Science.gov

Sample records for ac field amplitude

  1. Modified Solenoid Coil That Efficiently Produces High Amplitude AC Magnetic Fields With Enhanced Uniformity for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Bordelon, David E.; Goldstein, Robert C.; Nemkov, Valentin S.; Kumar, Ananda; Jackowski, John K.; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Ivkov, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a modified solenoid coil that efficiently generates high amplitude alternating magnetic fields (AMF) having field uniformity (≤10%) within a 125-cm3 volume of interest. Two-dimensional finite element analysis (2D-FEA) was used to design a coil generating a targeted peak AMF amplitude along the coil axis of ~100 kA/m (peak-to-peak) at a frequency of 150 kHz while maintaining field uniformity to >90% of peak for a specified volume. This field uniformity was realized by forming the turns from cylindrical sections of copper plate and by adding flux concentrating rings to both ends of the coil. Following construction, the field profile along the axes of the coil was measured. An axial peak field value of 95.8 ± 0.4 kA/m was measured with 650 V applied to the coil and was consistent with the calculated results. The region of axial field uniformity, defined as the distance over which field ≥90% of peak, was also consistent with the simulated results. We describe the utility of such a device for calorimetric measurement of nanoparticle heating for cancer therapy and for magnetic fluid hyperthermia in small animal models of human cancer. PMID:25392562

  2. Effect of the magnetic material on AC losses in HTS conductors in AC magnetic field carrying AC transport current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xing-Xing; Huang, Chen-Guang; Yong, Hua-Dong; Zhou, You-He

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the AC losses in several typical superconducting composite conductors using the H-formulation model. A single superconducting strip with ferromagnetic substrate or cores and a stack of coated conductors with ferromagnetic substrates are studied. We consider all the coated conductors carrying AC transport currents and simultaneously exposed to perpendicular AC magnetic fields. The influences of the amplitude, frequency, phase difference and ferromagnetic materials on the AC losses are investigated. The results show that the magnetization losses of single strip and stacked strips have similar characteristics. The ferromagnetic substrate can increase the magnetization loss at low magnetic field, and decrease the loss at high magnetic field. The ferromagnetic substrate can obviously increase the transport loss in stacked strips. The trends of total AC losses of single strip and stacked strips are similar when they are carrying current or exposed to a perpendicular magnetic field. The effect of the frequency on the total AC losses of single strip is related to the amplitude of magnetic field. The AC losses decrease with increasing frequency in low magnetic field region while increase in high magnetic field region. As the phase difference changes, there is a periodic variation for the AC losses. Moreover, when the strip is under only the transport current and magnetic field, the ferromagnetic cores will increase the AC losses for large transport current or field.

  3. AC photovoltaic module magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, C.; Chang, G.J.; Reyes, A.B.; Whitaker, C.M.

    1997-12-31

    Implementation of alternating current (AC) photovoltaic (PV) modules, particularly for distributed applications such as PV rooftops and facades, may be slowed by public concern about electric and magnetic fields (EMF). This paper documents magnetic field measurements on an AC PV module, complementing EMF research on direct-current PV modules conducted by PG and E in 1993. Although not comprehensive, the PV EMF data indicate that 60 Hz magnetic fields (the EMF type of greatest public concern) from PV modules are comparable to, or significantly less than, those from household appliances. Given the present EMF research knowledge, AC PV module EMF may not merit considerable concern.

  4. The amplitude of quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Medvedev, B.V. ); Pavlov, V.P.; Polivanov, M.K. ); Sukhanov, A.D. )

    1989-05-01

    General properties of the transition amplitude in axiomatic quantum field theory are discussed. Bogolyubov's axiomatic method is chosen as the variant of the theory. The axioms of this method are analyzed. In particular, the significance of the off-shell extension and of the various forms of the causality condition are examined. A complete proof is given of the existence of a single analytic function whose boundary values are the amplitudes of all channels of a process with given particle number.

  5. Variation of Magnetic Particle Imaging Tracer Performance With Amplitude and Frequency of the Applied Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Khandhar, Amit P.; Kemp, Scott J.; Ota, Satoshi; Nakamura, Kosuke; Takemura, Yasushi; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2015-01-01

    The magnetic response of magnetic particle imaging (MPI) tracers varies with the slew rate of the applied magnetic field, as well as with the tracer's average magnetic core size. Currently, 25 kHz and 20 mT/μ0 drive fields are common in MPI, but lower field amplitudes may be necessary for patient safety in future designs. We studied how several different sizes of monodisperse MPI tracers behaved under different drive field amplitude and frequency, using magnetic particle spectrometry and ac hysteresis for drive field conditions at 16, 26, and 40 kHz, with field amplitudes from 5 to 40 mT/μ0. We observed that both field amplitude and frequency can influence the tracer behavior, but that the magnetic behavior is consistent when the slew rate (the product of field amplitude and frequency) is consistent. However, smaller amplitudes provide a correspondingly smaller field of view, sometimes resulting in excitation of a minor hysteresis loop. PMID:26023242

  6. AC conductivity of a niobium thin film in a swept magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Tsindlekht, M I; Genkin, V M; Gazi, S; Chromik, S

    2013-02-27

    We report results of measurements of the ac conductivity of a Nb superconducting thin film in a swept dc magnetic field. In the mixed state the swept dc field creates vortices at the film surface which pass through the film and form the observed ac conductivity. Vortex rate generation does not depend on the value of the dc field and there is a large plateau-like region of dc magnetic fields where the dissipation is approximately constant. A proposed phenomenological model describes quite well the main features of the ac response in these fields, including its dependency on the sweep rate, ac amplitude, frequency, and value of the second and third harmonics.

  7. Manipulating Flames with AC Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Kyle

    2013-11-01

    Time-oscillating electric fields applied to plasmas present in flames create steady flows of gas capable of shaping, directing, enhancing, or even extinguishing flames. Interestingly, electric winds induced by AC electric fields can be stronger that those due to static fields of comparable magnitude. Furthermore, unlike static fields, the electric force due to AC fields is localized near the surface of the flame. Consequently, the AC response depends only on the local field at the surface of the flame - not on the position of the electrodes used to generate the field. These results suggest that oscillating electric fields can be used to manipulate and control combustion processes at a distance. To characterize and explain these effects, we investigate a simple experimental system comprising a laminar methane-air flame positioned between two parallel-plate electrodes. We quantify both the electric and hydrodynamic response of the flame as a function of frequency and magnitude of the applied field. A theoretical model shows how steady gas flows emerge from the time-averaged electrical force due to the field-induced motion of ions generated within the flame and by their disappearance by recombination. These results provide useful insights into the application of AC fields to direct combustion processes.

  8. AC Magnetic Field Frequency Dependence of Magnetoacoustic Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, M.; Wincheski, B.; Fulton, J. P.; DeNale, R.

    1992-01-01

    Our recent study has proved a strong correlation between the low-frequency AC applied magnetic field amplitude dependence of the asymmetry of the magnetoacoustic emission (MAE) burst and the strength of the domain wall-defect interaction in iron-base ferromagnets. For the present study the AC magnetic field frequency dependence of the asymmetry has been investigated in the range of 1 to 200 Hz. When represented by the third moment of the rectified acoustic emission pulses, the asymmetry becomes a bell-shaped function of frequency with its center located around 25 Hz. This experiment has been performed with low carbon, high yield stress steel specimens of three different levels of domain wall-defect interaction strength. The results show that the increase in the interaction strength causes a vertical down shift of the asymmetry in the entire frequency range investigated.

  9. Droplet condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces with enhanced dewetting under a tangential AC electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xinzhu; Li, Jian; Li, Licheng; Huang, Zhengyong; Wang, Feipeng; Wei, Yuan

    2016-10-01

    In this Letter, the dewetting behavior of superhydrophobic condensing surfaces under a tangential AC electric field is reported. The surface coverage of condensed droplets only exhibits a negligible increase with time. The jumping frequency of droplets is enhanced. The AC electric field motivates the dynamic transition of droplets from stretch to recoil, resulting in the counterforce propelling droplet jumping. The considerable horizontal component of jumping velocity facilitates droplet departure from superhydrophobic surfaces. Both the amplitude and frequency of AC voltage are important factors for droplet departure and dewetting effect. Thereby, the tangential electric field provides a unique and easily implementable approach to enhance droplet removal from superhydrophobic condensing surfaces.

  10. Field-dependence of AC susceptibility in titanomagnetites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, M.; Moskowitz, B.; Rosenbaum, J.; Kissel, Catherie

    1998-01-01

    AC susceptibility measurements as a function of field amplitude Hac and of frequency show a strong field dependence for a set of synthetic titanomagnetites (Fe3-xTixO4) and for certain basalts from the SOH-1 Hawaiian drill hole and from Iceland. In-phase susceptibility is constant below fields of about 10-100 A/m, and then increases by as much as a factor of two as Hsc is increased to 2000 A/m. Both the initial field-independent susceptibilities and field-dependence of susceptibility are systematically related to composition: initial susceptibility is 3 SI for a single-crystal sphere of TMO (x = 0) and decreases with increasing titanium content; field-dependence is nearly zero for TM0 and increases systematically to a maximum near TM60 (x = 0.6). This field dependence can in some cases be mistaken for frequency dependence, and leaf to incorrect interpretations of magnetic grain size and composition when titanomagnetite is present.

  11. De Wijk gas field: Reservoir mapping with amplitude anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Bruijn, B. )

    1993-09-01

    De Wijk field, discovered in 1949, is located in the northeastern part of Netherlands. The main gas accumulation is contained in cretaceous and Triassic sandstone reservoirs trapped in a broad salt-induced structure of around 80 km[sup 2] areal extent. The field contains gas in the tertiary, Chalk, Zechstein 2 Carbonate, and Carboniferous reservoirs as well. De Wijk field is unique in the Netherlands as most gas-producing reservoirs in the Cretaceous/Triassic are of no commercial interest. Post-depositional leaching has positively affected the reservoir properties of the Triassic formations subcropping below the Cretaceous unconformity. Optimum, interpretation of 3-D seismic data acquired in 1989 resulted in spectacular displays highlighting the uniqueness of the field. Most gas-bearing reservoirs are expressed on seismic by amplitude anomalies. Various attribute-measurement techniques show the effect of gas fill, leaching, and sand distribution in the various reservoirs.

  12. AC electric field induced droplet deformation in a microfluidic T-junction.

    PubMed

    Xi, Heng-Dong; Guo, Wei; Leniart, Michael; Chong, Zhuang Zhi; Tan, Say Hwa

    2016-08-01

    We present for the first time an experimental study on the droplet deformation induced by an AC electric field in droplet-based microfluidics. It is found that the deformation of the droplets becomes stronger with increasing electric field intensity and frequency. The measured electric field intensity dependence of the droplet deformation is consistent with an early theoretical prediction for stationary droplets. We also proposed a simple equivalent circuit model to account for the frequency dependence of the droplet deformation. The model well explains our experimental observations. In addition, we found that the droplets can be deformed repeatedly by applying an amplitude modulation (AM) signal. PMID:27173587

  13. Amplitude modulation detection by human listeners in sound fields

    PubMed Central

    Zahorik, Pavel; Kim, Duck O.; Kuwada, Shigeyuki; Anderson, Paul W.; Brandewie, Eugene; Srinivasan, Nirmal

    2011-01-01

    The temporal modulation transfer function (TMTF) approach allows techniques from linear systems analysis to be used to predict how the auditory system will respond to arbitrary patterns of amplitude modulation (AM). Although this approach forms the basis for a standard method of predicting speech intelligibility based on estimates of the acoustical modulation transfer function (MTF) between source and receiver, human sensitivity to AM as characterized by the TMTF has not been extensively studied under realistic listening conditions, such as in reverberant sound fields. Here, TMTFs (octave bands from 2 – 512 Hz) were obtained in 3 listening conditions simulated using virtual auditory space techniques: diotic, anechoic sound field, reverberant room sound field. TMTFs were then related to acoustical MTFs estimated using two different methods in each of the listening conditions. Both diotic and anechoic data were found to be in good agreement with classic results, but AM thresholds in the reverberant room were lower than predictions based on acoustical MTFs. This result suggests that simple linear systems techniques may not be appropriate for predicting TMTFs from acoustical MTFs in reverberant sound fields, and may be suggestive of mechanisms that functionally enhance modulation during reverberant listening. PMID:22822417

  14. AC-field-induced quantum phase transitions in density of states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kai-Hua; Liu, Kai-Di; Wang, Huai-Yu; Qin, Chang-Dong

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the joint effects of the intralead electron interaction and an external alternating gate voltage on the time-averaged local density of states (DOSs) of a quantum dot coupled to two Luttinger-liquid leads in the Kondo regime. A rich dependence of the DOSs on the driving amplitude and intralead interaction is demonstrated. We show that the feature is quite different for different interaction strengths in the presence of the ac field. It is shown that the photon-assisted transport processes cause an additional splitting of the Kondo peak or dip, which exhibits photon-assisted single-channel (1CK) or two-channel Kondo (2CK) physics behavior. The phase transition between photon-assisted 1CK and 2CK physics occurs when the interaction strength is moderately strong. The inelastic channels associated with photon-assisted electron tunneling can dominate electron transport for weak interaction when the ac amplitude is greater than the frequency by one order of magnitude. In the limit of strong interaction the DOSs scale as a power-law behavior which is strongly affected by the ac field.

  15. Trapping of Rb Atoms by ac Electric Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Schlunk, Sophie; Marian, Adela; Geng, Peter; Meijer, Gerard; Schoellkopf, Wieland; Mosk, Allard P.

    2007-06-01

    We demonstrate trapping of an ultracold gas of neutral atoms in a macroscopic ac electric trap. Three-dimensional confinement is obtained by switching between two saddle-point configurations of the electric field. Stable trapping is observed in a narrow range of switching frequencies around 60 Hz. The dynamic confinement of the atoms is directly visualized at different phases of the ac switching cycle. We observe about 10{sup 5} Rb atoms in the 1 mm{sup 3} large and several microkelvins deep trap with a lifetime of approximately 5 s.

  16. Waveform magnetic field survey in Russian DC and Swiss AC powered trains: a basis for biologically relevant exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Ptitsyna, N G; Kopytenko, Y A; Villoresi, G; Pfluger, D H; Ismaguilov, V; Iucci, N; Kopytenko, E A; Zaitzev, D B; Voronov, P M; Tyasto, M I

    2003-12-01

    Recent epidemiological studies suggest a link between transport magnetic fields (MF) and certain adverse health effects. We performed measurements in workplaces of engineers on Russian DC and Swiss AC powered (16.67 Hz) electric trains using a computer based waveform capture system with a 200 Hz sampling rate. MF in DC and AC trains show complex combinations of static and varying components. The most probable levels of quasistatic MF (0.001-0.03 Hz) were in the range 40 microT. Maximum levels of 120 microT were found in DC powered locomotives. These levels are much higher than the geomagnetic field at the site of measurements. MF encountered both in DC and AC powered rail systems showed irregular temporal variability in frequency composition and amplitude characteristics across the whole frequency range studied (0-50 Hz); however, more than 90% of the magnetic field power was concentrated in frequencies AC locomotives, such as the most popular engine Re 4/4 II, the major energy falls around the fundamental frequency 16.67 Hz, with an average magnetic field intensity of about 44 microT; moreover, a significant contribution (about 15%) is due to components below the fundamental frequency. In Russian DC powered trains amplitudes of field variations sharply decrease from static to approximately 3-4 Hz fields; for higher frequencies a tendency of slow decrease is observed up to 50 Hz. For frequencies higher than 1 Hz average amplitudes of magnetic field variations are less than 1 microT; maximum levels reach tens of microtesla. At frequencies lower than 15 Hz, the average magnetic field generated by Swiss AC powered locomotives was approximately 10 times greater than fields observed in Russian DC powered trains.

  17. Hysteretic ac loss in a coated superconductor subjected to oscillating magnetic fields: ferromagnetic effect and frequency dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Guang-Tong

    2014-06-01

    Numerical simulations of the hysteretic ac loss in a coated superconductor with a more realistic version of the architecture were performed via the finite-element technique in the presence of an oscillating magnetic field. The coated superconductor was electromagnetically modeled by resorting to the quasistatic approximation of a vector potential approach in conjunction with nonlinear descriptions of the superconducting layer and the ferromagnetic substrate therein by a power-law model and the Langevin equation, respectively. A diverse effect of the ferromagnetic substrate on the hysteretic ac loss, depending on the strength of the applied magnetic field, was displayed, and its underlying cause was identified. The dependence of the hysteretic ac loss on the applied frequency is found to be related to a critical amplitude of the applied magnetic field, and the eddy-current loss dissipated in the metal coatings becomes prominent as the frequency increases only at high applied magnetic fields.

  18. On the field theory expansion of superstring five point amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boels, Rutger H.

    2013-11-01

    A simple recursive expansion algorithm for the integrals of tree level superstring five point amplitudes in a flat background is given which reduces the expansion to simple symbol(ic) manipulations. This approach can be used for instance to prove the expansion is maximally transcendental to all orders and to verify several conjectures made in recent literature to high order. Closed string amplitudes follow from these open string results by the KLT relations. To obtain insight into these results in particular the maximal R-symmetry violating amplitudes (MRV) in type IIB superstring theory are studied. The obtained expansion of the open string amplitudes reduces the analysis for MRV amplitudes to the classification of completely symmetric polynomials of the external legs, up to momentum conservation. Using Molien's theorem as a counting tool this problem is solved by constructing an explicit nine element basis for this class. This theorem may be of wider interest: as is illustrated at higher points it can be used to calculate dimensions of polynomials of external momenta invariant under any finite group for in principle any number of legs, up to momentum conservation. In the closed (or mixed) case this follows after application of the Kawai-Lewellen-Tye [1] relations (or their analogons [2,3]).

  19. Mechanism for AC Electric Field Deflection of Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemama, Michael; Bishop, Kyle; Cademartiri, Ludovico; Brenner, Michael P.; Whitesides, Georges M.

    2010-11-01

    Effects of electric fields on flames have been observed and studied since the 19th century. It is well known that the presence of an electric field can modify the shape of a burner or candle-like diffusion flame. Most experimental observations and theoretical analyses focused on DC fields. Recent experiments show that a flame can also be bent and even put out by an AC field. To explain how a zero time average cause can give rise to a net effect on the flame we develop a perturbation theory of the combustion equations modified to allow for the presence of the field and completed by Maxwell's equation. Theoretical and numerical analyses of the equations indeed show that the AC field creates a force whose magnitude is comparable to gravity for high enough fields (1e5 V/m). The dependency of this critical field on the frequency and the effect on the flame shape are also obtained and compared to experimental results.

  20. Lipid Bilayer Vesicle Dynamics in AC Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Lane; Vlahovska, Petia; Miksis, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Vesicles are closed, fluid-filled lipid bilayers which are mechanically similar to biological cells and which undergo shape transitions in the presence of electric fields. Here we model the vesicle membrane as an infinitely thin, capacitive, area-incompressible interface with the surrounding fluids acting as charge-advecting leaky dielectrics. We then implement the boundary integral method to numerically investigate the dynamics of a vesicle in various AC electric field profiles. Our numerical results are then compared with recent small deformation theory and experimental data. We also note our observation of a new theoretical vesicle behavior that has yet to be observed experimentally.

  1. Dependence of seismoelectric amplitudes on water content - a field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strahser, M. H. P.; Matthey, P.-D.; Jouniaux, L.; Sailhac, P.

