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Sample records for ac driving force

  1. Forces Driving Chaperone Action.

    PubMed

    Koldewey, Philipp; Stull, Frederick; Horowitz, Scott; Martin, Raoul; Bardwell, James C A

    2016-07-14

    It is still unclear what molecular forces drive chaperone-mediated protein folding. Here, we obtain a detailed mechanistic understanding of the forces that dictate the four key steps of chaperone-client interaction: initial binding, complex stabilization, folding, and release. Contrary to the common belief that chaperones recognize unfolding intermediates by their hydrophobic nature, we discover that the model chaperone Spy uses long-range electrostatic interactions to rapidly bind to its unfolded client protein Im7. Short-range hydrophobic interactions follow, which serve to stabilize the complex. Hydrophobic collapse of the client protein then drives its folding. By burying hydrophobic residues in its core, the client's affinity to Spy decreases, which causes client release. By allowing the client to fold itself, Spy circumvents the need for client-specific folding instructions. This mechanism might help explain how chaperones can facilitate the folding of various unrelated proteins. PMID:27293188

  2. Environmental Crack Driving Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, M. M.

    2013-03-01

    The effect of environment on the crack driving force is considered, first by assuming quasistatic extension of a stationary crack and second, by use of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) crack growth rate models developed previously by this author and developed further here. A quasistatic thermodynamic energy balance approach, of the Griffith-Irwin type, is used to develop stationary crack threshold expressions, tilde{J}_c , which represent the conjoint mechanical and electrochemical conditions, below which stationary cracks are stable. Expressions for the electrochemical crack driving force (CDF) were derived using an analysis that is analogous to that used by Irwin to derive his "strain energy release rate," G, which Rice showed as being equivalent to his mechanical CDF, J. The derivations show that electrochemical CDFs both for active path dissolution (APD) and hydrogen embrittlement (HE) mechanisms of SCC are simply proportional to Tafel's electrochemical anodic and cathodic overpotentials, η a and η c, respectively. Phenomenological SCC models based on the kinetics of APD and HE crack growth are used to derive expressions for the kinetic threshold, J scc, below which crack growth cannot be sustained. These models show how independent mechanical and environmental CDFs may act together to drive SCC crack advance. Development of a user-friendly computational tool for calculating Tafel's overpotentials is advocated.

  3. Measurement of coupling resonance driving terms with the AC dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.

    2010-10-01

    Resonance driving terms for linear coupled betatron motion in a synchrotron ring can be determined from corresponding spectral lines of an excited coherent beam motion. An AC dipole is one of instruments to excite such a motion. When a coherent motion is excited with an AC dipole, measured Courant-Snyder parameters and betatron phase advance have apparent modulations, as if there is an additional quadrupole field at the location of the AC dipole. Hence, measurements of these parameters using the AC dipole require a proper interpretation of observed quantities. The situation is similar in measurements of resonance driving terms using the AC dipole. In this note, we derive an expression of coupled betatron motion excited with two AC dipoles in presence of skew quadrupole fields, discuss an impact of this quadrupole like effect of the AC dipole on a measurement of coupling resonance driving terms, and present an analytical method to determine the coupling resonance driving terms from quantities observed using the AC dipole.

  4. Sequential control by speed drive for ac motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsoum, Nader

    2012-11-01

    The speed drive for ac motor is widely used in the industrial field to allow direct control for the speed and torque without any feedback from the motor shaft. By using the ABB ACS800 speed drive unit, the speed and torque can be controlled using sequential control method. Sequential control is one of the application control method provided in the ABB ACS800 Drive, where a set of events or action performed in a particular order one after the other to control the speed and torque of the ac motor. It was claimed that sequential control method is using the preset seven constant speeds being provided in ABB ACS800 drive to control the speed and torque in a continuous and sequential manner. The characteristics and features of controlling the speed and torque using sequential control method can be investigated by observing the graphs and curves plotted which are obtained from the practical result. Sequential control can run either in the Direct Torque Control (DTC) or Scalar motor control mode. By using sequential control method, the ABB ACS800 drive can be programmed to run the motor automatically according to the time setting of the seven preset constant speeds. Besides, the intention of this project is to generate a new form of the experimental set up.

  5. Path integral approach to Brownian motion driven with an ac force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L. Y.; Nash, P. L.

    2004-09-01

    Brownian motion in a periodic potential driven by an ac (oscillatory) force is investigated for the full range of damping constant from the overdamped limit to the underdamped limit. The path (functional) integral approach is advanced to produce formulas for the probability distribution function and for the current of the Brownian particle in response to an ac driving force. The negative friction Langevin dynamics technique is employed to evaluate the dc current for various parameters without invoking the overdamped or the underdamped approximation. The dc current is found to have nonlinear dependence upon the damping constant, the potential parameter, and the ac force magnitude and frequency.

  6. AC drive system efficiency evaluation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Langley, R.

    1998-12-01

    Industrial and commercial facilities are continually searching for ways to reduce costs while increasing revenues. One way of accomplishing this objective is to reduce energy consumption costs. Industrial and commercial facilities, in their heavy reliance on electric motors, are by far the largest consumers of electric power. In fact, electric motors consume more than fifty percent of all generated electric energy. The use of energy efficient motors and electronic adjustable-speed drives (ASDs) can provide industries with a means for reducing energy costs. Taking advantage of available contracts with incentives for energy conservation, industries can justify the costs for retrofitting old inefficient production lines with state-of-the-art, efficient, process equipment. The use of ASDs for improving process control and increasing process efficiency has been well documented. To this point, however, there are no published research reports or technical papers presenting energy efficiency data for ASDs and ASD/motor systems at load conditions other than rated load conditions. The IEC-1800 standard does call for manufacturers to report the ASD or the ASD/motor system efficiency at rated load and base speed conditions. This report presents energy efficiency test data for two 150-hp ASD/motor combinations. Each test was conducted at multiple load torque and speed setpoints, which includes interpretations and discussions of the test results. The report presents test standards, test procedures, and test data that show how the energy efficiencies of ASD/motor system components relate. 51 figs., 13 tabs.

  7. Forces driving epithelial wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Veldhuis, Jim H.; Gupta, Mukund; Colombelli, Julien; Muñoz, José J.; Brodland, G. Wayne; Ladoux, Benoit; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental feature of multicellular organisms is their ability to self-repair wounds through the movement of epithelial cells into the damaged area. This collective cellular movement is commonly attributed to a combination of cell crawling and “purse-string” contraction of a supracellular actomyosin ring. Here we show by direct experimental measurement that these two mechanisms are insufficient to explain force patterns observed during wound closure. At early stages of the process, leading actin protrusions generate traction forces that point away from the wound, showing that wound closure is initially driven by cell crawling. At later stages, we observed unanticipated patterns of traction forces pointing towards the wound. Such patterns have strong force components that are both radial and tangential to the wound. We show that these force components arise from tensions transmitted by a heterogeneous actomyosin ring to the underlying substrate through focal adhesions. The structural and mechanical organization reported here provides cells with a mechanism to close the wound by cooperatively compressing the underlying substrate. PMID:27340423

  8. Unraveling Base Stacking Driving Forces in DNA.

    PubMed

    Mak, Chi H

    2016-07-01

    Base stacking is a key determinant of nucleic acid structures, but the precise origin of the thermodynamic driving force behind the stacking of nucleobases remains open. The rather mild stacking free energy measured experimentally, roughly a kcal/mol depending on the identity of the bases, is physiologically significant because while base stacking confers stability to the genome in its double helix form, the duplex also has to be unwound in order to be replicated or transcribed. A stacking free energy that is either too high or too low will over- or understabilize the genome, impacting the storage of genetic information and also its retrieval. While the molecular origin of stacking driving force has been attributed to many different sources including dispersion, electrostatics, and solvent hydrogen bonding, here we show via a systematic decomposition of the stacking free energy using large-scale computer simulations that the dominant driving force stabilizing base stacking is nonhydrophobic solvent entropy. Counteracting this is the conformational entropic penalty on the sugar-phosphate backbone against stacking, while solvent hydrogen-bonding, charge-charge interactions, and dispersive forces produce only secondary perturbations. Solvent entropic forces and DNA backbone conformational strains therefore work against each other, leading to a very mild composite stacking free energy in agreement with experiments. PMID:27045853

  9. A driving scheme to reduce AC LED flicker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jianchuan; Narendran, Nadarajah

    2013-09-01

    Light flicker is a common but unwelcome phenomenon in conventional lighting applications. In solid-state lighting, driving or dimming methods also give rise to light flicker. AC LED products in today's marketplace suffer from flicker, which stems from the arrangement of the micro-LEDs and the driving method. Research has shown that light flicker can be a health hazard to humans. Several solutions have been proposed to reduce light flicker in solid-state lighting applications; however, most have drawbacks in terms of power and other performance. This paper proposes a circuit design to reduce light flicker from AC LEDs while maintaining a normal power factor and high power efficiency. The circuit is composed of one resistive branch and one capacitive branch, and each branch drives a load which is made up of high-voltage LEDs. Percent flicker, power factor, and power efficiency were selected as three metrics, and their benchmarks were set to evaluate the performance of this circuit. Phase shift between the two branches was selected as a factor that could determine the circuit performance. The variations of percent flicker, power factor, and power efficiency as a function of phase shift were identified by theoretical analysis and were verified by experiments. The experimental results show that an optimal solution can be achieved for this circuit design at proper phase shift, where the benchmarks of the three metrics are reached.

  10. A PWM transistor inverter for an ac electric vehicle drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slicker, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    A prototype system consisting of closely integrated motor, inverter, and transaxle has been built in order to demonstrate the feasibility of a three-phase ac transistorized inverter for electric vehicle applications. The microprocessor-controlled inverter employs monolithic power transistors to drive an oil-cooled, three-phase induction traction motor at a peak output power of 30 kW from a 144 V battery pack. Transistor safe switching requirements are discussed, and a circuit is presented for recovering trapped snubber inductor energy at transistor turn-off.

  11. An AC drive system for a battery driven moped

    SciTech Connect

    Nandi, S.; Saha, S.; Sharon, M.; Sundersingh, V.P.

    1995-12-31

    A petrol driven moped is converted to an electric one by replacing the petrol engine by a three phase 1.5 HR, AC squirrel cage induction motor drive system. The motor voltage rating selected is 200 V to keep the DC boost voltage level to a reasonable value.f the power source used is a high energy density, 24 V, 110 Ah, Ni-Zn battery. A modified indirect current controlled step-up chopper as well as a standard push-pull DC-DC boost converter is studied for the boost scheme. A simple three phase quasi-square wave inverter is designed along with suitable protection for driving the motor. Successful trial test of the system has been conducted at the laboratory.

  12. Controlling Casimir force via coherent driving field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Rashid; Abbas, Muqaddar; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Qamar, Sajid

    2016-04-01

    A four level atom-field configuration is used to investigate the coherent control of Casimir force between two identical plates made up of chiral atomic media and separated by vacuum of width d. The electromagnetic chirality-induced negative refraction is obtained via atomic coherence. The behavior of Casimir force is investigated using Casimir-Lifshitz formula. It is noticed that Casimir force can be switched from repulsive to attractive and vice versa via coherent control of the driving field. This switching feature provides new possibilities of using the repulsive Casimir force in the development of new emerging technologies, such as, micro-electro-mechanical and nano-electro-mechanical systems, i.e., MEMS and NEMS, respectively.

  13. System and method for determining stator winding resistance in an AC motor using motor drives

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Bin; Habetler, Thomas G; Zhang, Pinjia

    2013-02-26

    A system and method for determining the stator winding resistance of AC motors is provided. The system includes an AC motor drive having an input connectable to an AC source and an output connectable to an input terminal of an AC motor, a pulse width modulation (PWM) converter having switches therein to control current flow and terminal voltages in the AC motor, and a control system connected to the PWM converter. The control system generates a command signal to cause the PWM converter to control an output of the AC motor drive corresponding to an input to the AC motor, selectively generates a modified command signal to cause the PWM converter to inject a DC signal into the output of the AC motor drive, and determines a stator winding resistance of the AC motor based on the DC signal of at least one of the voltage and current.

  14. Power Electronic Transformer based Three-Phase PWM AC Drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Kaushik

    A Transformer is used to provide galvanic isolation and to connect systems at different voltage levels. It is one of the largest and most expensive component in most of the high voltage and high power systems. Its size is inversely proportional to the operating frequency. The central idea behind a power electronic transformer (PET) also known as solid state transformer is to reduce the size of the transformer by increasing the frequency. Power electronic converters are used to change the frequency of operation. Steady reduction in the cost of the semiconductor switches and the advent of advanced magnetic materials with very low loss density and high saturation flux density implies economic viability and feasibility of a design with high power density. Application of PET is in generation of power from renewable energy sources, especially wind and solar. Other important application include grid tied inverters, UPS e.t.c. In this thesis non-resonant, single stage, bi-directional PET is considered. The main objective of this converter is to generate adjustable speed and magnitude pulse width modulated (PWM) ac waveforms from an ac or dc grid with a high frequency ac link. The windings of a high frequency transformer contains leakage inductance. Any switching transition of the power electronic converter connecting the inductive load and the transformer requires commutation of leakage energy. Commutation by passive means results in power loss, decrease in the frequency of operation, distortion in the output voltage waveform, reduction in reliability and power density. In this work a source based partially loss-less commutation of leakage energy has been proposed. This technique also results in partial soft-switching. A series of converters with novel PWM strategies have been proposed to minimize the frequency of leakage inductance commutation. These PETs achieve most of the important features of modern PWM ac drives including 1) Input power factor correction, 2) Common

  15. Direct Experimental Observation of a Practical AC Zeeman Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fancher, Charles; Pyle, Andrew; Rotunno, Andrew; Du, Shuangli; Aubin, Seth

    2016-05-01

    We present measurements of the spin-dependent AC Zeeman force produced by microwave magnetic near-field gradients on an atom chip. We measure the AC Zeeman force on ultracold 87 Rb atoms by observing its effect on the motion of atoms in free-fall and on those confined in a trap. We have studied the force as a function of microwave frequency detuning from a hyperfine transition at 6.8 GHz at several magnetic field strengths and have observed its characteristic bipolar and resonant features predicted by two-level dressed atom theory. We find that the force is several times the strength of gravity in our setup, and that it can be targeted to a specific hyperfine transition while leaving other hyperfine states and transitions relatively unaffected. We find that our measurements are reasonably consistent with theory and are working towards a parameter-free comparison. AC Zeeman potentials offer the possibility of targeting qualitatively different trapping potentials to different spin states, a capability currently absent from the toolbox of atomic quantum control techniques. In particular, an AC Zeeman potential could be used as the beamsplitter for a spin-dependent atom interferometer or for engineering a quantum gate. Work supported by AFOSR and W&M, and in part by AFRL.

  16. Global Plate Driving Forces at 50Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterworth, N. P.; Quevedo, L. E.; Müller, R. D.

    2011-12-01

    We apply a novel workflow utilising the BEM-Earth geodynamic software to analyse the global coupled plate-mantle dynamics at 50 Ma. A subduction history model based on kinematic data going as far back as 80 Ma was developed using the GPlates software. Advection of the plates into the mantle takes into account the absolute plate motions and lithospheric thickness derived from its age to produce an estimated density heterogeneity initial model condition in the upper mantle. The resulting global model consists of regions of a mantle viscosity and density structure that is post-processed to ensure smooth non-overlapping 3D surfaces. BEM-Earth is then free to evolve the model toward the 50 Ma solution. The evolution of the model is driven by self-consistent buoyancy driven mantle dynamics. We use the model velocity output to quantify changes in forces driving the plates before and after 50 Ma. We analyse the rapid change in plate motion of India, Africa and plates in the Pacific Ocean basin by considering slab-pull, ridge-push and mantle drag/suction forces that naturally result from such top-down driven mantle flow. We compare the results with plate kinematic reconstructions and other geological observations.

  17. Numerical calculations of the driving force on an Abrikosov vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.-X.; Pardo, E.; Sanchez, A.

    2010-05-01

    The driving force on an Abrikosov vortex is calculated numerically from the London equation and involved energies for a vortex perpendicular to the screening current near the surface of a superconductor. Compared with previous analytical derivation of the total force, the partial magnetic, kinematic, and external forces are also obtained so that the nature of the driving force may be deeply discussed. It is shown that the force is neither a Lorentz force nor a Magnus force as often believed and that in order to get a correct result, the image effects and the work done by the applied field must be taken into account. A name of London force is suggested for the driving force. A deep understanding of the nature of the driving force on Abrikosov vortices may also be important in the study of vortex pinning and dynamics in type-II superconductors.

  18. Inversion for the driving forces of plate tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    Inverse modeling techniques have been applied to the problem of determining the roles of various forces that may drive and resist plate tectonic motions. Separate linear inverse problems have been solved to find the best fitting pole of rotation for finite element grid point velocities and to find the best combination of force models to fit the observed relative plate velocities for the earth's twelve major plates using the generalized inverse operator. Variance-covariance data on plate motion have also been included. Results emphasize the relative importance of ridge push forces in the driving mechanism. Convergent margin forces are smaller by at least a factor of two, and perhaps by as much as a factor of twenty. Slab pull, apparently, is poorly transmitted to the surface plate as a driving force. Drag forces at the base of the plate are smaller than ridge push forces, although the sign of the force remains in question.

  19. OSHA Laboratory Standard: Driving Force for Laboratory Safety!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Kenneth R.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA's) Laboratory Safety Standards as the major driving force in establishing and maintaining a safe working environment for teachers and students. (Author)

  20. Effects of resistance training on force steadiness and common drive.

    PubMed

    Beck, Travis W; Defreitas, Jason M; Stock, Matt S; Dillon, Michael A

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of an 8-week resistance training program on force steadiness and common drive for the vastus lateralis muscle. Eight untrained men performed a resistance training program. Before the program and at the end of each week, the subjects performed a trapezoid isometric muscle action of the leg extensors, and bipolar surface electromyographic signals were recorded from the vastus lateralis. The signals were decomposed into action potential trains that were cross-correlated to measure common drive. Force steadiness was quantified as the standard deviation of force during the constant-force portion of the trapezoid muscle action. The training program did not consistently affect force steadiness or common drive for any of the subjects. Although future studies are needed with different muscles and training programs, changes in the overall motor control scheme are not likely with resistance training.

  1. New Technique of AC drive in Tokamak using Permanent Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteucci, Jackson; Zolfaghari, Ali

    2013-10-01

    This study investigates a new technique of capturing the rotational energy of alternating permanent magnets in order to inductively drive an alternating current in tokamak devices. The use of rotational motion bypasses many of the pitfalls seen in typical inductive and non-inductive current drives. Three specific designs are presented and assessed in the following criteria: the profile of the current generated, the RMS loop voltage generated as compared to the RMS power required to maintain it, the system's feasibility from an engineering perspective. All of the analysis has been done under ideal E&M conditions using the Maxwell 3D program. Preliminary results indicate that it is possible to produce an over 99% purely toroidal current with a RMS d Φ/dt of over 150 Tm2/s, driven by 20 MW or less of rotational power. The proposed mechanism demonstrates several key advantages including an efficient mechanical drive system, the generation of pure toroidal currents, and the potential for a quasi-steady state fusion reactor. The following quantities are presented for various driving frequencies and magnet strengths: plasma current generated, loop voltage, torque and power required. This project has been supported by DOE Funding under the SULI program.

  2. Entropic forces drive contraction of cytoskeletal networks.

    PubMed

    Braun, Marcus; Lansky, Zdenek; Hilitski, Feodor; Dogic, Zvonimir; Diez, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    The cytoskeleton is a network of interconnected protein filaments, which provide a three-dimensional scaffold for cells. Remodeling of the cytoskeleton is important for key cellular processes, such as cell motility, division, or morphogenesis. This remodeling is traditionally considered to be driven exclusively by processes consuming chemical energy, such as the dynamics of the filaments or the action of molecular motors. Here, we review two mechanisms of cytoskeletal network remodeling that are independent of the consumption of chemical energy. In both cases directed motion of overlapping filaments is driven by entropic forces, which arise from harnessing thermal energy present in solution. Entropic forces are induced either by macromolecular crowding agents or by diffusible crosslinkers confined to the regions where filaments overlap. Both mechanisms increase filament overlap length and lead to the contraction of filament networks. These force-generating mechanisms, together with the chemical energy-dependent mechanisms, need to be considered for the comprehensive quantitative picture of the remodeling of cytoskeletal networks in cells. PMID:26996935

  3. Developing pressures: fluid forces driving morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Navis, Adam; Bagnat, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Over several decades genetic studies have unraveled many molecular mechanisms that underlie the signaling networks guiding morphogenesis, but the mechanical forces at work remain much less well understood. Accumulation of fluid within a luminal space can generate outward hydrostatic pressure capable of shaping morphogenesis at several scales, ranging from individual organs to the entire vertebrate body-plan. Here, we focus on recent work that uncovered mechanical roles for fluid secretion during morphogenesis. Identifying the roles and regulation of fluid secretion will be instrumental for understanding the mechanics of morphogenesis as well as many human diseases of complex genetic and environmental origin including secretory diarrheas and scoliosis. PMID:25698116

  4. Driving forces: Slab subduction and mantle convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, Bradford H.

    1988-01-01

    Mantle convection is the mechanism ultimately responsible for most geological activity at Earth's surface. To zeroth order, the lithosphere is the cold outer thermal boundary layer of the convecting mantle. Subduction of cold dense lithosphere provides tha major source of negative buoyancy driving mantle convection and, hence, surface tectonics. There are, however, importnat differences between plate tectonics and the more familiar convecting systems observed in the laboratory. Most important, the temperature dependence of the effective viscosity of mantle rocks makes the thermal boundary layer mechanically strong, leading to nearly rigid plates. This strength stabilizes the cold boundary layer against small amplitude perturbations and allows it to store substantial gravitational potential energy. Paradoxically, through going faults at subduction zones make the lithosphere there locally weak, allowing rapid convergence, unlike what is observed in laboratory experiments using fluids with temperature dependent viscosities. This bimodal strength distribution of the lithosphere distinguishes plate tectonics from simple convection experiments. In addition, Earth has a buoyant, relatively weak layer (the crust) occupying the upper part of the thermal boundary layer. Phase changes lead to extra sources of heat and bouyancy. These phenomena lead to observed richness of behavior of the plate tectonic style of mantle convection.

  5. Ocean forcing drives glacier retreat sometimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassis, J. N.; Ultee, E.; Ma, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Observations show that marine-terminating glaciers respond to climate forcing nonlinearly, with periods of slow or negligible glacier advance punctuated by abrupt, rapid retreat. Once glacier retreat has initiated, glaciers can quickly stabilize with a new terminus position. Alternatively, retreat can be sustained for decades (or longer), as is the case for Columbia Glacier, Alaska where retreat initiated ~1984 and continues to this day. Surprisingly, patterns of glacier retreat show ambiguous or even contradictory correlations with atmospheric temperature and glacier surface mass balance. Despite these puzzles, observations increasingly show that intrusion of warm subsurface ocean water into fjords can lead to glacier erosion rates that can account for a substantial portion of the total mass lost from glaciers. Here we use a simplified flowline model to show that even relatively modest submarine melt rates (~100 m/a) near the terminus of grounded glaciers can trigger large increases in iceberg calving leading to rapid glacier retreat. However, the strength of the coupling between submarine melt and calving is a strong function of the geometry of the glacier (bed topography, ice thickness and glacier width). This can lead to irreversible retreat when the terminus is thick and grounded deeply beneath sea level or result in little change when the glacier is relatively thin, grounded in shallow water or pinned in a narrow fjord. Because of the strong dependence on glacier geometry, small perturbations in submarine melting can trigger glaciers in their most advanced—and geometrically precarious—state to undergo sudden retreat followed by much slower re-advance. Although many details remain speculative, our model hints that some glaciers are more sensitive than others to ocean forcing and that some of the nonlinearities of glacier response to climate change may be attributable to variations in difficult-to-detect subsurface water temperatures that need to be better

  6. Wall relaxation and the driving forces for cell expansive growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    When water uptake by growing cells is prevented, the turgor pressure and the tensile stress in the cell wall are reduced by continued wall loosening. This process, termed in vivo stress relaxation, provides a new way to study the dynamics of wall loosening and to measure the wall yield threshold and the physiological wall extensibility. Stress relaxation experiments indicate that wall stress supplies the mechanical driving force for wall yielding. Cell expansion also requires water absorption. The driving force for water uptake during growth is created by wall relaxation, which lowers the water potential of the expanding cells. New techniques for measuring this driving force show that it is smaller than believed previously; in elongating stems it is only 0.3 to 0.5 bar. This means that the hydraulic resistance of the water transport pathway is small and that rate of cell expansion is controlled primarily by wall loosening and yielding.

  7. Sequential reconstruction of driving-forces from nonlinear nonstationary dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güntürkün, Ulaş

    2010-07-01

    This paper describes a functional analysis-based method for the estimation of driving-forces from nonlinear dynamic systems. The driving-forces account for the perturbation inputs induced by the external environment or the secular variations in the internal variables of the system. The proposed algorithm is applicable to the problems for which there is too little or no prior knowledge to build a rigorous mathematical model of the unknown dynamics. We derive the estimator conditioned on the differentiability of the unknown system’s mapping, and smoothness of the driving-force. The proposed algorithm is an adaptive sequential realization of the blind prediction error method, where the basic idea is to predict the observables, and retrieve the driving-force from the prediction error. Our realization of this idea is embodied by predicting the observables one-step into the future using a bank of echo state networks (ESN) in an online fashion, and then extracting the raw estimates from the prediction error and smoothing these estimates in two adaptive filtering stages. The adaptive nature of the algorithm enables to retrieve both slowly and rapidly varying driving-forces accurately, which are illustrated by simulations. Logistic and Moran-Ricker maps are studied in controlled experiments, exemplifying chaotic state and stochastic measurement models. The algorithm is also applied to the estimation of a driving-force from another nonlinear dynamic system that is stochastic in both state and measurement equations. The results are judged by the posterior Cramer-Rao lower bounds. The method is finally put into test on a real-world application; extracting sun’s magnetic flux from the sunspot time series.

  8. Progress on advanced dc and ac induction drives for electric vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, H. J.

    1982-01-01

    Progress is reported in the development of complete electric vehicle propulsion systems, and the results of tests on the Road Load Simulator of two such systems representative of advanced dc and ac drive technology are presented. One is the system used in the DOE's ETV-1 integrated test vehicle which consists of a shunt wound dc traction motor under microprocessor control using a transistorized controller. The motor drives the vehicle through a fixed ratio transmission. The second system uses an ac induction motor controlled by transistorized pulse width modulated inverter which drives through a two speed automatically shifted transmission. The inverter and transmission both operate under the control of a microprocessor. The characteristics of these systems are also compared with the propulsion system technology available in vehicles being manufactured at the inception of the DOE program and with an advanced, highly integrated propulsion system upon which technology development was recently initiated.

  9. Designing Teaching Facilities: Pedagogy as the Driving Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stump, Karen H.; Swensen, Jill

    2005-01-01

    Pedagogy, the art and science of teaching, should be the driving force behind the design of any teaching facility. What is taught and how it is taught should determine the size, type, and configuration of educational space. The statement seems obvious, but often miscommunication and ill-considered compromises can divert a capital project from an…

  10. Toward understanding driving forces in membrane protein folding.

    PubMed

    Hong, Heedeok

    2014-12-15

    α-Helical membrane proteins are largely composed of nonpolar residues that are embedded in the lipid bilayer. An enigma in the folding of membrane proteins is how a polypeptide chain can be condensed into the compact folded state in the environment where the hydrophobic effect cannot strongly drive molecular interactions. Probably other forces such as van der Waals packing, hydrogen bonding, and weakly polar interactions, which are regarded less important in the folding of water-soluble proteins, should emerge. However, it is not clearly understood how those individual forces operate and how they are balanced for stabilizing membrane proteins. Studying this problem is not a trivial task mainly because of the methodological challenges in controlling the reversible folding of membrane proteins in the lipid bilayer. Overcoming the hurdles, meaningful progress has been made in the field in the last few decades. This review will focus on recent studies tackling the problem of driving forces in membrane protein folding. PMID:25107533

  11. Learning theory: a driving force in understanding orbitofrontal function.

    PubMed

    McDannald, Michael A; Jones, Joshua L; Takahashi, Yuji K; Schoenbaum, Geoffrey

    2014-02-01

    Since it was demonstrated the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) is critical to reversal learning, there has been considerable interest in specifying its role in flexible, outcome-guided behavior. Behavioral paradigms from the learning theory tradition, such as outcome devaluation, blocking, Pavlovian to instrumental transfer, and overexpectation have been a driving force in this research. The use of these procedures has revealed OFC's unique role in forming and integrating information about specific features of events and outcomes to drive behavior and learning. These studies highlight the power and importance of learning theory principles in guiding neuroscience research.

  12. Pulling together: Tissue-generated forces that drive lumen morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Navis, Adam; Nelson, Celeste M

    2016-07-01

    Mechanical interactions are essential for bending and shaping tissues during morphogenesis. A common feature of nearly all internal organs is the formation of a tubular network consisting of an epithelium that surrounds a central lumen. Lumen formation during organogenesis requires precisely coordinated mechanical and biochemical interactions. Whereas many genetic regulators of lumen formation have been identified, relatively little is known about the mechanical cues that drive lumen morphogenesis. Lumens can be shaped by a variety of physical behaviors including wrapping a sheet of cells around a hollow core, rearranging cells to expose a lumenal cavity, or elongating a tube via cell migration, though many of the details underlying these movements remain poorly understood. It is essential to define how forces generated by individual cells cooperate to produce the tissue-level forces that drive organogenesis. Transduction of mechanical forces relies on several conserved processes including the contraction of cytoskeletal networks or expansion of lumens through increased fluid pressure. The morphogenetic events that drive lumen formation serve as a model for similar mechanical processes occurring throughout development. To understand how lumenal networks arise, it will be essential to investigate how biochemical and mechanical processes integrate to generate complex structures from comparatively simple interactions.

  13. Evaluation of semiconductor devices for Electric and Hybrid Vehicle (EHV) ac-drive applications, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, F. C.; Chen, D. Y.; Jovanovic, M.; Hopkins, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    The results of evaluation of power semiconductor devices for electric hybrid vehicle ac drive applications are summarized. Three types of power devices are evaluated in the effort: high power bipolar or Darlington transistors, power MOSFETs, and asymmetric silicon control rectifiers (ASCR). The Bipolar transistors, including discrete device and Darlington devices, range from 100 A to 400 A and from 400 V to 900 V. These devices are currently used as key switching elements inverters for ac motor drive applications. Power MOSFETs, on the other hand, are much smaller in current rating. For the 400 V device, the current rating is limited to 25 A. For the main drive of an electric vehicle, device paralleling is normally needed to achieve practical power level. For other electric vehicle (EV) related applications such as battery charger circuit, however, MOSFET is advantageous to other devices because of drive circuit simplicity and high frequency capability. Asymmetrical SCR is basically a SCR device and needs commutation circuit for turn off. However, the device poses several advantages, i.e., low conduction drop and low cost.

  14. Kondo physics in the single-electron transistor with ac driving

    SciTech Connect

    Nordlander, Peter; Wingreen, Ned S.; Meir, Yigal; Langreth, David C.

    2000-01-15

    Using a time-dependent Anderson Hamiltonian, a quantum dot with an ac voltage applied to a nearby gate is investigated. A rich dependence of the linear response conductance on the external frequency and driving amplitude is demonstrated. At low frequencies a sufficiently strong ac potential produces sidebands of the Kondo peak in the spectral density of the dot, and a slow, roughly logarithmic decrease in conductance over several decades of frequency. At intermediate frequencies, the conductance of the dot displays an oscillatory behavior due to the appearance of Kondo resonances of the satellites of the dot level. At high frequencies, the conductance of the dot can vary rapidly due to the interplay between photon-assisted tunneling and the Kondo resonance. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  15. Instabilities across the isotropic conductivity point in a nematic phenyl benzoate under AC driving.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pramoda; Patil, Shivaram N; Hiremath, Uma S; Krishnamurthy, K S

    2007-08-01

    We characterize the sequence of bifurcations generated by ac fields in a nematic layer held between unidirectionally rubbed ITO electrodes. The material, which possesses a negative dielectric anisotropy epsilona and an inversion temperature for electrical conductivity anisotropy sigmaa, exhibits a monostable tilted alignment near TIN, the isotropic-nematic point. On cooling, an anchoring transition to the homeotropic configuration occurs close to the underlying smectic phase. The field experiments are performed for (i) negative sigmaa and homeotropic alignment, and (ii) weakly positive sigmaa and nearly homeotropic alignment. Under ac driving, the Freedericksz transition is followed by bifurcation into various patterned states. Among them are the striped states that seem to belong to the dielectric regime and localized hybrid instabilities. Very significantly, the patterned instabilities are not excited by dc fields, indicating their possible gradient flexoelectric origin. The Carr-Helfrich mechanism-based theories that take account of flexoelectric terms can explain the observed electroconvective effects only in part. PMID:17616118

  16. Impact assessment of land use planning driving forces on environment

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Longgao; Yang, Xiaoyan; Chen, Longqian; Li, Long

    2015-11-15

    Land use change may exert a negative impact on environmental quality. A state–impact–state (SIS) model describing a state transform under certain impacts has been integrated into land use planning (LUP) environmental impact assessment (LUPEA). This logical model is intuitive and easy to understand, but the exploration of impact is essential to establish the indicator system and to identify the scope of land use environmental impact when it is applied to a specific region. In this study, we investigated environmental driving forces from land use planning (LUPF), along with the conception, components, scope, and impact of LUPF. This method was illustrated by a case study in Zoucheng, China. Through the results, we concluded that (1) the LUPF on environment are impacts originated from the implementation of LUP on a regional environment, which are characterized by four aspects: magnitude, direction, action point, and its owner; (2) various scopes of LUPF on individual environmental elements based on different standards jointly define the final scope of LUPEA; (3) our case study in Zoucheng demonstrates the practicability of this proposed approach; (4) this method can be embedded into LUPEA with direction, magnitudes, and scopes of the LUPF on individual elements obtained, and the identified indicator system can be directly employed into LUPEA and (5) the assessment helps to identify key indicators and to set up a corresponding strategy to mitigate the negative impact of LUP on the environment, which are two important objectives of strategic environmental assessment (SEA) in LUP. - Highlights: • Environmental driving forces from land use planning (LUPF) are investigated and categorized. • Our method can obtains the direction, magnitudes and scopes of environmental driving forces. • The LUPEA scope is determined by the combination of various scopes of LUPF on individual elements. • LUPF assessment can be embedded into LUPEA. • The method can help to

  17. An adaptive fuzzy controller for permanent-magnet AC servo drives

    SciTech Connect

    Le-Huy, H.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents a theoretical study on a model-reference adaptive fuzzy logic controller for vector-controlled permanent-magnet ac servo drives. In the proposed system, fuzzy logic is used to implement the direct controller as well as the adaptation mechanism. The operation of the direct fuzzy controller and the fuzzy logic based adaptation mechanism is studied. The control performance of the adaptive fuzzy controller is evaluated by simulation for various operating conditions. The results are compared with that provided by a non-adaptive fuzzy controller. The implementation of proposed adaptive fuzzy controller is discussed.

  18. Driving forces for drug loading in drug carriers.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Yang, Li

    2015-01-01

    The loading capacity of a drug carrier is determined essentially by intermolecular interactions between drugs and carrier materials. In this review, the process of drug loading is described in detail based on the differences in the driving force for drug incorporation, including hydrophobic interaction, electrostatic interaction, hydrogen bonding, Pi-Pi stacking and van der Waals force. Modifying drug-loading sites of carrier materials with interacting groups aiming at tailoring drug-carrier interactions is reviewed by highlighting its importance for improving in vitro properties such as the loading capacity, release behaviour and stability. Other factors affecting drug loading, methods employed to predict the encapsulation capacity and the techniques to verify intermolecular interactions are also discussed to inform the readers of all-sided information on drug-loading processes and theories. The drug carriers can be designed more reasonably with the better understanding of the nature and interacting mechanism of intermolecular interactions.

  19. Fuzzy based power factor improvement strategy for a multiple connected AC-DC converter fed drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, N.; Muthiah, Ramaswamy

    2012-01-01

    The main focus of this paper is to design a Fuzzy based control algorithm to realize an improvement in the input power factor of a multiple connected AC-DC converter fed drive system. It incorporates the role of fuzzy inference principles to generate appropriate PWM pulses for the power switches at the second stage of the power module. The philosophy is developed, with a view to reshape the input current phasor and enables it to align with the supply voltage wave in the perspective of improving the input power factor. The closed loop scheme evaluated using MATLAB based simulation exhibits an enhancement in supply power factor over a range of operating loads in addition to illustrating the speed regulating capability of the drive.

  20. Traction-drive force transmission for telerobotic joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuban, D. P.; Williams, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    The U.S. Space Station Program is providing many technological developments to meet the increasing demands of designing such a facility. One of the key areas of research is that of telerobotics for space station assembly and maintenance. Initial implementation will be teleoperated, but long-term plans call for autonomous robotics. One of the essential components for making this transition successful is the manipulator joints mechanism. Historically, teleoperated manipulators and industrial robotics have had very different mechanisms for force transmission. This is because the design objectives are almost mutually exclusive. A teleoperator must have very low friction and inertia to minimize operator fatigue; backlash and stiffness are of secondary concern. A robot, however, must have minimum backlash, and high stiffness for accurate and rapid positioning. A joint mechanism has yet to be developed that can optimize these divergent performance objectives. A joint mechanism that approaches this optimal performance was developed for NASA Langley, Automation Technology Branch. It is a traction-drive differential that uses variable preload mechanisms. The differential provides compact, dexterous motion range with a torque density similar to geared systems. The traction drive offers high stiffness and zero backlash, for good robotic performance, and the variable loading mechanism (VLM) minimizes the drive-train friction, for improved teleoperation.

  1. The thermodynamic driving force for rafting in superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nabarro, F.R.N.; Cress, C.M. |; Kotschy

    1996-08-01

    Eshelby`s energy-momentum tensor is used to provide an analytical expression for the driving force for rafting in the elastic regime in a superalloy with a high volume fraction of {gamma}{prime}. The structure is modelled as a simple cubic array of {gamma}{prime} cubes separated by thin sheets of {gamma}. During rafting, the {gamma}{prime} particles are constrained to remain tetragonal prisms. For tension along a cube axis, the driving force is proportional to the product of the tension {sigma}, the fractional difference {delta} of lattice parameters of {gamma}{prime} and {gamma} and the fractional difference m of their elastic constants c{sub 11} {minus} c{sub 12}. As in the calculation of Pineau for an isolated spheroid, needles are formed when this product {sigma}{delta}m is positive. Two- and three-dimensional systems behave similarly. The initial plastic strain in {gamma} is anelastic and in principle reversible. When the plastic strain exceeds m{delta}, platelets perpendicular to the stress axis are formed if the product {sigma}{delta} is negative.

  2. Forces driving three-dimensional tissue patterning during morphogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Heng; Sokolow, Adam; Tulu, U. Serdar; Kiehart, Daniel; Edwards, Glenn

    2012-02-01

    Dorsal closure is an essential stage of Drosophila embryogenesis and is a model system for in-vivo investigations of cell sheet morphogenesis. During closure a system of four biological processes work collectively to close a gap in the epithelium, which initially is filled with a transient tissue. The geometry of the dorsal opening is similar to that of two intersecting circular arcs being pulled apart at a nearly constant rate. Substantial progress in understanding the dynamics has been made in the past by largely viewing closure as a two-dimensional process. However, tissue and cell dynamics are not confined to the embryo surface. We have been investigating the three-dimensional kinematics of dorsal closure by imaging the actomyosin purse strings at the periphery of the dorsal opening and by imaging the apical belts of DE-cadherin in each cell within the opening. We have analyzed the results with the methods of analytic geometry. In addition, in the past we have determined the relative magnitudes of the forces that drive dorsal closure. We have been using magnetic tweezers, time-resolved in-vivo microscopy, and biophysical modeling to measure the net force and to determine the magnitude of each force.

  3. An AC motor drive with power factor control for low cost applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellar, Maria Dias

    2000-10-01

    The front-end rectifier followed by a pulse-width modulated voltage source inverter (PWM-VSI) has been a well-established power converter configuration for many industrial drives. The increasing costs on the utility usage, due to power quality regulations, and the need to improve the VA capacity of systems, e.g. off-shore drilling rigs, have increased the interest in the development of power electronic equipment with power factor control capability. Electrical motors consume a large amount of the available electrical energy, and this energy tends to increase due to the massive emerging applications of electrical motor drives in appliances and in industrial processes. Therefore, the improvement of the power factor of these low power drive systems, usually in the range from fractional horse-power (hp) to 1 hp, is of particular interest. For these power ratings, the system configuration usually comprises a single-phase to three-phase type of converter with additional circuitry for power factor control (PFC). However, this approach has an impact on the system cost and packaging. In this work, a new concept of integrating motor and power factor controls by using a single-phase to three-phase DSP based six-switch converter topology is presented. Unlike other configurations using extra switch(es) and/or extra boost inductor, in this circuit the boost action, for input current shaping, is done by the motor leakage inductances. The power factor control and inverter operation are performed by applying two modulating signals to the SPWM control logic of the converter. In this dissertation, the converter operation and a proposed control strategy will be explained. Simulation and experimental results for a DSP based induction motor drive will be provided as proof of concept. The feasibility and potential of this configuration for ac motor drive applications will be established. The impact of this scheme on the machine operation will also be discussed.

  4. The chemical driving force for rafting in superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nabarro, F.R.N. |

    1997-08-15

    Until recently, all theories of the driving force for rafting have considered the compositions of the two phases to be fixed, although accepting that the rate of rafting might be controlled by diffusion. When plastic flow occurs, the difference in elastic constants becomes negligible. A high energy density builds up in the transverse {gamma} sheets, and rafting occurs by outward motion of the transverse interfaces, reducing the volume which has a high energy density. The analysis considers only the change in enthalpy between two states, one in which the two phases have the compositions which are in equilibrium in the absence of external stress, the external stress has been applied, but no diffusion has occurred, and one in which the two phases have the homogeneous compositions which are in equilibrium under the applied stress. The authors do not attempt to treat the intermediate configuration in which some diffusion has occurred, but the compositions of the phases are inhomogeneous.

  5. Development of a computer algorithm for the analysis of variable-frequency AC drives: Case studies included

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kankam, M. David; Benjamin, Owen

    1991-01-01

    The development of computer software for performance prediction and analysis of voltage-fed, variable-frequency AC drives for space power applications is discussed. The AC drives discussed include the pulse width modulated inverter (PWMI), a six-step inverter and the pulse density modulated inverter (PDMI), each individually connected to a wound-rotor induction motor. Various d-q transformation models of the induction motor are incorporated for user-selection of the most applicable model for the intended purpose. Simulation results of selected AC drives correlate satisfactorily with published results. Future additions to the algorithm are indicated. These improvements should enhance the applicability of the computer program to the design and analysis of space power systems.

  6. Effect of a powered drive on pushing and pulling forces when transporting bariatric hospital beds.

    PubMed

    Wiggermann, Neal

    2017-01-01

    Powered drives designed to assist with moving hospital beds are commercially available but no studies have evaluated whether they reduce the push and pull forces likely contributing to injury in caregivers. This study measured hand forces of 10 caregivers maneuvering a manual and powered bariatric bed through simulated hospital environments (hallway, elevator, and ramp). Peak push and pull forces exceeded previously established psychophysical limits for all activities with the manual bed. For the powered bed, peak forces were significantly (p < 0.05) lower for all tasks, and below psychophysical limits. Powered drive reduced peak forces between 38% (maneuvering into elevator) and 94% (descending ramp). Powered drive also reduced stopping distance by 55%. When maneuvering, the integral of hand force was 34% lower with powered drive, but average forces during straight-line pushing did not differ between beds. Powered drive may reduce the risk of injury or the number of caregivers needed for transport. PMID:27633198

  7. Traction-drive force transmission for telerobotic joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. M.; Kuban, D. P.

    1989-01-01

    A mechanism which meets the requirements of a teleoperated manipulator and those of an autonomous robot is discussed. The mechanism is a traction-drive differential that uses variable preload mechanisms. The differential provides compact design, with dextrous motion range and torque density similar to geared systems. The traction drive offers high stiffness to backlash for good robotic performance. The variable-loading mechanism (VLM) minimizes the drive-train friction for improved teleoperation. This combination provides a mechanism to allow advanced manipulation with either teleoperated control or autonomous robotic operation. The design principles of both major components of the joint mechanism are described.

  8. Cation charge dependence of the forces driving DNA assembly.

    PubMed

    DeRouchey, Jason; Parsegian, V Adrian; Rau, Donald C

    2010-10-20

    Understanding the strength and specificity of interactions among biologically important macromolecules that control cellular functions requires quantitative knowledge of intermolecular forces. Controlled DNA condensation and assembly are particularly critical for biology, with separate repulsive and attractive intermolecular forces determining the extent of DNA compaction. How these forces depend on the charge of the condensing ion has not been determined, but such knowledge is fundamental for understanding the basis of DNA-DNA interactions. Here, we measure DNA force-distance curves for a homologous set of arginine peptides. All forces are well fit as the sum of two exponentials with 2.4- and 4.8-Å decay lengths. The shorter-decay-length force is always repulsive, with an amplitude that varies slightly with length or charge. The longer-decay-length force varies strongly with cation charge, changing from repulsion with Arg¹ to attraction with Arg². Force curves for a series of homologous polyamines and the heterogeneous protein protamine are quite similar, demonstrating the universality of these forces for DNA assembly. Repulsive amplitudes of the shorter-decay-length force are species-dependent but nearly independent of charge within each species. A striking observation was that the attractive force amplitudes for all samples collapse to a single curve, varying linearly with the inverse of the cation charge.

  9. Nonlinear Forced Response of Electromechanical Integrated Toroidal Drive to Coupled Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lizhong; Wang, Fen

    2012-01-01

    The electric excitation and the parameter excitation from mesh stiffness fluctuation are analyzed. The forced response equations of the drive system to the coupled excitations are presented. For the exciting frequencies far from and near natural frequencies, the forced responses of the drive system to the coupled excitations are investigated. Results show that the nonlinear forced responses of the drive system to the coupled excitations change periodically and unsteadily; the time period of the nonlinear forced responses depends on the frequencies of the electric excitation, the mesh parameter excitation, and the nonlinear natural frequencies of the drive system; in order to improve the dynamics performance of the drive system, the frequencies of the electric excitations should not be taken as integral multiple of the mesh parameter exciting frequency. PMID:23251105

  10. The driving forces of land change in the Northern Piedmont of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Auch, Roger F.; Napton, Darrell E.; Kambly, Steven; Moreland, Thomas R.; Sayler, Kristi L.

    2012-01-01

    Driving forces facilitate or inhibit land-use/land-cover change. Human driving forces include political, economic, cultural, and social attributes that often change across time and space. Remotely sensed imagery provides regional land-change data for the Northern Piedmont, an ecoregion of the United States that continued to urbanize after 1970 through conversion of agricultural and forest land covers to developed uses. Eight major driving forces facilitated most of the land conversion; other drivers inhibited or slowed change. A synergistic web of drivers may be more important in understanding land change than individual drivers by themselves.

  11. True polar wander and plate-driving forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, D. M.; Solomon, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    The nature of net torques applied to the lithosphere by ridge and trench forces as implied by the absence of recent true polar wander is explored. The 'ridge push' and 'trench pull' forces and the potential net torques on the global lithosphere contributed by each of these forces are discussed. It is shown that the relative magnitudes of the net torques contributed by ridge and trench forces are constrained by the absence of true polar wander during the Cenozoic and by the magnitudes of basal shear stresses on the faster moving plates. It is suggested that the lack of recent true polar wander may be due at least in part to the coincidence of a near cancellation of net torques contributed by ridge and trench forces.

  12. Passive rotation of flagella on paralyzed Salmonella typhimurium (mot) mutants by external rotatory driving force.

    PubMed Central

    Ishihara, A; Yamaguchi, S; Hotani, H

    1981-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium mot mutants are unable to rotate their flagella. Dark-field light microscopy showed that the flagella could be rotated passively by an external rotatory driving force. Images PMID:7007338

  13. Self-Motion Depending on the Physicochemical Properties of Esters as the Driving Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakata, Satoshi; Matsuo, Kyoko; Kirisaka, Junko

    2007-01-01

    The self-motion of an ester boat is investigated depending on the physicochemical properties of the surface-active substance. The results show that the ester boat moves towards the higher surface tension generating as the driving force.

  14. An Analysis Of The Photothermal Drive Of A Quartz Force Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallalieu, Kim; Youngquist, Robert; Davies, D. E. N.; Jones, G. F.

    1985-08-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of running a quartz force sensor with an optical drive. The general theory behind optical (strictly speaking, photothermal) driving of a resonant structure is presented and this is used in conjunction with empirical results obtained from an existing system to clarify problem areas and to suggest improvements. A straightforward method for optical reading is briefly described.

  15. Analysis of Korean Students' International Mobility by 2-D Model: Driving Force Factor and Directional Factor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Elisa L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the dynamics of Korean students' international mobility to study abroad by using the 2-D Model. The first D, "the driving force factor," explains how and what components of the dissatisfaction with domestic higher education perceived by Korean students drives students' outward mobility to seek foreign…

  16. Spatial and Temporal Dynamics in the Ionic Driving Force for GABAA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wright, R.; Raimondo, J. V.; Akerman, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that the strength of GABAergic synaptic transmission is dynamic. One parameter that can establish differences in the actions of GABAergic synapses is the ionic driving force for the chloride-permeable GABAA receptor (GABAAR). Here we review some of the sophisticated ways in which this ionic driving force can vary within neuronal circuits. This driving force for GABAARs is subject to tight spatial control, with the distribution of Cl− transporter proteins and channels generating regional variation in the strength of GABAAR signalling across a single neuron. GABAAR dynamics can result from short-term changes in their driving force, which involve the temporary accumulation or depletion of intracellular Cl−. In addition, activity-dependent changes in the expression and function of Cl− regulating proteins can result in long-term shifts in the driving force for GABAARs. The multifaceted regulation of the ionic driving force for GABAARs has wide ranging implications for mature brain function, neural circuit development, and disease. PMID:21766044

  17. Nano-rheology of hydrogels using direct drive force modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nalam, Prathima C; Gosvami, Nitya N; Caporizzo, Matthew A; Composto, Russell J; Carpick, Robert W

    2015-11-01

    We present a magnetic force-based direct drive modulation method to measure local nano-rheological properties of soft materials across a broad frequency range (10 Hz to 2 kHz) using colloid-attached atomic force microscope (AFM) probes in liquid. The direct drive method enables artefact-free measurements over several decades of excitation frequency, and avoids the need to evaluate medium-induced hydrodynamic drag effects. The method was applied to measure the local mechanical properties of polyacrylamide hydrogels. The frequency-dependent storage stiffness, loss stiffness, and loss tangent (tan δ) were quantified for hydrogels having high and low crosslinking densities by measuring the amplitude and the phase response of the cantilever while the colloid was in contact with the hydrogel. The frequency bandwidth was further expanded to lower effective frequencies (0.1 Hz to 10 Hz) by obtaining force-displacement (FD) curves. Slow FD measurements showed a recoverable but highly hysteretic response, with the contact mechanical behaviour dependent on the loading direction: approach curves showed Hertzian behaviour while retraction curves fit the JKR contact mechanics model well into the adhesive regime, after which multiple detachment instabilities occurred. Using small amplitude dynamic modulation to explore faster rates, the load dependence of the storage stiffness transitioned from Hertzian to a dynamic punch-type (constant contact area) model, indicating significant influence of material dissipation coupled with adhesion. Using the appropriate contact model across the full frequency range measured, the storage moduli were found to remain nearly constant until an increase began near ∼100 Hz. The softer gels' storage modulus increased from 7.9 ± 0.4 to 14.5 ± 2.1 kPa (∼85%), and the stiffer gels' storage modulus increased from 16.3 ± 1.1 to 31.7 ± 5.0 kPa (∼95%). This increase at high frequencies may be attributed to a contribution from solvent

  18. Nano-rheology of hydrogels using direct drive force modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nalam, Prathima C; Gosvami, Nitya N; Caporizzo, Matthew A; Composto, Russell J; Carpick, Robert W

    2015-11-01

    We present a magnetic force-based direct drive modulation method to measure local nano-rheological properties of soft materials across a broad frequency range (10 Hz to 2 kHz) using colloid-attached atomic force microscope (AFM) probes in liquid. The direct drive method enables artefact-free measurements over several decades of excitation frequency, and avoids the need to evaluate medium-induced hydrodynamic drag effects. The method was applied to measure the local mechanical properties of polyacrylamide hydrogels. The frequency-dependent storage stiffness, loss stiffness, and loss tangent (tan δ) were quantified for hydrogels having high and low crosslinking densities by measuring the amplitude and the phase response of the cantilever while the colloid was in contact with the hydrogel. The frequency bandwidth was further expanded to lower effective frequencies (0.1 Hz to 10 Hz) by obtaining force-displacement (FD) curves. Slow FD measurements showed a recoverable but highly hysteretic response, with the contact mechanical behaviour dependent on the loading direction: approach curves showed Hertzian behaviour while retraction curves fit the JKR contact mechanics model well into the adhesive regime, after which multiple detachment instabilities occurred. Using small amplitude dynamic modulation to explore faster rates, the load dependence of the storage stiffness transitioned from Hertzian to a dynamic punch-type (constant contact area) model, indicating significant influence of material dissipation coupled with adhesion. Using the appropriate contact model across the full frequency range measured, the storage moduli were found to remain nearly constant until an increase began near ∼100 Hz. The softer gels' storage modulus increased from 7.9 ± 0.4 to 14.5 ± 2.1 kPa (∼85%), and the stiffer gels' storage modulus increased from 16.3 ± 1.1 to 31.7 ± 5.0 kPa (∼95%). This increase at high frequencies may be attributed to a contribution from solvent

  19. Axial force and efficiency tests of fixed center variable speed belt drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation of how the axial force varies with the centerline force at different speed ratios, speeds, and loads, and how the drive's transmission efficiency is affected by these related forces is described. The tests, intended to provide a preliminary performance and controls characterization for a variable speed belt drive continuously variable transmission (CVT), consisted of the design and construction of an experimental test rig geometrically similar to the CVT, and operation of that rig at selected speed ratios and power levels. Data are presented which show: how axial forces exerted on the driver and driven sheaves vary with the centerline force at constant values of speed ratio, speed, and output power; how the transmission efficiency varies with centerline force and how it is also a function of the V belt coefficient; and the axial forces on both sheaves as normalized functions of the traction coefficient.

  20. Drive-amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy: From vacuum to liquids

    PubMed Central

    Jaafar, Miriam; Cuenca, Mariano; Melcher, John; Raman, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Summary We introduce drive-amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy as a dynamic mode with outstanding performance in all environments from vacuum to liquids. As with frequency modulation, the new mode follows a feedback scheme with two nested loops: The first keeps the cantilever oscillation amplitude constant by regulating the driving force, and the second uses the driving force as the feedback variable for topography. Additionally, a phase-locked loop can be used as a parallel feedback allowing separation of the conservative and nonconservative interactions. We describe the basis of this mode and present some examples of its performance in three different environments. Drive-amplutide modulation is a very stable, intuitive and easy to use mode that is free of the feedback instability associated with the noncontact-to-contact transition that occurs in the frequency-modulation mode. PMID:22563531

  1. Nano-rheology of hydrogels using direct drive force modulation atomic force microscopy†

    PubMed Central

    Nalam, Prathima C.; Gosvami, Nitya N.; Caporizzo, Matthew A.; Composto, Russell J.

    2016-01-01

    We present a magnetic force-based direct drive modulation method to measure local nano-rheological properties of soft materials across a broad frequency range (10 Hz to 2 kHz) using colloid-attached atomic force microscope (AFM) probes in liquid. The direct drive method enables artefact-free measurements over several decades of excitation frequency, and avoids the need to evaluate medium-induced hydrodynamic drag effects. The method was applied to measure the local mechanical properties of polyacrylamide hydrogels. The frequency-dependent storage stiffness, loss stiffness, and loss tangent (tan δ) were quantified for hydrogels having high and low crosslinking densities by measuring the amplitude and the phase response of the cantilever while the colloid was in contact with the hydrogel. The frequency bandwidth was further expanded to lower effective frequencies (0.1 Hz to 10 Hz) by obtaining force–displacement (FD) curves. Slow FD measurements showed a recoverable but highly hysteretic response, with the contact mechanical behaviour dependent on the loading direction: approach curves showed Hertzian behaviour while retraction curves fit the JKR contact mechanics model well into the adhesive regime, after which multiple detachment instabilities occurred. Using small amplitude dynamic modulation to explore faster rates, the load dependence of the storage stiffness transitioned from Hertzian to a dynamic punch-type (constant contact area) model, indicating significant influence of material dissipation coupled with adhesion. Using the appropriate contact model across the full frequency range measured, the storage moduli were found to remain nearly constant until an increase began near ∼100 Hz. The softer gels' storage modulus increased from 7.9 ± 0.4 to 14.5 ± 2.1 kPa (∼85%), and the stiffer gels' storage modulus increased from 16.3 ± 1.1 to 31.7 ± 5.0 kPa (∼95%). This increase at high frequencies may be attributed to a contribution from solvent

  2. The thermodynamic driving force for kinetics in general and enzyme kinetics in particular.

    PubMed

    Pekař, Miloslav

    2015-03-16

    The thermodynamic driving force of a reaction is usually taken as the chemical potential difference between products and reactants. The forward and backward reaction rates are then related to this force. This procedure is of very limited validity, as the resulting expression contains no kinetic factor and gives little information on reaction kinetics. The transformation of the reaction rate as a function of concentration (and temperature) into a function of chemical potential should be more properly performed, as illustrated by a simple example of an enzymatic reaction. The proper thermodynamic driving force is the difference between the exponentials of the totaled chemical potentials of reactants and products.

  3. Tumor hypoxia as a driving force in genetic instability

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Sub-regions of hypoxia exist within all tumors and the presence of intratumoral hypoxia has an adverse impact on patient prognosis. Tumor hypoxia can increase metastatic capacity and lead to resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Hypoxia also leads to altered transcription and translation of a number of DNA damage response and repair genes. This can lead to inhibition of recombination-mediated repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Hypoxia can also increase the rate of mutation. Therefore, tumor cell adaptation to the hypoxic microenvironment can drive genetic instability and malignant progression. In this review, we focus on hypoxia-mediated genetic instability in the context of aberrant DNA damage signaling and DNA repair. Additionally, we discuss potential therapeutic approaches to specifically target repair-deficient hypoxic tumor cells. PMID:24152759

  4. Cancer metabolism as a central driving force of glioma pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Masui, Kenta; Cavenee, Webster K; Mischel, Paul S

    2016-07-01

    The recent identification of distinct genetic and epigenetic features in each glioma entity is leading to a multilayered, integrated diagnostic approach combining histologic features with molecular genetic information. Somatic mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) and receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) pathways are key oncogenic events in diffuse gliomas, including lower grade (grade II and III) gliomas (LGG) and the highly lethal brain tumor glioblastoma (GBM), respectively, where they reprogram the epigenome, transcriptome, and metabolome to drive tumor growth. However, the mechanisms by which these genetic aberrations are translated into the aggressive nature of gliomas through metabolic reprogramming have just begun to be unraveled. The intricate interactions between the oncogenic signaling and cancer metabolism have also been recently demonstrated. Here, we describe a set of recent discoveries on cancer metabolism driven by IDH mutation and mutations in RTK pathways, highlighting the integration of genetic mutations, metabolic reprogramming, and epigenetic shifts, potentially providing new therapeutic opportunities. PMID:27295313

  5. Lifetime of metastable states in a Ginzburg-Landau system: Numerical simulations at large driving forces.

    PubMed

    Umantsev, A

    2016-04-01

    We developed a "brute-force" simulation method and conducted numerical "experiments" on homogeneous nucleation in an isotropic system at large driving forces (not small supersaturations) using the stochastic Ginzburg-Landau approach. Interactions in the system are described by the asymmetric (no external field), athermal (temperature-independent driving force), tangential (simple phase diagram) Hamiltonian, which has two independent "drivers" of the phase transition: supersaturation and thermal noise. We obtained the probability distribution function of the lifetime of the metastable state and analyzed its mean value as a function of the supersaturation, noise strength, and volume. We also proved the nucleation theorem in the mean-field approximation. The results allowed us to find the thermodynamic properties of the barrier state and conclude that at large driving forces the fluctuating volumes are not independent. PMID:27176373

  6. Position and force control of a vehicle with two or more steerable drive wheels

    SciTech Connect

    Reister, D.B.; Unseren, M.A.

    1992-10-01

    When a vehicle with two or more steerable drive wheels is traveling in a circle, the motion of the wheels is constrained. The wheel translational velocity divided by the radius to the center of rotation must be the same for all wheels. When the drive wheels are controlled independently using position control, the motion of the wheels may violate the constraints and the wheels may slip. Consequently, substantial errors can occur in the orientation of the vehicle. A vehicle with N drive wheels has (N - 1) constraints and one degree of freedom. We have developed a new approach to the control of a vehicle with N steerable drive wheels. The novel aspect of our approach is the use of force control. To control the vehicle, we have one degree of freedom for the position on the circle and (N - 1) forces that can be used to reduce errors. Recently, Kankaanranta and Koivo developed a control architecture that allows the force and position degrees of freedom to be decoupled. In the work of Kankaanranta and Koivo the force is an exogenous input. We have made the force endogenous by defining the force in terms of the errors in satisfying the rigid body kinematic constraints. We have applied the control architecture to the HERMIES-III robot and have measured a dramatic reduction in error (more than a factor of 20) compared to motions without force control.

  7. Amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy, is acoustic driving in liquid quantitatively reliable?

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Zhao, Cunlu; Mugele, Frieder; van den Ende, Dirk

    2015-09-25

    Measuring quantitative tip-sample interaction forces in dynamic atomic force microscopy in fluids is challenging because of the strong damping of the ambient viscous medium and the fluid-mediated driving forces. This holds in particular for the commonly used acoustic excitation of the cantilever oscillation. Here we present measurements of tip-sample interactions due to conservative DLVO and hydration forces and viscous dissipation forces in aqueous electrolytes using tips with radii varying from typical 20 nm for the DLVO and hydration forces, to 1 μm for the viscous dissipation. The measurements are analyzed using a simple harmonic oscillator model, continuous beam theory with fluid-mediated excitation and thermal noise spectroscopy (TNS). In all cases consistent conservative forces, deviating less than 40% from each other, are obtained for all three approaches. The DLVO forces are even within 5% of the theoretical expectations for all approaches. Accurate measurements of dissipative forces within 15% of the predictions of macroscopic fluid dynamics require the use of TNS or continuous beam theory including fluid-mediated driving. Taking this into account, acoustic driving in liquid is quantitatively reliable. PMID:26335613

  8. Amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy, is acoustic driving in liquid quantitatively reliable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fei; Zhao, Cunlu; Mugele, Frieder; van den Ende, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    Measuring quantitative tip-sample interaction forces in dynamic atomic force microscopy in fluids is challenging because of the strong damping of the ambient viscous medium and the fluid-mediated driving forces. This holds in particular for the commonly used acoustic excitation of the cantilever oscillation. Here we present measurements of tip-sample interactions due to conservative DLVO and hydration forces and viscous dissipation forces in aqueous electrolytes using tips with radii varying from typical 20 nm for the DLVO and hydration forces, to 1 μm for the viscous dissipation. The measurements are analyzed using a simple harmonic oscillator model, continuous beam theory with fluid-mediated excitation and thermal noise spectroscopy (TNS). In all cases consistent conservative forces, deviating less than 40% from each other, are obtained for all three approaches. The DLVO forces are even within 5% of the theoretical expectations for all approaches. Accurate measurements of dissipative forces within 15% of the predictions of macroscopic fluid dynamics require the use of TNS or continuous beam theory including fluid-mediated driving. Taking this into account, acoustic driving in liquid is quantitatively reliable.

  9. Experimental modeling of the effect of hurricane wind forces on driving behavior and vehicle performance.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Jose M; Codjoe, Julius; Osman, Osama; Ishak, Sherif; Wolshon, Brian

    2015-01-01

    While traffic planning is important for developing a hurricane evacuation plan, vehicle performance on the roads during extreme weather conditions is critical to the success of the planning process. This novel study investigates the effect of gusty hurricane wind forces on the driving behavior and vehicle performance. The study explores how the parameters of a driving simulator could be modified to reproduce wind loadings experienced by three vehicle types (passenger car, ambulance, and bus) during gusty hurricane winds, through manipulation of appropriate software. Thirty participants were then tested on the modified driving simulator under five wind conditions (ranging from normal to hurricane category 4). The driving performance measures used were heading error and lateral displacement. The results showed that higher wind forces resulted in more varied and greater heading error and lateral displacement. The ambulance had the greatest heading errors and lateral displacements, which were attributed to its large lateral surface area and light weight. Two mathematical models were developed to estimate the heading error and lateral displacements for each of the vehicle types for a given change in lateral wind force. Through a questionnaire, participants felt the different characteristics while driving each vehicle type. The findings of this study demonstrate the valuable use of a driving simulator to model the behavior of different vehicle types and to develop mathematical models to estimate and quantify driving behavior and vehicle performance under hurricane wind conditions.

