synchrony. PMID:25648377

  6. Vibration effect on magnetization and critical current density of superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovchanskiy, Igor A.; Pan, Alexey V.; George, Jonathan; Wells, Frederick S.; Fedoseev, Sergey A.; Rozenfeld, Anatoly

    2016-07-01

    In this work the effect of vibrations on critical current density (J c ) of superconductors has been studied. The vibrations are shown to affect J c of all types of superconductors during their measurements, employing a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Increasing vibration frequency (f) and/or amplitude (A) leads to progressive reduction of J c as a function of magnetic field (B a ). The effect of vibrations is substantially stronger in thin films. It leads to development of unexpected kinks on {J}c({B}a) curves. Analysis of magnetization loops and relaxation of magnetization in YBCO films revealed that the vibration effect can be treated as the effective reduction of pinning potential. The asymmetry of the vibration effect in ascending and descending B a is observed, indicating differences in free energy of the corresponding vortex structures. Thermal effects induced by vibrations with large f and A are shown to have rather insignificant influence, while the vibrational vortex dynamics exhibit a strong impact. The irreversibility field ({B}{{irr}}) is shown to be instrumentally defined, and its value depends on VSM settings. In addition, the practical importance of {B}{{irr}} for J c modeling is demonstrated.

  7. High-density matter: current status and future challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, J. R.

    2015-05-01

    There are many fascinating processes in the Universe which we observe in more and more in detail thanks to increasingly sophisticated technology. One of the most interesting phenomena is the life cycle of stars, their birth, evolution and death. If the stars are massive enough, they end their lives in the core-collapse supernova explosion, the one of the most violent events in the Universe. As the result, the densest objects in the Universe, neutron stars and/or black holes are created. Naturally, the physical basis of these events should be understood in line with observation. The current status of our knowledge of processes in the life of stars is far from adequate for their true understanding. We show that although many models have been constructed their detailed ability to describe observations is limited or non-existent. Furthermore the general failure of all models means that we cannot tell which are heading in the right direction. A possible way forward in modeling of high-density matter is outlined, exemplified by the quark-meson-coupling model (QMC). This model has a natural explanation for the saturation of nuclear forces and depends on very few adjustable parameters, strongly constrained by the underlying physics. Latest QMC results for compact objects and finite nuclei are presented.

  8. Flux pinning in high-current-density superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Freyhardt, H.

    1983-05-01

    A major application of superconducting wire materials is the generation of magnetic fields, often in large volumes, with particular strenth, homogeneity, and field gradients. To fabricate superconductors which can carry high current densities at high temperatures and fields, flux pinning, by crystal inhomogeneities, must be understood. This paper attempts to answer two questions about flux pinning. The first addresses the nature and strenght of the elementary interaction force (f) between one flux line (FL) and one obstacle; the second, the correct summation of these elementary interactions between the obstacles in a unit volume and the FL to the (total) volume pinning force F /SUB v/ = B X J /SUB c/ . The discussion is confined to NbTi and A15 superconductors such as Nb/sub 3/Sn and V/sub 3/Ga. Important pinning sites in these superconductors are dislocation walls, precipitates, small inclusions, voids, grain boundaries, and bubbles. A series of mathematical models which have been used in the past are presented and synthesized into a more sophisticated explanation of pinning.

  9. I-BIEM calculations of the frequency dispersion and ac current distribution at disk and ring-disk electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahan, Boris D.

    1991-01-01

    The Iterative Boundary Integral Equation Method (I-BIEM) has been applied to the problem of frequency dispersion at a disk electrode in a finite geometry. The I-BIEM permits the direct evaluation of the AC potential (a complex variable) using complex boundary conditions. The point spacing was made highly nonuniform, to give extremely high resolution in those regions where the variables change most rapidly, i.e., in the vicinity of the edge of the disk. Results are analyzed with respect to IR correction, equipotential surfaces, and reference electrode placement. The current distribution is also examined for a ring-disk configuration, with the ring and the disk at the same AC potential. It is shown that the apparent impedance of the disk is inductive at higher frequencies. The results are compared to analytic calculations from the literature, and usually agree to better than 0.001 percent.

  10. I-BIEM calculations of the frequency dispersion and AC current distribution at disk and ring-disk electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahan, Boris D.

    1991-01-01

    The Iterative Boundary Integral Equation Method (I-BIEM) has been applied to the problem of frequency dispersion at a disk electrode in a finite geometry. The I-BIEM permits the direct evaluation of the AC potential (a complex variable) using complex boundary conditions. The point spacing was made highly nonuniform, to give extremely high resolution in those regions where the variables change most rapidly, i.e., in the vicinity of the edge of the disk. Results are analyzed with respect to IR correction, equipotential surfaces, and reference electrode placement. The current distribution is also examined for a ring-disk configuration, with the ring and the disk at the same AC potential. It is shown that the apparent impedance of the disk is inductive at higher frequencies. The results are compared to analytic calculations from the literature, and usually agree to better than 0.001 percent.

  11. Doubling of the Critical Current Density of 2G-YBCO Coated Conductors through proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welp, Ulrich; Jia, Ying; Kwok, Wai-Kwong; Rupich, Marty; Fleshler, Steven; Kayani, Asfghar

    2013-03-01

    We report on magnetization and transport measurements of the critical current density of commercial 2G YBCO coated conductors before and after proton irradiation. The samples were irradiated along the c-axis with 4 MeV protons to a fluence of 1.5x1016 p/cm2. We find that at temperatures below 50 K, proton irradiation increases Jc by a factor of 2 in low fields and increases up to 2.5 in fields of 7 T. At 77 K, proton irradiation is less effective in enhancing the critical current. Doubling of Jc in fields of several Tesla and at temperatures below 50 K will be highly beneficial for applications of coated conductors in rotating machinery, generators and magnet coils. - Work supported by the US DoE-BES funded Energy Frontier Research Center (YJ), and by Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (UW, WKK), under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  12. The Critical Current Density in High Critical Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Suvankar

    Critical current density, j_{ rm c}, is an important parameter for determining the usefulness. This work focuses on the understanding of various phenomena related to the j_{ rm c} in type II superconductor. Various methods to enhance j_{rm c} by introducing pinning are also considered. In particular, the effect of secondary phase addition and mechanical treatment on the microstructure and j _{rm c} of various high T _{rm c} superconducting system is investigated. Fine inclusions (<0.1 μm) can be introduced by secondary phase additions. An enhancement in j_{ rm c} is always observed associated with the presence of fine inclusions. These cavities are found to interact strongly with flux lines in a high T _{rm c} superconductor. However, the cavities are found ineffective to pin a large number of flux lines. Dislocations and other structural defects are introduced by consolidating Bi_2Sr _2CaCu_2O _{rm x} by hot isotatically pressing (HIP). Samples HIPed for 15 min. contained a high density of dislocations and showed a substantial higher j_{rm c} than the samples HIPed for 45 min. and 120 min., where most of the dislocations were annihilated during the recovery process. Various methods of determining the irreversibility line are also considered. Using the criterion of a constant j_{rm c}, the irreversibility line obtained from magnetic hysteresis measurements was found to improve with the enhancement of flux pinning and reduction of interlayer spacing. The results can be best explained by the model proposed by Kim et al (1) and Clem (2). Magnetic relaxation of various type II superconductors is also reported. The non-logarithmic of decay of magnetization can be understood by assuming a non-linear U-j relationship. A method to extract U-j relationship from magnetic relaxation experiments is also developed. The effect of flux pinning on the U-j relationship is also investigated. Melt-processed YBa_2Cu _3O_{rm x} samples with strong levitation force are also fabricated

  13. Realizing life-scalable experimental pyroclastic density currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, S. J.; Lube, G.; Breard, E.; Jones, J.; Valentine, G.; Freundt, A.; Hort, M. K.; Bursik, M. I.

    2013-12-01

    Pyroclastic Density Currents (PDCs) - the most deadly threat from volcanoes - are extremely hot, ground-hugging currents of rock fragments and gas that descend slopes at hundreds of kilometers per hour. These hostile flows are impossible to internally measure, thus volcanologists are persistently blocked in efforts to realistically forecast their internal mechanics and hazards. Attempts to fill this gap via laboratory-scale experiments continue to prove difficult, because they usually mismatch the dynamic and kinematic scaling of real-world flows by several orders of magnitude. In a multi-institutional effort, the first large-scale pyroclastic flow generator that can synthesize repeatable hot high-energy gas-particle mixture flows in safety has been commissioned in New Zealand. The final apparatus stands 15 m high, consisting of a tower/elevator system; an instrumented hopper that can hold >6000 kg (or 3.2 m3) of natural volcanic materials, which can be discharged at a range of controlled rates onto an instrumented, variably inclinable (6-25°) glass-sided chute for examining the vertical profiles of PDCs in motion. The use of rhyolitic pyroclastic material from the 1800 AD Taupo Eruption (with its natural grain-size, sorting and shape characteristics) and gas ensures natural coupling between the solids and fluid phases. PDC analogues with runout of >15 meters and flow depths of 1.5-6 meters are created by generating variably heated falling columns of natural volcanic particles (50-1300 kg/s), dispersed and aerated to controlled particle densities between 3 and 60 vol.% at the base of the elevated hopper. The descending columns rapidly generate high-velocity flows (up to 14 m/s) once impacting on the inclined channel, reproducing many features of natural flows, including segregation into dense and dilute regimes, progressive aggradational and en masse deposition of particles and the development of high internal gas-pore-pressures during flow. The PDC starting

  14. Some AC electrical properties of Li-Mg ferrites[Alternating Current

    SciTech Connect

    Bellad, S.S.; Watawe, S.C.; Chougule, B.K.

    1999-05-01

    The ac resistivity ({rho}{sub ac}), dielectric constant ({epsilon}{prime}), dielectric loss tangent (tan {delta}) and initial permeability ({mu}{sub i}) of mixed Li{sub 0.5{minus}x/2}Mg{sub x}Fe{sub 2.5{minus}x/2}O{sub 4} (where x = 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, and 0.6) ferrite system were measured at room temperature as a function of frequency in the range from 1 kHz to 1 MHz. The resistivity of all the samples decreased with increase in frequency, indicating that the samples exhibited normal ferrimagnetic behavior. The compositional variation of resistivity and dielectric constant indicated the inverse trends of each other. The sample with x = 0.3 showed the lowest resistivity and the highest dielectric constant. The dielectric loss tangent showed maxima at 3 kHz for x = 0.2 samples and at 15--20 kHz for x = 0.3 and 0.4 samples. All of the variations are explained on the basis of Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} ion concentration on octahedral sites as well as the electronic hopping frequency between Fe{sup 2+} {leftrightarrow} Fe{sup 3+} ions.

  15. Neighborhood matters: the impact of Hispanic ethnic density on future depressive symptoms 1-year following an ACS event among Hispanic patients.

    PubMed

    Denton, Ellen-Ge D; Shaffer, Jonathan A; Alcantara, Carmela; Cadermil, Esteban

    2016-02-01

    The Ethnic Density hypothesis posits that living around others from similar ethnic backgrounds reduces the risk of adverse mental health outcomes such as depression. Contrary to this hypothesis, previous work has shown that Hispanic ethnic density is cross-sectionally associated with increased depressive symptom severity among patients hospitalized with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS; myocardial infarction or unstable angina pectoris). To date, no study has examined the prospective association of Hispanic ethnic density on long-term depressive symptom severity following an acute medical event. We prospectively assessed the impact of Hispanic ethnic density on depressive symptoms, 1-year following an ACS event, among Hispanic adult patients. We tested the non-linear association between ethnic density and depressive symptoms to account for inconsistent findings on the ethnic density hypothesis. At the time of an index ACS event (i.e., baseline, N = 326) and 1-year later (N = 252), Hispanic patients from the Prescription Usage, Lifestyle, and Stress Evaluation prospective cohort study completed the Beck Depression Inventory as a measure of depressive symptom severity. Hispanic ethnic density was defined by the percentage of Hispanic residents within each patient's census tract using data extracted from the American Community Survey Census (2010-2013). Covariates included baseline demographic factors (age, gender, English fluency, education, nativity status), cardiovascular factors (Charlson comorbidity index, left ventricular ejection fraction, Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events 6-month prognostic risk score), and neighborhood factors (residential density, income, and percentage of households receiving public assistance). In an adjusted multivariable linear regression analysis there was a significant curvilinear association between Hispanic ethnic density and depressive symptom severity at 1 year. As Hispanic ethnic density increased from low to moderate

  16. Neighborhood matters: the impact of Hispanic ethnic density on future depressive symptoms 1-year following an ACS event among Hispanic patients.

    PubMed

    Denton, Ellen-Ge D; Shaffer, Jonathan A; Alcantara, Carmela; Cadermil, Esteban

    2016-02-01

    The Ethnic Density hypothesis posits that living around others from similar ethnic backgrounds reduces the risk of adverse mental health outcomes such as depression. Contrary to this hypothesis, previous work has shown that Hispanic ethnic density is cross-sectionally associated with increased depressive symptom severity among patients hospitalized with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS; myocardial infarction or unstable angina pectoris). To date, no study has examined the prospective association of Hispanic ethnic density on long-term depressive symptom severity following an acute medical event. We prospectively assessed the impact of Hispanic ethnic density on depressive symptoms, 1-year following an ACS event, among Hispanic adult patients. We tested the non-linear association between ethnic density and depressive symptoms to account for inconsistent findings on the ethnic density hypothesis. At the time of an index ACS event (i.e., baseline, N = 326) and 1-year later (N = 252), Hispanic patients from the Prescription Usage, Lifestyle, and Stress Evaluation prospective cohort study completed the Beck Depression Inventory as a measure of depressive symptom severity. Hispanic ethnic density was defined by the percentage of Hispanic residents within each patient's census tract using data extracted from the American Community Survey Census (2010-2013). Covariates included baseline demographic factors (age, gender, English fluency, education, nativity status), cardiovascular factors (Charlson comorbidity index, left ventricular ejection fraction, Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events 6-month prognostic risk score), and neighborhood factors (residential density, income, and percentage of households receiving public assistance). In an adjusted multivariable linear regression analysis there was a significant curvilinear association between Hispanic ethnic density and depressive symptom severity at 1 year. As Hispanic ethnic density increased from low to moderate

  17. Hazards from pyroclastic density currents at Mt. Etna (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behncke, Boris

    2009-03-01

    Despite the recent recognition of Mount Etna as a periodically violently explosive volcano, the hazards from various types of pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) have until now received virtually no attention at this volcano. Large-scale pyroclastic flows last occurred during the caldera-forming Ellittico eruptions, 15-16 ka ago, and the risk of them occurring in the near future is negligible. However, minor PDCs can affect much of the summit area and portions of the upper flanks of the volcano. During the past ~ 20 years, small pyroclastic flows or base-surge-like vapor and ash clouds have occurred in at least 8 cases during summit eruptions of Etna. Four different mechanisms of PDC generation have been identified during these events: (1) collapse of pyroclastic fountains (as in 2000 and possibly in 1986); (2) phreatomagmatic explosions resulting from mixing of lava with wet rock (2006); (3) phreatomagmatic explosions resulting from mixing of lava with thick snow (2007); (4) disintegration of the unstable flanks of a lava dome-like structure growing over the rim of one of the summit craters (1999). All of these recent PDCs were of a rather minor extent (maximum runout lengths were about 1.5 km in November 2006 and March 2007) and thus they represented no threat for populated areas and human property around the volcano. Yet, events of this type pose a significant threat to the lives of people visiting the summit area of Etna, and areas in a radius of 2 km from the summit craters should be off-limits anytime an event capable of producing similar PDCs occurs. The most likely source of further PDCs in the near future is the Southeast Crater, the youngest, most active and most unstable of the four summit craters of Etna, where 6 of the 8 documented recent PDCs originated. It is likely that similar hazards exist in a number of volcanic settings elsewhere, especially at snow- or glacier-covered volcanoes and on volcano slopes strongly affected by hydrothermal alteration.

  18. Clast comminution during pyroclastic density current transport: Mt St Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, B.; Brand, B. D.; Dufek, J.

    2011-12-01

    Volcanic clasts within pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) tend to be more rounded than those in fall deposits. This rounding reflects degrees of comminution during transport, which produces an increase in fine-grained ash with distance from source (Manga, M., Patel, A., Dufek., J. 2011. Bull Volcanol 73: 321-333). The amount of ash produced due to comminution can potentially affect runout distance, deposit sorting, the volume of ash lofted into the upper atmosphere, and increase internal pore pressure (e.g., Wohletz, K., Sheridan, M. F., Brown, W.K. 1989. J Geophy Res, 94, 15703-15721). For example, increased pore pressure has been shown to produce longer runout distances than non-comminuted PDC flows (e.g., Dufek, J., and M. Manga, 2008. J. Geophy Res, 113). We build on the work of Manga et al., (2011) by completing a pumice abrasion study for two well-exposed flow units from the May 18th, 1980 eruption of Mt St Helens (MSH). To quantify differences in comminution from source, sampling and the image analysis technique developed in Manga et al., 2010 was completed at distances proximal, medial, and distal from source. Within the units observed, data was taken from the base, middle, and pumice lobes within the outcrops. Our study is unique in that in addition to quantifying the degree of pumice rounding with distance from source, we also determine the possible range of ash sizes produced during comminution by analyzing bubble wall thickness of the pumice through petrographic and SEM analysis. The proportion of this ash size is then measured relative to the grain size of larger ash with distance from source. This allows us to correlate ash production with degree of rounding with distance from source, and determine the fraction of the fine ash produced due to comminution versus vent-fragmentation mechanisms. In addition we test the error in 2D analysis by completing a 3D image analysis of selected pumice samples using a Camsizer. We find that the roundness of PDC

  19. Exploring the conformational preferences of 20-residue peptides in isolation: Ac-Ala19-Lys + H(+)vs. Ac-Lys-Ala19 + H(+) and the current reach of DFT.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Franziska; Rossi, Mariana; Baldauf, Carsten; Pagel, Kevin; Warnke, Stephan; von Helden, Gert; Filsinger, Frank; Kupser, Peter; Meijer, Gerard; Salwiczek, Mario; Koksch, Beate; Scheffler, Matthias; Blum, Volker

    2015-03-21

    Reliable, quantitative predictions of the structure of peptides based on their amino-acid sequence information are an ongoing challenge. We here explore the energy landscapes of two unsolvated 20-residue peptides that result from a shift of the position of one amino acid in otherwise the same sequence. Our main goal is to assess the performance of current state-of-the-art density-functional theory for predicting the structure of such large and complex systems, where weak interactions such as dispersion or hydrogen bonds play a crucial role. For validation of the theoretical results, we employ experimental gas-phase ion mobility-mass spectrometry and IR spectroscopy. While unsolvated Ac-Ala19-Lys + H(+) will be shown to be a clear helix seeker, the structure space of Ac-Lys-Ala19 + H(+) is more complicated. Our first-principles structure-screening strategy using the dispersion-corrected PBE functional (PBE + vdW(TS)) identifies six distinctly different structure types competing in the low-energy regime (≈16 kJ mol(-1)). For these structure types, we analyze the influence of the PBE and the hybrid PBE0 functional coupled with either a pairwise dispersion correction (PBE + vdW(TS), PBE0 + vdW(TS)) or a many-body dispersion correction (PBE + MBD*, PBE0 + MBD*). We also take harmonic vibrational and rotational free energy into account. Including this, the PBE0 + MBD* functional predicts only one unique conformer to be present at 300 K. We show that this scenario is consistent with both experiments. PMID:25700010

  20. Higher harmonics in voltage on superconductor carrying AC current due to non-linear I- V curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janíková, Edita; Gömöry, Fedor; Šouc, Ján

    2004-01-01

    When superconducting wire carries AC current with amplitude exceeding its critical current, additional losses appear due to non-zero resistivity. The voltage attributed to this mechanism will contain higher harmonics because of non-linear I- V curve of superconducting material. This curve can be derived using the following simple model: parallel combination of superconductor standing for the properties of all the filaments and the normal resistor representing the matrix. I- V relation is then characterized by three parameters: the critical current, I0, the n-exponent, n, and the ratio of the cross-section to the resistivity of metallic matrix. Expressions for Fourier coefficients have been calculated for this model. Extensive analysis of the influence that the model parameters exhibit on higher harmonics have revealed some useful features: 3rd harmonic could be nicely used to detect I0 and n, while from the maximum of 5th harmonic the value of matrix resistivity can be estimated.

  1. AC current rectification in Nb films with or without symmetrical Nb/Ni periodic pinning arrays in perpendicular magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryadun, Vladimir

    2005-03-01

    Rectification of AC current has been observed in plain superconducting Nb films and in Nb/Ni films with symmetric periodic pinning centers. The rectified DC voltage appears for various sample geometries (cross or strip) both along and transverse to the alternating current direction, is nearly anti-symmetric with perpendicular magnetic field and strongly dependent on temperature below Tc. Analyses of the data at different temperatures, drive frequencies from 100kHz to 150MHz and at the different sample sides [1] shows that not far below Tc the rectification phenomena can be understood in terms of generation of electric fields due to local excess of critical current. Further below Tc anisotropic pinning effects could also contribute to the rectification. [1] F.G.Aliev, et al., Cond. Mat.405656. Supported by Comunidad Autonoma de Madrid -CAM/07N/0050/2002

  2. Efficacy of low level electric current (A-C) for controlling quagga mussles in the Welland Canal

    SciTech Connect

    Fears, C.; Mackie, G.L.

    1995-06-01

    The efficacy of systems (for which patents are pending) which use low-voltage A-C currents for preventing settlement and attachment by zebra mussels were tested with steel rods and plates placed near the intake of a pulp and paper plant in the Welland Canal at Thorold, Ontario. Six racks made of 16 ft. (4.9 m), 2x4s (5.1 x 10.2 cm) were placed into the Welland Canal on August 5, 1994. One rack had 1/8th in (3.2 mm) diam x 12 in (30.5 cm) long steel rods, each separated by 2 in (5.1 cm) attached to pressure treated wood and concrete blocks and an A-C current of 16 v (or 8 v/in); rack 2 had steel rods of the same configuration but 12 v (or 6 v/in) was applied; rack 3 was identical to these but no current was applied and was used as a rod control. The remaining three racks had steel plates, each plate being 3 in (7.6 cm) wide X 24 in (61 cm) long X 1/4 in (6.4 mm) thick and separated by 2 in (5.1 cm); one had 12 v applied (or 6 v/in), another had 16 v applied (or 8 v/in), and the third had no current and was used as a plate control. The racks were placed on the upstream and downstream side of the intake at a depth of about 7 ft (2.1 m) where the mussels populations were heaviest (as determined by SCUBA diving). All mussels were quagga mussels (Dreissena bugensis). The racks were pulled in mid November after settlement was complete and the results showed: (1) complete prevention of settlement of both new recruits and translocators at 8 volts/in with steel rods on both wood and concrete surfaces and with steel plate trash bars; (2) partial prevention of settlement at 6 volts/in with steel rods on both wood and concrete surfaces and steel plates; and (3) that, at current kilowatt hr rates, total efficacy at 8 volts/in would cost approximately $10.80/day/1000 sq ft using rods to protect concrete walls and about $16.32/day/1000 sq ft to protect 3 in wide x 1/4 in thick trash bars. These costs can be reduced even further with pulse dosed AC currents.

  3. Fourier transform magnetic resonance current density imaging (FT-MRCDI) from one component of magnetic flux density.

    PubMed

    Ider, Yusuf Ziya; Birgul, Ozlem; Oran, Omer Faruk; Arikan, Orhan; Hamamura, Mark J; Muftuler, L Tugan

    2010-06-01

    Fourier transform (FT)-based algorithms for magnetic resonance current density imaging (MRCDI) from one component of magnetic flux density have been developed for 2D and 3D problems. For 2D problems, where current is confined to the xy-plane and z-component of the magnetic flux density is measured also on the xy-plane inside the object, an iterative FT-MRCDI algorithm is developed by which both the current distribution inside the object and the z-component of the magnetic flux density on the xy-plane outside the object are reconstructed. The method is applied to simulated as well as actual data from phantoms. The effect of measurement error on the spatial resolution of the current density reconstruction is also investigated. For 3D objects an iterative FT-based algorithm is developed whereby the projected current is reconstructed on any slice using as data the Laplacian of the z-component of magnetic flux density measured for that slice. In an injected current MRCDI scenario, the current is not divergence free on the boundary of the object. The method developed in this study also handles this situation.

  4. MEMS electrostatic inductive transformer using potassium ion electrets for up- or down-conversion of AC current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Masato; Moriyama, Takashi; Toshiyoshi, Hiroshi; Hashiguchi, Gen

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we report on a novel MEMS electrostatic inductive transformer using potassium ion electrets on mechanically movable silicon microelectrodes. The device consists of a pair of electrostatic comb drive actuators that share a common mass in the middle part of a spring-mass-spring system. When an excitation AC voltage is applied to the electrode of the input-port comb drive at its mechanical resonant frequency, the mass in the middle oscillates to generate electrostatic inductive charges on the electrodes of the output-port comb drive, which could be read out as an output current. By appropriately designing the ratio of force factors of input- and output-port comb drives, the device operates as a transformer to amplify the current at a high efficiency over of 90% under the optimal load condition.

  5. CdS-metal contact at higher current densities.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stirn, R. J.; Boeer, K. W.; Dussel, G. A.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation is conducted concerning the mechanisms by which a steady flow of current proceeds through the contact when an external voltage is applied. The main characteristics of current mechanisms are examined, giving attention to photoemission from the cathode, thermionic emission, minority-carrier extraction, and the tunneling of electrons. A high-field domain analysis is conducted together with experimental studies. Particular attention is given to the range in which tunneling predominates.

  6. Analysis of recoverable current from one component of magnetic flux density in MREIT and MRCDI.

    PubMed

    Park, Chunjae; Lee, Byung Il; Kwon, Oh In

    2007-06-01

    Magnetic resonance current density imaging (MRCDI) provides a current density image by measuring the induced magnetic flux density within the subject with a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) has been focused on extracting some useful information of the current density and conductivity distribution in the subject Omega using measured B(z), one component of the magnetic flux density B. In this paper, we analyze the map Tau from current density vector field J to one component of magnetic flux density B(z) without any assumption on the conductivity. The map Tau provides an orthogonal decomposition J = J(P) + J(N) of the current J where J(N) belongs to the null space of the map Tau. We explicitly describe the projected current density J(P) from measured B(z). Based on the decomposition, we prove that B(z) data due to one injection current guarantee a unique determination of the isotropic conductivity under assumptions that the current is two-dimensional and the conductivity value on the surface is known. For a two-dimensional dominating current case, the projected current density J(P) provides a good approximation of the true current J without accumulating noise effects. Numerical simulations show that J(P) from measured B(z) is quite similar to the target J. Biological tissue phantom experiments compare J(P) with the reconstructed J via the reconstructed isotropic conductivity using the harmonic B(z) algorithm.

  7. Quench behavior of Sr0.6K0.4Fe2As2/Ag tapes with AC and DC transport currents at different temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qi; Zhang, Guomin; Yang, Hua; Li, Zhenming; Liu, Wei; Jing, Liwei; Yu, Hui; Liu, Guole

    2016-09-01

    In applications, superconducting wires may carry AC or DC transport current. Thus, it is important to understand the behavior of normal zone propagation in conductors and magnets under different current conditions in order to develop an effective quench protection system. In this paper, quench behavior of Ag sheathed Sr0.6K0.4Fe2As2 (Sr-122 in the family of iron-based superconductor) tapes with AC and DC transport current is reported. The measurements are performed as a function of different temperature (20 K-30 K), varying transport current and operating frequency (50 Hz-250 Hz). The focus of the research is the minimum quench energy (MQE), the normal zone propagation velocity (NZPV) and the comparison of the related results with AC and DC transport current.

  8. Simulation-based validation for four- dimensional multi-channel ultrasound current source density imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaohui; Witte, Russell S

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound current source density imaging (UCSDI), which has application to the heart and brain, exploits the acoustoelectric (AE) effect and Ohm's law to detect and map an electrical current distribution. In this study, we describe 4-D UCSDI simulations of a dipole field for comparison and validation with bench-top experiments. The simulations consider the properties of the ultrasound pulse as it passes through a conductive medium, the electric field of the injected dipole, and the lead field of the detectors. In the simulation, the lead fields of detectors and electric field of the dipole were calculated by the finite element (FE) method, and the convolution and correlation in the computation of the detected AE voltage signal were accelerated using 3-D fast Fourier transforms. In the bench-top experiment, an electric dipole was produced in a bath of 0.9% NaCl solution containing two electrodes, which injected an ac pulse (200 Hz, 3 cycles) ranging from 0 to 140 mA. Stimulating and recording electrodes were placed in a custom electrode chamber made on a rapid prototype printer. Each electrode could be positioned anywhere on an x-y grid (5 mm spacing) and individually adjusted in the depth direction for precise control of the geometry of the current sources and detecting electrodes. A 1-MHz ultrasound beam was pulsed and focused through a plastic film to modulate the current distribution inside the saline-filled tank. AE signals were simultaneously detected at a sampling frequency of 15 MHz on multiple recording electrodes. A single recording electrode is sufficient to form volume images of the current flow and electric potentials. The AE potential is sensitive to the distance from the dipole, but is less sensitive to the angle between the detector and the dipole. Multi-channel UCSDI potentially improves 4-D mapping of bioelectric sources in the body at high spatial resolution, which is especially important for diagnosing and guiding treatment of cardiac and

  9. Simulation-Based Validation for Four-Dimensional Multi-Channel Ultrasound Current Source Density Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaohui; Witte, Russell S.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound current source density imaging (UCSDI), which has application to the heart and brain, exploits the acoustoelectric (AE) effect and Ohm's law to detect and map an electrical current distribution. In this study, we describe 4-D UCSDI simulations of a dipole field for comparison and validation with bench-top experiments. The simulations consider the properties of the ultrasound pulse as it passes through a conductive medium, the electric field of the injected dipole, and the lead field of the detectors. In the simulation, the lead fields of detectors and electric field of the dipole were calculated by the finite element (FE) method, and the convolution and correlation in the computation of the detected AE voltage signal were accelerated using 3-D fast Fourier transforms. In the bench-top experiment, an electric dipole was produced in a bath of 0.9% NaCl solution containing two electrodes, which injected an ac pulse (200 Hz, 3 cycles) ranging from 0 to 140 mA. Stimulating and recording electrodes were placed in a custom electrode chamber made on a rapid prototype printer. Each electrode could be positioned anywhere on an x-y grid (5 mm spacing) and individually adjusted in the depth direction for precise control of the geometry of the current sources and detecting electrodes. A 1-MHz ultrasound beam was pulsed and focused through a plastic film to modulate the current distribution inside the saline-filled tank. AE signals were simultaneously detected at a sampling frequency of 15 MHz on multiple recording electrodes. A single recording electrode is sufficient to form volume images of the current flow and electric potentials. The AE potential is sensitive to the distance from the dipole, but is less sensitive to the angle between the detector and the dipole. Multi-channel UCSDI potentially improves 4-D mapping of bioelectric sources in the body at high spatial resolution, which is especially important for diagnosing and guiding treatment of cardiac and

  10. Inter-strand current sharing and ac loss measurements in superconducting YBCO Roebel cables

    SciTech Connect

    sumption, Mike; Majoros, Milan; Collings, E. W.; Van der Laan, D. C.

    2014-11-07

    A Roebel cable, one twist pitch long, was modified from its as-received state by soldering copper strips between the strands to provide inter-strand connections enabling current sharing. Various DC transport currents (representing different percentages of its critical current) were applied to a single strand of such a modified cable at 77 K in a liquid nitrogen bath. Simultaneous monitoring of I–V curves in different parts of the strand as well as in its interconnections with other strands was made using a number of sensitive Keithley nanovoltmeters in combination with a multichannel high-speed data acquisition card, all controlled via LabView software. Current sharing onset was observed at about 1.02 of strand Ic. At a strand current of 1.3Ic about 5% of the current was shared through the copper strip interconnections. A finite element method modeling was performed to estimate the inter-strand resistivities required to enable different levels of current sharing. The relative contributions of coupling and hysteretic magnetization (and loss) were compared, and for our cable and tape geometry, and at dB/dt=1 T s-1, and our inter-strand resistance of 0.77 mΩ, (enabling a current sharing of 5% at 1.3Ic ) the coupling component was 0.32% of the hysteretic component. However, inter-strand contact resistance values of 100–1000 times smaller (close to those of NbTi and Nb3Sn based accelerator cables) would make the coupling components comparable in size to the hysteretic components.

  11. Inter-strand current sharing and ac loss measurements in superconducting YBCO Roebel cables

    SciTech Connect

    Majoros, M.; Sumption, M. D.; Collings, E. W.; Long, N. J.

    2015-04-08

    A Roebel cable, one twist pitch long, was modified from its as-received state by soldering copper strips between the strands to provide inter-strand connections enabling current sharing. Various DC transport currents (representing different percentages of its critical current) were applied to a single strand of such a modified cable at 77 K in a liquid nitrogen bath. Simultaneous monitoring of I–V curves in different parts of the strand as well as in its interconnections with other strands was made using a number of sensitive Keithley nanovoltmeters in combination with a multichannel high-speed data acquisition card, all controlled via LabView software. Current sharing onset was observed at about 1.02 of strand Ic. At a strand current of 1.3Ic about 5% of the current was shared through the copper strip interconnections. A finite element method modeling was performed to estimate the inter-strand resistivities required to enable different levels of current sharing. The relative contributions of coupling and hysteretic magnetization (and loss) were compared, and for our cable and tape geometry, and at dB/dt=1 T s-1, and our inter-strand resistance of 0.77 mΩ, (enabling a current sharing of 5% at 1.3Ic) the coupling component was 0.32% of the hysteretic component. However, inter-strand contact resistance values of 100–1000 times smaller (close to those of NbTi and Nb3Sn based accelerator cables) would make the coupling components comparable in size to the hysteretic components.

  12. Inter-strand current sharing and ac loss measurements in superconducting YBCO Roebel cables

    DOE PAGES

    Majoros, M.; Sumption, M. D.; Collings, E. W.; Long, N. J.

    2015-04-08

    A Roebel cable, one twist pitch long, was modified from its as-received state by soldering copper strips between the strands to provide inter-strand connections enabling current sharing. Various DC transport currents (representing different percentages of its critical current) were applied to a single strand of such a modified cable at 77 K in a liquid nitrogen bath. Simultaneous monitoring of I–V curves in different parts of the strand as well as in its interconnections with other strands was made using a number of sensitive Keithley nanovoltmeters in combination with a multichannel high-speed data acquisition card, all controlled via LabView software.more » Current sharing onset was observed at about 1.02 of strand Ic. At a strand current of 1.3Ic about 5% of the current was shared through the copper strip interconnections. A finite element method modeling was performed to estimate the inter-strand resistivities required to enable different levels of current sharing. The relative contributions of coupling and hysteretic magnetization (and loss) were compared, and for our cable and tape geometry, and at dB/dt=1 T s-1, and our inter-strand resistance of 0.77 mΩ, (enabling a current sharing of 5% at 1.3Ic) the coupling component was 0.32% of the hysteretic component. However, inter-strand contact resistance values of 100–1000 times smaller (close to those of NbTi and Nb3Sn based accelerator cables) would make the coupling components comparable in size to the hysteretic components.« less

  13. Inter-strand current sharing and ac loss measurements in superconducting YBCO Roebel cables

    DOE PAGES

    sumption, Mike; Majoros, Milan; Collings, E. W.; Van der Laan, D. C.

    2014-11-07

    A Roebel cable, one twist pitch long, was modified from its as-received state by soldering copper strips between the strands to provide inter-strand connections enabling current sharing. Various DC transport currents (representing different percentages of its critical current) were applied to a single strand of such a modified cable at 77 K in a liquid nitrogen bath. Simultaneous monitoring of I–V curves in different parts of the strand as well as in its interconnections with other strands was made using a number of sensitive Keithley nanovoltmeters in combination with a multichannel high-speed data acquisition card, all controlled via LabView software.more » Current sharing onset was observed at about 1.02 of strand Ic. At a strand current of 1.3Ic about 5% of the current was shared through the copper strip interconnections. A finite element method modeling was performed to estimate the inter-strand resistivities required to enable different levels of current sharing. The relative contributions of coupling and hysteretic magnetization (and loss) were compared, and for our cable and tape geometry, and at dB/dt=1 T s-1, and our inter-strand resistance of 0.77 mΩ, (enabling a current sharing of 5% at 1.3Ic ) the coupling component was 0.32% of the hysteretic component. However, inter-strand contact resistance values of 100–1000 times smaller (close to those of NbTi and Nb3Sn based accelerator cables) would make the coupling components comparable in size to the hysteretic components.« less

  14. AC over-current characteristics of YBCO coated conductor with copper stabilizer layer considering insulation layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, H.-I.; Kim, M.-J.; Kim, Y.-J.; Lee, D.-H.; Han, B.-S.; Song, S.-S.

    2010-11-01

    Compared with the first-generation BSCCO wire, the YBCO thin-film wire boasts low material costs and high Jc and superior magnetic-field properties, among other strengths. Meanwhile, the previous BSCCO wire material for superconducting cables has been researched on considerably with regard to its post-wire quenching characteristics during the application of an alternating over-current. In this regard, the promising YBCO thin-film wire has yet to be further researched on. Moreover, still lacking is research on the YBCO thin-film wire with insulating layers, which is essential in the manufacture of superconducting cables, along with the testing of the application of an alternating over-current to the wire. In this study, YBCO thin-film wires with copper-stabilizing layers were used in testing alternating over-current application according to the presence or absence of insulating layers and to the thickness of such layers, to examine the post-quenching wire resistance increase and quenching trends. The YBCO thin-film wire with copper-stabilizing layers has a critical temperature of 90 K and a critical current of 85 A rms. Moreover, its current application cycle is 5.5 cycles, and its applied currents are 354, 517, 712, and 915 A peak. These figures enabled the YBCO thin-film wires with copper-stabilizing layers to reach 90, 180, 250, and 300 K, respectively, in this study. These temperatures serve as a relative reference to examine the post-quenching wire properties following the application of an alternating over-current.

  15. Method for determining transport critical current densities and flux penetration depth in bulk superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israelsson, Ulf E. (Inventor); Strayer, Donald M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A contact-less method for determining transport critical current density and flux penetration depth in bulk superconductor material. A compressor having a hollow interior and a plunger for selectively reducing the free space area for distribution of the magnetic flux therein are formed of superconductor material. Analytical relationships, based upon the critical state model, Maxwell's equations and geometrical relationships define transport critical current density and flux penetration depth in terms of the initial trapped magnetic flux density and the ratio between initial and final magnetic flux densities whereby data may be reliably determined by means of the simple test apparatus for evaluating the current density and flux penetration depth.

  16. Current Densities in speed analyzer with different symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Valdeblanquez, E.

    2006-12-04

    A comparative analysis of the currents in speed analyzer of speeds is made with different symmetries. Three kinds of symmetries are considered; plane, cylindrical and spherical. The analyzers considered are formed by threes electrodes, the selector grid, the discriminator and the collector. The selector grid has a negative potential and for the coulombian effect the space charge is formed with the ionic thermal bath. Using kinetic theory a strongly non linear differential equation is obtained which is solved by numerical calculation.

  17. Topology of magnetic-field induced electron current density in the cubane molecule.

    PubMed

    Pelloni, Stefano; Lazzeretti, Paolo

    2008-05-21

    A spatial model of the electronic current density induced in the cubane molecule by applying an external magnetic-field has been constructed employing quantum mechanical methods at the Hartree-Fock level of accuracy. The topological features of the current density vector field are described via a stagnation graph that shows the isolated points and the lines at which the current vanishes. Shielding density maps based on the differential Biot-Savart law, along with a collection of current density maps, explain magnetic shielding at hydrogen and carbon nuclei, and virtual shielding at ring and cage centers. PMID:18500863

  18. Improved critical current density in DI-BSCCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayai, N.; Kikuchi, M.; Tatamidani, K.; Nakashima, T.; Osabe, G.; Kagiyama, T.; Fujikami, J.; Kobayashi, S.; Yamazaki, K.; Yamade, S.; Shizuya, E.; Hayashi, K.; Sato, K.; Kiss, T.; Higashikawa, K.; Inoue, M.; Kitaguchi, H.; Kumakura, H.; Shimoyama, J.

    2010-06-01

    High Ic in DI-BSCCO has been demonstrated even in high temperature up to 90K and parallel magnetic field up to 200 mT. This performance is advantageous especially to power cables cooled with pressurized liquid nitrogen, where current and temperature fluctuates in real operation. Recent development has updated the highest Jc at 77K, self-field to 630 A/mm2 in a R&D tape. The evaluation by a scanning magnetic microscope has demonstrated the highest Jc of 900 A/mm2 at the midst of a tape which has Ic of 200 A. This property promises innovative Ic more than 300 A in future DI-BSCCO.

  19. Effective variable switching point predictive current control for ac low-voltage drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolze, Peter; Karamanakos, Petros; Kennel, Ralph; Manias, Stefanos; Endisch, Christian

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents an effective model predictive current control scheme for induction machines driven by a three-level neutral point clamped inverter, called variable switching point predictive current control. Despite the fact that direct, enumeration-based model predictive control (MPC) strategies are very popular in the field of power electronics due to their numerous advantages such as design simplicity and straightforward implementation procedure, they carry two major drawbacks. These are the increased computational effort and the high ripples on the controlled variables, resulting in a limited applicability of such methods. The high ripples occur because in direct MPC algorithms the actuating variable can only be changed at the beginning of a sampling interval. A possible remedy for this would be to change the applied control input within the sampling interval, and thus to apply it for a shorter time than one sample. However, since such a solution would lead to an additional overhead which is crucial especially for multilevel inverters, a heuristic preselection of the optimal control action is adopted to keep the computational complexity at bay. Experimental results are provided to verify the potential advantages of the proposed strategy.

  20. {ital Ab initio} full charge-density study of the atomic volume of {alpha}-phase Fr, Ra, Ac, Th, Pa, U, Np, and Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Vitos, L.; Kollar, J.; Skriver, H.L.

    1997-02-01

    We have used a full charge-density technique based on the linear muffin-tin orbitals method in first-principles calculations of the atomic volumes of the light actinides including Fr, Ra, and Ac in their low-temperature crystallographic phases. The good agreement between the theoretical and experimental values along the series support the picture of itinerant 5f electronic states in Th to Pu. The increased deviation between theory and experiment found in Np and Pu may be an indication of correlation effects not included in the local density approximation. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Near-surface Density Currents Observed in the Southeast Pacific Stratocumulus-topped Marine Boundary Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Wilbanks, Matt C.; Yuter, S. E.; de Szoeke, S.; Brewer, W. A.; Miller, Matthew A.; Hall, Andrew M.; Burleyson, Casey D.

    2015-09-01

    Density currents (i.e. cold pools or outflows) beneath marine stratocumulus clouds are characterized using a 30-d data set of ship-based observations obtained during the 2008 Variability of American Monsoon Systems (VAMOS) Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) in the southeast Pacific. An objective method identifies 71 density current fronts using an air density criterion and isolates each density current’s core (peak density) and tail (dissipating) zone. Compared to front and core zones, most density current tails exhibited weaker density gradients and wind anomalies elongated about the axis of the mean wind. The mean cloud-level advection relative to the surface layer wind (1.9 m s-1) nearly matches the mean density current propagation speed (1.8 m s-1). The similarity in speeds allows drizzle cells to deposit tails in their wakes. Based on high-resolution scanning Doppler lidar data, prefrontal updrafts had a mean intensity of 0.91 m s-1, reached an average altitude of 800 m, and were often surmounted by low-lying shelf clouds not connected to the overlying stratocumulus cloud. Nearly 90% of density currents were identified when C-band radar estimated 30-km diameter areal average rain rates exceeded 1 mm d-1. Rather than peaking when rain rates are highest overnight, density current occurrence peaks between 0600 and 0800 local solar time when enhanced local drizzle co-occurs with shallow subcloud dry and stable layers. The dry layers may contribute to density current formation by enhancing subcloud evaporation of drizzle. Density currents preferentially occur in regions of open cells but also occur in regions of closed cells.

  2. Gain and loss as a function of current density and temperature in interband cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Merritt, C D; Bewley, W W; Kim, C S; Canedy, C L; Vurgaftman, I; Meyer, J R; Kim, M

    2015-11-01

    We characterize the internal efficiency, internal loss, and optical gain versus current density in 7-stage interband cascade lasers operating at λ=3.1 and 3.45 μm using a cavity-length study of the external differential quantum efficiency (EDQE) and threshold current density at temperatures between 300 and 345 K. We find that the pronounced efficiency droop of the EDQE at high current densities is primarily due to an increase in the internal loss rather than a reduction in the internal efficiency. On the other hand, if the current density J is fixed, the temperature variation of the EDQE at that J is due primarily to a decrease of the internal efficiency. The gain versus current density is fit well by a logarithmic relationship, although the magnitude of the experimental gain is >20% below the theoretical estimate.

  3. Non-perturbative calculation of molecular magnetic properties within current-density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Tellgren, E. I. Lange, K. K.; Ekström, U.; Helgaker, T.; Teale, A. M.; Furness, J. W.

    2014-01-21

    We present a novel implementation of Kohn–Sham density-functional theory utilizing London atomic orbitals as basis functions. External magnetic fields are treated non-perturbatively, which enable the study of both magnetic response properties and the effects of strong fields, using either standard density functionals or current-density functionals—the implementation is the first fully self-consistent implementation of the latter for molecules. Pilot applications are presented for the finite-field calculation of molecular magnetizabilities, hypermagnetizabilities, and nuclear magnetic resonance shielding constants, focusing on the impact of current-density functionals on the accuracy of the results. Existing current-density functionals based on the gauge-invariant vorticity are tested and found to be sensitive to numerical details of their implementation. Furthermore, when appropriately regularized, the resulting magnetic properties show no improvement over standard density-functional results. An advantage of the present implementation is the ability to apply density-functional theory to molecules in very strong magnetic fields, where the perturbative approach breaks down. Comparison with high accuracy full-configuration-interaction results show that the inadequacies of current-density approximations are exacerbated with increasing magnetic field strength. Standard density-functionals remain well behaved but fail to deliver high accuracy. The need for improved current-dependent density-functionals, and how they may be tested using the presented implementation, is discussed in light of our findings.

  4. Effect of Circular p- n Junction Curvature on the Diode Current Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borblik, Vitalii

    2016-08-01

    The influence of the circular geometry of a p- n junction built into a nanowire or a nanorod, on the radial diode current density is investigated. While the current density from the core to the shell proves to be larger than that in a planar diode at the same values of the parameters, the density of the diode current from the shell to the core, on the contrary, proves to be smaller. A dependence of the effect on the core and the shell radii has been demonstrated. The nature of the effect is explained on the basis of radial distributions of the nonequilibrium current carriers.

  5. 3D Stationary electric current density in a spherical tumor treated with low direct current: an analytical solution.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Rolando Placeres; Pupo, Ana Elisa Bergues; Cabrales, Jesús Manuel Bergues; Joa, Javier Antonio González; Cabrales, Luis Enrique Bergues; Nava, Juan José Godina; Aguilera, Andrés Ramírez; Mateus, Miguel Angel O'Farril; Jarque, Manuel Verdecia; Brooks, Soraida Candida Acosta

    2011-02-01

    Electrotherapy with direct current delivered through implanted electrodes is used for local control of solid tumors in both preclinical and clinical studies. The aim of this research is to develop a solution method for obtaining a three-dimensional analytical expression for potential and electric current density as functions of direct electric current intensity, differences in conductivities between the tumor and the surrounding healthy tissue, and length, number and polarity of electrodes. The influence of these parameters on electric current density in both media is analyzed. The results show that the electric current density in the tumor is higher than that in the surrounding healthy tissue for any value of these parameters. The conclusion is that the solution method presented in this study is of practical interest because it provides, in a few minutes, a convenient way to visualize in 3D the electric current densities generated by a radial electrode array by means of the adequate selection of direct current intensity, length, number, and polarity of electrodes, and the difference in conductivity between the solid tumor and its surrounding healthy tissue.

  6. Complexities of determining the Field-Aligned current density from LEO satellites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gjerloev, J. W.; Friel, M. M.; Ohtani, S.; Muhleisen, M.; Gjerloev, A. W.; Martin, P.; Barnes, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    We show results from a study of the field-aligned currents (FAC) as derived from SWARM magnetic field perturbations. We calculate the FAC density using four different techniques and explain why they provide different results. Theoretical work, simulations and data are used to show that widely used techniques can provide current density estimates with errors of 1000%. These errors can be explained by spatial gradients in the currents and temporal variability of the currents as well as a breakdown of other fundamental assumptions. We apply the techniques to auroral crossings with THEMIS ASI coverage and use the SWARM magnetic field observations to calculate the current density. Finally, we show how to estimate the errors in the current density calculations.

  7. Microstructural factors influencing critical-current densities of high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Suenaga, M.

    1992-01-01

    Microstructural defects are the primary determining factors for the values of critical current densities in superconductors. A review is made to assess, (1) what would be the maximum achievable critical-current density in the oxide superconductors if nearly ideal pinning sites were introduced and (2) what types of pinning defects are currently introduced in these superconductors and how effective are these in pinning the vortices Only the case where the applied field is parallel to the c-axis is considered here.

  8. Microstructural factors influencing critical-current densities of high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Suenaga, M.

    1992-12-31

    Microstructural defects are the primary determining factors for the values of critical current densities in superconductors. A review is made to assess, (1) what would be the maximum achievable critical-current density in the oxide superconductors if nearly ideal pinning sites were introduced? and (2) what types of pinning defects are currently introduced in these superconductors and how effective are these in pinning the vortices? Only the case where the applied field is parallel to the c-axis is considered here.

  9. Distribution of ion current density on a rotating spherical cap substrate during ion-assisted deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Marushka, Viktor; Zabeida, Oleg Martinu, Ludvik

    2014-11-01

    The uniformity of ion density is critical for applications relying on the ion assisted deposition technique for the fabrication of the high quality thin films. The authors propose and describe here a method allowing one to calculate the ion density distribution on spherical substrate holders under stationary and rotating conditions for different positions of the ion source. The ion beam shape was approximated by a cos{sup n} function, and the ion current density was represented by a function inversely proportional to the distance from the ion source in accordance with our experimental results. As an example, a calculation of the current density distribution on the spherical cap substrate was performed for a broad beam ion source operated with an anode current of 3 A. The authors propose an approach for process optimization with respect to the ion source position and its inclination, in terms of uniformity and absolute value of the ion current density.

  10. Vortex-lattice pinning and critical current density in anisotropic high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingxu; Li, Xiangyu; Kang, Guozheng; Gao, Yuanwen

    2016-10-01

    The anisotropy of critical current density is an impressive manifestation in the physics of high-temperature superconductors. We develop an analytical characterization of anisotropic flux-lattice pinning and critical current density in a system of random point defects. The effect of superconducting anisotropy on the pinning force and critical current density is formulated. The in-plane/out-of-plane anisotropy and microscopic characteristic lengths are incorporated in the field and angular dependence of the critical current density. This is helpful in understanding the physical essence of the scaling behavior in the experiments for critical current anisotropy. We discuss the role of strong and weak point defects in the anisotropic flux-lattice pinning. Relevance of the theory to the critical-state model is dictated as well.

  11. Method for Determining Local Current Density in 2G HTS Tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bludova, A. I.

    Practically important problem is to determine the density and direction of 2G HTS induced currents at each point on the tape in order to examine its local deviations. This problem is resolved indirectly by spatial measurement of generated magnetic field with a scanning Hall sensor at a given height above the tape surface. Current density is subsequently determined by the Biot-Savart law inversion in Fourier domain. Tikhonov regularization is used in order to increase precision. Method is verified with the model current density reconstruction. Optimal calculation parameters and resulting precision are described.

  12. Local current density measurement using a Rogowski probe in Tokyo Spherical Tokamak-2.

    PubMed

    Furui, H; Nagashima, Y; Takase, Y; Ejiri, A; Kakuda, H; Sonehara, M; Oosako, T; Tsujii, N; Hiratsuka, J; Imamura, K; Inada, T; Nakamura, K; Nakanishi, A; Shinya, T; Togashi, H; Tsuda, S; Wakatsuki, T; Yamaguchi, T

    2014-11-01

    A Rogowski probe consisting of a small multi-layer Rogowski coil, five magnetic pick-up coils, and a Langmuir probe was developed to measure the local current density and its direction. It can be moved along the major radius and can be turned around its axis. This probe was used to measure the current density profile near the last closed flux surface of Ohmic plasmas in Tokyo Spherical Tokamak-2. The current density profile was measured successfully with a signal to noise ratio of greater than 20.

  13. Estimation of current density distribution of PAFC by analysis of cell exhaust gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, S.; Seya, A.; Asano, A.

    1996-12-31

    To estimate distributions of Current densities, voltages, gas concentrations, etc., in phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) stacks, is very important for getting fuel cells with higher quality. In this work, we leave developed a numerical simulation tool to map out the distribution in a PAFC stack. And especially to Study Current density distribution in the reaction area of the cell, we analyzed gas composition in several positions inside a gas outlet manifold of the PAFC stack. Comparing these measured data with calculated data, the current density distribution in a cell plane calculated by the simulation, was certified.

  14. AC corrosion -- A new challenge to pipeline integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Gummow, R.A.; Wakelin, R.G.; Segall, S.M.