    2009-04-01

    In porous saturated media, seismic compressional waves can cause seismoelectric and seismoelectromagnetic signals through electrokinetic coupling. It has been observed that these measureable signals also occur in partially saturated media, but the theory is largely unknown for these circumstances. Seismoelectromagnetic tomography is expected to combine the sensitivity of electrical properties to water-content and permeability, to the high spatial resolution of seismic surveys. A better understanding of the physical processes and a reliable quantification of the conversion between seismic and electric energy are necessary and need to take into account the effect of water-content, especially for shallow subsurface investigations. In order to quantify seismoelectric signals with changing water content, we repeated seismoelectric and seismic measurements on the same profile in the Vosges Mountains during several months. The electrical resistivity was also monitored to take into account the water-content variations. We show that an exponential relation can be established between the seismoelectric amplitudes normalized with the seismic amplitudes and the resistivity which in turn is related to the saturation: Increasing resistivity (decreasing water content) leads to decreasing normalized seismoelectric amplitudes. These results imply that the electrokinetic coefficient should increase with water-saturation, as measured in laboratory, but not predicted by theory. This work was funded by CNRS and Université Louis Pasteur de Strasbourg.

  2. The attenuation of the levitation force of HTS bulk exposed to AC magnetic field on the above NdFeB guideway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Minxian; Wang, Yan

    2012-01-01

    In the present High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) maglev vehicle system, the air gaps between the adjacent permanent magnets make the magnetic fields above the NdFeB guideway non-uniform. So it is required to study the characteristics of levitation force of the HTS bulk affected by the non-uniform applied magnetic fields along the moving direction. In this paper, we have studied the characteristics of the levitation force relaxation by an experiment in which AC magnetic field generated by an electromagnet is used to simulate the time-varying magnetic field caused by the inhomogeneity of the NdFeB guideway. From the experiment results, it is found that the levitation force is attenuated with the application of the AC field, and the attenuation is increased with the amplitude of the AC field, but the attenuation is almost independent of the frequency the AC magnetic field.

  3. On the existence of finite amplitude, transverse Alfven waves in the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sari, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Interplanetary magnetic field data from the Mariner 10 spacecraft were examined for evidence of small and finite amplitude transverse Alfven waves, general finite amplitude Alfven waves, and magnetosonic waves. No evidence for transverse Alfven waves was found. Instead, the field fluctuations were found to be dominated by the general finite amplitude Alfven wave. Such wave modes correspond to non-plane-wave solutions of the nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic equations.

  4. Microfluidic flow-focusing in ac electric fields.

    PubMed

    Tan, Say Hwa; Semin, Benoît; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2014-03-21

    We demonstrate the control of droplet sizes by an ac voltage applied across microelectrodes patterned around a flow-focusing junction. The electrodes do not come in contact with the fluids to avoid electrochemical effects. We found several regimes of droplet production in electric fields, controlled by the connection of the chip, the conductivity of the dispersed phase and the frequency of the applied field. A simple electrical modelling of the chip reveals that the effective voltage at the tip of the liquid to be dispersed controls the production mechanism. At low voltages (≲ 600 V), droplets are produced in dripping regime; the droplet size is a function of the ac electric field. The introduction of an effective capillary number that takes into account the Maxwell stress can explain the dependance of droplet size with the applied voltage. At higher voltages (≳ 600 V), jets are observed. The stability of droplet production is a function of the fluid conductivity and applied field frequency reported in a set of flow diagrams. PMID:24401868

  5. AC electric field induced dipole-based on-chip 3D cell rotation.

    PubMed

    Benhal, Prateek; Chase, J Geoffrey; Gaynor, Paul; Oback, Björn; Wang, Wenhui

    2014-08-01

    The precise rotation of suspended cells is one of the many fundamental manipulations used in a wide range of biotechnological applications such as cell injection and enucleation in nuclear transfer (NT) cloning. Noticeably scarce among the existing rotation techniques is the three-dimensional (3D) rotation of cells on a single chip. Here we present an alternating current (ac) induced electric field-based biochip platform, which has an open-top sub-mm square chamber enclosed by four sidewall electrodes and two bottom electrodes, to achieve rotation about the two axes, thus 3D cell rotation. By applying an ac potential to the four sidewall electrodes, an in-plane (yaw) rotating electric field is generated and in-plane rotation is achieved. Similarly, by applying an ac potential to two opposite sidewall electrodes and the two bottom electrodes, an out-of-plane (pitch) rotating electric field is generated and rolling rotation is achieved. As a prompt proof-of-concept, bottom electrodes were constructed with transparent indium tin oxide (ITO) using the standard lift-off process and the sidewall electrodes were constructed using a low-cost micro-milling process and then assembled to form the chip. Through experiments, we demonstrate rotation of bovine oocytes of ~120 μm diameter about two axes, with the capability of controlling the rotation direction and the rate for each axis through control of the ac potential amplitude, frequency, and phase shift, and cell medium conductivity. The maximum observed rotation rate reached nearly 140° s⁻¹, while a consistent rotation rate reached up to 40° s⁻¹. Rotation rate spectra for zona pellucida-intact and zona pellucida-free oocytes were further compared and found to have no effective difference. This simple, transparent, cheap-to-manufacture, and open-top platform allows additional functional modules to be integrated to become a more powerful cell manipulation system.

  6. Influence of AC external magnetic field on guidance force relaxation between HTS bulk and NdFeB guideway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Longcai; Wang, Suyu; Wang, Jiasu; Zheng, Jun

    2007-12-01

    Superconducting maglev vehicle is one of the most promising applications of HTS bulks. In such a system, the HTS bulks are always exposed to time-varying external magnetic field, which is generated by the inhomogeneous surface magnetic field of the NdFeB guideway. So it is required to study whether the guidance force of the bulks is influenced by the inhomogeneity. In this paper, we studied the characteristics of the guidance force relaxation between the HTS bulk and the NdFeB guideway by an experiment in which AC external magnetic field generated by an electromagnet was used to simulate the time-varying external magnetic field caused by the inhomogeneity of the guideway. From the experiment results, it was found that the guidance force was decreased with the application of the AC external magnetic field, and the decay increased with the amplitude and was almost independent of the frequency.

  7. Large amplitude middle atmospheric electric fields - Fact or fiction?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. C.; Siefring, C. L.; Pfaff, R. F., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    An analysis of the measurements of large apparent dc fields in the middle atmosphere, previously gathered by two sounding rockets, shows these fields to be spurious. In the case of one of the rockets, the evidence presented suggests that the measured electric fields, aligned with the rocket's velocity vector, may be due to a negatively charged wake. A comparison of measurements made by various electric field booms also suggests that the insulating boom coatings in one experiment may have affected the results obtained. It is recommended that insulating coatings should not be used at mesospheric altitudes, because of the detrimental effects that frictional charging may have.

  8. Coherence-population-trapping transients induced by an ac magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margalit, L.; Rosenbluh, M.; Wilson-Gordon, A. D.

    2012-06-01

    Coherent-population-trapping transients induced by an ac magnetic field are investigated theoretically for a realistic three-level Λ system in the D1 line of 87Rb. The contributions to the transient probe absorption from the various subsystems that compose the realistic atomic system are examined and the absorption of each Λ subsystem is compared to that of a simple Λ system. The population redistribution due to optical pumping is shown to be the dominant cause of the difference between the contributions of the various subsystems to the oscillatory character of the probe absorption. We also discuss the series of transients that reappear every half-cycle time of a modulated magnetic field when the system is in two-photon resonance, and we study the transient behavior as a function of the probe detuning. The effect of a buffer gas on the amplitude and shape of the transients is considered.

  9. Reconstruction of far-field tsunami amplitude distributions from earthquake sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, Eric L.; Parsons, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    The probability distribution of far-field tsunami amplitudes is explained in relation to the distribution of seismic moment at subduction zones. Tsunami amplitude distributions at tide gauge stations follow a similar functional form, well described by a tapered Pareto distribution that is parameterized by a power-law exponent and a corner amplitude. Distribution parameters are first established for eight tide gauge stations in the Pacific, using maximum likelihood estimation. A procedure is then developed to reconstruct the tsunami amplitude distribution that consists of four steps: (1) define the distribution of seismic moment at subduction zones; (2) establish a source-station scaling relation from regression analysis; (3) transform the seismic moment distribution to a tsunami amplitude distribution for each subduction zone; and (4) mix the transformed distribution for all subduction zones to an aggregate tsunami amplitude distribution specific to the tide gauge station. The tsunami amplitude distribution is adequately reconstructed for four tide gauge stations using globally constant seismic moment distribution parameters established in previous studies. In comparisons to empirical tsunami amplitude distributions from maximum likelihood estimation, the reconstructed distributions consistently exhibit higher corner amplitude values, implying that in most cases, the empirical catalogs are too short to include the largest amplitudes. Because the reconstructed distribution is based on a catalog of earthquakes that is much larger than the tsunami catalog, it is less susceptible to the effects of record-breaking events and more indicative of the actual distribution of tsunami amplitudes.

  10. Reconstruction of Far-Field Tsunami Amplitude Distributions from Earthquake Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geist, Eric L.; Parsons, Tom

    2016-04-01

    The probability distribution of far-field tsunami amplitudes is explained in relation to the distribution of seismic moment at subduction zones. Tsunami amplitude distributions at tide gauge stations follow a similar functional form, well described by a tapered Pareto distribution that is parameterized by a power-law exponent and a corner amplitude. Distribution parameters are first established for eight tide gauge stations in the Pacific, using maximum likelihood estimation. A procedure is then developed to reconstruct the tsunami amplitude distribution that consists of four steps: (1) define the distribution of seismic moment at subduction zones; (2) establish a source-station scaling relation from regression analysis; (3) transform the seismic moment distribution to a tsunami amplitude distribution for each subduction zone; and (4) mix the transformed distribution for all subduction zones to an aggregate tsunami amplitude distribution specific to the tide gauge station. The tsunami amplitude distribution is adequately reconstructed for four tide gauge stations using globally constant seismic moment distribution parameters established in previous studies. In comparisons to empirical tsunami amplitude distributions from maximum likelihood estimation, the reconstructed distributions consistently exhibit higher corner amplitude values, implying that in most cases, the empirical catalogs are too short to include the largest amplitudes. Because the reconstructed distribution is based on a catalog of earthquakes that is much larger than the tsunami catalog, it is less susceptible to the effects of record-breaking events and more indicative of the actual distribution of tsunami amplitudes.

  11. AC magnetic field losses in BSCCO-2223 superconducting tapes

    SciTech Connect

    Lelovic, M.; Mench, S.; Deis, T.

    1997-09-01

    The AC magnetic losses at power frequencies (60 Hz) were investigated for mono- and multifilament Ag-sheathed (Bi, Pb){sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} (BSCCO-2223) tapes with similar transport critical current (I{sub c}) values at 77 K. The multifilament sample exhibited higher losses than the monofilament under the same conditions. Loss peaks are discussed in terms of intergranular, intragranular and eddy current losses. Because of BSCCO`s anisotropy, field orientation has a large effect on the magnitude of these peaks, even at relatively small angles. Losses for fields applied parallel to the c-axis of the textured BSCCO grains are larger by more than one order of magnitude than those applied perpendicular.

  12. Effect of low voltage AC fields on cardiovascular implants.

    PubMed

    Kothandaraman, Anjana; Anson, Tony; Reynolds, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Coronary Artery Stents have been the preferred form of treatment for vascular occlusive disease, due to the minimally invasive surgical procedure, post-operative recovery time and cost, when compared to open coronary bypass surgery. The cellular response upon applying an AC electric field to type 316LM Stainless Steel stent mimics was investigated in this paper. The highest RBC adhesion was observed at voltages higher than 88 mV and lower than 74 mV. Their unique alignment along the lines of fracture on the stent surface at 88 mV was a phenomenon caused by an increase in electrical conductivity in these regions. Being able to control RBC adhesion may have various clinical implications such as inhibition of thrombus formation, and provide a basis to analyse whether electric fields may be applied to cancer therapy as well.

  13. Determining the True Polarity and Amplitude of Synaptic Currents Underlying Gamma Oscillations of Local Field Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Makarov, Valeri A.; Herreras, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    Fluctuations in successive waves of oscillatory local field potentials (LFPs) reflect the ongoing processing of neuron populations. However, their amplitude, polarity and synaptic origin are uncertain due to the blending of electric fields produced by multiple converging inputs, and the lack of a baseline in standard AC-coupled recordings. Consequently, the estimation of underlying currents by laminar analysis yields spurious sequences of inward and outward currents. We devised a combined analytical/experimental approach that is suitable to study laminated structures. The approach was essayed on an experimental oscillatory LFP as the Schaffer-CA1 gamma input in anesthetized rats, and it was verified by parallel processing of model LFPs obtained through a realistic CA1 aggregate of compartmental units. This approach requires laminar LFP recordings and the isolation of the oscillatory input from other converging pathways, which was achieved through an independent component analysis. It also allows the spatial and temporal components of pathway-specific LFPs to be separated. While reconstructed Schaffer-specific LFPs still show spurious inward/outward current sequences, these were clearly stratified into distinct subcellular domains. These spatial bands guided the localized delivery of neurotransmitter blockers in experiments. As expected, only Glutamate but not GABA blockers abolished Schaffer LFPs when applied to the active but not passive subcellular domains of pyramidal cells. The known chemical nature of the oscillatory LFP allowed an empirical offset of the temporal component of Schaffer LFPs, such that following reconstruction they yield only sinks or sources at the appropriate sites. In terms of number and polarity, some waves increased and others decreased proportional to the concomitant inputs in native multisynaptic LFPs. Interestingly, the processing also retrieved the initiation time for each wave, which can be used to discriminate afferent from

  14. Electric field characteristics of electroconvulsive therapy with individualized current amplitude: a preclinical study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Hee; Lisanby, Sarah H; Laine, Andrew F; Peterchev, Angel V

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the characteristics of the electric field induced in the brain by electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) with individualized current amplitude. The electric field induced by bilateral (BL), bifrontal (BF), right unilateral (RUL), and frontomedial (FM) ECT electrode configurations was computed in anatomically realistic finite element models of four nonhuman primates (NHPs). We generated maps of the electric field strength relative to an empirical neural activation threshold, and determined the stimulation strength and focality at fixed current amplitude and at individualized current amplitudes corresponding to seizure threshold (ST) measured in the anesthetized NHPs. The results show less variation in brain volume stimulated above threshold with individualized current amplitudes (16-36%) compared to fixed current amplitude (30-62%). Further, the stimulated brain volume at amplitude-titrated ST is substantially lower than that for ECT with conventional fixed current amplitudes. Thus individualizing the ECT stimulus current could compensate for individual anatomical variability and result in more focal and uniform electric field exposure across different subjects compared to the standard clinical practice of using high, fixed current for all patients.

  15. AC Electric Field Activated Shape Memory Polymer Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Jin Ho; Siochi, Emilie J.; Penner, Ronald K.; Turner, Travis L.

    2011-01-01

    Shape memory materials have drawn interest for applications like intelligent medical devices, deployable space structures and morphing structures. Compared to other shape memory materials like shape memory alloys (SMAs) or shape memory ceramics (SMCs), shape memory polymers (SMPs) have high elastic deformation that is amenable to tailored of mechanical properties, have lower density, and are easily processed. However, SMPs have low recovery stress and long response times. A new shape memory thermosetting polymer nanocomposite (LaRC-SMPC) was synthesized with conductive fillers to enhance its thermo-mechanical characteristics. A new composition of shape memory thermosetting polymer nanocomposite (LaRC-SMPC) was synthesized with conductive functionalized graphene sheets (FGS) to enhance its thermo-mechanical characteristics. The elastic modulus of LaRC-SMPC is approximately 2.7 GPa at room temperature and 4.3 MPa above its glass transition temperature. Conductive FGSs-doped LaRC-SMPC exhibited higher conductivity compared to pristine LaRC SMP. Applying an electric field at between 0.1 Hz and 1 kHz induced faster heating to activate the LaRC-SMPC s shape memory effect relative to applying DC electric field or AC electric field at frequencies exceeding1 kHz.

  16. Unusual polarity-dependent patterns in a bent-core nematic liquid crystal under low-frequency ac field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Ying; Zhou, Meng-jie; Xu, Ming-Ya; Salamon, Péter; Éber, Nándor; Buka, Ágnes

    2015-04-01

    Electric-field-induced patterns of diverse morphology have been observed over a wide frequency range in a recently synthesized bent-core nematic (BCN) liquid crystal. At low frequencies (up to ˜25 Hz), the BCN exhibited unusual polarity-dependent patterns. When the amplitude of the ac field was enhanced, these two time-asymmetrical patterns turned into time-symmetrical prewavylike stripes. At ac frequencies in the middle-frequency range (˜50-3000 Hz), zigzag patterns were detected whose obliqueness varied with the frequency. Finally, if the frequency was increased above 3 kHz, the zigzag pattern was replaced by another, prewavylike pattern, whose threshold voltage depended on the frequency; however, the wave vector did not. For a more complete characterization, material parameters such as elastic constants, dielectric permittivities, and the anisotropy of the diamagnetic susceptibility were also determined.

  17. Concentrating membrane proteins using asymmetric traps and AC electric fields.

    PubMed

    Cheetham, Matthew R; Bramble, Jonathan P; McMillan, Duncan G G; Krzeminski, Lukasz; Han, Xiaojun; Johnson, Benjamin R G; Bushby, Richard J; Olmsted, Peter D; Jeuken, Lars J C; Marritt, Sophie J; Butt, Julea N; Evans, Stephen D

    2011-05-01

    Membrane proteins are key components of the plasma membrane and are responsible for control of chemical ionic gradients, metabolite and nutrient transfer, and signal transduction between the interior of cells and the external environment. Of the genes in the human genome, 30% code for membrane proteins (Krogh et al. J. Mol. Biol.2001, 305, 567). Furthermore, many FDA-approved drugs target such proteins (Overington et al. Nat. Rev. Drug Discovery 2006, 5, 993). However, the structure-function relationships of these are notably sparse because of difficulties in their purification and handling outside of their membranous environment. Methods that permit the manipulation of membrane components while they are still in the membrane would find widespread application in separation, purification, and eventual structure-function determination of these species (Poo et al. Nature 1977, 265, 602). Here we show that asymmetrically patterned supported lipid bilayers in combination with AC electric fields can lead to efficient manipulation of charged components. We demonstrate the concentration and trapping of such components through the use of a "nested trap" and show that this method is capable of yielding an approximately 30-fold increase in the average protein concentration. Upon removal of the field, the material remains trapped for several hours as a result of topographically restricted diffusion. Our results indicate that this method can be used for concentrating and trapping charged membrane components while they are still within their membranous environment. We anticipate that our approach could find widespread application in the manipulation and study of membrane proteins.

