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Sample records for ac fel undulator

  1. Tapered undulators for SASE FELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawley, William M.; Huang, Zhirong; Kim, Kwang-Je; Vinokurov, Nikolai A.

    2002-05-01

    We discuss the use of tapered undulators to enhance the performance of free-electron lasers (FELs) based upon self-amplified spontaneous emission, where the radiation tends to have a relatively broad bandwidth and limited temporal coherence. Using the polychromatic FEL simulation code GINGER, we numerically demonstrate the effectiveness of tapered undulators for parameters corresponding to the Argonne low-energy undulator test line FEL and the proposed linac coherent light source.

  2. Tapered undulator for SASE FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, William M.; Huang, Zhirong; Kim, Kwang-Je; Vinokurov, Nikolai A.

    2001-09-14

    We discuss the use of tapered undulators to enhance the performance of free-electron lasers (FELs) based upon self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), where the radiation tends to have a relatively broad bandwidth, limited temporal phase coherence, and large amplitude fluctuations. Using the polychromatic FEL simulation code GINGER, we numerically demonstrate the effectiveness of a tapered undulator for parameters corresponding to the existing Argonne low-energy undulator test line (LEUTL) FEL. We also study possible tapering options for proposed x-ray FELs such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS).

  3. SASE FEL Polarization Control Using Crossed Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Yuantao; Huang, Zhirong; /SLAC

    2008-09-30

    There is a growing interest in producing intense, coherent x-ray radiation with an adjustable and arbitrary polarization state. In this paper, we study the crossed undulator scheme for rapid polarization control in a self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free electron laser (FEL). Because a SASE source is a temporally chaotic light, we perform a statistical analysis on the state of polarization using FEL theory and simulations. We show that by adding a small phase shifter and a short (about 1.3 times the FEL power gain length), 90{sup o} rotated planar undulator after the main SASE planar undulator, one can obtain circularly polarized light--with over 80% polarization--near the FEL saturation.

  4. Undulators for short wavelength FEL amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, R.

    1994-08-01

    Issues critical to the design of undulators for use in short wavelength FEL amplifiers, such as attainable on-axis field strength, device compactness, field quality, required magnetic gap, and strong focusing schemes, are discussed. The relative strength of various undulator technologies, including pure permanent magnet, hybrid, warm electromagnetic, pulsed, and superconducting electromagnetic devices in both helical and planar configurations are reviewed. Favored design options for proposed short wavelength FELs, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC and the DUV Free-Electron Laser at BNL, are presented.

  5. High harmonic generation in undulators for FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukovsky, K.

    2016-02-01

    The analytical study of the undulator radiation (UR), accounting for major sources of the spectral line broadening is presented. Analytical expressions for the UR spectrum and intensity are obtained. They demonstrate possibilities of the compensation of the divergency by the constant magnetic component. Some examples of single and double frequency undulators are considered. Generation of harmonics is studied with account for homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening in real devices. The obtained results with account for all broadening sources are applied for evaluation of free electron laser (FEL) performance and compared with those, obtained with the ideal undulator.

  6. Enhanced FEL performance from superconducting undulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottschalk, S. C.; Pindroh, A. L.; Quimby, D. C.; Robinson, K. E.; Slater, J. M.

    1991-07-01

    Superconducting undulators offer potentially higher field strengths than either pure rare-earth permanent magnet (Pure-REPM) undulators or wedged pole hybrid (WPH) undulators. In FELs, optimum extraction is obtained for values of the rms undulator vector potential, aw, near unity. Superconducting undulators are capable of achieving a unity aw at smaller wavelengths than either Pure-REPM or WPH undulators, leading to improved extraction at the same optical wavelength and E field, while the e-beam energy is reduced slightly. The degree of improvement depends on whether the e-beam energy spread (including equivalent energy spread due to emittance) is much smaller or larger than the FEL bucket height. When the bucket is much larger than the energy spread, the extraction (at fixed gain) improves by up to 70% over that which can be achieved by the WPH design. When the energy spread is larger than the bucket, the extraction improvement is up to 35%. The superferric superconducting undulator design consists of a holmium back plane and poles with racetrack niobium-titanium multifilamentary windings. Magnetic field wavelength scalings have been determined using PANDIRA. Maximum current density vs wavelength was based on quench stability considerations. An important end result is that the forces and stresses present in undulators are much smaller than in dipoles, such as those of the SSC, so complex mechanical designs to constrain windings are not needed. The low stored energy in short wavelength undulators should keep temperatures during a quench under 150 K and voltages below 500 V. Point designs for both superferric and WPH undulators at both energy spread limits are presented.

  7. On a theory of an FEL oscillator with multicomponent undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Yurkov, M.V.

    1995-12-31

    Some novel results of a theory of an FEL oscillator with multicomponent undulator are presented. Two popular FEL oscillator configuration are under consideration: optical klystron and FEL oscillator with a prebuncher and tapered main undulator. Using similarity techniques, universal formulae and plots are obtained which allow one to calculate the FEL oscillator lasing conditions an output parameters at saturation. A one-dimensional analysis of an FEL oscillator with a linear undulator tapering is presented. Some principally novel results have been obtained. The origin of these results is in principal difference between the FEL oscillator and an FEL amplifier. In the case of the FEL amplifier the frequency of the amplified wave and all the other parameters are defined by an experimenter. Contrary to this, the case of the FEL oscillator with tapered undulator is more complicated. The lasing frequency is defined by the maximum of the small-signal gain and depends on the tapering depth in some complex way. In particular, at smooth increasing of the tapering depth, the lasing frequency may change by a leap and lasing occurs at another local maximum of the gain curve. This effect influences significantly on the FEL oscillator operation at saturation. As a result, generally accepted method of undulator tapering (for instance, by decreasing undulator field at fixed period) provides an efficiency increase only in a narrow range of the parameters of tapering. We show that in some cases, so called {open_quotes}negative tapering{close_quotes} (for instance, by increasing undulator field at fixed period) has a benefit against traditional tapering method. Ignoring of these basic features of the FEL oscillator with the tapered undulator have led many FEL research groups to nonoptimal design of the FEL experiments and incorrect interpretation of the obtained results.

  8. Some novel features of an FEL oscillator with tapered undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Yurkov, M.V.

    1995-12-31

    A one-dimensional analysis of an FEL oscillator with a linear undulator tapering is presented. Some principally novel results have been obtained. The origin of these results is in principal difference between the FEL oscillator and an FEL amplifier. In the case of the FEL amplifier the frequency of the amplified wave and all the other parameters are defined by an experimenter. Contrary to this, the case of the FEL oscillator with tapered undulator is more complicated. The lasing frequency is defined by the maximum of the small-signal gain and depends on the tapering depth in some complex way.

  9. Undulators for the BESSY SASE-FEL Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bahrdt, J.; Frentrup, W.; Gaupp, A.; Kuske, B.; Meseck, A.; Scheer, M.

    2004-05-12

    BESSY plans to build a SASE-FEL facility for the energy range from 20 eV to 1000 eV. The energy range will be covered by three APPLE II type undulators with a magnetic length of about 60 m each. This paper summarizes the basic parameters of the FEL-undulators. The magnetic design will be presented. A modified APPLE II design will be discussed which provides higher fields at the expense of reduced horizontal access. GENESIS simulations give an estimate on the tolerances for the beam wander and for gap errors.

  10. Transverse Gradient Undulators and FEL operating with large energy spread

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciocci, F.; Dattoli, G.; Sabia, E.

    2015-12-01

    Undulators exhibiting a gradient of the field in the transverse direction have been proposed to mitigate the effects of the gain dilution in Free Electron Laser devices operating with large energy spread. The actual use of the device depends on the realization of a field distribution with quasi-vanishing quadrupolar terms in the tapering directions. We analyze the effect of a Transverse Gradient Undulator on the FEL operation and critically review the possibility of an appropriate field implementation.

  11. Undulators to FELs: Nanometers, Femtoseconds, Coherence and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Attwood, David

    2011-11-30

    For scientists in many fields, from material science to the life sciences and archeology, synchrotron radiation, and in particular undulator radiation, has provide an intense source of x-rays which are tunable to the absorption edges of particular elements of interest, often permitting studies at high spatial and spectral resolution. Now a close cousin to the undulator, the x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) has emerged with improved spatial coherence and, perhaps more importantly, femtosecond pulse durations which permit dynamical studies. In the future attosecond x-ray capabilities are anticipated. In this colloqium we will describe some state of the art undulator studies, how undulators work, the evolution to FELs, their pulse and coherence properties, and the types of experiments envisioned.

  12. Coherent harmonic production using a two-section undulator FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Jaroszynski, D.A.; Prazeres, R.; Glotin, F.

    1995-12-31

    We present measurements and a theoretical analysis of a new method of generating harmonic radiation in a free-electron laser oscillator with a two section undulator in a single optical cavity. To produce coherent harmonic radiation the undulator is arranged so that the downstream undulator section resonance frequency matches a harmonic of the upstream undulator. Both the fundamental and the harmonic optical fields evolve in the same optical cavity and are coupled out with different extraction fractions using a hole in one of the cavity mirrors. We present measurements that show that the optical power at the second and third harmonic can be enhanced by more than an order of magnitude in this fundamental/harmonic configuration. We compare the production of harmonic radiation of a two sectioned fundamental/harmonic undulator with that produced from a FEL operating at its highest efficiency with a step-tapered undulator, where the bunching at the end of the first section is very large. We examine, the dependence of the harmonic power on the intracavity power by adjusting the optical cavity desynchronism, {delta}L. We also examine the evolution of the fundamental and harmonic powers as a function of cavity roundtrip number to evaluate the importance of the small signal gain at the harmonic. We compare our measurements with predictions of a multi-electron numerical model that follows the evolution of fundamental and harmonic power to saturation. This fundamental/harmonic mode, of operation of the FEL may have useful applications in the production of coherent X-ray and VUV radiation, a spectral range where high reflectivity optical cavity mirrors are difficult or impossible to manufacture.

  13. DESIGN STUDY OF COMPACT MEGA-WATT CLASS FEL AMPLIFIER BASED ON THE VISA UNDULATOR.

    SciTech Connect

    WATANABE, T.; LIU, D.; MURPHY, J.B.; PINAYEV, I.; ROSE, J.; SHAFTAN, T.; SKARITKA, J.; TANABE, T.; TSANG, T.; WANG, X.J.; YU, L.H.

    2005-08-21

    The strong focusing VISA undulator is presented in this report. The proposed FEL will operate at the 1 {micro}m water window. Extensive simulations were performed to optimize an FEL amplifier based on the two-meter long VISA undulator which has a period of 1.8 cm and an undulator parameter K = 1.26. The betatron function inside the VISA undulator is about 30 cm. For an electron beam with a peak current {approx}1 kA and a normalized emittance of 5 mm-mrad, the FEL peak power can exceed 1 GW within the 2 m VISA undulator using a 5 kW peak power seed laser. Such a device can produce a megawatt of average power for a 700 MHz rep rate. The transverse distribution of the FEL radiation along the undulator, as well as after the undulator, is explored by numerical simulation. The FEL power density at 5 m downstream from the undulator is less than 100 kW/cm{sup 2} for this MW-class FEL. We will also discuss the feasibility of an experimental demonstration of the laser seeded FEL amplifier based on the 2-m VISA undulator at the NSLS Source Development Lab (SDL).

  14. The universal method for optimization of undulator tapering in FEL amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    2015-05-01

    Technique of undulator tapering in the post-saturation regime is used at the existing x-ray FELs for increasing the radiation power. There are also discussions on the future of high peak and average power FELs for scientific and industrial applications. Diffraction effects essentially influence on the choice of the tapering strategy. Recent studies resulted in an general law of the undulator tapering for a seeded FEL amplifier. In this paper we extend these results for the case of the Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) FEL.

  15. Coherent undulator radiation of electron beam, microbunched for the FEL power outcoupling

    SciTech Connect

    Kulipanov, G.N.; Sokolov, A.S.; Vinokurov, N.A.

    1995-12-31

    The spectral intensity of the coherent undulator radiation of electron beam, preliminarily microbunched by the FEL oscillator for the FEL power outcoupling, is approximately calculated by simple analytic considerations, taking into account the transverse emittances and the energy spread of the microbunched electron beams.

  16. Polarization Analysis for Seeded FELs in a Crossed-Planar Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Huiping; Ding, Yuantao; Huang, Zhirong; Bartolini, Riccardo; Dunning, David; Thompson, Neil; /Daresbury

    2012-06-25

    The crossed-planar undulator is a promising scheme for full polarization control in x-ray FELs. For SASE FELs, it has been shown a maximum degree of circular polarization of about 80% is achievable at fundamental wavelength just before saturation. In this paper, we study the effectiveness of a crossed undulator for a seeded x-ray FEL. The degree of circular polarization for both the fundamental and the harmonic radiation are considered. Simulations with realistic beam distributions show that a degree of circular polarization of over 90% and 80% is obtainable at the fundamental and 2nd harmonic frequencies, respectively.

  17. LCLS X-Ray FEL Output Performance in the Presence of HighlyTime-Dependent Undulator Wakefields

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, Karl L.F.; Emma, Paul; Huang, Heinz-Dieter Nuhn; Stupakov,Gennady; Fawley, William M.; Reiche, Sven

    2005-08-25

    Energy loss due to wakefields within a long undulator, if not compensated by an appropriate tapering of the magnetic field strength, can degrade the FEL process by detuning the resonant FEL frequency. The wakefields arise from the vacuum chamber wall resistivity, its surface roughness, and abrupt changes in its aperture. For LCLS parameters, the resistive-wall component is the most critical and depends upon the chamber material (e.g., Cu) and its radius. Of recent interest[1] is the so-called ''AC'' component of the resistive-wall wake which can lead to strong variations on very short timescales (e.g., {approx} 20 0fs). To study the expected performance of the LCLS in the presence of these wakefields, we have made an extensive series of start-to-end SASE simulations with tracking codes PARMELA and ELEGANT, and time-dependent FEL simulation codes GENESIS1.3 and GINGER. We discuss the impact of the wakefield losses upon output energy, spectral bandwidth, and temporal envelope of the output FEL pulse, as well as the benefits of a partial compensation of the time-dependent wake losses obtained with a slight z-dependent taper in the undulator field. We compare the taper results to those predicted analytically[2].

  18. LCLS X-Ray FEL Output Performance in the Presence of Highly Time-Dependent Undulator Wakefields

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, W.M.; Bane, K.L.F.; Emma, P.; Huang, Z.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Stupakov, G.; Reiche, S.; /UCLA

    2005-09-30

    Energy loss due to wakefields within a long undulator, if not compensated by an appropriate tapering of the magnetic field strength, can degrade the FEL process by detuning the resonant FEL frequency. The wakefields arise from the vacuum chamber wall resistivity, its surface roughness, and abrupt changes in its aperture. For LCLS parameters, the resistive-wall component is the most critical and depends upon the chamber material (e.g., Cu) and its radius. Of recent interest[1] is the so-called ''AC'' component of the resistive-wall wake which can lead to strong variations on very short timescales (e.g., {approx} 20 fs). To study the expected performance of the LCLS in the presence of these wakefields, we have made an extensive series of start-to-end SASE simulations with tracking codes PARMELA and ELEGANT, and time-dependent FEL simulation codes GENESIS1.3 and GINGER. We discuss the impact of the wakefield losses upon output energy, spectral bandwidth, and temporal envelope of the output FEL pulse, as well as the benefits of a partial compensation of the time-dependent wake losses obtained with a slight z-dependent taper in the undulator field. We compare the taper results to those predicted analytically[2].

  19. A superconducting short period undulator for a harmonic generation FEL experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ingold, G.; Solomon, L.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Krinsky, S.; Li, D.; Lynch, D.; Sheehan, J.; Woodle, M.; Qiu, X.Z.; Yu, L.H.; Zhang, X.; Sampson, W.; Gardner, M.; Robins, K.; Lehrman, I.; Heuer, R.; Sheehan, J.; Weissenburger, D.

    1993-07-01

    A three stage superconducting (SC) undulator for a high gain harmonic generation (HGE) FEL experiment in the infrared is under construction at the NSLS in collaboration with Grumman Corporation. A novel undulator technology suitable for short period (6--40mm) undulators will be employed for all three stages, the modulator, the dispersive section and the radiator. The undulator triples the frequency of a 10.4{mu}m CO{sub 2} seed laser. So far a 27 period (one third of the final radiator) prototype radiator has been designed, built and tested.

  20. A superconducting short period undulator for a harmonic generation FEL experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ingold, G.; Solomon, L.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Krinsky, S.; Li, D.; Lynch, D.; Sheehan, J.; Woodle, M.; Qiu, X.Z.; Yu, L.H.; Zhang, X.; Sampson, W.; Gardner, M.; Robins, K. ); Lehrman, I.; Heuer, R.; Sheehan, J.; Weissenburger, D. )

    1993-01-01

    A three stage superconducting (SC) undulator for a high gain harmonic generation (HGE) FEL experiment in the infrared is under construction at the NSLS in collaboration with Grumman Corporation. A novel undulator technology suitable for short period (6--40mm) undulators will be employed for all three stages, the modulator, the dispersive section and the radiator. The undulator triples the frequency of a 10.4[mu]m CO[sub 2] seed laser. So far a 27 period (one third of the final radiator) prototype radiator has been designed, built and tested.

  1. Polarization control in X-ray FELs by reverse undulator tapering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    2015-05-01

    Baseline design of a typical X-ray FEL undulator assumes a planar configuration which results in a linear polarization of the FEL radiation. However, many experiments at X-ray FEL user facilities would profit from using a circularly polarized radiation. As a cheap upgrade one can consider an installation of a short helical (or cross-planar) afterburner, but then one should have an efficient method to suppress powerful linearly polarized background from the main undulator. In this paper we propose a new method for such a suppression: an application of the reverse taper in the main undulator. We discover that in a certain range of the taper strength, the density modulation (bunching) at saturation is practically the same as in the case of non-tapered undulator while the power of linearly polarized radiation is suppressed by orders of magnitude. Then strongly modulated electron beam radiates at full power in the afterburner. Considering SASE3 undulator of the European XFEL as a practical example, we demonstrate that soft X-ray radiation pulses with peak power in excess of 100 GW and an ultimately high degree of circular polarization can be produced. The proposed method is rather universal, i.e. it can be used at SASE FELs and seeded (self-seeded) FELs, with any wavelength of interest, in a wide range of electron beam parameters, and with any repetition rate.

  2. FEL gain as a function of phace displacements induced by undulator intersection gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Varfolomeev, A.A.

    1995-12-31

    Gain characteristics are analytically considered for FEL based on a multisection undulator with short intersection gaps. It is shown that small phase displacements between laser beam and electron beam respectively caused by the above intersection gaps can seriously change the gain resonance frequency as well as gain curve shape. This effect is different from that of OK and can be used for fast undulator tuning or for its tapering. Gain characteristics are analitically considered for FEL based on a multisection undulator with short intersection gaps. It is shown that small phase displacements between laser beam and electron beam respectively caused by the above intersection gaps can seriously change the gain resonance frequency as well as gain curve shape. This effect is different from that of OK and can be used for fast undulator tuning or for its tapering.

  3. Simulations of the 100 kW TJNAF FEL Using a Step-Tapered Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    J. Blau; V. Bouras; W. B. Colson; A. Kalfoutzos; S. V. Benson; H. F. Dylla; G. R. Neil

    2002-05-01

    The TJNAF free electron laser (FEL) can be upgraded to operate at 100 kW average power in the near future using a configuration that recirculates the electron beam to recover energy. It is important to extract the maximum energy from the electron beam in a pass through the undulator while inducing the minimum amount of exhaust energy spread. A larger energy extraction reduces the requirement for a large recirculating current, while a smaller exhaust energy spread allows the intense electron beam to be recirculated without damaging components. To improve FEL performance, we explore the use of the step-tapered undulator which alters the resonance condition halfway through the undulator. Short pulses and optical diffraction complicate the desired interaction. Comparisons are made to the conventional periodic and linearly tapered undulators.

  4. Effects of undulator interruptions on the performance of high-gain FEL amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.; Xie, M.; Pelligrini, C.

    1995-12-31

    The high-gain amplifiers for short wavelength free electron lasers (FELs) such as the LCLS project require a long undulator. The construction of the undulator as well as the FEL operation would become easier if the undulator could be interrupted with drift sections every few gain lengths. We have investigated the influence of such interruption on the FEL performances. Three effects are considered: (i) the diffraction loss, (ii) the phase mismatch and, (iii) the phase smearing due to velocity spread and to dispersion errors. The effect (i) is the loss during the process in which the optical mode in a section of the undulator leaves the undulator, propagates through the free space and then re-enters and re-adjusts in the next section. The effect (ii) is the fact that the phase of the optical beam is displaced with respect to the electrons density modulation for optical FEL interaction due to the slippage of the electron beam in the interruption region. The effect (iii) is the fact that electrons velocity spread, emittance, and dispersion due to misalignment of the quadrupoles used for additional focusing lead to a reduction of the bunching factor. We present an approximate analysis of these effects. When applied to the LCLS parameters, we find that the effect (i) is negligible, the effect (ii) gives a condition on the length of the drift section, and the effects (iii) are small, but could be non-negligible if there are sufficient number of interruptions.

  5. Tailoring the amplification of attosecond pulse through detuned X-ray FEL undulator.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kang, Heung-Sik; Kim, Dong Eon

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate that the amplification of attosecond pulse in X-ray free electron laser (FEL) undulator can be tailored. The characteristic of the amplification of an isolated attosecond pulse in the FEL undulator is investigated. An isolated 180 attoseconds full width half maximum (FWHM) pulse at 1.25 nm with a spectral bandwidth of 1% is injected into an undulator. The simulation results show that for a direct seeding of 3MW, the seed is amplified to the peak power of 106 GW (40 μJ, an output pulse-width of 383 attoseconds) in the presence of a detuning at FEL resonance condition in 100-m long undulator. We note that the introduction of detuning leads to the better performance compared to the case without detuning: shorter by 15.5% in a pulse-width and higher by 76.6% in an output power. Tapering yields a higher power (116% increases in the output power compared to the case without detuning) but a longer pulse (15.4% longer in the pulse-width). It was observed that ± Δλ(r)/8 (Δλ(r)/λ(r) ~1%) is the maximum degree of detuning, beyond which the amplification becomes poor: lower in the output power and longer in the pulse duration. The minimum power for a seed pulse needs to be higher than 1 MW for the successful amplification of an attosecond pulse at 1.25 nm. Also, the electron beam energy-spread must be less than 0.1% for a suitable propagation of attosecond pulse along the FEL undulator under this study. PMID:25836141

  6. A new undulator for the extension of the spectral range of the CLIO FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Marcouille, O.; Berset, J.M.; Glotin, F.

    1995-12-31

    We built a new undulator in order to extend the lasing range of the CLIO infrared FEL. Presently, CLIO operates in the wavelength range 2 - 17 {mu}m. Beyond 14 {mu}m, the power decreases rapidly, because of the diffraction losses of the vacuum chamber (7 mm height and 2 m long). Thus, lasing at higher wavelengths implies installing a chamber with a height approximately twice. Then the minimum gap is increased and the maximum deflection parameter, K, is reduced from 2 to 1 : the laser tunability is greatly reduced. This is why a new undulator has been built.

  7. A hybrid type undulator for far-infrared FELs at FELI

    SciTech Connect

    Zako, A.; Miyauchi, Y.; Koga, A.

    1995-12-31

    Two FEL facilities of the FELI are now operating in the wavelength range of 1-20 {mu}m. A 3.2-m hybrid type undulator ({lambda}{sub u}=80mm, N=40) has been designed for far-infrared FELs and will be installed in December. It can cover the wavelength of 20-60 {mu}m by changing K-value from 1 to 2.7 for a 28.0-MeV electron beam. It is composed of ferrite magnetic poles and Sm-Co permanent magnets. Commonly wound coils induce alternating magnetic field in ferrite poles. Combination of the induced field and the permanent magnet field can controls the magnetic field between the undulator gap.

  8. Comparison of different undulator schemes with superimposed alternating gradients for the VUV-FEL at the TESLA Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pflueger, J.; Nikitina, Y.M.

    1995-12-31

    For the VUV-FEL at the TESLA Test Facility an undulator with a total length of 30 m is needed. In this study three different approaches to realize an undulator with a sinusoidal plus a superimposed quadrupolar field were studied with the 3D code MAFIA.

  9. Performance of an undulator for visible and UV FELs at FELI

    SciTech Connect

    Miyauchi, Y.; Zako, A.; Koga, A.

    1995-12-31

    Two infrared free electron lasers (FELs) of the FELI project are now operating in the wavelength range of 1-20{mu}m. A 2.68-m undulator has been constructed for visible and UV FELs covering the wavelength of 1-0.2{mu}m for 100-165 MeV electron beams. It generates alternating, horizontal magnetic field, and wiggles electron beam on a vertical plane. The undulator length and period are 2.68m and 40mm, respectively. The gap of undulator magnets can be changed remotely by using servomotors with an accuracy of 1 {mu}m from the control room. The maximum K-value and related magnetic field strength are 1.9 and 0.5T, respectively, when its gap is set to the minimum value of 16mm. In order to minimize magnetic field reduction due to radiation damage, Sm-Co permanent magnet was adopted. Its structure and the results of magnetic field measurement will be reported.

  10. Simulations of the TJNAF FEL with tapered and inversely tapered undulators

    SciTech Connect

    A. Christodoulou; D. Lampiris; W.B. Colson; P.P. Crooker; J. Blau; R.D. McGinnis; Steve Benson; Joseph Gubeli; George Neil

    2001-12-01

    Experiments using the TJNAF FEL have explored the operation with both tapered and inversely tapered undulators. We present here numerical simulations using the TJNAF experimental parameters, including the effects of taper. Single-mode simulations show the effect of taper on gain. Multimode simulations describe the evolution of short optical pulses in the far infrared, and show how taper affects single-pass gain and steady-state power as a function of desynchronism. A short optical pulse presents an ever-changing field strength to each section of the electron pulse so that idealized operation is not possible. Yet, advantages for the recirculation of the electron beam can be explored.

  11. Statistical properties of the radiation from SASE FEL operating in a post-saturation regime with and without undulator tapering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    2016-02-01

    We describe statistical and coherence properties of the radiation from X-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL) operating in the post-saturation regime. We consider the practical case of the SASE3 FEL at the European XFEL. We perform comparison of the main characteristics of the X-ray FEL operating in the post-saturation regime with and without undulator tapering: efficiency, coherence time, and degree of transverse coherence.

  12. Orbital motion in generalized static fields of FELs accounting for axial magnetic field, beam forces, undulator and external focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Papadichev, V.A.

    1995-12-31

    Various types of undulators with or without axial magnetic field are used in FELs. Supplementary beam focusing can be applied by wedging, inclining or profiling pole faces of plan undulators or superposing external focusing magnetic fields in addition to undulator own focusing. Space-charge forces influence significantly particle motion in high-current, low-energy electron beams. Finally, one can use simultaneously two or more different undulators for some specific purpose: more efficient and selective higher harmonics generation, changing polarization types and direction, gain enhancement in double-period undulator etc. All these cases can be treated by solving the generalized equations of transverse orbital motion in a linear approximation, which is widely used for orbit calculation, gives sufficient accuracy for practical purposes and allows to consider many variants and optimize the chosen one. The undulator field is described as a field of two plane undulators with mutually orthogonal fields and an arbitrary axial (phase) shift between them. Various values of the phase shift correspond to right- or left-handed helical undulators, plane undulator of different polarization etc. The general formulae are reduced to forms that allow easier examination of particular cases: planar or helical undulator combined with axial magnetic field or without it, gyroresonance, limiting beam current, polarization etc.

  13. Optimization of the LCLS X-Ray FEL Output Performance in the Presence of Strong Undulator Wakefields

    SciTech Connect

    Reiche, S.; Bane, K.L.F.; Emma, P.; Huang, Z.; Nuhn, H.D.; Stupakov, G.V.; Fawley, W.M.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2006-03-17

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Free-Electron Laser will operate in the wavelength range of 1.5 to 15 Angstroms. Energy loss due to wakefields within the long undulator can degrade the FEL process by detuning the resonant FEL frequency. The wakefields arise from the vacuum chamber wall resistivity, its surface roughness, and abrupt changes in its aperture. For LCLS parameters, the resistive component is the most critical and depends upon the chamber material (e.g. Cu) and its radius. To study the expected performance in the presence of these wakefields, we make a series of start-to-end simulations with tracking codes PARMELA and ELEGANT and time-dependent FEL simulation codes Genesis 1.3 and Ginger. We discuss the impact of the wakefield on output energy, spectral bandwidth, and temporal envelope of the output FEL pulse, as well as the benefits of a partial compensation obtained with a slight z dependent taper in the undulator field. We compare these results to those obtained by decreasing the bunch charge or increasing the vacuum chamber radius. We also compare our results to those predicted in concurrent analytical work.

  14. Toward the nano-FEL: Undulator and Cherenkov mechanisms of light emission in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batrakov, K. G.; Kuzhir, P. P.; Maksimenko, S. A.

    2008-03-01

    Stimulated emission of electron beam in isolated carbon nanotube (CNT) is considered. A concept of the CNT-based monomolecular light emitter-nanoscale traveling wave tube (TWT), backward oscillator (BWO) and free-electron laser (FEL) proposed for the first time in Batrakov et al. [in: A. Lakhtakia, S.A. Maksimenko (Eds.), Proceedings of the SPIE., vol. 6328, 2006, p. 63280Z]. is discussed in more details. Two possible basic mechanisms of the device operation-the undulator and the Cherenkov mechanisms of light emission-are considered. The particular emphasis is placed to the questions of matching of CNT and electron beam parameters in order to provide resonant conditions necessary for the radiative instability evolution. The influence of the beam energy spread on the dispersion characteristics and the starting current is revealed. Numerical calculations demonstrate that the electron beam spread larger than 3-5% influences significantly the generation process in the infrared frequency range at CNT lengths of the order of 10 μm.

  15. A table-top x-ray FEL based on a laser wakefield accelerator-undulator system

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, K.; Kawakubo, T.; Nakanishi, H.

    1995-12-31

    Ultrahigh-gradient electron acceleration has been confirmed owing to the laser wakefield acceleration mechanism driven by an intense short laser wakefield acceleration mechanism driven by an intense short laser pulse in an underdense plasma. The laser wakefield acceleration makes it possible to build a compact electron linac capable of producing an ultra-short bunched electron beam. While the accelerator is attributed to longitudinal wakefields, transverse wakefields simultaneously generated by a short laser pulse can serve as a plasma undulator with a very short wavelength equal to a half of the plasma wavelength. We propose a new FEL concept for X-rays based on a laser wakefield accelerator-undulator system driven by intense short laser pulses delivered from table-top terawatt lasers. The system is composed of the accelerator stage and the undulator stage in a table-top size. A low energy electron beam is accelerated an bunched into microbunches due to laser wakefields in the accelerator stage. A micro-bunched beam travelling to the opposite direction of driving laser pulses produces coherent X-ray radiation in the undulator stage. A practical configuration and its analyses are presented.

  16. Generation of radiation by intense plasma and electromagnetic undulators

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, C.

    1991-10-01

    We examine the characteristics of the classical radiation emission resulting from the interaction of a relativistic electron beam that propagates perpendicularly through a large amplitude relativistic plasma wave. Such a study is useful for evaluating the feasibility of using relativistic plasma waves as extremely short wavelength undulators for generating short wavelength radiation. The electron trajectories in a plasma wave undulator and in an ac FEL undulator are obtained using perturbation techniques. The spontaneous radiation frequency spectrum and angular distribution emitted by a single electron oscillating in these two undulators are then calculated. The radiation gain of a copropagating electromagnetic wave is calculated. The approximate analytic results for the trajectories, spontaneous radiation and gain are compared with 3-D simulation results. The characteristics of the plasma wave undulator are compared with the ac FEL undulator and linearly polarized magnetic undulator. 50 refs., 26 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Undulator system for the VUV FEL at the TESLA test facility phase-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflüger, J.; Hahn, U.; Faatz, B.; Tischer, M.

    2003-07-01

    The Phase-1 of the VUV Free Electron Laser at the TESLA Test Facility finishes in fall 2002. Phase-2, an extension of Phase-1 towards shorter wavelengths is under construction and will be ready for operation in 2003. A radiation wavelength as low as 6 nm will be obtained by raising the electron energy to 1 GeV. There will be only minor changes to the undulator system. Compared to Phase-1, six instead of three undulator segments will be installed. The integrated focusing system will be replaced by an electromagnetic doublet structure. We report about the changes of the undulator, the undulator vacuum system, the separated quadrupoles including a stretched wire alignment systems and the modifications to the beam diagnostic system consisting of pick up monitors and wire scanners.

  18. Production of Ultrashort FEL XUV Pulses via a Reverse UndulatorTaper

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, William M.

    2007-10-22

    We adapt the "reverse taper" scheme presented by Saldin etal. (Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams, 9, 050702 [2006]) for attosecond pulseproduction to the XUV/soft-xray regime. We find that that GW-level pulsesof a few femtosecond duration or shorter can be produced using electronbeams of quite moderate parameters and undulators of 20-m length orshorter. The output pulse is significantly shifted in wavelength relativeto the main background which permits a further increase in contrast ratiovia simple monochromatization. Moreover, the output pulse has a naturalwavelength chirp that allows further temporal compression, if wanted.Both positive and negative chirps can be produced depending uponthe signof the undulator taper.

  19. Reduction of undulator radiation and FEL small gain due to wiggler errors

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.

    1991-01-01

    A deterministic approach is taken to study the effect of errors in the wiggler magnet field on the spontaneous emission and the gain of Free Electron Lasers. A 3D formulation is used to derive the reduction in spontaneous emission due to changes in the time of flight of the electrons. A generalization of Madey's theorem to 3D is then used to calculate the reduction in the FEL small gain. 6 refs.

  20. Magnetic field measurements of the harmonic generation FEL superconducting undulator at BNL-NSLS

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, L.; Graves, W.S.; Lehrman, I.

    1994-12-31

    A three stage superconducting undulator (modulator, dispersive section, and radiator) is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Sections of the radiator, consisting of 25cm long steel yokes, each with 18mm period, 0.54 Tesla field, and 8.6mm gap are under test. The magnetic measurements and operational characteristics of the magnet are discussed. Measurement results and analysis are presented, with emphasis on the integrated field quality. The magnet winding and the effects of the various trims are discussed.

  1. Magnetic field measurements of a superconducting undulator for a Harmonic Generation FEL experiment at the NSLS

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, L.; Ingold, G.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Krinsky, S.; Yu, L.H.; Sampson, W.; Robins, K.

    1993-07-01

    An 18mm period, 0.54 Tesla, 8mm gap superconducting undulator with both horizontal and vertical focusing has been built and tested. This magnet, which is fabricated in 25 cm length sections, is being tested for use in the radiator section (total magnet length of 1.5 m) of the Harmonic Generation Free Electron Laser experiment at the National Synchrotron Light Source - Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Lab., in collaboration with Grumman Corp. The measurement system is outlined, sources and estimates of errors are described, and some magnetic field data are presented and discussed.

  2. Single Shot Polarization Characterization of XUV FEL Pulses from Crossed Polarized Undulators

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, E.; Allaria, E.; Buck, J.; De Ninno, G.; Diviacco, B.; Gauthier, D.; Giannessi, L.; Glaser, L.; Huang, Z.; Ilchen, M.; Lambert, G.; Lutman, A. A.; Mahieu, B.; Penco, G.; Spezzani, C.; Viefhaus, J.

    2015-01-01

    Polarization control is a key feature of light generated by short-wavelength free-electron lasers. In this work, we report the first experimental characterization of the polarization properties of an extreme ultraviolet high gain free-electron laser operated with crossed polarized undulators. We investigate the average degree of polarization and the shot-to-shot stability and we analyze aspects such as existing possibilities for controlling and switching the polarization state of the emitted light. The results are in agreement with predictions based on Gaussian beams propagation. PMID:26314764

  3. Single shot polarization characterization of XUV FEL pulses from crossed polarized undulators

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrari, E.; Allaria, E.; Buck, J.; De Ninno, G.; Diviacco, B.; Gauthier, D.; Giannessi, L.; Glaser, L.; Huang, Z.; Ilchen, M.; Lambert, G.; Lutman, A. A.; Mahieu, B.; Penco, G.; Spezzani, C.; Viefhaus, J.

    2015-08-28

    Polarization control is a key feature of light generated by short-wavelength free-electron lasers. In this work, we report the first experimental characterization of the polarization properties of an extreme ultraviolet high gain free-electron laser operated with crossed polarized undulators. We research the average degree of polarization and the shot-to-shot stability and we analyze aspects such as existing possibilities for controlling and switching the polarization state of the emitted light. The results are in agreement with predictions based on Gaussian beams propagation.

  4. Design Features of a Planar Hybrid/Permanent Magnet Strong Focusing Undulator for Free Electron Laser (FEL) And Synchrotron Radiation (SR) Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tatchyn, Roman; /SLAC

    2011-09-09

    Insertion devices for Angstrom-wavelength Free Electron Laser (FEL) amplifiers driven by multi-GeV electron beams generally require distributed focusing substantially stronger than their own natural focusing fields. Over the last several years a wide variety of focusing schemes and configurations have been proposed for undulators of this class, ranging from conventional current-driven quadrupoles external to the undulator magnets to permanent magnet (PM) lattices inserted into the insertion device gap. In this paper we present design studies of a flexible high-field hybrid/PM undulator with strong superimposed planar PM focusing proposed for a 1.5 Angstrom Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) driven by an electron beam with a 1 mm-mr normalized emittance. Attainable field parameters, tuning modes, and potential applications of the proposed structure are discussed.

  5. Enhancing FEL Power with Phase Shifters

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, Daniel; Chao, Alex; Huang, Zhirong; /SLAC

    2010-07-30

    Tapering the undulator parameter is a well-known method for maintaining the resonant condition past saturation, and increasing Free Electron Laser (FEL) efficiency. In this paper, we demonstrate that shifting the electron bunch phase relative to the radiation is equivalent to tapering the undulator parameter. Using discrete phase changes derived from optimized undulator tapers for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray FEL, we show that appropriate phase shifts between undulator sections can reproduce the power enhancement of undulator tapers. Phase shifters are relatively easy to implement and operate, and could be used to aid or replace undulator tapers in optimizing FEL performance.

  6. LCLS-II Undulator Tolerance Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nuhn, H.-D.; Marks, S.; Wu, J.; /SLAC

    2012-06-06

    The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is building a new FEL user facility, LCLS-II, as a major upgrade to the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The upgrade will include two new Free Electron Lasers (FELs), to generate soft (SXR) and hard x-ray (HXR) SASE FEL radiation, based on planar, variable gap hybrid undulators with two different undulator periods (SXU: 55 mm, HXU: 32 mm). An algebraic FEL tolerance analysis for the undulator lines, including tuning, alignment, and phase correction tolerances has been performed. The methods and results are presented in this paper.

  7. New results of the {open_quotes}CLIO{close_quotes} infrared FEL using the new undulator {open_quotes}OMIR{close_quotes} and a hole coupling extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Prazeres, R.; Berset, J.M.; Glotin, F.

    1995-12-31

    In order to extend the {open_quote}CLIO{close_quote} laser spectral range toward larger wavelength, the previous undulator {open_quotes}POPOO{close_quotes} has been replaced by a new one called {open_quotes}OMIR{close_quotes}. The new undulator has now N=38 periods of {lambda}{sub o}=5.04cm, instead of N=48 and {lambda}{sub o}=4cm. Lasing toward larger wavelength needs also a new larger undulator vacuum chamber to avoid laser diffraction. The ZnSe Brewster plate, which was initially used for laser extraction, has been replaced by a hole coupling extraction in order to allow lasing above 17{mu}m. This paper summarizes the general performances of CLIO with this new configuration, and makes a comparison with the previous results. The laser power has been increased for the users, and the wavelength range has been extended. Two colours operating mode has also been observed with hole coupling.

  8. The JLAB UV Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Gottschalk, Steven C.; Benson, Steven V.; Moore, Steven Wesley

    2013-05-01

    Recently the JLAB FEL has demonstrated 150 W at 400 nm and 200 W at 700 nm using a 33mm period undulator designed and built by STI Optronics. This paper describes the undulator design and performance. Two key requirements were low phase error, zero steering and offset end fields and small rms trajectory errors. We will describe a new genetic algorithm that allowed phase error minimization to 1.8 degrees while exceeding specifications. The mechanical design, control system and EPICS interface will also be summarized.

  9. Undulator beamline optimization with integrated chicanes for X-ray free-electron-laser facilities.

    PubMed

    Prat, Eduard; Calvi, Marco; Ganter, Romain; Reiche, Sven; Schietinger, Thomas; Schmidt, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    An optimization of the undulator layout of X-ray free-electron-laser (FEL) facilities based on placing small chicanes between the undulator modules is presented. The installation of magnetic chicanes offers the following benefits with respect to state-of-the-art FEL facilities: reduction of the required undulator length to achieve FEL saturation, improvement of the longitudinal coherence of the FEL pulses, and the ability to produce shorter FEL pulses with higher power levels. Numerical simulations performed for the soft X-ray beamline of the SwissFEL facility show that optimizing the advantages of the layout requires shorter undulator modules than the standard ones. This proposal allows a very compact undulator beamline that produces fully coherent FEL pulses and it makes possible new kinds of experiments that require very short and high-power FEL pulses. PMID:27359133

  10. Transmission Grating Measurements of Undulator K

    SciTech Connect

    Bionta, R. M.

    2010-12-01

    This study was undertaken to understand the practicalities of determine K differences in the undulator modules by measuring single-shot x-ray spectra of the spontaneous radiation with a transmissive grating spectrometer under development to measure FEL spectra. Since the quality of the FEL is dependent on a uniform K value in all the undulator modules, being able to measure the relative undulator K values is important. Preliminary results were presented in a presentation, 'Use of FEL Off-Axis Zone Plate Spectrometer to Measure Relative K by the Pinhole/Centroid Method', at the 'LCLS Beam-Based Undulator K Measurements Workshop' on November 14, 2005 (UCRL-PRES-217281). This study applies equally well to reflective gratings of the appropriate period and inclinations.

  11. Optical Klystron Enhancement to SASE X-ray FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Yuantao; Emma, Paul; Huang, Zhirong; Kumar, Vinit

    2006-04-07

    The optical klystron enhancement to self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free electron lasers (FELs) is studied in theory and in simulations. In contrast to a seeded FEL, the optical klystron gain in a SASE FEL is not sensitive to any phase mismatch between the radiation and the microbunched electron beam. The FEL performance with the addition of four optical klystrons located at the undulator long breaks in the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) shows significant improvement if the uncorrelated energy spread at the undulator entrance can be controlled to a very small level. In addition, FEL saturation at shorter x-ray wavelengths (around 1.0 A) within the LCLS undulator length becomes possible. We also discuss the application of the optical klystron in a compact x-ray FEL design that employs relatively low electron beam energy together with a shorter-period undulator.

  12. Free Electron Lasers with Slowly Varying Beam and Undulator Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z; Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

    2005-05-25

    The performance of a free electron lasers (FEL) is affected when the electron beam energy varies alone the undulator as would be caused by vacuum pipe wakefields and/or when the undulator strength parameter is tapered in the small signal regime until FEL saturation. In this paper, we present a self-consistent theory of FELs with slowly-varying beam and undulator parameters. A general method is developed to apply the WKB approximation to the beam-radiation system by employing the adjoint eigenvector that is orthogonal to the eigenfunctions of the coupled Maxwell-Vlasov equations. This method may be useful for other slowly varying processes in beam dynamics.

  13. Numerical study of X-ray FELS including quantum fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiche, S.; Saldin, E. L.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    1997-06-01

    One of the fundamental limitations towards achieving very short wavelength in a self amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser (SASE FEL) is connected with the energy diffusion in the electron beam due to quantum fluctuations of undulator radiation. Parameters of the LCLS and TESLA X-ray FEL projects are very close to this limit and there exists necessity in upgrading FEL simulation codes for optimization of SASE FEL for operation at a shortest possible wavelength. In this report we describe a one-dimensional FEL simulation code taking into account the effects of incoherent undulator radiation. Using similarity techniques we have calculated universal functions describing degradation of the FEL process due to quantum fluctuations of undulator radiation.

  14. Three-Dimensional Analysis of Frequency-Chirped FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Ding, Y.; Wu, J.; /SLAC

    2010-09-14

    Frequency-chirped free-electron lasers (FELs) are useful to generate a large photon bandwidth or a shorter x-ray pulse duration. In this paper, we present a three-dimensional analysis of a high-gain FEL driven by the energy-chirped electron beam. We show that the FEL eigenmode equation is the same for a frequency-chirped FEL as for an undulator-tapered FEL. We study the transverse effects of such FELs including mode properties and transverse coherence.

  15. Fast pulsed excitation wiggler or undulator

    DOEpatents

    van Steenbergen, Arie

    1990-01-01

    A fast pulsed excitation, electromagnetic undulator or wiggler, employing geometrically alternating substacks of thin laminations of ferromagnetic material, together with a single turn current loop excitation of the composite assembly, of such shape and configuration that intense, spatially alternating, magnetic fields are generated; for use as a pulsed mode undulator or wiggler radiator, for use in a Free Electron Laser (FEL) type radiation source or, for use in an Inverse Free Electron Laser (IFEL) charged particle accelerator.

  16. Diagnostic technique applied for FEL electron bunches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovko, O.; Grebentsov, A.; Morozov, N.; Syresin, E.; Yurkov, M.

    2016-05-01

    Diagnostic technique applied for FEL ultrashort electron bunches is developed at JINR-DESY collaboration within the framework of the FLASH and XFEL projects. Photon diagnostics are based on calorimetric measurements and detection of undulator radiation. The infrared undulator constructed at JINR and installed at FLASH is used for longitudinal bunch shape measurements and for two-color lasing provided by the FIR and VUV undulators. The pump probe experiments with VUV and FIR undulators provide the bunch profile measurements with resolution of several femtosecond. The new three microchannel plates (MCP) detectors operated in X-ray range are under development now in JINR for SASE1-SASE 3 European XFEL.

  17. Micropole undulator

    DOEpatents

    Csonka, P.L.; Tatchyn, R.O.

    1989-01-24

    Micropole undulators for use in the generation of x-rays from moving charged particles and methods for manufacturing such undulators are disclosed. One type of micropole undulator has two jaws containing rows of spaced apart poles arranged so that each pole produces a magnetic field aligned with all other similar fields. An external biasing field extends through the jaws so that an overall undulator field of substantially sinusoidal shape and substantially zero average value extends along the undulator axis. Preferably, the poles are bars formed of a magnetizable, but unmagnetized, material so that, after the jaws are assembled, all of the bars can be magnetized simultaneously in a uniform magnetic field of suitable strength. Another type of micropole undulator incorporates two parallel layers which have been magnetized to provide rows of alternating magnetic fields extending in opposite directions, the layers being positioned between the pole faces of a highly magnetically permeable material with the south poles of one layer opposite the north poles of the other. Poles in the layers are formed by subjecting successive regions of each layer to oppositely directed and suitably varied magnetizing forces. 16 figs.

  18. Micropole undulator

    DOEpatents

    Csonka, Paul L.; Tatchyn, Roman O.

    1989-01-24

    Micropole undulators for use in the generation of x-rays from moving charged particles and methods for manufacturing such undulators are disclosed. One type of micropole undulator has two jaws containing rows of spaced apart poles arranged so that each pole produces a magnetic field aligned with all other similar fields. An external biasing field extends through the jaws so that an overall undulator field of substantially sinusoidal shape and substantially zero average value extends along the undulator axis. Preferably, the poles are bars formed of a magnetizable, but unmagnetized, material so that, after the jaws are assembled, all of the bars can be magnetized simultaneously in a uniform magnetic field of suitable strength. Another type of micropole undulator incorporates two parallel layers which have been magnetized to provide rows of alternating magnetic fields extending in opposite directions, the layers being positioned between the pole faces of a highly magnetically permeable material with the south poles of one layer opposite the north poles of the other. Poles in the layers are formed by subjecting successive regions of each layer to oppositely directed and suitably varied magnetizing forces.

  19. Radiation emitted by transverse-gradient undulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhard, Axel; Braun, Nils; Rodríguez, Verónica Afonso; Peiffer, Peter; Rossmanith, Robert; Widmann, Christina; Scheer, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Conventional undulators are used in synchrotron light sources to produce radiation with a narrow relative spectral width as compared to bending magnets or wigglers. The spectral width of the radiation produced by conventional undulators is determined by the number of undulator periods and by the energy spread and emittance of the electron beam. In more compact electron sources like for instance laser plasma accelerators the energy spread becomes the dominating factor. Due to this effect these electron sources cannot in general be used for high-gain free electron lasers (FELs). In order to overcome this limitation, modified undulator schemes, so-called transverse gradient undulators (TGUs), were proposed and a first superconducting TGU was built at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe, Germany. In this paper simulations of the expected synchrotron radiation spectral distribution are presented. An experimental test with that device is under preparation at the laser wakefield accelerator at the JETI laser at the University of Jena, Germany.

  20. Coherent Radiation Effects in the LCLS Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Reiche, S.; Huang, Z.; /SLAC

    2010-12-14

    For X-ray Free-Electron Lasers such as LCLS and TESLA FEL, a change in the electron energy while amplifying the FEL radiation can shift the resonance condition out of the bandwidth of the FEL. The largest sources of energy loss is the emission of incoherent undulator radiation. Because the loss per electron depends only on the undulator parameters and the beam energy, which are fixed for a given resonant wavelength, the average energy loss can be compensated for by a fixed taper of the undulator. Coherent radiation has a strong enhancement proportional to the number of electrons in the bunch for frequencies comparable to or longer than the bunch dimension. If the emitted coherent energy becomes comparable to that of the incoherent emission, it has to be included in the taper as well. However, the coherent loss depends on the bunch charge and the applied compression scheme and a change of these parameters would require a change of the taper. This imposes a limitation on the practical operation of Free-Electron Lasers, where the taper can only be adjusted manually. In this presentation we analyze the coherent emission of undulator radiation and transition undulator radiation for LCLS, and estimate whether the resulting energy losses are significant for the operation of LCLS.

  1. Micropole undulator

    DOEpatents

    Tatchyn, Roman O.; Csonka, Paul L.; Cremer, Jay T.

    1990-12-11

    Micropole undulators for use in the generation of x-rays from moving charged particles are disclosed. Two rows of spaced apart poles are arranged so that each pole produces a magnetic field aligned with all other similar fields. The poles are the ends of "C"-shaped magnets. In each row, adjacent poles are separated by spacers made of a superconducting material.

  2. Micropole undulator

    DOEpatents

    Tatchyn, R.O.; Csonka, P.L.; Cremer, J.T.

    1990-12-11

    Micropole undulators for use in the generation of x-rays from moving charged particles are disclosed. Two rows of spaced apart poles are arranged so that each pole produces a magnetic field aligned with all other similar fields. The poles are the ends of C''-shaped magnets. In each row, adjacent poles are separated by spacers made of a superconducting material. 11 figs.

  3. Seeded FEL Microbunching Experiments at the UCLA Neptune Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Tochitsky, S. Ya.; Musumeci, P.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Joshi, C.; Gottschalk, S. C.

    2010-11-04

    Seeded high-gain FELs, which can generate very powerful radiation pulses in a relatively compact undulator and simultaneously modulate the electron beam longitudinally at the seed wavelength, are important tools for advanced accelerator development. A single-pass 0.5-9 THz FEL amplifier-buncher driven by a regular photoinjector is being built at the UCLA Neptune Laboratory. FEL interactions at 340 {mu}m (1 THz) are considered for the first experiment, since time-resolved measurements of longitudinal current distribution of the bunched beam using the RF deflecting cavity are possible. A design of a 0.2-2.0 {mu}m FEL using the same undulators is presented. In this case the FEL is driven by a high-peak current beam from the laser-plasma accelerator tunable in the 100-300 MeV range.

  4. Strong focusing influence on high gain FEL characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, A.; Varfolomeev, A.

    1995-12-31

    The use of intrinsic alternating focusing in a linac-driven FEL with planar undulator is considered numerically. The analysis is done on the basis of TDA code for soft X-ray FEL with FD lattice implementing focusing of quadrupole and periodic sextupole type. The influence of the focusing (type and phase advance) on FEL performance and the reasons of difference in FEL performance for focusing of two kinds are analyzed. A possibility of some kind of beam conditioning for intrinsic focusing is discussed.

  5. UNDULATOR-BASED LASER WAKEFIELD ACCELERATOR ELECTRON BEAM DIAGNOSTIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bakeman, M.S.; Fawley, W.M.; Leemans, W. P.; Nakamura, K.; Robinson, K.E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, C.

    2009-05-04

    to couple the THUNDER undulator to the LOASIS Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA). Currently the LWFA has achieved quasi-monoenergetic electron beams with energies up to 1 GeV. These ultra-short, high-peak-current, electron beams are ideal for driving a compact XUV free electron laser (FEL). Understanding the electron beam properties such as the energy spread and emittance is critical for achieving high quality light sources with high brightness. By using an insertion device such as an undulator and observing changes in the spontaneous emission spectrum, the electron beam energy spread and emittance can be measured with high precision. The initial experiments will use spontaneous emission from 1.5 m of undulator. Later experiments will use up to 5 m of undulator with a goal of a high gain, XUV FEL.

  6. Hybrid undulator numerical optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Hairetdinov, A.H.; Zukov, A.A.

    1995-12-31

    3D properties of the hybrid undulator scheme arc studied numerically using PANDIRA code. It is shown that there exist two well defined sets of undulator parameters which provide either maximum on-axis field amplitude or minimal higher harmonics amplitude of the basic undulator field. Thus the alternative between higher field amplitude or pure sinusoidal field exists. The behavior of the undulator field amplitude and harmonics structure for a large set of (undulator gap)/(undulator wavelength) values is demonstrated.

  7. Advanced in undulator technology at STI Optronics

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, K.E.; Gottschalk, S.C.; Quimby, D.C.

    1995-12-31

    Eighteen undulators and wigglers have been designed and built by STI Optronics since 1980 for FEL and synchrotron radiation applications. Design concepts for producing higher magnetic field strength with improved field quality will be reviewed. Shim tuning methods have permitted magnetic field tolerances, including pole-to-pole Field uniformity, trajectory straightness, and higher order moments, to be controlled to low levels as needed for various applications. A key figure of merit is the optical phase error, which determines the coherence of the light generated in the device. Coherence is a strict requirement for maximizing gain in FELs and is highly desirable for maintaining spectral intensity in synchrotron radiation sources with low emittance. The measurement capability necessary to certify coherence over extended undulator lengths has been developed. Example results obtained on undulators delivered to the Advanced Photon Source (APS) will be presented. STI is currently under contract for delivery of nineteen APS Undulator-A devices. These are 2.4 m long, wedged-pole hybrid undulators with on-axis peak Field in excess of 0.75 tesla at a gap of 11.5 mm and a period of 33 mm. The optical phase error is nominally controlled to 3{degrees} over the undulator length, thereby maintaining the spectral intensity of the third harmonic synchrotron radiation to better than 90% of the ideal value. The first five of these devices have been delivered as of early 1995 and the remainder are under construction. Experience gained applicable to free-electron lasers will be emphasized.

  8. Compact X-ray Free Electron Laser from a Laser-plasma Accelerator using a Transverse Gradient Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhirong; Ding, Yuantao; Schroeder, Carl B.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2012-09-13

    Compact laser-plasma accelerators can produce high energy electron beams with low emittance, high peak current but a rather large energy spread. The large energy spread hinders the potential applications for coherent FEL radiation generation. In this paper, we discuss a method to compensate the effects of beam energy spread by introducing a transverse field variation into the FEL undulator. Such a transverse gradient undulator together with a properly dispersed beam can greatly reduce the effects of electron energy spread and jitter on FEL performance. We present theoretical analysis and numerical simulations for SASE and seeded extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray FELs based on laser plasma accelerators.