    1998-12-31

    Corrosion of steel by alternating current was investigated as far back as the early 1900`s. These early studies and others in the 1950--60`s indicated that AC corrosion of steel was only a fraction of an equivalent amount of direct current (i.e. less than 1% of a like amount of DC) and in addition was controlled to negligible levels when cathodic protection was applied to industry standards. In 1986 however, an investigation into a corrosion failure on a high pressure gas pipeline in Germany indicated that the sole cause of the failure was AC corrosion. This corrosion failure on an otherwise well protected pipeline resulted in the initiation of several laboratory and field studies which indicated, that above a certain minimum AC current density, normal levels of cathodic protection will not control AC corrosion to acceptable levels and that AC mitigation is often required to prevent serious corrosion. Several other AC corrosion sites were discovered at coating holidays during the follow-up investigations in Germany. A graph, relating AC voltage to holiday size at the minimum AC current density for corrosion, is presented to assist the pipeline operator in determining whether or not a pipeline is susceptible to AC corrosion activity.

  15. Spin density wave (SDW) transition in Ru doped BaFeAs{sub 2} investigated by AC steady state calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Vinod, K. Sharma, Shilpam; Sundar, C. S.; Bharathi, A.

    2015-06-24

    Heat capacity measurements were done on sub-micron sized BaFe{sub 2−x}Ru{sub x}As{sub 2} single crystals using thin film membrane based the AC steady state calorimetry technique. Noticeable thermal hysteresis is observed in the heat capacity of the BaFe{sub 2−x}Ru{sub x}As{sub 2} during cooling and warming cycles, indicating first order nature of the SDW transition.

  16. Definition of current density in the presence of a non-local potential.

    PubMed

    Li, Changsheng; Wan, Langhui; Wei, Yadong; Wang, Jian

    2008-04-16

    In the presence of a non-local potential arising from electron-electron interaction, the conventional definition of current density J(c) = (e/2m)([(p-eA)ψ](*)ψ-ψ(*)[(p-eA)ψ]) cannot satisfy the condition of current conservation, i.e., [Formula: see text] in the steady state. In order to solve this problem, we give a new definition of current density including the contribution due to the non-local potential. We show that the current calculated based on the new definition of current density conserves the current and is the same as that obtained from the Landauer-Büttiker formula. Examples are given to demonstrate our results.

  17. The increase of the spin-transfer torque threshold current density in coupled vortex domain walls.

    PubMed

    Lepadatu, S; Mihai, A P; Claydon, J S; Maccherozzi, F; Dhesi, S S; Kinane, C J; Langridge, S; Marrows, C H

    2012-01-18

    We have studied the dependence on the domain wall structure of the spin-transfer torque current density threshold for the onset of wall motion in curved, Gd-doped Ni(80)Fe(20) nanowires with no artificial pinning potentials. For single vortex domain walls, for both 10% and 1% Gd-doping concentrations, the threshold current density is inversely proportional to the wire width and significantly lower compared to the threshold current density measured for transverse domain walls. On the other hand for high Gd concentrations and large wire widths, double vortex domain walls are formed which require an increase in the threshold current density compared to single vortex domain walls at the same wire width. We suggest that this is due to the coupling of the vortex cores, which are of opposite chirality, and hence will be acted on by opposing forces arising through the spin-transfer torque effect.

  18. Characterizing a December 2005 density current event in the Chicago River, Chicago, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia, C.M.; Jackson, P.R.; Oberg, K.A.; Johnson, K.K.; Garcia, M.H.

    2007-01-01

    During the winter months, the Chicago River in Chicago, Illinois is subject to bi-directional flows, and density currents are thought to be responsible for these flow variations. This paper presents detailed field measurements using three acoustic Doppler current profiler instruments and simultaneous water-quality measurements made during December 2005. Observations indicate that the formation of density currents within the Chicago River and density differences are mostly due to salinity differences between the North Branch and the main stem of the Chicago River, whereas temperature difference does not appreciably affect the creation of density currents. Sources of higher water temperature, conductivity, and salinity values should be addressed in future studies. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  19. Influence of electropolishing current densities on sulfur generation at niobium surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, P. V.; Nishiwaki, M.; Noguchi, T.; Sawabe, M.; Saeki, T.; Hayano, H.; Kato, S.

    2013-11-01

    We report the effect of different current densities on sulfur generation at Nb surface in the electropolishing (EP) with aged electrolyte. In this regard, we conducted a series of electropolishing (EP) experiments in aged EP electrolyte with high (≈50 mA/cm2) and low (≈30 mA/cm2) current densities on Nb surfaces. The experiments were carried out both for laboratory coupons and a real Nb single cell cavity with six witness samples located at three typical positions (equator, iris and beam pipe). Sample's surfaces were investigated by XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy), SEM (scanning electron microscope) and EDX (energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy). The surface analysis showed that the EP with a high current density produced a huge amount of sulfate/sulfite particles at Nb surface whereas the EP with a low current density was very helpful to mitigate sulfate/sulfite at Nb surface in both the experiments.

  20. Finite temperature bosonic charge and current densities in compactified cosmic string spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, A.; Bezerra de Mello, E. R.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we study the expectation values of the induced charge and current densities for a massive bosonic field with nonzero chemical potential in the geometry of a higher-dimensional compactified cosmic string with magnetic fluxes along the string core and also enclosed by the compactified direction in thermal equilibrium at finite temperature T . These densities are calculated by decomposing them into the vacuum expectation values and finite temperature contributions coming from the particles and antiparticles. The only nonzero components correspond to the charge, azimuthal, and axial current densities. By using the Abel-Plana formula, we decompose the components of the densities into the part induced by the cosmic string and the one by the compactification. The charge density is an odd function of the chemical potential and even periodic function of the magnetic flux with a period equal to the quantum flux. Moreover, the azimuthal (axial) current density is an even function of the chemical potential and an odd (even) periodic function of the magnetic flux with the same period. In this paper, our main concern is the thermal effect on the charge and current densities, including some limiting cases, the low- and high-temperature approximations. We show that in all cases, the temperature enhances the induced densities.

  1. Cortico-muscular coupling and motor performance are modulated by 20 Hz transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Vanessa; Wach, Claudia; Südmeyer, Martin; Ferrea, Stefano; Schnitzler, Alfons; Pollok, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is associated with pathologically altered oscillatory activity. While synchronized oscillations between 13 and 30 Hz are increased within a cortico-subcortical network, cortico-muscular coupling (CMC) is decreased. The present study aims at investigating the effect of non-invasive transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) of the primary motor cortex (M1) on motor symptoms and motor-cortical oscillations in PD. In 10 PD patients and 10 healthy control subjects, static isometric contraction, dynamic fast finger tapping, and diadochokinesia of the more severely affected hand were investigated prior to and shortly after tACS of the contralateral M1 at 10 Hz vs. 20 Hz vs. sham. During isometric contraction, neuromagnetic activity was recorded using magnetoencephalography. 20 Hz tACS attenuated beta band CMC during isometric contraction and amplitude variability during finger tapping in PD patients but not in healthy control subjects. 10 Hz tACS yielded no significant after-effects. The present data suggest that PD is associated with pathophysiological alterations which abet a higher responsiveness toward frequency-specific tACS – possibly due to pathologically altered motor-cortical oscillatory synchronization at frequencies between 13 and 30 Hz. PMID:24474912

  2. AC susceptibility and critical current in the organic superconductor {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu(NCS){sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, M.A.; Velez, M.; Vicent, J.L.; Schleuter, J.; Williams, J.M.; Crabtree, G.W.

    1994-05-01

    The AC susceptibility (X{prime}, X{double_prime}) has bee measured in a single crystal of the organic superconductor K-(ET){sub 2}Cu(NCS){sub 2} ({Tc} = 9.5 K) as a function of the DC magnetic field, for several frequencies (10 {sup 2} Hz AC fields (l{mu}T

  3. Influence of current density on microstructure of pulse electrodeposited tin coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Ashutosh; Bhattacharya, Sumit; Sen, Ranjan; Reddy, B.S.B.; Fecht, H.-J.; Das, Karabi; Das, Siddhartha

    2012-06-15

    Pulse electrodeposited tin coatings on copper substrate have been synthesized from an aqueous solution containing sodium stannate (Na{sub 2}SnO{sub 3}.3H{sub 2}O) and sodium hydroxide (NaOH). The effect of current density on surface morphology of the deposits has been investigated. As deposited coatings are characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, and line profile analysis. The X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the deposits consist of tetragonal ({beta}-Sn) structure with microcrystalline grains. The deposits plated at lower current density exhibit (110) texture which decreases with increasing current densities. The effects of current density on Cu-Sn diffusion and whisker growth of the electrodeposited tin coatings are also reported here. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pulse electrodeposition of Sn from aqueous alkaline solution without adding any organic additive. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of current density on morphology and whisker growth in tin coatings aged for 1 year. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solution bath is stable and can be operated over a wide range of current density.

  4. Wall current probe: A non-invasive in situ plasma diagnostic for space and time resolved current density distribution measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Baude, R.; Gaboriau, F.; Hagelaar, G. J. M.

    2013-08-15

    In the context of low temperature plasma research, we propose a wall current probe to determine the local charged particle fluxes flowing to the chamber walls. This non-intrusive planar probe consists of an array of electrode elements which can be individually biased and for which the current can be measured separately. We detail the probe properties and present the ability of the diagnostic to be used as a space and time resolved measurement of the ion and electron current density at the chamber walls. This diagnostic will be relevant to study the electron transport in magnetized low-pressure plasmas.

  5. Wall current probe: a non-invasive in situ plasma diagnostic for space and time resolved current density distribution measurement.

    PubMed

    Baude, R; Gaboriau, F; Hagelaar, G J M

    2013-08-01

    In the context of low temperature plasma research, we propose a wall current probe to determine the local charged particle fluxes flowing to the chamber walls. This non-intrusive planar probe consists of an array of electrode elements which can be individually biased and for which the current can be measured separately. We detail the probe properties and present the ability of the diagnostic to be used as a space and time resolved measurement of the ion and electron current density at the chamber walls. This diagnostic will be relevant to study the electron transport in magnetized low-pressure plasmas.

  6. Nonlinear dynamics of filamentation instability and current filament merging in a high density current-driven plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorashadizadeh, S. M.; Taghadosi, M. R.; Niknam, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    The magnetic field generation due to the filamentation instability (FI) of a high density current-driven plasma is studied through a new nonlinear diffusion equation. This equation is obtained on the basis of quantum hydrodynamic model and numerically solved by applying the Crank-Nicolson method. The spatiotemporal evolution of the magnetic field and the electron density distribution exhibits the current filament merging as a nonlinear phase of the FI which is responsible for the strong magnetic fields in the current-driven plasmas. It is found that the general behaviour of the FI is the same as that of the classical case but the instability growth rate, its magnitude, and the saturation time are affected by the quantum effects. It is eventually concluded that the quantum effects can play a stabilizing role in such situation.

  7. Synthesis, characterization and surface wettability study of polypyrrole films: Effect of applied constant current density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thombare, J. V.; Lohar, G. M.; Shinde, S. K.; Dhasade, S. S.; Rath, M. C.; Fulari, V. J.

    2015-03-01

    Polypyrrole thin films were prepared by galvanostatic mode of electrodeposition. The applied constant current density changes structural, optical and surface wettability properties of polypyrrole thin films. The prepared films were characterized for structural, optical and surface wettability study. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows the benzoid and qunoid like structures in polypyrrole films. The UV-Visible absorption study shows that the optical density varies with the applied deposition current density. The band gap energy calculated from the Tauc's plot was found to be 2.25 eV and shows the film is in semiconductor nature. The surface wettability study confirms hydrophilic nature of polypyrrole films. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. Current density distribution in cylindrical Li-Ion cells during impedance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osswald, P. J.; Erhard, S. V.; Noel, A.; Keil, P.; Kindermann, F. M.; Hoster, H.; Jossen, A.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, modified commercial cylindrical lithium-ion cells with multiple separate current tabs are used to analyze the influence of tab pattern, frequency and temperature on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. In a first step, the effect of different current tab arrangements on the impedance spectra is analyzed and possible electrochemical causes are discussed. In a second step, one terminal is used to apply a sinusoidal current while the other terminals are used to monitor the local potential distribution at different positions along the electrodes of the cell. It is observed that the characteristic decay of the voltage amplitude along the electrode changes non-linearly with frequency, where high-frequent currents experience a stronger attenuation along the current collector than low-frequent currents. In further experiments, the decay characteristic is controlled by the cell temperature, driven by the increasing resistance of the current collector and the enhanced kinetic and transport properties of the active material and electrolyte. Measurements indicate that the ac current distribution depends strongly on the frequency and the temperature. In this context, the challenges for electrochemical impedance spectroscopy as cell diagnostic technique for commercial cells are discussed.

  9. Effect of an axial magnetic field and arc current on the anode current density in diffuse vacuum arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui; Geng, Yingsan; Liu, Zhiyuan; Wang, Jianhua; Wang, Zhenxing; Zhang, Zaiqin

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to measure the effect of an axial magnetic field (AMF) BAMF and arc current on the anode current density in diffuse vacuum arcs. The experimental geometry included a split anode and a butt-type cathode, both with a diameter of 60 mm. The anode surface was divided into a central area and three symmetrically disposed peripheral annular areas. The central area of the split anode had a diameter of 20 mm. The contact material was CuCr25 (25% Cr). The arc current IARC ranged from 4 to 14 kA (rms) at 50 Hz. The opening velocity was 2.4 m/s. The currents of the four areas on the anode contact were measured using four Rogowski coils situated outside the vacuum chamber. An external uniform AMF BAMF ranging from 0 to 110 mT was applied during the experiment. The observed arc modes were recorded by a high-speed charge-coupled device video camera. The experimental results quantitatively reveal that the current density distribution on the anode surface in the diffuse arc mode was not uniform but concentrated in the central area. The current density in the central anode area at the current peak JPeakArea I decreased with increasing BAMF following a power law. For BAMF of 0-110 mT and IARC of 4-14 kA, JPeakArea I = (2.2 IARC + 0.069 IARC2) BAMF-0.22, where JPeakArea I is in A/mm2, BAMF is in mT, and IARC is in kA. Moreover, the current distribution was uneven in the three peripheral areas.

  10. The evaluation of a density current experiment as a verification tool of a secondary clarifier model.

    PubMed

    Kim, J; Kim, S; Yoon, J

    2003-01-01

    The prediction of the spatial and temporal flow regime is important for the efficient design and operation of the settling tank. The impact of the gravity current has been investigated by the temperature difference or artificial glass particles. This experimental study is designed to obtain the steady state of stratified flow with the consideration of the heavy density flow. Two different approaches were performed at lab scale considering the hydraulic similarity. One is the investigation of a heavy density current of saline water intrusion. The characteristics of the internal hydraulics are monitored using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). As a result of the saline intrusion, the internal flow established a continual density stratification of 3-layers in steady state. The other is the movement of activated sludge from a sewage treatment plant. The video image is captured to analyze the behavior of activated sludge in the settling tank. The experiments with various inlet baffle conditions suggest that the hydraulic characteristics of the two experiments are significantly different. As the distance between the baffle and inlet point was decreased, significant strength of saline density currents in the bottom layer was observed. However, the strength of the velocity in the bottom density currents appeared to be the opposite in the case of the activated sludge. The reason for the slower density current in the bottom layer is associated with the compressibility of activated sludge characteristics.

  11. Current Density Imaging Using Directly Measured Harmonic Bz Data in MREIT

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Oh In

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) measures magnetic flux density signals through the use of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to visualize the internal conductivity and/or current density. Understanding the reconstruction procedure for the internal current density, we directly measure the second derivative of Bz data from the measured k-space data, from which we can avoid a tedious phase unwrapping to obtain the phase signal of Bz. We determine optimal weighting factors to combine the derivatives of magnetic flux density data, ∇2Bz, measured using the multi-echo train. The proposed method reconstructs the internal current density using the relationships between the induced internal current and the measured ∇2Bz data. Results from a phantom experiment demonstrate that the proposed method reduces the scanning time and provides the internal current density, while suppressing the background field inhomogeneity. To implement the real experiment, we use a phantom with a saline solution including a balloon, which excludes other artifacts by any concentration gradient in the phantom. PMID:23573168

  12. Measurement of induced magnetic flux density using injection current nonlinear encoding (ICNE) in MREIT.

    PubMed

    Park, Chunjae; Lee, Byung Il; Kwon, Ohin; Woo, Eung Je

    2007-02-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) measures induced magnetic flux densities subject to externally injected currents in order to visualize conductivity distributions inside an electrically conducting object. Injection currents induce magnetic flux densities that appear in phase parts of acquired MR image data. In the conventional current injection method, we inject currents during the time segment between the end of the first RF pulse and the beginning of the reading gradient in order to ensure the gradient linearity. Noting that longer current injections can accumulate more phase changes, we propose a new pulse sequence called injection current nonlinear encoding (ICNE) where the duration of the injection current pulse is extended until the end of the reading gradient. Since the current injection during the reading gradient disturbs the gradient linearity, we first analyze the MR signal produced by the ICNE pulse sequence and suggest a novel algorithm to extract the induced magnetic flux density from the acquired MR signal. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments show that the new method is clearly advantageous in terms of the reduced noise level in measured magnetic flux density data. The amount of noise reduction depends on the choice of the data acquisition time and it was about 24% when we used a prolonged data acquisition time of 10.8 ms. The ICNE method will enhance the clinical applicability of the MREIT technique when it is combined with an appropriate phase artefact minimization method.

  13. Incorporation of Ca and P on anodized titanium surface: Effect of high current density.

    PubMed

    Laurindo, Carlos A H; Torres, Ricardo D; Mali, Sachin A; Gilbert, Jeremy L; Soares, Paulo

    2014-04-01

    This study systematically evaluated the surface and corrosion characteristics of commercially pure titanium (grade 2) modified by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) with high current density. The anodization process was carried out galvanostatically (constant current density) using a solution containing calcium glycerophosphate (0.02mol/L) and calcium acetate (0.15mol/L). The current densities applied were 400, 700, 1000 and 1200mA/cm(2) for a period of 15s. Composition, crystalline structure, morphology, roughness, wettability and "in-vitro" bioactivity test in SBF of the anodized layer were evaluated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, profilometry and contact angle measurements. Corrosion properties were evaluated by open circuit potential, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization measurements. The results show that the TiO2 oxide layers present an increase of thickness, porosity, roughness, wettability, Ca/P ratio, and bioactivity, with the applied current density up to 1000mA/cm(2). Corrosion resistance also increases with applied current density. It is observed that for 1200mA/cm(2), there is a degradation of the oxide layer. In general, the results suggest that the anodized TiO2 layer with better properties is formed with an applied current of 1000mA/cm(2).

  14. Gauge-Origin Independent Calculations of the Anisotropy of the Magnetically Induced Current Densities.

    PubMed

    Fliegl, Heike; Jusélius, Jonas; Sundholm, Dage

    2016-07-21

    Gauge-origin independent current density susceptibility tensors have been computed using the gauge-including magnetically induced current (GIMIC) method. The anisotropy of the magnetically induced current density (ACID) functions constructed from the current density susceptibility tensors are therefore gauge-origin independent. The ability of the gauge-origin independent ACID function to provide quantitative information about the current flow along chemical bonds has been assessed by integrating the cross-section area of the ACID function in the middle of chemical bonds. Analogously, the current strength susceptibility passing a given plane through the molecule is obtained by numerical integration of the current flow parallel to the normal vector of the integration plane. The cross-section area of the ACID function is found to be strongly dependent on the exact location of the integration plane, which is in sheer contrast to the calculated ring-current strength susceptibilities that are practically independent of the chosen position of the integration plane. The gauge-origin independent ACID functions plotted for different isosurface values show that a visual assessment of the current flow and degree of aromaticity depends on the chosen isosurface. The present study shows that ACID functions are not an unambiguous means to estimate the degree of molecular aromaticity according to the magnetic criterion and to determine the current pathway of complex molecular rings.

  15. Beta Band Transcranial Alternating (tACS) and Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) Applied After Initial Learning Facilitate Retrieval of a Motor Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Vanessa; Meier, Anna; Dinkelbach, Lars; Pollok, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    The primary motor cortex (M1) contributes to the acquisition and early consolidation of a motor sequence. Although the relevance of M1 excitability for motor learning has been supported, the significance of M1 oscillations remains an open issue. This study aims at investigating to what extent retrieval of a newly learned motor sequence can be differentially affected by motor-cortical transcranial alternating (tACS) and direct current stimulation (tDCS). Alpha (10 Hz), beta (20 Hz) or sham tACS was applied in 36 right-handers. Anodal or cathodal tDCS was applied in 30 right-handers. Participants learned an eight-digit serial reaction time task (SRTT; sequential vs. random) with the right hand. Stimulation was applied to the left M1 after SRTT acquisition at rest for 10 min. Reaction times were analyzed at baseline, end of acquisition, retrieval immediately after stimulation and reacquisition after eight further sequence repetitions. Reaction times during retrieval were significantly faster following 20 Hz tACS as compared to 10 Hz and sham tACS indicating a facilitation of early consolidation. tDCS yielded faster reaction times, too, independent of polarity. No significant differences between 20 Hz tACS and tDCS effects on retrieval were found suggesting that 20 Hz effects might be associated with altered motor-cortical excitability. Based on the behavioral modulation yielded by tACS and tDCS one might speculate that altered motor-cortical beta oscillations support early motor consolidation possibly associated with neuroplastic reorganization. PMID:26834593

  16. Measurement of local current density of all-vanadium redox flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Wen-Yen; Leu, Chih-Hsing; Wu, Chun-Hsing; Chen, Yong-Song

    2014-12-01

    This article presents a preliminary study of the measurement of local current density in all-vanadium redox flow batteries. Two batteries are designed and manufactured in this study, and the experimental results are compared. In the first cell, the current collector is divided into 25 segments, and the flow field plate is not segmented, whereas in the other cell, the flow field plate is segmented. The effects of the electrolyte flow rate on the battery efficiencies and the local current density variation are investigated. The experimental results show that the current density near the outlet significantly decreases when the discharge capacity approaches zero. In addition, the battery has a larger discharge depth at a higher electrolyte flow rate.

  17. Current densities and total contact currents for 110 and 220 kV power line tasks.

    PubMed

    Korpinen, Leena; Kuisti, Harri; Elovaara, Jarmo

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze all values of electric current from measured periods while performing tasks on 110 and 220 kV power lines. Additionally, the objective was to study the average current densities and average total contact currents caused by electric fields in 110 and 220 kV power line tasks. One worker simulated the following tasks: (A) tested insulation voltage at a 110 kV portal tower, (B) checked the wooden towers for rot at a 110 kV portal tower, (C) tested insulation voltage at a 220 kV portal tower, and (D) checked the wooden towers for rot at a 220 kV portal tower. The highest average current density in the neck was 2.0 mA/m(2) (calculated internal electric field was 19.0-38.0 mV/m), and the highest average contact current was 234 µA. All measured values at 110 and 220 kV towers were lower than the basic restrictions (0.1 and 0.8 V/m) of the International Commission on Non-ionizing Radiation Protection.

  18. Coupling of turbulent and non-turbulent flow regimes within pyroclastic density currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breard, Eric C. P.; Lube, Gert; Jones, Jim R.; Dufek, Josef; Cronin, Shane J.; Valentine, Greg A.; Moebis, Anja

    2016-10-01

    Volcanic eruptions are at their most deadly when pyroclastic density currents sweep across landscapes to devastate everything in their path. The internal dynamics underpinning these hazards cannot be directly observed. Here we present a quantitative view inside pyroclastic density currents by synthesizing their natural flow behaviour in large-scale experiments. The experiments trace flow dynamics from initiation to deposition, and can explain the sequence and evolution of real-world deposits. We show that, inside pyroclastic density currents, the long-hypothesized non-turbulent underflow and fully turbulent ash-cloud regions are linked through a hitherto unrecognized middle zone of intermediate turbulence and concentration. Bounded by abrupt jumps in turbulence, the middle zone couples underflow and ash-cloud regions kinematically. Inside this zone, strong feedback between gas and particle phases leads to the formation of mesoscale turbulence clusters. These extremely fast-settling dendritic structures dictate the internal stratification and evolution of pyroclastic density currents and allow the underflows to grow significantly during runout. Our experiments reveal how the underflow and ash-cloud regions are dynamically related--insights that are relevant to the forecasting of pyroclastic density current behaviour in volcanic hazard models.

  19. Estimation of nighttime dip-equatorial E-region current density using measurements and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Kuldeep; Sekar, R.; Anandarao, B. G.; Gupta, S. P.; Chakrabarty, D.

    2016-08-01

    The existence of the possible ionospheric current during nighttime over low-equatorial latitudes is one of the unresolved issues in ionospheric physics and geomagnetism. A detailed investigation is carried out to estimate the same over Indian longitudes using in situ measurements from Thumba (8.5 ° N, 76.9 ° E), empirical plasma drift model (Fejer et al., 2008) and equatorial electrojet model developed by Anandarao (1976). This investigation reveals that the nighttime E-region current densities vary from ∼0.3 to ∼0.7 A/km2 during pre-midnight to early morning hours on geomagnetically quiet conditions. The nighttime current densities over the dip equator are estimated using three different methods (discussed in methodology section) and are found to be consistent with one another within the uncertainty limits. Altitude structures in the E-region current densities are also noticed which are shown to be associated with altitudinal structures in the electron densities. The horizontal component of the magnetic field induced by these nighttime ionospheric currents is estimated to vary between ∼2 and ∼6 nT during geomagnetically quiet periods. This investigation confirms the existence of nighttime ionospheric current and opens up a possibility of estimating base line value for geomagnetic field fluctuations as observed by ground-based magnetometer.

  20. Towards the definition of AMS facies in the deposits of pyroclastic density currents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ort, M.H.; Newkirk, T.T.; Vilas, J.F.; Vazquez, J.A.; Ort, M.H.; Porreca, Massimiliano; Geissman, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) provides a statistically robust technique to characterize the fabrics of deposits of pyroclastic density currents (PDCs). AMS fabrics in two types of pyroclastic deposits (small-volume phreatomagmatic currents in the Hopi Buttes volcanic field, Arizona, USA, and large-volume caldera-forming currents, Caviahue Caldera, Neuquén, Argentina) show similar patterns. Near the vent and in areas of high topographical roughness, AMS depositional fabrics are poorly grouped, with weak lineations and foliations. In a densely welded proximal ignimbrite, this fabric is overprinted by a foliation formed as the rock compacted and deformed. Medial deposits have moderate–strong AMS lineations and foliations. The most distal deposits have strong foliations but weak lineations. Based on these facies and existing models for pyroclastic density currents, deposition in the medial areas occurs from the strongly sheared, high-particle-concentration base of a density-stratified current. In proximal areas and where topography mixes this denser base upwards into the current, deposition occurs rapidly from a current with little uniformity to the shear, in which particles fall and collide in a chaotic fashion. Distal deposits are emplaced by a slowing or stalled current so that the dominant particle motion is vertical, leading to weak lineation and strong foliation.

  1. High-Current-Density Vertical-Tunneling Transistors from Graphene/Highly Doped Silicon Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Sheng, Jiming; Wu, Hao; He, Qiyuan; Cheng, Hung-Chieh; Shakir, Muhammad Imran; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2016-06-01

    Scalable fabrication of vertical-tunneling transistors is presented based on heterostructures formed between graphene, highly doped silicon, and its native oxide. Benefiting from the large density of states of highly doped silicon, the tunneling transistors can deliver a current density over 20 A cm(-2) . This study demonstrates that the interfacial native oxide plays a crucial role in governing the carrier transport in graphene-silicon heterostructures.

  2. The current density in quantum electrodynamics in time-dependent external potentials and the Schwinger effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahn, Jochen

    2015-11-01

    In the framework of quantum electrodynamics (QED) in external potentials, we introduce a method to compute the time-dependence of the expectation value of the current density for time-dependent homogeneous external electric fields. We apply it to the so-called Sauter pulse. For late times, our results agree with the asymptotic value due to electron-positron pair production. We correct a general expression derived by Serber for the expectation value of the current, linearized in the external field, and compare with our results for the Sauter pulse. Based on the properties of the current density, we argue that the appearance of enhanced quasi-particle densities at intermediate times in slowly varying sub-critical potentials is generic. Also an alternative approach, which circumvents these difficulties, is sketched.

  3. Characterization of thunderstorm induced Maxwell current densities in the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baginski, Michael Edward

    1989-01-01

    Middle atmospheric transient Maxwell current densities generated by lightning induced charge perturbations are investigated via a simulation of Maxwell's equations. A time domain finite element analysis is employed for the simulations. The atmosphere is modeled as a region contained within a right circular cylinder with a height of 110 km and radius of 80 km. A composite conductivity profile based on measured data is used when charge perturbations are centered about the vertical axis at altitudes of 6 and 10 km. The simulations indicate that the temporal structure of the Maxwell current density is relatively insensitive to altitude variation within the region considered. It is also shown that the electric field and Maxwell current density are not generally aligned.

  4. Simultaneous Observations of Electric Fields, Current Density, Plasma Density, and Neutral Winds During Two Sounding Rocket Experiments Launched from Wallops Island into Strong Daytime Dynamo Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfaff, R. F., Jr.; Rowland, D. E.; Klenzing, J.; Freudenreich, H. T.; Martin, S. C.; Abe, T.; Habu, H.; Yamamoto, M. Y.; Watanabe, S.; Yamamoto, M.; Yokoyama, T.; Kakinami, Y.; Yamazaki, Y.; Larsen, M. F.; Hurd, L.; Clemmons, J. H.; Bishop, R. L.; Walterscheid, R. L.; Fish, C. S.; Bullett, T. W.; Mabie, J. J.; Murphy, N.; Angelopoulos, V.; Leinweber, H. K.; Bernal, I.; Chi, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the ion-neutral coupling that creates the global electrical daytime "dynamo" currents in the mid-latitude, lower ionosphere, NASA carried out two multiple sounding rocket experiments from Wallops Island, VA on July 10, 2011 (14:00 UT, 10:00 LT) and July 4, 2013 (14:31 UT, 10:31 LT). The rockets were launched in the presence of well-defined, westward Hall currents observed on the ground with ΔH values of ­-25 nT and -30 nT, respectively, as well as a well-defined, daytime ionospheric density observed by the VIPIR ionosonde at Wallops. During the 2011 experiment, a narrow, intense sporadic-E layer was observed near 102 km. Each experiment consisted of a pair of rockets launched 15 sec apart. The first rocket of each pair carried instruments to measure DC electric and magnetic fields, as well as the ambient plasma and neutral gases and attained apogees of 158 km and 135 km in the 2011 and 2013 experiments, respectively. The second rocket of each pair carried canisters which released a lithium vapor trail along the upleg to illuminate neutral winds in the upper atmosphere. This daytime vapor trail technology was developed jointly by researchers at JAXA and Clemson University. In the second experiment, the lithium release was clearly visible in cameras with infrared filters operated by US and Japanese researchers in a NASA airplane at 9.6 km altitude. The observed wind profiles reached speeds of 100 m/s with strong shears with respect to altitude and were consistent with an independent derivation of the wind from the ionization gauge sensor suite on the instrumented rocket. The "vapor trail" rockets, which also included a falling sphere, attained apogees of 150 km and 143 km in the 2011 and 2013 experiments, respectively. By measuring the current density, conductivity, DC electric fields, and neutral winds, we solve the dynamo equation as a function of altitude, revealing the different contributions to the lower E-region currents. We find that the DC

  5. Laser wavefront analyzer for imploding plasma density and current profile measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, N.; Prasad, R.R.; Campbell, K.; Coleman, P.; Krishnan, M.; Weber, B.V.; Stephanakis, S.J.; Mosher, D.

    2004-10-01

    The laser wavefront analyzer (LWA) consists of a polarized laser beam pulse that traverses an imploding z-pinch, and a microlens array that focuses the laser beam into a large number (10{sup 4}) of very tiny spots. LWA image analysis determines the refractive bending angles (due to density gradients) and Faraday rotation angles (due to the magnetic field-density integral) throughout the plasma cross section. Electron density and current distributions are derived from LWA data in an imploding gas-puff z-pinch plasma.

  6. Climatology of convective density currents in the southern foothills of the Atlas Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmel, C.; Knippertz, P.; Schulz, O.

    2010-06-01

    Density currents fed by evaporationally cooled air are an important dust storm-generating feature and can constitute a source of moisture in arid regions. Recently, the existence of such systems has been demonstrated for the area between the High Atlas Mountains and the Sahara desert in southern Morocco on the basis of case studies. Here, a climatological analysis is presented that uses data from the dense climate station network of the IMPETUS project (An Integrated Approach to the Efficient Management of Scarce Water Resources in West Africa) for the 5 year period 2002-2006. Objective criteria mainly based upon abrupt changes in wind and dew point temperature are defined to identify possible density current situations. The preselected events are then subjectively evaluated with the help of satellite imagery and surface observations to exclude causes for air mass changes other than moist convective cold pool formation. On average, 11 ± 4 density currents per year are detected with the main season lasting from April to September. Density currents occur mainly in the afternoon and evening due to the diurnal cycle of moist convection. Mean changes at the leading edge are increases in 2 m dew point temperature and wind speed by 5.4°C and 8.2 m s-1, respectively, and a decrease in 2 m air temperature of 2.3°C. The High Atlas and Jebel Saghro are found to be the most important source regions, while only a few systems originate over the Saharan lowlands. Labilization of the atmosphere due to upper-level troughs over northwest Africa and an enhanced moisture content favor density current formation. In addition, detailed case studies representative of different density current types are presented.

  7. High-current density, high-brightness electron beams from large-area lanthanum hexaboride cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loschialpo, P.; Kapetanakos, C. A.

    1987-12-01

    Large (approx. 5 cm) diameter lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) cathodes operated at 10 kV have produced 1 to 5 micro electron pulses with current density between 10 and 20 A/sq cm. Normalized beam brightness, has been consistently measured. To obtain this high current density, the LaB6 cathodes have been heated to temperatures between approximately 1600 to 1800 C. Very uniform temperature profiles are obtained by applying a carefully tailored electron bombardment heating power distribution. These measurements have been made between pressure .000001 to .00001 Torr, i.e., under much less demanding vacuum conditions than that required by conventional dispenser type cathodes.

  8. Four-dimensional ultrasound current source density imaging of a dipole field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. H.; Olafsson, R.; Ingram, P.; Li, Q.; Qin, Y.; Witte, R. S.

    2011-09-01

    Ultrasound current source density imaging (UCSDI) potentially transforms conventional electrical mapping of excitable organs, such as the brain and heart. For this study, we demonstrate volume imaging of a time-varying current field by scanning a focused ultrasound beam and detecting the acoustoelectric (AE) interaction signal. A pair of electrodes produced an alternating current distribution in a special imaging chamber filled with a 0.9% NaCl solution. A pulsed 1 MHz ultrasound beam was scanned near the source and sink, while the AE signal was detected on remote recording electrodes, resulting in time-lapsed volume movies of the alternating current distribution.

  9. High critical current densities of multifilamentary Nb-46. 5w%Ti superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Somerkoski, J.V.A.; Laasko, L.; Lindroos, V.K.; Toivanen, R.O.; Vanhatalo, V.

    1985-03-01

    Multiple heat treatment, critical current measurements and transmission electron microscopy were employed in improving the critical current carrying capacity of multifilamentary Nb-46.5w%Ti superconductors. The critical current density measurements at 4.2 K exhibited the values of 2860 A/mm/sup 2/ and 580 A/mm/sup 2/ at magnetic fields of 5 T and 9 T, respectively. The high current carrying capacity of the 5 times heat treated superconductor has been attributed to the improved size distribution of the effective pinning sites.

  10. THE ELECTRICAL CURRENT DENSITY VECTOR IN THE INNER PENUMBRA OF A SUNSPOT

    SciTech Connect

    Puschmann, K. G.; Cobo, B. Ruiz; Martinez Pillet, V. E-mail: brc@iac.e

    2010-09-20

    We determine the entire electrical current density vector in a geometrical three-dimensional volume of the inner penumbra of a sunspot from an inversion of spectropolarimetric data obtained with Hinode/SP. Significant currents are seen to wrap around the hotter, more elevated regions with lower and more horizontal magnetic fields that harbor strong upflows and radial outflows (the intraspines). The horizontal component of the current density vector is 3-4 times larger than the vertical; nearly all previous studies only obtain the vertical component J{sub z} , thus strongly underestimating the current density. The current density J-vector and the magnetic field B-vector form an angle of about 20{sup 0}. The plasma {beta} at the 0 km level is larger than 1 in the intraspines and is one order of magnitude lower in the background component of the penumbra (spines). At the 200 km level, the plasma {beta} is below 0.3, nearly everywhere. The plasma {beta} surface as well as the surface optical depth unity is very corrugated. At the borders of intraspines and inside, B-vector is not force-free at deeper layers and nearly force-free at the top layers. The magnetic field of the spines is close to being potential everywhere. The dissipated ohmic energy is five orders of magnitudes smaller than the solar energy flux and thus negligible for the energy balance of the penumbra.

  11. Effect of current density on electrolytic transformation of benzene for groundwater remediation.

    PubMed

    Sarahney, Hussam; Alshawabkeh, Akram N

    2007-05-17

    Electrolytic transformation of benzene in water is evaluated as a potential mechanism that can be implemented for in situ remediation of benzene in groundwater. Electrolytic transformation experiments were conducted using inert electrodes that are separated by a membrane. Electrolytes that consist of sodium chloride or sodium nitrate solutions with 40 mg/L benzene concentration were used. Electric currents of 1, 5 and 10 mA (1.8, 9.0 and 18.1 mA/L, respectively) were applied and the transformation of benzene was monitored and compared with a control. The results show that electrolytic transformation of benzene occurred under different rates that depend upon the type of electrolyte and the current density. Transformation results in formation of chlorinated benzene when sodium chloride is the electrolyte. However, processing for long enough time (up to 300 h) resulted in transformation of the chlorinated benzene byproducts. Benzene transformation occurred when the electrolyte was sodium nitrate but the rate was slower than the case with sodium chloride. The results did no show formation of byproducts in this case. The transformation rate was dependent on the current density. The results with sodium chloride showed that the rate increases with increasing the current density, but there is an optimum value, beyond which increasing the current density will not increase the transformation rate.

  12. Density functional theory studies of actinide(III) motexafins (An-Motex2+, An = Ac, Cm, Lr). Structure, stability, and comparison with lanthanide(III) motexafins.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaoyan; Li, Quansong; Moritz, Anna; Xie, Zhizhong; Dolg, Michael; Chen, Xuebo; Fang, Weihai

    2006-04-17

    Newly developed relativistic energy-consistent 5f-in-core actinide pseudopotentials and corresponding (7s6p5d1f)/[5s4p3d1f] basis sets in the segmented contraction scheme, combined with density functional theory methods, have been used to study the molecular structure and chemical properties of selected actinide(III) motexafins (An-Motex2+, An = Ac, Cm, Lr). Structure and stability are discussed, and a comparison to the lanthanide(III) motexafins (Ln-Motex2+, Ln = La, Gd, Lu) is made. The actinide element is found to reside above the mean N5 motexafin plane, and the larger the cation, the greater the observed out-of-plane displacement. It is concluded that the actinium(III), curium(III), and lawrencium(III) cations are tightly bound to the macrocyclic skeleton, yielding stable structures. However, the calculated metal-ligand gas-phase binding energy for An-Motex2+ is about 1-2 eV lower than that of Ln-Motex2+, implying a lower stability of An-Motex2+ compared to Ln-Motex2+. Results including solvent effects imply that Ac-Motex2+ is the most stable complex in aqueous solution and should be the best candidate for experimentalists to get stable actinide(III) motexafin complexes. PMID:16602805

  13. Lower hybrid current drive at high density in the multi-pass regimea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, G. M.; Faust, I. C.; Meneghini, O.; Parker, R. R.; Shiraiwa, S.; Baek, S. G.; Bonoli, P. T.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; LaBombard, B. L.; Lau, C.; Ma, Y.; Reinke, M. L.; Terry, J. L.; Whyte, D. G.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.; Harvey, R. W.; Schmidt, A. E.; Smirnov, A. P.; Wilson, J. R.

    2012-06-01

    Assessing the performance of lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) at high density is critical for developing non-inductive current drive systems on future steady-state experiments. Excellent LHCD efficiency has been observed during fully non-inductive operation (η =2.0-2.5×1019 AW-1m-2 at n¯e=0.5×1020 m-3) on Alcator C-Mod [I. H. Hutchinson et al., Phys. Plasmas 1, 1511 (1994)] under conditions (ne, magnetic field and topology, and LHCD frequency) relevant to ITER [S. Shiraiwa et al., Nucl. Fusion 51, 103024 (2011)]. To extend these results to advanced tokamak regimes with higher bootstrap current fractions on C-Mod, it is necessary to increase n ¯e to 1.0-1.5×1020 m-3. However, the number of current-carrying, non-thermal electrons generated by LHCD drops sharply in diverted configurations at densities that are well below the density limit previously observed on limited tokamaks. In these cases, changes in scrape off layer (SOL) ionization and density profiles are observed during LHCD, indicating that significant power is transferred from the LH waves to the SOL. Fokker-Planck simulations of these discharges utilizing ray tracing and full wave propagation codes indicate that LH waves in the high density, multi-pass absorption regime linger in the plasma edge, and SOL region, where absorption near or outside the LCFS results in the loss of current drive efficiency. Modeling predicts that non-thermal emission increases with stronger single-pass absorption. Experimental data show that increasing Te in high density LH discharges results in higher non-thermal electron emission, as predicted by the models.

  14. Lower hybrid current drive at high density in the multi-pass regime

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, G. M.; Faust, I. C.; Meneghini, O.; Parker, R. R.; Shiraiwa, S.; Baek, S. G.; Bonoli, P. T.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; LaBombard, B. L.; Lau, C.; Ma, Y.; Reinke, M. L.; Terry, J. L.; Whyte, D. G.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.; Schmidt, A. E.; Harvey, R. W.; Smirnov, A. P.; and others

    2012-06-15

    Assessing the performance of lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) at high density is critical for developing non-inductive current drive systems on future steady-state experiments. Excellent LHCD efficiency has been observed during fully non-inductive operation ({eta}=2.0-2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} AW{sup -1}m{sup -2} at n{sub e}=0.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} m{sup -3}) on Alcator C-Mod [I. H. Hutchinson et al., Phys. Plasmas 1, 1511 (1994)] under conditions (n{sub e}, magnetic field and topology, and LHCD frequency) relevant to ITER [S. Shiraiwa et al., Nucl. Fusion 51, 103024 (2011)]. To extend these results to advanced tokamak regimes with higher bootstrap current fractions on C-Mod, it is necessary to increase n{sub e} to 1.0-1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} m{sup -3}. However, the number of current-carrying, non-thermal electrons generated by LHCD drops sharply in diverted configurations at densities that are well below the density limit previously observed on limited tokamaks. In these cases, changes in scrape off layer (SOL) ionization and density profiles are observed during LHCD, indicating that significant power is transferred from the LH waves to the SOL. Fokker-Planck simulations of these discharges utilizing ray tracing and full wave propagation codes indicate that LH waves in the high density, multi-pass absorption regime linger in the plasma edge, and SOL region, where absorption near or outside the LCFS results in the loss of current drive efficiency. Modeling predicts that non-thermal emission increases with stronger single-pass absorption. Experimental data show that increasing T{sub e} in high density LH discharges results in higher non-thermal electron emission, as predicted by the models.

  15. AC corrosion -- a new threat to pipeline integrity?

    SciTech Connect

    Gummow, R.A.; Wakelin, R.G.; Segall, S.M.

    1996-12-31

    Corrosion of steel by alternating current was investigated as far back as the early 1900`s. These early studies and others in the 1950--60`s indicated that AC corrosion of steel was only a fraction of an equivalent amount of direct current (i.e., less than 1% of a like amount of DC) and in addition was controlled to negligible levels with cathodic protection applied to industry standards. In 1986 however, an investigation into a corrosion failure on a high pressure gas pipeline in Germany indicated that the sole cause of the failure was AC corrosion. This corrosion failure on an otherwise well protected pipeline resulted in several laboratory and field studies which indicated, that above a certain minimum AC current density, standard levels of cathodic protection will not control AC corrosion and AC mitigation is required to prevent further corrosion. Several other corrosion anomalies were discovered at coating holidays during the follow-up investigations in Germany. The authors have investigated several corrosion occurrences on pipelines in Ontario during the last 2--3 years which appear to be caused by AC corrosion. This presentation traces the literature record on AC electrolysis from the past to the present and discusses the key parameters which determine the likelihood of corrosion attack. Several case histories of suspected AC corrosion will be discussed and guidelines on how to assess whether or not a pipeline is susceptible to AC corrosion will be offered.

  16. Electron Charge and Current Densities, the Geometrie Phase and Cellular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukumar, N.; Deb, B. M.; Singh, Harjinder

    1993-02-01

    Some consequences of the quantum fluid dynamics formulation are discussed for excited states of atoms and molecules and for time-dependent processes. It is shown that the conservation of electronic current density j(r) allows us to manufacture a gauge potential for each excited state of an atom, molecule or atom in a molecule. This potential gives rise to a tube of magnetic flux carried around by the many-electron system. In time-dependent situations, the evolution of the electronic density distribution can be followed with simple, site-dependent cellular automaton (CA) rules. The CA consists of a lattice of sites, each with a finite set of possible values, here representing finite localized elements of electronic charge and current density (since the charge density r no longer suffices to fully characterize a time-dependent system, it needs to be supplemented with information about the current density j).Our numerical results are presented elsewhere and further development is in progress.

  17. Anomalies in vortex lattice dynamics driven by induced ac currents in superconducting films with magnetic arrays of two-fold symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, A. J.; Chiliotte, C. E.; Pasquini, G.; Bekeris, V.; Gomez, A.; del Valle, J.; Gonzalez, E. M.; Prieto, J. L.; Vicent, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    We study the dynamics of the vortex lattice driven by ac induced currents in the critical state regime, for T > 0.70 TC. The samples are superconducting films grown on top of two-fold symmetry array of magnetic dots. In these heterostructures, the induced ac currents flow parallel to the short and to the long side of the pinning array in different areas of the samples simultaneously. This behavior produces remarkable effects in the vortex lattice dynamics. First of all, periodic features are observed in the ac susceptibility versus applied magnetic field measurements which are related to matching effects between the vortex lattices and the magnetic array. However, the vortex lattice reconfiguration observed in magnetotransport experiments is absent. Some of these features are revealed as maxima instead of being minima, indicating higher mobility at certain matching fields. Competing unstable vortex configurations could lead to increase vortex mobility precluding the reconfiguration transition. At high temperatures, where the matching effects show up, the magnetic permeability of the dots is the mechanism that governs the JC(T) behavior. Moreover, the temperature dependence of the pinning force FP(T) shows a temperature crossover related to an unexpected enhancement in vortex mobility. Vortex-vortex interaction and the interplay between trapped and interstitial vortices are a hint to explain these phenomena.

  18. The role of induced current density in Steroelectronic effects: Perlin effect.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Lima, Joseelyne G; Barquera-Lozada, Jose E; Cuevas, Gabriel; Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando

    2015-08-01

    The normal and reverse Perlin effect is usually explained by the redistribution of electron density produced by hyperconjugative mechanisms, which increases the electron population within axial or equatorial proton in normal or reverse effect, respectively. Here an alternative explanation for the Perlin effect is presented on the basis of the topology of the induced current density, which directly determines the nuclear magnetic shielding. Current densities around the C-H bond critical point and intra-atomic and interatomic contributions to the magnetic shielding explain the observed Perlin effect. The balance between intra-atomic and interatomic contributions determines the difference in the total atomic shielding. Normal Perlin effect is dominated by intra-atomic part, whereas reverse effect is dominated by interatomic contribution.

  19. Lower hybrid current drive at ITER-relevant high plasma densities

    SciTech Connect

    Cesario, R.; Amicucci, L.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Marinucci, M.; Panaccione, L.; Pericoli-Ridolfini, V.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Tudisco, O.

    2009-11-26

    Recent experiments indicated that a further non-inductive current, besides bootstrap, should be necessary for developing advanced scenario for ITER. The lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) should provide such tool, but its effectiveness was still not proved in operations with ITER-relevant density of the plasma column periphery. Progress of the LH deposition modelling is presented, performed considering the wave physics of the edge, and different ITER-relevant edge parameters. Operations with relatively high edge electron temperatures are expected to reduce the LH{sub ||} spectral broadening and, consequently, enabling the LH power to propagate also in high density plasmas ({sub ||} is the wavenumber component aligned to the confinement magnetic field). New results of FTU experiments are presented, performed by following the aforementioned modeling: they indicate that, for the first time, the LHCD conditions are established by operating at ITER-relevant high edge densities.

  20. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy analysis of porous silicon prepared by photo-electrochemical etching: current density effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husairi, F. S.; Rouhi, J.; Eswar, K. A.; Zainurul, A. Z.; Rusop, M.; Abdullah, S.

    2014-09-01

    Electrical impedance characteristics of porous silicon nanostructures (PSiNs) in frequency function were studied. PSiNs were prepared through photo-electrochemical etching method at various current densities (15-40 mA/cm2) and constant etching time. The atomic force microscope images of PSiNs show that pore diameter and roughness increase when current density increases to 35 mA/cm2. The surface roughness subsequently decreases because of continuous etching of pillars, and a second etching process occurs. Photoluminescence spectra show blue and red shift with increasing applied current density that is attributed to PSiNs size. Variations of electrical resistance and capacitance values of PSiNs were measured using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy analysis. These results indicate that PSiNs prepared at 20 mA/cm2 current density have uniform porous structures with a large number of pillars. Furthermore, this PSiNs structure influences large values of charge transfer resistance and double layer capacitance, indicating potential application in sensors.

  1. Impact of biquadratic coupling on critical current density in Co/Cu/Ni-Fe nanopillar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravinthan, D.; Sabareesan, P.; Daniel, M.

    2016-05-01

    We have studied the effect of biquadratic coupling (BQC) on critical current density in the Co/Cu/Ni-Fe nanopillar by solving the magnetization switching dynamics of the free layer which is governed by Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert-Slonczewski (LLGS) equation. The LLGS equation is analytically solved for the time independent case and value of the critical current density required to initiate the magnetization switching is calculated. Its value in the absence of BQC is 0.8576×1012 Am-2 and in the presence of BQC its value increases to 1.0914×1012 Am-2. BQC field is acting along the easy axis which opposes the free layer magnetization moving to the out of plane and hence the value of critical current density is high in the presence of BQC. We can reduce the critical current density by reducing the BQC field which can be achieved by making the nanopillar with minimal or no roughness in the pinned and free layer.

  2. Interpretation of very low frequency electromagnetic measurements in terms of normalized current density over variable topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Anand; Sharma, S. P.

    2016-10-01

    A 2D inversion approach is developed to interpret VLF electromagnetic measurement recorded over variable topography. To depict the variable topography accurately, an octree mesh discretization is incorporated. Subsurface structure is modeled in terms of apparent current density distribution and compared with the inversion results for actual resistivity distribution obtained using numerical techniques. The study demonstrates that the results obtained using both approaches (current density and resistivity distribution) are comparable, but due to analytical expression, current density imaging is faster. The conjugate gradient method is used to reduce the computation time and storage space when solving the matrix equations, resulting in feasible and practical imaging inversion of VLF data. The preconditioned matrix, which is determined by the distances between the blocks and observation points, has an important function in improving the resolution. In case of flat earth, preconditioned conjugate gradient inversion of data results in images that are comparable to those obtained using resistivity inversion. We also test whether topography variation in the order of skin depth is significant to incorporate topography in the modeling. The example of a topographical field VLF data inversion shows the efficacy of the presented approach to appraise the subsurface structure in terms of current density.

  3. Current densities and total contact currents during forest clearing tasks under 400 kV power lines.

    PubMed

    Korpinen, Leena; Kuisti, Harri; Elovaara, Jarmo

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze all values of electric currents from measured periods while performing tasks in forest clearing. The objective was also to choose and analyze measurement cases, where current measurements successfully lasted the entire work period (about 30 min). Two forestry workers volunteered to perform four forest clearing tasks under 400 kV power lines. The sampling frequency of the current measurements was 1 sample/s. The maximum values of the current densities were 1.0-1.2 mA/m(2) (calculated internal EFs 5.0-12.0 mV/m), and the average values were 0.2-0.4 mA/m(2) . The highest contact current was 167.4 μA. All measured values during forest clearing tasks were lower than basic restrictions (0.1 V/m and 0.8 V/m) of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:423-428, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Bioelectromagnetics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Faraday-effect polarimeter-interferometer system for current density measurement on EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H. Q.; Jie, Y. X. Zou, Z. Y.; Li, W. M.; Wang, Z. X.; Qian, J. P.; Yang, Y.; Zeng, L.; Wei, X. C.; Hu, L. Q.; Wan, B. N.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Lan, T.; Li, G. S.

    2014-11-15

    A multichannel far-infrared laser-based POlarimeter-INTerferometer (POINT) system utilizing the three-wave technique is under development for current density and electron density profile measurements in the EAST tokamak. Novel molybdenum retro-reflectors are mounted in the inside wall for the double-pass optical arrangement. A Digital Phase Detector with 250 kHz bandwidth, which will provide real-time Faraday rotation angle and density phase shift output, have been developed for use on the POINT system. Initial calibration indicates the electron line-integrated density resolution is less than 5 × 10{sup 16} m{sup −2} (∼2°), and the Faraday rotation angle rms phase noise is <0.1°.