  10. Modeling of a High Force Density Fishbone Shaped Electrostatic Comb Drive Microactuator

    PubMed Central

    Megat Hasnan, Megat Muhammad Ikhsan; Mohd Sabri, Mohd Faizul; Mohd Said, Suhana; Nik Ghazali, Nik Nazri

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design and evaluation of a high force density fishbone shaped electrostatic comb drive actuator. This comb drive actuator has a branched structure similar to a fishbone, which is intended to increase the capacitance of the electrodes and hence increase the electrostatic actuation force. Two-dimensional finite element analysis was used to simulate the motion of the fishbone shaped electrostatic comb drive actuator and compared against the performance of a straight sided electrostatic comb drive actuator. Performances of both designs are evaluated by comparison of displacement and electrostatic force. For both cases, the active area and the minimum gap distance between the two electrodes were constant. An active area of 800 × 300 μm, which contained 16 fingers of fishbone shaped actuators and 40 fingers of straight sided actuators, respectively, was used. Through simulation, improvement of drive force of the fishbone shaped electrostatic comb driver is approximately 485% higher than conventional electrostatic comb driver. These results indicate that the fishbone actuator design provides good potential for applications as high force density electrostatic microactuator in MEMS systems. PMID:25165751

  11. Crack Driving Forces in a Multilayered Coating System for Ceramic Matrix Composite Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of the top coating thickness, modulus and shrinkage strains on the crack driving forces for a baseline multilayer Yttria-Stabilized-Zirconia/Mullite/Si thermal and environment barrier coating (TEBC) system for SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite substrates are determined for gas turbine applications. The crack driving forces increase with increasing modulus, and a low modulus thermal barrier coating material (below 10 GPa) will have no cracking issues under the thermal gradient condition analyzed. Since top coating sintering increases the crack driving forces with time, highly sintering resistant coatings are desirable to maintain a low tensile modulus and maintain a low crack driving force with time. Finite element results demonstrated that an advanced TEBC system, such as ZrO2/HfO2, which possesses improved sintering resistance and high temperature stability, exhibited excellent durability. A multi-vertical cracked structure with fine columnar spacing is an ideal strain tolerant coating capable of reducing the crack driving forces to an acceptable level even with a high modulus of 50 GPa.

  12. A Protonmotive Force Drives ATP Synthesis in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Maloney, Peter C.; Kashket, E. R.; Wilson, T. Hastings

    1974-01-01

    When cells of Streptococcus lactis or Escherichia coli were suspended in a potassium-free medium, a membrane potential (negative inside) could be artificially generated by the addition of the potassium ionophore, valinomycin. In response to this inward directed protonmotive force, ATP synthesis catalyzed by the membrane-bound ATPase (EC 3.6.1.3) was observed. The formation of ATP was not found in S. lactis that had been treated with the ATPase inhibitor, N,N′-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, nor was it observed in a mutant of E. coli lacking the ATPase. Inhibition of ATP synthesis in S. lactis was also observed when the membrane potential was reduced by the presence of external potassium, or when cells were first incubated with the proton conductor, carbonylcyanidefluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone. These results are in agreement with predictions made by the chemiosmotic hypothesis of Mitchell. PMID:4279406

  13. Kin competition as a major driving force for invasions.

    PubMed

    Kubisch, Alexander; Fronhofer, Emanuel A; Poethke, Hans Joachim; Hovestadt, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    Current theory explains accelerating invasions with increased levels of dispersal as being caused by "spatial selection." Here we argue that another selective force, strong kin competition resulting from high relatedness due to subsequent founder effects at the expanding margin, is of at least comparable importance for dispersal evolution during invasions. We test this hypothesis with individual-based simulations of a spatially structured population invading empty space. To quantify the relative contribution of kin competition to dispersal evolution, we contrast two scenarios, one including kin effects and one excluding them without influencing spatial selection. We find that kin competition is a major determinant for dispersal evolution at invasion fronts, especially under environmental conditions that favor a pronounced kin structure (i.e., small patches, low environmental stochasticity, and high patch isolation). We demonstrate the importance of kin competition and thus biotic influences on dispersal evolution during invasions.

  14. Characterizing a sustainability transition: goals, targets, trends, and driving forces.

    PubMed

    Parris, Thomas M; Kates, Robert W

    2003-07-01

    Sustainable development exhibits broad political appeal but has proven difficult to define in precise terms. Recent scholarship has focused on the nature of a sustainability transition, described by the National Research Council as meeting the needs of a stabilizing future world population while reducing hunger and poverty and maintaining the planet's life-support systems. We identify a small set of goals, quantitative targets, and associated indicators that further characterize a sustainability transition by drawing on the consensus embodied in internationally negotiated agreements and plans of action. To illustrate opportunities for accelerating progress, we then examine current scholarship on the processes that influence attainment of four such goals: reducing hunger, promoting literacy, stabilizing greenhouse-gas concentrations, and maintaining fresh-water availability. We find that such analysis can often reveal "levers of change," forces that both control the rate of positive change and are subject to policy intervention.

  15. Hypoxia: The Force that Drives Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qiangwei; Colgan, Sean P; Shelley, Carl Simon

    2016-01-01

    In the United States the prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) reached epidemic proportions in 2012 with over 600,000 patients being treated. The rates of ESRD among the elderly are disproportionally high. Consequently, as life expectancy increases and the baby-boom generation reaches retirement age, the already heavy burden imposed by ESRD on the US health care system is set to increase dramatically. ESRD represents the terminal stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD). A large body of evidence indicating that CKD is driven by renal tissue hypoxia has led to the development of therapeutic strategies that increase kidney oxygenation and the contention that chronic hypoxia is the final common pathway to end-stage renal failure. Numerous studies have demonstrated that one of the most potent means by which hypoxic conditions within the kidney produce CKD is by inducing a sustained inflammatory attack by infiltrating leukocytes. Indispensable to this attack is the acquisition by leukocytes of an adhesive phenotype. It was thought that this process resulted exclusively from leukocytes responding to cytokines released from ischemic renal endothelium. However, recently it has been demonstrated that leukocytes also become activated independent of the hypoxic response of endothelial cells. It was found that this endothelium-independent mechanism involves leukocytes directly sensing hypoxia and responding by transcriptional induction of the genes that encode the β2-integrin family of adhesion molecules. This induction likely maintains the long-term inflammation by which hypoxia drives the pathogenesis of CKD. Consequently, targeting these transcriptional mechanisms would appear to represent a promising new therapeutic strategy. PMID:26847481

  16. Force control compensation method with variable load stiffness and damping of the hydraulic drive unit force control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangdong; Ba, Kaixian; Yu, Bin; Cao, Yuan; Zhu, Qixin; Zhao, Hualong

    2016-05-01

    Each joint of hydraulic drive quadruped robot is driven by the hydraulic drive unit (HDU), and the contacting between the robot foot end and the ground is complex and variable, which increases the difficulty of force control inevitably. In the recent years, although many scholars researched some control methods such as disturbance rejection control, parameter self-adaptive control, impedance control and so on, to improve the force control performance of HDU, the robustness of the force control still needs improving. Therefore, how to simulate the complex and variable load characteristics of the environment structure and how to ensure HDU having excellent force control performance with the complex and variable load characteristics are key issues to be solved in this paper. The force control system mathematic model of HDU is established by the mechanism modeling method, and the theoretical models of a novel force control compensation method and a load characteristics simulation method under different environment structures are derived, considering the dynamic characteristics of the load stiffness and the load damping under different environment structures. Then, simulation effects of the variable load stiffness and load damping under the step and sinusoidal load force are analyzed experimentally on the HDU force control performance test platform, which provides the foundation for the force control compensation experiment research. In addition, the optimized PID control parameters are designed to make the HDU have better force control performance with suitable load stiffness and load damping, under which the force control compensation method is introduced, and the robustness of the force control system with several constant load characteristics and the variable load characteristics respectively are comparatively analyzed by experiment. The research results indicate that if the load characteristics are known, the force control compensation method presented in this

  17. Intracellular and extracellular forces drive primary cilia movement

    PubMed Central

    Battle, Christopher; Ott, Carolyn M.; Burnette, Dylan T.; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Schmidt, Christoph F.

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are ubiquitous, microtubule-based organelles that play diverse roles in sensory transduction in many eukaryotic cells. They interrogate the cellular environment through chemosensing, osmosensing, and mechanosensing using receptors and ion channels in the ciliary membrane. Little is known about the mechanical and structural properties of the cilium and how these properties contribute to ciliary perception. We probed the mechanical responses of primary cilia from kidney epithelial cells [Madin–Darby canine kidney-II (MDCK-II)], which sense fluid flow in renal ducts. We found that, on manipulation with an optical trap, cilia deflect by bending along their length and pivoting around an effective hinge located below the basal body. The calculated bending rigidity indicates weak microtubule doublet coupling. Primary cilia of MDCK cells lack interdoublet dynein motors. Nevertheless, we found that the organelles display active motility. 3D tracking showed correlated fluctuations of the cilium and basal body. These angular movements seemed random but were dependent on ATP and cytoplasmic myosin-II in the cell cortex. We conclude that force generation by the actin cytoskeleton surrounding the basal body results in active ciliary movement. We speculate that actin-driven ciliary movement might tune and calibrate ciliary sensory functions. PMID:25605896

  18. Tuning the driving force for exciton dissociation in single-walled carbon nanotube heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihly, Rachelle; Mistry, Kevin S.; Ferguson, Andrew J.; Clikeman, Tyler T.; Larson, Bryon W.; Reid, Obadiah; Boltalina, Olga V.; Strauss, Steven H.; Rumbles, Garry; Blackburn, Jeffrey L.

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the kinetics and energetics of interfacial electron transfer in molecular systems is crucial for the development of a broad array of technologies, including photovoltaics, solar fuel systems and energy storage. The Marcus formulation for electron transfer relates the thermodynamic driving force and reorganization energy for charge transfer between a given donor/acceptor pair to the kinetics and yield of electron transfer. Here we investigated the influence of the thermodynamic driving force for photoinduced electron transfer (PET) between single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and fullerene derivatives by employing time-resolved microwave conductivity as a sensitive probe of interfacial exciton dissociation. For the first time, we observed the Marcus inverted region (in which driving force exceeds reorganization energy) and quantified the reorganization energy for PET for a model SWCNT/acceptor system. The small reorganization energies (about 130 meV, most of which probably arises from the fullerene acceptors) are beneficial in minimizing energy loss in photoconversion schemes.

  19. Extracting the driving force from ozone data using slow feature analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Geli; Yang, Peicai; Zhou, Xiuji

    2016-05-01

    Slow feature analysis (SFA) is a recommended technique for extracting slowly varying features from a quickly varying signal. In this work, we apply SFA to total ozone data from Arosa, Switzerland. The results show that the signal of volcanic eruptions can be found in the driving force, and wavelet analysis of this driving force shows that there are two main dominant scales, which may be connected with the effect of climate mode such as North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and solar activity. The findings of this study represent a contribution to our understanding of the causality from observed climate data.

  20. Fast charge separation in a non-fullerene organic solar cell with a small driving force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Chen, Shangshang; Qian, Deping; Gautam, Bhoj; Yang, Guofang; Zhao, Jingbo; Bergqvist, Jonas; Zhang, Fengling; Ma, Wei; Ade, Harald; Inganäs, Olle; Gundogdu, Kenan; Gao, Feng; Yan, He

    2016-07-01

    Fast and efficient charge separation is essential to achieve high power conversion efficiency in organic solar cells (OSCs). In state-of-the-art OSCs, this is usually achieved by a significant driving force, defined as the offset between the bandgap (Egap) of the donor/acceptor materials and the energy of the charge transfer (CT) state (ECT), which is typically greater than 0.3 eV. The large driving force causes a relatively large voltage loss that hinders performance. Here, we report non-fullerene OSCs that exhibit ultrafast and efficient charge separation despite a negligible driving force, as ECT is nearly identical to Egap. Moreover, the small driving force is found to have minimal detrimental effects on charge transfer dynamics of the OSCs. We demonstrate a non-fullerene OSC with 9.5% efficiency and nearly 90% internal quantum efficiency despite a low voltage loss of 0.61 V. This creates a path towards highly efficient OSCs with a low voltage loss.

  1. Regional Quality Assurance Activity in Higher Education in Southeast Asia: Its Characteristics and Driving Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umemiya, Naoki

    2008-01-01

    This article analyses the characteristics and driving forces of regional quality assurance activity in Southeast Asia, which has been actively promoted in recent years by the ASEAN University Network, an organisation for higher education under the auspices of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). There are now more collaborative…

  2. Sustainment of Fine Particle Cloud by Means of Time-Averaged Particle Driving Force in Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gohda, Takuma; Iizuka, Satoru

    2008-09-07

    We have succeeded in sustaining fine particle cloud by using a time-averaged particle driving (TAPD) method in the RF discharge plasma. The particles feel only time-averaged force when the period of pulses applied to those point-electrodes is shorter than the particle response time. The particles are transported to a middle point between two point-electrodes.

  3. Driving Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Richard A.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses campus parking assessment and planning to meet the increasing demands of colleges and universities while controlling costs and reducing student and staff discontent. Explores advice for expanding parking-lot space and maintaining security. Provides a chart that shows general parking requirements for various groups based on students…

  4. A high switching frequency IGBT PWM rectifier/inverter system for ac motor drives operating from single phase supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiyagarajah, K.; Ranganathan, V. T.; Ramakrishna Iyengar, B. S.

    1991-10-01

    A pulse-width-modulated (PWM) rectifier/inverter system using insulated-gate-bipolar-transistors (IGBTs), capable of switching at 20 kHz is reported. The base drive circuit for the IGBT, incorporating short-circuit protection, is presented. The inverter uses an Undeland snubber together with a simple energy recovery circuit, which ensures reliable and efficient operation even for 20 kHz switching. The front end for the system is a regenerative single phase full-bridge IGBT inverter along with an ac reactor. Steady-state design considerations are explained, and control techniques for unity power factor operation and fast current control of the front end converter, in a rotating as well as a stationary reference frame, are discussed and compared. Results from computer simulations and experimental results for a 1.5-kW prototype system are presented.

  5. Measurement of Hand/Handrim Grip Forces in Two Different One Arm Drive Wheelchairs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to explore the total and regional grip forces in the hand when propelling two different manual one arm drive wheelchairs: the Neater Uni-wheelchair (NUW) and a foot steered Action3 wheelchair. Methods. 17 nondisabled users were randomly assigned to each wheelchair to drive around an indoor obstacle course. The Grip, a multiple sensor system taking continuous measurement of handgrip force, was attached to the propelling hand. Total grip force in each region of the hand and total grip force across the whole hand were calculated per user per wheelchair. Results. The Action3 with foot steering only generated significantly greater total grip force in straight running compared to the NUW and also in the fingers and thumb in straight running. Conclusions. The results suggest that the Action3 with foot steering generated greater grip forces which may infer a greater potential for repetitive strain injury in the upper limb. Further work is required to explore whether the difference in grip force is of clinical significance in a disabled population. PMID:25045684

  6. Influence of AC external magnetic field on guidance force relaxation between HTS bulk and NdFeB guideway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Longcai; Wang, Suyu; Wang, Jiasu; Zheng, Jun

    2007-12-01

    Superconducting maglev vehicle is one of the most promising applications of HTS bulks. In such a system, the HTS bulks are always exposed to time-varying external magnetic field, which is generated by the inhomogeneous surface magnetic field of the NdFeB guideway. So it is required to study whether the guidance force of the bulks is influenced by the inhomogeneity. In this paper, we studied the characteristics of the guidance force relaxation between the HTS bulk and the NdFeB guideway by an experiment in which AC external magnetic field generated by an electromagnet was used to simulate the time-varying external magnetic field caused by the inhomogeneity of the guideway. From the experiment results, it was found that the guidance force was decreased with the application of the AC external magnetic field, and the decay increased with the amplitude and was almost independent of the frequency.

  7. Frequency Domain Analysis of Beat-Less Control Method for Converter-Inverter Driving Systems Applied to AC Electric Cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Akira

    In inverter-converter driving systems for AC electric cars, the DC input voltage of an inverter contains a ripple component with a frequency that is twice as high as the line voltage frequency, because of a single-phase converter. The ripple component of the inverter input voltage causes pulsations on torques and currents of driving motors. To decrease the pulsations, a beat-less control method, which modifies a slip frequency depending on the ripple component, is applied to the inverter control. In the present paper, the beat-less control method was analyzed in the frequency domain. In the first step of the analysis, transfer functions, which revealed the relationship among the ripple component of the inverter input voltage, the slip frequency, the motor torque pulsation and the current pulsation, were derived with a synchronous rotating model of induction motors. An analysis model of the beat-less control method was then constructed using the transfer functions. The optimal setting of the control method was obtained according to the analysis model. The transfer functions and the analysis model were verified through simulations.

  8. Analyzing the Long Term Cohesive Effect of Sector Specific Driving Forces.

    PubMed

    Berman, Yonatan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Zhang, Xin; Shapira, Yoash

    2016-01-01

    Financial markets are partially composed of sectors dominated by external driving forces, such as commodity prices, infrastructure and other indices. We characterize the statistical properties of such sectors and present a novel model for the coupling of the stock prices and their dominating driving forces, inspired by mean reverting stochastic processes. Using the model we were able to explain the market sectors' long term behavior and estimate the coupling strength between stocks in financial markets and the sector specific driving forces. Notably, the analysis was successfully applied to the shipping market, in which the Baltic dry index (BDI), an assessment of the price of transporting the major raw materials by sea, influences the shipping financial market. We also present the analysis of other sectors-the gold mining market and the food production market, for which the model was also successfully applied. The model can serve as a general tool for characterizing the coupling between external forces and affected financial variables and therefore for estimating the risk in sectors and their vulnerability to external stress. PMID:27031230

  9. Analyzing the Long Term Cohesive Effect of Sector Specific Driving Forces

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Yonatan; Zhang, Xin; Shapira, Yoash

    2016-01-01

    Financial markets are partially composed of sectors dominated by external driving forces, such as commodity prices, infrastructure and other indices. We characterize the statistical properties of such sectors and present a novel model for the coupling of the stock prices and their dominating driving forces, inspired by mean reverting stochastic processes. Using the model we were able to explain the market sectors’ long term behavior and estimate the coupling strength between stocks in financial markets and the sector specific driving forces. Notably, the analysis was successfully applied to the shipping market, in which the Baltic dry index (BDI), an assessment of the price of transporting the major raw materials by sea, influences the shipping financial market. We also present the analysis of other sectors—the gold mining market and the food production market, for which the model was also successfully applied. The model can serve as a general tool for characterizing the coupling between external forces and affected financial variables and therefore for estimating the risk in sectors and their vulnerability to external stress. PMID:27031230

  10. Dynamic tensile forces drive collective cell migration through three-dimensional extracellular matrices

    PubMed Central

    Gjorevski, Nikolce; S. Piotrowski, Alexandra; Varner, Victor D.; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2015-01-01

    Collective cell migration drives tissue remodeling during development, wound repair, and metastatic invasion. The physical mechanisms by which cells move cohesively through dense three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM) remain incompletely understood. Here, we show directly that migration of multicellular cohorts through collagenous matrices occurs via a dynamic pulling mechanism, the nature of which had only been inferred previously in 3D. Tensile forces increase at the invasive front of cohorts, serving a physical, propelling role as well as a regulatory one by conditioning the cells and matrix for further extension. These forces elicit mechanosensitive signaling within the leading edge and align the ECM, creating microtracks conducive to further migration. Moreover, cell movements are highly correlated and in phase with ECM deformations. Migrating cohorts use spatially localized, long-range forces and consequent matrix alignment to navigate through the ECM. These results suggest biophysical forces are critical for 3D collective migration. PMID:26165921

  11. Application of Laser Ranging and VLBI Data to a Study of Plate Tectonic Driving Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    The conditions under which changes in plate driving or resistive forces associated with plate boundary earthquakes are measurable with laser ranging or very long base interferometry were investigated. Aspects of plate forces that can be characterized by such measurements were identified. Analytic solutions for two dimensional stress diffusion in a viscoelastic plate following earthquake faulting on a finite fault, finite element solutions for three dimensional stress diffusion in a viscoelastic Earth following earthquake faulting, and quantitative constraints from modeling of global intraplate stress on the magnitude of deviatoric stress in the lithosphere are among the topics discussed.

  12. Testing thermal gradient driving force for grain boundary migration using molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Xian-Ming; Zhang, Yongfeng; Tonks, Michael R.

    2015-02-01

    Strong thermal gradients in low-thermal-conductivity ceramics may drive extended defects, such as grain boundaries and voids, to migrate in preferential directions. In this work, molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to study thermal gradient driven grain boundary migration and to verify a previously proposed thermal gradient driving force equation, using uranium dioxide as a model system. It is found that a thermal gradient drives grain boundaries to migrate up the gradient and the migration velocity increases under a constant gradient owing to the increase in mobility with temperature. Different grain boundaries migrate at very different rates due to their different intrinsic mobilities. The extracted mobilities from the thermal gradient driven simulations are compared with those calculated from two other well-established methods and good agreement between the three different methods is found, demonstrating that the theoretical equation of the thermal gradient driving force is valid, although a correction of one input parameter should be made. The discrepancy in the grain boundary mobilities between modeling and experiments is also discussed.

  13. Theoretical analysis of the formation driving force and decreased sensitivity for CL-20 cocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jun-Hong; Shi, Liang-Wei; Zhang, Chao-Yang; Li, Hong-Zhen; Chen, Min-Bo; Chen, Wei-Ming

    2016-07-01

    Methods that analyze the driving force in the formation of the new energetic cocrystal are proposed in this paper. Various intermolecular interactions in the 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazatetracyclo [5.5.0.05,9.03,11]dodecane (CL-20) cocrystals are compared with those in pure CL-20 and coformer crystals by atom in molecule (AIM) and Hirshfeld surface methods under the supramolecular cluster model. The driving force in the formation of the CL-20 cocrystals is analyzed. The main driving force in the formation of the cocrystal CL-20/HMX comes from the O···H interactions, that in the formation of the cocrystal CL-20/TNT from the O···H and C···O interactions, and that in the formation of the cocrystal CL-20/BTF from the N···H and N···O interactions. Other interactions in the CL-20 cocrystals only contribute to their stabilization. At the same time, the reasons for the decreased impact sensitivity of the CL-20 cocrystals are also analyzed. They are the strengthening of the intermolecular interactions, the reducing of the free space, and the changing of the surrounding of CL-20 molecule in the CL-20 cocrystals in comparison with those in the pure CL-20 crystal.

  14. Tuning the driving force for exciton dissociation in single-walled carbon nanotube heterojunctions.

    PubMed

    Ihly, Rachelle; Mistry, Kevin S; Ferguson, Andrew J; Clikeman, Tyler T; Larson, Bryon W; Reid, Obadiah; Boltalina, Olga V; Strauss, Steven H; Rumbles, Garry; Blackburn, Jeffrey L

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the kinetics and energetics of interfacial electron transfer in molecular systems is crucial for the development of a broad array of technologies, including photovoltaics, solar fuel systems and energy storage. The Marcus formulation for electron transfer relates the thermodynamic driving force and reorganization energy for charge transfer between a given donor/acceptor pair to the kinetics and yield of electron transfer. Here we investigated the influence of the thermodynamic driving force for photoinduced electron transfer (PET) between single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and fullerene derivatives by employing time-resolved microwave conductivity as a sensitive probe of interfacial exciton dissociation. For the first time, we observed the Marcus inverted region (in which driving force exceeds reorganization energy) and quantified the reorganization energy for PET for a model SWCNT/acceptor system. The small reorganization energies (about 130 meV, most of which probably arises from the fullerene acceptors) are beneficial in minimizing energy loss in photoconversion schemes. PMID:27219706

  15. Facilitating Implementation of Interprofessional Collaborative Practices Into Primary Care: A Trilogy of Driving Forces.

    PubMed

    Bareil, Céline; Duhamel, Fabie; Lalonde, Lyne; Goudreau, Johanne; Hudon, Eveline; Lussier, Marie-Thérèse; Lévesque, Lise; Lessard, Sylvie; Turcotte, Alain; Lalonde, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Implementing interprofessional collaborative practices in primary care is challenging, and research about its facilitating factors remains scarce. The goal of this participatory action research study was to better understand the driving forces during the early stage of the implementation process of a community-driven and patient-focused program in primary care titled "TRANSforming InTerprofessional cardiovascular disease prevention in primary care" (TRANSIT). Eight primary care clinics in Quebec, Canada, agreed to participate by creating and implementing an interprofessional facilitation team (IFT). Sixty-three participants volunteered to be part of an IFT, and 759 patients agreed to participate. We randomized six clinics into a supported facilitation ("supported") group, with an external facilitator (EF) and financial incentives for participants. We assigned two clinics to an unsupported facilitation ("unsupported") group, with no EF or financial incentives. After 3 months, we held one interview for the two EFs. After 6 months, we held eight focus groups with IFT members and another interview with each EF. The analyses revealed three key forces: (1) opportunity for dialogue through the IFT, (2) active role of the EF, and (3) change implementation budgets. Decision-makers designing implementation plans for interprofessional programs should ensure that these driving forces are activated. Further research should examine how these forces affect interprofessional practices and patient outcomes. PMID:26364352

  16. Optomechanically induced transparency in the presence of an external time-harmonic-driving force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jinyong; You, Cai; Si, Liu-Gang; Xiong, Hao; Li, Jiahua; Yang, Xiaoxue; Wu, Ying

    2015-06-01

    We propose a potentially valuable scheme to measure the properties of an external time-harmonic-driving force with frequency ω via investigating its interaction with the combination of a pump field and a probe field in a generic optomechanical system. We show that the spectra of both the cavity field and output field in the configuration of optomechanically induced transparency are greatly modified by such an external force, leading to many interesting linear and non-linear effects, such as the asymmetric structure of absorption in the frequency domain and the antisymmetry breaking of dispersion near ω = ωm. Furthermore, we find that our scheme can be used to measure the initial phase of the external force. More importantly, this setup may eliminate the negative impact of thermal noise on the measurement of the weak external force in virtue of the process of interference between the probe field and the external force. Finally, we show that our configuration can be employed to improve the measurement resolution of the radiation force produced by a weak ultrasonic wave.

  17. Optomechanically induced transparency in the presence of an external time-harmonic-driving force

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jinyong; You, Cai; Si, Liu-Gang; Xiong, Hao; Li, Jiahua; Yang, Xiaoxue; Wu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    We propose a potentially valuable scheme to measure the properties of an external time-harmonic-driving force with frequency ω via investigating its interaction with the combination of a pump field and a probe field in a generic optomechanical system. We show that the spectra of both the cavity field and output field in the configuration of optomechanically induced transparency are greatly modified by such an external force, leading to many interesting linear and non-linear effects, such as the asymmetric structure of absorption in the frequency domain and the antisymmetry breaking of dispersion near ω = ωm. Furthermore, we find that our scheme can be used to measure the initial phase of the external force. More importantly, this setup may eliminate the negative impact of thermal noise on the measurement of the weak external force in virtue of the process of interference between the probe field and the external force. Finally, we show that our configuration can be employed to improve the measurement resolution of the radiation force produced by a weak ultrasonic wave. PMID:26062029

  18. Fluidic assisted thin-film device heterogeneous integration: Surface tension as driving force and magnetic as guiding force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jing; Ray Chaudhuri, Ritesh; Seo, Sang-Woo

    2015-10-01

    This paper demonstrates a fluidic assisted heterogeneous integration of optical thin-film device using surface tension as driving force and magnetic field as guiding force. Thin-film devices can be auto-aligned and integrated using surface tension onto their predesigned locations on a host substrate due to minimization of interfacial energy. By inserting a layer of nickel (Ni) into device metallization step, magnetic force was employed to increase mobility and contact probability of thin-film devices to their binding sites on the host substrate. A thin-film gallium arsenide (GaAs) inverted Metal-Semiconductor-Metal (MSM) photodetector (PD) has been successfully integrated onto a silicon host substrate with the proposed integration approach. The influence of the nickel layer to the PD performance was also investigated. Due to the self-assembly capability and thin-film format of the device, the proposed method has potential for wafer-scale implementation and is compatible with the matured silicon-based CMOS technology. This is a critical step towards a scalable manufacturing process to create advanced photonic/optoelectronic systems that are low-cost, compact, high performance, and complex in multi-material functionality.

  19. Nature of the coupling between neural drive and force-generating capacity in the human quadriceps muscle.

    PubMed

    Hug, François; Goupille, Clément; Baum, Daniel; Raiteri, Brent J; Hodges, Paul W; Tucker, Kylie

    2015-11-22

    The force produced by a muscle depends on both the neural drive it receives and several biomechanical factors. When multiple muscles act on a single joint, the nature of the relationship between the neural drive and force-generating capacity of the synergistic muscles is largely unknown. This study aimed to determine the relationship between the ratio of neural drive and the ratio of muscle force-generating capacity between two synergist muscles (vastus lateralis (VL) and vastus medialis (VM)) in humans. Twenty-one participants performed isometric knee extensions at 20 and 50% of maximal voluntary contractions (MVC). Myoelectric activity (surface electromyography (EMG)) provided an index of neural drive. Physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) was estimated from measurements of muscle volume (magnetic resonance imaging) and muscle fascicle length (three-dimensional ultrasound imaging) to represent the muscles' force-generating capacities. Neither PCSA nor neural drive was balanced between VL and VM. There was a large (r = 0.68) and moderate (r = 0.43) correlation between the ratio of VL/VM EMG amplitude and the ratio of VL/VM PCSA at 20 and 50% of MVC, respectively. This study provides evidence that neural drive is biased by muscle force-generating capacity, the greater the force-generating capacity of VL compared with VM, the stronger bias of drive to the VL.

  20. Analysis of driving efficiency for LRV wheels using forced-slip method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhongchao; Gao, Haibo; Ding, Liang; Deng, Zongquan; Qu, Jianjun

    2014-11-01

    To investigate and improve the mobility of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV), it is necessary to consider the mechanical properties of the interaction between the wheels and the ground. In this paper, a new solution method, the forced-slip solution method, which uses a semi-empirical approach, was presented. That is, given the wheel's vertical load and drawbar pull or driving torque as known input values, the unknown slip ratio can be resolved. The alternative method involves predicting the mechanics for a given slip ratio. The proposed method correlates better with actual wheel movements, and by studying a single wheel, this solution method can also be used to resolve the mechanical properties of the front and rear wheels in a four-wheel-drive (4WD) LRV configuration. It can also be used to consider the multi-pass effect of the rear wheels on lunar soil. The calculation results show that the 4WD LRV driving efficiency varies with the position of the center of mass. Thus, the LRV driving efficiency can be optimized by adjusting the position of its center of mass.

  1. Driving force of binding of amyloid {beta}-protein to lipid bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Keisuke; Matsuzaki, Katsumi

    2008-06-06

    Amyloid {beta}-protein (A{beta}) has been reported to interact with a variety of lipid species, although the thermodynamic driving force remains unclear. We investigated the binding of A{beta}s labeled with the dye diethylaminocoumarin (DAC-A{beta}s) to lipid bilayers under various conditions. DAC-A{beta}-(1-40) electrostatically bound to anionic and cationic lipids at acidic and alkaline interfacial pH, respectively. However, at neutral pH, electroneutral A{beta} did not bind to these lipids, indicating little hydrophobic interaction between A{beta}-(1-40) and the acyl chains of lipids. In contrast, DAC-A{beta} associated with glycolipids even under electroneutral conditions. These results suggested that hydrogen-bonding as well as hydrophobic interactions with sugar groups of glycolipids drive the membrane binding of A{beta}-(1-40)

  2. Role of Chemical Driving Force in Martensitic Transformations of High-Purity Fe-Cr-Ni Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behjati, P.; Najafizadeh, A.

    2011-12-01

    The main objective of the present work is to point out the respective roles of chemical driving force and stacking fault energy (SFE) in the occurrence of martensitic transformations in high-purity Fe-Cr-Ni alloys. For this purpose, the transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffractometer, thermal differential microanalyzer (TDA), and tension test were employed to report M s temperatures, austenite stacking fault energies, and driving forces for the concerned alloys. It was observed that the martensitic transformations in the studied alloys occur through the γ → ɛ → α' steps. As a remarkable result, it was shown that a low SFE, if necessary to ɛ-phase nucleation, is not a sufficient condition for nucleation of α' phase. In fact, the formation of stable α' nuclei from α' embryos occur if the required chemical driving force is provided. Also, an equation was proposed for the kinetics of spontaneous martensitic transformation as a function of driving force.

  3. Decay Characteristics of Levitation Force of YBCO Bulk Exposed to AC Magnetic Field above NdFeB Guideway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Minxian; Lu, Yiyun; Wang, Suyu; Ma, Guangtong

    2011-04-01

    The superconducting maglev vehicle is one of the most promising applications of HTS bulks. In such a system, the nonuniformity of the magnetic field along the movement direction above the NdFeB guideway is inevitable due to the assembly error and inhomogeneity of the material property of the NdFeB magnet. So it is required to study the characteristics of levitation force of the bulks affected by the non-uniform applied magnetic fields along the moving direction. In this paper, we will study the characteristics of the levitation force relaxation between the HTS bulk and the NdFeB guideway by an experiment in which AC external magnetic field generated by an electromagnet is used to simulate the time-varying external magnetic field caused by the inhomogeneity of the guideway. From the experimental results, it has found that the levitation force is decreasing with the application of the AC external magnetic field, and the decay increasing with the amplitude of the applied magnetic field and is almost independent of the frequency.

  4. Forces driving the attachment of Staphylococcus epidermidis to fibrinogen-coated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Herman, Philippe; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Geoghegan, Joan A; Vanzieleghem, Thomas; Foster, Timothy J; Hols, Pascal; Mahillon, Jacques; Dufrêne, Yves F

    2013-10-22

    Cell surface proteins of bacteria play essential roles in mediating the attachment of pathogens to host tissues and, therefore, represent key targets for anti-adhesion therapy. In the opportunistic pathogen Staphylococcus epidermidis , the adhesion protein SdrG mediates attachment of bacteria to the blood plasma protein fibrinogen (Fg) through a binding mechanism that is not yet fully understood. We report the direct measurement of the forces driving the adhesion of S. epidermidis to Fg-coated substrates using single-cell force spectroscopy. We found that the S. epidermidis -Fg adhesion force is of ~150 pN magnitude and that the adhesion strength and adhesion probability strongly increase with the interaction time, suggesting that the adhesion process involves time-dependent conformational changes. Control experiments with mutant bacteria lacking SdrG and substrates coated with the Fg β(6-20) peptide, instead of the full Fg protein, demonstrate that these force signatures originate from the rupture of specific bonds between SdrG and its peptide ligand. Collectively, our results are consistent with a dynamic, multi-step ligand-binding mechanism called "dock, lock, and latch".

  5. Quantitative Attribution of Major Driving Forces on Soil Organic Carbon Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WU, Y.; Liu, S.; Tan, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) storage plays a major role in the global carbon cycle and is affected by many factors including land use/management changes. However, the contributions of various factors to SOC changes are not well understood and quantified. This study was to investigate the impacts of changing farming practices, initial SOC levels, and biological enhancement of grain production on SOC dynamics and to attribute the relative contributions of major driving forces (CO2 enrichment and farming practices) using a fractional factorial modeling design. The case study using a crop site in Iowa in the United States demonstrated that the traditional corn-soybean (CS) rotation had the potential of accumulating SOC over this century under the current condition; whereas the continuous-corn (CC) system might have a higher SOC sequestration potential than CS. In either case, however, straw removal could reverse the sink potential to carbon neutral or a weak sink/source. Our results also suggested that the equilibrium SOC level may vary greatly depending on cropping systems and management practices. Importantly, the factorial design analysis indicated that residue management had the most significant impact on SOC changes, followed by CO2 enrichment. In brief, this study is valuable for understanding the major forces driving SOC dynamics of agro-ecosystems and informative for decision-makers when seeking the enhancement of SOC sequestration potential and sustainability of biofuel production, especially in the Corn Belt region.

  6. Salticid predation as one potential driving force of ant mimicry in jumping spiders.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jin-Nan; Cheng, Ren-Chung; Li, Daiqin; Tso, I-Min

    2011-05-01

    Many spiders possess myrmecomorphy, and species of the jumping spider genus Myrmarachne exhibit nearly perfect ant mimicry. Most salticids are diurnal predators with unusually high visual acuity that prey on various arthropods, including conspecifics. In this study, we tested whether predation pressure from large jumping spiders is one possible driving force of perfect ant mimicry in jumping spiders. The results showed that small non-ant-mimicking jumping spiders were readily treated as prey by large ones (no matter whether heterospecific or conspecific) and suffered high attack and mortality rates. The size difference between small and large jumping spiders significantly affected the outcomes of predatory interactions between them: the smaller the juvenile jumping spiders, the higher the predation risk from large ones. The attack and mortality rates of ant-mimicking jumping spiders were significantly lower than those of non-ant-mimicking jumping spiders, indicating that a resemblance to ants could provide protection against salticid predation. However, results of multivariate behavioural analyses showed that the responses of large jumping spiders to ants and ant-mimicking salticids differed significantly. Results of this study indicate that predation pressure from large jumping spiders might be one selection force driving the evolution of nearly perfect myrmecomorphy in spiders and other arthropods.

  7. Driving forces in moving-contact problems of dynamic elasticity: Indentation, wedging and free sliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slepyan, Leonid I.; Brun, Michele

    2012-11-01

    The steady-state solution for an elastic half-plane under a moving frictionless smooth indenter of arbitrary shape is derived based on the corresponding transient problem and on a condition concerning energy fluxes. Resulting stresses and displacements are found explicitly starting from their expressions in terms of a single analytical function. This solution incorporates all speed ranges, including the super-Rayleigh subsonic and intersonic speed regimes, which received no final description to date. Next, under a similar formulation the wedging of an elastic plane is considered for a finite wedge moving at a distance from the crack tip. Finally, we solve the problem for such a wedge moving along the interface of two elastic half-planes compressed together. Considering these problems we determine the driving forces caused by the main underlying factors: the stress field singular points on the contact area (super-Rayleigh subsonic speed regime), the wave radiation (intersonic and supersonic regimes) and the fracture resistance (wedging problem). In addition to the sub-Rayleigh speed regime, where the sliding contact itself gives no contribution to the driving forces, there exists a sharp decrease in the resistance in the vicinity of the longitudinal wave speed with zero limit at this speed.

  8. Salticid predation as one potential driving force of ant mimicry in jumping spiders.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jin-Nan; Cheng, Ren-Chung; Li, Daiqin; Tso, I-Min

    2011-05-01

    Many spiders possess myrmecomorphy, and species of the jumping spider genus Myrmarachne exhibit nearly perfect ant mimicry. Most salticids are diurnal predators with unusually high visual acuity that prey on various arthropods, including conspecifics. In this study, we tested whether predation pressure from large jumping spiders is one possible driving force of perfect ant mimicry in jumping spiders. The results showed that small non-ant-mimicking jumping spiders were readily treated as prey by large ones (no matter whether heterospecific or conspecific) and suffered high attack and mortality rates. The size difference between small and large jumping spiders significantly affected the outcomes of predatory interactions between them: the smaller the juvenile jumping spiders, the higher the predation risk from large ones. The attack and mortality rates of ant-mimicking jumping spiders were significantly lower than those of non-ant-mimicking jumping spiders, indicating that a resemblance to ants could provide protection against salticid predation. However, results of multivariate behavioural analyses showed that the responses of large jumping spiders to ants and ant-mimicking salticids differed significantly. Results of this study indicate that predation pressure from large jumping spiders might be one selection force driving the evolution of nearly perfect myrmecomorphy in spiders and other arthropods. PMID:20961898

  9. Driving forces behind the construction of an eco-compensation mechanism for wetlands in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changhai

    2016-09-01

    This research revealed important driving forces behind the construction of an eco-compensation mechanism for wetlands (DFEMW) in China. Using China's provincial panel data from 1978 to 2008, a fixed-effects model was used to analyze the impacts of agricultural production systems on wetlands. We identified three DFEMW as follows: the change of wetland resources and protection measures in China; declaration and implementation of the provincial Wetland Protection Ordinance; and wetland degradation by agricultural production systems, which necessitated the establishment of a wetland eco-compensation mechanism. In addition to the DFEMW, a significant positive correlation between wetland area and both rural population and gross agricultural production was identified, in addition to a negative correlation with chemical fertilizer usage, reservoir storage capacity, and irrigation area. The underlying reasons for the serious degradation and inadequate protection of wetlands were market failure and government failure; these were the driving forces behind the need to establish a wetland eco-compensation mechanism. From a governmental perspective, it has been difficult to rectify market failures in resource distribution and thus to prevent wetland degradation. Factors include conflicts of interest, lack of investment, effective special laws, a simple means to protect wetlands, and a multidisciplinary management system. Therefore, the key factor is the coordination of interest relationships between those who utilize wetlands and those who seek to minimize wetland degradation and effectively protect wetlands.

  10. Salticid predation as one potential driving force of ant mimicry in jumping spiders

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jin-Nan; Cheng, Ren-Chung; Li, Daiqin; Tso, I-Min

    2011-01-01

    Many spiders possess myrmecomorphy, and species of the jumping spider genus Myrmarachne exhibit nearly perfect ant mimicry. Most salticids are diurnal predators with unusually high visual acuity that prey on various arthropods, including conspecifics. In this study, we tested whether predation pressure from large jumping spiders is one possible driving force of perfect ant mimicry in jumping spiders. The results showed that small non-ant-mimicking jumping spiders were readily treated as prey by large ones (no matter whether heterospecific or conspecific) and suffered high attack and mortality rates. The size difference between small and large jumping spiders significantly affected the outcomes of predatory interactions between them: the smaller the juvenile jumping spiders, the higher the predation risk from large ones. The attack and mortality rates of ant-mimicking jumping spiders were significantly lower than those of non-ant-mimicking jumping spiders, indicating that a resemblance to ants could provide protection against salticid predation. However, results of multivariate behavioural analyses showed that the responses of large jumping spiders to ants and ant-mimicking salticids differed significantly. Results of this study indicate that predation pressure from large jumping spiders might be one selection force driving the evolution of nearly perfect myrmecomorphy in spiders and other arthropods. PMID:20961898

  11. The attenuation of the levitation force of HTS bulk exposed to AC magnetic field on the above NdFeB guideway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Minxian; Wang, Yan

    2012-01-01

    In the present High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) maglev vehicle system, the air gaps between the adjacent permanent magnets make the magnetic fields above the NdFeB guideway non-uniform. So it is required to study the characteristics of levitation force of the HTS bulk affected by the non-uniform applied magnetic fields along the moving direction. In this paper, we have studied the characteristics of the levitation force relaxation by an experiment in which AC magnetic field generated by an electromagnet is used to simulate the time-varying magnetic field caused by the inhomogeneity of the NdFeB guideway. From the experiment results, it is found that the levitation force is attenuated with the application of the AC field, and the attenuation is increased with the amplitude of the AC field, but the attenuation is almost independent of the frequency the AC magnetic field.

  12. Directed Self-Assembly of sub-10 nm Particles: Role of Driving Forces and Template Geometry in Packing and Ordering.

    PubMed

    Mehraeen, Shafigh; Asbahi, Mohamed; Fuke, Wang; Yang, Joel K W; Cao, Jianshu; Tan, Mei Chee

    2015-08-11

    By comparing the magnitude of forces, a directed self-assembly mechanism has been suggested previously in which immersion capillary is the only driving force responsible for packing and ordering of nanoparticles, which occur only after the meniscus recedes. However, this mechanism is insufficient to explain vacancies formed by directed self-assembly at low particle concentrations. Utilizing experiments, and Monte Carlo and Brownian dynamics simulations, we developed a theoretical model based on a new proposed mechanism. In our proposed mechanism, the competing driving forces controlling the packing and ordering of sub-10 nm particles are (1) the repulsive component of the pair potential and (2) the attractive capillary forces, both of which apply at the contact line. The repulsive force arises from the high particle concentration, and the attractive force is caused by the surface tension at the contact line. Our theoretical model also indicates that the major part of packing and ordering of nanoparticles occurs before the meniscus recedes. Furthermore, utilizing our model, we are able to predict the various self-assembly configurations of particles as their size increases. These results lay out the interplay between driving forces during directed self-assembly, motivating a better template design now that we know the importance and the dominating driving forces in each regime of particle size.

  13. Human health and the water environment: using the DPSEEA framework to identify the driving forces of disease.

    PubMed

    Gentry-Shields, Jennifer; Bartram, Jamie

    2014-01-15

    There is a growing awareness of global forces that threaten human health via the water environment. A better understanding of the dynamic between human health and the water environment would enable prediction of the significant driving forces and effective strategies for coping with or preventing them. This report details the use of the Driving Force-Pressure-State-Exposure-Effect-Action (DPSEEA) framework to explore the linkage between water-related diseases and their significant driving forces. The DPSEEA frameworks indicate that a select group of driving forces, including population growth, agriculture, infrastructure (dams and irrigation), and climate change, is at the root cause of key global disease burdens. Construction of the DPSEEA frameworks also allows for the evaluation of public health interventions. Sanitation was found to be a widely applicable and effective intervention, targeting the driver/pressure linkage of most of the water-related diseases examined. Ultimately, the DPSEEA frameworks offer a platform for constituents in both the health and environmental fields to collaborate and commit to a common goal targeting the same driving forces.

  14. Human health and the water environment: using the DPSEEA framework to identify the driving forces of disease.

    PubMed

    Gentry-Shields, Jennifer; Bartram, Jamie

    2014-01-15

    There is a growing awareness of global forces that threaten human health via the water environment. A better understanding of the dynamic between human health and the water environment would enable prediction of the significant driving forces and effective strategies for coping with or preventing them. This report details the use of the Driving Force-Pressure-State-Exposure-Effect-Action (DPSEEA) framework to explore the linkage between water-related diseases and their significant driving forces. The DPSEEA frameworks indicate that a select group of driving forces, including population growth, agriculture, infrastructure (dams and irrigation), and climate change, is at the root cause of key global disease burdens. Construction of the DPSEEA frameworks also allows for the evaluation of public health interventions. Sanitation was found to be a widely applicable and effective intervention, targeting the driver/pressure linkage of most of the water-related diseases examined. Ultimately, the DPSEEA frameworks offer a platform for constituents in both the health and environmental fields to collaborate and commit to a common goal targeting the same driving forces. PMID:24036221

  15. Application of laser ranging and VLBI data to a study of plate tectonic driving forces. [finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    The measurability of changes in plate driving or resistive forces associated with plate boundary earthquakes by laser rangefinding or VLBI is considered with emphasis on those aspects of plate forces that can be characterized by such measurements. Topics covered include: (1) analytic solutions for two dimensional stress diffusion in a plate following earthquake faulting on a finite fault; (2) two dimensional finite-element solutions for the global state of stress at the Earth's surface for possible plate driving forces; and (3) finite-element solutions for three dimensional stress diffusion in a viscoelastic Earth following earthquake faulting.

  16. Calculations of Alfvén wave driving forces, plasma flow, and current drive in the Tokamak Chauffage Alfvén wave experiment in Brazil (TCABR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarante-Segundo, G.; Elfimov, A. G.; Galvão, R. M. O.; Ross, D. W.; Nascimento, I. C.

    2001-01-01

    The current and plasma flows driven by ponderomotive forces are calculated for tokamak plasmas, using a kinetic code in the Alfvén range of frequencies. The rf (radio frequency) ponderomotive force is expressed as a sum of a gradient part and of a wave momentum transfer force, which is proportional to wave dissipation (electron Landau damping and transit time magnetic pumping). Finally, the rf force is balanced by the viscous force in the fluid momentum response to the rf fields in the plasma. The relative magnitudes of the different forces for kinetic and global Alfvén waves with low phase velocities are explicitly calculated. It is shown that, dissipating in electrons, Alfvén waves can drive ion flow via the gradient force, which is dominated in m=0-sideband harmonic resonance induced by toroidal mode coupling. Estimates of power requirements to drive substantial poloidal flow in the Tokamak Chauffage Alfvén wave heating experiment in Brazil (TCABR) [L. Ruchko, M. C. Andrade, R. M. O. Galvão, Nucl. Fusion 30, 503 (1996)] are made.

  17. The role of biotic forces in driving macroevolution: beyond the Red Queen.

    PubMed

    Voje, Kjetil L; Holen, Øistein H; Liow, Lee Hsiang; Stenseth, Nils Chr

    2015-06-01

    A multitude of hypotheses claim that abiotic factors are the main drivers of macroevolutionary change. By contrast, Van Valen's Red Queen hypothesis is often put forward as the sole representative of the view that biotic forcing is the main evolutionary driver. This imbalance of hypotheses does not reflect our current knowledge: theoretical work demonstrates the plausibility of biotically driven long-term evolution, whereas empirical work suggests a central role for biotic forcing in macroevolution. We call for a more pluralistic view of how biotic forces may drive long-term evolution that is compatible with both phenotypic stasis in the fossil record and with non-constant extinction rates. Promising avenues of research include contrasting predictions from relevant theories within ecology and macroevolution, as well as embracing both abiotic and biotic proxies while modelling long-term evolutionary data. By fitting models describing hypotheses of biotically driven macroevolution to data, we could dissect their predictions and transcend beyond pattern description, possibly narrowing the divide between our current understanding of micro- and macroevolution.

  18. Investigation of the stability of AC repulsive force levitation systems for low-speed maglev.

    SciTech Connect

    He, J. L.; Wang, Z.; Rote, D. M.; Winkelman, S.; Energy Systems

    1992-09-01

    Discusses the stability of an AC induction levitation system, focusing on the analysis and optimum design of the secondary conductor. Several improved secondary conductor geometries are considered. A theoretical model with numerical results, as well as experimental observations and data are presented. Theoretical and experimental results indicate that only marginal stability can be achieved with a single-plate secondary conductor. Modifications of the single plate can enhance its stability at rest, but this design suffers from longitudinal instabilities when propelled. It is concluded that a double-plate secondary conductor is stable in all six degrees of freedom.

  19. The driving force for glide of a threading dislocation in a strained epitaxial layer on a substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, L. B.

    T HE PROCESS of epitaxial growth of a very thin layer onto a substrate crystal is considered for the particular situation in which the layer and substrate materials have the same crystal structure and orientation but different lattice parameters. Under these conditions, the layer grows with an intrinsic elastic strain determined by the mismatch in lattice parameters. The associated stress in the crystalline layer provides a driving force for the nucleation and motion of defects, primarily dislocations. The focus here is on the glide of a dislocation extending from the free surface of the layer to the layer-substrate interface, the so-called threading dislocation. A general definition of driving force for glide of a threading dislocation is introduced on the basis of work arguments. The definition is then applied to calculate the driving force for steady motion of an isolated threading dislocation in a strained layer, and the result includes Matthews' critical thickness concept as one of its features. Next, a kinetic equation for glide of a dislocation in semiconductor materials is proposed to estimate the glide rate of a threading dislocation in these low mobility materials. Finally, for the case of cubic materials, the general definition of driving force is applied to estimate the additional driving force on a threading dislocation due to an encounter with a dislocation on an intersecting glide plane. The results indicate that this effect is significant in blocking the glide of a threading dislocation for large mismatch strains and for layer thicknesses near the critical thickness.

  20. Unraveling the genetic driving forces enabling antibiotic resistance at the single cell level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, Julia

    Bacteria are champions at finding ways to quickly respond and adapt to environments like the human gut, known as the epicentre of antibiotic resistance. How do they do it? Combining molecular biology tools to microfluidic and fluorescence microscopy technologies, we monitor the behavior of bacteria at the single cell level in the presence of non-toxic doses of antibiotics. By tracking the chromosome dynamics of Escherichia coli cells upon antibiotic treatment, we examine the changes in the number, localization and content of the chromosome copies within one cell compartment or between adjacent cells. I will discuss how our work pictures the bacterial genomic plasticity as a driving force in evolution and how it provides access to the mechanisms controlling the subtle balance between genetic diversity and stability in the development of antibiotic resistance.

  1. The Impact of Evolutionary Driving Forces on Human Complex Diseases: A Population Genetics Approach.

    PubMed

    Saeb, Amr T M; Al-Naqeb, Dhekra

    2016-01-01

    Investigating the molecular evolution of human genome has paved the way to understand genetic adaptation of humans to the environmental changes and corresponding complex diseases. In this review, we discussed the historical origin of genetic diversity among human populations, the evolutionary driving forces that can affect genetic diversity among populations, and the effects of human movement into new environments and gene flow on population genetic diversity. Furthermore, we presented the role of natural selection on genetic diversity and complex diseases. Then we reviewed the disadvantageous consequences of historical selection events in modern time and their relation to the development of complex diseases. In addition, we discussed the effect of consanguinity on the incidence of complex diseases in human populations. Finally, we presented the latest information about the role of ancient genes acquired from interbreeding with ancient hominids in the development of complex diseases. PMID:27313952

  2. Stress-triggered atavistic reprogramming (STAR) addiction: driving force behind head and neck cancer?

    PubMed

    Masuda, Muneyuki; Wakasaki, Takahiro; Toh, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Recent results of the Cancer Genome Atlas on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) revealed that HNSCC lacked predominant gain-of-function mutations in oncogenes, whereas an essential role for epigenetics in oncogenesis has become apparent. In parallel, it has gained general acceptance that cancer is considered as complex adaptive system, which evolves responding environmental selective pressures. This somatic evolution appears to proceed concurrently with the acquisition of an atavistic pluripotent state (i.e., "stemness"), which is inducible by intrinsic epigenetic reprogramming program as demonstrated by induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. This Nobel prize-winning discovery has markedly accelerated and expanded cancer stem cell research from the point of epigenetic reprogramming. Taken together, we hypothesize that stress-triggered atavistic reprogramming (STAR) may be the major driving force of HNSCC evolution. In this perspective, we discuss the possible mechanisms of STAR in HNSCC, focusing on recent topics of epigenetic reprogramming in developmental and cancer cell biology.

  3. Rapid Evolutionary Dynamics of Structural Disorder as a Potential Driving Force for Biological Divergence in Flaviviruses

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Juan F.; MacDonald, Madolyn L.; Masterson, Patrick; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Siltberg-Liberles, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Protein structure is commonly regarded to be conserved and to dictate function. Most proteins rely on conformational flexibility to some degree. Are regions that convey conformational flexibility conserved over evolutionary time? Can changes in conformational flexibility alter protein function? Here, the evolutionary dynamics of structurally ordered and disordered (flexible) regions are investigated genome-wide in flaviviruses, revealing that the amount and location of structural disorder fluctuates highly among related proteins. Some regions are prone to shift between structured and flexible states. Increased evolutionary dynamics of structural disorder is observed for some lineages but not in others. Lineage-specific transitions of this kind could alter the conformational ensemble accessible to the same protein in different species, causing a functional change, even if the predominant function remains conserved. Thus, rapid evolutionary dynamics of structural disorder is a potential driving force for phenotypic divergence among flaviviruses. PMID:23418179

  4. The Impact of Evolutionary Driving Forces on Human Complex Diseases: A Population Genetics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Saeb, Amr T. M.; Al-Naqeb, Dhekra

    2016-01-01

    Investigating the molecular evolution of human genome has paved the way to understand genetic adaptation of humans to the environmental changes and corresponding complex diseases. In this review, we discussed the historical origin of genetic diversity among human populations, the evolutionary driving forces that can affect genetic diversity among populations, and the effects of human movement into new environments and gene flow on population genetic diversity. Furthermore, we presented the role of natural selection on genetic diversity and complex diseases. Then we reviewed the disadvantageous consequences of historical selection events in modern time and their relation to the development of complex diseases. In addition, we discussed the effect of consanguinity on the incidence of complex diseases in human populations. Finally, we presented the latest information about the role of ancient genes acquired from interbreeding with ancient hominids in the development of complex diseases. PMID:27313952

  5. On the driving force for crack growth during thermal actuation of shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxevanis, T.; Parrinello, A. F.; Lagoudas, D. C.

    2016-04-01

    The effect of thermomechanically induced phase transformation on the driving force for crack growth in polycrystalline shape memory alloys is analyzed in an infinite center-cracked plate subjected to a thermal actuation cycle under mechanical load in plain strain. Finite element calculations are carried out to determine the mechanical fields near the static crack and the crack-tip energy release rate using the virtual crack closure technique. A substantial increase of the energy release rate - an order of magnitude for some material systems - is observed during the thermal cycle due to the stress redistribution induced by large scale phase transformation. Thus, phase transformation occurring due to thermal variations under mechanical load may result in crack growth if the crack-tip energy release rate reaches a material specific critical value.

  6. Quantitative attribution of major driving forces on soil organic carbon dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yiping; Liu, Shuguang; Tan, Zhengxi

    2015-03-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) storage plays a major role in the global carbon cycle and is affected by many factors including land use/management changes (e.g., biofuel production-oriented changes). However, the contributions of various factors to SOC changes are not well understood and quantified. This study was designed to investigate the impacts of changing farming practices, initial SOC levels, and biological enhancement of grain production on SOC dynamics and to attribute the relative contributions of major driving forces (CO2 enrichment and farming practices) using a fractional factorial modeling design. The case study at a crop site in Iowa in the United States demonstrated that the traditional corn-soybean (CS) rotation could still accumulate SOC over this century (from 4.2 to 6.8 kg C/m2) under the current condition; whereas the continuous-corn (CC) system might have a higher SOC sequestration potential than CS. In either case, however, residue removal could reduce the sink potential substantially. Long-term simulation results also suggested that the equilibrium SOC level may vary greatly (˜5.7 to ˜11 kg C/m2) depending on cropping systems and management practices, and projected growth enhancement could make the magnitudes higher (˜7.8 to ˜13 kg C/m2). Importantly, the factorial design analysis indicated that residue management had the most significant impact (contributing 49.4%) on SOC changes, followed by CO2 Enrichment (37%), Tillage (6.2%), the combination of CO2 Enrichment-Residue removal (5.8%), and Fertilization (1.6%). In brief, this study is valuable for understanding the major forces driving SOC dynamics of agroecosystems and informative for decision-makers when seeking the enhancement of SOC sequestration potential and sustainability of biofuel production, especially in the Corn Belt region of the United States.

  7. Driving forces for import of waste for energy recovery in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Olofsson, Mattias; Sahlin, Jenny; Ekvall, Tomas; Sundberg, Johan

    2005-02-01

    Between 1996 and 2002, the Swedish import of so-called yellow waste for energy recovery increased. The import mainly consisted of separated wood waste and mixes of used wood and paper and/or plastics that was combusted in district heat production plants (DHPPs). Some mixed waste was imported to waste incineration plants for energy recovery (10% of the import of yellow waste for energy recovery in 2002). The import came primarily from Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, Denmark and Finland. We identified six underlying driving forces for this recent increase of imported waste which are outlined and their interactive issues discussed. --The energy system infrastructure, which enables high energy recovery in Sweden. --The energy taxation, where high Swedish taxes on fossil fuels make relatively expensive solid biofuels the main alternative for base load production of district heat. --The quality of the waste-derived fuels, which has been higher in the exporting countries than in Sweden. --The bans on landfilling within Europe and the shortage of waste treatment capacity. --Taxes on waste management in Europe. --Gate fee differences between exporting countries and Sweden. In the future, the overall strength of these driving forces will probably be weakened. A Swedish tax on waste incineration is being investigated. In other European countries, the ambition to reach the Kyoto targets and increase the renewable electricity production could improve the competitiveness of waste-derived fuels in comparison with fossil fuels. Swedish DHPPs using waste-derived fuels will experience higher costs after the Waste Incineration Directive is fully implemented. The uncertainty about European waste generation and treatment capacity, however, might have a large influence on the future gate fees and thus also on the yellow waste import into Sweden. PMID:15751390

  8. Driving forces for import of waste for energy recovery in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Olofsson, Mattias; Sahlin, Jenny; Ekvall, Tomas; Sundberg, Johan

    2005-02-01

    Between 1996 and 2002, the Swedish import of so-called yellow waste for energy recovery increased. The import mainly consisted of separated wood waste and mixes of used wood and paper and/or plastics that was combusted in district heat production plants (DHPPs). Some mixed waste was imported to waste incineration plants for energy recovery (10% of the import of yellow waste for energy recovery in 2002). The import came primarily from Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, Denmark and Finland. We identified six underlying driving forces for this recent increase of imported waste which are outlined and their interactive issues discussed. --The energy system infrastructure, which enables high energy recovery in Sweden. --The energy taxation, where high Swedish taxes on fossil fuels make relatively expensive solid biofuels the main alternative for base load production of district heat. --The quality of the waste-derived fuels, which has been higher in the exporting countries than in Sweden. --The bans on landfilling within Europe and the shortage of waste treatment capacity. --Taxes on waste management in Europe. --Gate fee differences between exporting countries and Sweden. In the future, the overall strength of these driving forces will probably be weakened. A Swedish tax on waste incineration is being investigated. In other European countries, the ambition to reach the Kyoto targets and increase the renewable electricity production could improve the competitiveness of waste-derived fuels in comparison with fossil fuels. Swedish DHPPs using waste-derived fuels will experience higher costs after the Waste Incineration Directive is fully implemented. The uncertainty about European waste generation and treatment capacity, however, might have a large influence on the future gate fees and thus also on the yellow waste import into Sweden.

  9. Changing and Differentiated Urban Landscape in China: Spatiotemporal Patterns and Driving Forces.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chuanglin; Li, Guangdong; Wang, Shaojian

    2016-03-01

    Urban landscape spatiotemporal change patterns and their driving mechanisms in China are poorly understood at the national level. Here we used remote sensing data, landscape metrics, and a spatial econometric model to characterize the spatiotemporal patterns of urban landscape change and investigate its driving forces in China between 1990 and 2005. The results showed that the urban landscape pattern has experienced drastic changes over the past 15 years. Total urban area has expanded approximately 1.61 times, with a 2.98% annual urban-growth rate. Compared to previous single-city studies, although urban areas are expanding rapidly, the overall fragmentation of the urban landscape is decreasing and is more irregular and complex at the national level. We also found a stair-stepping, urban-landscape changing pattern among eastern, central, and western counties. In addition, administrative level, urban size, and hierarchy have effects on the urban landscape pattern. We also found that a combination of landscape metrics can be used to supplement our understanding of the pattern of urbanization. The changes in these metrics are correlated with geographical indicators, socioeconomic factors, infrastructure variables, administrative level factors, policy factors, and historical factors. Our results indicate that the top priority should be strengthening the management of urban planning. A compact and congregate urban landscape may be a good choice of pattern for urban development in China.

  10. Driving forces of global wildfires over the past millennium and the forthcoming century.

    PubMed

    Pechony, O; Shindell, D T

    2010-11-01

    Recent bursts in the incidence of large wildfires worldwide have raised concerns about the influence climate change and humans might have on future fire activity. Comparatively little is known, however, about the relative importance of these factors in shaping global fire history. Here we use fire and climate modeling, combined with land cover and population estimates, to gain a better understanding of the forces driving global fire trends. Our model successfully reproduces global fire activity record over the last millennium and reveals distinct regimes in global fire behavior. We find that during the preindustrial period, the global fire regime was strongly driven by precipitation (rather than temperature), shifting to an anthropogenic-driven regime with the Industrial Revolution. Our future projections indicate an impending shift to a temperature-driven global fire regime in the 21st century, creating an unprecedentedly fire-prone environment. These results suggest a possibility that in the future climate will play a considerably stronger role in driving global fire trends, outweighing direct human influence on fire (both ignition and suppression), a reversal from the situation during the last two centuries.

  11. Driving forces of global wildfires over the past millennium and the forthcoming century

    PubMed Central

    Pechony, O.; Shindell, D. T.