  9. Status of the PAL-XFEL undulator program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Eon; Park, Ki-Hyeon; Kang, Heung-Sik; Ko, In-Soo; Cho, Moo-Hyun; Pflueger, Jochaim

    2015-05-01

    Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL) is developing a 0.1 nm SASE based FEL based on 10 GeV S-band linear accelerator named PAL-XFEL. At the first stage, PAL-XFEL needs two undulator lines for photon source. The hard Xray undulator line requires 18 units of 5 m long hybrid-type conventional planar undulator and soft X-ray line requires 6 units of 5 m long hybrid type planar undulator with additional few EPUs for final polarization control. PAL is developing undulator magnetic structure based on EU-XFEL concepts. The key parameters are min pole gap of 8.3 mm, with period length 26 mm (HXU), 35 mm (SXU), and 5.0 m magnetic length. . In this report, the prototyping, and the development of pole tuning procedure, the impact of the background field error, and the effects of the girder bending on the optical phase error will be presented.

  10. Recent Progress in High-Gain FEL Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; /SLAC

    2005-09-30

    High-gain free electron lasers (FEL) are being developed as extremely bright x-ray sources of a next-generation radiation facility. In this paper, we review the basic theory and the recent progress in understanding the startup, the exponential growth and the saturation of the high-gain process, emphasizing the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE). We will also discuss how the FEL performance may be affected by various errors and wakefield effects in the undulator.

  11. FEL Oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2003-05-12

    FEL Oscillators have been around since 1977 providing not only a test bed for the physics of Free Electron Lasers and electron/photon interactions but as a workhorse of scientific research. More than 30 FEL oscillators are presently operating around the world spanning a wavelength range from the mm region to the ultraviolet using DC and rf linear accelerators and storage rings as electron sources. The characteristics that have driven the development of these sources are the desire for high peak and average power, high micropulse energies, wavelength tunability, timing flexibility, and wavelengths that are unavailable from more conventional laser sources. Substantial user programs have been performed using such sources encompassing medicine, biology, solid state research, atomic and molecular physics, effects of non-linear fields, surface science, polymer science, pulsed laser vapor deposition, to name just a few.

  12. Compact FEL`s based on slow wave wigglers

    SciTech Connect

    Riyopoulos, S.

    1995-12-31

    Slow waves excited in magnetron-type cavities are attractive canditates as wigglers for compact Free Electron Lasers. Because of group velocities much below the speed of light, slow waves offer an order of magnitude increase in FEL gain under given circulating power in the wiggler resonator, compared to fast wave wigglers of similar period. In addition, they offer the versatility of operation either at modest beam energy via upshifing of the fundamental wavelength, or at low beam energy benefiting from the submillimeter wiggler harmonics. Because the main electron undulation is in the transverse direction for all spatial harmonics, the radiated power is increased by a factor {gamma}{sup 2} relative to the Smith-Purcell approach that relies on axial electron undulation. Technical advantages offered by magnetron-type wiggles are: the generation of the wiggler microwaves and the FEL interaction take place inside the same cavity, avoiding the issue of high power coupling between cavities; the excitation of wiggler microwaves relies on distributed electron emission from the cavity wall and does not require separate beam injection.

  13. AN EXPERIMENTAL TEST OF SUPERRADIANCE IN A SINGLE PASS SEEDED FEL.

    SciTech Connect

    WATANABE, T.; LIU, D.; MURPHY, J.B.; ROSE, J.; SHAFTAN, T.; TSANG, T.; WANG, X.J.; YU, L.H.

    2005-08-21

    Superradiance and nonlinear evolution of a FEL pulse in a single-pass FEL were experimentally demonstrated at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) Source Development Laboratory (SDL). The experiment was performed using a 1.5 ps high-brightness electron beam and a 100fs Ti:Sapphire seed laser. The seed laser and electron beam interact in the 10 meter long NISUS undulator with a period of 3.89 cm. The FEL spectrum, energy and pulse length along the undulator were measured. FEL saturation was observed, and gain of more the 200 (relative to seed laser) was measured. Both FEL spectrum widening and pulse length shortening were observed; FEL pulses as short as 65 fs FWHM were measured. The superradiance and nonlinear evolution were also simulated using the numerical code GENESIS1.3 yielding good agreement with the experimental results.

  14. On use of time-dependent microwave fields to increase an FEL oscillator efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Yurkov, M.V.

    1995-12-31

    Various schemes of a high efficiency FEL oscillator with time-dependent accelerating (or decelerating) microwave field in interaction region are proposed. All the, schemes are based on standard accelerating structure and undulator technology. Feasibility of the proposed schemes is confirmed by results of numerical simulations. Realistic examples of FEL oscillators of infrared and visible wavelength ranges with efficiency about 20 % are presented.

  15. Users program for storage-ring based FEL and synchrotron sources of the Duke FEL Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, K.D.; Barnett, G.; Burnham, B.

    1995-12-31

    The storage ring at the Duke FEL Laboratory was first operated with a stored e-beam in November, 1994. It has now achieved operation energies in excess 1 GeV with more than 100 mA current at 280 MeV. The ring has several ports for FEL and synchrotron light source research. The circulating ring current can be synchronized with the seperate Mark III FEL operating in the 2-9.5 {mu}m IR region. This allows low optical jitter (10-20 ps) between the two sources and thus pump-probe operation. The ring has been configured to drive a number of light sources including the OK-4 FEL system capable of FEL operation between 400 and 65 nm, an inverse Compton scattering source using this undulator which will yield 4-200 MeV gammas, an undulator source at approximately 40 {angstrom} (not an FEL), a mm FEL with inverse compton scattering providing 1-100 keV x-rays and two synchrotron ports from the bend magnets for which the {lambda}{sub c} = 11-12 {angstrom} for 1 GeV. The broadly tunable FEL sources and their associated inverse compton scattering are extremely bright. The initial research proposals, submitted to the Laboratory emphasizes photoelectron spectroscopy, PEEM, high resolution vacuum UV of gases, solid spectroscopy and photochemistry in the UV, X-ray microprobe studies, X-ray microscopy, X-ray holography, X-ray crystallography, Mossbauer spectroscopy, nuclear spectroscopy, neutron production, photon activation therapy and broadband synchrotron as a probe of fast reaction in the IR and near IR.

  16. The CSU Accelerator and FEL Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biedron, Sandra; Milton, Stephen; D'Audney, Alex; Edelen, Jonathan; Einstein, Josh; Harris, John; Hall, Chris; Horovitz, Kahren; Martinez, Jorge; Morin, Auralee; Sipahi, Nihan; Sipahi, Taylan; Williams, Joel

    2014-03-01

    The Colorado State University (CSU) Accelerator Facility will include a 6-MeV L-Band electron linear accelerator (linac) with a free-electron laser (FEL) system capable of producing Terahertz (THz) radiation, a laser laboratory, a microwave test stand, and a magnetic test stand. The photocathode drive linac will be used in conjunction with a hybrid undulator capable of producing THz radiation. Details of the systems used in CSU Accelerator Facility are discussed.

  17. Simulation of a regenerative MW FEL amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, R.T.; Colson, W.B.; Wong, R.K.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1997-08-01

    Both oscillator and regenerative amplifier configurations are being studied to optimize the design of a MW class FEL. The regenerative amplifier uses a longer undulator and relies on higher extraction efficiency to achieve high average power, whereas the oscillator is a more compact overall design requiring the transport of the high energy electron beam around bends for energy recovery. Using parameters extrapolated from the 1 kW LANL regenerative amplifier, simulations study the feasibility of achieving 1 MW average power.

  18. High harmonic generation in the undulators for free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukovsky, K.

    2015-10-01

    We present the analysis of the undulator radiation (UR) with account for major sources of the spectral line broadening. For relativistic electrons we obtain the analytical expressions for the UR spectrum, the intensity and the emission line shape with account for the finite size of the beam, the emittance and the energy spread. Partial compensation of the divergency by properly imposed weak constant magnetic component is demonstrated in the analytical form. Considering the examples of radiation from single and double frequency undulators, we study high harmonic generation with account for all major sources of homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening with account for the characteristics of the electrons beam. We apply our analysis to free electron laser (FEL) calculations and we compare the obtained results with the radiation of a FEL on the supposition of the ideal undulator.

  19. Ther FERMI FEL project at TRIESTE

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.P.; Bulfone, D.; Cargnello, F.

    1995-12-31

    The goal of the FERMI project - Free Electron Radiation and Matching Instrumentation - is to construct a new user facility for FEL radiation beams covering a broad spectral range (2-250 {mu}m) to complement the high brightness VUV/Soft-Xray radiation available from the ELETTRA synchrotron radiation facility at Trieste. A unique feature of the project will be the possibility of carrying out {open_quote}pump-probe{close_quote} experiments using synchronized radiation beams from FERMI and ELETTRA on the same sample. The project was launched at a meeting with Italian FEL experts held in Trieste on the 18th November 1994, chaired by C. Rubbia, as a collaboration between Sincrotrone Trieste, ENEA (Frascati), INFN (Frascati) and the University of Naples (Department of Electronic Engineering). The facility will make use of an existing linac, that forms part of the ELETTRA injection system, and a hall into which the beam can be extracted. In addition, for the first phase of the project equipment will be used from the suspended INFN/ENEA {open_quote}SURF{close_quote} FEL experiment, including the undulator, beam transport magnets and optical cavity. In this first International FEL Conference report on the project, we summarize the main features of the project, concentrating in particular on the most recent activities, including: results of measurements of the linac beam in the FEL mode of operation, further studies of the electron beam transport system including possibilities for bunch length manipulations, and further numerical calculations of the FEL performance.

  20. PRELIMINARY MEASURMENTS OF THE HIGH-GAIN FEL RADIATION PROPERTIES ALONG THE RADIATOR.

    SciTech Connect

    SHAFTAN,T.; LOOS,H.; SHEEHY,B.; YU,L.H.

    2004-08-29

    We present preliminary experimental results on evolution of properties of the DUV FEL [1,2] radiation along the radiator. Intercepting the electron beam at the different locations inside the undulator we recorded and analyzed transverse profiles, spectra and intensity of the FEL output. Shot-to-shot fluctuations of the FEL radiation may significantly affect the accuracy of measurement. In the paper we present and discuss a single-shot measurement technique, based on a special imaging system.

  1. Harmonic cascade FEL designs for LUX

    SciTech Connect

    Penn, G.; Reinsch, M.; Wurtele, J.; Corlett, J.N.; Fawley, W.M.; Zholents, A.; Wan, W.

    2004-07-16

    LUX is a design concept for an ultrafast X-ray science facility, based on an electron beam accelerated to GeV energies in are circulating linac. Included in the design are short duration (200 fs or shorter FWHM) light sources using multiple stages of higher harmonic generation, seeded by a 200-250 nm laser of similar duration. This laser modulates the energy of a group of electrons within the electron bunch; this section of the electron bunch then produces radiation at a higher harmonic after entering a second, differently tuned undulator. Repeated stages in a cascade yield increasing photon energies up to 1 keV. Most of the undulators in the cascade operate in the low-gain FEL regime. Harmonic cascades have been designed for each pass of the recirculating linac up to a final electron beam energy of 3.1 GeV. For a given cascade, the photon energy can be selected over a wide range by varying the seed laser frequency and the field strength in the undulators. We present simulation results using the codes GENESIS and GINGER, as well as the results of analytical models which predict FEL performance. We discuss lattice considerations pertinent for harmonic cascade FELs, as well as sensitivity studies and requirements on the electron beam.

  2. High harmonics focusing undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Varfolomeev, A.A.; Hairetdinov, A.H.; Smirnov, A.V.; Khlebnikov, A.S.

    1995-12-31

    It was shown in our previous work that there exist a possibility to enhance significantly the {open_quote}natural{close_quote} focusing properties of the hybrid undulator. Here we analyze the actual undulator configurations which could provide such field structure. Numerical simulations using 2D code PANDIRA were carried out and the enhanced focusing properties of the undulator were demonstrated. The obtained results provide the solution for the beam transport in a very long (short wavelength) undulator schemes.

  3. Photon Beam Diagnostics for VISA FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Murokh, A.; Pellegrini, C.; Rosenzweig, J.; Frigola, P.; Musumeci, P.; Tremaine, A.; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Doyuran, A.; Johnson, E.; Skaritka, J.; Wang, X.J.; Van Bibber, K.; Hill, J.M.; LeSage, G.P.; Nguyen, D.; Cornacchia, M.

    1999-11-05

    The VISA (Visible to Infrared SASE Amplifier) project is designed to be a SASE-FEL driven to saturation in the sub-micron wavelength region. Its goal is to test various aspects of the existing theory of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission, as well as numerical codes. Measurements include: angular and spectral distribution of the FEL light at the exit and inside of the undulator; electron beam micro-bunching using CTR; single-shot time resolved measurements of the pulse profile, using auto-correlation technique and FROG algorithm. The diagnostics are designed to provide maximum information on the physics of the SASE-FEL process, to ensure a close comparison of the experimental results with theory and simulations.

  4. Intensification of Harmonic Spontaneous Radiation with a Novel Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, T.C.; Shao, Yichen; Parsa, Zohreh

    1998-11-01

    We have calculated the on-axis spectrum of spontaneous radiation emitted by an electron moving along a planar undulator that has a magnetic profile along the axis that approximates a square wave. (This could be obtained in practice by driving a ferromagnetic undulator into saturation by excessive current in the windings.) We find considerable enhancement of the harmonic radiation spectrum. We compare the harmonic power emitted by an electron moving through an undulator having a sine-wave field profile with the radiation emitted from an undulator having a square-wave profile; the latter is approximated by the first three Fourier components of the undulator magnetic field profile along the axial direction. Examples are computed for 40MeV electrons taking K < 1, for spontaneous radiation emitted along the axis of the system. The emission at harmonics f > 1 is greatly enhanced for the approximate square-wave magnetic profile: the ratio of the power emitted at f=5 by the square-wave undulator to that of the sine-wave undulator is about 15 (whereas the corresponding ratio at f=1 is only 1.5). While this enhancement might be expected because of the appreciable n=1 and n=5 Fourier components of the undulator field, higher odd harmonics are enhanced even more (e.g., x1000 at f=11). FEL gain at the harmonics should be enhanced by similar factors.

  5. Transverse-coherence properties of the FEL at the LCLS

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Yuantao; Huang, Zhirong; Ocko, Samuel A.; /MIT, Cambridge, Dept. Phys.

    2010-09-02

    The recently commissioned Linac Coherent Light Source is an x-ray free-electron laser at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, which is now operating at x-ray wavelengths of 20-1.2 Angstrom with peak brightness nearly ten orders of magnitude beyond conventional synchrotron sources. Understanding of coherence properties of the radiation from SASE FELs at LCLS is of great practical importance for some user experiments. We present the numerical analysis of the coherence properties at different wavelengths based on a fast algorithmusing ideal and start-end simulated FEL fields. The sucessful commissioning and operation of the linac coherent light source (LCLS) [1] has demonstrated that the x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) has come of age; these types of x-ray sources are poised to revolutionize the ultra-fast x-ray sciences. The LCLS and other hard x-ray FELs under construction are based on the principle of self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) [2, 3], where the amplification process starts from the shot noise in the electron beam. A large number of transverse radiation modes are also excited when the electron beam enters the undulator. The FEL collective instability in the electron beam causes the modulation of the electron density to increase exponentially, and after sufficient undulator distances, a single transverse mode starts to dominate. As a result, SASE FEL is almost fully coherent in the transverse dimension. Understanding of transverse coherence properties of the radiation from SASE FELs is of great practical importance. The longitudinal coherence properties of SASE FELs have been studied before [4]. Some studies on the transverse coherence can be found in previous papers, for example, in ref. [5, 6, 7, 8, 9]. In this paper, we first discuss a new numerical algorithm based on Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques to calculate the FEL transverse coherence. Then we focus on the numerical analysis of the LCLS FEL transverse coherence.

  6. Numerical simulations of x-ray generation in miltisectional FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Pitatelev, M.M.

    1995-12-31

    The process of x-ray generation in milticomponent FELs with alternate undulator and dispersion sections is investigate. The coptuter simulation was fulfilled for the ultrarelativistic electron beams. It was shown that the use of much number of dispersion sections allows to increase the gain considerably and to use more short magnetic systems.

  7. Tuning The Laser Heater Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zackary

    2010-12-03

    The laser heater undulator for the LCLS requires different tuning techniques than the main undulators. It is a pure permanent magnet (PPM) undulator, rather than the hybrid design of the main undulators. The PPM design allows analytic calculation of the undulator fields. The calculations let errors be introduced and correction techniques be derived. This note describes how the undulator was modelled, and the methods which were found to correct potential errors in the undulator. The laser heater undulator for the LCLS is a pure permanent magnet device requiring different tuning techniques than the main undulators. In this note, the laser heater undulator is modelled and tuning techniques to compensate various errors are derived.

  8. The FEL development at the Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, N. D.; Benson, C.; Berg, S.; Berg, W.; Biedron, S. G.; Chae, Y. C.; Crosbie, E. A.; Decker, G.; Dejus, R. J.; Den Hartog, P.; Deriy, B.; Dortwegt, R.; Edrmann, M.; Freund, H. P.; Friedsam, H.; Galavda, J. N.; Gluskin, E.; Goeppner, G. A.; Grelick, A.; Huang, Z.; Jones, J.; Kang, Y.; Kim, K.-J.; Kim, S.; Kinoshita, K.; Lewellen, J. W.; Lill, R.; Lumpkin, A. H.; Makarov, O.; Markovich, G. M.; Milton, S. V.; Moog, E. R.; Nassiri, A.; Ogurtsov, V.; Pasky, S.; Power, J.; Tieman, B.; Trakhtenberg, E.; Travish, G.; Vasserman, I.; Walters, D. R.; Wang, J.; Xu, S.; Yang, B.

    1999-03-15

    Construction of a single-pass free-electron laser (FEL) based on the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) mode of operation is nearing completion at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) with initial experiments imminent. The APS SASE FEL is a proof-of-principle fourth-generation light source. As of January 1999 the undulator hall, end-station building, necessary transfer lines, electron and optical diagnostics, injectors, and initial undulatory have been constructed and, with the exception of the undulatory, installed. All preliminary code development and simulations have also been completed. The undulator hall is now ready to accept first beam for characterization of the output radiation. It is the project goal to push towards fill FEL saturation, initially in the visible, but ultimately to W and VUV, wavelengths.

  9. Undulator Transportation Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zachary; Horton, Nick; Kharakh, David; Levashov, Yurii; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Poling, Ben; Reese, Ed; /SLAC

    2010-11-17

    A test was performed to determine whether transporting and handling the undulators makes any changes to their properties. This note documents the test. No significant changes to the test undulator were observed. After the LCLS undulators are tuned and fiducialized in the Magnetic Measurement Facility (MMF), they must be transported to storage buildings and transported to the tunnel. It has been established that the undulators are sensitive to temperature. We wish to know whether the undulators are also sensitive to the vibrations and shocks of transportation. To study this issue, we performed a test in which an undulator was measured in the MMF, transported to the tunnel, brought back to the MMF, and re-measured. This note documents the test and the results.

  10. Crossed elliptical polarization undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Shigemi

    1997-05-01

    The first switching of polarization direction is possible by installing two identical helical undulators in series in a same straight section in a storage ring. By setting each undulator in a circular polarization mode in opposite handedness, one can obtain linearly polarized radiation with any required polarization direction depending on the modulator setting between two undulators. This scheme can be used without any major degradation of polarization degree in any low energy low emittance storage ring.

  11. Electron Signal Detection for the Beam-Finder Wire of the Linac Coherent Light Source Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Juhao; Emma, P.; Field, R.C.; /SLAC

    2006-09-21

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a SASE x-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) based on the final kilometer of the Stanford Linear Accelerator. The tight tolerances for positioning the electron beam close to the undulator axis calls for the introduction of Beam Finder Wire (BFW) device. A BFW device close to the upstream end of the undulator segment and a quadrupole close to the down stream end of the undulator segment will allow a beam-based undulator segment alignment. Based on the scattering of the electrons on the BFW, we can detect the electron signal in the main dump bends after the undulator to find the beam position. We propose to use a threshold Cherenkov counter for this purpose. According to the signal strength at such a Cherenkov counter, we then suggest choice of material and size for such a BFW device in the undulator.

  12. The GALAXIE all-optical FEL project

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Arab, E.; Andonian, G.; Cahill, A.; Fitzmorris, K.; Fukusawa, A.; Hoang, P.; Jovanovic, I.; Marcus, G.; Marinelli, A.; Murokh, A.; Musumeci, P.; Naranjo, B.; O'Shea, B.; O'Shea, F.; Ovodenko, A.; Pogorelsky, I.; Putterman, S.; Roberts, K.; Shumail, M.; and others

    2012-12-21

    We describe a comprehensive project, funded under the DARPA AXiS program, to develop an all-optical table-top X-ray FEL based on dielectric acceleration and electromagnetic undulators, yielding a compact source of coherent X-rays for medical and related applications. The compactness of this source demands that high field (>GV/m) acceleration and undulation-inducing fields be employed, thus giving rise to the project's acronym: GV/m AcceLerator And X-ray Integrated Experiment (GALAXIE). There are numerous physics and technical hurdles to surmount in this ambitious scenario, and the integrated solutions include: a biharmonic photonic TW structure, 200 micron wavelength electromagnetic undulators, 5 {mu}m laser development, ultra-high brightness magnetized/asymmetric emittance electron beam generation, and SASE FEL operation. We describe the overall design philosophy of the project, the innovative approaches to addressing the challenges presented by the design, and the significant progress towards realization of these approaches in the nine months since project initialization.

  13. A Far-infrared Undulator for Coherent Synchrotron Radiation and Free Electron Laser at Tohoku University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hama, Hiroyuki; Hinode, Fujio; Kawai, Masayuki; Nanbu, Kenichi; Miyahara, Fusashi; Yasuda, Mafuyu

    2010-06-01

    In order to develop an intense far-infrared radiation source, a high quality electron beam has been studied at Tohoku University, Sendai. The bunch length of the beam expected is very much shorter than terahertz (THz) wavelength, so that coherent spontaneous emission of synchrotron radiation will be a promising high brilliant far-infrared source. An undulator consisting of permanent magnets has been designed in which optional free electron laser (FEL) will be operated in free space mode. Consequently the minimum gap of the undulator is decided to be 54 mm for 0.36 mm radiation to avoid diffraction loss, and then the period length of 10 cm is employed. The undulator may cover a wavelength range from 0.18 to 0.36 mm with the beam energy of 17 MeV. Property of coherent THz radiation from the undulator and possibility of novel pre-bunched THz FEL is discussed.

  14. LCLS Undulator Commissioning, Alignment, and Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter

    2009-10-30

    The LCLS x-ray FEL has recently achieved its 1.5-Angstrom lasing and saturation goals upon first trial. This was achieved as a result of a thorough pre-beam checkout, both traditional and beam-based component alignment techniques, and high electron beam brightness. The x-ray FEL process demands very tight tolerances on the straightness of the electron beam trajectory (<5 {micro}m) through the LCLS undulator system. Tight, but less stringent tolerances of {approx}100 {micro}m rms were met for the transverse placement of the individual undulator segments with respect to the beam axis. The tolerances for electron beam straightness can only be met through a beam-based alignment (BBA) method, which is implemented using large electron energy variations and sub-micron resolution cavity beam position monitors (BPM), with precise conventional alignment used to set the starting conditions. Precision-fiducialization of components mounted on remotely adjustable girders, and special beam-finder wires (BFW) at each girder have been used to meet these challenging alignment tolerances. Longer-term girder movement due to ground motion and temperature changes are being monitored, continuously, by a unique stretched wire and hydrostatic level Alignment Diagnostics System (ADS).

  15. Saturnus: the UCLA high-gain infrared FEL project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghamir, F.; Barletta, W. A.; Cline, D. B.; Dodd, J. W.; Hartman, S. C.; Katsouleas, T. C.; Kolonko, J.; Park, S.; Pellegrini, C.; Terrien, J.-C.; Davis, J. G.; Joshi, C. J.; Luhmann, N. C.; McDermott, D. B.; Ivanchenkov, S. N.; Lachin, Yu.; Varfolomeev, A. A.

    1991-07-01

    We present the status of Saturnus: an infrared FEL operating in the 10 μm wavelength region, driven by a compact 20 MeV linac with a photoinjector, under construction at UCLA. The 1.5 cm period, 0.5 T peak-field undulator is being built at the Kurchatov IAE. The FEL is being designed to operate primarily in the self-amplified spontaneous emission mode. We plan to study the startup from noise, optical guiding, saturation, sidebands and superradiance, with emphasis on the effects important for future short-wavelength operation of FELs. The photoinjector follows closely the Brookhaven design. Electrons are injected into an accelerating section based on the plane-wave transformer design developed by Swenson at SAIC. Simulation of the linac and FEL show a gain length of 10 cm, and saturation power of 50 MW.

  16. Optical properties of infrared FELs from the FELI Facility II

    SciTech Connect

    Saeki, K.; Okuma, S.; Oshita, E.

    1995-12-31

    The FELI Facility II has succeeded in infrared FEL oscillation at 1.91 {mu} m using a 68-MeV, 40-A electron beam from the FELI S-band linac in February 27, 1995. The FELI Facility II is composed of a 3-m vertical type undulator ({lambda}u=3.8cm, N=78, Km a x=1.4, gap length {ge}20mm) and a 6.72-m optical cavity. It can cover the wavelength range of 1-5{mu}m. The FELs can be delivered from the optical cavity to the diagnostics room through a 40-m evacuated optical pipeline. Wavelength and cavity length dependences of optical properties such as peak power, average power, spectrum width, FEL macropulse, FEL transverse profile are reported.

  17. Optimization Studies of the FERMI at ELETTRA FEL Design

    SciTech Connect

    De Ninno, Giovanni; Fawley, William M.; Penn, Gregory E.; Graves,William

    2005-08-25

    The FERMI at ELETTRA project at Sincotrone Trieste involves two FEL's, each based upon the principle of seeded harmonic generation and using the existing ELETTRA injection linac at 1.2 GeV beam energy. Scheduled to be completed in 2008, FEL-1 will operate in 40-100 nm wavelength range and will involve one stage of harmonic up-conversion. The second undulator line, FEL-2, will begin operation two years later in the 10-40 nm wavelength range and use two harmonic stages operating as a cascade. The FEL design assumes continuous wavelength tunability over the full wavelength range, and polarization tunability of the output radiation including vertical or horizontal linear as well as helical polarization. The design considers focusing properties and segmentation of realizable undulators and available input seed lasers. We review the studies that have led to our current design. We present results of simulations using GENESIS and GINGER simulation codes including studies of various shot-to-shot fluctuations and undulator errors. Findings for the expected output radiation in terms of the power, transverse and longitudinal coherence are reported.

  18. Undulator radiation driven by laser-wakefield accelerator electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, S. M.; Anania, M. P.; Welsh, G. H.; Brunetti, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Grant, P. A.; Reboredo, D.; Manahan, G.; Grant, D. W.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2015-05-01

    The Advanced Laser-Plasma High-Energy Accelerators towards X-rays (ALPHA-X) programme is developing laserplasma accelerators for the production of ultra-short electron bunches with subsequent generation of coherent, bright, short-wavelength radiation pulses. The new Scottish Centre for the Application of Plasma-based Accelerators (SCAPA) will develop a wide range of applications utilising such light sources. Electron bunches can be propagated through a magnetic undulator with the aim of generating fully coherent free-electron laser (FEL) radiation in the ultra-violet and Xrays spectral ranges. Demonstration experiments producing spontaneous undulator radiation have been conducted at visible and extreme ultra-violet wavelengths but it is an on-going challenge to generate and maintain electron bunches of sufficient quality in order to stimulate FEL behaviour. In the ALPHA-X beam line experiments, a Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser system with peak power 20 TW has been used to generate electron bunches of energy 80-150 MeV in a 2 mm gas jet laser-plasma wakefield accelerator and these bunches have been transported through a 100 period planar undulator. High peak brilliance, narrow band spontaneous radiation pulses in the vacuum ultra-violet wavelength range have been generated. Analysis is provided with respect to the magnetic quadrupole beam transport system and subsequent effect on beam emittance and duration. Requirements for coherent spontaneous emission and FEL operation are presented.

  19. A compact FEL upconverter of coherent radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Marshall, T.C.

    1995-12-31

    The objective is to generate a powerful millimeter-wave FEL signal in a single pass, using a coherent microwave source (24GHz) to prebunch the electron beam for a harmonically-related wave (72GHz). We use the Columbia FEL facility, operating the electron beam at 600kV, 100A; undulator period = 1.85cm and 250G (K = 0.25); electron beam diameter = 3mm inside a 8.5 mm ID drift tube; guiding field of 8800G. Under these conditions, both the microwave signal (5kW input) and the millimeter signal will show travelling-wave gain in the TE11 mode. We report initial experimental results for the millimeter wave spectrum and find an overall power gain of {approximately}20 for the 24GHz input wave. Also presented will be numerical solutions of the wave growth using the FEL equations with slippage. This device has the advantage of producing a high-power FEL output in a single-pass travelling-wave configuration, obtaining a millimeter wave which is phase-referenced to a coherent laboratory source.

  20. LCLS Undulator Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zachary

    2010-11-24

    This note presents the test plan for the LCLS undulators. The undulators will be measured and tuned in the Magnetic Measurement Facility at SLAC. The requirements for tuning are well established and are summarized. A brief discussion of the measurement equipment is presented. This is followed by the detailed test plan in which each step is enumerated. Finally, the measurement results and storage format are presented. The LCLS consists of 33 undulator segments, hereafter referred to as undulators, plus 6 spares and one reference undulator. The undulators must be tuned to meet strict requirements. They must also be fiducialized to allow alignment with other components. This note details the plan for tuning and fiducializing the LCLS undulators. The note begins with the list of tuning and fiducialization requirements. The laboratory in which the work will be performed and the relevant equipment is then briefly described. This is followed by a detailed test plan in which all the steps of tuning and fiducialization are enumerated.

  1. Resistive Wall Heating of the Undulator in High Repetition Rate

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J; Corlett, J; Emma, P; Wu, J

    2012-05-20

    In next generation high repetition rate FELs, beam energy loss due to resistive wall wakefields will produce significant amount of heat. The heat load for a superconducting undulator (operating at low temperature), must be removed and will be expensive to remove. In this paper, we study this effect in an undulator proposed for a Next Generation Light Source (NGLS) at LBNL. We benchmark our calculations with measurements at the LCLS and carry out detailed parameter studies using beam from a start-to-end simulation. Our preliminarym results suggest that the heat load in the undulator is about 2 W/m or lower with an aperture size of 6 mm for nominal NGLS preliminary design parameters.

  2. Progress in the injector for FEL at CIAE

    SciTech Connect

    Tianlu Yang; Wenzhen Zhou; Shinian Fu

    1995-12-31

    An intense current RF-linac for the far-infrared FEL is now under construction at CIAE. The normalized brightness of 3.4 x 10{sup 9} A/(m-rad) was obtained from the injector of the linac. An acceleration section with 9 cells will be connected with the injector to provide an electron beam for the 200 {mu}m FEL oscillator. In this paper, the late results from the injector beam test will be reported. The physical design and research progress in the acceleration section, beam transport, undulator as well as optical cavity will be introduced respectively.

  3. LCLS Undulator Fiducialization Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zachary

    2010-11-24

    This note presents the LCLS undulator fiducialization plan. The undulators will be fiducialized in the Magnetic Measurement Facility at SLAC. The note begins by summarizing the requirements for the fiducialization. A brief discussion of the measurement equipment is presented, followed by the methods used to perform the fiducialization and check the results. This is followed by the detailed fiducialization plan in which each step is enumerated. Finally, the measurement results and data storage format are presented.

  4. Undulator Gravitational Deflection

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, G.

    2005-01-31

    This note estimates distortions imposed by gravity on LCLS undulator strong-backs. Because of the strongback's asymmetric cross section, gravitational forces cause both torsion as well as simple bending. The superposition of these two effects yields a 4.4 {micro}m maximum deflection and a 0.16 milli radian rotation of the undulator axis. The choice of titanium is compared to aluminum.

  5. Reference Undulator Measurement Results

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zachary; Levashov, Yurii; /SLAC

    2011-08-18

    The LCLS reference undulator has been measured 22 times during the course of undulator tuning. These measurements provide estimates of various statistical errors. This note gives a summary of the reference undulator measurements and it provides estimates of the undulator tuning errors. We measured the reference undulator many times during the tuning of the LCLS undulators. These data sets give estimates of the random errors in the tuned undulators. The measured trajectories in the reference undulator are stable and straight to within {+-}2 {micro}m. Changes in the phase errors are less than {+-}2 deg between data sets. The phase advance in the cell varies by less than {+-}2 deg between data sets. The rms variation between data sets of the first integral of B{sub x} is 9.98 {micro}Tm, and the rms variation of the second integral of B{sub x} is 17.4 {micro}Tm{sup 2}. The rms variation of the first integral of B{sub y} is 6.65 {micro}Tm, and the rms variation of the second integral of B{sub y} is 12.3 {micro}Tm{sup 2}. The rms variation of the x-position of the fiducialized beam axis is 35 {micro}m in the final production run This corresponds to an rms uncertainty in the K value of {Delta}K/K = 2.7 x 10{sup -5}. The rms variation of the y-position of the fiducialized beam axis is 4 {micro}m in the final production run.

  6. LCLS Undulator Tuning And Fiducialization

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zachary; Kaplounenko, Vsevolod; Levashov, Yury; Weidemann, Achim; /SLAC

    2007-11-02

    The LCLS project at SLAC requires 40 undulators: 33 in the beam line, 6 spares, and one reference undulator. A new facility was constructed at SLAC for tuning and fiducializing the undulators. The throughput of the facility must be approximately one undulator per week. The undulator tuning has been partially automated. Fiducialization techniques have been devised. The new facility, the tuning techniques, and the fiducialization techniques will be discussed.

  7. Optimization of single-step tapering amplitude and energy detuning for high-gain FELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, He-Ting; Jia, Qi-Ka

    2015-01-01

    We put forward a method to optimize the single-step tapering amplitude of undulator strength and initial energy tuning of electron beam to maximize the saturation power of high gain free-electron lasers (FELs), based on the physics of longitudinal electron beam phase space. Using the FEL simulation code GENESIS, we numerically demonstrate the accuracy of the estimations for parameters corresponding to the linac coherent light source and the Tesla test facility.

  8. Spontaneous and amplified radiation at the initial stage of a SASE FEL.

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Kim, K.-J.

    2002-11-01

    At the initial stage of a self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free-electron laser (FEL), spontaneous undulator radiation in certain experimental configurations can dominate the amplified signal over an extended undulator distance. In this paper they study both the spontaneous and the amplified radiation in the framework of the paraxial wave equation and determine the transition from the dominance of spontaneous emission to exponential amplification. They compare theoretical expectations with SASE simulation codes GINGER and GENESIS.

  9. Spontaneous and amplified radiation at the initial stage of a SASE FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhirong; Kim, Kwang-Je

    2003-07-01

    At the initial stage of a self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free-electron laser (FEL), spontaneous undulator radiation in certain experimental configurations can dominate the amplified signal over an extended undulator distance. In this paper we study both the spontaneous and the amplified radiation in the framework of the paraxial wave equation and determine the transition from the dominance of spontaneous emission to exponential amplification. We compare theoretical expectations with SASE simulation codes GINGER and GENESIS.

  10. Design considerations on a high-power VUV FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Ciocci, F.; Dattoli, G.; Angelis, A. De; Garosi, F.; Giannessi, L.; Torre, A.; Faatz, B.; Ottaviani, P.L.

    1995-07-01

    The authors explore the feasibility conditions of a high-power FEL operating in the VUV region (below 100 nm) and exploiting a coupled oscillator triplicator configuration. A high quality beam from a linac is passed through a FEL oscillator and produces laser radiation at 240 nm. The same beam is extracted and then injected into a second undulator tuned at the third harmonic of the first. The bunching produced in the oscillator allows the start up of the laser signal in the second section which operates as an amplifier. The authors discuss the dynamical behavior of the system and the dependence of the output power on the characteristics of the e-beam and of the oscillator. The possibility of enhancing the output power, adding a tapered section to the second undulator, is finally analyzed.

  11. Experiment on suppression of spontaneous undulator radiation at ATF

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko,V.; Yakimenko, V.

    2009-08-23

    We propose undertaking a demonstration experiment on suppressing spontaneous undulator radiation from an electron beam at BNL's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). We describe the method, the proposed layout, and a possible schedule. There are several advantages in strongly suppressing shot noise in the electron beam, and the corresponding spontaneous radiation. The self-amplified spontaneous (SASE) emission originating from shot noise in the electron beam is the main source of noise in high-gain FEL amplifiers. It may negatively affect several HG FEL applications ranging from single- to multi-stage HGHG FELs. SASE saturation also imposes a fundamental hard limit on the gain of an FEL amplifier in a coherent electron-cooling scheme. A novel active method for suppressing shot noise in relativistic electron beams by many orders-of-magnitude was recently proposed. While theoretically such strong suppression appears feasible, the performance and applicability of this novel method must be evaluated experimentally. Several practical questions about the proposed noise suppressor, such as 3D effects and/or sensitivity to the e-beam parameters also require experimental clarification. To do this, we propose here a proof-of-principle experiment using elements of the VISA FEL at BNL's Accelerator Test Facility.

  12. X-ray FEL with a meV bandwidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldin, E. L.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Shvyd'ko, Yu. V.; Yurkov, M. V.

    2001-08-01

    A new design for a single pass X-ray Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) FEL was proposed in [1] and named two-stage SASE FEL. The scheme consists of two undulators and an X-ray monochromator located between them. For the Angström wavelength range the monochromator could be realized using Bragg reflections from crystals. Proposed scheme of monochromator is illustrated for the 14.4 keV X-ray SASE FEL being developed in the framework of the TESLA linear collider project. The spectral bandwidth of the radiation from the two-stage SASE FEL (20 meV) is defined by the finite duration of the electron pulse. The shot-to-shot fluctuations of energy spectral density are dramatically reduced in comparison with the 100% fluctuations in a SASE FEL. The peak and average brilliance are by three orders of magnitude higher than the values which could be reached by a conventional X-ray SASE FEL.

  13. X-ray FEL with a meV bandwidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldin, E. L.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Shvyd'ko, Yu. V.; Yurkov, M. V.

    2001-12-01

    A new design for a single pass X-ray Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) FEL was proposed by Feldhaus et al. (Opt. Commun. 140 (1997) 341) and named "two-stage SASE FEL". The scheme consists of two undulators and an X-ray monochromator located between them. For the Angström wavelength range the monochromator can be realized using Bragg reflections from crystals. We propose a scheme of monochromator with a bandwidth of 20 meV for the 14.4 keV X-ray SASE FEL being developed in the framework of the TESLA linear collider project. The spectral bandwidth of the radiation from the two-stage SASE FEL (20 meV) is determined by the finite duration of the electron pulse. The shot-to-shot fluctuations of energy spectral density are dramatically reduced in comparison with the 100% fluctuations in a SASE FEL. The peak and average brilliance are three orders of magnitude higher than the values which could be reached by a conventional X-ray SASE FEL.

  14. Electron Beam Alignment Strategy in the LCLS Undulators

    SciTech Connect

    Nuhn, H.-D.; Emma, P.J.; Gassner, G.L.; LeCocq, C.M.; Peters, E.; Ruland, R.E.; /SLAC

    2007-01-03

    The x-ray FEL process puts very tight tolerances on the straightness of the electron beam trajectory (2 {micro}m rms) through the LCLS undulator system. Tight but less stringent tolerances of 80 {micro}m rms vertical and 140 {micro}m rms horizontally are to be met for the placement of the individual undulator segments with respect to the beam axis. The tolerances for electron beam straightness can only be met through beam-based alignment (BBA) based on electron energy variations. Conventional alignment will set the start conditions for BBA. Precision-fiducialization of components mounted on remotely adjustable girders and the use of beam-finder wires (BFW) will satisfy placement tolerances. Girder movement due to ground motion and temperature changes will be monitored continuously by an alignment monitoring system (ADS) and remotely corrected. This stabilization of components as well as the monitoring and correction of the electron beam trajectory based on BPMs and correctors will increase the time between BBA applications. Undulator segments will be periodically removed from the undulator Hall and measured to monitor radiation damage and other effects that might degrade undulator tuning.

  15. Investigation of electron beam transport in a helical undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Y.U.; Lee, B.C.; Kim, S.K.

    1995-12-31

    Lossless transport of electrons through the undulator is essential for CW operation of the FELs driven by recirculating electrostatic accelerators. We calculate the transport ratio of an electron beam in a helical undulator by using a 3-D simulation code and compare the results with the experimental results. The energy and the current of the electron beam are 400 keV and 2 A, respectively. The 3-D distribution of the magnetic field of a practical permanent-magnet helical undulator is measured and is used in the calculations. The major parameters of the undutlator are : period = 32 mm, number of periods = 20, number of periods in adiabatic region = 3.5, magnetic field strength = 1.3 kG. The transport ratio is very sensitive to the injection condition of the electron beam such as the emittance, the diameter, the divergence, etc.. The injection motion is varied in the experiments by changing the e-gun voltage or the field strength of the focusing magnet located at the entrance of the undulator. It is confirmed experimentally and with simulations that most of the beam loss occurs at the adiabatic region of the undulator regardless of the length of the adiabatic region The effect of axial guiding magnetic field on the beam finish is investigated. According to the simulations, the increase of the strength of axial magnetic field from 0 to 1 kG results in the increase of the transport ratio from 15 % to 95%.

  16. FERMI@Elettra FEL Design Technical Optimization Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, William; Penn, Gregory; Allaria, Enrico; De Ninno,Giovanni; Graves, William

    2006-07-31

    This is the final report of the FEL Design Group for the Technical Optimization Study for the FERMI{at}ELETTRA project. The FERMI{at}ELETTRA project is based on the principle of harmonic upshifting of an initial ''seed'' signal in a single pass, FEL amplifier employing multiple undulators. There are a number of FEL physics principles which underlie this approach to obtaining short wavelength output: (1) the energy modulation of the electron beam via the resonant interaction with an external laser seed (2) the use of a chromatic dispersive section to then develop a strong density modulation with large harmonic overtones (3) the production of coherent radiation by the microbunched beam in a downstream radiator. Within the context of the FERMI project, we discuss each of these elements in turn.

  17. Short wavelength FELs using the SLAC linac

    SciTech Connect

    Winick, H.; Bane, K.; Boyce, R.

    1993-08-01

    Recent technological developments have opened the possibility to construct a device which we call a Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS); a fourth generation light source, with brightness, coherence, and peak power far exceeding other sources. Operating on the principle of the free electron laser (FEL), the LCLS would extend the range of FEL operation to much aborter wavelength than the 240 mn that has so far been reached. We report the results of studies of the use of the SLAC linac to drive an LCLS at wavelengths from about 3-100 nm initially and possibly even shorter wavelengths in the future. Lasing would be achieved in a single pass of a low emittance, high peak current, high energy electron beam through a long undulator. Most present FELs use an optical cavity to build up the intensity of the light to achieve lasing action in a low gain oscillator configuration. By eliminating the optical cavity, which is difficult to make at short wavelengths, laser action can be extended to shorter wavelengths by Self-Amplified-Spontaneous-Emission (SASE), or by harmonic generation from a longer wavelength seed laser. Short wavelength, single pass lasers have been extensively studied at several laboratories and at recent workshops.

  18. Nonlinear harmonic generation in the STARS FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abo-Bakr, M.; Goldammer, K.; Kamps, T.; Knobloch, J.; Kuske, B.; Leitner, T.; Meseck, A.

    2008-08-01

    BESSY proposes to build STARS, an FEL to demonstrate cascaded High Gain Harmonic Generation (HGHG). In two HGHG stages, a laser source of 700-900 nm is converted down to a wavelength of 40-70 nm. The STARS facility consists of a normal-conducting RF photoinjector, three superconducting TESLA-type acceleration modules, a magnetic bunch compressor and two stages of HGHG, each consisting of a modulator, dispersive chicane and a radiator. At the entrance of the undulator section, the beam energy is 325 MeV and the peak current is about 500 A. With these parameters, the STARS FEL reaches saturation with a peak power of 100-350 MW. A superradiant mode is also foreseen which boosts the radiation power to the GW-level. Due to nonlinear harmonic generation (NHG), free electron lasers also radiate coherently at higher harmonics of the FEL resonant frequency. STARS can hence extend its output range to even shorter wavelengths. This paper presents studies of the STARS harmonic content in the wavelength range of 6-20 nm. Seeding with high harmonic generation pulses at 32 nm is also discussed.

  19. Synchrotron Radiation and X-ray FEL Projects in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, M. H.

    2012-03-01

    There are two on-going major projects in Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL), the PLS-II light source upgrade and the construction of PAL-XFEL facility. PLS-II is a new light source upgraded from PLS(Pohang Light Source) which had been operated for 16 years from 1995 and shut down in Dec. 2010. The performance will be improved from ``18.9 nm-rad, 2.5 GeV, and 200 mA'' to ``5.8 nm-rad, 3 GeV, and 400 mA'' using three superconducting RF cavities. The old storage ring has been completely dismantled and new DBA ring has been re-installed in the same tunnel within 6 months, and is under commissioning now. The unique feature of PLS-II is the compact employment of 20 insertion-devices including 14 in-vacuum undulators. The PALXFEL is a 0.1-nm hard X-ray FEL construction project started in 2011 and to compete in 2014 with a total budget of 400 M. The PAL-XFEL is designed to have hard X-ray undulator lines at the end of 10-GeV linac, and a dog-leg branch line at 2.65 GeV point for a soft X-ray undulator line simultaneously and independently from hard X-ray FEL undulator line. The overview of two projects with current status is presented.

  20. Numerical study of the 3-D effect on FEL performance and its application to the APS LEUTL FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Chae, Y.C.

    1998-09-01

    A Low-Energy Undulator Test Line (LEUTL) is under construction at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). In LEUTL periodic focusing is provided by external quadrupoles. This results in an elliptical beam with its betatron oscillation envelope varying along the undulators. The free-electron laser (FEL) interaction with such a beam will exhibit truly 3-D effects. Thus the investigation of 3-D effects is important in optimizing the FEL performance. The programs GINGER and TDA3D, coupled with theoretically known facts, have been used for this purpose. Both programs are fully 3-D in moving the particle, but model the interaction between particles and axially symmetric electromagnetic waves. Even though TDA3D can include a few azimuthal modes in the interaction, it is still not a fully 3-D FEL code. However, they show that these 2-D programs can still be used for an elliptical beam whose aspect ratio is within certain limits. The author presents numerical results of FEL performance for the circular beam, the elliptical beam, and finally for the beam in the realistic LEUTL lattice.

  1. Cryogenic Permanent Magnet Undulators

    SciTech Connect

    Chavanne, J.; Lebec, G.; Penel, C.; Revol, F.; Kitegi, C.

    2010-06-23

    For an in-vacuum undulator operated at small gaps the permanent magnet material needs to be highly resistant to possible electron beam exposure. At room temperature, one generally uses Sm{sub 2}Co{sub 17} or high coercivity NdFeB magnets at the expense of a limited field performance. In a cryogenic permanent magnet undulator (CPMU), at a temperature of around 150 K, any NdFeB grade reveals a coercivity large enough to be radiation resistant. In particular, very high remanence NdFeB material can be used to build undulators with enhanced field and X-ray brilliance at high photon energy provided that the pre-baking of the undulator above 100 deg. C can be eliminated. The ESRF has developed a full scale 2 m long CPMU with a period of 18 mm. This prototype has been in operation on the ID6 test beamline since January 2008. A significant effort was put into the characterization of NdFeB material at low temperature, the development of dedicated magnetic measurement systems and cooling methods. The measured heat budget with beam is found to be larger than expected without compromising the smooth operation of the device. Leading on from this first experience, new CPMUs are currently being considered for the upgrade of the ESRF.

  2. Undulator Field Integral Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zachary

    2010-12-07

    The LCLS undulator field integrals must be very small so that the beam trajectory slope and offset stay within tolerance. In order to make accurate measurements of the small field integrals, a long coil will be used. This note describes the design of the coil measurement system.

  3. Two FEL`s in one

    SciTech Connect

    Epp, V.; Nikitin, M.

    1995-12-31

    A new scheme for a FEL operation is proposed. The conventional principle of FEL operation is means that the electron bunch passes through the interaction area of FEL only in one direction. We suggest another possible layout which implies that the electron bunch makes a turn after leaving the wiggler and entries the wiggler at the same end. Actually the wiggler is a kind of a bridge between two storage rings. The electron bunches on the orbit are expected to be adjusted in the way that after one of them leaves the wiggler, another one enters in the opposite direction and in the proper phase with the wave pulse emitted by the previous bunch. So the electron bunch comes in interaction with the amplified electromagnetic wave in both directions i.e. twice per period. It is especially important for the short wavelength FELs, because each reflection from the mirror causes a significant losses of the wave magnitude. The proposed design gives one interaction per each reflection instead of one interaction per two reflections in the traditional scheme. Another way to realize the suggested principle of operating is to insert the wiggler in the electron-positron storage ring. But this layout can be less efficient because of low intensity of the positron beam. The comparison study of radiation from different types of described double wigglers is fulfilled. The synchronization problems are discussed in this paper.

  4. Efficient frequency doubler for the soft X-ray SASE FEL at the TESLA Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldhaus, J.; Körfer, M.; Möller, T.; Pflüger, J.; Saldin, E. L.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    2004-08-01

    This paper describes an effective frequency doubler scheme for SASE free electron lasers (FEL). It consists of an undulator tuned to the first harmonic, a dispersion section, and a tapered undulator tuned to the second harmonic. The first stage is a conventional soft X-ray SASE FEL. Its gain is controlled in such a way that the maximum energy modulation of the electron beam at the exit is about equal to the local energy spread, but still far away from saturation. When the electron bunch passes through the dispersion section this energy modulation leads to effective compression of the particles. Then the bunched electron beam enters the tapered undulator and produces strong radiation in the process of coherent deceleration. We demonstrate a frequency doubler scheme that can be integrated into the SASE FEL at the TESLA Test Facility at DESY, and will allow to reach 3 nm wavelength with GW-level of output peak power. This would extend the operating range of the FEL into the so-called water window and significantly expand the capabilities of the TTF FEL user facility.

  5. FULL ELECTROMAGNETIC FEL SIMULATION VIA THE LORENTZ-BOOSTED FRAME TRANSFORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, William; Vay, Jean-Luc

    2010-08-16

    Numerical electromagnetic simulation of some systems containing charged particles with highly relativistic directed motion can by speeded up by orders of magnitude by choice of the proper Lorentz-boosted frame. A particularly good application for calculation in a boosted frame isthat of short wavelength free-electron lasers (FELs) where a high energy electron beam with small fractional energy spread interacts with a static magnetic undulator. In the optimal boost frame (i.e., the ponderomotive rest frame), the red-shifted FEL radiation and blue-shifted undulator field have identical wavelengths and the number of required longitudinal grid cells and time-steps for fully electromagnetic simulation (relative to the laboratory frame) decrease by factors of gamma^2 each. In theory, boosted frame EM codes permit direct study of FEL problems for which the eikonal approximation for propagation of the radiation field and wiggler-period-averaging for the particle-field interaction may be suspect. We have adapted the WARP code to apply this method to several electromagnetic FEL problems including spontaneous emission, strong exponential gain in a seeded, single pass amplifier configuration, and emission from e-beams in undulators with multiple harmonic components. WARP has a standard relativistic macroparticle mover and a fully 3-D electromagnetic field solver. We discuss our boosted frame results and compare with those obtained using the ?standard? eikonal FEL simulation approach.

  6. Development of IR-FEL facility for energy science in Kyoto University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zen, Heishun; Kii, Toshiteru; Masuda, Kai; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Yamazaki, Tetsuo

    2008-05-01

    A mid-infrared free electron laser (FEL) has been constructed for energy science in the Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University. The FEL system consists of a compact S-band Linac and an undulator to generate 4-13 μm coherent mid-infrared radiations. The Linac consists of a 4.5 cell rf gun with a thermionic cathode and a 3-m traveling-wave-type accelerator tube fed by 10 MW and 20 MW rf power, respectively. We have succeeded to produce 40 MeV, 40 mA and 3 μs electron beams. Last December, the 9.2 μm spontaneous emission from the undulator generated by 29.5 MeV electron beams was observed for the first time. Further optimization parameters of both the electron beam and the optical cavity are being pursued for an FEL lasing in the near future.

  7. Girder Support Scheme for the LCLS Undulator System

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, J.

    2005-01-31

    Differential settlement of the foundation of the LCLS Undulator Hall will cause quadrupoles to move and the electron beam trajectory to distort. The resulting phase errors will decrease the FEL power and require time consuming beam-based alignment sessions to correct. By supporting quadrupoles on girders, with three quadrupoles to a girder, the foundation motion induced phase error between the beam and the X Ray radiation can be reduced by a factor of 5 compared with supporting each quadrupole with a separate column. This comes about because the motions of three quadrupoles on a girder are linearly correlated so their effect on the beam is largely canceled out. Thus a girder support scheme can significantly help to extend the time between required beam based alignments and contribute to a more stable operation of the LCLS FEL beam.

  8. Non-destructive diagnosis of relativistic electron beams using a short undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Ponds, M.L.; Madey, J.M.J.; O`Shea, P.G.

    1995-12-31

    The performance of an FEL depends critically on the characteristics of the electron beam used to drive it. In the past it has been very difficult to measure the details of the transverse and longitudinal phase-space distributions of high-energy electron beams with the precision required to predict FEL performance. Furthermore, the available diagnostics were generally pertubative, and could not be used simultaneously with lasing. We investigate the potential use of a short undulator insertion device for non-destructive diagnosis of relativistic electron beams. Incoherent visible to near-infrared synchrotron radiation from a single magnet in the diagnostic undulator will be used to obtain information on beam position and transverse phase-space. Coherent off-axis undulator radiation in the millimeter to sub-millimeter range will be used to measure longitudinal phase-space characteristics of the beam. These two types of radiation can be analyzed simultaneously, while the FEL is lasing; thus giving a complete picture of relevant electron beam characteristics. In this paper we analyze the theoretical and practical design issues associated with such a diagnostic undulator.

  9. A helical optical for circular polarized UV-FEL project at the UVSOR

    SciTech Connect

    Hama, Hiroyuki

    1995-12-31

    Most of existing storage ring free electron lasers (SRFEL) are restricted those performances by degradation of mirrors in optical cavities. In general, the SRFEL gain at the short wavelength region with high energy electrons is quite low, and the high reflectivity mirrors such as dielectric multilayer mirrors are therefore required. The mirror degradation is considered as a result of irradiation of higher harmonic photons that are simultaneously emitted from planar optical klystron (OK) type undulators, which are commonly used in SRFEL. This problem is getting severer as the lasing wavelength becomes shorter. The UVSOR-FEL had been originally scheduled to be shutdown by 1996 because another undulator project for spectroscopic studies with circular polarized photon would take the FEL`s place. According to suggestion of the insertion device group of the SPring-8, we have designed a helical undulator that is able to vary degree and direction of the polarization easily. In addition, the undulator can be converted into a helical OK by replacing magnets at the center part of undulator in order to coexist with further FEL experiments. Using a calculated magnetic field for magnet configurations of the OK mode, the radiation spectrum at wide wavelength range was simulated by a Fourier transform of Lienard-Wiechert potentials. As a matter of course, some higher harmonics are radiated on the off-axis angle. However it was found out that the higher harmonics is almost negligible as far as inside a solid angle of the Gaussian laser mode. Moreover the gain at the UV region of 250 nm is expected to be much higher than our present FEL because of high brilliant fundamental radiation. The calculated spatial distribution of higher harmonics and the estimated instantaneous gain is presented. Advantages of the helical OK for SRFEL will be discussed in view of our experience, and a possibility of application two-color experiment with SR will be also mentioned.

  10. Flying radio frequency undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzikov, S. V.; Vikharev, A. A.; Savilov, A. V.

    2014-07-21

    A concept for the room-temperature rf undulator, designed to produce coherent X-ray radiation by means of a relatively low-energy electron beam and pulsed mm-wavelength radiation, is proposed. The “flying” undulator is a high-power short rf pulse co-propagating together with a relativistic electron bunch in a helically corrugated waveguide. The electrons wiggle in the rf field of the −1st spatial harmonic with the phase velocity directed in the opposite direction in respect to the bunch velocity, so that particles can irradiate high-frequency Compton's photons. A high group velocity (close to the speed of light) ensures long cooperative motion of the particles and the co-propagating rf pulse.