  18. Concentrating membrane proteins using asymmetric traps and AC electric fields.

    PubMed

    Cheetham, Matthew R; Bramble, Jonathan P; McMillan, Duncan G G; Krzeminski, Lukasz; Han, Xiaojun; Johnson, Benjamin R G; Bushby, Richard J; Olmsted, Peter D; Jeuken, Lars J C; Marritt, Sophie J; Butt, Julea N; Evans, Stephen D

    2011-05-01

    Membrane proteins are key components of the plasma membrane and are responsible for control of chemical ionic gradients, metabolite and nutrient transfer, and signal transduction between the interior of cells and the external environment. Of the genes in the human genome, 30% code for membrane proteins (Krogh et al. J. Mol. Biol.2001, 305, 567). Furthermore, many FDA-approved drugs target such proteins (Overington et al. Nat. Rev. Drug Discovery 2006, 5, 993). However, the structure-function relationships of these are notably sparse because of difficulties in their purification and handling outside of their membranous environment. Methods that permit the manipulation of membrane components while they are still in the membrane would find widespread application in separation, purification, and eventual structure-function determination of these species (Poo et al. Nature 1977, 265, 602). Here we show that asymmetrically patterned supported lipid bilayers in combination with AC electric fields can lead to efficient manipulation of charged components. We demonstrate the concentration and trapping of such components through the use of a "nested trap" and show that this method is capable of yielding an approximately 30-fold increase in the average protein concentration. Upon removal of the field, the material remains trapped for several hours as a result of topographically restricted diffusion. Our results indicate that this method can be used for concentrating and trapping charged membrane components while they are still within their membranous environment. We anticipate that our approach could find widespread application in the manipulation and study of membrane proteins. PMID:21476549

  19. Rapid magnetic microfluidic mixer utilizing AC electromagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Wen, Chih-Yung; Yeh, Cheng-Peng; Tsai, Chien-Hsiung; Fu, Lung-Ming

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents a novel simple micromixer based on stable water suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles (i.e. ferrofluids). The micromixer chip is built using standard microfabrication and simple soft lithography, and the design can be incorporated as a subsystem into any chemical microreactor or a miniaturized biological sensor. An electromagnet driven by an AC power source is used to induce transient interactive flows between a ferrofluid and Rhodamine B. The alternative magnetic field causes the ferrofluid to expand significantly and uniformly toward Rhodamine B, associated with a great number of extremely fine fingering structures on the interface in the upstream and downstream regions of the microchannel. These pronounced fingering patterns, which have not been observed by other active mixing methods utilizing only magnetic force, increase the mixing interfacial length dramatically. Along with the dominant diffusion effects occurring around the circumferential regions of the fine finger structures, the mixing efficiency increases significantly. The miscible fingering instabilities are observed and applied in the microfluidics for the first time. This work is carried with a view to developing functionalized ferrofluids that can be used as sensitive pathogen detectors and the present experimental results demonstrate that the proposed micromixer has excellent mixing capabilities. The mixing efficiency can be as high as 95% within 2.0 s and a distance of 3.0 mm from the inlet of the mixing channel, when the applied peak magnetic field is higher than 29.2 Oe and frequency ranges from 45 to 300 Hz. PMID:19921677

  20. Universal features of particle motion in ac electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeyer, L.; Seeger, M.

    2015-11-01

    Mobile particles present as contaminants in high voltage gas insulated switchgear (GIS) may constitute a risk for insulation failure. The understanding of their motion in the electric field of the insulation gap is therefore essential for quality control in manufacturing, commissioning and in service monitoring. Published research on particle motion in ac electric fields has shown that this rather complex process depends on numerous parameters, many of which remain unknown under practical conditions. This renders modelling, generalization of experimental data and practical application difficult. The scope of this paper therefore is to develop a unified description of particle motion which minimizes the number of controlling parameters, enables the comparison of experimental data and allows simple interpretation relations to be derived. This is achieved by making the controlling equations dimensionless with an appropriate choice of reference values and by using simplifying assumptions for the specific conditions prevailing in GIS. The resulting generalized description of the process can then be summarized in the form of 2D patterns (dynamic maps). Approximate scaling relations are derived between specific features of these patterns and particle-related parameters. A reference case is discussed in detail. The non-linear character of the equation of motion suggests that the particle motion may be a deterministic process with chaotic features. This is confirmed by a preliminary chaos-theoretical analysis of the process.

  1. Generation of longitudinally polarized terahertz pulses with field amplitudes exceeding 2 kV/cm

    SciTech Connect

    Cliffe, M. J. Rodak, A.; Graham, D. M.; Jamison, S. P.

    2014-11-10

    We demonstrate the generation of near-single cycle longitudinally polarized terahertz radiation using a large-area radially biased photoconductive antenna with a longitudinal field amplitude in excess of 2 kV/cm. The 76 mm diameter antenna was photo-excited by a 0.5 mJ amplified near-infrared femtosecond laser system and biased with a voltage of up to 100 kV applied over concentric electrodes. Amplitudes for both the transverse and longitudinal field components of the source were measured using a calibrated electro-optic detection scheme. By tightly focusing the radiation emitted from the photoconductive antenna, we obtained a maximum longitudinal field amplitude of 2.22 kV/cm with an applied bias field of 38.5 kV/cm.

  2. Analyze and experiment on AC magnetic field's effect to fiber optic gyroscopes in compact stabilization control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Mao, Yao; Tian, Jing; Li, Zhijun

    2015-10-01

    Fiber optic gyroscopes (FOG) are getting more and more attention in areas such as stabilization control systems as they are all solid state and have a wide bandwidth. In stabilization systems that require wide bandwidth control, motors are usually used as actuating mechanism for active disturbance restrain. Voice coil motors (VCMs) are usually used in compact stabilization systems that require large torque and fast response. However, AC magnetic field, which can affect the output of FOG due to Faraday effect, will be generated during operation of VCMs. The frequency range affected by the AC magnetic field to the FOG's output is the same as VCMs drive signal frequency range, which is also exactly the stabilization system's working range. Therefore the effect of the AC magnetic field to FOGs must be evaluated to verify the feasibility of a stable system design that uses both FOGs and VCMs. In this article, the basic structure and operating principle of stabilization system is introduced. The influence of AC magnetic field to FOG is theoretically analyzed. The magnetic field generated by VCMs is numerically simulated based on the theory deduction of the magnetic field near energized wires. To verify the influence of the VCM generated magnetic field to the FOGs in practical designs, a simplified random fiber coil model is built for it's hard to accurately test the exact polarize axis's twisting rate in a fiber coil. The influence to the FOG's output of different random coil model is simulated and the result shows a same trend that the influence of the VCM's magnetic field to the FOG is reduced as the distance between the VCM and the FOG increasing. The influence of a VCM to a FOG with the same parameters is experimentally tested. In the Fourier transformed FOG data the same frequency point as the VCM drive signal frequency can be read. The result fit simulated result that as the distance increases, the influence decreases. The amplitude of the frequency point is just

  3. Absorption of ac fields in amorphous indium-oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Ovadyahu, Z.

    2014-08-20

    Absorption data from applied ac fields in Anderson-localized amorphous indium-oxide (In{sub x}O) films are shown to be frequency and disorder dependent. The absorption shows a roll-off at a frequency which is much lower than the electron-electron scattering rate of the material when it is in the diffusive regime. This is interpreted as evidence for discreteness of the energy spectrum of the deeply localized regime. This is consistent with recent many-body localization scenarios. As the metal-insulator transition is approached, the absorption shifts to higher frequencies. Comparing with the previously obtained results on the crystalline version of indium-oxide (In{sub 2}O{sub 3−x}) implies a considerably higher inelastic electron-phonon scattering rate in the amorphous material. The range over which the absorption versus frequency decreases may indicate that a wide distribution of localization length is a common feature in these systems.

  4. Particle Agglomeration in Bipolar Barb Agglomerator Under AC Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chao; Ma, Xiuqin; Sun, Youshan; Wang, Meiyan; Zhang, Changping; Lou, Yueya

    2015-04-01

    The development of an efficient technology for removing fine particles in flue gas is essential as the haze is becoming more and more serious. To improve agglomeration effectiveness of fine particles, a dual zone electric agglomeration device consisting of a charging chamber and an agglomeration chamber with bipolar barb electrodes was developed. The bipolar barb electric agglomerator with a polar distance of 200 mm demonstrates good agglomeration effectiveness for particles with a size less than 8.0 μm under applied AC electric field. An optimal condition for achieving better agglomeration effectiveness was found to be as follows: flue gas flow velocity of 3.00 m/s, particle concentration of 2.00 g/m3, output voltage of 35 kV and length of the barb of 16 mm. In addition, 4.0-6.0 μm particles have the best effectiveness with the variation of particle volume occupancy of -3.2. supported by the Key Technology R&D Program of Hebei, China (No. 13211207D)

  5. Fourier-series-based phase and amplitude optical field screen generator for weak atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louthain, James A.; Welsh, Byron M.

    1998-09-01

    A new atmospheric screen generator is developed for use in performance calculations of adaptive optics and imaging systems. The generator is valid over a wide range of atmospheric turbulence parameters and incorporates both phase and amplitude effects. The new screen generator accounts for diffraction effects caused by turbulence and incorporates the phase, amplitude, and cross statistics of a weak turbulence model. The second order statistics of the phase and amplitude perturbations are based on the auto- correlation functions developed by Lee and Harp and the cross-correlation of the phase and amplitude perturbations derived in this paper. The correlations are derived by modeling the turbulence as a number of layers of randomly varying refractivity perpendicular to the propagation path. As the field propagates through the medium, diffraction occurs at each of the layers. A Fourier series expansion of the wavefront phase and amplitude is used. The screen generator uses the power and cross spectral densities of the phase and amplitude perturbations. The mean square value and the structure functions of the wavefront phase and amplitude are calculated in a Monte Carlo experiment and shown to be within 1% of the theoretical value.

  6. Absorption and Attenuation Coefficients Using the WET Labs ac-s in the Mid-Atlantic Bight: Field Measurements and Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohi, Nobuaki; Makinen, Carla P.; Mitchell, Richard; Moisan, Tiffany A.

    2008-01-01

    Ocean color algorithms are based on the parameterization of apparent optical properties as a function of inherent optical properties. WET Labs underwater absorption and attenuation meters (ac-9 and ac-s) measure both the spectral beam attenuation [c (lambda)] and absorption coefficient [a (lambda)]. The ac-s reports in a continuous range of 390-750 nm with a band pass of 4 nm, totaling approximately 83 distinct wavelengths, while the ac-9 reports at 9 wavelengths. We performed the ac-s field measurements at nine stations in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from water calibrations to data analysis. Onboard the ship, the ac-s was calibrated daily using Milli Q-water. Corrections for the in situ temperature and salinity effects on optical properties of water were applied. Corrections for incomplete recovery of the scattered light in the ac-s absorption tube were performed. The fine scale of spectral and vertical distributions of c (lambda) and a (lambda) were described from the ac-s. The significant relationships between a (674) and that of spectrophotometric analysis and chlorophyll a concentration of discrete water samples were observed.

  7. A method of measuring the amplitude-modulated vacuum field near a conducting mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youn, Sun-Hyun; Lee, Jai-Hyung; Chang, Joon-Sung

    1994-01-01

    Electromagnetic fields of the vacuum mode near a conducting mirror are modified with respect to those in free space, with their amplitudes having a sinusoidal spatial dependence from the mirror. Therefore if we combine this spatially amplitude-modulated vacuum field mode and intense coherent light with a beam splitter, we may detect this fluctuation of the vacuum mode in a homodyne detection scheme. It will give a new method to produce squeezed states of light with a single mirror placed close to an unused port of a beam splitter. We show that the amplitude fluctuation of the combined light can be reduced by a factor of 2 below that of the coherent light. We also discuss the limitations due to the finite line width of the laser and the effective absorption length of the photodiodes.

  8. The magnetisation profiles and ac magnetisation losses in a single layer YBCO thin film caused by travelling magnetic field waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Coombs, Timothy

    2015-05-01

    This paper studies the magnetisation and ac magnetisation losses caused by a travelling magnetic wave on a single-layer YBCO thin film. This work provides thorough investigations on how the critical magnetic field gradient has been changed by the application of a travelling wave. Several conditions were studied such as zero-field cooling (ZFC), field cooling (FC) and a delta-shaped trapped field. It was found that the travelling wave tends to attenuate the existing critical magnetic field gradients in all these conditions. This interesting magnetic behaviour can be well predicted by the finite element (FEM) software with the E-J power law and Maxwell’s equations. The numerical simulations show that the existing critical current density has been compromised after applying the travelling wave. The magnetisation profile caused by the travelling wave is very different from the standing wave, while the magnetisation based on the standing wave can be interpreted by the Bean model and constant current density assumption. Based on the numerical method, which has reliability that has been solidly proven in the study, we have extended the study to the ac magnetisation losses. Comparisons were made between the travelling wave and the standing wave for this specific YBCO sample. It was found that by applying the magnetic wave of the same amplitude, the ac magnetisation loss caused by the travelling wave is about 1/3 of that caused by the standing wave. These results are helpful in understanding the general magnetism problems and ac magnetisation loss in the travelling magnetic wave conditions such as inside a high temperature superconducting (HTS) rotating machine, etc.

  9. Lack of mucin MUC5AC field change expression associated with tubulovillous and villous colorectal adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Longman, R; Douthwaite, J; Sylvester, P; O'Leary, D; Warren, B; Corfield, A; Thomas, M

    2000-01-01

    Background—MUC5AC is a secreted mucin aberrantly expressed by polypoid colorectal adenomas. It has been hypothesised that the "normal" surrounding colorectal mucosa expresses MUC5AC as a field change phenomenon that can be used to predict adenoma recurrence following resection. Aim—To determine if there is a field change of de novo MUC5AC expression in histologically normal rectal mucosa adjacent to villous and tubulovillous adenomas, and thus whether MUC5AC expression can be used as a marker of early tumour recurrence. Methods—In a prospective cohort study paired mucosal biopsies of adenomatous and macroscopically "normal" mucosa were obtained from 11 patients with villous and 11 patients with tubulovillous adenomas who underwent primary resection for purpose of cure. The tissues were studied to determine MUC5AC gene expression by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridisation. Patients were followed up by flexible sigmoidoscopy to detect the presence of early local recurrence. Results—10 villous adenomas showed mature MUC5AC glycoprotein and all 11 expressed MUC5AC mRNA. Five tubulovillous adenomas showed mature MUC5AC glycoprotein and 10 expressed MUC5AC mRNA. Neoexpression of the MUC5AC mucin gene was not detected in any of the mucosal biopsies taken adjacent to either villous or tubulovillous adenomas, even in three patients with early, locally recurrent disease. Conclusions—Aberrant MUC5AC gene expression is not a "field change" in the colorectal mucosa in patients with rectal adenomas and therefore cannot be used to predict local recurrence of villous and tubulovillous adenomas. Key Words: mucin • colorectal adenoma • gene expression • field change PMID:10767823

  10. Adaptive algorithm for active control of high-amplitude acoustic field in resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Červenka, M.; Bednařík, M.; Koníček, P.

    2008-06-01

    This work is concerned with suppression of nonlinear effects in piston-driven acoustic resonators by means of two-frequency driving technique. An iterative adaptive algorithm is proposed to calculate parameters of the driving signal in order that amplitude of the second harmonics of the acoustic pressure is minimized. Functionality of the algorithm is verified firstly by means of numerical model and secondly, it is used in real computer-controlled experiment. The numerical and experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can be successfully used for generation of high-amplitude shock-free acoustic field in resonators.

  11. Use of amplitude vs offset seismic techniques to delineate subtle stratigraphic traps - Three field studies

    SciTech Connect

    Holton, J.E.; Lausten, C.D.; Blott, J.E. )

    1989-09-01

    Three stratigraphically trapped Wyoming fields which were previously held to be seismically invisible have been examined using amplitude vs. offset seismic techniques. This technology examines the seismic signature changes which take place as a function of source and receiver distance. Such signature changes are directly related to lithology and can be predicted in models and confirmed by the actual data. Two oil fields are located in the Powder River basin: Hartzog Draw and Coyote Creek. The third field, Dripping Rock, is a gas field in the Washakie basin of southwestern Wyoming. The fields produce from sands of the Shannon, Dakota, and Almond formations, respectively. All three fields lack significant velocity differences between the reservoir and trap facies. This results in an inability to delineate the sands using conventional seismic techniques. Amplitude vs. offset techniques, however, present easily identifiable anomalies which reliably delineate the extent of the reservoir sands in each of the cases. Amplitude vs. offset technology has been used successfully in numerous exploratory and development situations throughout the Rocky Mountains and other areas of the US and Canada. It has proven to be a very reliable technique to explore subtle stratigraphic plays which remain relatively immature in mature basins.

  12. Bordered surfaces, off-shell amplitudes, sewing, and string field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Carlip, S.

    1989-04-01

    These lectures will deal with the current status of the sewing problem. The rationale for this approach is that any nonperturbative string theory must reproduce the Polyakov path integral as a perturbation series. If our experience in ordinary field theory is a guide --- and admittedly it may not be --- the terms in such a perturbation series, like Feynman diagrams, are likely to be built up from simple ''vertices'' and ''propagators,'' which can themselves be represented as (off-shell) Polyakov amplitudes. Hence an understanding of how to put together simple components into more complicated world sheet amplitudes is likely to give us much-needed information about the structure of nonperturbative string theory. To understand sewing, we must first understand the building blocks, off-shell Polyakov amplitudes. This is the subject of my first lecture. Next, we will explore the sewing of conformal field theories at a fixed conformal structure, that is, the reconstruction of correlation functions for a fixed surface /Sigma/ from those on a pair of surfaces /Sigma//sub 1/ and /Sigma//sub 2/ obtained by cutting /Sigma/ along a closed curve. We will then look at the problem of sewing amplitudes, integrals of correlation functions over moduli space. This will necessitate an understanding of how to build the moduli space of a complicated surface from simpler moduli spaces. Finally, we will briefly examine vertices and string field theories. 48 refs., 10 figs.

  13. Simultaneous ac and dc magnetic field measurements in residential areas: Implications for resonance theories of biological effects

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, P.S.; Sastre, A.

    1995-10-01

    The goal of this study was to obtain data that could be used to evaluate the applicability of ``resonance`` theories of biological effects in residential settings. The authors first describe a measurement system which allows the study of ac and dc magnetic fields simultaneously in space and in time. Sample measurements were taken near two power lines, two objects and in two residential homes. The results show that the earth`s (dc) magnetic field was unaffected near power lines. The compass orientation of the power line influenced the relative values of the ac components parallel and perpendicular to the dc field. The electric heating system greatly affected the ac field levels in the home, causing the levels to increase from less than 1 mG to a maximum of 7.5 mG during heating. The magnitudes of the dc field in the two homes varied from about 380 to 650 mG, with the larger variations near metallic or magnetic objects such as the refrigerator or a metallic air duct. The earth`s field was elevated above its natural level within a distance of 8 feet from a subcompact passenger car, e.g., the level changed from about 540 to 1,100 mG beside the headlight. A steel chair changed the earth`s field by up to 60 mG within a distance of one foot. These results suggest that some of the narrow ``resonances`` described in laboratory studies may be difficult to observe against the variations in do field amplitude and direction resulting from the presence of everyday metallic objects.

  14. Decay Characteristics of Levitation Force of YBCO Bulk Exposed to AC Magnetic Field above NdFeB Guideway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Minxian; Lu, Yiyun; Wang, Suyu; Ma, Guangtong

    2011-04-01

    The superconducting maglev vehicle is one of the most promising applications of HTS bulks. In such a system, the nonuniformity of the magnetic field along the movement direction above the NdFeB guideway is inevitable due to the assembly error and inhomogeneity of the material property of the NdFeB magnet. So it is required to study the characteristics of levitation force of the bulks affected by the non-uniform applied magnetic fields along the moving direction. In this paper, we will study the characteristics of the levitation force relaxation between the HTS bulk and the NdFeB guideway by an experiment in which AC external magnetic field generated by an electromagnet is used to simulate the time-varying external magnetic field caused by the inhomogeneity of the guideway. From the experimental results, it has found that the levitation force is decreasing with the application of the AC external magnetic field, and the decay increasing with the amplitude of the applied magnetic field and is almost independent of the frequency.