    2010-01-01

    Recent bursts in the incidence of large wildfires worldwide have raised concerns about the influence climate change and humans might have on future fire activity. Comparatively little is known, however, about the relative importance of these factors in shaping global fire history. Here we use fire and climate modeling, combined with land cover and population estimates, to gain a better understanding of the forces driving global fire trends. Our model successfully reproduces global fire activity record over the last millennium and reveals distinct regimes in global fire behavior. We find that during the preindustrial period, the global fire regime was strongly driven by precipitation (rather than temperature), shifting to an anthropogenic-driven regime with the Industrial Revolution. Our future projections indicate an impending shift to a temperature-driven global fire regime in the 21st century, creating an unprecedentedly fire-prone environment. These results suggest a possibility that in the future climate will play a considerably stronger role in driving global fire trends, outweighing direct human influence on fire (both ignition and suppression), a reversal from the situation during the last two centuries. PMID:20974914

  12. Geographic concentration and driving forces of agricultural land use in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuluan; Li, Xiubin; Xin, Liangjie; Hao, Haiguang

    2012-03-01

    Since the 1990s, China has entered the middle phase of urbanization which leads to the existence of significant geographic concentration of agricultural land use. The average value of regional concentration degree of ten representative crops in China was 59.03%, showing a high degree of geographic concentration in farming. Some typical agriculture provinces in farming have arisen. The degree of geographic concentration in farming has been enhanced, with the average degree of regional concentration of ten crops increasing considerably by 3.83% in 2009 compared to that in 1990 (55.20%). The spatial growing center of farming was found to move westward and northward during 1990-2009. Meanwhile food production concentrated in the Northeast China and main producing area, and cash crops production concentrated in Northwest China. Off-farm employment of rural labor force, commercialization of agricultural product and regional comparative advantage are the main driving forces of geographic concentration of agricultural land use. Governmental policies with regional differences should be considered to promote further development of agriculture.

  13. Quantitatively probing the magnetic behavior of individual nanoparticles by an AC field-modulated magnetic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Lu, Wei; Song, Yiming; Wang, Yuxin; Chen, Aiying; Yan, Biao; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of advances in magnetic imaging, obtaining direct, quantitative information with nanometer scale spatial resolution remains an outstanding challenge. Current approaches, for example, Hall micromagnetometer and nitrogen-vacancy magnetometer, are limited by highly complex experimental apparatus and a dedicated sample preparation process. Here we present a new AC field-modulated magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and report the local and quantitative measurements of the magnetic information of individual magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), which is one of the most iconic objects of nanomagnetism. This technique provides simultaneously a direct visualization of the magnetization process of the individual MNPs, with spatial resolution and magnetic sensitivity of about 4.8 nm and 1.85 × 10−20 A m2, respectively, enabling us to separately estimate the distributions of the dipolar fields and the local switching fields of individual MNPs. Moreover, we demonstrate that quantitative magnetization moment of individual MNPs can be routinely obtained using MFM signals. Therefore, it underscores the power of the AC field-modulated MFM for biological and biomedical applications of MNPs and opens up the possibility for directly and quantitatively probing the weak magnetic stray fields from nanoscale magnetic systems with superior spatial resolution. PMID:26932357

  14. Nuclear Planetology: Constraining the Driving Force in Wegener's Continental Drift Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roller, G.

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear planetology [1] is a new research field, which aims at deciphering the nuclear physics processes responsible for the evolution of ultra-substellar objects and the driving force in Wegener's continental drift theory by means of Re-Os nuclear geochronometry [2]. Terrestrial Re/Os ratios observed within diamond sulphide inclusions [3], compatible with lunar r-process production ratios of Th/U≈1≈Au/Ir [4], drop from ≈0.8 to 0.2-0.05 for nucleogeochronometric ages between 2.3 Ga and 1.4 Ga [5]. It has therefore been argued [5,6] that the Re/Os fractionation is related to a change in oxygen fugacity due to the physics/chemistry of Earth's core after a possibly Fermi-pressure controlled core collapse [4]. Here, Pd/Ru, Pd/Pt, Pd/Ir, Pd/Os, Ru/Ir, Ru/Os, Pt/Ir or Pt/Os ratios from 24 published H chondrite components [7] are connected to their respective nucleogeochronometric ages to constrain an extended fossil fractionation record over 800 Ma. The following ranges are obtained: 0.06-1.04 (Pd/Ru), 0.06-0.79 (Pd/Pt), 0.06-1.76 (Pd/Os), 0.07-1.94 (Pd/Ir), 1.08-1.99 (Ru/Ir), 0.83-2.41 (Pt/Os), 0.82-2.64 (Pt/Ir). Comparing the Re/Os fractionation pattern of the diamond sulphide inclusions with these results and considering that Re is readily oxidized even at ultra-low oxygen fugacity, it may be concluded that (i) extremely reducing conditions within Earth's core basically preserve any unfractionated r-process element ratio until today; and (ii) nuclear/quantum physics processes leading to the observed ratios and fractionation pattern are ultimately the driving force in Wegener's continental drift theory. [1] Roller (2015), Abstract T34B-0407, AGU Spring Meeting. [2] Roller (2015), Geophys. Res. Abstr. 17, EGU2015-17. [3] Smit et al. (2010), GCA 74, 3292. [4] Roller (2015), Abstract #5041, 78th Ann. Met. Soc. Meeting. [5] Roller (2015), Geophys. Res. Abstr. 17, EGU2015-2399. [6] Roller (2015), Abstract PG34A-0283, AGU Spring Meeting. [7] Horan et al. (2009), GCA 73

  15. Direct determination of the driving forces for taurocholate uptake into rat liver plasma membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, M C; Blitzer, B L; Boyer, J L

    1983-01-01

    To determine directly the driving forces for bile acid entry into the hepatocyte, the uptake of [3H]taurocholic acid into rat liver plasma membrane vesicles was studied. The membrane preparation contained predominantly right-side-out vesicles, and was highly enriched in plasma membrane marker enzymes. The uptake of taurocholate at equilibrium was inversely related to medium osmolarity, indicating transport into an osmotically sensitive space. In the presence of an inwardly directed sodium gradient (NaCl or sodium gluconate), the initial rate of uptake was rapid and taurocholate was transiently accumulated at a concentration twice that at equilibrium (overshoot). Other inwardly directed cation gradients (K+, Li+, choline+) or the presence of sodium in the absence of a gradient (Na+ equilibrated) resulted in a slower initial uptake rate and did not sustain an overshoot. Bile acids inhibited sodium-dependent taurocholate uptake, whereas bromsulphthalein inhibited both sodium-dependent and sodium-independent uptake and D-glucose had no effect on uptake. Uptake was temperature dependent, with maximal overshoots occurring at 25 degrees C. Imposition of a proton gradient across the vesicle (pHo less than pHi) in the absence of a sodium gradient failed to enhance taurocholate uptake, indicating that double ion exchange (Na+-H+, OH- -anion) is unlikely. Creation of a negative intravesicular potential by altering accompanying anions or by valinomycin-induced K+-diffusion potentials did not enhance taurocholate uptake, suggesting an electroneutral transport mechanism. The kinetics of taurocholate uptake demonstrated saturability with a Michaelis constant at 52 microM and maximum velocity of 4.5 nmol X mg-1 X protein X min-1. These studies provide definitive evidence for a sodium gradient-dependent, carrier-mediated, electrically neutral transport mechanism for hepatic taurocholate uptake. These findings are consistent with a model for bile secretion in which the basolateral

  16. Kinesin-2 KIF3AC and KIF3AB Can Drive Long-Range Transport along Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Guzik-Lendrum, Stephanie; Rank, Katherine C.; Bensel, Brandon M.; Taylor, Keenan C.; Rayment, Ivan; Gilbert, Susan P.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian KIF3AC is classified as a heterotrimeric kinesin-2 that is best known for organelle transport in neurons, yet in vitro studies to characterize its single molecule behavior are lacking. The results presented show that a KIF3AC motor that includes the native helix α7 sequence for coiled-coil formation is highly processive with run lengths of ∼1.23 μm and matching those exhibited by conventional kinesin-1. This result was unexpected because KIF3AC exhibits the canonical kinesin-2 neck-linker sequence that has been reported to be responsible for shorter run lengths observed for another heterotrimeric kinesin-2, KIF3AB. However, KIF3AB with its native neck linker and helix α7 is also highly processive with run lengths of ∼1.62 μm and exceeding those of KIF3AC and kinesin-1. Loop L11, a component of the microtubule-motor interface and implicated in activating ADP release upon microtubule collision, is significantly extended in KIF3C as compared with other kinesins. A KIF3AC encoding a truncation in KIF3C loop L11 (KIF3ACΔL11) exhibited longer run lengths at ∼1.55 μm than wild-type KIF3AC and were more similar to KIF3AB run lengths, suggesting that L11 also contributes to tuning motor processivity. The steady-state ATPase results show that shortening L11 does not alter kcat, consistent with the observation that single molecule velocities are not affected by this truncation. However, shortening loop L11 of KIF3C significantly increases the microtubule affinity of KIF3ACΔL11, revealing another structural and mechanistic property that can modulate processivity. The results presented provide new, to our knowledge, insights to understand structure-function relationships governing processivity and a better understanding of the potential of KIF3AC for long-distance transport in neurons. PMID:26445448

  17. Influence of Critical Current Density on Guidance Force Decay of HTS Bulk Exposed to AC Magnetic Field Perturbation in a Maglev Vehicle System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longcai, Zhang; Jianguo, Kong

    2012-07-01

    Superconducting maglev vehicle is one of the most promising applications of HTS bulks. In such a system, the HTS bulks are always exposed to AC external magnetic field, which is generated by the inhomogeneous surface magnetic field of the NdFeB guideway. In our previous work, we studied the guidance force decay of the YBCO bulk over the NdFdB guideway used in the High-temperature superconducting maglev vehicle system with the application of the AC external magnetic field, and calculated the guidance force decay as a function of time based on an analytic model. In this paper, we investigated the influence of the critical current density on the guidance force decay of HTS bulk exposed to AC field perturbation in the maglev vehicle system and try to adopt a method to suppress the decay. From the results, it was found that the guidance force decay rate was higher for the bulk with lower critical current density. Therefore, we could suppress the guidance force decay of HTS bulk exposed to AC external magnetic field perturbation in the maglev vehicle system by improving critical current density of the bulk.

  18. Systematic processes of land use/land cover change to identify relevant driving forces: implications on water quality.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Zara; Teixeira, Heliana; Marques, João C

    2014-02-01

    Land use and land cover (LULC) are driving forces that potentially exert pressures on water bodies, which are most commonly quantified by simply obtained aggregated data. However, this is insufficient to detect the drivers that arise from the landscape change itself. To achieve this objective one must distinguish between random and systematic transitions and identify the transitions that show strong signals of change, since these will make it possible to identify the transitions that have evolved due to population growth, industrial expansion and/or changes in land management policies. Our goal is to describe a method to characterize driving forces both from LULC and dominant LULC changes, recognizing that the presence of certain LULC classes as well as the processes of transition to other uses are both sources of stress with potential effects on the condition of water bodies. This paper first quantifies the driving forces from LULC and also from processes of LULC change for three nested regions within the Mondego river basin in 1990, 2000 and 2006. It then discusses the implications for the environmental water body condition and management policies. The fingerprint left on the landscape by some of the dominant changes found, such as urbanization and industrial expansion, is, as expected, low due to their proportion in the geographic regions under study, yet their magnitude of change and consistency reveal strong signals of change regarding the pressures acting in the system. Assessing dominant LULC changes is vital for a comprehensive study of driving forces with potential impacts on water condition.

  19. Transcriptional abundance is not the single force driving the evolution of bacterial proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite rapid progress in understanding the mechanisms that shape the evolution of proteins, the relative importance of various factors remain to be elucidated. In this study, we have assessed the effects of 16 different biological features on the evolutionary rates (ERs) of protein-coding sequences in bacterial genomes. Results Our analysis of 18 bacterial species revealed new correlations between ERs and constraining factors. Previous studies have suggested that transcriptional abundance overwhelmingly constrains the evolution of yeast protein sequences. This transcriptional abundance leads to selection against misfolding or misinteractions. In this study we found that there was no single factor in determining the evolution of bacterial proteins. Not only transcriptional abundance (codon adaptation index and expression level), but also protein-protein associations (PPAs), essentiality (ESS), subcellular localization of cytoplasmic membrane (SLM), transmembrane helices (TMH) and hydropathicity score (HS) independently and significantly affected the ERs of bacterial proteins. In some species, PPA and ESS demonstrate higher correlations with ER than transcriptional abundance. Conclusions Different forces drive the evolution of protein sequences in yeast and bacteria. In bacteria, the constraints are involved in avoiding a build-up of toxic molecules caused by misfolding/misinteraction (transcriptional abundance), while retaining important functions (ESS, PPA) and maintaining the cell membrane (SLM, TMH and HS). Each of these independently contributes to the variation in protein evolution. PMID:23914835

  20. Marine incursion into East Asia: a forgotten driving force of biodiversity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lu; Hou, Zhonge; Li, Shuqiang

    2013-01-01

    Episodic marine incursion has been a major driving force in the formation of present-day diversity. Marine incursion is considered to be one of the most productive ‘species pumps’ particularly because of its division and coalescence effects. Marine incursion events and their impacts on diversity are well documented from South America, North America and Africa; however, their history and impacts in continental East Asia largely remain unknown. Here, we propose a marine incursion scenario occurring in East Asia during the Miocene epoch, 10–17 Ma. Our molecular phylogenetic analysis of Platorchestia talitrids revealed that continental terrestrial populations (Platorchestia japonica) form a monophyletic group that is the sister group to the Northwest Pacific coastal species Platorchestia pacifica. The divergence time between the two species coincides with Middle Miocene high global sea levels. We suggest that the inland form arose as a consequence of a marine incursion event. This is the first solid case documenting the impact of marine incursion on extant biodiversity in continental East Asia. We believe that such incursion event has had major impacts on other organisms and has played an important role in the formation of biodiversity patterns in the region. PMID:23446524

  1. Microstructure and mesh sensitivities of mesoscale surrogate driving force measures for transgranular fatigue cracks in polycrystals

    DOE PAGES

    Castelluccio, Gustavo M.; McDowell, David L.

    2015-05-22

    The number of cycles required to form and grow microstructurally small fatigue cracks in metals exhibits substantial variability, particularly for low applied strain amplitudes. This variability is commonly attributed to the heterogeneity of cyclic plastic deformation within the microstructure, and presents a challenge to minimum life design of fatigue resistant components. Our paper analyzes sources of variability that contribute to the driving force of transgranular fatigue cracks within nucleant grains. We also employ crystal plasticity finite element simulations that explicitly render the polycrystalline microstructure and Fatigue Indicator Parameters (FIPs) averaged over different volume sizes and shapes relative to the anticipatedmore » fatigue damage process zone. Volume averaging is necessary to both achieve description of a finite fatigue damage process zone and to regularize mesh dependence in simulations. Furthermore, results from constant amplitude remote applied straining are characterized in terms of the extreme value distributions of volume averaged FIPs. Grain averaged FIP values effectively mitigate mesh sensitivity, but they smear out variability within grains. Furthermore, volume averaging over bands that encompass critical transgranular slip planes appear to present the most attractive approach to mitigate mesh sensitivity while preserving variability within grains.« less

  2. Long-term regional precipitation disparity in northwestern China and its driving forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. F.; Pei, Q.; Zhang, D. D.; Choi, K. P. K.

    2014-08-01

    Subject to the unique physical setting of northwestern China (NW China), precipitation in the region is characterized by salient regional differences. Yet, the long-term regional precipitation disparity in NW China still remains insufficiently-explored. In the present study, we base on historical documentation to reconstruct the precipitation indices of two macro regions in NW China between AD580-1979 to address the following issues: (1) determine the multi-decadal to centennial regional precipitation disparity in NW China, a topic which has not been systematically examined in previous paleo-climate/paleo-environment studies; and (2) find the major driving forces behind it. Wavelet analysis, which is ideal for analyzing non-stationary systems, is applied. Our results show that there is significant regional discrepancy of precipitation change in NW China over extended period. Although there is significant association between the regional precipitation disparity in NW China and various modes of atmospheric circulation, the association is characterized by a regime shift during the transition from the Medieval Warm Period to the Little Ice Age. Most importantly, the low-frequency cycle of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation is found to be the most prominent pacemaker of regional precipitation disparity in NW China at the multi-decadal to centennial timescales. Our findings help to demonstrate which atmospheric circulation is primarily responsible for the long-term regional precipitation disparity in NW China, which may have important implications for water resource management in NW China in the near future.

  3. Whole-genome plasma sequencing reveals focal amplifications as a driving force in metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ulz, Peter; Belic, Jelena; Graf, Ricarda; Auer, Martina; Lafer, Ingrid; Fischereder, Katja; Webersinke, Gerald; Pummer, Karl; Augustin, Herbert; Pichler, Martin; Hoefler, Gerald; Bauernhofer, Thomas; Geigl, Jochen B.; Heitzer, Ellen; Speicher, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Genomic alterations in metastatic prostate cancer remain incompletely characterized. Here we analyse 493 prostate cancer cases from the TCGA database and perform whole-genome plasma sequencing on 95 plasma samples derived from 43 patients with metastatic prostate cancer. From these samples, we identify established driver aberrations in a cancer-related gene in nearly all cases (97.7%), including driver gene fusions (TMPRSS2:ERG), driver focal deletions (PTEN, RYBP and SHQ1) and driver amplifications (AR and MYC). In serial plasma analyses, we observe changes in focal amplifications in 40% of cases. The mean time interval between new amplifications was 26.4 weeks (range: 5–52 weeks), suggesting that they represent rapid adaptations to selection pressure. An increase in neuron-specific enolase is accompanied by clonal pattern changes in the tumour genome, most consistent with subclonal diversification of the tumour. Our findings suggest a high plasticity of prostate cancer genomes with newly occurring focal amplifications as a driving force in progression. PMID:27328849

  4. What are the driving forces behind the predicted elevated Ammonium-Nitrate Aerosol Concentrations in 2030?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S. E.; Koch, D.; Metzger, S.; Unger, N.

    2006-12-01

    The formation of Ammonium - Nitrate Aerosols depends on a number of precursor species, most importantly gaseous ammonia and nitric acid, and on the thermodynamic state of the atmospheric system as it competes for ammonia with Ammonium-Sulfate formation. However, because Ammonium-Nitrate formation is very sensitive to future emission and climate change this paper investigates which of these future changes are responsible for the predicted elevated nitrate concentrations in about 25 years from now. We use the GISS climate model, fully coupled to aerosol and gas phase chemistry modules and the SRES A1B emissions for 2030. Our results show that Ammonium-Nitrate Aerosols would increase globally by 40% compared to 1990 conditions. Nitrate Aerosols increase everywhere but most strongly over China. Looking into the separate processes, physical climate change (e.g. increased Temperature and Humidity) have only a small impact, changes in NOx and SO2 emissions still have week impacts, whereas increased NH3 emissions are the driving force behind future nitrate concentrations. However, the model results are extremely sensitive to heterogeneous processes on mineral dust surfaces. For example Ammonium-Nitrate formation depends strongly on the mixing state of sulfate aerosols, wether the sulfate is externally mixed or attached to mineral dust.

  5. Microstructure and mesh sensitivities of mesoscale surrogate driving force measures for transgranular fatigue cracks in polycrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Castelluccio, Gustavo M.; McDowell, David L.

    2015-05-22

    The number of cycles required to form and grow microstructurally small fatigue cracks in metals exhibits substantial variability, particularly for low applied strain amplitudes. This variability is commonly attributed to the heterogeneity of cyclic plastic deformation within the microstructure, and presents a challenge to minimum life design of fatigue resistant components. Our paper analyzes sources of variability that contribute to the driving force of transgranular fatigue cracks within nucleant grains. We also employ crystal plasticity finite element simulations that explicitly render the polycrystalline microstructure and Fatigue Indicator Parameters (FIPs) averaged over different volume sizes and shapes relative to the anticipated fatigue damage process zone. Volume averaging is necessary to both achieve description of a finite fatigue damage process zone and to regularize mesh dependence in simulations. Furthermore, results from constant amplitude remote applied straining are characterized in terms of the extreme value distributions of volume averaged FIPs. Grain averaged FIP values effectively mitigate mesh sensitivity, but they smear out variability within grains. Furthermore, volume averaging over bands that encompass critical transgranular slip planes appear to present the most attractive approach to mitigate mesh sensitivity while preserving variability within grains.

  6. [Landscape pattern change at the upper reaches of Minjiang River and its driving force].

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhibin; He, Xingyuan; Jiang, Xiaobo; Zhao, Yonghua; Hu, Yuanman; Chang, Yu; Li, Yuehui; Han, Wenquan; Liu, Miao

    2004-10-01

    The upper reaches of Minjiang River is an ecological sensitive and vulnerable area in southwest of China. It is of great significance to the ecological pattern safety in China. In this study, we analyzed the landscape pattern change through the interpretation of TM imageries in 1986, 1995 and 2000. The results showed that the matrix landscape in this area was grass landscape. Forest landscape patches were embedded in the grass landscape. The forest landscape area increased from 1986 to 1995 and decreased from 1995 to 2000. However, the number of patches of forest landscape was increasing during all the time. This suggested that the intensity of anthropogenic disturbances including harvesting, forest landscape reclaiming and excessive grazing were persistently increasing from 1986 to 2000. The ecological driving forces of the landscape change in this area were the intensified anthropogenic disturbances as a result of the population boom including the predacious harvesting of forest and excessive grazing. The natural disturbances such as the global climatic change also partly influenced the landscape change in this area.

  7. [Landscape pattern change at the upper reaches of Minjiang River and its driving force].

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhibin; He, Xingyuan; Jiang, Xiaobo; Zhao, Yonghua; Hu, Yuanman; Chang, Yu; Li, Yuehui; Han, Wenquan; Liu, Miao

    2004-10-01

    The upper reaches of Minjiang River is an ecological sensitive and vulnerable area in southwest of China. It is of great significance to the ecological pattern safety in China. In this study, we analyzed the landscape pattern change through the interpretation of TM imageries in 1986, 1995 and 2000. The results showed that the matrix landscape in this area was grass landscape. Forest landscape patches were embedded in the grass landscape. The forest landscape area increased from 1986 to 1995 and decreased from 1995 to 2000. However, the number of patches of forest landscape was increasing during all the time. This suggested that the intensity of anthropogenic disturbances including harvesting, forest landscape reclaiming and excessive grazing were persistently increasing from 1986 to 2000. The ecological driving forces of the landscape change in this area were the intensified anthropogenic disturbances as a result of the population boom including the predacious harvesting of forest and excessive grazing. The natural disturbances such as the global climatic change also partly influenced the landscape change in this area. PMID:15624811

  8. Invasion of Nostocales (cyanobacteria) to Subtropical and Temperate Freshwater Lakes - Physiological, Regional, and Global Driving Forces.

    PubMed

    Sukenik, Assaf; Hadas, Ora; Kaplan, Aaron; Quesada, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Similar to the increased number of studies on invasive plants and animals in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, many reports were recently published on the invasion of Nostocales (cyanobacteria) to freshwater environments worldwide. Invasion and proliferation of Nostocales in new habitats have the potential to significantly alter the structure of the native community and to modify ecosystem functioning. But most importantly, they influence the water quality due to a variety of toxic compounds that some species produce. Therefore a special attention was given to the invasion and persistence of toxic cyanobacteria in many aquatic ecosystems. Here we summarize the currently published records on the invasion of two Nostocales genera, Cylindrospermopsis and Aphanizomenon, to lakes and water reservoirs in subtropical and temperate zones. These invading species possess traits thought to be common to many invasive organisms: high growth rate, high resource utilization efficiency and overall superior competitive abilities over native species when local conditions vary. Assuming that dispersion routes of cyanobacteria have not been changed much in recent decades, their recent establishment and proliferation in new habitats indicate changes in the environment under which they can exploit their physiological advantage over the native phytoplankton population. In many cases, global warming was identified as the major driving force for the invasion of Nostocales. Due to this uncontrollable trend, invasive Nostocales species are expected to maintain their presence in new habitats and further expand to new environments. In other cases, regional changes in nutrient loads and in biotic conditions were attributed to the invasion events.

  9. Bif-1/Endophilin B1: a candidate for crescent driving force in autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yoshinori; Meyerkord, Cheryl L.; Wang, Hong-Gang

    2009-01-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular bulk degradation system that plays a vital role in maintaining cellular homeostasis. This degradation process involves dynamic membrane rearrangements resulting in the formation of double-membraned autophagosomes. However, the driving force for generating curvature and deformation of isolation membranes remains a mystery. Bif-1, also known as SH3GLB1 or Endophilin B1, was originally discovered as a Bax-binding protein. Bif-1 contains an amino-terminal N-BAR (Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs) domain and a carboxy-terminal SH3 (Src-homology 3) domain and displays membrane binding and bending activities. It has been shown that Beclin1 is involved in the nucleation of autophagosomal membranes through an unknown mechanism. Interestingly, Bif-1 forms a complex with Beclin1 through UVRAG and promotes the activation of the class III PI3 kinase, Vps34, in mammalian cells. In response to nutrient starvation, Bif-1 accumulates in punctate foci where it co-localizes with LC3, Atg5, and Atg9. Furthermore, Bif-1-positive, crescent-shaped small vesicles expand by recruiting and fusing with Atg9-positive small membranes to complete autophagosome formation. This review highlights the role of Bif-1 in the regulation of autophagy and discusses the potential involvement of Bif-1 in the biogenesis of membranes for the formation of autophagosomes. PMID:19265852

  10. Force Sensitive Handles and Capacitive Touch Sensor for Driving a Flexible Haptic-Based Immersive System

    PubMed Central

    Covarrubias, Mario; Bordegoni, Monica; Cugini, Umberto

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we present an approach that uses both two force sensitive handles (FSH) and a flexible capacitive touch sensor (FCTS) to drive a haptic-based immersive system. The immersive system has been developed as part of a multimodal interface for product design. The haptic interface consists of a strip that can be used by product designers to evaluate the quality of a 3D virtual shape by using touch, vision and hearing and, also, to interactively change the shape of the virtual object. Specifically, the user interacts with the FSH to move the virtual object and to appropriately position the haptic interface for retrieving the six degrees of freedom required for both manipulation and modification modalities. The FCTS allows the system to track the movement and position of the user's fingers on the strip, which is used for rendering visual and sound feedback. Two evaluation experiments are described, which involve both the evaluation and the modification of a 3D shape. Results show that the use of the haptic strip for the evaluation of aesthetic shapes is effective and supports product designers in the appreciation of the aesthetic qualities of the shape. PMID:24113680

  11. Driving Forces for Oppositely Charged Polyion Association in Aqueous Solutions: Enthalpic, Entropic, but Not Electrostatic.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jingcheng; Schlenoff, Joseph B

    2016-01-27

    Driving forces for association between oppositely charged biological or synthetic polymers in aqueous solution have long been identified as electrostatic in origin. This attraction is broken down into an entropic component, due to loss of counterions, and an enthalpic component, stemming from Coulombic attraction between opposite charges. While the balance between entropic and enthalpic contributions shifts according to the conditions, the presence of exotherms or endotherms on mixing, though small, are viewed as signatures of Coulombic interactions which support theories of polyelectrolyte association rooted in continuum electrostatics. Here, a head-to-head comparison is made between mechanisms based on electrostatics and those based on specific ion pairing, or ion exchange. Using a Hofmeister series of counterions for a common polycation, poly(diallyldimethylammonium), enthalpy changes on association with poly(styrenesulfonate) are shown to derive from changes in water perturbation, revealed by Raman scattering studies of water O-H vibrations. The free energy for complexation is almost completely entropic over all salt concentrations. PMID:26771205

  12. Stress-triggered atavistic reprogramming (STAR) addiction: driving force behind head and neck cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Muneyuki; Wakasaki, Takahiro; Toh, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Recent results of the Cancer Genome Atlas on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) revealed that HNSCC lacked predominant gain-of-function mutations in oncogenes, whereas an essential role for epigenetics in oncogenesis has become apparent. In parallel, it has gained general acceptance that cancer is considered as complex adaptive system, which evolves responding environmental selective pressures. This somatic evolution appears to proceed concurrently with the acquisition of an atavistic pluripotent state (i.e., “stemness”), which is inducible by intrinsic epigenetic reprogramming program as demonstrated by induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. This Nobel prize-winning discovery has markedly accelerated and expanded cancer stem cell research from the point of epigenetic reprogramming. Taken together, we hypothesize that stress-triggered atavistic reprogramming (STAR) may be the major driving force of HNSCC evolution. In this perspective, we discuss the possible mechanisms of STAR in HNSCC, focusing on recent topics of epigenetic reprogramming in developmental and cancer cell biology. PMID:27429838

  13. Driving force for indentation cracking in glass: composition, pressure and temperature dependence

    PubMed Central

    Rouxel, Tanguy

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of damage at the surface of glass parts caused by sharp contact loading is a major issue for glass makers, suppliers and end-users. Yet, it is still a poorly understood problem from the viewpoints both of glass science and solid mechanics. Different microcracking patterns are observed at indentation sites depending on the glass composition and indentation cracks may form during both the loading and the unloading stages. Besides, we do not know much about the fracture toughness of glass and its composition dependence, so that setting a criterion for crack initiation and predicting the extent of the damage yet remain out of reach. In this study, by comparison of the behaviour of glasses from very different chemical systems and by identifying experimentally the individual contributions of the different rheological processes leading to the formation of the imprint—namely elasticity, densification and shear flow—we obtain a fairly straightforward prediction of the type and extent of the microcracks which will most likely form, depending on the physical properties of the glass. Finally, some guidelines to reduce the driving force for microcracking are proposed in the light of the effects of composition, temperature and pressure, and the areas for further research are briefly discussed. PMID:25713446

  14. Driving force transmission mechanism using a timing belt for an internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, S.

    1987-11-24

    A driving force transmission mechanism is described comprising: a timing pulley having teeth, each of the teeth having a width perpendicular to a direction of movement of the teeth; and a timing belt engaging the timing pulley, the timing belt having teeth, each of the timing belt teeth having a width perpendicular to a direction of movement of the timing belt teeth; a width of the timing belt not being larger that a width of the timing pulley; the width of the teeth of the timing belt at dedendums of the teeth being larger than a width of engagement of the teeth of the timing belt with the teeth of the timing pulley; at least one of width end portions of the teeth of the timing pulley and width end portions of the teeth of the timing belt being cut out so that width end portions of the teeth of the timing belt at dedendums of the timing belt do not contact the teeth of the timing pulley.

  15. Marine incursion into East Asia: a forgotten driving force of biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lu; Hou, Zhonge; Li, Shuqiang

    2013-04-22

    Episodic marine incursion has been a major driving force in the formation of present-day diversity. Marine incursion is considered to be one of the most productive 'species pumps' particularly because of its division and coalescence effects. Marine incursion events and their impacts on diversity are well documented from South America, North America and Africa; however, their history and impacts in continental East Asia largely remain unknown. Here, we propose a marine incursion scenario occurring in East Asia during the Miocene epoch, 10-17 Ma. Our molecular phylogenetic analysis of Platorchestia talitrids revealed that continental terrestrial populations (Platorchestia japonica) form a monophyletic group that is the sister group to the Northwest Pacific coastal species Platorchestia pacifica. The divergence time between the two species coincides with Middle Miocene high global sea levels. We suggest that the inland form arose as a consequence of a marine incursion event. This is the first solid case documenting the impact of marine incursion on extant biodiversity in continental East Asia. We believe that such incursion event has had major impacts on other organisms and has played an important role in the formation of biodiversity patterns in the region.

  16. A study on the fundamental mechanism and the evolutionary driving forces behind aerobic fermentation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Hagman, Arne; Piškur, Jure

    2015-01-01

    Baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae rapidly converts sugars to ethanol and carbon dioxide at both anaerobic and aerobic conditions. The later phenomenon is called Crabtree effect and has been described in two forms, long-term and short-term effect. We have previously studied under fully controlled aerobic conditions forty yeast species for their central carbon metabolism and the presence of long-term Crabtree effect. We have also studied ten steady-state yeast cultures, pulsed them with glucose, and followed the central carbon metabolism and the appearance of ethanol at dynamic conditions. In this paper we analyzed those wet laboratory data to elucidate possible mechanisms that determine the fate of glucose in different yeast species that cover approximately 250 million years of evolutionary history. We determine overflow metabolism to be the fundamental mechanism behind both long- and short-term Crabtree effect, which originated approximately 125-150 million years ago in the Saccharomyces lineage. The "invention" of overflow metabolism was the first step in the evolution of aerobic fermentation in yeast. It provides a general strategy to increase energy production rates, which we show is positively correlated to growth. The "invention" of overflow has also simultaneously enabled rapid glucose consumption in yeast, which is a trait that could have been selected for, to "starve" competitors in nature. We also show that glucose repression of respiration is confined mainly among S. cerevisiae and closely related species that diverged after the whole genome duplication event, less than 100 million years ago. Thus, glucose repression of respiration was apparently "invented" as a second step to further increase overflow and ethanol production, to inhibit growth of other microbes. The driving force behind the initial evolutionary steps was most likely competition with other microbes to faster consume and convert sugar into biomass, in niches that were semi-anaerobic.

  17. Driving forces of heavy metal changes in agricultural soils in a typical manufacturing center.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Menglong; Li, Fangbai; Wang, Qi; Chen, Junjian; Yang, Guoyi; Liu, Liming

    2015-05-01

    Heavy metal concentrations in 2002 and 2012 in agricultural soils in Dongguan, a manufacturing center in southern China, were analyzed to determine the impact of rapid economic development on soil pollution. The level of pollution was assessed using the Nemerow synthetic pollution index (NPI), and its changing characteristics and driving forces were analyzed using multivariate statistical and geostatistical methods. The results indicate that the mean NPI was 0.79 in 2002 and 0.84 in 2012, which indicates aggravated heavy metal contamination in the agricultural soils. The concentrations of Cd and Zn increased 54.7 and 20.8 %, respectively, whereas Hg and Pb decreased 35.3 and 24.5 %, respectively. Cr, As, Cu, and Ni remained relatively stable. The Hg and Cd concentrations were highly correlated with soil types (P < 0.01), the secondary industrial output per unit of land (P < 0.01), proportion of cereal fields (P < 0.01), proportion of vegetable fields (P < 0.01), population density (P < 0.05), and road density (P < 0.05). The Pb and As concentrations were greatly influenced by soil types (P < 0.01), river density (P < 0.01), fertilizer rate (P < 0.01), and road density (P < 0.05). Cr, Zn, Cu, and Ni concentrations were primarily driven by soil types (P < 0.01), river density (P < 0.01), and fertilizer rate (P < 0.05).

  18. Thermodynamic descriptors, profiles and driving forces in membrane receptor-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Pliska, Vladimir

    2010-12-01

    Extension of the (isothermal) Gibbs-Helmholtz equation for the heat capacity terms (ΔC(p)) allows formulating a temperature function of the free (Gibbs) energy change (ΔG). An approximation of the virtually unknown ΔC(p) temperature function enables then to determine and numerically solve temperature functions of thermodynamic parameters ΔH and ΔS (enthalpy and entropy change, respectively). Analytical solutions and respective numeric procedures for several such approximation formulas are suggested in the presented paper. Agreement between results obtained by this analysis with direct microcalorimetric measurements of ΔH (and ΔC(p) derived from them) was approved on selected cases of biochemical interactions presented in the literature. Analysis of several ligand-membrane receptor systems indicates that temperature profiles of ΔH and ΔS are parallel, largely not monotonic, and frequently attain both positive and negative values within the current temperature range of biochemical reactions. Their course is determined by the reaction change of heat capacity: temperature extremes (maximum or minimum) of both ΔH and ΔS occur at ΔC(p)=0, for most of these systems at roughly 285-305 K. Thus, the driving forces of these interactions may change from enthalpy-, entropy-, or enthalpy-entropy-driven in a narrow temperature interval. In contrast, thermodynamic parameters of ligand-macromolecule interactions in solutions (not bound to a membrane) mostly display a monotonic course. In the case of membrane receptors, thermodynamic discrimination between pharmacologically defined groups-agonists, partial agonists, antagonists-is in general not specified and can be achieved, in the best, solely within single receptor groups.

  19. A study on the fundamental mechanism and the evolutionary driving forces behind aerobic fermentation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Hagman, Arne; Piškur, Jure

    2015-01-01

    Baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae rapidly converts sugars to ethanol and carbon dioxide at both anaerobic and aerobic conditions. The later phenomenon is called Crabtree effect and has been described in two forms, long-term and short-term effect. We have previously studied under fully controlled aerobic conditions forty yeast species for their central carbon metabolism and the presence of long-term Crabtree effect. We have also studied ten steady-state yeast cultures, pulsed them with glucose, and followed the central carbon metabolism and the appearance of ethanol at dynamic conditions. In this paper we analyzed those wet laboratory data to elucidate possible mechanisms that determine the fate of glucose in different yeast species that cover approximately 250 million years of evolutionary history. We determine overflow metabolism to be the fundamental mechanism behind both long- and short-term Crabtree effect, which originated approximately 125-150 million years ago in the Saccharomyces lineage. The "invention" of overflow metabolism was the first step in the evolution of aerobic fermentation in yeast. It provides a general strategy to increase energy production rates, which we show is positively correlated to growth. The "invention" of overflow has also simultaneously enabled rapid glucose consumption in yeast, which is a trait that could have been selected for, to "starve" competitors in nature. We also show that glucose repression of respiration is confined mainly among S. cerevisiae and closely related species that diverged after the whole genome duplication event, less than 100 million years ago. Thus, glucose repression of respiration was apparently "invented" as a second step to further increase overflow and ethanol production, to inhibit growth of other microbes. The driving force behind the initial evolutionary steps was most likely competition with other microbes to faster consume and convert sugar into biomass, in niches that were semi

  20. Crop modeling: Studying the effect of water stress on the driving forces governing plant water potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Emmerik, T. H. M.; Mirfenderesgi, G.; Bohrer, G.; Steele-Dunne, S. C.; Van De Giesen, N.

    2015-12-01

    Water stress is one of the most important environmental factors that influence plant water dynamics. To prevent excessive water loss and physiological damage, plants can regulate transpiration by adjusting the stomatal aperture. This enhances survival, but also reduced photosynthesis and productivity. During periods of low water availability, stomatal regulation is a trade-off between optimization of either survival or production. Water stress defence mechanisms lead to significant changes in plant dynamics, e.g. leaf and stem water content. Recent research has shown that water content in a corn canopy can change up to 30% diurnally as a result of water stress, which has a considerable influence on radar backscatter from a corn canopy [1]. This highlighted the potential of water stress detection using radar. To fully explore the potential of water stress monitoring using radar, we need to understand the driving forces governing plant water potential. For this study, the recently developed the Finite-Element Tree-Crown Hydrodynamic model version 2 (FETCH2) model is applied to a corn canopy. FETCH2 is developed to resolve the hydrodynamic processes within a plant using the porous media analogy, allowing investigation of the influence of environmental stress factors on plant dynamics such as transpiration, photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and leaf and stem water content. The model is parameterized and evaluated using a detailed dataset obtained during a three-month field experiment in Flevoland, the Netherlands, on a corn canopy. [1] van Emmerik, T., S. Steele-Dunne, J. Judge and N. van de Giesen: "Impact of Diurnal Variation in Vegetation Water Content on Radar Backscatter of Maize During Water Stress", Geosciences and Remote Sensing, IEEE Transactions on, vol. 52, issue 7, doi: 10.1109/TGRS.2014.2386142, 2015.

  1. Detailed Per-residue Energetic Analysis Explains the Driving Force for Microtubule Disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Ayoub, Ahmed T.; Klobukowski, Mariusz; Tuszynski, Jack A.

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules are long filamentous hollow cylinders whose surfaces form lattice structures of αβ-tubulin heterodimers. They perform multiple physiological roles in eukaryotic cells and are targets for therapeutic interventions. In our study, we carried out all-atom molecular dynamics simulations for arbitrarily long microtubules that have either GDP or GTP molecules in the E-site of β-tubulin. A detailed energy balance of the MM/GBSA inter-dimer interaction energy per residue contributing to the overall lateral and longitudinal structural stability was performed. The obtained results identified the key residues and tubulin domains according to their energetic contributions. They also identified the molecular forces that drive microtubule disassembly. At the tip of the plus end of the microtubule, the uneven distribution of longitudinal interaction energies within a protofilament generates a torque that bends tubulin outwardly with respect to the cylinder's axis causing disassembly. In the presence of GTP, this torque is opposed by lateral interactions that prevent outward curling, thus stabilizing the whole microtubule. Once GTP hydrolysis reaches the tip of the microtubule (lateral cap), lateral interactions become much weaker, allowing tubulin dimers to bend outwards, causing disassembly. The role of magnesium in the process of outward curling has also been demonstrated. This study also showed that the microtubule seam is the most energetically labile inter-dimer interface and could serve as a trigger point for disassembly. Based on a detailed balance of the energetic contributions per amino acid residue in the microtubule, numerous other analyses could be performed to give additional insights into the properties of microtubule dynamic instability. PMID:26030285

  2. Oxidized cholesterol as the driving force behind the development of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Gamba, Paola; Testa, Gabriella; Gargiulo, Simona; Staurenghi, Erica; Poli, Giuseppe; Leonarduzzi, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most common neurodegenerative disorder associated with dementia, is typified by the pathological accumulation of amyloid Aβ peptides and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) within the brain. Considerable evidence indicates that many events contribute to AD progression, including oxidative stress, inflammation, and altered cholesterol metabolism. The brain’s high lipid content makes it particularly vulnerable to oxidative species, with the consequent enhancement of lipid peroxidation and cholesterol oxidation, and the subsequent formation of end products, mainly 4-hydroxynonenal and oxysterols, respectively from the two processes. The chronic inflammatory events observed in the AD brain include activation of microglia and astrocytes, together with enhancement of inflammatory molecule and free radical release. Along with glial cells, neurons themselves have been found to contribute to neuroinflammation in the AD brain, by serving as sources of inflammatory mediators. Oxidative stress is intimately associated with neuroinflammation, and a vicious circle has been found to connect oxidative stress and inflammation in AD. Alongside oxidative stress and inflammation, altered cholesterol metabolism and hypercholesterolemia also significantly contribute to neuronal damage and to progression of AD. Increasing evidence is now consolidating the hypothesis that oxidized cholesterol is the driving force behind the development of AD, and that oxysterols are the link connecting the disease to altered cholesterol metabolism in the brain and hypercholesterolemia; this is because of the ability of oxysterols, unlike cholesterol, to cross the blood brain barrier (BBB). The key role of oxysterols in AD pathogenesis has been strongly supported by research pointing to their involvement in modulating neuroinflammation, Aβ accumulation, and cell death. This review highlights the key role played by cholesterol and oxysterols in the brain in AD pathogenesis

  3. How metal films de-wet substrates : identifying the kinetic pathways and energetic driving forces.

    SciTech Connect

    Thurmer, Konrad; Schmid, Andreas; Sato, Yu; Hamilton, John C.; Saa, Angela; McCarty, Kevin F.; de la Figuera, Juan; Bartelt, Norman Charles

    2008-10-01

    We study how single-crystal chromium films of uniform thickness on W(110) substrates are converted to arrays of three-dimensional (3D) Cr islands during annealing. We use low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) to directly observe a kinetic pathway that produces trenches that expose the wetting layer. Adjacent film steps move simultaneously uphill and downhill relative to the staircase of atomic steps on the substrate. This step motion thickens the film regions where steps advance. Where film steps retract, the film thins, eventually exposing the stable wetting layer. Since our analysis shows that thick Cr films have a lattice constant close to bulk Cr, we propose that surface and interface stress provide a possible driving force for the observed morphological instability. Atomistic simulations and analytic elastic models show that surface and interface stress can cause a dependence of film energy on thickness that leads to an instability to simultaneous thinning and thickening. We observe that de-wetting is also initiated at bunches of substrate steps in two other systems, Ag/W(110) and Ag/Ru(0001). We additionally describe how Cr films are converted into patterns of unidirectional stripes as the trenches that expose the wetting layer lengthen along the W[001] direction. Finally, we observe how 3D Cr islands form directly during film growth at elevated temperature. The Cr mesas (wedges) form as Cr film steps advance down the staircase of substrate steps, another example of the critical role that substrate steps play in 3D island formation.

  4. Sector trends and driving forces of global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions: focus in industry and buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Khrushch, Marta

    1999-09-01

    Disaggregation of sectoral energy use and greenhouse gas emissions trends reveals striking differences between sectors and regions of the world. Understanding key driving forces in the energy end-use sectors provides insights for development of projections of future greenhouse gas emissions. This report examines global and regional historical trends in energy use and carbon emissions in the industrial, buildings, transport, and agriculture sectors, with a more detailed focus on industry and buildings. Activity and economic drivers as well as trends in energy and carbon intensity are evaluated. The authors show that macro-economic indicators, such as GDP, are insufficient for comprehending trends and driving forces at the sectoral level. These indicators need to be supplemented with sector-specific information for a more complete understanding of future energy use and greenhouse gas emissions.

  5. Dynamics of completely unfolded and native proteins through solid-state nanopores as a function of electric driving force.

    PubMed

    Oukhaled, Abdelghani; Cressiot, Benjamin; Bacri, Laurent; Pastoriza-Gallego, Manuela; Betton, Jean-Michel; Bourhis, Eric; Jede, Ralf; Gierak, Jacques; Auvray, Loïc; Pelta, Juan

    2011-05-24

    We report experimentally the dynamic properties of the entry and transport of unfolded and native proteins through a solid-state nanopore as a function of applied voltage, and we discuss the experimental data obtained as compared to theory. We show an exponential increase in the event frequency of current blockades and an exponential decrease in transport times as a function of the electric driving force. The normalized current blockage ratio remains constant or decreases for folded or unfolded proteins, respectively, as a function of the transmembrane potential. The unfolded protein is stretched under the electric driving force. The dwell time of native compact proteins in the pore is almost 1 order of magnitude longer than that of unfolded proteins, and the event frequency for both protein conformations is low. We discuss the possible phenomena hindering the transport of proteins through the pores, which could explain these anomalous dynamics, in particular, electro-osmotic counterflow and protein adsorption on the nanopore wall.

  6. Passive Joint Forces Are Tuned to Limb Use in Insects and Drive Movements without Motor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ache, Jan M.; Matheson, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Limb movements are generally driven by active muscular contractions working with and against passive forces arising in muscles and other structures. In relatively heavy limbs, the effects of gravity and inertia predominate, whereas in lighter limbs, passive forces intrinsic to the limb are of greater consequence. The roles of passive forces generated by muscles and tendons are well understood, but there has been little recognition that forces originating within joints themselves may also be important, and less still that these joint forces may be adapted through evolution to complement active muscle forces acting at the same joint. Results We examined the roles of passive joint forces in insect legs with different arrangements of antagonist muscles. We first show that passive forces modify actively generated movements of a joint across its working range, and that they can be sufficiently strong to generate completely passive movements that are faster than active movements observed in natural behaviors. We further demonstrate that some of these forces originate within the joint itself. In legs of different species adapted to different uses (walking, jumping), these passive joint forces complement the balance of strength of the antagonist muscles acting on the joint. We show that passive joint forces are stronger where they assist the weaker of two antagonist muscles. Conclusions In limbs where the dictates of a key behavior produce asymmetry in muscle forces, passive joint forces can be coadapted to provide the balance needed for the effective generation of other behaviors. PMID:23871240

  7. Thermodynamic stability of histone H3 is a necessary but not sufficient driving force for its evolutionary conservation.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Vogel, Lisa; Strahl, Brian D; Dokholyan, Nikolay V

    2011-01-06

    Determining the forces that conserve amino acid positions in proteins across species is a fundamental pursuit of molecular evolution. Evolutionary conservation is driven by either a protein's function or its thermodynamic stability. Highly conserved histone proteins offer a platform to evaluate these driving forces. While the conservation of histone H3 and H4 "tail" domains and surface residues are driven by functional importance, the driving force behind the conservation of buried histone residues has not been examined. Using a computational approach, we determined the thermodynamically preferred amino acids at each buried position in H3 and H4. In agreement with what is normally observed in proteins, we find a significant correlation between thermodynamic stability and evolutionary conservation in the buried residues in H4. In striking contrast, we find that thermodynamic stability of buried H3 residues does not correlate with evolutionary conservation. Given that these H3 residues are not post-translationally modified and only regulate H3-H3 and H3-H4 stabilizing interactions, our data imply an unknown function responsible for driving conservation of these buried H3 residues.

  8. Economy, Speed and Size Matter: Evolutionary Forces Driving Nuclear Genome Miniaturization and Expansion

    PubMed Central

    CAVALIER-SMITH, THOMAS

    2005-01-01

    • Background Nuclear genome size varies 300 000-fold, whereas transcriptome size varies merely 17-fold. In the largest genomes nearly all DNA is non-genic secondary DNA, mostly intergenic but also within introns. There is now compelling evidence that secondary DNA is functional, i.e. positively selected by organismal selection, not the purely neutral or ‘selfish’ outcome of mutation pressure. The skeletal DNA theory argued that nuclear volumes are genetically determined primarily by nuclear DNA amounts, modulated somewhat by genes affecting the degree of DNA packing or unfolding; the huge spread of nuclear genome sizes is the necessary consequence of the origin of the nuclear envelope and the nucleation of its assembly by DNA, plus the adaptively significant 300 000-fold range of cell volumes and selection for balanced growth by optimizing karyoplasmic volume ratios (essentially invariant with cell volume in growing/multiplying cells). This simple explanation of the C-value paradox is refined here in the light of new insights into the nature of heterochromatin and the nuclear lamina, the genetic control of cell volume, and large-scale eukaryote phylogeny, placing special emphasis on protist test cases of the basic principles of nuclear genome size evolution. • Genome Miniaturization and Expansion Intracellular parasites (e.g. Plasmodium, microsporidia) dwarfed their genomes by gene loss and eliminating virtually all secondary DNA. The primary driving forces for genome reduction are metabolic and spatial economy and cell multiplication speed. Most extreme nuclear shrinkage yielded genomes as tiny as 0·38 Mb (making the nuclear genome size range effectively 1·8 million-fold!) in some minute enslaved nuclei (nucleomorphs) of cryptomonads and chlorarachneans, chimaeric cells that also retain a separate normal large nucleus. The latter shows typical correlation between genome size and cell volume, but nucleomorphs do not despite co-existing in the same cell

  9. Driving Forces behind Organic Matter and Nutrient Dynamics in a Mangrove Forest Ecosystem in South India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, M. B.

    2005-05-01

    even surface-water, concentration of nutrients seemed to respond to plant root zone oxidation and uptake and release of nutrients. Pore water biogeochemical processes were linked to surface-water nutrient dynamics as well. Based on these findings, tidal effects, pore water concentrations, seasonal variation and microbial transformations were identified as driving forces behind coastal outwelling of nutrients and organic matter from mangroves.

  10. Relationship between tectonic overpressure, deviatoric stress, driving force, isostasy and gravitational potential energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalholz, Stefan M.; Medvedev, Sergei; Lechmann, Sarah M.; Podladchikov, Yuri

    2014-05-01

    We present analytical derivations and 2-D numerical simulations that quantify magnitudes of deviatoric stress and tectonic overpressure (i.e. difference between the pressure, or mean stress, and the lithostatic pressure) by relating them to lateral variations in the gravitational potential energy (GPE). These predictions of tectonic overpressure and deviatoric stress associated with GPE differences are independent of rock rheology (e.g. viscous or elastic) and rock strength. We consider a simple situation with lowlands and mountains (plateau). We use a numerical two-layer model consisting of a crust with higher Newtonian viscosity than that in the mantle, and also a three-layer model in which the two-layer lithosphere overlies a much less viscous asthenosphere. Our results (1) explain why estimates for the magnitude of stresses in Tibet, previously published by different authors, vary by a factor of two, (2) are applied to test the validity of the thin sheet approximation, (3) show that the magnitude of the depth-integrated tectonic overpressure is equal to the magnitude of the depth-integrated deviatoric stress if depth-integrated shear stresses on vertical and horizontal planes within the lithosphere are negligible (the thin sheet approximation) and (4) show that under thin sheet approximation tectonic overpressure is required to build and support continental plateaus, such as in Tibet or in the Andes, even if the topography and the crustal root are in isostatic equilibrium. Under thin sheet approximation, the magnitude of the depth-integrated tectonic overpressure is equal to the depth-integrated horizontal deviatoric stress, and both are approximately 3.5 × 1012 N m-1 for Tibet. The horizontal driving force per unit length related to lateral GPE variations around Tibet is composed of the sum of both tectonic overpressure and deviatoric stress, and is approximately 7 × 1012 N m-1. This magnitude exceeds previously published estimates for the force per unit

  11. ac propulsion system for an electric vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geppert, S.

    1980-01-01

    It is pointed out that dc drives will be the logical choice for current production electric vehicles (EV). However, by the mid-80's, there is a good chance that the price and reliability of suitable high-power semiconductors will allow for a competitive ac system. The driving force behind the ac approach is the induction motor, which has specific advantages relative to a dc shunt or series traction motor. These advantages would be an important factor in the case of a vehicle for which low maintenance characteristics are of primary importance. A description of an EV ac propulsion system is provided, taking into account the logic controller, the inverter, the motor, and a two-speed transmission-differential-axle assembly. The main barrier to the employment of the considered propulsion system in EV is not any technical problem, but inverter transistor cost.

  12. MRCK-1 Drives Apical Constriction in C. elegans by Linking Developmental Patterning to Force Generation.

    PubMed

    Marston, Daniel J; Higgins, Christopher D; Peters, Kimberly A; Cupp, Timothy D; Dickinson, Daniel J; Pani, Ariel M; Moore, Regan P; Cox, Amanda H; Kiehart, Daniel P; Goldstein, Bob

    2016-08-22

    Apical constriction is a change in cell shape that drives key morphogenetic events including gastrulation and neural tube formation. Apical force-producing actomyosin networks drive apical constriction by contracting while connected to cell-cell junctions. The mechanisms by which developmental patterning regulates these actomyosin networks and associated junctions with spatial precision are not fully understood. Here we identify a myosin light-chain kinase MRCK-1 as a key regulator of C. elegans gastrulation that integrates spatial and developmental patterning information. We show that MRCK-1 is required for activation of contractile actomyosin dynamics and elevated cortical tension in the apical cell cortex of endoderm precursor cells. MRCK-1 is apically localized by active Cdc42 at the external, cell-cell contact-free surfaces of apically constricting cells, downstream of cell fate determination mechanisms. We establish that the junctional components α-catenin, β-catenin, and cadherin become highly enriched at the apical junctions of apically constricting cells and that MRCK-1 and myosin activity are required in vivo for this enrichment. Taken together, our results define mechanisms that position a myosin activator to a specific cell surface where it both locally increases cortical tension and locally enriches junctional components to facilitate apical constriction. These results reveal crucial links that can tie spatial information to local force generation to drive morphogenesis. PMID:27451898

  13. A lateral-axis micromachined tuning fork gyroscope with torsional Z-sensing and electrostatic force-balanced driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Z. Y.; Yang, Z. C.; Zhao, Q. C.; Lin, L. T.; Ding, H. T.; Liu, X. S.; Cui, J.; Xie, H.; Yan, G. Z.

    2010-02-01

    A single-crystal silicon-based lateral-axis tuning-fork gyroscope (TFG) with electrostatic force-balanced (EFB) driving and torsional z-sensing is presented. The EFB comb drive used in this TFG can efficiently suppress the mechanical coupling in a simple manner. The TFG structure is also optimized to further reduce the coupling. Moreover, the Coriolis acceleration-induced out-of-plane rotation of the sensing mode is detected by using bending springs and differential comb fingers. This z-sensing design has relatively high Q, so this gyroscope can work at atmospheric pressure. This TFG design has been fabricated and tested. Measured in air, the device demonstrates a sensitivity of 2.9 mV/°/s, a full range of 800° s-1 with a 0.9% nonlinearity and the noise floor of 0.035°/s/Hz1/2. This TFG design also has very low coupling, where the measured drive-to-sense coupling and sense-to-drive coupling are -45 dB and -51 dB, respectively.

  14. Risky driving among UK regular armed forces personnel: changes over time

    PubMed Central

    Sheriff, Rebecca J Syed; Forbes, Harriet J; Wessely, Simon C; Greenberg, Neil; Jones, Norman; Fertout, Mohammed; Harrison, Kate; Fear, Nicola T

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To compare the prevalence of self-reported risky driving in a sample of UK military personnel at 2 different time points (2004 and 2009), and to identify the incidence of new onset risky driving and possible determinants of becoming a new risky driver. Methods Data were used from 2 phases of a military cohort study investigating the health and well-being of UK military personnel between 2004 and 2009. Participants were included if they were undertaking regular (rather than reserve) engagements, had completed both surveys and reported being a driver at both surveys. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the relationship between risky driving status and sociodemographic and military characteristics. Data analysis was conducted in 2011. Results The prevalence of risky driving reduced from 18% to 14%, over an average of 3.3 years. The incidence of new onset risky driving was 7%. Predictors for becoming a new risky driver were: younger age, not being in a relationship at phase 2 and harmful alcohol use. Those deployed after 2007 were less likely to become risky drivers following deployment, compared with those deployed before 2007 (adjusted OR 0.62 (95% CI 0.40 to 0.95)). Conclusions The prevalence of becoming a risky driver appears to have reduced over time. This paper suggests a number of explanations for this reduction, including changes in the way that the UK military have dealt with road safety with the introduction of the road safety campaign (in 2007). PMID:26399573

  15. Spatial driving forces of dominant land use/land cover transformations in the Dongjiang River watershed, Southern China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Changjun; Zhou, Ping; Jia, Peng; Liu, Zhiyong; Wei, Long; Tian, Huiling

    2016-02-01

    Information about changes in, and causes of, land use/land cover (LULC) is crucial for land use resource planning. We investigated the processes involved in LULC change (LUCC) in the Dongjiang Watershed, in Southern China, over a 15-year period to gain a better understanding of the causes of the main types of LUCC. Using a depth transition matrix and redundancy analysis (RDA), the major types and causes of LUCC for each LULC type over the past 15 years were identified. LUCC exhibited obvious net change, relatively low persistence, and high swap change. The swap changes in most LULC types were considered as a strong signal of LULC transformations. The driving forces behind swap changes were quantified and identified through RDA. The results showed that all driving forces played important roles in explaining swap changes of LULC, although the relative effects of these drivers varied widely with both LULC type and time period. Swap changes of the LULC types were generally classified into two categories. Some, e.g., built-up land and wetland, were affected mostly by landform and/or distance factors, while others, e.g., grassland and woodland, were modulated mostly by climate and/or socioeconomic factors. Selected spatial driving forces and local land use policies played important roles in explaining the dominant LUCC types, but on different timescales. These findings may improve understanding of the detailed processes involved in LUCC, landscape transformation, and the causes of LUCC in other areas with extensive LUCC and could help managers plan, design, and implement land resource management. PMID:26746657

  16. Transient-state fluctuationlike relation for the driving force on a biomolecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponmurugan, M.; Vemparala, Satyavani

    2011-12-01

    In experiments and simulations the force acting on a single biomolecular system has been observed as a fluctuating quantity if the system is driven under constant velocity. We ask the question that is analogous to transient state entropy production and work fluctuation relations whether the force fluctuations observed in the single biomolecular system satisfy a transient state fluctuationlike relation, and the answer is in the affirmative. Using a constant velocity pulling steered molecular dynamics simulation study for protein unfolding, we confirm that the force fluctuations of this single biomolecular system satisfy a transient-state fluctuationlike relation (1)/(γ(T,v))ln[(Pv(+f))/(Pv(-f))]=f. Pv(±f) is the probability of positive and negative values of forces f=f⃗·n̂ for a given unfolding velocity of magnitude v and the pulling direction n⃗, n̂ is the unit vector of n⃗, and γ(T,v) is a factor that depends on initial equilibrium temperature T and the unfolding velocity. For different unfolding velocities we find that the system in the nonequilibrium pulling region displays substantial negative fluctuation in its unfolding force when velocity decreases. A negative value of force may indicate the emergence of refolding behavior during protein unfolding. We also find that γ(T,v)˜T-δvα and the system relaxation time τ(T,v)˜Tδv-(1+α), where α and δ are scaling exponents.

  17. Electrochemical reduction of carbon fluorine bond in 4-fluorobenzonitrile Mechanistic analysis employing Marcus Hush quadratic activation-driving force relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthukrishnan, A.; Sangaranarayanan, M. V.

    2007-10-01

    The reduction of carbon-fluorine bond in 4-fluorobenzonitrile in acetonitrile as the solvent, is analyzed using convolution potential sweep voltammetry and the dependence of the transfer coefficient on potential is investigated within the framework of Marcus-Hush quadratic activation-driving force theory. The validity of stepwise mechanism is inferred from solvent reorganization energy estimates as well as bond length calculations using B3LYP/6-31g(d) method. A novel method of estimating the standard reduction potential of the 4-fluorobenzonitrile in acetonitrile is proposed.

  18. A combined kinetic push and thermodynamic pull as driving forces for outer membrane protein sorting and folding in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Karen G.

    2015-01-01

    In vitro folding studies of outer membrane beta-barrels have been invaluable in revealing the lipid effects on folding rates and efficiencies as well as folding free energies. Here, the biophysical results are summarized, and these kinetic and thermodynamic findings are considered in terms of the requirements for folding in the context of the cellular environment. Because the periplasm lacks an external energy source the only driving forces for sorting and folding available within this compartment are binding or folding free energies and their associated rates. These values define functions for periplasmic chaperones and suggest a biophysical mechanism for the BAM complex. PMID:26370938

  19. Predation risk as a driving force for phenotypic assortment: a cross-population comparison.

    PubMed

    Croft, D P; Darden, S K; Ruxton, G D

    2009-05-22

    Frequency-dependent predation has been proposed as a general mechanism driving the phenotypic assortment of social groups via the 'oddity effect', which occurs when the presence of odd individuals in a group allows a predator to fixate on a single prey item, increasing the predator's attack-to-kill ratio. However, the generality of the oddity effect has been debated and, previously, there has not been an ecological assessment of the role of predation risk in driving the phenotypic assortment of social groups. Here, we compare the levels of body length assortment of social groups between populations of the Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata) that experience differences in predation risk. As predicted by the oddity effect hypothesis, we observe phenotypic assortment by body length to be greater under high predation risk. However, we found that a number of low-predation populations were also significantly assorted by body length, suggesting that other mechanisms may have a role to play.

  20. Dynamic model of the force driving kinesin to move along microtubule-Simulation with a model system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Y. C.; Hsiao, Yi-Feng; To, Kiwing

    2015-09-01

    A dynamic model for the motility of kinesin, including stochastic-force generation and step formation is proposed. The force driving the motion of kinesin motor is generated by the impulse from the collision between the randomly moving long-chain stalk and the ratchet-shaped outer surface of microtubule. Most of the dynamical and statistical features of the motility of kinesin are reproduced in a simulation system, with (a) ratchet structures similar to the outer surface of microtubule, (b) a bead chain connected to two heads, similarly to the stalk of the real kinesin motor, and (c) the interaction between the heads of the simulated kinesin and microtubule. We also propose an experiment to discriminate between the conventional hand-over-hand model and the dynamic model.