  11. Commissioning of the Delta Polarizing Undulator at LCLS

    SciTech Connect

    Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter

    2015-09-25

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) generates linearly polarized, intense, high-brightness x-ray pulses from planar fixed-gap undulators. While the fixed-gap design supports a very successful and tightly controlled alignment concept, it provides only limited taper capability (up to 1% through canted pole and horizontal position adjustability) and lacks polarization control. The latter is of great importance for soft x-ray experiments. A new 3.2-m-long compact undulator (based on the Cornell University Delta design) has been developed and installed in place of the last LCLS undulator segment (U33) in October 2014. This undulator provides full control of the polarization degree and K value. Used on its own, it produces fully polarized radiation in the selected state (linear, circular or elliptical) but at low intensity. To increase the output power by orders of magnitude, the electron beam is micro-bunched by several (~10) of the upstream LCLS undulator segments operated in the linear FEL regime. As unavoidable by-product, this microbunching process produces moderate amounts of horizontally linear polarized radiation which mixes with the radiation produced by the Delta undulator. This unwanted radiation component has been greatly reduced by the reverse taper configuration, as suggested by E. Schneidmiller and M. Yurkov. Full elimination of the linear polarized component was achieved through spatial separation combined with transverse collimation. The paper describes these and other methods tested during commissioning. It also presents results of polarization measurements showing high degrees of circular polarization in the soft x-ray wavelength range (500 eV - 1500 eV).

  12. The LCLS Undulator Beam Loss Monitor Readout System

    SciTech Connect

    Dusatko, John; Browne, M.; Fisher, A.S.; Kotturi, D.; Norum, S.; Olsen, J.; /SLAC

    2012-07-23

    The LCLS Undulator Beam Loss Monitor System is required to detect any loss radiation seen by the FEL undulators. The undulator segments consist of permanent magnets which are very sensitive to radiation damage. The operational goal is to keep demagnetization below 0.01% over the life of the LCLS. The BLM system is designed to help achieve this goal by detecting any loss radiation and indicating a fault condition if the radiation level exceeds a certain threshold. Upon reception of this fault signal, the LCLS Machine Protection System takes appropriate action by either halting or rate limiting the beam. The BLM detector consists of a PMT coupled to a Cherenkov radiator located near the upstream end of each undulator segment. There are 33 BLMs in the system, one per segment. The detectors are read out by a dedicated system that is integrated directly into the LCLS MPS. The BLM readout system provides monitoring of radiation levels, computation of integrated doses, detection of radiation excursions beyond set thresholds, fault reporting and control of BLM system functions. This paper describes the design, construction and operational performance of the BLM readout system.

  13. Description of FEL3D: A three dimensional simulation code for TOK and FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Dutt, S.; Friedman, A.; Gover, A.

    1988-10-20

    FEL3D is a three dimensional simulation code, written for the purpose of calculating the parameters of coherent radiation emitted by electrons in an undulator. The program was written predominantly for simulating the coherent super-radiant harmonic frequency emission of electrons which are being bunched by an external laser beam while propagating in an undulator magnet. This super-radiant emission is to be studied in the TOK (transverse optical klystron) experiment, which is under construction in the NSLS department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The program can also calculate the stimulated emission radiometric properties of a free electron laser (FEL) taking into account three dimensional effects. While this application is presently limited to the small gain operation regime of FEL's, extension to the high gain regime is expected to be relatively easy. The code is based on a semi-analytical concept. Instead of a full numerical solution of the Maxwell-Lorentz equations, the trajectories of the electron in the wiggler field are calculated analytically, and the radiation fields are expanded in terms of free space eigen-modes. This approach permits efficient computation, with a computation time of about 0.1 sec/electron on the BNL IBM 3090. The code reflects the important three dimensional features of the electron beam, the modulating laser beam, and the emitted radiation field. The statistical approach is based on averaging over the electron initial conditions according to a given distribution function in phase space, rather than via Monte-Carlo simulation. The present version of the program is written for uniform periodic wiggler field, but extension to nonuniform fields is straightforward. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Resistive Wall Wakefield in the LCLS Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, Karl L.F.; Stupakov, Gennady; /SLAC

    2005-06-02

    The authors have shown that in the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) undulator region, because of the high frequency content in the bunch shape, the energy variation induced by the resistive wall wake is much larger when the (proper) ac conductivity calculation is performed, than for the often-used dc calculation. Using a round copper beam pipe will result in a (relative) energy variation many times the Pierce parameter, implying that a large fraction of beam will not reach saturation. Our results suggest that this situation can be improved by, instead, choosing a flat, aluminum beam pipe.

  15. Commissioning the FELI linac and UV-FEL facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tomimasu, T.; Saeki, K.; Miyauchi, Y.

    1995-12-31

    The FELI 165-MeV linac and UV-FEL facility are in the commissioning, stage. A thermionic triode gun of the 6-MeV injector emits 500-ps pulses of 2.3A at 22.3125MHz. These pulses are compressed to 60AX 7ps by a 714-MHz prebuncher and a 2856-MHz buncher and seven ETL type accelerating waveguides with a length of 2.93m. The length of the linac including bending sections of two S-type BT systems for two undulators used for IR-FEL oscillations is 46m. The buncher and these accelerating waveguides are powered by two klystrons (E3729, 2856MHz, total 48MW, 24-{mu}s flat top long pulses). The flatness of our klystron modulator pulses is 0.067% at 24-{mu}s duration. An rf-ageing for new four accelerating waveguides will be started in May. An S-type BT line for 165-MeV beam from the linac will be installed in the end of April. A 2.68-m undulator ({lambda}u=4.0cm, N=67, Kmax gap length {ge}16mm) and an optical cavity (Lc=6.72m) will be installed early in July. The beam conditionings for UV-FEL experiments will be started in July.

  16. Influence of electron beam halos on the FEL performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faatz, B.; Reiche, S.

    1999-06-01

    For single-pass free-electron lasers (FEL), such as amplifiers and SASE devices, saturation of the radiation power has to be reached within the length of the undulator. Therefore, detailed knowledge of electron beam parameters is crucial. So far, simulations have been performed with a given rms emittance and energy spread. At short radiation wavelengths, bunch compressors are used to compress the electron beam to achieve the desired high peak currents. In addition, external focusing along the entire undulator is used to maintain a constant small radius. The rotation of phase space due to compression might lead to a significant part of the bunch in tails that could increase the gain length. Furthermore, it is in general not possible to match both the beam core and the tail to the focusing structure. In this contribution, the influence of these tails, both transverse and in energy, on the FEL performance will be investigated. Simulations will be performed for beam parameters that have been assumed for the TESLA Test Facility FEL at DESY.

  17. Analysis of the 3D magnetic field and its errors for undulators with iron poles

    SciTech Connect

    Ingold, G.; Bahrdt, J.; Gaupp, A.

    1995-12-31

    The attainable field strength and field quality, such as the optical phase error, the electron beam displacement within the undulator and higher order multipoles of the magnetic field, are discussed. These issues are critical to the design and construction of short period undulators for use in short wavelength FEL or for operation in third generation light sources. We discuss two approaches: (i) For superferric undulators the construction of a full length device would rely on the optimum sorting of precision machined undulator segments. Magnetic data on segments with 20 periods (period length 8.80mm) will be presented. (ii) For hybrid undulators the sorting has to be done on individual poles and magnets. For this approach typical error sources such as machining tolerances, magnetization errors of the permanent magnet material and assembly errors are modeled in 3D and compared to induced errors on an existing hybrid undulator segment. In case of undulators having a full length of hundred periods at least five times as many individual parts have to be characterized. This should be done automatically where both the mechanical and magnetic data before and after the assembly of the magnetic structure are recorded in one step. A CNC programmable measuring device suitable for this task will shortly be presented.

  18. ORAL ISSUE OF THE JOURNAL "USPEKHI FIZICHESKIKH NAUK": Ginzburg's invention of undulators and their role in modern synchrotron radiation sources and free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulipanov, Gennadii N.

    2007-04-01

    Undulators — periodic magnetic structures that were originally introduced by Vitalii Ginzburg in 1947 for electromagnetic radiation generation using relativistic electrons — are among the key elements of modern synchrotron radiation sources and free electron lasers (FELs). In this talk, the history of three generations of storage ring-based synchrotron X-ray sources using wigglers and undulators is briefly traced. Prospects for two types of next-generation space-coherent X-ray sources are discussed, which use long undulators and energy recovery accelerators or, alternatively, employ linear accelerator-based FELs. The recently developed Novosibirsk terahertz FEL facility, currently the world' s most powerful terahertz source, is described. It was the generation of electromagnetic radiation in this range that Ginzburg discussed in his 1947 work.

  19. Magnetic Characterization and Design of an Undulator-Based Electron Beam Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Bakeman, Michael S.; Nakamura, Kei; Leemans, Wim P.; Schroeder, Carl B.; Robinson, Kem E.; Toth, Csaba; Fawley, W. M.

    2009-01-22

    The LOASIS Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) has achieved quasi-mono-energetic electron beams with energies up to 1 GeV. These beams offer the potential for use with insertion devices such as wigglers and undulators to create tabletop XUV and x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) sources. To achieve a high quality light source producing high brightness radiation requires an electron beam with low energy spread and low emittance. Here we discuss the use of an undulator to generate XUV radiation to characterize in a single shot the electron beam energy spread and emittance with high precision.

  20. 2-D simulation of a waveguide free electron laser having a helical undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.K.; Lee, B.C.; Jeong, Y.U.

    1995-12-31

    We have developed a 2-D simulation code for the calculation of output power from an FEL oscillator having a helical undulator and a cylindrical waveguide. In the simulation, the current and the energy of the electron beam is 2 A and 400 keV, respectively. The parameters of the permanent-magnet helical undulator are : period = 32 mm, number of periods = 20, magnetic field = 1.3 kG. The gain per pass is 10 and the output power is calculated to be higher than 10 kW The results of the 2-D simulation are compared with those of 1-D simulation.

  1. Predicted performance of a multi-section VUV FEL with the Amsterdam pulse stretcher and storage ring AmPS

    SciTech Connect

    Bazylev, V.A.; Pitatelev, M.I.; Tulupov, A.V.

    1995-12-31

    A design is proposed to realize a VUV FEL with the Amsterdam Pulse Stretcher and Storage Ring (AmPS). The FEL is based on 4 identical undulator sections and 3 dispersive sections. The total magnetic system has a length of 12 m. 3 D simulations with the actual electron beam parameters of AmPS have been done with a version of TDA code modified for multi-sectional FELs. The spectral range between 50 and 100 nm has been considered. The simulations show that an amplification as large as 1*E5 - 1*E7 can be achieved. The amplification can be enhanced by a further optimisation procedure.

  2. Parameter study of the VUV-FEL at the Tesla Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brefeld, W.; Faatz, B.

    1995-12-31

    In this contribution we present a detailed study of the influence of the electron beam and machine parameters on the performance of the TTF VUV FEL, which is in its design stage at DESY. The TTF FEL will be a 6 nm SASE device operating with the beam provided by the Tesla Test Facility superconducting linac, driven by an rf photcathode gun. The FEL output power and saturation length have been assessed with the use of different 2D3-D steady state simulation codes. The parameter range over which the FEL would reach saturation within the specified undulator length of 25 to 30 m have been determined and checked against semi-analytical expressions.

  3. Optical properties of mid-infrared FELs from the FELI Facility I

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, A.; Okuma, S.; Oshita, E.

    1995-12-31

    The FELI Facility I has succeeded in mid-infrared FEL oscillation at 6 {mu} m using a 30-MeV, 42-A electron beam from the FELI S-band linac in October 31, 1994. The FELI Facility I is composed of a 2-m vertical type undulator ({lambda}u=3.4cm, N=58, K m a x = 55, gap length{ge}14mm) and a 6.72-m optical cavity. It can cover the wavelength range of 5-20{mu}m. The FELs can be delivered from the optical cavity to the diagnostics room through a 50-m evacuated optical pipeline. Wavelength and cavity length dependences of optical properties such as peak power, average power, spectrum width, subpulses in FEL macropulse, FEL transverse profile are reported.

  4. Transverse effects in UV FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Small, D.W.; Wong, R.K.; Colson, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    In an ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (UV FEL), the electron beam size can be approximately the same as the optical mode size. The performance of a UV FEL is studied including the effect of emittance, betatron focusing, and external focusing of the electron beam on the transverse optical mode. The results are applied to the Industrial Laser Consortium`s UV FEL.

  5. Performance Evaluation of Undulator Radiation at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Chuyu Liu, Geoffrey Krafft, Guimei Wang

    2010-05-01

    The performance of undulator radiation (UR) at CEBAF with a 3.5 m helical undulator is evaluated and compared with APS undulator-A radiation in terms of brilliance, peak brilliance, spectral flux, flux density and intensity distribution.

  6. Possible application of X-ray optical elements for reducing the spectral bandwidth of an X-ray SASE FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldhaus, J.; Saldin, E. L.; Schneider, J. R.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    1997-08-01

    A new design for a single pass X-ray Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) FEL is proposed. The scheme consists of two undulators and an X-ray monochromator located between them. The first stage of the FEL amplifier operates in the SASE linear regime. After the exit of the first undulator the electron bunch is guided through a non-isochronous bypass and the X-ray beam enters the monochromator. The main function of the bypass is to suppress the modulation of the electron beam induced in the first undulator. This is possible because of the finite value of the natural energy spread in the beam. At the entrance to the second undulator the radiation power from the monochromator dominates significantly over the shot noise and the residual electron bunching. As a result the second stage of the FEL amplifier operates in the steady-state regime when the input signal bandwidth is small with respect to that of the FEL amplifier. Integral losses of the radiation power in the monochromator are relatively small because grazing incidence optics can be used. The proposed scheme is illustrated for the example of the 6 nm option SASE FEL at the TESLA Test Facility under construction at DESY. As shown in this paper the spectral bandwidth of such a two-stage SASE FEL (Δλ/λ⋍ 5 × 10-5) is close to the limit defined by the finite duration of the radiation pulse. The average brilliance is equal to 7 × 1024photons/(s × mrad2 × mm2 × 0.1% bandw.) which is by two orders of magnitude higher than the value which could be reached by the conventional SASE FEL. The monochromatization of the radiation is performed at a low level of radiation power (about 500 times less than the saturation level) which allows one to use conventional X-ray optical elements (grazing incidence grating and mirrors) for the monochromator design.

  7. Cavity-mirror degradation in the deep-UV FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, K.; Yamazaki, T.; Sei, N.

    1995-12-31

    It is known that the degradation of dielectric multilayer mirrors used in short wavelength free-electron lasers (FELs) is caused by the carbon contamination on the mirror surface and the defects inside the dielectrics. We reported last year that the degraded dielectric multilayer mirrors can be repaired with both surface treatment by RF-induced oxygen plasma and thermal annealing. However, such a mirror degradation is still one of the most critical issues in the deep ultraviolet (UV) FELs, because the fundamental undulator radiation resonating in the laser cavity, the intensity of which is much higher than that of higher harmonics, can be sufficiently energetic to cause the mirror degradation through photochemical reactions. We are investigating the mirror degradation mainly in the deep UV region down to 240 nm. The experimental results will be shown. The mirror degradation mechanism will be discussed.

  8. Image tuning techniques for enhancing the performance of pure permanent magnet undulators with small gap/period ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Tatchyn, R.

    1995-12-31

    The on-axis field of a small-gap undulator constricted out of pure permanent magnet (PM) blocks arranged in an alternating-dipole (i.e., 2 dipoles/period) array can be substantially varied by positioning monolithic permeable plates above and below the undulator jaws. This simple technique, which can be used to control the 1st harmonic energy in conventional synchrotron radiation (SR) or Free Electron Laser (FEL) applications requiring sub-octave tuning, can also be shown to suppress magnetic inhomogeneities that can contribute to the undulator`s on-axis field errors. If a standard 4 block/period Halbach undulator, composed of PM blocks with square cross sections, is rearranged into an alternating-dipole array with the same period, the peak field that can be generated with superimposed image plates can substantially exceed that of the pure-PM Halbach array. This design technique, which can be viewed as intermediate between the {open_quotes}pure-PM{close_quotes} and standard {open_quotes}hybrid/PM{close_quotes} configurations, provides a potentially cost-effective method of enhancing the performance of small-gap, pure-PM insertion devices. In this paper we report on the analysis and recent characterization of pure-PM undulator structures with superimposed image plates, and discuss possible applications to FEL research.

  9. Variable Gap Undulator for 1.5-48 Kev Free Electron Laser at Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrini, C.; Wu, J.; /SLAC

    2011-08-17

    We study the feasibility of generating femtosecond duration Free-Electron Laser with a variable photon energy from 1.5 to 48 keV, using an electron bunch with the same characteristics of the LINAC Coherent Light Source (LCLS) bunch, and a planar undulator with additional focusing. We assume that the electron bunch energy can be changed, and the undulator has a variable gap, allowing a variable undulator parameter. It is assumed to be operated in an ultra-low charge and ultra-short pulse regime. We study the feasibility of a tunable, short pulse, X-ray FEL with photon energy from 1.5 to 48 keV, using an electron beam like the one in the LCLS and a 2:5 cm period, variable gap, planar undulator. The beam energy changes from 4.6 to 13.8 GeV, the electorn charge is kept at 10 pC, and the undulator parameter varies from 1 to 3. The undulator length needed to saturate the 48 keV FEL is about 55 m, with a peak power around 5 GW. At longer wavelength the saturation length is as short as 15 m, and the peak power around 20 GW. The results from the analytical models and the GENESIS simulations show that the system is feasible. The large wavelength range, full tunability and short, few femtosecond pulses, together with the large peak power, would provide a powerful research tool.

  10. Start-to-end simulations of SASE FEL at the TESLA Test Facility, phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohlus, M.; Flöttmann, K.; Kozlov, O. S.; Limberg, T.; Piot, Ph.; Saldin, E. L.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    2004-09-01

    Phase 1 of the vacuum ultra-violet free-electron laser (FEL) at the TESLA Test Facility recently concluded operation. It successfully demonstrated the saturation of a SASE FEL in the wavelength range of 80-120 nm. We present a posteriori start-to-end numerical simulations of this FEL. These simulations are based on the programs Astra and elegant for the generation and transport of the electron distribution. An independent simulation of the intricate beam dynamics in the magnetic bunch compressor is performed with the program CSRtrack. The SASE FEL process is simulated with the code FAST. From our detailed simulations and the resulting phase space distribution at the undulator entrance, we found that the FEL was driven only by a small fraction (slice) of the electron bunch. This "lasing slice" is located in the head of the bunch, and has a peak current of approximately 3 kA. A strong energy chirp (due to the space charge field after compression) within this slice had a significant influence on the FEL operation. Our study shows that the radiation pulse duration is about 40 fs (FWHM) with a corresponding peak power of 1.5 GW. The simulated FEL properties are compared with various experimental data and found to be in excellent agreement.

  11. Seeded FEL Amplifier-Buncher in the 0.5-9 THz for Advanced Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Tochitsky, S. Ya.; Reiche, S.; Sung, C.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Joshi, C.; Gottschalk, S. C.; Kelly, R.

    2009-01-22

    Longitudinal modulation of a relativistic electron beam in the THz range is important for advanced laser- or beam-driven plasma accelerators operating in the 10{sup 16}-10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} plasma density range. We describe a single-pass FEL amplifier-buncher which is under construction at the UCLA Neptune laboratory. Microbunching on the 0.5-3 THz frequency scale is achieved during the process of a resonant FEL interaction between an electron beam and a THz seed pulse. A narrow-band, low-power THz seed source based on the frequency mixing of CO{sub 2} laser lines in a GaAs nonlinear crystal is built and fully characterized. The THz radiation pulse generated by this source will be guided through a hollow waveguide inside the planar FEL undulator driven by a regular photoinjector. By using a time-dependent FEL code GENESIS 1.3, we optimized the undulator parameters and analyzed the dynamics of the modulated electron beam. At present, the THz FEL microbuncher is being built and we update the status of the project.

  12. Initial studies of Bremsstrahlung energy deposition in small-bore superconducting undulator structures in linac environments

    SciTech Connect

    Cremer, T.; Tatchyn, R.

    1995-12-31

    One of the more promising technologies for developing minimal-length insertion devices for linac-driven, single-pass Free Electron Lasers (FELs) operating in the x-ray range is based on the use of superconducting (SC) materials. In recent FEL simulations, for example, a bifilar helical SC device with a 2 cm period and 1.8 T field was found to require a 30 m saturation length for operation at 1.5{Angstrom} on a 15 GeV linac, more than 40% shorter than an alternative hybrid/permanent magnet (hybrid/PM) undulator. AT the same time, however, SC technology is known to present characteristic difficulties for insertion device design, both in engineering detail and in operation. Perhaps the most critical problem, as observed, e.g., by Madey and co-workers in their initial FEL experiments, was the frequent quenching induced by scattered electrons upstream of their (bifilar) device. Postulating that this quenching was precipitated by directly-scattered or bremsstrahlung-induced particle energy deposited into the SC material or into material contiguous with it, the importance of numerical and experimental characterizations of this phenomenon for linac-based, user-facility SC undulator design becomes evident. In this paper we discuss selected prior experimental results and report on initial EGS4 code studies of scattered and bremsstrahlung induced particle energy deposition into SC structures with geometries comparable to a small-bore bifilar helical undulator.

  13. Photon Source Capabilities of the Jefferson Lab FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, S. V.; Douglas, D. R.; Evtushenko, P.; Hannon, F. E.; Hernandez-Garcia, C.; Klopf, J. M.; Legg, R. A.; Neil, G. R.; Shinn, M. D.; Tennant, C. D.; Zhang, S.; Williams, G. P.

    2013-03-22

    Jefferson Lab operates a superconducting energy recovered linac which is operated with CW RF and which powers oscillator-based IR and UV Free Electron Lasers (FELs) with diffraction limited sub-picosecond pulses with >10{sup 13} photons per pulse (1.0%BW) at pulse repetition frequencies up to 75 MHz. Useful harmonics extend into the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV). Based on FEL model calculations validated using this facility, we have designed both an oscillator-based VUV-FEL that would produce 6 10{sup12} coherent (0.5% BW) 100 eV photons per pulse at multi-MHz repetition rates in the fundamental, and a dual FEL configuration that would allow simultaneous lasing lasing at THz and UV wavelengths. The VUV-FEL would utilize a novel high gain, low Q cavity, while the THz source would be an FEL oscillator with a short wiggler providing diffraction limited pulses with pulse energy exceeding 50 microJoules. The THz source would use the exhaust beam from a UVFEL. Such multiphoton capabilities would provide unique opportunities for out of equilibrium dynamical studies at time-scales down to 50 fs. The fully coherent nature of all these sources results in peak and average brightness values that are many orders of magnitude higher than storage rings. We acknowledge support from the Commonwealth of Virginia. Jefferson Lab is supported by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC05-84-ER40150.

  14. Extension of the spectral range of the CLIO FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Marcouille, O.; Boyer, J.C.; Corlier, M.

    1995-12-31

    The CLIO FEL has been designed to lase between 2 and 20 {mu}m. The electrons are produced by a 32/50 MeV RF linear accelerator. The injector is a 100 keV thermoionic gun, followed by a subharmonic prebuncher at 0.5 GHz and a buncher at 3 GHz. The electron beam is then accelerated in a 4.5 m long travelling wave accelerating section, to the nominal energy. The undulator consisted of 48 periods of 40 mm and the optical cavity is 4.8 m long which corresponds to a 1.2 m Rayleigh length. The peak power extracted by a ZnSe Brewster plate is 10 MW at 10 {mu}. But, beyond 11{mu}m, the laser power decreases rapidely and no laser oscillation appears above 17 {mu}m. In order to lase at farther wavelengths, few changes have been made: First of all, the power limit is due to the diffraction losses of the undulator vaccuum chamber (7 mm height and 2 m long). Numerical calculations have been made and show that cavity losses reach 55 % at 15 {mu}m whereas the measured gain is 60 %. Consequently, the undulator vaccuum chamber have been replaced by a approximately twice bigger one. Then, the minimum gap is increased and the maximum deflection parameter K is reduced by a factor 2: laser tunability is greatly reduced. This why a new undulator has been built. The main characteristics are summarized.

  15. Ultrahigh harmonics generation in a FEL with a seed laser

    SciTech Connect

    Goloviznin, V.V.; Amersfoort, P.W. van

    1995-12-31

    One of the most challenging problems in modern FEL technology is to operate in the X-ray region, especially in the {open_quotes}water window{close_quotes}. Because of the absence of optical resonators in this range of wavelengths, only a single-pass device may be suitable for this task. The Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) mechanism is now under active discussion as a realistic way to provide high-power coherent emission in the X-ray range. Both the undulator parameters and the electron beam parameters required for the lasing are achieveable at today`s technological level. On the other hand, the SASE approach implies a very long and expensive periodic magnetic structure, typically several tens of meters long. This is mainly because of the rather long build-up time necessary to establish a coherent mode from incoherent noise. A mechanism of shortening this time would be therefore highly desirable. In the present paper we consider a scheme using two undulators and a seed-laser to produce coherent X-ray emission. The first undulator and the seed-laser provide a pre-modulation of the beam while the second undulator serves as a source of coherent spontaneous radiation at a very high harmonic of the seed-laser frequency; the whole scheme may then be considered to be an FEL-based frequency upconvertor. The total length of the periodic magnetic structure is shown to be of the order of several meters, nearly an order of magnitude shorter than in the SASE case. For the same beam quality as in the SASE scheme and with realistic seed-laser parameters, the efficiency of the beam pre-modulation at the 50-th (!) harmonic is shown to be as high as 15%. The output radiation is tunable between discrete harmonics of the seed-frequency.

  16. Gain length dependence on phase shake in the VUV-FEL at the TESLA Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pflueger, J.; Pierini, P.

    1995-12-31

    The TTF VUV FEL, which is in its design stage at DESY, consists of a 30 m long SASE FEL which will radiate around 6 nm, driven by a superconducting linac with final energy of 1 GeV. One of the important issues in its design is the undulator performance, which is studied in this paper. The present setup, including FODO lattice, is discussed in this paper. Results of simulations, including the realistic wiggler field errors and beam stearing, are presented. Dependence of the performance, in particular the gain and saturation length as well as the saturation peak power, on the wiggler field errors is discussed.

  17. Pulse Length Control in an X-Ray FEL by Using Wakefields

    SciTech Connect

    Reiche, S.; Pellegrini, Claudio; Emma, P.; /UCLA /SLAC

    2008-03-18

    For the users of the high-brightness radiation sources of free-electron lasers it is desirable to reduce the FEL pulse length to 10 fs and below for time-resolved pump and probe experiments. Although it can be achieved by conventional compression methods for the electron beam or the chirped FEL pulse, the technical realization is demanding. In this presentation we study the impact of longitudinal wakefields in the undulator and how their properties can be used to reduced the amplifying part of the bunch to the desired length. Methods of actively controlling the wakefields are presented.

  18. Observations of z-dependent microbunching harmonic intensities using COTR in a SASE FEL.

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, A. H.; Biedron, S. G.; Dejus, R. J.; Berg, W. J.; Borland, M.; Chae, Y. C.; Erdmann, M.; Huang, Z.; Kim, K. -J.; Li, Y.; Lewellen, J. W.; Milton, S. V.; Moog, E.; Sajaev, V.; Yang, B. X.

    2002-09-24

    The nonlinear generation of harmonics in a self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free-electron laser (FEL) continues to be of interest. Complementary to such studies is the search for information on the electron beam microbunching harmonic components, which are revealed by coherent optical transition radiation (COTR) experiments. An initial z-dependent set of data has been obtained with the fundamental at 530 nm and the second harmonic at 265 nm. The latter data were collected after every other undulator in a nine-undulator string. These results are compared to estimates based on GINGER and an analytical model for nonlinear harmonic generation.

  19. Introduction to LCLS Undulator Tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Z.

    2005-01-31

    This note gives a general introduction to undulator tuning for the LCLS. It starts with a theoretical discussion in which the equations necessary to understand undulator tuning are derived. The trajectory of an electron in an undulator and the relation between the electron motion and a radiation wave are analyzed. Common terms are defined such as slippage, K{sub eff}, and B{sub eff}. The radiation wavelength is derived. After the theoretical discussion, the results are illustrated with simulations. A program was written which gives simulated undulator field measurements along with an assortment of possible field errors. The simulated measurements are sent to the analysis program we are developing and the effect of various field errors is studied. The shims used to correct the field errors are discussed.

  20. An electromagnetic micro=undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Nassiri, A.; Turner, L.R.

    1997-12-31

    Microfabrication technology using the LIGA (a German acronym for Lithography, Electroforming, and Molding) process offers an attractive alternative for fabricating precision devices with micron-sized features. One such device is a mm-sized micro-undulator with potential applications in a table-top synchrotron light source for medical and other industrial uses. The undulator consists of a silver conductor embedded in poles and substrate of nickel-iron. Electromagnetic modeling of the undulator is done using the eddy current computer code ELEKTRA. Computations predict a field pattern of appropriate strength and quality if the current can be prevented from being shunted from silver by the nickel-iron poles either through insulation or through slotted poles. The design of the undulator along with the computational results are discussed.

  1. FEL-accelerator related diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Jordan; David Douglas; Stephen V. Benson; Pavel Evtuschenko

    2007-08-02

    Free Electron Lasers (FEL) present a unique set of beam parameters to the diagnostics suite. The FEL requires characterization of the full six dimensional phase space of the electron beam at the wiggler and accurate alignment of the electron beam to the optical mode of the laser. In addition to the FEL requirements on the diagnostics suite, the Jefferson Lab FEL is operated as an Energy Recovered Linac (ERL) which imposes additional requirements on the diagnostics. The ERL aspect of the Jefferson Lab FEL requires that diagnostics operate over a unique dynamic range and operate with simultaneous transport of the accelerated and energy recovered beams. This talk will present how these challenges are addressed at the Jefferson Lab FEL.

  2. The ENEA F-CUBE Facility: Trends in R.F. driven compact FELs and related diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Doria, A.; Gallerano, G.P.; Giovenale, E.

    1995-12-31

    The Frascati FEL Facility F-CUBE (FEL-Compact for User Basic Experiment) currently operates in the mm-wave region providing about 600 hrs of beam time per year to users. This FEL is a low cost compact device intended to be the first step in making the FEL a laboratory tool. It exploits some unique features like short pulses with coherent emission seeding and the dispersion properties of a waveguide resonator at {open_quotes}zero slippage{close_quotes} to provide wide band tunability. The system is presently being upgraded to extend these characteristics into the far infrared. A new NdFeB permanent magnet undulator has been built and magnetic measurements have been performed. FEL tunability in the interval from 400 to 900 pm will be provided by the variation of the undulator gap and of the gap of the planar waveguide in the resonator. Due to the short electron bunch duration coherent spontaneous emission is expected also in this wavelength range. Its effect on the FEL performance will be discussed together with a comparison of different coherent emission mechanisms, like coherent transition radiation (CTR), which can be used as a diagnostic tool.

  3. Saturation and pulsed FEL dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Giannessi, L.; Mezi, L.

    1995-12-31

    The behavior of a FEL operating in the saturated pulsed regime, may be reproduced by the linear FEL integral equation, suitably modified to include saturation effects through a gain depression coefficient depending on the laser intensity. This simple method allows to evaluate several FEL parameters like gain, efficiency, band-width and optical pulse duration as functions of the optical cavity length, only with a numerical integration. The predictions have been compared with available experimental and numerical data, and the method has been applied to estimate the operating characteristics of some planned FEL experiments.

  4. Short period, high field cryogenic undulator for extreme performance x-ray free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shea, F. H.; Marcus, G.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Scheer, M.; Bahrdt, J.; Weingartner, R.; Gaupp, A.; Grüner, F.

    2010-07-01

    Short period, high field undulators can enable short wavelength free electron lasers (FELs) at low beam energy, with decreased gain length, thus allowing much more compact and less costly FEL systems. We describe an ongoing initiative to develop such an undulator based on an approach that utilizes novel cryogenic materials. While this effort was begun in the context of extending the photon energy regime of a laser-plasma accelerator based electron source, we consider here implications of its application to sub-fs scenarios in which more conventional injectors are employed. The use of such low-charge, ultrashort beams, which has recently been proposed as a method of obtaining single-spike performance in x-ray FELs, is seen in simulation to give unprecedented beam brightness. This brightness, when considered in tandem with short wavelength, high field undulators, enables extremely high performance FELs. Two examples discussed in this paper illustrate this point well. The first is the use of the SPARX injector at 2.1 GeV with 1 pC of charge to give 8 GW peak power in a single spike at 6.5 Å with a photon beam peak brightness greater than 1035photons/(smm2mrad20.1%BW), which will also reach LCLS wavelengths on the 5th harmonic. The second is the exploitation of the LCLS injector with 0.25 pC, 150 as pulses to lase at 1.5 Å using only 4.5 GeV energy; beyond this possibility, we present start-to-end simulations of lasing at unprecedented short wavelength, 0.15 Å, using 13.65 GeV LCLS design energy.

  5. Start-to-End Simulations of the LCLS Accelerator and FEL Performance at Very Low Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y; Brachmann, A.; Decker, F.-J.; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hays, G.; Hering, Ph.; Huang, Z.; Iverson, R.; Loos, H.; Miahnahri, A.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Ratner, D.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; White, W.; Wu, J.; Pellegrini, C.; /UCLA

    2009-05-26

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is an x-ray Free-electron Laser (FEL) being commissioned at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Recent beam measurements have shown that, using the LCLS injector-linac-compressors, the beam emittance is very small at 20 pC. In this paper we perform start-to-end simulations of the entire accelerator including the FEL undulator and study the FEL performance versus the bunch charge. At 20 pC charge, these calculations associated with the measured beam parameters suggest the possibility of generating a longitudinally coherent single x-ray spike with 2-femtosecond (fs) duration at a wavelength of 1.5 nm. At 100 pC charge level, our simulations show an x-ray pulse with 10 femtosecond duration and up to 10{sup 12} photons at a wavelength of 1.5 {angstrom}. These results open exciting possibilities for ultrafast science and single shot molecular imaging.

  6. GINGER simulations of short-pulse effects in the LEUTL FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Fawley, W.M.

    2001-07-01

    While the long-pulse, coasting beam model is often used in analysis and simulation of self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free-electron lasers (FELs), many current SASE demonstration experiments employ relatively short electron bunches whose pulse length is on the order of the radiation slippage length. In particular, the low-energy undulator test line (LEUTL) FEL at the Advanced Photon Source has recently lased and nominally saturated in both visible and near-ultraviolet wavelength regions with a sub-ps pulse length that is somewhat shorter than the total slippage length in the 22-m undulator system. In this paper we explore several characteristics of the short pulse regime for SASE FELs with the multidimensional, time-dependent simulation code GINGER, concentrating on making a direct comparison with the experimental results from LEUTL. Items of interest include the radiation gain length, pulse energy, saturation position, and spectral bandwidth. We address the importance of short-pulse effects when scaling the LEUTL results to proposed x-ray FELs and also briefly discuss the possible importance of coherent spontaneous emission at startup.

  7. Progress of the commissioning of the DELTA storage ring FEL facility

    SciTech Connect

    Noelle, D.; Geisler, A.; Ridder, M.

    1995-12-31

    This paper will present the status of the ongoing commissioning of the DELTA storage-ring FEL facility. The commissioning of the LINAC started in autumn `94. The operation of the booster started in spring `95, the first stored beam was achieved end of march `95. During the summer of `95 the commissioning of the main storage ring will be started. Simultaneously, the first FEL FELICTA I was built. All FEL hardware is in house, the undulator is already mounted in the storage-ring. Thus first operation of the undulator with electron beam, will take place immediately after the first stored beam in DELTA. Therefore, first spontanous photons are to be expected in late summer `95. As soon as DELTA provides stable and rather reliable operation the experiments on FELICITA I will start. 16 mA total average current in DELTA at 500 MeV should be sufficient to reach the laser threshold in the FEL mode of FELICITA I. Operating the device as an optical klystron should result in lasing at substantial less currents.

  8. Permanent magnet undulator for SPEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Halbach, K.; Chin, J.; Hoyer, E.; Winick, H.; Cronin, R.; Yang, J.; Zambre, Y.

    1981-03-01

    A 30 period permanent magnet (SmCo/sub 5/) undulator has been designed, built and tested. The period is 6.1 cm, overall length is 1.95 m, and the gap is variable from 2.7 cm to 6.0 cm. Magnetic measurements at the midplane with a 2.7 cm gap show that the field is sinusoidal with a peak value of .28 T. Construction details and magnetic measurements are presented along with the spectral distribution of radiation produced by 3.0 GeV electrons traversing the undulator.

  9. Towards short wavelengths FELs workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Winick, H.

    1993-12-01

    This workshop was caged because of the growing perception in the FEL source community that recent advances have made it possible to extend FEL operation to wavelengths about two orders of magnitude shorter than the 240 nm that has been achieved to date. In addition short wavelength FELs offer the possibilities of extremely high peak power (several gigawatts) and very short pulses (of the order of 100 fs). Several groups in the USA are developing plans for such short wavelength FEL facilities. However, reviewers of these plans have pointed out that it would be highly desirable to first carry out proof-of-principle experiments at longer wavelengths to increase confidence that the shorter wavelength devices will indeed perform as calculated. The need for such experiments has now been broadly accepted by the FEL community. Such experiments were the main focus of this workshop as described in the following objectives distributed to attendees: (1) Define measurements needed to gain confidence that short wavelength FELs will perform as calculated. (2) List possible hardware that could be used to carry out these measurements in the near term. (3) Define a prioritized FEL physics experimental program and suggested timetable. (4) Form collaborative teams to carry out this program.

  10. The Stanford Picosecond FEL Center

    SciTech Connect

    Schwettman, H.A.; Smith, T.I.; Swent, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    In the past two years, FELs have decisively passed the threshold of scientific productivity. There are now six FEL facilities in the United States and Europe, each delivering more than 2000 hours of FEL beam time per year. at the present time approximately 100 papers are published each in referred journals describing optics experiments performed with FELs. Despite the recent success there are important challenges the FEL facilities must address. At Stanford these challenges include: (1) Providing sufficient experimental time at reasonable cost: At Stanford we provide 2000 hours of experimental time per year at a cost of approximately $500 per hour: We are now studying options for markedly increasing experimental time and decreasing cost per hour. (2) Competing effectively with conventional lasers in the mid-IR: Despite the NRC report we do not intend to concede the mid-IR to conventional lasers. FELs are capable of providing optical beams of exceptional quality and stability, and they can also be remarkable flexible devices. Improvements in our superconducting linac driver and our optical beam conditioning systems will dramatically enhance our FEL experimental capabilities. (3) making the transition from first generation to second generation experiments: Important pump-probe and photon echo experiments have been performed at Stanford and others are feasible using present capabilities. None-the-less we are now investing substantial experimental time to improving signal-to-noise and developing other optical cababilities. (4) Extending operation to the far-infrared where the FEL is unique inits capabilities: {open_quotes}FIREFLY{close_quotes} will extend our FEL capabilities to 100 microns. We are now seeking funds for optical instrumentation. (5) Creating and maintaining a good environment for graduate students.

  11. An FEL project at IAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weiren; Wu, Tielong; Yang, Tianlu; Weng, Zhenshan; Ma, Youwu

    1988-10-01

    The FEL project of the Institute of Atomic Energy is aimed at developing an FEL in the medium-infrared region and related accelerator technology. The s-band RF linac LINAC-14 will be modified to improve the electron beam qualities for FEL experiments. The injector system consists of an electron gun, two subharmonic prebunchers, a prebuncher and a buncher. An electron beam of 12-25 MeV, 15 ps, 50 A enters into the interaction region through a transport system. Some simulation calculation results for the physical design of the system are given.

  12. Undulator Production of Polarized Positrons

    SciTech Connect

    William M. Bugg

    2008-08-27

    E-166 at SLAC has demonstrated the feasibilty of production of polarized positrons for the International Linear Collider using a helical undulator to produce polarized photons which are converted in a thin target to polarized positrons. The success of the experim ent has resulted in the choice of this technique for the baseline design of ILC.

  13. Transition undulator radiation as bright infrared sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.

    1995-02-01

    Undulator radiation contains, in addition to the usual component with narrow spectral features, a broad-band component in the low frequency region emitted in the near forward direction, peaked at an angle 1/{gamma}, where {gamma} is the relativistic factor. This component is referred to as the transition undulator radiation, as it is caused by the sudden change in the electron`s longitudinal velocity as it enters and leaves the undulator. The characteristic of the transition undulator radiation are analyzed and compared with the infrared radiation from the usual undulator harmonics and from bending magnets.

  14. FEL on slow cyclotron wave

    SciTech Connect

    Silivra, A.

    1995-12-31

    A physical mechanism of interaction of fast electromagnetic wave with slow cyclotron wave of relativistic electron beam in a FEL with helical wiggler field is described. It is shown that: (1) interaction is possible for both group of steady state electron trajectories (2) positive gain is achieved within certain interval of guide field strength (3) operation wavelength for group 1 trajectories ({Omega}{sub 0}/{gamma} < k{omega}{upsilon}{parallel}) is shorter than for the conventional FEL synchronism. A nonlinear analysis shows that efficiency of slow cyclotron FEL is restricted mainly by a breakdown of a single electron synchronism due to dependence of (modified) electron cyclotron frequency on an energy of electron. Nevertheless, as numerical simulation shows, typical efficiency of 15 % order is achieved in millimeter wavelength band for the midrelativistic ({gamma}= 3 {divided_by} 4) slow cyclotron wave FEL. Tapering of magnetic field results in a substantial increase of efficiency.

  15. Step-tapered operation of the FEL: Efficiency enhancement and two-colour operation

    SciTech Connect

    Jaroszynski, D.A.; Prazeres, R.; Glotin, F.

    1995-12-31

    We present new measurements of the temporal and spectral properties of radiation produced from two step-tapered undulator free-electron lasers (FEL), CLIO in France and FELIX in the Netherlands. Using a two section undulator with independently adjustable deflection parameters (K) the FEL will operate either with enhanced efficiency and improved spectral properties (with a small positive {Delta}K step) or will operate simultaneously at two frequencies (for large {Delta}K). The first experiments demonstrating at two-colour operation were restricted to a maximum wavelength difference, {delta}{lambda}/{lambda} < 0.15 because of the influence of optical dispersion in the cavity introduced by a dielectric output coupling plate. Using a dispersion-free hole output coupler the maximum {delta}{lambda}/{lambda} has been extended to more than 0.6. We present these new dispersion-less two-colour operation results and show that quenching of one of the wavelength unless the optical cavity is detuned significantly so that the FEL operates with reduced efficiency and lower intracavity power. To overcome this problem a larger fraction of the radiation will need to be coupled in the future to limit the intracavity power. To determine the temporal distribution of the optical radiation at the two wavelengths we have carried out second order autocorrelation measurements using a nonlinear crystal and established that the optical pulses are very short, a few hundreds of femtoseconds long, and overlapping. To establish how the two colours build up in the cavity we have also measured the spectral and temporal evolution of the macropulse. To establish the efficiency over a wide range of {Delta}K values we have measured the electron spectra of the electrons leaving the undulator and find that the efficiency is enhanced significantly over normal undulator operation.

  16. On a theory of an FEL amplifier with circular waveguide and guiding magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Yurkov, M.V.

    1995-12-31

    We consider an FEL amplifier with an axisymmetric electron beam, circular waveguide, helical undulator and guiding magnetic field. The presented nonlinear theory of the FEL amplifier is based on Hamiltonian description of particle motion and radiation field representation with Green function method. The space charge fields, energy spread and diffraction effects are taken into consideration. Such an FEL amplifier configuration possesses some peculiarities when it operates in a regime with the negative longitudinal mass (i.e. when{mu}{sup -1}{proportional_to}dv{sub z}/dE < 0). It is shown that in the presence of strong space charge fields, the so-called {open_quotes}negative mass{close_quotes} instability may influence significantly on the FEL amplifier operation resulting in a significant increase in the FEL amplifier efficiency. It is proposed in the presented paper to use the effect of the {open_quotes}negative mass instability{close_quotes} to achieve an effective bunching of the CERN Linear Collider (LIC) driving beam.

  17. Superconducting switch concept applied to superconducting undulator phase-error correction

    SciTech Connect

    Madur, A.; Trillaud, F.; Dietderich, D.; Marks, S.; Prestemon, S.; Schlueter, R.

    2010-06-23

    Superconducting undulator (SCU) technology has the potential to significantly enhance the performance of synchrotron radiation sources for storage ring and FEL applications. Since 2002, our team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been performing R and D on superconducting undulators, including the fabrication of three Nb{sub 3}Sn prototypes. We have demonstrated experimentally the possibility to provide the prototype with trim coils that could be used for phase error correction. The research effort that we report here demonstrates the possibility to add degrees of freedom to the field correction provided by these coils in a cryogenic environment. By means of bridge of superconducting switches, we can modify the current direction through a trim coil. Here we describe the design of the experimental bridge we fabricated, the results we obtained and finally the generalized concept one could plan to apply to correct the phase errors with trim coils connected to a network of superconducting bridges.

  18. Observational constraints on undulant cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Barenboim, Gabriela; Mena Requejo, Olga; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2005-10-01

    In an undulant universe, cosmic expansion is characterized by alternating periods of acceleration and deceleration. We examine cosmologies in which the dark-energy equation of state varies periodically with the number of e-foldings of the scale factor of the universe, and use observations to constrain the frequency of oscillation. We find a tension between a forceful response to the cosmic coincidence problem and the standard treatment of structure formation.

  19. Coherent radiation in an undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Yong Ho

    1990-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the synchrotron radiation from an undulating electron beam in a rectangular waveguide. The analysis is based on the dyadic Green's function approach to solve Maxwell's equations in terms of the vector potential. It is shown analytically and numerically that the radiated energy spectrum may differ significantly from the free space results when the undulator length divided by the Lorentz factor of the electron beam is larger than the transverse size of the waveguide. Then, the appearance of the spectrum is changed into a small number of sharp peaks, each corresponding to an excited waveguide mode. The undulator radiation is identified with the wake field in beam instabilities. The concepts of wake function and impedance are introduced to formulate the present problem in the same manner as the beam instability problem, so that the accumulated techniques of the latter can be applied. It is shown that the obtained impedances satisfy the Panofsky-Wenzel theorem and other properties inevitable for wake fields.

  20. Final construction of the C.R.E.O.L. 8 millimeter period hybrid undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Tesch, P.; Gallagher, J.; Elias, L.

    1995-12-31

    The construction of an 8 millimeter period hybrid undulator for the C.R.E.O.L. high power far-infared free electron laser has just been completed. This FEL is expected to come on-line in the fall of 1995 and produce close to a kilowatt of continuous power at wavelengths of 225 - 800 microns. The undulator has extremely precise mechanical tolerances and high field uniformity allowing for high electron beam recovery rates. Almost complete beam recovery is required for DC operation at high currents. A novel method for measuring the magnetic properties of individual magnets and sorting the magnets to reduce magnetic field errors will be reported. The peak field and phase errors of the undulator without the pole pieces are reduced through a magnet ordering procedure. These errors are further reduced by inserting and tuning adjustable pole pieces. The reduction of field errors through these two techniques will be presented. An analysis of the final undulator errors and the results of measurements of the mechanical tolerances will be presented.

  1. Output characteristics of SASE-driven short wavelength FEL`s

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, W.M.

    1997-02-01

    This paper investigates various properties of the ``microspikes`` associated with self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) in a short wavelength free-electron laser (FEL). Using results from the 2-D numerical simulation code GINGER, we confirm theoretical predictions such as the convective group velocity in the exponential gain regime. In the saturated gain regime beyond the initial saturation, we find that the average radiation power continues to grow with an approximately linearly dependence upon undulator length. Moreover, the spectrum significantly broadens and shifts in wavelength to the redward direction, with{ital P(w)} approaching a constant, asymptotic value. This is in marked contrast to the exponential gain regime where the spectrum steadily narrows, {ital P(w)} grows, and the central wavelength remains constant with {ital z}. Via use of a spectrogram diagnostic {ital S(w,t)}, it appears that the radiation pattern in the saturated gain regime is composed of an ensemble of distinct ``sinews`` whose widths AA remain approximately constant but whose central wavelengths can ``chirp`` by varying a small extent with {ital t}.

  2. First lasing of LEBRA FEL at Nihon University at a wavelength of 1.5 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Y.; Sato, I.; Hayakawa, K.; Tanaka, T.; Nakazawa, H.; Yokoyama, K.; Kanno, K.; Sakai, T.; Ishiwata, K.; Enomoto, A.; Fukuda, S.; Ohsawa, S.; Tsuchiya, K.; Kato, M.

    2002-05-01

    The FEL system covering wavelengths from 800 nm to 5 μm has been developed at Laboratory for Electron Beam Research and Application (LEBRA) in Nihon University. The system consists of a conventional 125 MeV S-band linac and a planar undulator with the alternative field of 50 periods. The first lasing of the system was achieved at the wavelength of 1.5 μm using dielectric mirrors. Although the saturation of the FEL power has not been observed yet, amplification of the spontaneous radiation power by about 10 8 times has been obtained with the measurement using the InSb detector. The absolute power has been estimated to be a few mJ/macropulse. An intense visible light has been observed frequently depending on the intensity of the fundamental FEL. The measured time structure of the phenomenon suggests that this is the radiation related with the formation of the microbunches in the electron beam.

  3. Electron beam effects in a UV FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.K.; Blau, J.; Colson, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    At the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), a free electron laser (FEL) is designed to produce ultraviolet (UV) light. A four-dimensional FEL simulation studies the effects of betatron oscillations, external focusing, and longitudinal pulse compression of the electron beam on the FEL performance.

  4. HIGH AVERAGE POWER OPTICAL FEL AMPLIFIERS.

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI, ILAN, DAYRAN, D.; LITVINENKO, V.

    2005-08-21

    Historically, the first demonstration of the optical FEL was in an amplifier configuration at Stanford University [l]. There were other notable instances of amplifying a seed laser, such as the LLNL PALADIN amplifier [2] and the BNL ATF High-Gain Harmonic Generation FEL [3]. However, for the most part FELs are operated as oscillators or self amplified spontaneous emission devices. Yet, in wavelength regimes where a conventional laser seed can be used, the FEL can be used as an amplifier. One promising application is for very high average power generation, for instance FEL's with average power of 100 kW or more. The high electron beam power, high brightness and high efficiency that can be achieved with photoinjectors and superconducting Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL) combine well with the high-gain FEL amplifier to produce unprecedented average power FELs. This combination has a number of advantages. In particular, we show that for a given FEL power, an FEL amplifier can introduce lower energy spread in the beam as compared to a traditional oscillator. This properly gives the ERL based FEL amplifier a great wall-plug to optical power efficiency advantage. The optics for an amplifier is simple and compact. In addition to the general features of the high average power FEL amplifier, we will look at a 100 kW class FEL amplifier is being designed to operate on the 0.5 ampere Energy Recovery Linac which is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Collider-Accelerator Department.

  5. Studies of Resistive Wall Heating at JLAB FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Rui; Benson, Stephen V.

    2013-06-01

    When the JLAB FEL is under CW operation, it had been observed that temperature rises over the wiggler vacuum chamber, presumably as the result of the power deposition on the resistive wall of the wiggler chamber. Previous analyses have been done on the resistive wall impedance for various cases, such as DC, AC, and anomalous skin effects*. Here we report an investigation on the beam kinetic energy losses for each of these cases. This study includes the non-ultrarelativistic effect on resistive wall loss, for both round pipe and parallel plates. We will present the comparison of our results with the measured data obtained during CW operation of the JLAB FEL. Other possible factors contributing to the measured heating will also be discussed.

  6. Undulation Instability of Epithelial Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basan, Markus; Joanny, Jean-François; Prost, Jacques; Risler, Thomas

    2011-04-01

    Treating the epithelium as an incompressible fluid adjacent to a viscoelastic stroma, we find a novel hydrodynamic instability that leads to the formation of protrusions of the epithelium into the stroma. This instability is a candidate for epithelial fingering observed in vivo. It occurs for sufficiently large viscosity, cell-division rate and thickness of the dividing region in the epithelium. Our work provides physical insight into a potential mechanism by which interfaces between epithelia and stromas undulate and potentially by which tissue dysplasia leads to cancerous invasion.

  7. Small-signal gain in a gas-loaded FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Goloviznin, V.V.; Amersfoort, P.W. van

    1995-12-31

    At present, existing FEL facilities operate in the infrared and visible ranges of wavelengths. Generation of shorter waves (in the VUV and X-ray region) is of great scientific interest, but this would require a very expensive accelerator which could provide a high-current electron beam in the GeV-range of energies. A promising way to relax requirements on electron energy by introduction of a gas into the optical cavity was proposed nearly ten years ago. For small deviations from the vacuum wavelength, the idea was confirmed in experiments performed in Stanford; however, a detailed theory of such a device is still not developed. We present an analysis of the small-signal gain in a gas-loaded free-electron laser. Multiple scattering of electrons by the atoms of the gas inside the optical cavity is shown to lead to two additional effects, as compared to the case of a vacuum FEL: a loss of coherence between different parts of the electron trajectory and an enhancement of the phase {open_quotes}jitter{close_quotes}. Both effects become increasingly important at short wavelengths and significantly reduce the small-signal gain per pass. In 1D approximation analytical expressions are obtained and numerical calculations are made to estimate beam and undulator parameters necessary for lasing in the vacuum ultraviolet. Hydrogen-filled FELs are shown to have good prospects for this at today`s technological level. To operate in the range of wavelengths 125-140 nm, an electron beam should have an energy above 50 MeV and a good quality: a normalised emittance of the order of 5{pi} mm-mrad and an energy spread below 10{sup -3}. All these parameters are achieveable with modern linacs and photoinjectors.

  8. LCLS Undulator Quadrupole Fiducialization Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zachary; Levashov, Michael; Lundahl, Eric; Reese, Ed; LeCocq, Catherine; Ruland, Robert; /SLAC

    2010-11-24

    This note presents the fiducialization plan for the LCLS undulator quadrupoles. The note begins by summarizing the requirements for the fiducialization. A discussion of the measurement equipment is presented, followed by the methods used to perform the fiducialization and check the results. This is followed by the detailed fiducialization plan in which each step is enumerated. Finally, the measurement results and data storage formats are presented. The LCLS is made up of 33 assemblies consisting of an undulator, quadrupole, beam finder wire, and other components mounted on a girder. The components must be mounted in such a way that the beam passes down the axis of each component. In this note, we describe how the ideal beam axis is related to tooling balls on the quadrupole. This step, called fiducialization, is necessary because the ideal beam axis is determined magnetically, whereas tangible objects must be used to locate the quadrupole. The note begins with the list of fiducialization requirements. The laboratory in which the work will be performed and the relevant equipment is then briefly described. This is followed by a discussion of the methods used to perform the fiducialization and the methods used to check the results. A detailed fiducialization plan is presented in which all the steps of fiducialization are enumerated. A discussion of the resulting data files and directory structure concludes the note.

  9. Beam quality and wavelength limitation in visible and UV FEL oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Tomimasu, T.

    1995-12-31

    The FELI linac beam has succeeded in visible-FEL oscillation on the third harmonics at 0.64 {mu}m using a 3-m undulator and a 6.72-m optical cavity with two Au-coated mirrors in Feb. 28, 1995. The beam is a 68-MeV, 40-A electron beam with a normalized emittance of 26 {pi}mm{center_dot}mrad and a relative energy spread of 1%. In 1993, an ultraviolet (UV) FEL oscillation was already achieved on the third harmonics at 0.37{mu} m using a 46-MeV, 130-A electron beam with a normalized emittance of 3{pi}mm{center_dot}mrad and a relative energy spread of 0.24% from the APEX L-band linac with an rf photocathode electron gun. However, we are now trying to achieve an FEL oscillation in the UV range using the FELI linac with the thermionic gun because of long-life, easy-operation, and low-cost of the thermionic gun, as the FELI ring with 9.8-m long straight sections capable of storing a long lived 1-A beam is in the design stage. Recent experimental and theoretical results on relations between beam quality and short wavelength FEL oscillations have been also reviewed and wavelength limitations due to normalized emittance and relative energy spread are discussed.