  15. C/NOFS Observations of AC Electric Field Fields Associated with Equatorial Spread-F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.; Liebrecht, C.

    2009-01-01

    The Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the C/NOFS equatorial satellite provides a unique data set in which to acquire detailed knowledge of irregularities associated with the equatorial ionosphere and in particular with spread-F depletions. We present vector AC electric field observations, primarily gathered within the ELF band (1 Hz to 250 Hz) on C/NOFS that address a variety of key questions regarding how plasma irregularities, from meter to kilometer scales, are created and evolve. The data will be used to explore the anisotropy/isotropy of the waves, their wavelength and phase velocity, as well as their spectral distributions. When analyzed in conjunction with the driving DC electric fields and detailed plasma number density measurements, the combined data reveal important information concerning the instability mechanisms themselves. We also present high resolution, vector measurements of intense lower hybrid waves that have been detected on numerous occasions by the VEFI burst memory VLF electric field channels.

  16. Dipole pulse theory: Maximizing the field amplitude from 4π focused laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonoskov, Ivan; Aiello, Andrea; Heugel, Simon; Leuchs, Gerd

    2012-11-01

    We present a class of exact nonstationary solutions of Maxwell equations in vacuum from dipole pulse theory: electric and magnetic dipole pulses. These solutions can provide for a very efficient focusing of electromagnetic field and can be generated by 4π focusing systems, such as parabolic mirrors, by using radially polarized laser pulses with a suitable amplitude profile. The particular cases of a monochromatic dipole wave and a short dipole pulse with either quasi-Gaussian or Gaussian envelopes in the far-field region are analyzed and compared in detail. As a result, we propose how to increase the maximum field amplitude in the focus by properly shaping the temporal profile of the input laser pulses with given main wavelength and peak power.

  17. A method for approximating acoustic-field-amplitude uncertainty caused by environmental uncertainties.

    PubMed

    James, Kevin R; Dowling, David R

    2008-09-01

    In underwater acoustics, the accuracy of computational field predictions is commonly limited by uncertainty in environmental parameters. An approximate technique for determining the probability density function (PDF) of computed field amplitude, A, from known environmental uncertainties is presented here. The technique can be applied to several, N, uncertain parameters simultaneously, requires N+1 field calculations, and can be used with any acoustic field model. The technique implicitly assumes independent input parameters and is based on finding the optimum spatial shift between field calculations completed at two different values of each uncertain parameter. This shift information is used to convert uncertain-environmental-parameter distributions into PDF(A). The technique's accuracy is good when the shifted fields match well. Its accuracy is evaluated in range-independent underwater sound channels via an L(1) error-norm defined between approximate and numerically converged results for PDF(A). In 50-m- and 100-m-deep sound channels with 0.5% uncertainty in depth (N=1) at frequencies between 100 and 800 Hz, and for ranges from 1 to 8 km, 95% of the approximate field-amplitude distributions generated L(1) values less than 0.52 using only two field calculations. Obtaining comparable accuracy from traditional methods requires of order 10 field calculations and up to 10(N) when N>1.

  18. Nonlinear magnetization relaxation of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in superimposed ac and dc magnetic bias fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Serguey V.; Déjardin, Pierre-Michel; El Mrabti, Halim; Kalmykov, Yuri P.

    2010-09-01

    The nonlinear ac response of the magnetization M(t) of a uniaxially anisotropic superparamagnetic nanoparticle subjected to both ac and dc bias magnetic fields of arbitrary strengths and orientations is determined by averaging Gilbert’s equation augmented by a random field with Gaussian white-noise properties in order to calculate exactly the relevant statistical averages. It is shown that the magnetization dynamics of the uniaxial particle driven by a strong ac field applied at an angle to the easy axis of the particle (so that the axial symmetry is broken) alters drastically leading to different nonlinear effects due to coupling of the thermally activated magnetization reversal mode with the precessional modes of M(t) via the driving ac field.

  19. Numeric description of space charge in polyethylene under ac electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J.; Xu, Z.; Chen, G.; Lewin, P. L.

    2010-12-01

    Space charge in polyethylene-based insulation materials and its effect on the local electric field under a dc environment have been extensively examined over the last few decades while the behavior of space charge under ac stress has received less attention. Space charge phenomenon under ac electric fields becomes an important issue with increased operating field strength in many applications, such as next generation high voltage cables. In this paper, a bipolar charge transport model has been developed to simulate space charge in polymers under ac electric fields. Obtained simulation results show that there is a small quantity of phase-dependent bipolar charge accumulation in the vicinity of the electrodes that does not move into the bulk under ac stress. This causes a slight distortion of the local field in the bulk. However, at lower frequencies less than 1 Hz, there is increased charge accumulation and penetration. Comparison with available experimental data suggests that the model is capable of describing the underlying physics of charge behavior when a dielectric material is subjected to ac electric fields. Due to the weak charge movement in the bulk, the conduction current density is small and hence the displacement component dominates the total current density and this increases linearly with ac frequency.

  20. Electro-optic fiber sensor for amplitude and phase detection of radio frequency electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Axel; Müller, Peter; Lott, Urs; Kuster, Niels; Bomholt, Fin

    2006-08-15

    We present a miniature fiber-optic electromagnetic field (EMF) sensor that is capable of simultaneously detecting the amplitude and phase of an EMF in the range of 0.1-6 GHz. We focus on magnetic field measurements, since the H-field is more significant in our target applications due its direct relation to the current. The sensor is based on an open optical platform to which various antennas can be attached and contains a radio-frequency amplifier for signal conditioning and a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser as an electro-optic converter. The millimeter size and the full electrical isolation of the sensor allow EMF detection with minimal disturbance. We have characterized the sensor in the near field of a lambda/2 dipole, a rectangular waveguide, and a microstrip line, and we explain the experimental results with a simple theoretical model confirming the mapped near-field distribution of the investigated field source.

  1. Large amplitude free vibrations of Timoshenko beams at higher modes using coupled displacement field method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Bhaskar, K.; Meera Saheb, K.

    2015-12-01

    A simple but accurate continuum solution for the shear flexible beam problem using the energy method involves in assuming suitable single term admissible functions for the lateral displacement and total rotation. This leads to two non-linear temporal differential equations in terms of the lateral displacement and the total rotation and are difficult, if not impossible, to solve to obtain the large amplitude fundamental frequencies of beams as a function of the amplitude and slenderness ratios of the vibrating beam. This situation can be avoided if one uses the concept of coupled displacement field where in the fields for lateral displacement and the total rotation are coupled through the static equilibrium equation. In this paper the lateral displacement field is assumed and the field for the total rotation is evaluated through the coupling equation. This approach leads to only one undetermined coefficient which can easily be used in the principle of conservation of total energy of the vibrating beam at a given time, neglecting damping. Finally, through a number of algebraic manipulations, one gets a nonlinear equation of Duffing type which can be solved using any standard method. To demonstrate the simplicity of the method discussed above the problem of large amplitude free vibrations of a uniform shear flexible hinged beam at higher modes with ends immovable to move axially has been solved. The numerical results obtained from the present formulation are in very good agreement with those obtained through finite element and other continuum methods for the fundamental mode, thus demonstrating the efficacy of the proposed method. Also some interesting observations are made with variation of frequency Vs amplitude at different modes.

  2. Amplitude Metrics for Field Retrieval with Hard-Edged and Uniformly Illuminated Apertures. Section 7.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurman, Samuel T.; DeRosa, Ryan; Fienup, James R.

    2009-01-01

    In field retrieval, the amplitude and phase of the generalized pupil function for an optical system are estimated from multiple defocused measurements of the system point-spread function. A baseline field reconstruction algorithm optimizing a data consistency metric is described. Additionally, two metrics specifically designed to incorporate a priori knowledge about pupil amplitude for hard-edged and uniformly illuminated aperture systems are given. Experimental results demonstrate the benefit of using these amplitude metrics in addition to the baseline metric

  3. Electric field in an AC dielectric barrier discharge overlapped with a nanosecond pulse discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Benjamin M.; Shkurenkov, Ivan; Adamovich, Igor V.; Lempert, Walter R.

    2016-08-01

    The effect of ns discharge pulses on the AC barrier discharge in hydrogen in plane-to-plane geometry is studied using time-resolved measurements of the electric field in the plasma. The AC discharge was operated at a pressure of 300 Torr at frequencies of 500 and 1750 Hz, with ns pulses generated when the AC voltage was near zero. The electric field vector is measured by ps four-wave mixing technique, which generates coherent IR signal proportional to the square of electric field. Absolute calibration was done using an electrostatic (sub-breakdown) field applied to the discharge electrodes, when no plasma was generated. The results are compared with one-dimensional kinetic modeling of the AC discharge and the nanosecond pulse discharge, predicting behavior of both individual micro-discharges and their cumulative effect on the electric field distribution in the electrode gap, using stochastic averaging based on the experimental micro-discharge temporal probability distribution during the AC period. Time evolution of the electric field in the AC discharge without ns pulses, controlled by a superposition of random micro-discharges, exhibits a nearly ‘flat top’ distribution with the maximum near breakdown threshold, reproduced quite well by kinetic modeling. Adding ns pulse discharges on top of the AC voltage waveform changes the AC discharge behavior in a dramatic way, inducing transition from random micro-discharges to a more regular, near-1D discharge. In this case, reproducible volumetric AC breakdown is produced at a well-defined moment after each ns pulse discharge. During the reproducible AC breakdown, the electric field in the plasma exhibits a sudden drop, which coincides in time with a well-defined current pulse. This trend is also predicted by the kinetic model. Analysis of kinetic modeling predictions shows that this effect is caused by large-volume ionization and neutralization of surface charges on the dielectrics by ns discharge pulses. The present

  4. Measurement of a microwave field amplitude beyond the standard quantum limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penasa, M.; Gerlich, S.; Rybarczyk, T.; Métillon, V.; Brune, M.; Raimond, J. M.; Haroche, S.; Davidovich, L.; Dotsenko, I.

    2016-08-01

    We report a quantum measurement beyond the standard quantum limit (SQL) for the amplitude of a small displacement acting on a cavity field. This measurement uses as a resource an entangled mesoscopic state, prepared by the resonant interaction of a circular Rydberg atom with a field stored in a superconducting cavity. We analyze the measurement process in terms of Fisher information and prove that it is, in principle, optimal. The experimental precision achieved, 2.4 dB below the SQL, is well understood in terms of experimental imperfections. This method could be transposed to other systems, particularly to circuit QED, for the precise measurement of weak forces acting on oscillators.

  5. Resonant tunneling of interacting electrons in an AC electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Elesin, V. F.

    2013-11-15

    The problem of the effect of electron-electron interaction on the static and dynamic properties of a double-barrier nanostructure (resonant tunneling diode (RTD)) is studied in terms of a coherent tunneling model, which includes a set of Schrödinger and Poisson equations with open boundary conditions. Explicit analytical expressions are derived for dc and ac potentials and reduced (active and reactive) currents in the quasi-classical approximation over a wide frequency range. These expressions are used to analyze the frequency characteristics of RTD. It is shown that the interaction can radically change the form of these expressions, especially in the case of a hysteretic I-V characteristic. In this case, the active current and the ac potentials can increase sharply at both low and high frequencies. For this increase to occur, it is necessary to meet quantum regime conditions and to choose a proper working point in the I-V characteristic of RTD. The possibility of appearance of specific plasma oscillations, which can improve the high-frequency characteristics of RTD, is predicted. It is found that the active current can be comparable with the resonant dc current of RTD.

  6. Electroporation of cells using EM induction of ac fields by a magnetic stimulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Evans, J. A.; Robinson, M. P.; Smye, S. W.; O'Toole, P.

    2010-02-01

    This paper describes a method of effectively electroporating mammalian cell membranes with pulsed alternating-current (ac) electric fields at field strengths of 30-160 kV m-1. Although many in vivo electroporation protocols entail applying square wave or monotonically decreasing pulses via needles or electrode plates, relatively few have explored the use of pulsed ac fields. Following our previous study, which established the effectiveness of ac fields for electroporating cell membranes, a primary/secondary coil system was constructed to produce sufficiently strong electric fields by electromagnetic induction. The primary coil was formed from the applicator of an established transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) system, while the secondary coil was a purpose-built device of a design which could eventually be implanted into tissue. The effects of field strength, pulse interval and cumulative exposure time were investigated using microscopy and flow cytometry. Results from experiments on concentrated cell suspensions showed an optimized electroporation efficiency of around 50%, demonstrating that electroporation can be practicably achieved by inducing such pulsed ac fields. This finding confirms the possibility of a wide range of in vivo applications based on magnetically coupled ac electroporation.

  7. Simulational studies of epitaxial semiconductor superlattices: Quantum dynamical phenomena in ac and dc electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J.

    1997-10-08

    Using high-accuracy numerical methods the author investigates the dynamics of independent electrons in both ideal and realistic superlattices subject to arbitrary ac and/or dc electric fields. For a variety of superlattice potentials, optically excited initial wave packets, and combinations of ac and dc electric fields, he numerically solves the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. In the case of ideal periodic superlattice potentials, he investigates a long list of dynamical phenomena involving multiple miniband transitions and time-dependent electric fields. These include acceleration effects associated with interminiband transitions in strong fields, Zener resonances between minibands, dynamic localization with ac fields, increased single-miniband transport with an auxiliary resonant ac field, and enhanced or suppressed interminiband probability exchange using an auxiliary ac field. For all of the cases studied, the resulting time-dependent wave function is analyzed by projecting the data onto convenient orthonormal bases. This allows a detailed comparison with approximately analytic treatments. In an effort to explain the rapid decay of experimentally measured Bloch oscillation (BO) signals the author incorporates a one-dimensional representation of interface roughness (IR) into their superlattice potential. He shows that as a result of IR, the electron dynamics can be characterized in terms of many discrete, incommensurate frequencies near the Block frequency. Chapters 2, 3, 4 and 5 have been removed from this report and will be processed separately.

  8. Achieving High Performance in AC-Field Driven Organic Light Sources

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junwei; Carroll, David L.; Smith, Gregory M.; Dun, Chaochao; Cui, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Charge balance in organic light emitting structures is essential to simultaneously achieving high brightness and high efficiency. In DC-driven organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), this is relatively straight forward. However, in the newly emerging, capacitive, field-activated AC-driven organic devices, charge balance can be a challenge. In this work we introduce the concept of gating the compensation charge in AC-driven organic devices and demonstrate that this can result in exceptional increases in device performance. To do this we replace the insulator layer in a typical field-activated organic light emitting device with a nanostructured, wide band gap semiconductor layer. This layer acts as a gate between the emitter layer and the voltage contact. Time resolved device characterization shows that, at high-frequencies (over 40 kHz), the semiconductor layer allows for charge accumulation in the forward bias, light generating part of the AC cycle and charge compensation in the negative, quiescent part of the AC cycle. Such gated AC organic devices can achieve a non-output coupled luminance of 25,900 cd/m2 with power efficiencies that exceed both the insulator-based AC devices and OLEDs using the same emitters. This work clearly demonstrates that by realizing balanced management of charge, AC-driven organic light emitting devices may well be able to rival today’s OLEDs in performance. PMID:27063414

  9. Achieving High Performance in AC-Field Driven Organic Light Sources.

    PubMed

    Xu, Junwei; Carroll, David L; Smith, Gregory M; Dun, Chaochao; Cui, Yue

    2016-04-11

    Charge balance in organic light emitting structures is essential to simultaneously achieving high brightness and high efficiency. In DC-driven organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), this is relatively straight forward. However, in the newly emerging, capacitive, field-activated AC-driven organic devices, charge balance can be a challenge. In this work we introduce the concept of gating the compensation charge in AC-driven organic devices and demonstrate that this can result in exceptional increases in device performance. To do this we replace the insulator layer in a typical field-activated organic light emitting device with a nanostructured, wide band gap semiconductor layer. This layer acts as a gate between the emitter layer and the voltage contact. Time resolved device characterization shows that, at high-frequencies (over 40 kHz), the semiconductor layer allows for charge accumulation in the forward bias, light generating part of the AC cycle and charge compensation in the negative, quiescent part of the AC cycle. Such gated AC organic devices can achieve a non-output coupled luminance of 25,900 cd/m(2) with power efficiencies that exceed both the insulator-based AC devices and OLEDs using the same emitters. This work clearly demonstrates that by realizing balanced management of charge, AC-driven organic light emitting devices may well be able to rival today's OLEDs in performance.

  10. Acquisition of Cry1Ac protein by non-target arthropods in Bt soybean fields.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huilin; Romeis, Jörg; Li, Yunhe; Li, Xiangju; Wu, Kongming

    2014-01-01

    Soybean tissue and arthropods were collected in Bt soybean fields in China at different times during the growing season to investigate the exposure of arthropods to the plant-produced Cry1Ac toxin and the transmission of the toxin within the food web. Samples from 52 arthropod species/taxa belonging to 42 families in 10 orders were analysed for their Cry1Ac content using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Among the 22 species/taxa for which three samples were analysed, toxin concentration was highest in the grasshopper Atractomorpha sinensis and represented about 50% of the concentration in soybean leaves. Other species/taxa did not contain detectable toxin or contained a concentration that was between 1 and 10% of that detected in leaves. These Cry1Ac-positive arthropods included a number of mesophyll-feeding Hemiptera, a cicadellid, a curculionid beetle and, among the predators, a thomisid spider and an unidentified predatory bug belonging to the Anthocoridae. Within an arthropod species/taxon, the Cry1Ac content sometimes varied between life stages (nymphs/larvae vs. adults) and sampling dates (before, during, and after flowering). Our study is the first to provide information on Cry1Ac-expression levels in soybean plants and Cry1Ac concentrations in non-target arthropods in Chinese soybean fields. The data will be useful for assessing the risk of non-target arthropod exposure to Cry1Ac in soybean.

  11. Acquisition of Cry1Ac Protein by Non-Target Arthropods in Bt Soybean Fields

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Huilin; Romeis, Jörg; Li, Yunhe; Li, Xiangju; Wu, Kongming

    2014-01-01

    Soybean tissue and arthropods were collected in Bt soybean fields in China at different times during the growing season to investigate the exposure of arthropods to the plant-produced Cry1Ac toxin and the transmission of the toxin within the food web. Samples from 52 arthropod species/taxa belonging to 42 families in 10 orders were analysed for their Cry1Ac content using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Among the 22 species/taxa for which three samples were analysed, toxin concentration was highest in the grasshopper Atractomorpha sinensis and represented about 50% of the concentration in soybean leaves. Other species/taxa did not contain detectable toxin or contained a concentration that was between 1 and 10% of that detected in leaves. These Cry1Ac-positive arthropods included a number of mesophyll-feeding Hemiptera, a cicadellid, a curculionid beetle and, among the predators, a thomisid spider and an unidentified predatory bug belonging to the Anthocoridae. Within an arthropod species/taxon, the Cry1Ac content sometimes varied between life stages (nymphs/larvae vs. adults) and sampling dates (before, during, and after flowering). Our study is the first to provide information on Cry1Ac-expression levels in soybean plants and Cry1Ac concentrations in non-target arthropods in Chinese soybean fields. The data will be useful for assessing the risk of non-target arthropod exposure to Cry1Ac in soybean. PMID:25110881

  12. Velocity-Field Measurements of an Axisymmetric Separated Flow Subjected to Amplitude-Modulated Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trosin, Barry James

    2007-01-01

    Active flow control was applied at the point of separation of an axisymmetric, backward-facing-step flow. The control was implemented by employing a Helmholtz resonator that was externally driven by an amplitude-modulated, acoustic disturbance from a speaker located upstream of the wind tunnel. The velocity field of the separating/reattaching flow region downstream of the step was characterized using hotwire velocity measurements with and without flow control. Conventional statistics of the data reveal that the separating/reattaching flow is affected by the imposed forcing. Triple decomposition along with conditional averaging was used to distinguish periodic disturbances from random turbulence in the fluctuating velocity component. A significant outcome of the present study is that it demonstrates that amplitude-modulated forcing of the separated flow alters the flow in the same manner as the more conventional method of periodic excitation.