  5. Improvement of the noise level of the Split Langmuir Probe - a spatial current density meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marusenkov, Andriy; Dudkin, Fedor; Shuvalov, Valentyn

    2013-04-01

    One of the main tasks at the experimental investigations of the wave processes in space plasma is the determination of the dispersion relations between their wave vector and frequency. The frequency analysis of the magnetic field fluctuations and the electric current density in plasma is very efficient in this case. It had been shown that the simultaneous measurements of the magnetic field orthogonal components and the spatial current density fluctuations can give the wave vector k values for the plane wave spectra, by which a wave field in a plasma reference frame can be represented. The measurements of the magnetic field fluctuations usually are made by a variety of magnetometers using well developed methods. Unfortunately, up to the moment the methods and instruments for the reliable measurements of the space current density are not so good developed as the magnetic ones. There are three independent techniques to study the spatial current density in plasma: the contactless Rogovsky coil, the Faraday cap and the Split Langmuir Probe (SLP). The attempt to compare the different approaches and instruments was carried out during the experiment "Variant" onboard Ukrainian remote sensing satellite SICH-1M launched 2004. The clear advantages of the SLP over other instruments were revealed and proved. Using whistler as a test signal the very good consistency between the magnetic and electric fields and the spatial electric current density was obtained. However, the signal-to-noise ratio of the current density meters has to be further improved. In this report we analyze the sources of the SLP noises and propose the ways to decrease it. The computer simulation of the improved current density meter reveals that the introduced changes have almost no influence on the sensor matching with the space plasma and, as a result, the minor changes of the transformation factor in operation frequency band are expected. The modernized version of the SLP was successfully tested in the

  6. Switching of YBCO thin films into the dissipative state at high current densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villard, Catherine; Devismes, Marie-Françoise; Carbone, Laurent; Bourgault, Daniel

    We report on the switching properties at high current densities of YBCO thin films shunted by an Ag layer. These experiments are performed either in liquid nitrogen or liquid argon (87.3K). Different transition regimes associated to specific electric field thresholds are observed. The nature of the thermal exchange with the bath and the role of the silver shunt and substrate are discussed. While only two regimes in the current-voltage characteristics are observed in liquid nitrogen, successively reversible and hysteretic, an intermediate behaviour appears at 87.3K associated with a total current diversion by the silver layer.

  7. Development of internal magnetic probe for current density profile measurement in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Lee, J. W.; Jung, B. K.; Chung, K. J.; Hwang, Y. S.

    2014-11-01

    An internal magnetic probe using Hall sensors to measure a current density profile directly with perturbation of less than 10% to the plasma current is successfully operated for the first time in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus (VEST). An appropriate Hall sensor is chosen to produce sufficient signals for VEST magnetic field while maintaining the small size of 10 mm in outer diameter. Temperature around the Hall sensor in a typical VEST plasma is regulated by blown air of 2 bars. First measurement of 60 kA VEST ohmic discharge shows a reasonable agreement with the total plasma current measured by Rogowski coil in VEST.

  8. C-axis critical current density of second-generation YBCO tapes.

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Y.; Hua, J.; Crabtree, G. W.; Kwok, W. K.; Welp, U.; Malozemoff, A. P.; Rupich, M.; Fleshler, S.; Materials Science Division; American Superconductor Corp.

    2010-10-01

    We report on measurements of the temperature and field dependence of the c-axis critical current density (J{sub c}{sup c}) obtained on mesa structures that were patterned into the YBCO layer of second-generation HTS tapes. We find the J{sub c}{sup c}-values of {approx}4 kA cm{sup -2} at 77 K and self-field, corresponding to an unexpectedly high anisotropy in the critical current density J{sub c}{sup ab}/J{sub c}{sup c} of 500-600. C-axis current flow is expected to arise in applications such as the helically wound wires in HTS cables. A simple estimate is given of the fraction of tape width for such a c-axis flow; while in our samples this fraction is approximately 5% for a typical geometry, the fraction will grow linearly with increasing current density anisotropy and could affect the current-carrying ability of the tape.

  9. High temperature and current density induced degradation of multi-layer graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Baoming; Haque, M. A.; Mag-isa, Alexander E.; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Hak-Joo

    2015-10-19

    We present evidence of moderate current density, when accompanied with high temperature, promoting migration of foreign atoms on the surface of multi-layer graphene. Our in situ transmission electron microscope experiments show migration of silicon atoms at temperatures above 800 °C and current density around 4.2 × 10{sup 7} A/cm{sup 2}. Originating from the micro-machined silicon structures that clamp the freestanding specimen, the atoms are observed to react with the carbon atoms in the multi-layer graphene to produce silicon carbide at temperatures of 900–1000 °C. In the absence of electrical current, there is no migration of silicon and only pyrolysis of polymeric residue is observed.

  10. Threshold current density of electromigration in eutectic SnPb solder

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Y.T.; Chou, C.K.; Hsu, Y.C.; Chen Chih; Tu, K.N.

    2005-05-16

    Electromigration has emerged as an important reliability issue in the microelectronics packaging industry since the dimension of solder joints has continued to shrink. In this letter, we report a technique that enables the precise measurement of the important parameters of solder electromigration, such as activation energy, critical length, threshold current density, effective charge numbers, and electromigration rate. Patterned Cu/Ti films in a Si trench were employed for eutectic SnPb solder to be reflowed on, and thus solder Blech specimens were fabricated. Atomic force microscope was used to measure the depletion volume caused by electromigration on the cathode end. The threshold current density is estimated to be 8.5x10{sup 3} A/cm{sup 2} at 100 deg. C, which relates directly to the maximum allowable current that a solder joint can carry without electromigration damage. This technique facilitates the scientifically systematic investigation of electromigration in solders.

  11. Imaging of current density distributions with a Nb weak-link scanning nano-SQUID microscope

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Yusuke; Nomura, Shintaro; Kashiwaya, Hiromi; Kashiwaya, Satoshi; Ishiguro, Ryosuke; Takayanagi, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) are accepted as one of the highest magnetic field sensitive probes. There are increasing demands to image local magnetic fields to explore spin properties and current density distributions in a two-dimensional layer of semiconductors or superconductors. Nano-SQUIDs have recently attracting much interest for high spatial resolution measurements in nanometer-scale samples. Whereas weak-link Dayem Josephson junction nano-SQUIDs are suitable to miniaturization, hysteresis in current-voltage (I-V) characteristics that is often observed in Dayem Josephson junction is not desirable for a scanning microscope. Here we report on our development of a weak-link nano-SQUIDs scanning microscope with small hysteresis in I-V curve and on reconstructions of two-dimensional current density vector in two-dimensional electron gas from measured magnetic field. PMID:26459874

  12. Transport, deposition, and liftoff in laboratory density currents composed of hot particles in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, B. J.; Manga, M.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding the dynamics of transport, deposition, and air entrainment in pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) is required for accurate predictions of future current behaviors and interpretations of ancient deposits, but directly observing the interiors of natural PDCs is effectively impossible. We model PDCs with scaled, hot, particle-laden density currents generated in a 6 m long, 0.6 m wide, 1.8 m tall air-filled tank. Comparison of relevant scaling between our experiments and natural PDCs indicates that we are accurately capturing much of the dynamics of dilute PDCs: * Reynolds numbers of our experiments are lower than natural currents, 10^3 compared to 10^6, but still fully turbulent; * Densimetric and Thermal Richardson numbers are of O(1) in both natural and modeled currents; * Stokes and settling numbers for particles in the experiments fall within the expected range for natural PDCs. Conditions within the tank are monitored with temperature and humidity probes. Experiments are illuminated with sheet lighting, and recorded with high-definition video cameras. In general, currents have average velocities of 10-20 cm/s, initial thicknesses of 10-20 cm (although thickness greatly increases as currents entrain and expand air), and run out or lift off distances of 3-5 m. Large Kelvin-Helmholtz type eddies usually form along the top of the current immediately behind the head; these vortices are similar in size to the total current thickness. In currents that lift off, the distal current end typically retreats with time. Preliminary results suggest that lift off distance decreases with increasing thermal Richardson number. Analysis of turbulent structures indicates that the current heads are dominated by large coherent structures with length scales, L, comparable to the current thickness. Within 5-10 L of the current fronts, sequences of similar large eddies often occur. At greater distances behind the current fronts, turbulent structures become smaller and less

  13. Comparison between the magnetic and transport critical current densities in high critical current density melt-textured yttrium barium copper-oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, L.; Meng, R. L.; Xue, Y. Y.; Hor, P. H.; Chu, C. W.

    1991-01-01

    Using a recently developed pulsed critical current density (Jc) measuring system, the Jc of the high-Jc melt-textured YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) (Y123) bulk samples has been determined. I-V curves with a voltage resolution of 0.5 microV were obtained, and transport Jc's along the a-b plane as high as 7.2 x 10 to the 4th A/sq cm were extracted. These results are comparable to the values obtained magnetically. On the other hand, transport Jc along the c axis were found to be two orders of magnitude smaller, even though the magnetic Jc along the c axis is only about five times smaller than Jc along the a-b plane. It is suggested that for the high-temperature superconducting materials which are highly anisotropic, caution should be taken when using the nontransport magnetic methods to determine Jc.

  14. THEMIS two‐point measurements of the cross‐tail current density: A thick bifurcated current sheet in the near‐Earth plasma sheet

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The basic properties of the near‐Earth current sheet from 8 RE to 12 RE were determined based on Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) observations from 2007 to 2013. Ampere's law was used to estimate the current density when the locations of two spacecraft were suitable for the calculation. A total of 3838 current density observations were obtained to study the vertical profile. For typical solar wind conditions, the current density near (off) the central plane of the current sheet ranged from 1 to 2 nA/m2 (1 to 8 nA/m2). All the high current densities appeared off the central plane of the current sheet, indicating the formation of a bifurcated current sheet structure when the current density increased above 2 nA/m2. The median profile also showed a bifurcated structure, in which the half thickness was about 3 RE. The distance between the peak of the current density and the central plane of the current sheet was 0.5 to 1 RE. High current densities above 4 nA/m2 were observed in some cases that occurred preferentially during substorms, but they also occurred in quiet times. In contrast to the commonly accepted picture, these high current densities can form without a high solar wind dynamic pressure. In addition, these high current densities can appear in two magnetic configurations: tail‐like and dipolar structures. At least two mechanisms, magnetic flux depletion and new current system formation during the expansion phase, other than plasma sheet compression are responsible for the formation of the bifurcated current sheets. PMID:27722039

  15. Effects of Neutral Density on Energetic Ions Produced Near High-Current Hollow Cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kameyama, Ikuya

    1997-01-01

    Energy distributions of ion current from high-current, xenon hollow cathodes, which are essential information to understand erosion phenomena observed in high-power ion thrusters, were obtained using an electrostatic energy analyzer (ESA). The effects of ambient pressure and external flow rate introduced immediately downstream of hollow cathode on ion currents with energies greater than that associated with the cathode-to-anode potential difference were investigated. The results were analyzed to determine the changes in the magnitudes of ion currents to the ESA at various energies. Either increasing the ambient pressure or adding external flow induces an increase in the distribution of ion currents with moderate energies (epsilon less than 25 to 35 eV) and a decrease in the distribution for high energies (epsilon greater than 25 to 35 eV). The magnitude of the current distribution increase in the moderate energy range is greater for a cathode equipped with a toroidal keeper than for one without a keeper, but the distribution in the high energy range does not seem to be affected by a keeper. An MHD model, which has been proposed to describe energetic-ion production mechanism in hollow cathode at high discharge currents, was developed to describe these effects. The results show, however, that this model involves no mechanism by which a significant increase of ion current could occur at any energy. It was found, on the other hand, that the potential-hill model of energetic ion production, which assumes existence of a local maximum of plasma potential, could explain combined increases in the currents of ions with moderate energies and decreases in high energy ions due to increased neutral atom density using a charge-exchange mechanism. The existing, simplified version of the potential-hill model, however, shows poor quantitative agreement with measured ion-current-energy-distribution changes induced by neutral density changes.

  16. Thermal history of pyroclastic density currents and pyroclasts at Tungurahua, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benage, M. C.; Dufek, J.

    2014-12-01

    The associated hazards and opaqueness of pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) make it impossible for in-situ thermal or concentration measurements within the currents that would provide critical information on the dynamics of PDCs. The entrainment of ambient air into these currents significantly impacts their runout distance and thermal history. The most efficient mechanism to cool a PDC is through the entrainment of colder, denser ambient air through Kelvin-Helmholtz and lobe-and-cleft instabilities, which are dependent on density stratification in the current and topographic-current interactions. The combination of high-resolution multiphase numerical models in concert with field measurements of PDC deposits allows us to better understand the evolving concentration gradients, instabilities, entrainment of air, and temperatures of PDCs. We employ a three-dimensional multiphase Eulerian-Eulerian-Lagrangian (EEL) model, high-resolution topography, and field data to understand the PDCs that traveled down the Juive Grande quebrada during the 2006 eruption of Tungurahua volcano. The multiphase model allows us to examine PDC dynamics such as particle concentrations, velocities, thermal heterogeneities, and ambient air entrainment. As the PDC propagates, the entrainment coefficient decreases due to enhanced density stratification. The interaction of the current with rugged topography increases the entrainment coefficient. We also calculate the temperature of deposition and breadcrust bomb rind thickness for individual pyroclasts. The individual pyroclasts are tracked as Lagrangian particles in the multiphase model and we employ the breadcrust bomb model (Benage et al., 2014) to calculate the deposition temperature and the formation of the non-vesicular to low vesicularity rinds. The model results are compared to paleomagnetic data and field measurements of rind thickness, respectively. This allows the deposited pyroclasts to be natural thermometers that help constrain the

  17. Density currents in the Chicago River: Characterization, effects on water quality, and potential sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, P. Ryan; Garcia, Carlos M.; Oberg, Kevin A.; Johnson, Kevin K.; Garcia, Marcelo H.

    2008-01-01

    Bidirectional flows in a river system can occur under stratified flow conditions and in addition to creating significant errors in discharge estimates, the upstream propagating currents are capable of transporting contaminants and affecting water quality. Detailed field observations of bidirectional flows were made in the Chicago River in Chicago, Illinois in the winter of 2005-06. Using multiple acoustic Doppler current profilers simultaneously with a water-quality profiler, the formation of upstream propagating density currents within the Chicago River both as an underflow and an overflow was observed on three occasions. Density differences driving the flow primarily arise from salinity differences between intersecting branches of the Chicago River, whereas water temperature is secondary in the creation of these currents. Deicing salts appear to be the primary source of salinity in the North Branch of the Chicago River, entering the waterway through direct runoff and effluent from a wastewater-treatment plant in a large metropolitan area primarily served by combined sewers. Water-quality assessments of the Chicago River may underestimate (or overestimate) the impairment of the river because standard water-quality monitoring practices do not account for density-driven underflows (or overflows). Chloride concentrations near the riverbed can significantly exceed concentrations at the river surface during underflows indicating that full-depth parameter profiles are necessary for accurate water-quality assessments in urban environments where application of deicing salt is common.

  18. Production of ultrahigh ion current densities at skin-layer subrelativistic laser plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badziak, J.; Glowacz, S.; Jablonski, S.; Parys, P.; Wolowski, J.; Hora, H.; Krása, J.; Láska, L.; Rohlena, K.

    2004-12-01

    Some applications of fast ions driven by a short (<=1 ps) laser pulse (e.g. fast ignition of ICF targets, x-ray laser pumping, laboratory astrophysics research or some nuclear physics experiments) require ion beams of picosecond (or shorter) time durations and of very high ion current densities (~1010 A cm-2 or higher). A possible way of producing ion beams with such extreme parameters is ballistic focusing of fast ions generated by a target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) mechanism at relativistic laser intensities. In this paper we discuss another method, where the production of short-pulse ion beams of ultrahigh current densities is possible in a planar geometry at subrelativistic laser intensities and at a low energy (<=1 J) of the laser pulse. This method—referred to as skin-layer ponderomotive acceleration (S-LPA)—uses strong ponderomotive forces induced at the skin-layer interaction of a short laser pulse with a proper preplasma layer in front of a solid target. The basic features of the high-current ion generation by S-LPA were investigated using a simplified theory, numerical hydrodynamic simulations and measurements. The experiments were performed with subjoule 1 ps laser pulses interacting with massive or thin foil targets at intensities of up to 2 × 1017 W cm-2. It was found that both in the backward and forward directions highly collimated high-density ion beams (plasma blocks) with current densities at the ion source (close to the target) approaching 1010 A cm-2 are produced, in accordance with the theory and numerical calculations. These ion current densities were found to be comparable to (or even higher than) those estimated from recent short-pulse TNSA experiments with relativistic laser intensities. Apart from the simpler physics of the laser plasma interaction, the advantage of the considered method is the low energy of the driving laser pulses allowing the production of ultrahigh-current-density ion beams with a high repetition rate. It

  19. Magnetically filtered Faraday probe for measuring the ion current density profile of a Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Rovey, Joshua L.; Walker, Mitchell L.R.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Peterson, Peter Y.

    2006-01-15

    The ability of a magnetically filtered Faraday probe (MFFP) to obtain the ion current density profile of a Hall thruster is investigated. The MFFP is designed to eliminate the collection of low-energy, charge-exchange (CEX) ions by using a variable magnetic field as an ion filter. In this study, a MFFP, Faraday probe with a reduced acceptance angle (BFP), and nude Faraday probe are used to measure the ion current density profile of a 5 kW Hall thruster operating over the range of 300-500 V and 5-10 mg/s. The probes are evaluated on a xenon propellant Hall thruster in the University of Michigan Large Vacuum Test Facility at operating pressures within the range of 4.4x10{sup -4} Pa Xe (3.3x10{sup -6} Torr Xe) to 1.1x10{sup -3} Pa Xe (8.4x10{sup -6} Torr Xe) in order to study the ability of the Faraday probe designs to filter out CEX ions. Detailed examination of the results shows that the nude probe measures a greater ion current density profile than both the MFFP and BFP over the range of angular positions investigated for each operating condition. The differences between the current density profiles obtained by each probe are attributed to the ion filtering systems employed. Analysis of the results shows that the MFFP, operating at a +5 A solenoid current, provides the best agreement with flight-test data and across operating pressures.

  20. Towards time-dependent current-density-functional theory in the non-linear regime

    SciTech Connect

    Escartín, J. M.; Vincendon, M.; Dinh, P. M.; Suraud, E.; Romaniello, P.; Reinhard, P.-G.

    2015-02-28

    Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory (TDDFT) is a well-established theoretical approach to describe and understand irradiation processes in clusters and molecules. However, within the so-called adiabatic local density approximation (ALDA) to the exchange-correlation (xc) potential, TDDFT can show insufficiencies, particularly in violently dynamical processes. This is because within ALDA the xc potential is instantaneous and is a local functional of the density, which means that this approximation neglects memory effects and long-range effects. A way to go beyond ALDA is to use Time-Dependent Current-Density-Functional Theory (TDCDFT), in which the basic quantity is the current density rather than the density as in TDDFT. This has been shown to offer an adequate account of dissipation in the linear domain when the Vignale-Kohn (VK) functional is used. Here, we go beyond the linear regime and we explore this formulation in the time domain. In this case, the equations become very involved making the computation out of reach; we hence propose an approximation to the VK functional which allows us to calculate the dynamics in real time and at the same time to keep most of the physics described by the VK functional. We apply this formulation to the calculation of the time-dependent dipole moment of Ca, Mg and Na{sub 2}. Our results show trends similar to what was previously observed in model systems or within linear response. In the non-linear domain, our results show that relaxation times do not decrease with increasing deposited excitation energy, which sets some limitations to the practical use of TDCDFT in such a domain of excitations.

  1. Towards time-dependent current-density-functional theory in the non-linear regime.

    PubMed

    Escartín, J M; Vincendon, M; Romaniello, P; Dinh, P M; Reinhard, P-G; Suraud, E

    2015-02-28

    Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory (TDDFT) is a well-established theoretical approach to describe and understand irradiation processes in clusters and molecules. However, within the so-called adiabatic local density approximation (ALDA) to the exchange-correlation (xc) potential, TDDFT can show insufficiencies, particularly in violently dynamical processes. This is because within ALDA the xc potential is instantaneous and is a local functional of the density, which means that this approximation neglects memory effects and long-range effects. A way to go beyond ALDA is to use Time-Dependent Current-Density-Functional Theory (TDCDFT), in which the basic quantity is the current density rather than the density as in TDDFT. This has been shown to offer an adequate account of dissipation in the linear domain when the Vignale-Kohn (VK) functional is used. Here, we go beyond the linear regime and we explore this formulation in the time domain. In this case, the equations become very involved making the computation out of reach; we hence propose an approximation to the VK functional which allows us to calculate the dynamics in real time and at the same time to keep most of the physics described by the VK functional. We apply this formulation to the calculation of the time-dependent dipole moment of Ca, Mg and Na2. Our results show trends similar to what was previously observed in model systems or within linear response. In the non-linear domain, our results show that relaxation times do not decrease with increasing deposited excitation energy, which sets some limitations to the practical use of TDCDFT in such a domain of excitations.

  2. Cluster electric current density measurements within a magnetic flux rope in the plasma sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, J. A.; Lepping, R. P.; Gjerloev, J.; Goldstein, M. L.; Fairfield, D. H.; Acuna, M. H.; Balogh, A.; Dunlop, M.; Kivelson, M. G.; Khurana, K.

    2003-01-01

    On August 22, 2001 all 4 Cluster spacecraft nearly simultaneously penetrated a magnetic flux rope in the tail. The flux rope encounter took place in the central plasma sheet, Beta(sub i) approx. 1-2, near the leading edge of a bursty bulk flow. The "time-of-flight" of the flux rope across the 4 spacecraft yielded V(sub x) approx. 700 km/s and a diameter of approx.1 R(sub e). The speed at which the flux rope moved over the spacecraft is in close agreement with the Cluster plasma measurements. The magnetic field profiles measured at each spacecraft were first modeled separately using the Lepping-Burlaga force-free flux rope model. The results indicated that the center of the flux rope passed northward (above) s/c 3, but southward (below) of s/c 1, 2 and 4. The peak electric currents along the central axis of the flux rope predicted by these single-s/c models were approx.15-19 nA/sq m. The 4-spacecraft Cluster magnetic field measurements provide a second means to determine the electric current density without any assumption regarding flux rope structure. The current profile determined using the curlometer technique was qualitatively similar to those determined by modeling the individual spacecraft magnetic field observations and yielded a peak current density of 17 nA/m2 near the central axis of the rope. However, the curlometer results also showed that the flux rope was not force-free with the component of the current density perpendicular to the magnetic field exceeding the parallel component over the forward half of the rope, perhaps due to the pressure gradients generated by the collision of the BBF with the inner magnetosphere. Hence, while the single-spacecraft models are very successful in fitting flux rope magnetic field and current variations, they do not provide a stringent test of the force-free condition.

  3. High-current density, high-brightness electron beams from large-area lanthanum hexaboride cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loschialpo, P.; Kapetanakos, C. A.

    1988-04-01

    Large diameter lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) cathodes operated at 10 kV have produced 1-5-microsec electron pulses with current density between 10 and 20 A/sq cm. Normalized beam brightness, approximately 300,000 A/sq cm sq rad has been consistently measured. To obtain this high-current density, the LaB6 cathodes have been heated to temperatures between about 1600 and 1800 C. Very uniform temperature profiles are obtained by applying a carefully tailored electron bombardment heating power distribution. These measurements have been made between pressure 10 to the -6th to -10 to the -5th Torr, i.e., under much less demanding vacuum conditions than that required by conventional dispenser-type cathodes.

  4. Power density spectra of frog skin potential, current and admittance functions during patch clamp.

    PubMed

    Hoshiko, T

    1978-01-01

    Clamp current fluctuations in frog skin of areas down to 0.07 cm2 are dominated by low frequency components (less than 100 Hz). Patch clamp of 0.001 cm2 under high density fluorosilicone oil exhibits components up to 5000 Hz, often including a peak in the current power density spectrum. The admittance spectrum also exhibits a peak at the same frequency. In some skins no peak was observed, but the break in the curve was too sharp to be Lorentzian. In all instances the final limiting slope approached 1/f2. The resonance peak was observed in either Cl- or SO = 4 Ringer's but disappeared when Na+ was replaced with K+. Resonance frequency varied from 100 to 700 Hz.

  5. Broadband external cavity tunable quantum dot lasers with low injection current density.

    PubMed

    Lv, X Q; Jin, P; Wang, W Y; Wang, Z G

    2010-04-26

    Broadband grating-coupled external cavity laser, based on InAs/GaAs quantum dots, is achieved. The device has a wavelength tuning range from 1141.6 nm to 1251.7 nm under a low continuous-wave injection current density (458 A/cm(2)). The tunable bandwidth covers consecutively the light emissions from both the ground state and the 1st excited state of quantum dots. The effects of cavity length and antireflection facet coating on device performance are studied. It is shown that antireflection facet coating expands the tuning bandwidth up to ~150 nm, accompanied by an evident increase in threshold current density, which is attributed to the reduced interaction between the light field and the quantum dots in the active region of the device. PMID:20588736

  6. Morphological features of the copper surface layer under sliding with high density electric current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadin, V. V.; Aleutdinova, M. I.; Rubtsov, V. Ye.; Aleutdinova, V. A.

    2015-10-01

    Conductivity and wear intensity of copper under the influence of dry friction and electric current with contact density higher 100 A/cm2 are presented. It is shown that an increase in hardness and heat outflow from a friction zone leads to the reduction of wear intensity and current contact density increase corresponding to the beginning of catastrophic wear. Structural changes, such as the formation of FeO oxide and α-Fe particles in the copper surface layer, have also been found. It is observed that a worn surface is deformed according to a viscous liquid mechanism. Such singularity is explained in terms of appearance of high-excited atomic states in deforming micro-volumes near contact spots that lead to easy stress relaxation by local plastic shears in the vicinity of stress concentrators. In common this effect allows to achieve high wear resistance.

  7. Simulating the frontal instability of lock-exchange density currents with dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanggui; Geng, Xingguo; Wang, Heping; Zhuang, Xin; Ouyang, Jie

    2016-06-01

    The frontal instability of lock-exchange density currents is numerically investigated using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) at the mesoscopic particle level. For modeling two-phase flow, the “color” repulsion model is adopted to describe binary fluids according to Rothman-Keller method. The present DPD simulation can reproduce the flow phenomena of lock-exchange density currents, including the lobe-and-cleft instability that appears at the head, as well as the formation of coherent billow structures at the interface behind the head due to the growth of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. Furthermore, through the DPD simulation, some small-scale characteristics can be observed, which are difficult to be captured in macroscopic simulation and experiment.

  8. Morphological features of the copper surface layer under sliding with high density electric current

    SciTech Connect

    Fadin, V. V.; Aleutdinova, M. I.; Rubtsov, V. Ye.; Aleutdinova, V. A.

    2015-10-27

    Conductivity and wear intensity of copper under the influence of dry friction and electric current with contact density higher 100 A/cm{sup 2} are presented. It is shown that an increase in hardness and heat outflow from a friction zone leads to the reduction of wear intensity and current contact density increase corresponding to the beginning of catastrophic wear. Structural changes, such as the formation of FeO oxide and α-Fe particles in the copper surface layer, have also been found. It is observed that a worn surface is deformed according to a viscous liquid mechanism. Such singularity is explained in terms of appearance of high-excited atomic states in deforming micro-volumes near contact spots that lead to easy stress relaxation by local plastic shears in the vicinity of stress concentrators. In common this effect allows to achieve high wear resistance.

  9. PHYSICS OF THE HIGH CURRENT DENSITY ELECTRON BEAM ION SOURCE (EBIS).

    SciTech Connect

    Vella, M.C.

    1980-02-01

    Interest in upgrading present heavy particle accelerators has led to study of EBIS as a possible source of high Z ions, e.g,, Ar{sup +18}. The present work has been motivated primarily by the results reported by CRYEBIS, which indicate that a space charge neutralized, external electron gun can achieve current densities of 10{sup 5} A/cm{sup 2}. Scaling relationships are developed as a basis for understanding CRYEBIS operation. The relevance of collective effects to beam equilibrium and stability is pointed out, Single electron impact ionization scaling and beam neutralization scaling indicate that higher beam voltage may be the easiest way of increasing both ionization rate and particle intensity. Consideration of radial ion confinement suggests that beam collapse to high current density may be related to the highest charge state which is energetically accessible.

  10. Strong critical current density enhancement in NiCu/NbN superconducting nanostripes for optical detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrocco, N.; Pepe, G. P.; Capretti, A.; Parlato, L.; Pagliarulo, V.; Peluso, G.; Barone, A.; Cristiano, R.; Ejrnaes, M.; Casaburi, A.; Kashiwazaki, N.; Taino, T.; Myoren, H.; Sobolewski, Roman

    2010-08-01

    We present measurements of ferromagnet/superconductor (NiCu/NbN) and plain superconducting (NbN) nanostripes with the linewidth ranging from 150 to 300 nm. The NiCu (3 nm)/NbN (8 nm) bilayers, as compared to NbN (8 nm), showed a up to six times increase in their critical current density, reaching at 4.2 K the values of 5.5 MA/cm2 for a 150 nm wide nanostripe meander and 12.1 MA/cm2 for a 300 nm one. We also observed six-time sensitivity enhancement when the 150 nm wide NiCu/NbN nanostripe was used as an optical detector. The strong critical current enhancement is explained by the vortex pinning strength and density increase in NiCu/NbN bilayers and confirmed by approximately tenfold increase in the vortex polarizability factor.

  11. Dependence of various SOL widths on plasma current and density in NSTX H-mode plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, J; Maingi, R; Boedo, J; Soukhanovskii, V A

    2009-02-12

    The dependence of various SOL widths on the line-averaged density ({ovr n}{sub e}) and plasma current (l{sub p}) for the quiescent H-mode plasmas with Type-V ELMs in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) was investigated. It is found that the heat flux SOL width ({lambda}{sub q}), measured by the IR camera, is virtually insensitive to {ovr n}{sub e} and has a strong negative dependence on l{sub p}. This insensitivity of {lambda}{sub q} to {ovr n}{sub e} is consistent with the scaling law from JET H-mode plasmas that shows a very weak dependence on the upstream density. The electron temperature, ion saturation current density, electron density, and electron pressure decay lengths ({lambda}{sub Te}, {lambda}{sub jsat}, {lambda}{sub ne}, and {lambda}{sub pe}, respectively) measured by the probe showed that {lambda}{sub Te} and {lambda}{sub jsat} have strong negative dependence on l{sub p}, whereas {lambda}{sub ne} and {lambda}{sub pe} revealed only a little or no dependence. The dependence of {lambda}{sub Te} on l{sub p} is consistent with the scaling law in the literature while {lambda}{sub ne} and {lambda}{sub pe} dependence shows a different trend.

  12. Current Density Functional Theory Using Meta-Generalized Gradient Exchange-Correlation Functionals.

    PubMed

    Furness, James W; Verbeke, Joachim; Tellgren, Erik I; Stopkowicz, Stella; Ekström, Ulf; Helgaker, Trygve; Teale, Andrew M

    2015-09-01

    We present the self-consistent implementation of current-dependent (hybrid) meta-generalized gradient approximation (mGGA) density functionals using London atomic orbitals. A previously proposed generalized kinetic energy density is utilized to implement mGGAs in the framework of Kohn-Sham current density functional theory (KS-CDFT). A unique feature of the nonperturbative implementation of these functionals is the ability to seamlessly explore a wide range of magnetic fields up to 1 au (∼235 kT) in strength. CDFT functionals based on the TPSS and B98 forms are investigated, and their performance is assessed by comparison with accurate coupled-cluster singles, doubles, and perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) data. In the weak field regime, magnetic properties such as magnetizabilities and nuclear magnetic resonance shielding constants show modest but systematic improvements over generalized gradient approximations (GGA). However, in the strong field regime, the mGGA-based forms lead to a significantly improved description of the recently proposed perpendicular paramagnetic bonding mechanism, comparing well with CCSD(T) data. In contrast to functionals based on the vorticity, these forms are found to be numerically stable, and their accuracy at high field suggests that the extension of mGGAs to CDFT via the generalized kinetic energy density should provide a useful starting point for further development of CDFT approximations.

  13. Current Density Functional Theory Using Meta-Generalized Gradient Exchange-Correlation Functionals.

    PubMed

    Furness, James W; Verbeke, Joachim; Tellgren, Erik I; Stopkowicz, Stella; Ekström, Ulf; Helgaker, Trygve; Teale, Andrew M

    2015-09-01

    We present the self-consistent implementation of current-dependent (hybrid) meta-generalized gradient approximation (mGGA) density functionals using London atomic orbitals. A previously proposed generalized kinetic energy density is utilized to implement mGGAs in the framework of Kohn-Sham current density functional theory (KS-CDFT). A unique feature of the nonperturbative implementation of these functionals is the ability to seamlessly explore a wide range of magnetic fields up to 1 au (∼235 kT) in strength. CDFT functionals based on the TPSS and B98 forms are investigated, and their performance is assessed by comparison with accurate coupled-cluster singles, doubles, and perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) data. In the weak field regime, magnetic properties such as magnetizabilities and nuclear magnetic resonance shielding constants show modest but systematic improvements over generalized gradient approximations (GGA). However, in the strong field regime, the mGGA-based forms lead to a significantly improved description of the recently proposed perpendicular paramagnetic bonding mechanism, comparing well with CCSD(T) data. In contrast to functionals based on the vorticity, these forms are found to be numerically stable, and their accuracy at high field suggests that the extension of mGGAs to CDFT via the generalized kinetic energy density should provide a useful starting point for further development of CDFT approximations. PMID:26575912

  14. Self-consistent density functional calculation of field emission currents from metals

    PubMed

    Gohda; Nakamura; Watanabe; Watanabe

    2000-08-21

    We have developed a fully self-consistent method which is suitable to examine field emission currents, on the basis of the density functional theory. In our method, the nearby counterelectrode is not necessary. By using this method, we have investigated field emission currents from a biased metallic surface represented by the jellium model. We have found that the energy barrier between the jellium and vacuum becomes lower than the Fermi energy under strong electric fields (e.g., 10 V/nm for r(s) = 4 bohr). In this situation, the slope of the Fowler-Nordheim plot becomes flatter than that under a weaker field.

  15. Current density and poloidal magnetic field for toroidal elliptic plasmas with triangularity

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.; Haines, M.G.; Castro, E.

    2005-08-15

    Changes in the poloidal magnetic field around a tokamak magnetic surface due to different values of triangularity and ellipticity are analyzed in this paper. The treatment here presented allows the determination of the poloidal magnetic field from knowledge of the toroidal current density. Different profiles of these currents are studied. Improvements in the analytic forms of the magnetic surfaces have also been found. The treatment has been performed using a recent published system of coordinates. Suitable analytic equations have been used for the elliptic magnetic surfaces with triangularity and Shafranov shift.

  16. Resistance of 4H-SiC Schottky barriers at high forward-current densities

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, P. A. Samsonova, T. P.; Il’inskaya, N. D.; Serebrennikova, O. Yu.; Kon’kov, O. I.; Potapov, A. S.

    2015-07-15

    The resistance of Schottky barriers based on 4H-SiC is experimentally determined at high forward-current densities. The measured resistance is found to be significantly higher than the resistance predicted by classical mechanisms of electron transport in Schottky contacts. An assumption concerning the crucial contribution of the tunnel-transparent intermediate oxide layer between the metal and semiconductor to the barrier resistance is proposed and partially justified.

  17. Enhanced current and power density of micro-scale microbial fuel cells with ultramicroelectrode anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hao; Rangaswami, Sriram; Lee, Hyung-Sool; Chae, Junseok

    2016-09-01

    We present a micro-scale microbial fuel cell (MFC) with an ultramicroelectrode (UME) anode, with the aim of creating a miniaturized high-current/power-density converter using carbon-neutral and renewable energy sources. Micro-scale MFCs have been studied for more than a decade, yet their current and power densities are still an order of magnitude lower than those of their macro-scale counterparts. In order to enhance the current/power densities, we engineer a concentric ring-shaped UME, with a width of 20 μm, to facilitate the diffusion of ions in the vicinity of the micro-organisms that form biofilm on the UME. The biofilm extends approximately 15 μm from the edge of the UME, suggesting the effective biofilm area increases. Measured current/power densities per the effective area and the original anode area are 7.08  ±  0.01 A m‑2 & 3.09  ±  0.04 W m‑2 and 17.7  ±  0.03 A m‑2 & 7.72  ±  0.09 W m‑2, respectively. This is substantially higher than any prior work in micro-scale MFCs, and very close, or even higher, to that of macro-scale MFCs. A Coulombic efficiency, a measure of how efficiently an MFC harvests electrons from donor substrate, of 70%, and an energy conversion efficiency of 17% are marked, highlighting the micro-scale MFC as an attractive alternative within the existing energy conversion portfolio.

  18. Divergence of the axial current and fermion density in Gross-Neveu models

    SciTech Connect

    Karbstein, Felix; Thies, Michael

    2007-10-15

    The divergence of the axial current is used to relate the spatial derivative of the fermion density to the bare fermion mass and scalar/pseudoscalar condensates in 1+1 dimensional Gross-Neveu models. This serves as a useful test of known results, to explain simple features of the continuous chiral model and to resolve a conflict concerning the assignment of baryon number to certain multifermion bound states.

  19. Enhanced current and power density of micro-scale microbial fuel cells with ultramicroelectrode anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hao; Rangaswami, Sriram; Lee, Hyung-Sool; Chae, Junseok

    2016-09-01

    We present a micro-scale microbial fuel cell (MFC) with an ultramicroelectrode (UME) anode, with the aim of creating a miniaturized high-current/power-density converter using carbon-neutral and renewable energy sources. Micro-scale MFCs have been studied for more than a decade, yet their current and power densities are still an order of magnitude lower than those of their macro-scale counterparts. In order to enhance the current/power densities, we engineer a concentric ring-shaped UME, with a width of 20 μm, to facilitate the diffusion of ions in the vicinity of the micro-organisms that form biofilm on the UME. The biofilm extends approximately 15 μm from the edge of the UME, suggesting the effective biofilm area increases. Measured current/power densities per the effective area and the original anode area are 7.08  ±  0.01 A m-2 & 3.09  ±  0.04 W m-2 and 17.7  ±  0.03 A m-2 & 7.72  ±  0.09 W m-2, respectively. This is substantially higher than any prior work in micro-scale MFCs, and very close, or even higher, to that of macro-scale MFCs. A Coulombic efficiency, a measure of how efficiently an MFC harvests electrons from donor substrate, of 70%, and an energy conversion efficiency of 17% are marked, highlighting the micro-scale MFC as an attractive alternative within the existing energy conversion portfolio.

  20. Fast electron current density profile and diffusion studies during LHCD in PBX-M

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.E.; Kesner, J.; Luckhardt, S.; Paoletti, F.; von Goeler, S.; Bernabei, S.; Kaita, R.; Rimini, F.

    1993-08-01

    Successful current profile control experiments using lower hybrid current drive (LCHD) clearly require knowledge of (1) the location of the driven fast electrons and (2) the ability to maintain that location from spreading due to radial diffusion. These issues can be addressed by examining the data from the hard x-ray camera on PBX-M, a unique diagnostic producing two-dimensional, time resolved tangential images of fast electron bremsstrahlung. Using modeling, these line-of-sight images are inverted to extract a radial fast electron current density profile. We note that ``hollow`` profiles have been observed, indicative of off-axis current drive. These profiles can then be used to calculate an upper bound for an effective fast electron diffusion constant: assuming an extremely radially narrow lower hybrid absorption profile and a transport model based on Rax and Moreau, a model fast electron current density profile is calculated and compared to the experimentally derived profile. The model diffusion constant is adjusted until a good match is found. Applied to steady-state quiescent modes on PBX-M, we obtain an upper limit for an effective diffusion constant of about D*=1.1 m{sup 2}/sec.

  1. Microwave field frequency and current density modulated skyrmion-chain in nanotrack

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Fusheng; Ezawa, Motohiko; Zhou, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are promising candidates as information carriers for the next-generation spintronic devices because of their small size, facile current-driven motion and topological stability. The controllable nucleation and motion of skyrmions in magnetic nanostructures will be essential in future skyrmionic devices. Here, we present the microwave assisted nucleation and motion of skyrmion-chains in magnetic nanotrack by micromagnetic simulation. A skyrmion-chain is a one-dimensional cluster of equally spaced skyrmions. A skyrmion-chain conveys an integer bit n when it consists of n skyrmions. A series of skyrmion-chains with various lengths is generated and moved in the nanotrack driven by spin-polarized current. The period, length and spacing of the skyrmion-chains can be dynamically manipulated by controlling either the frequency of the microwave field or the time dependent spin-polarized current density. A skyrmion-chain behaves as a massless particle, where it stops without delay when the current is stopped. Their velocity is found to be linearly dependent on the current density and insensitive to the frequency and amplitude of the excitation microwave field. Uniform motion of trains of skyrmion-chains in nanotrack offers a promising approach for spintronic multi-bit memories containing series of skyrmion-chains to represent data stream. PMID:26468929

  2. Iontophoretic Permeation of Lisinopril at Different Current Densities and Drug Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Ashish; Nayak, Satish; Soni, Vandana

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present work was to assess iontophoretic permeation of Lisinopril at different current densities and concentrations for development of patient-controlled active transdermal system. Methods: In vitro iontophoretic transdermal delivery of Lisinopril across the pigskin was investigated at three different drug concentrations and three different current densities (0.25- 0.75 mA/cm2) in the donor cell of the diffusion apparatus, using cathodal iontophoresis along with the passive controls. Results: For passive permeation, the steady state flux significantly increased with the increasing of donor drug concentration. At all concentration levels, iontophoresis considerably increased the permeation rate compared to passive controls. Iontophoretic transport of Lisinopril was to be found increase with current densities. Flux enhancement was highest at the lowest drug load and lowest at the highest drug load. Conclusion: The obtained results indicate that permeation rate of Lisinopril across the pigskin can be considerably enhanced, controlled or optimized by the use of Iontophoresis technique. PMID:24312799

  3. Measurement of current density fluctuations and ambipolar particle flux due to magnetic fluctuations in MST

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Weimin.

    1992-08-01

    Studies of magnetic fluctuation induced particle transport on Reversed Field Pinch plasmas were done on the Madison Symmetric Torus. Plasma current density and current density fluctuations were measured using a multi-coil magnetic probes. The low frequency (f<50 kHz) current density fluctuations are consistent with the global resistive tearing instabilities predicted by 3-D MHD simulations. At frequencies above 50 kHz, the magnetic fluctuations were detected to be localized with a radial correlation length of about 1--2 cm. These modes are locally resonant modes since the measured dominant mode number spectra match the local safety factor q. The net charged particle flux induced by magnetic fluctuations was obtained by measuring the correlation term <{tilde j}{sub {parallel}} {tilde B}{sub r}>. The result of zero net charged particle loss was obtained, meaning the flux is ambipolar. The ambipolarity of low frequency global tearing modes is satisfied through the phase relations determined by tearing instabilities. The ambipolarity of high frequency localized modes could be partially explained by the simple model of Waltz based on the radial average of small scale turbulence.

  4. Impact of aviation emissions on UTLS and air quality in current and future climate - GEM-AC model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the potential impacts of aviation emissions on the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) and surface air quality. The tool that was used in our study is the GEM-AC (Global Environmental Multiscale with Atmospheric Chemistry) chemical weather model where air quality, free tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry processes are on-line and interactive in a weather forecast model of Environment Canada. In vertical, the model domain is defined on 70 hybrid levels from the surface to ~60km. The gas-phase chemistry includes a comprehensive set of reactions for Ox, NOx, HOx, CO, CH4, NMVOCs, halocarbons, ClOx and BrO. Also, the model can address aerosol microphysics and gas-aerosol partitioning. Aircraft emissions are provided by the AEDT 2006 database developed by the Federal Aviation Administration. Results from model simulations on a global variable grid with 1 degree uniform resolution in the northern hemisphere will be presented.

  5. Electric characterization of (Sr, Sr-Ba, Ba) M-type ferrites by AC measurements[Alternating Current

    SciTech Connect

    Huanosta-Tera, A.; Lira-Hueso, R. de; Perez-Orta, O.; Palomares-Sanchez, S.A.; Ponce-Castaneda, S.; Mirabal-Garcia, M.

    2000-02-01

    Considering the electrical conductivity in ceramics, necessary reference should be given to dynamic processes occurring as a function of frequency and temperature. Although the most immediate interest in ferrites lies in their magnetic properties, technological applications require a wider knowledge of general physical properties as well. This is especially applicable when the materials are studied as a function of composition or when adding different modifiers. In this report, the authors present results of the ac and dc electric characteristics of a family of magneto-plumbite-type hexaferrites, where Ba gradually substitutes Sr in the Ba{sub x}Sr{sub 1{minus}x}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 19} compound (0 {le} x {le} 1). The results were determined over a wide range of frequencies and temperatures.

  6. Persistent current and Drude weight of one-dimensional interacting fermions on imperfect ring from current lattice density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akande, Akinlolu; Sanvito, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    We perform a numerical study of interacting one-dimensional Hubbard rings with a single impurity potential and pierced by a magnetic flux. Our calculations are carried out at the level of current lattice density functional theory (CLDFT) for the Hubbard model and compared to known results obtained in the thermodynamical limit from the Bethe ansatz. In particular, we investigate the effects of disorder and Coulomb interaction on the persistent current (PC) and the Drude weight. It is found that CLDFT is able to accurately describe qualitative and quantitative features of these ground state properties in the presence of disorder and electronic interaction. When the impurity potential is switched off, the CLDFT approach describes well the velocity of the Luttinger liquid excitations as a function of both interaction strength and electron filling. Then, when the impurity scattering potential is finite, we find the PC to vanish as {{L}-{{α\\text{B}}-1}} for large L and independent on the strength of the scattering potential, in good agreement with Luttinger liquid theory.

  7. Persistent current and Drude weight of one-dimensional interacting fermions on imperfect ring from current lattice density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Akande, Akinlolu; Sanvito, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    We perform a numerical study of interacting one-dimensional Hubbard rings with a single impurity potential and pierced by a magnetic flux. Our calculations are carried out at the level of current lattice density functional theory (CLDFT) for the Hubbard model and compared to known results obtained in the thermodynamical limit from the Bethe ansatz. In particular, we investigate the effects of disorder and Coulomb interaction on the persistent current (PC) and the Drude weight. It is found that CLDFT is able to accurately describe qualitative and quantitative features of these ground state properties in the presence of disorder and electronic interaction. When the impurity potential is switched off, the CLDFT approach describes well the velocity of the Luttinger liquid excitations as a function of both interaction strength and electron filling. Then, when the impurity scattering potential is finite, we find the PC to vanish as [Formula: see text] for large L and independent on the strength of the scattering potential, in good agreement with Luttinger liquid theory. PMID:27605413

  8. Quasi-ballistic carbon nanotube array transistors with current density exceeding Si and GaAs

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Gerald J.; Way, Austin J.; Safron, Nathaniel S.; Evensen, Harold T.; Gopalan, Padma; Arnold, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are tantalizing candidates for semiconductor electronics because of their exceptional charge transport properties and one-dimensional electrostatics. Ballistic transport approaching the quantum conductance limit of 2G0 = 4e2/h has been achieved in field-effect transistors (FETs) containing one CNT. However, constraints in CNT sorting, processing, alignment, and contacts give rise to nonidealities when CNTs are implemented in densely packed parallel arrays such as those needed for technology, resulting in a conductance per CNT far from 2G0. The consequence has been that, whereas CNTs are ultimately expected to yield FETs that are more conductive than conventional semiconductors, CNTs, instead, have underperformed channel materials, such as Si, by sixfold or more. We report quasi-ballistic CNT array FETs at a density of 47 CNTs μm−1, fabricated through a combination of CNT purification, solution-based assembly, and CNT treatment. The conductance is as high as 0.46 G0 per CNT. In parallel, the conductance of the arrays reaches 1.7 mS μm−1, which is seven times higher than the previous state-of-the-art CNT array FETs made by other methods. The saturated on-state current density is as high as 900 μA μm−1 and is similar to or exceeds that of Si FETs when compared at and equivalent gate oxide thickness and at the same off-state current density. The on-state current density exceeds that of GaAs FETs as well. This breakthrough in CNT array performance is a critical advance toward the exploitation of CNTs in logic, high-speed communications, and other semiconductor electronics technologies.

  9. Quasi-ballistic carbon nanotube array transistors with current density exceeding Si and GaAs.

    PubMed

    Brady, Gerald J; Way, Austin J; Safron, Nathaniel S; Evensen, Harold T; Gopalan, Padma; Arnold, Michael S

    2016-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are tantalizing candidates for semiconductor electronics because of their exceptional charge transport properties and one-dimensional electrostatics. Ballistic transport approaching the quantum conductance limit of 2G 0 = 4e (2)/h has been achieved in field-effect transistors (FETs) containing one CNT. However, constraints in CNT sorting, processing, alignment, and contacts give rise to nonidealities when CNTs are implemented in densely packed parallel arrays such as those needed for technology, resulting in a conductance per CNT far from 2G 0. The consequence has been that, whereas CNTs are ultimately expected to yield FETs that are more conductive than conventional semiconductors, CNTs, instead, have underperformed channel materials, such as Si, by sixfold or more. We report quasi-ballistic CNT array FETs at a density of 47 CNTs μm(-1), fabricated through a combination of CNT purification, solution-based assembly, and CNT treatment. The conductance is as high as 0.46 G 0 per CNT. In parallel, the conductance of the arrays reaches 1.7 mS μm(-1), which is seven times higher than the previous state-of-the-art CNT array FETs made by other methods. The saturated on-state current density is as high as 900 μA μm(-1) and is similar to or exceeds that of Si FETs when compared at and equivalent gate oxide thickness and at the same off-state current density. The on-state current density exceeds that of GaAs FETs as well. This breakthrough in CNT array performance is a critical advance toward the exploitation of CNTs in logic, high-speed communications, and other semiconductor electronics technologies. PMID:27617293

  10. Quasi-ballistic carbon nanotube array transistors with current density exceeding Si and GaAs.

    PubMed

    Brady, Gerald J; Way, Austin J; Safron, Nathaniel S; Evensen, Harold T; Gopalan, Padma; Arnold, Michael S

    2016-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are tantalizing candidates for semiconductor electronics because of their exceptional charge transport properties and one-dimensional electrostatics. Ballistic transport approaching the quantum conductance limit of 2G 0 = 4e (2)/h has been achieved in field-effect transistors (FETs) containing one CNT. However, constraints in CNT sorting, processing, alignment, and contacts give rise to nonidealities when CNTs are implemented in densely packed parallel arrays such as those needed for technology, resulting in a conductance per CNT far from 2G 0. The consequence has been that, whereas CNTs are ultimately expected to yield FETs that are more conductive than conventional semiconductors, CNTs, instead, have underperformed channel materials, such as Si, by sixfold or more. We report quasi-ballistic CNT array FETs at a density of 47 CNTs μm(-1), fabricated through a combination of CNT purification, solution-based assembly, and CNT treatment. The conductance is as high as 0.46 G 0 per CNT. In parallel, the conductance of the arrays reaches 1.7 mS μm(-1), which is seven times higher than the previous state-of-the-art CNT array FETs made by other methods. The saturated on-state current density is as high as 900 μA μm(-1) and is similar to or exceeds that of Si FETs when compared at and equivalent gate oxide thickness and at the same off-state current density. The on-state current density exceeds that of GaAs FETs as well. This breakthrough in CNT array performance is a critical advance toward the exploitation of CNTs in logic, high-speed communications, and other semiconductor electronics technologies.

  11. Quasi-ballistic carbon nanotube array transistors with current density exceeding Si and GaAs

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Gerald J.; Way, Austin J.; Safron, Nathaniel S.; Evensen, Harold T.; Gopalan, Padma; Arnold, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are tantalizing candidates for semiconductor electronics because of their exceptional charge transport properties and one-dimensional electrostatics. Ballistic transport approaching the quantum conductance limit of 2G0 = 4e2/h has been achieved in field-effect transistors (FETs) containing one CNT. However, constraints in CNT sorting, processing, alignment, and contacts give rise to nonidealities when CNTs are implemented in densely packed parallel arrays such as those needed for technology, resulting in a conductance per CNT far from 2G0. The consequence has been that, whereas CNTs are ultimately expected to yield FETs that are more conductive than conventional semiconductors, CNTs, instead, have underperformed channel materials, such as Si, by sixfold or more. We report quasi-ballistic CNT array FETs at a density of 47 CNTs μm−1, fabricated through a combination of CNT purification, solution-based assembly, and CNT treatment. The conductance is as high as 0.46 G0 per CNT. In parallel, the conductance of the arrays reaches 1.7 mS μm−1, which is seven times higher than the previous state-of-the-art CNT array FETs made by other methods. The saturated on-state current density is as high as 900 μA μm−1 and is similar to or exceeds that of Si FETs when compared at and equivalent gate oxide thickness and at the same off-state current density. The on-state current density exceeds that of GaAs FETs as well. This breakthrough in CNT array performance is a critical advance toward the exploitation of CNTs in logic, high-speed communications, and other semiconductor electronics technologies. PMID:27617293

  12. Amplification of current density modulation in a FEL with an infinite electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Webb, S.D.