  10. Vacuum systems for the ILC helical undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Malyshev, O. B.; Scott, D. J.; Bailey, I. R.; Barber, D. P.; Baynham, E.; Bradshaw, T.; Brummitt, A.; Carr, S.; Clarke, J. A.; Cooke, P.; Dainton, J. B.; Ivanyushenkov, Y.; Malysheva, L. I.; Moortgat-Pick, G. A.; Rochford, J.; Department of Physics, University of Liverpool Oxford St. Liverpool L69 7ZE; Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD

    2007-07-15

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) positron source uses a helical undulator to generate polarized photons of {approx}10 MeV at the first harmonic. Unlike many undulators used in synchrotron radiation sources, the ILC helical undulator vacuum chamber will be bombarded by photons, generated by the undulator, with energies mostly below that of the first harmonic. Achieving the vacuum specification of {approx}100 nTorr in a narrow chamber of 4-6 mm inner diameter, with a long length of 100-200 m, makes the design of the vacuum system challenging. This article describes the vacuum specifications and calculations of the flux and energy of photons irradiating the undulator vacuum chamber and considers possible vacuum system design solutions for two cases: cryogenic and room temperature.

  11. An experimental superconducting helical undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Taylor, C.

    1995-12-31

    Improvements in the technology of superconducting magnets for high energy physics and recent advancements in SC materials with the artificial pinning centers (APC){sup 2}, have made a bifilar helical SC device an attractive candidate for a single-pass free electron laser (FEL){sup 3}. Initial studies have suggested that a 6.5 mm inner diameter helical device, with a 27 mm period, can generate a central field of 2-2.5 Tesla. Additional studies have also suggested that with a stored energy of 300 J/m, such a device can be made self-protecting in the event of a quench. However, since the most critical area associated with high current density SC magnets is connected with quenching and training, a short experimental device will have to be built and tested. In this paper we discuss technical issues relevant to the construction of such a device, including a conceptual design, fields, and forces.

  12. X-band prebunched FEL amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Kazuyoshi; Takayama, Ken; Ozaki, Toshiyuki

    1995-12-31

    Following the successful results of the ion-channel-guiding FEL experiments, we began a new experiment {open_quotes}prebunched FEL{close_quotes}. It is an FEL driven by prebunched beams, whose configuration is a normal FEL system with a prebuncher like the bunching section of a klystron. There are two purposes in this prebunched FEL system; (1) Demonstration of a compact/efficient FEL. Attaining the saturation power level with a short wiggler length (compact wiggler) and enhancing the power through the remaining wiggler length by wiggler tapering (high efficiency FEL). (2) Experimental simulation of multi-stage FELs in the FEL-TBA. Examination of FEL interactions with prebunched injection beams, especially, about the controllability of the output RF phase by changing the RF phase of the input seed power to the wiggler. Recent experimental results show: (1) The saturation power of 120MW has been attained at the wiggler length of 1.1m by 1.5MeV prebunched beams with a 45%-modulated 750A current. However, enhanced power has not been observed yet by wiggler tapering. (2) The current modulation of the injection beam (1.5MeV-500A) becoming higher than 30%, the adjustable range of the output RF phase was limitted less than 40 degrees by the input power of 60kW only. Detail explanations of design concept, theoretical and experimental results will be presented at the conference.

  13. Monte Carlo Studies of the Radiation Fields in the Linac Coherent Light Source Undulators and of the Corresponding Signals in the Cerenkov Beam Loss Monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Santana Leitner, Mario; Fasso, Alberto; Fisher, Alan S.; Nuhn, Heinz D.; Dooling, Jeffrey C.; Berg, William; Yang, Bin X.; /Argonne

    2010-09-14

    In 2009 the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Center started free electron laser (FEL) operation. In order to continue to produce the bright and short-pulsed x-ray laser demanded by FEL scientists, this pioneer hard x-ray FEL requires a perfectly tailored magnetic field at the undulators, so that the photons generated at the electron wiggling path interact at the right phase with the electron beam. In such a precise system, small (>0.01%) radiation-induced alterations of the magnetic field in the permanent magnets could affect FEL performance. This paper describes the simulation studies of radiation fields in permanent magnets and the expected signal in the detectors. The transport of particles from the radiation sources (i.e. diagnostic insert) to the undulator magnets and to the beam loss monitors (BLM) was simulated with the intra nuclear cascade codes FLUKA and MARS15. In order to accurately reproduce the optics of LCLS, lattice capabilities and magnetic fields were enabled in FLUKA and betatron oscillations were validated against reference data. All electron events entering the BLMs were printed in data files. The paper also introduces the Radioactive Ion Beam Optimizer (RIBO) Monte Carlo 3-D code, which was used to read from the event files, to compute Cerenkov production and then to simulate the optical coupling of the BLM detectors, accounting for the transmission of light through the quartz.

  14. Undulator with dynamic compensation of magnetic forces

    DOEpatents

    Gluskin, Efim; Trakhtenberg, Emil; Xu, Joseph Z.

    2016-05-31

    A method and apparatus for implementing dynamic compensation of magnetic forces for undulators are provided. An undulator includes a respective set of magnet arrays, each attached to a strongback, and placed on horizontal slides and positioned parallel relative to each other with a predetermined gap. Magnetic forces are compensated by a set of compensation springs placed along the strongback. The compensation springs are conical springs having exponential-force characteristics that substantially match undulator magnetic forces independently of the predetermined gap. The conical springs are positioned along the length of the magnets.

  15. MaRIE Undulator & XFEL Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong; Marksteiner, Quinn R.; Anisimov, Petr Mikhaylovich; Buechler, Cynthia Eileen

    2015-03-23

    The 22 slides in this presentation treat the subject under the following headings: MaRIE XFEL Performance Parameters, Input Electron Beam Parameters, Undulator Design, Genesis Simulations, Risks, and Summary It is concluded that time-dependent Genesis simulations show the MaRIE XFEL can deliver the number of photons within the required bandwidth, provided a number of assumptions are met; the highest risks are associated with the electron beam driving the XFEL undulator; and risks associated with the undulator and/or distributed seeding technique may be evaluated or retired by performing early validation experiments.

  16. RF FEL for power beaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Robert

    The laser device components associated with operating a radio frequency-free electron laser (RF-FEL) for beaming power from Earth were designed and tested. Analysis of the power beaming system requirements reveals that the FEL, identified by NASA as the laser of choice, is the major subsystem requiring demonstration before proceeding further in proving the efficacy of laser power beaming. Rocketdyne has identified a series of low cost, low risk demonstrations which proceed sequentially, as follows: (1) a 1 kW proof-of-principle demonstration; (2) a 150 kW demonstration of beaming power to a satellite; and (3) a MW class demonstration of Earth to lunar surface power transmission. This sequence of events can be completed in 5.5 years at a cost of $188M, with key milestones each year.

  17. Prospects for the FEL (Free Electron Laser)

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1989-04-01

    The future for FELs depends upon the very large number of applications which is envisioned for them. These grow out of the FEL extensive range of wavelengths, tunability, and high power capability. High power requires demonstration of optical guiding. Tunability has already been demonstrated. And the effort to extend the range of wavelengths is ever ongoing. The future will also bring more work on gas-loaded FELs, on electromagnetic wigglers, and on harmonic generation. We can, also, look forward to observation of various new effects, a few of which will be described. Finally, a list of various FEL projects around the world will be given. 12 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  18. The Variable Gap Permanent Magnet Linear Undulator For The Enea Fel Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciocci, F.; Fiorentino, E.; Renieri, A.; Sabia, E.

    1987-01-01

    Industrial machine vision requires speed, accuracy, and low cost. The SUPERSIGHT vision system at General Motors Research locates industrial parts with high accuracy even with low-resolution video cameras. This leads to large savings in the hardware costs of subsequent image processing electronics, and considerable speed improvements over current methods. With a prototype system employing a Reticon 100x100 photodiode array camera, the relative locations of lines, circles, and ellipses in a plane could be routinely determined to 1/10 to 1/20 pixel accuracy, with 1/50 pixel (1 part in 5000) accuracy best case. Theory indicates that there is no upper bound on the accuracy that can be achieved, with the only limiting factor being noise. Primary sources of noise were hypothesized to be fixed-pattern camera noise for within-frame location measurements, and digitization synchronizing error (frame jitter) and mechanical vibration for between-frame measurements. Gaussian digital filters, pixel-by-pixel correction of gain and bias variations, and higher quality solid-state video cameras can reduce the influence of camera fixed-pattern noise. Frame averaging and improved digitizers can reduce frame jitter. In extensions to 3-D surface and edge analysis, multiple-order Gaussian-derivative filters allowed for an efficient means of determining the regression coefficients useful for specifying the 3-D surface shapes of objects from shading, range or stereo data. The Krawtchouck polynomials, the discrete form of the Gaussian derivative functions, allowed more accurate estimates than current facet models of the properties of surface patches, and the locations of edges. Such Gaussian derivative-like operators are similar to the vision operators used by the primate brain, as measured neurophysiologically.

  19. Algorithms to Automate LCLS Undulator Tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zachary

    2010-12-03

    Automation of the LCLS undulator tuning offers many advantages to the project. Automation can make a substantial reduction in the amount of time the tuning takes. Undulator tuning is fairly complex and automation can make the final tuning less dependent on the skill of the operator. Also, algorithms are fixed and can be scrutinized and reviewed, as opposed to an individual doing the tuning by hand. This note presents algorithms implemented in a computer program written for LCLS undulator tuning. The LCLS undulators must meet the following specifications. The maximum trajectory walkoff must be less than 5 {micro}m over 10 m. The first field integral must be below 40 x 10{sup -6} Tm. The second field integral must be below 50 x 10{sup -6} Tm{sup 2}. The phase error between the electron motion and the radiation field must be less than 10 degrees in an undulator. The K parameter must have the value of 3.5000 {+-} 0.0005. The phase matching from the break regions into the undulator must be accurate to better than 10 degrees. A phase change of 113 x 2{pi} must take place over a distance of 3.656 m centered on the undulator. Achieving these requirements is the goal of the tuning process. Most of the tuning is done with Hall probe measurements. The field integrals are checked using long coil measurements. An analysis program written in Matlab takes the Hall probe measurements and computes the trajectories, phase errors, K value, etc. The analysis program and its calculation techniques were described in a previous note. In this note, a second Matlab program containing tuning algorithms is described. The algorithms to determine the required number and placement of the shims are discussed in detail. This note describes the operation of a computer program which was written to automate LCLS undulator tuning. The algorithms used to compute the shim sizes and locations are discussed.

  20. Effects of angular misalignment on optical klystron undulator radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, G.; Prakash, Bramh; Gehlot, Mona

    2015-11-01

    In this paper ,we analyze the important effects of optical klystron undulator radiation with an angular offset of the relativistic electron beam in the second undulator section. An anlytical expression for the undulator radiation is obtained through a transparent and simple procedure.It is shown that the effects of the angular offset is more severe for longer undulator lengths and with higher dispersive field strengths.Both these effects are less pronounced for undulators with large K values.

  1. Simulations of the LANL regenerative amplifier FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Kesselring, M.; Colson, W.B.; Wong, R.K.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1997-08-01

    The LANL regenerative amplifier FEL is designed to produce an average output power of 1 kW. Simulations study the transverse effects due to guiding by the intense electron beam and feedback. These simulations coupled with experimental measurements can be used to improve future high-power FEL designs.

  2. Recent developments in CrystFEL 1

    PubMed Central

    White, Thomas A.; Mariani, Valerio; Brehm, Wolfgang; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Barty, Anton; Beyerlein, Kenneth R.; Chervinskii, Fedor; Galli, Lorenzo; Gati, Cornelius; Nakane, Takanori; Tolstikova, Alexandra; Yamashita, Keitaro; Yoon, Chun Hong; Diederichs, Kay; Chapman, Henry N.

    2016-01-01

    CrystFEL is a suite of programs for processing data from ‘serial crystallography’ experiments, which are usually performed using X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) but also increasingly with other X-ray sources. The CrystFEL software suite has been under development since 2009, just before the first hard FEL experiments were performed, and has been significantly updated and improved since then. This article describes the most important improvements which have been made to CrystFEL since the first release version. These changes include the addition of new programs to the suite, the ability to resolve ‘indexing ambiguities’ and several ways to improve the quality of the integrated data by more accurately modelling the underlying diffraction physics. PMID:27047311

  3. Integrated computer simulation on FIR FEL dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, H.; Kuruma, S.; Imasaki, K.

    1995-12-31

    An integrated computer simulation code has been developed to analyze the RF-Linac FEL dynamics. First, the simulation code on the electron beam acceleration and transport processes in RF-Linac: (LUNA) has been developed to analyze the characteristics of the electron beam in RF-Linac and to optimize the parameters of RF-Linac. Second, a space-time dependent 3D FEL simulation code (Shipout) has been developed. The RF-Linac FEL total simulations have been performed by using the electron beam data from LUNA in Shipout. The number of particles using in a RF-Linac FEL total simulation is approximately 1000. The CPU time for the simulation of 1 round trip is about 1.5 minutes. At ILT/ILE, Osaka, a 8.5MeV RF-Linac with a photo-cathode RF-gun is used for FEL oscillation experiments. By using 2 cm wiggler, the FEL oscillation in the wavelength approximately 46 {mu}m are investigated. By the simulations using LUNA with the parameters of an ILT/ILE experiment, the pulse shape and the energy spectra of the electron beam at the end of the linac are estimated. The pulse shape of the electron beam at the end of the linac has sharp rise-up and it slowly decays as a function of time. By the RF-linac FEL total simulations with the parameters of an ILT/ILE experiment, the dependencies of the start up of the FEL oscillations on the pulse shape of the electron beam at the end of the linac are estimated. The coherent spontaneous emission effects and the quick start up of FEL oscillations have been observed by the RF-Linac FEL total simulations.

  4. Geoid undulation computations at laser tracking stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Despotakis, Vasilios K.

    1987-01-01

    Geoid undulation computations were performed at 29 laser stations distributed around the world using a combination of terrestrial gravity data within a cap of radius 2 deg and a potential coefficient set up to 180 deg. The traditional methods of Stokes' and Meissl's modification together with the Molodenskii method and the modified Sjoberg method were applied. Performing numerical tests based on global error assumptions regarding the terrestrial data and the geopotential set it was concluded that the modified Sjoberg method is the most accurate and promising technique for geoid undulation computations. The numerical computations for the geoid undulations using all the four methods resulted in agreement with the ellipsoidal minus orthometric value of the undulations on the order of 60 cm or better for most of the laser stations in the eastern United States, Australia, Japan, Bermuda, and Europe. A systematic discrepancy of about 2 meters for most of the western United States stations was detected and verified by using two relatively independent data sets. For oceanic laser stations in the western Atlantic and Pacific oceans that have no terrestrial data available, the adjusted GEOS-3 and SEASAT altimeter data were used for the computation of the geoid undulation in a collocation method.

  5. Undulator Hall Air Temperature Fault Scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Sevilla, J.; Welch, J.; /SLAC

    2010-11-17

    Recent experience indicates that the LCLS undulator segments must not, at any time following tuning, be allowed to change temperature by more than about {+-}2.5 C or the magnetic center will irreversibly shift outside of acceptable tolerances. This vulnerability raises a concern that under fault conditions the ambient temperature in the Undulator Hall might go outside of the safe range and potentially could require removal and retuning of all the segments. In this note we estimate changes that can be expected in the Undulator Hall air temperature for three fault scenarios: (1) System-wide power failure; (2) Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system shutdown; and (3) HVAC system temperature regulation fault. We find that for either a system-wide power failure or an HVAC system shutdown (with the technical equipment left on), the short-term temperature changes of the air would be modest due to the ability of the walls and floor to act as a heat ballast. No action would be needed to protect the undulator system in the event of a system-wide power failure. Some action to adjust the heat balance, in the case of the HVAC power failure with the equipment left on, might be desirable but is not required. On the other hand, a temperature regulation failure of the HVAC system can quickly cause large excursions in air temperature and prompt action would be required to avoid damage to the undulator system.

  6. Design of a high average-power FEL driven by an existing 20 MV electrostatic-accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kimel, I.; Elias, L.R.

    1995-12-31

    There are some important applications where high average-power radiation is required. Two examples are industrial machining and space power-beaming. Unfortunately, up to date no FEL has been able to show more than 10 Watts of average power. To remedy this situation we started a program geared towards the development of high average-power FELs. As a first step we are building in our CREOL laboratory, a compact FEL which will generate close to 1 kW in CW operation. As the next step we are also engaged in the design of a much higher average-power system based on a 20 MV electrostatic accelerator. This FEL will be capable of operating CW with a power output of 60 kW. The idea is to perform a high power demonstration using the existing 20 MV electrostatic accelerator at the Tandar facility in Buenos Aires. This machine has been dedicated to accelerate heavy ions for experiments and applications in nuclear and atomic physics. The necessary adaptations required to utilize the machine to accelerate electrons will be described. An important aspect of the design of the 20 MV system, is the electron beam optics through almost 30 meters of accelerating and decelerating tubes as well as the undulator. Of equal importance is a careful design of the long resonator with mirrors able to withstand high power loading with proper heat dissipation features.

  7. Planar Undulator Considerations(LCC-0085)

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, J

    2003-10-07

    This note consists of informal working notes that document an effort to understand the TESLA baseline, unpolarized, undulator based positron source. This is the first step in the design process of an undulator based positron system for the NLC. The expressions and methodologies developed herein are used in subsequent memos that reference this note. In regards to the TESLA design, it is found that a 135 m long (versus 100 m length) undulator is consistent with the performance descriptions in the TDR text. And while operation of the TESLA system with a 250 GeV drive beam energy provides a safety margin of a factor of {approx}2 in e{sup +} yield, operation of the same system at 160 GeV results in a yield of about 0.6.

  8. Progress at the Jefferson Laboratory FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Tennant, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    As the only currently operating free electron laser (FEL) based on a CW superconducting energy recovering linac (ERL), the Jefferson Laboratory FEL Upgrade remains unique as an FEL driver. The present system represents the culmination of years of effort in the areas of SRF technology, ERL operation, lattice design, high power optics and DC photocathode gun technology. In 2001 the FEL Demo generated 2.1 kW of laser power. Following extensive upgrades, in 2006 the FEL Upgrade generated 14.3 kW of laser power breaking the previous world record. The FEL Upgrade remains a valuable testbed for studying a variety of collective effects, such as the beam breakup instability, longitudinal space charge and coherent synchrotron radiation. Additionally, there has been exploration of operation with lower injection energy and higher bunch charge. Recent progress and achievements in these areas will be presented, and two recent milestones â installation of a UV FEL and establishment of a DC gun test s

  9. Undulator Beam Pipe Magnetic Shielding Effect Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Andrew; Wolf, Zachary; /SLAC

    2010-11-23

    The proposed stainless steel beampipe for the LCLS undulator has a measurable shielding effect on the magnetic field of the LCLS undulators. This note describes the tests used to determine the magnitude of the shielding effect, as well as deviations in the shielding effect caused by placing different phase shims in the undulator gap. The effect of the proposed Steel strongback which will be used to support the beam pipe, was also studied. A hall probe on a 3 axis movement system was set up to measure the main component of the magnetic field in the Prototype Undulator. To account for temperature variations of the magnetic field of the undulator for successive tests, a correction is applied which is described in this technical note. Using this method, we found the shielding effect, the amount which the field inside the gap was reduced due to the placement of the beampipe, to be {approx}10 Gauss. A series of tests was also performed to determine the effect of phase shims and X and Y correction shims on the shielding. The largest effect on shielding was found for the .3 mm phase shims. The effect of the .3 mm phase shims was to increase the shielding effect {approx}4 Gauss. The tolerance for the shielding effect of the phase shims is less than 1 gauss. The effect of the strongback was seen in its permanent magnetic field. It introduced a dipole field across the measured section of the undulator of {approx}3 gauss. This note documents the tests performed to determine these effects, as well as the results of those tests.

  10. Output characteristics of SASE-driven short-wavelength FELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawley, William M.

    1997-05-01

    This paper investigates various properties of the 'microspikes' associated with self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) in a short wavelength free-electron laser (FEL). Using results from the 2-D numerical simulation code GINGER, we confirm theoretical predictions such as the convective group velocity in the exponential gain regime. In the saturated gain regime beyond the initial saturation, we find that the average radiation power continues to grow with an approximately linearly dependence upon undulator length. Moreover, the spectrum significantly broadens and shifts in wavelength to the redward direction, with P(omega) approaching a constant, asymptotic value. This is in marked contrast to the exponential gain regime where the spectrum steadily narrows, P(omega) grows, and the central wavelength remains constant with z. Via use of a spectrogram diagnostic S(omega, t), it appears that the radiation pattern in the saturated gain regime is composed of an ensemble of distinct 'sinews' whose widths (Delta) (lambda) remain approximately constant but whose central wavelengths can 'chirp' by varying a small extent with t.

  11. A survey of microwave inverse FEL and inverse cerenkov accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, T. C.; Zhang, T. B.

    1997-02-01

    A Microwave Inverse FEL Accelerator (MIFELA) and a Microwave Inverse Cerenkov Accelerator (MICA) are currently under construction at the Yale Beam Physics Laboratory. MIFELA and MICA will share the same injector, a thermionic cathode rf gun that should furnish 5 psec, 6 MeV, 0.2 nC electron pulses spaced by 350 psec, using microwave power of many MW provided from a 2.85 GHz klystron. MIFELA is to operate with ˜4 Mw of 11.4 GHz microwave power in the TE11 mode, with beam injection into each fourth rf cycle; a variable pitch and field undulator together with a guide magnetic field are present as well. MICA will operate at 2.85 GHz using an alumina-lined waveguide driven in the TM01 mode; the phase velocity is just below c, with no guide field. MIFELA produces a beam of spiralling electrons, while MICA makes an axially-directed beam. This is a survey of the operating principles of these smooth-bore "tabletop" accelerators (˜15 MeV) as they are understood prior to operation.

  12. Theoretical computation of the polarization characteristics of an X-ray Free-Electron Laser with planar undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni

    2015-12-01

    We show that radiation pulses from an X-ray Free-Electron Laser (XFEL) with a planar undulator, which are mainly polarized in the horizontal direction, exhibit a suppression of the vertical polarization component of the power at least by a factor λw2/(4 πLg) 2, where λw is the length of the undulator period and Lg is the FEL field gain length. We illustrate this fact by examining the XFEL operation under the steady state assumption. In our calculations we considered only resonance terms: in fact, non-resonance terms are suppressed by a factor λw3/(4 πLg) 3 and can be neglected. While finding a situation for making quantitative comparison between analytical and experimental results may not be straightforward, the qualitative aspects of the suppression of the vertical polarization rate at XFELs should be easy to observe. We remark that our exact results can potentially be useful to developers of new generation FEL codes for cross-checking their results.

  13. Variable-Period Undulators For Synchrotron Radiation

    DOEpatents

    Shenoy, Gopal; Lewellen, John; Shu, Deming; Vinokurov, Nikolai

    2005-02-22

    A new and improved undulator design is provided that enables a variable period length for the production of synchrotron radiation from both medium-energy and high-energy storage rings. The variable period length is achieved using a staggered array of pole pieces made up of high permeability material, permanent magnet material, or an electromagnetic structure. The pole pieces are separated by a variable width space. The sum of the variable width space and the pole width would therefore define the period of the undulator. Features and advantages of the invention include broad photon energy tunability, constant power operation and constant brilliance operation.

  14. Strong permanent magnet-assisted electromagnetic undulator

    DOEpatents

    Halbach, Klaus

    1988-01-01

    This invention discloses an improved undulator comprising a plurality of electromagnet poles located along opposite sides of a particle beam axis with alternate north and south poles on each side of the beam to cause the beam to wiggle or undulate as it travels generally along the beam axis and permanent magnets spaced adjacent the electromagnetic poles on each side of the axis of said particle beam in an orientation sufficient to reduce the saturation of the electromagnet poles whereby the field strength of the electromagnet poles can be increased beyond the normal saturation levels of the electromagnetic poles.

  15. Variable-Period Undulators for Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shenoy, Gopal; Lewellen, John; Shu, Deming; Vinokurov, Nikolai

    2005-02-22

    A new and improved undulator design is provided that enables a variable period length for the production of synchrotron radiation from both medium-energy and high energy storage rings. The variable period length is achieved using a staggered array of pole pieces made up of high permeability material, permanent magnet material, or an electromagnetic structure. The pole pieces are separated by a variable width space. The sum of the variable width space and the pole width would therefore define the period of the undulator. Features and advantages of the invention include broad photon energy tunability, constant power operation and constant brilliance operation.

  16. FEL development at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinokurov, N. A.

    1993-07-01

    There are three different FEL projects at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics: 1) the FEL on the VEPP-3 storage ring which operates in the visible and ultraviolet region; 2) the high power FEL using a racetrack microtron recuperator (this machine will provide an average power of about tens of kilowatt in the infrared region); and 3) the compact infrared FEL project, using a microton, and a powerful FEL on a dedicated superconducting storage ring, which is under consideration now.

  17. Fused rock from Köfels, Tyrol

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milton, Daniel J.

    1964-01-01

    The vesicular glass from Köfels, Tyrol, contains grains of quartz that have been partially melted but not dissolved in the matrix glass. This phenomenon has been observed in similar glasses formed by friction along a thrust fault and by meteorite impact, but not in volcanic glasses. The explosion of a small nuclear device buried behind a steep slope produced a geologic structure that is a good small-scale model of that at Köfels. Impact of a large meteorite would have an effect analogous to that of a subsurface nuclear explosion and is the probable cause of the Köfels feature.

  18. FEL system for energy transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, R.J.; Curtin, M.S.; Lampel, M.C.; Cover, R.A.

    1994-12-01

    The use of a Free Electron Laser (FEL) as the power source for transmission from Earth stations to space assets is discussed. Considerations of requirements including net power transmitted, of system reliability, of system availability, of costs, and of technical maturity are addressed to determine a reasonable development path to an optimal system. Various applications of transmitted power are examined such as supplementary power to communications satellites, orbit raising through the use of electric and thermal thrusters, and supplementary power to manned orbiters and space stations. It is seen that each of these applications leads to different stages of infrastructure development, and that a program following a near optimal development path can lead to a system that has justifiable investments for the services delivered at each stage past the initial technology demonstration. 13 refs.

  19. Air Temperature in the Undulator Hall

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-12-07

    Various analyses have been performed recently to estimate the performance of the air conditioning (HVAC) system planned for the Undulator Hall. This reports summarizes the results and provides an upgrade plan to be used if new requirements are needed in the future. The estimates predict that with the planned loads the tunnel air temperature will be well within the allowed tolerance during normal operation.

  20. KIAE-1.5-3 undulator performance

    SciTech Connect

    Varfolomeev, A.A.; Ivanchenko, S.N.; Khlebnikov, A.S.

    1995-12-31

    Hybrid type undulator with 60 periods of {lambda}{sub w} = 1.5 cm and tunable gap in wide range has been designed and manufactured. Additional side magnet arrays provide high magnetic field (near Halbach limit) along with transverse field profiles for e.b. focusing.

  1. Undulator Radiation Damage Experience at LCLS

    SciTech Connect

    Nuhn, H. D.; Field, C.; Mao, S.; Levashov, Y.; Santana, M.; Welch, J. N.; Wolf, Z.

    2015-01-06

    The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has been running the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the first x-ray Free Electron Laser since 2009. Undulator magnet damage from radiation, produced by the electron beam traveling through the 133-m long straight vacuum tube, has been and is a concern. A damage measurement experiment has been performed in 2007 in order to obtain dose versus damage calibrations. Radiation reduction and detection devices have been integrated into the LCLS undulator system. The accumulated radiation dose rate was continuously monitored and recorded. In addition, undulator segments have been routinely removed from the beamline to be checked for magnetic (50 ppm, rms) and mechanic (about 0.25 µm, rms) changes. A reduction in strength of the undulator segments is being observed, at a level, which is now clearly above the noise. Recently, potential sources for the observed integrated radiation levels have been investigated. The paper discusses the results of these investigation as well as comparison between observed damage and measured dose accumulations and discusses, briefly, strategies for the new LCLS-II upgrade, which will be operating at more than 300 times larger beam rate.

  2. Generation and characterization of superradiant undulator radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bocek, D.

    1997-06-01

    High-power, pulsed, coherent, far-infrared (FIR) radiation has many scientific applications, such as pump-probe studies of surfaces, liquids, and solids, studies of high-T{sub c} superconductors, biophysics, plasma diagnostics, and excitation of Rydberg atoms. Few sources of such FIR radiation currently exist. Superradiant undulator radiation produced at the SUNSHINE (Stanford UNiversity SHort INtense Electron-source) is such a FIR source. First proposed in the mm-wave spectral range by Motz, superradiant undulator radiation has been realized in the 45 {micro}m to 300 {micro}m spectral range by using sub-picosecond electron bunches produced by the SUNSHINE facility. The experimental setup and measurements of this FIR radiation are reported in this thesis. In addition, to being a useful FIR source, the superradiant undulator radiation produced at SUNSHINE is an object of research in itself. Measured superlinear growth of the radiated energy along the undulator demonstrates the self-amplification of radiation by the electron bunch. This superlinear growth is seen at 47 {micro}m to 70 {micro}m wavelengths. These wavelengths are an order of magnitude shorter than in previous self-amplification demonstrations.

  3. Development of a 2 m Pr2Fe14B Cryogenic Permanent Magnet Undulator at SOLEIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benabderrahmane, C.; Valléau, M.; Berteaud, P.; Tavakoli, K.; Marlats, J. L.; Nagaoka, R.; Béchu, N.; Zerbib, D.; Brunelle, P.; Chapuis, L.; Dallé, D.; Herbeaux, C.; Lestrade, A.; Louvet, M.; Couprie, M. E.

    2013-03-01

    A 2 m long 18 mm period Cryogenic Permanent Magnet Undulator (CPMU) has been constructed at SOLEIL. Praseodymium was chosen instead of Neodymium magnetic material, because of the absence of the Spin Reorientation Transition phenomenon. The use of Pr2Fe14B with a remnence Br of 1.35 T at room temperature enables to increase the peak magnetic field at 5.5 mm minimum gap, from 1.04 T at room temperature to 1.15 T at a cryogenic temperature of 77 K. The magnetic field reaches 1.91 T at a gap of 3 mm in case of FELs applications. Different corrections were performed first at room temperature to adjust the phase error, the electron trajectory and to reduce the multipolar components. A dedicated magnetic measurement bench to check the magnetic performance of the undulator at low temperature has been designed and assembled inside the vacuum chamber. The results of the magnetic measurements at low temperature and at room temperature are compared. The CPMU has been installed and commissioned in the storage ring.

  4. Green function analysis of a Raman FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvets, G.; Wurtele, J. S.

    1995-04-01

    This paper derives, in closed form, the Green function of an FEL operating in the strongly Raman regime. This Green function allows for the calculation of the temporal and spacial evolution of an arbitrary input radiation pulse. For the first time superradiance, originally studied in Compton regime by Bonifacio and co-workers [Phys. Rev. Lett. 73 (1994) 70; Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 239 (1985) 36], has been seen numerically in a strongly Raman FEL.

  5. Temporal characteristics of a SASE FEL.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y,; Huang, Z.; Kim, K.-J.; Lewellen, J.; Milton, S. V.; Sajaev, V.

    2003-01-01

    We have performed a single-shot, time-resolved measurement of the output field of a SASE FEL using the frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) technique. The measurement reveals the phase and the amplitude of the SASE output as functions of time and frequency, hence enables us to perform a full characterization of the SASE FEL output. We examined both the single-shot field evolution as well as the statistics over multiple shots on the phase and intensity evolution.

  6. Fluctuation-induced linewidth in oscillator FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, Oleg A.; Vinokurov, Nikolay A.

    2004-08-01

    Due to relatively small number of microscopic radiators, the noise (spontaneous emission contribution to the radiation field) level in free electron lasers (FELs) is much more than in other types of lasers. The influence of this noise on the FEL linewidth is considered. A low gain optical klystron model is used. It is shown that in the most of practically interesting cases the noise-induced linewidth is negligible.

  7. Concept of quasi-periodic undulator - control of radiation spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Shigemi

    1995-02-01

    A new type of undulator, the quasi-periodic undulator (QPU) is considered which generates the irrational harmonics in the radiation spectrum. This undulator consists of the arrays of magnet blocks aligned in a quasi-periodic order, and consequentially lead to a quasi-periodic motion of electron. A combination of the QPU and a conventional crystal/grating monochromator provides pure monochromatic photon beam for synchrotron radiation users because the irrational harmonics do not be diffracted in the same direction by a monochromator. The radiation power and width of each radiation peak emitted from this undulator are expected to be comparable with those of the conventional periodic undulator.

  8. Design of a REBCO thin film superconducting undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesgin, I.; Doose, C. L.; Kasa, M. T.; Ivanyushenkov, Y.; Welp, U.

    2015-12-01

    Recent developments have shown that superconducting undulators, mainly NbTi- based, outperform the existing devices. However, cooling these undulators is a challenge. REBCO (RE = rare earth, barium copper oxide) coated conductors (CCs) have been found to be a promising alternative to these materials due to their larger temperature stability margin and high engineering current densities. Here, we have investigated the feasibility of building an undulator magnetic structure using REBCO coated conductors and conducted experiments to evaluate their performance. The undulator coil has been wound with no inter-layer insulation. The critical current measurements at 77K showed that the winding of the undulator does not noticeably deteriorate the performance of the tape. Transient behaviour of the undulator has also been investigated and found to be characterized by long magnetic field decay times that result from current sharing between the windings. Steady-state operation was found to be very suitable for most undulator applications.

  9. Time dependence of FEL-induced surface photovoltage on semiconductor interfaces measured with synchroton radiation photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Marsi, M.; Delboulbe, A.; Garzella, D.

    1995-12-31

    During the last year, the first surface science experiments simultaneously using a Free Electron Laser (FEL) and Synchrotron Radiation (SR) have been performed on SuperACO at LURE (Orsay, France). These {open_quotes}two color{close_quotes} experiments studied the surface photovoltage (SPV) induced on semiconductor surfaces and interfaces by the SuperACO FEL, a storage ring FEL delivering 350 nm photons which am naturally synchronized with the SR; the SPV was measured by synchrotron radiation core-level photoemission spectroscopy on the high-resolution SU3 undulator beamline. We will describe the experimental setup, which allowed us to convey the FEL light onto the samples sitting in the SU3 experimental station by means of a series of mirrors, and show the results we obtained for prototypical systems such as Ag/GaAs(110) and Si(111) 2 x 1. The dependence of the SPV was studied in function of various parameters, changing sample doping and photon flux; but our efforts were mainly devoted to studying its dependence on the time delay between the FEL pump and the SR probe. On SuperACO, such delay can be varied between 1 and 120 ns, the limits being given by the time duration of a SR pulse and by the interval between two consecutive positron bunches, respectively. The results show a clear temporal dependence of the amount of SPV on cleaved Si surfaces, where as the Ag/GaAs(110) does not show any difference on the ns time scale. We will discuss these results in terms of the role of surface recombination in the dynamics of the photoinduced electron-hole pairs. These studies follow the evolution of the density of electrostatic charge at surfaces and interfaces on a nanosecond time scale, and might pave the way for a new series of experiments: for example, one might explore what are the physical mechanisms limiting the time response of Schottky diodes.

  10. Coherent SASE FEL with electron beams prebunched in a masked chicane

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.; Carlsten, B.E.

    1995-12-31

    We present a new FEL concept based on coherent, self-amplified spontaneous emission of electron beams that are prebunched in a chicane buncher. In this scheme a chirped electron bunch is focused in the middle of the magnetic chicane where a transmission mask consisting of a series of slits modulates the transmitted beam current. With the appropriate slit spacing, the output of the chicane is a compressed pulse whose density is modulated at the resonant wavelength. It is then injected into a short, untapered wiggler with periods 2{gamma}{sup 2}(1+ a{sub w}) times the beam modulation wavelength. Due to prebunched nature of the beam, the emitted radiation exhibits coherent amplification analogous to the mutual coherency of radiation emitted in multiple undulators. In addition, because the bunch has a chirp, the interaction is similar to that in a tapered wiggler. The new scheme is also applicable to coherent x-ray production via Compton backscattering.

  11. Comprehensive z-dependent measurements of electron-beam microbunching using COTR in a saturated SASE FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumpkin, A. H.; Dejus, R.; Lewellen, J. W.; Berg, W.; Biedron, S.; Borland, M.; Chae, Y.; Erdmann, M.; Huang, Z.; Kim, K.-J.; Li, Y.; Milton, S. V.; Moog, E.; Rule, D. W.; Sajaev, V.; Yang, B. X.

    2002-05-01

    We report the initial, comprehensive set of z-dependent measurements of electron-beam microbunching using coherent optical transition radiation (COTR) in a saturated self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free-electron laser (FEL) experiment. In this case the FEL was operated near 530 nm using an enhanced facility including a bunch-compressed photocathode gun electron beam, linac, and 21.6 m of undulator length. The longitudinal microbunching was tracked by inserting a metal foil and mirror after each of the nine 2.4-m-long undulators and measuring the visible COTR spectra, intensity, angular, distribution, and spot size. We observed for the first time the z-dependent transition of the COTR spectra from simple lines to complex structure/sidebands near saturation. We also observed the change in the microbunching fraction after saturation, multiple fringes in the COTR interferogram that are consistent with involvement of a smaller core of the e-beam transverse distribution, and the second harmonic content of the microbunching. The results will be compared to relevant calculations using GENESIS and/or GINGER.

  12. Thermal analysis of superconducting undulator cryomodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiroyanagi, Y.; Doose, C.; Fuerst, J.; Harkay, K.; Hasse, Q.; Ivanyushenkov, Y.; Kasa, M.

    2015-12-01

    A cryocooler-cooled superconducting undulator (SCU0) has been operating in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring since January of 2013. Based on lessons learned from the construction and operation of SCU0, a second superconducting undulator (SCU1) has been built and cold tested stand-alone. An excess cooling capacity measurement and static heat load analysis show a large improvement of cryogenic performance of SCU1 compared with SCU0. ANSYS-based thermal analysis of these cryomodules incorporating all the cooling circuits was completed. Comparisons between measured and calculated temperatures at the three operating conditions of the cryomodule (static, beam heat only, beam heat and magnet current) will be presented.

  13. Wavenumber and Defect Distributions in Undulation Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Karen E.; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2000-11-01

    We report experimental results on thermally driven convection in a large aspect ratio inclined layer with a fluid of Prandtl number σ ≈ 1. Very close to the onset of convection for inclination angles between 20 and 70 degrees, we find the defect turbulent state of undulation chaos (Daniels, Plapp, and Bodenschatz. Phys. Rev. Lett. 84:5320). We characterize this state by determining the defect locations and the wavenumber distribution. A snapshot of the pattern, as well as its wavenumber distribution, can be well-reconstructed from a perfect underlying undulation pattern and the phase field given by the point defects. The defect density distribution shows a crossover from a Poisson to a squared Poisson distribution. By measuring the creation, annihilation, inflow, and outflow rates of defects we can quantitatively explain this behavior. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation DMR-0072077.

  14. In vacuum undulator task force report

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, J.B.; Kao, C.C.; Stefan, P.

    1998-06-01

    Historically the NSLS has been active in R&D for state-of-the-art electron beams, photon beams and x-ray optics. One of the available straight sections has therefore been dedicated to insertion device R&D. Over the past five to seven years a program aimed at exploiting the very small vertical {beta} function in the straight sections has yielded first a prototype small gap undulator (PSGU) and then an in-vacuum undulator (IVUN). The IVUN sources attain a brightness similar to the existing hybrid wigglers in X21 and X25. They radiate significantly lower total power than the wigglers but produce higher power densities. They provide undulator rather than wiggler spectra. Because of the small gaps and small periods there is not much tunability in these devices and they will have to be purpose-built for a specific scientific program. The original IVUN parameters were chosen for in-elastic x-ray scattering, similar to the scientific program on X21. This put the fundamental at 4.6 keV and the third harmonic at 13.8 keV. The question that this new possible insertion device poses is what science programs can best take advantage of this new insertion device source? To answer this, a task force was formed by M. Hart, NSLS Department Chair and charged with identifying viable scientific programs that could seek outside funding to construct IVUN beamlines. The task force concentrated on experimental programs that are presently being pursued on new insertion devices worldwide. For example, x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy, which takes advantage of the large coherent flux from undulator sources, was considered. However, this program was not considered as the highest priority. The general area of protein crystallography, however, is ideal for the IVUN source. The unique electron beam optics that makes the IVUN possible in the first place also makes the IVUN ideal as a source for microdiffraction.

  15. Undulator-Based Production of Polarized Photons

    SciTech Connect

    Professor Kirk McDonald

    2008-05-29

    "Project Title: Undulator-Based Production of Polarized Photons" DOE Contract Number: FG02-04ER41355 Principal Investigator: Prof. Kirk McDonald Period of Performance: 09/10/2004 thru 08/31/2006 This award was to fund Princeton's activity on SLAC experiment E166, "Undulator-Based Production of Polarized Positrons" which was performed at SLAC during June and September 2005. Princeton U. fabricated a magnetic spectrometer for this experiment, and participated in the commissioning, operation, and analysis of the experiment, for which Prof. McDonald was a co-spokesperson. The experiment demonstrated that an intense positron beam with 80% longitudinal polarization could be generated by conversion of MeVenergy circularly polarized photons in a thin target, which photons were generated by passage of high-energy electrons through a helical undulator. This technique has since been adopted as the baseline for the polarized positron source of the proposed International Linear Collider. Results of the experiment have been published in Physical Review Letters, vol 100, p 210801 (2008) [see attached .pdf file], and a longer paper is in preparation.

  16. Undulator Long Coil Measurement System Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zachary; Levashov, Yurii; /SLAC

    2010-11-24

    The first and second field integrals in the LCLS undulators must be below a specified limit. To accurately measure the field integrals, a long coil system is used. This note describes a set of tests which were used to check the performance of the long coil system. A long coil system was constructed to measure the first and second field integrals of the LCLS undulators. The long coil measurements of the background fields were compared to field integrals obtained by sampling the background fields and numerically calculating the integrals. This test showed that the long coil has the sensitivity required to measure at the levels specified for the field integrals. Tests were also performed by making long coil measurements of short magnets of known strength placed at various positions The long coil measurements agreed with the known field integrals obtained by independent measurements and calculation. Our tests showed that the long coil measurements are a valid way to determine whether the LCLS undulator field integrals are below the specified limits.

  17. Optical tailoring of xFEL beams

    SciTech Connect

    West, Gavin; Coffee, R.

    2015-08-20

    There is an inherent exibility unique to free electron lasers (FELs) that lends well to experimental approaches normally too difficult for other light sources to accomplish. This includes the ability to optically shape the electron bunch prior to final its acceleration for the final FEL process. Optical pulse shaping of the electron bunch can enable both femtosecond and attosecond level FEL pulse control. Pulse shaping is currently implemented, not optically but mechanically, in LCLS-I with an adjustable foil slit that physically spoils the momentum phase of the electron bunch. This selectively suppresses the downstream FEL process ofspoiled electrons. Such a mechanical spoiling method fails for both the soft x-ray regime as well as the high repetition rates that are planned in LCLS-II. Our proposed optical spoiling method circumvents this limitation by making use of the existing ultrafast laser beam that is typically used for adjusting the energy spread for the initial electron bunch. Using Fourier domain shaping we can nearly arbitrarily shape the laser pulses to affect the electron bunch. This can selectively spoil electrons within each bunch. Here we demonstrate the viability of this approach with a programmable acousto-optic dispersive filter. This method is not only well suited for LCLS-II but also has several advantages over mechanical spoiling, including lack of radiation concerns, experiment specific FEL pulse shapes, and real-time adjustment for applications that require high duty-cycle variation such as lock-in amplification of small signals.

  18. Design study of a longer wavelength FEL for FELIX

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L.; Oepts, D.; Meer, A.F.G. van der

    1995-12-31

    We present a design study of FEL3, which will extend the FELIX spectral range towards a few hundred microns. A rectangular waveguide will be used to reduce diffraction losses. Calculations show that with a waveguide gap of 1 cm, only one sinusoidal mode along the guided direction can exist within the FEL gain bandwidth, thus excluding group velocity dispersion and lengthening of short radiation pulses. To incorporate FEL3 in the existing FELIX facility, two options are being considered: to combine FEL3 with FEL1 by insertion of a waveguide into FEL1, and to build a dedicated third beam line for FEL3 after the two linacs. Expected FEL performance: gain, spectrum, power, pulse shape, etc., will be presented based on numerical simulations.

  19. Charged layer with undulated surface: configuration of electrical double layer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sung-Hwa

    2010-06-15

    A charged layer with undulated surface exists commonly in natural entities (for example the biological membrane layer and the surface of charged colloid) and in artificial fabrications (for example the peripheral surface of ion-exchange membrane pores). When the micro- or nano-scale charged layer systems are concerned, the effect of undulation of charged layer surface on the electrical phenomenon may become great significant. In this work, using the perturbation method, the significance of undulated surface on a charged layer in the electrical phenomenon is investigated. Under assumptions that the undulation amplitude is small and that the Debye-Huckel approximation is applicable, the electrical potential field in three regions is solved simultaneously. Based on the analytical results it is found that, if compared with that in condition of flat surface, the undulation of charged layer surface decreases/increases the magnitude of electrical potential field near the wave crest/trough, due to the curvature of undulated surface. In addition, the surface potential on the undulated surface shows a wavelike distribution. The analytical results also show that, the significance of undulated surface is determined by the physical parameters, including the geometry of undulated surface, the amplitude and the period of undulation, and the fixed charge density in charged layer.

  20. An FEL design code running on Mathcad(trademark)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, D. C.; Gierman, S. M.; Oshea, P. G.

    We present a simple computer code called FEL-CAD that runs on the Mathcad(trademark) software. FEL-CAD gives estimates of the expected performance of a low-gain Compton FEL oscillator driven by an rf linac. The code provides fast, albeit approximate, answers to basic FEL design questions. Scaling can be done by varying the wiggler, the linac, the electron beam and the optical resonator parameters.

  1. First Lasing of the Regenerative Amplifier FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Sheffield, R.L.; Fortang, C.M.; Goldstein, J.C.; Kinross-Wright, J.M.; Ebrahim, N.A.

    1998-08-17

    The Regenerative Amplifier Free-Electron Laser (RAFEL) is a high-gain RF-linac FEL capable of producing high optical power from a compact design. The combination of a high-gain and small optical feedback enables the FEL to reach saturation and produce a high optical power and high extraction efficiency without risk of optical damage to the mirrors. This paper summarizes the first lasing of the Regenerative Amplifier FEL and describes recent experimental results. The highest optical energy achieved thus far at 16.3 {micro}m is 1.7 J over an 9-{micro}s macropulse, corresponding to an average power during the macropulse of 190 kW. They deduce an energy of 1.7 mJ in each 16 ps micropulse, corresponding to a peak power of 110 MW.

  2. The APS SASE FEL : modeling and code comparison.

    SciTech Connect

    Biedron, S. G.

    1999-04-20

    A self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free-electron laser (FEL) is under construction at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Five FEL simulation codes were used in the design phase: GENESIS, GINGER, MEDUSA, RON, and TDA3D. Initial comparisons between each of these independent formulations show good agreement for the parameters of the APS SASE FEL.

  3. THz wiggler applied for measurements of electron bunch longitudinal structure in FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syresin, E.; Kostromin, S.; Krasilnikov, M.; Makarov, R.; Morozov, N.; Petrov, D.

    2015-01-01

    The infrared undulator manufactured at JINR and installed at FLASH in 2007 is used for longitudinal bunch shape measurements in the range of several tenths of a micrometer. The presented electromagnetic wiggler is intended for generating a narrow-band THz radiation to measure the longitudinal electron bunch structure in FELs with an electron energy of several tens of MeV. This is a planar electromagnetic device with six regular periods, each 30 cm long. The K parameter is varied in the range 0.5-7.12 corresponding to the range B = 0.025-0.356 T of the peak field on the axis. The wiggler is simulated for 19.8 MeV/ c corresponding to the possible FEL option at PITZ. The wavelength range is 126 μm - 5.1 mm for this electron beam momentum. The 3D Opera simulations of the THz wiggler are discussed. A new PITZ photocathode laser system is proposed for the optimized performance of the high-brightness electron beam. The main goal is a production of 3D ellipsoidal electron bunches with homogeneous charge density. The electromagnetic wiggler is supposed to be used for measuring the longitudinal shape of these electron bunches.

  4. Compensation of FEL gain reduction by emittance effects in a strong focusing lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiche, S.

    2000-05-01

    As the constraint of a small transverse emittance becomes more severe, the higher the electron beam energy in an FEL. To compensate for the transverse and thus the longitudinal velocity spread, a compensation scheme has been proposed previously by Derbenev and Sessler et al., for Free Electron Lasers by introducing a correlation between the energy and the average betatron amplitude of each electron. This compensation scheme is based on a constant absolute value of the transverse velocity, a feature of the natural focusing of undulators, and does not include strong focusing of a superimposed quadrupole lattice. This paper focuses on the electron motion in a strong focusing lattice with a variation in the axial velocity. The resulting reduction of the compensation efficiency is analyzed using simulations. It is seen that the compensation scheme is not much affected if the lattice cell length is shorter than the gain length. For the results presented in this paper, the parameters of the proposed TESLA X-ray FEL have been used.

  5. Optical alignment and tuning system for the HUST THz-FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xu; Liu, Kaifeng; Qin, Bin; Tan, Ping; Fu, Qiang; Wang, Wei; Pei, Yuanji

    2016-11-01

    A compact FEL oscillator with a radiation wavelength of 30 - 100 μm is proposed by HUST and NSRL. The optical cavity is very sensitive to misalignment errors of the mirror, due to its near-concentric and symmetric structure. The magnetic axis of the undulator, the optical axis of the resonator, and the electron beam propagation axis must all be aligned with high precision for achieving saturated lasing. This paper introduces a high-precision, multi-degree-of-freedom controlled optical alignment system, which has the ability to align in the transverse and longitudinal directions. The alignment tolerances are given by theoretical analysis and numerical simulations with three-dimensional FEL code GENESIS and optical propagation code (OPC). To accomplish optical alignment, two auxiliary HeNe laser systems were introduced. By adjusting the HeNe laser beam spot on the wedge, the optical axis can be aligned to the magnetic axis, and the estimated errors meet the tolerances. Finally, the electron beam will be guided through the hole in the central wedge to complete the transverse alignment. The longitudinal alignment and tuning methods are also described.

  6. Design of an XUV FEL Driven by the Laser-Plasma Accelerator at theLBNL LOASIS Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl B.; Fawley, W.M.; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, W.P.

    2006-09-01

    We present a design for a compact FEL source of ultrafast, high-peak flux, soft x-ray pulses employing a high-current, GeV-energy electron beam from the existing laser-plasma accelerator at the LBNL LOASIS laser facility. The proposed ultra-fast source would be intrinsically temporally synchronized to the drive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fast science with pulse lengths of tens of fs. Owing both to the high current ({approx} 10 kA) and reasonable charge/pulse ({approx} 0.1-0.5 nC) of the laser-plasma-accelerated electron beams, saturated output fluxes are potentially 10{sup 13}--10{sup 14} photons/pulse. We examine devices based both on SASE and high-harmonic generated input seeds to give improved coherence and reduced undulator length, presenting both analytic scalings and numerical simulation results for expected FEL performance. A successful source would result in a new class of compact laser-driven FELs in which a conventional RF accelerator is replaced by a GeV-class laser-plasma accelerator whose active acceleration region is only a few cm in length.

  7. Transport studies of LPA electron beam towards the FEL amplification at COXINEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khojoyan, M.; Briquez, F.; Labat, M.; Loulergue, A.; Marcouillé, O.; Marteau, F.; Sharma, G.; Couprie, M. E.

    2016-09-01

    Laser Plasma Acceleration (LPA) [1] is an emerging concept enabling to generate electron beams with high energy, high peak current and small transverse emittance within a very short distance. The use of LPA can be applied to the Free Electron Laser (FEL) [2] case in order to investigate whether it is suitable for the light amplification in the undulator. However, capturing and guiding of such beams to the undulator is very challenging, because of the large divergence and high energy spread of the electron beams at the plasma exit, leading to large chromatic emittances. A specific beam manipulation scheme was recently proposed for the COXINEL (Coherent X-ray source inferred from electrons accelerated by laser) setup, which makes an advantage from the intrinsically large chromatic emittance of such beams [3]. The electron beam transport is studied using two simulation codes: a SOLEIL in-house one and ASTRA [4]. The influence of the collective effects on the electron beam performance is also examined.

  8. Phase-stable, microwave FEL amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.; Fazio, M.V.; Haynes, W.B.; May, L.; Potter, M.

    1995-07-01

    Free-electron laser (FEL) amplifiers have demonstrated high efficiency and high output power for microwave wavelengths. However, using present technology, microwave FEL amplifiers are not phase stable enough to be suitable for driving linear accelerators, where several much amplifiers need to be phase locked. The growing wave`s phase sensitivity to the beam voltage in the small-signal gain regime is responsible for the largest contribution to this phase instability. We discuss a scheme that reduces the phase sensitivity to the beam voltage by operating off synchronism and matching the phase variation resulting from the desynchronism to the phase variation from the reduced plasma wavenumber as the beam voltage changes.

  9. Planar undulator motion excited by a fixed traveling wave: Quasiperiodic averaging, normal forms, and the free electron laser pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, James A.; Heinemann, Klaus; Vogt, Mathias; Gooden, Matthew

    2013-09-01

    We present a mathematical analysis of planar motion of energetic electrons moving through a planar dipole undulator, excited by a fixed planar polarized plane wave Maxwell field in the x-ray free electron laser (FEL) regime. Our starting point is the 6D Lorentz system, which allows planar motions, and we examine this dynamical system as the wavelength λ of the traveling wave varies. By scalings and transformations the 6D system is reduced, without approximation, to a 2D system in a form for a rigorous asymptotic analysis using the method of averaging (MoA), a long-time perturbation theory. The two dependent variables are a scaled energy deviation and a generalization of the so-called ponderomotive phase. As λ varies the system passes through resonant and nonresonant (NonR) intervals and we develop NonR and near-to-resonant (NearR) MoA normal form approximations to the exact equations. The NearR normal forms contain a parameter which measures the distance from a resonance. For the planar motion, with the special initial condition that matches into the undulator design trajectory, and on resonance, the NearR normal form reduces to the well-known FEL pendulum system. We then state and prove NonR and NearR first-order averaging theorems which give explicit error bounds for the normal form approximations. We prove the theorems in great detail, giving the interested reader a tutorial on mathematically rigorous perturbation theory in a context where the proofs are easily understood. The proofs are novel in that they do not use a near-identity transformation and they use a system of differential inequalities. The NonR case is an example of quasiperiodic averaging where the small divisor problem enters in the simplest possible way. To our knowledge the planar problem has not been analyzed with the generality we aspire to here nor has the standard FEL pendulum system been derived with associated error bounds as we do here. We briefly discuss the low gain theory in light of

  10. Optimizing an undulating magnetic microswimmer for cargo towing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Or, Yizhar; Gutman, Emiliya

    2015-11-01

    One of the promising applications of robotic microswimmers is towing a cargo for controlled drug delivery, micro-surgery or tumor detection. This capability has been demonstrated by the magnetically-actuated microswimmer of Dreyfus et al. [Nature 2005] in which a red blood cell was attached to a chain of magnetic beads connected by flexible DNA links. A key question is what should be the optimal size of the magnetic tail for towing a given cargo. This question is addressed here for the simplest theoretical model of a magnetic microswimmer under planar undulations - a spherical load connected by a torsion spring to a magnetized rigid slender link. The swimmer's dynamics is formulated assuming negligible hydrodynamic interaction and leading-order expressions for the resulting motion are obtained explicitly under small amplitude approximation. Optimal combinations of magnetic actuation frequency, torsion stiffness, and tail length for maximizing displacement or average speed are obtained. The theoretical results are compared with several reported magnetic microswimmers, and also agree qualitatively with recent results on cargo towing by screw rotation of magnetic helical tails [Walker et al., ACS Nano Letters 2015]. This work is supported by the Israeli Science Foundation (ISF) under Grant No. 567/14.