  13. Upper critical field and AC-Susceptibility studies on FeTe0.5Se0.5 superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zargar, Rayees A.; Pal, Anand; Hafiz, A. K.; Awana, V. P. S.

    2015-06-01

    In this study we present synthesis and characterization of FeTe0.5Se0.5 sample that has been prepared by solid state reaction route by encapsulation of stoichiometric high purity (5N) ingredients in an evacuated quartz tube at 750 °C. The resultant compound is crystallized in single phase tetragonal structure with space group P4/nmm, having lattice parameters a = 3.792(1) Å and c = 6.0081(3) Å. The studied compound is superconducting at below 13K in both magnetic and transport measurements. Further superconductivity is barely affected by external applied magnetic field, giving rise to upper critical field of above 180 Tesla at 0 K. The sample is studied extensively for AC susceptibility measurements in superconducting state. The AC drive field and frequency are varied from 1-13 Oe and 33-9999 Hz respectively. It is concluded that though the grain boundaries of this superconductor are mainly metallic the minor (undetectable in XRD) foreign phases and the role of porosity cannot be ruled out completely. This is because both frequency and amplitude affects slightly the superconductivity coupling temperature of the grains.

  14. Modeling of finite-amplitude sound beams: second order fields generated by a parametric loudspeaker.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Sha, Kan; Gan, Woon-Seng; Tian, Jing

    2005-04-01

    The nonlinear interaction of sound waves in air has been applied to sound reproduction for audio applications. A directional audible sound can be generated by amplitude-modulating the ultrasound carrier with an audio signal, then transmitting it from a parametric loudspeaker. This brings the need of a computationally efficient model to describe the propagation of finite-amplitude sound beams for the system design and optimization. A quasilinear analytical solution capable of fast numerical evaluation is presented for the second-order fields of the sum-, difference-frequency and second harmonic components. It is based on a virtual-complex-source approach, wherein the source field is treated as an aggregation of a set of complex virtual sources located in complex distance, then the corresponding fundamental sound field is reduced to the computation of sums of simple functions by exploiting the integrability of Gaussian functions. By this result, the five-dimensional integral expressions for the second-order sound fields are simplified to one-dimensional integrals. Furthermore, a substantial analytical reduction to sums of single integrals also is derived for an arbitrary source distribution when the basis functions are expressible as a sum of products of trigonometric functions. The validity of the proposed method is confirmed by a comparison of numerical results with experimental data previously published for the rectangular ultrasonic transducer.

  15. Limits of the measurability of the local quantum electromagnetic-field amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compagno, G.; Persico, F.

    1998-03-01

    The precision with which the amplitude of the free electromagnetic field can be measured locally in QED is evaluated by analyzing a well-known gedanken experiment originally proposed by Bohr and Rosenfeld (BR). The analysis is performed by applying standard theoretical techniques familiar in quantum optics. The main result obtained for the precision is significantly different from the generally accepted Bohr-Rosenfeld result. This leads to questioning the widely accepted notion of the compensating field, fostered by these authors. A misconception at the origin of this notion is pointed out by a careful investigation of the self-force acting on the apparatus designed to measure the field. The correct expression for this self-force is found to be at variance with that proposed by Bohr and Rosenfeld and generally accepted. It is argued that, as a consequence of this new expression and in contrast with the generally accepted view, no compensating force of nonelectromagnetic nature is required in order to perform measurements of the quantum field amplitude with any desired accuracy. It is shown that the only limitations to the precision of the measurement, in the BR gedanken experiment, arise from the time-energy uncertainty principle, as well as from the finite dimensions of the measuring apparatus.

  16. Modeling of finite-amplitude sound beams: second order fields generated by a parametric loudspeaker.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Sha, Kan; Gan, Woon-Seng; Tian, Jing

    2005-04-01

    The nonlinear interaction of sound waves in air has been applied to sound reproduction for audio applications. A directional audible sound can be generated by amplitude-modulating the ultrasound carrier with an audio signal, then transmitting it from a parametric loudspeaker. This brings the need of a computationally efficient model to describe the propagation of finite-amplitude sound beams for the system design and optimization. A quasilinear analytical solution capable of fast numerical evaluation is presented for the second-order fields of the sum-, difference-frequency and second harmonic components. It is based on a virtual-complex-source approach, wherein the source field is treated as an aggregation of a set of complex virtual sources located in complex distance, then the corresponding fundamental sound field is reduced to the computation of sums of simple functions by exploiting the integrability of Gaussian functions. By this result, the five-dimensional integral expressions for the second-order sound fields are simplified to one-dimensional integrals. Furthermore, a substantial analytical reduction to sums of single integrals also is derived for an arbitrary source distribution when the basis functions are expressible as a sum of products of trigonometric functions. The validity of the proposed method is confirmed by a comparison of numerical results with experimental data previously published for the rectangular ultrasonic transducer. PMID:16060510

  17. Efficacy of an AC sinusoidal electric field for apoptosis induction in lung carcinoma cells (A549)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyoun-Hyang; Lee, Seung S.; Hoon Lee, Dae

    2012-08-01

    An AC sinusoidal electric field was applied to lung carcinoma cells for the induction of apoptosis. The occurrence of apoptosis was determined by analysis of Annexin V/PI and DNA fragmentation. Additional evidence of apoptosis was confirmed by caspase-3 cleavage and disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential. These results demonstrated that the expression of apoptosis can be controlled by varying the magnitude and the duration of the field, and that the application of an AC electric field can stimulate the apoptosis via mitochondria-mediated pathway.

  18. An energy stable, hexagonal finite difference scheme for the 2D phase field crystal amplitude equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Zhen; Heinonen, Vili; Lowengrub, John; Wang, Cheng; Wise, Steven M.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we construct an energy stable finite difference scheme for the amplitude expansion equations for the two-dimensional phase field crystal (PFC) model. The equations are formulated in a periodic hexagonal domain with respect to the reciprocal lattice vectors to achieve a provably unconditionally energy stable and solvable scheme. To our knowledge, this is the first such energy stable scheme for the PFC amplitude equations. The convexity of each part in the amplitude equations is analyzed, in both the semi-discrete and fully-discrete cases. Energy stability is based on a careful convexity analysis for the energy (in both the spatially continuous and discrete cases). As a result, unique solvability and unconditional energy stability are available for the resulting scheme. Moreover, we show that the scheme is point-wise stable for any time and space step sizes. An efficient multigrid solver is devised to solve the scheme, and a few numerical experiments are presented, including grain rotation and shrinkage and grain growth studies, as examples of the strength and robustness of the proposed scheme and solver.

  19. Field of Bachelor's Degree in the United States: 2009. American Community Survey Reports. ACS-18

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siebens, Julie; Ryan, Camille L.

    2012-01-01

    This report provides information on fields of bachelor's degrees in the United States using data from the 2009 American Community Survey (ACS). It includes estimates of fields of bachelor's degree by demographic characteristics including age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, nativity, and educational attainment. This report also looks at geographic and…

  20. Influence of size distribution and field amplitude on specific loss power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boskovic, M.; Goya, G. F.; Vranjes-Djuric, S.; Jovic, N.; Jancar, B.; Antic, B.

    2015-03-01

    Herein we present the results of specific loss power (SLP) analysis of polydisperse water based ferrofluids, Fe3O4/PEG200 and Fe3O4/PEG6000, with average Fe3O4 particle size of 9 nm and 11 nm, respectively. Specific loss power was measured in alternating magnetic field of various amplitudes and at fixed frequency of 580.5 kHz. Maximum SLP values acquired were 195 W/g for Fe3O4/PEG200 and 60 W/g for Fe3O4/PEG6000 samples. The samples were labeled as superparamagnetic by magnetization measurements, but SLP field dependence showed deviation from the behavior predicted by the commonly employed linear response theory. The scope of this theory for both samples with wide particle size distribution is discussed. Deviation from the expected behavior is explained by referring to polydisperse nature of the samples and field dependent relaxation rates.

  1. FDTD simulation of finite-amplitude pressure and temperature fields for biomedical ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Hallaj, I M; Cleveland, R O

    1999-05-01

    Full wave simulations provide a valuable tool for studying the spatial and temporal nature of an acoustic field. One method for producing such simulations is the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. This method uses discrete differences to approximate derivatives in the governing partial differential equations. We used the FDTD method to model the propagation of finite-amplitude sound in a homogeneous thermoviscous fluid. The calculated acoustic pressure field was then used to compute the transient temperature rise in the fluid; the heating results from absorption of acoustic energy by the fluid. As an example, the transient temperature field was calculated in biological tissue in response to a pulse of focused ultrasound. Enhanced heating of the tissue from finite-amplitude effects was observed. The excess heating was attributed to the nonlinear generation of higher-frequency harmonics which are absorbed more readily than the fundamental. The effect of nonlinear distortion on temperature rise in tissue was observed to range from negligible at 1 MPa source pressure to an 80% increase in temperature elevation at 10 MPa source pressure.

  2. Encouragement of Enzyme Reaction Utilizing Heat Generation from Ferromagnetic Particles Subjected to an AC Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masashi; Aki, Atsushi; Mizuki, Toru; Maekawa, Toru; Usami, Ron; Morimoto, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method of activating an enzyme utilizing heat generation from ferromagnetic particles under an ac magnetic field. We immobilize α-amylase on the surface of ferromagnetic particles and analyze its activity. We find that when α-amylase/ferromagnetic particle hybrids, that is, ferromagnetic particles, on which α-amylase molecules are immobilized, are subjected to an ac magnetic field, the particles generate heat and as a result, α-amylase on the particles is heated up and activated. We next prepare a solution, in which α-amylase/ferromagnetic particle hybrids and free, nonimmobilized chitinase are dispersed, and analyze their activities. We find that when the solution is subjected to an ac magnetic field, the activity of α-amylase immobilized on the particles increases, whereas that of free chitinase hardly changes; in other words, only α-amylase immobilized on the particles is selectively activated due to heat generation from the particles. PMID:25993268

  3. Encouragement of Enzyme Reaction Utilizing Heat Generation from Ferromagnetic Particles Subjected to an AC Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masashi; Aki, Atsushi; Mizuki, Toru; Maekawa, Toru; Usami, Ron; Morimoto, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method of activating an enzyme utilizing heat generation from ferromagnetic particles under an ac magnetic field. We immobilize α-amylase on the surface of ferromagnetic particles and analyze its activity. We find that when α-amylase/ferromagnetic particle hybrids, that is, ferromagnetic particles, on which α-amylase molecules are immobilized, are subjected to an ac magnetic field, the particles generate heat and as a result, α-amylase on the particles is heated up and activated. We next prepare a solution, in which α-amylase/ferromagnetic particle hybrids and free, nonimmobilized chitinase are dispersed, and analyze their activities. We find that when the solution is subjected to an ac magnetic field, the activity of α-amylase immobilized on the particles increases, whereas that of free chitinase hardly changes; in other words, only α-amylase immobilized on the particles is selectively activated due to heat generation from the particles.

  4. Ultrafast modulation of polarization amplitude by terahertz fields in electronic-type organic ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Tatsuya; Yada, Hiroyuki; Yamakawa, Hiromichi; Okamoto, Hiroshi

    2013-10-01

    Ferroelectrics sometimes show large electro-optical and non-linear optical effects, available for polarization rotation and frequency conversion of light, respectively. If the amplitude of ferroelectric polarization is modulated in the picosecond time domain, terahertz repetition of optical switching via electro-optical and non-linear optical effects would be achieved. Here we show that polarization amplitude can be rapidly modulated by a terahertz electric field in an organic ferroelectric, tetrathiafulvalene-p-chloranil (TTF-CA). In this compound, alternately stacked donor (TTF) and acceptor (CA) molecules are dimerized via the spin-Peierls mechanism, and charge transfer within each dimer results in a new type of ferroelectricity called electronic-type ferroelectricity. Using a terahertz field, the intradimer charge transfer is strongly modulated, producing a subpicosecond change in the macroscopic polarization, which is demonstrated by transient reflectivity and second-harmonic generation measurements. Subsequently, coherent oscillation of the dimeric molecular displacements occur, which is explained by the modulation of the spin moment of each molecule.

  5. Rapid computation of the amplitude and phase of tightly focused optical fields distorted by scattering particles

    PubMed Central

    Ranasinghesagara, Janaka C.; Hayakawa, Carole K.; Davis, Mitchell A.; Dunn, Andrew K.; Potma, Eric O.; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2014-01-01

    We develop an efficient method for accurately calculating the electric field of tightly focused laser beams in the presence of specific configurations of microscopic scatterers. This Huygens–Fresnel wave-based electric field superposition (HF-WEFS) method computes the amplitude and phase of the scattered electric field in excellent agreement with finite difference time-domain (FDTD) solutions of Maxwell’s equations. Our HF-WEFS implementation is 2–4 orders of magnitude faster than the FDTD method and enables systematic investigations of the effects of scatterer size and configuration on the focal field. We demonstrate the power of the new HF-WEFS approach by mapping several metrics of focal field distortion as a function of scatterer position. This analysis shows that the maximum focal field distortion occurs for single scatterers placed below the focal plane with an offset from the optical axis. The HF-WEFS method represents an important first step toward the development of a computational model of laser-scanning microscopy of thick cellular/tissue specimens. PMID:25121440

  6. Fiber - Optic Devices as Temperature Sensors for Temperature Measurements in AC Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rablau, Corneliu; Lafrance, Joseph; Sala, Anca

    2007-10-01

    We report on the investigation of several fiber-optic devices as potential sensors for temperature measurements in AC magnetic fields. Common temperature sensors, such as thermocouples, thermistors or diodes, will create random and/or systematic errors when placed in a magnetic field. A DC magnetic field is susceptible to create a systematic offset to the measurement, while in an AC magnetic field of variable frequency random errors which cannot be corrected for can also be introduced. Fiber-Bragg-gratings and thin film filters have an inherent temperature dependence. Detrimental for their primary applications, the same dependence allows one to use such devices as temperature sensors. In an AC magnetic field, they present the advantage of being immune to electromagnetic interference. Moreover, for fiber-Bragg-gratings, the shape factor and small mass of the bare-fiber device make it convenient for temperature measurements on small samples. We studied several thin-film filters and fiber-Bragg-gratings and compared their temperature measurement capabilities in AC magnetic fields of 0 to 150 Gauss, 0 to 20 KHz to the results provided by off-the-shelf thermocouples and thermistor-based temperature measurement systems.

  7. Study of DC and AC electric field effect on Pisum sativum seeds growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Bahar; Jaleh, Sojoodi; Yasaman, Yasaie

    2014-07-01

    In this research the effect of electric field on two groups of wet and dry Pisum sativum seeds growth was studied. To generate the required electric field a parallel-plate capacitor with round copper plates of 30 cm diameter was used. The experiments were performed once in fixed exposure duration of 8 min in variable DC electric field of 0.25-1.5 kV/m. The other experiments were performed in variable fields of 50-125 kV/m in fixed exposure duration of 8 min, in two groups of AC and DC electric fields. The experiments were repeated three times. In each experiment 10 seeds were used and there was a sham exposed group for comparison, too. After application of electric field, the seeds were kept for six days in the same growth chamber with the temperature of 25 ± 1 °C and 12 h light/12 h darkness. On the 6th day length of stems and height of roots were measured. After doing statistical analysis, in low intensities of DC electric field, the highest significant increase of mean growth (The average of stem length and the height of roots) was seen in 1.5 kV/m in wet seeds. In high intensities of DC and AC electric fields, the highest significant increase of mean growth was seen in AC electric field of 100 kV/m in wet seeds.

  8. Exploiting SENTINEL-1 Amplitude Data for Glacier Surface Velocity Field Measurements: Feasibility Demonstration on Baltoro Glacier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascetti, A.; Nocchi, F.; Camplani, A.; Di Rico, C.; Crespi, M.

    2016-06-01

    The leading idea of this work is to continuously retrieve glaciers surface velocity through SAR imagery, in particular using the amplitude data from the new ESA satellite sensor Sentinel-1 imagery. These imagery key aspects are the free access policy, the very short revisit time (down to 6 days with the launch of the Sentinel-1B satellite) and the high amplitude resolution (up to 5 m). In order to verify the reliability of the proposed approach, a first experiment has been performed using Sentinel-1 imagery acquired over the Karakoram mountain range (North Pakistan) and Baltoro and other three glaciers have been investigated. During this study, a stack of 11 images acquired in the period from October 2014 to September 2015 has been used in order to investigate the potentialities of the Sentinel-1 SAR sensor to retrieve the glacier surface velocity every month. The aim of this test was to measure the glacier surface velocity between each subsequent pair, in order to produce a time series of the surface velocity fields along the investigated period. The necessary coregistration procedure between the images has been performed and subsequently the glaciers areas have been sampled using a regular grid with a 250 × 250 meters posting. Finally the surface velocity field has been estimated, for each image pair, using a template matching procedure, and an outlier filtering procedure based on the signal to noise ratio values has been applied, in order to exclude from the analysis unreliable points. The achieved velocity values range from 10 to 25 meters/month and they are coherent to those obtained in previous studies carried out on the same glaciers and the results highlight that it is possible to have a continuous update of the glacier surface velocity field through free Sentinel-1 imagery, that could be very useful to investigate the seasonal effects on the glaciers fluid-dynamics.

  9. Inviscid evolution of large amplitude filaments in a uniform gravity field

    SciTech Connect

    Angus, J. R.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2014-11-15

    The inviscid evolution of localized density stratifications under the influence of a uniform gravity field in a homogeneous, ambient background is studied. The fluid is assumed to be incompressible, and the stratification, or filament, is assumed to be initially isotropic and at rest. It is shown that the center of mass energy can be related to the center of mass position in a form analogous to that of a solid object in a gravity field g by introducing an effective gravity field g{sub eff}, which is less than g due to energy that goes into the background and into non-center of mass motion of the filament. During the early stages of the evolution, g{sub eff} is constant in time and can be determined from the solution of a 1D differential equation that depends on the initial, radially varying density profile of the filament. For small amplitude filaments such that ρ{sub 0} ≪ 1, where ρ{sub 0} is the relative amplitude of the filament to the background, the early stage g{sub eff} scales linearly with ρ{sub 0}, but as ρ{sub 0}→∞, g{sub eff}→g and is thus independent of ρ{sub 0}. Fully nonlinear simulations are performed for the evolution of Gaussian filaments, and it is found that the time t{sub max}, which is defined as the time for the center of mass velocity to reach its maximum value U{sub max}, occurs very soon after the constant acceleration phase and so U{sub max}≈g{sub eff}(t=0)t{sub max}. The simulation results show that U{sub max}∼1/t{sub max}∼√(ρ{sub 0}) for ρ{sub 0} ≪ 1, in agreement with theory and results from previous authors, but that U{sub max} and t{sub max} both scale approximately with √(ρ{sub 0}) for ρ{sub 0} ≫ 1. The fact that U{sub max} and t{sub max} have the same scaling with ρ{sub 0} for large amplitude filaments is in agreement with the theory presented in this paper.