  1. Selective nanomanipulation of fluorescent polystyrene nano-beads and single quantum dots at gold nanostructures based on the AC-dielectrophoretic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jinsik; Hwang, Kyo Seon; Lee, Sangyoup; Park, Jung Ho; Shin, Hyun-Joon

    2015-11-01

    We introduced the selective manipulation of polystyrene (PS) nano-beads and single quantum dots (QDs) at a gold nanostructure by using the AC-dielectrophoretic (DEP) force. Manipulation in three degrees of freedom (end-facet, side, and position-selective manipulation) was accomplished in gold nanostructures between microelectrodes. A 10 μm gap between the microelectrodes, which has a 100 nm-wide nanowire and 200 nm-wide vortex nanostructures at the inside of the gap, was fabricated, and nanostructures were not connected with the electrodes. We also performed theoretical calculations to verify the selective manipulation through the floating AC-DEP force. A sufficiently high gradient of the square of the electric field (∇|E|2, ~1019 V2 m-3) was accomplished and controlled for achieving a strong attaching force of nanoparticles using the gap between microelectrodes and nanostructures as well as the rotation of structures. Fluorescent PS nano-beads and QDs were attached at the designed end facet, side, and position of nanostructures with high selectivity. A single QD attachment was also realized at gold nanostructures, and the attached QDs were verified as single using optical ``blinking'' measurements.We introduced the selective manipulation of polystyrene (PS) nano-beads and single quantum dots (QDs) at a gold nanostructure by using the AC-dielectrophoretic (DEP) force. Manipulation in three degrees of freedom (end-facet, side, and position-selective manipulation) was accomplished in gold nanostructures between microelectrodes. A 10 μm gap between the microelectrodes, which has a 100 nm-wide nanowire and 200 nm-wide vortex nanostructures at the inside of the gap, was fabricated, and nanostructures were not connected with the electrodes. We also performed theoretical calculations to verify the selective manipulation through the floating AC-DEP force. A sufficiently high gradient of the square of the electric field (∇|E|2, ~1019 V2 m-3) was accomplished and

  2. Bilateral deficit in explosive force production is not caused by changes in agonist neural drive.

    PubMed

    Buckthorpe, Matthew W; Pain, Matthew T G; Folland, Jonathan P

    2013-01-01

    Bilateral deficit (BLD) describes the phenomenon of a reduction in performance during synchronous bilateral (BL) movements when compared to the sum of identical unilateral (UL) movements. Despite a large body of research investigating BLD of maximal voluntary force (MVF) there exist a paucity of research examining the BLD for explosive strength. Therefore, this study investigated the BLD in voluntary and electrically-evoked explosive isometric contractions of the knee extensors and assessed agonist and antagonist neuromuscular activation and measurement artefacts as potential mechanisms. Thirteen healthy untrained males performed a series of maximum and explosive voluntary contractions bilaterally (BL) and unilaterally (UL). UL and BL evoked twitch and octet contractions were also elicited. Two separate load cells were used to measure MVF and explosive force at 50, 100 and 150 ms after force onset. Surface EMG amplitude was measured from three superficial agonists and an antagonist. Rate of force development (RFD) and EMG were reported over consecutive 50 ms periods (0-50, 50-100 and 100-150 ms). Performance during UL contractions was compared to combined BL performance to measure BLD. Single limb performance during the BL contractions was assessed and potential measurement artefacts, including synchronisation of force onset from the two limbs, controlled for. MVF showed no BLD (P = 0.551), but there was a BLD for explosive force at 100 ms (11.2%, P = 0.007). There was a BLD in RFD 50-100 ms (14.9%, P = 0.004), but not for the other periods. Interestingly, there was a BLD in evoked force measures (6.3-9.0%, P<0.001). There was no difference in agonist or antagonist EMG for any condition (P≥0.233). Measurement artefacts contributed minimally to the observed BLD. The BLD in volitional explosive force found here could not be explained by measurement issues, or agonist and antagonist neuromuscular activation. The BLD in voluntary and evoked explosive force might

  3. Do elevated gravitational-force events while driving predict crashes and near crashes?

    PubMed

    Simons-Morton, Bruce G; Zhang, Zhiwei; Jackson, John C; Albert, Paul S

    2012-05-15

    The purpose of this research was to determine the extent to which elevated gravitational-force event rates predict crashes and near crashes. Accelerometers, global positioning systems, cameras, and other technology were installed in vehicles driven by 42 newly licensed Virginia teenage drivers for a period of 18 months between 2006 and 2009. Elevated gravitational force and crash and near-crash events were identified, and rates per miles driven were calculated. (One mile = 1.6 km.) The correlation between crashes and near crashes and elevated gravitational-force event rates was 0.60. Analyses were done by using generalized estimating equations with logistic regression. Higher elevated gravitational-force event rates in the past month substantially increased the risk of a crash in the subsequent month (odds ratio = 1.07, 95% confidence interval: 1.02, 1.12). Although the difference in this relation did not vary significantly by time, it was highest in the first 6 months compared with the second and third 6-month periods. With a receiver operating characteristic curve, the risk models showed relatively high predictive accuracy with an area under the curve of 0.76. The authors conclude that elevated gravitational-force event rates can be used to assess risk and to show high predictive accuracy of a near-future crash.

  4. Increasing climate extremes under global warming - What is the driving force?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, J.; Wang, S. Y.; Gillies, R. R.; Hipps, L.; Kravitz, B.; Rasch, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    More climate extreme events have occurred in recent years, including the continual development of extreme drought in California, the severe cold winters in the eastern U.S. since 2014, 2015 Washington drought, and excessive wildfire events over Alaska in 2015. These have been casually attributed to global warming. However, a need for further understanding of mechanisms responsible for climate extremes is growing. In this presentation, we'll use sets of climate model simulation that designed to identify the role of the oceanic feedback in increasing climate extremes under global warming. One is with a fully coupled climate model forced by 1% ramping CO2, and the other is with an atmosphere only model forced by the same CO2 forcing. By contrasting these two, an importance of the oceanic feedback in increasing climate extremes under global warming can be diagnosed.

  5. Vegetation coverage change and associated driving forces in mountain areas of Northwestern Yunnan, China using RS and GIS.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jian; Liu, Yinghui; Shen, Hong; Han, Yinan; Pan, Yajing

    2012-08-01

    The dynamics of vegetation coverage and associated driving forces are one of the key issues in global environmental change. In the study, taking Lijiang County as a case, the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index was used to quantify vegetation coverage change in mountain areas of Northwestern Yunnan, China, with the application of remote sensing data and GIS technologies. And associated driving forces of vegetation coverage change were also analyzed, with a focus on land use change and elevation. The results showed that there was high vegetation coverage with a significant increase in the whole county during 1986-2002. However, due to economic development and the implementation of environmental protection polices, vegetation coverage change in the county showed distinct spatial diversity, which mainly behaved as the increasing in the northwest of the county with low human activities, and the decreasing in the south with high economic development. The results also showed that as a restrictive factor, elevation was of great signification on the spatial distribution of vegetation coverage in a broad scale; while in the county level, it was land use that determined the vegetation coverage, since the change of vegetation coverage grades in the study area was mainly associated with the change of land use types.

  6. Land use changes and its driving forces in hilly ecological restoration area based on gis and RS of northern China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Niu, Xiang; Wang, Bing; Zheng, Yunlong

    2015-01-01

    Land use change is one of the important aspects of the regional ecological restoration research. With remote sensing (RS) image in 2003, 2007 and 2012, using geographic information system (GIS) technologies, the land use pattern changes in Yimeng Mountain ecological restoration area in China and its driving force factors were studied. Results showed that: (1) Cultivated land constituted the largest area during 10 years, and followed by forest land and grass land; cultivated land and unused land were reduced by 28.43% and 44.32%, whereas forest land, water area and land for water facilities and others were increased. (2) During 2003-2007, forest land change showed the largest, followed by unused land and grass land; however, during 2008-2012, water area and land for water facilities change showed the largest, followed by grass land and unused land. (3) Land use degree was above the average level, it was in the developing period during 2003-2007 and in the degenerating period during 2008-2012. (4) Ecological Restoration Projects can greatly change the micro topography, increase vegetation coverage, and then induce significant changes in the land use distribution, which were the main driving force factors of the land use pattern change in the ecological restoration area.

  7. Land use changes and its driving forces in hilly ecological restoration area based on gis and rs of northern china

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Peng; Niu, Xiang; Wang, Bing; Zheng, Yunlong

    2015-01-01

    Land use change is one of the important aspects of the regional ecological restoration research. With remote sensing (RS) image in 2003, 2007 and 2012, using geographic information system (GIS) technologies, the land use pattern changes in Yimeng Mountain ecological restoration area in China and its driving force factors were studied. Results showed that: (1) Cultivated land constituted the largest area during 10 years, and followed by forest land and grass land; cultivated land and unused land were reduced by 28.43% and 44.32%, whereas forest land, water area and land for water facilities and others were increased. (2) During 2003–2007, forest land change showed the largest, followed by unused land and grass land; however, during 2008–2012, water area and land for water facilities change showed the largest, followed by grass land and unused land. (3) Land use degree was above the average level, it was in the developing period during 2003–2007 and in the degenerating period during 2008–2012. (4) Ecological Restoration Projects can greatly change the micro topography, increase vegetation coverage, and then induce significant changes in the land use distribution, which were the main driving force factors of the land use pattern change in the ecological restoration area. PMID:26047160

  8. [Spatiotemporal pattern of urban growth and its driving forces in urban agglomeration of central Liaoning Province, China].

    PubMed

    Xi, Feng-Ming; He, Hong-Shi; Hu, Yuan-Man; Wu, Xiao-Qing; Chang, Yu; Liu, Miao; Shi, Tie-Mao; Wang, Jin-Nian

    2010-03-01

    Based on the five temporal Landsat TM remote sensing data of 1988, 1992, 1997, 2000, and 2004, and by using GIS spatial analysis and landscape pattern analysis, this paper analyzed the spatiotemporal pattern of urban growth and its driving forces in the urban agglomeration of central Liaoning Province (UACLP). From 1988 to 2004, the urban area in the UACLP had being increased from 812.55 km2 to 1345.86 km2, with an average growth rate of 32.96 km2 per year. The urban growth rate increased rapidly after 1997, and the urban growth intensity was up to the peak in 1997-2000. The urban growth was mainly concentrated in the central dense belt of the UACLP. From 1988 to 1997, the urban growth was relatively slow, its spatial pattern was compact, and edge growth and filling were the main urban growth types. From 1997 to 2004, the urban growth became faster with diffused spatial pattern and complex patch shape, and "frog leap" and diffusion were the main urban growth types. Non-agricultural population growth, economic growth, urban spatial mutual attraction, industrial development, and development zones construction policies were the main driving forces of urban growth in the UACLP.

  9. Exciplexes versus Loose Ion Pairs: How Does the Driving Force Impact the Initial Product Ratio of Photoinduced Charge Separation Reactions?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Many donor–acceptor systems can undergo a photoinduced charge separation reaction, yielding loose ion pairs (LIPs). LIPs can be formed either directly via (distant) electron transfer (ET) or indirectly via the dissociation of an initially formed exciplex or tight ion pair. Establishing the prevalence of one of the reaction pathways is challenging because differentiating initially formed exciplexes from LIPs is difficult due to similar spectroscopic footprints. Hence, no comprehensive reaction model has been established for moderately polar solvents. Here, we employ an approach based on the time-resolved magnetic field effect (MFE) of the delayed exciplex luminescence to distinguish the two reaction channels. We focus on the effects of the driving force of ET and the solvent permittivity. We show that, surprisingly, the exciplex channel is significant even for an exergonic ET system with a free energy of ET of −0.58 eV and for the most polar solutions studied (butyronitrile). Our findings demonstrate that exciplexes play a crucial role even in polar solvents and at moderate driving forces, contrary to what is usually assumed. PMID:25243054

  10. Thermodynamic Driving Force of the γ → ɛ Transformation and Resulting MS Temperature in High-Mn Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisarik, S. T.; Van Aken, D. C.

    2016-03-01

    Two-stage transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) behavior characterized by the martensitic transformations, γ → ɛ → α', has produced exceptional tensile strengths and work hardening rates in Fe-14 wt pct Mn alloys containing Al and Si. A regular solution model has been developed to accurately calculate Δ G γ → ɛ for a given TRIP alloy and the calculated driving force is used to determine the M S ɛ temperature. The regular solution model developed here predicted driving forces that corresponded well with reported microstructures and behavior of seven FeMnAlSiC steels from literature when considered in conjunction with nucleating defect critical size and material process history. The role of available nucleating defects of critical size, n*, has been linked to the stacking fault energy necessary to observe the γ → ɛ transformation and the M S ɛ temperature. The regular solution model provided excellent correlation between calculated M S ɛ temperatures and those measured experimentally in 89 alloys from literature and suggested n* = 4 is the critical size of a nucleating defect in annealed microstructures. Factors affecting the γ → ɛ transformation and the M S ɛ temperature have been identified as prior austenite grain size, dislocation substructure due to prior deformation, and solute segregation.

  11. Experiments on functional fatigue of thermally activated shape memory alloy springs and correlations with driving force intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Ashwin; Srinivasa, A. R.

    2013-04-01

    The issue of material performance over its designed life is of prime concern with designers lately due to increasing use of shape memory alloy (SMA) components in different engineering applications. In this work, a concept of "Driving force amplitude v/s no of cycles" is proposed to analyze functional degradation of SMA components under torsion. The model is formulated using experimentally measurable quantities such as torque and angle of twist with the inclusion of both mechanical and thermal loading in the same framework. Such an approach can potentially substitute the traditional fatigue theories like S-N, epsilon-N theories which primarily use mechanical loading effects with temperature being an external control parameter. Such traditional S-N, epsilon-N fatigue theories work well for capturing superelastic effects at a given temperature but not for shape memory effects or temperature dependent superelastic effects which involves mechanical and thermal coupling. Experiments on SMA extension springs are performed using a custom designed thermomechanical test rig capable of mimicking shape memory effect on thermally activated SMA springs held under constant deformation. For every thermomechanical cycle, load and temperature sensor readings are continually recorded as a function of time using LabVIEW software. The sensor data over the specimen lifetime is used to construct a "Driving force amplitude v/s no of cycles" relationship that can be used as a guideline for analyzing functional degradation of SMA components.

  12. [Land use change dynamics and driving forces of the vulnerable ecological region in northwestern Shanxi Province, China].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiu-Fen; Liu, Li-Min; Qi, Xin; Zhang, Jin-Xin; Zhao, Tong-Bin; Wang, Yi; Liu, Xue-Fen; Zhou, Yong-Bin

    2014-10-01

    By using remote sensing and GIS technology, this paper collected land use information of 1980, 1990, 2000 and 2010 and the relevant statistical data, and analyzed the characteristics of land use change and its driving forces in northwestern Shanxi Province, the typical ecological fragile area. The results showed that there were significant changes in land use patterns in the past 30 years. During 1980-1990, 1990-2000 and 2000-2010 periods, the area of farmland decreased continuously, while the areas of grassland and woodland experienced increase-decrease-increase and decrease-increase-decrease patterns of change, respectively. The areas of industrial and resident lands increased continuously, but the water body and unused land decreased. The farmland was mainly transformed to grassland and woodland, and the areas of industrial and resident lands increased from the farmland. The lost area of water body was transformed to grassland and farmland. The decrease of unused land was due to the implementation of ecological engineering and urban ex-panding. In general, the changes of land use types were significantly higher before 2000 than after 2000. The industrial and resident lands, unused land and grassland changed drastically. The relationships between land use types and driving forces indicated that population pressure and economic development led to the changes of industrial land and farmland; policy of forestry ecological engi- neering drove the changes of woodland and grassland; the drought-characterized climate was the major cause inducing the decrease of water area and hindering the restoration of forest.

  13. Solitary waves in the nonlinear Dirac equation in the presence of external driving forces

    DOE PAGES

    Mertens, Franz G.; Cooper, Fred; Quintero, Niurka R.; Shao, Sihong; Khare, Avinash; Saxena, Avadh

    2016-01-05

    In this paper, we consider the nonlinear Dirac (NLD) equation in (1 + 1) dimensions with scalar–scalar self interaction g2/κ + 1 (Ψ¯Ψ)κ + 1 in the presence of external forces as well as damping of the form f(x) - iμγ0Ψ, where both f and Ψ are two-component spinors. We develop an approximate variational approach using collective coordinates (CC) for studying the time dependent response of the solitary waves to these external forces. This approach predicts intrinsic oscillations of the solitary waves, i.e. the amplitude, width and phase all oscillate with the same frequency. The translational motion is also affected,more » because the soliton position oscillates around a mean trajectory. For κ = 1 we solve explicitly the CC equations of the variational approximation for slow moving solitary waves in a constant external force without damping and find reasonable agreement with solving numerically the CC equations. Finally, we then compare the results of the variational approximation with no damping with numerical simulations of the NLD equation for κ = 1, when the components of the external force are of the form fj = rj exp(–iΚx) and again find agreement if we take into account a certain linear excitation with specific wavenumber that is excited together with the intrinsic oscillations such that the momentum in a transformed NLD equation is conserved.« less

  14. Commentary: Forces That Drive the Vape Shop Industry and Implications for the Health Professions

    PubMed Central

    Sussman, Steve; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Garcia, Robert; Barker, Dianne C.; Samet, Jonathan M.; Leventhal, Adam; Unger, Jennifer B.

    2016-01-01

    At least three factors may be driving the evolution of the vape shop industry, a rapidly growing market sector that specializes in the sales of electronic cigarettes: (1) the tobacco industry, (2) the public health sector and its diverse stakeholders, and (3) consumer demand. These influences and the responses of the vape shop sector have resulted in a rapidly changing landscape. This commentary briefly discusses these three factors and the implications for the health professions, as they address the vape shop industry and its consequences for public health. PMID:25967071

  15. Quantifying the forces driving cell-cell adhesion in a fungal pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Alsteens, David; Van Dijck, Patrick; Lipke, Peter N.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2013-01-01

    Owing to its ability to form biofilms on implanted medical devices, the fungal pathogen Candida albicans causes frequent infections in humans. A hallmark of C. albicans biofilms is the presence of two types of cells, budding yeast cells and growing hyphae, which are bound together and embedded in extracellular matrix material. Although cell-cell adhesion is critical to biofilm formation, architecture and cohesion, we know little about the fundamental forces behind this interaction. Here, we use single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS) to quantify the forces engaged in yeast-hyphae adhesion, focusing on the role of Als (Agglutinin-like sequence) proteins as prototypes of cell adhesion molecules. We show that adhesion between individual yeast and hyphal cells involves strong, short-range cohesive interactions (1.1 nN ± 0.2 nN; 86 ± 33 nm), and weak, long-range tether interactions (0.4 ± 0.2 nN; 234 ± 81 nm). Control experiments demonstrate that these interactions originate from cell surface proteins that are specific to C. albicans. Using mutant strains deficient for Als expression, we find that Als3 proteins, primarily expressed on the germ tube, play a key role in establishing strong cohesive adhesion. We suggest a model in which cohesive adhesion during biofilm formation originates from tight hydrophobic interactions between Als tandem repeat domains on adjacent cells. When subjected to force, the two interacting cell surfaces detach but the cell bodies remain tethered through macromolecular extensions. Our results represent the first direct, non-invasive measurement of adhesion forces between interacting fungal cells, and provide novel insights into the molecular origin of the cohesive strength of fungal biofilms. PMID:24152214

  16. Forest dynamics and its driving forces of sub-tropical forest in South China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lei; Lian, Juyu; Lin, Guojun; Cao, Honglin; Huang, Zhongliang; Guan, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Tree mortality and recruitment are key factors influencing forest dynamics, but the driving mechanisms of these processes remain unclear. To better understand these driving mechanisms, we studied forest dynamics over a 5-year period in a 20-ha sub-tropical forest in the Dinghushan Nature Reserve, South China. The goal was to identify determinants of tree mortality/recruitment at the local scale using neighborhood analyses on some locally dominant tree species. Results show that the study plot was more dynamic than some temperate and tropical forests in a comparison to large, long-term forest dynamics plots. Over the 5-year period, mortality rates ranged from 1.67 to 12.33% per year while recruitment rates ranged from 0 to 20.26% per year. Tree size had the most consistent effect on mortality across species. Recruitment into the ≥1-cm size class consistently occurred where local con-specific density was high. This suggests that recruitment may be limited by seed dispersal. Hetero-specific individuals also influenced recruitment significantly for some species. Canopy species had low recruitment into the ≥1-cm size class over the 5-year period. In conclusion, tree mortality and recruitment for sixteen species in this plot was likely limited by seed dispersal and density-dependence. PMID:26940005

  17. Forest dynamics and its driving forces of sub-tropical forest in South China

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lei; Lian, Juyu; Lin, Guojun; Cao, Honglin; Huang, Zhongliang; Guan, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Tree mortality and recruitment are key factors influencing forest dynamics, but the driving mechanisms of these processes remain unclear. To better understand these driving mechanisms, we studied forest dynamics over a 5-year period in a 20-ha sub-tropical forest in the Dinghushan Nature Reserve, South China. The goal was to identify determinants of tree mortality/recruitment at the local scale using neighborhood analyses on some locally dominant tree species. Results show that the study plot was more dynamic than some temperate and tropical forests in a comparison to large, long-term forest dynamics plots. Over the 5-year period, mortality rates ranged from 1.67 to 12.33% per year while recruitment rates ranged from 0 to 20.26% per year. Tree size had the most consistent effect on mortality across species. Recruitment into the ≥1-cm size class consistently occurred where local con-specific density was high. This suggests that recruitment may be limited by seed dispersal. Hetero-specific individuals also influenced recruitment significantly for some species. Canopy species had low recruitment into the ≥1-cm size class over the 5-year period. In conclusion, tree mortality and recruitment for sixteen species in this plot was likely limited by seed dispersal and density-dependence. PMID:26940005

  18. Causality of global warming seen from observations: a scale analysis of driving force of the surface air temperature time series in the Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Peicai; Wang, Geli; Zhang, Feng; Zhou, Xiuji

    2016-05-01

    By using the slow feature analysis, we reconstructed the driving force for an observed monthly surface air temperature anomaly time series in the northern hemisphere. Wavelet transformation technique was then used to analyze the scale structure of the derived driving force and its causal relationship with global warming. Results showed that the driving force for the analyzed temperature climate system included two independent degrees of freedom which respectively represented the effects of 22-year solar cycle and Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation on the climate. More importantly, the driving force is modulated in amplitude by signals with much longer time periods. The modulation controls the energy input to the climate system and its effect on the global warming is decisive. In addition, through analyzing phase transitions from zero to extremes of the modulating signals, we provide a projection for the future trend of the surface air temperature. In specific, in the next 45-65 years, the driving force will continue to rise which will drive the air temperature even warmer. This is a long term natural trend determined by the modulating amplitude signals, but not directly related to human activity.

  19. Self-similar Expansion of Solar Coronal Mass Ejections: Implications for Lorentz Self-force Driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Prasad; Arunbabu, K. P.; Vourlidas, Angelos; Mauriya, Adwiteey

    2014-08-01

    We examine the propagation of several coronal mass ejections (CMEs) with well-observed flux rope signatures in the field of view of the SECCHI coronagraphs on board the STEREO satellites using the graduated cylindrical shell fitting method of Thernisien et al. We find that the manner in which they propagate is approximately self-similar; i.e., the ratio (κ) of the flux rope minor radius to its major radius remains approximately constant with time. We use this observation of self-similarity to draw conclusions regarding the local pitch angle (γ) of the flux rope magnetic field and the misalignment angle (χ) between the current density J and the magnetic field B. Our results suggest that the magnetic field and current configurations inside flux ropes deviate substantially from a force-free state in typical coronagraph fields of view, validating the idea of CMEs being driven by Lorentz self-forces.

  20. Driving force for martensitic transformation in Ni2Mn1 +xSn1 -x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Soumyadipta; Sarkar, Sagar; Pandey, S. K.; Maji, Chhayabrita; Mahadevan, Priya

    2016-09-01

    The martensitic transformation in Ni2Mn1 +xSn1 -x alloys has been investigated within ab initio density functional theory. The experimental trend of a martensitic transition happening beyond x =0.36 is captured within these calculations. The microscopic considerations leading to this are traced to increased Ni-Mn hybridization which results from the Ni atom experiencing a resultant force along a lattice vector and moving towards the Mn atoms above a critical concentration. The presence of the lone pair electrons on Sn forces the movement of Ni atoms away from Sn. While band Jahn Teller effects have been associated with this transition, we show quantitatively that at least in this class of compounds they have a minor role.

  1. Self-similar expansion of solar coronal mass ejections: Implications for Lorentz self-force driving

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, Prasad; Arunbabu, K. P.; Mauriya, Adwiteey; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2014-08-01

    We examine the propagation of several coronal mass ejections (CMEs) with well-observed flux rope signatures in the field of view of the SECCHI coronagraphs on board the STEREO satellites using the graduated cylindrical shell fitting method of Thernisien et al. We find that the manner in which they propagate is approximately self-similar; i.e., the ratio (κ) of the flux rope minor radius to its major radius remains approximately constant with time. We use this observation of self-similarity to draw conclusions regarding the local pitch angle (γ) of the flux rope magnetic field and the misalignment angle (χ) between the current density J and the magnetic field B. Our results suggest that the magnetic field and current configurations inside flux ropes deviate substantially from a force-free state in typical coronagraph fields of view, validating the idea of CMEs being driven by Lorentz self-forces.

  2. [Changes in the spatiotemporal pattern of urbanization in Erdos of Inner Mongolia and related driving forces].

    PubMed

    Dong, Ning; Han, Xing-Guo; Wu, Jian-Guo

    2012-04-01

    Urbanization is the most drastic form of land use change, which affects the biodiversity and ecosystem functioning and services far beyond the limits of cities. Based on the land use data in three time periods and by the method of landscape pattern analysis, this paper analyzed the change characteristics of the spatiotemporal pattern of urbanization in the four Banners of East Erdos at different spatial scales. Urbanization had profound effects on the local ecology, society, and economics. The landscape as a whole became more fragmented and complex, and different patch types exhibited distinctive spatial characteristics and were affected to different degrees at class-level. Desert and urban land varied greater, and cropland was most affected by urbanization. Resources factors, increase of urban population, and development of economy were the main socio-economic driving factors to the changes in the local landscape spatiotemporal pattern of urbanization.

  3. Pressure perturbations from geologic carbon sequestration: Area-of-review boundaries and borehole leakage driving forces

    SciTech Connect

    Nicot, J.-P.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Bryant, S.L.; Hovorka, S.D.

    2009-07-01

    We investigate the possibility that brine could be displaced upward into potable water through wells. Because of the large volumes of CO2 to be injected, the influence of the zone of elevated pressure on potential conduits such as well boreholes could extend many kilometers from the injection site-farther than the CO2 plume itself. The traditional approach to address potential brine leakage related to fluid injection is to set an area of fixed radius around the injection well/zone and to examine wells and other potentially open pathways located in the ''Area-of-Review'' (AoR). This suggests that the AoR eeds to be defined in terms of the potential for a given pressure perturbation to drive upward fluid flow in any given system rather than on some arbitrary pressure rise. We present an analysis that focuses on the changes in density/salinity of the fluids in the potentially leaking wellbore.

  4. What drives interannual variability of hypoxia in Chesapeake Bay: Climate forcing versus nutrient loading?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Lee, Younjoo J.; Testa, Jeremy M.; Li, Yun; Ni, Wenfei; Kemp, W. Michael; Di Toro, Dominic M.

    2016-03-01

    Oxygen depletion in estuaries is a worldwide problem with detrimental effects on many organisms. Although nutrient loading has been stabilized for a number of these systems, seasonal hypoxia persists and displays large year-to-year variations, with larger hypoxic volumes in wetter years and smaller hypoxic volumes in drier years. Data analysis points to climate as a driver of interannual hypoxia variability, but nutrient inputs covary with freshwater flow. Here we report an oxygen budget analysis of Chesapeake Bay to quantify relative contributions of physical and biogeochemical processes. Vertical diffusive flux declines with river discharge, whereas longitudinal advective flux increases with river discharge, such that their total supply of oxygen to bottom water is relatively unchanged. However, water column respiration exhibits large interannual fluctuations and is correlated with primary production and hypoxic volume. Hence, the model results suggest that nutrient loading is the main mechanism driving interannual hypoxia variability in Chesapeake Bay.

  5. Line tension at lipid phase boundaries as driving force for HIV fusion peptide-mediated fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sung-Tae; Kiessling, Volker; Tamm, Lukas K.

    2016-04-01

    Lipids and proteins are organized in cellular membranes in clusters, often called `lipid rafts'. Although raft-constituent ordered lipid domains are thought to be energetically unfavourable for membrane fusion, rafts have long been implicated in many biological fusion processes. For the case of HIV gp41-mediated membrane fusion, this apparent contradiction can be resolved by recognizing that the interfaces between ordered and disordered lipid domains are the predominant sites of fusion. Here we show that line tension at lipid domain boundaries contributes significant energy to drive gp41-fusion peptide-mediated fusion. This energy, which depends on the hydrophobic mismatch between ordered and disordered lipid domains, may contribute tens of kBT to fusion, that is, it is comparable to the energy required to form a lipid stalk intermediate. Line-active compounds such as vitamin E lower line tension in inhomogeneous membranes, thereby inhibit membrane fusion, and thus may be useful natural viral entry inhibitors.

  6. Line tension at lipid phase boundaries as driving force for HIV fusion peptide-mediated fusion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sung-Tae; Kiessling, Volker; Tamm, Lukas K

    2016-01-01

    Lipids and proteins are organized in cellular membranes in clusters, often called 'lipid rafts'. Although raft-constituent ordered lipid domains are thought to be energetically unfavourable for membrane fusion, rafts have long been implicated in many biological fusion processes. For the case of HIV gp41-mediated membrane fusion, this apparent contradiction can be resolved by recognizing that the interfaces between ordered and disordered lipid domains are the predominant sites of fusion. Here we show that line tension at lipid domain boundaries contributes significant energy to drive gp41-fusion peptide-mediated fusion. This energy, which depends on the hydrophobic mismatch between ordered and disordered lipid domains, may contribute tens of kBT to fusion, that is, it is comparable to the energy required to form a lipid stalk intermediate. Line-active compounds such as vitamin E lower line tension in inhomogeneous membranes, thereby inhibit membrane fusion, and thus may be useful natural viral entry inhibitors. PMID:27113279

  7. Stability enhancement and fuel economy of the 4-wheel-drive hybrid electric vehicles by optimal tyre force distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodarzi, Avesta; Mohammadi, Masoud

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, vehicle stability control and fuel economy for a 4-wheel-drive hybrid vehicle are investigated. The integrated controller is designed within three layers. The first layer determines the total yaw moment and total lateral force made by using an optimal controller method to follow the desired dynamic behaviour of a vehicle. The second layer determines optimum tyre force distribution in order to optimise tyre usage and find out how the tyres should share longitudinal and lateral forces to achieve a target vehicle response under the assumption that all four wheels can be independently steered, driven, and braked. In the third layer, the active steering, wheel slip, and electrical motor torque controllers are designed. In the front axle, internal combustion engine (ICE) is coupled to an electric motor (EM). The control strategy has to determine the power distribution between ICE and EM to minimise fuel consumption and allowing the vehicle to be charge sustaining. Finally, simulations performed in MATLAB/SIMULINK environment show that the proposed structure could enhance the vehicle stability and fuel economy in different manoeuvres.

  8. Complete canthi removal reveals that forces from the amnioserosa alone are sufficient to drive dorsal closure in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Adrienne R.; Zou, Roger S.; Tulu, U. Serdar; Sokolow, Adam C.; Crawford, Janice M.; Edwards, Glenn S.; Kiehart, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila's dorsal closure provides an excellent model system with which to analyze biomechanical processes during morphogenesis. During native closure, the amnioserosa, flanked by two lateral epidermal sheets, forms an eye-shaped opening with canthi at each corner. The dynamics of amnioserosa cells and actomyosin purse strings in the leading edges of epidermal cells promote closure, whereas the bulk of the lateral epidermis opposes closure. Canthi maintain purse string curvature (necessary for their dorsalward forces), and zipping at the canthi shortens leading edges, ensuring a continuous epithelium at closure completion. We investigated the requirement for intact canthi during closure with laser dissection approaches. Dissection of one or both canthi resulted in tissue recoil and flattening of each purse string. After recoil and a temporary pause, closure resumed at approximately native rates until slowing near the completion of closure. Thus the amnioserosa alone can drive closure after dissection of one or both canthi, requiring neither substantial purse string curvature nor zipping during the bulk of closure. How the embryo coordinates multiple, large forces (each of which is orders of magnitude greater than the net force) during native closure and is also resilient to multiple perturbations are key extant questions. PMID:25253724

  9. Active transport of the Ca(2+)-pump: introduction of the temperature difference as a driving force.

    PubMed

    Lervik, Anders; Bedeaux, Dick; Kjelstrup, Signe

    2013-05-01

    We analyse a kinetic cycle of the Ca(2+)-ATPase molecular pump using mesoscopic non-equilibrium thermodynamics. The pump is known to generate heat, and by analysing the operation on the mesoscopic level, we are able to introduce a temperature difference and the corresponding heat flux in the description. Integration over the internal coordinates then results in non-linear flux-force relations describing the operation of the pump on the macroscopic level. Specifically, we obtain an expression for the heat flux associated with the active transport and the coupling of heat effects to the transport of ions and the rate of the ATP-hydrolysis.

  10. Mechanical forces drive neuroblast morphogenesis and are required for epidermal closure.

    PubMed

    Wernike, Denise; Chen, Yun; Mastronardi, Karina; Makil, Neetha; Piekny, Alisa

    2016-04-15

    Tissue morphogenesis requires myosin-dependent events such as cell shape changes and migration to be coordinated between cells within a tissue, and/or with cells from other tissues. However, few studies have investigated the simultaneous morphogenesis of multiple tissues in vivo. We found that during Caenorhabditis elegans ventral enclosure, when epidermal cells collectively migrate to cover the ventral surface of the embryo, the underlying neuroblasts (neuronal precursor cells) also undergo morphogenesis. We found that myosin accumulates as foci along the junction-free edges of the ventral epidermal cells to form a ring, whose closure is myosin-dependent. We also observed the accumulation of myosin foci and the adhesion junction proteins E-cadherin and α-catenin in the underlying neuroblasts. Myosin may help to reorganize a subset of neuroblasts into a rosette-like pattern, and decrease their surface area as the overlying epidermal cells constrict. Since myosin is required in the neuroblasts for ventral enclosure, we propose that mechanical forces in the neuroblasts influence constriction of the overlying epidermal cells. In support of this model, disrupting neuroblast cell division or altering their fate influences myosin localization in the overlying epidermal cells. The coordination of myosin-dependent events and forces between cells in different tissues could be a common theme for coordinating morphogenetic events during metazoan development. PMID:26923492

  11. Embryo as epiphenomenon: some cultural, social and economic forces driving the stem cell debate.

    PubMed

    Green, R M

    2008-12-01

    Our human embryonic stem cell debates are not simply about good or bad ethical arguments. The fetus and the embryo have instead become symbols for a larger set of value conflicts occasioned by social and cultural changes. Beneath our stem cell debates lie conflicts between those who would privilege scientific progress and individual choice and others who favour the sanctity of family life and traditional family roles. Also at work, on both the national and international levels, is the use of the embryo by newly emergent social groups to express resentment against cultural elites. The organisational needs of religious groups have also played a role, with the issue of protection of the embryo and fetus serving as a useful means of rallying organisational allegiance in the Roman Catholic and evangelical communities. Because the epiphenomenal moral positions on the status and use of the embryo are driven by the powerful social, cultural or economic forces beneath them, they will most likely change only with shifts in the underlying forces that sustain them.

  12. The Role of CO2 Physiological Forcing in Driving Future Precipitation Variability and Precipitation Extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, C. B.; Poulsen, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Transpired water contributes roughly 25% to total precipitation over the Earth's land surface. In addition to transpiration's impact on climatological mean precipitation, recent work suggests that transpiration reduces daily and intraseasonal precipitation variability in tropical forest regions. Projected increases in the concentration of CO2 are expected to reduce transpiration through changes in plant physiology (termed the CO2 physiological effect). Here, we use an ensemble of climate model experiments to assess the potential contribution of the CO2 physiological effect to future changes in precipitation variability and extreme precipitation events. Within our model simulations, precipitation responses to the physiological effects of increased CO2 concentrations are greatest throughout the tropics. In most tropical forest regions CO2 physiological forcing increases the annual number of dry (less than 0.1 mm/day) and extremely wet (rainfall exceeds 95th percentile) days. Changes in precipitation are primarily driven by an increase in surface temperature and subsequent changes in atmospheric stability and moisture convergence over vegetated tropical land regions. Our results suggest that the plant physiological response to CO2 forcing may serve as an important contributor to future precipitation variability in the tropics, and that future work should aim to reduce uncertainty in the response of plant physiology to changes in climate.

  13. Line tension at lipid phase boundaries as driving force for HIV fusion peptide-mediated fusion

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sung-Tae; Kiessling, Volker; Tamm, Lukas K.

    2016-01-01

    Lipids and proteins are organized in cellular membranes in clusters, often called ‘lipid rafts'. Although raft-constituent ordered lipid domains are thought to be energetically unfavourable for membrane fusion, rafts have long been implicated in many biological fusion processes. For the case of HIV gp41-mediated membrane fusion, this apparent contradiction can be resolved by recognizing that the interfaces between ordered and disordered lipid domains are the predominant sites of fusion. Here we show that line tension at lipid domain boundaries contributes significant energy to drive gp41-fusion peptide-mediated fusion. This energy, which depends on the hydrophobic mismatch between ordered and disordered lipid domains, may contribute tens of kBT to fusion, that is, it is comparable to the energy required to form a lipid stalk intermediate. Line-active compounds such as vitamin E lower line tension in inhomogeneous membranes, thereby inhibit membrane fusion, and thus may be useful natural viral entry inhibitors. PMID:27113279

  14. Geological and climatic forces driving speciation in the continentally distributed trilling chorus frogs (Pseudacris).

    PubMed

    Lemmon, Emily Moriarty; Lemmon, Alan R; Cannatella, David C

    2007-09-01

    Tertiary geological events and Quaternary climatic fluctuations have been proposed as important factors of speciation in the North American flora and fauna. Few studies, however, have rigorously tested hypotheses regarding the specific factors driving divergence of taxa. Here, we test explicit speciation hypotheses by correlating geologic events with divergence times among species in the continentally distributed trilling chorus frogs (Pseudacris). In particular, we ask whether marine inundation of the Mississippi Embayment, uplift of the Appalachian Mountains, or modification of the ancient Teays-Mahomet River system contributed to speciation. To examine the plausibility of ancient rivers causing divergence, we tested whether modern river systems inhibit gene flow. Additionally, we compared the effects of Quaternary climatic factors (glaciation and aridification) on levels of genetic variation. Divergence time estimates using penalized likelihood and coalescent approaches indicate that the major lineages of chorus frogs diversified during the Tertiary, and also exclude Quaternary climate change as a factor in speciation of chorus frogs. We show the first evidence that inundation of the Mississippi Embayment contributed to speciation. We reject the hypotheses that Cenozoic uplift of the Appalachians and that diversion of the Teays-Mahomet River contributed to speciation in this clade. We find that by reducing gene flow, rivers have the potential to cause divergence of lineages. Finally, we demonstrate that populations in areas affected by Quaternary glaciation and aridification have reduced levels of genetic variation compared to those from more equable regions, suggesting recent colonization.

  15. The endoderm and myocardium join forces to drive early heart tube assembly.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrova, Anastasiia; Czirok, Andras; Kosa, Edina; Galkin, Oleksandr; Cheuvront, Tracey J; Rongish, Brenda J

    2015-08-01

    Formation of the muscular layer of the heart, the myocardium, involves the medial movement of bilateral progenitor fields; driven primarily by shortening of the endoderm during foregut formation. Using a combination of time-lapse imaging, microsurgical perturbations and computational modeling, we show that the speed of the medial-ward movement of the myocardial progenitors is similar, but not identical to that of the adjacent endoderm. Further, the extracellular matrix microenvironment separating the two germ layers also moves with the myocardium, indicating that collective tissue motion and not cell migration drives tubular heart assembly. Importantly, as myocardial cells approach the midline, they perform distinct anterior-directed movements relative to the endoderm. Based on the analysis of microincision experiments and computational models, we propose two characteristic, autonomous morphogenetic activities within the early myocardium: 1) an active contraction of the medial portion of the heart field and 2) curling- the tendency of the unconstrained myocardial tissue to form a spherical surface with a concave ventral side. In the intact embryo, these deformations are constrained by the endoderm and the adjacent mesoderm, nevertheless the corresponding mechanical stresses contribute to the proper positioning of myocardial primordia.

  16. Predation risk as a driving force for sexual segregation: a cross-population comparison.

    PubMed

    Croft, Darren P; Morrell, Lesley J; Wade, Amy S; Piyapong, Chantima; Ioannou, Christos C; Dyer, John R G; Chapman, Ben B; Wong, Yan; Krause, Jens

    2006-06-01

    Sexual segregation is widespread throughout the animal kingdom. Although a number of hypotheses have been proposed to account for observed patterns, the generality of the mechanisms remains debated. One possible reason for this is the focus on segregation patterns in large mammals such as ungulates, where the majority of studies are descriptions of a single population. Here, we present the results of a cross‐population comparison of patterns of sexual segregation in the Trinidadian guppy, Poecilia reticulata. We relate observed patterns to experimental quantification of predation risk and sexual harassment of females by males in eight populations. We find that the degree of segregation increases with predation risk, with deeper waters becoming increasingly female biased. Furthermore, we observed that levels of male harassment are lower in deeper water but only in those rivers that contain major guppy predators. We conclude that sexual segregation in guppies is consistent with the predation risk hypothesis: sexual segregation results from a combination of predation risk driving males (the more vulnerable sex) into less risky habitats and females gaining benefits of reduced sexual harassment by remaining in high‐predation environments.

  17. Inherent Driving Force for Charge Separation in Curved Stacks of Oligothiophenes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Qin

    2015-01-30

    Coexistence of high local charge mobility and an energy gradient can lead to efficient free charge carrier generation from geminate charge transfer states at the donor–acceptor interface in bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaics. It is, however, not clear what polymer microstructures can support such coexistence. Using recent methods from density functional theory, we propose that a stack of similarly curved oligothiophene chains can deliver the requirements for efficient charge separation. Curved stacks are stable because of the polymer’s strong π-stacking ability and because backbone torsions are flexible in neutral chains. However, energy of a charge in a polymer chain has remarkably stronger dependence on torsions. The trend of increasing planarity in curved stacks effectively creates an energy gradient that drives charge in one direction. The curvature of these partially ordered stacks is found to beneficially interact with fullerenes for charge separation. The curved stacks, therefore, are identified as possible building blocks for interfacial structures that lead to efficient free carrier generation in high-performing organic photovoltaic systems.

  18. Inherent Driving Force for Charge Separation in Curved Stacks of Oligothiophenes

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Qin

    2015-01-30

    Coexistence of high local charge mobility and an energy gradient can lead to efficient free charge carrier generation from geminate charge transfer states at the donor–acceptor interface in bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaics. It is, however, not clear what polymer microstructures can support such coexistence. Using recent methods from density functional theory, we propose that a stack of similarly curved oligothiophene chains can deliver the requirements for efficient charge separation. Curved stacks are stable because of the polymer’s strong π-stacking ability and because backbone torsions are flexible in neutral chains. However, energy of a charge in a polymer chain has remarkablymore » stronger dependence on torsions. The trend of increasing planarity in curved stacks effectively creates an energy gradient that drives charge in one direction. The curvature of these partially ordered stacks is found to beneficially interact with fullerenes for charge separation. The curved stacks, therefore, are identified as possible building blocks for interfacial structures that lead to efficient free carrier generation in high-performing organic photovoltaic systems.« less

  19. A calibrated Monte Carlo approach to quantify the impacts of misorientation and different driving forces on texture development

    SciTech Connect

    Liangzhe Zhang; Anthony D. Rollett; Timothy Bartel; Di Wu; Mark T. Lusk

    2012-02-01

    A calibrated Monte Carlo (cMC) approach, which quantifies grain boundary kinetics within a generic setting, is presented. The influence of misorientation is captured by adding a scaling coefficient in the spin flipping probability equation, while the contribution of different driving forces is weighted using a partition function. The calibration process relies on the established parametric links between Monte Carlo (MC) and sharp-interface models. The cMC algorithm quantifies microstructural evolution under complex thermomechanical environments and remedies some of the difficulties associated with conventional MC models. After validation, the cMC approach is applied to quantify the texture development of polycrystalline materials with influences of misorientation and inhomogeneous bulk energy across grain boundaries. The results are in good agreement with theory and experiments.

  20. Thermodynamic Driving Forces for Dye Molecule Position and Orientation in Nanoconfined Solvents.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Jacob A; Thompson, Ward H

    2015-07-23

    The results of replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations of a coumarin 153 (C153) dye molecule dissolved in ethanol confined within a 2.4 nm hydrophilic amorphous silica pore are presented. The C153 dye position and orientation distributions provide insight into time-dependent fluorescence measurements in nanoconfined solvents as well as general features of chemistry in mesoporous materials. In addition to the distributions themselves, the free energy, internal energy, and entropic contributions have been calculated to explore the factors determining the distributions. The most likely location of C153 is found to be near the pore surface, but two possible hydrogen-bonding structures lead to differing orientations. Internal energy and entropy are found to be competing forces within the pore, with entropy playing a significant role with unexpected consequences. These results represent a crucial step in determining how the nanoconfining framework can affect measurements of solvation dynamics. PMID:25295835

  1. The driving forces for nitrogen and phosphorus flows in the food chain of china, 1980 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Hou, Y; Ma, L; Gao, Z L; Wang, F H; Sims, J T; Ma, W Q; Zhang, F S

    2013-07-01

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) use and losses in China's food chain have accelerated in the past three decades, driven by population growth, rapid urbanization, dietary transition, and changing nutrient management practice. There has been little detailed quantitative analysis of the relative magnitude of these driving forces throughout this period. Therefore, we analyzed changes in N and P flows and key drivers behind changes in the food (production and consumption) chain at the national scale from 1980 to 2010. Food (N and P) consumption increased by about fivefold in urban settings over this period but has decreased in rural settings since the 1990s. For urban settings, the integrated driving forces for increased food consumption were population growth, which accounted for ∼60%, and changing urban diets toward a greater emphasis on the consumption of animal products. Nutrient inputs and losses in crop and animal productions have continuously increased from 1980 to 2010, but the rates of decadal increase were greatly different. Increased total inputs and losses in crop production were primarily driven by increased crop production for food demand (68-96%) in the 1980s but were likely offset in the 2000s by improved nutrient management practices, as evidenced by decreased total inputs to and losses from cropland for harvesting per nutrient in crop. The contributions of animal production to total N and P losses to waters from the food chain increased by 34 and 60% from 1980 to 2010. These increases were caused mainly by decreased ratios of manure returned to cropland. Our study highlights a larger impact of changing nutrient management practice than population growth on elevated nutrient flows in China's food chain. PMID:24216348

  2. [Land use change dynamics and driving forces of the vulnerable ecological region in northwestern Shanxi Province, China].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiu-Fen; Liu, Li-Min; Qi, Xin; Zhang, Jin-Xin; Zhao, Tong-Bin; Wang, Yi; Liu, Xue-Fen; Zhou, Yong-Bin

    2014-10-01

    By using remote sensing and GIS technology, this paper collected land use information of 1980, 1990, 2000 and 2010 and the relevant statistical data, and analyzed the characteristics of land use change and its driving forces in northwestern Shanxi Province, the typical ecological fragile area. The results showed that there were significant changes in land use patterns in the past 30 years. During 1980-1990, 1990-2000 and 2000-2010 periods, the area of farmland decreased continuously, while the areas of grassland and woodland experienced increase-decrease-increase and decrease-increase-decrease patterns of change, respectively. The areas of industrial and resident lands increased continuously, but the water body and unused land decreased. The farmland was mainly transformed to grassland and woodland, and the areas of industrial and resident lands increased from the farmland. The lost area of water body was transformed to grassland and farmland. The decrease of unused land was due to the implementation of ecological engineering and urban ex-panding. In general, the changes of land use types were significantly higher before 2000 than after 2000. The industrial and resident lands, unused land and grassland changed drastically. The relationships between land use types and driving forces indicated that population pressure and economic development led to the changes of industrial land and farmland; policy of forestry ecological engi- neering drove the changes of woodland and grassland; the drought-characterized climate was the major cause inducing the decrease of water area and hindering the restoration of forest. PMID:25796906

  3. Mining spatial information to investigate the evolution of karst rocky desertification and its human driving forces in Changshun, China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Erqi; Zhang, Hongqi; Li, Mengxian

    2013-08-01

    The processes of karst rocky desertification (KRD) have been found to cause the most severe environmental degradation in southwestern China. Understanding the driving forces that cause KRD is essential for managing and restoring the areas that it impacts. Studies of the human driving forces of KRD are limited to the county level, a specific administrative unit in China; census data are acquired at this scale, which can lead to scale biases. Changshun County is studied here as a representative area and anthropogenic influences in the county are accounted for by using Euclidean distances for the proximity to roads and settlements. We propose a standard coefficient of human influence (SOI) that standardizes the Euclidean distances for different KRD transformations to compare the effects of human activities in different areas. In Changshun County, the individual influences of roads and settlements share similar characteristics. The SOIs of improved KRD transformation types are almost negative, but the SOIs of deteriorated types are nearly positive except for one form of KRD turning to the extremely severe KRD. The results indicated that the distribution and evolution of the KRD areas from 2000 to 2010 in Changshun were affected positively by human activities (e.g., KRD restoration projects) and also negatively (e.g., by intense and irrational land use). Our results demonstrate that the spatial techniques and SOI used in this study can effectively incorporate information concerning human influences and internal KRD transformations. This provides a suitable approach for studying the relationships between human activities and KRD processes at fine scales. PMID:23685367

  4. The driving forces for nitrogen and phosphorus flows in the food chain of china, 1980 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Hou, Y; Ma, L; Gao, Z L; Wang, F H; Sims, J T; Ma, W Q; Zhang, F S

    2013-07-01

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) use and losses in China's food chain have accelerated in the past three decades, driven by population growth, rapid urbanization, dietary transition, and changing nutrient management practice. There has been little detailed quantitative analysis of the relative magnitude of these driving forces throughout this period. Therefore, we analyzed changes in N and P flows and key drivers behind changes in the food (production and consumption) chain at the national scale from 1980 to 2010. Food (N and P) consumption increased by about fivefold in urban settings over this period but has decreased in rural settings since the 1990s. For urban settings, the integrated driving forces for increased food consumption were population growth, which accounted for ∼60%, and changing urban diets toward a greater emphasis on the consumption of animal products. Nutrient inputs and losses in crop and animal productions have continuously increased from 1980 to 2010, but the rates of decadal increase were greatly different. Increased total inputs and losses in crop production were primarily driven by increased crop production for food demand (68-96%) in the 1980s but were likely offset in the 2000s by improved nutrient management practices, as evidenced by decreased total inputs to and losses from cropland for harvesting per nutrient in crop. The contributions of animal production to total N and P losses to waters from the food chain increased by 34 and 60% from 1980 to 2010. These increases were caused mainly by decreased ratios of manure returned to cropland. Our study highlights a larger impact of changing nutrient management practice than population growth on elevated nutrient flows in China's food chain.

  5. Technique of optimization of minimum temperature driving forces in the heaters of regeneration system of a steam turbine unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamarokov, A. S.; Zorin, V. M.; Dai, Fam Kuang

    2016-03-01

    At the current stage of development of nuclear power engineering, high demands on nuclear power plants (NPP), including on their economy, are made. In these conditions, improving the quality of NPP means, in particular, the need to reasonably choose the values of numerous managed parameters of technological (heat) scheme. Furthermore, the chosen values should correspond to the economic conditions of NPP operation, which are postponed usually a considerable time interval from the point of time of parameters' choice. The article presents the technique of optimization of controlled parameters of the heat circuit of a steam turbine plant for the future. Its particularity is to obtain the results depending on a complex parameter combining the external economic and operating parameters that are relatively stable under the changing economic environment. The article presents the results of optimization according to this technique of the minimum temperature driving forces in the surface heaters of the heat regeneration system of the steam turbine plant of a K-1200-6.8/50 type. For optimization, the collector-screen heaters of high and low pressure developed at the OAO All-Russia Research and Design Institute of Nuclear Power Machine Building, which, in the authors' opinion, have the certain advantages over other types of heaters, were chosen. The optimality criterion in the task was the change in annual reduced costs for NPP compared to the version accepted as the baseline one. The influence on the decision of the task of independent variables that are not included in the complex parameter was analyzed. An optimization task was decided using the alternating-variable descent method. The obtained values of minimum temperature driving forces can guide the design of new nuclear plants with a heat circuit, similar to that accepted in the considered task.

  6. Wading for food the driving force of the evolution of bipedalism?

    PubMed

    Kuliukas, Algis

    2002-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that suggests that the large human brain is most likely to have evolved in littoral and estuarine habitats rich in naturally occurring essential fatty acids. This paper adds further weight to this view, suggesting that another key human trait, our bipedality might also be best explained as an adaptation to a water-side niche. Evidence is provided here that extant apes, although preferring to keep dry, go into water when driven to do so by hunger. The anecdotal evidence has suggested that they tend to do this bipedally. Here, a new empirical study of captive bonobos found them to exhibit 2% or less bipedality on the ground or in trees but over 90% when wading in water to collect food. The skeletal morphology of AL 288-1 ("Lucy") is shown to indicate a strong ability to abduct and adduct the femur. These traits, together with a remarkably platypelloid pelvis, have not yet been adequately explained by terrestrial or arboreal models for early bipedalism but are consistent with those expected in an ape that adopted a specialist side-to-side 'ice-skating' or sideways wading mode. It is argued that this explanation of A. afarensis locomotor morphology is more parsimonious than others which have plainly failed to produce a consensus. Microwear evidence of Australopithecus dentition is also presented as evidence that the drive for such a wading form of locomotion might well have been waterside foods. This model obtains further support from the paleo-habitats of the earliest known bipeds, which are consistent with the hypothesis that wading contributed to the adaptive pressure towards bipedality.

  7. Environmental disruption of host–microbe co-adaptation as a potential driving force in evolution

    PubMed Central

    Soen, Yoav

    2014-01-01

    The microbiome is known to have a profound effect on the development, physiology and health of its host. Whether and how it also contributes to evolutionary diversification of the host is, however, unclear. Here we hypothesize that disruption of the microbiome by new stressful environments interferes with host–microbe co-adaptation, contributes to host destabilization, and can drive irreversible changes in the host prior to its genetic adaptation. This hypothesis is based on three presumptions: (1) the microbiome consists of heritable partners which contribute to the stability (canalization) of host development and physiology in frequently encountered environments, (2) upon encountering a stressful new environment, the microbiome adapts much faster than the host, and (3) this differential response disrupts cooperation, contributes to host destabilization and promotes reciprocal changes in the host and its microbiome. This dynamic imbalance relaxes as the host and its microbiome establish a new equilibrium state in which they are adapted to one another and to the altered environment. Over long time in this new environment, the changes in the microbiome contribute to the canalization of the altered state. This scenario supports stability of the adapted patterns, while promoting variability which may be beneficial in new stressful conditions, thus allowing the organism to balance stability and flexibility based on contextual demand. Additionally, interaction between heritable microbial and epigenetic/physiological changes can promote new outcomes which persist over a wide range of timescales. A sufficiently persistent stress can further induce irreversible changes in the microbiome which may permanently alter the organism prior to genetic changes in the host. Epigenetic and microbial changes therefore provide a potential infrastructure for causal links between immediate responses to new environments and longer-term establishment of evolutionary adaptations. PMID

  8. Spatial pattern of land use change and its driving force in Jiangsu Province.

    PubMed

    Du, Xindong; Jin, Xiaobin; Yang, Xilian; Yang, Xuhong; Zhou, Yinkang

    2014-03-18

    Scientific interpretation of the mechanism of land use change is important for government planning and management activities. This study analyzes the land use change in Jiangsu Province using three land use maps of 2000, 2005 and 2008. The study results show that there was a significant change in land use. The change was mainly characterized by a continuous built-up land expansion primarily at the expense of cropland loss, and the trend became increasingly rapid. There was an obvious regional difference, as most of the cropland loss or built-up land expansion took place in southern Jiangsu, where the rate of built-up land expansion was faster than in central and northern Jiangsu. Meanwhile, the spatial pattern changed remarkably; in general, the number of patches (NumP) showed a declining trend, and the mean patch size (MPS) and patch size standard deviation (PSSD) displayed increase trends. Furthermore, the relative importance of selected driven factors was identified by principal component analysis (PCA) and general linear model (GLM). The results showed that not only the relative importance of a specific driving factor may vary, but the driven factors may as well. The most important driven factor changed from urban population (UP), secondary gross domestic product (SGDP) and gross domestic product (GDP) during 2000-2005 to resident population (RP), population density (POD) and UP during 2005-2008, and the deviance explained (DE) decreased from 91.60% to 81.04%. Policies also had significant impacts on land use change, which can be divided into direct and indirect impacts. Development policies usually had indirect impacts, particularly economic development policies, which promote the economic development to cause land use change, while land management policies had direct impacts. We suggest that the government should think comprehensively and cautiously when proposing a new development strategy or plan.

  9. Experiments using atmospheric forcing from a FGGE analysis to drive an upper ocean model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camerlengo, A.

    1983-01-01

    Results are presented of a series of numerical experiments in which an upper ocean model is driven by surface heat fluxes and stress fields derived from the FGGE SOP-1 GLAS analysis/forecast system (Halem, et al., 1982). The model results show that most changes in the mixed layer height and horizontal velocity occurs in the first days. On the other hand, changes in the temperature field take a longer time to develop. In the most realistic case (real initial conditions, instantaneous forcing fields from the atmospheric analysis), the resulting changes in temperature were larger than observed and the correlation between observed and predicted changes was poor. The deficiency in the forecast of SST changes may be due to several factors: lack of sufficient ocean resolution, improper initialization, lack of feedback between the ocean and the atmosphere and the absence of transports by the strong boundary currents, and perhaps unrealistic surface fluxes of heat and momentum. Unless these problems are alleviated it is not reasonable to perform coupled atmospheric ocean forecasts.

  10. Apico-basal forces exerted by apoptotic cells drive epithelium folding.

    PubMed

    Monier, Bruno; Gettings, Melanie; Gay, Guillaume; Mangeat, Thomas; Schott, Sonia; Guarner, Ana; Suzanne, Magali

    2015-02-12

    Epithelium folding is a basic morphogenetic event that is essential in transforming simple two-dimensional epithelial sheets into three-dimensional structures in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Folding has been shown to rely on apical constriction. The resulting cell-shape changes depend either on adherens junction basal shift or on a redistribution of myosin II, which could be driven by mechanical signals. Yet the initial cellular mechanisms that trigger and coordinate cell remodelling remain largely unknown. Here we unravel the active role of apoptotic cells in initiating morphogenesis, thus revealing a novel mechanism of epithelium folding. We show that, in a live developing tissue, apoptotic cells exert a transient pulling force upon the apical surface of the epithelium through a highly dynamic apico-basal myosin II cable. The apoptotic cells then induce a non-autonomous increase in tissue tension together with cortical myosin II apical stabilization in the surrounding tissue, eventually resulting in epithelium folding. Together our results, supported by a theoretical biophysical three-dimensional model, identify an apoptotic myosin-II-dependent signal as the initial signal leading to cell reorganization and tissue folding. This work further reveals that, far from being passively eliminated as generally assumed (for example, during digit individualization), apoptotic cells actively influence their surroundings and trigger tissue remodelling through regulation of tissue tension.

  11. Biomechanical force in blood development: extrinsic physical cues drive pro-hematopoietic signaling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Jung; Li, Nan; Evans, Siobahn M; Diaz, Miguel F; Wenzel, Pamela L

    2013-10-01

    The hematopoietic system is dynamic during development and in adulthood, undergoing countless spatial and temporal transitions during the course of one's life. Microenvironmental cues in the many unique hematopoietic niches differ, characterized by distinct soluble molecules, membrane-bound factors, and biophysical features that meet the changing needs of the blood system. Research from the last decade has revealed the importance of substrate elasticity and biomechanical force in determination of stem cell fate. Our understanding of the role of these factors in hematopoiesis is still relatively poor; however, the developmental origin of blood cells from the endothelium provides a model for comparison. Many endothelial mechanical sensors and second messenger systems may also determine hematopoietic stem cell fate, self renewal, and homing behaviors. Further, the intimate contact of hematopoietic cells with mechanosensitive cell types, including osteoblasts, endothelial cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and pericytes, places them in close proximity to paracrine signaling downstream of mechanical signals. The objective of this review is to present an overview of the sensors and intracellular signaling pathways activated by mechanical cues and highlight the role of mechanotransductive pathways in hematopoiesis.

  12. Selective pressure against horizontally acquired prokaryotic genes as a driving force of plastid evolution

    PubMed Central

    Llorente, Briardo; de Souza, Flavio S. J.; Soto, Gabriela; Meyer, Cristian; Alonso, Guillermo D.; Flawiá, Mirtha M.; Bravo-Almonacid, Fernando; Ayub, Nicolás D.; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The plastid organelle comprises a high proportion of nucleus-encoded proteins that were acquired from different prokaryotic donors via independent horizontal gene transfers following its primary endosymbiotic origin. What forces drove the targeting of these alien proteins to the plastid remains an unresolved evolutionary question. To better understand this process we screened for suitable candidate proteins to recapitulate their prokaryote-to-eukaryote transition. Here we identify the ancient horizontal transfer of a bacterial polyphenol oxidase (PPO) gene to the nuclear genome of an early land plant ancestor and infer the possible mechanism behind the plastidial localization of the encoded enzyme. Arabidopsis plants expressing PPO versions either lacking or harbouring a plastid-targeting signal allowed examining fitness consequences associated with its subcellular localization. Markedly, a deleterious effect on plant growth was highly correlated with PPO activity only when producing the non-targeted enzyme, suggesting that selection favoured the fixation of plastid-targeted protein versions. Our results reveal a possible evolutionary mechanism of how selection against heterologous genes encoding cytosolic proteins contributed in incrementing plastid proteome complexity from non-endosymbiotic gene sources, a process that may also impact mitochondrial evolution. PMID:26750147

  13. Structural Fe(II) Oxidation in Biotite by an Ectomycorrhizal Fungi Drives Mechanical Forcing.

    PubMed

    Bonneville, Steeve; Bray, Andrew W; Benning, Liane G

    2016-06-01

    Microorganisms are essential agents of Earth's soil weathering engine who help transform primary rock-forming minerals into soils. Mycorrhizal fungi, with their vast filamentous networks in symbiosis with the roots of most plants can alter a large number of minerals via local acidification, targeted excretion of ligands, submicron-scale biomechanical forcing, and mobilization of Mg, Fe, Al, and K at the hypha-biotite interface. Here, we present experimental evidence that Paxillus involutus-a basidiomycete fungus-in ectomycorrhizal symbiosis with Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), is able to oxidize a substantial amount of structural Fe(II) in biotite. Iron redox chemistry, quantified by X-ray absorption near edge spectra on 13 fungi-biotite sections along three distinct hypha colonizing the [001] basal plane of biotite, revealed variable but extensive Fe(II) oxidation up to ∼2 μm in depth and a Fe(III)/Fetotal ratio of up to ∼0.8. The growth of Fe(III) hydroxide implies a volumetric change and a strain within the biotite lattice potentially large enough to induce microcrack formation, which are abundant below the hypha-biotite interface. This Fe(II) oxidation also leads to the formation of a large pool of Fe(III) (i.e., structural Fe(III) and Fe(III) oxyhydroxides) within biotite that could participate in the Fe redox cycling in soils. PMID:27128742

  14. Selective pressure against horizontally acquired prokaryotic genes as a driving force of plastid evolution.

    PubMed

    Llorente, Briardo; de Souza, Flavio S J; Soto, Gabriela; Meyer, Cristian; Alonso, Guillermo D; Flawiá, Mirtha M; Bravo-Almonacid, Fernando; Ayub, Nicolás D; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2016-01-11

    The plastid organelle comprises a high proportion of nucleus-encoded proteins that were acquired from different prokaryotic donors via independent horizontal gene transfers following its primary endosymbiotic origin. What forces drove the targeting of these alien proteins to the plastid remains an unresolved evolutionary question. To better understand this process we screened for suitable candidate proteins to recapitulate their prokaryote-to-eukaryote transition. Here we identify the ancient horizontal transfer of a bacterial polyphenol oxidase (PPO) gene to the nuclear genome of an early land plant ancestor and infer the possible mechanism behind the plastidial localization of the encoded enzyme. Arabidopsis plants expressing PPO versions either lacking or harbouring a plastid-targeting signal allowed examining fitness consequences associated with its subcellular localization. Markedly, a deleterious effect on plant growth was highly correlated with PPO activity only when producing the non-targeted enzyme, suggesting that selection favoured the fixation of plastid-targeted protein versions. Our results reveal a possible evolutionary mechanism of how selection against heterologous genes encoding cytosolic proteins contributed in incrementing plastid proteome complexity from non-endosymbiotic gene sources, a process that may also impact mitochondrial evolution.

  15. Biomechanical force in blood development: extrinsic physical cues drive pro-hematopoietic signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Jung; Li, Nan; Evans, Siobahn M.; Diaz, Miguel F.; Wenzel, Pamela L.

    2013-01-01

    The hematopoietic system is dynamic during development and in adulthood, undergoing countless spatial and temporal transitions during the course of one’s life. Microenvironmental cues in the many unique hematopoietic niches differ, characterized by distinct soluble molecules, membrane-bound factors, and biophysical features that meet the changing needs of the blood system. Research from the last decade has revealed the importance of substrate elasticity and biomechanical force in determination of stem cell fate. Our understanding of the role of these factors in hematopoiesis is still relatively poor; however, the developmental origin of blood cells from the endothelium promts a model for comparison. Many endothelial mechanical sensors and second messenger systems may also determine hematopoietic stem cell fate, self renewal, and homing behaviors. Further, the intimate contact of hematopoietic cells with mechanosensitive cell types, including osteoblasts, endothelial cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and pericytes, places them in close proximity to paracrine signaling downstream of mechanical signals. The objective of this review is to present an overview of the sensors and intracellular signaling pathways activated by mechanical cues and highlight the role of mechanotransductive pathways in hematopoiesis. PMID:23850217

  16. Reconfigurable optical-force-drive chirp and delay line in micro- or nanofiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wei; Xu, Fei; Lu, Yan-qing

    2015-05-01

    The emergence of optical micro- or nanofibers (MNFs) with subwavelength diameter, which have ultralight mass and an intense light field, provides an opportunity for developing fiber-based optomechanical systems. In this study we show theoretically an optomechanical effect in silica MNF Bragg gratings (MNFBGs). The light-induced mechanical effect results in continuously distributed strain along the grating and the power-related strain introduces an optically reconfigurable chirp in the grating period. We develop optomechanical coupled-mode equations and analyze theoretically the influence of the optical-force-induced nonlinearity and chirp on the grating performance. Compared with the weak Kerr effect, the optomechanical effect dominates in the properties' evolution of MNFBGs. Significant group-velocity reduction and switching effect have been demonstrated theoretically at medium power level. This kind of optomechanical MNFBG with optically reconfigurable chirp may offer a path toward an all-optical tunable bandwidth of Bragg resonance and may lead to useful applications such as all-optical switching, optically controlled dispersion, and slow or fast light.