  11. Magnetic Measurement Results of the LCLS Undulator Quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Scott; Caban, Keith; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Reese, Ed; Wolf, Zachary; /SLAC

    2011-08-18

    This note details the magnetic measurements and the magnetic center fiducializations that were performed on all of the thirty-six LCLS undulator quadrupoles. Temperature rise, standardization reproducibility, vacuum chamber effects and magnetic center reproducibility measurements are also presented. The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) undulator beam line has 33 girders, each with a LCLS undulator quadrupole which focuses and steers the beam through the beam line. Each quadrupole has main quadrupole coils, as well as separate horizontal and vertical trim coils. Thirty-six quadrupoles, thirty-three installed and three spares were, manufactured for the LCLS undulator system and all were measured to confirm that they met requirement specifications for integrated gradient, harmonics and for magnetic center shifts after current changes. The horizontal and vertical dipole trims of each quadrupole were similarly characterized. Each quadrupole was also fiducialized to its magnetic center. All characterizing measurements on the undulator quads were performed with their mirror plates on and after a standardization of three cycles from -6 to +6 to -6 amps. Since the undulator quadrupoles could be used as a focusing or defocusing magnet depending on their location, all quadrupoles were characterized as focusing and as defocusing quadrupoles. A subset of the undulator quadrupoles were used to verify that the undulator quadrupole design met specifications for temperature rise, standardization reproducibility and magnetic center reproducibility after splitting. The effects of the mirror plates on the undulator quadrupoles were also measured.

  12. Undulator radiation carrying spin and orbital angular momentum.

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, S.; McNulty, I.; Dejus, R.; X-Ray Science Division

    2007-11-11

    We show that the radiation from a helical undulator not only carries spin angular momentum (circular polarization) but also orbital angular momentum. This exotic property of the undulator radiation may be useful in coherent X-ray imaging and scattering experiments and to probe electronic transitions in matter by orbital dichroism spectroscopy. Also, we present that a new magnet configuration, similar to the structure of Figure-8 undulator or the PERA undulator, may generate right- and left-hand circularly polarized off-axis radiation simultaneously.

  13. Undulations from amplified low frequency surface waves

    SciTech Connect

    Coutant, Antonin; Parentani, Renaud

    2014-04-15

    We study the linear scattering of gravity waves in longitudinal inhomogeneous stationary flows. When the flow becomes supercritical, it is known that counterflow propagating shallow waves are blocked and converted into deep waves. Here we show that in the zero-frequency limit, the reflected waves are amplified in such a way that the free surface develops an undulation, i.e., a zero-frequency wave of large amplitude with nodes located at specific places. This amplification involves negative energy waves and implies that flat surfaces are unstable against incoming perturbations of arbitrary small amplitude. The relation between this instability and black hole radiation (the Hawking effect) is established.

  14. Bunch Length Measurements at JLab FEL

    SciTech Connect

    P. Evtushenko; J. L. Coleman; K. Jordan; J. M. Klopf; G. Neil; G. P. Williams

    2006-09-01

    The JLab FEL is routinely operated with sub-picosecond bunches. The short bunch length is important for high gain of the FEL. Coherent transition radiation has been used for the bunch length measurements for many years. This diagnostic can be used only in the pulsed beam mode. It is our goal to run FEL with CW beam and 74.85 MHz micropulse repetition rate. Hence it is very desirable to have the possibility of doing the bunch length measurements when running CW beam with any micropulse frequency. We use a Fourier transform infrared interferometer, which is essentially a Michelson interferometer, to measure the spectrum of the coherent synchrotron radiation generated in the last dipole of the magnetic bunch compressor upstream of the FEL wiggler. This noninvasive diagnostic provides the bunch length measurements for CW beam operation at any micropulse frequency. We also compare the measurements made with the help of the FTIR interferometer with the data obtained by the Martin-Puplett interferometer. Results of the two diagnostics are usually agree within 15%. Here we present a description of the experimental setup, data evaluation procedure and results of the beam measurements.

  15. FELS FOUNDATION PROJECT FOR DEVELOPING YOUTH POTENTIAL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BAIR, ROBERT A.; AND OTHERS

    THE OPERATION OF THE FELS FOUNDATION PROJECT FOR DEVELOPING YOUTH POTENTIAL IN HANFORD, CALIFORNIA, IS DESCRIBED. OF GENERAL CONCERN WAS THE PREPARATION OF CULTURALLY DEPRIVED CHILDREN FOR SCHOOL EXPERIENCES AND FOR FUTURE EMPLOYMENT. A MAJOR GOAL WAS TO IMPROVE THE SELF-IMAGE OF THE CHILDREN AND TO ASSIST THE PARENTS AND CHILDREN IN PROVIDING…

  16. Evaluation of the FEL+ Program, Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evaluation and Training Inst., Los Angeles, CA.

    An external evaluation of the Family English Literacy, Plus (FEL+) program of the Sweetwater Union High School District (California) is presented. Program objectives included: (1) development and implementation of curriculum and activities integrating technology-assisted instruction into the existing literacy program; (2) increasing parent/child…

  17. FEL potential of eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Hao, Y.; Kao, C-C.; Kayran, D.; Murphy, J.B.; Ptitsyn, V.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.

    2010-08-23

    Brookhaven National Laboratory plans to build a 5-to-30 GeV energy-recovery linac (ERL) for its future electron-ion collider, eRHIC. In past few months, the Laboratory turned its attention to the potential of this unique machine for free electron lasers (FELS), which we initially assessed earlier. In this paper, we present our current vision of a possible FEL farm, and of narrow-band FEL-oscillators driven by this accelerator. eRHIC, the proposed electron-ion collider at BNL, takes advantage of the existing Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) complex. Plans call for adding a six-pass super-conducting (SRF) ERL to this complex to collide polarized- and unpolarized- electron beams with heavy ions (with energies up to 130 GeV per nucleon) and with polarized protons (with energies up to 325 GeV). RHIC, with a circumference of 3.834 km, has three-fold symmetry and six straight sections each {approx} 250 m long. Two of these straight sections will accommodate 703-MHz SRF linacs. The maximum energy of the electron beam in eRHIC will be reached in stages, from 5 GeV to 30 GeV, by increasing the lengths of its SRF linacs. We plan to install at the start the six-pass magnetic system with small gap magnets. The structure of the eRHIC's electron beam will be identical with that of its hadron beam, viz., 166 bunches will be filled, reserving about a one-microsecond gap for the abort kicker. With modest modifications, we can assure that eRHIC's ERL will become an excellent driver for continuous wave (CW) FELs (see Fig.1). The eRHIC's beam structure will support the operation of several such FELs in parasitic mode.

  18. Pathway to a compact SASE FEL device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattoli, G.; Di Palma, E.; Petrillo, V.; Rau, Julietta V.; Sabia, E.; Spassovsky, I.; Biedron, S. G.; Einstein, J.; Milton, S. V.

    2015-10-01

    Newly developed high peak power lasers have opened the possibilities of driving coherent light sources operating with laser plasma accelerated beams and wave undulators. We speculate on the combination of these two concepts and show that the merging of the underlying technologies could lead to new and interesting possibilities to achieve truly compact, coherent radiator devices.

  19. Laser-plasma interactions from thin tapes for high-energy electron accelerators and seeding compact FELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Brian Henry

    This thesis comprises a detailed investigation of the physics of using a plasma mirror (PM) from a tape by reflecting ultrashort pulses from a laser-triggered surface plasma. The tapes used in the characterization of the PM are VHS and computer data storage tape. The tapes are 6.6 m (computer storage tape) and 15 m (VHS) thick. Each tape is 0.5 inches wide, and 10s of meters of tape are spooled using a tape drive; providing thousands of shots on a single reel of tape. The amount of reflected energy of the PM was studied for different input intensities. The fluence was varied by translating the focus of the laser upstream and downstream of the tape, which changed the spot size on the tape surface and hence changed the fluence. This study measured reflectances from both sides of the two tapes, and for input light of both s and p-polarizations. Lastly, an analytic model was developed to understand the reflectance as a function of fluence for each tape material and polarization. Another application that benefits from the advancements of LPA technology is an LPAbased FEL. By sending a high quality electron bunch through an undulator (a periodic structure of positive and negative magnetic poles), the electrons oscillate transversely to the propagation axis and produce radiation. The 1.5 m THUNDER undulator at the BELLA Center has been commissioned using electron beams of 400MeV beams with broad energy spread (35%). To produce a coherent LPA-based FEL, the beam quality would need to improve to sub-percent level energy spread. A seed source could be used to help induce bunching of the electron beam within the undulator. This thesis described the experimental investigation of the physics of using solid-based surface high-harmonic generation (SHHG) from a thin tape as a possible seed source for an FEL. A thin tape placed within centimeters of the undulator's entrance could act as a harmonic generating source, while simultaneously transmitting an electron beam. This removes

  20. Propulsive Forces of a Biomimetic Undulating Fin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalumuck, Kenneth; Brandt, Alan; Armand, Mehran

    2007-11-01

    Understanding gained from much recent work on force production mechanisms of aquatic organisms holds great promise for improved undersea vehicle propulsion and maneuvering. One class of fish locomotion is that of the median fin utilized by animals such as squid, cuttlefish, knifefish, and seahorse. It is characterized by undulatory motion that creates traveling waves along the fin. Results of experiments conducted on a submerged mechanical underwater undulating fin test bed are presented. The 0.5 m long fin is mounted to a cylindrical body and consists of a flexible skin attached to ribs driven by an adjustable cam mechanism and variable speed motor that enables changing the characteristics of the undulating wave(s). Forces produced were measured in a captive mode under quiescent conditions as well in the presence of an ambient current. Propulsive forces are characterized as a function of the fin width, oscillation frequency, amplitude, and wavelength. Free swimming experiments were also conducted to determine the point of self propulsion. Flow field structure visualization using dye tracers is presented for selected cases. Estimates of performance and applications for use with larger scale vehicles are discussed.

  1. Magnetic Measurement of the Background Field in the Undulator Hall

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Andrew; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Welch, James; /SLAC

    2010-11-18

    The steel present in the construction of the undulator hall facility has the potential for changing the ambient fields present in the undulator hall. This note describes a measurement done to make a comparison between the fields in the hall and in the Magnetic Measurement Facility. In order for the undulators to have the proper tuning, the background magnetic field in the Undulator Hall should agree with the background field in the Magnetic Measurements Facility within .5 gauss. In order to verify that this was the case measurements were taken along the length of the undulator hall, and the point measurements were compared to the mean field which was measured on the MMF test bench.

  2. The performance of a superconducting micro-undulator prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Jiang, Z. Y.; Ingold, G.; Yu, L. H.; Sampson, W. B.

    1990-11-01

    We report on the performance of a prototype of a superferric micro-undulator. The micro-undulator consists of a continuous winding of niobium-titanium wire wound on a low-carbon-steel yoke. It is about three periods long with a period of 8.8 mm and a gap of 4.4 mm. The undulator achieves a peak magnetic field on axis of over0.5 T. Asymmetry of the field pattern due to a dipole component was identified, analyzed and a correction has been applied to the undulator ends to produce a symmetric field distribution. Within the precision of the measurement the field pattern produced by the superferric undulator needed no correction.

  3. A Low-Charge, Hard X-Ray FEL Driven with an X-band Injector and Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yipeng; Adolphsen, Chris; Limborg-Deprey, Cecile; Raubenheimer, Tor; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    After the successful operation of FLASH (Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg) and LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source), soft and hard X-ray Free Electron Lasers (FELs) are being built, designed or proposed at many accelerator laboratories. Acceleration employing lower frequency RF cavities, ranging from L-band to C-band, is usually adopted in these designs. In the first stage bunch compression, higher-frequency harmonic RF system is employed to linearize the beam's longitudinal phase space, which is nonlinearly chirped during the lower frequency RF acceleration process. In this paper, a hard X-ray FEL design using an all X-band accelerator at 11.424 GHz (from photo-cathode RF gun to linac end) is presented, without the assistance of any harmonic RF linearization. It achieves LCLS-like performance at low charge using X-band linac drivers, which is more versatile, efficient and compact than ones using S-band or C-band rf technology. It employs initially 42 microns long (RMS), low charge (10 pC) electron bunches from an X-band photoinjector. An overall bunch compression ratio of roughly 100 times is proposed in a two stage bunch compressor system. The start-to-end macro-particle 3-D simulation employing several computer codes is presented in this paper, where space charge, wakefields, incoherent and coherent synchrotron radiation (ISR and CSR) effects are included. Employing an undulator with a short period of 1.5 cm, a Genesis FEL simulation shows successful lasing at a wavelength of 0.15 nm with a pulse length of 2 fs and a power saturation length as short as 20 meters, which is equivalent to LCLS low charge mode. Its overall length of both accelerators and undulators is 180 meters (much shorter than the effective LCLS overall length of 1230 meters, including an accelerator length of 1100 meters and an undulator length of 130 meters), which makes it possible to be built in places where only limited space is available.

  4. The Advanced Light Source elliptically polarizing undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, S.; Cortopassi, C.; DeVries, J.

    1997-05-01

    An elliptically polarizing undulator (EPU) for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) has been designed and is currently under construction. The magnetic design is a moveable quadrant pure permanent magnet structure featuring adjustable magnets to correct phase errors and on-axis field integrals. The device is designed with a 5.0 cm period and will produce variably polarized light of any ellipticity, including pure circular and linear. The spectral range at 1.9 GeV for typical elliptical polarization with a degree of circular polarization greater than 0.8 will be from 100 eV to 1,500 eV, using the first, third, and fifth harmonics. The device will be switchable between left and right circular modes at a frequency of up to 0.1 Hz. The 1.95 m long overall length will allow two such devices in a single ALS straight sector.

  5. The SwissFEL Experimental Laser facility.

    PubMed

    Erny, Christian; Hauri, Christoph Peter

    2016-09-01

    The hard X-ray laser SwissFEL at the Paul Scherrer Institute is currently being commissioned and will soon become available for users. In the current article the laser facility is presented, an integral part of the user facility, as most time-resolved experiments will require a versatile optical laser infrastructure and precise information about the relative delay between the X-ray and optical pulse. The important key parameters are a high availability and long-term stability while providing advanced laser performance in the wavelength range from ultraviolet to terahertz. The concept of integrating a Ti:sapphire laser amplifier system with subsequent frequency conversion stages and drift compensation into the SwissFEL facility environment for successful 24 h/7 d user operation is described. PMID:27577769

  6. Duke storage rink UV/VUV FEL: Status and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Burnham, B.; Madey, J.M.J.

    1995-12-31

    The 1 GeV Duke storage ring was successfully commissioned with parameters exceeding initial specification. The OK-4 FEL has arrived at the Duke FEL laboratory from the Novosibirsk Institute of Nuclear Physics. The OK-4 installation and commissioning is in progress. In this paper we describe the up-to-date status of the Duke storage ring and the OK-4 FEL. The projected performance of the OK-4 UV/VUV FEL is presented based on the electron beam parameters achieved. Initial plans to operate the OK-4 UV/VUV FEL at the Duke 1 GeV storage ring are outlined. Future plans and prospects of both the OK-4 FEL and the Duke storage ring are discussed.

  7. A proposed FEL injector at the IAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xinglin, Zhai; Wenzhen, Zhou; Zhenshan, Weng; Tielong, Wu; Tianlu, Yang; Chen, Liu; Yuzhu, Lu; Xiuzhen, Shi

    1990-10-01

    For the purpose of scientific research, an L-band FEL injector at the Institute of Atomic Energy (IAE) was proposed years ago. It consists of an electron gun, one subharmonic buncher (SHB), a fundamental buncher (1300 MHz) an, accelerating section and diagnostic devices. We expect that the electron energy is about 20 MeV, the micropulse curent is up to 100 A, and the micropulse length 10-20 ps. Now this project is in progress.

  8. A proposed visible FEL Facility at Boeing

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D.H.; Adamski, J.L.; Hayward, T.D.

    1995-12-31

    A 1-kW average power, visible wavelength FEL is described, based on a 120-MeV, 0.1. A macropulse average current linac operating at a duty factor of 0. 6% and having average beam power of 70 kW. The accelerator will employ a demonstrated photoinjector, 18-MeV, 433-MHz linac as an injector, followed by a 1300-MHz longitudinal phase space {open_quotes} linearizer,{close_quotes} a magnetic buncher chicane, and seven 1300-MHz, pulsed traveling wave linac sections. The magnets used to transport the beam from the linac to the FEL centerline, the 5-m THUNDER wiggler, and the optical resonator will be reclaimed from previous FEL demonstration experiments. We expect to attain pulse lengths of 7 ps for 3.5 nC, with minimal distortion of the pulse profile and normalized rms emittance of 7.5 {+-} 2.5 {pi} mm-mr. FELEX projects a laser conversion efficiency of 4.3 %, yielding average output of 3 kW.

  9. Instability-based mechanism for body undulations in centipede locomotion.

    PubMed

    Aoi, Shinya; Egi, Yoshimasa; Tsuchiya, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Centipedes have many body segments and legs and they generate body undulations during terrestrial locomotion. Centipede locomotion has the characteristic that body undulations are absent at low speeds but appear at faster speeds; furthermore, their amplitude and wavelength increase with increasing speed. There are conflicting reports regarding whether the muscles along the body axis resist or support these body undulations and the underlying mechanisms responsible for the body undulations remain largely unclear. In the present study, we investigated centipede locomotion dynamics using computer simulation with a body-mechanical model and experiment with a centipede-like robot and then conducted dynamic analysis with a simple model to clarify the mechanism. The results reveal that body undulations in these models occur due to an instability caused by a supercritical Hopf bifurcation. We subsequently compared these results with data obtained using actual centipedes. The model and actual centipedes exhibit similar dynamic properties, despite centipedes being complex, nonlinear dynamic systems. Based on our findings, we propose a possible passive mechanism for body undulations in centipedes, similar to a follower force or jackknife instability. We also discuss the roles of the muscles along the body axis in generating body undulations in terms of our physical model.

  10. Instability-based mechanism for body undulations in centipede locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoi, Shinya; Egi, Yoshimasa; Tsuchiya, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Centipedes have many body segments and legs and they generate body undulations during terrestrial locomotion. Centipede locomotion has the characteristic that body undulations are absent at low speeds but appear at faster speeds; furthermore, their amplitude and wavelength increase with increasing speed. There are conflicting reports regarding whether the muscles along the body axis resist or support these body undulations and the underlying mechanisms responsible for the body undulations remain largely unclear. In the present study, we investigated centipede locomotion dynamics using computer simulation with a body-mechanical model and experiment with a centipede-like robot and then conducted dynamic analysis with a simple model to clarify the mechanism. The results reveal that body undulations in these models occur due to an instability caused by a supercritical Hopf bifurcation. We subsequently compared these results with data obtained using actual centipedes. The model and actual centipedes exhibit similar dynamic properties, despite centipedes being complex, nonlinear dynamic systems. Based on our findings, we propose a possible passive mechanism for body undulations in centipedes, similar to a follower force or jackknife instability. We also discuss the roles of the muscles along the body axis in generating body undulations in terms of our physical model.

  11. Nonlinear harmonic generation and proposed experimental verification in SASE FELs.

    SciTech Connect

    Biedron, S. G.; Freund, H. P.; Milton, S. V.

    1999-08-24

    Recently, a 3D, polychromatic, nonlinear simulation code was developed to study the growth of nonlinear harmonics in self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free-electron lasers (FELs). The simulation was applied to the parameters for each stage of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) SASE FEL, intended for operation in the visible, UV, and short UV wavelength regimes, respectively, to study the presence of nonlinear harmonic generation. Significant nonlinear harmonic growth is seen. Here, a discussion of the code development, the APS SASE FEL, the simulations and results, and, finally, the proposed experimental procedure for verification of such nonlinear harmonic generation at the APS SASE FEL will be given.

  12. Computer modelling of statistical properties of SASE FEL radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldin, E. L.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    1997-06-01

    The paper describes an approach to computer modelling of statistical properties of the radiation from self amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser (SASE FEL). The present approach allows one to calculate the following statistical properties of the SASE FEL radiation: time and spectral field correlation functions, distribution of the fluctuations of the instantaneous radiation power, distribution of the energy in the electron bunch, distribution of the radiation energy after monochromator installed at the FEL amplifier exit and the radiation spectrum. All numerical results presented in the paper have been calculated for the 70 nm SASE FEL at the TESLA Test Facility being under construction at DESY.

  13. Start-Up of FEL Oscillator from Shot Noise

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, V.; Krishnagopal, S.; Fawley, W.M.

    2007-01-25

    In free-electron laser (FEL) oscillators, as inself-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) FELs, the buildup of cavitypower starts from shot noise resulting from the discreteness ofelectronic charge. It is important to do the start-up analysis for thebuild-up of cavity power in order to fix the macropulse width from theelectron accelerator such that the system reaches saturation. In thispaper, we use the time-dependent simulation code GINGER [1]toperformthis analysis. We present results of this analysis for theparameters of the Compact Ultrafast TErahertz FEL (CUTE-FEL) [2]beingbuilt atRRCAT.

  14. Status of the microwave inverse FEL experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, R. B.; Marshall, T. C.; Wang, Mei; Hirshfield, J. L.

    1999-07-01

    A status report is presented on an inverse free-electron-laser accelerator experiment operating in the microwave regime (1). This proof-of-principle electron accelerator is powered by up to 15 MW of RF power at 2.86 GHz, which propagates in a smooth-walled circular waveguide surrounded by a pulsed bifilar helical undulator: solenoids provide an axial guiding magnetic field. Undulator pitch, which is initially 11.75 cm, is up-tapered to 13.5 cm over the 1-meter length of the structure to maintain acceleration gradient. Numerical computations predict an energy gain of 0.7 MeV using a 6 MeV injected beam from a 2-1/2 cell RF gun, with small energy spread and strong phase trapping. The maximum attainable acceleration gradient with such a design, using 150 MW of RF power at 34 GHz, is estimated to be at least 30 MV/m. Results from bench tests of the structure and undulator are presented, along with preliminary beam measurements.

  15. ELECTRON COOLING IN THE PRESENCE OF UNDULATOR FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV,A.; BEN-ZVI, I.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    The design of the higher-energy cooler for Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) recently adopted a non-magnetized approach which requires a low temperature electron beam. However, to avoid significant loss of heavy ions due to recombination with electrons in the cooling section, the temperature of the electron beam should be high. These two contradictory requirements are satisfied in the design of the RWIC cooler with the help of the undulator fields. The model of the friction force in the presence of an undulator field was benchmarked vs. direct numerical simulations with an excellent agreement. Here, we discuss cooling dynamics simulations with a helical undulator, including recombination suppression and resulting luminosities.

  16. The possibility for a short-period hybrid staggered undulator.

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, S.; Experimental Facilities Division

    2005-01-01

    A short-period hybrid-type staggered undulator is proposed. A proper combination of vanadium Permendur (VP) pole and NdFeB magnet provide approximately 40% larger peak field strength than a conventional staggered undulator. The peak field of a 15-mm-period hybrid staggered undulator exceeds 0.8 T at a gap of 6 mm. Also, by using dysprosium as a pole and PrFeB as a magnet at liquid nitrogen temperature (77K), even higher peak field ({approx} 0.94 T) can be achieved at the same gap.

  17. Observation of Picometer Vertical Emittance with a Vertical Undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wootton, K. P.; Boland, M. J.; Dowd, R.; Tan, Y.-R. E.; Cowie, B. C. C.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Taylor, G. N.; Rassool, R. P.

    2012-11-01

    Using a vertical undulator, picometer vertical electron beam emittances have been observed at the Australian Synchrotron storage ring. An APPLE-II type undulator was phased to produce a horizontal magnetic field, which creates a synchrotron radiation field that is very sensitive to the vertical electron beam emittance. The measured ratios of undulator spectral peak heights are evaluated by fitting to simulations of the apparatus. With this apparatus immediately available at most existing electron and positron storage rings, we find this to be an appropriate and novel vertical emittance diagnostic.

  18. Performance of a hard x-ray undulator at CHESS

    SciTech Connect

    Bilderback, D. H.; Batterman, B. W.; Bedzyk, M. J.; Finkelstein, K.; Henderson, C.; Merlini, A.; Schildkamp, W.; Shen, Q.; White, J.; Blum, E. B.; and others

    1989-07-01

    A 3.3-cm period Nd-Fe-B hybrid undulator has been designed and successfully operated in the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR). This 2-m-long, 123-pole insertion device is a prototype of one of the undulators planned for the Advanced Photon Source. In dedicated operation, the undulator produced the expected brightness at 5.437 GeV with the fundamental x-ray energy ranging from 4.3 to 7.9 keV corresponding to a change in gap from 1.5 to 2.8 cm.

  19. The equivalence of inverse Compton scattering and the undulator concept

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y,; /Fermilab

    2009-08-01

    Inverse Compton scattering is a method to produce very high frequency photon beam. However, the production mechanism can also be viewed as a undulator emission. This is because the electron sees electric and magnetic fields of the incident laser beam and is driven into transverse oscillatory motion in exactly the same way when the electron passes through a undulator consisting of alternating magnetic field. This note gives a detailed examination of the similarity about the two views. Equivalent undulator parameters are derived for the incident laser beam, as well as the differential cross section of photon emission.

  20. Proposal of a Bulk HTSC Staggered Array Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kii, Toshiteru; Kinjo, Ryota; Bakr, Mahmoud A.; Sonobe, Taro; Higashimura, Keisuke; Masuda, Kai; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Yoshida, Kyohei; Zen, Heisyun

    2010-06-23

    We proposed a new type of undulator based on bulk high-T{sub c} superconductors (HTSC) which consists of a single solenoid and a stacked array of bulk HTSC. The main advantage of this configuration is that a mechanical structure is not required to produce and control the undulator field. In order to perform a proof of principle experiment, we have developed a prototype of bulk HTSC staggered array undulator using 11 pairs of DyBaCuO bulk superconductors and a normal conducting solenoid. Experimental results obtained by using the prototype undulator and numerical results obtained by a loop current model based on the Bean mode for a type-II superconductor were compared.

  1. A Comparison of Geoid Undulations for West Central Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Daniel R.; Csatho, Beata; Jezek, Kenneth C.; Thomas, Robert H.; Krabill, William B.; vonFrese, Ralph R. B.; Forsberg, Rene

    1997-01-01

    The accuracy of a new local gravity field model, GEOID94A, is examined at a site on the western Greenland ice sheet. The model, developed by the Danish National Survey and Cadastre, incorporates several new gravity data sets including an extensive amount of airborne gravity data. Model-derived geoid undulations were compared to independently determined undulations found by differencing the elevations from Global Positioning System controlled airborne laser altimetry and optical leveling surveys. Differences between the two sets of undulations were less than +/- 6 cm RMS. The comparison improved (+/- 5 cm RMS) when GEOID94A undulations were adjusted by local gravity observations also acquired at the site. Our comparisons demonstrate that GEOID94A adequately models the long to intermediate wavelengths of the gravity field. We conclude that GEOID94A constitutes a reliable reference model for studies of Greenland's gravity field.

  2. A Fixed Gap APPLE II Undulator for SLS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, T.; Imhof, A.; Ingold, G.; Jakob, B.; Vollenweider, C.

    2007-01-19

    To vary the polarization vector of an APPLE II undulator continuously from 0 - 180 deg., all four magnet arrays need to be movable. Following the adjustable-phase undulator approach by R. Carr, a 3.4 m long fixed gap undulator for SLS with a gap of 11.6 mm has been constructed. It will be installed in fall 2006. The gap drive is replaced by a pair-wise shift of the magnet arrays to change the energy, while the polarization is changed by shifts of diagonal arrays. The high injection efficiency and standard operation top-up mode at the SLS allows this simplified undulator design. The design as well as the operational aspects will be discussed.

  3. An Undulator Based Polarized Positron Source for CLIC

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wanming; Gai, Wei; Rinolfi, Louis; Sheppard, John; /SLAC

    2012-07-02

    A viable positron source scheme is proposed that uses circularly polarized gamma rays generated from the main 250 GeV electron beam. The beam passes through a helical superconducting undulator with a magnetic field of {approx} 1 Tesla and a period of 1.15 cm. The gamma-rays produced in the undulator in the energy range between {approx} 3 MeV - 100 MeV will be directed to a titanium target and produce polarized positrons. The positrons are then captured, accelerated and transported to a Pre-Damping Ring (PDR). Detailed parameter studies of this scheme including positron yield, and undulator parameter dependence are presented. Effects on the 250 GeV CLIC main beam, including emittance growth and energy loss from the beam passing through the undulator are also discussed.

  4. Earth's Magnetic Field Measurements for the LCLS Undulators

    SciTech Connect

    Hacker, Kirsten

    2010-12-13

    Measurements of the earth's magnetic field at several locations at SLAC were conducted to determine the possible field error contribution from tuning the undulators in a location with a different magnetic field than that which will be found in the undulator hall. An average difference of 0.08 {+-} 0.04 Gauss has been measured between the downward earth's field components in the test facility and SLAC tunnel locations.

  5. Source challenges resulting of the first applications of a UV storage ring FEL on Super-ACO

    SciTech Connect

    Couprie, M.E.; Bakker, R.; Nahon, L. |

    1995-12-31

    Since 1992, significant progresses were achieved on the Super-ACO (S-ACO) storage ring Free Electron Laser (FEL) in the UV. The operation at the nominal energy 800 MeV has several consequences: higher average power in the UV (25 mW at 60 mA and more recently 100 mW at 100 mA available for the users), 10 hours of lasing for the same injection of positrons, providing enough time for performing an user experiment, compatibility with the users of synchrotron radiation (SR) in the temporal structure mode for 120 mA with the possibility of closing the four insertion devices of S-ACO. The main difficulties to extend the FEL optical performances come from the small gain (2%), limiting a rapid extention of the spectral range (either in the laser mode or by coherent harmonic generation from the FEL itself in the undulator) or linewidth narrowing. The installation of a 500 MHz harmonic cavity for bunch length reduction and gain increase is under consideration{hor_ellipsis} The stability of the FEL temporal and spectral was systematically followed versus time, for various scales (from ns to half an hour) with different detectors. The stability of the laser source has been significantly improved with a longitudinal feedback system allowing the jitter of the 25 ps RMS laser micropulse to be reduced from 150-200 ps down to 10-20 ps. the intensity fluctuations to be damped down 1% and the spectral drift to be smaller than the resolution of the scanning Fabry-Perot (0.01{angstrom}) at perfect synchronism. The laser can work during more than 3 consecutive hours without readjustments. In addition, according to the ring current, the positron beam is submitted to coherent modes of synchrotron oscillations. Right now, a Pedersen type longitudinal feedback damps the dipolar modes of such oscillation. The quadrupolar modes in the 120-60 mA range leading to a rather unstable FEL are on the way to be damped with an additional feedback.

  6. Feasibility and electromagnetic analysis of a REBCO superconducting undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesgin, Ibrahim; Kasa, Matthew; Doose, Charles; Ivanyushenkov, Yury; Zhang, Yifei; Knoll, Alan; Brownsey, Paul; Hazelton, Drew; Welp, Ulrich

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in second-generation (2G) high temperature superconducting (HTS) coated conductors (CCs) have made them very attractive for new applications such as undulators. In this paper, we have, for the first time, experimentally evaluated a design to validate applicability of 2G-HTS tapes for next generation undulator magnetic structures. A two-period undulator magnetic core was fabricated and 2G-HTS CCs were successfully wound onto the undulator core. The performance of the undulator magnetic structure was investigated and the highest engineering current density, J e, in such configuration reported yet was obtained. A new U-slit tape configuration was used to reduce the number of resistive joints and it was shown that with this new technique affordable levels of resistance values can be achieved for short length undulators. The ferromagnetic core was designed such as to accommodate winding the U-slit tapes. Test results indicated that the winding and the soldering procedures are successful and do not deteriorate the performance of the 2G-HTS tapes.

  7. Undulation frequency affects burial performance in living and model flatfishes.

    PubMed

    McKee, Amberle; MacDonald, Ian; Farina, Stacy C; Summers, Adam P

    2016-04-01

    Flatfishes bury themselves under a thin layer of sand to hide from predators or to ambush prey. We investigated the role of undulation frequency of the body in burial in five species of flatfishes (Isopsetta isolepis, Lepidopsetta bilineata, Hippoglossoides elassodon, Parophrys vetulus, and Psettichthys melanostictus). High-speed videos show that undulations begin cranially and pass caudally while burying, as in forward swimming in many other fishes. The flatfishes also flick the posterior edge of their dorsal and anal fins during burial, which may increase the total surface area covered by substrate. We built a simple physical model - a flexible, oval silicone plate with a motorized, variable-speed actuator - to isolate the effect of undulation frequency on burial. In both the model and actuated dead flatfish, increased undulation frequency resulted in an increase in the area of sand coverage. Complete coverage required an undulation frequency of no more than 10Hz for our models, and that was also sufficient for live flatfishes. The model shows that undulation is sufficient to bury the animal, but live flatfishes showed a superior ability to bury, which we attribute to the action of the median fins. PMID:26763759

  8. On the Kinematics of Undulator Girder Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, J; /SLAC

    2011-08-18

    The theory of rigid body kinematics is used to derive equations that govern the control and measurement of the position and orientation of undulator girders. The equations form the basis of the girder matlab software on the LCLS control system. The equations are linear for small motion and easily inverted as desired. For reference, some relevant girder geometrical data is also given. Equations 6-8 relate the linear potentiometer readings to the motion of the girder. Equations 9-11 relate the cam shaft angles to the motion of the girder. Both sets are easily inverted to either obtain the girder motion from the angles or readings, or, to find the angles and readings that would give a desired motion. The motion of any point on the girder can be calculated by applying either sets of equations to the two cam-planes and extrapolating in the z coordinate using equation 19. The formulation of the equations is quite general and easily coded via matrix and vector methods. They form the basis of the girder matlab software on the LCLS control system.

  9. Wakefields in the LCLS Undulator Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, Karl L.F.; Zagorodnov, Igor A.; /DESY

    2005-08-15

    We have studied longitudinal wakefields of very short bunches in non-cylindrically symmetric (3D) vacuum chamber transitions using analytical models and the computer program ECHO. The wake (for pairs of well-separated, non-smooth transitions) invariably is resistive, with its shape proportional to the bunch distribution. For the example of an elliptical collimator in a round beam pipe we have demonstrated that--as in the cylindrically symmetric (2D) case--the wake can be obtained from the static primary field of the beam alone. We have obtained the wakes of the LCLS rectangular-to-round transitions using indirect (numerical) field integration combined with a primary beam field calculation. For the LCLS 1 nC bunch charge configuration we find that the total variation in wake-induced energy change is small (0.03% in the core of the beam, 0.15% in the horns of the distribution) compared to that due to the resistive wall wakes of the undulator beam pipe (0.6%).

  10. Proposed uv-FEL user facility at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Di Mauro, L.F.; Krinsky, S.; White, M.G.; Yu, L.H.; Batchelor, K.; Friedman, A.; Fisher, A.S.; Halama, H.; Ingold, G.; Johnson, E.D.; Kramer, S.; Rogers, J.T.; Solomon, L.; Wachtel, J.; Zhang, X.

    1991-01-01

    The NSLS at Brookhaven National Laboratory is proposing the construction of a UV-FEL operating in the wavelength range from visible to 750{Angstrom}. Nano-Coulomb electron pulses will be generated at a laser photo-cathode RF gun at a repetition rate of 10 KHz. The 6 ps pulses will be accelerated to 250 MeV in a superconducting linac. The FEL output will serve four stations with independent wavelength tuning, using two wigglers and two rotating mirror beam switches. Seed radiation for the FEL amplifiers will be provided by conventional tunable lasers, and the final frequency multiplication from the visible or near UV to the VUV will be carried out in the FEL itself. Each FEL will comprise of an initial wiggler resonant to the seed wavelength, a dispersion section, and a second wiggler resonant to the output wavelength. The facility will provide pump probe capability, FEL or FEL, and FEL on synchrotron light from an insersion device on the NSLS X-Ray ring. 15 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Where Would Economics Education Be without Rendigs Fels?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegfried, John J.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the career of Rendigs Fels from his first academic appointment in 1948 until the present. Concludes that Fels is one of a small number of respected economists who have made interest, involvement, and research in the teaching of economics an important and respectable part of the profession. (CFR)

  12. Facts of Environmental Life (FEL): A Projective Counseling Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golden, James R.; Parker, Joseph P.

    This paper presents the Facts of Environmental Life (FEL), a counseling technique which incorporates the action sociogram and the Adlerian concept of purposeful behavior. The use of the FEL materials, i.e., a life space board, standing figures of varying sizes, and blocks and barricades representing emotional blocks, is illustrated. Instructions…

  13. Feedback Requirements for SASE-FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Loos, Henrik; /SLAC

    2012-07-06

    The operation of a Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) Free Electron Lasers (FEL) at soft and hard X-ray wavelengths driven by a high brightness electron beam imposes strong requirements on the stability of the accelerator and feedback systems are necessary to both guarantee saturation of the SASE process as well as a stable photon beam for user experiments. Diagnostics for the relevant transverse and longitudinal beam parameters are presented and various examples of feedback systems for bunches with low repetition rate as well as systems for intra bunch train feedbacks are discussed.

  14. Gain results for low voltage FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, A.; Stuart, R.A.; Al-Shamma`a, A.

    1995-12-31

    We have designed and constructed a low voltage (130 kV) FEL system capable of operating in the microwave frequency range for which the electron beam current is cw (rather than pulsed) in time at a level of {approximately} 12 mA. The gain of this system has been measured as a function of the electron beam accelerating voltage and current level, and the input microwave frequency (8-10 GHz). The results are compared with the predictions of a simple theoretical model.

  15. Design considerations and analysis of potential applications of a high power ultraviolet FEL at the TESLA test facility at DESY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagani, C.; Saldin, E. L.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    1999-02-01

    A possibility of constructing a high power ultraviolet free electron laser at the TESLA test facility at DESY is discussed. The proposed facility consists of a tunable master oscillator (P av˜10 mW, P peak˜10 kW, λ≃200-350 nm) and an FEL amplifier with a tapered undulator. The average and peak radiation power at the exit of the FEL amplifier is about 7 kW and 220 GW, respectively. Installation of such a facility can significantly extend scientific potential of the TESLA test facility. The UV free electron laser can be used to construct a polarized, monochromatic gamma-source with the ultimate yield up to 10 12 gamma-quanta per second and the maximal energy of about 100 MeV. An intensive gamma-source can also form the base for constructing the test facility for the TESLA positron generation system. Another accelerator application of the proposed facility is verification of the main technical solutions for the laser and the optical system to be used in the gamma-gamma option of the TESLA collider. A high average power UV laser is also promising for industrial applications.

  16. Method for separating FEL output beams from long wavelength radiation

    DOEpatents

    Neil, George; Shinn, Michelle D.; Gubeli, Joseph

    2016-04-26

    A method for improving the output beam quality of a free electron laser (FEL) by reducing the amount of emission at wavelengths longer than the electron pulse length and reducing the amount of edge radiation. A mirror constructed of thermally conductive material and having an aperture therein is placed at an oblique angle with respect to the beam downstream of the bending magnet but before any sensitive use of the FEL beam. The aperture in the mirror is sized to deflect emission longer than the wavelength of the FEL output while having a minor impact on the FEL output beam. A properly sized aperture will enable the FEL radiation, which is coherent and generally at a much shorter wavelength than the bending radiations, to pass through the aperture mirror. The much higher divergence bending radiations will subsequently strike the aperture mirror and be reflected safely out of the way.

  17. FEL gain optimisation and spontaneous radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bali, L.M.; Srivastava, A.; Pandya, T.P.

    1995-12-31

    Colson have evaluated FEL gains for small deviations from perfect electron beam injection, with radiation of the same polarisation as that of the wiggler fields. We find that for optimum gain the polarisation of the optical field should be the same as that of the spontaneous emission under these conditions. With a helical wiggler the axial oscillations resulting from small departures from perfect electron beam injection lead to injection dependent unequal amplitudes and phases of the spontaneous radiation in the two transverse directions. Viewed along the axis therefore the spontaneous emission is elliptically polarised. The azimuth of the ellipse varies with the difference of phase of the two transverse components of spontaneous emission but the eccentricity remains the same. With planar wigglers the spontaneous emission viewed in the axial direction is linearly polarised, again with an injection dependent azimuth. For optimum coherent gain of a radiation field its polarisation characteristics must be the same as those of the spontaneous radiation with both types of wiggler. Thus, with a helical wiggler and the data reported earlier, an increase of 10% in the FEL gain at the fundamental frequency and of 11% at the fifth harmonic has been calculated in the small gain per pass limit. Larger enhancements in gain may result from more favourable values of input parameters.

  18. 40-{angstrom} FEL designs for the PEP storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.S.; Gallardo, J.C.; Nuhn, H.D.; Tatchyn, R.; Winick, H.; Pellegrini, C.

    1991-12-31

    We explore the use of the 2.2-km PEP storage ring at SLAC to drive a 40-{Angstrom} free-electron laser in the self-amplified spontaneous emission configuration. Various combinations for electron-beam and undulator parameters, as well as special undulator designs, are discussed. Saturation and high peak, in-band, coherent power (460 MW) are possible with a 67-m, hybrid permanent-magnet undulator in a ring bypass. A 100-m, cusp-field undulator can achieve high average, in-band, coherent power (0.25 W) in the main ring. The existing, 25.6-m, Paladin undulator at LLNL, with the addition of optical-klystron dispersive sections, is considered for both peak and average power. 35 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. 40- angstrom FEL designs for the PEP storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.S.; Gallardo, J.C. ); Nuhn, H.D.; Tatchyn, R.; Winick, H. . Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Pellegrini, C. . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-01-01

    We explore the use of the 2.2-km PEP storage ring at SLAC to drive a 40-{Angstrom} free-electron laser in the self-amplified spontaneous emission configuration. Various combinations for electron-beam and undulator parameters, as well as special undulator designs, are discussed. Saturation and high peak, in-band, coherent power (460 MW) are possible with a 67-m, hybrid permanent-magnet undulator in a ring bypass. A 100-m, cusp-field undulator can achieve high average, in-band, coherent power (0.25 W) in the main ring. The existing, 25.6-m, Paladin undulator at LLNL, with the addition of optical-klystron dispersive sections, is considered for both peak and average power. 35 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. 40 CFR 1037.645 - In-use compliance with family emission limits (FELs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... in-use FEL for certain in-use vehicles, subject to the provisions of this section. Note that § 1037... intended to address circumstances in which it is in the public interest to apply a higher in-use FEL based... different FELs, we may apply a higher FEL within the family than was applied to the vehicle's...

  1. 40 CFR 1036.625 - In-use compliance with family emission limits (FELs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... us to apply a higher in-use FEL for certain in-use engines, subject to the provisions of this section... higher in-use FEL based on forfeiting an appropriate number of emission credits. (b) FELs. When applying... forfeit CO2 emission credits based on the difference between the in-use FEL and the otherwise...

  2. 40 CFR 1036.625 - In-use compliance with family emission limits (FELs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... us to apply a higher in-use FEL for certain in-use engines, subject to the provisions of this section... higher in-use FEL based on forfeiting an appropriate number of emission credits. (b) FELs. When applying... forfeit CO2 emission credits based on the difference between the in-use FEL and the otherwise...

  3. 40 CFR 1037.645 - In-use compliance with family emission limits (FELs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... in-use FEL for certain in-use vehicles, subject to the provisions of this section. Note that § 1037... intended to address circumstances in which it is in the public interest to apply a higher in-use FEL based... different FELs, we may apply a higher FEL within the family than was applied to the vehicle's...

  4. 40 CFR 1036.625 - In-use compliance with family emission limits (FELs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... us to apply a higher in-use FEL for certain in-use engines, subject to the provisions of this section... higher in-use FEL based on forfeiting an appropriate number of emission credits. (b) FELs. When applying... forfeit CO2 emission credits based on the difference between the in-use FEL and the otherwise...

  5. Optics-free x-ray FEL oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Hao, Y.; Kayran, D.; Trbojevic, D.

    2011-03-28

    There is a need for an Optics-Free FEL Oscillators (OFFELO) to further the advantages of free-electron lasers and turning them in fully coherent light sources. While SASE (Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission) FELs demonstrated the capability of providing very high gain and short pulses of radiation and scalability to the X-ray range, the spectra of SASE FELs remains rather wide ({approx}0.5%-1%) compared with typical short wavelengths FEL-oscillators (0.01%-0.0003% in OK-4 FEL). Absence of good optics in VUV and X-ray ranges makes traditional oscillator schemes with very high average and peak spectral brightness either very complex or, strictly speaking, impossible. In this paper, we discuss lattice of the X-ray optics-free FEL oscillator and present results of initial computer simulations of the feedback process and the evolution of FEL spectrum in X-ray OFFELO. We also discuss main limiting factors and feasibility of X-ray OFFELO.

  6. Spontaneous emission effects in optically pumped x-ray FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Smetanin, I.V.; Grigor`ev, S.V.

    1995-12-31

    An effect of spontaneous emission in both quantum and classical regimes of the optically pumped X-ray free electron laser (FEL) in investigated. The quantum properties of an FEL are determined by the ratio of the separation {h_bar} between the absorption and emission lines (i.e. the quanta emitted) and their effective width {Delta}{epsilon} {eta}={h_bar}/{Delta}{epsilon}. In the conventional classical regime {eta} {much_lt} 1 an electron emits and absorbes a great number of shortwavelength photons over the interaction region, the gain in FEL being the result of these competitive processes. In the quantum limit {eta} {much_gt} 1 the emission and absorption lines are completely separated and thus the FEL becomes a two-level quantum oscillator with a completely inverted active medium. Spontaneous emission causes the electron to leave the range of energies where resonant interaction with the laser field occurs, thus effectively reducing the number of particles that take part in generating the induced X-ray signal. This effect is found to be crucial for lasing in optically pumped X-ray FEL. The characteristic relaxation times are calculated for both classical and quantum FEL regimes. It is shown that spontaneous emission results in FEL electron beam threshold current, which is of rather high value. An optimal range of pumping laser intensities is determined.

  7. Optimization for Single-Spike X-Ray FELs at LCLS with a Low Charge Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Ding, Y.; Huang, Z.; /SLAC

    2011-12-14

    The Linac Coherent Light Source is an x-ray free-electron laser at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, which is operating at x-ray wavelengths of 20-1.2 Angstrom with peak brightness nearly ten orders of magnitude beyond conventional synchrotron radiation sources. At the low charge operation mode (20 pC), the x-ray pulse length can be <10 fs. In this paper we report our numerical optimization and simulations to produce even shorter x-ray pulses by optimizing the machine and undulator setup at 20 pC charge. In the soft x-ray regime, with combination of slotted-foil or undulator taper, a single spike x-ray pulse is achievable with peak FEL power of a few 10s GW. Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the world's first hard x-ray Free electron laser (FEL), has started operation since 2009. With nominal operation charge of 250 pC, the generated x-ray pulse length is from 70 fs to a few hundred fs. This marks the beginning of a new era of ultrashort x-ray sciences. In addition, a low charge (20pC) operation mode has also been established. Since the collective effects are reduced at the low charge mode, we can increase the compression factor and still achieve a few kA peak current. The expected electron beam and x-ray pulses are less than 10 fs. There are growing interests in even shorter x-ray pulses, such as fs to sub-fs regime. One of the simple solutions is going to even lower charge. As discussed, single-spike x-ray pulses can be generated using 1 pC charge. However, this charge level is out of the present LCLS diagnostic range. 20 pC is a reasonable operation charge at LCLS, based on the present diagnostic system. At 20 pC in the soft x-ray wavelength regime, we have experimentally demonstrated that FEL can work at undercompression or over-compression mode, such as 1 degree off the full-compression; at full-compression, however, there is almost no lasing. In hard x-ray wavelength regime, we observed that there are reasonable photons generated even at full

  8. Wakefield computations for a corrugated pipe as a beam dechirper for FEL applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, C. K.; Bane, K. L.F.

    2015-06-09

    A beam “dechirper” based on a corrugated, metallic vacuum chamber has been proposed recently to cancel residual energy chirp in a beam before it enters the undulator in a linac-based X-ray FEL. Rather than the round geometry that was originally proposed, we consider a pipe composed of two parallel plates with corrugations. The advantage is that the strength of the wake effect can be tuned by adjusting the separation of the plates. The separation of the plates is on the order of millimeters, and the corrugations are fractions of a millimeter in size. The dechirper needs to be meters long in order to provide sufficient longitudinal wakefield to cancel the beam chirp. Considerable computation resources are required to determine accurately the wakefield for such a long structure with small corrugation gaps. Combining the moving window technique and parallel computing using multiple processors, the time domain module in the parallel finite-element electromagnetic suite ACE3P allows efficient determination of the wakefield through convergence studies. In this paper, we will calculate the longitudinal, dipole and quadrupole wakefields for the dechirper and compare the results with those of analytical and field matching approaches.

  9. Design study of the bending sections between harmonic cascade FEL stages

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Weishi; Corlett, John; Fawley, William; Zholents, A.

    2004-06-30

    The present design of LUX (linac based ultra-fast X-ray facility) includes a harmonic cascade FEL chain to generate coherent EUV and soft X-ray radiation. Four cascade stages, each consisting of two undulators acting as a modulator and a radiator, respectively, are envisioned to produce photons of approximate wavelengths 48 nm, 12 nm, 4 nm and 1 nm. Bending sections may be placed between the modulator and the radiator of each stage to adjust and maintain bunching of the electrons, to separate, in space, photons of different wavelengths and to optimize the use of real estate. In this note, the conceptual design of such a bending section, which may be used at all four stages, is presented. Preliminary tracking results show that it is possible to maintain bunch structure of nm length scale in the presence of errors, provided that there is adequate orbit correction and there are 2 families of trim quads and trim skew quads, respectively, in each bending section.

  10. High-power FEL design issues - a critical review

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Madey, J.M.J.; O`Shea, P.G.

    1995-12-31

    The high-average power capability of FELs has been much advertised but little realized. In this paper we provide a critical analysis of the technological and economic issues associated with high-average power FEL operation from the UV to near IR. The project of IR FEL for the Siberian Center of photochemical researches is described. The distinguished features of this project are the use of the race-track microtron-recuperator and the {open_quotes}electron output of radiation{close_quotes}. The building for the machine is under reconstruction now. About half of hardware has been manufactured. The assembly of installation began.

  11. CEBAF UV/IR FEL subsystem testing and validation program

    SciTech Connect

    G.R. Neil; S.V. Benson; H.F. Dylla; H. Liu

    1995-01-01

    A design has been established for IR and UV FELs within the Laser Processing Consortium's (LPC) program for development and application of high-average-power FELs for materials processing. Hardware prototyping and testing for the IR portion of the system are underway. The driver portion has been designed based on the superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) technology now seeing large-scale application in the commissioning of CEBAF, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, where LPC activities are centered. As of July 1994, measurements of beam performance confirm SRF's benefits in beam quality and stability, which are applicable to high-average-power FELs.

  12. NSLS IN-VACUUM UNDULATORS AND MINI-BETA STRAIGHTS.

    SciTech Connect

    RAKOWSKY,G.; LYNCH,D.; BLUM,E.B.; KRINSKY,S.

    2001-06-18

    We review the work carried out in the X13 R&D Straight Section of the NSLS X-Ray Ring on small gap in-vacuum undulators (IVUNs). Then we discuss: (1) plans to replace the pure permanent magnet undulator in X13 by a hybrid design providing stronger magnetic fields, enhancing the tunability of the device; (2) plans to install hybrid IVUNs in the two RF straights of the X-Ray Ring, increasing the number of insertion devices in the XRay Ring to eight; (3) the possibility of reducing the vertical beta function in the X13 straight from 0.33 m down to 0.16 m. This reduction in beta function would allow us to decrease the usable undulator gap from 3mm down to 2mm, further increasing the tuning range.

  13. The Jefferson lab FEL driver ERLs

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, David R.; Tennant, Christopher D.

    2013-11-01

    Jefferson Lab has - for over a decade - been operating high power IR and UV FELs using CW energy recovering linacs based on DC photocathode electron sources and CEBAF SRF technology. These machines have unique combinations of beam quality, power, and operational flexibility, and thus offer significant opportunity for experiments that use low and medium energy (several tens - few hundreds of MeV) electron beams. We will describe the systems and detail their present and near-term (potential) performance. Recent internal-target analysis and validation testing will be discussed, and schemes for single- and two-pass fixed target operation described. An introduction to subsequent discussions of beam quality and upgrade paths to polarized operation/higher energy will be given.

  14. A strong permanent magnet-assisted electromagnetic undulator

    DOEpatents

    Halbach, K.

    1987-01-30

    This invention discloses an improved undulator comprising a plurality of electromagnet poles located along opposite sides of a particle beam axis with alternate north and south poles on each side of the beam to cause the beam to wiggle or undulate as it travels generally along the beam axis and permanent magnets spaced adjacent the electromagnetic poles on each side of the axis of said particle beam in an orientation sufficient to reduce the saturation of the electromagnet poles whereby the field strength of the electromagnet poles can be increased beyond the normal saturation levels of the electromagnetic poles. 4 figs.

  15. The Advanced Light Source (ALS) Slicing Undulator Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Heimann, P. A.; Glover, T. E.; Plate, D.; Brown, V. C.; Padmore, H. A.; Lee, H. J.; Schoenlein, R. W.

    2007-01-19

    A beamline optimized for the bunch slicing technique has been construction at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). This beamline includes an in-vacuum undulator, soft and hard x-ray beamlines and a femtosecond laser system. The soft x-ray beamline may operate in spectrometer mode, where an entire absorption spectrum is accumulated at one time, or in monochromator mode. The femtosecond laser system has a high repetition rate of 20 kHz to improve the average slicing flux. The performance of the soft x-ray branch of the ALS slicing undulator beamline will be presented.

  16. NATIONAL HIGH MAGENTIC FIELD LABORATORY FEL INJECTOR DESIGN CONSIDERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Pavel Evtushenko; Stephen Benson; David Douglas; George Neil

    2007-06-25

    A Numerical study of beam dynamics was performed for two injector systems for the proposed National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at the Florida State University (FSU) Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility. The first considered a system consisting of a thermionic DC gun, two buncher cavities operated at 260 MHz and 1.3 GHz and two TESLA type cavities, and is very similar to the injector of the ELBE Radiation Source. The second system we studied uses a DC photogun (a copy of JLab FEL electron gun), one buncher cavity operated at 1.3 GHz and two TESLA type cavities. The study is based on PARMELA simulations and takes into account operational experience of both the JLab FEL and the Radiation Source ELBE. The simulations predict the second system will have a much smaller longitudinal emittance. For this reason the DC photo gun based injector is preferred for the proposed FSU FEL facility.

  17. Proposed UV-FEL user facility at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Di Mauro, L.F.; Krinsky, S.; White, M.G.; Yu, L.H.

    1990-01-01

    The NSLS at Brookhaven National Laboratory is proposing the construction of a UV-FEL operating in the wavelength range from visible to 1000{angstrom}. Nano-Coulomb electron pulses will be generated at a laser photo-cathode RF gun at a repetition rate of 10 KHz. The 6 ps pulses will be accelerated to 250 MeV in a superconducting linac. The FEL consists of an exponential growth section followed by a tapered section. The amplifier input is a harmonic of a tunable visible laser generated either by nonlinear optical material or the non-linearity of the FEL itself. The FEL output in 10{sup {minus}4} bandwidth is 1 mJ per pulse, resulting in an average power of 10 watts. The availability of radiation with these characteristics would open up new opportunities in photochemistry, biology and non linear optics, as discussed in a recent workshop held at BNL. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. An FEL-based microwave system for fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, R. R.; Jong, R. A.; Orzechowski, T. J.; Scharlemann, E. T.; Throop, A. L.; Kulke, B.; Thomassen, K. I.; Stallard, B. W.

    1990-03-01

    This paper describes designs for 280-GHz and 560-GHz microwave sources based on free electron lasers (FELs). These 10-MW units are based on technology developed over the last 5 years. A first demonstration of high-average-power microwave production with an FEL system is expected in the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) facility. This paper gives details on the design and construction of that 250-GHz, 2-MW system and discusses specific applications for the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT).

  19. The performance of the Duke FEL storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Burnham, B.; Litvinenko, V.N.