    2011-03-28

    We show that the paraxial field equation for a free electron laser (FEL) in an infinitely wide electron beam with {kappa}-2 energy distribution can be reduced to a fourth ordinary differential equation (ODE). Its solution for arbitrary initial phase space density modulation has been derived in the wave-vector domain. For initial current modulation with Gaussian profile, close form solutions are obtained in space-time domain. In developing an analytical model for a FEL-based coherent electron cooling system, an infinite electron beam has been assumed for the modulation and correction processes. While the assumption has its limitation, it allows for an analytical close form solution to be obtained, which is essential for investigating the underlying scaling law, benchmarking the simulation codes and understanding the fundamental physics. 1D theory was previously applied to model a CeC FEL amplifier. However, the theory ignores diffraction effects and does not provide the transverse profile of the amplified electron density modulation. On the other hand, 3D theories developed for a finite electron beam usually have solutions expanded over infinite number of modes determined by the specific transverse boundary conditions. Unless the mode with the largest growth rate substantially dominates other modes, both evaluation and extracting scaling laws can be complicated. Furthermore, it is also preferable to have an analytical FEL model with assumptions consistent with the other two sections of a CeC system. Recently, we developed the FEL theory in an infinitely wide electron beam with {kappa}-1 (Lorentzian) energy distribution. Close form solutions have been obtained for the amplified current modulation initiated by an external electric field with various spatial-profiles. In this work, we extend the theory into {kappa}-2 energy distribution and study the evolution of current density induced by an initial density modulation.

  13. Relation between electric current densities and X-ray emissions from particles accelerated during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musset, Sophie; Vilmer, Nicole; Bommier, Veronique

    The energy released during solar flares is believed to be stored in non-potential magnetic fields associated with electric currents. This energy is partially transferred to particle acceleration. We studied for several X-class flares located near the solar disk center the relation between the location of the X-ray emissions produced by energetic electrons accelerated in the corona and the magnetic field and vertical component of the electric current density in the photosphere. The study is based on X-ray images with data from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and magnetic field maps and current density maps calculated with the UNNOFIT inversion and Metcalf disambiguation codes from the spectropolarimetric measurements of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). A comparison between X-ray and Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) images from the SDO Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) complete the study. We shall present preliminary conclusions on the link between particle acceleration and the presence of electric currents in the active region.

  14. Ultra-thin YBa2Cu3O7-x films with high critical current density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyatti, M.; Savenko, A.; Poppe, U.

    2016-06-01

    Despite impressive progress in the development of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPD), the main obstacle for the widespread use of such detectors is the low operating temperature required for low-temperature superconductors. The very attractive idea of increasing the operating temperature using high-temperature superconductors for SNSPD fabrication is problematic due to the insufficient quality of ultra-thin films from high-temperature superconductors, which is one of the key requirements for the single-photon detection by superconducting nanowires. In this work, we demonstrate the possibility of fabricating ultra-thin YBa2Cu3O7-x films on SrTiO3 substrates with a surface flatness of ±1 unit cell and a high critical current density up to 14 MA cm-2 at T = 78 K. The critical current density of ultra-thin films had very low value in the first three unit cell layers adjacent to the substrate and reached nearly the bulk value at the fifth layer. 97% of the superconducting current is carried by only two upper layers of a 5-unit-cell thick YBa2Cu3O7-x film. Due to such superconducting current distribution over the film thickness and good surface flatness 5-unit-cell thick YBa2Cu3O7-x films could be promising for the fabrication of single-photon detectors.

  15. Analysis of nanosecond breaking of a high-density current in SOS diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grekhov, I. V.; Lyublinskii, A. G.; Smirnova, I. A.

    2015-11-01

    Effect of a sharp (nanosecond) breaking of the reverse current with a density on the order of 103-104 A/cm2 in a silicon diode upon switching from direct to reverse bias voltage (so-called silicon opening switch, or SOS effect) is widely used in nanosecond technologies of gigawatt powers. For detailed analysis of the SOS effect, we constructed a special setup with small stray inductance, which makes it possible to test single SOS diodes with a working area of 1-2 mm2 in a wide range of current densities. Our experiments show, in particular, that the numerical model of the SOS effect developed at the Institute of Electrophysics, Ural Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences successfully described the experimental results. It is also shown that the charge extracted from the diode structure by the reverse current exceeds the charge introduced by a direct current pulse by not more than 10%, indicating a relatively small role of ionization processes. The possibility to carry out experiments on single samples with a small surface area allows us to study the SOS effect and considerably facilitates investigations aimed at the perfection of the design of SOS diodes.

  16. Lab Experiments Probe Interactions Between Dilute Pyroclastic Density Currents and 3D Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauria, K.; Andrews, B. J.; Manga, M.

    2014-12-01

    We conducted scaled laboratory experiments of unconfined dilute pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) to examine interactions between three - dimensional obstacles and dilute PDCs. While it is known that PDCs can surmount barriers by converting kinetic energy into potential energy, the signature of topography on PDC dynamics is unclear. To examine the interplay between PDCs and topography, we turbulently suspended heated and ambient-temperature 20 μm talc powder in air within an 8.5 x 6.1 x 2.6 m tank. Experimental parameters (Froude number, densimetric and thermal Richardson number, particle Stokes and Settling numbers) were scaled such that the experimental currents were dynamically similar to natural PCS. The Reynolds number, however, is much smaller than in natural currents, but still large enough for the flows to be turbulent. We placed cylindrical and ridge-like objects in the path of the currents, illuminated the currents with orthogonal laser sheets, and recorded each experiment with high definition cameras. We observed currents surmounting ridge-like barriers (barrier height = current height). Slanted ridges redirected the currents upward and parallel to the upstream face of the ridges (~45° from horizontal). Down stream of the slanted ridges, ambient-temperature currents reattached to the floor. By comparison, hot currents reversed buoyancy and lifted off. These observations suggest that obstacles enhance air entrainment, a process key to affecting runout distance and the depletion of fine particles in ignimbrites. Moreover, we observed vortex shedding in the wake of cylinders. Our experiments demonstrate that barriers of various shapes affect PDC dynamics and can shorten PDC runout distances. Understanding the effects of topography on PDCs is required for interpreting many deposits because processes such as vortex shedding and topographically-induced changes in turbulent length scales and entrainment likely leave depositional signatures.

  17. Pyroclastic density currents and local topography as seen with the conveyer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doronzo, Domenico M.; Dellino, Pierfrancesco

    2014-05-01

    Pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) are multiphase flows generated during explosive volcanic eruptions, and they move down the volcano, and over the surrounding topography. The flow-topography interaction can play a fundamental role in the sedimentary processes, and in the resulting deposit facies architecture, as well as can play a dramatic role in the flow behavior, and in the associated volcanic hazard. This paper aims at discussing the PDC-topography interaction theme from the viewpoint of both deposits and flow structure, by accounting for appropriate literature, and revising the concepts in light of the theoretical conveyer model of Doronzo and Dellino (2013) on sedimentation and deposition in particulate density currents. First the effects, then the causes of the flow-topography interaction are discussed, in order to follow the historical development of theme concepts. The discussion is relative in terms of inertial and forced currents, which are defined on the basis of a dimensionless quantity (SD) representing the conservation of mass. Momentum equation relating depositional unit thickness, flow shear velocity, and density contrast shows that the flow is the cause of PDC motion, whereas the density contrast sustains the momentum, and the deposits are the process effect. In particular, the flow structure is described into three parts, flow-substrate boundary zone, boundary layer (lower part), and wake region (upper part) of the current. The facies architecture of PDC deposits, and the volcanic hazard depend on fluid dynamic and hydraulic behavior represented, in light of the conveyer model, by the balance of sedimentation and deposition rates through transport and erosion (“sedimentation-deposition” ratio, SD). This balance acts between flow-substrate boundary zone and boundary layer. The paper discussion mainly applies to small-to-intermediate volume eruptions. Field and modeling examples of Vulcano tuff cone and Colli Albani maar (Italy) constrain the

  18. Micromagnetic model for studies on Magnetic Tunnel Junction switching dynamics, including local current density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankowski, Marek; Czapkiewicz, Maciej; Skowroński, Witold; Stobiecki, Tomasz

    2014-02-01

    We present a model introducing the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation with a Slonczewski's Spin-Transfer-Torque (STT) component in order to take into account spin polarized current influence on the magnetization dynamics, which was developed as an Object Oriented MicroMagnetic Framework extension. We implement the following computations: magnetoresistance of vertical channels is calculated from the local spin arrangement, local current density is used to calculate the in-plane and perpendicular STT components as well as the Oersted field, which is caused by the vertical current flow. The model allows for an analysis of all listed components separately, therefore, the contribution of each physical phenomenon in dynamic behavior of Magnetic Tunnel Junction (MTJ) magnetization is discussed. The simulated switching voltage is compared with the experimental data measured in MTJ nanopillars.

  19. Current initiation in low-density foam z-pinch plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Derzon, M.; Nash, T.; Allshouse, G.

    1996-07-01

    Low density agar and aerogel foams were tested as z-pinch loads on the SATURN accelerator. In these first experiments, we studied the initial plasma conditions by measuring the visible emission at early times with a framing camera and 1-D imaging. At later time, near the stagnation when the plasma is hotter, x-ray imaging and spectral diagnostics were used to characterize the plasma. Filamentation and arcing at the current contacts was observed. None of the implosions were uniform along the z-axis. The prime causes of these problems are believed to be the electrode contacts and the current return configuration and these are solvable. Periodic phenomena consistent with the formation of instabilities were observed on one shot, not on others, implying that there may be a way of controlling instabilities in the pinch. Many of the issues involving current initiation may be solvable. Solutions are discussed.

  20. High voltage and high current density vertical GaN power diodes

    DOE PAGES

    Fischer, A. J.; Dickerson, J. R.; Armstrong, A. M.; Moseley, M. W.; Crawford, M. H.; King, M. P.; Allerman, A. A.; Kaplar, R. J.; van Heukelom, M. S.; Wierer, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the realization of a GaN high voltage vertical p-n diode operating at > 3.9 kV breakdown with a specific on-resistance < 0.9 mΩ.cm2. Diodes achieved a forward current of 1 A for on-wafer, DC measurements, corresponding to a current density > 1.4 kA/cm2. An effective critical electric field of 3.9 MV/cm was estimated for the devices from analysis of the forward and reverse current-voltage characteristics. Furthermore this suggests that the fundamental limit to the GaN critical electric field is significantly greater than previously believed.

  1. High voltage and high current density vertical GaN power diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, A. J.; Dickerson, J. R.; Armstrong, A. M.; Moseley, M. W.; Crawford, M. H.; King, M. P.; Allerman, A. A.; Kaplar, R. J.; van Heukelom, M. S.; Wierer, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the realization of a GaN high voltage vertical p-n diode operating at > 3.9 kV breakdown with a specific on-resistance < 0.9 mΩ.cm2. Diodes achieved a forward current of 1 A for on-wafer, DC measurements, corresponding to a current density > 1.4 kA/cm2. An effective critical electric field of 3.9 MV/cm was estimated for the devices from analysis of the forward and reverse current-voltage characteristics. Furthermore this suggests that the fundamental limit to the GaN critical electric field is significantly greater than previously believed.

  2. Studies in High Current Density Ion Sources for Heavy Ion FusionApplications

    SciTech Connect

    Chacon-Golcher, E.

    2002-06-01

    This dissertation develops diverse research on small (diameter {approx} few mm), high current density (J {approx} several tens of mA/cm{sup 2}) heavy ion sources. The research has been developed in the context of a programmatic interest within the Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) Program to explore alternative architectures in the beam injection systems that use the merging of small, bright beams. An ion gun was designed and built for these experiments. Results of average current density yield () at different operating conditions are presented for K{sup +} and Cs{sup +} contact ionization sources and potassium aluminum silicate sources. Maximum values for a K{sup +} beam of {approx}90 mA/cm{sup 2} were observed in 2.3 {micro}s pulses. Measurements of beam intensity profiles and emittances are included. Measurements of neutral particle desorption are presented at different operating conditions which lead to a better understanding of the underlying atomic diffusion processes that determine the lifetime of the emitter. Estimates of diffusion times consistent with measurements are presented, as well as estimates of maximum repetition rates achievable. Diverse studies performed on the composition and preparation of alkali aluminosilicate ion sources are also presented. In addition, this work includes preliminary work carried out exploring the viability of an argon plasma ion source and a bismuth metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion source. For the former ion source, fast rise-times ({approx} 1 {micro}s), high current densities ({approx} 100 mA/cm{sup 2}) and low operating pressures (< 2 mtorr) were verified. For the latter, high but acceptable levels of beam emittance were measured ({var_epsilon}{sub n} {le} 0.006 {pi} mm {center_dot} mrad) although measured currents differed from the desired ones (I {approx} 5mA) by about a factor of 10.

  3. Investigation of nonthermal particle effects on ionization dynamics in high current density ion beam transport experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, H. K.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Wang, P.; Moses, G. A.; Bailey, J. E.; Olson, C. L.; Welch, D. R.

    1997-01-01

    Light ion inertial fusion experiments require the presence of a moderate density background gas in the transport region to provide charge and current neutralization for a high current density ion beam. In this article, we investigate the effects of nonthermal particles such as beam ions or non-Maxwellian electron distributions on the ionization dynamics of the background gas. In particular, we focus on the case of Li beams being transported in an argon gas. Nonthermal particles as well as thermal electrons are included in time-dependent collisional-radiative calculations to determine time-dependent atomic level populations and charge state distributions in a beam-produced plasma. We also briefly discuss the effects of beam ions and energetic electrons on the visible and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectral regions. It is found that the mean charge state of the gas, and hence the electron density, is significantly increased by collisions with energetic particles. This higher ionization significantly impacts the VUV spectral region, where numerous resonance lines occur. On the other hand, the visible spectrum tends to be less affected because the closely spaced excited states are populated by lower energy thermal electrons.

  4. Critical Current Density and Bulk Pinning Force in RHQT-Processed Niobium-Aluminum Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buta, F.; Sumption, M. D.; Collings, E. W.

    2004-06-01

    Transformation heat treatments with short excursions (1-10 min) to 1000°C preceding the conventional 800°C/10h were applied to jelly-roll Nb-Al samples that had been rapidly heated and quenched (RHQ) in bcc phase from high temperatures. The critical current density dependence on magnetic field at 4.2K in magnetic fields ranging from 0 to 8.5T was determined from magnetization measurements performed by Vibrating Sample Magnetometry. It was found that in this range of magnetic fields the highest critical current densities are not necessarily obtained for the samples with the highest initial heating rate of the transformation heat treatment as it is the case at magnetic fields in the vicinity of 20T. The highest pinning force density is present in samples that were transformed by rapid insertion in a furnace preheated to 1000°C and not in samples that were ohmically heated to 1000°C (the fastest heating rate employed).

  5. Effects of the current boundary conditions at the plasma-gun gap on density in SSPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, Roman; Lodestro, L. L.; Meyer, W. H.

    2012-10-01

    The Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) was a toroidal magnetic-confinement device without toroidal magnetic-field coils or a central transformer but which generated core-plasma currents by dynamo processes driven by coaxial plasma-gun injection into a flux-conserving vessel. Record electron temperatures in a spheromak (Te˜500eV) were achieved, and final results of the SSPX program were reported in [1]. Plasma density, which depended strongly on wall conditions, was an important parameter in SSPX. It was observed that density rises with Igun and that confinement improved as the density was lowered. Shortly after the last experiments, a new feature was added to the Corsica code's solver used to reconstruct SSPX equilibria. Motivated by n=0 fields observed in NIMROD simulations of SSPX, an insulating boundary condition was implemented at the plasma-gun gap. Using this option we will perform new reconstructions of SSPX equilibria and look for correlations between the location of the separatrix (which moves up the gun wall and onto the insulating gap as Igun increases) and plasma density and magnetic-flux amplification [2].[4pt] [1] H. S. McLean, APS, DPP, Dallas, TX, 2008.[0pt] [2] E. B. Hooper et al., Nucl. Fusion 47, 1064 (2007).

  6. Surface Current Density Mapping for Identification of Gastric Slow Wave Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, L. A.; Cheng, L. K.; Richards, W. O.; Pullan, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    The magnetogastrogram records clinically relevant parameters of the electrical slow wave of the stomach noninvasively. Besides slow wave frequency, gastric slow wave propagation velocity is a potentially useful clinical indicator of the state of health of gastric tissue, but it is a difficult parameter to determine from noninvasive bioelectric or biomagnetic measurements. We present a method for computing the surface current density (SCD) from multichannel magnetogastrogram recordings that allows computation of the propagation velocity of the gastric slow wave. A moving dipole source model with hypothetical as well as realistic biomagnetometer parameters demonstrates that while a relatively sparse array of magnetometer sensors is sufficient to compute a single average propagation velocity, more detailed information about spatial variations in propagation velocity requires higher density magnetometer arrays. Finally, the method is validated with simultaneous MGG and serosal EMG measurements in a porcine subject. PMID:19403355

  7. Structure of Dilute Pyroclastic Density Currents During Transport, Buoyancy Reversal and Liftoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Scaled laboratory experiments provide insight into structure, entrainment and liftoff in pyroclastic density currents (PDCs). Experiments are conducted in a 8.5×6.1×2.6 m air-filled tank and comprise turbulently suspended mixtures of heated 20-μm talc particles introduced to the tank at steady and sustained rates; the tank is large enough that the currents are effectively unconfined. Experiments are scaled with bulk (densimetric and thermal Richardson numbers, Froude number) and turbulent (Stokes and settling numbers) parameters dynamically similar to natural currents. The Reynolds numbers of experiments are smaller than those of natural PDCs, but analysis of the experiments demonstrates that they are fully turbulent. Red, green, and blue laser sheets illuminate orthogonal planes within the currents for imaging and recording with HD video cameras; those data are reprojected into cross-sectional and map-view planes for analysis of turbulent velocity fields and fluctuations in particle concentration. A green laser sheet can be swept through the tank at 60 Hz and imaged with a high-speed CCD camera at up to 3000 fps; sequences of 60-300 images are used to make 3D volumetric reconstructions of the currents at up to 10 Hz. Currents typically comprise a lower "bypass" region and an upper entraining region that turbulently mixes with the ambient air. The bypass region is generally about half of the total current thickness and moves faster than the overlying, entraining region. The bypass region controls runout distance and steadiness of currents. If turbulent structures in the entraining region penetrate through the bypass region, the trailing portion of the current can stall before resuming forward progress; thus a single, "steady" current can generate multiple currents. When a current lifts off, it focuses along a narrow axis beneath the rising (coignimbrite) plume. At that time, ambient air entrainment occurs primarily through the lateral margins of the narrow

  8. High-current-density gun with a LaB6 cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebihara, K.; Hiramatsu, S.

    1996-08-01

    To develop a high-current electron gun for an induction linac, a prototype of a Pierce-type electron gun using planar 12-mm-diam lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) is studied as a thermionic emitter at high current densities. The cathode is heated up to temperatures of 1750 °C by electron bombardment and thermal radiation from a tungsten heater. The heater that has the highest temperature in the gun is thermally isolated from the outer vacuum chamber with heat shields. The bombardment voltage of ˜1 kV is typically applied to a gap between the cathode and the heater. The gun has been operated up to voltages of 55 kV, obtaining a maximum current density of 20 A/cm2 with a pulse width of 250 ns at a cathode temperature of 1600 °C. High-voltage pulsing results show that the gun, with applied voltages of over 40 kV, is operated in space-charge-limited region at temperatures of over 1600 °C; also it is operated in a temperature-limited region at temperatures of less than 1500 °C. An effective work function of 2.68 eV is obtained. The cathode, when heated up to 1600 °C, emits over 7 A of electrons with a ˜20% reduction after 850 h of continuous operation. These measurements were made between vacuum pressures of 10-6 and 10-7 Torr.

  9. Characterisation of high current density resonant tunneling diodes for THz emission using photoluminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Kristof J. P.; Baba, Razvan; Stevens, Benjamin J.; Mukai, Toshikazu; Ohnishi, Dai; Hogg, Richard A.

    2016-03-01

    Resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) provide high speed current oscillation which is applicable to THz generation when coupled to a suitably designed antenna. For this purpose, the InGaAs/AlAs/InP materials have been used, as this system offers high electron mobility, suitable band-offsets, and low resistance contacts. However for high current density operation (~MA/cm2) the epitaxial structure is challenging to characterize using conventional techniques as it consists of a single, very thin AlAs/InGaAs quantum well (QW). Here, we present a detailed low temperature photoluminescence spectroscopic study of high current density RTDs that allow the non-destructive mapping of a range of critical parameters for the device. We show how the doping level of the emitter/collector and contact layers in the RTD structure can be measured using the Moss-Burstein effect. For the full device structure, we show how emission from the QW may be identified, and detail how the emission changes with differing indium composition and well widths. We show that by studying nominally identical, un-doped structures, a type-II QW emission is observed, and explain the origin of the type-I emission in doped devices. This observation opens the way for a new characterization scheme where a "dummy" RTD active element is incorporated below the real RTD structure. This structure allows significantly greater control in the epitaxial process.

  10. The influence of critical current density of Bi-2212 superconductors by defects after Yb-doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tianni; Zhang, Cuiping; Guo, Shengwu; Wu, Yifang; Li, Chengshan; Zhou, Lian

    2015-12-01

    Bi2Sr2Ca1-xYbxCu2O8+δ (Bi-2212) single crystals with x = 0.000, 0.005, 0.010 and 0.020 have been prepared by self-flux method. The influences of Yb doping on the formation of the dislocations in the lattice structures, as well as the related current carrying capability are investigated. Due to the SQUID measurement and the Bean model calculation, the maximum critical current density (Jc) is obtained when the Yb doping content is x = 0.010, though the Tc and the carrier concentration are not in the optimal region. Based on the HRTEM analyses of the Ca-O and Cu-O2 layers, the optimal dislocation density in the Cu-O2 layers is deduced according to the number of the dislocations per unit area. Besides, the sizes of the dislocations also prove the effectiveness of Yb substitution on the enhancement of the current carrying capability in Bi-2212 single crystals.

  11. Energy transportation via MITL by the linear current flow density up to 7 MA/cm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, V. D.; Bakshaev, Yu. L.; Bartov, A. V.; Blinov, P. I.; Bryzgunov, V. A.; Chernenko, A. S.; Dan'ko, S. A.; Kalinin, Yu. G.; Kingsep, A. S.; Kazakov, E. D.; Smirnov, V. P.; Smirnova, E. A.; Ustroev, G. I.

    2006-10-01

    The transmission properties of the magnetically self-insulated vacuum transporting line (MITL) were studied on the S-300 pulsed power machine (3 MA, 100 ns) at the high linear current flow density up to dI/db = 7 MA/cm. Experiments were carried out with the short line sections with 10 ÷ 15 mm length and 3 ÷ 5 mm vacuum gap. For measuring of the plasma parameters, the frame ICT photography with the nanosecond temporal resolution in the SXR range and ICT (Image Converter Tube) chronography in visible range were used. The X-ray radiation in various ranges was recorded by the XRD with thin filters (SXR) and by the semiconductor detectors (HXR). The information about current transmission efficiency was obtained by means of magnetic loops and low-inductance shunt. It was determined that dense plasma arose on both anode and cathode when the linear current flow density was low enough, dI/db ≤ 1 MA/cm. A dense plasma moves across the vacuum gap with the velocity (1 ÷ 2) × 106 cm/s. By recording the current and hard X-ray radiation it was found that electron losses in the current front did not exceed 10 ÷ 100 kA. Under strong magnetization of electrons r H = mvc/eB < d, these losses could be due to the motion of fast plasma component, which velocity exceeds 107 cm/s. Such a rare plasma sheath formed on the cathode by dI/db ≥ 1 MA/cm. Thereby the successful physical modeling of the recyclable MITL related to the Sandia Laboratories’ Conceptual Project of fusion reactor on the base of fast Z-pinch has been brought about.

  12. Density functional study of collective electron localization: detection by persistent current.

    PubMed

    Siegmund, Marc; Hofmann, Markus; Pankratov, Oleg

    2009-04-15

    We apply the optimized effective potential (OEP) implementation of density functional theory (DFT) to the model system of interacting spinless electrons on a quantum ring. The ring encircles a magnetic flux that induces a persistent current. In a perfect rotationally invariant system the current does not depend on the electron-electron interaction (the latter is characterized by a standard dimensionless parameter r(S)) and hence is not sensitive to the microscopic structure of the electron correlated state. This changes, however, if a symmetry-breaking external potential is introduced or, in a realistic system, due to the crystal lattice potential (Hamer et al 1987 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 20 5677-93). In our model, we calculate the persistent current as a function of r(S) in the presence of a weak Gaussian-shaped 'impurity' potential. We find that while below a threshold value r(S)current is independent of r(S), it decays exponentially for r(S)>r(S)(c). This signals the formation of an electron Wigner crystal pinned by the impurity potential. The electron density, homogeneous below r(S)(c), indeed shows a periodic modulation at r(S)>r(S)(c). The modulation amplitude follows a (r(S)-r(S)(c))((1)/(2)) behaviour which is characteristic for a second-order phase transition, as expected in the mean-field-type DFT-OEP approach. Our calculation shows that the macroscopic current, which is a quantity directly accessible in DFT, can serve as an indicator of the formation of a correlated electron state.

  13. Evaluation of levels of defect sites present in highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes using capacitive and faradaic current components derived simultaneously from large-amplitude Fourier transformed ac voltammetric experiments.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chong-Yong; Bond, Alan M

    2009-01-15

    The level of edge plane defect sites present in highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) electrodes has been evaluated via analysis of dc, ac fundamental, and higher-order ac harmonics available from a single large-amplitude Fourier transformed (FT) ac voltammetric experiment. Deliberate introduction of a low level of edge plane defect was achieved by polishing, with a higher level being introduced via electrochemical pretreatment. Kinetics regimes associated with fast electron transfer on the edge plane defect sites and slow electron transfer on the basal plane surface are resolved under ac conditions when using the surface-sensitive [Fe(CN)(6)](3-/4-) redox probe. However, because of their insensitivity to slow electron transfer, higher-order ac faradaic harmonics almost exclusively detect only the much faster processes that emanate from edge plane defect sites. Thus, detection of fourth- and higher-order ac Faradaic harmonic components that are devoid of background capacitive current is possible at freshly cleaved HOPG in the region near the reversible potential for the [Fe(CN)(6)](3-/4-) process. Under these circumstances, dc cyclic voltammograms exhibit only reduction and oxidation peaks separated by more than 1 V. The fundamental ac harmonic provides detailed information on the capacitive current, which increases with the level of edge plane defect sites. Apparent charge transfer rate constants also can be derived from peak-to-peak separations obtained from the dc aperiodic component. Estimates of the percentage of edge plane defect sites based on ac higher harmonics, capacitance, and dc aperiodic component that are available from a single experiment have been compared. The edge plane defect levels deduced from capacitance (fundamental harmonic ac component) and higher harmonic Faradaic currents are considered to be more reliable than estimations based on apparent rate constants derived from the dc aperiodic component or conventional dc cyclic voltammogram.

  14. Flux Pinning and Critical Current Densities in Proton Irradiated Single Crystal Yttrium Barium Copper Oxide.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, Hema Krishnan

    Radiation damage has been traditionally used to introduce artificial pinning centers into superconducting material in order to enhance their critical current densities. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of defects induced by irradiation with 3.5 MeV protons on the critical current densities and to investigate the structure of the defects using SQUID magnetization and magnetoresistive measurements. There are three general types of defects produced by proton irradiation at room temperature. They are (1) a relatively high concentration of point defects on all the sublattices, (2) clusters of point defects, and (3) the defect cascades. SQUID magnetization measurements suggest that the defect clusters and cascades are effective in pinning the vortices at 70 K for vec{rm H}|vec{rm c} axis. Additional contribution to pinning at 10 K for vec{rm H}|vec {rm c} axis comes from the vacancies formed upon irradiation with protons. The defect clusters seem to be the only contributors to pinning for vec{rm H}|vec{ rm ab} plane. The anisotropy of the critical current densities in detwinned crystals between field orientations parallel to the vec{ rm a} and vec{rm b} axes determined from magnetization measurements at 10 K consistently show that rm J_sp {c}{c}(vec H|vec b)>J_sp{c}{c}(vec H| vec a) at all fields after 2 irradiations and annealing for 2 and 4 weeks. The effect of proton irradiation on the resistive transition and the anisotropy of the defect structure was studied using angular dependence of the resistivity in rm YBa_2Cu_3O_{7 -delta} single crytals. The expected drop in resistivity when the field is aligned parallel to the vec{rm c} axis due to the alignment of the vortices with the defect cluster as observed in the case of the twin boundaries was absent.

  15. Study of the time-resolved, 3-dimensional current density distribution in solid metallic liners at 1 MA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bott-Suzuki, S. C.; Cordaro, S. W.; Caballero Bendixsen, L. S.; Atoyan, L.; Byvank, T.; Potter, W.; Kusse, B. R.; Greenly, J. B.; Hammer, D. A.

    2016-09-01

    We present a study of the time varying current density distribution in solid metallic liner experiments at the 1 MA level. Measurements are taken using an array of magnetic field probes which provide 2D triangulation of the average centroid of the drive current in the load at 3 discrete axial positions. These data are correlated with gated optical self-emission imaging which directly images the breakdown and plasma formation region. Results show that the current density is azimuthally non-uniform and changes significantly throughout the 100 ns experimental timescale. Magnetic field probes show clearly motion of the current density around the liner azimuth over 10 ns timescales. If breakdown is initiated at one azimuthal location, the current density remains non-uniform even over large spatial extents throughout the current drive. The evolution timescales are suggestive of a resistive diffusion process or uneven current distributions among simultaneously formed but discrete plasma conduction paths.

  16. Mechanism for producing normal current density in a high-frequency {alpha} discharge in inert gases

    SciTech Connect

    Raizer, Yu.P.; Shneider, M.N.

    1993-09-01

    In the present work, it was desired to show that the normal current density in an alpha discharge in light inert gases, i.e. helium, behaves essentially like that in nitrogen. As was done in a previous work (Ref.3), a uniform alpha discharge in a planar gap was considered. The balance equations for the Helium atoms were written, as were the balance equations for the electrons in the positive column for the metastables. With simplifying approximations, these equations were solved, and analytical expressions for the average electron energy and the electron energy distribution were obtained.

  17. Planar gradient coil design by scaling the spatial frequencies of minimum-inductance current density.

    PubMed

    Lee, S Y; Park, B S; Yi, J H; Yi, W

    1997-11-01

    Gradient coil inductance has been remarkably reduced by the minimum-inductance design technique, which minimizes the magnetic energy stored by the gradient coil. The planar gradient coil designed by this technique, however, often has poor magnetic field linearity. Scaling the spatial frequencies of the current density function derived by this method, the magnetic field linearity of the planar gradient coil can be greatly improved with a small sacrifice of gradient coil inductance. A figure of merit of the planar gradient coil has been found to be improved by scaling the spatial frequencies.

  18. Giant increase in critical current density of KxFe2-ySe₂ single crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Lei, Hechang; Petrovic, C.

    2011-12-28

    The critical current density Jabc of KxFe2-ySe₂ single crystals can be enhanced by more than one order of magnitude, up to ~2.1×10⁴ A/cm² by the post annealing and quenching technique. A scaling analysis reveals the universal behavior of the normalized pinning force as a function of the reduced field for all temperatures, indicating the presence of a single vortex pinning mechanism. The main pinning sources are three-dimensional (3D) point-like normal cores. The dominant vortex interaction with pinning centers is via spatial variations in critical temperature Tc (“δTc pinning”).

  19. Structural, optical and electrical characterization of nanostructured porous silicon: Effect of current density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulathuraan, K.; Mohanraj, K.; Natarajan, B.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, an attempt has been made to fabricate porous silicon (PS) from p-type crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafers by using the electrochemical etching process at six different current densities (40, 60, 75, 100, 125 and 150 mA/cm2) with constant time (30 min). The influence of varying current density on morphological, structural, optical and electrical properties of PS samples were analyzed by using SEM, AFM, XRD, FT-IR, PL and electrical (I-V) techniques, respectively. Microstructural images clearly showed that the average pore diameter and thickness increase with increase current densities up to 100 mA/cm2 and decrease for 125 mA/cm2. It could be related to breaking of pore walls and exposing to the next layer of c-Si. Further increase the current density about 150 mA/cm2, the average pore diameter increase as in the case of first layer (40-100 mA/cm2) of c-Si wafer. The result is reflected in PL emission band (at 708 nm) and the intensity of the emission band shifted towards red region. The X-ray diffraction pattern confirm the formation of porous silicon as appeared as a broad peak at 2θ = 69.3° belongs to (4 0 0) reflection. The FTIR study supports the X-ray diffraction analysis that shows the vibrational bands of S-H2 and Si-O-Si at 2109 cm-1, 915 cm-1 and 615 cm-1 and 1107 cm-1, respectively. The I-V characteristic of PS exhibited rectifying behavior with different values of ideality factor (η) and barrier height (ϕb). It is concluded from the experimental results that the formed pores developed up to 100 mA/cm2 in the top layer of c-Si and the formed pores exposed to the next layer of c-Si when increase the high electrochemical etching process (above 100 mA/cm2).

  20. Temperature-dependence of Threshold Current Density-Length Product in Metallization Lines: A Revisit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saptono Duryat, Rahmat; Kim, Choong-Un

    2016-04-01

    One of the important phenomena in Electromigration (EM) is Blech Effect. The existence of Threshold Current Density-Length Product or EM Threshold has such fundamental and technological consequences in the design, manufacture, and testing of electronics. Temperature-dependence of Blech Product had been thermodynamically established and the real behavior of such interconnect materials have been extensively studied. The present paper reviewed the temperature-dependence of EM threshold in metallization lines of different materials and structure as found in relevant published articles. It is expected that the reader can see a big picture from the compiled data, which might be overlooked when it was examined in pieces.

  1. The critical current density in the layered superconductors with ferromagnetic nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashurnikov, V. A.; Maksimova, A. N.; Rudnev, I. A.; Odintsov, D. S.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we have calculated the dependence of critical current density jc on the radius R and concentration of extended ferromagnetic defects in the system simulating a high-temperature superconductor (HTSC) layer. It was shown that at fixed volume concentration of ferromagnetic fraction the jc (R) dependence, as against nonmagnetic defects, has one maximum or two maxima at certain magnetization values of ferromagnetic fraction. We found that these maxima are due to the interplay of two parameters: concentration and effective depth of potential wells of defects.

  2. DESIGN NOTE: A preliminary study on temperature change monitoring using the MR current density imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khang, H. S.; Oh, S. H.; Han, B. H.; Lee, S. Y.; Cho, M. H.; Woo, E. J.

    2002-04-01

    Based on the fact that the electrical impedance of biological tissues is very sensitive to temperature, we have proposed a method to monitor local temperature changes inside the tissues. Using an analytic model and a finite element method model, we have analysed the effect of the local temperature change on the phase image obtained by the magnetic resonance current density imaging technique. We show preliminary experimental results of the temperature change monitoring performed with a 0.3 T magnetic resonance imaging system. We expect that the proposed method can be utilized for the development of non-invasive temperature imaging techniques.

  3. High current density electropolishing in the preparation of highly smooth substrate tapes for coated conductors

    DOEpatents

    Kreiskott, Sascha; Matias, Vladimir; Arendt, Paul N.; Foltyn, Stephen R.; Bronisz, Lawrence E.

    2009-03-31

    A continuous process of forming a highly smooth surface on a metallic tape by passing a metallic tape having an initial roughness through an acid bath contained within a polishing section of an electropolishing unit over a pre-selected period of time, and, passing a mean surface current density of at least 0.18 amperes per square centimeter through the metallic tape during the period of time the metallic tape is in the acid bath whereby the roughness of the metallic tape is reduced. Such a highly smooth metallic tape can serve as a base substrate in subsequent formation of a superconductive coated conductor.

  4. Heavy ion irradiation of Bi-2223 silver-clad tapes for superconducting current density enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Malozcnoff, A.P.; Carter, W.L.; Riley, G.N. Jr.; Wheeler, R. IV; Kirk, M.A.; Civale, L.; Marwick, A.D.

    1993-07-01

    Silver-clad composite tapes of Bi(Pb)SrCaCuO-2223 were irradiated with 1 GeV Au{sup 23+} ions perpendicular to the tape plane, creating columnar tracks with 10 nm diameter. Detailed transmission electron microscopy shows continuous columns, but with variations in the track thickness of +/{minus}2 nm. Magnetic hystersis measurements show substantial enhancement of superconducting current density at most temperatures and fields. Granular and nongranular models for the origin of the magnetic signals are discussed. The results indicate the potential for further performance improvement in high temperature superconducting wire technology, as well as limits in the high-field performance at 77 K.

  5. System and method for magnetic current density imaging at ultra low magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Espy, Michelle A.; George, John Stevens; Kraus, Robert Henry; Magnelind, Per; Matlashov, Andrei Nikolaevich; Tucker, Don; Turovets, Sergei; Volegov, Petr Lvovich

    2016-02-09

    Preferred systems can include an electrical impedance tomography apparatus electrically connectable to an object; an ultra low field magnetic resonance imaging apparatus including a plurality of field directions and disposable about the object; a controller connected to the ultra low field magnetic resonance imaging apparatus and configured to implement a sequencing of one or more ultra low magnetic fields substantially along one or more of the plurality of field directions; and a display connected to the controller, and wherein the controller is further configured to reconstruct a displayable image of an electrical current density in the object. Preferred methods, apparatuses, and computer program products are also disclosed.

  6. Optimization of the epitaxial design of high current density resonant tunneling diodes for terahertz emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Razvan; Stevens, Benjamin J.; Mukai, Toshikazu; Hogg, Richard A.

    2016-02-01

    We discuss the numerical simulation of high current density InGaAs/AlAs/InP resonant tunneling diodes with a view to their optimization for application as THz emitters. We introduce a figure of merit based upon the ratio of maximum extractable THz power and the electrical power developed in the chip. The aim being to develop high efficiency emitters as output power is presently limited by catastrophic failure. A description of the interplay of key parameters follows, with constraints on strained layer epitaxy introduced. We propose an optimized structure utilizing thin barriers paired with a comparatively wide quantum well that satisfies strained layer epitaxy constraints.

  7. Electron density profile measurements at a self-focusing ion beam with high current density and low energy extracted through concave electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Y. Nakamiya, A.; Sakakita, H.; Hirano, Y.; Kiyama, S.; Koguchi, H.

    2014-02-15

    The self-focusing phenomenon has been observed in a high current density and low energy ion beam. In order to study the mechanism of this phenomenon, a special designed double probe to measure the electron density and temperature is installed into the chamber where the high current density ion beam is injected. Electron density profile is successfully measured without the influence of the ion beam components. Estimated electron temperature and density are ∼0.9 eV and ∼8 × 10{sup 8} cm{sup −3} at the center of ion beam cross section, respectively. It was found that a large amount of electrons are spontaneously accumulated in the ion beam line in the case of self-forcing state.

  8. Tunnelling and current density in short period strained AlN/GaN superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asenova, Iglika; Valcheva, Evgenia; Arnaudov, Dimo

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we theoretically analyze the under-barrier perpendicular transport in short period strained III-nitride superlattices via a generalized model. The transmission coefficient of unbiased and biased structures, as well as the tunnel current at room temperature, are calculated via the transfer matrix formalism and the effective mass approximation. The inherent to the III-nitrides electric polarization fields taken into account and the exact solution of the Schrödinger equation is used in the calculation process. The minizone structure is shown to periodically disintegrate and reform as the externally applied electric field increases, while the tunnel current density shows nonlinear behavior and negative differential conductance. The theoretical results we obtain are compared and found to be consistent with the experimental ones.

  9. Unified models of E-layer plasma turbulence from density gradients and Hall currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Ehab; Litt, Sandeep; Horton, Wendell; Smolyakov, Andrei; Skiff, Fred

    2013-10-01

    The Earth's ionosphere is rich with plasma irregularities of scale-lengths extend from few centimeters to hundreds of kilometers. The combination of small-scale turbulence with large coherent structures is at the forefront of basic plasma turbulence theory. A new unified model for the small-scale plasma turbulence called Type-I and Type-II in the E-region ionosphere is presented. Simulations and a proposed laboratory experiment for these plasma waves in a weakly ionized plasma are reported. The ions [Argon in the lab and NO+ in the ionosphere] are collisional and the electrons ExB drifts produce Hall currents. The dispersion relations are analyzed for both density gradient and electron current driven instabilities. A basic understanding of the turbulence is important for forecasting disruptions in GNSS communication signals from RF signal scattering produced by the E-layer plasma turbulence on the 10cm to 10m scales lengths. NSF:AGS-0964692.

  10. Density-matrix renormalization-group study of current and activity fluctuations near nonequilibrium phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Gorissen, Mieke; Hooyberghs, Jef; Vanderzande, Carlo

    2009-02-01

    Cumulants of a fluctuating current can be obtained from a free-energy-like generating function, which for Markov processes equals the largest eigenvalue of a generalized generator. We determine this eigenvalue with the density-matrix renormalization group for stochastic systems. We calculate the variance of the current in the different phases, and at the phase transitions, of the totally asymmetric exclusion process. Our results can be described in the terms of a scaling ansatz that involves the dynamical exponent z . We also calculate the generating function of the dynamical activity (total number of configuration changes) near the absorbing-state transition of the contact process. Its scaling properties can be expressed in terms of known critical exponents. PMID:19391693

  11. Frequency spectra from current vs. magnetic flux density measurements for mobile phones and other electrical appliances.

    PubMed

    Straume, Aksel; Johnsson, Anders; Oftedal, Gunnhild; Wilén, Jonna

    2007-10-01

    The frequency spectra of electromagnetic fields have to be determined to evaluate human exposure in accordance to ICNIRP guidelines. In the literature, comparisons with magnetic field guidelines have been performed by using the frequency distribution of the current drawn from the battery. In the present study we compared the frequency spectrum in the range 217 Hz to 2.4 kHz of the magnetic flux density measured near the surface of a mobile phone with the frequency spectrum of the supply current. By using the multiple frequency rule, recommended in the ICNIRP guidelines, we estimated the magnetic field exposure in the two cases. Similar measurements and estimations were done for an electric drill, a hair dryer, and a fluorescent desk lamp. All the devices have a basic frequency of 50 Hz, and the frequency spectra were evaluated up to 550 Hz. We also mapped the magnetic field in 3D around three mobile phones. The frequency distributions obtained from the two measurement methods are not equal. The frequency content of the current leads to an overestimation of the magnetic field exposure by a factor up to 2.2 for the mobile phone. For the drill, the hair dryer, and the fluorescent lamp, the supply current signal underestimated the exposure by a factor up to 2.3. In conclusion, an accurate exposure evaluation requires the magnetic flux density spectrum of the device to be measured directly. There was no indication that the devices studied would exceed the reference levels at the working distances normally used.

  12. Growth and characterization of high current density, high-speed InAs/AlSb resonant tunneling diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderstrom, J. R.; Brown, E. R.; Parker, C. D.; Mahoney, L. J.; Yao, J. Y.

    1991-01-01

    InAs/AlSb double-barrier resonant tunneling diodes with peak current densities up to 370,000 A/sq cm and high peak-to-valley current ratios of 3.2 at room temperature have been fabricated. The peak current density is well-explained by a stationary-state transport model with the two-band envelope function approximation. The valley current density predicted by this model is less than the experimental value by a factor that is typical of the discrepancy found in other double-barrier structures. It is concluded that threading dislocations are largely inactive in the resonant tunneling process.

  13. Current-density functional theory of the friction of ions in an interacting electron gas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarov, V. U.; Pitarke, J. M.; Takada, Y.; Vignale, G.; Chang, Y.-C.

    2007-03-01

    Recently [1], the dynamical contribution to the friction coefficient of an electron gas for ions has been obtained quite generally in terms of the exchange and correlation (xc) kernel of the time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT). To implement this approach practically, an efficient approximation, like the local-density approximation (LDA), is needed for the dynamical xc kernel. It is, however, known that the scalar xc kernel of the TDDFT is a nonlocal quantity for which the LDA is not only inaccurate, but also contradictory [2]. Here we recast the theory into the terms of the tensorial xc kernel of the current-density functional theory [3] in which form the LDA can be applied. Our numerical results are in a considerably better agreement with the experimental stopping power of Al than it has been the case within the LDA to the TDDFT. [1] V.U.Nazarov et al., Phys. Rev. B71, 121106 (2005). [2] G.Vignale, Phys. Lett. A209, 206 (1995). [3] G.Vignale and W.Kohn, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 2037 (1996).

  14. Microfabricated AC impedance sensor

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter; Ackler, Harold D.; Becker, Frederick; Boser, Bernhard E.; Eldredge, Adam B.; Fuller, Christopher K.; Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Hamilton, Julie K.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Wang, Xiao-Bo

    2002-01-01

    A microfabricated instrument for detecting and identifying cells and other particles based on alternating current (AC) impedance measurements. The microfabricated AC impedance sensor includes two critical elements: 1) a microfluidic chip, preferably of glass substrates, having at least one microchannel therein and with electrodes patterned on both substrates, and 2) electrical circuits that connect to the electrodes on the microfluidic chip and detect signals associated with particles traveling down the microchannels. These circuits enable multiple AC impedance measurements of individual particles at high throughput rates with sufficient resolution to identify different particle and cell types as appropriate for environmental detection and clinical diagnostic applications.

  15. Truncation planes from a dilute pyroclastic density current: field data and analogue experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douillet, Guilhem Amin; Gegg, Lukas; Mato, Celia; Kueppers, Ulrich; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-04-01

    Pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) are a catastrophic transport mode of ground hugging gas-particle mixtures associated with explosive volcanic eruptions. The extremely high sedimentation rates and turbulence levels of these particulate density currents can freeze and preserve dynamic phenomena that happen but are not recorded in other sedimentary environments. Several intriguing and unanticipated features have been identified in outcrops and reproduced via analogue experiments, with the potential to change our views on morphodynamics and particle motion. Three types of small-scale (ca. 10 cm) erosion structures were observed on the stoss side of dune bedforms in the field: 1) vertical erosion planes covered with stoss-aggrading, vertical lamination, 2) overturned laminations at the preserved limit of erosion planes and 3) loss of stratification at erosion planes. These features are interpreted to indicate rapidly evolving velocities, undeveloped boundary layers, and a diffuse zone rather than a sharp border defining the flow-bed interface. Most experimental work on particle motion and erosion from the literature has been accomplished under constant conditions and with planar particle beds. Here, in order to reproduce the field observations, short-lived air-jets generated with a compressor-gun were shot into stratified beds of coarse particles (300 μm) of low density (1000 kg/m3). These "eroding jets" were filmed with a high speed camera and the deposits were sectioned after the experiments. The three natural types of erosion characteristics were experimentally generated. Vertical erosion planes are produced by small-scale, relatively sustained jets. Overturned laminations are due to a fluidization-like behavior at the erosion front of short-lived, strong jets, demonstrating that the fluid's velocity profile penetrates into the deposit. Loss of lamination seems related to the nature of erosion onset in packages. Rather than providing simple answers, the dataset

  16. In Situ Study on Current Density Distribution and Its Effect on Interfacial Reaction in a Soldering Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Lin; Zhao, Ning; Ma, Haitao; Zhao, Huijing; Huang, Mingliang

    2015-01-01

    The interfacial reaction in Cu/Sn/Cu solder joint during liquid-solid eletromigration (EM) was in situ studied using synchrotron radiation real-time imaging technology. The current density distribution in the solder joint was analyzed with the finite element method (FEM). The relationships among solder shape, current density distribution, Cu dissolution, and the formation and dissolution of interfacial intermetallic compound (IMC) were revealed. The current promoted dissolution of the cathode IMC and growth of the anode IMC and suppressed the dissolution of anode Cu. The change of interfacial IMC had little effect on the current density distribution; however, the dissolution of cathode Cu, which changed the solder shape, had a significant effect on the current density distribution. The dissolution of cathode Cu under forward current and cathode IMC under reverse current and the growth of anode IMC under forward current was faster where the current density was higher. The synchrotron radiation real-time imaging technology can not only in situ observe the change of solder shape, the dissolution and growth behavior of interfacial IMC and the dissolution behavior of substrate in a soldering process but also provide data needed for numerical simulation of current density distribution in a solder joint.

  17. Seasonal Variation in Sea Turtle Density and Abundance in the Southeast Florida Current and Surrounding Waters.

    PubMed

    Bovery, Caitlin M; Wyneken, Jeanette

    2015-01-01

    Assessment and management of sea turtle populations is often limited by a lack of available data pertaining to at-sea distributions at appropriate spatial and temporal resolutions. Assessing the spatial and temporal distributions of marine turtles in an open system poses both observational and analytical challenges due to the turtles' highly migratory nature. Surface counts of marine turtles in waters along the southern part of Florida's east coast were made in and adjacent to the southeast portion of the Florida Current using standard aerial surveys during 2011 and 2012 to assess their seasonal presence. This area is of particular concern for sea turtles as interest increases in offshore energy developments, specifically harnessing the power of the Florida Current. While it is understood that marine turtles use these waters, here we evaluate seasonal variation in sea turtle abundance and density over two years. Density of sea turtles observed within the study area ranged from 0.003 turtles km-2 in the winter of 2011 to 0.064 turtles km-2 in the spring of 2012. This assessment of marine turtles in the waters off southeast Florida quantifies their in-water abundance across seasons in this area to establish baselines and inform future management strategies of these protected species.

  18. Seasonal Variation in Sea Turtle Density and Abundance in the Southeast Florida Current and Surrounding Waters.

    PubMed

    Bovery, Caitlin M; Wyneken, Jeanette

    2015-01-01

    Assessment and management of sea turtle populations is often limited by a lack of available data pertaining to at-sea distributions at appropriate spatial and temporal resolutions. Assessing the spatial and temporal distributions of marine turtles in an open system poses both observational and analytical challenges due to the turtles' highly migratory nature. Surface counts of marine turtles in waters along the southern part of Florida's east coast were made in and adjacent to the southeast portion of the Florida Current using standard aerial surveys during 2011 and 2012 to assess their seasonal presence. This area is of particular concern for sea turtles as interest increases in offshore energy developments, specifically harnessing the power of the Florida Current. While it is understood that marine turtles use these waters, here we evaluate seasonal variation in sea turtle abundance and density over two years. Density of sea turtles observed within the study area ranged from 0.003 turtles km-2 in the winter of 2011 to 0.064 turtles km-2 in the spring of 2012. This assessment of marine turtles in the waters off southeast Florida quantifies their in-water abundance across seasons in this area to establish baselines and inform future management strategies of these protected species. PMID:26717520

  19. Seasonal Variation in Sea Turtle Density and Abundance in the Southeast Florida Current and Surrounding Waters

    PubMed Central

    Bovery, Caitlin M.; Wyneken, Jeanette

    2015-01-01

    Assessment and management of sea turtle populations is often limited by a lack of available data pertaining to at-sea distributions at appropriate spatial and temporal resolutions. Assessing the spatial and temporal distributions of marine turtles in an open system poses both observational and analytical challenges due to the turtles’ highly migratory nature. Surface counts of marine turtles in waters along the southern part of Florida’s east coast were made in and adjacent to the southeast portion of the Florida Current using standard aerial surveys during 2011 and 2012 to assess their seasonal presence. This area is of particular concern for sea turtles as interest increases in offshore energy developments, specifically harnessing the power of the Florida Current. While it is understood that marine turtles use these waters, here we evaluate seasonal variation in sea turtle abundance and density over two years. Density of sea turtles observed within the study area ranged from 0.003 turtles km-2 in the winter of 2011 to 0.064 turtles km-2 in the spring of 2012. This assessment of marine turtles in the waters off southeast Florida quantifies their in-water abundance across seasons in this area to establish baselines and inform future management strategies of these protected species. PMID:26717520

  20. Efficient evaluation of neuron populations receiving colored-noise current based on a refractory density method.

    PubMed

    Chizhov, Anton V; Graham, Lyle J

    2008-01-01

    The expected firing probability of a stochastic neuron is approximated by a function of the expected subthreshold membrane potential, for the case of colored noise. We propose this approximation in order to extend the recently proposed white noise model [A. V. Chizhov and L. J. Graham, Phys. Rev. E 75, 011924 (2007)] to the case of colored noise, applying a refractory density approach to conductance-based neurons. The uncoupled neurons of a single population receive a common input and are dispersed by the noise. Within the framework of the model the effect of noise is expressed by the so-called hazard function, which is the probability density for a single neuron to fire given the average membrane potential in the presence of a noise term. To derive the hazard function we solve the Kolmogorov-Fokker-Planck equation for a mean voltage-driven neuron fluctuating due to colored noisy current. We show that a sum of both a self-similar solution for the case of slow changing mean voltage and a frozen stationary solution for fast changing mean voltage gives a satisfactory approximation for the hazard function in the arbitrary case. We demonstrate the quantitative effect of a temporal correlation of noisy input on the neuron dynamics in the case of leaky integrate-and-fire and detailed conductance-based neurons in response to an injected current step.

  1. Seasonal variation in sea turtle density and abundance in the southeast Florida current and surrounding waters

    DOE PAGES

    Bovery, Caitlin M.; Wyneken, Jeanette

    2015-12-30

    Assessment and management of sea turtle populations is often limited by a lack of available data pertaining to at-sea distributions at appropriate spatial and temporal resolutions. Assessing the spatial and temporal distributions of marine turtles in an open system poses both observational and analytical challenges due to the turtles’ highly migratory nature. Surface counts of marine turtles in waters along the southern part of Florida’s east coast were made in and adjacent to the southeast portion of the Florida Current using standard aerial surveys during 2011 and 2012 to assess their seasonal presence. This area is of particular concern formore » sea turtles as interest increases in offshore energy developments, specifically harnessing the power of the Florida Current. While it is understood that marine turtles use these waters, here we evaluate seasonal variation in sea turtle abundance and density over two years. Density of sea turtles observed within the study area ranged from 0.003 turtles km-2 in the winter of 2011 to 0.064 turtles km-2 in the spring of 2012. As a result, this assessment of marine turtles in the waters off southeast Florida quantifies their in-water abundance across seasons in this area to establish baselines and inform future management strategies of these protected species.« less

  2. Seasonal variation in sea turtle density and abundance in the southeast Florida current and surrounding waters

    SciTech Connect

    Bovery, Caitlin M.; Wyneken, Jeanette

    2015-12-30

    Assessment and management of sea turtle populations is often limited by a lack of available data pertaining to at-sea distributions at appropriate spatial and temporal resolutions. Assessing the spatial and temporal distributions of marine turtles in an open system poses both observational and analytical challenges due to the turtles’ highly migratory nature. Surface counts of marine turtles in waters along the southern part of Florida’s east coast were made in and adjacent to the southeast portion of the Florida Current using standard aerial surveys during 2011 and 2012 to assess their seasonal presence. This area is of particular concern for sea turtles as interest increases in offshore energy developments, specifically harnessing the power of the Florida Current. While it is understood that marine turtles use these waters, here we evaluate seasonal variation in sea turtle abundance and density over two years. Density of sea turtles observed within the study area ranged from 0.003 turtles km-2 in the winter of 2011 to 0.064 turtles km-2 in the spring of 2012. As a result, this assessment of marine turtles in the waters off southeast Florida quantifies their in-water abundance across seasons in this area to establish baselines and inform future management strategies of these protected species.