  10. AC Electric Field-Induced Trapping of Microparticles in Pinched Microconfinements.

    PubMed

    Dey, Ranabir; Shaik, Vaseem Akram; Chakraborty, Debapriya; Ghosal, Sandip; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-06-01

    The trapping of charged microparticles under confinement in a converging-diverging microchannel, under a symmetric AC field of tunable frequency, is studied. We show that at low frequencies, the trapping characteristics stem from the competing effects of positive dielectrophoresis and the linear electrokinetic phenomena of electroosmosis and electrophoresis. It is found, somewhat unexpectedly, that electroosmosis and electrophoresis significantly affect the concentration profile of the trapped analyte, even for a symmetric AC field. However, at intermediate frequencies, the microparticle trapping mechanism is predominantly a consequence of positive dielectrophoresis. We substantiate our experimental results for the microparticle concentration distribution, along the converging-diverging microchannel, with a detailed theoretical analysis that takes into account all of the relevant frequency-dependent electrokinetic phenomena. This study should be useful in understanding the response of biological components such as cells to applied AC fields. Moreover, it will have potential applications in the design of efficient point-of-care diagnostic devices for detecting biomarkers and also possibly in some recent strategies in cancer therapy using AC fields. PMID:25954982

  11. Sensitive detection of vortex-core resonance using amplitude-modulated magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiaomin; Hu, Shaojie; Hidegara, Makoto; Yakata, Satoshi; Kimura, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Understanding and manipulating the dynamic properties of the magnetic vortices stabilized in patterned ferromagnetic structures are of great interest owing to the superior resonant features with the high thermal stability and their flexible tunability. So far, numerous methods for investigating the dynamic properties of the magnetic vortex have been proposed and demonstrated. However, those techniques have some regulations such as spatial resolution, experimental facility and sensitivity. Here, we develop a simple and sensitive method for investigating the vortex-core dynamics by using the electrically separated excitation and detection circuits. We demonstrate that the resonant oscillation of the magnetic vortex induced by the amplitude- modulated alternating-sign magnetic field is efficiently picked up by the lock-in detection with the modulated frequency. By extending this method, we also investigate the size dependence and the influence of the magneto-static interaction in the resonant property of the magnetic vortex. PMID:26647840

  12. Sensitive detection of vortex-core resonance using amplitude-modulated magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiaomin; Hu, Shaojie; Hidegara, Makoto; Yakata, Satoshi; Kimura, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    Understanding and manipulating the dynamic properties of the magnetic vortices stabilized in patterned ferromagnetic structures are of great interest owing to the superior resonant features with the high thermal stability and their flexible tunability. So far, numerous methods for investigating the dynamic properties of the magnetic vortex have been proposed and demonstrated. However, those techniques have some regulations such as spatial resolution, experimental facility and sensitivity. Here, we develop a simple and sensitive method for investigating the vortex-core dynamics by using the electrically separated excitation and detection circuits. We demonstrate that the resonant oscillation of the magnetic vortex induced by the amplitude- modulated alternating-sign magnetic field is efficiently picked up by the lock-in detection with the modulated frequency. By extending this method, we also investigate the size dependence and the influence of the magneto-static interaction in the resonant property of the magnetic vortex.

  13. Why an ac magnetic field shifts the irreversibility line in type-II superconductors.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Ernst Helmut; Mikitik, Grigorii P

    2002-07-01

    We show that for a thin superconducting strip placed in a transverse dc magnetic field--the typical geometry of experiments with high-T(c) superconductors--the application of a weak ac magnetic field perpendicular to the dc field generates a dc voltage in the strip. This voltage leads to the decay of the critical currents circulating in the strip, and eventually the equilibrium state of the superconductor is established. This relaxation is not due to thermally activated flux creep but to the "walking" motion of vortices in the two-dimensional critical state of the strip with in-plane ac field. Our theory explains the shaking effect that was used for detecting phase transitions of the vortex lattice in superconductors.

  14. Contact-Free Templating of 3-D Colloidal Structures Using Spatially Nonuniform AC Electric Fields.

    PubMed

    Raveendran, Joshua; Wood, Jeffery A; Docoslis, Aristides

    2016-09-20

    The formation of ordered and regularly shaped structures of colloidal particles with the aid of spatially nonuniform electric fields is a modern research area of great interest. This work illustrates how alternating current (AC) electrokinetic effects (dielectrophoresis, electroosmosis) can serve as contact-free templates, inside which colloidal microspheres can assemble into a variety of shapes and sizes. We show how three-dimensional colloidal structures of square, circular, and diamond shape of many tens of micrometers in size can be reproducibly formed with a single set of quadrupolar microelectrodes. Numerical simulations performed help to explain the role of AC electroosmosis and AC dielectrophoresis on the shaping of these structures as a function of applied voltage and frequency. We also demonstrate how the templating repertoire is further enhanced with the simultaneous application of a second, individually controlled AC electric field, which enables a variety of asymmetric colloidal structures to be produced using the same set of quadrupolar microelectrodes. As the preservation of shape and size of such electric-field templated structures after medium evaporation still remains a big challenge, here we also report on a novel method that permits the stabilization and isolation of these particle assemblies through medium gelation and subsequent hydrogel removal with a UV/ozone treatment.

  15. Contact-Free Templating of 3-D Colloidal Structures Using Spatially Nonuniform AC Electric Fields.

    PubMed

    Raveendran, Joshua; Wood, Jeffery A; Docoslis, Aristides

    2016-09-20

    The formation of ordered and regularly shaped structures of colloidal particles with the aid of spatially nonuniform electric fields is a modern research area of great interest. This work illustrates how alternating current (AC) electrokinetic effects (dielectrophoresis, electroosmosis) can serve as contact-free templates, inside which colloidal microspheres can assemble into a variety of shapes and sizes. We show how three-dimensional colloidal structures of square, circular, and diamond shape of many tens of micrometers in size can be reproducibly formed with a single set of quadrupolar microelectrodes. Numerical simulations performed help to explain the role of AC electroosmosis and AC dielectrophoresis on the shaping of these structures as a function of applied voltage and frequency. We also demonstrate how the templating repertoire is further enhanced with the simultaneous application of a second, individually controlled AC electric field, which enables a variety of asymmetric colloidal structures to be produced using the same set of quadrupolar microelectrodes. As the preservation of shape and size of such electric-field templated structures after medium evaporation still remains a big challenge, here we also report on a novel method that permits the stabilization and isolation of these particle assemblies through medium gelation and subsequent hydrogel removal with a UV/ozone treatment. PMID:27541583

  16. Evaluation of levels of defect sites present in highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes using capacitive and faradaic current components derived simultaneously from large-amplitude Fourier transformed ac voltammetric experiments.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chong-Yong; Bond, Alan M

    2009-01-15

    The level of edge plane defect sites present in highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) electrodes has been evaluated via analysis of dc, ac fundamental, and higher-order ac harmonics available from a single large-amplitude Fourier transformed (FT) ac voltammetric experiment. Deliberate introduction of a low level of edge plane defect was achieved by polishing, with a higher level being introduced via electrochemical pretreatment. Kinetics regimes associated with fast electron transfer on the edge plane defect sites and slow electron transfer on the basal plane surface are resolved under ac conditions when using the surface-sensitive [Fe(CN)(6)](3-/4-) redox probe. However, because of their insensitivity to slow electron transfer, higher-order ac faradaic harmonics almost exclusively detect only the much faster processes that emanate from edge plane defect sites. Thus, detection of fourth- and higher-order ac Faradaic harmonic components that are devoid of background capacitive current is possible at freshly cleaved HOPG in the region near the reversible potential for the [Fe(CN)(6)](3-/4-) process. Under these circumstances, dc cyclic voltammograms exhibit only reduction and oxidation peaks separated by more than 1 V. The fundamental ac harmonic provides detailed information on the capacitive current, which increases with the level of edge plane defect sites. Apparent charge transfer rate constants also can be derived from peak-to-peak separations obtained from the dc aperiodic component. Estimates of the percentage of edge plane defect sites based on ac higher harmonics, capacitance, and dc aperiodic component that are available from a single experiment have been compared. The edge plane defect levels deduced from capacitance (fundamental harmonic ac component) and higher harmonic Faradaic currents are considered to be more reliable than estimations based on apparent rate constants derived from the dc aperiodic component or conventional dc cyclic voltammogram.

  17. Numerical and theoretical evaluations of AC losses for single and infinite numbers of superconductor strips with direct and alternating transport currents in external AC magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajikawa, K.; Funaki, K.; Shikimachi, K.; Hirano, N.; Nagaya, S.

    2010-11-01

    AC losses in a superconductor strip are numerically evaluated by means of a finite element method formulated with a current vector potential. The expressions of AC losses in an infinite slab that corresponds to a simple model of infinitely stacked strips are also derived theoretically. It is assumed that the voltage-current characteristics of the superconductors are represented by Bean’s critical state model. The typical operation pattern of a Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) coil with direct and alternating transport currents in an external AC magnetic field is taken into account as the electromagnetic environment for both the single strip and the infinite slab. By using the obtained results of AC losses, the influences of the transport currents on the total losses are discussed quantitatively.

  18. Ac losses for the self field of an ac transport current with a dc transport current offset in high {Tc} superconducting magnet coils for MagLev application

    SciTech Connect

    Koosh, V.F.

    1993-10-01

    Although much research has been conducted concerning the losses of high-{Tc} superconductors, very little has concentrated on the self-field losses in an actual magnet arrangement. The coils studied in this work were designed for use as actual magnets in an industrial application. Self field loss measurements were made upon tape-wound 2223 superconducting helix coils. The self-field losses were produced by an AC transport current with a DC transport current offset. Losses were taken for single, double and triple tape windings, giving essentially monofilament, dual, and three filament cases. The losses measured here were varied over a range of AC current values for several different DC values, and over a range of frequencies. The currents were all AC sinusoids with a DC offset. All measurements were made at T = 77K.

  19. Revisiting the pion leading-twist distribution amplitude within the QCD background field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Tao; Wu, Xing-Gang; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Huang, Tao; Fu, Hai-Bing; Han, Hua-Yong

    2014-07-01

    We study the pion leading-twist distribution amplitude (DA) within the framework of Shifman-Vainshtein-Zakharov sum rules under the background field theory. To improve the accuracy of the sum rules, we expand both the quark propagator and the vertex (z.D↔)n of the correlator up to dimension-six operators in the background field theory. The sum rules for the pion DA moments are obtained, in which all condensates up to dimension-six have been taken into consideration. Using the sum rules, we obtain ⟨ξ2⟩|1 GeV=0.338±0.032, ⟨ξ4⟩|1GeV=0.211±0.030 and ⟨ξ6⟩|1GeV=0.163±0.030. It is shown that the dimension-six condensates shall provide sizable contributions to the pion DA moments. We show that the first Gegenbauer moment of the pion leading-twist DA is a2π|1 GeV=0.403±0.093, which is consistent with those obtained in the literature within errors but prefers a larger central value as indicated by lattice QCD predictions.

  20. ρ -meson longitudinal leading-twist distribution amplitude within QCD background field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Hai-Bing; Wu, Xing-Gang; Cheng, Wei; Zhong, Tao

    2016-10-01

    We revisit the ρ -meson longitudinal leading-twist distribution amplitude (DA) ϕ2;ρ ∥ by using the QCD sum rules approach within the background field theory. To improve the accuracy of the sum rules for its moments ⟨ξn;ρ ∥⟩ , we include the next-to-leading order QCD correction to the perturbative part and keep all nonperturbative condensates up to dimension-six consistently within the background field theory. The first two moments read ⟨ξ2;ρ ∥⟩|1 GeV=0.241 (28 ) and ⟨ξ4;ρ ∥⟩|1 GeV=0.109 (10 ) , indicating a double humped behavior for ϕ2;ρ ∥ at small energy scale. As an application, we apply them to the B →ρ transition form factors within the QCD light-cone sum rules, which are key components for the decay width Γ (B →ρ ℓνℓ) . To compare with the world average of Γ (B →ρ ℓνℓ) issued by Particle Data Group, we predict |Vub|=3.1 9-0.62+0.65 , which agrees with the BABAR and Omnès parametrization prediction within errors.

  1. Influence of Ca 2+ in biological stimulating effects of AC magnetic fields on germination of bean seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhnini, Lama

    This study reports an attempt to investigate the effects of AC magnetic field on the seed germination and seedling growth of beans, at different concentrations of CaCl 2, since Ca 2+ is an essential plant nutrient. Bean seeds were exposed to a combination of local geomagnetic field (DC field) and sinusoidal time-varying extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic field (AC field) 28.3 Hz, 20 μT AC field tuned to the fundamental cyclotron resonance for calcium ions. . The application of AC field promoted the germination of bean seeds for all CaCl 2 concentrations. There was no significant change of average weight of the radicals for all concentrations of CaCl 2, whereas there was a significant increase of radicals' length for deionized (DD) and distilled DD water and DD water+ Ca 10 mM.

  2. Investigation of mediated oxidation of ascorbic acid by ferrocenemethanol using large-amplitude Fourier transformed ac voltammetry under quasi-reversible electron-transfer conditions at an indium tin oxide electrode.

    PubMed

    Lertanantawong, Benchaporn; O'Mullane, Anthony P; Zhang, Jie; Surareungchai, Werasak; Somasundrum, Mithran; Bond, Alan M

    2008-09-01

    The ability of the technique of large-amplitude Fourier transformed (FT) ac voltammetry to facilitate the quantitative evaluation of electrode processes involving electron transfer and catalytically coupled chemical reactions has been evaluated. Predictions derived on the basis of detailed simulations imply that the rate of electron transfer is crucial, as confirmed by studies on the ferrocenemethanol (FcMeOH)-mediated electrocatalytic oxidation of ascorbic acid. Thus, at glassy carbon, gold, and boron-doped diamond electrodes, the introduction of the coupled electrocatalytic reaction, while producing significantly enhanced dc currents, does not affect the ac harmonics. This outcome is as expected if the FcMeOH (0/+) process remains fully reversible in the presence of ascorbic acid. In contrast, the ac harmonic components available from FT-ac voltammetry are predicted to be highly sensitive to the homogeneous kinetics when an electrocatalytic reaction is coupled to a quasi-reversible electron-transfer process. The required quasi-reversible scenario is available at an indium tin oxide electrode. Consequently, reversible potential, heterogeneous charge-transfer rate constant, and charge-transfer coefficient values of 0.19 V vs Ag/AgCl, 0.006 cm s (-1) and 0.55, respectively, along with a second-order homogeneous chemical rate constant of 2500 M (-1) s (-1) for the rate-determining step in the catalytic reaction were determined by comparison of simulated responses and experimental voltammograms derived from the dc and first to fourth ac harmonic components generated at an indium tin oxide electrode. The theoretical concepts derived for large-amplitude FT ac voltammetry are believed to be applicable to a wide range of important solution-based mediated electrocatalytic reactions.

  3. Experimental investigation of impulsive magnetic reconnection induced by large amplitude electromagnetic fluctuations in the presence of a guide field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahata, Akihiro; Inomoto, Michiaki; Yanai, Ryoma; Ono, Yasushi

    2015-11-01

    Impulsive enhancement of magnetic reconnection is one of the potential candidates to invoke various explosive events observed in nature and laboratory plasmas. In TS-3 laboratory experiment with a guide field of Bguide /Brec = 1-2.5, impulsive growth of the reconnection electric field was observed just behind the onset of large-amplitude electromagnetic fluctuations (f = 1.5-2 fci and the amplitude was 0.1Brec). It was found that both the fluctuation amplitude and the enhanced reconnection electric field during the fluctuation period showed positive correlation with the guide field. The normalized reconnection rate of about 0.03 before the onset of fluctuations was reasonably comparable with the classical reconnection rate of Sweet-Parker model. However, the reconnection rate rose up to 0.11 after the fluctuations onset, suggesting that the transition from slow steady reconnection to fast impulsive reconnection took place. Since the fluctuation amplitude was so large that the nonlinear terms of the induced electric field was not negligible. The electric field enhancement due to the nonlinear contribution from the observed fluctuation was 650 V/m, which showed good agreement with the experimentally observed electric field increment of about 800 V/m.

  4. Propagation of magnetic avalanches in Mn12Ac at high field sweep rates.

    PubMed

    Decelle, W; Vanacken, J; Moshchalkov, V V; Tejada, J; Hernández, J M; Macià, F

    2009-01-16

    Time-resolved measurements of the magnetization reversal in single crystals of Mn12Ac in pulsed magnetic fields, at magnetic field sweep rates from 1.5 kT/s up to 7 kT/s, suggest a new process that cannot be scaled onto a deflagrationlike propagation driven by heat diffusion. The sweep rate dependence of the propagation velocity, increasing from a few 100 m/s up to the speed of sound in Mn12Ac, indicates the existence of two new regimes at the highest sweep rates, with a transition around 4 kT/s that can be understood as a magnetic deflagration-to-detonation transition. PMID:19257315

  5. Propagation of magnetic avalanches in Mn12Ac at high field sweep rates.

    PubMed

    Decelle, W; Vanacken, J; Moshchalkov, V V; Tejada, J; Hernández, J M; Macià, F

    2009-01-16

    Time-resolved measurements of the magnetization reversal in single crystals of Mn12Ac in pulsed magnetic fields, at magnetic field sweep rates from 1.5 kT/s up to 7 kT/s, suggest a new process that cannot be scaled onto a deflagrationlike propagation driven by heat diffusion. The sweep rate dependence of the propagation velocity, increasing from a few 100 m/s up to the speed of sound in Mn12Ac, indicates the existence of two new regimes at the highest sweep rates, with a transition around 4 kT/s that can be understood as a magnetic deflagration-to-detonation transition.

  6. The influence of fluid properties and pulse amplitude on bubble dynamics in the field of a shock wave lithotripter.

    PubMed

    Choi, M J; Coleman, A J; Saunders, J E

    1993-11-01

    This study concerns the radial dynamics of a bubble driven by pulsed ultrasound of the type generated during extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. In particular, a numerical model has been used to examine the sensitivity of the bubble oscillations to changes in both the amplitude of the driving field and the physical conditions of the fluid surrounding the bubble: viscosity, surface tension, temperature and gas content. It is shown that, at high negative pressures (p- = 10 MPa) as in lithotripsy, the timing and amplitude of bubble collapses have a considerably reduced sensitivity to the initial bubble size and all fluid parameters, except gas content, compared with those expected in lower-amplitude fields (p- = 0.2 MPa). This study indicates that, in the lithotripsy fields, the differences in the viscosity, surface tension and temperature of body fluids and the initial bubble size will have little effect on bubble dynamics compared with those expected in water.