    1995-12-31

    The commissioning of the Duke FEL storage ring has been completed. During commissioning, we have conducted a series of performance measurements on the storage ring lattice and the electron beam parameters. In this paper, we will discuss the techniques used in the measurements, present measurement results, and compare the measured parameters with the design specifications. In addition, we will present the expected OK-4 FEL performance based on the measured beam parameters.

  20. FEL Design Studies at LBNL: Activities and Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Corlett, John N.; Fawley, W.; Lidia, S.; Padmore, H.; Penn, G.; Pogorelov, I.; Qiang, J.; Sannibale, F.; Staples, J.; Steier, C.; Venturini, M.; Wan, W.; Wilcox, R.; Zholents, A.

    2007-03-01

    LBNL staff are currently pursuing R&D for future x-ray FELs, and participate in two FEL construction projects. Our strategy is to address the most fundamental challenges, which are the cost-drivers and performance limitations of FEL facilities. An internally funded R&D program is aimed at investigating accelerator physics and technologies in three key areas: (1) Theoretical study, modeling, and experimental development of low emittance, high quantum efficiency cathodes; (2) Design studies of electron beam delivery systems, including emittance manipulations, high-resolution modeling of 6-D phase space, and low-emittance beam transport; and (3) Design studies of optical manipulations of electron beams for seeded and SASE FELs, providing short x-ray pulses of variable duration, synchronous with the seed and pump laser sources, and also long transform-limited pulses with a narrow bandwidth. Design studies of means for production of attosecond x-ray pulses at various wavelengths. We are collaborators in the FERMI{at}Elettra seeded FEL facility under construction at Sincrotrone Trieste, Italy, participating in accelerator design and FEL physics studies, and mechanical and electrical engineering. We are participating in the LCLS project at SLAC, implementing our design of stabilized timing and synchronization systems. Here we outline our long-term objectives, and current activities.

  1. Study of waveguide resonators for FEL operating at submillimeter wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Yakover, I.M.; Pinhasi, Y.; Gover, A.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents theoretical results of waveguide resonator study for FEL operating at the submillimeter wavelength region. Because of increased ohmic losses it is harder to obtain high Q waveguide cavities at these wavelengths. The following unconventional multimode waveguides: metal-dielectric, corrugated and curved parallel plates, were considered. The type and structure of the operating modes were determined and their attenuation constant, effective mode area and wave impedance were calculated. On the basis of this analysis small-signal gain simulations were made. We have performed a parametric study of the various FEL oscillator cavity designs based on the parameters of the Israeli Tandem FEL experiment. It was found that an FEL utilizing unconventional waveguides has much better performance in comparison to an FEL based on conventional multimode rectangular and circular waveguides. In particular, promising design parameters for a sub-mm wavelength FEL utilizing a metal-dielectric waveguide were identified: gain of 45%/Amp and ohmic losses of 2% at frequency 300 GHz, and gain of 20%/Amp and ohmic losses 1% at frequency 675 GHz.

  2. Coaxial passive undulator for the rotational-velocity pumping of annular relativistic electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, A. F.; Vesnin, V. L.; Kubarev, V. A.

    1991-08-01

    It is proposed that a passive magnetic undulator of coaxial design be used for the transverse-velocity pumping of annular relativistic electron beams. This undulator leads to a substantial reduction in the nonuniformity of the undulator field on the beam thickness. An analytical-numerical methodology is developed which enables a detailed investigation and optimization of the nonstationary field structure.

  3. Design issues for cryogenic cooling of short periodsuperconducting undulators

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Dietderich, D.R.; Marks, S.; Prestemon, S.O.; Schlueter, R.D.

    2003-09-15

    Superconducting insertion devices, which produce periodic magnetic fields, have been built and installed in a number of synchrotron-light source storage-rings. For the most part, these devices have been wigglers, which have relatively long period lengths. This report concerns itself with the special cryogenic issues associated with short period undulators. The motivation for considering the incorporation of superconducting technology in insertion device designs is to achieve higher magnetic fields than can be achieved with more conventional permanent magnet technology. Since the peak field decreases sharply with increased magnet gap to period ratio, the cryogenic design of the magnet system is crucial. In particular, the insulation required for a warm vacuum bore device is impractical for short period undulators. This report describes the issues that are related to a cold bore ({approx}4 K) and an intermediate temperature bore (30 to 70 K) designs. The criteria for the use of small cryocoolers for cooling a short period undulator are presented. The problems associated with connecting small coolers to an undulator at 4.2 K are discussed.

  4. Triggering for Magnetic Field Measurements of the LCLS Undulators

    SciTech Connect

    Hacker, Kirsten

    2010-12-13

    A triggering system for magnetic field measurements of the LCLS undulators has been built with a National Instruments PXI-1002 and a Xylinx FPGA board. The system generates single triggers at specified positions, regardless of encoder sensor jitter about a linear scale.

  5. Undulator based scanning microscope at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Rarback, H.; Shu, D.; Ade, H.; Jacobsen, C.; Kirz, J.; McNulty, I.; Rosser, R.

    1986-01-01

    A second generation scanning soft x-ray microscope is under construction, designed to utilize the dramatic increase in source bightness available at the soft x-ray undulator. The new instrument is expected to reduce image acquisition time by a factor of about 100, and to improve resolution, stability, and reproducibility.

  6. An Electromagnetic Micro-Undulator with Millimeter-Size Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassiri, A.; Turner, L. R.

    1997-05-01

    Microfabrication technology using the LIGA (a German acronym for Lithography, Electroforming, and Molding) process offers an attractive alternative for fabricating percision devices with micron-sized features. One such device is a mm-sized micro-undulator with potential applications in a table-top synchrotron light source for medical and other industrial uses. The undulator consists of a silver conductor embedded in poles and substrate of nickle-iron. Electromagnetic modeling of the undulator is done using the eddy-current code ELEKTRA. The silver and nickle-iron are treated as different vector-potential regions and the surrounding ``air" is treated as a combination of vector-potential and magnetic scalar-potential regions. Computations predict a field pattern of appropriate strength and quality if the current can be prevented from being shunted from silver by the nickle-iron poles either through insulation or through slotted poles. The design of the undulator along with the! computational results are discussed.

  7. High Efficiency Electron-Laser Interactions in Tapered Helical Undulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duris, Joseph Patrick

    Efficient coupling of relativistic electron beams with high power radiation lies at the heart of advanced accelerator and light source research and development. The inverse free electron laser is a stable accelerator capable of harnessing very high intensity laser electric fields to efficiently transfer large powers from lasers to electron beams. In this dissertation, we first present the theoretical framework to describe the interaction, and then apply our improved understanding of the IFEL to the design and numerical study of meter-long, GeV IFELs for compact light sources. The central experimental work of the dissertation is the UCLA BNL helical inverse free electron laser experiment at the Accelerator Test Facility in Brookhaven National Laboratory which used a strongly tapered 54cm long, helical, permanent magnet undulator and a several hundred GW CO2 laser to accelerate electrons from 52 to 106MeV, setting new records for inverse free electron laser energy gain (54MeV) and average accelerating gradient (100MeV/m). The undulator design and fabrication as well as experimental diagnostics are presented. In order to improve the stability and quality of the accelerated electron beam, we redesigned the undulator for a slightly reduced output energy by modifying the magnet gap throughout the undulator, and we used this modified undulator to demonstrated capture of >25% of the injected beam without prebunching. In the study of heavily loaded GeV inverse free electron lasers, we show that a majority of the power may be transferred from a laser to the accelerated electron beam. Reversing the process to decelerate high power electron beams, a mechanism we refer to as tapering enhanced stimulated superradiant amplification, offers a clear path to high power light sources. We present studies of radiation production for a wide range of wavelengths (10mum, 13nm, and 0.3nm) using this method and discuss the design for a deceleration experiment using the same undulator used

  8. The dynamics of radiation formation in a FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Ognivenko, V.

    1995-12-31

    The dynamics of stimulated radiation formation from spontaneous emission of the relativistic electrons moving in a magnetic helical undulator is investigated theoretically. The total radiation field of the electron beam has been calculated by summating the spontaneous undulator radiation fields of its individual electrons. The nonlinear dynamics of pointed electrons motion in the total radiation field and the self-amplification of this radiation are considered for the finite length of the electron beam. We analyzed the linear and nonlinear regimes for the one dimensional model. In the linear regime, the longitudinal displacements of electrons relative to their equilibrium trajectories in the undulator have been obtained anallyticatly as functions of entry time, the beam length and axial position of electrons in the undulator. The dependence of the efficiency on the beam length is established. We determined the mechanisms of axial beam bunching in the case of the intense electron beam, where the average distance between electrons in the beam reference frame is smaller than the undulator radiation wavelength, and in the limit case of ultra-short wavelength radiation, where the number of particles over the wavelength is not very large. The one-dimensional numerical simulation of nonlinear dynamics of the beam electron motion in the undulator magnetic field and the total radiation field is carried out for the finite beam length. The expression obtained by the analytical methods well agrees with the numerical simulation.

  9. Simulation of magnetization process of Pure-type superconductor magnet undulator based on T-method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deri, Yi; Kawaguchi, Hideki; Tsuchimoto, Masanori; Tanaka, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    For the next generation Free Electron Laser, Pure-type undulator made of high Tc superconductors (HTSs) was considered to achieve a small size and high intensity magnetic field undulator. In general, it is very difficult to adjust the undulator magnet alignment after the HTS magnetization since the entire undulator is installed inside a cryostat. The appropriate HTS alignment has to be determined in the design stage. This paper presents the development of a numerical simulation code for magnetization process of the Pure-type HTS undulator to assist the design of the optimal size and alignment of the HTS magnets.

  10. The ARC-EN-CIEL FEL proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couprie, M. E.; Desmons, M.; Chubar, O.; Gilquin, B.; Garzella, D.; Jablonka, M.; Lambert, G.; Loulergue, A.; Marquès, J. R.; Ortega, J. M.; Méot, F.; Monot, P.; Mosnier, A.; Nahon, L.; Rousse, A.

    2005-08-01

    We propose an accelerator based 4th generation source to provide coherent femtosecond light pulses down to the soft X ray range to the user community. The project is based on a CW 700 MeV to 1 GeV superconducting linear accelerator delivering high charge, subpicosecond, low emittance electron bunches with high repetition rate. This facility allows for providing High Gain Harmonic Generation seeded with high harmonics in gases, covering a spectral range down to 0.8 nm. In addition, two beam loops are foreseen to increase the beam current in using the energy recovery technique. They will accommodate fs synchrotron radiation sources in the IR, VUV and X ray ranges together with a FEL oscillator in the 10 nm range. A particular emphasis is put on the synergy between accelerator and laser communities. In particular, electron plasma acceleration will be tested. Hard X ray femtosecond radiation will be produced by Thomson Scattering. The first phase of the project, ARC-EN-CIEL phase 1, is now under study. A general overview is given.

  11. The ARC-EN-CIEL FEL proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, G.; Carre, B.; Couprie, M. E.; Desmons, M.; Chubar, O.; Gilquin, B.; Garzella, D.; Jablonka, M.; Labat, M.; Loulergue, A.; Marques, J. R.; Ortega, J. M.; Meot, F.; Monot, P.; Mosnier, A.; Nahon, L.; Rousse, A.

    2005-08-01

    The French project of a fourth generation light source, ARC-EN-CIEL (Accelerator-Radiation for Enhanced Coherent Intense Extended Light), is a unique facility providing the user community with coherent femtosecond light pulses covering the UV, VUV and soft X ray spectral range. It is based on a CW 1 GeV superconducting linear accelerator delivering high charge, subpicosecond, low emittance electron bunches with high repetition rate (1 kHz), and adjustable polarisation until 1 keV. In addition to the High Gain Harmonic Generation (HGHG) experiment seeded with High Harmonics in Gases (HHG), allowing radiation down to 0.8 nm to be produced, two beam loops are foreseen to increase the beam current in using the energy recovery technique. They will accommodate fs synchrotron radiation sources in the IR, VUV and X ray ranges together with a FEL oscillator in the 10 nm range. Moreover, an important synergy is expected between accelerator and laser communities. Indeed, electron plasma acceleration will be tested and hard X ray femtosecond radiations will be produced by Thomson Scattering. The first phase of the project, ARC-EN-CIEL phase 1, is now under study. A general overview will be given.

  12. Magnetic field analysis and achievable on-axis field for helical undulators.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S. H.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2008-01-01

    The on- and off-axis magnetic fields for infinitely long, helical undulators were analyzed for linear and nonlinear poles. An analytical expression of the on-axis field for linear poles was derived in terms of coil current density, undulator period length, and coil dimensions. The derived expression showed that, when the undulator dimensions were scaled according to the period ratios, the on-axis fields were proportional to the periods, which is in agreement with calculations of model undulators. For undulators with nonlinear steel poles, when the undulator dimensions were scaled, the field distributions remained unchanged for a constant value of (current density x period). It was also shown that, for two scaled undulators, one with linear and one with nonlinear poles, the off-axis field components, normalized to the respective on-axis fields, had the same field distributions near the axis within the calculation errors. This implies that the derived normalized off-axis field for linear poles may be used for beam dynamic analysis in the fields of undulators with nonlinear poles within the beam chamber. Achievable on-axis fields were calculated for short-period undulators with parameters close to those for the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) positron production undulators. The required undulator parameters for the ILC appear to be achievable depending on the Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductor packing factor in the coil and on how close the chosen operating current is to the critical current.

  13. High-gain X-ray free electron laser by beat-wave terahertz undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chao; Hei, DongWei; Pellegrin, Claudio; Tantawi, Sami

    2013-12-15

    The THz undulator has a higher gain to realize a much brighter X-ray at saturation, compared with the optical undulator under the same undulator strength and beam quality. In order to fill the high-power THz gap and realize the THz undulator, two superimposed laser pulses at normal incidence to the electron-beam moving direction form an equivalent high-field THz undulator by the frequency difference to realize the high-gain X-ray Free electron laser. The pulse front tilt of lateral fed lasers is used to realize the electron-laser synchronic interaction. By PIC simulation, a higher gain and a larger X-ray radiation power by the beat wave THz undulator could be realized, compared with the optical undulator for the same electron beam parameters.

  14. Injection system for microtron-based terehertz FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakevich, Grigory M.; Kuznetsov, Gennady I.; Pavlov, Viatcheslav M.; Jeong, Young Uk; Park, Seong Hee; Lee, Byung Cheol; /KAERI, Taejon

    2005-09-01

    A reliable injection system of the widely tunable microtron-based terahertz Free Electron Laser (FEL) has been developed and during last few years provides stable operation of the FEL for users. The system is based on the long-life thermionic cathode assembly using 2.5 mm-in diameter monocrystalline LaB{sub 6} emitter, heated by the tungsten cylindrical filament with the power consumption less than 55 W. The cathode emits the macro-pulse current in the range of 1-1.4 A providing operation of the terahertz FEL during more than 1000 h. The cathode assembly is installed on the cover of the I-type microtron accelerating cavity in location providing an efficient injection for the acceleration with variable number of orbits. This variation widely changes the energy of the electron beam and allows on-the-fly retuning of the FEL in the range of 1-3 THz. Pulse-signal system stabilizing the emission current prevents randomized break-downs in the accelerating cavity and decreases fluctuations of the power of the FEL radiation. The standard deviation of the fluctuations was measured to be less than 10% during long-time operation.

  15. Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation for Seeded FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

    2011-05-19

    In the x-ray wavelengths, the two leading FEL concepts are the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) configuration and the high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG) scheme. While the radiation from a SASE FEL is coherent transversely, it typically has rather limited temporal coherence. Alternatively, the HGHG scheme allows generation of fully coherent radiation by up-converting the frequency of a high-power seed laser. However, due to the relatively low up-frequency conversion efficiency, multiple stages of HGHG FEL are needed in order to generate x-rays from a UV laser. The up-frequency conversion efficiency can be greatly improved with the recently proposed echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) technique. In this work we will present the concept of EEHG, and address some practically important issues that affect the performance of the seeding. We show how the EEHG can be incorporated in the FEL scheme and what is the expected performance of the EEHG seeded FEL. We will then briefly describe the first proof-of-principle EEHG experiment carried out at the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at SLAC. We will also discuss latest advances in the echo-scheme approach, and refer to subsequent modifications of the original concept.

  16. Electron Beam Diagnostics Of The JLAB UV FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Evtushenko, Pavel; Benson, Stephen; Biallas, George; Coleman, James; Dickover, Cody; Douglas, David; Marchlik, Matthew; Sexton, Daniel; Tennant, Christopher

    2011-03-01

    In this contribution we describe various systems and aspects of the electron beam diagnostics of the JLab UV FEL. The FEL is installed on a new bypass beam line at the existing 10 kW IR Upgrade FEL. Here, we describe a set of the following systems. A combination of OTR and phosphor viewers is used for measurements of the transverse beam profile, transverse emittance, and Twiss parameters. This system is also used for alignment of the optical cavity of the UV oscillator and to ensure the overlap between the electron beam and optical mode in the FEL wiggler. A system of beam position monitors equipped with log-amp based BPM electronics. Bunch length on the order of 120 fs RMS is measured with the help of a modified Martin-Puplett interferometer. The longitudinal transfer function measurement system is used to set up bunch compression in an optimal way, such that the LINAC RF curvature is compensated using only higher order magnetic elements of the beam transport. This set of diagnostic systems made a significant contribution in achieving first lasing of the FEL after only about 60 hours of beam operation.

  17. Infrared FEL photochemistry: Multiple-photon dissociation of Freon gas

    SciTech Connect

    Newnam, B.E.; Early, J.W.; Lyman, J.L.

    1993-10-01

    Wavelength tunability, synchrotron sidebands, and picosecond pulse structure are inherent FEL characteristics that should be advantageous for photochemistry involving infrared multiple-photon photodissociation. Tuned to an absorption resonance, the FEL sideband structure will overlap the broad, excited-state spectral absorption and should lead to enhanced dissociation. The Los Alamos APEX FEL was operated with and without sidebands to test this hypothesis on CFCl{sub 3} (Freon 11), an inert chlorofluorocarbon widely used in refrigeration systems and one of the gases implicated as depleting the ozone in the Earth`s stratospheric layer. The FEL wavelength was set at the C-Cl stretch absorption resonance at 11.8-{mu}m, the oscillator cavity length was detuned first to minimize and then to maximize the spectral bandwidth, and the beam was focused through a pair of test cells (1.0 Torr Freon+1.7 Torr air). Comparison of final and initial absorbance spectra indicated the CFCl{sub 3} photodissociation yield was 1.2% for the cell exposed with sideband spectra (3% FWHM) and 9-ns micropulse separation. Negligible effect was seen without sidebands, albeit at lower total beam fluence. Although the result of this single experiment is not large enough to be conclusive, it does provide a basis for optimizing the FEL temporal and spectral parameters to attain higher photodissociation yield in future tests.

  18. Temporal characterization of the Stanford Mid-IR FEL by frequency-resolved optical gating

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, B.A.; DeLong, K.W.; Trebino, R.

    1995-02-01

    We measure the time-dependent intensity and phase of laser pulses from the Stanford Mid-IR FEL. We present the first measurements of near-transform-limited, linearly chirped, and sideband modulated FEL pulses.

  19. 77 FR 75660 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: FEL Out-of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-21

    ... Collection; Comments Requested: FEL Out-of-Business Records ACTION: 30-day notice. The Department of Justice...: FEL Out of Business Records. (3) Form Number: None. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms...

  20. 77 FR 63340 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: FEL Out-of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-16

    ... Collection; Comments Requested: FEL Out-of-Business Records ACTION: 60-Day Notice. The Department of Justice... Information Collection: New collection. (2) Title of the Form/Collection: FEL Out-of-Business Records....

  1. Suppression of microbunching instability via a transverse gradient undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Chao; Huang, Dazhang; Deng, Haixiao; Gu, Qiang; Zhao, Zhentang

    2015-07-01

    The microbunching instability in the linear accelerator (linac) of a free-electron laser facility has always been a problem that degrades the electron beam quality. In this paper, a quite simple and inexpensive technique is proposed to smooth the electron beam current profile to suppress the instability. By directly adding a short undulator with a transverse gradient field right after the injector to couple the transverse spread into the longitudinal direction, additional density mixing in the electron beam is introduced to smooth the current profile, which results in the reduction of the gain of the microbunching instability. The magnitude of the density mixing can be easily controlled by varying the strength of the undulator magnetic field. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations demonstrate the capability of the proposed technique in the accelerator of an x-ray free-electron laser.

  2. Electron orbits in the microwave inverse FEL accelerator (MIFELA)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, T.B.; Marshall, T.C.

    1995-12-31

    The MIFELA is a new device based on stimulated absorption of microwaves by electrons moving along an undulator. An intense microwave field is used (a{sub s} = eE{sub s}/k{sub s} m c{sup 2} = 0.2) as well as a large undulator field (a{sub w}/{gamma} = eB{sub {perpendicular}}/{gamma}k{sub w} mc{sup 2} = 1/2) to accelerate electrons emitted at 6MeV from a rf gun to 20MeV in 1.5m. The spiral radius of the electrons in the undulator is 8mm, in a waveguide of diameter 34mm, with undulator period about 10cm. There is a small guiding field, and the electrons move in type I orbits. We describe three problems connected with the orbital motion of the electrons in this structure: (i) injecting the electrons in an increasing undulator field prior to entering the MIFELA; (ii) orbital motion and stability inside the MIFELA; (iii) extraction of electrons from the spiral orbit in the accelerator into an axially-propagating beam, obtaining {Beta}{sub {perpendicular}} < 0.02. These studies have application to a MIFELA which is under construction at Yale University by Omega-P.

  3. Effect of free electron laser (FEL) irradiation on tooth dentine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogino, Seiji; Awazu, Kunio; Tomimasu, Takio

    1996-12-01

    Free electron laser (FEL) gives high efficiency for the photo-induced effects when the laser is tuned to the absorption maximum of target materials. The effect on dentine was investigated using the FEL tuned to 9.4 micrometers , which is an absorption maximum of phosphoric acid in infrared region. As a result, irradiated dentine surface which was amorphous had changed to the recrystalized structure by the spectroscopic analysis of IR absorption and x-ray diffraction. Furthermore, the atomic ratio of P/Ca had reduced from 0.65 to 0.60. These results indicated that 9.4micrometers -FEL irradiation caused the selective ablation of phosphoric acid ion and the reconstruction of disordered atoms.

  4. Analysis of FEL optical systems with grazing incidence mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, C.E.; Viswanathan, V.K.; Bender, S.C.; Appert, Q.D.; Lawrence, G.; Barnard, C.

    1986-01-01

    The use of grazing incidence optics in resonators alleviates the problem of damage to the optical elements and permits higher powers in cavities of reasonable dimensions for a free electron laser (FEL). The design and manufacture of a grazing incidence beam expander for the Los Alamos FEL mock-up has been completed. In this paper, we describe the analysis of a bare cavity, grazing incidence optical beam expander for an FEL system. Since the existing geometrical and physical optics codes were inadequate for such an analysis, the GLAD code was modified to include global coordinates, exact conic representation, raytracing, and exact aberration features to determine the alignment sensitivities of laser resonators. A resonator cavity has been manufactured and experimentally setup in the Optical Evaluation Laboratory at Los Alamos. Calculated performance is compared with the laboratory measurements obtained so far.

  5. Seeded quantum FEL at 478 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G.; Seggebrock, T.; Habs, D.

    2012-07-09

    We present for the first time the concept of a seeded {gamma} quantum Free-Electron-Laser (QFEL) at 478 keV, which has very different properties compared to a classical. The basic concept is to produce a highly brilliant {gamma} beam via SASE. To produce highly intense and coherent {gamma} beam, we intend to use a seeded FEL scheme. Important for the production of such a {gamma} beam are novel refractive {gamma}-lenses for focusing and an efficient monochromator, allowing to generate a very intense and coherent seed beam. The energy of the {gamma} beam is 478 keV, corresponding to a wavelength in the sub-Angstrom regime (1/38 A). To realize a coherent {gamma} beam at 478 keV, it is necessary to use a quantum FEL design. At such high radiation energies a classical description of the {gamma}-FEL becomes wrong.

  6. A high-average-power FEL for industrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dylla, H.F.; Benson, S.; Bisognano, J.

    1995-12-31

    CEBAF has developed a comprehensive conceptual design of an industrial user facility based on a kilowatt UV (150-1000 nm) and IR (2-25 micron) FEL driven by a recirculating, energy-recovering 200 MeV superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) accelerator. FEL users{endash}CEBAF`s partners in the Laser Processing Consortium, including AT&T, DuPont, IBM, Northrop-Grumman, 3M, and Xerox{endash}plan to develop applications such as polymer surface processing, metals and ceramics micromachining, and metal surface processing, with the overall effort leading to later scale-up to industrial systems at 50-100 kW. Representative applications are described. The proposed high-average-power FEL overcomes limitations of conventional laser sources in available power, cost-effectiveness, tunability and pulse structure. 4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Construction of CHESS compact undulator magnets at Kyma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temnykh, Alexander B.; Lyndaker, Aaron; Kokole, Mirko; Milharcic, Tadej; Pockar, Jure; Geometrante, Raffaella

    2015-05-01

    In 2014 KYMA S.r.l. has built two CHESS Compact Undulator (CCU) magnets that are at present installed and successfully operate at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. This type of undulator was developed for upgrade of Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source beam-lines, but it can be used elsewhere as well. CCU magnets are compact, lightweight, cost efficient and in-vacuum compatible. They are linearly polarized undulators and have a fixed gap. Magnetic field tuning is achieved by phasing (shifting) top magnetic array relative bottom. Two CCUs constructed by KYMA S.r.l. have 28.4 mm period, 6.5 mm gap, 0.93 T peak field. Magnetic structure is of PPM type, made with NdFeB (40UH grade) permanent magnet material. Transitioning from the laboratory to industrial environment for a novel design required additional evaluation, design adjusting and extensive testing. Particular attention was given to the soldering technique used for fastening of the magnetic blocks to holders. This technique had thus far never been used before for undulator magnet construction by industry. The evaluation included tests of different types of soldering paste, measurements of strength of solder and determining the deformations of the soldered magnet and holder under simulated loading forces. This paper focuses on critical features of the CCU design, results of the soldering technique testing and the data regarding permanent magnets magnetization change due to soldering. In addition it deals with optimization-assisted assembly and the performance of the assembled devices and assesses some of the results of the CCU magnets operation at CESR.

  8. Undulant rock pressure distribution along a longwall face

    SciTech Connect

    Reuter, M.; Kurfurst, V.; Mayrhofer, K.; Veksler, J.

    2009-03-15

    The paper presents measurement data on pressures in legs of a powered support in a longwall. The authors show that the rock pressure distribution along the longwall face is undulating and, based on the geomechanical calculation, find the relationship between the energy density of the rock mass and support. Based on the case study of a longwall before a rockburst, it is shown that the seam energy density decrease can initiate the rockburst.

  9. 40 CFR 1033.750 - Changing a locomotive's FEL at remanufacture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Changing a locomotive's FEL at... Certification § 1033.750 Changing a locomotive's FEL at remanufacture. Locomotives are generally required to be certified to the previously applicable emission standard or FEL when remanufactured. This section...

  10. 40 CFR 1033.750 - Changing a locomotive's FEL at remanufacture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Changing a locomotive's FEL at... Certification § 1033.750 Changing a locomotive's FEL at remanufacture. Locomotives are generally required to be certified to the previously applicable emission standard or FEL when remanufactured. This section...

  11. 40 CFR 1033.750 - Changing a locomotive's FEL at remanufacture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Changing a locomotive's FEL at... Certification § 1033.750 Changing a locomotive's FEL at remanufacture. Locomotives are generally required to be certified to the previously applicable emission standard or FEL when remanufactured. This section...

  12. 40 CFR 1033.750 - Changing a locomotive's FEL at remanufacture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Changing a locomotive's FEL at... Certification § 1033.750 Changing a locomotive's FEL at remanufacture. Locomotives are generally required to be certified to the previously applicable emission standard or FEL when remanufactured. This section...

  13. 40 CFR 1033.750 - Changing a locomotive's FEL at remanufacture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Changing a locomotive's FEL at... Certification § 1033.750 Changing a locomotive's FEL at remanufacture. Locomotives are generally required to be certified to the previously applicable emission standard or FEL when remanufactured. This section...

  14. Wave scattering by a permeable barrier over undulating bed topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, A.; Martha, S. C.

    2016-06-01

    The scattering of surface water waves by bottom undulation in the presence of a permeable vertical barrier is investigated for its solution. A mixed boundary value problem (BVP) arises here in a natural way while examining this physical problem. Regular perturbation analysis is employed to determine the solution of the BVP. By utilizing this analysis the given BVP reduces to two different BVPs up to first order. The solution of the zeroth order BVP is obtained with the aid of eigenfunction expansion method in conjunction with least-squares approximation. The first order BVP is solved with the help of the Green's integral theorem and the physical quantities, namely the reflection and transmission coefficients, are obtained in the form of integrals which involve the bottom undulation and the solution of the zeroth order BVP. A particular form of the bottom undulation which closely resembles to some obstacles made by nature due to sedimentation and ripple growth of sand, is considered to evaluate these integrals. The variation of these coefficients is examined for different values of the porous effect parameter, barrier length, number of ripples and ripple amplitude.

  15. The Generic Beamline Concept of the PETRA III Undulator Beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, U.; Peters, H. B.; Roehlsberger, R.; Schulte-Schrepping, H.

    2007-01-19

    The conversion of the PETRA storage ring at DESY to a third generation synchrotron radiation light source poses a challenge to the design of the beam transport system. The total power in the white beam will be as high as 7.5kW in the case of the 5m long undulator at 100mA. The power density will be 476 W/mm2 at 20m from the source. Upgrades to a beam current of 200mA have to be accounted for in the design of the beamline components. For the beam transport between the undulator and the experimental hall, the design of a generic beamline is presented. It contains all elements which are needed to guide the beam to the experiment. This generic beamline consists of the estimated maximum of components for this purpose. Special experimental needs may reduce the number of proposed devices in the generic part and add special optical devices close to the experiment, e. g. strong focusing. The paper focuses on the girder concept for all major beam transport components and the collimating shutter system which has to deal with the high power density of the PETRA III undulators.

  16. Antiaging activity of low molecular weight peptide from Paphia undulate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin; Cai, Bingna; Chen, Hua; Pan, Jianyu; Chen, Deke; Sun, Huili

    2013-05-01

    Low molecular weight peptide (LMWP) was prepared from clam Paphia undulate and its antiaging effect on D-galactose-induced acute aging in rats, aged Kunming mice, ultraviolet-exposed rats, and thermally injured rats was investigated. P. undulate flesh was homogenized and digested using papain under optimal conditions, then subjected to Sephadex G-25 chromatography to isolate the LMWP. Administration of LMWP significantly reversed D-galactose-induced oxidative stress by increasing the activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase (CAT), and by decreasing the level of malondialdehyde (MDA). This process was accompanied by increased collagen synthesis. The LMWP prevented photoaging and promoted dermis recovery and remission of elastic fiber hyperplasia. Furthermore, treatment with the LMWP helped to regenerate elastic fibers and the collagen network, increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the serum and significantly decreased MDA. Thermal scald-induced inflammation and edema were also relieved by the LWMP, while wound healing in skin was promoted. These results suggest that the LMWP from P. undulate could serve as a new antiaging substance in cosmetics.

  17. The Mark III IR FEL: Improvements in performance and operation

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, G.A.; Madey, J.M.J.; Straub, K.D.

    1995-12-31

    The Mark III IR FEL has been upgraded by the installation of a new thermionic microwave gun. The new gun yields a reduced emittance and allows operation at a higher repetition rate and an increased electron macropulse length. The RF system of the Mark III has also been phase-locked to the RF systemof the adjacent storage ring driver for the laboratory`s short-wavelength FEL sources, making possible two-color UV-IR pump probe experiments. In this paper, the design and performance of the new gun are presented and the implications of the improvements investigated.

  18. Resonance hard radiation in a gas-loaded FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Gevorgian, L.A.

    1995-12-31

    The process of induced radiation under the condition when the relativistic beam oscillation frequency coincides with the plasma frequency of the FEL filling gas, is investigated. Such a resonance results in a giant enhancement of interaction between electrons and photons providing high gain in the hard FEL frequency region. Meanwhile the spectralwidth of the spontaneous radiation is broadened significantly. A method is proposed for maintaining the synchronism between the electron oscillation frequency and the medium plasma frequency, enabling to transform the electron energy into hard radiation with high efficiency.

  19. STARS A Two Stage High Gain Harmonic Generation FEL Demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    M. Abo-Bakr; W. Anders; J. Bahrdt; P. Budz; K.B. Buerkmann-Gehrlein; O. Dressler; H.A. Duerr; V. Duerr; W. Eberhardt; S. Eisebitt; J. Feikes; R. Follath; A. Gaupp; R. Goergen; K. Goldammer; S.C. Hessler; K. Holldack; E. Jaeschke; Thorsten Kamps; S. Klauke; J. Knobloch; O. Kugeler; B.C. Kuske; P. Kuske; A. Meseck; R. Mitzner; R. Mueller; M. Neeb; A. Neumann; K. Ott; D. Pfluckhahn; T. Quast; M. Scheer; Th. Schroeter; M. Schuster; F. Senf; G. Wuestefeld; D. Kramer; Frank Marhauser

    2007-08-01

    BESSY is proposing a demonstration facility, called STARS, for a two-stage high-gain harmonic generation free electron laser (HGHG FEL). STARS is planned for lasing in the wavelength range 40 to 70 nm, requiring a beam energy of 325 MeV. The facility consists of a normal conducting gun, three superconducting TESLA-type acceleration modules modified for CW operation, a single stage bunch compressor and finally a two-stage HGHG cascaded FEL. This paper describes the faciliy layout and the rationale behind the operation parameters.

  20. Experimental test of the SCA/FEL external cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haar, P.; Schwettman, H. A.; Smith, T. I.

    1993-07-01

    An external cavity driven by the optical pulse train of the SCA/FEL has been installed and tested. The external cavity provides an opportunity to enhance the micropulse energy available for experiment and can be used as an FEL diagnostic. We have demonstrated optical energy storage which is the theoretical maximum for a cavity Q of 15. The temporal behavior of the optical pulse in the external cavity has been compared to calculations of the dynamics, allowing us to infer the stability of our system. We have used our results to plan improvements to the external cavity.

  1. A Test of Superradiance in an FEL Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce, R

    2004-12-14

    We describe the design of an FEL Amplifier Test Experiment (FATE)1 to demonstrate the superradiant short bunch regime of a Free Electron Laser in the 1-3 {micro}m wavelength range starting from noise. The relevance to the LCLS X-ray FEL [1] proposal is discussed and numerical simulations are shown. It is numerically demonstrated for the first time with the 2-D code GINGER, that clean-up of noise in the superradiant regime occurs even at low power levels.

  2. The PixFEL project: Progress towards a fine pitch X-ray imaging camera for next generation FEL facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, G.; Batignani, G.; Benkechkache, M. A.; Bettarini, S.; Casarosa, G.; Comotti, D.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Fabris, L.; Forti, F.; Grassi, M.; Lodola, L.; Malcovati, P.; Manghisoni, M.; Mendicino, R.; Morsani, F.; Paladino, A.; Pancheri, L.; Paoloni, E.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Vacchi, C.; Verzellesi, G.; Xu, H.

    2016-07-01

    The INFN PixFEL project is developing the fundamental building blocks for a large area X-ray imaging camera to be deployed at next generation free electron laser (FEL) facilities with unprecedented intensity. Improvement in performance beyond the state of art in imaging instrumentation will be explored adopting advanced technologies like active edge sensors, a 65 nm node CMOS process and vertical integration. These are the key ingredients of the PixFEL project to realize a seamless large area focal plane instrument composed by a matrix of multilayer four-side buttable tiles. In order to minimize the dead area and reduce ambiguities in image reconstruction, a fine pitch active edge thick sensor is being optimized to cope with very high intensity photon flux, up to 104 photons per pixel, in the range from 1 to 10 keV. A low noise analog front-end channel with this wide dynamic range and a novel dynamic compression feature, together with a low power 10 bit analog to digital conversion up to 5 MHz, has been realized in a 110 μm pitch with a 65 nm CMOS process. Vertical interconnection of two CMOS tiers will be also explored in the future to build a four-side buttable readout chip with high density memories. In the long run the objective of the PixFEL project is to build a flexible X-ray imaging camera for operation both in burst mode, like at the European X-FEL, or in continuous mode with the high frame rates anticipated for future FEL facilities.

  3. Feasibility of a ring FEL at low emittance storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapov, I.

    2015-09-01

    A scheme for generating coherent radiation at latest generation low emittance storage rings such as PETRA III at DESY (Balewski et al., 2004 [1]) is proposed. The scheme is based on focusing and subsequent defocusing of the electron beam in the longitudinal phase space at the undulator location. The expected performance characteristics are estimated for radiation in the wavelength range of 500-1500 eV. It is shown that the average brightness is increased by several orders of magnitude compared to spontaneous undulator radiation, which can open new perspectives for photon-hungry soft X-ray spectroscopy techniques.

  4. X-Band Microwave Undulators for Short Wavelength Free-Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrini, C.

    2006-01-03

    Microwave undulators have two features that make them attractive to use in free-electron lasers, when compared with conventional static magnetic undulators. One is that the beam aperture is larger than the period, and thus the undulator period is smaller than that achievable with static systems. The second is the possibility of easily producing both circular and planar polarization and dynamically controlling the polarization characteristic and the undulator field intensity. The recent development of high power klystrons and pulse compression techniques at X-band frequency, near 12 GHz, is making this type of undulators very attractive for use in short wavelength free-electron lasers operating in the few nanometers to the Angstrom spectral region. In this paper we discuss the choice of parameters for X-band microwave undulators, the effect of microwave energy losses in the waveguide walls and its possible compensation by tapering the waveguide geometry, and the characteristics of free-electron lasers based on these systems.

  5. Numerical investigation of the radiation characteristics of a variable-period helical undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kitae; Mun, Jungho; Hee Park, Seong; Jang, Kyu-Ha; Uk Jeong, Young; Vinokurov, Nikolay A.

    2015-03-01

    A helical undulator with a variable-period capability has been developed at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) to generate high power radiation in the terahertz range. A simulation code for the spontaneous emission from an electron beam inside an undulator has been developed to characterize the performance of the undulator. In the case of the KAERI undulator, there is a non-negligible high-order harmonics in the longitudinal field distribution compared with a bifilar one.The axial velocity modulation by the high-order harmonics in the field distribution has been found to lead to small deviation of the spectrum of spontaneous emission from the KAERI undulator with respect to the bifilars one. The gain functions obtained from the spontaneous emission spectra according to the Madey theory, show similar shapes for both undulators.

  6. Beam dynamics studies of a helical X-band RF undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Shumail, M.; Bowden, G.; Chang, C.; Neilson, J.; Tantawi, S.

    2012-12-21

    We present beam dynamics studies of a proposed circularly polarized RF undulator cavity to be operated at 50 MW to yield the undulator strength parameter K= 0.7. A symplectic integration scheme is used for numerical studies. The expressions for field integrals of the RF undulator are also developed. Simulation results for the electron trajectories, showing off-axis drift and bunch defocusing, for 60 and 120 MeV beam energies are presented.

  7. The physics of FEL in an infinite electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Webb, S.

    2010-10-07

    We solve linearized Vlasov-Maxwell FEL equations for a 3-D perturbation in the infinite electron beam with Lorentzian energy distributions using paraxial approximation. We present analytical solutions for various initial perturbations and discuss the effect of optical guiding in such system.

  8. Status of the project of Novosibirsk high power FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Pinayev, I.V.; Erg, G.I.; Gavrilov, N.G.

    1995-12-31

    The project of IR FEL for the Siberian Center of photochemical researches is described. The distinguished features of this project are the use of the race-track microtron-recuperator and the {open_quotes}electron output of radiation{close_quotes}. The building for the machine is under reconstruction now. About half of hardware has been manufactured. The assembly of installation began.

  9. Dispersion relations for 1D high-gain FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, S.D.; Litvinenko, V.N.

    2010-08-23

    We present analytical results for the one-dimensional dispersion relation for high-gain FELs. Using kappa-n distributions, we obtain analytical relations between the dispersion relations for various order kappa distributions. Since an exact solution exists for the kappa-1 (Lorentzian) distribution, this provides some insight into the number of modes on the way to the Gaussian distribution.

  10. Milestone experiments for single pass UV/X-ray FELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    1995-04-01

    In the past decade, significant advances have been made in the theory and technology of high brightness electron beams and single pass FELs. These developments facilitate the construction of practical UV and X-ray FELs and has prompted proposals to the DOE for the construction of such facilities. There are several important experiments to be performed before committing to the construction of dedicated user facilities. Two experiments are under construction in the IR, the UCLA self-amplified spontaneous emission experiment and the BNL laser seeded harmonic generation experiment. A multi-institution collaboration is being organized about a 210 MeV electron linac available at BNL and the 10 m long NISUS wiggler. This experiment will be done in the UV and will test various experimental aspects of electron beam dynamics, FEL exponential regime with gain guiding, start-up from noise, seeding and harmonic generation. These experiments will advance the state of FEL research and lead towards future dedicated users' facilities.

  11. A Comparison of Short Rayleigh Range FEL Performance with Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, Stephen; Evtushenko, Pavel; Michelle D. Shinn; Neil, George; Blau, Joe; Burggraff, D.; Colson, William; Crooker, P.P.; Sans Aguilar, J.

    2007-08-01

    One approach to attaining very high power in a free-electron laser (FEL) is to operate with a Rayleigh range much smaller than the wiggler length. Previously, 3D simulations of Free-electron laser (FEL) oscillators showed that FEL gain doesn't fall off with Rayleigh range as predicted by one-dimensional simulations*. They also predict that the angular tolerance for the mirrors is much large than simplistic theory predicts. Using the IR Upgrade laser at Jefferson Lab lasing at 935 nm we have studied the performance of an FEL with very short Rayleigh range. We also looked at the angular sensitivity for several different Rayleigh ranges. We find very good agreement between simulations and measured gain and angular sensitivities. Surprisingly the gain continues to rise as the Rayleigh range is shortened and continues to grow even when the resonator becomes geometrically unstable. The same behavior is seen in both the experiment and simulations. We also find that, even for large Rayleigh r

  12. Efficiency optimization in a FEL with fields` nonadiabatic tapering

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, I.A.; Belyavskiy, E.D.; Silivra, A.A.

    1995-12-31

    Amplification of an electromagnetic wave in free electron lasers with a reversed guide field and right-hand polarized wiggler field is investigated both analytically and numerically. An effect of electron bunch trapping by the high frequency electromagnetic field is used for efficiency optimization. On the basis of motion stability criteria a possibility of bunches trapping by FEL parameters nonadiabatic (experimentally realizable) tapering is shown. The stability analysis of electron motion is based on Lyapunov theory for autonomy systems. A particle simulation is carried out for FEL parameters close to the experimental ones (relativistic factor {gamma}=4.75, wiggler field strength B{sub w}= 2.8 kG, guide field strength B{sub o}= -1.4 kG, operation wavelength {lambda}=6.2 mm) for the case of wiggler field tapering. Theoretically predicted rule of wiggler field tapering corresponding to FEL efficiency of 55% is approximated by stepped functions. For the experimentally realizable tapering it is found that FEL efficiency can be over 40%.

  13. FEL Beamline for Wide Tunable Range and Beam Sharing System at Kyoto University

    SciTech Connect

    Bakr, Mahmoud; Yoshida, K.; Higashimura, K.; Ueda, S.; Kinjo, R.; Sonobe, T.; Kii, T.; Masuda, K.; Ohgaki, H.; Zen, H.

    2010-02-03

    A mid-infrared free electron laser (MIR-FEL) facility (KU-FEL: Kyoto University Free Electron Laser) has been constructed for developing energy materials in Institute of Advanced Energy (IAE), Kyoto University. The tunable range of KU-FEL was estimated as 5-13.2 {mu}m by numerical calculation to design the MIR-FEL transport line for application purposes. Aiming to increase the number of FEL users with different desires we decided to develop an FEL beam sharing system that is useful for multi-utilization at different end-stations. The transport line and the beam sharing system has been designed and constructed to the user stations. Applications of the MIR-FEL in the renewable energy research at Kyoto University will start as well.

  14. FEL Beamline for Wide Tunable Range and Beam Sharing System at Kyoto University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakr, Mahmoud; Yoshida, K.; Higashimura, K.; Ueda, S.; Kinjo, R.; Zen, H.; Sonobe, T.; Kii, T.; Masuda, K.; Ohgaki, H.

    2010-02-01

    A mid-infrared free electron laser (MIR-FEL) facility (KU-FEL: Kyoto University Free Electron Laser) has been constructed for developing energy materials in Institute of Advanced Energy (IAE), Kyoto University. The tunable range of KU-FEL was estimated as 5-13.2 μm by numerical calculation to design the MIR-FEL transport line for application purposes. Aiming to increase the number of FEL users with different desires we decided to develop an FEL beam sharing system that is useful for multi-utilization at different end-stations. The transport line and the beam sharing system has been designed and constructed to the user stations. Applications of the MIR-FEL in the renewable energy research at Kyoto University will start as well.

  15. A comparison of satellite Doppler and gravimetric geoid undulations considering terrain-corrected gravity data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, R. H.; Wichiencharoen, C.

    1984-01-01

    Geoid undulations derived from Doppler satellite positioning are compared with corresponding values derived from terrestrial and satellite information using three different procedures. Doppler undulations are compared with uncorrected gravimetric undulations, and systematic differences of 1.6 m and 0.4 m are found for western and eastern U.S. stations, respectively. The systematic difference of 1.6 m was reduced to 0.1 m when terrain-related corrections were applied. Undulations computed from a spherical harmonic expansion to degree 180 yielded standard deviations only slightly poorer than the combined data. A more systematic difference in the western than in the eastern stations remained.

  16. Preparing the BESSY APPLE Undulators for Top-Up Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Bahrdt, J.; Frentrup, W.; Gaupp, A.; Scheer, M.

    2007-01-19

    BESSY plans to go to topping up operation in the near future. A high injection efficiency is essential to avoid particle losses inside the undulator magnets and to ensure a low radiation background in the beamlines. Dynamic and static multipoles of the insertion devices have to be minimized to accomplish this requirement. APPLE II devices show strong dynamic multipoles in the elliptical and vertical polarization mode. Measurements before and after shimming of these multipoles are presented. The static multipoles of the BESSY UE56-2 which are due to systematic block inhomgeneities have successfully been shimmed recovering the full dynamic aperture.

  17. MECHANICAL DESIGN OF NSLS MINI - GAP UNDULATOR (MGU)

    SciTech Connect

    LYNCH,D.; RAKOWSKY,G.

    2002-09-05

    The mechanical design considerations are discussed with respect to the currently installed X-13 and future X-29 MGU. Comparisons to the previous 2 generations of variable small-gap undulator evolution in the NSLS X-ray ring are made and design improvements noted. The design requirements and mechanical difficulties for holding, positioning and driving the magnetic arrays are explored. Structural, thermal and electrical considerations which influenced the design are then analyzed. The mechanical performance of the MGU currently installed at X-13 is examined and future installations and enhancements are presented.

  18. Observation of Polarized Positrons from an Undulator-Based Source

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, G; Barley, J.; Batygin, Y.; Berridge, S.; Bharadwaj, V.; Bower, G.; Bugg, W.; Decker, F.-J.; Dollan, R.; Efremenko, Y.; Gharibyan, V.; Hast, C.; Iverson, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Kovermann, J.; Laihem, K.; Lohse, T.; McDonald, K.T.; Mikhailichenko, A.A.; Moortgat-Pick, G.A.; Pahl, P.; /Tel Aviv U. /Cornell U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Tennessee U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /DESY /Yerevan Phys. Inst. /Aachen, Tech. Hochsch. /DESY, Zeuthen /Princeton U. /Durham U. /Daresbury

    2008-03-06

    An experiment (E166) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) has demonstrated a scheme in which a multi-GeV electron beam passed through a helical undulator to generate multi-MeV, circularly polarized photons which were then converted in a thin target to produce positrons (and electrons) with longitudinal polarization above 80% at 6 MeV. The results are in agreement with Geant4 simulations that include the dominant polarization-dependent interactions of electrons, positrons and photons in matter.

  19. Direct Observation of Ultralow Vertical Emittance using a Vertical Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, Kent

    2015-09-17

    In recent work, the first quantitative measurements of electron beam vertical emittance using a vertical undulator were presented, with particular emphasis given to ultralow vertical emittances [K. P. Wootton, et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams, 17, 112802 (2014)]. Using this apparatus, a geometric vertical emittance of 0.9 #6;± 0.3 pm rad has been observed. A critical analysis is given of measurement approaches that were attempted, with particular emphasis on systematic and statistical uncertainties. The method used is explained, compared to other techniques and the applicability of these results to other scenarios discussed.

  20. The PixFEL project: development of advanced X-ray pixel detectors for application at future FEL facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, G.; Comotti, D.; Fabris, L.; Grassi, M.; Lodola, L.; Malcovati, P.; Manghisoni, M.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Vacchi, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Casarosa, G.; Forti, F.; Morsani, F.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Pancheri, L.; Verzellesi, G.; Xu, H.; Mendicino, R.; Benkechkache, M. A.

    2015-02-01

    The PixFEL project aims to develop an advanced X-ray camera for imaging suited for the demanding requirements of next generation free electron laser (FEL) facilities. New technologies can be deployed to boost the performance of imaging detectors as well as future pixel devices for tracking. In the first phase of the PixFEL project, approved by the INFN, the focus will be on the development of the microelectronic building blocks, carried out with a 65 nm CMOS technology, implementing a low noise analog front-end channel with high dynamic range and compression features, a low power ADC and high density memory. At the same time PixFEL will investigate and implement some of the enabling technologies to assembly a seamless large area X-ray camera composed by a matrix of multilayer four-side buttable tiles. A pixel matrix with active edge will be developed to minimize the dead area of the sensor layer. Vertical interconnection of two CMOS tiers will be explored to build a four-side buttable readout chip with small pixel pitch and all the on-board required functionalities. The ambitious target requirements of the new pixel device are: single photon resolution, 1 to 104 photons @ 1 keV to 10 keV input dynamic range, 10-bit analog to digital conversion up to 5 MHz, 1 kevent in-pixel memory and 100 μm pixel pitch. The long term goal of PixFEL will be the development of a versatile X-ray camera to be operated either in burst mode (European XFEL), or in continuous mode to cope with the high frame rates foreseen for the upgrade phase of the LCLS-II at SLAC.

  1. Undulating fins produce off-axis thrust and flow structures.

    PubMed

    Neveln, Izaak D; Bale, Rahul; Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; Curet, Oscar M; Patankar, Neelesh A; MacIver, Malcolm A

    2014-01-15

    While wake structures of many forms of swimming and flying are well characterized, the wake generated by a freely swimming undulating fin has not yet been analyzed. These elongated fins allow fish to achieve enhanced agility exemplified by the forward, backward and vertical swimming capabilities of knifefish, and also have potential applications in the design of more maneuverable underwater vehicles. We present the flow structure of an undulating robotic fin model using particle image velocimetry to measure fluid velocity fields in the wake. We supplement the experimental robotic work with high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics, simulating the hydrodynamics of both a virtual fish, whose fin kinematics and fin plus body morphology are measured from a freely swimming knifefish, and a virtual rendering of our robot. Our results indicate that a series of linked vortex tubes is shed off the long edge of the fin as the undulatory wave travels lengthwise along the fin. A jet at an oblique angle to the fin is associated with the successive vortex tubes, propelling the fish forward. The vortex structure bears similarity to the linked vortex ring structure trailing the oscillating caudal fin of a carangiform swimmer, though the vortex rings are distorted because of the undulatory kinematics of the elongated fin.

  2. Undulating fins produce off-axis thrust and flow structures.

    PubMed

    Neveln, Izaak D; Bale, Rahul; Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; Curet, Oscar M; Patankar, Neelesh A; MacIver, Malcolm A

    2014-01-15

    While wake structures of many forms of swimming and flying are well characterized, the wake generated by a freely swimming undulating fin has not yet been analyzed. These elongated fins allow fish to achieve enhanced agility exemplified by the forward, backward and vertical swimming capabilities of knifefish, and also have potential applications in the design of more maneuverable underwater vehicles. We present the flow structure of an undulating robotic fin model using particle image velocimetry to measure fluid velocity fields in the wake. We supplement the experimental robotic work with high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics, simulating the hydrodynamics of both a virtual fish, whose fin kinematics and fin plus body morphology are measured from a freely swimming knifefish, and a virtual rendering of our robot. Our results indicate that a series of linked vortex tubes is shed off the long edge of the fin as the undulatory wave travels lengthwise along the fin. A jet at an oblique angle to the fin is associated with the successive vortex tubes, propelling the fish forward. The vortex structure bears similarity to the linked vortex ring structure trailing the oscillating caudal fin of a carangiform swimmer, though the vortex rings are distorted because of the undulatory kinematics of the elongated fin. PMID:24072799

  3. Ripple reduction control of the undulation pump total artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Saito, Itsuro; Chinzei, Tsuneo; Mochizuki, Shuichi; Abe, Yusuke; Isoyama, Takashi; Iwasaki, Kiyotaka; Suzuki, Takafumi; Karita, Tatsuro; Ono, Toshiya; Kouno, Akimasa; Ishimaru, Mitsuhiko; Baba, Atsushi; Ozeki, Toshinaga; Tohyama, Takahiro; Kobayashi Si, Shin-ichi; Imachi, Kou

    2002-01-01

    An undulation pump total artificial heart (UPTAH) in which the revolutions of the motor are converted to undulation motion of a disk has been developed. In an experiment, a goat using the UPTAH survived for 54 days. However, a large ripple was observed in the device's output pressure and flow waveform. In calculating the spectrum of the ripple, we found that the ripple mainly comprised 2 frequency sine waves: 1 having the same frequency as and 1 having double the frequency of the motor revolutions. To reduce the ripple, 2 sine waves, 1 having the same frequency as and 1 having double the frequency of the motor revolutions, were provided to the motor current to modulate the pulse width of the pulse width modulation controlling the motor revolutions. This ripple control method reduced the pressure ripple by 90% in a mock circulation and by 70% in animal experiments. These results revealed that the ripple generated in the UPTAH could be controlled through the use of motor control software.

  4. Global anomaly and undulation recovery using GEOS-3 altimeter data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, R. H.

    1979-01-01

    The data were adjusted to remove orbit error and altimeter bias in a primary adjustment and four regional adjustments. The root mean square crossover discrepancy was about + or - 55 cm after the adjustment. The adjusted altimeter data, now considered to give geoid undulations, was used to predict values at 1 deg intersections from which an oceanic geoid map, with predicted accuracies, was prepared at a two meter contour interval. This geoid was compared to the Gemini 9 geoid over very long profiles to examine the long wavelength error in the altimeter geoid. At a wavelength of 13,010 km the root mean squares difference was 57 cm. The altimeter geoid was also compared to altimeter geoids fixed by precise orbits. A root mean square difference was found of about 1 m with a systematic difference that implied the equatorial radius of the earth was 6,378,137 meters. The adjusted altimeter data was also used to determine a total of 29,479 1 deg x 1 deg anomalies (and undulations).