  3. Inverse current source density method in two dimensions: inferring neural activation from multielectrode recordings.

    PubMed

    Łęski, Szymon; Pettersen, Klas H; Tunstall, Beth; Einevoll, Gaute T; Gigg, John; Wójcik, Daniel K

    2011-12-01

    The recent development of large multielectrode recording arrays has made it affordable for an increasing number of laboratories to record from multiple brain regions simultaneously. The development of analytical tools for array data, however, lags behind these technological advances in hardware. In this paper, we present a method based on forward modeling for estimating current source density from electrophysiological signals recorded on a two-dimensional grid using multi-electrode rectangular arrays. This new method, which we call two-dimensional inverse Current Source Density (iCSD 2D), is based upon and extends our previous one- and three-dimensional techniques. We test several variants of our method, both on surrogate data generated from a collection of Gaussian sources, and on model data from a population of layer 5 neocortical pyramidal neurons. We also apply the method to experimental data from the rat subiculum. The main advantages of the proposed method are the explicit specification of its assumptions, the possibility to include system-specific information as it becomes available, the ability to estimate CSD at the grid boundaries, and lower reconstruction errors when compared to the traditional approach. These features make iCSD 2D a substantial improvement over the approaches used so far and a powerful new tool for the analysis of multielectrode array data. We also provide a free GUI-based MATLAB toolbox to analyze and visualize our test data as well as user datasets.

  4. Current source density correlates of cerebellar Golgi and Purkinje cell responses to tactile input

    PubMed Central

    Tahon, Koen; Wijnants, Mike; De Schutter, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The overall circuitry of the cerebellar cortex has been known for over a century, but the function of many synaptic connections remains poorly characterized in vivo. We used a one-dimensional multielectrode probe to estimate the current source density (CSD) of Crus IIa in response to perioral tactile stimuli in anesthetized rats and to correlate current sinks and sources to changes in the spike rate of corecorded Golgi and Purkinje cells. The punctate stimuli evoked two distinct early waves of excitation (at <10 and ∼20 ms) associated with current sinks in the granular layer. The second wave was putatively of corticopontine origin, and its associated sink was located higher in the granular layer than the first trigeminal sink. The distinctive patterns of granular-layer sinks correlated with the spike responses of corecorded Golgi cells. In general, Golgi cell spike responses could be linearly reconstructed from the CSD profile. A dip in simple-spike activity of coregistered Purkinje cells correlated with a current source deep in the molecular layer, probably generated by basket cell synapses, interspersed between sparse early sinks presumably generated by synapses from granule cells. The late (>30 ms) enhancement of simple-spike activity in Purkinje cells was characterized by the absence of simultaneous sinks in the granular layer and by the suppression of corecorded Golgi cell activity, pointing at inhibition of Golgi cells by Purkinje axon collaterals as a likely mechanism of late Purkinje cell excitation. PMID:21228303

  5. Spatially resolved determination of the short-circuit current density of silicon solar cells via lock-in thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Fertig, Fabian Greulich, Johannes; Rein, Stefan

    2014-05-19

    We present a spatially resolved method to determine the short-circuit current density of crystalline silicon solar cells by means of lock-in thermography. The method utilizes the property of crystalline silicon solar cells that the short-circuit current does not differ significantly from the illuminated current under moderate reverse bias. Since lock-in thermography images locally dissipated power density, this information is exploited to extract values of spatially resolved current density under short-circuit conditions. In order to obtain an accurate result, one or two illuminated lock-in thermography images and one dark lock-in thermography image need to be recorded. The method can be simplified in a way that only one image is required to generate a meaningful short-circuit current density map. The proposed method is theoretically motivated, and experimentally validated for monochromatic illumination in comparison to the reference method of light-beam induced current.

  6. Sparse cortical current density imaging in motor potentials induced by finger movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Lei; Ni, Ying; Sweeney, John; He, Bin

    2011-06-01

    Predominant components in electro- or magneto-encephalography (EEG/MEG) are scalp projections of synchronized neuronal electrical activity distributed over cortical structures. Reconstruction of cortical sources underlying EEG/MEG can thus be achieved with the use of the cortical current density (CCD) model. We have developed a sparse electromagnetic source imaging method based on the CCD model, named as the variation-based cortical current density (VB-SCCD) algorithm, and have shown that it has much enhanced performance in reconstructing extended cortical sources in simulations (Ding 2009 Phys. Med. Biol. 54 2683-97). The present study aims to evaluate the performance of VB-SCCD, for the first time, using experimental data obtained from six participants. The results indicate that the VB-SCCD algorithm is able to successfully reveal spatially distributed cortical sources behind motor potentials induced by visually cued repetitive finger movements, and their dynamic patterns, with millisecond resolution. These findings of motor sources and cortical systems are supported by the physiological knowledge of motor control and evidence from various neuroimaging studies with similar experiments. Furthermore, our present results indicate the improvement of cortical source resolvability of VB-SCCD, as compared with two other classical algorithms. The proposed solver embedded in VB-SCCD is able to handle large-scale computational problems, which makes the use of high-density CCD models possible and, thus, reduces model misspecifications. The present results suggest that VB-SCCD provides high resolution source reconstruction capability and is a promising tool for studying complicated dynamic systems of brain activity for basic neuroscience and clinical neuropsychiatric research.

  7. Modeling of electrochemical machining with the use of a curvilinear electrode and a stepwise dependence of the current efficiency on the current density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotlyar, L. M.; Minazetdinov, N. M.

    2016-01-01

    An analytical solution of the problem of electrochemical machining of metals by a curvilinear cathode tool with allowance for a discontinuous function that describes the dependence of the current efficiency on the current density is obtained. According to the hydrodynamic interpretation, the original problem reduces to the problem of the theory of ideal fluid flows with a free surface. It is demonstrated that the use of the proposed dependence of the current efficiency on the current density ensures the existence of three domains on an unknown treated surface; these domains have different laws of the distribution of the charge fraction spent on metal dissolution. Results calculated for various particular cases are presented.

  8. Improved critical current density of MgB2--carbon nanotubes composite.

    PubMed

    Shekhar, Chandra; Giri, Rajiv; Malik, S K; Srivastav, O N

    2007-06-01

    In the present study, we report a systematic study of doping/admixing of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in different concentrations in MgB2. The composite material corresponding to MgB2-x at.% CNTs (35 at.% > or = x > or = 0 at.%) have been prepared by solid-state reaction at ambient pressure. All the samples in the present investigation have been subjected to structural/microstructural characterization employing XRD, Scanning electron microscopic (SEM), and Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) techniques. The magnetization measurements were performed by Physical property measurement system (PPMS) and electrical transport measurements have been done by the four-probe technique. The microstructural investigations reveal the formation of MgB2-carbon nanotube composites. A CNT connecting the MgB2 grains may enhance critical current density due to its size (approximately 5-20 nm diameter) compatible with coherence length of MgB2 (approximately 5-6 nm) and ballistic transport current carrying capability along the tube axis. The transport critical current density (Jct) of MgB2 samples with varying CNTs concentration have been found to vary significantly e.g., Jct of the MgB2 sample with 10 at.% CNT addition is approximately 2.3 x 10(3) A/cm2 and its value for MgB2 sample without CNT addition is approximately 7.2 x 102 A/cm2 at 20 K. In order to study the flux pinning effect of CNTs doping/ admixing in MgB2, the evaluation of intragrain critical current density (JJ) has been carried out through magnetic measurements on the fine powdered version of the as synthesized samples. The optimum result on Jc is obtained for 10 at.% CNTs admixed MgB2 sample at 5 K, the Jc reaches approximately 5.2 x 10(6) A/cm2 in self field, -1.6 x 10(6) A/cm2 at 1 T, approximately 2.9 x 10(5) A/cm2 at 2.6 T, and approximately 3.9 x 10(4) A/cm2 at 4 T. The high value of intragrain Jc in 10 at.% CNTs admixed MgB2 superconductor has been attributed to the incorporation of CNTs into the crystal matrix of

  9. Ion Current Density Study of the NASA-300M and NASA-457Mv2 Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Wensheng; Shastry, Rohit; Herman, Daniel A.; Soulas, George C.; Kamhawi, Hani

    2012-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center is developing a Hall thruster in the 15-50 kW range to support future NASA missions. As a part of the process, the performance and plume characteristics of the NASA-300M, a 20-kW Hall thruster, and the NASA-457Mv2, a 50-kW Hall thruster, were evaluated. The collected data will be used to improve the fidelity of the JPL modeling tool, Hall2De, which will then be used to aid the design of the 15-50 kW Hall thruster. This paper gives a detailed overview of the Faraday probe portion of the plume characterization study. The Faraday probe in this study is a near-field probe swept radially at many axial locations downstream of the thruster exit plane. Threshold-based integration limits with threshold values of 1/e, 1/e2, and 1/e3 times the local peak current density are tried for the purpose of ion current integration and divergence angle calculation. The NASA-300M is operated at 7 conditions and the NASA-457Mv2 at 14 conditions. These conditions span discharge voltages of 200 to 500 V and discharge power of 10 to 50 kW. The ion current density profiles of the near-field plume originating from the discharge channel are discovered to strongly resemble Gaussian distributions. A novel analysis approach involving a form of ray tracing is used to determine an effective point of origin for the near-field plume. In the process of performing this analysis, definitive evidence is discovered that showed the near-field plume is bending towards the thruster centerline.

  10. Ion Current Density Study of the NASA-300M and NASA-457Mv2 Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Wensheng; Shastry, Rohit; Herman, Daniel A.; Soulas, George C.; Kamhawi, Hani

    2012-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center is developing a Hall thruster in the 15-50 kW range to support future NASA missions. As a part of the process, the performance and plume characteristics of the NASA-300M, a 20-kW Hall thruster, and the NASA-457Mv2, a 50-kW Hall thruster, were evaluated. The collected data will be used to improve the fidelity of the JPL modeling tool, Hall2De, which will then be used to aid the design of the 15-50 kW Hall thruster. This paper gives a detailed overview of the Faraday probe portion of the plume characterization study. The Faraday probe in this study is a near-field probe swept radially at many axial locations downstream of the thruster exit plane. Threshold-based integration limits with threshold values of 1/e, 1/e(sup 2), and 1/e(sup 3) times the local peak current density are tried for the purpose of ion current integration and divergence angle calculation. The NASA-300M is operated at 7 conditions and the NASA-457Mv2 at 14 conditions. These conditions span discharge voltages of 200 to 500 V and discharge power of 10 to 50 kW. The ion current density profiles of the near-field plume originating from the discharge channel are discovered to strongly resemble Gaussian distributions. A novel analysis approach involving a form of ray tracing is used to determine an effective point of origin for the near-field plume. In the process of performing this analysis, definitive evidence is discovered that showed the near-field plume is bending towards the thruster centerline.

  11. Plasma Shape and Current Density Profile Control in Advanced Tokamak Operating Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wenyu

    The need for new sources of energy is expected to become a critical problem within the next few decades. Nuclear fusion has sufficient energy density to potentially supply the world population with its increasing energy demands. The tokamak is a magnetic confinement device used to achieve controlled fusion reactions. Experimental fusion technology has now reached a level where tokamaks are able to produce about as much energy as is expended in heating the fusion fuel. The next step towards the realization of a nuclear fusion tokamak power plant is ITER, which will be capable of exploring advanced tokamak (AT) modes, characterized by a high fusion gain and plasma stability. The extreme requirements of the advanced modes motivates researchers to improve the modeling of the plasma response as well as the design of feedback controllers. This dissertation focuses on several magnetic and kinetic control problems, including the plasma current, position and shape control, and data-driven and first-principles-driven modeling and control of plasma current density profile and the normalized plasma pressure ratio betaN. The plasma is confined within the vacuum vessel by an external electromagnetic field, produced primarily by toroidal and poloidal field coils. The outermost closed plasma surface or plasma boundary is referred to as the shape of the plasma. A central characteristic of AT plasma regimes is an extreme elongated shape. The equilibrium among the electromagnetic forces acting on an elongated plasma is unstable. Moreover, the tokamak performance is improved if the plasma is located in close proximity to the torus wall, which guarantees an efficient use of available volume. As a consequence, feedback control of the plasma position and shape is necessary. In this dissertation, an Hinfinity-based, multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) controller for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is developed, which is used to control the plasma position, shape, and X

  12. Pyroclastic Density Current Hazards in the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, B. D.; Gravley, D.; Clarke, A. B.; Bloomberg, S. H.

    2012-12-01

    The most dangerous phenomena associated with phreatomagmatic eruptions are dilute pyroclastic density currents (PDCs). These are turbulent, ground-hugging sediment gravity currents that travel radially away from the explosive center at up to 100 m/s. The Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF), New Zealand, consists of approximately 50 eruptive centers, at least 39 of which have had explosive phreatomagmatic behaviour. A primary concern for future AVF eruptions is the impact of dilute PDCs in and around the Auckland area. We combine field observations from the Maungataketake tuff ring, which has one of the best exposures of dilute PDC deposits in the AVF, with a quantitative model for flow of and sedimentation from a radially-spreading, steady-state, depth-averaged dilute PDC (modified from Bursik and Woods, 1996 Bull Volcanol 58:175-193). The model allows us to explore the depositional mechanisms, macroscale current dynamics, and potential impact on societal infrastructure of dilute PDCs from a future AVF eruption. The lower portion of the Maungataketake tuff ring pyroclastic deposits contains trunks, limbs and fragments of Podocarp trees (<1 m in diameter) that were blown down by dilute PDCs up to 0.7-0.9 km from the vent. Beyond this trees were encapsulated and buried in growth position up to the total runout distance of 1.6-1.8 km. This observation suggests that the dynamic pressure of the current quickly dropped as it travelled away from source. Using the tree diameter and yield strength of the wood, we calculate that dynamic pressures (Pdyn) of 10-75 kPa are necessary to topple trees of this size and composition. Thus the two main criteria for model success based on the field evidence include (a) Pdyn must be >10 kPa nearer than 0.9 km to the vent, and <10 kPa beyond 0.9 km, and (b) the total run-out distance must be between 1.6 and 1.8 km. Model results suggest the two main forces controlling the runout distance and Pdyn over the extent of the current are

  13. Invariance in current dipole moment density across brain structures and species: Physiological constraint for neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Shingo; Okada, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Although anatomical constraints have been shown to be effective for MEG and EEG inverse solutions, there are still no effective physiological constraints. Strength of the current generator is normally described by the moment of an equivalent current dipole Q. This value is quite variable since it depends on size of active tissue. In contrast, the current dipole moment density q, defined as Q per surface area of active cortex, is independent of size of active tissue. Here we studied whether the value of q has a maximum in physiological conditions across brain structures and species. We determined the value due to the primary neuronal current (qprimary) alone, correcting for distortions due to measurement conditions and secondary current sources at boundaries separating regions of differing electrical conductivity. The values were in the same range for turtle cerebellum (0.56–1.48 nAm/mm2), guinea pig hippocampus (0.30–1.34 nAm/mm2), and swine neocortex (0.18–1.63 nAm/mm2), rat neocortex (~2.2 nAm/mm2), monkey neocortex (~0.40 nAm/mm2) and human neocortex (0.16–0.77 nAm/mm2). Thus, there appears to be a maximum value across the brain structures and species (1–2 nAm/mm2). The empirical values closely matched the theoretical values obtained with our independently validated neural network model (1.6–2.8 nAm/mm2 for initial spike and 0.7–3.1 nAm/mm2 for burst), indicating that the apparent invariance is not coincidental. Our model study shows that a single maximum value may exist across a wide range of brain structures and species, varying in neuron density, due to fundamental electrical properties of neurons. The maximum value of qprimary may serve as an effective physiological constraint for MEG/EEG inverse solutions. PMID:25680520

  14. Flow Transformation in Pyroclastic Density Currents: Entrainment and Granular Dynamics during the 2006 eruption of Tungurahua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufek, J.; Benage, M. C.; Geist, D.; Harpp, K. S.

    2013-12-01

    Pyroclastic density currents are ground hugging flows composed of hot gases, fragments of juvenile magmatic material, and entrained clasts from the conduit or the edifice over which the flows have traveled. The interior of these flows are opaque to observation due to their large ash content, but recent investigations have highlighted that there are likely strong gradients in particle concentration and segregation of particle sizes in these particle-laden gravity currents. Pyroclastic density currents refer to a broad range of phenomena from dense flows in which the dynamics are dominated by frictional interaction between particles (dense granular flows), to gas fluidized flows, to dilute flows dominated by particle-gas turbulent interaction. However, abrupt flow transformation (e.g. from dense to dilute pyroclastic density currents) can arise due to energy exchange across multiple length scales and phases, and understanding these flow transformations is important in delineating the entrainment and erosion history of these flows, interpretations of their deposits, and in better understanding the hazards they present. During the 2006 eruption of Tungurahua, Ecuador numerous, dense pyroclastic density currents descended the volcano as result of boiling-over or low column collapse eruptions. The deposits of these flows typically have pronounced snouts and levees, and are often dominated by large, clasts (meter scale in some locations). There is an exceptional observational record of these flows and their deposits, permitting detailed field constraints of their dynamics. A particularly interesting set of flows occurred on Aug. 17, 2006 during the paroxysmal phase of the eruption that descended the slope of the volcano, filled in the river channel of the Chambo river, removing much of the larger clasts from the flow, and resulting in a dilute ';surge' that transported finer material across the channel and uphill forming dune features on the opposite bank of the river. We

  15. Erosion and entrainment of snow and ice by pyroclastic density currents: some outstanding questions (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walder, J. S.

    2010-12-01

    A pyroclastic density current moving over snow is likely to transform to a lahar if the pyroclasts incorporate enough (melting) snow and meltwater to bring the bulk water content of the mixture to about 35% by volume. However, the processes by which such a mixture forms are still not well understood. Walder (Bull. Volcanol., v. 62, 2000) showed experimentally the existence of an erosion mechanism that functions even in the absence of relative shear motion between pyroclasts and snow substrate: a portion of the snow melted by a blanket of pyroclasts is vaporized; the flux of water vapor upward through the pyroclasts may be enough to fluidize the pyroclasts, which then convect, rapidly scour the snow substrate and transform into a slurry. But these experiments do not tell us how moving pyroclasts would erode snow, and simply releasing a hot grain flow over a snow surface in the lab gives misleading results owing to improper scaling of τ/σ , the ratio of the shear stress τ exerted by the pyroclastic flow to the shear strength σ of snow. There seems to be no way around this problem for experiments with actual snow. However, it may be possible to circumvent the scaling problem by replacing the snow substrate by a gas-fluidized particle bed: by varying the gas flux, the apparent shear strength of the particle bed can be varied. Such an investigation of erosional processes could be done at room temperature. Snow-avalanche studies (for example, Gauer and Issler, Ann. Glaciol. v. 38, 2003) may provide some insight into snow erosion by a pyroclastic density current. Snow is eroded at the base of a dense snow avalanche by abrasion, particle impacts, and—at the avalanche head—by plowing and a “blasting” mechanism associated with compression of the snowpack and expulsion of pore fluid (air). Erosion at the avalanche head seems to be particularly important. Similar processes are likely to occur when the over-riding flow comprises hot grains. The laboratory release of

  16. Observations of currents and density structure across a buoyant plume front

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gelfenbaum, G.; Stumpf, R.P.

    1993-01-01

    Observations of the Mobile Bay, Alabama, plume during a flood event in April 1991 reveal significant differences in the current field on either side of a front associated with the buoyant plume. During a strong southeasterly wind, turbid, low salinity water from Mobile Bay was pushed through an opening in the west side of the ebb-tidal delta and moved parallel to the coast. A stable front developed between the low salinity water of the buoyant plume (11???) and the high salinity coastal water (>23???) that was being forced landward by the prevailing winds. Despite the shallow water depth of 6 m, measurements of currents, temperature, and salinity show large shears and density gradients in both the vertical and the horizontal directions. At a station outside of the buoyant plume, currents at 0.5 m and 1.5 m below the surface were in the same direction as the wind. Inside the plume, however, currents at 0.5 m below the surface were parallel to the coast, 45??, off the direction of the wind and the magnitude was 45% larger than the magnitude of the surface currents outside the plume. Beneath the level of the plume, the currents were identical to the wind-driven currents in the ambient water south of the front. Our observations suggest that the wind-driven surface currents of the ambient water converged with the buoyant plume at the front and were subducted beneath the plume. The motion of the ambient coastal surface water was in the direction of the local wind stress, however, the motion of the plume had no northerly component of motion. The plume also did not show any flow toward the front, suggesting a balance between the northerly component of wind stress and the southerly component of buoyant spreading. In addition, the motion of the plume did not appear to affect the motion of the underlying ambient water, suggesting a lack of mixing between the two waters. ?? 1993 Estuarine Research Federation.

  17. Excessive magnetic field flux density distribution from overhead isolated powerline conductors due to neutral line current.

    PubMed

    Netzer, Moshe

    2013-06-01

    Overhead isolated powerline conductors (hereinafter: "OIPLC") are the most compact form for distributing low voltage currents. From the known physics of magnetic field emission from 3-phase power lines, it is expected that excellent symmetry of the 120° shifted phase currents and where compact configuration of the 3-phase+neutral line exist, the phase current vectorial summation of the magnetic field flux density (MFFD) is expected to be extremely low. However, despite this estimation, an unexpectedly very high MFFD was found in at least three towns in Israel. This paper explains the reasons leading to high MFFD emissions from compact OIPLC and the proper technique to fix it. Analysis and measurement results had led to the failure hypothsis of neutral line poor connection design and poor grounding design of the HV-LV utility transformers. The paper elaborates on the low MFFD exposure level setup by the Israeli Environmental Protection Office which adopted a rather conservative precaution principal exposure level (2 mG averaged over 24 h).

  18. Large critical current density improvement in Bi-2212 wires through the groove-rolling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malagoli, A.; Bernini, C.; Braccini, V.; Romano, G.; Putti, M.; Chaud, X.; Debray, F.

    2013-04-01

    Recently there has been a growing interest in Bi-2212 superconductor round wire for high magnetic field use despite the fact that an increase of the critical current is still needed to boost its successful use in such applications. Recent studies have demonstrated that the main obstacle to current flow, especially in long wires, is the residual porosity inside these powder-in-tube processed conductors that develops from bubble agglomeration when the Bi-2212 melts. In this work we tried to overcome this issue affecting the wire densification by changing the deformation process. Here we show the effects of groove rolling versus the drawing process on the critical current density JC and on the microstructure. In particular, groove-rolled multifilamentary wires show a JC increased by a factor of about 3 with respect to drawn wires prepared with the same Bi-2212 powder and architecture. We think that this approach in the deformation process is able to produce the required improvements both because the superconducting properties are enhanced and because it makes the fabrication process faster and cheaper.

  19. Air Entrainment and Thermal Evolution of Pyroclastic Density Currents at Tungurahua, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benage, M. C.; Dufek, J.; Mothes, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    The entrainment of air into pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) impacts the thermal profile and evolution of the current. However, the associated hazards and opaqueness of PDCs make it difficult to discern internal dynamics and entrainment through direct observations. In this work, we use a three-dimensional multiphase Eulerian-Eulerian-Lagrangian (EEL) model, deposit descriptions, and pyroclast field data, such as paleomagnetic and rind thickness, to study the entrainment efficiency and thus the thermal history of PDCs down the Juive Grande quebrada during the August 16-17th 2006 eruption of Tungurahua volcano. We conclude that 1) the efficient entrainment of ambient air cools the nose and upper portion of the PDCs by 30-60% of the original temperature, 2) PDCs with an initial temperature of 727 °C are on average more efficient at entraining ambient air than PDCs with an initial temperature of 327 °C, 3) the channelized PDCs develop a particle concentration gradient with a concentrated bed load region and suspended load region that leads to a large vertical temperature gradient, and 4) observations and pyroclast temperatures and textures suggest that the PDCs had temperatures greater than 327 °C in the bed load region while the upper, exterior portion of the currents cooled down to temperatures less than 100 °C. By combining field data and numerical models, the structure and dynamics of a PDC can be deduced for these relatively common small volume PDCs.

  20. A HIGH CURRENT DENSITY LI+ ALUMINO-SILICATE ION SOURCE FOR TARGET HEATING EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Prabir K.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Kwan, Joe W.; Seidl, Peter A.; Waldron, William L.

    2011-03-23

    The NDCX-II accelerator for target heating experiments has been designed to use a large diameter ({approx_equal} 10.9 cm) Li{sup +} doped alumino-silicate source with a pulse duration of 0.5 {micro}s, and beam current of {approx_equal} 93 mA. Characterization of a prototype lithium alumino-silicate sources is presented. Using 6.35mm diameter prototype emitters (coated on a {approx_equal} 75% porous tungsten substrate), at a temperature of {approx_equal} 1275 C, a space-charge limited Li{sup +} beam current density of {approx_equal} 1 mA/cm{sup 2} was measured. At higher extraction voltage, the source is emission limited at around {approx_equal} 1.5 mA/cm{sup 2}, weakly dependent on the applied voltage. The lifetime of the ion source is {approx_equal} 50 hours while pulsing the extraction voltage at 2 to 3 times per minute. Measurements show that the life time of the ion source does not depend only on beam current extraction, and lithium loss may be dominated by neutral loss or by evaporation. The life time of a source is around {ge} 10 hours in a DC mode extraction, and the extracted charge is {approx_equal} 75% of the available Li in the sample. It is inferred that pulsed heating may increase the life time of a source.

  1. Distribution characteristics of coronal electric current density as an indicator for the occurrence of a solar flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jihye; Magara, Tetsuya; Inoue, Satoshi; Kubo, Yuki; Nishizuka, Naoto

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we investigate the distribution characteristics of the coronal electric current density in a flare-producing active region (AR12158; SOL2014-09-10) by reconstructing nonlinear force-free (NLFF) fields from photospheric magnetic field data. A time series of NLFF fields shows the spatial distribution and its temporal development of coronal current density in this active region. A fractal dimensional analysis shows that a concentrated coronal current forms a structure of fractal spatiality. Furthermore, the distribution function of coronal current density is featured with a double power-law profile, and the value of electric current density at the breaking point of a double power-law fitting function shows a noticeable time variation toward the onset of an X-class flare. We discuss that this quantity will be a useful indicator for the occurrence of a flare.

  2. Soft x-ray camera for internal shape and current density measurements on a noncircular tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Fonck, R.J.; Jaehnig, K.P.; Powell, E.T.; Reusch, M.; Roney, P.; Simon, M.P.

    1988-05-01

    Soft x-ray measurements of the internal plasma flux surface shaped in principle allow a determination of the plasma current density distribution, and provide a necessary monitor of the degree of internal elongation of tokamak plasmas with a noncircular cross section. A two-dimensional, tangentially viewing, soft x-ray pinhole camera has been fabricated to provide internal shape measurements on the PBX-M tokamak. It consists of a scintillator at the focal plane of a foil-filtered pinhole camera, which is, in turn, fiber optically coupled to an intensified framing video camera (/DELTA/t />=/ 3 msec). Automated data acquisition is performed on a stand-alone image-processing system, and data archiving and retrieval takes place on an optical disk video recorder. The entire diagnostic is controlled via a PDP-11/73 microcomputer. The derivation of the polodial emission distribution from the measured image is done by fitting to model profiles. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  3. High-current-density field emission display fabricated from single-walled carbon nanotube electron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, P.; Shang, X. F.; Ma, Y. P.; Zhou, J. J.; Gu, Z. Q.; Li, Z. H.; Xu, Y. B.; Wang, M.

    2008-06-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes can be used as electron sources in the process of field emission, and have great potential for practical application of the field emission display (FED) panels with large screen size. We fabricated a FED using the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as the cathode by the screen-printing process. Test showed that the SWNTs emitters exhibit excellent macroscopic emission properties. It has low turn-on voltage (2.7 V/μ m) and high brightness, with a high current density of good uniformity and stability. It was observed that the field emission qualitatively follows the conventional Fowler Nordheim (F N) theory, and aging treatment played an important role in improving the image uniformity and stability. Compared to other complicated processes, the simple fabrication using screen-printing process seems to be advantageous for practical application.

  4. Measurements of beam current density and proton fraction of a permanent-magnet microwave ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Waldmann, Ole; Ludewigt, Bernhard

    2011-11-15

    A permanent-magnet microwave ion source has been built for use in a high-yield, compact neutron generator. The source has been designed to produce up to 100 mA of deuterium and tritium ions. The electron-cyclotron resonance condition is met at a microwave frequency of 2.45 GHz and a magnetic field strength of 87.5 mT. The source operates at a low hydrogen gas pressure of about 0.15 Pa. Hydrogen beams with a current density of 40 mA/cm{sup 2} have been extracted at a microwave power of 450 W. The dependence of the extracted proton beam fraction on wall materials and operating parameters was measured and found to vary from 45% for steel to 95% for boron nitride as a wall liner material.

  5. High Current Density and Low Thermal Conductivity of Atomically Thin Semimetallic WTe2.

    PubMed

    Mleczko, Michal J; Xu, Runjie Lily; Okabe, Kye; Kuo, Hsueh-Hui; Fisher, Ian R; Wong, H-S Philip; Nishi, Yoshio; Pop, Eric

    2016-08-23

    Two-dimensional (2D) semimetals beyond graphene have been relatively unexplored in the atomically thin limit. Here, we introduce a facile growth mechanism for semimetallic WTe2 crystals and then fabricate few-layer test structures while carefully avoiding degradation from exposure to air. Low-field electrical measurements of 80 nm to 2 μm long devices allow us to separate intrinsic and contact resistance, revealing metallic response in the thinnest encapsulated and stable WTe2 devices studied to date (3-20 layers thick). High-field electrical measurements and electrothermal modeling demonstrate that ultrathin WTe2 can carry remarkably high current density (approaching 50 MA/cm(2), higher than most common interconnect metals) despite a very low thermal conductivity (of the order ∼3 Wm(-1) K(-1)). These results suggest several pathways for air-stable technological viability of this layered semimetal.

  6. Low-current-density LED-pumped Nd:YAG laser using a solid cylindrical reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, G. I.; Kiang, Y. C.

    1974-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of Nd:YAG lasers is theoretically analyzed. In experiments, an array of twenty GaAlAs diodes was used as the pumping light source for a Nd:YAG laser. An index-matching glass half-cylinder was used instead of the conventional hollow metal reflector. The refractive index of the half-cylinder was 1.8, which matched the refractive index of the Nd:YAG rod. A maximum CW output power of 27 mW at a current density of 207 A/sq cm was achieved using this glass half-cylinder, while 6.7 mW were obtained when a hollow metal reflector was used.

  7. High Current Density and Low Thermal Conductivity of Atomically Thin Semimetallic WTe2.

    PubMed

    Mleczko, Michal J; Xu, Runjie Lily; Okabe, Kye; Kuo, Hsueh-Hui; Fisher, Ian R; Wong, H-S Philip; Nishi, Yoshio; Pop, Eric

    2016-08-23

    Two-dimensional (2D) semimetals beyond graphene have been relatively unexplored in the atomically thin limit. Here, we introduce a facile growth mechanism for semimetallic WTe2 crystals and then fabricate few-layer test structures while carefully avoiding degradation from exposure to air. Low-field electrical measurements of 80 nm to 2 μm long devices allow us to separate intrinsic and contact resistance, revealing metallic response in the thinnest encapsulated and stable WTe2 devices studied to date (3-20 layers thick). High-field electrical measurements and electrothermal modeling demonstrate that ultrathin WTe2 can carry remarkably high current density (approaching 50 MA/cm(2), higher than most common interconnect metals) despite a very low thermal conductivity (of the order ∼3 Wm(-1) K(-1)). These results suggest several pathways for air-stable technological viability of this layered semimetal. PMID:27434729

  8. Critical current density measurement of striated multifilament-coated conductors using a scanning Hall probe microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Fen; Kochat, Mehdi; Majkic, Goran; Selvamanickam, Venkat

    2016-08-01

    In this paper the authors succeeded in measuring the critical current density ({J}{{c}}) of multifilament-coated conductors (CCs) with thin filaments as low as 0.25 mm using the scanning hall probe microscope (SHPM) technique. A new iterative method of data analysis is developed to make the calculation of {J}{{c}} for thin filaments possible, even without a very small scan distance. The authors also discussed in detail the advantage and limitation of the iterative method using both simulation and experiment results. The results of the new method correspond well with the traditional fast Fourier transform method where this is still applicable. However, the new method is applicable for the filamentized CCs in much wider measurement conditions such as with thin filament and a large scan distance, thus overcoming the barrier for application of the SHPM technique on {J}{{c}} measurement of long filamentized CCs with narrow filaments.

  9. High-brightness, high-current density cathode for induction linac FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, W.C.; Chen, Y.-J.; Nexsen, W.E.; Green, M.C.; Miram, G.; Nordquist, A.V.

    1988-09-28

    We have recently initiated an investigation to determine the intrinsic operating limits of an osmium coated dispenser cathode for use in free-electron lasers (FELs) driven by an induction linear accelerator. The experimental apparatus consists of a 5.1-cm-diam osmium coated dispenser cathode driven by a 250-kV, 10-..cap omega.., 35-ns Blumlein pulse line. The pepper pot technique is used to measure intrinsic cathode brightness and uniformity. Recent measurements have yielded brightness values exceeding 1 /times/ 10/sup 10/ A/m/sup 2/rad/sup 2/ for current densities up to 140 A/cm/sup 2/. We have also obtained quantitative data on cathode poisoning caused by a number of chemical agents of interest in the induction linac environment. 7 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Current guidelines for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in therapy and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Subedi, Bishnu H; Joshi, Parag H; Jones, Steven R; Martin, Seth S; Blaha, Michael J; Michos, Erin D

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have suggested that a significant risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Therefore, increasing HDL-C with therapeutic agents has been considered an attractive strategy. In the prestatin era, fibrates and niacin monotherapy, which cause modest increases in HDL-C, reduced ASCVD events. Since their introduction, statins have become the cornerstone of lipoprotein therapy, the benefits of which are primarily attributed to decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Findings from several randomized trials involving niacin or cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors have challenged the concept that a quantitative elevation of plasma HDL-C will uniformly translate into ASCVD benefits. Consequently, the HDL, or more correctly, HDL-C hypothesis has become more controversial. There are no clear guidelines thus far for targeting HDL-C or HDL due to lack of solid outcomes data for HDL specific therapies. HDL-C levels are only one marker of HDL out of its several structural or functional properties. Novel approaches are ongoing in developing and assessing agents that closely mimic the structure of natural HDL or replicate its various functions, for example, reverse cholesterol transport, vasodilation, anti-inflammation, or inhibition of platelet aggregation. Potential new approaches like HDL infusions, delipidated HDL, liver X receptor agonists, Apo A-I upregulators, Apo A mimetics, and gene therapy are in early phase trials. This review will outline current therapies and describe future directions for HDL therapeutics. PMID:24748800

  11. Current guidelines for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in therapy and future directions.

    PubMed

    Subedi, Bishnu H; Joshi, Parag H; Jones, Steven R; Martin, Seth S; Blaha, Michael J; Michos, Erin D

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have suggested that a significant risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Therefore, increasing HDL-C with therapeutic agents has been considered an attractive strategy. In the prestatin era, fibrates and niacin monotherapy, which cause modest increases in HDL-C, reduced ASCVD events. Since their introduction, statins have become the cornerstone of lipoprotein therapy, the benefits of which are primarily attributed to decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Findings from several randomized trials involving niacin or cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors have challenged the concept that a quantitative elevation of plasma HDL-C will uniformly translate into ASCVD benefits. Consequently, the HDL, or more correctly, HDL-C hypothesis has become more controversial. There are no clear guidelines thus far for targeting HDL-C or HDL due to lack of solid outcomes data for HDL specific therapies. HDL-C levels are only one marker of HDL out of its several structural or functional properties. Novel approaches are ongoing in developing and assessing agents that closely mimic the structure of natural HDL or replicate its various functions, for example, reverse cholesterol transport, vasodilation, anti-inflammation, or inhibition of platelet aggregation. Potential new approaches like HDL infusions, delipidated HDL, liver X receptor agonists, Apo A-I upregulators, Apo A mimetics, and gene therapy are in early phase trials. This review will outline current therapies and describe future directions for HDL therapeutics.

  12. Experimental study on magnetically insulated transmission line electrode surface evolution process under MA/cm current density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, PengFei; Hu, Yang; Yang, HaiLiang; Sun, Jiang; Wang, Liangping; Cong, Peitian; Qiu, Aici

    2016-03-01

    The design of high-current density magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL) is a difficult problem of current large-scale Z-pinch device. In particular, a thorough understanding of the MITL electrode surface evolution process under high current density is lacking. On the "QiangGuang-I" accelerator, the load area possesses a low inductance short-circuit structure with a diameter of 2.85 mm at the cathode, and three reflux columns with a diameter of 3 mm and uniformly distributed circumference at the anode. The length of the high density MITL area is 20 mm. A laser interferometer is used to assess and analyze the state of the MITL cathode and anode gap, and their evolution process under high current density. Experimental results indicate that evident current loss is not observed in the current density area at pulse leading edge, and peak when the surface current density reaches MA/cm. Analysis on electrode surface working conditions indicates that when the current leading edge is at 71.5% of the peak, the total evaporation of MITL cathode structure can be realized by energy deposition caused by ohmic heating. The electrode state changes, and diffusion conditions are reflected in the laser interferometer image. The MITL cathode area mainly exists in metal vapor form. The metal vapor density in the cathode central region is higher than the upper limit of laser penetration density (˜4 × 1021/cm3), with an expansion velocity of ˜0.96 km/s. The metal vapor density in the electrode outer area may lead to evident distortion of fringes, and its expansion velocity is faster than that in the center area (1.53 km/s).

  13. Microstructure, critical current density and trapped field experiments in IG-processed Y-123

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralidhar, M.; Ide, N.; Koblischka, M. R.; Diko, P.; Inoue, K.; Murakami, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we adapted the top-seeded infiltration growth ‘IG’ technique and produced several YBa2Cu3O y ‘Y-123’ samples with an addition of Y2BaCuO5 ‘Y-211’ secondary phase particles with varying sizes by the sintering process and the ball milling technique. For the first set of samples, Y-211 disks were sintered at temperatures ranging between 900 °C and 1100 °C and were used for the production of Y-123 material by the IG process. Magnetization measurements showed a sharp superconducting transition with an onset T c at around 92 K, irrespective of the sintering temperature. However, the trapped field and critical current density (J c) values were dependent on the sintering temperature and it was found that the best temperature is around 925 °C. Further, the trapped field distribution measurements at 77 K indicated that all samples are of single grain nature. The highest trapped field was recorded around 0.31 T at 77 K for the Y-123 sample with 20 mm in diameter and 5 mm thickness produced by Y-211 pre-from around 925 °C. On the other hand, a second set of samples Y-211 were controlled by ball milling technique combined with an optimized slow cooling process. As a result, the critical current density (J c) at 77 K and zero field was determined to be 225 kA cm-2. The improved performance of the Y-123 material can be understood in terms of homogeneous distribution of fine secondary phase particles which is demonstrated by AFM micrographs.

  14. Scaling laws for the critical current density of NbN films in high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hampshire, D.P. . Dept. of Physics); Gray, K.E.; Kampwirth, R.T. )

    1992-08-01

    We have measured the critical current density (Jc) of two NbN films (500 {Angstrom} and 1550 {Angstrom} thick) as a function of temperature in magnetic fields up to 25 Tesla using transport measurements. In both films, the functional form of the volume pinning force F{sub p} obeys the Fietz - Webb scaling law throughout the entire magnetic field and temperature range such that: F{sub p}=J{sub c} {times} B= {alpha}B{sub c2}{sup m}(T)b{sup {1/2}} (1-b){sup 2} = {alpha}*(1-T/T{sub c}){sup m}b{sup {1/2}}(1-b){sup 2} where {alpha} and {alpha}* are constants dependent on the film, B{sub c2}(T) is the upper critical field, b = B/B{sub c2}(T) is the reduced magnetic field, {Tc} is the critical temperature and we find m = 2.7 {plus minus} 0.1. Over a limited range of magnetic fields close to B{sub c2}(T), we can approximate this functional form by: F{sub p} = {Beta}B{sub c2}{sup M}(T)b(1-b){sup 2}={Beta}*(1-T/{Tc}){sup M}b(1-b){sup 2} where {Beta} and {Beta}* are constants and we find M = 2.6{plus minus}0.2. Values of J{sub c} derived from D.C. magnetisation data obtained using Bean's model show qualitative agreement with the transport measurements throughout the superconducting phase. Despite the marked granularity in the microstructure of these films, we interpret our results as evidence that a flux pinning mechanism determines the transport current density in NbN films in high magnetic fields.

  15. Scaling laws for the critical current density of NbN films in high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hampshire, D.P.; Gray, K.E.; Kampwirth, R.T.

    1992-08-01

    We have measured the critical current density (Jc) of two NbN films (500 {Angstrom} and 1550 {Angstrom} thick) as a function of temperature in magnetic fields up to 25 Tesla using transport measurements. In both films, the functional form of the volume pinning force F{sub p} obeys the Fietz - Webb scaling law throughout the entire magnetic field and temperature range such that: F{sub p}=J{sub c} {times} B= {alpha}B{sub c2}{sup m}(T)b{sup {1/2}} (1-b){sup 2} = {alpha}*(1-T/T{sub c}){sup m}b{sup {1/2}}(1-b){sup 2} where {alpha} and {alpha}* are constants dependent on the film, B{sub c2}(T) is the upper critical field, b = B/B{sub c2}(T) is the reduced magnetic field, {Tc} is the critical temperature and we find m = 2.7 {plus_minus} 0.1. Over a limited range of magnetic fields close to B{sub c2}(T), we can approximate this functional form by: F{sub p} = {Beta}B{sub c2}{sup M}(T)b(1-b){sup 2}={Beta}*(1-T/{Tc}){sup M}b(1-b){sup 2} where {Beta} and {Beta}* are constants and we find M = 2.6{plus_minus}0.2. Values of J{sub c} derived from D.C. magnetisation data obtained using Bean`s model show qualitative agreement with the transport measurements throughout the superconducting phase. Despite the marked granularity in the microstructure of these films, we interpret our results as evidence that a flux pinning mechanism determines the transport current density in NbN films in high magnetic fields.

  16. Dynamics of Braided Channels, Bars, and Associated Deposits Under Experimental Density Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limaye, A. B. S.; Jean-Louis, G.; Paola, C.

    2015-12-01

    Turbidity currents are the principal agents that transfer clastic sediment from continental margins to the deep ocean. The extensive sedimentary deposits that result can record influences from fluvial transport, ocean currents, and seafloor bathymetry; decoding these controls is key to understanding long-term continental denudation and the formation of hydrocarbon reservoirs. Experimental turbidity currents often use pre-formed, single-thread channels, but more recent experiments and seafloor observations suggest that braided channels also develop in submarine environments. Yet controls on the formation of submarine braided channels and relationships between these channels and stratigraphic evolution remain largely untested. We have conducted a series of experiments to determine the conditions conducive to forming braided submarine channels, and to relate channel geometry and kinematics to deposit architecture. Dissolved salt supplies the excess density of the experimental turbidity currents, which transport plastic, sand-sized sediment as bedload across a test section two meters long and one meter wide. Our experiments indicate that braided channels can form as constructional features without prior erosion for a range of input water and sediment fluxes. Channel migration, avulsion, and aggradation construct sedimentary deposits with bars at a variety of scales. Bar geometry and channel kinematics are qualitatively similar under subaerial and subaqueous experiments with other parameters fixed. We will present quantitative analyses of the relationships between channel geometry and mobility and deposit architecture, at scales from individual bars to the entire deposit, and compare these results to control experiments with subaerial braiding. These experimental results suggest parallels between subaerial and subaqueous braiding, and help to constrain forward models for stratigraphic evolution and inverse methods for estimating flow conditions from turbidites.

  17. The influence of current speed and vegetation density on flow structure in two macrotidal eelgrass canopies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lacy, Jessica R.; Wyllie-Echeverria, Sandy

    2011-01-01

    The influence of eelgrass (Zostera marina) on near-bed currents, turbulence, and drag was investigated at three sites in two eelgrass canopies of differing density and at one unvegetated site in the San Juan archipelago of Puget Sound, Washington, USA. Eelgrass blade length exceeded 1 m. Velocity profiles up to 1.5 m above the sea floor were collected over a spring-neap tidal cycle with a downward-looking pulse-coherent acoustic Doppler profiler above the canopies and two acoustic Doppler velocimeters within the canopies. The eelgrass attenuated currents by a minimum of 40%, and by more than 70% at the most densely vegetated site. Attenuation decreased with increasing current speed. The data were compared to the shear-layer model of vegetated flows and the displaced logarithmic model. Velocity profiles outside the meadows were logarithmic. Within the canopies, most profiles were consistent with the shear-layer model, with a logarithmic layer above the canopy. However, at the less-dense sites, when currents were strong, shear at the sea floor and above the canopy was significant relative to shear at the top of the canopy, and the velocity profiles more closely resembled those in a rough-wall boundary layer. Turbulence was strong at the canopy top and decreased with height. Friction velocity at the canopy top was 1.5–2 times greater than at the unvegetated, sandy site. The coefficient of drag CD on the overlying flow derived from the logarithmic velocity profile above the canopy, was 3–8 times greater than at the unvegetated site (0.01–0.023 vs. 2.9 × 10−3).

  18. Status Epilepticus Induced Spontaneous Dentate Gyrus Spikes: In Vivo Current Source Density Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Sean P.; Barrier, Sylvain; Scott, Rod C.; Lenck- Santini, Pierre-Pascal; Holmes, Gregory L.

    2015-01-01

    The dentate gyrus is considered to function as an inhibitory gate limiting excitatory input to the hippocampus. Following status epilepticus (SE), this gating function is reduced and granule cells become hyper-excitable. Dentate spikes (DS) are large amplitude potentials observed in the dentate gyrus (DG) of normal animals. DS are associated with membrane depolarization of granule cells, increased activity of hilar interneurons and suppression of CA3 and CA1 pyramidal cell firing. Therefore, DS could act as an anti-excitatory mechanism. Because of the altered gating function of the dentate gyrus following SE, we sought to investigate how DS are affected following pilocarpine-induced SE. Two weeks following lithium-pilocarpine SE induction, hippocampal EEG was recorded in male Sprague-Dawley rats with 16-channel silicon probes under urethane anesthesia. Probes were placed dorso-ventrally to encompass either CA1-CA3 or CA1-DG layers. Large amplitude spikes were detected from EEG recordings and subject to current source density analysis. Probe placement was verified histologically to evaluate the anatomical localization of current sinks and the origin of DS. In 9 of 11 pilocarpine-treated animals and two controls, DS were confirmed with large current sinks in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. DS frequency was significantly increased in pilocarpine-treated animals compared to controls. Additionally, in pilocarpine-treated animals, DS displayed current sinks in the outer, middle and/or inner molecular layers. However, there was no difference in the frequency of events when comparing between layers. This suggests that following SE, DS can be generated by input from medial and lateral entorhinal cortex, or within the dentate gyrus. DS were associated with an increase in multiunit activity in the granule cell layer, but no change in CA1. These results suggest that following SE there is an increase in DS activity, potentially arising from hyperexcitability along the

  19. Propagation and deposition mechanisms of dense pyroclastic density currents: insights from analogue laboratory experiments. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, O.; Montserrat, S.; Niño, Y.; Tamburrino, A.

    2010-12-01

    Analogue laboratory experiments on air-particle flows represent a useful tool to investigate the mechanisms of propagation and deposition of dense (or the dense part of) pyroclastic density currents. In this context, we carried out experiments in the dam-break configuration and studied the emplacement processes of analogue biphasic currents generated from the quasi-instantaneous release of fluidized columns of fine (80 µm) particles. The low permeability of the granular material permitted relatively slow diffusion of the initial pore pressure within the flows until they came to halt. Analysis of the flow kinematics and comparison with flows of water in the same apparatus revealed that the air-particle currents propagated in two distinct stages. They behaved as their inertial water counterparts for most their emplacement, as both types of flows had the same morphology and propagated at constant front velocity U~√(2gh), h being the initial height of the granular column. This occurred as long as the height of the collapsing fluidized columns was higher than the that of the resultant flows, thus generating a driving pressure gradient. This fluid-inertial behavior suggested that the pore fluid pressure was high during propagation of the mixture. In order to check this hypothesis, we carried out non invasive measurements of the pore fluid pressure at the base of the air-particle flows and made correlation of the pressure signal with the flow structure from analyses of high speed videos. The flow structure consisted of a sliding head that caused underpressure relative to ambient conditions and whose magnitude correlated with the flow velocity. The flow head was followed by a body that generated overpressure and at the base of which a deposit aggraded at a nearly constant rate. Both the flow head and body were sheared pervasively as the internal velocity increased upwards. The combination of pressure advection from the source and relatively slow pressure diffusion

  20. Dependence of the flux-creep activation energy on current density and magnetic field for a Ca10(Pt3As8)[(Fe1-xPtx)2As2]5 single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, J.; Gutierrez, J.; Li, J.; Yuan, J.; Wang, H.-B.; Yamaura, K.; Takayama-Muromachi, E.; Moshchalkov, V. V.

    2014-03-01

    We have performed detailed ac susceptibility measurements to investigate the vortex dynamics in a Ca10(Pt3As8)[(Fe1-xPtx)2As2]5 single crystal as a function of temperature, frequency, ac amplitude, and dc field. The field dependence of the activation energy U is derived in the framework of thermally activated flux creep theory, yielding a power law dependence of U ˜ Hα with α ≈ -1.0 for H above 0.30 T, while below 0.3 T U is independent of the field. The activation energy reaches 104 K at low fields, suggesting strong pinning in the material. The nonlinear function of the activation energy vs. the current density is determined, which shows logarithmic dependence U(J)∝lnJ.

  1. Emplacement temperatures of boiling-over pyroclastic density currents from Tungurahua and Cotopaxi volcanoes, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rader, E. L.; Geist, D.; Geissman, J. W.; Harpp, K. S.; Dufek, J.

    2011-12-01

    Pyroclastic density currents (PDC) can be sourced by collapsing columns, dome collapse, and boiling-over fountains. Although there are innumerable studies of the deposits produced by the first 2 mechanisms, pyroclastic deposits from boiling-over have not been well characterized. We are studying several pyroclastic flow deposits from two boiling over eruptions in Ecuador, Tungurahua, 2006 and Cotopaxi, 1877. These eruptions produced abundant cauliflower-textured, large (up to 1 m in diameter), fragile scoria clasts. Some evidence points to relatively low temperatures during transport. For example, some flows at Cotopaxi are unusually long and sinuous and probably influenced by melt water from the glacier that caps the cone. Additionally, un-charred vegetation and eyewitness reports of un-melted plastic in the path of pyroclastic flows at Tungurahua also support cool emplacement temperatures. On the other hand, some scoria clasts were ductile when deposited as evidenced by draped clasts. We cut 5 to 9 cm transects from rim to core of 36 lithic and juvenile samples, which were then thermally demagnetized and measured. Lithic samples from Tungurahua indicate only one flow was fully remagnetized above ~580°C, while another flow was only partially remagnetized below 210°C. All other lithics from both volcanoes were never heated to above 90°C. Juvenile clasts from Cotopaxi indicate three types of flows: currents that begin hot (above 580°C) but cool quickly (juveniles emplaced hot, but lithics emplaced cold); currents that deposit at ~330°C (two components of magnetization that intersect at 330°C in the juvenile clasts), and cold currents such as lahars. The majority of currents from Tungurahua are of the 2nd type, having emplacement temperatures of ~380°C-280°C, with the deformable juvenile clasts being hotter than the rest of the flow. Despite the intact nature of the fragile bombs, emplacement temperatures indicate that the majority of flow deposits at

  2. High current density PQQ-dependent alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase bioanodes.

    PubMed

    Aquino Neto, Sidney; Hickey, David P; Milton, Ross D; De Andrade, Adalgisa R; Minteer, Shelley D

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, we explore the bioelectrooxidation of ethanol using pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ADH and AldDH) enzymes for biofuel cell applications. The bioanode architectures were designed with both direct electron transfer (DET) and mediated electron transfer (MET) mechanisms employing high surface area materials such as multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and MWCNT-decorated gold nanoparticles, along with different immobilization techniques. Three different polymeric matrices were tested (tetrabutyl ammonium bromide (TBAB)-modified Nafion; octyl-modified linear polyethyleneimine (C8-LPEI); and cellulose) in the DET studies. The modified Nafion membrane provided the best electrical communication between enzymes and the electrode surface, with catalytic currents as high as 16.8 ± 2.1 µA cm(-2). Then, a series of ferrocene redox polymers were evaluated for MET. The redox polymer 1,1'-dimethylferrocene-modified linear polyethyleneimine (FcMe2-C3-LPEI) provided the best electrochemical response. Using this polymer, the electrochemical assays conducted in the presence of MWCNTs and MWCNTs-Au indicated a Jmax of 781 ± 59 µA cm(-2) and 925 ± 68 µA cm(-2), respectively. Overall, from the results obtained here, DET using the PQQ-dependent ADH and AldDH still lacks high current density, while the bioanodes that operate via MET employing ferrocene-modified LPEI redox polymers show efficient energy conversion capability in ethanol/air biofuel cells.