  7. Amplitude modulation detection by human listeners in reverberant sound fields: Effects of prior listening exposure

    PubMed Central

    Zahorik, Pavel; Anderson, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    Previous work [Zahorik et al., POMA, 15, 050002 (2012)] has reported that for both broadband and narrowband noise carrier signals in a simulated reverberant sound field, human sensitivity to amplitude modulation (AM) is higher than would be predicted based on the acoustical modulation transfer function (MTF) of the listening environment. These results may be suggestive of mechanisms that functionally enhance modulation in reverberant listening, although many details of this enhancement effect are unknown. Given recent findings that demonstrate improvements in speech understanding with prior exposure to reverberant listening environments, it is of interest to determine whether listening exposure to a reverberant room might also influence AM detection in the room, and perhaps contribute to the AM enhancement effect. Here, AM detection thresholds were estimated (using an adaptive 2-alternative forced-choice procedure) in each of two listening conditions: one in which consistent listening exposure to a particular room was provided, and a second that intentionally disrupted listening exposure by varying the room from trial-to-trial. Results suggest that consistent prior listening exposure contributes to enhanced AM sensitivity in rooms. [Work supported by the NIH/NIDCD.] PMID:24163718

  8. Reversal of the bicycle drawing direction in Parkinson's disease by AC pulsed electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Sandyk, R

    1998-09-01

    The Draw-a-Bicycle Test is employed in neuropsychological testing of cognitive skills since the bicycle design is widely known and also because of its complex structure. The Draw-a-Bicycle Test has been administered routinely to patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and other neurodegenerative disorders to evaluate the effect of transcranial applications of AC pulsed electromagnetic fields (EMFs) in the picotesla flux density on visuoconstructional skills. A seminal observation is reported in 5 medicated PD patients who demonstrated reversal of spontaneous drawing direction of the bicycle after they received a series of transcranial treatments with AC pulsed EMFs. In 3 patients reversal of the bicycle drawing direction was observed shortly after the administration of pulsed EMFs while in 2 patients these changes were observed within a time lag ranging from several weeks to months. All patients also demonstrated a dramatic clinical response to the administration of EMFs. These findings are intriguing because changes in drawing direction do not occur spontaneously in normal individuals as a result of relateralization of cognitive functions. This report suggests that administration of AC pulsed EMFs may induce in some PD patients changes in hemispheric dominance during processing of a visuoconstructional task and that these changes may be predictive of a particularly favourable response to AC pulsed EMFs therapy.

  9. Theoretical study of electromagnetic electron cyclotron waves in the presence of AC field in Uranian magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, R. S.; Kaur, Rajbir

    2015-10-01

    Electromagnetic electron cyclotron (EMEC) waves with temperature anisotropy in the magnetosphere of Uranus have been studied in present work. EMEC waves are investigated using method of characteristic solution by kinetic approach, in presence of AC field. In 1986, Voyager 2 encounter with Uranus revealed that magnetosphere of Uranus exhibit non-Maxwellian high-energy tail distribution. So, the dispersion relation, real frequency and growth rate are evaluated using Lorentzian Kappa distribution function. Effect of temperature anisotropy, AC frequency and number density of particles is found. The study is also extended to oblique propagation of EMEC waves in presence and absence of AC field. Through comprehensive mathematical analysis it is found that when EMEC wave propagates parallel to intrinsic magnetic field of Uranus, its growth is more enhanced than in case of oblique propagation. Results are also discussed in context to magnetosphere of Earth and also gives theoretical explanation to existence of high energetic particles observed by Voyager 2 in the magnetosphere of Uranus. The results can present a further insight into the nature of electron-cyclotron instability condition for the whistler mode waves in the outer radiation belts of Uranus or other space plasmas.

  10. Super-resolution high sensitivity AC Magnetic Field Imaging with NV Centers in Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauch, Erik; Jaskula, Jean-Christophe; Trifonov, Alexei; Walsworth, Ronald

    2015-05-01

    The Nitrogen-Vacancy center in diamond (NV center), a defect consisting of a nitrogen atom next to a missing atom, has been successfully applied to sense magnetic field, electric field, temperature and can also be used as fluorescence marker and single photon emitter. We will present super-resolution imaging of NV centers and simultaneous sensing of AC magnetic fields with high sensitivity. To demonstrate the applicability of super-resolution magnetic field imaging, we resolve several NV centers with an optical resolution smaller than 20 nm and probe locally the gradient of a externally applied magnetic field. Additionally, we demonstrate the detection of magnetic field signals from 1H protons with subdiffraction image resolution. We will also show that our super-resolution magnetometer will benefit from a new readout method based on a spin-to-charge mapping that we have developed to increase the readout contrast.

  11. A review of the physical properties and biological effects of the high amplitude acoustic field used in extracorporeal lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Coleman, A J; Saunders, J E

    1993-01-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) has now been used for more than a decade in the treatment of urinary stone disease. During this period there has been a wide range of studies on the physical properties of the high-amplitude focussed fields used in ESWL and the biological effects of exposure to such fields, including their ability to fragment hard concretions. These studies form a distinct body of knowledge whose relevance to the broader literature on biological effects from lower amplitude exposures has yet to be fully evaluated. This review attempts to present the main results of biological-effects studies in ESWL along with what is known of the physical properties of lithotripsy fields with the aim of assisting this evaluation. In general, the reported biological effects of lithotripsy fields are compatible with those that have been observed at those lower amplitudes of focussed pulsed ultrasound in which transient cavitation is the dominant mechanism of interaction. The relatively large amplitudes and low frequencies in ESWL, however, make it a more potent generator of transient cavitation than most other forms of medical ultrasound. Biological-effects studies with lithotripsy fields may, therefore, be expected to extend our understanding of the nature of transient cavitation and, in particular, its effects in mammalian tissue.

  12. Electro-worming: The behaviors of Caenorhabditis (C.) elegans in DC and AC electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Han-Sheng; Raizen, David M.; Dabbish, Nooreen; Bau, Haim H.

    2011-09-01

    The video showcases how C. elegans worms respond to DC and AC electrical stimulations. Gabel et al (2007) demonstrated that in the presence of DC and low frequency AC fields, worms of stage L2 and larger propel themselves towards the cathode. Rezai et al (2010) have demonstrated that this phenomenon, dubbed electrotaxis, can be used to control the motion of worms. In the video, we reproduce Rezai's experimental results. Furthermore, we show, for the first time, that worms can be trapped with high frequency, nonuniform electric fields. We studied the effect of the electric field on the nematode as a function of field intensity and frequency and identified a range of electric field intensities and frequencies that trap worms without apparent adverse effect on their viability. Worms tethered by dielectrophoresis (DEP) avoid blue light, indicating that at least some of the nervous system functions remain unimpaired in the presence of the electric field. DEP is useful to dynamically confine nematodes for observations, sort them according to size, and separate dead worms from live ones.

  13. Granular Responses of GdBa2Cu3O7-δ Using ac Magnetic Susceptibility Measurement under ac and dc Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namuco, S. B.; Lao, M. L.; Sarmago, R. V.

    Granularity of bulk materials has a great impact on the characterization of superconductors as well as its path towards room temperature applications. Bulk GdBCO that has crystal formation and Tc close to YBCO were fabricated using the conventional solid state route method. AC magnetic susceptibility measurement is done on the sample to observe the granular responses brought about by small magnetic field values that is superimposed with DC magnetic field. Results show that compared to YBCO, GdBCO show more sensitive behaviour with the addition of DC magnetic field. It is shown in the results that abrupt response in the AC loss peaks observed in χ" is more prominent in GdBCO even at lower applied magnetic fields.

  14. Dynamic melting and impurity particle tracking in continuously adjustable AC magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojarevics, V.; Pericleous, K.

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of semi-levitation melting is extended to account for the presence of particles (impurities, broken metal dendrite agglomerates, bubbles) during the full melting cycle simulated numerically using the pseudo-spectral schemes. The AC coil is dynamically moving with the melt front progress, while the generated Joule heat serves to enhance the melting rate. The electromagnetic force is decomposed into the time average and the oscillating parts. The time average effects on the particle transport are investigated previously using approximations derived for a locally uniform magnetic field. This paper presents expressions for the skin-layer type of the AC force containing also the pulsating part which contributes to the particle drag by the ‘history’ and ‘added mass’ contributions. The intense turbulence in the bulk of molten metal additionally contributes to the particle dispersion. The paper attempts to demonstrate the importance of each of the mentioned effects onto the particle transport during the melting until the final pouring stage. The method could be extended to similar AC field controlled melting/solidification processes.

  15. Heavy pseudoscalar twist-3 distribution amplitudes within QCD theory in background fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Tao; Wu, Xing-Gang; Huang, Tao; Fu, Hai-Bing

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we study the properties of the twist-3 distribution amplitude (DA) of the heavy pseudoscalars such as η _c, B_c, and η _b. New sum rules for the twist-3 DA moments < ξ ^n_Prangle _HP and < ξ ^n_σ rangle _HP up to sixth order and up to dimension-six condensates are deduced under the framework of the background field theory. Based on the sum rules for the twist-3 DA moments, we construct a new model for the two twist-3 DAs of the heavy pseudoscalar with the help of the Brodsky-Huang-Lepage prescription. Furthermore, we apply them to the B_c→ η _c transition form factor (f^{B_c→ η _c}_+(q^2)) within the light-cone sum rules approach, and the results are comparable with other approaches. It has been found that the twist-3 DAs φ ^P_{3;η _c} and φ ^σ _{3;η _c} are important for a reliable prediction of f^{B_c→ η _c}_+(q^2). For example, at the maximum recoil region, we have f^{B_c→ η _c}_+(0) = 0.674 ± 0.066, in which those two twist-3 terms provide {˜ }33 and {˜ }22 % contributions. Also we calculate the branching ratio of the semi-leptonic decay B_c → η _c lν as Br(B_c → η _c lν ) = ( 9.31^{+2.27}_{-2.01} ) × 10^{-3}.

  16. Analysis of resistance to Cry1Ac in field-collected pink bollworm, Pectinophora gossypiella (Lepidoptera:Gelechiidae), populations

    PubMed Central

    Ojha, Abhishek; Sree, K Sowjanya; Sachdev, Bindiya; Rashmi, MA; Ravi, KC; Suresh, PJ; Mohan, Komarlingam S; Bhatnagar, Raj K

    2014-01-01

    High survivorship of pink bollworrm, Pectinophora gossypiella in bolls of Bollgard® cotton hybrids and resistance to Cry1Ac protein, expressed in Bollgard cotton were reported in field-populations collected from the state of Gujarat (western India) in 2010. We have found Cry1Ac-resistance in pink bollworm populations sourced from Bollgard and non-Bt cotton fields in the adjoining states of Maharashtra and Madhya Pradesh in Central India. Further, we observed reduced binding of labeled Cry1Ac protein to receptors localized on the brush-border membrane of pink bollworm larval strains with high tolerance to Cry1Ac. These strains were sourced from Bollgard and conventional cotton fields. A pooled Cry1Ac-resistant strain, further selected on Cry1Ac diet also showed significantly reduced binding to Cry1Ac protein. The reduced binding of Cry1Ac to receptors could be an underlying mechanism for the observed resistance in pink bollworm populations feeding on Bollgard hybrids. PMID:25523173

  17. Pekeris waveguide comparisons of methods for predicting acoustic field amplitude uncertainty caused by a spatially uniform environmental uncertainty (L).

    PubMed

    James, Kevin R; Dowling, David R

    2011-02-01

    Acoustic field calculations in underwater environments are often uncertain because the environmental parameters required for such calculations are uncertain. This letter compares the accuracy of direct simulations, the field shifting approximation, and polynomial chaos expansions for predicting acoustic amplitude uncertainty in 100-m-deep Pekeris waveguides having spatially uniform uncertain water-column sound speed. When this sound speed is Gaussian-distributed with a standard deviation of 1 m/s, direct simulations and polynomial chaos expansions, based on 21 field calculations, are more accurate than the field shifting approximation, based on two field calculations. This ranking reverses as the sound-speed standard deviation increases to 20 m/s.

  18. Inference in alpha rhythm phase and amplitude modeled on Markov random field using belief propagation from electroencephalograms.

    PubMed

    Naruse, Yasushi; Takiyama, Ken; Okada, Masato; Murata, Tsutomu

    2010-07-01

    Alpha rhythm is a major component of spontaneous electroencephalographic (EEG) data. We develop a novel method that can be used to estimate the instantaneous phases and amplitudes of the alpha rhythm with high accuracy by modeling the alpha rhythm phase and amplitude as Markov random field (MRF) models. By using a belief propagation technique, we construct an exact-inference algorithm that can be used to estimate instantaneous phases and amplitudes and calculate the marginal likelihood. Maximizing the marginal likelihood enables us to estimate the hyperparameters on the basis of type-II maximum likelihood estimation. We prove that the instantaneous phase and amplitude estimation by our method is consistent with that by the Hilbert transform, which has been commonly used to estimate instantaneous phases and amplitudes, of a signal filtered from observed data in the limited case that the observed data consist of only one frequency signal whose amplitude is constant and a Gaussian noise. Comparison of the performances of observation noise reduction by our method and by a Gaussian MRF model of alpha rhythm signal indicates that our method reduces observation noise more efficiently. Moreover, the instantaneous phase and amplitude estimates obtained using our method are more accurate than those obtained by the Hilbert transform. Application of our method to experimental EEG data also demonstrates that the relationship between the alpha rhythm phase and the reaction time emerges more clearly by using our method than the Hilbert transform. This indicates our method's practical usefulness. Therefore, applying our method to experimental EEG data will enable us to estimate the instantaneous phases and amplitudes of the alpha rhythm more precisely.

  19. Inference in alpha rhythm phase and amplitude modeled on Markov random field using belief propagation from electroencephalograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naruse, Yasushi; Takiyama, Ken; Okada, Masato; Murata, Tsutomu

    2010-07-01

    Alpha rhythm is a major component of spontaneous electroencephalographic (EEG) data. We develop a novel method that can be used to estimate the instantaneous phases and amplitudes of the alpha rhythm with high accuracy by modeling the alpha rhythm phase and amplitude as Markov random field (MRF) models. By using a belief propagation technique, we construct an exact-inference algorithm that can be used to estimate instantaneous phases and amplitudes and calculate the marginal likelihood. Maximizing the marginal likelihood enables us to estimate the hyperparameters on the basis of type-II maximum likelihood estimation. We prove that the instantaneous phase and amplitude estimation by our method is consistent with that by the Hilbert transform, which has been commonly used to estimate instantaneous phases and amplitudes, of a signal filtered from observed data in the limited case that the observed data consist of only one frequency signal whose amplitude is constant and a Gaussian noise. Comparison of the performances of observation noise reduction by our method and by a Gaussian MRF model of alpha rhythm signal indicates that our method reduces observation noise more efficiently. Moreover, the instantaneous phase and amplitude estimates obtained using our method are more accurate than those obtained by the Hilbert transform. Application of our method to experimental EEG data also demonstrates that the relationship between the alpha rhythm phase and the reaction time emerges more clearly by using our method than the Hilbert transform. This indicates our method’s practical usefulness. Therefore, applying our method to experimental EEG data will enable us to estimate the instantaneous phases and amplitudes of the alpha rhythm more precisely.

  20. On the angle between the average interplanetary magnetic field and the propagation direction of plane large amplitude Alfven waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenstein, B. R.; Sonett, C. P.

    1979-01-01

    The paper shows that the experimentally observed close alignment of magnetic field minimum variance direction with the average magnetic field for Alfven waves in the solar wind is consistent with theoretically predicted properties of plane large amplitude Alfven waves in the MHD approximation. The theoretical properties of these Alfven waves constrain the time averaged magnetic field to cluster around the direction of minimum variance, which is aligned with the wave normal. Thus, spacecraft magnetometer observations in the solar wind of minimum variance directions strongly peaked about the average magnetic field direction are consistent with plane large amplitude Alfven waves which have wave normals aligned with the directions of minimum variance. This does not imply that geometrical hydromagnetic calculations for Alfven wave propagation direction in the solar wind are incorrect, but there is a discrepancy between geometrical hydromagnetics theory and observations that IMF minimum variance directions tend to be aligned with the ideal Parker spiral instead of the radial direction.

  1. The ac and dc electric field meters developed for the US Department of Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkham, H.; Johnston, A.; Jackson, S.; Sheu, K.

    1987-01-01

    Two space-potential electric field meters developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy are described. One of the meters was designed to measure dc fields, the other ac fields. Both meters use fiber optics to couple a small measuring probe to a remote readout device, so as to minimize field perturbation due to the presence of the probe. By using coherent detection, it has been possible to produce instruments whose operating range extends from about 10 V/m up to about 2.5 kV/cm, without the need for range switching on the probe. The electrical and mechanical design of both meters are described in detail. Data from laboratory tests are presented, as well as the results of the tests at the National Bureau of Standards and the Electric Power Research Institute's High Voltage Transmission Research Facility.

  2. Understanding Electric Interactions in Suspensions in Gradient AC Electric Fields II:. Simulations and Application Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tada, Shigeru; Shen, Yan; Jacqmin, David; Fu, Bingmei; Qiu, Zhiyong

    We used numerical simulations of a continuous model and the molecular dynamics model to understand the particle instability, formation of island-like structures and existence of one critical particle concentration of 1% (v/v) for formation of island-like structures in the suspension in a gradient AC electric field reported in Paper I. The simulations of the continuous model show that the critical concentration of 1% (v/v) is the concentration of which the particles of a suspension are just fully filling the lower field region finally. According to the MD simulations, the particles instability does exist in the corn oil in a gradient AC electric field, anisotropic polarization interactions among the particles are responsible for the particle instability and have memory, and the memory is still kept even when the particles are transported by a dielectrophoresis force. The island-like structures can be regarded as signature of the memory. We explored possibilities to apply our findings in biomedical fields.

  3. Hot electrons injection in carbon nanotubes under the influence of quasi-static ac-field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amekpewu, M.; Mensah, S. Y.; Musah, R.; Mensah, N. G.; Abukari, S. S.; Dompreh, K. A.

    2016-07-01

    The theory of hot electrons injection in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) where both dc electric field (Ez), and a quasi-static ac field exist simultaneously (i.e. when the frequency ω of ac field is much less than the scattering frequency v (ω ≪ v or ωτ ≪ 1, v =τ-1) where τ is relaxation time) is studied. The investigation is done theoretically by solving semi-classical Boltzmann transport equation with and without the presence of the hot electrons source to derive the current densities. Plots of the normalized current density versus dc field (Ez) applied along the axis of the CNTs in the presence and absence of hot electrons reveal ohmic conductivity initially and finally negative differential conductivity (NDC) provided ωτ ≪ 1 (i.e. quasi- static case). With strong enough axial injection of the hot electrons, there is a switch from NDC to positive differential conductivity (PDC) about Ez ≥ 75 kV / cm and Ez ≥ 140 kV / cm for a zigzag CNT and an armchair CNT respectively. Thus, the most important tough problem for NDC region which is the space charge instabilities can be suppressed due to the switch from the NDC behaviour to the PDC behaviour predicting a potential generation of terahertz radiations whose applications are relevance in current-day technology, industry, and research.

  4. Ac and Impulse Breakdown of Liquid Nitrogen at 77 K for Quasi-Uniform Field Gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, D. R.; Sauers, I.; Ellis, A. R.; Schwenterly, S. W.; Tuncer, E.; Pleva, E.

    2008-03-01

    Liquid nitrogen (LN2) is commonly used both as a coolant and electrical insulation in high temperature superconductor (HTS) equipment for power applications. Hence it is necessary to know the electrical breakdown characteristics of LN2 under a variety of practical conditions. The ac breakdown and positive and negative polarity breakdown results for lightning impulse (1.2 microsecond rise time/50 microsecond fall time) are presented for LN2 using sphere to plane electrode geometry for sphere diameters of 50.8 and 101.6 mm over a gap range of 1 to 15 mm. Voltages up to 110 kVrms were studied for ac breakdown and up to 500-kV peak for impulse. In this work both the ac and impulse breakdown voltages scale approximately with distance over the limited gaps studied which is indicative of a quasi-uniform (near-uniform) electric field between sphere and plane. These measurements were conducted in a dewar which could be pressurized from 1 to 2 bar absolute which greatly reduces the spontaneous formation of bubbles that can occur in open LN2 bath experiments and thus potentially reduce the breakdown strength. Results from the pressurized system and near atmospheric pressure similar to an open bath are compared.