  5. Field Encapsulation Library The FEL 2.2 User Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Patrick J.; Henze, Chris; Ellsworth, David

    1999-01-01

    This document describes version 2.2 of the Field Encapsulation Library (FEL), a library of mesh and field classes. FEL is a library for programmers - it is a "building block" enabling the rapid development of applications by a user. Since FEL is a library intended for code development, it is essential that enough technical detail be provided so that one can make full use of the code. Providing such detail requires some assumptions with respect to the reader's familiarity with the library implementation language, C++, particularly C++ with templates. We have done our best to make the explanations accessible to those who may not be completely C++ literate. Nevertheless, familiarity with the language will certainly help one's understanding of how and why things work the way they do. One consolation is that the level of understanding essential for using the library is significantly less than the level that one should have in order to modify or extend the library. One more remark on C++ templates: Templates have been a source of both joy and frustration for us. The frustration stems from the lack of mature or complete implementations that one has to work with. Template problems rear their ugly head particularly when porting. When porting C code, successfully compiling to a set of object files typically means that one is almost done. With templated C++ and the current state of the compilers and linkers, generating the object files is often only the beginning of the fun. On the other hand, templates are quite powerful. Used judiciously, templates enable more succinct designs and more efficient code. Templates also help with code maintenance. Designers can avoid creating objects that are the same in many respects, but not exactly the same. For example, FEL fields are templated by node type, thus the code for scalar fields and vector fields is shared. Furthermore, node type templating allows the library user to instantiate fields with data types not provided by the FEL

  6. Direct Observation of Ultralow Vertical Emittance using a Vertical Undulator - presentation slides

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, Kent

    2015-09-17

    Direct emittance measurement based on vertical undulator is discussed. Emittance was evaluated from peak ratios, the smallest measured being 𝜀𝑦 =0.9 ±0.3 pm rad. The angular distribution of undulator radiation departs from Gaussian approximations, a fact of which diffraction-limited light sources should be aware.

  7. A design concept for a planar superconducting undulator for the APS.

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanyushenkov, Y.; Abliz, M.; Boerste, K.; Buffington, T.; Capatina, D.; Dejus, R. J.; Doose, C.; Fuerst, J.; Hasse, Q.; Jaski, M.; Kasa, M.; Kim, S .H.; Kustom, R .L.; Mezentsev, N. A.; Moog, E. R.; Skiadopoulos, D.; Syrovatin, V. M.; Trakhtenberg, E. M.; Vasserman, I. B.; Xu, J.

    2011-06-01

    A superconducting planar undulator is under development at the Advanced Photon Source. The R&D phase culminated in the successful testing of several short magnetic structure prototypes. Work is now focused on a complete design for the first undulator. The conceptual designs for its superconducting magnet, the cooling system, and the cryostat are described in this paper.

  8. Compact Undulator for the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source: Design and Beam Test Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temnykh, A.; Dale, D.; Fontes, E.; Li, Y.; Lyndaker, A.; Revesz, P.; Rice, D.; Woll, A.

    2013-03-01

    We developed, built and beam tested a novel, compact, in-vacuum undulator magnet based on an adjustable phase (AP) scheme. The undulator is 1 m long with a 5mm gap. It has a pure permanent magnet structure with 24.4mm period and 1.1 Tesla maximum peak field. The device consists of two planar magnet arrays mounted on rails inside of a rectangular box-like frame with 156 mm × 146 mm dimensions. The undulator magnet is enclosed in a 273 mm (10.75") diameter cylindrical vacuum vessel with a driver mechanism placed outside. In May 2012 the CHESS Compact Undulator (CCU) was installed in Cornell Electron Storage Ring and beam tested. During four weeks of dedicated run we evaluated undulator radiation properties as well as magnetic, mechanical and vacuum properties of the undulator magnet. We also studied the effect of the CCU on storage ring beam. The spectral characteristics and intensity of radiation were found to be in very good agreement with expected. The magnet demonstrated reproducibility of undulator parameter K at 1.4 × 10-4 level. It was also found that the undulator K. parameter change does not affect electron beam orbit and betatron tunes.

  9. Investigation of the polarization state of dual APPLE-II undulators

    PubMed Central

    Hand, Matthew; Wang, Hongchang; Dhesi, Sarnjeet S.; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-01-01

    The use of an APPLE II undulator is extremely important for providing a high-brilliance X-ray beam with the capability to switch between various photon beam polarization states. A high-precision soft X-ray polarimeter has been used to systematically investigate the polarization characteristics of the two helical APPLE II undulators installed on beamline I06 at Diamond Light Source. A simple data acquisition and processing procedure has been developed to determine the Stokes polarization parameters for light polarized at arbitrary linear angles emitted from a single undulator, and for circularly polarized light emitted from both undulators in conjunction with a single-period undulator phasing unit. The purity of linear polarization is found to deteriorate as the polarization angle moves away from the horizontal and vertical modes. Importantly, a negative correlation between the degree of circular polarization and the photon flux has been found when the phasing unit is used. PMID:26698061

  10. Magnetic Measurements of the Background Field in the Undulator Hall with Ductwork and Cable Trays

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Andrew; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Welch, James; /SLAC

    2010-11-18

    The duct work and cable trays present in the undulator hall facility are made out of potentially magnetically active materials. This note describes a measurement done to make a comparison between the fields in the undulator hall with the duct work and cable trays present and in the Magnetic Measurement Facility. In order for the undulators to have the proper tuning, the background magnetic field in the Undulator Hall must agree with the background field in the Magnetic Measurements Facility within 0.5 gauss. To verify that this was the case, measurements were taken along the length of the undulator hall, and the point measurements were compared to the mean field which was measured on the MMF test bench. This set of measurements was conducted with most of the cable trays and duct work in place, but without any of the magnet stands in place.

  11. Beam transport for an SRF recirculating-linac FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.; Douglas, D.; Li, Z.

    1995-12-31

    The beam transport system for the CEBAF UV Demo FEL includes a two-pan transport of the beam with acceleration from injector to wiggler, followed by energy recovery transport from wiggler to dump. From that contact we discuss the general problem of multi-pass energy-recovery beam transport for FELs. Tuneable, nearly-isochronous, large-momentum-acceptance import systems are required. The entire transport must preserve beam quality, particularly in the acceleration transport to the wiggler, and have low losses throughout the entire system. Issues such as injection and final energies, number of passes, linac focusing effects, beam separation, chronicity management, and stability constraints are critical. Various possible designs are discussed. Particle tracking results exploring the design options are also reported.

  12. A wiggler magnet for FEL low voltage operation

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Shamma`a, A.; Stuart, R.A.; Lucas, J.

    1995-12-31

    In low voltage FELs (ie, 200kV), operation is necessarily in the microwave frequency range for wiggler periods of the order of cms., so that a waveguide system is mandatory. Also, because of the relatively low velocity of the electron beam, the wiggle amplitude of the electron beam can be much larger than is normal for highly relativistic FELs. Both these factors mean that the electron trajectory must be carefully controlled to avoid beam collision with the waveguide walls. A wiggler system with half poles at entrance and exit is not an acceptable solution because of the offset is gives rise to the electron trajectory. Consequently, we have designed and constructed a wiggler magnet with exponential entrance and exit tapers for a minimal deflection and displacement of the electron beam. Simulations and experimental measurements showed that an on axis trajectory is easily obtainable.

  13. Energy stability in a high average power FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Mermings, L.; Bisognano, J.; Delayen, J.

    1995-12-31

    Recirculating, energy-recovering linacs can be used as driver accelerators for high power FELs. Instabilities which arise from fluctuations of the cavity fields or beam current are investigated. Energy changes can cause beam loss on apertures, or, when coupled to M, phase oscillations. Both effects change the beam induced voltage in the cavities and can lead to unstable variations of the accelerating field. Stability analysis for small perturbations from equilibrium is performed and threshold currents are determined. Furthermore, the analytical model is extended to include feedback. Comparison with simulation results derived from direct integration of the equations of motion is presented. Design strategies to increase the instability threshold are discussed and the UV Demo FEL, proposed for construction at CEBAF, and the INP Recuperatron at Novosibirsk are used as examples.

  14. Infrared Photoablation Studies of Arsenic Selenide with the Vanderbilt FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adair, Janet; Marka, Zsuzsanna; Albert, Mike; Singh, Shailesh; Tolk, Norman

    2000-03-01

    In recent years arsenic selenide has shown a high potential for application as an infrared fiber material. It transmits in most of the 2-10 micron region, which is available at the Vanderbilt Free Electron Laser (FEL). The ablation threshold was measured for the bulk material at several different wavelengths corresponding to impurity absorption, such as Se-H and C-H vibrational modes. Using a time of flight spectrometer to detect the ablated particles, individual As/Se ions as well as bigger clusters of 6 As/Se atoms were observed. The Vanderbilt FEL delivers 3-5 microsecond long macropulses which consist of 1 ps long micropulses separated by 350 ps. Previous threshold measurements were made with the entire length of the macropulse hitting the sample. In the future a Pockel cell will be used to reduce the length of the macropulse to investigate the pulse length dependence of the ablation process. (Work funded by ONR)

  15. First lasing of the IR upgrade FEL at Jefferson lab

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Behre; Stephen Benson; George Biallas; James Boyce; Christopher Curtis; David Douglas; H. Dylla; L. Dillon-townes; Richard Evans; Albert Grippo; Joseph Gubeli; David Hardy; John Heckman; Carlos Hernandez-Garcia; Tommy Hiatt; Kevin Jordan; Nikolitsa Merminga; George Neil; Joseph Preble; Harvey Rutt; Michelle D. Shinn; Timothy Siggins; Hiroyuki Toyokawa; David W. Waldman; Richard Walker; Neil Wilson; Byung Yunn; Shukui Zhang

    2004-08-01

    We report initial lasing results from the IR Upgrade FEL at Jefferson Lab[1]. The electron accelerator was operated with low average current beam at 80 MeV. The time structure of the beam was 120 pC bunches at 4.678 MHz with up to 750 {micro}sec pulses at 2Hz. Lasing was established over the entire wavelength range of the mirrors (5.5-6.6 {micro}m). The detuning curve length, turn-on time, and power were in agreement with modeling results assuming a 1 psec FWHM micropulse. The same model predicts over 10 kW of power output with 10 mA of beam and 10% output coupling, which is the ultimate design goal of the IR Upgrade FEL. The behavior of the laser while the dispersion section strength was varied was found to qualitatively match predictions. Initial CW lasing results also will be presented.

  16. FEL gain calculation for imperfectly matched electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swent, R. L.; Berryman, K. W.

    1995-04-01

    We present here the details of an analytical small-signal gain calculation. The analysis builds on the basic one-dimensional analytical calculation by modeling the effects of finite electron beam size and imperfect matching of the electron beam to the wiggler. The calculation uses TRANSPORT [SLAC-91, Rev. 2 (1977)] parameters to describe the electron beam in order to easily take the output of beam transport calculations and use them as the input for FEL gain calculations. The model accepts an arbitrary TRANSPORT beam and includes the effects of energy spread, beam size, betatron oscillations, and focussing in the wiggle plane. The model has allowed us to calculate the range over which our FEL can be tuned by changing the electron energy alone (i.e., without changing any magnets).

  17. FEL POTENTIAL OF THE HIGH CURRENT ERLs AT BNL.

    SciTech Connect

    KAYRAN,D.; BEN-ZVI, I.; LITVINENKO, V.; POZDEYEV, E.; MATVEENKO, A.; SHEVCHENKO, O.; VINOKUROV, N.

    2007-08-26

    An ampere class 20 MeV superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for testing concepts for high-energy electron cooling and electron-ion colliders. This ERL prototype will be used as a test bed to study issues relevant for very high current ERLs. High average current and high performance of electron beam with some additional components make this ERL an excellent driver for high power far infrared Free Electron Laser (FEL). A possibility for future up-grade to a two-pass ERL is considered. We present the status and our plans for construction and commissioning of the ERL. We discus a FEL potential based on electron beam provided by BNL ERL.

  18. Locking Lasers to RF in an Ultra Fast FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, R.; Huang, G.; Doolittle, L.; White, W.; Frisch, J.; Coffee, R.

    2010-01-02

    Using a novel, phase-stabilized RF-over-fiber scheme, they transmit 3GHz over 300m with 27fs RMS error in 250kHz bandwidth over 12 hours, and phase lock a laser to enable ultrafast pump-probe experiments. Free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of producing short-duration (< 10fs), high-energy X-ray pulses for a range of scientific applications. The recently activated Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) FEL facility at SLAC will support experiments which require synchronized light pulses for pump-probe schemes. They developed and operated a fiber optic RF transmission system to synchronize lasers to the emitted X-ray pulses, which was used to enable the first pump-probe experiments at the LCLS.

  19. Serial snapshot crystallography for materials science with SwissFEL

    SciTech Connect

    Dejoie, Catherine; Smeets, Stef; Baerlocher, Christian; Tamura, Nobumichi; Pattison, Philip; Abela, Rafael; McCusker, Lynne B.

    2015-04-21

    New opportunities for studying (sub)microcrystalline materials with small unit cells, both organic and inorganic, will open up when the X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) presently being constructed in Switzerland (SwissFEL) comes online in 2017. Our synchrotron-based experiments mimicking the 4%-energy-bandpass mode of the SwissFEL beam show that it will be possible to record a diffraction pattern of up to 10 randomly oriented crystals in a single snapshot, to index the resulting reflections, and to extract their intensities reliably. The crystals are destroyed with each XFEL pulse, but by combining snapshots from several sets of crystals, a complete set of data can be assembled, and crystal structures of materials that are difficult to analyze otherwise will become accessible. Even with a single shot, at least a partial analysis of the crystal structure will be possible, and with 10–50 femtosecond pulses, this offers tantalizing possibilities for time-resolved studies.

  20. Results from the Liverpool prototype Industrial FEL (IFEL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dearden, G.; Quirk, E. G.; Al-Shamma'a, A. I.; Stuart, R. A.; Lucas, J.

    1994-03-01

    The prototype Industrial FEL (IFEL) now operating at Liverpool is a low current demonstrator and represents the UK's first working FEL. This compact, X-band waveguide design employs a 55 keV, 1 mA electron beam and a permanent magnet wiggler of period 1.9 cm. The concept, construction details and results obtained so far are all presented here. A pre-bunching technique allows gain to be achieved with currents between 10 μA and 1 mA in both oscillator and amplifier configurations. Below 0.25 mA the power varies with current squared. In the amplifier mode, the gain curve resembles that of an optical klystron. For future operation above 1 mA, if the device is saturated, results indicate the maximum energy removed from the beam will be ˜ 8-9 keV per electron and the power should be directly proportional to the current.

  1. Simulation of waveguide FEL oscillator using RF linac

    SciTech Connect

    Kuruma, S.; Asakawa, M.; Imasaki, K.

    1995-12-31

    One dimensional multifrequency simulation code for waveguide mode FEL has been developed. Using this simulation code, we analyzed the spontaneous emission from electron micropulse from RF Linac. It is found that some parameters both high and low frequency waveguide modes are growing simultaneously, so the two radiation pulses are generated and amplified. And the experimental data for cavity length detuning of the radiation power are analyzed.

  2. Evolution of longitudinal modes in low voltage FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, R.A.; Al-Shamma`a, A.; Shaw, A.

    1995-12-31

    A low voltage FEL operating at 130 kV which can be run cw with a continuous electron beam current level up to 12 mA has been constructed for the X-Band microwave range (8-12 GHz). In this poster, we will report on the dependence on time, after the electron beam is switched on, of the growth and competition of those longitudinal modes in the cavity having nett gain.

  3. Optical alignment and diagnostics for the ATF microundulator FEL oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Fang, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    The microundulator FEL oscillator has a wiggler period of 8.8 mm, and is designed for initial lasing at 0.5 microns with a 50 MeV electron beam. The design and performance of the optical diagnostics and alignment are discussed. A HeNe coalignment laser is mode-matched to the resonator cavity for transverse alignment. Interference fringes are observed in the cavity with a pellicle, allowing an alignment tolerance of +/- 10 micro-radians. The same pellicle is used to produce transition radiation by the electron beam. This enables precise transverse alignment of the electron beam to the resonator axis. The HeNe laser is also used to align the wiggler by backlighting its bore. This method aligns the wiggler to the optic axis to a tolerance of +/- 50 microns. A frequency-doubled,pulsed Nd:YAG laser that produces the electron bunch train is also mode-matched to the FEL cavity. The cavity length is adjusted to resonate with this pulse train. Light from the FEL is transported to the diagnostic room using two separate paths: one for the single pass spontaneous emission, and the second for the multipass cavity output. Several diagnostics (CCD camera, photodiode, photomultiplier tube, joulemeter, spectrometer, and streak camera) are used to characterize the light. These instruments measure light energy per micropulse ranging from 10 femto-Joules to 10 micro-Joules.

  4. Electron bunch length measurement at the Vanderbilt FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Amirmadhi, F.; Brau, C.A.; Mendenhall, M.

    1995-12-31

    During the past few years, a number of experiments have been performed to demonstrate the possibility to extract the longitudinal charge distribution from spectroscopic measurements of the coherent far-infrared radiation emitted as transition radiation or synchrotron radiation. Coherent emission occurs in a spectral region where the wavelength is comparable to or longer than the bunch length, leading to an enhancement of the radiation intensity that is on the order of the number of particles per bunch, as compared to incoherent radiation. This technique is particularly useful in the region of mm and sub-mm bunch lengths, a range where streak-cameras cannot be used for beam diagnostics due to their limited time resolution. Here we report on experiments that go beyond the proof of principle of this technique by applying it to the study and optimization of FEL performance. We investigated the longitudinal bunch length of the Vanderbilt FEL by analyzing the spectrum of coherent transition radiation emitted by the electron bunches. By monitoring the bunch length while applying a bunch-compression technique, the amount of the compression could be easily observed. This enabled us to perform a systematic study of the FEL performance, especially gain and optical pulse width, as a function of the longitudinal electron distribution in the bunch. The results of this study will be presented and discussed.

  5. Lightning control system using high power microwave FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Shiho, M.; Watanbe, A.; Kawasaki, S.

    1995-12-31

    A research project for developing a thunder lightning control system using an induction linac based high power microwave free electron laser (FEL) started at JAERI The system will produce weakly ionized plasma rod in the atmosphere by high power microwaves and control a lightning path, away from , e. g., nuclear power stations and rocket launchers. It has been known that about MW/cm{sup 2} power density is enough for the atmospheric breakdown in the microwave region, and which means high power microwave FEL with GW level output power is feasible for atmospheric breakdown, and accordingly is feasible for thunder lightning control tool with making a conductive plasma channel in the atmosphere. From the microwave attenuation consideration in the atmosphere, FEL of 35GHz(0.13dB/km), 90GHz(0.35dB/km), 140GHz(1.7dB/km), and of 270 GHz(4.5dB/km) are the best candidates for the system. Comparing with other proposed lightning control system using visible or ultraviolet laser, the system using microwave has an advantage that microwave suffers smaller attenuation by rain or snow which always exist in the real atmospheric circumstances when lightning occurs.

  6. Simulation of FEL pulse length calculation with THz streaking method.

    PubMed

    Gorgisyan, I; Ischebeck, R; Prat, E; Reiche, S; Rivkin, L; Juranić, P

    2016-05-01

    Having accurate and comprehensive photon diagnostics for the X-ray pulses delivered by free-electron laser (FEL) facilities is of utmost importance. Along with various parameters of the photon beam (such as photon energy, beam intensity, etc.), the pulse length measurements are particularly useful both for the machine operators to measure the beam parameters and monitor the stability of the machine performance, and for the users carrying out pump-probe experiments at such facilities to better understand their measurement results. One of the most promising pulse length measurement techniques used for photon diagnostics is the THz streak camera which is capable of simultaneously measuring the lengths of the photon pulses and their arrival times with respect to the pump laser. This work presents simulations of a THz streak camera performance. The simulation procedure utilizes FEL pulses with two different photon energies in hard and soft X-ray regions, respectively. It recreates the energy spectra of the photoelectrons produced by the photon pulses and streaks them by a single-cycle THz pulse. Following the pulse-retrieval procedure of the THz streak camera, the lengths were calculated from the streaked spectra. To validate the pulse length calculation procedure, the precision and the accuracy of the method were estimated for streaking configuration corresponding to previously performed experiments. The obtained results show that for the discussed setup the method is capable of measuring FEL pulses with about a femtosecond accuracy and precision. PMID:27140142

  7. Feasibility studies of a compact mm-wave linac FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Nassiri, A.; Kustom, R.L.; Kang, Y.W.; Song, J.

    1995-12-31

    Short wavelength FELs impose stringent requirements on the quality of the electron beams. The key factor in obtaining a single-pass UV or x-ray FEL is the generation of small emittance electron beams with ultra-high brightness. The pioneering work at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the last decade has resulted in a dramatic improvement in the production of high electron beam brightness and small beam emittance using rf photocathode gun. The lower bound on the emittance of a 1-nC bunch without any emittance compensation is on the order of 3 {pi} mm-mrad. This is well within the emittance requirement being considered here. Although the original R&D work at Argonne, in collaboration with the University of Illinois at Chicago and University of Wisconsin-Madison, has produced encouraging results in the area of rf structure design, x-ray mask fabrication, and LIGA processing (Lithography, Electroforming, and Molding), the goal to prove feasibility has not yet been achieved. In this paper, we will present feasibility studies for a compact single-pass mm-linac FEL based on LIGA technology. This system will consist of a photocathode rf gun operated at 30 GHz, a 50-MeV superconducting constant gradient structure operated at 60 GHz, and a microundulator with 1-mm period.

  8. Simulation of FEL pulse length calculation with THz streaking method

    PubMed Central

    Gorgisyan, I.; Ischebeck, R.; Prat, E.; Reiche, S.; Rivkin, L.; Juranić, P.

    2016-01-01

    Having accurate and comprehensive photon diagnostics for the X-ray pulses delivered by free-electron laser (FEL) facilities is of utmost importance. Along with various parameters of the photon beam (such as photon energy, beam intensity, etc.), the pulse length measurements are particularly useful both for the machine operators to measure the beam parameters and monitor the stability of the machine performance, and for the users carrying out pump–probe experiments at such facilities to better understand their measurement results. One of the most promising pulse length measurement techniques used for photon diagnostics is the THz streak camera which is capable of simultaneously measuring the lengths of the photon pulses and their arrival times with respect to the pump laser. This work presents simulations of a THz streak camera performance. The simulation procedure utilizes FEL pulses with two different photon energies in hard and soft X-ray regions, respectively. It recreates the energy spectra of the photoelectrons produced by the photon pulses and streaks them by a single-cycle THz pulse. Following the pulse-retrieval procedure of the THz streak camera, the lengths were calculated from the streaked spectra. To validate the pulse length calculation procedure, the precision and the accuracy of the method were estimated for streaking configuration corresponding to previously performed experiments. The obtained results show that for the discussed setup the method is capable of measuring FEL pulses with about a femtosecond accuracy and precision. PMID:27140142

  9. Exploring the undulating plateau: the future of global oil supply.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Peter M; Smith, Leta K

    2014-01-13

    In this paper, we analyse the factors that will influence long-term oil supply and describe the future form of the global oil supply profile as an 'undulating plateau' rather than an irreversible, short-term peak or an ever upward trend of increasing production. The ultimate transition from a world of relatively plentiful and cheap oil to one of tight supply and high cost will be slow and challenging. An understanding of the signposts for the future path of supply and the drivers of that profile will be critical to managing the transition. The ultimate form of the global supply curve may well be dictated by demand evolution rather than a limited resource endowment in the longer term. Several factors will probably control future global oil supply. We believe that the scale of global oil resource will not constitute a physical supply limit for at least the next two or three decades. However, all categories of oil resources are already more expensive to develop than in the past, requiring high oil prices to stimulate supply growth. Lower rates of oil demand growth relative to economic growth, combined with more challenging supply growth, will probably lead to an undulating plateau sometime after 2040, with demand from non-Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development states continuing to dominate. Upstream investment requirements and oil price volatility will increase towards and beyond the undulating production plateau. In this new world, high oil prices will induce demand destruction, fuel substitution and ever increasing energy efficiency. As we discuss below, the fundamental differences between the IHS Cambridge Energy Research Associates' (IHS CERA) view of the future of oil supply and many peak oil supply models are the timing of the onset of a dramatic slowdown in the rate of growth of supply and the existence or otherwise of a production plateau. We do not dispute that supply will plateau and eventually fall; the question is when, how and at what price

  10. Hypoallergenic derivatives of Fel d 1 obtained by rational reassembly for allergy vaccination and tolerance induction

    PubMed Central

    Curin, M.; Weber, M.; Thalhamer, T.; Swoboda, I.; Focke-Tejkl, M.; Blatt, K.; Valent, P.; Marth, K.; Garmatiuk, T.; Grönlund, H.; Thalhamer, J.; Spitzauer, S.; Valenta, R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background and objective The major cat allergen Fel d 1 represents one of the most important respiratory allergens. Aim of this study was to engineer recombinant Fel d 1 derivatives with reduced IgE reactivity and preserved T cell epitopes for vaccination and tolerance induction. Methods Seven recombinant mosaic proteins were generated by reassembly of non-IgE-reactive peptides of Fel d 1 which contained the sequence elements for induction of allergen-specific blocking IgG antibodies and T cell epitopes. Mosaic proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli using codon-optimized synthetic genes and compared with Fel d 1 regarding structural fold by circular dichroism, IgE-binding capacity, activation of allergic patients’ basophils and ability to induce allergen-specific blocking IgG antibodies upon immunization. Results Although each of the mosaic proteins had lost the alpha-helical fold typical for Fel d 1, a strong reduction in IgE reactivity as well as allergenic activity in basophil activation assays was only obtained for three constructs, two reassembled fragments (Fel d 1 MB, Fel d 1 MC) and a fusion of the latter two (Fel d 1 MF) in which the cysteines of Fel d 1 MC were replaced by serines. Immunization of rabbits with Fel d 1 MB, MC and MF induced high levels of IgG antibodies that inhibited IgE reactivity of cat-allergic patients to Fel d 1 in a comparable manner as IgG induced with the wild-type allergen. Conclusions We report the development of hypoallergenic reassembled Fel d 1 proteins suitable for vaccination and tolerance induction in cat-allergic patients. PMID:24552249

  11. Cryogenic performance of a cryocooler-cooled superconducting undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuerst, J. D.; Doose, C.; Hasse, Q.; Ivanyushenkov, Y.; Kasa, M.; Shiroyanagi, Y.

    2014-01-01

    A cryocooler-cooled superconducting undulator has been installed and operated with beam at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The device consists of a dual-core 42-pole magnet structure that is cooled to 4.2 K with a system of four cryocoolers operating in a zero-boil-off configuration. This effort represents the culmination of a development program to establish concept feasibility and evaluate cryostat design and cryocooler-based refrigeration. Cryostat performance is described including cool-down/warm-up, steady-state operation, cooling margin, and the impact of beam during operation in the APS storage ring. Plans for future devices with longer magnets, which will incorporate lessons learned from the development program, are also discussed.

  12. Cryogenic performance of a cryocooler-cooled superconducting undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerst, J. D.; Doose, C.; Hasse, Q.; Ivanyushenkov, Y.; Kasa, M.; Shiroyanagi, Y.

    2014-01-29

    A cryocooler-cooled superconducting undulator has been installed and operated with beam at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The device consists of a dual-core 42-pole magnet structure that is cooled to 4.2 K with a system of four cryocoolers operating in a zero-boil-off configuration. This effort represents the culmination of a development program to establish concept feasibility and evaluate cryostat design and cryocooler-based refrigeration. Cryostat performance is described including cool-down/warm-up, steady-state operation, cooling margin, and the impact of beam during operation in the APS storage ring. Plans for future devices with longer magnets, which will incorporate lessons learned from the development program, are also discussed.

  13. Interfaces modify the undulation spectrum of bicontinuous microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holderer, O.; Lipfert, F.; Frielinghaus, H.; Ohl, M.; Richter, D.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the structure and dynamics of microemulsions adjacent to a planar hydrophilic wall have been characterized using grazing incidence small angle neutron scattering (GISANS) and grazing incidence neutron spin echo (GINSES) spectroscopy, respectively. It has been found that a bicontinuous microemulsion develops a lamellar structure, and that the relaxation rate is faster for a membrane close to the interface compared to the bulk. A model developed by Seifert was employed to explain the discovered acceleration for the near-surface lamellar ordered membranes. In this contribution we present how confinement of a flat interface influences the elastic properties of surfactant membranes and discuss the effect of locally introduced flat interfaces by clay platelets. This analysis sheds light onto the undulation mode spectrum of the surfactant membrane.

  14. Marine Geoid Undulation Assessment Over South China Sea Using Global Geopotential Models and Airborne Gravity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazid, N. M.; Din, A. H. M.; Omar, K. M.; Som, Z. A. M.; Omar, A. H.; Yahaya, N. A. Z.; Tugi, A.

    2016-09-01

    Global geopotential models (GGMs) are vital in computing global geoid undulations heights. Based on the ellipsoidal height by Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) observations, the accurate orthometric height can be calculated by adding precise and accurate geoid undulations model information. However, GGMs also provide data from the satellite gravity missions such as GRACE, GOCE and CHAMP. Thus, this will assist to enhance the global geoid undulations data. A statistical assessment has been made between geoid undulations derived from 4 GGMs and the airborne gravity data provided by Department of Survey and Mapping Malaysia (DSMM). The goal of this study is the selection of the best possible GGM that best matches statistically with the geoid undulations of airborne gravity data under the Marine Geodetic Infrastructures in Malaysian Waters (MAGIC) Project over marine areas in Sabah. The correlation coefficients and the RMS value for the geoid undulations of GGM and airborne gravity data were computed. The correlation coefficients between EGM 2008 and airborne gravity data is 1 while RMS value is 0.1499.In this study, the RMS value of EGM 2008 is the lowest among the others. Regarding to the statistical analysis, it clearly represents that EGM 2008 is the best fit for marine geoid undulations throughout South China Sea.

  15. Distorted orbit due to field errors and particle trajectories in combined undulator and axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Papadichev, V.A.

    1995-12-31

    Undulator and solenoid field errors cause electron trajectory deviation from the ideal orbit. Even small errors can result in a large lower frequency excursion from the undulator axis of a distorted orbit and of betatron oscillations performed now around it, especially near resonant conditions. Numerical calculation of a trajectory step by step requires large computing time and treats only particular cases, thus lacking generality. Theoretical treatment is traditionally based on random distribution of field errors, which allows a rather general approach, but is not convenient for practical purposes. In contrast, analytical treatment shows explicitly how distorted orbit and betatron oscillation amplitude depend on field parameters and errors and indicates how to eliminate these distortions. An analytical solution of the equations of motion can be found by expanding field errors and distorted orbit in Fourier series as was done earlier for the simplest case of a plane undulator without axial magnetic field. The same method is applied now to the more general case of combined generlized undulator and axial magnetic fields. The undulator field is a superposition of the fields of two plane undulators with mutually orthogonal fields and an arbitrary axial shift of the second undulator relative to the first. Beam space-charge forces and external linear focusing are taken into account. The particle trajectory is a superposition of ideal and distorted orbits with cyclotron gyration and slow drift gyration in the axial magnetic field caused by a balance of focusing and defocusing forces. The amplitudes of these gyrations depend on transverse coordinate and velocity at injection and can nearly double the total deviation of an electron from the undulator axis even after an adiabatic undulator entry. If the wavenumber of any Fourier harmonic is close to the wavenumbers of cyclotron or drift gyrations, a resonant increase of orbit distortion occurs.

  16. R&D Requirements, RF Gun Mode Studies, FEL-2 Steady-StateStudies, Preliminary FEL-1 Time-Dependent Studies, and Preliminary LayoutOption Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, John; Corlett, John; Doolittle, Larry; Fawley, William; Lidia, Steven; Penn, Gregory; Ratti, Alex; Staples, John; Wilcox Russell; Wurtele, Jonathan; Zholents, Alexander

    2005-10-01

    This report constitutes the third deliverable of LBNLs contracted role in the FERMI {at} Elettra Technical Optimization study. It describes proposed R&D activities for the baseline design of the Technical Optimization Study, initial studies of the RF gun mode-coupling and potential effects on beam dynamics, steady-state studies of FEL-2 performance to 10 nm, preliminary studies of time-dependent FEL-1 performance using electron bunch distribution from the start-to-end studies, and a preliminary investigation of a configuration with FEL sinclined at a small angle from the line of the linac.

  17. FEL beam sharing systems for eight user`s stations of the FELI

    SciTech Connect

    Okuma, S.; Saeki, K.; Kobayashi, A.

    1995-12-31

    Two infrared free electron lasers (FELs) of the FELI are now operating in the wavelength range of 1-20 {mu}m. Two kinds of FEL beam are sent from the exits of the optical cavities to the diagnostics room through the evacuated optical pipelines whose inner diameter is about 150 mm. From the diagnostic room to user`s stations, FEL beams are delivered through FEL beam sharing systems. Au-coated mirrors with fan-shaped holes are used instead of half mirrors such as ZnSe to share FEL beams to the diagnostics room and the following user`s stations, since maximum diameter of FEL beams is 50 mm in the wavelength range of 1-20 {mu}m and an opening angle of the fan-shaped holes can change a sharing ratio of delivering FEL average power for user`s stations; for instance, 10% to the diagnostics room and 90% to eight user`s stations. Each system enables us to use the same FEL beam simultaneously at the user`s stations. The two beam sharing systems will be installed in the user`s facility early in August.

  18. Development of a high average power, CW, MM-wave FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Ramian, G.

    1995-12-31

    Important operational attributes of FELs remain to be demonstrated including high average power and single-frequency, extremely narrow-linewidth lasing. An FEL specifically designed to achieve these goals for scientific research applications is currently under construction. Its most salient feature is operation in a continuous-wave (CW) mode with an electrostatically generated, high-current, recirculating, DC electron beam.

  19. Shot noise startup of the 6 nm SASE FEL at the TESLA test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierini, P.; Fawley, W. M.

    1996-02-01

    We present here the results of an extensive simulation activity for the TESLA SASE FEL. We have used the program GINGER to determine the FEL saturation length and the power fluctuations from shot to shot. The spectral properties of the output power and the correlation functions are investigated and compared with available theoretical models.

  20. Real time diagnostic for operation at a CW low voltage FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Balfour, C.; Shaw, A.; Mayhew, S.E.

    1995-12-31

    At Liverpool University, a system for single user control of an FEL has been designed to satisfy the low voltage FEL (ie 200kV) operational requirements. This system incorporates many aspects of computer automation for beam diagnostics, radiation detection and vacuum system management. In this paper the results of the development of safety critical control systems critical control systems are reported.

  1. Application of a wide-band compact FEL on THz imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Young Uk; Kazakevitch, Grigori M.; Cha, Hyuk Jin; Park, Seong Hee; Lee, Byung Cheol

    2005-05-01

    We have developed a laboratory-scale users facility with a compact terahertz (THz) free-electron laser (FEL). The FEL operates in the wavelength range of 100-1200 μm, which corresponds to 0.3-3 THz. THz radiation from the FEL shows well-collimated Gaussian spatial distribution and narrow spectral width of Δ λ/λ˜0.003, which is Fourier transform limited by the estimated pulse duration of 20 ps. The THz FEL beam shows good performance in pulse-energy stability, polarization, spectrum and spatial distribution. The main application of the FEL is in THz imaging for bio-medical researches. We are developing THz imaging techniques by two-dimensional (2D) scanning, single pulse capturing with the electro-optic method, and 3D holography. We could get the 2D imaging of various materials with the THz FEL beam. High power, coherent, and pulsed feature of the FEL radiation is expected to show much better performance in advanced THz imaging of 3D tomography. In this paper, we will show and discuss the main results of THz imaging with the different methods by using the KAERI compact FEL.

  2. Parametric x-ray FEL operating with external Bragg reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Baryshevsky, V.G.; Batrakov, K.G.; Dubovskaya, I.Ya.

    1995-12-31

    In the crystal X-ray FELs using channeling and parametric quasi-Cherenkov mechanisms of spontaneous radiation were considered as versions of FEL allowing, in principle, to obtain coherent X-ray source. In this case a crystal is both radiator and resonator for X-rays emitted by a particle beam passing through crystal. However, it is well-known that a beam current density required for lasing is extremely high in X-ray spectral range for any radiation mechanisms and it is very important to find a way to lower its magnitude. The application of three-dimensional distributed feedback formed by dynamical diffraction of emitted photons permitted to reduce starting beam current density 10{sup 2}-10{sup 4} times up to 10{sup 9}. One of ways to lower the starting current is the formation of multi-wave distributed feedback the another one is the application of external reflectors. The thing is that lasing regime was shown to be produced at frequencies in the vicinity of degeneration point for roots of dispersion equation describing radiation modes excited in an active medium (crystal plus particle beam). Unfortunately, in case of parametric quasi-Cherenkov FEL this region coincides with the region of strong self-absorption of radiation inside a crystal. That fact, obviously, increases the starting beam current. In this report we have shown that the application of external Bragg reflectors gives the possibility to lower radiation self-absorption inside a crystal by modifying radiation modes excited in the active medium under consideration. The corresponding dispersion equation and the expression for excited modes are derived. The generation equation determining starting conditions for lasing is obtained. Using these expressions we have shown that the application of external Bragg reflectors permits to reduce starting beam current density more than 10 times.

  3. Wavelength dependent delay in the onset of FEL tissue ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Tribble, J.A.; Edwards, G.S.; Lamb, J.A.

    1995-12-31

    We are investigating the wavelength dependence of the onset of laser tissue ablation in the IR Visible and UV ranges. Toward this end, we have made simultaneous measurements of the ejected material (using a HeNe probe beam tangential to the front surface) and the residual stress transient in the tissue (using traditional piezoelectric detection behind the thin samples). For the IR studies we have used the Vanderbilt FEL and for the UV and Vis range we have used a Q-switched ND:Yag with frequency doubling and quadrupling. To satisfy the conditions of the near field limit for the detection of the stress transient, the duration of the IR FEL macropulse must be as short as possible. We have obtained macropulses as short as 100 ns using Pockels Cell technology. The recording of the signals from both the photodiode monitoring the HeNe probe beam and the acoustic detector are synchronized with the arrival of the 100 ns macropulse. With subablative intensities, the resulting stress transient is bipolar with its positive peak separated from its negative peak by 100 ns in agreement with theory. Of particular interest is the comparison of ablative results using 3 {mu}m and 6.45 {mu}m pulses. Both the stress transient and the ejection of material suffer a greater delay (with respect to the arrival of the 100 ns pulse) when the FEL is tuned to 3 {mu}m as compared to 6.45 {mu}m. A comparison of IR Vis and UV data will be discussed in terms of microscopic mechanisms governing the laser ablation process.

  4. Towards attosecond X-ray pulses from the FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Zholents, Alexander A.; Fawley, William M.

    2004-07-01

    The ability to study ultrafast phenomena has been recently advanced by the demonstrated production and measurement of a single, 650-attosecond (10{sup 18} sec), VUV x-ray pulse[1] and, latter, a 250-attosecond pulse[2]. The next frontier is a production of the x-ray pulses with shorter wavelengths and in a broader spectral range. Several techniques for a generation of an isolated, attosecond duration, short-wavelength x-ray pulse based upon the ponderomotive laser acceleration [3], SASE and harmonic cascade FELs ([4] - [6]) had been already proposed. In this paper we briefly review a technique proposed in [5] and present some new results.

  5. Self-seeded injection-locked FEL amplifer

    DOEpatents

    Sheffield, Richard L.

    1999-01-01

    A self-seeded free electron laser (FEL) provides a high gain and extraction efficiency for the emitted light. An accelerator outputs a beam of electron pulses to a permanent magnet wiggler having an input end for receiving the electron pulses and an output end for outputting light and the electron pulses. An optical feedback loop collects low power light in a small signal gain regime at the output end of said wiggler and returns the low power light to the input end of the wiggler while outputting high power light in a high signal gain regime.

  6. Start-to-end global imaging as a sunward propagating, SAPS-associated giant undulation event

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Michael G; Donovan, Eric F; Foster, John C; Mann, Ian R; Immel, Thomas J

    2009-01-01

    We present high-time resolution global imaging of a sunward propagating giant undulation event from start to finish. The event occurred on November 24, 2001 during a very disturbed storm interval. The giant undulations began to develop at around 13UT and persisted for approximately 2 hours. The sunward propagation speed was on the order of 0.6 km/s (relative to SM coordinate system). The undulations had a wavelength of {approx} 750 km, amplitudes of {approx} 890 km and produced ULF pulsations on the ground with a period of {approx} 1108s. We show that the undulations were associated with SAPs flows that were caused by the proton plasma sheet penetrating substantially farther Earthward than the electron plasma sheet on the duskside. The observations appear to be consistent with the development of a shear flow and/or ballooning type of instability at the plasmapause driven by intense SAPS-associated shear flows.

  7. Power spectra of geoid undulations. [definition of altimeter design requirements for geoid recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. D.

    1975-01-01

    Data from spacecraft altimeters are expected to contribute to an improved determination of the marine geoid. To better define altimeter system design requirements for geoid recovery, amplitudes of geoid undulations at short wavelengths were examined. Models of detailed geoids in selected areas around the earth, developed from a combination of satellite derived spherical harmonics and 1 deg-by-1 deg area mean free-air gravity anomalies, were subjected to a spectral analysis. The resulting undulation power spectra were compared to existing estimates for the magnitude of geoid undulations at short wavelengths. The undulation spectra were found to be consistent with Kaula's rule of thumb, following an inverse third power relationship with spatial frequency for wavelengths at least as small as 300 km. The requirements imposed by this relationship on altimeter accuracy, data rate, and horizontal resolution to meet the goal of a detailed geoid description are discussed.

  8. Practical method using superposition of individual magnetic fields for initial arrangement of undulator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, K.; Shioya, T.

    2015-04-15

    We have developed a practical method for determining an excellent initial arrangement of magnetic arrays for a pure-magnet Halbach-type undulator. In this method, the longitudinal magnetic field distribution of each magnet is measured using a moving Hall probe system along the beam axis with a high positional resolution. The initial arrangement of magnetic arrays is optimized and selected by analyzing the superposition of all distribution data in order to achieve adequate spectral quality for the undulator. We applied this method to two elliptically polarizing undulators (EPUs), called U#16-2 and U#02-2, at the Photon Factory storage ring (PF ring) in the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). The measured field distribution of the undulator was demonstrated to be excellent for the initial arrangement of the magnet array, and this method saved a great deal of effort in adjusting the magnetic fields of EPUs.

  9. The DiagOn: an Undulator Diagnostic for SOLEIL Low Energy Beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Desjardins, K.; Hustache, S.; Polack, F.; Moreno, T.; Idir, M.; Dubuisson, J.-M.; Daguerre, J.-P.; Giorgetta, J.-L.; Thoraud, S.; Delmotte, F.; Ravet-Krill, M.-F.

    2007-01-19

    DiagOn is a diagnostic tool intended to precisely define the emission axis of an undulator, that has been developed by SOLEIL synchrotron Optics and Detectors groups. It uses the particular structure of monochromatic undulator emission into a narrow hollow cone centered on the axis. One wavelength is selected by a multilayer mirror to produce a characteristic image of the emission cone on scintillator and CCD camera. We review the emission properties of undulator in order to define the best parameters, K value, photon energy and emission angle, for diagnosis. Then the choice of optimal multilayer coating of the mirror is discussed. We finish by some consideration on mirror cooling and mechanical conception for stable operation. The precise localization of the undulator axis will allow an optimal and fast alignment of the elements located before this detector, particularly adjustable aperture from the head of each of the lines.

  10. Spectrum splitting for fast polarization switching of undulator radiation.

    PubMed

    Kinjo, Ryota; Tanaka, Takashi

    2016-05-01

    A simple scheme to quickly switch the polarity of circular radiation is proposed, which is based on spectrum splitting of undulator radiation. In this scheme, two helical undulators with opposite helicities are placed tandem in one straight section, both of which are divided into several segments. The optical phases between segments are tuned so that light waves from one of the two undulators are out of phase, while those from the other are in phase. Then the radiation spectrum of the former is split and the intensity at the fundamental photon energy vanishes. As a consequence, the monochromated photon beam at the fundamental energy is circularly polarized with the helicity specified by the in-phase undulator, which can be quickly flipped by tuning the optical phase. Numerical calculations carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed scheme show that a relatively high degree of circular polarization is expected if the angular acceptance of the beamline is not too large. PMID:27140155

  11. MAGNETIC MEASUREMENT SYSTEM FOR THE NSLS SUPERCONDUCTING UNDULATOR VERTICAL TEST FACILITY.

    SciTech Connect

    HARDER, D.; CHOUHAN, S.; LEHECKA, M.; RAKOWSKY, G.; SKARITKA, J.; TANABE, T.

    2005-05-16

    One of the challenges of small-gap superconducting undulators is measurement of magnetic fields within the cold bore to characterize the device performance and to determine magnetic field errors for correction or shimming, as is done for room-temperature undulators. Both detailed field maps and integrated field measurements are required. This paper describes a 6-element, cryogenic Hall probe field mapper for the NSLS superconducting undulator Vertical Test Facility (VTF) [1]. The probe is designed to work in an aperture only 3 mm high. A pulsed-wire insert is also being developed, for visualization of the trajectory, for locating steering errors and for determining integrated multi-pole errors. The pulsed-wire insert will be interchangeable with the Hall probe mapper. The VTF and the magnetic measurement systems can accommodate undulators up to 0.4 m in length.

  12. Spectrum splitting for fast polarization switching of undulator radiation.

    PubMed

    Kinjo, Ryota; Tanaka, Takashi

    2016-05-01

    A simple scheme to quickly switch the polarity of circular radiation is proposed, which is based on spectrum splitting of undulator radiation. In this scheme, two helical undulators with opposite helicities are placed tandem in one straight section, both of which are divided into several segments. The optical phases between segments are tuned so that light waves from one of the two undulators are out of phase, while those from the other are in phase. Then the radiation spectrum of the former is split and the intensity at the fundamental photon energy vanishes. As a consequence, the monochromated photon beam at the fundamental energy is circularly polarized with the helicity specified by the in-phase undulator, which can be quickly flipped by tuning the optical phase. Numerical calculations carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed scheme show that a relatively high degree of circular polarization is expected if the angular acceptance of the beamline is not too large.

  13. Undulator-Based Laser Wakefield Accelerator Electron Beam Energy Spread and Emittance Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Bakeman, M.S.; Van Tilborg, J.; Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A.; Osterhoff, J.; Sokollik, T.; Lin, C.; Robinson, K.E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Cs.; Weingartner, R.; Gruner, F.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-06-01

    The design and current status of experiments to couple the Tapered Hybrid Undulator (THUNDER) to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser plasma accelerator (LPA) to measure electron beam energy spread and emittance are presented.

  14. Radiation from relativistic electrons in "light" and in conventional undulators. Classical and quantum approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potylitsyn, A. P.; Kolchuzhkin, A. M.; Strokov, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    A photon spectrum of undulator radiation (UR) is calculated in the semi-classical approach. The UR intensity spectrum is determined by an electron trajectory in the undulator neglecting by energy losses for radiation. Using the Planck's law, the UR photon spectrum can be calculated from the classical intensity spectrum both for linear and nonlinear regimes. The radiation of an electron in a field of strong electromagnetic wave (radiation in the "light" undulator) is considered in the quantum electromagnetic frame. Comparison of results obtained by both approaches has been shown that UR spectra in the whole cone coincide with high accuracy for the case x<<1. Characteristics of the collimated UR beam were simulated with taking into account the discrete process of photon emission along an electron trajectory in both kinds of undulators.

  15. Optimisation of An HHG-Seeded Harmonic Cascade FEL Design for the NLS Project

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, David; Thompson, Neil; Bartolini, Riccardo; Geng, Huiping; Huang, Zhirong; McNeil, Brian; /Strathclyde U.

    2012-06-25

    Optimization studies of an HHG-seeded harmonic cascade FEL design for the UK's proposed New Light Source (NLS) facility are presented. Three separate FELs are planned to meet the requirements for continuous coverage of the photon energy range 50-1000 eV with variable polarization, 20 fs pulse widths and good temporal coherence. The design uses an HHG seed source tuneable from 50-100 eV to provide direct FEL seeding in this range, and one or two stage harmonic cascades to reach the higher photon energies. Studies have been carried out to optimize a harmonic cascade FEL operating at 1 keV; topics investigated include modulator configuration, seed power level and ef- fects of the HHG seed structure. FEL simulations using realistic electron beam distributions are presented and tolerance to increased emittance has been considered.

  16. FEL indulators with the hollow-ring electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Epp, V.; Bordovitsyn, V.; Kozhevnikov, A.

    1995-12-31

    A conceptual design of undulators with a modulated longitudinal magnetic field is proposed. The magnetic field is created by use of a solenoid with axis coincident with the electron beam axis. In order to modulate the magnetic field we propose an insertion of a row of alternating ferromagnetic and superconducting diaphragms in line with electron beam. The simulation of two-dimensional distribution of the magnetic field in the plane containing undulator axis was made using the computer code {open_quotes}Mermaid{close_quotes}. The magnetic field was analysed as a function of the system geometry. The dependence on the spacing l between superconducting diaphragms, inner a and outer b radii of the last ones is investigated. Two versions of the device are considered: with ferromagnetic rings made of magnetically soft material placed between the superconducting diaphragms and without them. It is shown that the field modulation depth increases with ratio of b/l and can exceed 50% in case of the ferromagnetic insertions. An approximate analytical calculation of the magnetic field distribution is performed as follows. The axial-symmetrical magnetic field can be defined by the vector potential with only one nonzero component A(r,{phi}) where r and {phi} are the cylindrical coordinates. The solution of the Laplace`s equation is found under the assumption that the magnetic field is infinitely extended and periodic along the z-axis. The boundary conditions are defined by the undulator design. The result is used for the calculation of the particle dynamics and for the investigations of the trajectory stability. The spectral and angular distribution of the radiation emitted from the described systems is found. The estimations show that the proposed design allows to create relatively high magnitude of the magnetic field (up to 1 T) with a short period about 1 cm or less.

  17. A possibility for using an APPLE undulator to generate a photon beam with transverse optical modes.

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, S.; McNulty, I.; Shimada, T.; JAEA

    2008-01-01

    We investigate use of an APPLE-type undulator for generating Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) and Hermite-Gaussian (HG) mode beams. We find that the second harmonic radiation in the circular mode corresponds to an LG beam with l=1, and the second harmonic in the linear mode corresponds to an HG beam with l=1. The combination of an APPLE undulator and conventional monochromator optics may provide an opportunity for a new type of experimental research in the synchrotron radiation community.

  18. Measurements of x-ray spectral flux and intensity distribution of APS/CHESS undulator radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ilinski, P.; Yun, W.; Lai, B.; Gluskin, E.; Cai, Z.

    1994-09-01

    Absolute radiation flux and polarization measurements of the APS undulators may have to be made under high thermal loading conditions. A method that may circumvent the high-heat-load problem was tested during a recent APS/CHESS undulator run. The technique makes use of a Si(Li) energy-dispersive detector to measure 5--35 keV x-rays scattered from a well-defined He gas volume at controlled pressure.

  19. Measurements of x-ray spectral flux of high brightness undulators by gas scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ilinski, P.; Yun, W.; Lai, B.; Gluskin, E.; Cai, Z. )

    1995-02-01

    Absolute radiation flux and polarization measurements of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) undulators may have to be made under high thermal loading conditions. A method that may circumvent the high-heat-load problem was tested during a recent APS/CHESS undulator run. The technique makes use of a Si(Li) energy-dispersive detector to measure 5--35 keV x rays scattered from a well-defined He gas volume at controlled pressure.

  20. Impact of a Vertically Polarized Undulator on LCLS Hard X-ray Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, David

    2014-11-14

    The LCLS-II project will install two variable gap, horizontally polarized undulators into the LCLS undulator hall. One undulator is designed to produce soft x-rays spanning an energy range of 200-1250 eV (SXU) while the other is designed for the hard spectral range of 1-25 keV (HXU). The hard x-ray LCLS instruments (X-ray Pump- Probe [XPP], X-ray correlation Spectroscopy [XCS], Coherent X-ray Imaging [CXI], Matter in Extreme Conditions [MEC]) will be repurposed to operate on the HXU line while two new soft x-ray beamlines will be created for the SXU line. An alternate HXU undulator design is being considered that could provide advantages over the present design choice. In particular, the project team is collaborating with Argonne National Laboratory to develop a vertically polarized undulator (VPU). A 1-m prototype VPU device was successfully constructed this year and a full size prototype is in process. A decision to alter the project baseline, which is the construction of a horizontally polarized device, must be made in the coming weeks to not impact the present project schedule. Please note that a change to the soft x-ray undulator is not under discussion at the moment.

  1. Experience on the operation of the 2-in-1 electromagnetic undulator of FELICITA I

    SciTech Connect

    Geisler, A.; Noelle, D.; Ridder, M.

    1995-12-31

    The 5m-Undulator of FELICITA I has been installed at the final position in the storage ring DELTA in spring 95. Detailed magnetic measurements have been performed in place to get a complete characterization of this device in both possible modes, pure undulator and optical klystron mode, respectively. The undulator consists of 38 identic poles. Four power supplies are connected to the main coils. Three of them drive the central six poles to get the dispersive section with its matching to the outer undulator sections. This setup allows a change between the optical klystron and the pure undulator mode without changing the hardware. For measuring the magnetic field components a hall-probe was used. It was found that correction coils for compensating peak field variations were not necessary, because of errors less then 0.2 %. Only for the purpose of steering correction coils had to be used. The field integrals were also measured with the pulsed-wire technique. For fast response concerning the matching, in particular of the dispersive section this technique was found to be very useful. Because of the large period length of 25 cm the wire sag in the rather long undulator could be neglected.

  2. Indentation and overall compression behavior of multilayered thin-film composites. Effect of undulating layer geometry

    DOE PAGES

    Jamison, Ryan D.; Shen, Y. -L.

    2015-03-19

    Two finite element models are used to investigate the behavior of aluminum/silicon carbide thin-film layered composites with imperfect internal geometry when subjected to various loadings. In both models, undulating layers are represented by regular waveforms with various amplitudes, wavelengths, and phase offsets. First, uniaxial compressive loading of the composite is considered. The modulus and stress/strain response of the composite is sensitive to both loading direction and frequency of the undulation. Second, the nanoindentation response of the composite is investigated. The derived hardness and modulus are shown to be sensitive to the presence of undulating layers and the relative size ofmore » the indenter to the undulation. Undulating layers create bands of tensile and compressive stress in the indentation direction that are significantly different from the flat layers. The amount of equivalent plastic strain in the Al layers is increased by the presence of undulating layers. The correlations between the two forms of loading, and the implications to composite property measurement are carefully examined in this study.« less

  3. Indentation and overall compression behavior of multilayered thin-film composites. Effect of undulating layer geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Jamison, Ryan D.; Shen, Y. -L.

    2015-03-19

    Two finite element models are used to investigate the behavior of aluminum/silicon carbide thin-film layered composites with imperfect internal geometry when subjected to various loadings. In both models, undulating layers are represented by regular waveforms with various amplitudes, wavelengths, and phase offsets. First, uniaxial compressive loading of the composite is considered. The modulus and stress/strain response of the composite is sensitive to both loading direction and frequency of the undulation. Second, the nanoindentation response of the composite is investigated. The derived hardness and modulus are shown to be sensitive to the presence of undulating layers and the relative size of the indenter to the undulation. Undulating layers create bands of tensile and compressive stress in the indentation direction that are significantly different from the flat layers. The amount of equivalent plastic strain in the Al layers is increased by the presence of undulating layers. The correlations between the two forms of loading, and the implications to composite property measurement are carefully examined in this study.

  4. X-Band Microwave Undulators for Short Wavelength Free-Electron Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, C.

    2006-01-01

    Microwave undulators have two features that make them attractive to use in free-electron lasers, when compared with conventional static magnetic undulators. One is that the beam aperture is larger than the period, and thus the undulator period is smaller than that achievable with static systems. The second is the possibility of easily producing both circular and planar polarization and dynamically controlling the polarization characteristic and the undulator field intensity. The recent development of high power klystrons and pulse compression techniques at X-band frequency, near 12 GHz, is making this type of undulators very attractive for use in short wavelength free-electron lasers operating in the few nanometers to the Ångstrom spectral region. In this paper we discuss the choice of parameters for X-band microwave undulators, the effect of microwave energy losses in the waveguide walls and its possible compensation by tapering the waveguide geometry, and the characteristics of free-electron lasers based on these systems.

  5. Influence of static electron beam`s self-fields on the cyclotron-undulator resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Rozanov, N.E.; Golub, Yu.Ya. |

    1995-12-31

    When undulators with a leading magnetic field B are used, the regime of double resonance is possible in which an undulator period is equal to an electron cyclotron wavelength. In the vicinity of this resonance an amplitude of particle oscillations in the undulator strongly depends on a difference between B and a resonant value of the leading magnetic field. Consequently, it is important to investigate a role of self-fields of the electron beam, in particular, due to its influence on the electron cyclotron wavelength. At the paper analytically and by numerical simulation the influence of the static fields of the annular electron beam on its dynamics in the axisymmetrical magnetic undulator with the leading magnetic field in the vicinity of the cyclotron-undulator resonance is investigated. It is shown that the value of the resonant magnetic field is changed with the rise of beam`s current. A shift of the resonant magnetic field may be both to larger values of B and to smaller ones, when different values of beam and waveguide radii, beam energy and undulator period are considered. A width of the resonance (on B - scale) is increased with the beam current.