  3. Measuring the acoustoelectric interaction constant using ultrasound current source density imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qian; Olafsson, Ragnar; Ingram, Pier; Wang, Zhaohui; Witte, Russell

    2012-10-01

    Ultrasound current source density imaging (UCSDI) exploits the acoustoelectric (AE) effect, an interaction between ultrasound pressure and electrical resistivity, to map electrical conduction in the heart. The conversion efficiency for UCSDI is determined by the AE interaction constant K, a fundamental property of all materials; K directly affects the magnitude of the detected voltage signal in UCSDI. This paper describes a technique for measuring K in biological tissue, and reports its value for the first time in cadaver hearts. A custom chamber was designed and fabricated to control the geometry for estimating K, which was measured in different ionic salt solutions and seven cadaver rabbit hearts. We found K to be strongly dependent on concentration for the divalent salt CuSO4, but not for the monovalent salt NaCl, consistent with their different chemical properties. In the rabbit heart, K was determined to be 0.041±0.012%/MPa, similar to the measurement of K in physiological saline (0.034±0.003%/MPa). This study provides a baseline estimate of K for modeling and experimental studies that involve UCSDI to map cardiac conduction and reentry currents associated with arrhythmias.

  4. High critical current density and enhanced irreversibility field in superconducting MgB2 thin films.

    PubMed

    Eom, C B; Lee, M K; Choi, J H; Belenky, L J; Song, X; Cooley, L D; Naus, M T; Patnaik, S; Jiang, J; Rikel, M; Polyanskii, A; Gurevich, A; Cai, X Y; Bu, S D; Babcock, S E; Hellstrom, E E; Larbalestier, D C; Rogado, N; Regan, K A; Hayward, M A; He, T; Slusky, J S; Inumaru, K; Haas, M K; Cava, R J

    2001-05-31

    The discovery of superconductivity at 39 K in magnesium diboride offers the possibility of a new class of low-cost, high-performance superconducting materials for magnets and electronic applications. This compound has twice the transition temperature of Nb3Sn and four times that of Nb-Ti alloy, and the vital prerequisite of strongly linked current flow has already been demonstrated. One possible drawback, however, is that the magnetic field at which superconductivity is destroyed is modest. Furthermore, the field which limits the range of practical applications-the irreversibility field H*(T)-is approximately 7 T at liquid helium temperature (4.2 K), significantly lower than about 10 T for Nb-Ti (ref. 6) and approximately 20 T for Nb3Sn (ref. 7). Here we show that MgB2 thin films that are alloyed with oxygen can exhibit a much steeper temperature dependence of H*(T) than is observed in bulk materials, yielding an H* value at 4.2 K greater than 14 T. In addition, very high critical current densities at 4.2 K are achieved: 1 MA cm-2 at 1 T and 105 A cm-2 at 10 T. These results demonstrate that MgB2 has potential for high-field superconducting applications.

  5. First test of BNL electron beam ion source with high current density electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Pikin, Alexander Alessi, James G. Beebe, Edward N.; Shornikov, Andrey; Mertzig, Robert; Wenander, Fredrik; Scrivens, Richard

    2015-01-09

    A new electron gun with electrostatic compression has been installed at the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) Test Stand at BNL. This is a collaborative effort by BNL and CERN teams with a common goal to study an EBIS with electron beam current up to 10 A, current density up to 10,000 A/cm{sup 2} and energy more than 50 keV. Intensive and pure beams of heavy highly charged ions with mass-to-charge ratio < 4.5 are requested by many heavy ion research facilities including NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL and HIE-ISOLDE at CERN. With a multiampere electron gun, the EBIS should be capable of delivering highly charged ions for both RHIC facility applications at BNL and for ISOLDE experiments at CERN. Details of the electron gun simulations and design, and the Test EBIS electrostatic and magnetostatic structures with the new electron gun are presented. The experimental results of the electron beam transmission are given.

  6. An organic-heterojunction diode current equation including random site trap density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, SeongMin; Ha, Jaewook; Kim, Jin-Baek

    2016-08-01

    The current-voltage characteristics of an organic heterojunction (HJ), where random site trap density at the donor-acceptor (D-A) interface is included, is numerically investigated based on the polaron-pair (PP) model (Phys. Rev. B. 82, 155305 (2010)). To derive the analytic equation, the electric field FI at the D-A interface, which is included in the field parameter b, is first approximated to estimate the polaron-pair dissociation rate, k_{ppd}. It is then assumed that the quasi-Fermi level E_{Fp/n} at the donor/acceptor lies in the trap energy level ( E_{trap}) at random sites without a direct dependence on applied bias ( Va), but on a HOMO/LUMO with Va dependence. As a result, the low diode current (DC) at forward bias is attributed to the E_{trap}, which is lower than the LUMO at acceptors, and is higher than the HOMO at donors. This implies that the pattern of DC is at forward biases depending upon the position of E_{trap}.

  7. Current-density functional theory study of the H2 molecule evolving under a strong ultrashort magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikas, Hash(0xb7f6e60)

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen molecule in a strong ultrashort magnetic field is investigated through a current-density functional theory (CDFT) and quantum fluid dynamics (QFD) based approach employing current-density dependent vector exchange-correlation potential and energy density functional derived with a vorticity variable. The numerical computations through the CDFT based approach are performed for the H2 molecule, starting initially from its field-free ground state, in a parallel internuclear axis and magnetic field-axis configuration with the internuclear separation R ranging from 0.1 a.u. to 14.0 a.u., and the strength of the time-dependent (TD) magnetic field varying between 0-1011 G over a few femtoseconds. The numerical results are compared with that obtained using an approach based on the current-density independent approximation under similar computational constraints but employing only scalar exchange-correlation potential dependent on the electronic charge-density alone. The current-density based approach yields exchange- and correlation energy as well as electronic charge-density of the H2 molecule drastically different from that obtained using current-independent approach, in particular, at TD magnetic field-strengths >109 G during a typical time-period of the field when the magnetic-field had attained maximum applied field-strength and is switched to a decreasing ramp function. This nonadiabatic behavior of the TD electronic charge-density is traced to the TD vorticity-dependent vector exchange-correlation potential of the CDFT based approach. The interesting electron dynamics of the H2 molecule in strong TD magnetic field is further elucidated by treating electronic charge-density as an `electron-fluid'. The present work also reveals interesting real-time dynamics on the attosecond time-scale in the electronic charge-density distribution of the hydrogen molecule.

  8. ac bidirectional motor controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiner, K.

    1988-01-01

    Test data are presented and the design of a high-efficiency motor/generator controller at NASA-Lewis for use with the Space Station power system testbed is described. The bidirectional motor driver is a 20 kHz to variable frequency three-phase ac converter that operates from the high-frequency ac bus being designed for the Space Station. A zero-voltage-switching pulse-density-modulation technique is used in the converter to shape the low-frequency output waveform.

  9. A hydrodynamical model of shear flow over semi-infinite barriers with application to density currents

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A. )

    1992-12-01

    Vertically sheared airflow over semi-infinite barriers is investigated with a simple hydrodynamical model. The idealized flow is steady, two-dimensional, neutrally buoyant, and inviscid, bounded on the bottom by a semi-infinite impermeable barrier and on the top by a rigid tropopause lid. With attention further restricted to an exponentially decreasing wind shear, the equations of motion (Euler's equations) reduce, without approximation, to a modified Poisson equation for a pseudo streamfunction and a formula for the Exner function. The free parameters characterizing the model's environment are the tropopause height, the density scale height, the wind speed at ground level, and the wind speed at tropopause level. Additional parameters characterize the barrier geometry. Exact solutions of the equations of motion are obtained for semi-infinite plateau barriers and for a barrier qualitatively resembling the shallow density current associated with some thunderstorm outflows. These solutions are noteworthy in that the reduction of a certain nondimensional shear parameter (through negative values) results in greater vertical parcel displacements over the barrier despite a corresponding reduction in the vertical velocity. This steepening tendency culminates in overturning motions associated with both upstream and down-stream steering levels. In this latter case the low-level inflow impinging on the barrier participates in a mixed jump and overturning updraft reminiscent of updrafts simulated in numerical convective models. Conversely, for large values of the nondimensional shear parameter, parcels undergo small vertical parcel displacements over the barrier despite large vertical velocities. This latter behavior may account for the finding that strong convergence along the leading edge of storm outflows does not always trigger deep convection even in unstable environments.

  10. Kinetic theory of current and density drift instabilities with weak charged-neutral collisions. [in space plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, S. P.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes the linear kinetic theory of electrostatic instabilities driven by a density gradient drift and a magnetic-field-aligned current in a plasma with weak charged neutral collisions. The configuration is that of a uniform magnetic field B, a weak, uniform density gradient in the x direction and a weak, uniform electric field in the z direction. Collisions are represented by the BGK model. The transition from the (kinetic) universal density drift instability to the (fluidlike) current convective instability is studied in detail, and the short wavelength properties of the latter mode are investigated.

  11. Radial Profiles of Electron Density and Current Components at Cathode Surface in LaB6 Hollow Cathode Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Setsuo; Asano, Toshiaki; Morimiya, Osami

    1987-06-01

    Experimental studies on a hydrogen-fed LaB6 hollow cathode arc have been pursued. The plasma parameter in the cathode has been measured by a Langmuir probe. The radial variation in the electron density inside the cathode was calculated using the continuity and momentum equations, showing good agreement with the experimental results. The electron density at the cathode surface was estimated to be 15%-20% of that at the cathode axis. It was also found from the current balance that the arc current components at the cathode surface consist of a thermionic current which takes into account the Schottky effect, the ion current and the secondary electron current induced by ion bombardment. The ion current and the cathode surface is larger than the electron current emitted from the cathode.

  12. Vortex creep and critical current densities in superconducting (Ba,K)Fe2As2 single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Konczykowski, M.; van Der Beek, C.J.; Tanatar, Makariy A.; Luo, Huiqian; Wang, Zhaosheng; Shen, Bing; Wen, Hai Hu; Prozorov, Ruslan

    2012-07-13

    The surprisingly rapid relaxation of the sustainable current density in the critical state of single-crystalline Ba1−xKxFe2As2 is investigated for magnetic fields oriented parallel to the c axis and to the ab plane, respectively. Due to the inadequacy of standard analysis procedures developed for flux creep in the high-temperature superconducting cuprates, we develop a simple, straightforward data treatment technique that reveals the creep mechanism and the creep exponent μ. At low magnetic fields, below the second magnetization peak, μ varies only slightly as a function of temperature and magnetic flux density B. From the data, we determine the temperature and field dependencies of the effective activation barrier for creep. At low temperatures, the measured current density approaches the zero-temperature critical current density (in the absence of creep) to within a factor 2, thus lending credence to earlier conclusions drawn with respect to the pinning mechanism. The comparable values of the experimental screening current density and the zero-temperature critical current density reveal the limited usefulness of the widely used “interpolation formula.”

  13. He 2++ molecular ion in a strong time-dependent magnetic field: a current-density functional study.

    PubMed

    Vikas

    2011-08-01

    The He 2++ molecular ion exposed to a strong ultrashort time-dependent (TD) magnetic field of the order of 10(9) G is investigated through a quantum fluid dynamics (QFD) and current-density functional theory (CDFT) based approach using vector exchange-correlation (XC) potential and energy density functional that depend not only on the electronic charge-density but also on the current density. The TD-QFD-CDFT computations are performed in a parallel internuclear-axis and magnetic field-axis configuration at the field-free equilibrium internuclear separation R = 1.3 au with the field-strength varying between 0 and 10(11) G. The TD behavior of the exchange- and correlation energy of the He 2++ is analyzed and compared with that obtained using a [B-TD-QFD-density functional theory (DFT)] approach based on the conventional TD-DFT under similar computational constraints but using only scalar XC potential and energy density functional dependent on the electronic charge-density alone. The CDFT based approach yields TD exchange- and correlation energy and TD electronic charge-density significantly different from that obtained using the conventional TD-DFT based approach, particularly, at typical magnetic field strengths and during a typical time period of the TD field. This peculiar behavior of the CDFT-based approach is traced to the TD current-density dependent vector XC potential, which can induce nonadiabatic effects causing retardation of the oscillating electronic charge density. Such dissipative electron dynamics of the He 2++ molecular ion is elucidated by treating electronic charge density as an electron-"fluid" in the terminology of QFD. PMID:21598275

  14. Photoelectrolysis of water at high current density - Use of ultraviolet laser excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bocarsly, A. B.; Bolts, J. M.; Cummins, P. G.; Wrighton, M. S.

    1977-01-01

    The behavior of TiO2 and SrTiO3 photoanodes in cells for the photoelectrolysis of H2O has been investigated for high-intensity 351-,364-nm excitation from an Ar ion laser. Intensities up to 380 W/sq cm have been used. For TiO2 a small amount of surface decomposition is found after irradiation at high intensity, whereas SrTiO3 undergoes no detectable changes. Current-voltage properties for both electrodes are essentially independent of light intensity up to the level of 380 W/sq cm, and there is little if any change in quantum efficiency for electron flow. Photocurrent densities have been shown to exceed 5 A/sq cm for O2 evolution. Data show that the energy storage rate associated with the SrTiO3 photoelectrolysis can exceed 30 W/sq cm; this represents the highest demonstrated rate of sustained optical-to-chemical energy conversion.

  15. Field and temperature scaling of the critical current density in commercial REBCO coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senatore, Carmine; Barth, Christian; Bonura, Marco; Kulich, Miloslav; Mondonico, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Scaling relations describing the electromagnetic behaviour of coated conductors (CCs) greatly simplify the design of REBCO-based devices. The performance of REBCO CCs is strongly influenced by fabrication route, conductor architecture and materials, and these parameters vary from one manufacturer another. In the present work we have examined the critical surface for the current density, J c(T, B, θ), of coated conductors from six different manufacturers: American Superconductor Co. (US), Bruker HTS GmbH (Germany), Fujikura Ltd (Japan), SuNAM Co. Ltd (Korea), SuperOx ZAO (Russia) and SuperPower Inc. (US). Electrical transport and magnetic measurements were performed at temperatures between 4.2 K and 77 K and in magnetic fields of up to 19 T. Experiments were conducted at three different orientations of the field with respect to the crystallographic c-axis of the REBCO layer, θ = 0°, 45° and 90°, in order to probe the angular anisotropy of J c. In spite of the large variability of the CCs’ performance, we show here that field and temperature dependences of J c at a given angle can be reproduced over wide ranges using a scaling relation based only on three parameters. Furthermore, we present and validate a new approach combining magnetic and transport measurements for the determination of the scaling parameters with minimal experimental effort.

  16. Rounding of Clasts by Abrasion and Comminution in Pyroclastic Density Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, A.; Manga, M.; Dufek, J.

    2009-12-01

    Abrasion and comminution of pumice clasts during the propagation of pyroclastic density currents has long been recognized as a potential source for the enhanced production of volcanic ash. The amount of ash produced in-situ can potentially affect runout distance, deposit sorting, the volume of ash introduced in the upper atmosphere, and internal pore pressure. Such ash production should be reflected in the roundness of clasts. We performed experimental measurements to determine the relationship between particle roundness (measured in two-dimensions by how close each particle’s area to perimeter squared ratio is to a circle’s) and mass loss caused by particle-particle interactions. We use airfall pumice from Medicine Lake, and clasts from flow deposits at Taupo and Mount St Helens. We find that average sample roundness reaches a maximum value once particles lose between 10 and 70% of their mass. The most texturally homogeneous clasts (Taupo) become the most round. We compared our experimental measurements with the roundness of clasts in the May 18, 1980 pyroclastic flow units at Mount St Helens, deposited 4.5-8 km from the vent. The roundness measurements of these clasts are close to the experimentally determined maximum values, suggesting that a significant amount of ash may have been produced in-situ within the flow. Numerical multiphase flow simulations for conditions similar to this eruption (Dufek and Manga, JGR 2008) are consistent with this conclusion.

  17. Magnetic petrofabric of igneous rocks: Lessons from pyroclastic density current deposits and obsidians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañón-Tapia, E.; Mendoza-Borunda, R.

    2014-12-01

    Measurement of the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) of igneous rocks can provide clues concerning their mechanism of formation and in particular are very helpful as flow direction indicators. Unlike other igneous rocks, however, pyroclastic density current deposits (PDCDs) present a challenge in the interpretation of AMS measurements due to the complexity of their mechanism of emplacement. In this paper we review the most common assumptions made in the interpretation of the AMS of PDCD, taking advantage of key lessons obtained from obsidians. Despite the complexities on the mechanism of formation of PDCDs, it is shown that a key element for the fruitful interpretation of AMS is to give proper attention to the various components likely to be involved in controlling their general petrofabric. The anisotropies of ferromagnetic crystals (whether as free phases or embedded within clasts or shards), and those of paramagnetic minerals (mainly ferrosilicates) need to be taken into consideration when interpreting the AMS measurements of PDCDs. Variations of the deposition regime both as a function of position and of time also need to be considered on the interpretations. Nevertheless, if a suitable sampling strategy is adopted, the potential of the AMS method as a petrofabric indicator is maximized.

  18. Antarctic density stratification and the strength of the circumpolar current during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch-Stieglitz, Jean; Ito, Takamitsu; Michel, Elisabeth

    2016-05-01

    The interaction between ocean circulation and biological processes in the Southern Ocean is thought to be a major control on atmospheric carbon dioxide content over glacial cycles. A better understanding of stratification and circulation in the Southern Ocean during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) provides information that will help us to assess these scenarios. First, we evaluate the link between Southern Ocean stratification and circulation states in a suite of climate model simulations. While simulated Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) transport varies widely (80-350 Sverdrup (Sv)), it co-varies with horizontal and vertical stratification and the formation of the southern deep water. We then test the LGM simulations against available data from paleoceanographic proxies, which can be used to assess the density stratification and ACC transport south of Australia. The paleoceanographic data suggest a moderate increase in the Southern Ocean stratification and the ACC strength during the LGM. Even with the relatively large uncertainty in the proxy-based estimates, extreme scenarios exhibited by some climate models with ACC transports of greater than 250 Sv and highly saline Antarctic Bottom Water are highly unlikely.

  19. Catalysts for ultrahigh current density oxygen cathodes for space fuel cell applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tryk, D.; Yeager, E.; Shingler, M.; Aldred, W.; Wang, C.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this research was to identify promising electrocatalyst/support systems for the oxygen cathode in alkaline fuel cells operating at relatively high temperatures, O2 pressures and current densities. A number of materials were prepared, including Pb-Ru and Pb-Ir pyrochlores, RuO2 and Pt-doped RuO2, and lithiated NiO. Several of these were prepared using techniques that had not been previously used to prepare them. Particularly interesting is the use of the alkaline solution technique to prepare the Pt-doped Pb-Ru pyrochlore in high area form. Well-crystallized Pb(2)Ru(2)O(7-y) was used to fabricate high performance O2 cathodes with relatively good stability in room temperature KOH. This material was also found to be stable over a useful potential range at approximately 140 C in concentrated KOH. Other pyrochlores were found to be either unstable (amorphous samples) or the fabrication of the gas-fed electrodes could not be fully optimized during this project period. Future work may be directed at this problem. High area platinum supported on conductive metal oxide supports produced mixed results: small improvements in O2 reduction performance for Pb(2)Ru(2)O(7-y) but a large improvement for Li-doped NiO at room temperature. Nearly reversible behavior was observed for the O2/OH couple for Li-doped NiO at approximately 200 C.

  20. High Current Density, Long Life Cathodes for High Power RF Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, Robert Lawrence; Collins, George; Falce, Lou; Schwartzkopf, Steve; Busbaher, Daniel

    2014-01-22

    This program was tasked with improving the quality and expanding applications for Controlled Porosity Reservoir (CPR) cathodes. Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. (CCR) initially developed CPR cathodes on a DOE-funded SBIR program to improve cathodes for magnetron injection guns. Subsequent funding was received from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. The program developed design requirements for implementation of the technology into high current density cathodes for high frequency applications. During Phase I of this program, CCR was awarded the prestigious 2011 R&D100 award for this technology. Subsequently, the technology was presented at numerous technical conferences. A patent was issued for the technology in 2009. These cathodes are now marketed by Semicon Associates, Inc. in Lexington, KY. They are the world’s largest producer of cathodes for vacuum electron devices. During this program, CCR teamed with Semicon Associates, Inc. and Ron Witherspoon, Inc. to improve the fabrication processes and expand applications for the cathodes. Specific fabrications issues included the quality of the wire winding that provides the basic structure and the sintering to bond the wires into a robust, cohesive structure. The program also developed improved techniques for integrating the resulting material into cathodes for electron guns.

  1. Evidence of current free double layer in high density helicon discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguli, A.; Sahu, B. B.; Tarey, R. D.

    2013-01-15

    This paper investigates the formation of double layer (DL) in helicon plasmas. In the experiment, argon plasma production is using the excitation of m = -1 helicon mode with magnetic mirror field with high mirror ratio of {approx}1:1.7. We have specifically used the radio frequency compensated Langmuir probe (LP) to measure the relevant plasma parameters simultaneously so as to investigate the details about the plasma production. The DL, which consists of both warm and bulk populations towards higher potential region and only dense bulk plasmas towards the lower potential region downstream the antenna, is present in the transition region. LP measurements also show an abrupt fall of density along with a potential drop of about 20 V and (e {Delta}V{sub p}/k T{sub e}) Almost-Equal-To 12 within a few cm. The potential drop is equal to the difference of the electron temperatures between the two plasma regions forming the DL, which is present in the plateau region of mirror, unlike in several prior studies on the DL formation in the region of strong gradients in the magnetic field. The DL is strong, current-free, electric double-layer with estimated thickness of about 10 Debye lengths.

  2. Pyroclastic density current dynamics and associated hazards at ice-covered volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufek, J.; Cowlyn, J.; Kennedy, B.; McAdams, J.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the processes by which pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) are emplaced is crucial for volcanic hazard prediction and assessment. Snow and ice can facilitate PDC generation by lowering the coefficient of friction and by causing secondary hydrovolcanic explosions, promoting remobilisation of proximally deposited material. Where PDCs travel over snow or ice, the reduction in surface roughness and addition of steam and meltwater signficantly changes the flow dynamics, affecting PDC velocities and runout distances. Additionally, meltwater generated during transit and after the flow has come to rest presents an immediate secondary lahar hazard that can impact areas many tens of kilometers beyond the intial PDC. This, together with the fact that deposits emplaced on ice are rarely preserved means that PDCs over ice have been little studied despite the prevalence of summit ice at many tall stratovolcanoes. At Ruapehu volcano in the North Island of New Zealand, a monolithologic welded PDC deposit with unusually rounded clasts provides textural evidence for having been transported over glacial ice. Here, we present the results of high-resolution multiphase numerical PDC modeling coupled with experimentaly determined rates of water and steam production for the Ruapehu deposits in order to assess the effect of ice on the Ruapehu PDC. The results suggest that the presence of ice significantly modified the PDC dynamics, with implications for assessing the PDC and associated lahar hazards at Ruapehu and other glaciated volcanoes worldwide.

  3. Influences of current density on tribological characteristics of ceramic coatings on ZK60 Mg alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaohong; Su, Peibo; Jiang, Zhaohua; Meng, Song

    2010-03-01

    Current density is a key factor of plasma electrolytic oxidation process. Its influences on structure, mechanical, and tribological characteristics of ceramic coatings on ZK60 Mg alloy by pulsed bipolar microplasma oxidation in Na(3)PO(4) solution were studied in this paper. Thickness, structure, composition, mechanical property, and tribological characteristics of the coatings were studied by eddy current coating thickness gauge, scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), nanoindentation measurements, and ball-on-disk friction testing. The results show that all the coatings prepared under different current densities are composed of MgO phase. The amount of MgO phase, thickness and friction coefficient of the coatings increased with the increasing current density. Among three ceramic coatings produced under three current densities, the coating produced under the current density of 7 A/dm(2) got the highest nanohardness and lowest wear rate with the value of 1.7 GPa and 1.27 x 10(-5) mm(3)/Nm.

  4. Influence of the current density on the electrochemical treatment of concentrated 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride solutions on diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Marcionilio, Suzana M L de Oliveira; Alves, Gisele M; E Silva, Rachel B Góes; Marques, Pablo J Lima; Maia, Poliana D; Neto, Brenno A D; Linares, José J

    2016-10-01

    This paper focuses on the influence of the current density treatment of a concentrated 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMImCl) solution on an electrochemical reactor with a boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode. The decrease in the total organic carbon (TOC) and the BMImCl concentration demonstrate the capability of BDD in oxidizing ionic liquids (ILs) and further mineralizing (to CO2 and NO3 (-)) more rapidly at higher current densities in spite of the reduced current efficiency of the process. Moreover, the presence of Cl(-) led to the formation of oxychlorinated anions (mostly ClO3 (-) and ClO4 (-)) and, in combination with the ammonia generated in the cathode from the nitrate reduction, chloramines, more intensely at higher current density. Finally, the analysis of the intermediates formed revealed no apparent influence of the current density on the BMImCl degradation mechanism. The current density presents therefore a complex influence on the IL treatment process that is discussed throughout this paper.

  5. Inferring the Magnetic Structure of a Sunspot from Decomposition of Photospheric Vertical Current Density into Twist and Shear Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatakrishnan, P.

    2015-12-01

    The electric current density, derived from the curl of the vector magnetic field, can be decomposed into the so-called twist and shear components. We examined this decomposition for 2 highly flare productive active regions undergoing magnetic flux emergence, viz. AR 10930 observed by SOT aboard Hinode and AR 11158 observed by HMI aboard SDO. We found the following common evolutionary behaviour in both the cases: 1. The percentage of variation of the spatially averaged value of the ratio of the shear current density to the twist current density is much smaller than the percentage of variation of the twist current throughout the evolution. 2. The average ratio was negative in sign, viz. the shear current density was opposite in sign to the twist current density in most of the pixels. 3. The magnitude of the average ratio increased with increase of pixel size. The above 3 results were examined for two extreme kinds of magnetic structure: a) a monolithic continuous didtribution of magnetic flux and b) an intermittent cluster of magnetic fibrils separated by field free regions. We arrive at the conclusion that the above mentioned observations tend to favor the monolithic model of sunspot magnetic field over the fibril model, although a fibril structure at deeper layers cannot be ruled out. Observations of vector magnetic fields of sunspots using the infrared FeI line around 1560 nm could perhaps resolve this issue.

  6. Origin of dc voltage in type II superconducting flux pumps: field, field rate of change, and current density dependence of resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, J.; Matsuda, K.; Fu, L.; Fagnard, J.-F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Shen, B.; Dong, Q.; Baghdadi, M.; Coombs, T. A.

    2016-03-01

    Superconducting flux pumps are the kind of devices which can generate direct current into superconducting circuit using external magnetic field. The key point is how to induce a dc voltage across the superconducting load by ac fields. Giaever (1966 IEEE Spectr. 3 117) pointed out flux motion in superconductors will induce a dc voltage, and demonstrated a rectifier model which depended on breaking superconductivity. van de Klundert et al (1981 Cryogenics 21 195, 267) in their review(s) described various configurations for flux pumps all of which relied on inducing the normal state in at least part of the superconductor. In this letter, following their work, we reveal that a variation in the resistivity of type II superconductors is sufficient to induce a dc voltage in flux pumps and it is not necessary to break superconductivity. This variation in resistivity is due to the fact that flux flow is influenced by current density, field intensity, and field rate of change. We propose a general circuit analogy for travelling wave flux pumps, and provide a mathematical analysis to explain the dc voltage. Several existing superconducting flux pumps which rely on the use of a travelling magnetic wave can be explained using the analysis enclosed. This work can also throw light on the design and optimization of flux pumps.

  7. The antidune question for bedforms in deposits of dilute pyroclastic density currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin Douillet, Guilhem; Kueppers, Ulrich; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2014-05-01

    Dilute pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) are mixture of volcanic particles and gas that can be produced during explosive volcanic eruptions. Like turbidites, they travel on the ground driven by their higher density compared to the ambient fluid, which is due to the load of suspended particles. Dilute PDCs have a low enough particle concentration so that their deposit can contain cross stratification, but high enough so that they do not lift off as ash clouds. Since the 1970's most dune bedform cross stratifications found within dilute PDC deposits have been interpreted as antidunes, mainly due to the fact that they can exhibit more aggradation on the stoss than on the lee side. However, several studies have challenged this interpretation in the last few years (stepwise aggradation, differential draping, flow reversal, near-bed load blocking). In order to decipher which are the valuable arguments to confirm or infirm the antidune interpretation, we document deposits from different eruptions: Tungurahua (Ecuador), Laacher See (Germany), Purrumbete (Australia), Ubehebe (USA), Stromboli (Italy), Yasur (Vanuatu). We consider fluid dynamics arguments on the formation of gravity waves within the shallow water approximation and for internal gravity waves within a stratified medium. Indeed, antidunes are by definition sedimentary prints of stationary gravity waves. We also consider the possibility of cyclic steps as a parental phenomenon for the formation of dilute PDC bedforms. Finally, results of wind tunnel experiments for boundary layer conditions give another independent set of data to interpret cross stratifications within dilute PDC deposits. Whereas we cannot rule out an interpretation as antidunes for some bedforms (lensoidal stoss-depositional structures, low aspect ratio bedforms in train), others can clearly be disregarded based on geometrical considerations. Overall, the interpretation as antidune cannot be simply based on stoss-deposition, and needs to take

  8. Time-dependent density-functional theory simulation of local currents in pristine and single-defect zigzag graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shenglai; Russakoff, Arthur; Li, Yonghui; Varga, Kálmán

    2016-07-01

    The spatial current distribution in H-terminated zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) under electrical bias is investigated using time-dependent density-functional theory solved on a real-space grid. A projected complex absorbing potential is used to minimize the effect of reflection at simulation cell boundary. The calculations show that the current flows mainly along the edge atoms in the hydrogen terminated pristine ZGNRs. When a vacancy is introduced to the ZGNRs, loop currents emerge at the ribbon edge due to electrons hopping between carbon atoms of the same sublattice. The loop currents hinder the flow of the edge current, explaining the poor electric conductance observed in recent experiments.

  9. Laboratory Study Of Magnetic Reconnection With A Density Asymmetry Across The Current Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Joseph; Yamada, Massaaki; Ji, Hantao; Meyers,, Clayton E.; Jara-Almonte,; Chen, Li-Jen

    2014-04-18

    The effects of an upstream density asymmetry on magnetic reconnection are studied systematically in a laboratory plasma. Despite a significant upstream density asymmetry of up to 10, the reconnecting magnetic field pro file is not signifi cantly changed. On the other hand, the out-of-plane magnetic field profile is considerably modified; it is almost bipolar in structure with the density asymmetry, as compared to the quadrupolar structure in the symmetric configuration. The in-plane ion flow pattern and the electrostatic potential pro file are also affected by the density asymmetry. Strong bulk electron heating is observed near the low-density-side separatrix together with electromagnetic fluctuations in the lower hybrid frequency range. The dependence of the ion outflow and reconnection electric field on the density asymmetry is measured and compared with theoretical expectations.

  10. Preliminary scaling laws for plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density in the NASA Lewis bumpy torus plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Parametric variation of independent variables which may affect the characteristics of bumpy torus plasma have identified those which have a significant effect on the plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density, and those which do not. Empirical power law correlations of the plasma current, and the ion kinetic temperature and number density were obtained as functions of potential applied to the midplane electrode rings, the background neutral gas pressure, and the magnetic field strength. Additional parameters studied included the type of gas, the polarity of the midplane electrode rings, the mode of plasma operation, and the method of measuring the plasma number density. No significant departures from the scaling laws appear to occur at the highest ion kinetic temperatures or number densities obtained to date.

  11. Preliminary scaling laws for plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density in the NASA Lewis Bumpy Torus plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Parametric variation of independent variables which may affect the characteristics of the NASA Lewis Bumpy Torus plasma have identified those which have a significant effect on the plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density, and those which do not. Empirical power-law correlations of the plasma current, and the ion kinetic temperature and number density were obtained as functions of the potential applied to the midplane electrode rings, the background neutral gas pressure, and the magnetic field strength. Additional parameters studied include the type of gas, the polarity of the midplane electrode rings (and hence the direction of the radial electric field), the mode of plasma operation, and the method of measuring the plasma number density. No significant departures from the scaling laws appear to occur at the highest ion kinetic temperatures or number densities obtained to date.

  12. Three-dimensional turbulent bottom density currents from a high-order nonhydrostatic spectral element model.

    SciTech Connect

    Ozgokmen, T.; Fischer, P.; Duan, J.; Iliescu, T.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Miami; IIT; Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ.

    2004-09-01

    Overflows are bottom gravity currents that supply dense water masses generated in high-latitude and marginal seas into the general circulation. Oceanic observations have revealed that mixing of overflows with ambient water masses takes place over small spatial and time scales. Studies with ocean general circulation models indicate that the strength of the thermohaline circulation is strongly sensitive to representation of overflows in these models. In light of these results, overflow-induced mixing emerges as one of the prominent oceanic processes. In this study, as a continuation of an effort to develop appropriate process models for overflows, nonhydrostatic 3D simulations of bottom gravity are carried out that would complement analysis of dedicated observations and large-scale ocean modeling. A parallel high-order spectral-element Navier-Stokes solver is used as the basis of the simulations. Numerical experiments are conducted in an idealized setting focusing on the startup phase of a dense water mass released at the top of a sloping wedge. Results from 3D experiments are compared with results from 2D experiments and laboratory experiments, based on propagation speed of the density front, growth rate of the characteristic head at the leading edge, turbulent overturning length scales, and entrainment parameters. Results from 3D experiments are found to be in general agreement with those from laboratory tank experiments. In 2D simulations, the propagation speed is approximately 20% slower than that of the 3D experiments and the head growth rate is 3 times as large, Thorpe scales are 1.3-1.5 times as large, and the entrainment parameter is up to 2 times as large as those in the 3D experiments. The differences between 2D and 3D simulations are entirely due to internal factors associated with the truncation of the Navier-Stokes equations for 2D approximation.

  13. Volcán de Colima dome collapse of July, 2015 and associated pyroclastic density currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Dávila, Gabriel A.; Arámbula-Mendoza, Raúl; Espinasa-Pereña, Ramón; Pankhurst, Matthew J.; Navarro-Ochoa, Carlos; Savov, Ivan; Vargas-Bracamontes, Dulce M.; Cortés-Cortés, Abel; Gutiérrez-Martínez, Carlos; Valdés-González, Carlos; Domínguez-Reyes, Tonatiuh; González-Amezcua, Miguel; Martínez-Fierros, Alejandro; Ramírez-Vázquez, Carlos Ariel; Cárdenas-González, Lucio; Castañeda-Bastida, Elizabeth; Vázquez Espinoza de los Monteros, Diana M.; Nieto-Torres, Amiel; Campion, Robin; Courtois, Loic; Lee, Peter D.

    2016-06-01

    During July 10th-11th 2015, Volcán de Colima, Mexico, underwent its most intense eruptive phase since its Subplinian-Plinian 1913 AD eruption. Production of scoria coincident with elevated fumarolic activity and SO2 flux indicate a significant switch of upper-conduit dynamics compared with the preceding decades of dome building and vulcanian explosions. A marked increase in rockfall events and degassing activity was observed on the 8th and 9th of July. On the 10th at 20:16 h (Local time = UTM - 6 h) a partial collapse of the dome generated a series of pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) that lasted 52 min and reached 9.1 km to the south of the volcano. The PDCs were mostly channelized by the Montegrande and San Antonio ravines, and produced a deposit with an estimated volume of 2.4 × 106 m3. Nearly 16 h after the first collapse, a second and larger collapse occurred which lasted 1 h 47 min. This second collapse produced a series of PDCs along the same ravines, reaching a distance of 10.3 km. The total volume calculated for the PDCs of the second event is 8.0 × 106 m3. Including associated ashfall deposits, the two episodes produced a total of 14.2 × 106 m3 of fragmentary material. The collapses formed an amphitheater-shaped crater open towards the south. We propose that the dome collapse was triggered by arrival of gas-rich magma to the upper conduit, which then boiled-over and sustained the PDCs. A juvenile scoria sample selected from the second partial dome collapse contains hornblende, yet at an order of magnitude less abundant (0.2%) than that of 1913, and exhibits reaction rims, whereas the 1913 hornblende is unreacted. At present there is no compelling petrologic evidence for imminent end-cycle activity observed at Volcán de Colima.

  14. Impact of Cigarette Smoking on Tear Function and Correlation between Conjunctival Goblet Cells and Tear MUC5AC Concentration in Office Workers

    PubMed Central

    Uchino, Yuichi; Uchino, Miki; Yokoi, Norihiko; Dogru, Murat; Kawashima, Motoko; Komuro, Aoi; Sonomura, Yukiko; Kato, Hiroaki; Argüeso, Pablo; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    The first aim of this study was to clarify whether cigarette smoking affects tear secretion, goblet cell density, and tear MUC5AC concentration. The second purpose was to evaluate the correlations of conjunctival goblet cell density with tear MUC5AC concentration and other ocular surface evaluation factors. This cross-sectional study included 88 office workers. All subjects were required to fill in dry eye and smoking questionnaires, in addition to ocular surface evaluation. Tear wash fluid was collected from inferior fornix, and conjunctival epithelium was obtained by impression cytology. Tear MUC5AC concentration was quantified using enzyme-linked immunoassay, and conjunctival goblet cell density was counted after Periodic-acid Schiff staining. Tear MUC5AC concentration had significant positive correlation with conjunctival goblet cell density (r = 0.181, P = 0.03). In current smokers, Schirmer I test value, goblet cell density and tear MUC5AC concentration were significantly lower than non-smokers. Pack-years of smoking have significant negative correlation with goblet cell density (r = −0.174, P = 0.036) and tear MUC5AC concentration (r = −0.183, P = 0.028). We concluded that smoking might decrease tear secretion, goblet cell density and tear MUC5AC concentration. In addition, MUC5AC concentration in tears depends on goblet cell density in the conjunctiva among office workers. PMID:27297822

  15. Impact of Cigarette Smoking on Tear Function and Correlation between Conjunctival Goblet Cells and Tear MUC5AC Concentration in Office Workers.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Yuichi; Uchino, Miki; Yokoi, Norihiko; Dogru, Murat; Kawashima, Motoko; Komuro, Aoi; Sonomura, Yukiko; Kato, Hiroaki; Argüeso, Pablo; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    The first aim of this study was to clarify whether cigarette smoking affects tear secretion, goblet cell density, and tear MUC5AC concentration. The second purpose was to evaluate the correlations of conjunctival goblet cell density with tear MUC5AC concentration and other ocular surface evaluation factors. This cross-sectional study included 88 office workers. All subjects were required to fill in dry eye and smoking questionnaires, in addition to ocular surface evaluation. Tear wash fluid was collected from inferior fornix, and conjunctival epithelium was obtained by impression cytology. Tear MUC5AC concentration was quantified using enzyme-linked immunoassay, and conjunctival goblet cell density was counted after Periodic-acid Schiff staining. Tear MUC5AC concentration had significant positive correlation with conjunctival goblet cell density (r = 0.181, P = 0.03). In current smokers, Schirmer I test value, goblet cell density and tear MUC5AC concentration were significantly lower than non-smokers. Pack-years of smoking have significant negative correlation with goblet cell density (r = -0.174, P = 0.036) and tear MUC5AC concentration (r = -0.183, P = 0.028). We concluded that smoking might decrease tear secretion, goblet cell density and tear MUC5AC concentration. In addition, MUC5AC concentration in tears depends on goblet cell density in the conjunctiva among office workers. PMID:27297822

  16. New insights into aromatic pathways of carbachlorins and carbaporphyrins based on calculations of magnetically induced current densities.

    PubMed

    Benkyi, Isaac; Fliegl, Heike; Valiev, Rashid R; Sundholm, Dage

    2016-04-28

    Magnetically induced current densities have been calculated and analyzed for a number of synthesized carbachlorins and carbaporphyrins using density functional theory and the gauge including magnetically induced current (GIMIC) method. Aromatic properties have been determined by using accurate numerical integration of the current flow yielding reliable current strengths and pathways that are related to the degree of aromaticity and the aromatic character of the studied molecules. All investigated compounds are found to be aromatic. However, the obtained aromatic pathways differ from those previously deduced from spectroscopic data and magnetic shielding calculations. For all studied compounds, the ring current divides into an outer and an inner branch at each pyrrolic subring, showing that all π-electrons of the pyrrolic rings take part in the delocalization pathway. The calculations do not support the common notion that the main share of the current takes the inner route at the pyrrolic rings without an inner hydrogen and follows an 18π aromatic pathway. The aromatic pathways of the investigated carbaporphyrins and carbachlorins are very similar, since the current strength via the Cβ[double bond, length as m-dash]Cβ' bond of the cyclopentadienyl ring of the carbaporphyrins is almost as weak as the current density passing the corresponding saturated Cβ-Cβ' bond of the carbachlorins.

  17. New insights into aromatic pathways of carbachlorins and carbaporphyrins based on calculations of magnetically induced current densities.

    PubMed

    Benkyi, Isaac; Fliegl, Heike; Valiev, Rashid R; Sundholm, Dage

    2016-04-28

    Magnetically induced current densities have been calculated and analyzed for a number of synthesized carbachlorins and carbaporphyrins using density functional theory and the gauge including magnetically induced current (GIMIC) method. Aromatic properties have been determined by using accurate numerical integration of the current flow yielding reliable current strengths and pathways that are related to the degree of aromaticity and the aromatic character of the studied molecules. All investigated compounds are found to be aromatic. However, the obtained aromatic pathways differ from those previously deduced from spectroscopic data and magnetic shielding calculations. For all studied compounds, the ring current divides into an outer and an inner branch at each pyrrolic subring, showing that all π-electrons of the pyrrolic rings take part in the delocalization pathway. The calculations do not support the common notion that the main share of the current takes the inner route at the pyrrolic rings without an inner hydrogen and follows an 18π aromatic pathway. The aromatic pathways of the investigated carbaporphyrins and carbachlorins are very similar, since the current strength via the Cβ[double bond, length as m-dash]Cβ' bond of the cyclopentadienyl ring of the carbaporphyrins is almost as weak as the current density passing the corresponding saturated Cβ-Cβ' bond of the carbachlorins. PMID:26974190

  18. Concentration-dependent flow stratification in experimental high-density turbidity currents and their relevance to turbidite facies models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartigny, M. J. B.; Eggenhuisen, J. T.; Hansen, E. W. M.; Postma, G.

    2012-04-01

    High-density turbidity currents exhibit internal density stratifications. In the basal part of these stratified flows, high-sediment concentrations cause rheological deviations from the Newtonian turbulent flow that dominates clear water and low density conditions. Previous studies have distinguished different types of basal layers on the basis of concentration-dependent differences in grain interactions. Field studies have classically linked crude stratification bands, spaced laminations, and/or abundant internal erosion surfaces to high-density turbidity currents. Studies of high-density turbidity current deposits have proposed various mechanisms for this variation in depositional characteristics; however, none of these propositions has been thoroughly tested by experiments or theory. This study presents experiments of high-density turbidity currents (varying in initial sediment concentration between 9-26 vol%) moving quasi steady on an inclined bed surface, being close to their equilibrium slope in a 4 m x 0.5 x 0.07 tank. Three distinct internal flow layers were distinguished on the basis of their observed behavior as captured by a high-speed camera. Ultrasonic velocity profiler (UVP) probes were used to measure the overall velocity and turbulent intensity profiles of the flows, and the change therein as a result of different stacking patterns of internal flow layers. The relation between maximum velocity, shear stress and equilibrium slope for different types of high-density turbidity current was investigated in the experiments. Velocity and camera data were combined to study the interactions between the different flow layers over time. Small-scale fluctuations (0.2-2 seconds) were observed to have a clear control on the depositional behavior of the flow. However, the influence of these fluctuations gradually decreased with increasing sediment concentrations as function of the different types of basal flow layers. By combining these observations with

  19. Structural and phase transformations in zinc and brass wires under heating with high-density current pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervikov, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    The work is focused on revealing the mechanism of structure and phase transformations in the metal wires under heating with a high-density current pulse (the electric explosion of wires, EEWs). It has been demonstrated on the example of brass and zinc wires that the transition of a current pulse with the density of j ≈ 3.3 × 107 A/cm2 results in homogeneous heating of the crystalline structure of the metal/alloy. It has been determined that under heating with a pulse of high-density current pulse, the electric resistance of the liquid phases of zinc and brass decreases as the temperature increases. The results obtained allow for a conclusion that the presence of the particles of the condensed phase in the expanding products of EEW is the result of overheating instabilities in the liquid metal.

  20. On the toroidal current density flowing across a poloidal-magnetic-field null in an axisymmetric plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, Paulo; Bizarro, Joao P. S.

    2013-04-15

    The axisymmetry condition and two of Maxwell's equations are used to show that, in general, there are no nested magnetic surfaces around a poloidal-magnetic-field null for a sufficiently small value of the toroidal current density flowing there. Hence, the toroidal current density at the axis of a magnetic configuration with extreme shear reversal cannot continuously approach zero unless nested surfaces are first broken or particular values are assigned to boundary conditions and other plasma parameters. The threshold of the toroidal current-density at which the topology changes is shown to be set by such parameters, and some examples of the predicted topology transition are presented using analytical solutions of the Grad-Shafranov equation.

  1. Effect of current density on the microstructure and corrosion behaviour of plasma electrolytic oxidation treated AM50 magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bala Srinivasan, P.; Liang, J.; Blawert, C.; Störmer, M.; Dietzel, W.

    2009-01-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) of an AM50 magnesium alloy was accomplished in a silicate-based electrolyte using a DC power source. Coatings were produced at three current densities, i.e. 15 mA cm -2, 75 mA cm -2, and 150 mA cm -2 and were characterised for thickness, roughness, microstructural morphology, phase composition, and corrosion resistance. Even though the 15 min treated coatings produced at higher current density levels were thicker, they showed poor corrosion resistance when compared to that of the coatings obtained at 15 mA cm -2. Short-term treatments (2 min and 5 min) at 150 mA cm -2 yielded coatings of thickness and corrosion resistance comparable to that of the low current density coatings. The superior corrosion resistance of the low thickness coatings is attributed to the better pore morphology and compactness of the layer.

  2. Analysis of the magnetically induced current density of molecules consisting of annelated aromatic and antiaromatic hydrocarbon rings.

    PubMed

    Sundholm, Dage; Berger, Raphael J F; Fliegl, Heike

    2016-06-21

    Magnetically induced current susceptibilities and current pathways have been calculated for molecules consisting of two pentalene groups annelated with a benzene (1) or naphthalene (2) moiety. Current strength susceptibilities have been obtained by numerically integrating separately the diatropic and paratropic contributions to the current flow passing planes through chosen bonds of the molecules. The current density calculations provide novel and unambiguous current pathways for the unusual molecules with annelated aromatic and antiaromatic hydrocarbon moieties. The calculations show that the benzene and naphthalene moieties annelated with two pentalene units as in molecules 1 and 2, respectively, are unexpectedly antiaromatic sustaining only a local paratropic ring current around the ring, whereas a weak diatropic current flows around the C-H moiety of the benzene ring. For 1 and 2, the individual five-membered rings of the pentalenes are antiaromatic and a slightly weaker semilocal paratropic current flows around the two pentalene rings. Molecules 1 and 2 do not sustain any net global ring current. The naphthalene moiety of the molecule consisting of a naphthalene annelated with two pentalene units (3) does not sustain any strong ring current that is typical for naphthalene. Instead, half of the diatropic current passing the naphthalene moiety forms a zig-zag pattern along the C-C bonds of the naphthalene moiety that are not shared with the pentalene moieties and one third of the current continues around the whole molecule partially cancelling the very strong paratropic semilocal ring current of the pentalenes. For molecule 3, the pentalene moieties and the individual five-membered rings of the pentalenes are more antiaromatic than for 1 and 2. The calculated current patterns elucidate why the compounds with formally [4n + 2] π-electrons have unusual aromatic properties violating the Hückel π-electron count rule. The current density calculations also provide

  3. Average OH density in alternating current dielectric barrier discharge by laser-induced fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongliang; Feng, Chunlei; Gao, Liang; Ding, Hongbin

    2015-10-01

    The average OH density in atmospheric He-H2O(0.4%) needle-plate dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) was measured by the asynchronous laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique and the fluctuation of OH radical density was measured simultaneously to prove that the average OH density can be obtained by the asynchronous LIF technique. The evolution of the average OH density in four different discharge patterns, namely, negative barrier corona discharge, glow discharge, multi glow discharge, and streamer discharge, was studied, and it was found that the average OH density has an observable increase from corona discharge to streamer discharge. The main mechanism of OH production in the four different discharge patterns was analyzed. It was shown that the main mechanism of OH production in negative barrier corona discharge is electron direct collision dissociation, whereas in the other three discharge patterns the He metastable Penning ionization is the main process.

  4. Critical current density behaviors across a grain boundary inclined to current with different angles in YBa2Cu3O7-δ bicrystal junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Hua; Wei-Wei, Xu; Zheng-Ming, Ji; Da-Yuan, Guo; Qing-Yun, Wang; Xiang-Rong, Ma; Rui-Yu, Liang

    2016-06-01

    The critical current density behaviors across a bicrystal grain boundary (GB) inclined to the current direction with different angles in YBa2Cu3O7-δ bicrystal junctions in magnetic fields are investigated. There are two main reasons for the difference in critical current density in junctions at different GB inclined angles in the same magnetic field: (i) the GB plane area determines the current carrying cross section; (ii) the vortex motion dynamics at the GB affects the critical current value when the vortex starts to move along the GB by Lorentz force. Furthermore, the vortex motion in a bicrystal GB is studied by investigating transverse (Hall) and longitudinal current-voltage characteristics (I-V xx and I-V xy ). It is found that the I-V xx curve diverges from linearity at a high driving current, while the I-V xy curve keeps nearly linear, which indicates the vortices inside the GB break out of the GB by Lorentz force. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61501222, 61371036, and 61571219) and the School Scientific Research Fund of Nanjing Institute of Technology, China (Grant Nos. YKJ201418).

  5. Assessing the spatial and field dependence of the critical current density in YBCO bulk superconductors by scanning Hall probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hengstberger, F.; Eisterer, M.; Zehetmayer, M.; Weber, H. W.

    2009-02-01

    Although the flux density map of a bulk superconductor provides in principle sufficient information for calculating the magnitude and the direction of the supercurrent flow, the inversion of the Biot-Savart law is ill conditioned for thick samples, thus rendering this method unsuitable for state of the art bulk superconductors. If a thin (<1 mm) slab is cut from the bulk, the inversion is reasonably well conditioned and the variation of the critical current density in the sample can be calculated with adequate spatial resolution. Therefore a novel procedure is employed, which exploits the symmetry of the problem and solves the equations non-iteratively, assuming a planar thickness-independent current density. The calculated current density at a certain position is found to depend on the magnetic induction. In this way the average field dependence of the critical current density Jc(B) is also obtained at low fields, which is not accessible to magnetization measurements due to the self-field of the sample. It is further shown that an evaluation of magnetization loops, taking the self-field into account, results in a similar dependence in the field range accessible to this experiment.

  6. Evaluation of plasma density in RF CCP discharges from ion current to Langmuir probe: experiment and numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voloshin, Dmitry; Kovalev, Alexander; Mankelevich, Yuri; Proshina, Olga; Rakhimova, Tatyana; Vasilieva, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Experimental measurements of current-voltage relationship in RF CCP discharge in argon at 81 MHz have been performed by cylindrical Langmuir probes technique. Two different probe radii have been used: 50 and 250 μm. The high plasma density 1010-1011 cm-3 has been estimated at specific input power under study. The experimental data on nonmonotonic behavior of probe current with pressure were observed firstly for conditions of RF discharge plasmas. To analyze the probe measurements the fast numerical model for ion current collected by a cylindrical probe has been developed. This model is based on the particle-in-cell with Monte-Carlo collision method for ions motion and Boltzmann relation for electrons. The features of probe data at studied conditions were discussed. The comparative analysis of different collisionless approaches for plasma density calculation from ion probe current is done. It is shown that in general collisionless theories underestimate the plasma density value. For correct evaluation of plasma density experimental I- V probe measurement should be supplied by the numerical simulation. It was demonstrated that the collisionless analytical theory of orbital motion can formally give correct results on plasma density at some plasma conditions even when ion collisions take place. The physical reasons of this accidental validity are explained.

  7. Quantum-mechanical calculations of residual current density excited during gas ionisation by an intense two-colour laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vvedenskii, N. V.; Romanov, A. A.; Silaev, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    By solving analytically and numerically the three-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation, we have studied the excitation of a residual current density during gas ionisation by a two-colour laser pulse containing a field at the fundamental frequency and an additional field at the doubled frequency. We have found the dependences of the residual current density on the phase shift between the components of the field and on the intensity of the fundamental harmonic. It is shown that the strong-field approximation taking into account the interaction of freed electrons with the parent ion yields a good quantitative agreement with the results of direct numerical simulation.