  17. Spatial analysis and quantification of the thermodynamic driving forces in protein-ligand binding: binding site variability.

    PubMed

    Raman, E Prabhu; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2015-02-25

    The thermodynamic driving forces behind small molecule-protein binding are still not well-understood, including the variability of those forces associated with different types of ligands in different binding pockets. To better understand these phenomena we calculate spatially resolved thermodynamic contributions of the different molecular degrees of freedom for the binding of propane and methanol to multiple pockets on the proteins Factor Xa and p38 MAP kinase. Binding thermodynamics are computed using a statistical thermodynamics based end-point method applied on a canonical ensemble comprising the protein-ligand complexes and the corresponding free states in an explicit solvent environment. Energetic and entropic contributions of water and ligand degrees of freedom computed from the configurational ensemble provide an unprecedented level of detail into the mechanisms of binding. Direct protein-ligand interaction energies play a significant role in both nonpolar and polar binding, which is comparable to water reorganization energy. Loss of interactions with water upon binding strongly compensates these contributions leading to relatively small binding enthalpies. For both solutes, the entropy of water reorganization is found to favor binding in agreement with the classical view of the "hydrophobic effect". Depending on the specifics of the binding pocket, both energy-entropy compensation and reinforcement mechanisms are observed. It is notable to have the ability to visualize the spatial distribution of the thermodynamic contributions to binding at atomic resolution showing significant differences in the thermodynamic contributions of water to the binding of propane versus methanol. PMID:25625202

  18. Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Reed

    1989-01-01

    Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

  19. Multi Satellites Monitoring of Land Use/Cover Change and Its Driving Forces in Kashgar Region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maimaitiaili, Ayisulitan; Aji, xiaokaiti; Kondoh, Akihiko

    2016-04-01

    Multi Satellites Monitoring of Land Use/Cover Change and Its Driving Forces in Kashgar Region, China Ayisulitan Maimaitiaili1, Xiaokaiti Aji2 Akihiko Kondoh2 1Graduate School of Science, Chiba University, Japan 2Center for Environmental Remote Sensing, Chiba University The spatio-temporal changes of Land Use/Cover (LUCC) and its driving forces in Kashgar region, Xinjiang Province, China, are investigated by using satellite remote sensing and a geographical information system (GIS). Main goal of this paper is to quantify the drivers of LUCC. First, considering lack of the Land Cover (LC) map in whole study area, we produced LC map by using Landsat images. Land use information from Landsat data was collected using maximum likelihood classification method. Land use change was studied based on the change detection method of land use types. Second, because the snow provides a key water resources for stream flow, agricultural production and drinking water for sustaining large population in Kashgar region, snow cover are estimated by Spot Vegetation data. Normalized Difference Snow Index (NDSI) algorithm are applied to make snow cover map, which is used to screen the LUCC and climate change. The best agreement is found with threshold value of NDSI≥0.2 to generate multi-temporal snow cover and snowmelt maps. Third, driving forces are systematically identified by LC maps and statistical data such as climate and socio-economic data, regarding to i) the climate changes and ii) socioeconomic development that the spatial correlation among LUCC, snow cover change, climate and socioeconomic changes are quantified by using liner regression model and negative / positive trend analysis. Our results showed that water bodies, bare land and grass land have decreasing notably. By contrast, crop land and urban area have continually increasing significantly, which are dominated in study area. The area of snow/ice have fluctuated and has strong seasonal trends, total annual snow cover

  20. Land use/cover changes in European mountain areas: identifying links between global driving forces and local consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, Žiga; Schröter, Dagmar; Glade, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Minor land use/cover changes in mountain areas can aggravate the consequences of hydro-meteorological hazards such as landslides, avalanches, rockfall and flash floods. What is more, they change the provisioning of ecosystem services; also as their recovery after anthropogenic induced changes in mountains are slower or not occurring at all due to harsh climate and soil conditions. Examples of these changes are urbanization in high risk areas or deforestation on slopes. To understand the driving forces behind land use/cover changes in European mountain areas, the focus is on the two case study areas: The Val Canale valley in the Italian Alps and the Buzau valley in the Romanian Carpathians. Land use/cover changes were analyzed in the recent decades applying various remote sensing techniques, such as satellite imagery classification and visual interpretation, as well as integration of various databases (e.g. forestry, spatial planning and cadaster plans). Instead of identifying the statistical significance of particular variables (e.g. population change), the links between different driving forces of global change (e.g. political and policy changes, infrastructural plans) and local socio-economic variables were investigated further through interviewing local and regional stakeholders. The results show how both areas differ in the consequences of global changes in terms of land use/cover change. The Italian area witnessed a trajectory from a commercially active and competitive area, to an area with a large portion of abandoned commercial, customs, industrial and mining zones. These processes were accompanied by the expansion of settlements comprised mostly of secondary housing on areas with high risk, resulting in catastrophic consequences in recent flash floods and debris flows events. The Romanian site also witnessed a breakdown of local commercial and industrial activities. Together with land ownership reforms, this has resulted in the emergence of subsistence

  1. Toward a Theory of Island Pedogeography: Testing the driving forces for pedological assemblages in archipelagos of different origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibáñez, Juan-José; Effland, William R.

    2011-12-01

    The Theory of Island Biogeography has been based on biodiversity studies and used as a powerful predictive tool. Currently pedogeography does not have a similar theoretical construct. Although island biodiversity and biological assemblages have been topics of widespread interest in biogeography, ecology and conservation biology, soil scientists have conducted few studies of pedodiversity and pedological assemblages in archipelagos. Several studies have demonstrated that pedodiversity and biodiversity patterns have striking similarities in very disparate environments and at different scales, thus it is possible to test for a similar construct of island pedogeography. We analyze similarities and differences in the pedosphere for three archipelagos with different origins: (i) oceanic-intra-plate chains islands (Hawaiian Islands), (ii) oceanic-intra-plate cluster islands (Canary Islands), (iii) non-marine land-bridge islands with volcanism associated with plate boundary conditions (Aegean Islands) and (iv) as a comparison, islands in a nonplate boundary setting (the British Isles). In the Canary Islands, we also compiled selected biological, physiographical, geological and climatic data for further analysis of pedodiversity, climatic diversity, geodiversity and biodiversity. Our pedogeographic analysis of the three archipelagos indicates archipelagos of varying origins contain different soil assemblages with plate tectonics as the main driving force. The similarities between pedodiversity and biodiversity are more remarkable than the differences. We tested the hypothesis that soil taxa distributions on island chains can be modelled as a power function similar to the species-area relationship (SAR) proposed by McArthur and Wilson for archipelagos. The SAR functional relationship has been widely corroborated in other biodiversity studies. The same patterns were obtained for pedodiversity and biodiversity in the British Isles, and after that in the Aegean Archipelago. In

  2. Solvent driving force ensures fast formation of a persistent and well-separated radical pair in plant cryptochrome.

    PubMed

    Lüdemann, Gesa; Solov'yov, Ilia A; Kubař, Tomáš; Elstner, Marcus

    2015-01-28

    The photoreceptor protein cryptochrome is thought to host, upon light absorption, a radical pair that is sensitive to very weak magnetic fields, endowing migratory birds with a magnetic compass sense. The molecular mechanism that leads to formation of a stabilized, magnetic field sensitive radical pair has despite various theoretical and experimental efforts not been unambiguously identified yet. We challenge this unambiguity through a unique quantum mechanical molecular dynamics approach where we perform electron transfer dynamics simulations taking into account the motion of the protein upon the electron transfer. This approach allows us to follow the time evolution of the electron transfer in an unbiased fashion and to reveal the molecular driving force that ensures fast electron transfer in cryptochrome guaranteeing formation of a persistent radical pair suitable for magnetoreception. We argue that this unraveled molecular mechanism is a general principle inherent to all proteins of the cryptochrome/photolyase family and that cryptochromes are, therefore, tailored to potentially function as efficient chemical magnetoreceptors. PMID:25535848

  3. [Landscape pattern change of Dongzhai Harbour mangrove, South China analyzed with a patch-based method and its driving forces].

    PubMed

    Huang, Xing; Xin, Kun; Li, Xiu-zhen; Wang, Xue-ping; Ren, Lin-jing; Li, Xi-zhi; Yan, Zhong-zheng

    2015-05-01

    According to the interpreted results of three satellite images of Dongzhai Harbour obtained in 1988, 1998 and 2009, the changes of landscape pattern and the differences of its driving forces of mangrove forest in Dongzhai Harbour were analyzed with a patch-based method on spatial distribution dynamics. The results showed that the areas of mangrove forest in 1988, 1998 and 2009 were 1809.4, 1738.7 and 1608.2 hm2 respectively, which presented a trend of decrease with enhanced degree of landscape fragmentation. The transformations among different landscape types indicated that the mangrove, agricultural land and forest land were mainly changed into built-up land and aquaculture pond. The statistical results obtained from three different methods, i.e., accumulative counting, percentage counting and main transformation route counting, showed that natural factors were the main reason for the changes of patch number, responsible for 58.6%, 72.2% and 72.1% of patch number change, respectively, while the percentages of patch area change induced by human activities were 70.4%, 70.3% and 76.4%, respectively, indicating that human activities were the primary factors of the change of patch areas. PMID:26571672

  4. [Landscape pattern change of Dongzhai Harbour mangrove, South China analyzed with a patch-based method and its driving forces].

    PubMed

    Huang, Xing; Xin, Kun; Li, Xiu-zhen; Wang, Xue-ping; Ren, Lin-jing; Li, Xi-zhi; Yan, Zhong-zheng

    2015-05-01

    According to the interpreted results of three satellite images of Dongzhai Harbour obtained in 1988, 1998 and 2009, the changes of landscape pattern and the differences of its driving forces of mangrove forest in Dongzhai Harbour were analyzed with a patch-based method on spatial distribution dynamics. The results showed that the areas of mangrove forest in 1988, 1998 and 2009 were 1809.4, 1738.7 and 1608.2 hm2 respectively, which presented a trend of decrease with enhanced degree of landscape fragmentation. The transformations among different landscape types indicated that the mangrove, agricultural land and forest land were mainly changed into built-up land and aquaculture pond. The statistical results obtained from three different methods, i.e., accumulative counting, percentage counting and main transformation route counting, showed that natural factors were the main reason for the changes of patch number, responsible for 58.6%, 72.2% and 72.1% of patch number change, respectively, while the percentages of patch area change induced by human activities were 70.4%, 70.3% and 76.4%, respectively, indicating that human activities were the primary factors of the change of patch areas.

  5. Mantle viscosity - A comparison of models from postglacial rebound and from the geoid, plate driving forces, and advected heat flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, Bradford H.

    1991-01-01

    Models of the radial variation of effective viscosity inferred from the earth's response to surface loads associated with Pleistocene deglaciation are compared to structures inferred from models of geodynamic phenomena associated with convection: the geoid, plate-driving forces, and advected heat flux. While observations of the earth's response to surface loads do not have sufficient resolution to justify more than two viscous layers, adequately matching the observed long-wavelength geoid anomalies associated with density contrasts in the lower mantle (inferred from seismic tomography) and in the upper mantle (inferred from a model of subducted slabs) requires more structure. It is possible to explain the geoid, observed plate velocities, the advected heat flux in the lower mantle, and relative sea-level variations in oceanic regions, all with a mantle with a high-viscosity/elastic lid, an asthenospheric channel of 2 x 10 exp 19 Pa s from 100 to 400-km depth, a 6 x 10 exp 20 Pa s transition zone, and a lower mantle of 6 x 10 exp 21 Pa s. The uplift history of Australia, Fennoscandia, and Laurentia can be explained with an asthenospheric viscosity less than a factor of 10 higher. Lateral variations in lower mantle viscosity are not required. Transient creep appears to be unimportant for the recent response-to-surface loads from Pleistocene deglaciation.

  6. Born-Haber cycle for monolayer self-assembly at the liquid-solid interface: assessing the enthalpic driving force.

    PubMed

    Song, Wentao; Martsinovich, Natalia; Heckl, Wolfgang M; Lackinger, Markus

    2013-10-01

    The driving force for self-assembly is the associated gain in free energy with decisive contributions from both enthalpy and entropy differences between final and initial state. For monolayer self-assembly at the liquid-solid interface, solute molecules are initially dissolved in the liquid phase and then become incorporated into an adsorbed monolayer. In this work, we present an adapted Born-Haber cycle for obtaining precise enthalpy values for self-assembly at the liquid-solid interface, a key ingredient for a profound thermodynamic understanding of this process. By choosing terephthalic acid as a model system, it is demonstrated that all required enthalpy differences between well-defined reference states can be independently and consistently assessed by both experimental and theoretical methods, giving in the end a reliable value of the overall enthalpy gain for self-assembly of interfacial monolayers. A quantitative comparison of enthalpy gain and entropy cost reveals essential contributions from solvation and dewetting, which lower the entropic cost and render monolayer self-assembly a thermodynamically favored process.

  7. Driving forces in energy-related CO2 emissions in south and east coastal China: commonality and variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, C.; Liu, Y.; Jin, J.; Wei, T.

    2015-12-01

    East and south coastal China contributes to respectively about 30% and 8% of CO2 emissions in China and the world, and therefore play a critical role in achieving the national goal of emission reduction to mitigate the global warming. It also serves as a benchmark for the less developed regions of China, in terms of achieving the developed world's human development standard under lower per capita emissions. We analyze the driving forces of emissions in this region and their provincial characteristics by applying the Logarithmic Mean Divisia Index method. Our findings show that emissions have been doubled during the period from 2000 to 2012, along with three and two folds increase in economy and energy consumption, respectively. This suggests a persistent lock between economic growth and emissions, even in this socioeconomically advanced region in China. Provincial difference in annual emission growth reveals three distinguished low-carbon developmental stages, owning mainly to the effectiveness of energy efficiency in reducing emission growth. This may explain why previous climate policies have aimed to reduce carbon intensity. These results indicate that targeted measures on enhancing energy efficiency in the short term and de-carbonization of both the economic and energy structure in the long term can lower the emission growth more effectively and efficiently. They also suggest that factor-driven emission reduction strategies and policies are needed in the geographically and socioeconomically similar regions.

  8. Driving forces of individual BVOC emissions from a spruce tree in Central Germany; results from a dynamic enclosure study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourtsoukidis, S.; Dittmann, A.; Jacobi, S.; Bonn, B.

    2012-04-01

    We have conducted seasonal ambient and emission measurements of a series of biogenic VOCs such as monoterpenes (MT), sesquiterpenes (SQT), isoprene, methanol, methyl chavicol and acetaldehyde. Therefore a plant enclosure technique was applied in order to investigate a Central European spruce forest and its emissions responses to meteorological and environmental parameters. A healthy ≈15m tall Norway spruce tree was selected and a vegetation enclosure technique was applied from April to November 2011. VOCs are measured by PTR-MS, while samples have also been analyzed with GC-MS (Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry) techniques for intercomparison and identification of individual VOCs. E/N ratio was adjusted at 117Td[2] and the primary ion signal (H3O+) was continuously above 4×10^7cps, implying a high sensitivity to our measurements. Temperature, relative humidity, ozone, photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) and CO2 concentrations were continuously measured inside the plant cuvette. Meteorological and environmental parameters (radiation, atmospheric pressure, wind velocity, wind direction, temperature, O3, relative humidity, soil moisture, precipitation, global radiation, H2O, NO, NO2) were measured by HLUG (Hessian Agency for Environment and Geology) and DWD (German Weather Service), 50 meters away from the measuring site. In a peculiar season, which was characterized by a warm spring (temperature anomaly >40C), a wet summer (precipitation anomaly 126-150%) and an extremely dry autumn (precipitation anomaly <50%), VOC emissions were analyzed and studied in order to discern different driving forces for the individual compounds. The suggested[3] empirical beta factor for MT found to be in a reasonable range but the temperature dependency was almost double for daytime compared to nighttime measurements, suggesting that light is also influencing MT emissions. On the contrary, SQT emissions showed similar temperature dependency for both day and night measurements

  9. Estimating rat renal medullary interstitial oncotic pressures and the driving force for fluid uptake into ascending vasa recta

    PubMed Central

    MacPhee, P J

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the potential contribution of medullary interstitial oncotic pressure to the net balance of forces influencing fluid movement through the walls of the ascending vasa recta (AVR) in the exposed papillae of 2-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats.Using a capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) assay, hyaluronan (HA) concentrations were measured in fresh tissue slices from the renal papilla. HA content per wet weight of tissue decreased from tip to base of the papilla, but as a function of cell-free interstitial space (IS) HA concentration was relatively constant at 1.6 μg HA per mg IS up to 1600–1800 μm from the tip. Thereafter the concentration fell rapidly to near zero levels.The volume of the IS was determined using a transmission electron micrographic study of the papilla in age-matched rats. Total interstitial volume (i.e. IS + IC, the interstitial cell volume), as a function of total tissue volume, decreased only slightly between 0 and 1800 μm (i.e. from about 40 to 35%). IS and IC were found to be reciprocally related with IS decreasing from 21.8 to 10.2%, while IC increased from 18.3 to 25.2% over the 1800 μm.Total interstitial oncotic pressures were estimated as the sum of the oncotic pressure due to HA alone plus the oncotic pressure of albumin (A) in an HA matrix. Taking into account reflection coefficients to HA and A, there was an effective oncotic pressure (Eπ) of between 3.46 and 6.0 cmH2O on the interstitial side of the AVR. Under free flow conditions an Eπ in this range is sufficient to result in a net inward driving force of between 5.4 and 9.3 cmH2O, sufficient to account for current estimates of water reabsorption by the AVR.HA concentrations in the papilla increased over the first 3 weeks of life from 0.313 ±0.09 μg (mg wet weight of slice)−1 (mean ± s.e.m.) at 1 week to 0.563 ±0.06 at 3 weeks of age (P > 0.01), in parallel with an age-dependent increase in mean urine osmolarity. It is suggested that the increasing

  10. Comparison of the driving forces of spring phenology among savanna landscapes by including combined spatial and temporal heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Likai; Southworth, Jane; Meng, Jijun

    2015-10-01

    Understanding spatial and temporal dynamics of land surface phenology (LSP) and its driving forces are critical for providing information relevant to short- and long-term decision making, particularly as it relates to climate response planning. With the third generation Global Inventory Monitoring and Modeling System (GIMMS3g) Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data and environmental data from multiple sources, we investigated the spatio-temporal changes in the start of the growing season (SOS) in southern African savannas from 1982 through 2010 and determined its linkage to environmental factors using spatial panel data models. Overall, the SOS occurs earlier in the north compared to the south. This relates in part to the differences in ecosystems, with northern areas representing high rainfall and dense tree cover (mainly tree savannas), whereas the south has lower rainfall and sparse tree cover (mainly bush and grass savannas). From 1982 to 2010, an advanced trend was observed predominantly in the tree savanna areas of the north, whereas a delayed trend was chiefly found in the floodplain of the north and bush/grass savannas of the south. Different environmental drivers were detected within tree- and grass-dominated savannas, with a critical division being represented by the 800 mm isohyet. Our results supported the importance of water as a driver in this water-limited system, specifically preseason soil moisture, in determining the SOS in these water-limited, grass-dominated savannas. In addition, the research pointed to other, often overlooked, effects of preseason maximum and minimum temperatures on the SOS across the entire region. Higher preseason maximum temperatures led to an advance of the SOS, whereas the opposite effects of preseason minimum temperature were observed. With the rapid increase in global change research, this work will prove helpful for managing savanna landscapes and key to predicting how projected climate changes will affect

  11. Free energy partitioning analysis of the driving forces that determine ion density profiles near the water liquid-vapor interface.

    PubMed

    Arslanargin, Ayse; Beck, Thomas L

    2012-03-14

    Free energy partitioning analysis is employed to explore the driving forces for ions interacting with the water liquid-vapor interface using recently optimized point charge models for the ions and SPC/E water. The Na(+) and I(-) ions are examined as an example kosmotrope/chaotrope pair. The absolute hydration free energy is partitioned into cavity formation, attractive van der Waals, local electrostatic, and far-field electrostatic contributions. We first compute the bulk hydration free energy of the ions, followed by the free energy to insert the ions at the center of a water slab. Shifts of the ion free energies occur in the slab geometry consistent with the SPC/E surface potential of the water liquid-vapor interface. Then the free energy profiles are examined for ion passage from the slab center to the dividing surface. The profiles show that, for the large chaotropic I(-) ion, the relatively flat total free energy profile results from the near cancellation of several large contributions. The far-field electrostatic part of the free energy, largely due to the water liquid-vapor interface potential, has an important effect on ion distributions near the surface in the classical model. We conclude, however, that the individual forms of the local and far-field electrostatic contributions are expected to be model dependent when comparing classical and quantum results. The substantial attractive cavity free energy contribution for the larger I(-) ion suggests that there is a hydrophobic component important for chaotropic ion interactions with the interface.

  12. Comparison of the driving forces of spring phenology among savanna landscapes by including combined spatial and temporal heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Likai; Southworth, Jane; Meng, Jijun

    2015-10-01

    Understanding spatial and temporal dynamics of land surface phenology (LSP) and its driving forces are critical for providing information relevant to short- and long-term decision making, particularly as it relates to climate response planning. With the third generation Global Inventory Monitoring and Modeling System (GIMMS3g) Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data and environmental data from multiple sources, we investigated the spatio-temporal changes in the start of the growing season (SOS) in southern African savannas from 1982 through 2010 and determined its linkage to environmental factors using spatial panel data models. Overall, the SOS occurs earlier in the north compared to the south. This relates in part to the differences in ecosystems, with northern areas representing high rainfall and dense tree cover (mainly tree savannas), whereas the south has lower rainfall and sparse tree cover (mainly bush and grass savannas). From 1982 to 2010, an advanced trend was observed predominantly in the tree savanna areas of the north, whereas a delayed trend was chiefly found in the floodplain of the north and bush/grass savannas of the south. Different environmental drivers were detected within tree- and grass-dominated savannas, with a critical division being represented by the 800 mm isohyet. Our results supported the importance of water as a driver in this water-limited system, specifically preseason soil moisture, in determining the SOS in these water-limited, grass-dominated savannas. In addition, the research pointed to other, often overlooked, effects of preseason maximum and minimum temperatures on the SOS across the entire region. Higher preseason maximum temperatures led to an advance of the SOS, whereas the opposite effects of preseason minimum temperature were observed. With the rapid increase in global change research, this work will prove helpful for managing savanna landscapes and key to predicting how projected climate changes will affect

  13. Volcanism of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province as a potential driving force in the end-Triassic mass extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pálfy, József

    Radiometric dating suggests that eruptions in the Central Atlantic magmatic province (CAMP) are synchronous with the ˜200 Ma end-Triassic mass extinction. Although stratigraphic evidence for major flows prior to the extinction horizon is still lacking, the vast extent of the province allows the assumption of cause-and-effect relationship between volcanism and extinction, mediated by drastic environmental change. A recently recognized negative carbon isotope anomaly at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary is interpreted to reflect combined effects of volcanically derived CO2 input, methane release through dissociation of gas hydrates in a global warming episode, and a possible marine productivity crisis. Maximum duration of the Rhaetian stage is estimated as only 2 m.y., and the isotope event appears short, lasting for less than 100 k.y. A variety of marine and terrestrial fossil groups (e.g., radiolarians, corals, bivalves, and plants) experienced correlated and sudden extinction at the end of Triassic, although some groups (e.g., ammonoids and conodonts) underwent a prolonged period of declining diversity. Post-extinction faunas and floras are cosmopolitan. Biotic recovery was delayed and the earliest Hettangian is a lag phase characterized by low diversity, possibly due to sustained environmental stress. The hypothesis of CAMP as the principal driving force in the end-Triassic extinction appears more consistent with paleontological and isotopic observations than alternative models. The temporally adjacent large igneous provinces, the Siberian Traps at the Permian-Triassic boundary and the Early Jurassic Karoo-Ferrar province, are also linked to extinction events, albeit of differing magnitude.

  14. Scaling behaviors and novel creep motion of ac-driven flux lines in type II superconductor with random point pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wei-Ping; Luo, Meng-Bo; Hu, Xiao

    2012-01-01

    We performed Langevin dynamics simulations for the ac-driven flux lines in a type II superconductor with random point-like pinning centers. Scaling properties of flux-line velocity with respect to an instantaneous driving force of small frequency and around the critical dc depinning force are revealed successfully, which provides precise estimates on dynamic critical exponents. From the scaling function, we derive a creep law associated with activation by regular shaking. The effective energy barrier vanishes at the critical dc depinning point in a square-root way when the instantaneous driving force increases. The frequency plays a similar role to temperature in conventional creep motions, but in a nontrivial way governed by the critical exponents. We have also performed systematic finite-size scaling analysis for flux-line velocity in transient processes with dc driving, which provide estimates on critical exponents in good agreement with those derived with ac driving. The scaling law is checked successfully.

  15. Probing into the Supramolecular Driving Force of an Amphiphilic β-Cyclodextrin Dimer in Various Solvents: Host-Guest Recognition or Hydrophilic-Hydrophobic Interaction?

    PubMed

    Bai, Yang; Fan, Xiao-dong; Yao, Hao; Yang, Zhen; Liu, Ting-ting; Zhang, Hai-tao; Zhang, Wan-bin; Tian, Wei

    2015-09-01

    Tuning of the morphology and size of supramolecular self-assemblies is of theoretical and practical significance. To date, supramolecular driving forces in different solvents remain unclear. In this study, we first synthesized an amphiphilic β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) dimer that consists of one hydrophobic ibuprofen (Ibu) and two hydrophilic β-CD moieties (i.e., Ibu-CD2). Ibu-CD2 possesses double supramolecular driving forces, namely, the host-guest recognition and hydrophilic-hydrophobic interaction. The host-guest interaction of Ibu-CD2 induced the formation of branched supramolecular polymers (SPs) in pure water, whereas the hydrophilic-hydrophobic interaction generated spherical or irregular micelles in water/organic mixtures. The SP size increased with the increase in Ibu-CD2 concentration in pure water. By contrast, the size of micelles decreased with the increase in volume ratio of water in mixtures. PMID:26301920

  16. DropBot: An open-source digital microfluidic control system with precise control of electrostatic driving force and instantaneous drop velocity measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Fobel, Ryan; Fobel, Christian; Wheeler, Aaron R.

    2013-05-13

    We introduce DropBot: an open-source instrument for digital microfluidics (http://microfluidics.utoronto.ca/dropbot). DropBot features two key functionalities for digital microfluidics: (1) real-time monitoring of instantaneous drop velocity (which we propose is a proxy for resistive forces), and (2) application of constant electrostatic driving forces through compensation for amplifier-loading and device capacitance. We anticipate that this system will enhance insight into failure modes and lead to new strategies for improved device reliability, and will be useful for the growing number of users who are adopting digital microfluidics for automated, miniaturized laboratory operation.

  17. A drive for all users

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, W.; Satya, T.

    1995-12-31

    The forces of industrial automation and efficiency, both in terms of process capability and energy, continue to fuel the rapid growth in the market for electrical variable speed drives. This demand coupled with the need for improved performance and the inevitable consequence of growth, results in a fiercely competitive market place. Within such an environment the claim of ``A drive for all users`` is not new, and those with some knowledge of the drives industry will consider any such claim with great skepticism. The literature on drives is littered with industrialists, and more than a few academics, claiming to have the ultimate drive, the optimum for each and every application. This situation is particularly true in the case of AC drive technology. The documented battles between proponents of current source verses PWM voltage source, not to mention the quest for the ultimate PWM strategy, have resulted in substantial deforestation of the planet. This paper makes no such unqualified claim rather it describes a very substantial and significant step towards such a eutopia.

  18. Characterization of the driving force as a modulator of gating in cardiac ATP-sensitive K+ channels - evidence for specific elementary properties.

    PubMed

    Benz, I; Haverkampf, K; Kohlhardt, M

    1998-09-01

    Single cardiac ATP-sensitive K+ channels and, comparatively, two other members of the inwardly rectifying K+ channel family, cardiac K+(ir) and K+(ACh) channels, were studied in the inside-out recording mode in order to analyze influence and significance of the electrochemical K+ gradient for open-state kinetics of these K+ channels. The conductive state of K+(ATP) channels was defined as a function of the electrochemical K+ gradient in that increased driving force correlates with shortened open-channel lifetime. Flux coupling of gating can be largely excluded as the underlying mechanism for two reasons: (i) tauopen proved identical in 23 pS, 56 pS and 80 pS channels; (ii) K+(ATP) channel protonation by an external pH shift from 9.5 to 5.5 reduced conductance without a concomitant detectable change of tauopen. Since gating continued to operate at EK, i.e., in the absence of K+ permeation through the pore, K+ driving force cannot be causally involved in gating. Rather the driving force acts to modulate the gating process similar to Rb+ whose interference with an externally located binding site stabilizes the open state. In K+(ir) and K+(ACh) channels, the open state is essentially independent on driving force meaning that their gating apparatus does not sense the electrochemical K+ gradient. Thus, K+(ATP) channels differ in an important functional aspect which may be tentatively explained by a structural peculiarity of their gating apparatus.

  19. Efficient dye regeneration at low driving force achieved in triphenylamine dye LEG4 and TEMPO redox mediator based dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenxing; Vlachopoulos, Nick; Hao, Yan; Hagfeldt, Anders; Boschloo, Gerrit

    2015-06-28

    Minimizing the driving force required for the regeneration of oxidized dyes using redox mediators in an electrolyte is essential to further improve the open-circuit voltage and efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Appropriate combinations of redox mediators and dye molecules should be explored to achieve this goal. Herein, we present a triphenylamine dye, LEG4, in combination with a TEMPO-based electrolyte in acetonitrile (E(0) = 0.89 V vs. NHE), reaching an efficiency of up to 5.4% under one sun illumination and 40% performance improvement compared to the previously and widely used indoline dye D149. The origin of this improvement was found to be the increased dye regeneration efficiency of LEG4 using the TEMPO redox mediator, which regenerated more than 80% of the oxidized dye with a driving force of only ∼0.2 eV. Detailed mechanistic studies further revealed that in addition to electron recombination to oxidized dyes, recombination of electrons from the conducting substrate and the mesoporous TiO2 film to the TEMPO(+) redox species in the electrolyte accounts for the reduced short circuit current, compared to the state-of-the-art cobalt tris(bipyridine) electrolyte system. The diffusion length of the TEMPO-electrolyte based DSSCs was determined to be ∼0.5 μm, which is smaller than the ∼2.8 μm found for cobalt-electrolyte based DSSCs. These results show the advantages of using LEG4 as a sensitizer, compared to previously record indoline dyes, in combination with a TEMPO-based electrolyte. The low driving force for efficient dye regeneration presented by these results shows the potential to further improve the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of DSSCs by utilizing redox couples and dyes with a minimal need of driving force for high regeneration yields.

  20. Efficient dye regeneration at low driving force achieved in triphenylamine dye LEG4 and TEMPO redox mediator based dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenxing; Vlachopoulos, Nick; Hao, Yan; Hagfeldt, Anders; Boschloo, Gerrit

    2015-06-28

    Minimizing the driving force required for the regeneration of oxidized dyes using redox mediators in an electrolyte is essential to further improve the open-circuit voltage and efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Appropriate combinations of redox mediators and dye molecules should be explored to achieve this goal. Herein, we present a triphenylamine dye, LEG4, in combination with a TEMPO-based electrolyte in acetonitrile (E(0) = 0.89 V vs. NHE), reaching an efficiency of up to 5.4% under one sun illumination and 40% performance improvement compared to the previously and widely used indoline dye D149. The origin of this improvement was found to be the increased dye regeneration efficiency of LEG4 using the TEMPO redox mediator, which regenerated more than 80% of the oxidized dye with a driving force of only ∼0.2 eV. Detailed mechanistic studies further revealed that in addition to electron recombination to oxidized dyes, recombination of electrons from the conducting substrate and the mesoporous TiO2 film to the TEMPO(+) redox species in the electrolyte accounts for the reduced short circuit current, compared to the state-of-the-art cobalt tris(bipyridine) electrolyte system. The diffusion length of the TEMPO-electrolyte based DSSCs was determined to be ∼0.5 μm, which is smaller than the ∼2.8 μm found for cobalt-electrolyte based DSSCs. These results show the advantages of using LEG4 as a sensitizer, compared to previously record indoline dyes, in combination with a TEMPO-based electrolyte. The low driving force for efficient dye regeneration presented by these results shows the potential to further improve the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of DSSCs by utilizing redox couples and dyes with a minimal need of driving force for high regeneration yields. PMID:26016854

  1. AC magnetohydrodynamic microfluidic switch

    SciTech Connect

    Lemoff, A V; Lee, A P

    2000-03-02

    A microfluidic switch has been demonstrated using an AC Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pumping mechanism in which the Lorentz force is used to pump an electrolytic solution. By integrating two AC MHD pumps into different arms of a Y-shaped fluidic circuit, flow can be switched between the two arms. This type of switch can be used to produce complex fluidic routing, which may have multiple applications in {micro}TAS.

  2. [Spatio-temporal change of sand-fixing function and its driving forces in desertification control ecological function area of Hunshandake, China].

    PubMed

    Shen, Lu; Tian, Mei-rong; Gao, Ji-xi; Qian, Jin-ping

    2016-01-01

    Soil erosion is an important ecological and environmental problem in Hunshandake Desert, and the sand-fixing function determines the degree of ecological security in the entire region. In order to clarify the situation of windbreak and sand fixation in Hunshandake area, and to guide the prevention and treatment of desertification on regional scale, based on the meteorological and remote sensing data, this paper quantitatively analyzed the temporal and spatial pattern of windbreak and sand fixation ability between 2000-2010 by the revised wind erosion equation (RWEQ) model, meanwhile, the driving forces for each county ( or banner) in the functional zone were analyzed with the method of principal component analysis. The results showed that there was a fluctuation of the sand fixing capacity in Hunshandake over time, generally rendering a decline trend. The coniferous forest and grassland had strong windbreak and sand fixation capacity in unit area among the various land categories. In terms of spatial distribution, the windbreak and sand fixation function in western and southeastern region was weak and needed to be strengthened with ecological restoration efforts. Through the study of the social driving forces of each administrative region in the function zone, there were 3 main social driving forces of soil erosion in the administrative functions: the intensity of input-output, the level of economic development and the level of agriculture-husbandry development.

  3. [Spatio-temporal change of sand-fixing function and its driving forces in desertification control ecological function area of Hunshandake, China].

    PubMed

    Shen, Lu; Tian, Mei-rong; Gao, Ji-xi; Qian, Jin-ping

    2016-01-01

    Soil erosion is an important ecological and environmental problem in Hunshandake Desert, and the sand-fixing function determines the degree of ecological security in the entire region. In order to clarify the situation of windbreak and sand fixation in Hunshandake area, and to guide the prevention and treatment of desertification on regional scale, based on the meteorological and remote sensing data, this paper quantitatively analyzed the temporal and spatial pattern of windbreak and sand fixation ability between 2000-2010 by the revised wind erosion equation (RWEQ) model, meanwhile, the driving forces for each county ( or banner) in the functional zone were analyzed with the method of principal component analysis. The results showed that there was a fluctuation of the sand fixing capacity in Hunshandake over time, generally rendering a decline trend. The coniferous forest and grassland had strong windbreak and sand fixation capacity in unit area among the various land categories. In terms of spatial distribution, the windbreak and sand fixation function in western and southeastern region was weak and needed to be strengthened with ecological restoration efforts. Through the study of the social driving forces of each administrative region in the function zone, there were 3 main social driving forces of soil erosion in the administrative functions: the intensity of input-output, the level of economic development and the level of agriculture-husbandry development. PMID:27228595

  4. Deciphering the driving forces of short-term erosion in glacially impacted landscapes, an example from the Western Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glotzbach, Christoph; van der Beek, Peter; Carcaillet, Julien; Delunel, Romain

    2013-04-01

    Tectonic uplift is the main driver of long-term erosion, but climate changes can markedly affect the link between tectonics and erosion, causing transient variations in short-term erosion rate. Here we study the driving forces of short-term erosion rates in the French Western Alps as estimated from in-situ produced cosmogenic 10Be and detrital apatite fission-track thermochronology analysis of stream sediments. Short-term erosion rates from 10Be analyses vary between ~0.27 and ~1.33 mm/yr, similar to rates measured in adjacent areas of the Alps. Part of the data scales positively with elevation, while the full dataset shows a significant positive correlation with steepness index of streams and normalized geophysical relief. Mean long-term exhumation and short-term erosion rates are comparable in areas that are exhuming rapidly (>0.4 km/Myr), but short-term rates are on average two-three (and up to six) times higher than long-term rates in areas where the latter are slow (<0.4 km/Myr). These findings are supported by detrital apatite fission-track age distributions that appear to require similar variations in erosion rates. Major glaciations strongly impacted the external part of the Alps, increasing both long-term exhumation rates as well as relief (e.g. Glotzbach et al. 2011; Häuselmann et al. 2007; Valla et al.). Based on our data, it seems that glacial impact in the more slowly eroding internal part is mainly restricted to relief, which is reflected in high transient short-term erosion rates. The data further reveal that normalized steepness index and ridgeline geophysical relief are well correlated with (and could be used as proxies for) short-term erosion, in contrast to slope, corroborating studies in purely fluvial landscapes. Our study demonstrates that climate change, e.g. through occurrence of major glaciations, can markedly perturb landscapes short-term erosion patterns in regions of tectonically controlled long-term exhumation. Glotzbach C., P.A. van

  5. Balancing shortening and extension around the Adriatic Plate to constrain its independent motion and driving forces since Late Cretaceous time.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Breton, E.; Handy, M.; Ustaszewski, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    thought. This modified motion path for Adria raises the question of what forces drive the motion of Adria; so far, the most likely explanation invokes a combination of trench suction and slab pull along the northern borders of Adria in Late Cretaceous-Paleogene time, transitional to Africa push since Early Miocene time.

  6. The Cardiomyopathy Lamin A/C D192G Mutation Disrupts Whole-Cell Biomechanics in Cardiomyocytes as Measured by Atomic Force Microscopy Loading-Unloading Curve Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lanzicher, Thomas; Martinelli, Valentina; Puzzi, Luca; Del Favero, Giorgia; Codan, Barbara; Long, Carlin S.; Mestroni, Luisa; Taylor, Matthew R. G.; Sbaizero, Orfeo

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) cell loading/unloading curves were used to provide comprehensive insights into biomechanical behavior of cardiomyocytes carrying the lamin A/C (LMNA) D192G mutation known to cause defective nuclear wall, myopathy and severe cardiomyopathy. Our results suggested that the LMNA D192G mutation increased maximum nuclear deformation load, nuclear stiffness and fragility as compared to controls. Furthermore, there seems to be a connection between this lamin nuclear mutation and cell adhesion behavior since LMNA D192G cardiomyocytes displayed loss of AFM probe-to-cell membrane adhesion. We believe that this loss of adhesion involves the cytoskeletal architecture since our microscopic analyses highlighted that mutant LMNA may also lead to a morphological alteration in the cytoskeleton. Furthermore, chemical disruption of the actin cytoskeleton by cytochalasin D in control cardiomyocytes mirrored the alterations in the mechanical properties seen in mutant cells, suggesting a defect in the connection between the nucleoskeleton, cytoskeleton and cell adhesion molecules in cells expressing the mutant protein. These data add to our understanding of potential mechanisms responsible for this fatal cardiomyopathy, and show that the biomechanical effects of mutant lamin extend beyond nuclear mechanics to include interference of whole-cell biomechanical properties. PMID:26323789

  7. Polarization-dependent force driving the Eg mode in bismuth under optical excitation: comparison of first-principles theory with ultra-fast x-ray experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahy, Stephen; Murray, Eamonn

    2015-03-01

    Using first principles electronic structure methods, we calculate the induced force on the Eg (zone centre transverse optical) phonon mode in bismuth immediately after absorption of a ultrafast pulse of polarized light. To compare the results with recent ultra-fast, time-resolved x-ray diffraction experiments, we include the decay of the force due to carrier scattering, as measured in optical Raman scattering experiments, and simulate the optical absorption process, depth-dependent atomic driving forces, and x-ray diffraction in the experimental geometry. We find excellent agreement between the theoretical predictions and the observed oscillations of the x-ray diffraction signal, indicating that first-principles theory of optical absorption is well suited to the calculation of initial atomic driving forces in photo-excited materials following ultrafast excitation. This work is supported by Science Foundation Ireland (Grant No. 12/IA/1601) and EU Commission under the Marie Curie Incoming International Fellowships (Grant No. PIIF-GA-2012-329695).

  8. The Scrunchworm Hypothesis: Transitions Between A-DNA and B-DNA Provide the Driving Force for Genome Packaging in Double-Stranded DNA Bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Double-stranded DNA bacteriophages have motors that drive the genome into preformed capsids, using the energy releas ed by hydrolysis of ATP to overcome the forces opposing DNA packaging. Viral packaging motors are the strongest of all biological motors, but it is not known how they generate these forces. Several models for the process of mechanochemical force generation have been put forward, but there is no consensus on which, if any, of these is correct. All the existing models assume that protein-generated forces drive the DNA forward. The scrunchworm hypothesis proposes that the DNA molecule is the active force-generating core of the motor, not simply a substrate on which the motor operates. The protein components of the motor dehydrate a section of the DNA, converting it from the B form to the A form and shortening it by about 23%. The proteins then rehydrate the DNA, which converts back to the B form. Other regions of the motor grip and release the DNA to capture the shortening-lengthening motions of the B→A→B cycle (“scrunching”), so that DNA is pulled into the motor and pushed forward into the capsid. This DNA-centric mechanism provides a quantitative physical explanation for the magnitude of the forces generated by viral packaging motors. It also provides a simple explanation for the fact that each of the steps in the burst cycle advances the DNA by 2.5 base pairs. The scrunchworm hypothesis is consistent with a large body of published data, and it makes four experimentally testable predictions. PMID:25486612

  9. The scrunchworm hypothesis: transitions between A-DNA and B-DNA provide the driving force for genome packaging in double-stranded DNA bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    Double-stranded DNA bacteriophages have motors that drive the genome into preformed capsids, using the energy released by hydrolysis of ATP to overcome the forces opposing DNA packaging. Viral packaging motors are the strongest of all biological motors, but it is not known how they generate these forces. Several models for the process of mechanochemical force generation have been put forward, but there is no consensus on which, if any, of these is correct. All the existing models assume that protein-generated forces drive the DNA forward. The scrunchworm hypothesis proposes that the DNA molecule is the active force-generating core of the motor, not simply a substrate on which the motor operates. The protein components of the motor dehydrate a section of the DNA, converting it from the B form to the A form and shortening it by about 23%. The proteins then rehydrate the DNA, which converts back to the B form. Other regions of the motor grip and release the DNA to capture the shortening-lengthening motions of the B→A→B cycle ("scrunching"), so that DNA is pulled into the motor and pushed forward into the capsid. This DNA-centric mechanism provides a quantitative physical explanation for the magnitude of the forces generated by viral packaging motors. It also provides a simple explanation for the fact that each of the steps in the burst cycle advances the DNA by 2.5 base pairs. The scrunchworm hypothesis is consistent with a large body of published data, and it makes four experimentally testable predictions.

  10. Using geoinformatics and cultural anthropology to identify links between land change, driving forces and actors in the Okavango catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röder, Achim; Stellmes, Marion; Pröpper, Michael; Schneibel, Anne

    2015-04-01

    intensive uses, although the same processes are likely to occur in parts of the Okavango region in the future. Literature: Banwart, S. (2011). "Save our soils." Nature 474: 151-152. Bürgi, M., A. M. Hersperger, et al. (2004). "Driving forces of landscape change - current and new directions." Landscape Ecology 19: 857-868. Butchart, S. H. M., M. Walpole, et al. (2010). "Global Biodiversity: Indicators of Recent Declines." Science 328(5982): 1164-1168. Ellis, E. C. and N. Ramankutty (2008). "Putting people in the map: anthropogenic biomes of the world." Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 6(8): 439-447. Foley, J. A., R. Defries, et al. (2005). "Global consequences of land use." Science 309(5734): 570-574. Geist, H. J. and E. F. Lambin (2002). "Proximate causes and underlying driving forces of tropical deforestation." BioScience 52(2): 143-150. Haub, C. (2012) World Population Data Sheet. World Population Hein, L., K. van Koppen, et al. (2006). "Spatial scales, stakeholders and the valuation of ecosystem services." Ecological Economics 57: 209-228. Hersperger, A. M., M.-P. Gennaio, et al. (2010). "Linking land change with driving forces and actors: four conceptual models." Ecology and Society 15(4): 1-17. Huang, C., L. S. Davis, et al. (2002). "An assessment of support vector machines for land cover classification." International Journal of Remote Sensing 23(4): 725-749. IPCC (2013). Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. T. F. Stocker, G. Qin, G.-K. Plattneret al. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. Jönsson, P. and L. Eklundh (2004). "TIMESAT - a program for analysing time-series of satellite sensor data." Computers and Geosciences 30(833-845). Kowalski, B., N. Azebaze, et al. (2013). "Mashare - The People." Biodiversity & Ecology 5: 121-128. Lal, R. (2013). "Climate-strategic agriculture and the water-soil-waste nexus." Journal of Plant

  11. An investigation of the relationships between rate and driving force in simple uncatalysed and enzyme-catalysed reactions with applications of the findings to chemiosmotic reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Stoner, C D

    1992-01-01

    Both the rate and the driving force of a reaction can be expressed in terms of the concentrations of the reactants and products. Consequently, rate and driving force can be expressed as a function of each other. This has been done for a single-reactant, single-product, uncatalysed reaction and its enzyme-catalysed equivalent using the van't Hoff reaction isotherm and Haldane's generalized Michaelis-Menten rate equation, the primary objective being explanation of the exponential and sigmoidal relationships between reaction rate and delta mu H+ commonly observed in studies on chemiosmotic reactions. Acquisition of a purely thermodynamic rate vs. driving-force relationship requires recognition of the intensive and extensive variables and maintenance of the extensive variables constant. This relationship is identical for the two reactions and is hyperbolic or sigmoidal, depending on whether the equilibrium constant is smaller or larger than unity. In the case of the catalysed reaction, acquisition of the purely thermodynamic relationship requires the assumption that the enzyme be equally effective in catalysing the forward and backward reactions. If this condition is not met, the relationship is modified by the enzyme in a manner which can be determined from the ratio of the Michaelis constants of the reactant and product. Under conditions of enzyme saturation in respect to reactant+product, the rate vs. driving-force relationship is determined exclusively by the thermodynamics of the reaction and a single kinetic parameter, the magnitude of which is determined by the relative effectiveness of the enzyme in catalysing the forward and backward reactions. In view of this finding, it is pointed out that, since the catalytic components of chemiosmotic reactions appear to be saturated with respect to the reactant-product pair that is varied in experimental rate vs. delta mu H+ determinations, and that, since many complex enzymic reactions conform to the simple Michaelis

  12. Driving force-dependent block by internal Ba(2+) on the Kir2.1 channel: Mechanistic insight into inward rectification.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chi-Pan; Kuo, Chung-Chin; Huang, Chiung-Wei

    2015-07-01

    The Kir2.1 channel is characterized by strong inward rectification; however, the mechanism of the steep voltage dependence near the equilibrium potential remains to be investigated. Here, we studied the internal Ba(2+) block of the Kir2.1 channel expressed in Xenopus oocytes. We showed that the driving force and thus the K(+) ion flux significantly influenced the apparent affinity of the block by internal Ba(2+). Kinetic analysis revealed that the binding rate shifted with the driving force and changed steeply near the equilibrium point, either in the presence or absence of the transmembrane electrical field. The unbinding rate was determined by the intrinsic affinity of the site. Mutagenesis studies revealed that the high-affinity binding site for Ba(2+) was located near T141 at the internal entrance of the selectivity filter. The steep change of the blocking affinity near the equilibrium potential may result from the flux-coupling effect in the single-file, multi-ion cytoplasmic pore.

  13. Multiple G-quartet structures in pre-edited mRNAs suggest evolutionary driving force for RNA editing in trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Leeder, W.-Matthias; Hummel, Niklas F. C.; Göringer, H. Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcript maturation in African trypanosomes requires a U-nucleotide specific RNA editing reaction. In its most extreme form hundreds of U’s are inserted into and deleted from primary transcripts to generate functional mRNAs. Unfortunately, both origin and biological role of the process have remained enigmatic. Here we report a so far unrecognized structural feature of pre-edited mRNAs. We demonstrate that the cryptic pre-mRNAs contain numerous clustered G-nt, which fold into G-quadruplex (GQ) structures. We identified 27 GQ’s in the different pre-mRNAs and demonstrate a positive correlation between the steady state abundance of guide (g)RNAs and the sequence position of GQ-elements. We postulate that the driving force for selecting G-rich sequences lies in the formation of DNA/RNA hybrid G-quadruplex (HQ) structures between the pre-edited transcripts and the non-template strands of mitochondrial DNA. HQ’s are transcription termination/replication initiation sites and thus guarantee an unperturbed replication of the mt-genome. This is of special importance in the insect-stage of the parasite. In the transcription-on state, the identified GQ’s require editing as a GQ-resolving activity indicating a link between replication, transcription and RNA editing. We propose that the different processes have coevolved and suggest the parasite life-cycle and the single mitochondrion as evolutionary driving forces. PMID:27436151

  14. Driving Forces of Dynamic Changes in Soil Erosion in the Dahei Mountain Ecological Restoration Area of Northern China Based on GIS and RS

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao; Niu, Xiang; Wang, Bing; Gao, Peng; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic change in soil erosion is an important focus of regional ecological restoration research. Here, the dynamic changes of soil erosion and its driving forces in the Dahei Mountain ecological restoration area of northern China were analyzed by LANDSAT TM remote sensing captured via geographic information system (GIS) technologies during three typical periods in 2004, 2008 and 2013. The results showed the following: (1) a decrease in intensive erosion and moderate erosion areas, as well as an increase in light erosion areas, was observed during two periods: one from 2004 to 2008 and the other from 2008 to 2013. (2) Between 2004 and 2008, the variation in the range of slight erosion was the largest (24.28%), followed by light erosion and intensive erosion; between 2008 and 2013, the variation in the range of intensive erosion area was the largest (9.89%), followed by slight erosion and moderate erosion. (3) Socioeconomic impact, accompanied by natural environmental factors, was the main driving force underlying the change in soil erosion within the ecological restoration area. In particular, the socioeconomic factors of per capita forest area and land reclamation rate, as well as the natural environmental factor of terrain slope, significantly influenced soil erosion changes within the ecological restoration area. PMID:26981637

  15. Driving Forces of Dynamic Changes in Soil Erosion in the Dahei Mountain Ecological Restoration Area of Northern China Based on GIS and RS.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Niu, Xiang; Wang, Bing; Gao, Peng; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic change in soil erosion is an important focus of regional ecological restoration research. Here, the dynamic changes of soil erosion and its driving forces in the Dahei Mountain ecological restoration area of northern China were analyzed by LANDSAT TM remote sensing captured via geographic information system (GIS) technologies during three typical periods in 2004, 2008 and 2013. The results showed the following: (1) a decrease in intensive erosion and moderate erosion areas, as well as an increase in light erosion areas, was observed during two periods: one from 2004 to 2008 and the other from 2008 to 2013. (2) Between 2004 and 2008, the variation in the range of slight erosion was the largest (24.28%), followed by light erosion and intensive erosion; between 2008 and 2013, the variation in the range of intensive erosion area was the largest (9.89%), followed by slight erosion and moderate erosion. (3) Socioeconomic impact, accompanied by natural environmental factors, was the main driving force underlying the change in soil erosion within the ecological restoration area. In particular, the socioeconomic factors of per capita forest area and land reclamation rate, as well as the natural environmental factor of terrain slope, significantly influenced soil erosion changes within the ecological restoration area.

  16. Comparison Studies of Applied Pressure and Concentration Gradient Driving Forces in Ceramic Nano-Filtration Membrane for the Production of Intravenous Salt Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarbatly, Rosalam; Krishnaiah, Duduku; England, Richard; Abang, Sariah; Jeffery, Jeanette

    In this study, the boundary-resistance layer model and solution-diffusion model were used to investigate the applied driving pressure force technique and the concentration driving force technique, respectively, for the production of intravenous drip solution. A 5 kD monolithic membrane coated with Al2O3 and TiO and NaCl aqueous solution as the feed solution was used. The results show that the boundary-resistance layer model diffusivity coefficient, D = 1.8x10-9 m2 sec-1 and the mass transfer coefficient, k = 1.19-10-4 m sec-1 which were both slightly higher than the solution-diffusion model. Applying Fick`s law for the solution diffusion model, the calculated operating pressure inside the lumen was 15 kPa. Clearly, the findings suggested that the boundary-resistance layer model should be chosen for the production of pure and sterile intravenous salt solution as it provided higher diffusivity and mass transfer coefficient than the solution-diffusion model.

  17. Multiple Infections with Cardinium and Two Strains of Wolbachia in The Spider Mite Tetranychus phaselus Ehara: Revealing New Forces Driving the Spread of Wolbachia

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dong-Xiao; Chen, Da-Song; Ge, Cheng; Gotoh, Tetsuo; Hong, Xiao-Yue

    2013-01-01

    Cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) has been proposed as a major mechanism by which certain strains of Wolbachia to invade and persist in host populations. However, mechanisms that underlie the invasion and persistence of non-CI strains are less well understood. Here, we established a spider mite Tetranychus phaselus population multiply infected by Cardinium as well as two distinct lineages of Wolbachia, designated wCon and wOri, to study the forces driving the spread of the non-CI strain of Wolbachia wOri. Interestingly, we found that wOri provided a longevity advantage to its female hosts under ideal conditions, making wOri stay longer in this population, and then being transmitted to more offspring. Furthermore, the lifespan of uninfected females was reduced when mated with multiple-infected males. As a result, the uninfected population is attenuated by the multiple-infected males. Thus, we infer that the host age effects of multiple infection may represent sufficient forces driving the spread of wOri through the host population. PMID:23355904

  18. The effect of electric field geometry on the performance of electromembrane extraction systems: footprints of a third driving force along with migration and diffusion.

    PubMed

    Moazami, Hamid Reza; Hosseiny Davarani, Saied Saeed; Mohammadi, Jamil; Nojavan, Saeed; Abrari, Masoud

    2015-09-01

    The distribution of electric field vectors was first calculated for electromembrane extraction (EME) systems in classical and cylindrical electrode geometries. The results showed that supported liquid membrane (SLM) has a general field amplifying effect due to its lower dielectric constant in comparison with aqueous donor/acceptor solutions. The calculated norms of the electric field vector showed that a DC voltage of 50 V can create huge electric field strengths up to 64 kV m(-1) and 111 kV m(-1) in classical and cylindrical geometries respectively. In both cases, the electric field strength reached its peak value on the inner wall of the SLM. In the case of classical geometry, the field strength was a function of the polar position of the SLM whereas the field strength in cylindrical geometry was angularly uniform. In order to investigate the effect of the electrode geometry on the performance of real EME systems, the analysis was carried out in three different geometries including classical, helical and cylindrical arrangements using naproxen and sodium diclofenac as the model analytes. Despite higher field strength and extended cross sectional area, the helical and cylindrical geometries gave lower recoveries with respect to the classical EME. The observed decline of the signal was proved to be against the relations governing migration and diffusion processes, which means that a third driving force is involved in EME. The third driving force is the interaction between the radially inhomogeneous electric field and the analyte in its neutral form.

  19. [Spatiotemporal patterns and driving forces of land use change in industrial relocation area: a case study of old industrial area in Tiexi of Shenyang, Northeast China].

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei-Ling; Bing, Long-Fei; Xi, Feng-Ming; Wu, Rui; Geng, Yong

    2013-07-01

    Based on the QuickBird remote sensing images and with the support of GIS, this paper analyzed the spatiotemporal characteristics of land use change and its driving forces in old industrial area of Tiexi, Shenyang City of Liaoning Province in 2000-2010. During the study period, the industrial and mining warehouse land pattern had the greatest change, evolving from the historical pattern of residential land in the south and of industrial land in the north into residential land as the dominant land use pattern. In the last decade, the residential land area increased by 9%, mainly transferred from the industrial and mining warehouse land located in the north of Jianshe Road, while the industrial and mining warehouse land area decreased by 20%. The land areas for the commercial service and for the administrative and public services were increased by 1.3% and 3.1%, respectively. The land area for construction had a greater change, with an overall change rate being 76.9%. The land use change rate in 2000-2005 was greater than that in 2005-2010. National development strategies and policies, regional development planning, administrative reform, and industrial upgrading were the main driving forces of the land use change in old industrial area of Tiexi.

  20. Driving Forces of Dynamic Changes in Soil Erosion in the Dahei Mountain Ecological Restoration Area of Northern China Based on GIS and RS.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Niu, Xiang; Wang, Bing; Gao, Peng; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic change in soil erosion is an important focus of regional ecological restoration research. Here, the dynamic changes of soil erosion and its driving forces in the Dahei Mountain ecological restoration area of northern China were analyzed by LANDSAT TM remote sensing captured via geographic information system (GIS) technologies during three typical periods in 2004, 2008 and 2013. The results showed the following: (1) a decrease in intensive erosion and moderate erosion areas, as well as an increase in light erosion areas, was observed during two periods: one from 2004 to 2008 and the other from 2008 to 2013. (2) Between 2004 and 2008, the variation in the range of slight erosion was the largest (24.28%), followed by light erosion and intensive erosion; between 2008 and 2013, the variation in the range of intensive erosion area was the largest (9.89%), followed by slight erosion and moderate erosion. (3) Socioeconomic impact, accompanied by natural environmental factors, was the main driving force underlying the change in soil erosion within the ecological restoration area. In particular, the socioeconomic factors of per capita forest area and land reclamation rate, as well as the natural environmental factor of terrain slope, significantly influenced soil erosion changes within the ecological restoration area. PMID:26981637

  1. A piezo motor based on a new principle with high output force, rigidity and integrity: The Tuna Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaolong; Lu, Qingyou

    2012-11-01

    We present a linear piezoelectric motor as simple as one piezoelectric scanner tube (PST) spring-clamping a central shaft at both ends with roughly equal clamping forces. The clamping points are aligned with ±X electrodes at one end and ±Y electrodes at the other end. Thus, the ±X (or ±Y) push-pull motions of the PST can cause the push-pull motions of the clamping points on the shaft (called push-pull rubbing), which reduces the total dynamic friction force at one (or the other) end of the PST. This new piezo motor advances one step by fast push-pull rubbing at one end while slowly retracting the PST followed by fast push-pull rubbing at the other end while slowly elongating the PST. Apart from the obvious advantages of simplicity, rigidity, integrity, etc., we will also show that this motor can produce a large output force, which we believe is because of the huge drop of the clamping friction force when the push-pull rubbing occurs.

  2. The short range anion-H interaction is the driving force for crystal formation of ions in water.

    PubMed

    Alejandre, José; Chapela, Gustavo A; Bresme, Fernando; Hansen, Jean-Pierre

    2009-05-01

    The crystal formation of NaCl in water is studied by extensive molecular dynamics simulations. Ionic solutions at room temperature and various concentrations are studied using the SPC/E and TIP4P/2005 water models and seven force fields of NaCl. Most force fields of pure NaCl fail to reproduce the experimental density of the crystal, and in solution some favor dissociation at saturated conditions, while others favor crystal formation at low concentration. A new force field of NaCl is proposed, which reproduces the experimental phase diagram in the solid, liquid, and vapor regions. This force field overestimates the solubility of NaCl in water at saturation conditions when used with standard Lorentz-Berthelot combining rules for the ion-water pair potentials. It is shown that precipitation of ions is driven by the short range interaction between Cl-H pairs, a term which is generally missing in the simulation of ionic solutions. The effects of intramolecular flexibility of water on the solubility of NaCl ions are analyzed and is found to be small compared to rigid models. A flexible water model, extending the rigid SPC/E, is proposed, which incorporates Lennard-Jones interactions centered on the hydrogen atoms. This force field gives liquid-vapor coexisting densities and surface tensions in better agreement with experimental data than the rigid SPC/E model. The Cl-H, Na-O, and Cl-O pair distribution functions of the rigid and flexible models agree well with experiment. The predicted concentration dependence of the electric conductivity is in fair agreement with available experimental data. PMID:19425788

  3. The short range anion-H interaction is the driving force for crystal formation of ions in water.

    PubMed

    Alejandre, José; Chapela, Gustavo A; Bresme, Fernando; Hansen, Jean-Pierre

    2009-05-01

    The crystal formation of NaCl in water is studied by extensive molecular dynamics simulations. Ionic solutions at room temperature and various concentrations are studied using the SPC/E and TIP4P/2005 water models and seven force fields of NaCl. Most force fields of pure NaCl fail to reproduce the experimental density of the crystal, and in solution some favor dissociation at saturated conditions, while others favor crystal formation at low concentration. A new force field of NaCl is proposed, which reproduces the experimental phase diagram in the solid, liquid, and vapor regions. This force field overestimates the solubility of NaCl in water at saturation conditions when used with standard Lorentz-Berthelot combining rules for the ion-water pair potentials. It is shown that precipitation of ions is driven by the short range interaction between Cl-H pairs, a term which is generally missing in the simulation of ionic solutions. The effects of intramolecular flexibility of water on the solubility of NaCl ions are analyzed and is found to be small compared to rigid models. A flexible water model, extending the rigid SPC/E, is proposed, which incorporates Lennard-Jones interactions centered on the hydrogen atoms. This force field gives liquid-vapor coexisting densities and surface tensions in better agreement with experimental data than the rigid SPC/E model. The Cl-H, Na-O, and Cl-O pair distribution functions of the rigid and flexible models agree well with experiment. The predicted concentration dependence of the electric conductivity is in fair agreement with available experimental data.

  4. Dual excitation multiphase electrostatic drive

    SciTech Connect

    Niino, Toshiki; Higuchi, Toshiro |; Egawa, Saku

    1995-12-31

    A novel electrostatic drive technology named Dual Excitation Multiphase Electrostatic Drive (DEMED) was presented. A basic DEMED consisted of two plastic films in which 3-phase parallel electrodes were embedded and was driven by a 3-phase ac excitation to the electrodes. Static characteristics of DEMED were calculated and tested and the results agreed very well. Three prototype motors of DEMED were fabricated using commercially available technique. The first prototype consisted of a single slider and stator and generated a linear motion with a slider`s motion range of about 5mm. It weighed 7g and generated a power of 1.6W and a thrust force of 4.4N. The second prototype consisted of 50 layer stack of linear motors, summing their outputs. It weighed 3.6kg and generated a propulsive force of 310N being powered with boosted commercial 3-phase electricity. The third prototype consisted of a rotor and a stator in which electrodes were arranged radially and generated rotational motion. The maximum power of 36mW was generated by the prototype weighing only 260mg for its rotor and stator. From the results of the numerical calculation, a practical design methodology for the motor was determined. An optimal design for a motor employing currently available material and fabrication techniques is provided as an example. Analyses predict that force generation over the interfacial area between the slider and stator of this motor would be 3,900N/m{sup 2}.