  6. Patterns in biofilms: From contour undulations to fold focussing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Amar, Martine; Wu, Min

    2014-11-01

    Morphologies of soft materials in growth, swelling or drying have been extensively studied recently. Shape modifications occur as the size varies transforming ordinary spheres, cylinders and thin plates into more or less complex objects. Here we consider the genesis of biofilm patterns when a simple disc containing initially bacteria with moderate adhesion to a rigid substrate grows according to very simple rules. The initial circular geometry is lost during the growth expansion, contour undulations and buckling appear, ultimately a rather regular periodic focussing of folds repartition emerges. We theoretically predict these morphological instabilities as bifurcations of solutions in elasticity, characterized by typical driving parameters established here. The substrate plays a critical role limiting the geometry of the possible modes of instabilities and anisotropic growth, adhesion and toughness compete to eventually give rise to wrinkling, buckling or both. Additionally, due to the substrate, we show that the ordinary buckling modes, vertical deviation of thin films, are not observed in practice and a competitive pattern with self-focussing of folds can be found analytically. These patterns are reminiscent of the blisters of delamination in material sciences and explain recent observations of bacteria biofilms. The model presented here is purely analytical, is based on a neo-Hookean elastic energy, and can be extended without difficulties and applied to polymer materials.

  7. Long wavelength undulations dominate dynamics in large surfactant membrane patches

    SciTech Connect

    Lipfert, Frederik; Holderer, Olaf; Frielinghaus, Henrich; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Do, Changwoo; Ohl, Michael E.; Richter, Dieter

    2014-12-03

    In this study, by exposing microemulsions to small (80 nm diameter) and large (500 nm) disk shaped clay particles we were able to show the presence of long wavelength undulations that only occur for large membrane patches. A combination of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and neutron spin echo (NSE) experiments have been applied to study microemulsions. These, consisting of D2O, d-decane and the surfactant C10E4, were used in connection with Laponite (small) and Nanofil (large) clay. To our knowledge our experiments show for the first time that the clay platelets induce lamellar ordering adjacent to the clay discs in the otherwise bicontinuous microemulsion. This is due to the fact that in purely structural investigations, radial averaging smears out the signature of the lamellar phase. For thermodynamically fluctuating membranes near interfaces the theory of Seifert predicts a cross-over of the dispersion relationship from k2 to a k3-dependence. Lastly, with the correlation length of the membrane patches being confined by the dimension of the clay platelets we were able to show that this in fact takes place but is only present for the larger Nanofil particles.

  8. Long wavelength undulations dominate dynamics in large surfactant membrane patches

    DOE PAGES

    Lipfert, Frederik; Holderer, Olaf; Frielinghaus, Henrich; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Do, Changwoo; Ohl, Michael E.; Richter, Dieter

    2014-12-03

    In this study, by exposing microemulsions to small (80 nm diameter) and large (500 nm) disk shaped clay particles we were able to show the presence of long wavelength undulations that only occur for large membrane patches. A combination of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and neutron spin echo (NSE) experiments have been applied to study microemulsions. These, consisting of D2O, d-decane and the surfactant C10E4, were used in connection with Laponite (small) and Nanofil (large) clay. To our knowledge our experiments show for the first time that the clay platelets induce lamellar ordering adjacent to the clay discs inmore » the otherwise bicontinuous microemulsion. This is due to the fact that in purely structural investigations, radial averaging smears out the signature of the lamellar phase. For thermodynamically fluctuating membranes near interfaces the theory of Seifert predicts a cross-over of the dispersion relationship from k2 to a k3-dependence. Lastly, with the correlation length of the membrane patches being confined by the dimension of the clay platelets we were able to show that this in fact takes place but is only present for the larger Nanofil particles.« less

  9. Geometric Mechanics Reveals Optimal Complex Terrestrial Undulation Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Chaohui; Astley, Henry; Schiebel, Perrin; Dai, Jin; Travers, Matthew; Goldman, Daniel; Choset, Howie; CMU Team; GT Team

    Geometric mechanics offers useful tools for intuitively analyzing biological and robotic locomotion. However, utility of these tools were previously restricted to systems that have only two internal degrees of freedom and in uniform media. We show kinematics of complex locomotors that make intermittent contacts with substrates can be approximated as a linear combination of two shape bases, and can be represented using two variables. Therefore, the tools of geometric mechanics can be used to analyze motions of locomotors with many degrees of freedom. To demonstrate the proposed technique, we present studies on two different types of snake gaits which utilize combinations of waves in the horizontal and vertical planes: sidewinding (in the sidewinder rattlesnake C. cerastes) and lateral undulation (in the desert specialist snake C. occipitalis). C. cerastes moves by generating posteriorly traveling body waves in the horizontal and vertical directions, with a relative phase offset equal to +/-π/2 while C. occipitalismaintains a π/2 offset of a frequency doubled vertical wave. Geometric analysis reveals these coordination patterns enable optimal movement in the two different styles of undulatory terrestrial locomotion. More broadly, these examples demonstrate the utility of geometric mechanics in analyzing realistic biological and robotic locomotion.

  10. Long wavelength undulations dominate dynamics in large surfactant membrane patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipfert, Frederik; Holderer, Olaf; Frielinghaus, Henrich; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Do, Changwoo; Ohl, Michael; Richter, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    By exposing microemulsions to small (80 nm diameter) and large (500 nm) disk shaped clay particles we were able to show the presence of long wavelength undulations that only occur for large membrane patches. A combination of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and neutron spin echo (NSE) experiments have been applied to study microemulsions. These, consisting of D2O, d-decane and the surfactant C10E4, were used in connection with Laponite (small) and Nanofil (large) clay. To our knowledge our experiments show for the first time that the clay platelets induce lamellar ordering adjacent to the clay discs in the otherwise bicontinuous microemulsion. This is due to the fact that in purely structural investigations, radial averaging smears out the signature of the lamellar phase. For thermodynamically fluctuating membranes near interfaces the theory of Seifert predicts a cross-over of the dispersion relationship from k2 to a k3-dependence. With the correlation length of the membrane patches being confined by the dimension of the clay platelets we were able to show that this in fact takes place but is only present for the larger Nanofil particles.

  11. Orbit Correction for the Newly Developed Polarization-Switching Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Obina, Takashi; Honda, Tohru; Shioya, Tatsuro; Kobayashi, Yukinori; Tsuchiya, Kimichika; Yamamoto, Shigeru

    2007-01-19

    A new scheme of undulator magnet arrangements has been proposed and developed as a polarization-switching radiation source, and its test-stand was installed in the 2.5-GeV Photon Factory storage ring (PF ring) in order to investigate the effects on the beam orbit. The closed orbit distortion (COD) over 200 {mu}m was produced in a vertical direction when we switched the polarization of the radiation from the test-stand. In a horizontal direction, the COD was less than 50{mu}m. The results agreed well with the predictions from the magnetic-field measurement on the bench. In order to suppress the CODs and realize a stable operation of the ring with the polarization-switching, we developed an orbit correction system which consists of an encoder to detect motion of magnets, a pair of beam position monitors (BPMs), signal processing parts, and a pair of steering magnets. We succeeded in suppressing the CODs to the level below 3{mu}m using the system even when we switch the polarization at a maximum frequency of 0.8 Hz.

  12. An electromagnetic helical undulator for polarized x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Gluskin, E.; Vinokurov, N.; Tcheskidov, V.; Medvedko, A.; Evtushenko, Y. Kolomogorov, V.; Vobly, P.; Antokhin, E.; Ivanov, P.; Vasserman, I. B.; Trakhtenberg, E. M.; Den Hartog, P. K.; Deriy, B.; Erdmann, M.; Makarov, O.; Moog, E. R.

    1999-10-28

    Linearly and circularly polarized x-rays have been very successfully applied to the study of the properties of materials. Many applications can benefit from the availability of energy-turnable, high-brilliance x-ray beams with adjustable polarization properties. A helical undulator that can generate beams of variable (linear to circular) polarization has been designed and built by the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics and the Advanced Photon Source. The first harmonic of this 12.8-cm-period device will cover the energy range from 0.4 keV to 3.5 keV. An important feature of this fully electromagnetic device is that it will allow one to generate 100% horizontally (K{sub x}=O)or vertically (K{sub y}=O) plane-polarized radiation, which will enable many experiments otherwise not technically feasible. With symmetric deflection parameters (K{sub x}=K{sub y}), the on-axis radiation will be circularly polarized, with a user-selectable handedness. The polarization can be changed at rates up to 10 Hz.

  13. Scaling Behavior in Twisted, Helical and Undulating Lysozyme Amyloid Fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzenga, Raffaele; Lara, Cecile; Adamcik, Jozef; Usov, Ivan; Jordens, Sophia

    2012-02-01

    We combine atomic force microscopy single-molecule statistical analysis with polymer physics concepts to study the molecular conformations of lysozyme amyloid fibrils. We use different denaturation conditions to yield amyloid fibrils of different types. At 90 C and pH2, highly laminated twisted and helical ribbons are found, in which as many as 17 protofilaments pack laterally for a total width approaching 180 nm. In the case of 60 C and pH2, we find thin, wavy fibrils, in which the scaling behavior varies at multiple length scales. We use bond and pair correlation functions, end-to-end distribution and worm-like chain model to identify 3 characteristic length scales. At short length scales there is a first bending transition of the fibrils, corresponding to a bending length Lb. At slightly larger length scales (>2Lb), the fibrils become pseudoperiodic and start to undulate. Finally, at length scales larger than the persistence length Lp, the fibrils become flexible and are well described by a 2D self-avoiding random walk. We interpret these results in terms of the periodic fluctuations of the cross-section orientation of the fibrils (twisting) and the impact these have on the area moment of inertia and the corresponding propensity of the fibrils to bend.

  14. Demonstration of inverse free-electron laser seeding in a sub-80 K, short period cryogenic undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    OʼShea, F. H.; Knyazik, Andrey; Marinelli, A.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Dunning, M.; Hast, C.; Hemsing, E.; Jobe, K.; Nelson, J.; Weathersby, S.; Xiang, D.; Holy, F.; Grüner, F.; Bahrdt, J.

    2014-12-01

    Short period, high field undulators have been shown to permit operation of x-ray free-electron lasers with short gain-lengths, and at unprecedented short wavelengths. In addition, the reduced beam energy required to reach resonance with a given radiation wavelength in short period undulators could prove useful in advanced inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) seeding schemes for future light sources, such as high-gain harmonic generation and echo-enabled harmonic generation, or in IFEL acceleration. We report here the in situ beam testing of a 9 mm period length cryogenic undulator having undulator parameter near unity in the context appropriate for advanced seeding and acceleration schemes, a linear accelerator. Because of the short period length of the undulator, a 47 MeV high-brightness electron beam could be used to produce near infrared photons via the undulator radiation mechanism. The undulator radiation was observed through a filter and the spectral response of the undulator is compared to simulation. Finally, an 800 nm seed laser was introduced in order to generate an energy modulation via the IFEL mechanism. Resonance between the electron beam and the laser seed was achieved without detailed knowledge of the temperature dependent undulator magnetic field through the observation of the undulator radiation. The energy modulation (and concomitant energy spread increase) of the electron beam was observed both directly in an electron beam spectrometer and indirectly via coherent transition radiation after conversion to a density modulation in a longitudinally dispersive chicane.

  15. Serial snapshot crystallography for materials science with SwissFEL

    PubMed Central

    Dejoie, Catherine; Smeets, Stef; Baerlocher, Christian; Tamura, Nobumichi; Pattison, Philip; Abela, Rafael; McCusker, Lynne B.

    2015-01-01

    New opportunities for studying (sub)microcrystalline materials with small unit cells, both organic and inorganic, will open up when the X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) presently being constructed in Switzerland (SwissFEL) comes online in 2017. Our synchrotron-based experiments mimicking the 4%-energy-bandpass mode of the SwissFEL beam show that it will be possible to record a diffraction pattern of up to 10 randomly oriented crystals in a single snapshot, to index the resulting reflections, and to extract their intensities reliably. The crystals are destroyed with each XFEL pulse, but by combining snapshots from several sets of crystals, a complete set of data can be assembled, and crystal structures of materials that are difficult to analyze otherwise will become accessible. Even with a single shot, at least a partial analysis of the crystal structure will be possible, and with 10–50 femtosecond pulses, this offers tantalizing possibilities for time-resolved studies. PMID:25995845

  16. Development of BPM Electronics at the JLAB FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, D.; Evtushenko, P.; Jordan, K.; Yan, J.; Dutton, S.; Moore, W.; Evans, R.; Coleman, J.

    2006-11-20

    A new version of BPM electronics based on the AD8362 RMS detector, which is a direct RF to DC converter, is under development at the JLAB FEL. Each of these new BPM electronics utilizes an embedded ColdFire Microprocessor for data processing and communication with the EPICS control system via TCP/IP. The ColdFire runs RTEMS, which is an open source real-time operating system. The JLAB FEL is a SRF Energy Recovery LINAC capable of running up to 10 mA CW beam with a 74.85 MHz micropulse frequency. For diagnostic reasons and for machine tune up, the micropulse frequency can be reduced to 1.17 MHz, which corresponds to about 160 {mu}A of beam current. It is required that the BPM system would be functional for all micropulse frequencies. By taking into account the headroom for the beam steering and current variations the dynamic range of the RF front end is required to be about 60 dB. A BPM resolution of at least 100 {mu}m is required, whereas better resolution is very desirable to make it possible for more accurate measurements of the electron beam optics. Some results of the RF front end development are presented as well as the first measurements made with an electron beam.

  17. Development of BPM Electronics at the JLAB FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Sexton; Pavel Evtushenko; Kevin Jordan; Jianxun Yan; Steven Dutton; Steven Moore; Richard Evans; James Coleman

    2006-05-01

    A new version of BPM electronics based on the AD8362 RMS detector, which is a direct RF to DC converter, is under development at the JLAB FEL. Each of these new BPM electronics utilizes an embedded ColdFire Microprocessor for data processing and communication with the EPICS control system via TCP/IP. The ColdFire runs RTEMS, which is an open source real-time operating system. The JLAB FEL is a SRF Energy Recovery LINAC capable of running up to 10 mA CW beam with the micropulse up to 74.85 MHz. For diagnostic reasons and for the machine tune up, the micropulse frequency can be reduced to 1.17 MHz, which corresponds to about 160 ?A of beam current. It is required that the BPM system would be functional for all micropulse frequencies. By taking into account the headroom for the beam steering and current variations the dynamic range of the RF front end is required to be about 60 dB. A BPM resolution of at least 100 ?m is required, whereas better resolution is very desirable to make it possible for more accurate measurements of the electron beam optics. Some results of the RF front end development are presented as well as the first measurements made with an electron beam.

  18. ETHERNET BASED EMBEDDED SYSTEM FOR FEL DIAGNOSTICS AND CONTROLS

    SciTech Connect

    Jianxun Yan; Daniel Sexton; Steven Moore; Albert Grippo; Kevin Jordan

    2006-10-24

    An Ethernet based embedded system has been developed to upgrade the Beam Viewer and Beam Position Monitor (BPM) systems within the free-electron laser (FEL) project at Jefferson Lab. The embedded microcontroller was mounted on the front-end I/O cards with software packages such as Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) and Real Time Executive for Multiprocessor System (RTEMS) running as an Input/Output Controller (IOC). By cross compiling with the EPICS, the RTEMS kernel, IOC device supports, and databases all of these can be downloaded into the microcontroller. The first version of the BPM electronics based on the embedded controller was built and is currently running in our FEL system. The new version of BPM that will use a Single Board IOC (SBIOC), which integrates with an Field Programming Gate Array (FPGA) and a ColdFire embedded microcontroller, is presently under development. The new system has the features of a low cost IOC, an open source real-time operating system, plug&play-like ease of installation and flexibility, and provides a much more localized solution.

  19. Options for the Cryogenic System for the BESSY-FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutzschbach, A.; Quack, H.; Haberstroh, Ch.; Knobloch, J.; Anders, W.; Pflueckhahn, D.

    2004-06-01

    The Berliner Elektronenspeicherring-Gesellschaft für Synchrotronstrahlung (BESSY GmbH), in January 1999, started operation of BESSY II, a third-generation synchrotron light source delivering world-class, high-brilliance photon beams in the VUV to XUV spectral range. Based on this experience, BESSY has recently proposed the construction of a free-electron laser (FEL), covering a photon-energy range from 20 eV to 1 keV. To reduce the development time and cost, BESSY intends to use proven cavity and cryostat technology developed for the TESLA linear collider. However, the cryogenic load per cavity is approximately 15 to 20 times higher than that anticipated for the (pulsed) TESLA operation. This paper describes possible modifications of the cryostat design to accommodate these additional losses. Superconducting RF cavities are the basis of the FEL accelerator providing the driving electron beam with 2.25 GeV. The accelerator consists of five cold sections separated by warm sections reserved for bunch compression and beam extraction. The total refrigeration load will be covered by a single refrigerator. Several possible layouts of the cryogenic system are described and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed.

  20. Serial snapshot crystallography for materials science with SwissFEL

    DOE PAGES

    Dejoie, Catherine; Smeets, Stef; Baerlocher, Christian; Tamura, Nobumichi; Pattison, Philip; Abela, Rafael; McCusker, Lynne B.

    2015-04-21

    New opportunities for studying (sub)microcrystalline materials with small unit cells, both organic and inorganic, will open up when the X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) presently being constructed in Switzerland (SwissFEL) comes online in 2017. Our synchrotron-based experiments mimicking the 4%-energy-bandpass mode of the SwissFEL beam show that it will be possible to record a diffraction pattern of up to 10 randomly oriented crystals in a single snapshot, to index the resulting reflections, and to extract their intensities reliably. The crystals are destroyed with each XFEL pulse, but by combining snapshots from several sets of crystals, a complete set of datamore » can be assembled, and crystal structures of materials that are difficult to analyze otherwise will become accessible. Even with a single shot, at least a partial analysis of the crystal structure will be possible, and with 10–50 femtosecond pulses, this offers tantalizing possibilities for time-resolved studies.« less

  1. ACS: ALMA Common Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiozzi, Gianluca; Šekoranja, Matej

    2013-02-01

    ALMA Common Software (ACS) provides a software infrastructure common to all ALMA partners and consists of a documented collection of common patterns and components which implement those patterns. The heart of ACS is based on a distributed Component-Container model, with ACS Components implemented as CORBA objects in any of the supported programming languages. ACS provides common CORBA-based services such as logging, error and alarm management, configuration database and lifecycle management. Although designed for ALMA, ACS can and is being used in other control systems and distributed software projects, since it implements proven design patterns using state of the art, reliable technology. It also allows, through the use of well-known standard constructs and components, that other team members whom are not authors of ACS easily understand the architecture of software modules, making maintenance affordable even on a very large project.

  2. On-axis brilliance and power of in-vacuum undulators for the Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Dejus, R.; Jaski, M.; Kim, S. H.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2009-11-25

    A request for studying the spectral performance of in-vacuum undulators (IVUs) for the APS storage ring was recently put forward. In-vacuum undulators are prevalent at other synchrotron radiation facilities such as the ESRF and the Spring-8. However, they never made it into the arsenal of undulators at the APS because the brilliance tuning curves were sufficiently wide due to the fact that the undulator minimum gap could be set as low as 10.5 mm. For sector 3, which in the past used a narrow-gap vacuum chamber, the minimum undulator pole gap was allowed to be set as low as 8.5 mm, providing contiguous tuning curves between the first and third harmonic radiation for a 2.7-cm-period device. (Subsequently, the narrow-gap vacuum chamber was removed and replaced with a standard vacuum chamber, which allows a minimum gap of 10.5 mm.) For sector 4, which currently holds the only narrow-gap vacuum chamber at the APS, the minimum gap is 9.5 mm. In this sector, a permanent magnet hybrid undulator with SmCo magnets is used instead of NdFeB magnets because of their higher radiation resistance and their better protection against radiation-induced demagnetization of the magnets. In the realm of looking to the future, new concepts and technologies are being revisited. Most notable is the superconducting undulator (SCU) technology, which provides the ultimate highest magnetic field of any technology and design. The SCU program has been ongoing at the APS for several years and substantial progress has been made.3,4 However, the in-vacuum undulators may bridge some of the user demands, and it is therefore worthwhile revisiting their potential at the APS. In this work, the following were assumed or required: (1) the smallest in-vacuum beam-stay-clear gap is 5.0 mm, (2) a beam-liner of 2 x 0.060 mm, which increases the pole gap by the same amount, (3) both NdFeB and SmCo magnets shall be studied, even though SmCo magnets are the preferred choice for very small gaps, (4) compare the in

  3. An Undulator-Wiggler Beamline for Spectromicroscopy at SRC

    SciTech Connect

    Reininger, R.; De Stasio, G.; Bissen, M.; Severson, M.

    2004-05-12

    A high-flux medium-energy-resolution beamline based on an existing insertion device is being constructed at SRC. The insertion device will be operated as an undulator up to {approx}400 eV and as a wiggler at higher energies. The beamline will be dedicated mainly to X-ray PhotoElectron Emission spectroMicroscopy (X-PEEM) and will cover the energy range 75-2000 eV. The most relevant requirement for high-resolution and high-sensitivity X-PEEM is a high flux density on the sample surface. This will allow spatial resolutions on the order of a few nanometers, and a minimum detection limit on the order of 10 parts per million, using the already existing Spectromicroscope for PHotoelectron Imaging of Nanostructures with X-rays (SPHINX). To maximize the flux at the sample position, the beamline does not include an entrance slit and has only three optical elements on the beam path: an ellipsoidal mirror, a variable-line-spacing plane grating, and a re-focusing ellipsoidal mirror. The first ellipsoidal mirror provides the converging light to one of the three gratings needed to cover the beamline energy range. The position of the fixed exit slit is at the focus of the ellipsoidal mirror when the grating is tuned to zero order. The second ellipsoidal mirror demagnifies the beam at the exit slit plane by a factor of two. More than 1012 photons/s are expected at the sample position between 100 and 1200 eV onto a spot having a FWHM of 25 {mu}m vertical and 70 {mu}m horizontal at a resolving power of {approx}1000.

  4. An Undulator-Wiggler Beamline for Spectromicroscopy at SRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reininger, R.; De Stasio, G.; Bissen, M.; Severson, M.

    2004-05-01

    A high-flux medium-energy-resolution beamline based on an existing insertion device is being constructed at SRC. The insertion device will be operated as an undulator up to ˜400 eV and as a wiggler at higher energies. The beamline will be dedicated mainly to X-ray PhotoElectron Emission spectroMicroscopy (X-PEEM) and will cover the energy range 75-2000 eV. The most relevant requirement for high-resolution and high-sensitivity X-PEEM is a high flux density on the sample surface. This will allow spatial resolutions on the order of a few nanometers, and a minimum detection limit on the order of 10 parts per million, using the already existing Spectromicroscope for PHotoelectron Imaging of Nanostructures with X-rays (SPHINX). To maximize the flux at the sample position, the beamline does not include an entrance slit and has only three optical elements on the beam path: an ellipsoidal mirror, a variable-line-spacing plane grating, and a re-focusing ellipsoidal mirror. The first ellipsoidal mirror provides the converging light to one of the three gratings needed to cover the beamline energy range. The position of the fixed exit slit is at the focus of the ellipsoidal mirror when the grating is tuned to zero order. The second ellipsoidal mirror demagnifies the beam at the exit slit plane by a factor of two. More than 1012 photons/s are expected at the sample position between 100 and 1200 eV onto a spot having a FWHM of 25 μm vertical and 70 μm horizontal at a resolving power of ˜1000.

  5. Beam Halo Measurements at UMER and the JLAB FEL Using an Adaptive Masking Method

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H D; Fiorito, R B; Kishek, R A; O'Shea, P G; Shkvarunets, A G; Benson, S V; Douglas, D; Wilson, F G; Zhang, S

    2011-03-01

    Beam halo is a chal­leng­ing issue for in­tense beams since it can cause beam loss, emit­tance growth, nu­cle­ar ac­ti­va­tion and sec­ondary elec­tron emis­sion. Be­cause of the po­ten­tial­ly low num­ber of par­ti­cles in the halo com­pared with beam core, tra­di­tion­al imag­ing meth­ods may not have suf­fi­cient con­trast to de­tect faint halos. We have de­vel­oped a high dy­nam­ic range, adap­tive mask­ing method to mea­sure halo using a dig­i­tal mi­cro-mir­ror array de­vice and demon­strat­ed its ef­fec­tive­ness ex­per­i­men­tal­ly on the Uni­ver­si­ty of Mary­land Elec­tron Ring (UMER). We also re­port on sim­i­lar ex­per­i­ments cur­rent­ly in progress at the Jef­fer­son Lab Free Elec­tron Laser (FEL) using this method.

  6. Evolution of electron beam phase space distribution in a high-gain FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Webb,S.D.; Litvinenko, V. N.

    2009-08-23

    FEL-based coherent electron cooling (CEC) offers a new avenue to achieve high luminosities in high energy colliders such as RHIC, LHC, and eRHIC. Traditional treatments consider the FEL as an amplifier of optical waves with specific initial conditions, focusing on the resulting field. CEC requires knowledge of the phase space distribution of the electron beam in the FEL. We present 1D analytical results for the phase space distribution of an electron beam with an arbitrary initial current profile, and discuss approaches of expanding to 3D results.

  7. Analysis of FEL-based CeC amplification at high gain limit

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Litvinenko, V.; Jing, Y.

    2015-05-03

    An analysis of Coherent electron Cooling (CeC) amplifier based on 1D Free Electron Laser (FEL) theory was previously performed with exact solution of the dispersion relation, assuming electrons having Lorentzian energy distribution. At high gain limit, the asymptotic behavior of the FEL amplifier can be better understood by Taylor expanding the exact solution of the dispersion relation with respect to the detuning parameter. In this work, we make quadratic expansion of the dispersion relation for Lorentzian energy distribution and investigate how longitudinal space charge and electrons’ energy spread affect the FEL amplification process.

  8. One-dimensional single-mode nonlinear FEL amplification code: User's manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Yasuaki; Oda, Hisako

    1989-05-01

    The 1-dimensional single mode nonlinear FEL amplification code is developed which is useful for the basic design of Free Electron Laser. The wiggler field is given by the helical configuration, and the guide magnetic field for the stable beam propagation and the incident beam energy spread are taken into account. The tapered-wiggler with arbitrary configuration is also considered. The nonlinear FEL characteristics in the wide range from Compton to Raman regimes are analyzed since the electrostatic interaction between particles is included. The FEL code developed here is vectorized about 97%. Therefore, the large amount of parameter study for the optimization of machine design is possible.

  9. Gigawatt, femtosecond VUV pulses from a SASE FEL: Photon beam characterisation and first applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiedtke, K.

    2002-11-01

    Parallel to the enormous progress in optical and conventional X-ray lasers there have also been tremendous advances in the field of Free Electron Lasers (FELs) based on the principle of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE). At the TESLA Test Facility (TTF FEL) at DESY, a linac-driven SASE FEL has produced short pulses with GW peak power in the wavelengths range of 80-120 nm. The radiation pulse length has been adjusted between 30 fs and 200 fs. Currently an energy upgrade of the TTF linear accelerator to 1 GeV is being prepared which will make radiation wavelengths down to 6 nm available for users.

  10. FEL and Optical Klystron Gain for an Electron Beam with Oscillatory Energy Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.; Ding, Y.; Huang, Z.; /SLAC

    2009-12-09

    If the energy spread of a beam is larger then the Pierce parameter, the FEL gain length increases dramatically and the FEL output gets suppressed. We show that if the energy distribution of such a beam is made oscillatory on a small scale, the gain length can be considerably decreased. Such an oscillatory energy distribution is generated by first modulating the beam energy with a laser via the mechanism of inverse FEL, and then sending it through a strong chicane. We show that this approach also works for the optical klystron enhancement scheme. Our analytical results are corroborated by numerical simulations.

  11. Self-seeded FEL wavelength extension with high-gain harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Ling; Qin, Weilun; Zhao, Gang; Huang, Senlin; Ding, Yuantao; Huang, Zhirong; Marcus, Gabriel; Liu, Kexin

    2016-09-01

    We study a self-seeded high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG) free-electron laser (FEL) scheme to extend the wavelength of a soft X-ray FEL. This scheme uses a regular self-seeding monochromator to generate a seed laser at the wavelength of 1.52 nm, followed by a HGHG configuration to produce coherent, narrow-bandwidth harmonic radiations at the GW level. The 2nd and 3rd harmonic radiation is investigated with start-to-end simulations. Detailed studies of the FEL performance and shot-to-shot fluctuations are presented.

  12. In-vacuum figure-8 undulator for hard X-rays with both horizontal and vertical polarization.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, T; Maréchal, X M; Hara, T; Tanabe, T; Kitamura, H

    1998-05-01

    A figure-8 undulator of the in-vacuum type has been adopted as an insertion device for BL24XU, the Hyogo Beamline at SPring-8, to provide hard X-rays with both horizontal and vertical polarization instead of a tandem undulator consisting of horizontal and vertical undulators. The undulator will be operated with the gap almost fixed at 11.6 mm to provide the fundamental radiation with horizontal polarization at 9.5 keV and the 1.5th harmonic with vertical polarization at 14 keV.

  13. A 300-nm compact mm-wave linac FEL design

    SciTech Connect

    Nassiri, A.; Kustom, R.L.; Kang, Y.W.

    1995-12-31

    Microfabrication technology offers an alternative method for fabricating precision, miniature-size components suitable for use in accelerator physics and commercial applications. The original R&D work at Argonne, in collaboration with the University of Illinois at Chicago, has produced encouraging results in the area of rf accelerating structure design, optical and x-ray masks production, deep x-ray lithography (LIGA exposures), and precision structural alignments. In this paper we will present a design study for a compact single pass mm-linac FEL to produce short wavelength radiation. This system will consists of a photocathode rf gun operated at 30 GHz, a 50-MeV superconducting constant gradient structure operated at 60 GHz, and a microundulator with 1-mm period. Initial experimental results on a scale model rf gun and microundulator will be presented.

  14. Study of CSR Effects in the Jefferson Laboratory FEL Driver

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, C. C.; Biedron, S.; Burleson, Theodore A.; Milton, Stephen V.; Morin, Auralee L.; Benson, Stephen V.; Douglas, David R.; Evtushenko, Pavel E.; Hannon, Fay E.; Li, Rui; Tennant, Christopher D.; Zhang, Shukui; Carlsten, Bruce E.; Lewellen, John W.

    2013-08-01

    In a recent experiment conducted on the Jefferson Laboratory IR FEL driver the effects of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) on beam quality were studied. The primary goal of this work was to explore CSR output and effect on the beam with variation of the bunch compression in the IR chicane. This experiment also provides a valuable opportunity to benchmark existing CSR models in a system that may not be fully represented by a 1-D CSR model. Here we present results from this experiment and compare to initial simulations of CSR in the magnetic compression chicane of the machine. Finally, we touch upon the possibility for CSR induced microbunching gain in the magnetic compression chicane, and show that parameters in the machine are such that it should be thoroughly damped.

  15. High Power Operation of the JLab IR FEL Driver Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Beard; Stephen Benson; George Biallas; James Boyce; Donald Bullard; James Coleman; David Douglas; H. Dylla; Richard Evans; Pavel Evtushenko; Christopher Gould; Albert Grippo; Joseph Gubeli; David Hardy; Carlos Hernandez-Garcia; J. Hovater; Kevin Jordan; John Klopf; Rui Li; Steven Moore; George Neil; Benard Poelker; Thomas Powers; Joseph Preble; Robert Rimmer; Daniel Sexton; Michelle D. Shinn; Christopher Tennant; Richard Walker; Gwyn Williams; Shukui Zhang

    2007-08-01

    Operation of the JLab IR Upgrade FEL at CW powers in excess of 10 kW requires sustained production of high electron beam powers by the driver ERL. This in turn demands attention to numerous issues and effects, including: cathode lifetime; control of beamline and RF system vacuum during high current operation; longitudinal space charge; longitudinal and transverse matching of irregular/large volume phase space distributions; halo management; management of remnant dispersive effects; resistive wall, wake-field, and RF heating of beam vacuum chambers; the beam break up instability; the impact of coherent synchrotron radiation (both on beam quality and the performance of laser optics); magnetic component stability and reproducibility; and RF stability and reproducibility. We discuss our experience with these issues and describe the modus vivendi that has evolved during prolonged high current, high power beam and laser operation.

  16. Recent Results from the IR Upgrade FEL at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    K. Beard; C. Behre; S. Benson; G. Biallas; J. Boyce; D. Douglas; H. F. Dylla; R. Evans; A. Grippo; J. Gubeli; D. Hardy; C. Hernandez-Garcia; K. Jordan; L. Merminga; N. Nishimori; G. Neil; J. Preble; Michelle D. Shinn; T. Siggins; R. Walker; G. Williams; S. Zhang

    2005-08-21

    After demonstrating 10 kW operation with 1 second pulses, the Jefferson Lab program switched to demonstrating high power operation at short wavelengths using a new 8 cm period wiggler and a THz suppression chicane. We report here on the lasing results to date using this new configuration. We have demonstrated a large reduction in THz heating on the mirrors. We have also eliminated heating in the mirror steering assemblies, making operation at high power much more stable. Finally, we have greatly reduced astigmatism in the optical cavity, allowing operation with a very short Rayleigh range. The laser has been tuned from 0.9 to 3.1 microns using the new wiggler. User experiments commenced in April of 2005 with the FEL Upgrade operating over the 1-3 micron range. We are in the process of installing a 5.5 cm permanent magnet wiggler that will give us even larger tuning range and higher power.

  17. Ethernet Based Embedded IOC for FEL Control Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Jianxun; Sexton, Daniel; Grippo, Albert; Moore, Steven; Jordan, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    An Ethernet based embedded Input Output Controller (IOC) has been developed as part of an upgrade to the control system for the Free Electron Laser Project at Jefferson Lab. Currently most of the FEL systems are controlled, configured and monitored using a central VME bus-based configuration. These crate based systems are limited in growth and usually interleave multiple systems. In order to accommodate incremental system growth and lower channel costs, we developed a stand-alone system, an Ethernet based embedded controller called the Single Board IOC (SBIOC). The SBIOC is a module which integrates an Altera FPGA and the Arcturus uCdimm Coldfire 5282 Microcontroller daughter card into one module, which can be easily configured for different kinds of I/O devices. The microcontroller is a complete System-on-Module, including three highly integrated functional blocks, the core processor, memory, and Ethernet communication. A real-time operating system, RTEMS is cross compiled with

  18. An analysis of the saturation of a high gain FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Gluckstern, R.L.; Okamoto, Hiromi; Krinsky, S.

    1992-12-01

    We study the saturated state of an untapered free electron laser in the Compton regime, arising after exponential amplification of an initial low level of radiation by an initially monoenergetic, unbunched electron beam. The saturated state of the FEL is described by oscillations about an equilibrium state. Using the two invariants of the motion, and certain assumptions motivated by computer simulations, we provide approximate analytic descriptions of the radiation field and electron distribution in the saturation regime. We first consider a one-dimensional approximation, and later extend our approach to treat an electron beam of finite radial extent. Of note is a result on the radiated power in the case of an electron beam with small radius.

  19. Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator to drive the future FEL Light Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Power, J.; Zholents, A. )

    2011-04-20

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) are expensive instruments and a large part of the cost of the entire facility is driven by the accelerator. Using a high-energy gain dielectric wake-field accelerator (DWA) instead of the conventional accelerator may provide a significant cost saving and reduction of the facility size. In this article, we investigate using a collinear dielectric wakefield accelerator to provide a high repetition rate, high current, high energy beam to drive a future FEL x-ray light source. As an initial case study, a {approx}100 MV/m loaded gradient, 850 GHz quartz dielectric based 2-stage, wakefield accelerator is proposed to generate a main electron beam of 8 GeV, 50 pC/bunch, {approx}1.2 kA of peak current, 10 x 10 kHz (10 beamlines) in just 100 meters with the fill factor and beam loading considered. This scheme provides 10 parallel main beams with one 100 kHz drive beam. A drive-to-main beam efficiency {approx}38.5% can be achieved with an advanced transformer ratio enhancement technique. rf power dissipation in the structure is only 5 W/cm{sup 2} in the high repetition rate, high gradient operation mode, which is in the range of advanced water cooling capability. Details of study presented in the article include the overall layout, the transform ratio enhancement scheme used to increase the drive to main beam efficiency, main wakefield linac design, cooling of the structure, etc.

  20. Undulator beamline of the Brockhouse sector at the Canadian Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, B. E-mail: skycia@uoguelph.ca; Gomez, A.; Duffy, A.; Hallin, E.; Meyer, B.; Kycia, S. E-mail: skycia@uoguelph.ca

    2014-08-15

    The Brockhouse project at the Canadian Light Source plans the construction of three beamlines, two wiggler beamlines, and one undulator beamline, that will be dedicated to x-ray diffraction and scattering. In this work, we will describe the undulator beamline main components and performance parameters, obtained from ray tracing using XOP-SHADOW codes. The undulator beamline will operate from 4.95 to 21 keV, using a 20 mm period hybrid undulator placed upstream of the wiggler in the same straight section. The beamline optics design was developed in cooperation with the Brazilian Synchrotron - LNLS. The beamline will have a double crystal monochromator with the options of Si(111) or Si(311) crystal pairs followed by two mirrors in the KB configuration to focus the beam at the sample position. The high brilliance of the undulator source will produce a very high flux of ∼10{sup 13} photons/s and high energy resolution into a small focus of 170 μm horizontal and 20-60 μm vertical, depending on the optical configuration and energy chosen. Two multi-axis goniometer experimental stations with area detectors and analyzers are foreseen to enable diffraction, resonant and inelastic scattering experiments, and SAXS/WAXS experiments with high resolution and time resolving capabilities.

  1. A Study of undulator magnets characterization using the Vibrating Wire technique

    SciTech Connect

    Temnykh, Alexander; Levashov, Yurii; Wolf, Zachary; /SLAC

    2011-02-07

    The vibrating wire (VW) technique employs a stretched wire as a magnetic field sensor. Because of the wire's small diameter ({approx}0.1mm or smaller) and because the wire can be supported from outside the magnet, this technique is very appealing for field measurements in small gap/bore undulators with small good field regions and with limited access to the tested field. In addition, in the case of elliptical undulators in which Hall probe (HP) measurements can be affected by the planar Hall effect, VW technique can be used as an independent method to verify and supplement HP measurements. In this article we studied the potential of the VW technique for measurement of magnetic field errors and for prediction of beam trajectories in undulator magnets using a 3.8m long LCLS undulator as a test bench. Introducing calibrated magnetic field distortion at various locations, we measured the sensitivity and spatial resolution of the method. The method demonstrated 0.9mm spatial resolution at a distance up to a few meters and 0.37Gcm sensitivity to the field integral. To compare Hall probe and Vibrating wire measurements side-by-side, we measured field errors in an LCLS undulator previously characterized by Hall probe measurements. The field errors found with the Vibrating Wire technique appeared to be in good agreement with errors measured with the Hall probe. Beam trajectory distortions calculated from both data sets are also in a good agreement.

  2. Canyon-related undulation structures in the Shenhu area, northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Shaohua; Su, Ming; Kuang, Zenggui; Yang, Rui; Liang, Jinqiang; Wu, Nengyou

    2015-09-01

    The characteristics and origin of seafloor and subsurface undulations were studied in the Shenhu area, northern South China Sea using high-precision multibeam bathymetric map and high-resolution 2D seismic data. Two undulation structure fields associated with submarine canyons have been identified. One structure field is developed in canyon head areas and shows waveform morphology on the bathymetric map. The waves display wavelengths and wave heights of 1-2 km and 20-50 m, respectively, generally occur on slopes from 1° to 5°, and extend for about 15 km approximately parallel to the canyon's orientation. The other structure field is developed in the lower segment or mouth area of submarine canyons. In general, the waves display wavelengths and wave heights of 1.3-3.6 km and 50-80 m, respectively, occur on slopes of approximately 2°, and extend for more than 20 km. Sediment cores from crests between submarine canyons in the lower segment include predominantly silts and clayey silts. Since undulations in the two fields show differences in morphology and internal architectures, two different formation mechanisms are suggested. Seafloor undulations in the head area of submarine canyons are interpreted as creep folds induced by soft sediment deformation. Undulation structures in the lower segment or the mouth area of submarine canyons are sediment waves constructed by turbidity currents overflows along the submarine canyons.

  3. Acceleration results from the microwave inverse FEL experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, R. B.; Marshall, T. C.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    2001-05-01

    An inverse free-electron-laser accelerator has been developed, built, and operated in the microwave regime. Development of this device has been described at previous Workshops; the accelerator is driven by RF power at 2.8 GHz propagating in a smooth-walled circular waveguide surrounded by a pulsed bifilar helical undulator with tapered pitch, while an array of solenoid coils provides an axial guide magnetic field. In low-power experiments, injected electron beams at energies between 5 and 6 MeV have gained up to 0.35 MeV with minimal energy spread, and the phase sensitivity of the IFEL mechanism has been clearly demonstrated for the first time. Agreement with simulation is very good for accelerating phases, though less exact otherwise. Scaling the device to high power and high frequency is discussed.

  4. Diamond monochromators for APS undulator-A beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Blasdell, R.C.; Assoufid, L.A.; Mills, D.M.

    1995-09-01

    There has been considerable interest in the use of diamonds in high heat load monochromators (HHLMs) in the last several years. The superb thermal and mechanical properties of single crystal diamonds serve to minimize distortions caused by a given thermal load, while the low x-ray absorption cross-section reduces both the total power deposited in the crystal as well as the peak (volumetric) power density. The primary obstacle for the widespread use of diamonds at present is a lack of ready availability of perfect single crystals of the desired size and orientation. Although it is possible to obtain near-perfect natural diamonds of the size and orientation required for use on an undulator beamline, the selection process is generally one of trial and error. Near perfect synthetic diamonds can currently be obtained in the minimum necessary size (typically 4-5 mm on a side). A collaborative agreement has been made between the staff of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), and the Super Photon Ring-8 GeV (SPring-8) to explore the use of diamonds as high heat load monochromators and is on-going. One of the avenues of research is to push for improved perfection and size of synthetic diamonds. Sumitomo Electric Corporation of Japan has agreed to work with staff from SPring-8 to grow [100] oriented perfect single crystal diamonds of 10 x 10 x 1 mm{sup 3} size by 1996/1997 (from which one could also cut pieces with the large face parallel to the (111) planes). They have taken the first step in producing an essentially perfect 4 x 4 x 1 mm{sup 3} type II diamond with less than 5 {mu}rad (1 arc second) strain (measured over the entire surface). The authors believe progress in the production of synthetic diamonds, as well as improvement in ties with suppliers of natural diamonds, should make available a relatively large number of high quality diamonds of moderate size within the next several years.

  5. Generation of XUV light by resonant frequency tripling in a two-wiggler FEL amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacio, R.; De Salvo Souza, L.; Pierini, P.; Scharlemann, E. T.

    1990-10-01

    FEL operation at short wavelengths is limited by electron-beam quality, by the availability of mirrors for oscillators and by the availability of input sources for FEL amplifiers. It is possible to use an FEL amplifier as a resonant-frequency tripling device, generating light and strong bunching at the third harmonic of a conventional input source in an initial wiggler section, then using a second wiggler section resonant at the tripled frequency to amplify the short-wavelength light. Neither mirrors nor a short-wavelength input source are required, and some relaxation of the electron-beam quality appears to be possible. We illustrate the scheme with a one-dimensional model and then with NUTMEG simulations of an 80 nm FEL amplifier initiated by a 240 nm input signal, in which an efficiency of the electron-beam power conversion to 80 nm light of nearly 10-4 was obtained.

  6. Generation of XUV light by resonant frequency tripling in a two-wiggler FEL amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacio, R.; Desalvosouza, L.; Pierini, P.; Scharlemann, E. T.

    FEL operation at short wavelength is limited by electron beam quality, by the availability of mirrors for oscillators, and by the availability of input sources for FEL amplifiers. It is possible to use and FEL amplifier as a resonant frequency tripling device, generating light and strong bunching at the 3rd harmonic of a conventional input source in an initial section of wiggler, then using a second section of wiggler resonant at the tripled frequency to amplify the short wavelength light. Neither mirrors nor a short-wavelength input source are required, and some relaxation of electron beam quality appears to be possible. We illustrate the scheme with a one-dimensional model and then with NUTMEG simulations of an 80 nm FEL amplifier initiated by a 240 nm input signal, in which an efficiency of conversion of electron beam power to 80 nm light of nearly 10(exp -4) was obtained.

  7. Generation of XUV light by resonant frequency tripling in a two-wiggler FEL amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Bonifacio, R.; de Salvo Souza, L.; Pierini, P. . Dipt. di Fisica Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milan ); Scharlemann, E.T. )

    1989-01-01

    FEL operation at short wavelength is limited by electron beam quality, by the availability of mirrors for oscillators, and by the availability of input sources for FEL amplifiers. It is possible to use and FEL amplifier as a resonant frequency tripling device, generating light and strong bunching at the 3rd harmonic of a conventional input source in an initial section of wiggler, then using a second section of wiggler resonant at the tripled frequency to amplify the short wavelength light. Neither mirrors nor a short-wavelength input source are required, and some relaxation of electron beam quality appears to be possible. We illustrate the scheme with a one-dimensional model and then with NUTMEG simulations of an 80 nm FEL amplifier initiated by a 240 nm input signal, in which an efficiency of conversion of electron beam power to 80 nm light of nearly 10{sup -4} was obtained. 3 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Diffraction and pulse slippage in the Boeing 1 kW FEL oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, J.; Wong, R.K.; Colson, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    A four-dimensional simulation in x, y, z, and t, including betatron motion of the electrons, is used to study the combined effects of diffraction, pulse slippage and desynchronism in the Boeing 1 kW FEL oscillator.

  9. High average power CW FELs (Free Electron Laser) for application to plasma heating: Designs and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Booske, J.H.; Granatstein, V.L.; Radack, D.J.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Bidwell, S.; Carmel, Y.; Destler, W.W.; Latham, P.E.; Levush, B.; Mayergoyz, I.D.; Zhang, Z.X. . Lab. for Plasma Research); Freund, H.P. )

    1989-01-01

    A short period wiggler (period {approximately} 1 cm), sheet beam FEL has been proposed as a low-cost source of high average power (1 MW) millimeter-wave radiation for plasma heating and space-based radar applications. Recent calculation and experiments have confirmed the feasibility of this concept in such critical areas as rf wall heating, intercepted beam ( body'') current, and high voltage (0.5 - 1 MV) sheet beam generation and propagation. Results of preliminary low-gain sheet beam FEL oscillator experiments using a field emission diode and pulse line accelerator have verified that lasing occurs at the predicted FEL frequency. Measured start oscillation currents also appear consistent with theoretical estimates. Finally, we consider the possibilities of using a short-period, superconducting planar wiggler for improved beam confinement, as well as access to the high gain, strong pump Compton regime with its potential for highly efficient FEL operation.

  10. Influence of nonlinear effects on statistical properties of the radiation from SASE FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldin, E. L.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    1998-02-01

    The paper presents analysis of statistical properties of the radiation from self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free-electron laser operating in nonlinear mode. The present approach allows one to calculate the following statistical properties of the SASE FEL radiation: time and spectral field correlation functions, distribution of the fluctuations of the instantaneous radiation power, distribution of the energy in the electron bunch, distribution of the radiation energy after monochromator installed at the FEL amplifier exit and the radiation spectrum. It has been observed that the statistics of the instantaneous radiation power from SASE FEL operating in the nonlinear regime changes significantly with respect to the linear regime. All numerical results presented in the paper have been calculated for the 70 nm SASE FEL at the TESLA Test Facility under construction at DESY.

  11. Scientific opportunities for FEL amplifier based VUV and X-ray research

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.D.

    1994-12-31

    It has become increasingly clear to a wide cross section of the synchrotron radiation research community that FELs will be the cornerstone of Fourth Generation Radiation Sources. Through the coherent generation of radiation, they provide as much as 12 orders of magnitude increase in peak power over the third generation storage ring machines of today. Facilities have been proposed which will extend the operating wavelength of these devices well beyond the reach of existing solid state laser technology. In addition, it appears possible to generate pulses of unprecedented brevity, down to a few femtoseconds, with mJ pulse energies. The combination of these attributes has stimulated considerable interest in short wavelength FELs for experiments in chemical, surface, and solid state physics, biology and materials science. This paper provides a brief overview of how the features of these FEL`s relate to the experimental opportunities.

  12. Picosecond pump-probe using an FEL and a synchrotron source

    SciTech Connect

    Denbeaux, G.; Straub, K.D.; Madey, J.M.J.

    1995-12-31

    Two color pump-probe experiments using both the Duke Storage Ring as a synchrotron light source for visible light the Mark III FEL as a tunable, high peak power IR source are possible. The visible synchrotron source can be used as a probe of vibrational excitation from the FEL in an experiment using vibrationally-assisted fluorescence as an indicator of overlap of the IR and the visible pulses. An optical delay line in the FEL beam will allow adjustment of the arrival time of the IR pulse relative to the visible probe. The storage ring RF booster and the Mark III FEL RF sources will be both driven by the same master oscillator with a timing jitter between sources of less than 20 psec. Exploration of coupling between electronic excitation and lifetimes of vibrational excitation of fluorescent compounds in solution can be carried out with this configuration.

  13. Possibility of a high-power, high-gain amplifier FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D. C.; Freund, H. P.

    2002-01-01

    High-gain amplifier FEL offer many unique advantages such as robust operation without a high-Q optical cavity and potentially high extraction eaciencies with the use of tapered wigglers. Although a high average power, cw amplifier FEL has not been demonstrated, many key physics issues such as electron beam brightness requirements, single-pass gains, saturation, etc. have been resolved. In this paper, we study the feasibility of a high-power FEL based on the high-gain amplifier concept. We show that with suitable electron beam parameters, i.e. high peak current, low emittance, low energy spread, and sufficient tapered wiggler length, peak output power of 1 QW and optical pulse energy of 8 mJ can be achieved. We also outline a possible configuration of a high-power, high-gain amplifier FEL with energy recovery.

  14. Coherence and linewidth studies of a 4-nm high power FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, W.M.; Sessler, A.M.; Scharlemann, E.T.

    1993-05-01

    Recently the SSRL/SLAC and its collaborators elsewhere have considered the merits of a 2 to 4-nm high power FEL utilizing the SLAC linac electron beam. The FEL would be a single pass amplifier excited by spontaneous emission rather than an oscillator, in order to eliminate the need for a soft X-ray resonant cavity. We have used GINGER, a multifrequency 2D FEL simulation code, to study the expected linewidth and coherence properties of the FEL, in both the exponential and saturated gain regimes. We present results concerning the effective shot noise input power and mode shape, the expected subpercent output line widths, photon flux, and the field temporal and spatial correlation functions. We also discuss the effects of tapering the wiggler upon the output power and line width.

  15. Genetic evolution of bacteriophage. I. Hybrids between unrelated bacteriophages P22 and Fels 2.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, N

    1969-01-01

    A new bacteriophage species, designated F22, was isolated from phage P22 stocks grown on Salmonella typhimurium Q1 lysogenic for Fels 2 at a frequency of less than 10(-11). P22 has a very short tail with a hexagonal base plate and six spikes. Phage Fels 2 is morphologically similar to E. coli T-even phages, having a long tail with a contractile sheath and carrying no genetic region related to P22. Phage F22 is morphologically and serologically indistinguishable from Fels 2, but carries the c(c(1), c(2), and c(3)) markers of P22. The color markers h(21), g, and m(3) of P22 do not appear in F22. Thus, F22 is evidently a recombinant between the unrelated bacteriophages P22 and Fels 2. The recombination between unrelated bacteriophages could play an important role in the evolution of bacteriophages.

  16. Synchronously injected amplifiers, a novel approach to high-average-power FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Fortgang, C.M.; Goldstein, J.C.; Kinross-Wright, J.M.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1996-11-01

    Two new FEL ideas based on synchronously injected amplifiers are described. Both of these rely on the synchronous injection of the optical signal into a high-gain, high-efficiency tapered wiggler. The first concept, called Regenerative Amplifier FEL (RAFEL), uses an optical feedback loop to provide a coherent signal at the wiggler entrance so that the optical power can reach saturation rapidly. The second idea requires the use of a uniform wiggler in the feedback loop to generate light that can be synchronously injected back into the first wiggler. The compact Advanced FEL is being modified to implement the RAFEL concept. We describe future operation of the Advanced FEL at high average current and discuss the possibility of generating 1 kW average power.

  17. About the scheme of the infrared FEL system for the accelerator based on HF wells

    SciTech Connect

    Kabanov, V.S.; Dzergach, A.I.

    1995-12-31

    Accelerators, based on localization of plasmoids in the HF wells (RF traps) of the axially-symmetric electromagnetic field E {sub omn} in an oversized (m,n>>1) resonant system, can give accelerating gradients {approximately}100 kV/{lambda}, e.g. 10 GV/m if {lambda}=10 {mu}m. One of possible variants of HF feeding for these accelerators is based on using the powerful infrared FEL System with 2 frequencies. The corresponding FEL`s may be similar to the Los Alamos compact Advanced FEL ({lambda}{sub 1,2}{approximately}10 pm, e-beam energy {approximately}15 MeV, e-beam current {approximately}100 A). Their power is defined mainly by the HF losses in the resonant system of the supposed accelerator.

  18. Microfabricated AC impedance sensor

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter; Ackler, Harold D.; Becker, Frederick; Boser, Bernhard E.; Eldredge, Adam B.; Fuller, Christopher K.; Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Hamilton, Julie K.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Wang, Xiao-Bo

    2002-01-01

    A microfabricated instrument for detecting and identifying cells and other particles based on alternating current (AC) impedance measurements. The microfabricated AC impedance sensor includes two critical elements: 1) a microfluidic chip, preferably of glass substrates, having at least one microchannel therein and with electrodes patterned on both substrates, and 2) electrical circuits that connect to the electrodes on the microfluidic chip and detect signals associated with particles traveling down the microchannels. These circuits enable multiple AC impedance measurements of individual particles at high throughput rates with sufficient resolution to identify different particle and cell types as appropriate for environmental detection and clinical diagnostic applications.

  19. Gain enhancement plasma-loaded FEL in the presence of beat waves

    SciTech Connect

    Shamamian, A.H.; Gevorgian, L.A.

    1995-12-31

    An expression for the dielectric permittivity of underdense plasma interacting with laser beat waves is derived. It is shown that the presence of beat waves in plasma results in an effective growth of the plasma frequency. The FEL Gain is investigated in the case when the frequency of soft photons weakly depending on the electron beam energy and the synchronism condition is maintained. It is shown that the plasma beat waves lead to the essential increase in FEL gain.

  20. Scientific potential and design considerations for an undulator beam line on Aladdin storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Arko, A. J.; Bader, S. D.; Dehmer, Joseph L.; Kim, S. H.; Knapp, G. S.; Shenoy, G. K.; Veal, B. W.; Young, C. E.; Brown, F. C.; Weaver, J. W.

    1985-04-08

    The unique features of undulator radiation, i.e., high photon flux and brightness, partial coherence, small beam divergence, spectral tunability, etc., mandate that undulators be included in the future plans for Aladdin. This will make it possible to perform the next generation of experiments in photon-stimulated spectroscopies. A team of scientists (see Appendix) has now been assembled to build an insertion device (ID) and the associated beam line at Aladdin. In considering the specifications for the ID, it was assumed that the ID beamline will be an SRC user facility. Consequently, design parameters were chosen with the intent of maximizing experimental flexibility consistent with a conservative design approach. A tunable ''clamshell'' undulator device was Chosen with a first harmonic tunable from 35 to 110 eV to operate on a 1 GeV storage ring. Higher harmonics will be utilized for experiments needing higher photon energies.