  8. Surface layer structure of AISI 1020 steel at different stages of dry sliding under electric current of high density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleutdinov, K. A.; Rubtsov, V. Ye; Fadin, V. V.; Aleutdinova, M. I.

    2016-02-01

    Wear intensity of the sliding electric contact steel 1020/steel 1045 depending on sliding time is presented at the contact current density higher than 100 A/cm2 without lubricant. It is shown that wear intensity of 1020 steel decreases at increasing of sliding time. Wear intensity is stabilized after some sliding time. This time (burn-in time) decreases at reduction of current density. Structural changes are realized in surface layer. Signs of liquid phase are observed on sliding surface. This liquid isn't a result of melting. It is established using Auger spectrometry that the contact layer contains up to 50 at.% of oxygen.

  9. Tevatron AC dipole system

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.; Kopp, S.E.; Jansson, A.; Syphers, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The AC dipole is an oscillating dipole magnet which can induce large amplitude oscillations without the emittance growth and decoherence. These properties make it a good tool to measure optics of a hadron synchrotron. The vertical AC dipole for the Tevatron is powered by an inexpensive high power audio amplifier since its operating frequency is approximately 20 kHz. The magnet is incorporated into a parallel resonant system to maximize the current. The use of a vertical pinger magnet which has been installed in the Tevatron made the cost relatively inexpensive. Recently, the initial system was upgraded with a more powerful amplifier and oscillation amplitudes up to 2-3{sigma} were achieved with the 980 GeV proton beam. This paper discusses details of the Tevatron AC dipole system and also shows its test results.

  10. Theory of electron current filamentation instability and ion density filamentation in the early development of a DPF discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Guillory, J.; Rose, D. V.; Lerner, E. J.

    2009-01-21

    Two-dimensional simulations of the initial stages of plasma formation in a dense plasma focus show the formation, in a few tens of nanoseconds, of a dense layer of plasma (n{sub e}{approx}10{sup 18} cm{sup -3},T{sub e}{approx}3 eV) in a thin layer surrounding the insulator-covered central anode of the focus device, and carrying axially-directed current at rather high current density.Earlier work on the filamentation of dense cathode plasma in high-power diodes seems to indicate that the anode plasma current layer in a dense plasma focus (DPF) device could be subject to the same instability, creating a growth of axially-directed filaments in the current density. The growth rate for resistive-thermal-driven filamentation, e.g. at 30 torr and {approx}3 eV electron temperature, exceeds the that due to non-thermal current (JxB) driving, and is determined by electron dynamics, so its evolution is quicker than the response-time of the ions.Nonetheless, with such a growing current-density perturbation as a seed and its increasing rippling of the azimuthal magnetic field as a driver, the ions will eventually take part in the azimuthal bunching, forming filaments in the ion density as well. The resistive-thermal-driven filamentation fields thus serve to 'hurry-up' the development of ion density filamentation, as shown approximately in the work presented here. This theory predicts, for light ions, a relatively early ({<=}250 ns) development of visible filaments along the anode, perhaps even before the main rundown phase of the focus plasma motion, and these filaments may persist during the 'liftoff' phase of the current layer to form the rundown phase of the plasma front. This work is supported by Larwenceville Plasma Physics.

  11. Formation of Mosaic Silicon Oxide Structure during Metal-Assisted Electrochemical Etching of Silicon at High Current Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Dao Tran; Anh, Cao Tuan; Ngan, Luong Truc Quynh

    2016-05-01

    We have used constant-current, metal-assisted electrochemical etching of silicon in HF/H2O2/ethanol electrolyte to fabricate porous silicon. We found that, at large enough current density, the sponge-like porous silicon structure is replaced by a mosaic structure, which includes islands of various shapes emerging between trenches that have been etched downward. Energy-dispersive x-ray analysis showed that the surface of the mosaic pieces was covered with silicon oxide, while little silicon oxide developed on the surface of trenches. We suggest that the appearance of the mosaic structure can be explained by the increase in the oxidation rate of silicon when the anodic current density increases, combined with no change in the dissolution rate of silicon oxide into the solution. Consequently, above a certain value of anodic current density, there is sufficient residual silicon oxide on the etched surface to create a continuous thin film. However, if the silicon oxide layer is too thick (e.g., due to too high anodic current density or too long etching time), it will become cracked (formation of mosaic pieces), likely due to differences in thermal expansion coefficient between the amorphous silicon oxide layer and crystalline silicon substrate. The oxide is cracked at locations with many defects, and the cracks reveal the silicon substrate. Therefore, at the locations where cracks occur, etching will go sideways and downward, creating trenches.

  12. Short-circuit current density imaging of crystalline silicon solar cells via lock-in thermography: Robustness and simplifications

    SciTech Connect

    Fertig, Fabian Greulich, Johannes; Rein, Stefan

    2014-11-14

    Spatially resolved determination of solar cell parameters is beneficial for loss analysis and optimization of conversion efficiency. One key parameter that has been challenging to access by an imaging technique on solar cell level is short-circuit current density. This work discusses the robustness of a recently suggested approach to determine short-circuit current density spatially resolved based on a series of lock-in thermography images and options for a simplified image acquisition procedure. For an accurate result, one or two emissivity-corrected illuminated lock-in thermography images and one dark lock-in thermography image have to be recorded. The dark lock-in thermography image can be omitted if local shunts are negligible. Furthermore, it is shown that omitting the correction of lock-in thermography images for local emissivity variations only leads to minor distortions for standard silicon solar cells. Hence, adequate acquisition of one image only is sufficient to generate a meaningful map of short-circuit current density. Beyond that, this work illustrates the underlying physics of the recently proposed method and demonstrates its robustness concerning varying excitation conditions and locally increased series resistance. Experimentally gained short-circuit current density images are validated for monochromatic illumination in comparison to the reference method of light-beam induced current.

  13. Catalysts for ultrahigh current density oxygen cathodes for space fuel cell applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tryk, Donald A.; Yeager, E.

    1992-01-01

    The objective was to identify promising electrocatalyst/support systems for oxygen cathodes capable of operating at ultrahigh current densities in alkaline fuel cells. Such cells will require operation at relatively high temperatures and O2 pressures. A number of materials were prepared, including Pb-Ru and Pb-Ir pyrochlores, RuO2 and Pt-doped RuO2, lithiated NiO and La-Ni perovskites. Several of these materials were prepared using techniques that had not been previously used to prepare them. Particularly interesting was the use of the alkaline solution technique to prepare Pt-doped and Pb-Ru pyrochlores in high area form. Also interesting was the use of the fusion (melt) method for preparing the Pb-Ru pyrochlore. Several of the materials were also deposited with platinum. Well-crystallized Pb2Ru2O(7-y) was used to fabricate very high performance O2 cathodes with good stability in room temperature KOH. This material was also found to be stable over a useful potential range at approx. 140 C in concentrated KOH. For some of the samples, fabrication of the gas-fed electrodes could not be fully optimized during this project period. Future work may be directed at this problem. Pyrochlores that were not well-crystallized were found to be unstable in alkaline solution. Very good O2 reduction performance and stability were observed with Pb2RuO(7-y) in a carbon-based gas-fed electrode with an anion-conducting membrane placed on the electrolyte side of the electrode. The performance came within a factor of about two of that observed without carbon. High area platinum and gold supported on several conductive metal oxide supports were examined. Only small improvements in O2 reduction performance at room temperature were observed for Pb2Ru2O(7-y) as a support because of the high intrinsic activity of the pyrochlore. In contrast, a large improvement was observed for Li-doped NiO as a support for Pt. Very poor performance was observed for Au deposited on Li-NiO at approx. 150 C

  14. Critical current density behaviors across a grain boundary inclined to current with different angles in YBa2Cu3O7‑δ bicrystal junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Hua; Wei-Wei, Xu; Zheng-Ming, Ji; Da-Yuan, Guo; Qing-Yun, Wang; Xiang-Rong, Ma; Rui-Yu, Liang

    2016-06-01

    The critical current density behaviors across a bicrystal grain boundary (GB) inclined to the current direction with different angles in YBa2Cu3O7‑δ bicrystal junctions in magnetic fields are investigated. There are two main reasons for the difference in critical current density in junctions at different GB inclined angles in the same magnetic field: (i) the GB plane area determines the current carrying cross section; (ii) the vortex motion dynamics at the GB affects the critical current value when the vortex starts to move along the GB by Lorentz force. Furthermore, the vortex motion in a bicrystal GB is studied by investigating transverse (Hall) and longitudinal current–voltage characteristics (I–V xx and I–V xy ). It is found that the I–V xx curve diverges from linearity at a high driving current, while the I–V xy curve keeps nearly linear, which indicates the vortices inside the GB break out of the GB by Lorentz force. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61501222, 61371036, and 61571219) and the School Scientific Research Fund of Nanjing Institute of Technology, China (Grant Nos. YKJ201418).

  15. Synthesis of zinc oxide nanostructures on graphene/glass substrate by electrochemical deposition: effects of current density and temperature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The electrochemical growth of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures on graphene on glass using zinc nitrate hexahydrate was studied. The effects of current densities and temperatures on the morphological, structural, and optical properties of the ZnO structures were studied. Vertically aligned nanorods were obtained at a low temperature of 75°C, and the diameters increased with current density. Growth temperature seems to have a strong effect in generating well-defined hexagonal-shape nanorods with a smooth top edge surface. A film-like structure was observed for high current densities above -1.0 mA/cm2 and temperatures above 80°C due to the coalescence between the neighboring nanorods with large diameter. The nanorods grown at a temperature of 75°C with a low current density of -0.1 mA/cm2 exhibited the highest density of 1.45 × 109 cm-2. X-ray diffraction measurements revealed that the grown ZnO crystallites were highly oriented along the c-axis. The intensity ratio of the ultraviolet (UV) region emission to the visible region emission, IUV/IVIS, showed a decrement with the current densities for all grown samples. The samples grown at the current density below -0.5 mA/cm2 showed high IUV/IVIS values closer to or higher than 1.0, suggesting their fewer structural defects. For all the ZnO/graphene structures, the high transmittance up to 65% was obtained at the light wavelength of 550 nm. Structural and optical properties of the grown ZnO structures seem to be effectively controlled by the current density rather than the growth temperature. ZnO nanorod/graphene hybrid structure on glass is expected to be a promising structure for solar cell which is a conceivable candidate to address the global need for an inexpensive alternative energy source. PMID:25411567

  16. Ultrasound Current Source Density Imaging in live rabbit hearts using clinical intracardiac catheter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qian

    Ultrasound Current Source Density Imaging (UCSDI) is a noninvasive modality for mapping electrical activities in the body (brain and heart) in 4-dimensions (space + time). Conventional cardiac mapping technologies for guiding the radiofrequency ablation procedure for treatment of cardiac arrhythmias have certain limitations. UCSDI can potentially overcome these limitations and enhance the electrophysiology mapping of the heart. UCSDI exploits the acoustoelectric (AE) effect, an interaction between ultrasound pressure and electrical resistivity. When an ultrasound beam intersects a current path in a material, the local resistivity of the material is modulated by the ultrasonic pressure, and a change in voltage signal can be detected based on Ohm's Law. The degree of modulation is determined by the AE interaction constant K. K is a fundamental property of any type of material, and directly affects the amplitude of the AE signal detected in UCSDI. UCSDI requires detecting a small AE signal associated with electrocardiogram. So sensitivity becomes a major challenge for transferring UCSDI to the clinic. This dissertation will determine the limits of sensitivity and resolution for UCSDI, balancing the tradeoff between them by finding the optimal parameters for electrical cardiac mapping, and finally test the optimized system in a realistic setting. This work begins by describing a technique for measuring K, the AE interaction constant, in ionic solution and biological tissue, and reporting the value of K in excised rabbit cardiac tissue for the first time. K was found to be strongly dependent on concentration for the divalent salt CuSO4, but not for the monovalent salt NaCl, consistent with their different chemical properties. In the rabbit heart tissue, K was determined to be 0.041 +/- 0.012 %/MPa, similar to the measurement of K in physiologic saline: 0.034 +/- 0.003 %/MPa. Next, this dissertation investigates the sensitivity limit of UCSDI by quantifying the relation

  17. An analytical model for floating probes in AC plasma and its application to double probes for high density, high power RF discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caneses, Juan Francisco; Blackwell, Boyd; Plasma Research Laboratory Team

    2013-10-01

    In this work we provide an analytical model that allows one to quantitatively assess the RF compensation performance and suitability of the double probe technique for use in RF generated plasma. The model is based in the theory of the self-bias effect as described in Braithwaite's work, which we extend to include the time resolved behavior of floating probes. We provide experimental verification for this model and show that the theory of transient RF self-bias probes and harmonic current detection probes are limiting cases of this extended model. Furthermore, the model shows that the RF compensation is solely dependent on the sheath impedance, the probe's stray capacitance to ground and RF frequency. In addition, we use these results to implement a double probe system for use in high density helicon plasma where heat loads could potentially damage the intricate components in an RF compensating circuit. Finally we use this model to (1) recommend ways to extend the operational regime of double probes where the plasma conditions would render them unsuitable and to (2) comment on the use of this model to aid design of RF compensated Langmuir probes.

  18. Enhancement of critical current density in YBa2Cu3O7-dgr thin films grown using PLD on YSZ (001) surface modified with Ag nano-dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionescu, M.; Li, A. H.; Zhao, Y.; Liu, H. K.; Crisan, A.

    2004-07-01

    Y123 thin films were grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on YSZ (001) substrate. Prior to the film deposition, a discontinuous layer of Ag was deposited on the substrate, also using PLD, in the form of separate islands. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) investigation of the Ag layer showed that its morphology consisted of self-assembled islands of nanometre size, randomly distributed on the surface of the substrate, called nano-dots. The Y123 superconducting films grown on such a surface were characterized using AFM, x-ray diffraction, secondary electron microscopy, ac susceptibility and dc magnetization. The results show that there is no significant difference in surface morphology, crystallographic orientation, phase composition or superconducting transition temperature between the Y123 films grown on YSZ (001) with an Ag nano-dots layer and a control Y123 film grown on a virgin YSZ (001) surface. On the other hand, at 77 K, the magnetic critical current density ( J_c^m ) was three times higher for the Y123 film grown on YSZ with the modified (001) surface than for the film grown on YSZ with a virgin (001) surface. At 5 K the enhancement of J_c^m was approximately seven times, at both low and high fields. This suggests an increase in pinning, caused presumably by point defects formed in the Y123 film above the Ag islands.

  19. Finite difference calculations of current densities in a homogeneous model of a man exposed to extremely low frequency electric fields.

    PubMed

    Dimbylow, P J

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents three-dimensional finite difference calculations of induced current densities in a grounded, homogeneous, realistically human-shaped phantom. Comparison is made with published experimental values of current density at 60 Hz, measured in conducting saline manikins with their arms down by the side. The congruence between calculation and experiment gives confidence in the applicability of the numerical method and phantom shape to other configurations. The effect of raising both arms above the head is to reduce the current densities in the head and neck by approximately 50% and to increase those from the thorax downwards by 20-30%. A sensitivity analysis was performed on the shape and dimensions of the phantom, from a 45-kg, 1.5-m-tall person to a 140-kg, 1.9-m-tall person. When the phantom is grounded through both feet the current densities range from 50 to 90 microAm-2 in the head (all values for a 60-Hz, 1-kVm-1, vertical applied field), 70 to 140 microAm-2 in the thorax, 150 to 440 microAm-2 at the crotch, and 500 to 2,230 microAm-2 in the ankle. When grounded through only one foot the current densities at the crotch range from 400 to 1,000 microAm-2 and from 1,000 to 4,400 microAm-2 in the ankle of the grounded leg. Scale transformations of the short-circuit current with phantom height, weight, and surface area are confirmed. PMID:3122768

  20. Theoretical design of gradient coils with minimum power dissipation: accounting for the discretization of current density into coil windings.

    PubMed

    While, Peter T; Korvink, Jan G; Shah, N Jon; Poole, Michael S

    2013-10-01

    Gradient coil windings are typically constructed from either variable width copper tracks or fixed width wires. Excessive power dissipation within these windings during gradient coil operation limits the maximum drive current or duty cycle of the coil. It is common to design gradient coils in terms of a continuous minimum power current density and to perform a discretization to obtain the locations of the coil tracks or wires. However, the existence of finite gaps between these conductors and a maximum conductor width leads to an underestimation of coil resistance when calculated using the continuous current density. Put equivalently, the actual current density within the tracks or wires is higher than that used in the optimization and this departure results in suboptimal coil designs. In this work, a mapping to an effective current density is proposed to account for these effects and provide the correct contribution to the power dissipation. This enables the design of gradient coils that are genuinely optimal in terms of power minimization, post-discretization. The method was applied to the theoretical design of a variety of small x- and z-gradient coils for use in small animal imaging and coils for human head imaging. Computer-driven comparisons were made between coils designed with and without the current density mapping, in terms of simulated power dissipation. For coils to be built using variable width tracks, the method provides slight reductions in power dissipation in most cases and substantial gains only in cases where the minimum separation between track centre-lines is less than twice the gap size. However, for coils to be built using fixed width wires, very considerable reductions in dissipated power are consistently attainable (up to 60%) when compared to standard approaches of coil optimization. PMID:23994605

  1. Optimal control of the electronic current density: Application to one- and two-dimensional one-electron systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kammerlander, David; Marques, Miguel A. L.; Castro, Alberto

    2011-04-15

    Quantum optimal control theory is a powerful tool for engineering quantum systems subject to external fields such as the ones created by intense lasers. The formulation relies on a suitable definition for a target functional, that translates the intended physical objective to a mathematical form. We propose the use of target functionals defined in terms of the one-particle density and its current. A strong motivation for this is the possibility of using time-dependent density-functional theory for the description of the system dynamics. We exemplify this idea by defining an objective functional that on one hand attempts a large overlap with a target density and on the other hand minimizes the current. The latter requirement leads to optimized states with increased stability, which we prove with a few examples of one- and two-dimensional one-electron systems.

  2. Extracted ion current density in close-coupling multi-antenna type radio frequency driven ion source: CC-MATIS

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Y. E-mail: oka@LHD.nifs.ac.jp; Shoji, T.

    2014-02-15

    Positive ions are extracted by using a small extractor from the Close-Coupling Multi-Antenna Type radio frequency driven Ion Source. Two types of RF antenna are used. The maximum extracted ion current density reaches 0.106 A/cm{sup 2}. The RF net power efficiency of the extracted ion current density under standard condition is 11.6 mA/cm{sup 2}/kW. The efficiency corresponds to the level of previous beam experiments on elementary designs of multi-antenna sources, and also to the efficiency level of a plasma driven by a filament in the same chamber. The multi-antenna type RF plasma source is promising for all metal high density ion sources in a large volume chamber.

  3. Effect of current density on the microstructure and corrosion resistance of microarc oxidized ZK60 magnesium alloy.

    PubMed

    You, Qiongya; Yu, Huijun; Wang, Hui; Pan, Yaokun; Chen, Chuanzhong

    2014-09-01

    The application of magnesium alloys as biomaterials is limited by their poor corrosion behavior. Microarc oxidation (MAO) treatment was used to prepare ceramic coatings on ZK60 magnesium alloys in order to overcome the poor corrosion resistance. The process was conducted at different current densities (3.5 and 9.0 A/dm(2)), and the effect of current density on the process was studied. The microstructure, elemental distribution, and phase composition of the MAO coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry, and x-ray diffraction, respectively. The increment of current density contributes to the increase of thickness. A new phase Mg2SiO4 was detected as the current density increased to 9.0 A/dm(2). A homogeneous distribution of micropores could be observed in the coating produced at 3.5 A/dm(2), while the surface morphology of the coating formed at 9.0 A/dm(2) was more rough and apparent microcracks could be observed. The coating obtained at 3.5 A/dm(2) possessed a better anticorrosion behavior. PMID:25280850

  4. Syntrophic interactions between H2-scavenging and anode-respiring bacteria can improve current density in microbial electrochemical cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    High current density of 10.0-14.6 A/m2 and COD removal up to 96% were obtained in a microbial electrochemical cell (MEC) fed with digestate at hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 4d and 8d. Volatile fatty acids became undetectable in MEC effluent (HRT 8d), except for trivial acetat...

  5. Spatially resolved charge-state and current-density distributions at the extraction of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Panitzsch, Lauri; Peleikis, Thies; Stalder, Michael; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2011-09-15

    In this paper we present our measurements of charge-state and current-density distributions performed in very close vicinity (15 mm) of the extraction of our hexapole geometry electron cyclotron resonance ion source. We achieved a relatively high spatial resolution reducing the aperture of our 3D-movable extraction (puller) electrode to a diameter of only 0.5 mm. Thus, we are able to limit the source of the extracted ion beam to a very small region of the plasma electrode's hole (O = 4 mm) and therefore to a very small region of the neutral plasma sheath. The information about the charge-state distribution and the current density in the plane of the plasma electrode at each particular position is conserved in the ion beam. We determined the total current density distribution at a fixed coaxial distance of only 15 mm to the plasma electrode by remotely moving the small-aperture puller electrode which contained a dedicated Faraday cup (FC) across the aperture of the plasma electrode. In a second measurement we removed the FC and recorded m/q-spectra for the different positions using a sector magnet. From our results we can deduce that different ion charge-states can be grouped into bloated triangles of different sizes and same orientation at the extraction with the current density peaking at centre. This confirms observations from other groups based on simulations and emittance measurements. We present our measurements in detail and discuss possible systematic errors.

  6. Investigations of LHW-plasma coupling and current drive at high density related to H-mode experiments in EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, B. J.; Li, Y. C.; Zhang, L.; Li, M. H.; Wei, W.; Kong, E. H.; Wang, M.; Xu, H. D.; Wang, S. L.; Xu, G. S.; Zhao, L. M.; Hu, H. C.; Jia, H.; Cheng, M.; Yang, Y.; Liu, L.; Zhao, H. L.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Goniche, M.; Amicucci, L.; Cesario, R.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Baek, S. G.; Parker, R.; Bonoli, P. T.; Paoletti, F.; Yang, C.; Shan, J. F.; Liu, F. K.; Zhao, Y. P.; Gong, X. Z.; Hu, L. Q.; Gao, X.; Wan, B. N.; Li, J. G.; the EAST Team

    2015-09-01

    Two important issues in achieving lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) high confinement plasma in EAST are to improve lower hybrid wave (LHW)-plasma coupling and to drive the plasma current at a high density. Studies in different configurations with different directions of toroidal magnetic field (Bt) show that the density near the antenna is affected by both the radial electric field induced by plasma without a LHW (Er_plasma) in the scrape off layer (SOL), and the radial electric field induced by LHW power (Er_LH) near the grill. Investigations indicate that Er  ×  Bt in the SOL leads to a different effect of configuration on the LHW-plasma coupling and Er_LH  ×  Bt accounts for the asymmetric density behaviour in the SOL observed in the experiments, where Er is the total radial electric field in the SOL. Modelling of parametric instability (PI), collisional absorption (CA) and scattering from density fluctuations (SDF) in the edge region, performed considering the parameters of high density LHCD experiments in EAST, has shown that these mechanisms could be responsible for the low current drive (CD) efficiency at high density. Radiofrequency probe spectra, useful for documenting PI occurrence, show sidebands whose amplitude in the case of the lithiated vacuum chamber is smaller than in the case of poor lithiation, consistently with growth rates from PI modeling of the respective reference discharges. Since strong lithiation is also expected to diminish the parasitic effect on the LHCD of the remaining possible mechanisms, this appears to be a useful method for improving LHCD efficiency at a high density.

  7. Separation of a midlevel density current from the bottom of a continental slope.

    PubMed

    Stern, M E

    1999-02-16

    The high-salinity water flowing out of the Mediterranean Sea descends to mid depths in the density-stratified ocean, continues as a narrow jet along the Iberian continental slope, and intermittently detaches large-scale eddies (called "Meddies"). This process is important because it maintains the relatively high mean salinity of a major water mass (the "Mediterranean Intermediate Water") in the North Atlantic. Our simplified model of this jet consists of a moving layer with intermediate density rho2 sandwiched between motionless layers of density rho1 < rho2 and rho3 > rho2. The inshore (anticyclonic) portion of the midlevel jet (in the "rho2-water") rests on an inclined bottom (the continental slope), whereas the (cyclonic) offshore portion rests on the density interface of the stagnant deep (rho3) layer. An inviscid, steady, and finite-amplitude longwave theory is used to show that if the cross-stream topographic slope increases gradually in the downstream direction, then the "rho2-jet" is deflected off the bottom slope and onto the upper density interface of the rho3 layer. The computed magnitude of this separation effect is such as to produce an essentially free jet which is removed from the stabilizing influence of the continental topography. It is therefore conjectured that time-dependent effects (baroclinic instability) will produce further amplification, causing an eddy to detach seaward from the branch of the jet remaining on the slope. PMID:9990002

  8. AC photovoltaic module magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, C.; Chang, G.J.; Reyes, A.B.; Whitaker, C.M.

    1997-12-31

    Implementation of alternating current (AC) photovoltaic (PV) modules, particularly for distributed applications such as PV rooftops and facades, may be slowed by public concern about electric and magnetic fields (EMF). This paper documents magnetic field measurements on an AC PV module, complementing EMF research on direct-current PV modules conducted by PG and E in 1993. Although not comprehensive, the PV EMF data indicate that 60 Hz magnetic fields (the EMF type of greatest public concern) from PV modules are comparable to, or significantly less than, those from household appliances. Given the present EMF research knowledge, AC PV module EMF may not merit considerable concern.

  9. The use of segmented cathodes to determine the spoke current density distribution in high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Poolcharuansin, Phitsanu; Estrin, Francis Lockwood; Bradley, James W.

    2015-04-28

    The localized target current density associated with quasi-periodic ionization zones (spokes) has been measured in a high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge using an array of azimuthally separated and electrical isolated probes incorporated into a circular aluminum target. For a particular range of operating conditions (pulse energies up to 2.2 J and argon pressures from 0.2 to 1.9 Pa), strong oscillations in the probe current density are seen with amplitudes up to 52% above a base value. These perturbations, identified as spokes, travel around the discharge above the target in the E×B direction. Using phase information from the angularly separated probes, the spoke drift speeds, angular frequencies, and mode number have been determined. Generally, at low HiPIMS pulse energies E{sub p} < 0.8 J, spokes appear to be chaotic in nature (with random arrival times), however as E{sub p} increases, coherent spokes are observed with velocities between 6.5 and 10 km s{sup −1} and mode numbers m = 3 or above. At E{sub p} > 1.8 J, the plasma becomes spoke-free. The boundaries between chaotic, coherent, and no-spoke regions are weakly dependent on pressure. During each HiPIMS pulse, the spoke velocities increase by about 50%. Such an observation is explained by considering spoke velocities to be determined by the critical ionization velocity, which changes as the plasma composition changes during the pulse. From the shape of individual current density oscillations, it appears that the leading edge of the spoke is associated with a slow increase in local current density to the target and the rear with a more rapid decrease. The measurements show that the discharge current density associated with individual spokes is broadly spread over a wide region of the target.

  10. 3D model of small-scale density cavities in the auroral magnetosphere with field-aligned current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bespalov, P. A.; Misonova, V. G.; Savina, O. N.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a 3D model of small-scale density cavities stimulated by an auroral field-aligned current and an oscillating field-aligned current of kinetic Alfvén waves. It is shown that when the field-aligned current increases so that the electron drift velocity exceeds a value of the order of the electron thermal velocity, the plasma becomes unstable to the formation of cavities with low density and strong electric field. The condition of instability is associated with the value of the background magnetic field. In the case of a relatively weak magnetic field (where the electron gyro-radius is greater than the ion acoustic wavelength), the current instability can lead to the formation of one-dimensional cavities along the magnetic field. In the case of a stronger magnetic field (where the ion acoustic wavelength is greater than the electron gyro-radius, but still is less than the ion gyro-radius), the instability can lead to the formation of 3D density cavities. In this case, the spatial scales of the cavity, both along and across the background magnetic field, can be comparable, and at the earlier stage of the cavity formation they are of the order of the ion acoustic wavelength. Rarefactions of the cavity density are accompanied by an increase in the electric field and are limited by the pressure of bipolar electric fields that occur within them. The estimates of typical density cavity characteristics and the results of numerical solutions agree with known experimental data: small-scale structures with a sufficiently strong electric field are observed in the auroral regions with strong field-aligned current.

  11. Enhancement of critical current density in fast neutron irradiated melt-textured YBa 2Cu 3O 7- x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puźniak, R.; Wiśniewski, A.; Baran, M.; Szymczak, H.; Pingxiang, Zhang; Jingrong, Wang; Lian, Zhou; Pytel, K.; Pytel, B.

    The critical current density in melt-textured samples obtained by the powder melting process was determined from magnetization measurements. Linear dependence between the width of the hysteresis loop and sample size was observed for both unirradiated and irradiated samples. This indicates that the critical current is circulating through the whole sample and is not disconnected by weak links, even when a magnetic field is applied in the irradiated sample. After fast neutron irradiation with fluences from 5 × 10 16 to 6 × 10 17 n cm -2 ( E > 0.5 MeV), significant enhancement of the critical current density, jc, was observed. Critical current density, determined from magnetization measurements, for magnetic field perpendicular to the a-b plane, jcab, reaches - 10 5 A cm 42 at 77 K in 1 T. For H parallel to the a-b plane, jcc along the c-axis reaches 5 × 10 3 A cm -2. An increase in the anisotropy of the critical current was observed after fast neutron irradiation in the temperature range 60 - 80 K.

  12. Modeling, Fabrication and Test Results of a MOS Controlled Thyristor — MCT - with high controllable current density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyavskiy, Evgeny; Popov, Vladimir; Vermeire, Bert

    2005-06-01

    A simple 2D static model for the evaluation of the maximum controllable current density in a MOS Controlled Thyristor (MCT) will be presented. It is shown that a 2D model of a P-I-N diode with a cathode PMOS transistor is appropriate for simulating the carrier distribution in an MCT. The maximum controllable current density can be modeled accurately using a static model of the free electron and acceptor concentrations. The simple physics rationale for this is discussed. MCT test results validate this simplified modeling approach. Punchthrough technology (PT) for high voltage application was used to manufacture an MCT with breakdown voltage of 2500 V and a maximum controllable current of 33 A with active area 0.33 cm2. The total number of N-type cathode emitter cells is 144,042. For optimization, transient power dissipation electron irradiation with 2 MeV energy was used. This increased the maximum controllable current to 50 A. To our knowledge, our current density values of 100 A/cm2 for non irradiated and 150 A/cm2 for irradiated MCTs are the highest that have been reported for large area devices.

  13. Microstructural and crystallographic imperfections of MgB{sub 2} superconducting wire and their correlation with the critical current density

    SciTech Connect

    Shahabuddin, Mohammed; Alzayed, Nasser S.; Oh, Sangjun; Choi, Seyong; Maeda, Minoru; Hata, Satoshi; Shimada, Yusuke; Hossain, Md Shahriar Al; Kim, Jung Ho

    2014-01-15

    A comprehensive study of the effects of structural imperfections in MgB{sub 2} superconducting wire has been conducted. As the sintering temperature becomes lower, the structural imperfections of the MgB{sub 2} material are increased, as reflected by detailed X-ray refinement and the normal state resistivity. The crystalline imperfections, caused by lattice disorder, directly affect the impurity scattering between the π and σ bands of MgB{sub 2}, resulting in a larger upper critical field. In addition, low sintering temperature keeps the grain size small, which leads to a strong enhancement of pinning, and thereby, enhanced critical current density. Owing to both the impurity scattering and the grain boundary pinning, the critical current density, irreversibility field, and upper critical field are enhanced. Residual voids or porosities obviously remain in the MgB{sub 2}, however, even at low sintering temperature, and thus block current transport paths.

  14. Immersed boundary Eulerian-Lagrangian 3D simulation of pyroclastic density currents: numerical scheme and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doronzo, Domenico Maria; de Tullio, Marco; Pascazio, Giuseppe; Dellino, Pierfrancesco

    2010-05-01

    Pyroclastic density currents are ground hugging, hot, gas-particle flows representing the most hazardous events of explosive volcanism. Their impact on structures is a function of dynamic pressure, which expresses the lateral load that such currents exert over buildings. In this paper we show how analog experiments can be matched with numerical simulations for capturing the essential physics of the multiphase flow. We used an immersed boundary scheme for the mesh generation, which helped in reconstructing the steep velocity and particle concentration gradients near the ground surface. Results show that the calculated values of dynamic pressure agree reasonably with the experimental measurements. These outcomes encourage future application of our method for the assessment of the impact of pyroclastic density currents at the natural scale.

  15. An experimental investigation of the dynamics of submarine leveed channel initiation as sediment-laden density currents experience sudden unconfinement

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, Joel C; Hilley, George E; Fildani, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Leveed submarine channels play a critical role in the transfer of sediment from the upper continental slopes to interslope basins and ultimately deepwater settings. Despite a reasonable understanding of how these channels grow once established, how such channels initiate on previously unchannelized portions of the seafloor remains poorly understood. We conducted a series of experiments that elucidate the influence of excess density relative to flow velocity on the dynamics of, and depositional morphologies arising from, density currents undergoing sudden unconfinement across a sloped bed. Experimental currents transported only suspended sediment across a non-erodible substrate. Under flow conditions ranging from supercritical to subcritical (bulk Richardson numbers of 0.02 to 1.2) our experiments failed to produce deposits resembling or exhibiting the potential to evolve into self-formed leveed channels. In the absence of excess density, a submerged sediment-laden flow produced sharp crested lateral deposits bounding the margins of the flow for approximately a distance of two outlet widths down basin. These lateral deposits terminated in a centerline deposit that greatly exceeded marginal deposits in thickness. As excess density increased relative to the outlet velocity, the rate of lateral spreading of the flow increased relative to the downstream propagation of the density current, transitioning from a narrow flow aligned with the channel outlet to a broad radially expanding flow. Coincident with these changes in flow dynamics, the bounding lateral deposits extended for shorter distances, had lower, more poorly defined crests that were increasingly wider in separation than the initial outlet, and progressively became more oblong rather than linear. Based on our results, we conclude that leveed channels cannot initiate from sediment-laden density currents under strictly depositional conditions. Partial confinement of these currents appears to be necessary to

  16. Transport studies in polymer electrolyte fuel cell with porous metallic flow field at ultra high current density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srouji, Abdul-Kader

    Achieving cost reduction for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC) requires a simultaneous effort in increasing power density while reducing precious metal loading. In PEFCs, the cathode performance is often limiting due to both the slow oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), and mass transport limitation caused by limited oxygen diffusion and liquid water flooding at high current density. This study is motivated by the achievement of ultra-high current density through the elimination of the channel/land (C/L) paradigm in PEFC flow field design. An open metallic element (OME) flow field capable of operating at unprecedented ultra-high current density (3 A/cm2) introduces new advantages and limitations for PEFC operation. The first part of this study compares the OME with a conventional C/L flow field, through performance and electrochemical diagnostic tools such as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results indicate the uniqueness of the OME's mass transport improvement. No sign of operation limitation due to flooding is noted. The second part specifically examines water management at high current density using the OME flow field. A unique experimental setup is developed to measure steady-state and transient net water drag across the membrane, in order to characterize the fundamental aspects of water transport at high current density with the OME. Instead of flooding, the new limitation is identified to be anode side dry-out of the membrane, caused by electroosmotic drag. The OME improves water removal from the cathode, which immediately improves oxygen transport and performance. However, the low water content in the cathode reduces back diffusion of water to the membrane, and electroosmotic drag dominates at high current density, leading to dry-out. The third part employs the OME flow field as a tool that avoids C/L effects endemic to a typical flow field, in order to study oxygen transport resistance at the catalyst layer of a PEFC. In open literature, a

  17. Cooling of Water in a Flask: Convection Currents in a Fluid with a Density Maximum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velasco, S.; White, J. A.; Roman, F. L.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of density inversion on the convective flow of water in a spherical glass flask cooled with the help of an ice-water bath is shown. The experiment was carried out by temperature measurements (cooling curves) taken at three different heights along the vertical diameter of the flask. Flows inside the flask are visualized by seeding the…

  18. Density banding in corals: barcodes of past and current climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brachert, T. C.; Reuter, M.; Krüger, S.; Böcker, A.; Lohmann, H.; Mertz-Kraus, R.; Fassoulas, C.

    2013-12-01

    The predicted sea surface temperature (SST) rise over the next decades is likely hazardous to coral health because precipitation of the calcareous skeleton depends primarily on SST. Temperature modulates vertical growth and density of the skeleton with seasonal SST changes resulting in an alternation of high-density and low-density bands (HDB and LDB). Notably, growth rates and the timing of the HDBs and LDBs relative to the seasons differ on a global scale within geographic regions. In this contribution, we use combined information of skeletal density and seasonally resolved oxygen isotope SST estimates from massive Porites from a Late Miocene (9 Ma) reef in the eastern Mediterranean Sea (Crete, Greece) to understand reef vulnerability over short and geological periods of time. Three types of HDB-SST relationships have been found: (1) coincidence of HDB with summer, (2) winter or (3) autumn and spring. The latter doubles HDBs in a year and implies maximum calcification is coupled to the taxon-specific optimum SST during the transitional seasons and reduced at its respective critical winter and summer SSTs. Modeling with a nonlinear temperature-calcification relationship reproduces the climate barcode of density bands. The model should be relevant for other poikilothermic carbonate producers in reefs and platforms and has implications for judging geographic distributions and causes of extinctions of corals, benthic carbonate communities and entire carbonate systems. With regard to the causes underlying expansion and demise of carbonate platforms and reefs in geological history, we expect the model predictions to help for a deeper understanding of biotic responses during hyperthermals or coolings and possibly also for identifying regions in the modern ocean where corals are endangered or taking advantage of global warming.

  19. Alfven resonance mode conversion in the Phaedrus-T current drive experiments: Modelling and density fluctuations measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Vukovic, M.; Harper, M.; Breun, R.; Wukitch, S.

    1995-12-31

    Current drive experiments on the Phaedrus-T tokamak performed with a low field side two-strap fast wave antenna at frequencies below {omega}{sub cH} show loop volt drops of up to 30% with strap phasing (0, {pi}/2). RF induced density fluctuations in the plasma core have also been observed with a microwave reflectometer. It is believed that they are caused by kinetic Alfven waves generated by mode conversion of fast waves at the Alfven resonance. Correlation of the observed density fluctuations with the magnitude of the {Delta}V{sub loop} suggest that the {Delta}V{sub loop} is attributable to current drive/heating due to mode converted kinetic Alfven waves. The toroidal cold plasma wave code LION is used to model the Alfven resonance mode conversion surfaces in the experiments while the cylindrical hot plasma kinetic wave code ISMENE is used to model the behavior of kinetic Alfven waves at the Alfven resonance location. Initial results obtained from limited density, magnetic field, antenna phase, and impurity scans show good agreement between the RF induced density fluctuations and the predicted behavior of the kinetic Alfven waves. Detailed comparisons between the density fluctuations and the code predictions are presented.

  20. Unidirectional bulk conduction and the anomalous temperature dependence of drift current under a trap-density gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yukio

    2010-05-01

    Nonlinear drift conduction under a trap-density gradient is mathematically formulated. Semianalytical and numerical solutions demonstrate bulk-induced unidirectional current flow, i.e., rectification. The present theory is in excellent agreement with various experimental J-V characteristics ( J : current density and V : applied voltage). At low V , the J-V characteristics are ohmic and bidirectional. As the injection increases, the J-V characteristics become nonlinear and exhibit unidirectionality under proper conditions. The major requirements for a large unidirectionality are the trap-density gradient G≫1 , an intermediate V , and not too large trap-filling factor Θ , which requires the presence of acceptorlike traps. The unidirectional J-V characteristics due to the difference in trap-filled-to-trap-free-limit voltage VTFL for forward and reverse bias markedly resemble the standard rectification. In addition, the trap-density gradient yields a positive T dependence of resistance for a proper set of parameters, evident J∝V1.5 characteristics, and a photovoltaic effect. The present results suggest that bulk conduction under trap-density gradient explains fractions of resistance switching and rectification phenomena. The semianalytical solutions are verified by numerical solutions and comparison with experiments. In particular, semianalytical solutions for shallow-trap case excellently fit the experimental data by three parameters in practice: two scaling factors and G .

  1. Simultaneous distribution of AC and DC power

    DOEpatents

    Polese, Luigi Gentile

    2015-09-15

    A system and method for the transport and distribution of both AC (alternating current) power and DC (direct current) power over wiring infrastructure normally used for distributing AC power only, for example, residential and/or commercial buildings' electrical wires is disclosed and taught. The system and method permits the combining of AC and DC power sources and the simultaneous distribution of the resulting power over the same wiring. At the utilization site a complementary device permits the separation of the DC power from the AC power and their reconstruction, for use in conventional AC-only and DC-only devices.

  2. Spin transfer torques in MnSi at ultralow current densities.

    PubMed

    Jonietz, F; Mühlbauer, S; Pfleiderer, C; Neubauer, A; Münzer, W; Bauer, A; Adams, T; Georgii, R; Böni, P; Duine, R A; Everschor, K; Garst, M; Rosch, A

    2010-12-17

    Spin manipulation using electric currents is one of the most promising directions in the field of spintronics. We used neutron scattering to observe the influence of an electric current on the magnetic structure in a bulk material. In the skyrmion lattice of manganese silicon, where the spins form a lattice of magnetic vortices similar to the vortex lattice in type II superconductors, we observe the rotation of the diffraction pattern in response to currents that are over five orders of magnitude smaller than those typically applied in experimental studies on current-driven magnetization dynamics in nanostructures. We attribute our observations to an extremely efficient coupling of inhomogeneous spin currents to topologically stable knots in spin structures. PMID:21164010

  3. Farfield Ion Current Density Measurements before and after the NASA HiVHAc EDU2 Vibration Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Wensheng; Kamhawi, Hani; Shastry, Rohit

    2012-01-01

    There is an increasing need to characterize the plasma plume of the NASA HiVHAc thruster in order to better understand the plasma physics and to obtain data for spacecraft interaction studies. To address this need, the HiVHAc research team is in the process of developing a number of plume diagnostic systems. This paper presents the initial results of the farfield current density probe diagnostic system. Farfield current density measurements were carried out before and after a vibration test of the HiVHAc engineering development unit 2 that simulate typical launch conditions. The main purposes of the current density measurements were to evaluate the thruster plume divergence and to investigate any changes in the plasma plume that may occur as a result of the vibration test. Radial sweeps, as opposed to the traditional polar sweeps, were performed during these tests. The charged-weighted divergence angles were found to vary from 16 to 28 degrees. Charge density profiles measured pre- and post-vibration-test were found to be in excellent agreement. This result, alongside thrust measurements reported in a companion paper, confirm that the operation of the HiVHAc engineering development unit 2 were not altered by full-level/random vibration testing.

  4. Current density in a model of a human body with a conductive implant exposed to ELF electric and magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Valic, Blaz; Gajsek, Peter; Miklavcic, Damijan

    2009-10-01

    A numerical model of a human body with an intramedullary nail in the femur was built to evaluate the effects of the implant on the current density distribution in extremely low frequency electric and magnetic fields. The intramedullary nail was chosen because it is one of the longest high conductive implants used in the human body. As such it is expected to alter the electric and magnetic fields significantly. The exposure was a simultaneous combination of inferior to superior electric field and posterior to anterior magnetic field both alternating at 50 Hz with the values corresponding to the ICNIRP reference levels: 5000 V m(-1) for electric field and 100 microT for magnetic flux density. The calculated current density distribution inside the model was compared to the ICNIRP basic restrictions for general public (2 mA m(-2)). The results show that the implant significantly increases the current density up to 9.5 mA m(-2) in the region where it is in contact with soft tissue in the model with the implant in comparison to 0.9 mA m(-2) in the model without the implant. As demonstrated the ICNIRP basic restrictions are exceeded in a limited volume of the tissue in spite of the compliance with the ICNIRP reference levels for general public, meaning that the existing safety limits do not necessarily protect implanted persons to the same extent as they protect people without implants.

  5. Enhancement in field emission current density of Ni nanoparticles embedded in thin silica matrix by swift heavy ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sarker, Debalaya; Patra, Rajkumar; Srivastava, P.; Ghosh, S.; Kumar, H.; Kabiraj, D.; Avasthi, D. K.; Vayalil, Sarathlal K.; Roth, S. V.

    2014-05-07

    The field emission (FE) properties of nickel nanoparticles embedded in thin silica matrix irradiated with 100 MeV Au{sup +7} ions at various fluences are studied here. A large increase in FE current density is observed in the irradiated films as compared to their as deposited counterpart. The dependence of FE properties on irradiation fluence is correlated with surface roughness, density of states of valence band and size distribution of nanoparticles as examined with atomic force microscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering. A current density as high as 0.48 mA/cm{sup 2} at an applied field 15 V/μm has been found for the first time for planar field emitters in the film irradiated with fluence of 5.0 × 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. This significant enhancement in the current density is attributed to an optimized size distribution along with highest surface roughness of the same. This new member of field emission family meets most of the requirements of cold cathodes for vacuum micro/nanoelectronic devices.

  6. Superconductor coil geometry and ac losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, T. V., Jr.; Zapata, R. N.

    1976-01-01

    An empirical relation is presented which allows simple computation of volume-averaged winding fields from central fields for coils of small rectangular cross sections. This relation suggests that, in certain applications, ac-loss minimization can be accomplished by use of low winding densities, provided that hysteresis losses are independent of winding density. The ac-loss measurements on coils wound of twisted multifilamentary composite superconductors show no significant dependence on ac losses on winding density, thus permitting the use of winding density as an independent design parameter in loss minimization.

  7. Study of the origin and structure of a nocturnal atmospheric density current from observations and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ander Arrillaga, Jon; Yagüe, Carlos; Román-Cascón, Carlos; Sastre, Mariano

    2016-04-01

    Density currents are flows generated when a dense fluid passes through a less dense surrounding, under the influence of gravity. They usually appear as a consequence of sea-breeze circulations, thunderstorm outflows or katabatic flows. Density currents acquire a particular relevance during nocturnal stable situations, as their onset causes a significant turbulence increase (both from buoyancy and shear) and they occasionally produce turbulence intermittency through the formation of gravity waves. In this work, the arrival of a density current on 23 September 2015 is analysed in the CIBA site (Spain), which is located in the Spanish Northern Plateau, approximately 200 km away from the sea and 100 km away from the closest mountain ranges. Previous studies at this location associated similar nocturnal events with daytime sea breeze in the eastern Cantabrian coast [1]. Micrometeorological measurements from sonic anemometers and different sensors at multiple levels up to 100 m agl provide a solid database. In this specific case, the outbreak of the density current occurs 2 hours after sunset, causing an abrupt increase of the wind speed and a significant weakening of the surface-based thermal inversion. Besides, turbulent parameters and fluxes such as the friction velocity, the sensible heat flux and the Turbulent Kinetic Energy (TKE) are sharply altered with its arrival. The latter, indeed, increases by two orders of magnitude and the Multi Resolution Flux Decomposition (MRFD) of this and other turbulent variables gives the approximate size of the contributing eddies. Furthermore, simulations with the WRF model, which is tested for different Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) schemes and the topo_wind option for complex topography [2], give meaningful information about the vertical structure and origin of this density current. [1] Udina, M., Soler, M.R., Viana, S. & Yagüe, C. (2013). Model simulation of gravity waves triggered by a density current. Q J R Meteorol Soc, 139

  8. New developments in the analysis of column-collapse pyroclastic density currents through numerical simulations of multiphase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepore, S.; Scarpati, C.

    2012-06-01

    A granular multiphase model has been used to evaluate the action of differently sized particles on the dynamics of fountains and associated pyroclastic density currents. The model takes into account the overall disequilibrium conditions between a gas phase and several solid phases, each characterized by its own physical properties. The dynamics of the granular flows (fountains and pyroclastic density currents) has been simulated by adopting a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes model for describing the turbulence effects. Numerical simulations have been carried out by using different values for the eruptive column temperature at the vent, solid particle frictional concentration, turbulent kinetic energy, and dissipation. The results obtained provide evidence of the multiphase nature of the model and describe several disequilibrium effects. The low concentration (≤5 × 10-4) zones lie in the upper part of the granular flow, above the fountain, and above the tail and body of pyroclastic density current as thermal plumes. The high concentration zones, on the contrary, lie in the fountain and at the base of the current. Hence, pyroclastic density currents are assimilated to granular flows constituted by a low concentration suspension flowing above a high concentration basal layer (boundary layer), from the proximal regions to the distal ones. Interactions among the solid particles in the boundary layer of the granular flow are controlled by collisions between particles, whereas the dispersal of particles in the suspension is determined by the dragging of the gas phase. The simulations describe well the dynamics of a tractive boundary layer leading to the formation of stratified facies during Strombolian to Plinian eruptions.

  9. Interacting effects of age, density, and weather on survival and current reproduction for a large mammal

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Emmanuelle; Simpson, Steven E; Medill, Sarah A; McLoughlin, Philip D

    2014-01-01

    Individual-based study of natural populations allows for accurate and precise estimation of fitness components and the extent to which they might vary with ecological conditions. By tracking the fates of all 701 horses known to have lived on Sable Island, Canada, from 2009 to 2013 (where there is no predation, human interference, or interspecific competition for food), we present a detailed analysis of structured population dynamics with focus on interacting effects of intraspecific competition and weather on reproduction and survival. Annual survival of adult females (0.866 ± 0.107 [ ± SE]) was lower than that of 3-year-olds (0.955 ± 0.051), although annual fecundity (producing a foal in a year that was observed during our census) was higher in adults (0.616 ± 0.023) compared to 3-year-olds (0.402 ± 0.054). Milder winters and lower densities during gestation increased fecundity. Density negatively impacted survival for all age and sex categories; however, highest adult female survival was observed during high-density years coupled with a harsh winter, the result expected if pregnancy loss during winter or loss of foals in spring improved survival. Three-year-old females, which reproduced at lower rates, experienced higher survival than adults. Our results contrast with a previous study of feral horses that suggested recently feral ungulates might be artificially selected to reproduce even when costs to survival are high. In part, this may be because of the comparably long history of feralization (250 years; at least 25 generations) for Sable Island horses. PMID:25614799

  10. Current density distribution in a large cross-section beam in an electron accelerator with a multiaperture plasma cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorob'ev, M. S.; Koval', N. N.

    2016-06-01

    An electron accelerator with a multiaperture plasma cathode with grid stabilization of the boundary of emission plasma based on a low-pressure arc discharge generating a large cross-section (750 × 150 mm2) beam with its ejection into the atmosphere or high-pressure gas through the exit foil window is described. A comparatively simple method for decreasing the nonuniformity of the current density distribution over the beam cross section using a mask with variable-diameter holes is proposed and experimentally tested. In this case, the higher the plasma concentration in the emission region, the smaller the diameter of the holes in the mask. When this mask was used, the nonuniformity of the current density distribution was decreased from ±15 and ±10% to ±10 and ±5% on the long and short sides of the beam cross section, respectively.

  11. High-current density, high-brightness electron beams from large-area lanthanum hexaboride cathodes. Memorandum report

    SciTech Connect

    Loschialpo, P.; Kapetanakos, C.A.

    1987-12-13

    Large (approx. 5 cm) diameter lanthanum hexaboride (LaB/sub 6/) cathodes operated at 10 kV produced 1-5 micro electron pulses with current density between 10 and 20 A/sq. cm. Normalized beam brightness was consistently measured. To obtain this high current density, the LaB/sub 6/ cathodes have been heated to temperatures between approx 1600 to 1800 C. Very uniform temperature profiles are obtained by applying a carefully tailored electron-bombardment heating power distribution. These measurements have been made between pressure .000001 to .00001 Torr, i.e., under much less-demanding vacuum conditions than that required by conventional dispenser-type cathodes.

  12. Polarization curve measurements combined with potential probe sensing for determining current density distribution in vanadium redox-flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Maik; Bredemeyer, Niels; Tenhumberg, Nils; Turek, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Potential probes are applied to vanadium redox-flow batteries for determination of effective felt resistance and current density distribution. During the measurement of polarization curves in 100 cm2 cells with different carbon felt compression rates, alternating potential steps at cell voltages between 0.6 V and 2.0 V are applied. Polarization curves are recorded at different flow rates and states of charge of the battery. Increasing compression rates lead to lower effective felt resistances and a more uniform resistance distribution. Low flow rates at high or low state of charge result in non-linear current density distribution with high gradients, while high flow rates give rise to a nearly linear behavior.

  13. Angular dependence of critical current density and magnetoresistance of sputtered high-T(sub c)-films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geerkens, A.; Meven, M.; Frenck, H.-J.; Ewert, S.

    1995-01-01

    The angular dependence of the critical current density and the magnetoresistance of high-T(sub c)-films in high and low magnetic fields and for different temperatures were measured to investigate the flux pinning and the superconducting properties. A comparison of the results for the different superconductors shows their increasing dependence on the angle Theta between the magnetic field and the c-axis of the film due to the anisotropy of the chosen superconductor. Furthermore the influence of the current direction to the Theta-rotation plane is discussed.

  14. Angular dependence of critical current density and magnetoresistance of sputtered high-T{sub c}-films

    SciTech Connect

    Geerkens, A.; Frenck, H.J.; Ewert, S.

    1994-12-31

    The angular dependence of the critical current density and the magnetoresistance of high-T{sub c}-films in high and low magnetic fields and for different temperatures were measured to investigate the flux pinning and the superconducting properties. A comparison of the results for the different superconductors shows their increasing dependence on the angle {Theta} between the magnetic field and the c-axis of the film due to the anisotropy of the chosen superconductor. Furthermore the influence of the current direction to the {Theta}-rotation plane is discussed.