  5. Fine-Scale Variation in Vector Host Use and Force of Infection Drive Localized Patterns of West Nile Virus Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Hamer, Gabriel L.; Chaves, Luis F.; Anderson, Tavis K.; Kitron, Uriel D.; Brawn, Jeffrey D.; Ruiz, Marilyn O.; Loss, Scott R.; Walker, Edward D.; Goldberg, Tony L.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of host diversity on multi-host pathogen transmission and persistence can be confounded by the large number of species and biological interactions that can characterize many transmission systems. For vector-borne pathogens, the composition of host communities has been hypothesized to affect transmission; however, the specific characteristics of host communities that affect transmission remain largely unknown. We tested the hypothesis that vector host use and force of infection (i.e., the summed number of infectious mosquitoes resulting from feeding upon each vertebrate host within a community of hosts), and not simply host diversity or richness, determine local infection rates of West Nile virus (WNV) in mosquito vectors. In suburban Chicago, Illinois, USA, we estimated community force of infection for West Nile virus using data on Culex pipiens mosquito host selection and WNV vertebrate reservoir competence for each host species in multiple residential and semi-natural study sites. We found host community force of infection interacted with avian diversity to influence WNV infection in Culex mosquitoes across the study area. Two avian species, the American robin (Turdus migratorius) and the house sparrow (Passer domesticus), produced 95.8% of the infectious Cx. pipiens mosquitoes and showed a significant positive association with WNV infection in Culex spp. mosquitoes. Therefore, indices of community structure, such as species diversity or richness, may not be reliable indicators of transmission risk at fine spatial scales in vector-borne disease systems. Rather, robust assessment of local transmission risk should incorporate heterogeneity in vector host feeding and variation in vertebrate reservoir competence at the spatial scale of vector-host interaction. PMID:21886821

  6. The endothermic ATP hydrolysis and crossbridge attachment steps drive the increase of force with temperature in isometric and shortening muscle

    PubMed Central

    Offer, Gerald; Ranatunga, K W

    2015-01-01

    The isometric tetanic tension of skeletal muscle increases with temperature because attached crossbridge states bearing a relatively low force convert to those bearing a higher force. It was previously proposed that the tension-generating step(s) in the crossbridge cycle was highly endothermic and was therefore itself directly targeted by changes in temperature. However, this did not explain why a rapid rise in temperature (a temperature jump) caused a much slower rate of rise of tension than a rapid length step. This led to suggestions that the step targeted by a temperature rise is not the tension-generating step but is an extra step in the attached pathway of the crossbridge cycle, perhaps located on a parallel pathway. This enigma has been a major obstacle to a full understanding of the operation of the crossbridge cycle. We have now used a previously developed mechano-kinetic model of the crossbridge cycle in frog muscle to simulate the temperature dependence of isometric tension and shortening velocity. We allowed all five steps in the cycle to be temperature-sensitive. Models with different starting combinations of enthalpy changes and activation enthalpies for the five steps were refined by downhill simplex runs and scored by their ability to fit experimental data on the temperature dependence of isometric tension and the relationship between force and shortening velocity in frog muscle. We conclude that the first tension-generating step may be weakly endothermic and that the rise of tension with temperature is largely driven by the preceding two strongly endothermic steps of ATP hydrolysis and attachment of M.ADP.Pi to actin. The refined model gave a reasonable fit to the available experimental data and after a temperature jump the overall rate of tension rise was much slower than after a length step as observed experimentally. The findings aid our understanding of the crossbridge cycle by showing that it may not be necessary to include an additional

  7. Selective copper diffusion into quartz-hosted vapor inclusions: Evidence from other host minerals, driving forces, and consequences for Cu-Au ore formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jung Hun; Heinrich, Christoph A.

    2013-07-01

    Recent experimental studies have raised concerns that Cu concentrations in quartz-hosted fluid inclusions from magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposits do not represent pristine concentrations in the trapped fluids, but are modified by post-entrapment diffusional exchange through the host quartz. New microanalyses of fluid inclusions hosted in topaz show significantly lower Cu concentrations in vapor inclusions, compared to otherwise identical inclusions hosted by coexisting quartz, whereas coeval brine (hypersaline liquid) inclusions are very similar independent of host mineral in one sample. Sulfur is present as a major component in all vapor inclusions, as in most porphyry-related vapor inclusions, and Cu never exceeds S, but commonly matches the S content at a molar ratio of Cu:S ⩽ 2 in vapor inclusions hosted by quartz. Univalent ions with a radius smaller than ˜1 Å are known to diffuse rapidly through the channels of the quartz structure, parallel to its crystallographic c axis. Since only Cu concentrations differ between topaz- and quartz-hosted inclusions, we hypothesize that Cu+ and H+ re-equilibrate by diffusional ion exchange through these channels, while all other element concentrations remain essentially unchanged. A thermodynamic model considering charge-balanced Cu+H+ exchange and diffusive H2 re-equilibration of an initially Cu-poor but S-rich vapor inclusion with a typical rock-buffered fluid environment outside the host crystal demonstrates a strong chemical driving force for Cu+ to migrate from the surrounding rock into the fluid inclusion during cooling of the system. The driving force for Cu diffusion, against the gradient in total Cu concentration, is the abundant H+ liberated inside the inclusion by dissociation of HCl and particularly by the precipitation of CuFeS2 by reaction with the initially trapped H2S and/or SO2. Gold is not only a much larger ion, but is subject to an opposing driving force, suggesting that high concentrations of this

  8. Analysis of Urban-Rural Land-Use Change during 1995-2006 and Its Policy Dimensional Driving Forces in Chongqing, China

    PubMed Central

    Long, Hualou; Wu, Xiuqin; Wang, Wenjie; Dong, Guihua

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes the urban-rural land-use change of Chongqing and its policy dimensional driving forces from 1995 to 2006, using high-resolution Landsat TM (Thematic Mapper) data of 1995, 2000 and 2006, and socio-economic data from both research institutes and government departments. The outcomes indicated that urban-rural land-use change in Chongqing can be characterized by two major trends: First, the non-agricultural land increased substantially from 1995 to 2006, thus causing agricultural land especially farmland to decrease continuously. Second, the aggregation index of urban settlements and rural settlements shows that local urban-rural development experienced a process of changing from aggregation (1995-2000) to decentralization (2000-2006). Chongqing is a special area getting immersed in many important policies, which include the establishment of the municipality directly under the Central Government, the building of Three Gorges Dam Project, the Western China Development Program and the Grain-for-Green Programme, and bring about tremendous influences on its land-use change. By analyzing Chongqing's land-use change and its policy driving forces, some implications for its new policy of ‘Urban-rural Integrated Reform’ are obtained. That is more attentions need to be paid to curbing excessive and idle rural housing and consolidating rural construction land, and to laying out a scientific land-use plan for its rural areas taking such rural land-use issues as farmland occupation and rural housing land management into accounts, so as to coordinate and balance the urban-rural development.

  9. Persistent disparities in stratospheric water vapor measurements drive large uncertainties in the radiative forcing by lower stratospheric water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, D. F.; Rosenlof, K. H.; Portmann, R. W.; Voemel, H.; Schiller, C.; Smith, J. B.; Thornberry, T. D.; Rollins, A. W.; Hall, E.; Jordan, A.; Oltmans, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    Lower stratospheric water vapor is a powerful attenuator of outgoing long wave radiation, hence its strong influence on the Earth's radiation budget. The radiative forcing by lower stratospheric water vapor is, however, quite uncertain because of significant disparities in lower stratospheric water vapor measurements by different instruments. Specifically, measurement discrepancies of 0.5 to 2 ppmv H2O (15 to 60%) between several well-established aircraft- and balloon-borne instruments have now persisted for almost two decades. The Mid-latitude Airborne Cirrus Properties Experiment (MACPEX) in April 2011 provided not only a fresh opportunity to reexamine and reevaluate these persistent measurement discrepancies, but also to compare water vapor measurements by additional aircraft-based instrumentation. Here we compare the in situ measurements of lower stratospheric water vapor by five different instruments during MACPEX. Three of these instruments (Harvard water, FISH, and NOAA CIMS) were aboard the NASA WB-57 aircraft, while two (CFH and NOAA FPH) were launched on balloons. Substantial efforts were made to coordinate aircraft and balloon measurements in space and time, such that the aircraft would reach maximum altitude en route to the balloon rendezvous point, then both aircraft and balloon would descend together. Lower stratospheric water vapor measurements during MACPEX generally fall into two groups: CFH, NOAA FPH and FISH are in good agreement, while Harvard water and NOAA CIMS agree with each other but are significantly different than the other group. Differences between the two groups range from 0.5 to 1.0 ppmv (15 to 30%), with Harvard and NOAA CIMS mixing ratios consistently higher. Though these differences seem relatively large, they are smaller than some previously observed differences between the FPH/CFH and Harvard water. For example, Harvard stratospheric water vapor measurements during the 1993 CEPEX and 2006 CR-AVE campaigns were 1.5 and 2 ppmv

  10. Nonequivalence of membrane voltage and ion-gradient as driving forces for the bacterial flagellar motor at low load.

    PubMed

    Lo, Chien-Jung; Leake, Mark C; Pilizota, Teuta; Berry, Richard M

    2007-07-01

    Many bacterial species swim using flagella. The flagellar motor couples ion flow across the cytoplasmic membrane to rotation. Ion flow is driven by both a membrane potential (V(m)) and a transmembrane concentration gradient. To investigate their relation to bacterial flagellar motor function we developed a fluorescence technique to measure V(m) in single cells, using the dye tetramethyl rhodamine methyl ester. We used a convolution model to determine the relationship between fluorescence intensity in images of cells and intracellular dye concentration, and calculated V(m) using the ratio of intracellular/extracellular dye concentration. We found V(m) = -140 +/- 14 mV in Escherichia coli at external pH 7.0 (pH(ex)), decreasing to -85 +/- 10 mV at pH(ex) 5.0. We also estimated the sodium-motive force (SMF) by combining single-cell measurements of V(m) and intracellular sodium concentration. We were able to vary the SMF between -187 +/- 15 mV and -53 +/- 15 mV by varying pH(ex) in the range 7.0-5.0 and extracellular sodium concentration in the range 1-85 mM. Rotation rates for 0.35-microm- and 1-microm-diameter beads attached to Na(+)-driven chimeric flagellar motors varied linearly with V(m). For the larger beads, the two components of the SMF were equivalent, whereas for smaller beads at a given SMF, the speed increased with sodium gradient and external sodium concentration.

  11. Nonequivalence of Membrane Voltage and Ion-Gradient as Driving Forces for the Bacterial Flagellar Motor at Low Load

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Chien-Jung; Leake, Mark C.; Pilizota, Teuta; Berry, Richard M.

    2007-01-01

    Many bacterial species swim using flagella. The flagellar motor couples ion flow across the cytoplasmic membrane to rotation. Ion flow is driven by both a membrane potential (Vm) and a transmembrane concentration gradient. To investigate their relation to bacterial flagellar motor function we developed a fluorescence technique to measure Vm in single cells, using the dye tetramethyl rhodamine methyl ester. We used a convolution model to determine the relationship between fluorescence intensity in images of cells and intracellular dye concentration, and calculated Vm using the ratio of intracellular/extracellular dye concentration. We found Vm = −140 ± 14 mV in Escherichia coli at external pH 7.0 (pHex), decreasing to −85 ± 10 mV at pHex 5.0. We also estimated the sodium-motive force (SMF) by combining single-cell measurements of Vm and intracellular sodium concentration. We were able to vary the SMF between −187 ± 15 mV and −53 ± 15 mV by varying pHex in the range 7.0–5.0 and extracellular sodium concentration in the range 1–85 mM. Rotation rates for 0.35-μm- and 1-μm-diameter beads attached to Na+-driven chimeric flagellar motors varied linearly with Vm. For the larger beads, the two components of the SMF were equivalent, whereas for smaller beads at a given SMF, the speed increased with sodium gradient and external sodium concentration. PMID:17416615

  12. Vibrational relaxation as the driving force for wavelength conversion in the peridinin-chlorophyll a-protein.

    PubMed

    Götze, Jan P; Karasulu, Bora; Patil, Mahendra; Thiel, Walter

    2015-12-01

    We present a computationally derived energy transfer model for the peridinin-chlorophyll a-protein (PCP), which invokes vibrational relaxation in the two lowest singlet excited states rather than internal conversion between them. The model allows an understanding of the photoinduced processes without assuming further electronic states or a dependence of the 2Ag state character on the vibrational sub-state. We report molecular dynamics simulations (CHARMM22 force field) and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations on PCP. In the latter, the QM region containing a single peridinin (Per) chromophore or a Per-Chl a (chlorophyll a) pair is treated by density functional theory (DFT, CAM-B3LYP) for geometries and by DFT-based multireference configuration interaction (DFT/MRCI) for excitation energies. The calculations show that Per has a bright, green light absorbing 2Ag state, in addition to the blue light absorbing 1Bu state found in other carotenoids. Both states undergo a strong energy lowering upon relaxation, leading to emission in the red, while absorbing in the blue or green. The orientation of their transition dipole moments indicates that both states are capable of excited-state energy transfer to Chl a, without preference for either 1Bu or 2Ag as donor state. We propose that the commonly postulated partial intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) character of a donating Per state can be assigned to the relaxed 1Bu state, which takes on ICT character. By assuming that both 1Bu and 2Ag are able to donate to the Chl a Q band, one can explain why different chlorophyll species in PCP exhibit different acceptor capabilities.

  13. Comparison of DC and AC Transport in 1.5-7.5 nm Oligophenylene Imine Molecular Wires across Two Junction Platforms: Eutectic Ga-In versus Conducting Probe Atomic Force Microscope Junctions.

    PubMed

    Sangeeth, C S Suchand; Demissie, Abel T; Yuan, Li; Wang, Tao; Frisbie, C Daniel; Nijhuis, Christian A

    2016-06-15

    We have utilized DC and AC transport measurements to measure the resistance and capacitance of thin films of conjugated oligophenyleneimine (OPI) molecules ranging from 1.5 to 7.5 nm in length. These films were synthesized on Au surfaces utilizing the imine condensation chemistry between terephthalaldehyde and 1,4-benzenediamine. Near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy yielded molecular tilt angles of 33-43°. To probe DC and AC transport, we employed Au-S-OPI//GaOx/EGaIn junctions having contact areas of 9.6 × 10(2) μm(2) (10(9) nm(2)) and compared to previously reported DC results on the same OPI system obtained using Au-S-OPI//Au conducting probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM) junctions with 50 nm(2) areas. We found that intensive observables agreed very well across the two junction platforms. Specifically, the EGaIn-based junctions showed: (i) a crossover from tunneling to hopping transport at molecular lengths near 4 nm; (ii) activated transport for wires >4 nm in length with an activation energy of 0.245 ± 0.008 eV for OPI-7; (iii) exponential dependence of conductance with molecular length with a decay constant β = 2.84 ± 0.18 nm(-1) (DC) and 2.92 ± 0.13 nm(-1) (AC) in the tunneling regime, and an apparent β = 1.01 ± 0.08 nm(-1) (DC) and 0.99 ± 0.11 nm(-1) (AC) in the hopping regime; (iv) previously unreported dielectric constant of 4.3 ± 0.2 along the OPI wires. However, the absolute resistances of Au-S-OPI//GaOx/EGaIn junctions were approximately 100 times higher than the corresponding CP-AFM junctions due to differences in metal-molecule contact resistances between the two platforms.

  14. Mediterranean coastal dune vegetation: Are disturbance and stress the key selective forces that drive the psammophilous succession?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciccarelli, Daniela

    2015-11-01

    Plant communities of coastal dunes are distributed along a characteristic sea-inland gradient. Generally, there is a shift from annual and short height species with small leaves in the initial successional stages to perennial tall shrubs with tough leaves in later phases. Assessing the community-weighted mean (CWM) trait values is used in plant ecology to describe ecosystem properties especially during succession. In particular, CSR (Competitive, Stress-tolerant, and Ruderal strategy) classification allows us to explore community functional shifts in terms of disturbance, stress and competition selective forces. The functional basis of the psammophilous succession was studied based on the following questions: (1) Can we circumscribe different functional types among plant species of Mediterranean coastal dunes? (2) How do CWM trait values vary along the environmental sea-inland gradient? (3) What is the relative importance of competition, stress and disturbance in the processes of plant community assembling? (4) Can we postulate that along primary successions there is generally a shift from ruderality to stress-tolerance? An explorative analysis of functional groups was performed by Non-Metric Multidimensional Scaling (NMDS) analysing nine morpho-functional traits measured for 45 taxa from 880 dune plots localised in Tuscany (central Italy, Europe). NMDS ordination showed a scattered distribution of psammophytes that could not be delimited in precise plant functional types. The first NMDS axis has been interpreted as a leaf economics axis because it was correlated to leaf area (LA) and leaf dry matter content (LDMC), while the second one was a plant size axis because of its correlation with canopy height. Along the sea-inland gradient, pioneer plant communities of upper beach were dominated by ruderals (with the lowest values of LDMC and specific leaf area - SLA), well-adapted to the harsh environmental conditions of coastal dunes. More distant from the sea, where

  15. Unlocking the biogeochemical black box: What drives microbial response to climate forcing in semi-arid soils?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moravec, B. G.; McLain, J. E.; Lohse, K. A.

    2009-12-01

    Microbial mediated cycling of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) and their loss from soils are closely linked to soil moisture and temperature. Yet, it is unclear how microbial communities will respond to climatic forcing (namely increased inter-annual precipitation variability and severe drought) and to what extent parent material controls these responses. We used Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) and C utilization assays to determine the relative abundance and diversity of microbial populations during pre-, mid- and post-monsoon time intervals at four sites along a steep elevation gradient (temperature and precipitation range of >10°C and >50 cm, respectively) in the Santa Catalina Mountains, AZ. Contrasting parent materials (schist and granite) were paired at elevations. RT-PCR results showed large increases of bacterial and fungal biomarkers at high elevations with the onset of precipitation (pre- to mid- monsoon conditions) (as much as 824%). In contrast, bacteria biomarkers did not change at low elevation granite site as a result of the onset of precipitation whereas fungal biomarkers increased by 177% at this site. Both bacteria and fungal biomarkers increased substantially at low elevation schist sites with the onset of precipitation. Finally, C utilization assays indicated that high elevation sites had a relatively high diversity of C utilization compared to low elevation soils. We hypothesize that increased bacterial and fungal abundance in low elevation schist-derived soils relative to granite soils after the onset of monsoon rains may be a function of soil texture, with higher clay content in schist soils leading to higher soil moisture availability. Alternatively, differences in microbial responses may be due to higher C availability in schist soils compared to granite soils. Higher C utilization diversity as well as similar bacteria and fungal biomarker responses found at high elevation sites (both granite and schist soils) in response to

  16. 10-15 years of GST monitoring over mountain permafrost in Switzerland: Indicators for driving forces for permafrost evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staub, Benno; Delaloye, Reynald; Hilbich, Christin; Lambiel, Christophe; Nötzli, Jeannette; Völksch, Ingo

    2013-04-01

    Ground Surface Temperatures (GST) are mainly controlled by atmospheric factors and topographical effects and represent an important standard element within the operational permafrost monitoring network PERMOS in Switzerland. Due to its shape, position and extent the Alpine arc is influenced by prevailing winds from several directions provoking a complex and highly variable pattern of precipitation in different regions of Switzerland with a general trend to a more continental climate in some inner-alpine valleys. The lower boundary for the occurrence of mountain permafrost in the Swiss Alps is located at about 2500 m asl., close to the free atmosphere where air temperatures are almost homogenous in all regions, but precipitation usually shows large regional differences regarding timing and quantity depending on the meteorological conditions. At the elevation range of mountain permafrost the ground surface remains snow-free only for about 4-5 months (between June and November) with a high temporal and spatial variability, while over the rest of the year it stays well shielded from the atmosphere (due to the high surface albedo and emissivity and low thermal conductivity of snow). Therefore, the influence of the atmosphere at this boundary layer on the ground thermal regime is well reflected by GST measurements on a very local, site-specific scale. Relative values like GST anomalies can serve as indicators describing processes of energy and heat transfer at the ground surface in a semi-quantitative way. This information is used in a signal-response analysis integrating GST with other permafrost monitoring elements that represent the permafrost response to external effects (e.g. relative changes in borehole temperatures, apparent electrical resistivities or rock glacier creep rates). To identify and quantify the dominant processes and factors controlling the response of Alpine permafrost to external forces, special consideration is devoted to the characteristics of

  17. Kinematic constraints on the forces driving the rapid motion of India in the Late Cretaceous and early Cenozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cande, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Indo-Atlantic plate kinematics during the Late Cretaceous and early Cenozoic were dominated by a period of roughly 25 Ma during which the motions of Africa and India appear to have been coupled: a rapid speedup of India around 68 Ma was accompanied by a dramatic slowdown of Africa and the subsequent slowdown of India around 50 Ma was accompanied by a speedup of Africa. The sudden and dramatic speedup of India between 68 and 66 Ma is almost certainly related to the arrival of the Reunion plume head; the short period of India's fastest motion (roughly 190 mm/yr during Chron C29R) is synchronous with the time of the greatest outpouring of Deccan flood basalts. However, the significance of the nearly simultaneous slowdown of Africa at 70 Ma and the later anti-correlated kinematic changes around 50 Ma is unclear. Distinguishing between a plume head force and the effects of ridge push and slab pull requires as accurate a model as possible of the motions of India and Africa. Here I will discuss how improvements in Indo-Atlantic Euler rotations, updates to the geomagnetic polarity time scale, and the analysis of stage pole paths, have clarified the nature of several major Indo-Atlantic tectonic events. Recently determined sets of closely spaced Euler rotations for the Southwest, Southeast and Central Indian ridges better constrain the time of significant changes in relative plate motions. However, although improvements in the geomagnetic polarity time scale in the Eocene and Paleocene provide a more accurate portrayal of relative plate velocities following India's speedup, remaining uncertainties in the time scale, particularly in the Late Cretaceous, leave the timing of other important spreading rate changes more poorly resolved. Where the Euler rotations are sufficiently accurate, an analysis of stage pole paths provides additional insight into the significance of the plate motion changes. Treating stage poles as velocity vectors and examining the changes in the velocity

  18. Full description of copper uptake by algal biomass combining an equilibrium NICA model with a kinetic intraparticle diffusion driving force approach.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Roberto; Lodeiro, Pablo; García-Casal, Lino J; Vilariño, Teresa; Rey-Castro, Carlos; David, Calin; Rodríguez, Pilar

    2011-02-01

    In this work kinetic and equilibrium studies related to copper binding to the protonated macroalga Sargassum muticum are reported. An intraparticle-diffusion linear driving force (LDF) model has been chosen for the quantitative description of the kinetics at several initial metal concentrations. Copper intraparticle homogeneous diffusion coefficient (D(h)) obtained is in the range 0.2-0.9×10(-10) m(2) s(-1). NICA isotherm is demonstrated to constitute a substantial improvement with respect to a simpler Langmuir competitive equation. The binding parameters were chosen to provide the best simultaneous description of the equilibrium experiments. Values of log K(Cu) (4.3), n(Cu) (1) and p (0.31) in NICA isotherm, and log K(Cu) (3.5-5) in Langmuir competitive model, have been obtained. These parameters have been also used to predict the competition between copper and cadmium for binding sites. Two acids, HNO(3) and HCl, have been tested to evaluate their effectiveness to release copper from the metal-laden biomass. PMID:20980146

  19. Driving forces for the adsorption of a His-tag Chagas antigen. A rational approach to design bio-functional surfaces.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Laura E; Smania, Andrea M; De Pauli, Carlos P; Giacomelli, Carla E

    2013-12-01

    In order to rationally design a bio-functional surface based on the adsorption of a His-tag antigen, three requirements have to be considered: the bio-recognition element, the driving forces for the adsorption process and the detection mode of the bio-recognition event. This work is focused on the study of the adsorption mechanism of the His-tag H49 Chagas antigen on Ni(II) modified substrates. In order to construct the bio-functional surface, the gen of the H49 Chagas antigen was modified to incorporate His6 moiety at the N-terminal (His6-H49). Then, its physical adsorption and bio-affinity interaction with the solid substrate was studied by reflectometry. Besides His-Ni(II) bio-affinity interactions, His6-H49 was also physically adsorbed on Ni(II) modified substrates, leading to randomly oriented antigens. These loosely attached bio-molecules were partially removed using conditions of electrostatic repulsion. On the other hand, bio-affinity interactions, resulting in site-oriented molecules on the substrate, were only removable by specific competitors for Ni(II) surface sites. Finally, the surface bio-activity was determined from the peak separations of voltammetry waves due to the change of the electron transfer kinetics of a redox probe through the bio-functional surface (working electrode). PMID:24001449

  20. Driving forces for the adsorption of a His-tag Chagas antigen. A rational approach to design bio-functional surfaces.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Laura E; Smania, Andrea M; De Pauli, Carlos P; Giacomelli, Carla E

    2013-12-01

    In order to rationally design a bio-functional surface based on the adsorption of a His-tag antigen, three requirements have to be considered: the bio-recognition element, the driving forces for the adsorption process and the detection mode of the bio-recognition event. This work is focused on the study of the adsorption mechanism of the His-tag H49 Chagas antigen on Ni(II) modified substrates. In order to construct the bio-functional surface, the gen of the H49 Chagas antigen was modified to incorporate His6 moiety at the N-terminal (His6-H49). Then, its physical adsorption and bio-affinity interaction with the solid substrate was studied by reflectometry. Besides His-Ni(II) bio-affinity interactions, His6-H49 was also physically adsorbed on Ni(II) modified substrates, leading to randomly oriented antigens. These loosely attached bio-molecules were partially removed using conditions of electrostatic repulsion. On the other hand, bio-affinity interactions, resulting in site-oriented molecules on the substrate, were only removable by specific competitors for Ni(II) surface sites. Finally, the surface bio-activity was determined from the peak separations of voltammetry waves due to the change of the electron transfer kinetics of a redox probe through the bio-functional surface (working electrode).

  1. Mannose-Binding Lectin Inhibits the Motility of Pathogenic Salmonella by Affecting the Driving Forces of Motility and the Chemotactic Response

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Shuichi; Islam, Md. Shafiqul; Guo, Yijie; Ihara, Kohei; Tomioka, Rintaro; Masuda, Mizuki; Yoneyama, Hiroshi; Isogai, Emiko

    2016-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a key pattern recognition molecule in the lectin pathway of the complement system, an important component of innate immunity. MBL functions as an opsonin which enhances the sequential immune process such as phagocytosis. We here report an inhibitory effect of MBL on the motility of pathogenic bacteria, which occurs by affecting the energy source required for motility and the signaling pathway of chemotaxis. When Salmonella cells were treated with a physiological concentration of MBL, their motile fraction and free-swimming speed decreased. Rotation assays of a single flagellum showed that the flagellar rotation rate was significantly reduced by the addition of MBL. Measurements of the intracellular pH and membrane potential revealed that MBL affected a driving force for the Salmonella flagellum, the electrochemical potential difference of protons. We also found that MBL treatment increased the reversal frequency of Salmonella flagellar rotation, which interfered with the relative positive chemotaxis toward an attractive substrate. We thus propose that the motility inhibition effect of MBL may be secondarily involved in the attack against pathogens, potentially facilitating the primary role of MBL in the complement system. PMID:27104738

  2. A thermo-mechanical correlation with driving forces for hcp martensite and twin formations in the Fe–Mn–C system exhibiting multicomposition sets

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Jinichiro

    2013-03-15

    Thermodynamic properties of the Fe-Mn-C system were investigated by using an analytical model constructed by a CALPHAD approach. Stacking fault energy (SFE) of the fcc structure with respect to the hcp phase was always constant at T0, independent of composition and temperature when the other related parameters were assumed to be constant. Experimental limits for the thermal hcp formation and the mechanical (deformation-induced) hcp formation were separated by the SFE at T0. The driving force for the fcc to hcp transition, defined as a dimensionless value –dGm/(RT), was determined in the presence of Fe-rich and Mn-rich composition sets in each phase. Carbon tended to partition to the Mn-rich phase rather than to the Fe-rich phase for the studied compositions. The obtained results revealed a thermo-mechanical correlation with empirical yield strength, maximum true stress and maximum true strain. The proportionality between thermodynamics and mechanical properties is discussed.

  3. The spatial-temporal patterns and the driving forces of land-use/cover change in the Dongting Lake area of the middle Yangtze River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rendong; Liu, Jiyuan; Zhuang, Dafang; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2004-11-01

    Dongting Lake area, located on the southern bank of the middle Yangtze River in central China, is one of the regions experiencing rapid land use change and seriously suffering from flooding disaster in the country. In this paper, a series of land-use coverage was generated through visually interpreting Landsat MSS, TM and ETM images, of 1980, 1990 and 2000 respectively. Then, the spatial-temporal characteristics and the driving forces of the land use changes were analyzed in the study area. The results show that, from 1980 to 2000, the areas of farmland, woodland and non-used land decreased, while those of built-up land, water area and grassland increased. There was a significant shifting from farmland to water or built-up area, and the large-scale reclamation from the lake ever in history has not been found since 1980. The fastest changed area was in Shishou City, Yueyang City and Jinshi City, and the slowest in the eastern and southeastern area. About 49% of the changes were caused by the adjustment of agricultural economic structure, 29.75% by the urbanization and industrialization, and 21.41% by the environmental pressure. The policy, market price and tax on land products also have definitively influences on the land-use changes.

  4. A thermo-mechanical correlation with driving forces for hcp martensite and twin formations in the Fe–Mn–C system exhibiting multicomposition sets

    DOE PAGES

    Nakano, Jinichiro

    2013-03-15

    Thermodynamic properties of the Fe-Mn-C system were investigated by using an analytical model constructed by a CALPHAD approach. Stacking fault energy (SFE) of the fcc structure with respect to the hcp phase was always constant at T0, independent of composition and temperature when the other related parameters were assumed to be constant. Experimental limits for the thermal hcp formation and the mechanical (deformation-induced) hcp formation were separated by the SFE at T0. The driving force for the fcc to hcp transition, defined as a dimensionless value –dGm/(RT), was determined in the presence of Fe-rich and Mn-rich composition sets in eachmore » phase. Carbon tended to partition to the Mn-rich phase rather than to the Fe-rich phase for the studied compositions. The obtained results revealed a thermo-mechanical correlation with empirical yield strength, maximum true stress and maximum true strain. The proportionality between thermodynamics and mechanical properties is discussed.« less

  5. Fixed negative charge and the Donnan effect: a description of the driving forces associated with brain tissue swelling and oedema

    PubMed Central

    Elkin, Benjamin S.; Shaik, Mohammed A.; Morrison, Barclay

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral oedema or brain tissue swelling is a significant complication following traumatic brain injury or stroke that can increase the intracranial pressure (ICP) and impair blood flow. Here, we have identified a potential driver of oedema: the negatively charged molecules fixed within cells. This fixed charge density (FCD), once exposed, could increase ICP through the Donnan effect. We have shown that metabolic processes and membrane integrity are required for concealing this FCD as slices of rat cortex swelled immediately (within 30 min) following dissection if treated with 2 deoxyglucose + cyanide (2DG+CN) or Triton X-100. Slices given ample oxygen and glucose, however, did not swell significantly. We also found that dead brain tissue swells and shrinks in response to changes in ionic strength of the bathing medium, which suggests that the Donnan effect is capable of pressurizing and swelling brain tissue. As predicted, a non-ionic osmolyte, 1,2 propanediol, elicited no volume change at 2000×10−3 osmoles l−1 (Osm). Swelling data were well described by triphasic mixture theory with the calculated reference state FCD similar to that measured with a 1,9 dimethylmethylene blue assay. Taken together, these data suggest that intracellular fixed charges may contribute to the driving forces responsible for brain swelling. PMID:20047940

  6. Driving forces and risk management

    EPA Science Inventory

    From a public health perspective, food safety is the overall goal and there are two distinct areas where interventions to this end can take place – either pre- or post-harvest. In pre-harvest, water quality management is the focus whereas post-harvest quality management depends ...

  7. A Driving Force in NASCAR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Frank J.

    2007-01-01

    Minority participation and interest in sports is legendary--depending on what sport you are talking about. Blacks have long been a major factor in the popularity of basketball and football. Tiger Woods' success has contributed to an explosion of interest in golf within the Black community. Arthur Ashe brought tennis into the Black consciousness,…

  8. Driving forces push Italian exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Steven, R.R.

    1982-03-01

    The Italian offshore is one of the most active in Europe. Although it cannot be compared with the North Sea in terms of hydrocarbon production or potential, Italy is expending a great deal of effort in order to reduce imported oil and gas from the current level of around 90% of total domestic consumption of 147 million tons of oil equivalent a year. The drilling program, major targets, and development of new oil fields are discussed briefly. (JMT)

  9. Driving forces of researchers mobility

    PubMed Central

    Gargiulo, Floriana; Carletti, Timoteo

    2014-01-01

    Starting from the dataset of the publication corpus of the APS during the period 1955–2009, we reconstruct the individual researchers trajectories, namely the list of the consecutive affiliations for each scholar. Crossing this information with different geographic datasets we embed these trajectories in a spatial framework. Using methods from network theory and complex systems analysis we characterise these patterns in terms of topological network properties and we analyse the dependence of an academic path across different dimensions: the distance between two subsequent positions, the relative importance of the institutions (in terms of number of publications) and some socio–cultural traits. We show that distance is not always a good predictor for the next affiliation while other factors like “the previous steps” of the career of the researchers (in particular the first position) or the linguistic and historical similarity between two countries can have an important impact. Finally we show that the dataset exhibit a memory effect, hence the fate of a career strongly depends from the first two affiliations. PMID:24810800

  10. Simulation of an ac electro-osmotic pump with step microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byoung Jae; Lee, Seung-Hyun; Rezazadeh, Soghra; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2011-05-01

    Pumps with step microelectrodes subjected to an ac voltage are known to have faster pumping rates than those with planar asymmetric microelectrodes. The driving force for pumping in these systems is ac electro-osmosis. This paper aims to understand the flow behaviors of pumps with step microelectrodes by using a realistic model applicable to high external voltages. This model takes the steric effect due to the finite sizes of ions into account and copes with the exponential sensitivity of the counterion concentration to voltage. The effects on the pumping flow rate of varying the pump parameters were investigated. The geometrical parameters were optimized, and the effects of varying the ac frequency and amplitude were examined. The electrical potential of the fluid and the electrical charge at the electrode surface were solved simultaneously, and the Stokes equation was used to describe the fluid flow.

  11. Driving forces for metamorphic vein filling during bauxite dehydration: insights from Li and Al transfer illustrated by LIBS compositional profiles (Western Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verlaguet, Anne; Brunet, Fabrice; Goffé, Bruno; Menut, Denis; Findling, Nathaniel; Poinssot, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    In subduction zones, the significant amounts of aqueous fluid released in the course of the successive dehydration reactions occurring during prograde metamorphism are expected to strongly influence the rock rheology, as well as kinetics of metamorphic reactions and mass transfer efficiency. Mineralized veins, ubiquitous in metamorphic rocks, can be seen as preserved witnesses of fluid and mass redistribution that partly accommodate the rock deformation (lateral segregation). However, the driving forces and mechanisms of mass transfer towards fluid-filled open spaces remain somewhat unclear. The aim of this study is to investigate the vein-forming processes and the modalities of mass transfer during local fluid-rock interactions, and their links with fluid production and rock deformation, with new insights from Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) profiles. This study focuses on karstic pockets (metre scale) of Triassic metabauxites embedded in thick carbonate units, that have been isolated from large-scale fluid flow during HP-LT Alpine metamorphism (W. Vanoise, French Alps). These rocks display several generations of metamorphic veins containing various Al-bearing minerals, which give particular insights into mass transfer processes. It is proposed that the internally-derived fluid (~13 vol% produced by successive dehydration reactions) has promoted the opening of fluid-filled open spaces (euhedral habits of vein minerals) and served as medium for diffusive mass transfer from rock to vein. Based on mineralogical and textural features, two vein types can be distinguished: (1) some veins are filled with newly formed products of either prograde (chloritoid) or retrograde (chlorite) metamorphic reactions; in this case, fluid-filled open spaces seem to offer energetically favourable nucleation/growth sites; (2) the second vein type is filled with cookeite (Li-Al-rich chlorite) or pyrophyllite, which were present in the host-rock prior to the vein formation. In

  12. Interactions between seasonality and oceanic forcing drive the phytoplankton variability in the tropical-temperate transition zone (~ 30°S) of Eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armbrecht, Linda H.; Schaeffer, Amandine; Roughan, Moninya; Armand, Leanne K.

    2015-04-01

    The East Australian Current (EAC) has been shown to be warming rapidly, which is expected to cause latitudinal shifts in phytoplankton abundance, distribution and composition along the east Australian coast. Yet a lack of phytoplankton information exists northward of 34°S. Here, we provide the first detailed taxonomic time-series survey (monthly sampling for about one annual cycle, 2011-2012) in the east Australian tropical-temperate transition zone (~ 30°S, upstream of the EAC separation point at ~ 31-32°S). All phytoplankton (categorised depending on their association with specific water-types) show a seasonal signal with abundance maxima (minima) during summer (winter). This seasonal signal is most pronounced in the seasonal/bloom category and least expressed by deep-water taxa, which prefer cold, saline and dense bottom water independent of the season. Different extents of EAC encroachment onto the continental shelf drive the cross-shelf phytoplankton composition and distribution, such that a weak EAC is associated with phytoplankton community being organised along 'depth' and 'distance from the coast' gradients with high phytoplankton abundances inshore. A strong EAC favours the occurrence of warm-water taxa offshore and an increase in diatom abundance on the mid-shelf (53% shelf width). We conclude that the phytoplankton community in the tropical-temperate transition zone of Eastern Australia is driven by an interaction of intrinsic seasonal cycles and primarily EAC-driven oceanic forcing. Our findings benefit studies located in Western Boundary Current systems worldwide, in which warming and strengthening of these currents are predicted to severely impact phytoplankton dynamics.

  13. The SCOPSCO deep drilling program in ancient Lake Ohrid: Unravelling the driving forces of speciation in Europe's oldest and most biodiverse lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilke, Thomas; Wagner, Bernd; Albrecht, Christian; Levkov, Zlatko; Francke, Alexander; Hauffe, Torsten; Cvetkoska, Aleksandra; Jovanovska, Elena; Zhang, Xiaosen; Reed, Jane M.; Wagner-Cremer, Friederike; Stelbrink, Björn; Viehberg, Finn

    2015-04-01

    Ancient Lake Ohrid on the Balkan Peninsula constitutes the oldest and most biodiverse lake in Europe. The processes generating this extraordinary species richness with a high share of endemic taxa, however, are poorly understood. In order to unravel the geological and biological history of the lake and to study, among others, the influence of major geological and environmental events on the evolution of endemic taxa, an international research initiative - the SCOPSCO project - was launched. The project combines sedimentological, tephro-stratigraphical, seismic and paleontological (diatoms, mollusks, ostracods) studies of lake sediment cores with molecular-dating and empirical modelling approaches applied to extant taxa. Preliminary analyses of sediment core and borehole logging data from drill sites with a maximum penetration depth of 569 m below lake floor and an overall recovery of > 95 % indicate that Lake Ohrid is roughly 1.3 to 1.5 My old. Intriguingly, these data fully reinforce the results of molecular clock analyses conducted prior to the drilling operation. Moreover, the combined geological and biological studies suggest that the extraordinary biodiversity in Lake Ohrid is largely driven by 1) the long and continuous existence of the lake, 2) the lack of catastrophic events (e.g., desiccation, full glaciation or salinization) during its lifetime potentially causing massive extinctions, 3) the high buffer capacity of the lake to environmental change and/or the high resilience of its taxa, and 4) distinct turnovers in species composition over time promoting frequency dependent selection. The cumulative effect of these factors, in turn, resulted in overall low extinction rates and continuous speciation and radiation events. These findings not only shed new light on patterns and processes of evolution in Europe's oldest lake, they also show that data from sediment cores can contribute to a better understanding of the driving forces of biotic evolution

  14. Study on HCl Driving Force for the Reaction of NaCl-Maleic Acid Mixing Single Droplet Using Micro-FTIR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiang; Zhang, Yunhong

    2016-04-01

    Chemical aging is the one of the most important physicochemical process in atmospheric aerosols. Mixing of sea salt and water-soluble organic components has profound effects on the volatile characteristic and evolving chemical composition of the anthropogenic origin aerosols, which are poorly understood. In this study, the chemical reaction behavior of the mixture of NaCl and maleic acid (H2MA) micron-level single droplet was investigated using a gas-flow system combined with microscopic Fourier transform infrared (micro-FTIR) spectrometer over the range of relative humidity (63˜95% RH) for the first time. The results showed that the mixture of NaCl and H2MA single droplet could react to form monosodium maleate salt (NaHMA) at the constant RH from the characterization of the FTIR. The reaction is a result of an acid displacement reaction R1, which is driven by high volatility of the HCl product. NaCl(aq)+H2MA(aq)=NaHMA(aq)+HCl(aq,g) (R1) According to the change tendency of the absorbance values of 1579 cm-1 COO- stretching band of the NaHMA dependent upon reaction times at different RHs, the growth range of the trend which could lead to the faster reaction rate was obvious at lower RH. The water content of the droplet was also more likely to reduce rapidly with the loss of the RH from the absorbance changes of 3400 cm-1H2O stretching band dependent upon reaction times. These may be due to irreversible evaporation of HCl gas which is the main driving force for this type of reaction and the NaHMA is a less hygroscopic component compared to H2MA. And the HCl gas is more likely to evaporate faster from the single droplet and promote the reaction rate and the consumption of water content at lower RH. These results could help in understanding the chemical conversion processes of water-soluble dicarboxylic acids to dicarboxylate salts, as well as the consumption of Cl in sea salt aerosols by organic acids in the atmosphere.

  15. Study on HCl Driving Force for the Reaction of NaCl-Maleic Acid Mixing Single Droplet Using Micro-FTIR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiang; Zhang, Yunhong

    2016-04-01

    Chemical aging is the one of the most important physicochemical process in atmospheric aerosols. Mixing of sea salt and water-soluble organic components has profound effects on the volatile characteristic and evolving chemical composition of the anthropogenic origin aerosols, which are poorly understood. In this study, the chemical reaction behavior of the mixture of NaCl and maleic acid (H2MA) micron-level single droplet was investigated using a gas-flow system combined with microscopic Fourier transform infrared (micro-FTIR) spectrometer over the range of relative humidity (63˜95% RH) for the first time. The results showed that the mixture of NaCl and H2MA single droplet could react to form monosodium maleate salt (NaHMA) at the constant RH from the characterization of the FTIR. The reaction is a result of an acid displacement reaction R1, which is driven by high volatility of the HCl product. NaCl(aq)+H2MA(aq)=NaHMA(aq)+HCl(aq,g) (R1) According to the change tendency of the absorbance values of 1579 cm‑1 COO‑ stretching band of the NaHMA dependent upon reaction times at different RHs, the growth range of the trend which could lead to the faster reaction rate was obvious at lower RH. The water content of the droplet was also more likely to reduce rapidly with the loss of the RH from the absorbance changes of 3400 cm‑1H2O stretching band dependent upon reaction times. These may be due to irreversible evaporation of HCl gas which is the main driving force for this type of reaction and the NaHMA is a less hygroscopic component compared to H2MA. And the HCl gas is more likely to evaporate faster from the single droplet and promote the reaction rate and the consumption of water content at lower RH. These results could help in understanding the chemical conversion processes of water-soluble dicarboxylic acids to dicarboxylate salts, as well as the consumption of Cl in sea salt aerosols by organic acids in the atmosphere.

  16. MEMS electrostatic inductive transformer using potassium ion electrets for up- or down-conversion of AC current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Masato; Moriyama, Takashi; Toshiyoshi, Hiroshi; Hashiguchi, Gen

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we report on a novel MEMS electrostatic inductive transformer using potassium ion electrets on mechanically movable silicon microelectrodes. The device consists of a pair of electrostatic comb drive actuators that share a common mass in the middle part of a spring-mass-spring system. When an excitation AC voltage is applied to the electrode of the input-port comb drive at its mechanical resonant frequency, the mass in the middle oscillates to generate electrostatic inductive charges on the electrodes of the output-port comb drive, which could be read out as an output current. By appropriately designing the ratio of force factors of input- and output-port comb drives, the device operates as a transformer to amplify the current at a high efficiency over of 90% under the optimal load condition.

  17. Frequency modulation drive for a piezoelectric motor

    DOEpatents

    Mittas, Anthony

    2001-01-01

    A piezoelectric motor has peak performance at a specific frequency f.sub.1 that may vary over a range of frequencies. A drive system is disclosed for operating such a motor at peak performance without feedback. The drive system consists of the motor and an ac source connected to power the motor, the ac source repeatedly generating a frequency over a range from f.sub.1 -.DELTA.x to f.sub.1 +.DELTA.y.

  18. Quality-Factor Enhancement of Nanoelectromechanical Systems by Capacitive Driving Beyond Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barois, T.; Perisanu, S.; Poncharal, P.; Vincent, P.; Purcell, S. T.; Ayari, A.

    2016-07-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems are considered as ultrasensitive devices for mass and force detection. Capacitive actuation is widely used in these devices but is known to degrade the quality factor of the resonator due to dc electrostatic damping. We report the enhancement of the quality factor of SiC vibrating nanowires detected nano-optomechanically and electrically by applying an ac capacitive driving at a frequency above both the resonance frequency and the electrical cutoff frequency. Self-oscillations are demonstrated for optimal conditions. We develop an analytical model of the phenomenon and show that it can lead to an improvement of the force sensitivity.

  19. Method of driving liquid flow at or near the free surface using magnetic microparticles

    DOEpatents

    Snezhko, Oleksiy; Aronson, Igor; Kwok, Wai-Kwong; Belkin, Maxim V.

    2011-10-11

    The present invention provides a method of driving liquid flow at or near a free surface using self-assembled structures composed of magnetic particles subjected to an external AC magnetic field. A plurality of magnetic particles are supported at or near a free surface of liquid by surface tension or buoyancy force. An AC magnetic field traverses the free surface and dipole-dipole interaction between particles produces in self-assembled snake structures which oscillate at the frequency of the traverse AC magnetic field. The snake structures independently move across the free surface and may merge with other snake structures or break up and coalesce into additional snake structures experiencing independent movement across the liquid surface. During this process, the snake structures produce asymmetric flow vortices across substantially the entirety of the free surface, effectuating liquid flow across the free surface.

  20. CONTROL ROD DRIVE

    DOEpatents

    Chapellier, R.A.

    1960-05-24

    BS>A drive mechanism was invented for the control rod of a nuclear reactor. Power is provided by an electric motor and an outside source of fluid pressure is utilized in conjunction with the fluid pressure within the reactor to balance the loadings on the motor. The force exerted on the drive mechanism in the direction of scramming the rod is derived from the reactor fluid pressure so that failure of the outside pressure source will cause prompt scramming of the rod.

  1. iDriving (Intelligent Driving)

    2012-09-17

    iDriving identifies the driving style factors that have a major impact on fuel economy. An optimization framework is used with the aim of optimizing a driving style with respect to these driving factors. A set of polynomial metamodels is constructed to reflect the responses produced in fuel economy by changing the driving factors. The optimization framework is used to develop a real-time feedback system, including visual instructions, to enable drivers to alter their driving stylesmore » in responses to actual driving conditions to improve fuel efficiency.« less

  2. [Driving forces of carbon emission from energy consumption in China old industrial cities: a case study of Shenyang City, Northeast China].

    PubMed

    Ren, Wan-Xia; Geng, Yong; Xue, Bing

    2012-10-01

    To quantitatively analyze the effects of anthropogenic factors on regional environmental quality is a hot topic in the field of sustainable development research. Taking the typical old industrial city Shenyang in Northeast China as a case, and by using the IPCC method for calculating carbon emission from energy consumption, this paper estimated the carbon emission from energy consumption in the city in 1978-2009, and a time series analysis on the anthropogenic factors driving this carbon emission was made by the STIRPAT model based upon Kaya equation and ridge regression. In 1978-2009, the carbon emission in the city had a slow increase first, slow decrease then, and a rapid increase thereafter. The total carbon emission in 2009 was 4.6 times of that in 1978. Population growth was the main factor driving the growth of the emission, and there existed an equal-proportional variation between the population growth and the carbon emission growth. Urbanization was another main driving factor followed by population growth, and the per capita GDP was positively correlated with the carbon emission. Kuznets curve did not exist for the relationship between economic development and carbon emission in Shenyang. Energy source intensity reduction (representing technology improvement) was the main factor driving the reduction of the total carbon emission.

  3. Drugged Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infographics » Drugged Driving Drugged Driving Email Facebook Twitter Text Description of Infographic Top Right Figure : In 2009, ... crash than those who don't smoke. Bottom Text: Develop Social Strategies Offer to be a designated ...

  4. Impaired Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Risk Factors BAC Effects Prevention Additional Resources How big is the problem? In 2014, 9,967 people ... Driving: A Threat to Everyone (October 2011) Additional Data Drunk Driving State Data and Maps Motor Vehicle ...

  5. Intermodulation electrostatic force microscopy for imaging surface photo-voltage

    SciTech Connect

    Borgani, Riccardo Forchheimer, Daniel; Thorén, Per-Anders; Haviland, David B.; Bergqvist, Jonas; Inganäs, Olle

    2014-10-06

    We demonstrate an alternative to Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy for imaging surface potential. The open-loop, single-pass technique applies a low-frequency AC voltage to the atomic force microscopy tip while driving the cantilever near its resonance frequency. Frequency mixing due to the nonlinear capacitance gives intermodulation products of the two drive frequencies near the cantilever resonance, where they are measured with high signal to noise ratio. Analysis of this intermodulation response allows for quantitative reconstruction of the contact potential difference. We derive the theory of the method, validate it with numerical simulation and a control experiment, and we demonstrate its utility for fast imaging of the surface photo-voltage on an organic photo-voltaic material.

  6. [Driving force analysis of land use change in the developed area based on Probit regression model: A case study of Nanjing City, China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Kang; Li, Yue-e; Wu, Qun; Shen, Jian-fen

    2015-07-01

    Based on the remote sensing image in 1996, 2002 and 2010, with the help of RS and GIS technology, and using the Probit regression model, this paper analyzed the characteristics of land use change in Nanjing City from 1996 to 2010, and the driving factors of land use change. The results showed that the cultivated land and woodland decreased, constructive land, garden plot and grassland continued to increase, and the comprehensive land use change rate was rising since 1996. The results of regression model for cultivated land and woodland change indicated that the change of cultivated land in the years 1996-2002 was mainly affected by the factors of "distance to the nearest rural settlement" and "farmers' population density". However, in the years 2002-2010 it was mainly affected by the factors of "change of per area GDP", "distance to the rural settlement" and "distance to the nearest road". The change of woodland in the years 1996-2002 was mainly affected by the factors of "the elevation" and "distance to the rural settlement". However, in the years 2002-2010 it was mainly affected by the factors of "change of per area GDP", "population density" and "distance to the nearest road". By comparison, the early driving factors of land use change were mainly natural factors, but in recent years, they were mainly social, economic and demographic factors. PMID:26710642

  7. [Driving force analysis of land use change in the developed area based on Probit regression model: A case study of Nanjing City, China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Kang; Li, Yue-e; Wu, Qun; Shen, Jian-fen

    2015-07-01

    Based on the remote sensing image in 1996, 2002 and 2010, with the help of RS and GIS technology, and using the Probit regression model, this paper analyzed the characteristics of land use change in Nanjing City from 1996 to 2010, and the driving factors of land use change. The results showed that the cultivated land and woodland decreased, constructive land, garden plot and grassland continued to increase, and the comprehensive land use change rate was rising since 1996. The results of regression model for cultivated land and woodland change indicated that the change of cultivated land in the years 1996-2002 was mainly affected by the factors of "distance to the nearest rural settlement" and "farmers' population density". However, in the years 2002-2010 it was mainly affected by the factors of "change of per area GDP", "distance to the rural settlement" and "distance to the nearest road". The change of woodland in the years 1996-2002 was mainly affected by the factors of "the elevation" and "distance to the rural settlement". However, in the years 2002-2010 it was mainly affected by the factors of "change of per area GDP", "population density" and "distance to the nearest road". By comparison, the early driving factors of land use change were mainly natural factors, but in recent years, they were mainly social, economic and demographic factors.

  8. Control rod drive

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Basil C.

    1986-01-01

    A control rod drive uses gravitational forces to insert one or more control rods upwardly into a reactor core from beneath the reactor core under emergency conditions. The preferred control rod drive includes a vertically movable weight and a mechanism operatively associating the weight with the control rod so that downward movement of the weight is translated into upward movement of the control rod. The preferred control rod drive further includes an electric motor for driving the control rods under normal conditions, an electrically actuated clutch which automatically disengages the motor during a power failure and a decelerator for bringing the control rod to a controlled stop when it is inserted under emergency conditions into a reactor core.

  9. QPSK modulation for AC-power-signal-biased visible light communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu-Feng; Yeh, Chien-Hung; Chow, Chi-Wai; Liu, Yang

    2013-01-01

    With the integration of light emitting diode (LED), visible light communication (VLC) can provide wireless communication link using the lightning system. Due to the consideration of power efficiency, AC-LED has the design of reducing energy waste with alternating current from the power outlet. In this work, we propose an AC-power-signalbiased system that provides communication on both DC-LED and AC-LED. The bias circuit is designed to combine ACpower signal and the message signal with QPSK format. This driving scheme needs no AC-to-DC converters and it is suitable for driving AC LED. Synchronization is completed to avoid threshold effect of LED.

  10. Measurement of Casimir Force between Monolithic Silicon Microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Lu; Chan, Ho Bun; Zou, Jie; Marcet, Zsolt; Bao, Yiliang; Rodriguez, Alejandro; Reid, Homer; McCauley, Alexander; Johnson, Steven; Kravchenko, Ivan

    2014-03-01

    We present measurements of the Casimir force between silicon components in a near-planar geometry. We create the device from a silicon-on-insulator wafer using microfabrication. It contains a force-sensing micromechanical beam and an electrostatic comb actuator for controlling the distance. The two lithographically-defined micromechanical components are on the same silicon substrate and are automatically aligned after fabrication. Thus, we can achieve a high degree of parallelism between the two interacting surfaces. We employ a magneto-motive technique to measure the shift in the resonance frequency of the force sensing beam. Periodic Lorentz forces are exerted on the beam when an ac current is applied in a perpendicular magnetic field. As the movable electrode is pushed towards the silicon beam by the comb drives, the Casimir force increases. The force gradient is proportional to the resonance frequency shift of the beam. After the calibration using electrostatic forces and balancing the residual voltage, we measure the Casimir force gradient. Our results are in reasonable agreement with theoretical calculations, considering possible contributions of patch potentials. Apart from providing a compact platform for Casimir force measurements, this scheme also opens new opportunities for the measurement of Casimir force in complex geometries.

  11. Pile Driving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Machine-oriented structural engineering firm TERA, Inc. is engaged in a project to evaluate the reliability of offshore pile driving prediction methods to eventually predict the best pile driving technique for each new offshore oil platform. Phase I Pile driving records of 48 offshore platforms including such information as blow counts, soil composition and pertinent construction details were digitized. In Phase II, pile driving records were statistically compared with current methods of prediction. Result was development of modular software, the CRIPS80 Software Design Analyzer System, that companies can use to evaluate other prediction procedures or other data bases.

  12. ACS: ALMA Common Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiozzi, Gianluca; Šekoranja, Matej

    2013-02-01

    ALMA Common Software (ACS) provides a software infrastructure common to all ALMA partners and consists of a documented collection of common patterns and components which implement those patterns. The heart of ACS is based on a distributed Component-Container model, with ACS Components implemented as CORBA objects in any of the supported programming languages. ACS provides common CORBA-based services such as logging, error and alarm management, configuration database and lifecycle management. Although designed for ALMA, ACS can and is being used in other control systems and distributed software projects, since it implements proven design patterns using state of the art, reliable technology. It also allows, through the use of well-known standard constructs and components, that other team members whom are not authors of ACS easily understand the architecture of software modules, making maintenance affordable even on a very large project.

  13. Vegetation dynamics and its driving forces from climate change and human activities in the Three-River Source Region, China from 1982 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Chaobin; Wang, Zhaoqi; Chen, Yizhao; Gang, Chengcheng; An, Ru; Li, Jianlong

    2016-09-01

    The Three-River Source Region (TRSR), a region with key importance to the ecological security of China, has undergone climate changes and a shift in human activities driven by a series of ecological restoration projects in recent decades. To reveal the spatiotemporal dynamics of vegetation dynamics and calculate the contributions of driving factors in the TRSR across different periods from 1982 to 2012, net primary productivity (NPP) estimated using the Carnegie-Ames-Stanford approach model was used to assess the status of vegetation. The actual effects of different climatic variation trends on interannual variation in NPP were analyzed. Furthermore, the relationships of NPP with different climate factors and human activities were analyzed quantitatively. Results showed the following: from 1982 to 2012, the average NPP in the study area was 187.37gcm(-2)yr(-1). The average NPP exhibited a fluctuation but presented a generally increasing trend over the 31-year study period, with an increase rate of 1.31gcm(-2)yr(-2). During the entire study period, the average contributions of temperature, precipitation, and solar radiation to NPP interannual variation over the entire region were 0.58, 0.73, and 0.09gcm(-2)yr(-2), respectively. Radiation was the climate factor with the greatest influence on NPP interannual variation. The factor that restricted NPP increase changed from temperature and radiation to precipitation. The average contributions of climate change and human activities to NPP interannual variation were 1.40gcm(-2)yr(-2) and -0.08gcm(-2)yr(-2), respectively. From 1982 to 2000, the general climate conditions were favorable to vegetation recovery, whereas human activities had a weaker negative impact on vegetation growth. From 2001 to 2012, climate conditions began to have a negative impact on vegetation growth, whereas human activities made a favorable impact on vegetation recovery. PMID:27135584

  14. Vegetation dynamics and its driving forces from climate change and human activities in the Three-River Source Region, China from 1982 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Chaobin; Wang, Zhaoqi; Chen, Yizhao; Gang, Chengcheng; An, Ru; Li, Jianlong

    2016-09-01

    The Three-River Source Region (TRSR), a region with key importance to the ecological security of China, has undergone climate changes and a shift in human activities driven by a series of ecological restoration projects in recent decades. To reveal the spatiotemporal dynamics of vegetation dynamics and calculate the contributions of driving factors in the TRSR across different periods from 1982 to 2012, net primary productivity (NPP) estimated using the Carnegie-Ames-Stanford approach model was used to assess the status of vegetation. The actual effects of different climatic variation trends on interannual variation in NPP were analyzed. Furthermore, the relationships of NPP with different climate factors and human activities were analyzed quantitatively. Results showed the following: from 1982 to 2012, the average NPP in the study area was 187.37gcm(-2)yr(-1). The average NPP exhibited a fluctuation but presented a generally increasing trend over the 31-year study period, with an increase rate of 1.31gcm(-2)yr(-2). During the entire study period, the average contributions of temperature, precipitation, and solar radiation to NPP interannual variation over the entire region were 0.58, 0.73, and 0.09gcm(-2)yr(-2), respectively. Radiation was the climate factor with the greatest influence on NPP interannual variation. The factor that restricted NPP increase changed from temperature and radiation to precipitation. The average contributions of climate change and human activities to NPP interannual variation were 1.40gcm(-2)yr(-2) and -0.08gcm(-2)yr(-2), respectively. From 1982 to 2000, the general climate conditions were favorable to vegetation recovery, whereas human activities had a weaker negative impact on vegetation growth. From 2001 to 2012, climate conditions began to have a negative impact on vegetation growth, whereas human activities made a favorable impact on vegetation recovery.

  15. Dielectric Analysis for the Spherical and Rodlike Micelle Aggregates Formed from a Gemini Surfactant: Driving Forces of Micellization and Stability of Micelles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shanshan; Zhao, Kongshuang

    2016-08-01

    The self-aggregation behavior of Gemini surfactant 12-2-12 (ethanediyl-1,2-bis(dimethyldodecylammonium bromide)) in water was investigated by dielectric relaxation spectroscopy (DRS) over a frequency range from 40 Hz to 110 MHz. Dielectric determination shows that well-defined spherical micelles formed when the concentration of the surfactant was above a critical micelle concentration CMC1 of 3 mM and rodlike micelles formed above CMC2, 16 mM. The formation mechanism of the spherical micelles and their transition mechanism to clubbed micelles were proposed by calculating the degree of counterion binding of the micelles. The interactions between the head groups and the hydrophobic chains of the surfactant led to the formation of the micelles, whereas the transition is mainly attributed to the interaction among the hydrophobic chains. By analyzing the dielectric relaxation observed at about 10(7) Hz based on the interface polarization theory, the permittivity and conductivity of micelle aggregates (spherical and clubbed) and volume fraction of micelles were calculated theoretically as well as the electrical properties of the solution medium. Furthermore, we also calculated the electrokinetic parameters of the micelle particle surface, surface conductivity, surface charge density, and zeta potential, using the relaxation parameters and phase parameters. On the basis of these results, the balance of forces controlling morphological transitions, interfacial electrokinetic properties, and the stability of the micelle aggregates was discussed. PMID:27396495

  16. Hairless mutation: a driving force of humanization from a human–ape common ancestor by enforcing upright walking while holding a baby with both hands

    PubMed Central

    Sutou, Shizuyo

    2012-01-01

    Three major characteristics distinguish humans from other primates: bipedality, practical nakedness, and the family as a social unit. A hairless mutation introduced into the chimpanzee/human last common ancestor (CLCA) 6 million years ago (Mya) diverged hairless human and hairy chimpanzee lineages. All primates except humans can carry their babies without using their hands. A hairless mother would be forced to stand and walk upright. Her activities would be markedly limited. The male partner would have to collect food and carry it to her by hand to keep her and their baby from starving; irresponsible and selfish males could not have left their offspring. The mother would have sexually accepted her partner at any time as a reward for food. Sexual relations irrespective of estrus cycles might have strengthened the pair bond. Molecular and paleontological dating indicates that CLCA existed 6 Mya, and early hominin fossils show that they were bipeds, indicating that humanization from CLCA occurred rapidly. A single mutation in animals with scalp hair is known to induce hairless phenotype (ectodermal dysplasia). Bipedalism and hairlessness are disadvantageous traits; only those who could survive trials and tribulations in cooperation with family members must have been able to evolve as humans. PMID:22404045

  17. Distracted Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... combines all three types of distraction. 3 How big is the problem? Deaths In 2013, 3,154 ... European countries. More A CDC study analyzed 2011 data on distracted driving, including talking on a cell ...

  18. Head tilt during driving.

    PubMed

    Zikovitz, D C; Harris, L R

    1999-05-01

    In order to distinguish between the use of visual and gravito-inertial force reference frames, the head tilt of drivers and passengers were measured as they went around corners at various speeds. The visual curvature of the corners were thus dissociated from the magnitude of the centripetal forces (0.30-0.77 g). Drivers' head tilts were highly correlated with the visually-available estimate of the curvature of the road (r2=0.86) but not with the centripetal force (r2<0.1). Passengers' head tilts were inversely correlated with the lateral forces (r2=0.3-0.7) and seem to reflect a passive sway. The strong correlation of the tilt of drivers' heads with a visual aspect of the road ahead, supports the use of a predominantly visual reference frame for the driving task. PMID:10722313

  19. Probing cellular traction forces with magnetic nanowires and microfabricated force sensor arrays.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Chia; Kramer, Corinne M; Chen, Christopher S; Reich, Daniel H

    2012-02-24

    In this paper, the use of magnetic nanowires for the study of cellular response to force is demonstrated. High-aspect ratio Ni rods with diameter 300 nm and lengths up to 20 μm were bound to or internalized by pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs) cultured on arrays of flexible micropost force sensors. Forces and torques were applied to the cells by driving the nanowires with AC magnetic fields in the frequency range 0.1-10 Hz, and the changes in cellular contractile forces were recorded with the microposts. These local stimulations yield global force reinforcement of the cells' traction forces, but this contractile reinforcement can be effectively suppressed upon addition of a calcium channel blocker, ruthenium red, suggesting the role of calcium channels in the mechanical response. The responsiveness of the SMCs to actuation depends on the frequency of the applied stimulation. These results show that the combination of magnetic nanoparticles and micropatterned, flexible substrates can provide new approaches to the study of cellular mechanotransduction.

  20. Probing cellular traction forces with magnetic nanowires and microfabricated force sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Chia; Kramer, Corinne M.; Chen, Christopher S.; Reich, Daniel H.

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, the use of magnetic nanowires for the study of cellular response to force is demonstrated. High-aspect ratio Ni rods with diameter 300 nm and lengths up to 20 μm were bound to or internalized by pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs) cultured on arrays of flexible micropost force sensors. Forces and torques were applied to the cells by driving the nanowires with AC magnetic fields in the frequency range 0.1-10 Hz, and the changes in cellular contractile forces were recorded with the microposts. These local stimulations yield global force reinforcement of the cells’ traction forces, but this contractile reinforcement can be effectively suppressed upon addition of a calcium channel blocker, ruthenium red, suggesting the role of calcium channels in the mechanical response. The responsiveness of the SMCs to actuation depends on the frequency of the applied stimulation. These results show that the combination of magnetic nanoparticles and micropatterned, flexible substrates can provide new approaches to the study of cellular mechanotransduction.