  15. Relationship between anode material, supporting electrolyte and current density during electrochemical degradation of organic compounds in water.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Duque, Fernando L; Palma-Goyes, Ricardo E; González, Ignacio; Peñuela, Gustavo; Torres-Palma, Ricardo A

    2014-08-15

    Taking crystal violet (CV) dye as pollutant model, the electrode, electrolyte and current density (i) relationship for electro-degrading organic molecules is discussed. Boron-doped diamond (BDD) or Iridium dioxide (IrO2) used as anode materials were tested with Na2SO4 or NaCl as electrolytes. CV degradation and generated oxidants showed that degradation pathways and efficiency are strongly linked to the current density-electrode-electrolyte interaction. With BDD, the degradation pathway depends on i: If icurrent density (i(lim)), CV is mainly degraded by OH radicals, whereas if i>i(lim), generated oxidants play a major role in the CV elimination. When IrO2 was used, CV removal was not dependent on i, but on the electrolyte. Pollutant degradation in Na2SO4 on IrO2 seems to occur via IrO3; however, in the presence of NaCl, degradation was dependent on the chlorinated oxidative species generated. In terms of efficiency, the Na2SO4 electrolyte showed better results than NaCl when BDD anodes were employed. On the contrary, NaCl was superior when combined with IrO2. Thus, the IrO2/Cl(-) and BDD/SO4(2-) systems were better at removing the pollutant, being the former the most effective. On the other hand, pollutant degradation with the BDD/SO4(2-) and IrO2/Cl(-) systems is favored at low and high current densities, respectively.

  16. Relationship between anode material, supporting electrolyte and current density during electrochemical degradation of organic compounds in water.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Duque, Fernando L; Palma-Goyes, Ricardo E; González, Ignacio; Peñuela, Gustavo; Torres-Palma, Ricardo A

    2014-08-15

    Taking crystal violet (CV) dye as pollutant model, the electrode, electrolyte and current density (i) relationship for electro-degrading organic molecules is discussed. Boron-doped diamond (BDD) or Iridium dioxide (IrO2) used as anode materials were tested with Na2SO4 or NaCl as electrolytes. CV degradation and generated oxidants showed that degradation pathways and efficiency are strongly linked to the current density-electrode-electrolyte interaction. With BDD, the degradation pathway depends on i: If icurrent density (i(lim)), CV is mainly degraded by OH radicals, whereas if i>i(lim), generated oxidants play a major role in the CV elimination. When IrO2 was used, CV removal was not dependent on i, but on the electrolyte. Pollutant degradation in Na2SO4 on IrO2 seems to occur via IrO3; however, in the presence of NaCl, degradation was dependent on the chlorinated oxidative species generated. In terms of efficiency, the Na2SO4 electrolyte showed better results than NaCl when BDD anodes were employed. On the contrary, NaCl was superior when combined with IrO2. Thus, the IrO2/Cl(-) and BDD/SO4(2-) systems were better at removing the pollutant, being the former the most effective. On the other hand, pollutant degradation with the BDD/SO4(2-) and IrO2/Cl(-) systems is favored at low and high current densities, respectively. PMID:24981674

  17. Comparison of SAR and induced current densities in adults and children exposed to electromagnetic fields from electronic article surveillance devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Búrdalo, M.; Sanchis, A.; Martín, A.; Villar, R.

    2010-02-01

    Electronic article surveillance (EAS) devices are widely used in most stores as anti-theft systems. In this work, the compliance with international guidelines in the human exposure to these devices is analysed by using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Two sets of high resolution numerical phantoms of different size (REMCOM/Hershey and Virtual Family), simulating adult and child bodies, are exposed to a 10 MHz pass-by panel-type EAS consisting of two overlapping current-carrying coils. Two different relative positions between the EAS and the body (frontal and lateral exposures), which imply the exposure of different parts of the body at different distances, have been considered. In all cases, induced current densities in tissues of the central nervous system and specific absorption rates (SARs) are calculated to be compared with the limits from the guidelines. Results show that induced current densities are lower in the case of adult models as compared with those of children in both lateral and frontal exposures. Maximum SAR values calculated in lateral exposure are significantly lower than those calculated in frontal exposure, where the EAS-body distance is shorter. Nevertheless, in all studied cases, with an EAS driving current of 4 A rms, maximum induced current and SAR values are below basic restrictions.

  18. Quenched dynamics in interacting one-dimensional systems: Appearance of current carrying steady states from initial domain wall density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancaster, Jarrett; Gull, Emanuel; Mitra, Aditi

    2011-03-01

    Dynamics arising after an interaction quench in the quantum sine-Gordon model is studied for the case of a system initially prepared in a spatially inhomogeneous domain wall state. The time-evolution of the density, current and equal time correlation functions are studied using the truncated Wigner approximation (TWA) to which quantum corrections are added in order to set the limits on its validity. For weak to moderate strengths of the back-scattering interaction, the domain wall is found to spread out ballistically with the system within the light cone reaching a non-equilibrium steady-state characterized by a net current flow. A steady state current is also found to exist for a quench at the exactly solvable Luther-Emery point. The magnitude of the current decreases with increasing strength of the back-scattering interaction. The two-point correlation function of the variable canonically conjugate to the density reaches a steady state which is spatially oscillating at a wavelength which is inversely related to the current. This was was supported by NSF-DMR (Award no. 1004589).

  19. High current density ion beam obtained by a transition to a highly focused state in extremely low-energy region

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Y. E-mail: hirano.yoichi@phys.cst.nihon-u.ac.jp; Kiyama, S.; Koguchi, H.; Fujiwara, Y.; Sakakita, H.

    2015-11-15

    A high current density (≈3 mA/cm{sup 2}) hydrogen ion beam source operating in an extremely low-energy region (E{sub ib} ≈ 150–200 eV) has been realized by using a transition to a highly focused state, where the beam is extracted from the ion source chamber through three concave electrodes with nominal focal lengths of ≈350 mm. The transition occurs when the beam energy exceeds a threshold value between 145 and 170 eV. Low-level hysteresis is observed in the transition when E{sub ib} is being reduced. The radial profiles of the ion beam current density and the low temperature ion current density can be obtained separately using a Faraday cup with a grid in front. The measured profiles confirm that more than a half of the extracted beam ions reaches the target plate with a good focusing profile with a full width at half maximum of ≈3 cm. Estimation of the particle balances in beam ions, the slow ions, and the electrons indicates the possibility that the secondary electron emission from the target plate and electron impact ionization of hydrogen may play roles as particle sources in this extremely low-energy beam after the compensation of beam ion space charge.

  20. Enhanced critical current density in the pressure-induced magnetic state of the high-temperature superconductor FeSe

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Soon-Gil; Kang, Ji-Hoon; Park, Eunsung; Lee, Sangyun; Lin, Jiunn-Yuan; Chareev, Dmitriy A.; Vasiliev, Alexander N.; Park, Tuson

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the relation of the critical current density (Jc) and the remarkably increased superconducting transition temperature (Tc) for the FeSe single crystals under pressures up to 2.43 GPa, where the Tc is increased by ~8 K/GPa. The critical current density corresponding to the free flux flow is monotonically enhanced by pressure which is due to the increase in Tc, whereas the depinning critical current density at which the vortex starts to move is more influenced by the pressure-induced magnetic state compared to the increase of Tc. Unlike other high-Tc superconductors, FeSe is not magnetic, but superconducting at ambient pressure. Above a critical pressure where magnetic state is induced and coexists with superconductivity, the depinning Jc abruptly increases even though the increase of the zero-resistivity Tc is negligible, directly indicating that the flux pinning property compared to the Tc enhancement is a more crucial factor for an achievement of a large Jc. In addition, the sharp increase in Jc in the coexisting superconducting phase of FeSe demonstrates that vortices can be effectively trapped by the competing antiferromagnetic order, even though its antagonistic nature against superconductivity is well documented. These results provide new guidance toward technological applications of high-temperature superconductors. PMID:26548444

  1. Enhanced critical current density in the pressure-induced magnetic state of the high-temperature superconductor FeSe.

    PubMed

    Jung, Soon-Gil; Kang, Ji-Hoon; Park, Eunsung; Lee, Sangyun; Lin, Jiunn-Yuan; Chareev, Dmitriy A; Vasiliev, Alexander N; Park, Tuson

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the relation of the critical current density (Jc) and the remarkably increased superconducting transition temperature (Tc) for the FeSe single crystals under pressures up to 2.43 GPa, where the Tc is increased by ~8 K/GPa. The critical current density corresponding to the free flux flow is monotonically enhanced by pressure which is due to the increase in Tc, whereas the depinning critical current density at which the vortex starts to move is more influenced by the pressure-induced magnetic state compared to the increase of Tc. Unlike other high-Tc superconductors, FeSe is not magnetic, but superconducting at ambient pressure. Above a critical pressure where magnetic state is induced and coexists with superconductivity, the depinning Jc abruptly increases even though the increase of the zero-resistivity Tc is negligible, directly indicating that the flux pinning property compared to the Tc enhancement is a more crucial factor for an achievement of a large Jc. In addition, the sharp increase in Jc in the coexisting superconducting phase of FeSe demonstrates that vortices can be effectively trapped by the competing antiferromagnetic order, even though its antagonistic nature against superconductivity is well documented. These results provide new guidance toward technological applications of high-temperature superconductors. PMID:26548444

  2. High current density ion beam obtained by a transition to a highly focused state in extremely low-energy region.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Y; Kiyama, S; Fujiwara, Y; Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H

    2015-11-01

    A high current density (≈3 mA/cm(2)) hydrogen ion beam source operating in an extremely low-energy region (E(ib) ≈ 150-200 eV) has been realized by using a transition to a highly focused state, where the beam is extracted from the ion source chamber through three concave electrodes with nominal focal lengths of ≈350 mm. The transition occurs when the beam energy exceeds a threshold value between 145 and 170 eV. Low-level hysteresis is observed in the transition when E(ib) is being reduced. The radial profiles of the ion beam current density and the low temperature ion current density can be obtained separately using a Faraday cup with a grid in front. The measured profiles confirm that more than a half of the extracted beam ions reaches the target plate with a good focusing profile with a full width at half maximum of ≈3 cm. Estimation of the particle balances in beam ions, the slow ions, and the electrons indicates the possibility that the secondary electron emission from the target plate and electron impact ionization of hydrogen may play roles as particle sources in this extremely low-energy beam after the compensation of beam ion space charge.

  3. The effect of ion current density amplification in a diode with passive anode in magnetic self-isolation mode

    SciTech Connect

    Pushkarev, Alexander I.; Isakova, Yulia I.; Vakhrushev, Dmitry V.

    2010-12-15

    The results of a study on gigawatt power pulsed ion beam parameters are presented here. The pulsed ion beam is formed by a diode with an explosive-emission potential electrode, in magnetic self-isolation mode [A. I. Pushkarev, J. I. Isakova, M. S. Saltimakov et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 013104 (2010)]. The ion current density is 20-40 A/cm{sup 2}, the energy of the ions is 200-250 keV, and the beam composition is of protons and carbon ions. Experiments have been performed on the TEMP-4M accelerator, set in double-pulse formation mode. To measure the beam parameters, we used a time-of-flight diagnosis. It is shown that the carbon ion current density, formed in a planar diode with graphite potential electrode, is five to seven times higher than the values calculated from the Child-Langmuir ratio. A model of ion current density amplification in a diode with magnetic self-isolation is proposed. The motion of electrons in the anode-cathode gap is simulated using the program CST PARTICLE STUDIO.

  4. Investigation of the effect of Ag addition on the critical current density of the high-temperature superconductor Nd1.85Ce0.15CuO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhikesh Raveendran, N.; Vinod, K.; Amaladass, E. P.; Janaki, J.; Mani, Awadhesh

    2016-07-01

    We have synthesized a Nd1.85Ce0.15CuO4 + Ag composite system with the aim of studying the effect of Ag addition in the electron-doped system Nd1.85Ce0.15CuO4 on its superconducting and magnetic properties. Measurements of magnetization using a vibration sample magnetometer indicate a systematic increase in diamagnetic shielding upon Ag addition. A subsequent analysis of the critical current density using the Bean model indicates a small but significant increase in intra-grain critical current density upon Ag addition. From the study of the dependence of electrical resistivity on the temperature and electrical current, an increase in inter-granular critical current has also been evidenced upon Ag addition. These results correlate well with the earlier reports of a similar improvement in the properties on the hole-doped ceramic superconductor/Ag composites. Possible reasons for the enhancement of JC have been described and discussed. Magnetic characterization by AC susceptibility using a SQUID magnetometer has been presented for a representative composition, which enabled delineation of the inter- and intra-granular transitions.

  5. Field Emission Study of Carbon Nanotubes: High Current Density from Nanotube Bundle Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bronikowski, Micheal J.; Manohara, Harish M.; Siegel, Peter H.; Hunt, Brian D.

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated the field emission behavior of lithographically patterned bundles of multiwalled carbon nanotubes arranged in a variety of array geometries. Such arrays of nanotube bundles are found to perform significantly better in field emission than arrays of isolated nanotubes or dense, continuous mats of nanotubes, with the field emission performance depending on the bundle diameter and inter-bundle spacing. Arrays of 2-micrometers diameter nanotube bundles spaced 5 micrometers apart (edge-to-edge spacing) produced the largest emission densities, routinely giving 1.5 to 1.8 A/cm(sup 2) at approximately 4 V/micrometer electric field, and greater than 6 A/cm(sup 2) at 20 V/micrometers.

  6. Magnetic Field, Density Current, and Lorentz Force Full Vector Maps of the NOAA 10808 Double Sunspot: Evidence of Strong Horizontal Current Flows in the Penumbra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bommier, V.; Landi Degl'Innocenti, E.; Schmieder, B.; Gelly, B.

    2011-04-01

    The context is that of the so-called “fundamental ambiguity” (also azimuth ambiguity, or 180° ambiguity) in magnetic field vector measurements: two field vectors symmetrical with respect to the line-of-sight have the same polarimetric signature, so that they cannot be discriminated. We propose a method to solve this ambiguity by applying the “simulated annealing” algorithm to the minimization of the field divergence, added to the longitudinal current absolute value, the line-of-sight derivative of the magnetic field being inferred by the interpretation of the Zeeman effect observed by spectropolarimetry in two lines formed at different depths. We find that the line pair Fe I λ 6301.5 and Fe I λ 6302.5 is appropriate for this purpose. We treat the example case of the δ-spot of NOAA 10808 observed on 13 September 2005 between 14:25 and 15:25 UT with the THEMIS telescope. Besides the magnetic field resolved map, the electric current density vector map is also obtained. A strong horizontal current density flow is found surrounding each spot inside its penumbra, associated to a non-zero Lorentz force centripetal with respect to the spot center (i.e., oriented towards the spot center). The current wrapping direction is found to depend on the spot polarity: clockwise for the positive polarity, counterclockwise for the negative one. This analysis is made possible thanks to the UNNOFIT2 Milne-Eddington inversion code, where the usual theory is generalized to the case of a line Fe I λ 6301.5) that is not a normal Zeeman triplet line (like Fe I λ 6302.5).

  7. Sedimentology and geomorphology of the deposits from the August 2006 pyroclastic density currents at Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douillet, Guilhem Amin; Tsang-Hin-Sun, Ève; Kueppers, Ulrich; Letort, Jean; Pacheco, Daniel Alejandro; Goldstein, Fabian; Von Aulock, Felix; Lavallée, Yan; Hanson, Jonathan Bruce; Bustillos, Jorge; Robin, Claude; Ramón, Patricio; Hall, Minard; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2013-11-01

    The deposits of the pyroclastic density currents from the August 2006 eruption of Tungurahua show three facies associations depending on the topographic setting: the massive, proximal cross-stratified, and distal cross-stratified facies. (1) The massive facies is confined to valleys on the slopes of the volcano. It contains clasts of >1 m diameter to fine ash material, is massive, and interpreted as deposited from dense pyroclastic flows. Its surface can exhibit lobes and levees covered with disk-shaped and vesicular large clasts. These fragile large clasts must have rafted at the surface of the flows all along the path in order to be preserved, and thus imply a sharp density boundary near the surface of these flows. (2) The proximal cross-stratified facies is exposed on valley overbanks on the upper part of the volcano and contains both massive coarse-grained layers and cross-stratified ash and lapilli bedsets. It is interpreted as deposited from (a) dense pyroclastic flows that overflowed the gentle ridges of valleys of the upper part of the volcano and (b) dilute pyroclastic density currents created from the dense flows by the entrainment of air on the steep upper flanks. (3) The distal cross-stratified facies outcrops as spatially limited, isolated, and wedge-shaped bodies of cross-stratified ash deposits located downstream of cliffs on valleys overbanks. It contains numerous aggrading dune bedforms, whose crest orientations reveal parental flow directions. A downstream decrease in the size of the dune bedforms, together with a downstream fining trend in the grain size distribution are observed on a 100-m scale. This facies is interpreted to have been deposited from dilute pyroclastic density currents with basal tractional boundary layers. We suggest that the parental flows were produced from the dense flows by entrainment of air at cliffs, and that these diluted currents might rapidly deposit through "pneumatic jumps". Three modes are present in the grain size

  8. Two-dimensional TaSe2 metallic crystals: spin-orbit scattering length and breakdown current density.

    PubMed

    Neal, Adam T; Du, Yuchen; Liu, Han; Ye, Peide D

    2014-09-23

    We have determined the spin-orbit scattering length of two-dimensional layered 2H-TaSe2 metallic crystals by detailed characterization of the weak antilocalization phenomena in this strong spin-orbit interaction material. By fitting the observed magneto-conductivity, the spin-orbit scattering length for 2H-TaSe2 is determined to be 17 nm in the few-layer films. This small spin-orbit scattering length is comparable to that of Pt, which is widely used to study the spin Hall effect, and indicates the potential of TaSe2 for use in spin Hall effect devices. A material must also support large charge currents in addition to strong spin-orbit coupling to achieve spin-transfer-torque via the spin Hall effect. Therefore, we have characterized the room temperature breakdown current density of TaSe2 in air, where the best breakdown current density reaches 3.7 × 10(7) A/cm(2). This large breakdown current further indicates the potential of TaSe2 for use in spin-torque devices and two-dimensional device interconnect applications.

  9. Non-invasive probe diagnostic method for electron temperature and ion current density in atmospheric pressure plasma jet source

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Cheol; Kim, Yu-Sin; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Moon, Jun-Hyeon; Chung, Chin-Wook; Kim, Yunjung; Cho, Guangsup

    2015-08-15

    The electrical probe diagnostics are very hard to be applied to atmospheric plasmas due to severe perturbation by the electrical probes. To overcome this, the probe for measuring electron temperature and ion current density is indirectly contacted with an atmospheric jet source. The plasma parameters are obtained by using floating harmonic analysis. The probe is mounted on the quartz tube that surrounds plasma. When a sinusoidal voltage is applied to a probe contacting on a quartz tube, the electrons near the sheath at dielectric tube are collected and the probe current has harmonic components due to probe sheath nonlinearity. From the relation of the harmonic currents and amplitude of the sheath voltage, the electron temperature near the wall can be obtained with collisional sheath model. The electron temperatures and ion current densities measured at the discharge region are in the ranges of 2.7–3.4 eV and 1.7–5.2 mA/cm{sup 2} at various flow rates and input powers.

  10. Combining hydraulic and granular flow extremes for density currents by depth averaging two phase flow equations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordoba, G. A.; Sheridan, M.; Pitman, B.

    2009-05-01

    Ground-hugging particle-laden flows constitute some of the most dangerous natural phenomena on Earth. Such currents, in the form of snow avalanches, pyroclastic flows, debris flows, lahars, and landslides, are among the most destructive processes in nature. Humans tend to settle in areas near rich soils, volcanoes, or watercourses, all of which could be strongly affected by these dangerous flows. In order to improve risk preparedness and site management in the affected zones, an appropriate knowledge of these natural hazardous phenomena is required. Their evolution in time, flow dynamics and run out distance are key aspects that help in the planning for hazardous events, development of hazardous regions and design of management policy to prepare in advance of potential natural disasters. This paper describes a depth-averaged model for two phase flows that is currently in develop at the University at Buffalo. It is presently implemented within the TITAN2D framework to improve the version that currently simulates dry geophysical mass flows over natural-scale terrains. The initial TITAN2D code was developed to simulate granular flow. But because the introduction of an interstitial fluid strongly modifies the dynamics of the flow, a new, more general, two-phase model was developed to account for a broad range in volume fraction of solids. The proposed mathematical model depth-integrates the Navier-Stokes equations for each phase, solid and fluid. The solid phase is modeled assuming a Coulomb constitutive behavior (at the theoretical limit of pure solids), whereas the fluid phase conforms to a typical hydraulic approach (at the limit of pure fluid). The linkage for compositions between the pure end-member phases is accommodated by the inclusion of a phenomenological-based drag coefficient. The model is capable of simulating particle volumetric fractions as dilute as 0.001 and as concentrated as 0.55.

  11. Quantifying entrainment in pyroclastic density currents from the Tungurahua eruption, Ecuador: Integrating field proxies with numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benage, M. C.; Dufek, J.; Mothes, P. A.

    2016-07-01

    The entrainment of air into pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) impacts the dynamics and thermal history of these highly mobile currents. However, direct measurement of entrainment in PDCs is hampered due to hazardous conditions and opaqueness of these flows. We combine three-dimensional multiphase Eulerian-Eulerian-Lagrangian calculations with proxies of thermal conditions preserved in deposits to quantify air entrainment in PDCs at Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador. We conclude that small-volume PDCs develop a particle concentration gradient that results in disparate thermal characteristics for the concentrated bed load (>600 to ~800 K) and the overlying dilute suspended load (~300-600 K). The dilute suspended load has effective entrainment coefficients 2-3 times larger than the bed load. This investigation reveals a dichotomy in entrainment and thermal history between two regions in the current and provides a mechanism to interpret the depositional thermal characteristics of small-volume but frequently occurring PDCs.

  12. Current Activities Assessing Butt Fusion Joint Integrity in High Density Polyethylene Piping

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Susan L.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Doctor, Steven R.; Denslow, Kayte M.

    2012-09-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, conducted initial studies to evaluate the effectiveness of nondestructive examinations (NDE) coupled with mechanical testing for assessing butt fusion joint integrity in high density polyethylene (HDPE) pipe. The work provided insightful information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on the effectiveness of volumetric inspection techniques for detecting lack of fusion (LOF) conditions in the fusion joints. HDPE has been installed on a limited basis in American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Class 3, buried piping systems at several operating U.S. nuclear power plants and has been proposed for use in new construction. A comparison was made between the results from ultrasonic and microwave nondestructive examinations and the results from mechanical destructive evaluations, specifically the high-speed tensile test and the side-bend test, for determining joint integrity. The data comparison revealed that none of the NDE techniques detected all of the lack-of-fusion conditions that were revealed by the destructive tests. Follow-on work has recently been initiated at PNNL to accurately characterize the NDE responses from machined flaws of varying size and location in PE 4710 materials as well as the LOF condition. This effort is directed at quantifying the ability of volumetric NDE techniques to detect flaws in relation to the critical flaw size associated with joint integrity. A status of these latest investigations is presented.

  13. Prospects for Edge Current Density Determination Using Li beam on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    D.M. Thomas; A.S. Bozek; T.N. Carlstrom; D.K. Finkenthal; R. Jayakumar; M.A. Makowski; D.G. Nilson; T.H. Osborne; B.W. Rice; R.T. Snider

    2000-08-01

    The specific size and structure of the edge current profile has important effects on the MHD stability and ultimate performance of many advanced tokamak (AT) operating modes. This is true for both bootstrap and externally driven currents that may be used to tailor the edge shear. Absent a direct local measurement of j(r), the best alternative is a determination of the poloidal field. Measurements of the precision (0.1-0.01{sup o} in magnetic pitch angle and 1-10 ms) necessary to address issues of stability and control and provide constraints for EFIT are difficult to do in the region of interest ({rho} = 0.9-1.1). Using Zeeman polarization spectroscopy of the 2S-2P lithium resonance line emission from the DIII-D LIBEAM, measurements of the various field components may be made to the necessary precision in exactly the region of interest to these studies. Because of the negligible Stark mixing of the relevant atomic levels, this method of determining j(r) is insensitive to the large local electric fields typically found in enhanced confinement (H-mode) edges, and thus avoids an ambiguity common to Motional Stark Effect (MSE) measurements of B. Key issues for utilizing this technique include good beam quality, an optimum viewing geometry, and a suitable optical pre-filter to isolate the polarized emission line. A prospective diagnostic system for the DIII-D AT program will be described.

  14. Overlay of neuromagnetic current-density images and morphological MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Manfred; Wischmann, Hans-Aloys; Doessel, Olaf

    1992-09-01

    Neuromagnetic imaging is a relatively new diagnostic tool for examination of electric activities in the nervous system. It is based on the noninvasive detection of extremely weak magnetic fields around the human body with superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detectors. `Equivalent current dipoles' and linear estimation reconstructions of current distributions both with spherical volume conductor models are used to localize the neural activity. For practical use in medical diagnosis a combination of the abstract neuromagnetic images with magnetic resonance (MR)- or computer tomography (CT)-images is required in order to match the functional activity with anatomy and morphology. The neuromagnetic images can be overlayed onto three-dimensional morphological images with spatially arbitrarily selectable slices. The matching of both imaging modalities is discussed. Based on the detection of auditory evoked magnetic fields, neuromagnetic images are reconstructed with linear estimation theory algorithms. The MR images are used as a-priori information of the volume conductor geometry and they allow an attachment of functional and morphological properties.

  15. Operation Method for AC Motor Control during Power Interruption in Direct AC/AC Converter System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shizu, Keiichiro; Azuma, Satoshi

    Direct AC/AC converters have been studied due to their potential use in power converters with no DC-link capacitor, which can contribute to the miniaturization of power converters. However, the absence of a DC-link capacitor makes it difficult to control the AC motor during power interruption. First, this paper proposes a system that realizes AC motor control during power interruption by utilizing a clamp capacitor. In general, direct AC/AC converters have a clamp circuit consisting of a rectifier diode(s) and a clamp capacitor in order to avoid over-voltages. In the proposed system, there is an additional semiconductor switch reverse-parallel to the rectifier diode(s), and the clamp capacitor voltage can be utilized for AC motor control by turning on the additional switch. Second, this paper discusses an operation method for AC motor control and clamp capacitor voltage control during power interruption. In the proposed method “DC-link voltage control”, the kinetic energy in the AC motor is transformed into electrical energy and stored in the clamp capacitor; the clamp capacitor is therefore charged and the capacitor voltage is controlled to remain constant at an instruction value. Third, this paper discusses a switching operation during power interruption. A dead-time is introduced between the operation of turning off all switches on the rectifier side and the operation of turning on the additional switch, which prevents the occurrence of a short circuit between the interrupted power source and the clamp capacitor. Finally, experimental results are presented. During power interruptions, an output current was continuously obtained and the clamp capacitor voltage was maintained to be equal to the instruction value of the capacitor voltage. These results indicate that both AC motor control and capacitor voltage control were successfully achieved by using the proposed system.

  16. Study on lower hybrid current drive efficiency at high density towards long-pulse regimes in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M. H.; Ding, B. J.; Zhang, J. Z.; Gan, K. F.; Wang, H. Q.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Zhang, L.; Wei, W.; Li, Y. C.; Wu, Z. G.; Ma, W. D.; Jia, H.; Chen, M.; Yang, Y.; Feng, J. Q.; Wang, M.; Xu, H. D.; Shan, J. F.; Liu, F. K.

    2014-06-01

    Significant progress on both L- and H-mode long-pulse discharges has been made recently in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) with lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) [J. Li et al., Nature Phys. 9, 817 (2013) And B. N. Wan et al., Nucl. Fusion 53, 104006 (2013).]. In this paper, LHCD experiments at high density in L-mode plasmas have been investigated in order to explore possible methods of improving current drive (CD) efficiency, thus to extend the operational space in long-pulse and high performance plasma regime. It is observed that the normalized bremsstrahlung emission falls much more steeply than 1/ne_av (line-averaged density) above ne_av = 2.2 × 1019 m-3 indicating anomalous loss of CD efficiency. A large broadening of the operating line frequency (f = 2.45 GHz), measured by a radio frequency (RF) probe located outside the EAST vacuum vessel, is generally observed during high density cases, which is found to be one of the physical mechanisms resulting in the unfavorable CD efficiency. Collisional absorption of lower hybrid wave in the scrape off layer (SOL) may be another cause, but this assertion needs more experimental evidence and numerical analysis. It is found that plasmas with strong lithiation can improve CD efficiency largely, which should be benefited from the changes of edge parameters. In addition, several possible methods are proposed to recover good efficiency in future experiments for EAST.

  17. Current, charge, and capacitance during scanning probe oxidation of silicon. I. Maximum charge density and lateral diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagata, J. A.; Perez-Murano, F.; Martin, C.; Kuramochi, H.; Yokoyama, H.

    2004-08-01

    A comprehensive analysis of the electrical current passing through the tip-substrate junction during oxidation of silicon by scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is presented. This analysis of experimental results under dc-bias conditions resolves the role of electronic and ionic contributions, especially for the initial stages of the reaction, determines the effective contact area of the tip-substrate junction, and unifies the roles of space charge and meniscus formation. In Part I of this work, we demonstrate that SPM oxidation is governed by a maximum charge density generated by electronic species within the junction at the onset of the oxidation process. Excess charge is channeled into lateral diffusion, keeping the charge density within the reaction zone constant and reducing the aspect ratio of the resulting oxide features. A uniform charge density implies that SPM oxides contain a fixed defect concentration, in accordance with the space-charge model. The effective (electrical) thickness of SPM oxides determined by these defects is investigated by Fowler-Nordheim analysis. We conclude that most of the electrical current involved in high voltage SPM oxidation of Si does not actually induce surface oxide growth, and that lateral diffusion and small aspect ratios are unavoidable aspects of contact-mode conditions.

  18. T Lymphocyte Density and Distribution in Human Colorectal Mucosa, and Inefficiency of Current Cell Isolation Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Preza, Gloria Cuevas; Yang, Otto O.; Elliott, Julie; Anton, Peter A.; Ochoa, Maria T.

    2015-01-01

    Mucosal tissues are critical immune effector sites containing complex populations of leukocytes in a tissue microenvironment that remains incompletely understood. We identify and quantify in human distal colorectal tissue absolute mucosal CD3+ lymphocytes, including CD4+ and CD8+ subsets, by direct visualization using immunohistochemistry (IHC), immunofluorescence (IF), and an automated counting protocol (r2=0.90). Sigmoid and rectal mucosal tissues are both densely packed with T lymphocytes in the mucosal compartment. Both compartments had similar densities of CD3+ T lymphocytes with 37,400 ± 2,801 cells/mm3 and 33,700 ± 4,324 cell/mm3, respectively. Sigmoid mucosa contained 57% CD3+CD4+ and 40% CD3+CD8+ T lymphocytes which calculates to 21,300 ± 1,476/mm3 and 15,000 ± 275/mm3 T lymphocytes, respectively. Rectal mucosa had 57% CD3+CD4+ and 42% CD3+CD8+ or 21,577 ± 332, and 17,090 ± 1,206 cells/mm3, respectively. By comparison, sigmoid mucosal biopsies subjected to conventional collagenase digestion, mononuclear cell (MMC) isolation and staining for flow cytometry yielded 4,549 ± 381/mm3 and 2,708 ± 245/mm3 CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes. These data suggest only ~20.7% recovery compared to IHC results for these markers. Further studies will determine if this reflects a selective bias in only CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells or can be generalized to all flow-analyzed cells from mucosal tissues for phenotyping and functional testing. PMID:25856343

  19. Theoretical speed and current density limits for different types of electrical brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlmann-Wilsdorf, D.

    1984-03-01

    Theoretical performance limits based on the criterion of flash temperature are investigated for monolithic Ag-C brushes, Cu-on-Cu brushes with elastic contact spots, and 'QM' brushes (Quantum Mechanical brushes with ultrathin metal fibers), in which ordinary current conduction is significantly supplemented by electron tunneling peripherally about the contact spots. Equations are developed for the contact spot radii and heat input rates for frictional and electrical heating at the contact spots. Typical data for the flash temperatures are calculated for the high-speed approximation for plastic and elastic contact spots. The low-speed approximation is used for QM brushes. It is concluded that metal fiber and/or QM brushes may represent the best solution to the brush problem for electromagnetic launching.

  20. The flow structure of pyroclastic density currents: evidence from particle models and large-scale experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellino, Pierfrancesco; Büttner, Ralf; Dioguardi, Fabio; Doronzo, Domenico Maria; La Volpe, Luigi; Mele, Daniela; Sonder, Ingo; Sulpizio, Roberto; Zimanowski, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    Pyroclastic flows are ground hugging, hot, gas-particle flows. They represent the most hazardous events of explosive volcanism, one striking example being the famous historical eruption of Pompeii (AD 79) at Vesuvius. Much of our knowledge on the mechanics of pyroclastic flows comes from theoretical models and numerical simulations. Valuable data are also stored in the geological record of past eruptions, i.e. the particles contained in pyroclastic deposits, but they are rarely used for quantifying the destructive potential of pyroclastic flows. In this paper, by means of experiments, we validate a model that is based on data from pyroclastic deposits. It allows the reconstruction of the current's fluid-dynamic behaviour. We show that our model results in likely values of dynamic pressure and particle volumetric concentration, and allows quantifying the hazard potential of pyroclastic flows.

  1. Novelty P3 reductions in depression: characterization using principal components analysis (PCA) of current source density (CSD) waveforms.

    PubMed

    Tenke, Craig E; Kayser, Jürgen; Stewart, Jonathan W; Bruder, Gerard E

    2010-01-01

    We previously reported a novelty P3 reduction in depressed patients compared to healthy controls (n=20 per group) in a novelty oddball task using a 31-channel montage. In an independent replication and extension using a 67-channel montage (n=49 per group), reference-free current source density (CSD) waveforms were simplified and quantified by a temporal, covariance-based principal components analysis (PCA) (unrestricted Varimax rotation), yielding factor solutions consistent with other oddball tasks. A factor with a loadings peak at 343 ms summarized the target P3b source as well as a secondary midline frontocentral source for novels and targets. An earlier novelty vertex source (NVS) at 241 ms was present for novels, but not targets, and was reduced in patients. Compatible CSD-PCA findings were also confirmed for the original low-density sample. Results are consistent with a reduced novelty response in clinical depression, involving the early phase of the frontocentral novelty P3.

  2. Ultrahigh-current-density metal-ion implantation and diamondlike-hydrocarbon films for tribological applications; Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilbur, P.J.

    1993-09-01

    The metal-ion-implantation system used to implant metals into substrates are described. The metal vapor required for operation is supplied by drawing sufficient electron current from the plasma discharge to an anode-potential crucible so a solid, pure metal placed in the crucible will be heated to the point of vaporization. The ion-producing, plasma discharge is initiated within a graphite-ion-source body, which operates at high temperature, by using an argon flow that is turned off once the metal vapor is present. Extraction of ion beams several cm in diameter at current densities ranging to several hundred {mu}A/cm{sup 2} on a target 50 cm downstream of the ion source have been demonstrated using Mg, Ag, Cr, Cu, Si, Ti, V, B and Zr. These metals were implanted into over 100 substrates (discs, pins, flats, wires). A model describing thermal stresses induced in materials (e.g. ceramic plates) during high-current-density implantation is presented. Tribological and microstructural characteristics of iron and 304-stainless-steel samples implanted with Ti or B are examined. Diamondlike-hydrocarbon coatings were applied to steel surfaces and found to exhibit good tribological performance.

  3. Electrodeposition of hierarchically structured three-dimensional nickel–iron electrodes for efficient oxygen evolution at high current densities

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xunyu; Zhao, Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale industrial application of electrolytic splitting of water has called for the development of oxygen evolution electrodes that are inexpensive, robust and can deliver large current density (>500 mA cm−2) at low applied potentials. Here we show that an efficient oxygen electrode can be developed by electrodepositing amorphous mesoporous nickel–iron composite nanosheets directly onto macroporous nickel foam substrates. The as-prepared oxygen electrode exhibits high catalytic activity towards water oxidation in alkaline solutions, which only requires an overpotential of 200 mV to initiate the reaction, and is capable of delivering current densities of 500 and 1,000 mA cm−2 at overpotentials of 240 and 270 mV, respectively. The electrode also shows prolonged stability against bulk water electrolysis at large current. Collectively, the as-prepared three-dimensional structured electrode is the most efficient oxygen evolution electrode in alkaline electrolytes reported to the best of our knowledge, and can potentially be applied for industrial scale water electrolysis. PMID:25776015

  4. Electrodeposition of hierarchically structured three-dimensional nickel-iron electrodes for efficient oxygen evolution at high current densities.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xunyu; Zhao, Chuan

    2015-03-17

    Large-scale industrial application of electrolytic splitting of water has called for the development of oxygen evolution electrodes that are inexpensive, robust and can deliver large current density (>500 mA cm(-2)) at low applied potentials. Here we show that an efficient oxygen electrode can be developed by electrodepositing amorphous mesoporous nickel-iron composite nanosheets directly onto macroporous nickel foam substrates. The as-prepared oxygen electrode exhibits high catalytic activity towards water oxidation in alkaline solutions, which only requires an overpotential of 200 mV to initiate the reaction, and is capable of delivering current densities of 500 and 1,000 mA cm(-2) at overpotentials of 240 and 270 mV, respectively. The electrode also shows prolonged stability against bulk water electrolysis at large current. Collectively, the as-prepared three-dimensional structured electrode is the most efficient oxygen evolution electrode in alkaline electrolytes reported to the best of our knowledge, and can potentially be applied for industrial scale water electrolysis.

  5. Induced current density in the foetus of pregnant workers in high magnetic field environments.

    PubMed

    Xue, C; Wood, A W; Dovan, T

    2004-12-01

    There are moves to limit by legislation the amount of electric and magnetic fields that workers and the general public are exposed to. In work locations near wiring, cables & equipment carrying high electric currents, there are situations in which the proposed magnetic field limits could be exceeded. Since the limits for the general public are more conservative than those for workers and since the foetus or a pregnant worker should be afforded the status of a member of the general public, it is important to assess a worst-case scenario for the purposes of a general code of practice. Three different magnetic field exposures are modelled, which include the worst case - the body of a pregnant woman at a smallest distance of 30 cm to the conductor. All computations were done by using Multiple Multipole Program (MMP), which is based on the Generalized Multipole Technique (GMT) from ETH (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology), Zurich, Switzerland. In a worst-case scenario the proposed basic restrictions would be exceeded slightly in both maternal and foetal tissue. With appropriate pre-placement assessment, these over-exposures can be avoided.

  6. Doping effects of carbon and titanium on the critical current density of MgB2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, T. M.; Li, G.; Cheng, C. H.; Zhao, Y.

    2006-11-01

    MgB2 bulks doped with Ti or/and C were prepared by an in situ solid state reaction method to determine the combined effect of C and Ti doping and to probe the detailed mechanism. The magnetization measurement shows that Mg0.95Ti0.05B1.95C0.05 sample has significantly improved flux pinning compared to the MgB1.95C0.05 sample at 20 K, indicating that C and Ti are largely cooperative in improving the Jc(H) behaviour. No TiC phase was detected in the x-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns. Moreover, the overlap of the (100) peaks of MgB1.95C0.05 and Mg0.95Ti0.05B1.95C0.05 showed that Ti doping does not reduce the amount of C in MgB2. Microstructural analyses revealed that the addition of Ti eliminated the porosity present in the carbon-doped MgB2 pellet, resulting in an improved intergrain connectivity and an increase of effective current pass. Further, MgB2 doped with C and Ti, which mainly consists of spherical grains about 200-300 nm in size, shows an higher grain homogeneity than the C-doped sample, suggesting that the Ti doping in MgB1-xCx has played an important role in obtaining uniform grains.

  7. Electrochemical sulfide removal from synthetic and real domestic wastewater at high current densities.

    PubMed

    Pikaar, Ilje; Rozendal, René A; Yuan, Zhiguo; Keller, Jürg; Rabaey, Korneel

    2011-03-01

    Hydrogen sulfide generation is the key cause of sewer pipe corrosion, one of the major issues in water infrastructure. Current abatement strategies typically involve addition of various types of chemicals to the wastewater, which incurs large operational costs. The transport, storage and application of these chemicals also constitute occupational and safety hazards. In this study, we investigated high rate electrochemical oxidation of sulfide at Ir/Ta mixed metal oxide (MMO) coated titanium electrodes as a means to remove sulfide from wastewater. Both synthetic and real wastewaters were used in the experiments. Electrochemical sulfide oxidation by means of indirect oxidation with in-situ produced oxygen appeared to be the main reaction mechanism at Ir/Ta MMO coated titanium electrodes. The maximum obtained sulfide removal rate was 11.8 ± 1.7 g S m(-2) projected anode surface h(-1) using domestic wastewater at sulfide concentrations of ≥ 30 mg L(-1) or higher. The final products of the oxidation were sulfate, thiosulfate and elemental sulfur. Chloride and acetate concentrations did not entail differences in sulfide removal, nor were the latter two components affected by the electrochemical oxidation. Hence, the use of electrodes to generate oxygen in sewer systems may constitute a promising method for reagent-free removal of sulfide from wastewater. PMID:21300393

  8. Numerical Simulation using VolcFlow for Pyroclastic Density Currents by Explosive Eruption of Mt. Baekdu, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, S. H.; Chang, C.

    2015-12-01

    It is the numerical simulation using a VolcFlow model to determine the runout range of pyroclastic density currents where an eruption column had been formed by the explosive Plinian eruption and the collapse of the column had caused to occur on Mt. Baekdu. We assumed that the most realistic way for the simulation of a sustained volcanic column is to modify the topography with a cone above the crater to follow expert advice from Dr. Karim Kelfoun, the developer of VolcFlow. Then we set the radius and height of the cone, the volume of pyroclastic flow, and the duration and simulation time accoding to the volcanic explosivity index (VEI). Also we set the yield stress as 5,000 Pa, 10,000 Pa, 15,000 Pa, the basal friction angle as 3°, 5°, 10°, respectively. As the simulation results, the longest runout range was 2.3 km, 9.1 km, 14.4 km, 18.6 km, 23.4 km from VEI 3 to VEI 7, respectively. It can be used as a very important material to predict the impact range of pyroclastic density currents and to minimize human and material damages caused by pyroclastic density currents derived from the future explosive eruption of Mt. Baekdu. This research was supported by a grant 'Development of Advanced Volcanic Disaster Response System considering Potential Volcanic Risk around Korea' [MPSS-NH-2015-81] from the Natural Hazard Mitigation Research Group, National Emergency Management Agency of Korea.

  9. Numeric description of space charge in polyethylene under ac electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J.; Xu, Z.; Chen, G.; Lewin, P. L.

    2010-12-01

    Space charge in polyethylene-based insulation materials and its effect on the local electric field under a dc environment have been extensively examined over the last few decades while the behavior of space charge under ac stress has received less attention. Space charge phenomenon under ac electric fields becomes an important issue with increased operating field strength in many applications, such as next generation high voltage cables. In this paper, a bipolar charge transport model has been developed to simulate space charge in polymers under ac electric fields. Obtained simulation results show that there is a small quantity of phase-dependent bipolar charge accumulation in the vicinity of the electrodes that does not move into the bulk under ac stress. This causes a slight distortion of the local field in the bulk. However, at lower frequencies less than 1 Hz, there is increased charge accumulation and penetration. Comparison with available experimental data suggests that the model is capable of describing the underlying physics of charge behavior when a dielectric material is subjected to ac electric fields. Due to the weak charge movement in the bulk, the conduction current density is small and hence the displacement component dominates the total current density and this increases linearly with ac frequency.

  10. Suppression of external quantum efficiency roll-off of nanopatterned organic-light emitting diodes at high current densities

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwae, Hiroyuki; Kasahara, Takashi; Nitta, Atsushi; Yoshida, Kou; Inoue, Munetomo; Matsushima, Toshinori; Adachi, Chihaya; Shoji, Shuichi; Mizuno, Jun

    2015-10-21

    We developed organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with nanopatterned current flow regions using electron-beam lithography with the aim of suppressing singlet–polaron annihilation (SPA). Nanopatterns composed of lines and circles were used in the current flow regions of nano-line and nano-dot OLEDs, respectively. Excitons partially escape from the current flow regions where SPA takes place. As such, current densities where external quantum efficiencies were half of their initial values (J{sub 0}) increased as line width and circle diameter were decreased to close to the exciton diffusion length. Circles were more efficient at enhancing exciton escape and increasing J{sub 0} than lines. The J{sub 0} increase in the nano-dot OLEDs containing nanopatterned circles with a diameter of 50 nm was approximately 41-fold that of a conventional OLED with a current flow region of 4 mm{sup 2}. The dependence of J{sub 0} on the size and shape of the nanopatterns was well explained by an SPA model that considered exciton diffusion. Nanopatterning of OLEDs is a feasible method of obtaining large J{sub 0}.

  11. Suppression of external quantum efficiency roll-off of nanopatterned organic-light emitting diodes at high current densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwae, Hiroyuki; Nitta, Atsushi; Yoshida, Kou; Kasahara, Takashi; Matsushima, Toshinori; Inoue, Munetomo; Shoji, Shuichi; Mizuno, Jun; Adachi, Chihaya

    2015-10-01

    We developed organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with nanopatterned current flow regions using electron-beam lithography with the aim of suppressing singlet-polaron annihilation (SPA). Nanopatterns composed of lines and circles were used in the current flow regions of nano-line and nano-dot OLEDs, respectively. Excitons partially escape from the current flow regions where SPA takes place. As such, current densities where external quantum efficiencies were half of their initial values (J0) increased as line width and circle diameter were decreased to close to the exciton diffusion length. Circles were more efficient at enhancing exciton escape and increasing J0 than lines. The J0 increase in the nano-dot OLEDs containing nanopatterned circles with a diameter of 50 nm was approximately 41-fold that of a conventional OLED with a current flow region of 4 mm2. The dependence of J0 on the size and shape of the nanopatterns was well explained by an SPA model that considered exciton diffusion. Nanopatterning of OLEDs is a feasible method of obtaining large J0.

  12. Linear optical response of current-carrying molecular junction: a nonequilibrium Green's function-time-dependent density functional theory approach.

    PubMed

    Galperin, Michael; Tretiak, Sergei

    2008-03-28

    We propose a scheme for calculation of linear optical response of current-carrying molecular junctions for the case when electronic tunneling through the junction is much faster than characteristic time of external laser field. We discuss relationships between nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) approaches and derive expressions for optical response and linear polarizability within NEGF-TDDFT scheme. Corresponding results for isolated molecule, derived within TDDFT approach previously, are reproduced when coupling to contacts is neglected. PMID:18376958

  13. The Effect of Ag-DOPING on the Critical Current Density of YBa2Cu3O7-δ Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lue, Juh Tzeng; Kung, J. H.; Yen, H. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Wu, P. T.

    The superconducting state and the transition temperature Tc of the interstitially Ag-doped YBa2 Cu3 O7-δ are not changed even when the Ag concentration is increased up to 20%, whereas the substitutionally doped YBa2 Cu3-x Agx O7-δ system ceases to be superconductive when the contents x of Ag is over 1.2. Magnetic susceptibility measurement indicates that the interstitial Ag-doping yields higher diamagnetic signal and enhances the critical current density by 15 folds. Photoelectron emission and electron spin resonance spectroscopic studies elucidate that the copper ions change from diamagnetic to paramagnetic states at some doping levels.

  14. Fermion condensate and vacuum current density induced by homogeneous and inhomogeneous magnetic fields in (2+1) dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Raya, Alfredo; Reyes, Edward

    2010-07-01

    We calculate the condensate and the vacuum current density induced by external static magnetic fields in (2+1) dimensions. At the perturbative level, we consider an exponentially decaying magnetic field along one Cartesian coordinate. Nonperturbatively, we obtain the fermion propagator in the presence of a uniform magnetic field by solving the Schwinger-Dyson equation in the rainbow-ladder approximation. In the large flux limit, we observe that both these quantities, either perturbative (inhomogeneous) and nonperturbative (homogeneous), are proportional to the external field, in agreement with early expectations.

  15. Study on a high current density redox flow battery with tin(Ⅱ)/tin as negative couple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fuyu; Sun, Qing; Gao, Wei; Liu, Jianguo; Yan, Chuanwei; Liu, Qingyu

    2015-04-01

    The cyclic voltammetry characteristics of Sn2+/Sn couple in the H2SO4 medium on a graphite felt electrode is evaluated. The charge-discharge performance of Sn-V battery with VO2+/VO2+ couple as positive part and Sn2+/Sn couple as negative part is investigated through a small laboratory cell. The result shows that though the deposition/dissolution of Sn is not a normal reversible process, Sn deposits can almost dissolve completely during the charge-discharge tests. It is remarkable that the battery could work normally at a current density of 180 mA cm-2 with an average voltage efficiency of 72%.

  16. Digital ac monitor

    DOEpatents

    Hart, G.W.; Kern, E.C. Jr.

    1987-06-09

    An apparatus and method is provided for monitoring a plurality of analog ac circuits by sampling the voltage and current waveform in each circuit at predetermined intervals, converting the analog current and voltage samples to digital format, storing the digitized current and voltage samples and using the stored digitized current and voltage samples to calculate a variety of electrical parameters; some of which are derived from the stored samples. The non-derived quantities are repeatedly calculated and stored over many separate cycles then averaged. The derived quantities are then calculated at the end of an averaging period. This produces a more accurate reading, especially when averaging over a period in which the power varies over a wide dynamic range. Frequency is measured by timing three cycles of the voltage waveform using the upward zero crossover point as a starting point for a digital timer. 24 figs.

  17. Digital ac monitor

    DOEpatents

    Hart, George W.; Kern, Jr., Edward C.

    1987-06-09

    An apparatus and method is provided for monitoring a plurality of analog ac circuits by sampling the voltage and current waveform in each circuit at predetermined intervals, converting the analog current and voltage samples to digital format, storing the digitized current and voltage samples and using the stored digitized current and voltage samples to calculate a variety of electrical parameters; some of which are derived from the stored samples. The non-derived quantities are repeatedly calculated and stored over many separate cycles then averaged. The derived quantities are then calculated at the end of an averaging period. This produces a more accurate reading, especially when averaging over a period in which the power varies over a wide dynamic range. Frequency is measured by timing three cycles of the voltage waveform using the upward zero crossover point as a starting point for a digital timer.

  18. Modeling of Optical Waveguide Poling and Thermally Stimulated Discharge (TSD) Charge and Current Densities for Guest/Host Electro Optic Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Ashley, Paul R.; Abushagur, Mustafa

    2004-01-01

    A charge density and current density model of a waveguide system has been developed to explore the effects of electric field electrode poling. An optical waveguide may be modeled during poling by considering the dielectric charge distribution, polarization charge distribution, and conduction charge generated by the poling field. These charge distributions are the source of poling current densities. The model shows that boundary charge current density and polarization current density are the major source of currents measured during poling and thermally stimulated discharge These charge distributions provide insight into the poling mechanisms and are directly related to E(sub A), and, alpha(sub r). Initial comparisons with experimental data show excellent correlation to the model results.

  19. Simulations of Electron-Cloud Current Density Measurements in Dipoles, Drifts, and Wigglers at CesrTA

    SciTech Connect

    Calvey, J.; Crittenden, J. A.; Dugan, G.; Greenwald, S.; Kreinick, D.; Livezey, J. A.; Palmer, M. A.; Rubin, D.; Fukuma, H.; Jain, P.; Kanazawa, K.; Suetsugu, Y.; Celata, C. M.; Furman, M.; Penn, G.; Venturini, M.; Pivi, M.T.F.; Harkay, K.C.; Wang, L.

    2009-05-01

    A core component of the Cesr-TA research program at Cornell is to fully understand the electron cloud effect through the use of simulation programs that have been developed to predict the growth of the cloud and its interaction with the beam. As a local probe of the electron cloud, several segmented retarding field analyzers (RFAs) have been installed in CesrTA in dipole, drift and wiggler regions. Using these RFAs, the energy spectrum of the time-average electron cloud current density striking the walls has been measured for a variety of bunch train patterns, with different bunch currents, beam energies, emittances, and bunch lengths, and for both positron and electron beams. This paper will compare these measurements with the predictions of simulation programs.

  20. Simulations of Electron-Cloud Current Density Measurements in Dipoles, Drifts And Wigglers at CesrTA

    SciTech Connect

    Calvey, J.; Crittenden, J. A.; Dugan, G.; Greenwald, S.; Livezey, J. A.; Palmer, M. A.; Rubin, D.; Harkay, K. C.; Jain, P.; Kanazawa, K.; Suetsugu, Y.; Celata, C. M.; Furman, M.; Pivi, M. T. F.; Wang, L.; Kreinick, D.; Penn, G.; Venturini, M.

    2009-05-04

    A core component of the CesrTA research program at Cornell is to fully understand the electron cloud effect through the use of simulation programs that have been developed to predict the growth of the cloud and its interaction with the beam. As a local probe of the electron cloud, several segmented retarding field analyzers (RFAs) have been installed in CesrTA in dipole, drift and wiggler regions. Using these RFAs, the energy spectrum of the time-average electron cloud current density striking the walls has been measured for a variety of bunch train patterns, with different bunch currents, beam energies, emittances, and bunch lengths, and for both positron and electron beams. This paper will compare these measurements with the predictions of simulation programs.