  1. Protein–Protein Interfaces from Cytochrome c Oxidase I Evolve Faster than Nonbinding Surfaces, yet Negative Selection Is the Driving Force

    PubMed Central

    Aledo, Juan Carlos; Valverde, Héctor; Ruíz-Camacho, Manuel; Morilla, Ian; López, Francisco Demetrio

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory complexes are encoded by two genomes (mitochondrial DNA [mtDNA] and nuclear DNA [nDNA]). Although the importance of intergenomic coadaptation is acknowledged, the forces and constraints shaping such coevolution are largely unknown. Previous works using cytochrome c oxidase (COX) as a model enzyme have led to the so-called “optimizing interaction” hypothesis. According to this view, mtDNA-encoded residues close to nDNA-encoded residues evolve faster than the rest of positions, favoring the optimization of protein–protein interfaces. Herein, using evolutionary data in combination with structural information of COX, we show that failing to discern the effects of interaction from other structural and functional effects can lead to deceptive conclusions such as the “optimizing hypothesis.” Once spurious factors have been accounted for, data analysis shows that mtDNA-encoded residues engaged in contacts are, in general, more constrained than their noncontact counterparts. Nevertheless, noncontact residues from the surface of COX I subunit are a remarkable exception, being subjected to an exceptionally high purifying selection that may be related to the maintenance of a suitable heme environment. We also report that mtDNA-encoded residues involved in contacts with other mtDNA-encoded subunits are more constrained than mtDNA-encoded residues interacting with nDNA-encoded polypeptides. This differential behavior cannot be explained on the basis of predicted thermodynamic stability, as interactions between mtDNA-encoded subunits contribute more weakly to the complex stability than those interactions between subunits encoded by different genomes. Therefore, the higher conservation observed among mtDNA-encoded residues involved in intragenome interactions is likely due to factors other than structural stability. PMID:25359921

  2. Variable frequency drive applications guide

    SciTech Connect

    Laloudakis, D.J.

    1991-10-01

    Traditionally, fans and pumps have been designed to be capable of handling the maximum demand of the system in which they are installed. However, quite often the actual demand can vary and it can be much lower than the original design capacity. These situations have been corrected in the past through additions of outlet dampers to fans or throttling valves to pumps. While these can be effective and simple controls they severely affect the efficiency of the system. Variable frequency (speed) is the most efficient means of capacity control. The most cost effective method of achieving variable speed capacity control is using AC adjustable frequency drives. AC adjustable frequency controls convert any fixed speed AC motor into an adjustable speed device. Adjusting the speed of a motor, by controlling the frequency of the AC power to that motor, reduces its horsepower requirements. According to pump and fan laws, capacity is proportional to speed while horsepower is proportional to the cube of the speed. Therefore, by reducing the speed of an AC motor by 20 percent the horsepower requirement is reduced by nearly 50 percent. Reduced speed through variable frequency control allows for flexibility of meeting changing weather and comfort requirements without operating costly equipment at full capacity.

  3. 40 CFR 86.167-17 - AC17 Air Conditioning Emissions Test Procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... New Otto-Cycle Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.167-17 AC17 Air Conditioning...-conditioning cycle, a 30-minute soak period under simulated solar heat, followed by measurement of emissions over an SC03 drive cycle and a Highway Fuel Economy Driving Schedule (HFET) drive cycle. The vehicle...

  4. Microfabricated AC impedance sensor

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter; Ackler, Harold D.; Becker, Frederick; Boser, Bernhard E.; Eldredge, Adam B.; Fuller, Christopher K.; Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Hamilton, Julie K.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Wang, Xiao-Bo

    2002-01-01

    A microfabricated instrument for detecting and identifying cells and other particles based on alternating current (AC) impedance measurements. The microfabricated AC impedance sensor includes two critical elements: 1) a microfluidic chip, preferably of glass substrates, having at least one microchannel therein and with electrodes patterned on both substrates, and 2) electrical circuits that connect to the electrodes on the microfluidic chip and detect signals associated with particles traveling down the microchannels. These circuits enable multiple AC impedance measurements of individual particles at high throughput rates with sufficient resolution to identify different particle and cell types as appropriate for environmental detection and clinical diagnostic applications.

  5. Amplification of actin polymerization forces

    PubMed Central

    Dmitrieff, Serge; Nédélec, François

    2016-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton drives many essential processes in vivo, using molecular motors and actin assembly as force generators. We discuss here the propagation of forces caused by actin polymerization, highlighting simple configurations where the force developed by the network can exceed the sum of the polymerization forces from all filaments. PMID:27002174

  6. Electric vehicle drive train with contactor protection

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, C.E.; Benson, R.A.

    1994-11-29

    A drive train for an electric vehicle includes a traction battery, a power drive circuit, a main contactor for connecting and disconnecting the traction battery and the power drive circuit, a voltage detector across contacts of the main contactor, and a controller for controlling the main contactor to prevent movement of its contacts to the closed position when the voltage across the contacts exceeds a predetermined threshold, to thereby protect the contacts of the contactor. The power drive circuit includes an electric traction motor and a DC-to-AC inverter with a capacitive input filter. The controller also inhibits the power drive circuit from driving the motor and thereby discharging the input capacitor if the contacts are inadvertently opened during motoring. A precharging contactor is controlled to charge the input filter capacitor prior to closing the main contactor to further protect the contacts of the main contactor. 3 figures.

  7. Electric vehicle drive train with contactor protection

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, Charles E.; Benson, Ralph A.

    1994-01-01

    A drive train for an electric vehicle includes a traction battery, a power drive circuit, a main contactor for connecting and disconnecting the traction battery and the power drive circuit, a voltage detector across contacts of the main contactor, and a controller for controlling the main contactor to prevent movement of its contacts to the closed position when the voltage across the contacts exceeds a predetermined threshold, to thereby protect the contacts of the contactor. The power drive circuit includes an electric traction motor and a DC-to-AC inverter with a capacitive input filter. The controller also inhibits the power drive circuit from driving the motor and thereby discharging the input capacitor if the contacts are inadvertently opened during motoring. A precharging contactor is controlled to charge the input filter capacitor prior to closing the main contactor to further protect the contacts of the main contactor.

  8. Isolation of sequences flanking Ac insertion sites by Ac casting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dafang; Peterson, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Localizing Ac insertions is a fundamental task in studying Ac-induced mutation and chromosomal rearrangements involving Ac elements. Researchers may sometimes be faced with the situation in which the sequence flanking one side of an Ac/Ds element is known, but the other flank is unknown. Or, a researcher may have a small sequence surrounding the Ac/Ds insertion site and needs to obtain additional flanking genomic sequences. One way to rapidly clone unknown Ac/Ds flanking sequences is via a PCR-based method termed Ac casting. This approach utilizes the somatic transposition activity of Ac during plant development, and provides an efficient means for short-range genome walking. Here we describe the principle of Ac casting, and show how it can be applied to isolate Ac macrotransposon insertion sites.

  9. [Study on the types and water pollution driving forces of the typical and medium-small-sized cities in the southern China based on the analysis of water environment].

    PubMed

    Jiao, Shi-Xing; Wang, La-Chun; Huo, Yu; Chen, Chang-Chun; Teng, Juan

    2009-07-15

    According to the major pollution sources of urban water environment, 10 indexes such as industrial sewage quantity were closen to establish evaluation indexes system about the types and influencing factors of the typical and medium-small-sized cities in the southern China. Case studies of 16 typical and medium-small-sized cities were taken in Jiangsu, Zhejiang, Hubei and Anhui provinces. Combined with SPSS 11.0 cluster analysis results, city types were divided in reference to the values of water resources comprehensive pollution indexes and economical development indexes. The driving forces about city water environment pollution were studied by principal component analysis method. The result indicates that the 16 cities belong to two categories and four sub-categories, which are rich economy as well as light pollution of water environment and poor economy as well as heavy pollution of water environment. The influencing factors of water environment pollution are in sequence of industrial water pollution, agricultural no-point source pollution and urban domestic water pollution. The main factors of water environment pollution influenced I category cities, II as well as IV category cities and III category cities are industrial water pollution, urban domestic pollution and agricultural no-point source pollution respectively.

  10. [Using the 'Driving Force - Pressure - State - Exposure - Effects - Action' (DPSEEA) model of the World Health Organization (WHO) for the analysis of risks related to the use of pesticides in agricultural activities in the state of Rio de Janeiro].

    PubMed

    Araújo-Pinto, Mariana de; Peres, Frederico; Moreira, Josino Costa

    2012-06-01

    This paper seeks to apply the DPSEEA model (WHO) to identify major health risks to rural workers and the environment associated with the intensive use of pesticides in the State of Rio de Janeiro, based on an analysis of official public documents and a review of the (national and international) literature. It emphasizes the two main representative branches of agriculture in the state: family farming in the mountain region and the monoculture of sugarcane in the flatlands. Results show that the bulk of the determinants identified in the DPSEEA Matrix are related to deficiencies in actions for monitoring and surveillance of pesticide use, as well as a lack of technical assistance provided by the Public Sector in Rio de Janeiro State. Most of the actions developed in the state address the effects of pesticide exposure and, to a lesser extent, exposure to these chemicals, failing to focus on the higher levels of the matrix (such as driving forces and pressure). These are considered, by several authors, as the most appropriate when tackling the complex and systemic issues, such as the scope of this paper. By means of this study, an attempt was made to enable the application of the DPSEEA Model to assist in environmental and occupational health surveillance initiatives.

  11. SCM-Forcing Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Xie, Shaocheng; Tang,Shuaiqi; Zhang,Yunyan; Zhang,Minghua

    2016-07-01

    Single-Column Model (SCM) Forcing Data are derived from the ARM facility observational data using the constrained variational analysis approach (Zhang and Lin 1997 and Zhang et al., 2001). The resulting products include both the large-scale forcing terms and the evaluation fields, which can be used for driving the SCMs and Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs) and validating model simulations.

  12. The community as a driving force.

    PubMed

    1993-12-01

    A Workshop on Effective Strategies for Sustainable Community-based Family Planning (FP) and Maternal and Child Health (MCH) was held on October 14-23, 1993, as part of an Asian regional project focusing on women. Bangladesh, China, Laos, Nepal, the Philippines, and Viet Nam were represented at the workshop. The program introduced participants to effective community participation strategies in FP and MCH in Indonesia and allowed for the exchange of information. The UN Population Fund expressed support and encouragement for the exchange and recognition of Indonesia's government support for efforts at regional exchanges. Indonesia established integrated service posts or "Posyandu" in villages during the 1980s for women volunteers as health advocates. FP/MCH was later integrated in these health posts. The service posts aim to reduce infant mortality and maternal mortality through growth monitoring of children aged under five years, provision of FP, nutrition services for pregnant mothers, immunization, and monitoring of high-risk pregnancies. Trained volunteers and community people are aides to either government personnel or nongovernmental (NGO) workers. The Indonesian government FP program evolved from a program "for" the people, to "with" the people, and finally "by" the people. Fees for contraception, which are still below retail prices, are being introduced as a means of achieving sustainability. The government trains doctors and midwives in FP. NGOs such as Yayasan Kusuma Buana (YKB) in Jakarta provide a mix of quality services. YKB is active in promoting awareness of FP. Community outreach is achieved through mothers' classes, urban Posyandu services, and training of traditional birth attendants. The Indonesian Planned Parenthood Association maintains self-reliance programs in FP/MCH. Day-care centers and youth counseling centers are used in promoting FP/MCH. YKB methods were demonstrated for workshop participants (posters used in local shops and awareness activities for school health programs). Workshop participants were exposed to many activities in FP/MCH. Participants learned the importance of government commitment and the importance of people's acceptance that FP is necessary for improving the quality of life.

  13. Refiners respond to strategic driving forces

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, R.G.

    1996-05-01

    Better days should lie ahead for the international refining industry. While political unrest, lingering uncertainty regarding environmental policies, slowing world economic growth, over capacity and poor image will continue to plague the industry, margins in most areas appear to have bottomed out. Current margins, and even modestly improved margins, do not cover the cost of capital on certain equipment nor provide the returns necessary to achieve reinvestment economics. Refiners must determine how to improve the financial performance of their assets given this reality. Low margins and returns are generally characteristic of mature industries. Many of the business strategies employed by emerging businesses are no longer viable for refiners. The cost-cutting programs of the `90s have mainly been realized, leaving little to be gained from further reduction. Consequently, refiners will have to concentrate on increasing efficiency and delivering higher value products to survive. Rather than focusing solely on their competition, companies will emphasize substantial improvements in their own operations to achieve financial targets. This trend is clearly shown by the growing reliance on benchmarking services.

  14. Corporate Universities: Driving Force of Knowledge Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rademakers, Martijn

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explain the rapid emergence of corporate universities on the basis of fundamental developments presently shaping the economy and society on a world-wide scale. Design/methodology/approach: Four key forms of innovation are identified and combined with the corporate university concept. The paper explains why corporate…

  15. Collaboration: The Driving Force for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rourke, James; Boone, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Nestled in the mountains and surrounded by Christmas tree farms, Ashe County Middle School is a small, rural school in the far northwest corner of North Carolina. Recognized nationally for its fine academic and co-curricular programs, the school prepares students for high school and real-life situations by teaching important concepts, essential…

  16. Pattern-formation under acoustic driving forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valverde, Jose Manuel

    2015-07-01

    Chemical and metallurgical processes enhanced by high intensity acoustic waves, thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators, fuel rods in nuclear reactors, heat exchanger tubes, offshore and vibrating structures, solar thermal collectors, acoustic levitators, microfluidic devices, cycling, musical acoustics, blood flow through veins/arteries, hearing in the mammalian ear, carbon nanotube loudspeakers, etc. The evolution of a myriad of processes involving the oscillation of viscous fluids in the presence of solid boundaries is up to a certain extent influenced by acoustic streaming. In addition to the sound field, viscous energy dissipation at the fluid-solid boundary causes a time-independent fluid circulation, which can lead to a significant enhancement of heat, mass and momentum transfer at large oscillation amplitudes. A particularly relevant phenomenon that can be notably affected by acoustic streaming is the promotion of sound waves by temperature gradients or viceversa (thermoacoustics), which is at the basis of potentially efficient and environmental friendly engines and refrigerators that have attracted a renewed interest in the last years. In the present manuscript, historical developments and the underlying basic physics behind acoustic streaming and thermoacoustics are reviewed from an unifying perspective.

  17. Input Power Quality Improvement in Switched Reluctance Motor Drive using Minnesota Rectifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, B.; Rajesh, M.

    2013-09-01

    This paper deals with an input power quality improvement in a midpoint converter based switched reluctance motor (SRM) drive at ac mains using Minnesota rectifier. Normally a midpoint converter is used as a power converter for SRM drive. Conventionally three phase ac mains fed bridge rectifier is used as a dc source to feed this power converter which produces high content of harmonics at ac mains with a very low power factor. The proposed Minnesota rectifier with a midpoint converter fed SRM drive improves the power factor at ac mains with low current harmonics. This method provides constant dc link voltage and balanced capacitor voltages of the midpoint converter. The Minnesota rectifier fed SRM drive is modelled and its performance is simulated in Matlab/Simulink environment. The performance of Minnesota rectifier is compared with a conventional bridge topology for SRM drive to demonstrate improved power quality at ac mains.

  18. Manipulating Flames with AC Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Kyle

    2013-11-01

    Time-oscillating electric fields applied to plasmas present in flames create steady flows of gas capable of shaping, directing, enhancing, or even extinguishing flames. Interestingly, electric winds induced by AC electric fields can be stronger that those due to static fields of comparable magnitude. Furthermore, unlike static fields, the electric force due to AC fields is localized near the surface of the flame. Consequently, the AC response depends only on the local field at the surface of the flame - not on the position of the electrodes used to generate the field. These results suggest that oscillating electric fields can be used to manipulate and control combustion processes at a distance. To characterize and explain these effects, we investigate a simple experimental system comprising a laminar methane-air flame positioned between two parallel-plate electrodes. We quantify both the electric and hydrodynamic response of the flame as a function of frequency and magnitude of the applied field. A theoretical model shows how steady gas flows emerge from the time-averaged electrical force due to the field-induced motion of ions generated within the flame and by their disappearance by recombination. These results provide useful insights into the application of AC fields to direct combustion processes.

  19. The Thermodynamics of Drunk Driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Robert Q.

    1997-05-01

    Chemical and instrumental tests for driving under the influence of alcohol (DUI) measure the concentration of ethanol in the breath (BrAC), while state DUI laws are described in terms of blood alcohol concentration (BAC). Consequently, accurate and fair conversion from BrAC to BAC is crucial to the judicial process. Theoretical treatment of the water-air-ethanol equilibrium system and the related blood-breath-ethanol system, based on principles from general chemistry and biology, yields an equation relating the ratio of BAC to BrAC to the absolute temperature of the breath, the fraction of water in the blood, and the enthalpy and entropy of vaporization of ethanol from aqueous solution. The model equation predicts an average value for the ratio of 2350+100, not significantly different from reported experimental values. An exponential temperature dependence is predicted and has been confirmed experimentally as well. Biological, chemical, and instrumental variables are described along with their contributions to the overall uncertainty in the value of BrAC/BAC. While the forensic science community uses, and debates, a fixed ratio of 2100, the theoretical model suggests that a value of 1880 should be used to reduce the fraction of false positives to <1%.

  20. Metal band drives in spacecraft mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maus, Daryl

    1993-05-01

    Transmitting and changing the characteristics of force and stroke is a requirement in nearly all mechanisms. Examples include changing linear to rotary motion, providing a 90 deg change in direction, and amplifying stroke or force. Requirements for size, weight, efficiency and reliability create unique problems in spacecraft mechanisms. Flexible metal band and cam drive systems provide powerful solutions to these problems. Band drives, rack and pinion gears, and bell cranks are compared for effectiveness. Band drive issues are discussed including materials, bend radius, fabrication, attachment and reliability. Numerous mechanisms are shown which illustrate practical applications of band drives.

  1. Metal band drives in spacecraft mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maus, Daryl

    1993-01-01

    Transmitting and changing the characteristics of force and stroke is a requirement in nearly all mechanisms. Examples include changing linear to rotary motion, providing a 90 deg change in direction, and amplifying stroke or force. Requirements for size, weight, efficiency and reliability create unique problems in spacecraft mechanisms. Flexible metal band and cam drive systems provide powerful solutions to these problems. Band drives, rack and pinion gears, and bell cranks are compared for effectiveness. Band drive issues are discussed including materials, bend radius, fabrication, attachment and reliability. Numerous mechanisms are shown which illustrate practical applications of band drives.

  2. Tevatron AC dipole system

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.; Kopp, S.E.; Jansson, A.; Syphers, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The AC dipole is an oscillating dipole magnet which can induce large amplitude oscillations without the emittance growth and decoherence. These properties make it a good tool to measure optics of a hadron synchrotron. The vertical AC dipole for the Tevatron is powered by an inexpensive high power audio amplifier since its operating frequency is approximately 20 kHz. The magnet is incorporated into a parallel resonant system to maximize the current. The use of a vertical pinger magnet which has been installed in the Tevatron made the cost relatively inexpensive. Recently, the initial system was upgraded with a more powerful amplifier and oscillation amplitudes up to 2-3{sigma} were achieved with the 980 GeV proton beam. This paper discusses details of the Tevatron AC dipole system and also shows its test results.

  3. AC-3 audio coder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Craig

    1995-12-01

    AC-3 is a system for coding up to 5.1 channels of audio into a low bit-rate data stream. High quality may be obtained with compression ratios approaching 12-1 for multichannel audio programs. The high compression ratio is achieved by methods which do not increase decoder memory, and thus cost. The methods employed include: the transmission of a high frequency resolution spectral envelope; and a novel forward/backward adaptive bit allocation algorithm. In order to satisfy practical requirements of an emissions coder, the AC-3 syntax includes a number of features useful to broadcasters and consumers. These features include: loudness uniformity between programs; dynamic range control; and broadcaster control of downmix coefficients. The AC-3 coder has been formally selected for inclusion of the U.S. HDTV broadcast standard, and has been informally selected for several additional applications.

  4. ac bidirectional motor controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiner, K.

    1988-01-01

    Test data are presented and the design of a high-efficiency motor/generator controller at NASA-Lewis for use with the Space Station power system testbed is described. The bidirectional motor driver is a 20 kHz to variable frequency three-phase ac converter that operates from the high-frequency ac bus being designed for the Space Station. A zero-voltage-switching pulse-density-modulation technique is used in the converter to shape the low-frequency output waveform.

  5. Characterization of New Isolates of Apricot vein clearing-associated virus and of a New Prunus-Infecting Virus: Evidence for Recombination as a Driving Force in Betaflexiviridae Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Marais, Armelle; Faure, Chantal; Mustafayev, Eldar; Candresse, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Double stranded RNAs from Prunus samples gathered from various surveys were analyzed by a deep-sequencing approach. Contig annotations revealed the presence of a potential new viral species in an Azerbaijani almond tree (Prunus amygdalus) and its genome sequence was completed. Its genomic organization is similar to that of the recently described Apricot vein clearing associated virus (AVCaV) for which two new isolates were also characterized, in a similar fashion, from two Japanese plums (Prunus salicina) from a French germplasm collection. The amino acid identity values between the four proteins encoded by the genome of the new virus have identity levels with those of AVCaV which fall clearly outside the species demarcation criteria. The new virus should therefore be considered as a new species for which the name of Caucasus prunus virus (CPrV) has been proposed. Phylogenetic relationships and nucleotide comparisons suggested that together with AVCaV, CPrV could define a new genus (proposed name: Prunevirus) in the family Betaflexiviridae. A molecular test targeting both members of the new genus was developed, allowing the detection of additional AVCaV isolates, and therefore extending the known geographical distribution and the host range of AVCaV. Moreover, the phylogenetic trees reconstructed with the amino acid sequences of replicase, movement and coat proteins of representative Betaflexiviridae members suggest that Citrus leaf blotch virus (CLBV, type member of the genus Citrivirus) may have evolved from a recombination event involving a Prunevirus, further highlighting the importance of recombination as a driving force in Betaflexiviridae evolution. The sequences reported in the present manuscript have been deposited in the GenBank database under accession numbers KM507061-KM504070. PMID:26086395

  6. Characterization of New Isolates of Apricot vein clearing-associated virus and of a New Prunus-Infecting Virus: Evidence for Recombination as a Driving Force in Betaflexiviridae Evolution.

    PubMed

    Marais, Armelle; Faure, Chantal; Mustafayev, Eldar; Candresse, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Double stranded RNAs from Prunus samples gathered from various surveys were analyzed by a deep-sequencing approach. Contig annotations revealed the presence of a potential new viral species in an Azerbaijani almond tree (Prunus amygdalus) and its genome sequence was completed. Its genomic organization is similar to that of the recently described Apricot vein clearing associated virus (AVCaV) for which two new isolates were also characterized, in a similar fashion, from two Japanese plums (Prunus salicina) from a French germplasm collection. The amino acid identity values between the four proteins encoded by the genome of the new virus have identity levels with those of AVCaV which fall clearly outside the species demarcation criteria. The new virus should therefore be considered as a new species for which the name of Caucasus prunus virus (CPrV) has been proposed. Phylogenetic relationships and nucleotide comparisons suggested that together with AVCaV, CPrV could define a new genus (proposed name: Prunevirus) in the family Betaflexiviridae. A molecular test targeting both members of the new genus was developed, allowing the detection of additional AVCaV isolates, and therefore extending the known geographical distribution and the host range of AVCaV. Moreover, the phylogenetic trees reconstructed with the amino acid sequences of replicase, movement and coat proteins of representative Betaflexiviridae members suggest that Citrus leaf blotch virus (CLBV, type member of the genus Citrivirus) may have evolved from a recombination event involving a Prunevirus, further highlighting the importance of recombination as a driving force in Betaflexiviridae evolution. The sequences reported in the present manuscript have been deposited in the GenBank database under accession numbers KM507061-KM504070. PMID:26086395

  7. PEO-[M(CN)5NO](x-) (M = Fe, Mn, or Cr) interaction as a driving force in the partitioning of the pentacyanonitrosylmetallate anion in ATPS: strong effect of the central atom.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Luis Henrique M; da Silva, Maria C Hespanhol; Francisco, Kelly R; Cardoso, Marcus V C; Minim, Luis A; Coimbra, Jane S R

    2008-09-18

    The partitioning behavior of pentacyanonitrosilmetallate complexes[Fe(CN) 5 NO] (2-), [Mn(CN) 5 NO] 3(-), and [Cr(CN) 5 NO] 3(-)has been studied in aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS) formed by adding poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO; 4000 g mol (-1)) to an aqueous salt solution (Li2 SO4, Na2 SO4, CuSO4, or ZnSO4). The complexes partition coefficients ( K complex) in each of these ATPS have been determined as a function of increasing tie-line length (TLL) and temperature. Unlike the partition behavior of most ions, [Fe(CN) 5 NO] 2(-) and [Mn(CN) 5 NO] 3(-) anions are concentrated in the polymer-rich phase with K values depending on the nature of the central atom as follows: K [Fe(C N) 5 NO] 2 - > K [ Mn (CN 5 NO] 3 - > K [C r (C N) 5 NO ]3 - . The effect of ATPS salts in the complex partitioning behavior has also been verified following the order Li2 SO 4 > Na2 SO 4 > ZnSO4. Thermodynamic analysis revealed that the presence of anions in the polymer-rich phase is caused by an EO-[M(CN) 5 NO] ( x- ) (M = Fe, Mn, or Cr) enthalpic interaction. However, when this enthalpic interaction is weak, as in the case of the [Cr(CN) 5 NO]3(-) anion ( K [Cr(CN 5 NO] 3 - < 1), entropic driving forces dominate the transfer process, then causing the anions to concentrate in the salt-rich phase.

  8. Novel method for driving the ultrasonic motor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeoung woo; Dong, Shuxiang; Laoratanakul, Pitak; Uchino, Kenji; Park, Tae gone

    2002-10-01

    This paper reports a novel driving method for an annular plate-type ultrasonic motor. Instead of the direct current/alternating current (DC/AC) converter type driver using conventional electromagnetic transformer, a compact disc-type piezoelectric transformer is used to obtain high voltage output for driving the ultrasonic motor. The piezoelectric transformer is operated in the radial vibration mode at resonance frequency close to the resonance frequency of the ultrasonic motor. Later, it was found that the piezoelectric transformer could drive the ultrasonic motor, even if their resonance frequencies are not exactly the same by incorporating the matching network in the circuit. The maximum speed of the ultrasonic motor obtained by using this driving method is over 300 rpm. It is believed that the results of this study will have impact on the integration and miniaturization of the ultrasonic motor and its driving circuit.

  9. Novel method for driving the ultrasonic motor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeoung woo; Dong, Shuxiang; Laoratanakul, Pitak; Uchino, Kenji; Park, Tae gone

    2002-10-01

    This paper reports a novel driving method for an annular plate-type ultrasonic motor. Instead of the direct current/alternating current (DC/AC) converter type driver using conventional electromagnetic transformer, a compact disc-type piezoelectric transformer is used to obtain high voltage output for driving the ultrasonic motor. The piezoelectric transformer is operated in the radial vibration mode at resonance frequency close to the resonance frequency of the ultrasonic motor. Later, it was found that the piezoelectric transformer could drive the ultrasonic motor, even if their resonance frequencies are not exactly the same by incorporating the matching network in the circuit. The maximum speed of the ultrasonic motor obtained by using this driving method is over 300 rpm. It is believed that the results of this study will have impact on the integration and miniaturization of the ultrasonic motor and its driving circuit. PMID:12403137

  10. New levitation scheme with AC superconducting magnet for EDS MAGLEV system

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.H.; Lee, J.K.; Hahn, S.Y.; Cha, G.

    1996-09-01

    This paper proposes a new magnetic levitation scheme which is able to generate levitation force for all speeds including a standstill. Auxiliary wheels which are needed in EDS MAGLEV vehicle can be eliminated. This scheme uses AC superconducting magnets to generate levitation force. In this paper, magnetic fields, forces and power dissipations generated by AC magnets moving above a conducting slab are calculated analytically. Results of calculation show characteristics of EDS system with AC magnet, such as levitation force and loss, are superior to those of EDS system with DC magnets for all speeds.

  11. AC/RF Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  12. Fuzzy efficiency optimization of AC induction motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jani, Yashvant; Sousa, Gilberto; Turner, Wayne; Spiegel, Ron; Chappell, Jeff

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the early states of work to implement a fuzzy logic controller to optimize the efficiency of AC induction motor/adjustable speed drive (ASD) systems running at less than optimal speed and torque conditions. In this paper, the process by which the membership functions of the controller were tuned is discussed and a controller which operates on frequency as well as voltage is proposed. The membership functions for this dual-variable controller are sketched. Additional topics include an approach for fuzzy logic to motor current control which can be used with vector-controlled drives. Incorporation of a fuzzy controller as an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) microchip is planned.

  13. Perceived Danger while Intoxicated Uniquely Contributes to Driving after Drinking

    PubMed Central

    Morris, David H.; Treloar, Hayley R.; Niculete, Maria E.; McCarthy, Denis M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous findings suggest that alcohol alters perceptions of risky behaviors such as drinking and driving. However, studies testing these perceptions as a predictor of drinking and driving typically measure these perceptions while participants are sober. The present study tested whether the perceived danger of driving after drinking assessed while intoxicated was associated with increased willingness to drive and self-reported drinking-and-driving behavior over and above perceptions assessed while sober. Additionally, we tested the effect of acute tolerance on the perceived danger of driving after drinking assessed on the ascending and descending limbs of the breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) curve. Methods Eighty-two young adults attended two counterbalanced laboratory sessions. In one session, participants consumed a moderate dose of alcohol (men: .72 g/kg, women: .65 g/kg) and reported the perceived danger of driving and their willingness to drive at multiple points across the BrAC curve. On a separate occasion, participants remained sober and appraised the dangerousness of driving at a hypothetical, illegal BrAC. Results Perceptions of the dangerousness of driving following alcohol administration were associated with increased willingness to drive and higher rates of self-reported drinking-and-driving behavior over and above perceptions reported when sober. Furthermore, perceived danger was reduced on the descending limb of the BrAC curve, compared to the ascending limb, suggesting the occurrence of acute tolerance. Conclusions Results from this study suggest that intoxicated perceptions are uniquely associated with drinking-and-driving decisions and that the perceived danger of drinking and driving is lower on the descending limb of the BrAC curve. Efforts to prevent alcohol-impaired driving have focused on increasing awareness of the danger of driving after drinking. Prevention efforts may be enhanced by educating drivers about how intoxication

  14. AC power systems handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, J.

    1991-01-01

    Transient disturbances are what headaches are made of. Whatever you call them-spikes, surges, are power bumps-they can take your equipment down and leave you with a complicated and expensive repair job. Protection against transient disturbances is a science that demands attention to detail. This book explains how the power distribution system works, what can go wrong with it, and how to protect a facility against abnormalities. system grounding and shielding are covered in detail. Each major method of transient protection is analyzed and its relative merits discussed. The book provides a complete look at the critical elements of the ac power system. Provides a complete look at the ac power system from generation to consumption. Discusses the mechanisms that produce transient disturbances and how to protect against them. Presents diagrams to facilitate system design. Covers new areas, such as the extent of the transient disturbance problem, transient protection options, and stand-by power systems.

  15. Increased Ac excision (iae): Arabidopsis thaliana mutations affecting Ac transposition.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, P; Belzile, F; Page, T; Dean, C

    1997-05-01

    The maize transposable element Ac is highly active in the heterologous hosts tobacco and tomato, but shows very much reduced levels of activity in Arabidopsis. A mutagenesis experiment was undertaken with the aim of identifying Arabidopsis host factors responsible for the observed low levels of Ac activity. Seed from a line carrying a single copy of the Ac element inserted into the streptomycin phosphotransferase (SPT) reporter fusion, and which displayed typically low levels of Ac activity, were mutagenized using gamma rays. Nineteen mutants displaying high levels of somatic Ac activity, as judged by their highly variegated phenotypes, were isolated after screening the M2 generation on streptomycin-containing medium. The mutations fall into two complementation groups, iae1 and iae2, are unlinked to the SPT::Ac locus and segregate in a Mendelian fashion. The iae1 mutation is recessive and the iae2 mutation is semi-dominant. The iae1 and iae2 mutants show 550- and 70-fold increases, respectively, in the average number of Ac excision sectors per cotyledon. The IAE1 locus maps to chromosome 2, whereas the SPT::Ac reporter maps to chromosome 3. A molecular study of Ac activity in the iae1 mutant confirmed the very high levels of Ac excision predicted using the phenotypic assay, but revealed only low levels of Ac re-insertion. Analyses of germinal transposition in the iae1 mutant demonstrated an average germinal excision frequency of 3% and a frequency of independent Ac re-insertions following germinal excision of 22%. The iae mutants represents a possible means of improving the efficiency of Ac/Ds transposon tagging systems in Arabidopsis, and will enable the dissection of host involvement in Ac transposition and the mechanisms employed for controlling transposable element activity.

  16. Perceptions of breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) levels among a sample of bar patrons with BrAC values of 0.08% or higher.

    PubMed

    Martin, Ryan J; Chaney, Beth H; Cremeens-Matthews, Jennifer; Vail-Smith, Karen

    2016-09-01

    Breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) is a commonly used measure of alcohol intoxication. Because of the potential negative consequences of excessive alcohol consumption, it is important to examine how accurately intoxicated individuals can estimate their BrAC values, especially individuals over the legal BrAC driving threshold (i.e., 0.08%). To better understand perceptions of BrAC values among intoxicated individuals, this field study examined actual BrAC values and BrAC range estimates (0.08% and above, 0.02-0.07%, less than 0.02%) among a sample of bar patrons (N = 454) with BrAC levels at 0.08% or higher. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to examine the relationship between actual BrAC values and perceived BrAC levels. We also examined whether the following demographic and drinking variables were associated with underestimating BrAC in this sample: gender, age, race, college student status, plans to get home, and hazardous drinking. Results indicated that the majority (60.4%) of participants underestimated their BrAC (i.e., less than 0.08%) and lower BrAC values correlated with underestimating BrAC ranges (p < .001, 95% CI[0.2, 0.6]). Further, females (p = .001, 95% CI[1.3, 3.3]) and participants under 21 (p = .039, 95% CI = 1.0, 2.6) were significantly more likely to estimate their BrAC to be less than 0.08%, which is concerning given that young (less than 21) intoxicated females are a group at high risk for sexual assault on college campuses. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27631614

  17. The ac propulsion system for an electric vehicle, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geppert, S.

    1981-01-01

    A functional prototype of an electric vehicle ac propulsion system was built consisting of a 18.65 kW rated ac induction traction motor, pulse width modulated (PWM) transistorized inverter, two speed mechanically shifted automatic transmission, and an overall drive/vehicle controller. Design developmental steps, and test results of individual components and the complex system on an instrumented test frame are described. Computer models were developed for the inverter, motor and a representative vehicle. A preliminary reliability model and failure modes effects analysis are given.

  18. Interplay between electron overheating and ac Josephson effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Cecco, A.; Le Calvez, K.; Sacépé, B.; Winkelmann, C. B.; Courtois, H.

    2016-05-01

    We study the response of high-critical-current proximity Josephson junctions to a microwave excitation. Electron overheating in such devices is known to create hysteretic dc voltage-current characteristics. Here we demonstrate that it also strongly influences the ac response. The interplay of electron overheating and ac Josephson dynamics is revealed by the evolution of the Shapiro steps with the microwave drive amplitude. Extending the resistively shunted Josephson junction model by including a thermal balance for the electronic bath coupled to phonons, a strong electron overheating is obtained.

  19. Wind-powered asynchronous AC/DC/AC converter system. [for electric power supply regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reitan, D. K.

    1973-01-01

    Two asynchronous ac/dc/ac systems are modelled that utilize wind power to drive a variable or constant hertz alternator. The first system employs a high power 60-hertz inverter tie to the large backup supply of the power company to either supplement them from wind energy, storage, or from a combination of both at a preset desired current; rectifier and inverter are identical and operate in either mode depending on the silicon control rectifier firing angle. The second system employs the same rectification but from a 60-hertz alternator arrangement; it provides mainly dc output, some sinusoidal 60-hertz from the wind bus and some high harmonic content 60-hertz from an 800-watt inverter.

  20. How mantle slabs drive plate tectonics.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Clinton P; Lithgow-Bertelloni, Carolina

    2002-10-01

    The gravitational pull of subducted slabs is thought to drive the motions of Earth's tectonic plates, but the coupling between slabs and plates is not well established. If a slab is mechanically attached to a subducting plate, it can exert a direct pull on the plate. Alternatively, a detached slab may drive a plate by exciting flow in the mantle that exerts a shear traction on the base of the plate. From the geologic history of subduction, we estimated the relative importance of "pull" versus "suction" for the present-day plates. Observed plate motions are best predicted if slabs in the upper mantle are attached to plates and generate slab pull forces that account for about half of the total driving force on plates. Slabs in the lower mantle are supported by viscous mantle forces and drive plates through slab suction. PMID:12364804

  1. How mantle slabs drive plate tectonics.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Clinton P; Lithgow-Bertelloni, Carolina

    2002-10-01

    The gravitational pull of subducted slabs is thought to drive the motions of Earth's tectonic plates, but the coupling between slabs and plates is not well established. If a slab is mechanically attached to a subducting plate, it can exert a direct pull on the plate. Alternatively, a detached slab may drive a plate by exciting flow in the mantle that exerts a shear traction on the base of the plate. From the geologic history of subduction, we estimated the relative importance of "pull" versus "suction" for the present-day plates. Observed plate motions are best predicted if slabs in the upper mantle are attached to plates and generate slab pull forces that account for about half of the total driving force on plates. Slabs in the lower mantle are supported by viscous mantle forces and drive plates through slab suction.

  2. Magnetostrictive direct drive motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, Dipak; Dehoff, P. H.

    1992-01-01

    A new rare earth alloy, Terfenol-D, combines low frequency operation and extremely high energy density with high magnetostriction. Its material properties make it suitable as a drive element for actuators requiring high output torque. The high strains, the high forces and the high controllability of Terfenol alloys provide a powerful and challenging basis for new ways to generate motion in actuators. Two prototypes of motors using Terfenol-D rods were developed at NASA Goddard. The basic principles of operation are provided of the motor along with other relevant details. A conceptual design of a torque limiting safety clutch/brake under development is illustrated. Also, preliminary design drawings of a linear actuator using Terfenol-D is shown.

  3. QUICK RELEASABLE DRIVE

    DOEpatents

    Dickson, J.J.

    1958-07-01

    A quick releasable mechanical drive system suitable for use in a nuclear reactor is described. A small reversible motor positions a control rod by means of a worm and gear speed reducer, a magnetic torque clutch, and a bell crank. As the control rod is raised to the operating position, a heavy coil spring is compressed. In the event of an emergency indicated by either a''scram'' signal or a power failure, the current to the magnetic clutch is cut off, thereby freeing the coil spring and the bell crank positioner from the motor and speed reduction gearing. The coil spring will immediately act upon the bell crank to cause the insertion of the control rod. This arrangement will allow the slow, accurate positioning of the control rod during reactor operation, while providing an independent force to rapidly insert the rod in the event of an emergency.

  4. The Energetics of Motivated Cognition: A Force-Field Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruglanski, Arie W.; Belanger, Jocelyn J.; Chen, Xiaoyan; Kopetz, Catalina; Pierro, Antonio; Mannetti, Lucia

    2012-01-01

    A force-field theory of motivated cognition is presented and applied to a broad variety of phenomena in social judgment and self-regulation. Purposeful cognitive activity is assumed to be propelled by a "driving force" and opposed by a "restraining force". "Potential" driving force represents the maximal amount of energy an individual is prepared…

  5. Turbulent current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbet, X.; Esteve, D.; Sarazin, Y.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ghendrih, P.; Grandgirard, V.; Latu, G.; Smolyakov, A.

    2014-11-01

    The Ohm's law is modified when turbulent processes are accounted for. Besides an hyper-resistivity, already well known, pinch terms appear in the electron momentum flux. Moreover it appears that turbulence is responsible for a source term in the Ohm's law, called here turbulent current drive. Two terms contribute to this source. The first term is a residual stress in the momentum flux, while the second contribution is an electro-motive force. A non zero average parallel wave number is needed to get a finite source term. Hence a symmetry breaking mechanism must be invoked, as for ion momentum transport. E × B shear flows and turbulence intensity gradients are shown to provide similar contributions. Moreover this source term has to compete with the collision friction term (resistivity). The effect is found to be significant for a large scale turbulence in spite of an unfavorable scaling with the ratio of the electron to ion mass. Turbulent current drive appears to be a weak effect in the plasma core, but could be substantial in the plasma edge where it may produce up to 10 % of the local current density.

  6. Safe driving for teens

    MedlinePlus

    Driving and teenagers; Teens and safe driving; Automobile safety - teenage drivers ... Make a Commitment to Safety Teens also need to commit to being safe and responsible drivers in order to improve the odds in their favor. Reckless driving ...

  7. Stability and skill in driving.

    PubMed

    Treffner, Paul; Barrett, Rod; Petersen, Andrew

    2002-12-01

    Two experiments addressed the relation between postural stability, perceptual sensitivity, and stability of driving performance. A vehicle was fitted with differential GPS for measuring position and speed, position sensors for measuring brake and accelerator depression, force transducers for measuring door, console and footrest bracing forces, and an accelerometer for measuring the 3D accelerations of the vehicle. In Experiment 1, we investigated whether the initiation of deceleration and the control of braking might be due to sensitivity to the perceptual variable tau, which specifies time-to-contact (TTC), and in particular, whether its first derivative, tau-dot, is used to maintain a constant deceleration profile. Using both untrained experienced drivers (EDs) and trained driving instructors from the Holden Performance Driving Centre (HPDC), results confirmed that, regardless of skill level, tau-dot was maintained at a value close to 0.5 and, as predicted by Lee [Perception 5 (1976) 437], braking was initiated when TTC approximately 5 s. In Experiment 2, we wished to quantify the purported differences in driving behaviour between EDs and HPDC instructors during a variety of everyday manoeuvres. Results indicated that instructors utilised a different cornering trajectory, a different emergency braking strategy, and were able to perform a high-speed swerve and recovery task more effectively than the EDs. In general, the instructors applied greater bracing forces using the door and console compared with EDs. The instructors also applied greater footrest forces during emergency braking than did the EDs. The greater use of bracing by instructor drivers to resist g-forces represents a strategy of active stabilisation that enhances both postural stability, as well as overall stability and consistency of driving performance. Results are discussed with regard to the dynamics of perceptual-motor coordination, and how increased stability might improve sensitivity to

  8. AC resistance measuring instrument

    DOEpatents

    Hof, P.J.

    1983-10-04

    An auto-ranging AC resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an AC excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance. After the auto-ranging and auto-compensation functions are complete, the microprocessor calculates the resistance of the load from the selected range resistance, the excitation signal, and the load voltage signal, and displays of the measured resistance on a digital display of the instrument. 8 figs.

  9. AC Resistance measuring instrument

    DOEpatents

    Hof, Peter J.

    1983-01-01

    An auto-ranging AC resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an AC excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance. After the auto-ranging and auto-compensation functions are complete, the microprocessor calculates the resistance of the load from the selected range resistance, the excitation signal, and the load voltage signal, and displays of the measured resistance on a digital display of the instrument.

  10. Development of a 10 kW High Temperature High Power Density Three-Phase AC-DC-AC SiC Converter

    SciTech Connect

    Ning, Puqi

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the development and experimental performance of a 10 kW, all SiC, 250 C junction temperature high-power-density three-phase ac-dc-ac converter. The electromagnetic interference filter, thermal system, high temperature package, and gate drive design are discussed in detail. Finally, tests confirming the feasibility and validating the theoretical basis of the prototype converter system are described.

  11. 32 CFR 634.15 - Restricted driving privileges or probation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Restricted driving privileges or probation. 634... (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION Driving Privileges § 634.15 Restricted driving privileges or probation. (a) For the Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and...

  12. 32 CFR 634.15 - Restricted driving privileges or probation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Restricted driving privileges or probation. 634... (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION Driving Privileges § 634.15 Restricted driving privileges or probation. (a) For the Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and...

  13. 32 CFR 634.15 - Restricted driving privileges or probation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Restricted driving privileges or probation. 634... (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION Driving Privileges § 634.15 Restricted driving privileges or probation. (a) For the Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and...

  14. 32 CFR 634.15 - Restricted driving privileges or probation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Restricted driving privileges or probation. 634... (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION Driving Privileges § 634.15 Restricted driving privileges or probation. (a) For the Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and...

  15. 32 CFR 634.15 - Restricted driving privileges or probation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Restricted driving privileges or probation. 634... (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION Driving Privileges § 634.15 Restricted driving privileges or probation. (a) For the Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and...

  16. Electric vehicle drive train components

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, F.

    1994-12-31

    Power Control Systems has developed a family of electric vehicle drive systems that range from 65 horsepower through 300 horse power. These propulsion systems support vehicle applications ranging from light cars and pickups to buses and trucks weighing as much as 40,000 lbs (18,400 kg). These robust systems are designed specifically for automotive applications including safety, electromagnetic emissions, and environment ruggedness. Dolphin Drive Systems are very flexible. Their inverter controllers are programmable and can be provided as stand alone components matched to customer specified motors. A selection of pre-calibrated systems including motor and inverter/controller can be provided. Accessory tools are also available for customer self programming. Dolphin Drive Systems provide precision control of AC induction motors providing excellent torque-speed performance usually eliminating the need for multistage transmissions. In addition, they are very efficient over a wide speed/torque range. This provides for excellent power management over a variety of continuous speed and stop and go applications.

  17. Identification of /sup 233/Ac

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Y.Y.; Zhou, M.L.

    1983-09-01

    We report in this paper identification of the new isotope /sup 233/Ac. Uranium targets were irradiated with 28 GeV protons; after rapid retrieval of the target and separation of actinium from thorium, /sup 233/Ac was allowed to decay into the known /sup 233/Th daughter. Exhaustive chemical purification was employed to permit the identification of /sup 233/Th via its characteristic ..gamma.. radiations. The half-life derived for /sup 233/Ac from several experiments is 2.3 +- 0.3 min. The production cross section for /sup 233/Ac is 100 ..mu..b.

  18. AC and DC power transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The technical and economic assessment of AC and DC transmission systems; long distance transmission, cable transmission, system inter-connection, voltage support, reactive compensation, stabilisation of systems; parallel operation of DC links with AC systems; comparison between alternatives for particular schemes. Design and application equipment: design, testing and application of equipment for HVDC, series and shunt static compensated AC schemes, including associated controls. Installations: overall design of stations and conductor arrangements for HVDC, series and shunt static AC schemes including insulation co-ordination. System analysis and modelling.

  19. Efficient Driving of Piezoelectric Transducers Using a Biaxial Driving Technique

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Efficient driving of piezoelectric materials is desirable when operating transducers for biomedical applications such as high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) or ultrasound imaging. More efficient operation reduces the electric power required to produce the desired bioeffect or contrast. Our preliminary work [Cole et al. Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. 2014;26(13):135901.] suggested that driving transducers by applying orthogonal electric fields can significantly reduce the coercivity that opposes ferroelectric switching. We present here the experimental validation of this biaxial driving technique using piezoelectric ceramics typically used in HIFU. A set of narrow-band transducers was fabricated with two sets of electrodes placed in an orthogonal configuration (following the propagation and the lateral mode). The geometry of the ceramic was chosen to have a resonance frequency similar for the propagation and the lateral mode. The average (± s.d.) resonance frequency of the samples was 465.1 (± 1.5) kHz. Experiments were conducted in which each pair of electrodes was driven independently and measurements of effective acoustic power were obtained using the radiation force method. The efficiency (acoustic/electric power) of the biaxial driving method was compared to the results obtained when driving the ceramic using electrodes placed only in the pole direction. Our results indicate that the biaxial method increases efficiency from 50% to 125% relative to the using a single electric field. PMID:26418550

  20. Efficient Driving of Piezoelectric Transducers Using a Biaxial Driving Technique.

    PubMed

    Pichardo, Samuel; Silva, Rafael R C; Rubel, Oleg; Curiel, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Efficient driving of piezoelectric materials is desirable when operating transducers for biomedical applications such as high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) or ultrasound imaging. More efficient operation reduces the electric power required to produce the desired bioeffect or contrast. Our preliminary work [Cole et al. Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter. 2014;26(13):135901.] suggested that driving transducers by applying orthogonal electric fields can significantly reduce the coercivity that opposes ferroelectric switching. We present here the experimental validation of this biaxial driving technique using piezoelectric ceramics typically used in HIFU. A set of narrow-band transducers was fabricated with two sets of electrodes placed in an orthogonal configuration (following the propagation and the lateral mode). The geometry of the ceramic was chosen to have a resonance frequency similar for the propagation and the lateral mode. The average (± s.d.) resonance frequency of the samples was 465.1 (± 1.5) kHz. Experiments were conducted in which each pair of electrodes was driven independently and measurements of effective acoustic power were obtained using the radiation force method. The efficiency (acoustic/electric power) of the biaxial driving method was compared to the results obtained when driving the ceramic using electrodes placed only in the pole direction. Our results indicate that the biaxial method increases efficiency from 50% to 125% relative to the using a single electric field.

  1. Dynamic properties of force fields.

    PubMed

    Vitalini, F; Mey, A S J S; Noé, F; Keller, B G

    2015-02-28

    Molecular-dynamics simulations are increasingly used to study dynamic properties of biological systems. With this development, the ability of force fields to successfully predict relaxation timescales and the associated conformational exchange processes moves into focus. We assess to what extent the dynamic properties of model peptides (Ac-A-NHMe, Ac-V-NHMe, AVAVA, A10) differ when simulated with different force fields (AMBER ff99SB-ILDN, AMBER ff03, OPLS-AA/L, CHARMM27, and GROMOS43a1). The dynamic properties are extracted using Markov state models. For single-residue models (Ac-A-NHMe, Ac-V-NHMe), the slow conformational exchange processes are similar in all force fields, but the associated relaxation timescales differ by up to an order of magnitude. For the peptide systems, not only the relaxation timescales, but also the conformational exchange processes differ considerably across force fields. This finding calls the significance of dynamic interpretations of molecular-dynamics simulations into question.

  2. Camshaft driving system for internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Hiroshima, K.A.

    1987-06-23

    This patent describes camshaft driving system for a double overhead camshaft engine cylinder rows extend parallel to the crankshaft of the engine. The second cylinder row is rearwardly displaced from the first cylinder row in the axial direction of the crankshaft so that vacant spaces are formed respectively behind the first cylinder row and in front of the second cylinder row. All the pistons in the cylinders of the first and second cylinder rows are connected to the crankshaft and a pair of camshafts for driving the intake and exhaust valves are provided in the cylinder head of each cylinder row to extend in the direction of the crankshaft. The camshaft driving system comprises a timing pulley provided on one of the intake and exhaust camshafts of each cylinder row to rotate together with the camshaft; A crank pulley is driven by the crankshaft; A first driving force transmission means transmits rotation of the crank pulley to the timing pulleys of the first and second cylinder rows; a second driving force transmission means transmits rotation of the timing pulley of the first cylinder row to the other of the camshafts of the first cylinder row; and a third driving force transmission means transmits rotation of the timing pulley of the second cylinder row to the other of the camshafts of the second cylinder row. The second driving force transmission means is disposed in the vacant space behind the first cylinder row and the third driving force transmission means is disposed in the vacant space in front of the second cylinder row.

  3. DETAIL OF HEATING/COOLING SYSTEM, A/C MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT ROOM, FACING NORTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF HEATING/COOLING SYSTEM, A/C MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT ROOM, FACING NORTHEAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 34, Operations Support Building, Freedom Road, Southwest of Launch Stand CX-34, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  4. Digital ac monitor

    DOEpatents

    Hart, G.W.; Kern, E.C. Jr.

    1987-06-09

    An apparatus and method is provided for monitoring a plurality of analog ac circuits by sampling the voltage and current waveform in each circuit at predetermined intervals, converting the analog current and voltage samples to digital format, storing the digitized current and voltage samples and using the stored digitized current and voltage samples to calculate a variety of electrical parameters; some of which are derived from the stored samples. The non-derived quantities are repeatedly calculated and stored over many separate cycles then averaged. The derived quantities are then calculated at the end of an averaging period. This produces a more accurate reading, especially when averaging over a period in which the power varies over a wide dynamic range. Frequency is measured by timing three cycles of the voltage waveform using the upward zero crossover point as a starting point for a digital timer. 24 figs.

  5. Digital ac monitor

    DOEpatents

    Hart, George W.; Kern, Jr., Edward C.

    1987-06-09

    An apparatus and method is provided for monitoring a plurality of analog ac circuits by sampling the voltage and current waveform in each circuit at predetermined intervals, converting the analog current and voltage samples to digital format, storing the digitized current and voltage samples and using the stored digitized current and voltage samples to calculate a variety of electrical parameters; some of which are derived from the stored samples. The non-derived quantities are repeatedly calculated and stored over many separate cycles then averaged. The derived quantities are then calculated at the end of an averaging period. This produces a more accurate reading, especially when averaging over a period in which the power varies over a wide dynamic range. Frequency is measured by timing three cycles of the voltage waveform using the upward zero crossover point as a starting point for a digital timer.

  6. Cooling Floor AC Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Lu; Hao, Ding; Hong, Zhang; Ce, Gao Dian

    The present HVAC equipments for the residential buildings in the Hot-summer-and-Cold-winter climate region are still at a high energy consuming level. So that the high efficiency HVAC system is an urgently need for achieving the preset government energy saving goal. With its advantage of highly sanitary, highly comfortable and uniform of temperature field, the hot-water resource floor radiation heating system has been widely accepted. This paper has put forward a new way in air-conditioning, which combines the fresh-air supply unit and such floor radiation system for the dehumidification and cooling in summer or heating in winter. By analyze its advantages and limitations, we found that this so called Cooling/ Heating Floor AC System can improve the IAQ of residential building while keep high efficiency quality. We also recommend a methodology for the HVAC system designing, which will ensure the reduction of energy cost of users.

  7. Extended Driving Impairs Nocturnal Driving Performances

    PubMed Central

    Sagaspe, Patricia; Taillard, Jacques; Åkerstedt, Torbjorn; Bayon, Virginie; Espié, Stéphane; Chaumet, Guillaume; Bioulac, Bernard; Philip, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Though fatigue and sleepiness at the wheel are well-known risk factors for traffic accidents, many drivers combine extended driving and sleep deprivation. Fatigue-related accidents occur mainly at night but there is no experimental data available to determine if the duration of prior driving affects driving performance at night. Participants drove in 3 nocturnal driving sessions (3–5am, 1–5am and 9pm–5am) on open highway. Fourteen young healthy men (mean age [±SD] = 23.4 [±1.7] years) participated Inappropriate line crossings (ILC) in the last hour of driving of each session, sleep variables, self-perceived fatigue and sleepiness were measured. Compared to the short (3–5am) driving session, the incidence rate ratio of inappropriate line crossings increased by 2.6 (95% CI, 1.1 to 6.0; P<.05) for the intermediate (1–5am) driving session and by 4.0 (CI, 1.7 to 9.4; P<.001) for the long (9pm–5am) driving session. Compared to the reference session (9–10pm), the incidence rate ratio of inappropriate line crossings were 6.0 (95% CI, 2.3 to 15.5; P<.001), 15.4 (CI, 4.6 to 51.5; P<.001) and 24.3 (CI, 7.4 to 79.5; P<.001), respectively, for the three different durations of driving. Self-rated fatigue and sleepiness scores were both positively correlated to driving impairment in the intermediate and long duration sessions (P<.05) and increased significantly during the nocturnal driving sessions compared to the reference session (P<.01). At night, extended driving impairs driving performances and therefore should be limited. PMID:18941525

  8. Dynamics and control of instrumented harmonic drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazerooni, H.; Ellis, S. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Since torque in harmonic drives is transmitted by a pure couple, harmonic drives do not generate radial forces and therefore can be instrumented with torque sensors without interference from radial forces. The installation of torque sensors on the stationary component of harmonic drives (the Flexipline cup in this research work) produce backdrivability needed for robotic and telerobotic compliant maneuvers. Backdrivability of a harmonic drive, when used as torque increaser, means that the output shaft can be rotated via finite amount of torque. A high ratio harmonic drive is non-backdrivable because its output shaft cannot be turned by applying a torque on it. This article first develops the dynamic behavior of a harmonic drive, in particular the non-backdrivability, in terms of a sensitivity transfer function. The instrumentation of the harmonic drive with torque sensor is then described. This leads to a description of the control architecture which allows modulation of the sensitivity transfer function within the limits established by the closed-loop stability. A set of experiments on an active hand controller, powered by a DC motor coupled to an instrumented harmonic drive, is given to exhibit this method's limitations.

  9. Coaxial Redundant Drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brissette, R.

    1983-01-01

    Harmonic drives allow redundancy and high out put torque in small package. If main drive fails, standby drive takes over and produces torque along same axis as main drive. Uses include power units in robot for internal pipeline inspection, manipulators in deep submersible probes or other applications in which redundancy protects against costly failures.

  10. Solar array drive system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkopec, F. D.; Sturman, J. C.; Stanhouse, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    A solar array drive system consisting of a solar array drive mechanism and the corresponding solar array drive electronics is being developed. The principal feature of the solar array drive mechanism is its bidirectional capability which enables its use in mechanical redundancy. The solar array drive system is of a widely applicable design. This configuration will be tested to determine its acceptability for generic mission sets. Foremost of the testing to be performed is the testing for extended duration.

  11. Drug addiction as drive satisfaction ("antidrive") dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kostowski, Wojciech

    2002-01-01

    Drug addiction is a complex brain disorder, characterized by the loss of control over drug seeking and drug taking behavior, and by the risk of relapse, even after a prolonged period of abstinence. This disorder may have its source in a disturbed balance of drive-related behaviors, which control appetitive reactions aimed at seeking contact with an addictive substance. The act of consumption becomes more and more attractive, and the behavior takes on compulsive character. We suppose that drug addiction may involve a change in the mechanism of satisfaction of drives and states of satiation as well. To understand how the motivational processes are changed with the development of dependence, one must consider the mechanism of drive satisfaction and satiation states that occur in relation to the consumatory reflex. When a given drive is satisfied a state of fulfillment occurs. This state may be a result of a so-called "antidrive" mechanism (Konorski 1967). While a drive activity is characterized by general activation and tension, the drive satisfaction state ("antidrive") is characterized by relaxation and relief. When a particular drive is satisfied, the operation of other drives become possible. Therefore, we postulate that dysfunction of drive satisfaction leads to the sustained activation related to the current drug-related drive, which blocks the operation of other drives. In effect, uncontrolled compulsive appetitive behavior is released, and the operation of other drives is restrained, thus forcing the organism to focus on drug-related drive. The reason for an "antidrive" dysfunction may be related to adaptive changes which develop during a contact with an addictive substance.

  12. AC propulsion system for an electric vehicle, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slicker, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    A second-generation prototype ac propulsion system for a passenger electric vehicle was designed, fabricated, tested, installed in a modified Mercury Lynx vehicle and track tested at the Contractor's site. The system consisted of a Phase 2, 18.7 kw rated ac induction traction motor, a 192-volt, battery powered, pulse-width-modulated, transistorized inverter packaged for under rear seat installation, a 2-axis, 2-speed, automatically-shifted mechanical transaxle and a microprocessor-based powertrain/vehicle controller. A diagnostics computer to assist tuning and fault finding was fabricated. Dc-to-mechanical-system efficiency varied from 78% to 82% as axle speed/torque ranged from 159 rpm/788 nm to 65 rpm/328 nm. Track test efficiency results suggest that the ac system will be equal or superior to dc systems when driving urban cycles. Additional short-term work is being performed under a third contract phase (AC-3) to raise transaxle efficiency to predicted levels, and to improve starting and shifting characteristics. However, the long-term challenge to the system's viability remains inverter cost. A final report on the Phase 2 system, describing Phase 3 modifications, will be issued at the conclusion of AC-3.

  13. Operation Method for AC Motor Control during Power Interruption in Direct AC/AC Converter System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shizu, Keiichiro; Azuma, Satoshi

    Direct AC/AC converters have been studied due to their potential use in power converters with no DC-link capacitor, which can contribute to the miniaturization of power converters. However, the absence of a DC-link capacitor makes it difficult to control the AC motor during power interruption. First, this paper proposes a system that realizes AC motor control during power interruption by utilizing a clamp capacitor. In general, direct AC/AC converters have a clamp circuit consisting of a rectifier diode(s) and a clamp capacitor in order to avoid over-voltages. In the proposed system, there is an additional semiconductor switch reverse-parallel to the rectifier diode(s), and the clamp capacitor voltage can be utilized for AC motor control by turning on the additional switch. Second, this paper discusses an operation method for AC motor control and clamp capacitor voltage control during power interruption. In the proposed method “DC-link voltage control”, the kinetic energy in the AC motor is transformed into electrical energy and stored in the clamp capacitor; the clamp capacitor is therefore charged and the capacitor voltage is controlled to remain constant at an instruction value. Third, this paper discusses a switching operation during power interruption. A dead-time is introduced between the operation of turning off all switches on the rectifier side and the operation of turning on the additional switch, which prevents the occurrence of a short circuit between the interrupted power source and the clamp capacitor. Finally, experimental results are presented. During power interruptions, an output current was continuously obtained and the clamp capacitor voltage was maintained to be equal to the instruction value of the capacitor voltage. These results indicate that both AC motor control and capacitor voltage control were successfully achieved by using the proposed system.

  14. ACS CCD Stability Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grogin, Norman

    2012-10-01

    A moderately crowded stellar field in the cluster 47 Tuc {6 arcmin West of the cluster core} is observed every four months with the WFC. The first visit exercises the full suite of broad and narrow band imaging filters and sub-array modes; following visits observe with only the six most popular Cycle 18 filters in full-frame mode. The positions and magnitudes of objects will be used to monitor local and large scale variations in the plate scale and the sensitivity of the detectors and to derive an independent measure of the detector CTE. One exposure in each sub-array mode with the WFC will allow us to verify that photometry obtained in full-frame and in sub-array modes are repeatable to better than 1%. This test is important for the ACS Photometric Cross-Calibration program, which uses sub-array exposures. This program may receive additional orbits to investigate ORIENT-dependent geometric distortion, which motivates the ORIENT and BETWEEN requirement on the first visit.

  15. Effect of different breath alcohol concentrations on driving performance in horizontal curves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingjian; Zhao, Xiaohua; Du, Hongji; Ma, Jianming; Rong, Jian

    2014-11-01

    Driving under the influence of alcohol on curved roadway segments has a higher risk than driving on straight segments. To explore the effect of different breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) levels on driving performance in roadway curves, a driving simulation experiment was designed to collect 25 participants' driving performance parameters (i.e., speed and lane position) under the influence of 4 BrAC levels (0.00%, 0.03%, 0.06% and 0.09%) on 6 types of roadway curves (3 radii×2 turning directions). Driving performance data for 22 participants were collected successfully. Then the average and standard deviation of the two parameters were analyzed, considering the entire curve and different sections of the curve, respectively. The results show that the speed throughout curves is higher when drinking and driving than during sober driving. The significant interaction between alcohol and radius exists in the middle and tangent segments after a curve exit, indicating that a small radius can reduce speed at high BrAC levels. The significant impairment of alcohol on the stability of speed occurs mainly in the curve section between the point of curve (PC) and point of tangent (PT), with no impairment noted in tangent sections. The stability of speed is significantly worsened at higher BrAC levels. Alcohol and radius have interactive effects on the standard deviation of speed in the entry segment of curves, indicating that the small radius amplifies the instability of speed at high BrAC levels. For lateral movement, drivers tend to travel on the right side of the lane when drinking and driving, mainly in the approach and middle segments of curves. Higher BrAC levels worsen the stability of lateral movement in every segment of the curve, regardless of its radius and turning direction. The results are expected to provide reference for detecting the drinking and driving state.

  16. AC photovoltaic module magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, C.; Chang, G.J.; Reyes, A.B.; Whitaker, C.M.

    1997-12-31

    Implementation of alternating current (AC) photovoltaic (PV) modules, particularly for distributed applications such as PV rooftops and facades, may be slowed by public concern about electric and magnetic fields (EMF). This paper documents magnetic field measurements on an AC PV module, complementing EMF research on direct-current PV modules conducted by PG and E in 1993. Although not comprehensive, the PV EMF data indicate that 60 Hz magnetic fields (the EMF type of greatest public concern) from PV modules are comparable to, or significantly less than, those from household appliances. Given the present EMF research knowledge, AC PV module EMF may not merit considerable concern.

  17. Control rod drive for reactor shutdown

    DOEpatents

    McKeehan, Ernest R.; Shawver, Bruce M.; Schiro, Donald J.; Taft, William E.

    1976-01-20

    A means for rapidly shutting down or scramming a nuclear reactor, such as a liquid metal-cooled fast breeder reactor, and serves as a backup to the primary shutdown system. The control rod drive consists basically of an in-core assembly, a drive shaft and seal assembly, and a control drive mechanism. The control rod is driven into the core region of the reactor by gravity and hydraulic pressure forces supplied by the reactor coolant, thus assuring that common mode failures will not interfere with or prohibit scramming the reactor when necessary.

  18. Alternating-Current Motor Drive for Electric Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauthamer, S.; Rippel, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    New electric drive controls speed of a polyphase as motor by varying frequency of inverter output. Closed-loop current-sensing circuit automatically adjusts frequency of voltage-controlled oscillator that controls inverter frequency, to limit starting and accelerating surges. Efficient inverter and ac motor would give electric vehicles extra miles per battery charge.

  19. Improved transistorized AC motor controller for battery powered urban electric passenger vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peak, S. C.

    1982-01-01

    An ac motor controller for an induction motor electric vehicle drive system was designed, fabricated, tested, evaluated, and cost analyzed. A vehicle performance analysis was done to establish the vehicle tractive effort-speed requirements. These requirements were then converted into a set of ac motor and ac controller requirements. The power inverter is a three-phase bridge using power Darlington transistors. The induction motor was optimized for use with an inverter power source. The drive system has a constant torque output to base motor speed and a constant horsepower output to maximum speed. A gear shifting transmission is not required. The ac controller was scaled from the base 20 hp (41 hp peak) at 108 volts dec to an expanded horsepower and battery voltage range. Motor reversal was accomplished by electronic reversal of the inverter phase sequence. The ac controller can also be used as a boost chopper battery charger. The drive system was tested on a dynamometer and results are presented. The current-controlled pulse width modulation control scheme yielded improved motor current waveforms. The ac controller favors a higher system voltage.

  20. 75 FR 45694 - ITS Joint Program Office; IntelliDriveSM

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... ITS Joint Program Office; IntelliDrive\\SM\\ Task Force Meeting; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Research and... Transportation Engineers (ITE) IntelliDrive Task Force on August 10 and 11, 2010 during the ITE's Annual meeting... purpose of the meeting is to review various aspects of the IntelliDrive research program and to...

  1. Cannabis effects on driving longitudinal control with and without alcohol.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Rebecca L; Brown, Timothy L; Milavetz, Gary; Spurgin, Andrew; Pierce, Russell S; Gorelick, David A; Gaffney, Gary; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2016-11-01

    Although evidence suggests cannabis impairs driving, its driving-performance effects are not fully characterized. We aimed to establish cannabis' effects on driving longitudinal control (with and without alcohol, drivers' most common drug combination) relative to psychoactive ∆(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) blood concentrations. Current occasional (≥1×/last 3 months, ≤3 days per week) cannabis smokers drank placebo or low-dose alcohol, and inhaled 500 mg placebo, low (2.9%), or high (6.7%) THC vaporized cannabis over 10 min ad libitum in separate sessions (within-subject, six conditions). Participants drove (National Advanced Driving Simulator, University of Iowa) simulated drives 0.5-1.3 h post-inhalation. Blood and breath alcohol samples were collected before (0.17 and 0.42 h) and after (1.4 and 2.3 h) driving. We evaluated the mean speed (relative to limit), standard deviation (SD) of speed, percent time spent >10% above/below the speed limit (percent speed high/percent speed low), longitudinal acceleration, and ability to maintain headway relative to a lead vehicle (headway maintenance) against blood THC and breath alcohol concentrations (BrAC). In N=18 completing drivers, THC was associated with a decreased mean speed, increased percent speed low and increased mean following distance during headway maintenance. BrAC was associated with increased SD speed and increased percent speed high, whereas THC was not. Neither was associated with altered longitudinal acceleration. A less-than-additive THC*BrAC interaction was detected in percent speed high (considering only non-zero data and excluding an outlying drive event), suggesting cannabis mitigated drivers' tendency to drive faster with alcohol. Cannabis was associated with slower driving and greater headway, suggesting a possible awareness of impairment and attempt to compensate. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Characterization and snubbing of a bidirectional MCT in a resonant ac link converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Tony; Elbuluk, Malik E.; Zinger, Donald S.

    1993-01-01

    The MOS-Controlled Thyristor (MCT) is emerging as a powerful switch that combines the better characteristics of existing power devices. A study of switching stresses on an MCT switch under zero voltage resonant switching is presented. The MCT is used as a bidirectional switch in an ac/ac pulse density modulated inverter for induction motor drive. Current and voltage spikes are observed and analyzed with variations in the timing of the switching. Different snubber circuit configurations are under investigation to minimize the effect of these transients. The results will be extended to study and test the MCT switching in a medium power (5 hp) induction motor drive.

  3. Circuit for Driving Piezoelectric Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, David P.; Chapsky, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    The figure schematically depicts an oscillator circuit for driving a piezoelectric transducer to excite vibrations in a mechanical structure. The circuit was designed and built to satisfy application-specific requirements to drive a selected one of 16 such transducers at a regulated amplitude and frequency chosen to optimize the amount of work performed by the transducer and to compensate for both (1) temporal variations of the resonance frequency and damping time of each transducer and (2) initially unknown differences among the resonance frequencies and damping times of different transducers. In other words, the circuit is designed to adjust itself to optimize the performance of whichever transducer is selected at any given time. The basic design concept may be adaptable to other applications that involve the use of piezoelectric transducers in ultrasonic cleaners and other apparatuses in which high-frequency mechanical drives are utilized. This circuit includes three resistor-capacitor networks that, together with the selected piezoelectric transducer, constitute a band-pass filter having a peak response at a frequency of about 2 kHz, which is approximately the resonance frequency of the piezoelectric transducers. Gain for generating oscillations is provided by a power hybrid operational amplifier (U1). A junction field-effect transistor (Q1) in combination with a resistor (R4) is used as a voltage-variable resistor to control the magnitude of the oscillation. The voltage-variable resistor is part of a feedback control loop: Part of the output of the oscillator is rectified and filtered for use as a slow negative feedback to the gate of Q1 to keep the output amplitude constant. The response of this control loop is much slower than 2 kHz and, therefore, does not introduce significant distortion of the oscillator output, which is a fairly clean sine wave. The positive AC feedback needed to sustain oscillations is derived from sampling the current through the

  4. Combination spindle-drive system for high precision machining

    DOEpatents

    Gerth, Howard L.

    1977-07-26

    A combination spindle-drive is provided for fabrication of optical quality surface finishes. Both the spindle-and-drive utilize the spindle bearings for support, thereby removing the conventional drive-means bearings as a source of vibration. An airbearing spindle is modified to carry at the drive end a highly conductive cup-shaped rotor which is aligned with a stationary stator to produce torque in the cup-shaped rotor through the reaction of eddy currents induced in the rotor. This arrangement eliminates magnetic attraction forces and all force is in the form of torque on the cup-shaped rotor.

  5. Driving and neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Uc, Ergun Y; Rizzo, Matthew

    2008-09-01

    The proportion of elderly people in the general population is rising, resulting in greater numbers of drivers with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. These neurodegenerative disorders impair cognition, visual perception, and motor function, leading to reduced driver fitness and greater crash risk. Yet neither medical diagnosis nor age alone is reliable enough to predict driver safety or crashes or to revoke the driving privileges of these individuals. Driving research utilizes tools such as questionnaires about driving habits and history, driving simulators, standardized road tests utilizing instrumented vehicles, and state driving records. Research challenges include outlining the evolution of driving safety, understanding the mechanisms of driving impairment, and developing a reliable and efficient standardized test battery for prediction of driver safety in neurodegenerative disorders. This information will enable healthcare providers to advise their patients with neurodegenerative disorders with more certainty, affect policy, and help develop rehabilitative measures for driving. PMID:18713573

  6. Dementia and driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... has dementia , deciding when they can no longer drive may be difficult. They may react in different ... that the person may not be able to drive safely, such as: Forgetting recent events Mood swings ...

  7. Gear bearing drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Brian (Inventor); Mavroidis, Constantinos (Inventor); Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A gear bearing drive provides a compact mechanism that operates as an actuator providing torque and as a joint providing support. The drive includes a gear arrangement integrating an external rotor DC motor within a sun gear. Locking surfaces maintain the components of the drive in alignment and provide support for axial loads and moments. The gear bearing drive has a variety of applications, including as a joint in robotic arms and prosthetic limbs.

  8. Sequential Dependencies in Driving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doshi, Anup; Tran, Cuong; Wilder, Matthew H.; Mozer, Michael C.; Trivedi, Mohan M.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of recent experience on current behavior has been studied extensively in simple laboratory tasks. We explore the nature of sequential effects in the more naturalistic setting of automobile driving. Driving is a safety-critical task in which delayed response times may have severe consequences. Using a realistic driving simulator, we find…

  9. Force Measurements in Vibration and Acoustic Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, T. D.

    1996-01-01

    The advent of triaxial, piezoelectric force gages and the associated signal processing is a precursor to several dynamics testing innovations. This new technology is applicable to spacecraft programs that JPL manages. An application of force measurement is force limiting (when testing spacecraft in random vibration tests). Base-drive and acoustic modal testing is a potential application.

  10. Driving gear interaxle differential assembly for all-wheel-drive vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Ashikawa, N.; Friedrich, K.; Lanzer, H.

    1986-05-20

    A driving gear is described for all-wheel-drive vehicles, comprising a reduction gear meshed with an output gear in a transmission, a planetary gear type interaxle differential gear arranged concentrically with the reduction gear so as to output the driving force therefrom into front and rear interwheel differential gears in a divided manner, a driving shaft provided through and concentrically with the interaxle differential gear so as to transmit one output therefrom to one of the two interwheel differential gears, and a driving gear member mounted on the driving shaft so that the driving gear member can be rotated relatively thereto, so as to transmit the other output from the interaxle differential gear to the other interwheel differential gear. The interaxle differential gear consists of a planetary carrier mounted rotatably on the driving shaft on the side of the driving gear member so as to form a clearance between the planetary carrier and the driving shaft, a support member mounted rotatably on the driving shaft so as to be opposed to the planetary carrier, and a ring gear, pinions and a sun gear which are provided between the planetary carrier and the support member, a connecting member which joins the ring gear and the driving shaft together being provided between the pinions and the support member. The driving shaft is provided with a spline for joining the connecting member thereto, the driving gear member being provided with a hub formed integrally therewith, extending from the clearance into the interaxle differential gear and having a connecting portion joined to the sun gear. The reduction gear is formed unitarily with the planetary carrier and the support member.

  11. Electric versus hydraulic drives

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    This volume records the proceedings of a conference organised by the Engineering Manufacturing Industries Division of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers. Topics considered include high performance position control - a review of the current state of developments; hydrostatic drives - present and future; electric drives - present and future trends; electrical and hydraulic drives for heavy industrial robots; the development of an electro-mechanical tilt system for the advanced passenger train; industrial hydraulic ring mains - effective or efficient. the comparison of performance of servo feed-drive systems; overhead crane drives; the future of d.c. servodrives; the choice of actuator for military systems; linear electro-hydraulic actuators; and actuation for industrial robots.

  12. Positional Dependent Driving Torque in the Damped, Driven Pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlpine, Todd; Huff, Alison

    2009-04-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a plane pendulum with positional dependent driving torque as would be produced by a horizontally directed force exerted on the pendulum bob. We compare this with the well known dynamics of a standard damped, driven plane pendulum. In particular we compare the bifurcation diagrams of the two systems to compare the effects of the driving amplitude on the dynamics. In the system with positional dependent driving torque, bifurcation begins at higher driving amplitudes and there is a repetitive structure in the bifurcation diagram at high driving amplitude. Additionally, with positional dependent driving torque we see continued chaotic behavior at high driving amplitude whereas the chaotic behavior of the standard pendulum dies out at large driving amplitudes.

  13. Drill drive mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Dressel, Michael O.

    1979-01-01

    A drill drive mechanism is especially adapted to provide both rotational drive and axial feed for a drill of substantial diameter such as may be used for drilling holes for roof bolts in mine shafts. The drill shaft is made with a helical pattern of scroll-like projections on its surface for removal of cuttings. The drill drive mechanism includes a plurality of sprockets carrying two chains of drive links which are arranged to interlock around the drill shaft with each drive link having depressions which mate with the scroll-like projections. As the chain links move upwardly or downwardly the surfaces of the depressions in the links mate with the scroll projections to move the shaft axially. Tangs on the drive links mate with notch surfaces between scroll projections to provide a means for rotating the shaft. Projections on the drive links mate together at the center to hold the drive links tightly around the drill shaft. The entire chain drive mechanism is rotated around the drill shaft axis by means of a hydraulic motor and gear drive to cause rotation of the drill shaft. This gear drive also connects with a differential gearset which is interconnected with a second gear. A second motor is connected to the spider shaft of the differential gearset to produce differential movement (speeds) at the output gears of the differential gearset. This differential in speed is utilized to drive said second gear at a speed different from the speed of said gear drive, this speed differential being utilized to drive said sprockets for axial movement of said drill shaft.

  14. Force feedback in limb lengthening.

    PubMed

    Wee, Jinyong; Rahman, Tariq; Seliktar, Rahamim; Akins, Robert; Levine, David; Richardson, Dean; Dodge, George R; Thabet, Ahmed M; Holmes, Lauren; Mackenzie, William G

    2010-01-01

    A new variable-rate distraction system using a motorized distractor driven by feedback from the distraction force was designed. The distractor was mounted on a unilateral fixator and attached to the tibiae of 6 sheep that underwent distraction osteogenesis. The sheep were divided equally into 3 groups. In group 1, the forces were recorded but were not used to drive the lengthening rate. In group 2, force feedback was used and the desired distraction force level was set to 300 N and the initial rate was 1 mm/day. Group 3 also underwent force feedback with the desired force limit at 300 N, but the rate change was initiated earlier, at 200 N. The distraction force was recorded at 15 second intervals throughout the distraction phase and stored onboard the distractor.

  15. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Hough, Paul V. C.; Wang, Chengpu

    2003-01-01

    An atomic force microscope utilizes a pulse release system and improved method of operation to minimize contact forces between a probe tip affixed to a flexible cantilever and a specimen being measured. The pulse release system includes a magnetic particle affixed proximate the probe tip and an electromagnetic coil. When energized, the electromagnetic coil generates a magnetic field which applies a driving force on the magnetic particle sufficient to overcome adhesive forces exhibited between the probe tip and specimen. The atomic force microscope includes two independently displaceable piezo elements operable along a Z-axis. A controller drives the first Z-axis piezo element to provide a controlled approach between the probe tip and specimen up to a point of contact between the probe tip and specimen. The controller then drives the first Z-axis piezo element to withdraw the cantilever from the specimen. The controller also activates the pulse release system which drives the probe tip away from the specimen during withdrawal. Following withdrawal, the controller adjusts the height of the second Z-axis piezo element to maintain a substantially constant approach distance between successive samples.

  16. Nuclear forces

    SciTech Connect

    Machleidt, R.

    2013-06-10

    These lectures present an introduction into the theory of nuclear forces. We focus mainly on the modern approach, in which the forces between nucleons emerge from low-energy QCD via chiral effective field theory.

  17. 6. TYPE G, BUILDING #323443 BREENE DRIVE, INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. TYPE G, BUILDING #323-443 BREENE DRIVE, INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, LIVING ROOM, EAST VIEW. - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Brick Officers' Quarters, Types G & H, Area A, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  18. 5. TYPE G, BUILDING #323443 BREENE DRIVE, INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. TYPE G, BUILDING #323-443 BREENE DRIVE, INTERIOR, FIRST FLOOR, LIVING ROOM AND HALLWAY, NORTHWEST VIEW. - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Brick Officers' Quarters, Types G & H, Area A, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  19. 17. View of Mercury Avenue from Apollo Drive, looking north ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. View of Mercury Avenue from Apollo Drive, looking north at E-wing - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Headquarters Building, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  20. 15. Threequarter view of Gwing from intersection of Apollo Drive ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Three-quarter view of G-wing from intersection of Apollo Drive and Mercury Avenue, looking northwest - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Headquarters Building, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  1. AC operation and runaway electron behaviour in HT-7 tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hong-Wei; Hu, Li-Qun; Zhou, Rui-Jie; Lin, Shi-Yao; Zhong, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Shao-Feng; Chen, Kai-Yun; Xu, Ping; Zhang, Ji-Zong; Ling, Bi-Li; Mao, Song-Tao; Duan, Yan-Min

    2010-06-01

    Operation of HT-7 tokamak in a multicycle alternating square wave plasma current regime is reported. A set of AC operation experiments, including LHW heating to enhance plasma ionization during the current transition and current sustainment, is described. The behaviour of runaway electrons is analysed by four HXR detectors tangentially viewing the plasma in the equatorial plane, within energy ranges 0.3-1.2 MeV and 0.3-7 MeV, separately. High energy runaway electrons (~MeV) are found to circulate predominantly in the opposite direction to the plasma current, while the number of low energy runaway electrons (~tens to hundreds of keV) circulating along the plasma current is comparable to that in the direction opposite to the plasma current. AC operation with lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) is observed to have an additional benefit of suppressing the runaway electrons if the drop of the loop voltage is large enough.

  2. Lectures on magnetohydrodynamical drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loigom, Villem

    The paper deals with nonconventional types of electrical machines and drives - magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) machines and drives. In cardinal it is based on the research conducted with participation of the author in Tallinn Technical University at the Institute of Electrical Drives and Power Electronics, where the use of magnetohydrodynamical motors and drives in the metallurgical and casting industries have been studied for a long time. Major research interests include the qualities and applications of the induction MHD-drives for set in the motion (pumping, turning, dosing, mixing, etc.) non-ferrous molten metals like Al, Mg, Sn, Pb, Na, K, and their alloys. The first part of the paper describes induction MHD motors and their electrohydraulical qualities. In the second part energy conversion problems are described. Also, on the basis of the analogy between electromechanical and electrohydraulical phenomenas, static and dynamic qualities of MHD drives with induction MHD machines are discussed.

  3. Laterally self-oscillated and force-balanced microvibratory gyroscope packaged in a vacuum package with a conditioning ASIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyu-Yeon; Lee, Chong-Won; Oh, Yong-Soo; Lee, Byeungleul

    1997-11-01

    A novel concept self-oscillator and dynamically tunable micro vibratory gyroscope, where oscillating, position- sensing and force-balancing take place on the wafer surface, has been developed. The gyroscope consists of: a grid-type planar mass which oscillates on the wafer surface; pairs of the differential capacitor type with LT shape position sense electrodes; a pair of force-balancing electrodes; oppositely placed comb-drive and comb-sensor for mass self-oscillation; fish hook shape springs to match the first and second modes with the mass oscillating and position sensing modes, respectively. The natural frequency of the position sensing mode is lowered and tuned by the DC bias voltage applied to the position sense electrodes and then finely tuned by DC bias on a pair of force-balancing electrodes. To reduce the mass exciting along the sensing direction, we drive the mass by the same DC and opposite AC driving voltage on the oppositely placed comb-drives. It also features that the position sensing electric interference ins reduced. The mass is self-oscillated by the condition of limit cycle, so the mass is always oscillated in the natural frequency even if the natural frequency is varied by the environment and/or it has displacement-force nonlinear behavior. The gyroscope is fabricated on the silicon wafer by surface micromachining technology and the polysilicon is used as an active structure. The gyroscope has an active size of 700 by 600 micro meters, the thickness of the structure is 7 micron meters and the proof mass of 1 micro gram. To improve the resolution of the gyro, it is packaged in the 50 mili-torr vacuum package with a conditioning ASIC. Experimental results show that the gyroscope has the equivalent noise level of 0.1 deg/sec at 2 Hz, the bandwidth of 100 Hz, linearity of 1 percent FS and the sensing range of 90 deg/sec.

  4. Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people ages 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or the institutionalized population, such as prison inmates. Determining the size of the labor force is a way of determining how big the economy can get. The size of the labor force depends on two…

  5. Superluminal warp drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Díaz, Pedro F.

    2007-09-01

    In this Letter we consider a warp drive spacetime resulting from that suggested by Alcubierre when the spaceship can only travel faster than light. Restricting to the two dimensions that retains most of the physics, we derive the thermodynamic properties of the warp drive and show that the temperature of the spaceship rises up as its apparent velocity increases. We also find that the warp drive spacetime can be exhibited in a manifestly cosmological form.

  6. Proceedings of the international conference on maglev and linear drives

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This book contains papers presented at a conference on Maglev and linear drives. Topics covered include: Development of superconducting magnets for the Canadian electrodynamic Maglev vehicle; Power supply system to drive HSST - Expo '86; and Thrust and levitation force characteristics of linear synchronous motors.

  7. Diabetes and driving.

    PubMed

    Inkster, B; Frier, B M

    2013-09-01

    The principal safety concern for driving for people treated with insulin or insulin secretagogues is hypoglycaemia, which impairs driving performance. Other complications, such as those causing visual impairment and peripheral neuropathy, are also relevant to medical fitness to drive. Case control studies have suggested that drivers with diabetes pose a modestly increased but acceptable and measurable risk of motor vehicle accidents compared to non-diabetic drivers, but many studies are limited and of poor quality. Factors which have been shown to increase driving risk include previous episodes of severe hypoglycaemia, previous hypoglycaemia while driving, strict glycaemic control (lower HbA1c) and absence of blood glucose monitoring before driving. Impaired awareness of hypoglycaemia may be counteracted by frequent blood glucose testing. The European Union Third directive on driving (2006) has necessitated changes in statutory regulations for driving licences for people with diabetes in all European States, including the UK. Stricter criteria have been introduced for Group 1 vehicle licences while those for Group 2 licences have been relaxed. Insulin-treated drivers can now apply to drive Group 2 vehicles, but in the UK must meet very strict criteria and be assessed by an independent specialist to be issued with a 1-year licence. PMID:23350766

  8. Diverse driving forces underlie the invariant occurrence of the T42A, E139D, I282V and T468M SHP2 amino acid substitutions causing Noonan and LEOPARD syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Simone; Torreri, Paola; Tinti, Michele; Stella, Lorenzo; Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Flex, Elisabetta; Grottesi, Alessandro; Ceccarini, Marina; Palleschi, Antonio; Cesareni, Gianni; Castagnoli, Luisa; Petrucci, Tamara C.; Gelb, Bruce D.; Tartaglia, Marco

    2008-01-01

    Missense PTPN11 mutations cause Noonan and LEOPARD syndromes (NS and LS), two developmental disorders with pleiomorphic phenotypes. PTPN11 encodes SHP2, an SH2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase functioning as a signal transducer. Generally, different substitutions of a particular amino acid residue are observed in these diseases, indicating that the crucial factor is the residue being replaced. For a few codons, only one substitution is observed, suggesting the possibility of specific roles for the residue introduced. We analyzed the biochemical behavior and ligand-binding properties of all possible substitutions arising from single-base changes affecting codons 42, 139, 279, 282 and 468 to investigate the mechanisms underlying the invariant occurrence of the T42A, E139D and I282V substitutions in NS and the Y279C and T468M changes in LS. Our data demonstrate that the isoleucine-to-valine change at codon 282 is the only substitution at that position perturbing the stability of SHP2's closed conformation without impairing catalysis, while the threonine-to-alanine change at codon 42, but not other substitutions of that residue, promotes increased phosphopeptide-binding affinity. The recognition specificity of the C-SH2 domain bearing the E139D substitution differed substantially from its wild-type counterpart acquiring binding properties similar to those observed for the N-SH2 domain, revealing a novel mechanism of SHP2's functional dysregulation. Finally, while functional selection does not seem to occur for the substitutions at codons 279 and 468, we point to deamination of the methylated cytosine at nucleotide 1403 as the driving factor leading to the high prevalence of the T468M change in LS. PMID:18372317

  9. Quantum recurrence and fractional dynamic localization in ac-driven perfect state transfer Hamiltonians

    SciTech Connect

    Longhi, Stefano

    2014-06-15

    Quantum recurrence and dynamic localization are investigated in a class of ac-driven tight-binding Hamiltonians, the Krawtchouk quantum chain, which in the undriven case provides a paradigmatic Hamiltonian model that realizes perfect quantum state transfer and mirror inversion. The equivalence between the ac-driven single-particle Krawtchouk Hamiltonian H{sup -hat} (t) and the non-interacting ac-driven bosonic junction Hamiltonian enables to determine in a closed form the quasi energy spectrum of H{sup -hat} (t) and the conditions for exact wave packet reconstruction (dynamic localization). In particular, we show that quantum recurrence, which is predicted by the general quantum recurrence theorem, is exact for the Krawtchouk quantum chain in a dense range of the driving amplitude. Exact quantum recurrence provides perfect wave packet reconstruction at a frequency which is fractional than the driving frequency, a phenomenon that can be referred to as fractional dynamic localization.

  10. Reading Text While Driving

    PubMed Central

    Horrey, William J.; Hoffman, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In this study, we investigated how drivers adapt secondary-task initiation and time-sharing behavior when faced with fluctuating driving demands. Background Reading text while driving is particularly detrimental; however, in real-world driving, drivers actively decide when to perform the task. Method In a test track experiment, participants were free to decide when to read messages while driving along a straight road consisting of an area with increased driving demands (demand zone) followed by an area with low demands. A message was made available shortly before the vehicle entered the demand zone. We manipulated the type of driving demands (baseline, narrow lane, pace clock, combined), message format (no message, paragraph, parsed), and the distance from the demand zone when the message was available (near, far). Results In all conditions, drivers started reading messages (drivers’ first glance to the display) before entering or before leaving the demand zone but tended to wait longer when faced with increased driving demands. While reading messages, drivers looked more or less off road, depending on types of driving demands. Conclusions For task initiation, drivers avoid transitions from low to high demands; however, they are not discouraged when driving demands are already elevated. Drivers adjust time-sharing behavior according to driving demands while performing secondary tasks. Nonetheless, such adjustment may be less effective when total demands are high. Application This study helps us to understand a driver’s role as an active controller in the context of distracted driving and provides insights for developing distraction interventions. PMID:25850162

  11. Multilevel converters for large electric drives

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, L.M.; Peng, F.Z.

    1997-11-01

    Traditional two-level high frequency pulse width modulation (PWM) inverters for motor drives have several problems associated with their high frequency switching which produces common-mode voltage and high voltage change (dV/dt) rates to the motor windings. Multilevel inverters solve these problems because their devices can switch at a much lower frequency. Two different multilevel topologies are identified for use as a converter for electric drives, a cascade inverter with separate dc sources and a back-to-back diode clamped converter. The cascade inverter is a natural fit for large automotive all electric drives because of the high VA ratings possible and because it uses several levels of dc voltage sources which would be available from batteries or fuel cells. The back to back diode damped converter is ideal where a source of ac voltage is available such as a hybrid electric vehicle. Simulation and experimental results show the superiority of these two converters over PWM based drives.

  12. The ac53, ac78, ac101, and ac103 Genes Are Newly Discovered Core Genes in the Family Baculoviridae

    PubMed Central

    Garavaglia, Matías Javier; Miele, Solange Ana Belén; Iserte, Javier Alonso; Belaich, Mariano Nicolás

    2012-01-01

    The family Baculoviridae is a large group of insect viruses containing circular double-stranded DNA genomes of 80 to 180 kbp, which have broad biotechnological applications. A key feature to understand and manipulate them is the recognition of orthology. However, the differences in gene contents and evolutionary distances among the known members of this family make it difficult to assign sequence orthology. In this study, the genome sequences of 58 baculoviruses were analyzed, with the aim to detect previously undescribed core genes because of their remote homology. A routine based on Multi PSI-Blast/tBlastN and Multi HaMStR allowed us to detect 31 of 33 accepted core genes and 4 orthologous sequences in the Baculoviridae which were not described previously. Our results show that the ac53, ac78, ac101 (p40), and ac103 (p48) genes have orthologs in all genomes and should be considered core genes. Accordingly, there are 37 orthologous genes in the family Baculoviridae. PMID:22933288

  13. Semiconductor ac static power switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrancik, J.

    1968-01-01

    Semiconductor ac static power switch has long life and high reliability, contains no moving parts, and operates satisfactorily in severe environments, including high vibration and shock conditions. Due to their resistance to shock and vibration, static switches are used where accidental switching caused by mechanical vibration or shock cannot be tolerated.

  14. Highly Purified Mycobacterial Phosphatidylinositol Mannosides Drive Cell-Mediated Responses and Activate NKT Cells in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Regina; Jones, Gareth J.; Holder, Thomas; Holst, Otto; Vordermeier, H. Martin

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterial lipids play an important role in the modulation of the immune response upon contact with the host. Using novel methods, we have isolated highly purified phosphatidylinositol mannoside (PIM) molecules (phosphatidylinositol dimannoside [PIM2], acylphosphatidylinositol dimannoside [AcPIM2], diacyl-phosphatidylinositol dimannoside [Ac2PIM2], acylphosphatidylinositol hexamannoside [AcPIM6], and diacylphosphatidylinositol hexamannoside [Ac2PIM6]) from virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis to assess their potential to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) responses in Mycobacterium bovis-infected cattle. Of these molecules, one (AcPIM6) induced significant levels of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) in bovine PBMCs. Three PIM molecules (AcPIM6, Ac2PIM2, and Ac2PIM6) were shown to drive significant proliferation in bovine PBMCs. AcPIM6 was subsequently used to phenotype the proliferating cells by flow cytometry. This analysis demonstrated that AcPIM6 was predominantly recognized by CD3+ CD335+ NKT cells. In conclusion, we have identified PIM lipid molecules that interact with bovine lymphocyte populations, and these lipids may be useful as future subunit vaccines or diagnostic reagents. Further, these data demonstrate, for the first time, lipid-specific NKT activation in cattle. PMID:25499010

  15. Highly purified mycobacterial phosphatidylinositol mannosides drive cell-mediated responses and activate NKT cells in cattle.

    PubMed

    Pirson, Chris; Engel, Regina; Jones, Gareth J; Holder, Thomas; Holst, Otto; Vordermeier, H Martin

    2015-02-01

    Mycobacterial lipids play an important role in the modulation of the immune response upon contact with the host. Using novel methods, we have isolated highly purified phosphatidylinositol mannoside (PIM) molecules (phosphatidylinositol dimannoside [PIM2], acylphosphatidylinositol dimannoside [AcPIM2], diacyl-phosphatidylinositol dimannoside [Ac2PIM2], acylphosphatidylinositol hexamannoside [AcPIM6], and diacylphosphatidylinositol hexamannoside [Ac2PIM6]) from virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis to assess their potential to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) responses in Mycobacterium bovis-infected cattle. Of these molecules, one (AcPIM6) induced significant levels of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) in bovine PBMCs. Three PIM molecules (AcPIM6, Ac2PIM2, and Ac2PIM6) were shown to drive significant proliferation in bovine PBMCs. AcPIM6 was subsequently used to phenotype the proliferating cells by flow cytometry. This analysis demonstrated that AcPIM6 was predominantly recognized by CD3(+) CD335(+) NKT cells. In conclusion, we have identified PIM lipid molecules that interact with bovine lymphocyte populations, and these lipids may be useful as future subunit vaccines or diagnostic reagents. Further, these data demonstrate, for the first time, lipid-specific NKT activation in cattle. PMID:25499010

  16. Transport of particles and microorganisms in microfluidic channels using rectified ac electro-osmotic flow

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wen-I; Selvaganapathy, P. Ravi; Ching, Chan Y.

    2011-01-01

    A new method is demonstrated to transport particles, cells, and other microorganisms using rectified ac electro-osmotic flows in open microchannels. The rectified flow is obtained by synchronous zeta potential modulation with the driving potential in the microchannel. Experiments were conducted to transport both neutral, charged particles, and microorganisms of various sizes. A maximum speed of 50 μm∕s was obtained for 8 μm polystyrene beads, without any electrolysis, using a symmetrical square waveform driving electric field of 5 V∕mm at 10 Hz and a 360 V gate potential with its polarity synchronized with the driving potential (phase lag=0°). PMID:21522497

  17. Topological Instabilities in ac-Driven Bosonic Systems.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, G; Benito, M; Platero, G; Brandes, T

    2016-07-22

    Under nonequilibrium conditions, bosonic modes can become dynamically unstable with an exponentially growing occupation. On the other hand, topological band structures give rise to symmetry protected midgap states. In this Letter, we investigate the interplay of instability and topology. Thereby, we establish a general relation between topology and instability under ac driving. We apply our findings to create dynamical instabilities which are strongly localized at the boundaries of a finite-size system. As these localized instabilities are protected by symmetry, they can be considered as topological instabilities. PMID:27494478

  18. Topological Instabilities in ac-Driven Bosonic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, G.; Benito, M.; Platero, G.; Brandes, T.

    2016-07-01

    Under nonequilibrium conditions, bosonic modes can become dynamically unstable with an exponentially growing occupation. On the other hand, topological band structures give rise to symmetry protected midgap states. In this Letter, we investigate the interplay of instability and topology. Thereby, we establish a general relation between topology and instability under ac driving. We apply our findings to create dynamical instabilities which are strongly localized at the boundaries of a finite-size system. As these localized instabilities are protected by symmetry, they can be considered as topological instabilities.

  19. Trapping polar molecules in an ac trap

    SciTech Connect

    Bethlem, Hendrick L.; Veldhoven, Jacqueline van; Schnell, Melanie; Meijer, Gerard

    2006-12-15

    Polar molecules in high-field seeking states cannot be trapped in static traps as Maxwell's equations do not allow a maximum of the electric field in free space. It is possible to generate an electric field that has a saddle point by superposing an inhomogeneous electric field to an homogeneous electric field. In such a field, molecules are focused along one direction, while being defocused along the other. By reversing the direction of the inhomogeneous electric field the focusing and defocusing directions are reversed. When the fields are being switched back and forth at the appropriate rate, this leads to a net focusing force in all directions. We describe possible electrode geometries for creating the desired fields and discuss their merits. Trapping of {sup 15}ND{sub 3} ammonia molecules in a cylindrically symmetric ac trap is demonstrated. We present measurements of the spatial distribution of the trapped cloud as a function of the settings of the trap and compare these to both a simple model assuming a linear force and to full three-dimensional simulations of the experiment. With the optimal settings, molecules within a phase-space volume of 270 mm{sup 3} (m/s){sup 3} remain trapped. This corresponds to a trap depth of about 5 mK and a trap volume of about 20 mm{sup 3}.

  20. Nonlinear magnetization relaxation of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in superimposed ac and dc magnetic bias fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Serguey V.; Déjardin, Pierre-Michel; El Mrabti, Halim; Kalmykov, Yuri P.

    2010-09-01

    The nonlinear ac response of the magnetization M(t) of a uniaxially anisotropic superparamagnetic nanoparticle subjected to both ac and dc bias magnetic fields of arbitrary strengths and orientations is determined by averaging Gilbert’s equation augmented by a random field with Gaussian white-noise properties in order to calculate exactly the relevant statistical averages. It is shown that the magnetization dynamics of the uniaxial particle driven by a strong ac field applied at an angle to the easy axis of the particle (so that the axial symmetry is broken) alters drastically leading to different nonlinear effects due to coupling of the thermally activated magnetization reversal mode with the precessional modes of M(t) via the driving ac field.

  1. Ocular disease and driving.

    PubMed

    Wood, Joanne M; Black, Alex A

    2016-09-01

    As the driving population ages, the number of drivers with visual impairment resulting from ocular disease will increase given the age-related prevalence of ocular disease. The increase in visual impairment in the driving population has a number of implications for driving outcomes. This review summarises current research regarding the impact of common ocular diseases on driving ability and safety, with particular focus on cataract, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, hemianopia and diabetic retinopathy. The evidence considered includes self-reported driving outcomes, driving performance (on-road and simulator-based) and various motor vehicle crash indices. Collectively, this review demonstrates that driving ability and safety are negatively affected by ocular disease; however, further research is needed in this area. Older drivers with ocular disease need to be aware of the negative consequences of their ocular condition and in the case where treatment options are available, encouraged to seek these earlier for optimum driving safety and quality of life benefits. PMID:27156178

  2. Electric vehicles: Driving range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempton, Willett

    2016-09-01

    For uptake of electric vehicles to increase, consumers' driving-range needs must be fulfilled. Analysis of the driving patterns of personal vehicles in the US now shows that today's electric vehicles can meet all travel needs on almost 90% of days from a single overnight charge.

  3. Piezoelectric drive circuit

    DOEpatents

    Treu, C.A. Jr.

    1999-08-31

    A piezoelectric motor drive circuit is provided which utilizes the piezoelectric elements as oscillators and a Meacham half-bridge approach to develop feedback from the motor ground circuit to produce a signal to drive amplifiers to power the motor. The circuit automatically compensates for shifts in harmonic frequency of the piezoelectric elements due to pressure and temperature changes. 7 figs.

  4. Piezoelectric drive circuit

    DOEpatents

    Treu, Jr., Charles A.

    1999-08-31

    A piezoelectric motor drive circuit is provided which utilizes the piezoelectric elements as oscillators and a Meacham half-bridge approach to develop feedback from the motor ground circuit to produce a signal to drive amplifiers to power the motor. The circuit automatically compensates for shifts in harmonic frequency of the piezoelectric elements due to pressure and temperature changes.

  5. Forcing contact inhibition of locomotion.

    PubMed

    Roycroft, Alice; Mayor, Roberto

    2015-07-01

    Contact inhibition of locomotion drives a variety of biological phenomenon, from cell dispersion to collective cell migration and cancer invasion. New imaging techniques have allowed contact inhibition of locomotion to be visualised in vivo for the first time, helping to elucidate some of the molecules and forces involved in this phenomenon.

  6. Forcing contact inhibition of locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Roycroft, Alice; Mayor, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Contact inhibition of locomotion drives a variety of biological phenomenon, from cell dispersion to collective cell migration and cancer invasion. New imaging techniques have allowed contact inhibition of locomotion to be visualised in vivo for the first time, helping to elucidate some of the molecules and forces involved in this phenomenon. PMID:25981318

  7. Hybrid immersed interface-immersed boundary methods for AC dielectrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Hossan, Mohammad Robiul; Dillon, Robert; Dutta, Prashanta

    2014-08-01

    Dielectrophoresis, a nonlinear electrokinetic transport mechanism, has become popular in many engineering applications including manipulation, characterization and actuation of biomaterials, particles and biological cells. In this paper, we present a hybrid immersed interface–immersed boundary method to study AC dielectrophoresis where an algorithm is developed to solve the complex Poisson equation using a real variable formulation. An immersed interface method is employed to obtain the AC electric field in a fluid media with suspended particles and an immersed boundary method is used for the fluid equations and particle transport. The convergence of the proposed algorithm as well as validation of the hybrid scheme with experimental results is presented. In this paper, the Maxwell stress tensor is used to calculate the dielectrophoretic force acting on particles by considering the physical effect of particles in the computational domain. Thus, this study eliminates the approximations used in point dipole methods for calculating dielectrophoretic force. A comparative study between Maxwell stress tensor and point dipole methods for computing dielectrophoretic forces are presented. The hybrid method is used to investigate the physics of dielectrophoresis in microfluidic devices using an AC electric field. The numerical results show that with proper design and appropriate selection of applied potential and frequency, global electric field minima can be obtained to facilitate multiple particle trapping by exploiting the mechanism of negative dielectrophoresis. Our numerical results also show that electrically neutral particles form a chain parallel to the applied electric field irrespective of their initial orientation when an AC electric field is applied. This proposed hybrid numerical scheme will help to better understand dielectrophoresis and to design and optimize microfluidic devices.

  8. Design of traction drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, S. H.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    Traction drives are among the simplest of all speed-changing mechanisms. Because of their simplicity and their ability to smoothly and continuously adjust speed, they are excellent choices for many drive system applications. They have been used in industrial service for more than 100 years. Today's traction drives have power capacities which rival the best gear and belt drives due to modern traction fluids and highly fatigue-resistant bearing steels. This report summarizes methods to analyze and size traction drives. Lubrication principles, contact kinematics, stress, fatigue life, and performance prediction methods are presented. The effects of the lubricant's traction characteristics on life and power loss are discussed. An example problem is given which illustrates the effects of spin on power loss. Loading mechanism design and the design of nonlubricated friction wheels and rings are also treated.

  9. ACS Expands Role In High School Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Describes some of the services and programs of special interests to high school chemistry teachers that are being provided by ACS, and meant to make ACS membership more attractive to the teachers. (GA)

  10. A friction regulation hybrid driving method for backward motion restraint of the smooth impact drive mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liang; Chen, Dong; Cheng, Tinghai; He, Pu; Lu, Xiaohui; Zhao, Hongwei

    2016-08-01

    The smooth impact drive mechanism (SIDM) is a type of piezoelectric actuator that has been developed for several decades. As a kind of driving method for the SIDM, the traditional sawtooth (TS) wave is always employed. The kinetic friction force during the rapid contraction stage usually results in the generation of a backward motion. A friction regulation hybrid (FRH) driving method realized by a composite waveform for the backward motion restraint of the SIDM is proposed in this paper. The composite waveform is composed of a sawtooth driving (SD) wave and a sinusoidal friction regulation (SFR) wave which is applied to the rapid deformation stage of the SD wave. A prototype of the SIDM was fabricated and its output performance under the excitation of the FRH driving method and the TS wave driving method was tested. The results indicate that the backward motion can be restrained obviously using the FRH driving method. Compared with the driving effect of the TS wave, the backward rates of the prototype in forward and reverse motions are decreased by 83% and 85%, respectively.

  11. Development of the response AC/A ratio over the first year of life.

    PubMed

    Turner, J E; Horwood, A M; Houston, S M; Riddell, P M

    2002-10-01

    This study investigated the development of the link from accommodation to vergence in infants by occluding one eye thus removing binocular cues. Occluded adults continue to converge partially demonstrating that the accommodative drive to vergence (the AC/A link) and proximal cues are sufficient to drive vergence. For infants of all ages, AC/A ratios were found to be in the normal adult range. We conclude that infants can use monocular cues to drive vergence and that this occurs before the age when there is a substantial increase in the accuracy of oculomotor processes. There is flexibility in the developing visual system which is able to produce early vergence responses by relying upon alternative cues.

  12. Force-Field Analysis: Incorporating Critical Thinking in Goal Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hustedde, Ron; Score, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Force field analysis encourages members to examine the probability of reaching agreed-upon goals. It can help groups avoid working toward goals that are unlikely to be reached. In every situation are three forces: forces that encourage maintenance of the status quo or change; driving or helping forces that push toward change; and restraining…

  13. Magnetic drive system for a new centrifugal rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Andrew; Tansley, Geoff

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to design a novel magnetic drive and bearing system for a new centrifugal rotary blood pump (CRBP). The drive system consists of two components: (i) permanent magnets within the impeller of the CRBP; and (ii) the driving electromagnets. Orientation of the magnets varies from axial through to 60 degrees included out-lean (conical configuration). Permanent magnets replace the electromagnet drive to allow easier characterization. The performance characteristics tested were the axial force of attraction between the stator and rotor at angles of rotational alignment, Ø, and the corresponding torque at those angles. The drive components were tested for various magnetic cone angles, theta. The test was repeated for three backing conditions: (i) non-backed; (ii) steel-cupped; and (iii) steel plate back-iron, performed on an Instron tensile testing machine. Experimental results were expanded upon through finite element and boundary element analysis (BEM). The force/torque characteristics were maximal for a 12-magnet configuration at 0 degree cone angle with steel-back iron (axial force = 60 N, torque = 0.375 Nm). BEM showed how introducing a cone angle increases the radial restoring force threefold while not compromising axial bearing force. Magnets in the drive system may be orientated not only to provide adequate coupling to drive the CRBP, but to provide significant axial and radial bearing forces capable of withstanding over 100 m/s(2) shock excitation on the impeller. Although the 12 magnet 0 degree (theta) configuration yielded the greatest force/torque characteristic, this was seen as potentially unattractive as this magnetic cone angle yielded poor radial restoring force characteristics. PMID:18959665

  14. A Directional Entropic Force Approach to Assemble Anisotropic Nanoparticles into Superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byeongdu; Tao Li Team; Kaylie Young, George C. Schatz, Chad A. Mirkin Collaboration; Michael Engel, Pablo F. Damasceno, Sharon C. Glotzer Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    We introduce a directional entropic force approach (DEFA) for controlling the assembly of anisotropic nanoparticles into crystalline lattices. The method relies on surfactant micelle-induced depletion interactions to assemble anisotropic gold nanoparticles into reconfigurable, non-close-packed (open) superlattices in solution. The anisotropic nanoparticles align along their flat facets to maximize entropy, and therefore minimize the free energy of the system, leading to assemblies with long-range order. Importantly, our experimental work complements recent theoretical work that proposes directional entropic forces between nanoparticle facets as a viable means for thermodynamically assembling nanoparticle superlattices. The experimental work herein uses depletants to create strong attractive forces that can drive assembly of reversible superlattices with tunable spacing in solution. These directional entropic forces are analogous to the directional bonding between atoms in molecules. The resulting crystalline superlattices are therefore shape-dependent. We show that the electrostatic and depletion interactions combine to determine the lattice spacing, and can be tuned independently with surfactant concentration and ionic strength to reconfigure the lattice constant. . Work at the Argonne Natl Lab was supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US DOE under Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  15. 7. TOP SURFACES OF FOUR HYDRAULIC UNITS TO DRIVE COMPRESSORS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. TOP SURFACES OF FOUR HYDRAULIC UNITS TO DRIVE COMPRESSORS. Looking southeast along rear of building. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Helium Compression Plant, Test Area 1-115, intersection of Altair & Saturn Boulevards, Boron, Kern County, CA

  16. AC electrokinetic manipulation of selenium nanoparticles for potential nanosensor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmoodi, Seyed Reza; Bayati, Marzieh; Hosseinirad, Somayeh; Foroumadi, Alireza; Gilani, Kambiz; Rezayat, Seyed Mahdi

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Se nanoparticles were synthesized using a reverse-microemulsion process. ► AC osmotic fluid flow repulses the particles from electrode edges. ► Dielectrophoretic force attracts the particles to electrode edges. ► Dielectrophoresis electrode showed non-ohmic behavior. ► The device can potentially be used as a nanosensor. - Abstract: We report the AC electrokinetic behavior of selenium (Se) nanoparticles for electrical characterization and possible application as micro/nano devices. selenium Se nanoparticles were successfully synthesized using a reverse-microemulsion process and investigated structurally using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope. Interdigitated castellated ITO and non-castellated platinum electrodes were employed for manipulation of suspended materials in the fluid. Using ITO electrodes at low frequency limits resulted in deposition of Se particles on electrode surface. When Se particles exposed to platinum electrodes in the 10 Hz–1 kHz range and V {sub p−p}> 8, AC osmotic fluid flow repulses the particles from electrode edges. However, in 10 kHz–10 MHz range and V {sub p−p}> 5, dielectrophoretic force attracts the particles to electrode edges. As the Se particle concentration increased, the trapped Se particles were aligned along the electric field line and bridged the electrode gap. The device was characterized and can potentially be useful in making micro/nano electronic devices.

  17. The Test Drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory shows engineers rehearsing the sol 133 (June 8, 2004) drive into 'Endurance' crater by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. Engineers and scientists have recreated the martian surface and slope the rover will encounter using a combination of bare and thinly sand-coated rocks, simulated martian 'blueberries' and a platform tilted at a 25-degree angle. The results of this test convinced engineers that the rover was capable of driving up and down a straight slope before it attempted the actual drive on Mars.

  18. Vision and Driving

    PubMed Central

    Owsley, Cynthia; McGwin, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    Driving is the primary means of personal travel in many countries and is relies heavily on vision for its successful execution. Research over the past few decades has addressed the role of vision in driver safety (motor vehicle collision involvement) and in driver performance (both on-road and using interactive simulators in the laboratory). Here we critically review what is currently known about the role of various aspects of visual function in driving. We also discuss translational research issues on vision screening for licensure and re-licensure and rehabilitation of visually impaired persons who want to drive. PMID:20580907

  19. Drive System Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.

    2007-01-01

    An overview of the NASA Glenn Research Center Drive Systems Research will be presented. The primary purpose of this research is to improve performance, reliability, and integrity of aerospace drive systems and space mechanisms. The research is conducted through a combination of in-house, academia, and through contractors. Research is conducted through computer code development and validated through component and system testing. The drive system activity currently has four major thrust areas including: thermal behavior of high speed gearing, health and usage monitoring, advanced components, and space mechanisms.

  20. Polar Direct Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skupsky, S.

    2003-10-01

    Direct drive offers the potential of higher target gain on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) than x-ray drive: The initial direct-drive target design had a 1-D gain of 45 and consisted primarily of a pure cryogenic DT shell. Using the expected levels of target and laser nonuniformities for the NIF, two-dimensional (2-D) hydrodynamic simulations predicted target gains around 30.(P.W. McKenty et al.), Phys. Plasmas 8, 2315 (2001). More-recent designs have shown that higher target gains could be obtained by replacing a portion of the DT shell with ``wetted'' CH foam and by using adiabat shaping: (1) Higher-Z material (C) in the foam increases laser absorption by about 40% (from 60% absorption to 85%).(S. Skupsky et al.), in Inertial Fusion Sciences and Applications 2001, edited by K. Tanaka et al. (Elsevier, Paris, 2002), p. 240. (2) Adiabat shaping allows the main portion of the fuel to be placed on a lower adiabat without compromising target stability.(V.N. Goncharov et al.), Phys. Plasmas 10, 1906 (2003). These direct-drive concepts can be tested on the NIF, long before that facility is converted to a direct-drive (spherically symmetric) irradiation configuration. Using the NIF x-ray-drive beam configuration, some of the near-polar beams could be pointed to better illuminate the target's equator. These more-oblique, equatorial beams will have lower absorption and reduced drive efficiency than the polar beams. One strategy to compensate for the difference in polar and equatorial drive is to reduce the irradiation at the poles and employ different pulse shapes to accommodate the time-dependent variations in drive and absorption. This concept of polar direct drive (PDD) has been studied using the 2-D hydrocode DRACO to determine the requirements for achieving ignition and moderate target gain for the NIF. Experiments on the OMEGA laser will examine the effects of oblique irradiation on target drive. Results of simulations for different direct-drive target designs

  1. One Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotas, Ronald R.

    2002-04-01

    There is only one entity that can extend force and couple through space; and it should be apparent that Electromagnetism is that entity. In the cases of the nuclear strong force and the nuclear weak force, this is the same fundamental Electromagnetism manifesting itself in two different ways in the nucleus. It remains the same basic Electromagnetism. On the other hand, General Relativity fails to produce force at a distance, fails the Cavendish experiment, and does not allow an apple to fall to the ground. The result shows there is only Electromagnetism that functions through physical nature providing gravity, actions in the nucleus, as well as all other physical actions universally, including Gravity and Gravitation. There are many direct proofs of this, the same proofs as in NUCLEAR QUANTUM GRAVITATION. In contrast, General Relativity plainly relies on fallacy abstract and incoherent proofs; proofs which have now been mostly disproved. In the past it was deemed necessary by some to have an "ether" to propagate Electromagnetic waves. The fallacy concept of time space needs "space distortions" in order to cause gravity. However, Electromagnetic gravity does not have this problem. Clearly there is only ONE FORCE that causes Gravity, Electromagnetism, the Nuclear Strong Force, and the Nuclear Weak Force, and that ONE FORCE is Electromagnetism.

  2. Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people aged 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or institutionalized people, such as prison inmates. Quantifying this total supply of labor is a way of determining how big the economy can get. Labor force participation rates vary significantly…

  3. Simultaneous distribution of AC and DC power

    DOEpatents

    Polese, Luigi Gentile

    2015-09-15

    A system and method for the transport and distribution of both AC (alternating current) power and DC (direct current) power over wiring infrastructure normally used for distributing AC power only, for example, residential and/or commercial buildings' electrical wires is disclosed and taught. The system and method permits the combining of AC and DC power sources and the simultaneous distribution of the resulting power over the same wiring. At the utilization site a complementary device permits the separation of the DC power from the AC power and their reconstruction, for use in conventional AC-only and DC-only devices.

  4. Origin of Enthalpic Depletion Forces.

    PubMed

    Sapir, Liel; Harries, Daniel

    2014-04-01

    Solutes excluded from macromolecules or colloids are known to drive depletion attractions. The established Asakura-Oosawa model, as well as subsequent theories aimed at explaining the effects of macromolecular crowding, attribute depletion forces to diminished hard-core excluded volume upon compaction, and hence predict depletion forces dominated by entropy. However, recent experiments measuring the effect of preferentially excluded solutes on protein folding and macromolecular association find these forces can also be enthalpic. We use simulations of macromolecular association in explicit binary cosolute-solvent mixtures, with solvent and cosolute intermolecular interactions that go beyond hard-cores, to show that not all cosolutes conform to the established entropically dominated model. We further demonstrate how the enthalpically dominated depletion forces that we find can be well described within an Asakura-Oosawa like model provided that the hard-core macromolecule-cosolute potential of mean force is augmented by a "soft" step-like repulsion.

  5. Drive program documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, S.

    1979-01-01

    The program description and user's guide for the Downlist Requirement Integrated Verification and Evaluation (DRIVE) program is provided. The program is used to compare existing telemetry downlist files with updated downlist requirements.

  6. Labs drive the arms race

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, H.E.

    1984-11-01

    The conviction of laboratory managers that high technology can provide safety and national security in a dangerous world and that technological solutions are paramount over political solutions has been a major driving force in perpetuating the nuclear arms race. The credo in the laboratories appears to be that there are never enough designs of nuclear weapons for deterrence so that there is always a need to develop such new ideas as the nuclear-pumped X-ray laser as a defense against energy missiles. The author outlines several alternative steps, including the ratification and reaffirmation of arms control treaties, negotiations, and a halt to the Star Wars program. A central point is to stop nuclear weapons testing. 7 references.

  7. Driving platform for OLED lighting investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Uwe; Elgner, Andreas; Kreye, Daniel; Amelung, Jörg; Scholles, Michael

    2006-08-01

    OLED technology may be excellently suitable for lighting applications by combining high efficiency, cost effective manufacturing and the use of low cost materials. Certain issues remain to be solved so far, including OLED brightness, color, lifetime, large area uniformity and encapsulation. Another aspect, that might be capable in addressing some of the mentioned issues, is OLED lighting electrical driving. We report on the design of a driving platform for OLED lighting test panels or substrates. It is intended for being a test environment for lighting substrates as well as demonstration/presentation environment. It is based on a 128-channel passive-matrix driver/controller ASIC OC2. Its key component is an MSP430-compatible 16-bit micro-controller core including embedded Flash memory (program), EEPROM (parameter), and RAM (data memory). A significant feature of the device is an electronic approach for improving the lifetime/uniformity behavior of connected OLED. The embedded micro-controller is the key to the high versatility of OC2, since by firmware modification it can be adapted to various applications and conditions. Here its application for an OLED lighting driving platform is presented. Major features of this platform are PC-control mode (via USB interface), stand-alone mode (no external control necessary, just power supply), on-board OLED panel parameter storage, flat geometry of OLED lighting panel carrier (board), AC and DC driving regimes, adjustable reverse voltage, dedicated user SW (PC/Windows-based), sub-tile patterning and single sub-tile control, combination of multiple channels for increasing driving current. This publication contains results of the project "High Brightness OLEDs for ICT & Next Generation Lighting Applications" (OLLA), funded by the European Commission.

  8. Transcriptome modulations due to A/C2 plasmid acquisition.

    PubMed

    Lang, Kevin S; Johnson, Timothy J

    2015-07-01

    Plasmids play an important role in driving the genetic diversity of bacteria. Horizontal gene transfer via plasmids is crucial for the dissemination of antimicrobial resistance genes. Many factors contribute to the persistence of plasmids within bacterial populations, and it has been suggested that epistatic interactions between the host chromosome and plasmid contribute to the fitness of a particular plasmid-host combination. However, such interactions have been shown to differ between bacterial hosts. In this study, RNA-Seq was performed in six different strains, spanning three species, to characterize the influence of host background on the A/C2 plasmid transcriptome. In five of these strains, chromosomal transcriptomes were compared in the presence and absence of A/C2 plasmid pAR060302. Host-specific effects on plasmid gene expression were identified, and acquisition of pAR060302 resulted in changes in the expression of chromosomal genes involved in metabolism and energy production. These results suggest that A/C2 plasmid fitness is, in part, dependent on host chromosome content, as well as environmental factors. PMID:26079188

  9. Strongly nonlinear dynamics of electrolytes in large ac voltages.

    PubMed

    Højgaard Olesen, Laurits; Bazant, Martin Z; Bruus, Henrik

    2010-07-01

    We study the response of a model microelectrochemical cell to a large ac voltage of frequency comparable to the inverse cell relaxation time. To bring out the basic physics, we consider the simplest possible model of a symmetric binary electrolyte confined between parallel-plate blocking electrodes, ignoring any transverse instability or fluid flow. We analyze the resulting one-dimensional problem by matched asymptotic expansions in the limit of thin double layers and extend previous work into the strongly nonlinear regime, which is characterized by two features--significant salt depletion in the electrolyte near the electrodes and, at very large voltage, the breakdown of the quasiequilibrium structure of the double layers. The former leads to the prediction of "ac capacitive desalination" since there is a time-averaged transfer of salt from the bulk to the double layers, via oscillating diffusion layers. The latter is associated with transient diffusion limitation, which drives the formation and collapse of space-charge layers, even in the absence of any net Faradaic current through the cell. We also predict that steric effects of finite ion sizes (going beyond dilute-solution theory) act to suppress the strongly nonlinear regime in the limit of concentrated electrolytes, ionic liquids, and molten salts. Beyond the model problem, our reduced equations for thin double layers, based on uniformly valid matched asymptotic expansions, provide a useful mathematical framework to describe additional nonlinear responses to large ac voltages, such as Faradaic reactions, electro-osmotic instabilities, and induced-charge electrokinetic phenomena.

  10. Performance testing of the AC propulsion ELX electric vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, W. E.; MacDowall, R. D.; Burke, A. F.

    1994-06-01

    Performance testing of the AC Propulsion ELX electric vehicle is described. Test data are presented and analyzed. The ELX vehicle is the first of a series of electric vehicles of interest to the California Air Resources Board. The test series is being conducted under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the US Department of energy and the California Air Resources Board. The tests which were conducted showed that the AC Propulsion ELX electric vehicle has exceptional acceleration and range performance. When the vehicle's battery was fully charged, the vehicle can accelerate from 0 to 96 km/h in about 10 seconds. Energy consumption and range tests using consecutive FUDS and HWFET Driving cycles (the all-electric cycle) indicate that the energy economy of the AC Propulsion ELX electric vehicle with regenerative braking is 97 W(center dot)h/km, with a range of 153 km (95 miles). Computer simulations performed using the SIMPLEV Program indicate that the vehicle would have a range of 327 km (203 miles) on the all-electric cycle if the lead acid batteries were replaced with NiMH batteries having an energy density of 67 W(center dot)h/kg. Comparisons of FUDS test data with and without regenerative braking indicated that regenerative braking reduced the energy consumption of the ELX vehicle by approximately 25%.

  11. Performance testing of the AC propulsion ELX electric vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, W.E.; MacDowall, R.D.; Burke, A.F.

    1994-06-01

    Performance testing of the AC Propulsion ELX electric vehicle is described. Test data are presented and analyzed. The ELX vehicle is the first of a series of electric vehicles of interest to the California Air Resources Board. The test series is being conducted under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the US Department of energy and the California Air Resources Board. The tests which were conducted showed that the AC Propulsion ELX electric vehicle has exceptional acceleration and range performance. when the vehicle`s battery was fully charged, the vehicle can accelerate from 0 to 96 km/h in about 10 seconds. Energy consumption and range tests using consecutive FUDS and HWFET Driving cycles (the all-electric cycle) indicate that the energy economy of the AC Propulsion ELX electric vehicle with regenerative braking is 97 W{center_dot}h/km, with a range of 153 km (95 miles). Computer simulations performed using the SIMPLEV Program indicate that the vehicle would have a range of 327 km (203 miles) on the all-electric cycle if the lead acid batteries were replaced with NiMH batteries having an energy density of 67 W{center_dot}h/kg. Comparisons of FUDS test data with and without regenerative braking indicated that regenerative braking reduced the energy consumption of the ELX vehicle by approximately 25%.

  12. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Jesse, Stowell; Costin, Daniel

    2007-02-27

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  13. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Stowell, Jesse; Costin, Daniel

    2006-07-11

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  14. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Jesse, Stowell; Costin, Daniel

    2006-10-10

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  15. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bywaters, Garrett Lee; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Stowell, Jesse; Costin, Daniel

    2006-09-19

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  16. Characterization of flow-through electrode processes by AC impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Yuh, C.Y. ); Selman, J.R. )

    1993-04-01

    Flow-through porous electrodes, such as packed-bed and fluidized-bed electrodes, are attractive for electrowinning, electro-organic synthesis and flow-battery applications. The extensive surface area of the porous electrodes makes high volumetric reaction rate more possible than in a cell with smooth electrodes. Forced convection also enhances mass-transfer rate and hence reduces concentration polarization. AC-impedance method has been used successfully in characterizing a packed-bed flow-through electrode system. A macrohomogeneous model was developed to simulate the effect of structural, physical and flow parameters. The relative importance of kinetics and mass transfer can be inferred from the AC-impedance analysis. Kinetic information about copper deposition in supported cupric sulfate solution has been obtained successfully using this technique.

  17. Self-driving carsickness.

    PubMed

    Diels, Cyriel; Bos, Jelte E

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses the predicted increase in the occurrence and severity of motion sickness in self-driving cars. Self-driving cars have the potential to lead to significant benefits. From the driver's perspective, the direct benefits of this technology are considered increased comfort and productivity. However, we here show that the envisaged scenarios all lead to an increased risk of motion sickness. As such, the benefits this technology is assumed to bring may not be capitalised on, in particular by those already susceptible to motion sickness. This can negatively affect user acceptance and uptake and, in turn, limit the potential socioeconomic benefits that this emerging technology may provide. Following a discussion on the causes of motion sickness in the context of self-driving cars, we present guidelines to steer the design and development of automated vehicle technologies. The aim is to limit or avoid the impact of motion sickness and ultimately promote the uptake of self-driving cars. Attention is also given to less well known consequences of motion sickness, in particular negative aftereffects such as postural instability, and detrimental effects on task performance and how this may impact the use and design of self-driving cars. We conclude that basic perceptual mechanisms need to be considered in the design process whereby self-driving cars cannot simply be thought of as living rooms, offices, or entertainment venues on wheels.

  18. Dementia and driving.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, D; Neubauer, K; Boyle, M; Gerrard, J; Surmon, D; Wilcock, G K

    1992-04-01

    Many European countries test cars, but not their drivers, as they age. There is evidence to suggest that human factors are more important than vehicular factors as causes of motor crashes. The elderly also are involved in more accidents per distance travelled than middle-aged drivers. As the UK relies on self-certification of health by drivers over the age of 70 years, we examined the driving practices of patients with dementia attending a Memory Clinic. Nearly one-fifth of 329 patients with documented dementia continued to drive after the onset of dementia, and impaired driving ability was noted in two-thirds of these. Their families experienced great difficulty in persuading patients to stop driving, and had to invoke outside help in many cases. Neuropsychological tests did not help to identify those who drove badly while activity of daily living scores were related to driving ability. These findings suggest that many patients with dementia drive in an unsafe fashion after the onset of the illness. The present system of self-certification of health by the elderly for driver-licensing purposes needs to be reassessed.

  19. Self-driving carsickness.

    PubMed

    Diels, Cyriel; Bos, Jelte E

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses the predicted increase in the occurrence and severity of motion sickness in self-driving cars. Self-driving cars have the potential to lead to significant benefits. From the driver's perspective, the direct benefits of this technology are considered increased comfort and productivity. However, we here show that the envisaged scenarios all lead to an increased risk of motion sickness. As such, the benefits this technology is assumed to bring may not be capitalised on, in particular by those already susceptible to motion sickness. This can negatively affect user acceptance and uptake and, in turn, limit the potential socioeconomic benefits that this emerging technology may provide. Following a discussion on the causes of motion sickness in the context of self-driving cars, we present guidelines to steer the design and development of automated vehicle technologies. The aim is to limit or avoid the impact of motion sickness and ultimately promote the uptake of self-driving cars. Attention is also given to less well known consequences of motion sickness, in particular negative aftereffects such as postural instability, and detrimental effects on task performance and how this may impact the use and design of self-driving cars. We conclude that basic perceptual mechanisms need to be considered in the design process whereby self-driving cars cannot simply be thought of as living rooms, offices, or entertainment venues on wheels. PMID:26446454

  20. Hydraulic drive system prevents backlash

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acord, J. D.

    1965-01-01

    Hydraulic drive system uses a second drive motor operating at reduced torque. This exerts a relative braking action which eliminates the normal gear train backlash that is intolerable when driving certain heavy loads.