  5. AC and Impulse Breakdown of Liquid Nitrogen at 77 K for Quasi-Uniform Field Gaps

    SciTech Connect

    James, David Randy; Sauers, Isidor; Ellis, Alvin R; Schwenterly, S W; Tuncer, Enis; Pleva, Ed

    2008-01-01

    Liquid nitrogen (LN2) is commonly used both as a coolant and electrical insulation in high temperature superconductor (HTS) equipment for power applications. Hence it is necessary to know the electrical breakdown characteristics of LN2 under a variety of conditions which are likely to be encountered in practice. The ac breakdown and positive and negative polarity breakdown results for lightning impulse (1.2 microsecond rise time/50 microsecond fall time) are presented for LN2 using sphere to plane electrode geometry for sphere diameters of 50.8 and 101.6 mm over a gap range of 1 to 15 mm. Voltages up to 110 kVrms were studied for ac breakdown and up to 500-kV peak for impulse. In this work both the ac and impulse breakdown voltages scale approximately with distance over the limited gaps studied which is indicative of a quasi-uniform (near- uniform) electric field between sphere and plane. These measurements were conducted in a dewar which could be pressurized from 1 to 2 bar absolute which greatly reduces the spontaneous formation of bubbles that can occur in open LN2 bath experiments and thus potentially reduce the breakdown strength. Results from the pressurized system and near atmospheric pressure similar to an open bath are compared.

  6. New Method for One-Loop Scattering Amplitudes in Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ossola, Giovanni

    2009-12-17

    We review the main features of the OPP method for the evaluation of one-loop amplitudes of arbitrary scattering processes. In this approach, the coefficients of the scalar integrals are extracted by means of simple algebraic equations constructed by numerically evaluating the numerator of the integrand for specific choices of the integration momentum. No analytical information on the structure of the amplitude is needed, allowing for a purely numerical, but still algebraic, implementation of the algorithm. The method works for any set of internal and/or external masses, without being limited to massless theories.

  7. AC transport in p-Ge/GeSi quantum well in high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Drichko, I. L.; Malysh, V. A.; Smirnov, I. Yu.; Golub, L. E.; Tarasenko, S. A.; Suslov, A. V.; Mironov, O. A.; Kummer, M.; Känel, H. von

    2014-08-20

    The contactless surface acoustic wave technique is implemented to probe the high-frequency conductivity of a high-mobility p-Ge/GeSi quantum well structure in the regime of integer quantum Hall effect (IQHE) at temperatures 0.3–5.8 K and magnetic fields up to 18 T. It is shown that, in the IQHE regime at the minima of conductivity, holes are localized and ac conductivity is of hopping nature and can be described within the “two-site” model. The analysis of the temperature and magnetic-field-orientation dependence of the ac conductivity at odd filing factors enables us to determine the effective hole g-factor, |g{sub zz}|≈4.5. It is shown that the in-plane component of the magnetic field leads to a decrease in the g-factor as well as increase in the cyclotron mass, which is explained by orbital effects in the complex valence band of germanium.

  8. Understanding Electric Interactions in Suspensions in Gradient AC Electric Fields I:. Experimental

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yan; Qiu, Zhiyong; Tada, Shigeru

    When neutrally buoyant poly alpha olefin particles in corn oil were exposed to a gradient ac electric field generated by a spatially periodic electrode array, these particles experienced the negative dielectrophoresis and instability in all the suspensions of concentration range from 0.01% to 5% (v/v). One critical particle concentration was experimentally determined as 1% (v/v) below which the particles in corn oil were segregated to form island-like structures in the lower electric field regions; and above which, particles only formed straight stripes. The island-like structure was suspended in the lowest electric field area. Specially designed experiments with a suspension of 1.126% (v/v) confirmed that there exists particle instability. Anisotropic properties of electric interactions are responsible for particle instability in all the suspensions of different concentrations and island-like structures were formed only in the dilute suspensions in which the particle instability has enough space to be developed.

  9. Enhancement of the thermoelectric figure of merit in a quantum dot due to external ac field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qiao; Wang, Zhi-yong; Xie, Zhong-Xiang

    2013-08-01

    We investigate the figure of merit of a quantum dot (QD) system irradiated with an external microwave filed by nonequilibrium Green's function (NGF) technique. Results show that the frequency of microwave field influence the figure of merit ZT significantly. At low temperature, a sharp peak can be observed in the figure of merit ZT as the frequency of ac field increases. As the frequency varies, several zero points and resonant peaks emerge in the figure of merit ZT. By adjusting the frequency of the microwave field, we can obtain high ZT. The figure of merit ZT increases with the decreasing of linewidth function Γ. In addition, Wiedemann-Franz law does not hold, particularly in the low frequency region due to multi-photon emission and absorption. Some novel thermoelectric properties are also found in two-level QD system.

  10. Test Results of the AC Field Measurements of Fermilab Booster Corrector Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    DiMarco, E.Joseph; Harding, D.J.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Lamm, M.J.; Makulski, A.; Nehring, R.; Orris, D.F.; Schlabach, P.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, Michael Albert; /Fermilab

    2008-06-25

    Multi-element corrector magnets are being produced at Fermilab that enable correction of orbits and tunes through the entire cycle of the Booster, not just at injection. The corrector package includes six different corrector elements--normal and skew orientations of dipole, quadrupole, and sextupole--each independently powered. The magnets have been tested during typical AC ramping cycles at 15Hz using a fixed coil system to measure the dynamic field strength and field quality. The fixed coil is comprised of an array of inductive pick-up coils around the perimeter of a cylinder which are sampled simultaneously at 100 kHz with 24-bit ADC's. The performance of the measurement system and a summary of the field results are presented and discussed.

  11. Small-amplitude magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth in cylindrical liners and Z-pinches imploded in an axial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikovich, A. L.; Giuliani, J. L.; Clark, R. W.; Mikitchuk, D.; Kroupp, E.; Maron, Y.; Fisher, A.; Schmit, P. F.

    2014-10-01

    Recent progress in developing the MagLIF approach to pulsed-power driven inertial confinement fusion has stimulated the interest in observation and mitigation of the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability (MRTI) of liners and Z-pinches imploded in an axial magnetic field. Theoretical analysis of these issues is particularly important because direct numerical simulation of the MRTI development is challenging due to intrinsically 3D helical structure of the fastest-growing modes. We review the analytical small-amplitude theory of the MRTI perturbation development and the weakly nonlinear theory of MRTI mode interaction, emphasizing basic physics, opportunity for 3D code verification against exact analytical solutions, and stabilization criteria. The theory is compared to the experimental results obtained at Weizmann Institute with gas-puff Z pinches and on the Z facility at Sandia with solid liners imploded in an axial magnetic field. Work supported by the US DOE/NNSA, and by the US-Israel Binational Science Foundation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Effect of an AC electric field on the conductance of single-wall semiconductor-type carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Belonenko, M. B.; Glazov, S. Yu.; Mescheryakova, N. E.

    2010-09-15

    The effect of an ac electric field on the conductance of a system of single-wall semiconductor-type carbon nanotubes placed in a dc electric field is considered. The strength vectors of dc and ac electric fields are directed along the nanotube axis. The electronic system of carbon nanotubes is considered in the context of the Boltzmann kinetic equation in the relaxation-time approximation. The dependence of the current density in the system on the characteristics of applied fields is studied. The effect of absolute negative conductance is detected.

  13. Modeling of Nanoparticle-Mediated Electric Field Enhancement Inside Biological Cells Exposed to AC Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Pawan K.; Kang, Sung Kil; Kim, Gon Jun; Choi, Jun; Mohamed, A.-A. H.; Lee, Jae Koo

    2009-08-01

    We present in this article the effect of alternating electric field at kilohertz (kHz) and megahertz (MHz) frequencies on the biological cells in presence and absence of nanoparticles. The induced electric field strength distribution in the region around cell membrane and nucleus envelope display different behavior at kHz and MHz frequencies. The attachment of gold nanoparticles (GNPs), especially gold nanowires around the surface of nucleus induce enhanced electric field strengths. The induced field strengths are dependent on the length of nanowire and create varying field regions when the length of nanowire is increased from 2 to 4 µm. The varying nanowire length increased the induced field strengths inside nucleoplasm and region adjacent to the nucleus in the cytoplasm. We investigated a process of electrostatic disruption of nucleus membrane when the induced electric field strength across the nucleus exceeds its tensile strength.

  14. Numerical evaluation of AC loss properties in assembled superconductor strips exposed to perpendicular magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajikawa, K.; Funaki, K.; Shikimachi, K.; Hirano, N.; Nagaya, S.

    2009-10-01

    AC losses in superconductor strips assembled face-to-face are numerically evaluated by means of a finite element method. The external magnetic field is applied perpendicular to their flat face. It is also assumed that the superconductor strips have the voltage-current characteristics represented by the critical state model with constant critical current density. The influences of the number of strips and the gap length between strips on the losses are quantitatively discussed as compared with the conventional theoretical expressions for some special cases in order to understand only the geometrical effects on the perpendicular-field losses in actual assembled conductors with the finite numbers of Y-based superconducting tapes.

  15. Ac response of an electron gas under a strong electric-field bias

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, S. ); Shung, K.W. Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 )

    1993-10-15

    A linear ac response theory of an electron gas under a strong, static electric field ([bold E]) is presented, and applied to doped GaAs for a detailed calculation. This is a generalization of the force-balance transport equation developed by Ting [ital et] [ital al]., with which the nonlinear conductivity under a strong field can be studied. The dynamic screening effect is included in the theory and studied analytically. The result is expressed by a modified Drude formula, with an effective lifetime which is a function of the frequency and also of [bold E]---both its magnitude and its direction. The calculated optical reflectivity and absorption rate show anomalous structure at frequencies close to the plasmon oscillation, when the nonlinear dc effect due to a strong [bold E] is important. The anomaly is expected to be experimentally measurable.

  16. AC electric field induced dielectrophoretic assembly behavior of gold nanoparticles in a wide frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weiyu; Wang, Chunhui; Ding, Haitao; Shao, Jinyou; Ding, Yucheng

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we focus on frequency-dependence of pearl chain formations (PCF) of gold nanoparticles driven by AC dielectrophoresis (DEP), especially in a low field-frequency range, where induced double-layer charging effect at ideally polarizable surfaces on particle DEP behavior and surrounding liquid motion need not be negligible. As field frequency varies, grown features of DEP assembly structures ranging from low-frequency non-bridged gap to high-frequency single gold nanoparticle-made nanowires bridging the electrodes are demonstrated experimentally. Specifically, at 10 kHz, a kind of novel channel-like structure with parallel opposing banks is formed at the center of interelectrode gap. In stark contrast, at 1 MHz, thin PCF with diameter of 100 nm is created along the shortest distance of the isolation spacing. Moreover, a particular conductive path of nanoparticle chains is produced at 1 MHz in a DEP device embedded with multiple floating electrodes. A theoretical framework taking into account field-induced double-layer polarization at both the particle/electrolyte and electrode/electrolyte interface is developed to correlate these experimental observations with induced-charge electrokinetic (ICEK) phenomenon. And a RC circuit model is helpful in accounting for the formation of this particular non-bridged channel-like structure induced by a low-frequency AC voltage. As compared to thin PCF formed at high field frequency that effectively short circuits the electrode pair, though it is difficult for complete PCF bridging to occur at low frequency, the non-bridged conducting microstructure has potential to further miniaturize the size of electrode gap fabricated by standard micromachining process and may find useful application in biochemical sensing.

  17. Field Evolved Resistance in Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) to Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin Cry1Ac in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Alvi, Anwaar H. K.; Sayyed, Ali H.; Naeem, Muhammad; Ali, Muhammad

    2012-01-01

    Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) is one of the most destructive pests of several field and vegetable crops, with indiscriminate use of insecticides contributing to multiple instances of resistance. In the present study we assessed whether H. armigera had developed resistance to Bt cotton and compared the results with several conventional insecticides. Furthermore, the genetics of resistance was also investigated to determine the inheritance to Cry1Ac resistance. To investigate the development of resistance to Bt cotton, and selected foliar insecticides, H. armigera populations were sampled in 2010 and 2011 in several cotton production regions in Pakistan. The resistance ratios (RR) for Cry1Ac, chlorpyrifos, profenofos, cypermethrin, spinosad, indoxacarb, abamectin and deltamethrin were 580-fold, 320-, 1110-, 1950-, 200-, 380, 690, and 40-fold, respectively, compared with the laboratory susceptible (Lab-PK) population. Selection of the field collected population with Cry1Ac in 2010 for five generations increased RR to 5440-fold. The selection also increased RR for deltamethrin, chlorpyrifos, profenofos, cypermethrin, spinosad, indoxacarb, abamectin to 125-folds, 650-, 2840-, 9830-, 370-, 3090-, 1330-fold. The estimated LC50s for reciprocal crosses were 105 µg/ml (Cry1Ac-SEL female × Lab-PK male) and 81 g µg/ml (Lab-PK female × Cry1Ac-SEL male) suggesting that the resistance to Cry1Ac was autosomal; the degree of dominance (DLC) was 0.60 and 0.57 respectively. Mixing of enzyme inhibitors significantly decreased resistance to Cry1Ac suggesting that the resistance to Cry1Ac and other insecticides tested in the present study was primarily metabolic. Resistance to Cry1Ac was probably due to a single but unstable factor suggesting that crop rotation with non-Bt cotton or other crops could reduce the selection pressure for H. armigera and improve the sustainability of Bt cotton. PMID:23077589

  18. Human aquaporin 4 gating dynamics in dc and ac electric fields: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garate, J.-A.; English, Niall J.; MacElroy, J. M. D.

    2011-02-01

    Water self-diffusion within human aquaporin 4 has been studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in the absence and presence of external ac and dc electric fields. The computed diffusive (pd) and osmotic (pf) permeabilities under zero-field conditions are (0.718 ± 0.24) × 10-14 cm3 s-1 and (2.94 ± 0.47) × 10-14 cm3 s-1, respectively; our pf agrees with the experimental value of (1.50 ± 0.6) × 10-14 cm3 s-1. A gating mechanism has been proposed in which side-chain dynamics of residue H201, located in the selectivity filter, play an essential role. In addition, for nonequilibrium MD in external fields, it was found that water dipole orientation within the constriction region of the channel is affected by electric fields (e-fields) and that this governs the permeability. It was also found that the rate of side-chain flipping motion of residue H201 is increased in the presence of e-fields, which influences water conductivity further.

  19. Influence of constant and ac electric fields on ferromagnetic resonance in magnetoelectric composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatarenko, A. S.; Bichurin, M. I.; Petrov, V. M.; Fillipov, D. A.; Srinivasan, G.

    2004-03-01

    A composite of ferromagnetic and ferroelectric phases is expected to show magnetoelectric coupling that is mediated by mechanical deformation. For such composites, we proposed a model to treat the magnetoelectric (ME) coupling at frequencies corresponding to ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) [1,2]. The effect manifests as a shift in the resonance field when subjected to a constant electric field. Here we discuss a theory for the influence of both dc and high frequency electric fields on FMR in the composites. The model predicts a significant increase in the strength of ME coupling when the electric field is tuned to the electromechanical resonance (EMR) frequency. We assume the composite to be a homogeneous medium. By solving combined elastostatics, electrostatics and magnetostatics equations, we estimate the ME constants using effective parameters. The calculations are for 3-0, 0-3 and 2-2 connectivities. Expressions for ME coefficients are obtained as a function of interface coupling and the volume fraction for the piezoelectric phase. Under the influence of a constant electric field E, our model predicts a shift in the ferromagnetic resonance field that is proportional to ME constants. In the presence of an ac electric field, we estimate a strong ME coupling when the frequency is tuned to EMR. As an example, the FMR field shift at 9.3 GHz due an ac electrical field tuned to EMR at 350 kHz is determined for multilayer and bulk composites of nickel ferrite - lead zirconate titanate. It is shown that ME interactions are enhanced by several orders of magnitude compared to off resonance values. 1. M.I. Bichurin, I. A. Kornev, V. M. Petrov, A. S. Tatarenko, Yu. V. Kiliba, and G. Srinivasan. Phys. Rev. B 64, 094409 (2001). 2. M.I. Bichurin, V. M. Petrov, Yu. V. Kiliba, and G. Srinivasan. Phys. Rev. B 66, 134404 (2002). - supported by grants from the Russian Ministry of Education (Å02-3.4-278), the Universities of Russia Foundation (UNR 01.01.007), and the National Science

  20. Measurements on magnetized GdBCO pellets subjected to small transverse ac magnetic fields at very low frequency: Evidence for a slowdown of the magnetization decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagnard, Jean-Francois; Kirsch, Sébastien; Morita, Mitsuru; Teshima, Hidekazu; Vanderheyden, Benoit; Vanderbemden, Philippe

    2015-05-01

    Due to their ability to trap large magnetic inductions, superconducting bulk materials can be used as powerful permanent magnets. The permanent magnetization of such materials, however, can be significantly affected by the application of several cycles of a transverse variable magnetic field. In this work, we study, at T = 77 K, the long term influence of transverse ac magnetic fields of small amplitudes (i.e. much smaller than the full penetration field) on the axial magnetization of a bulk single grain superconducting GdBCO pellet over a wide range of low frequencies (1 mHz-20 Hz). Thermocouples are placed against the pellet surface to probe possible self-heating of the material during the experiments. A high sensitivity cryogenic Hall probe is placed close to the surface to record the local magnetic induction normal to the surface. The results show first that, for a given number of applied triangular transverse cycles, higher values of dBapp/dt induce smaller magnetization decays. An important feature of practical interest is that, after a very large number of cycles which cause the loss of a substantial amount of magnetization (depending on the amplitude and the frequency of the field), the rate of the magnetization decay goes back to its initial value, corresponding to the relaxation of the superconducting currents due to flux creep only. In the amplitude and frequency range investigated, the thermocouples measurements and a 2D magneto-thermal modelling show no evidence of sufficient self-heating to affect the magnetization so that the effect of the transverse magnetic field cycles on the trapped magnetic moment is only attributed to a redistribution of superconducting currents in the volume of the sample and not to a thermal effect.

  1. Dynamics of atom-field probability amplitudes in a coupled cavity system with Kerr non-linearity

    SciTech Connect

    Priyesh, K. V.; Thayyullathil, Ramesh Babu

    2014-01-28

    We have investigated the dynamics of two cavities coupled together via photon hopping, filled with Kerr non-linear medium and each containing a two level atom in it. The evolution of various atom (field) state probabilities of the coupled cavity system in two excitation sub space are obtained numerically. Detailed analysis has been done by taking different initial conditions of the system, with various coupling strengths and by varying the susceptibility of the medium. The role of susceptibility factor, on the dynamics atom field probability has been examined. In a coupled cavity system with strong photon hopping it is found that the susceptibility factor modifies the behaviour of probability amplitudes.

  2. Dependence of the amplitude of Pc5-band magnetic field variations on the solar wind and solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kazue; Yumoto, Kiyohumi; Claudepierre, Seth G.; Sanchez, Ennio R.; Troshichev, Oleg A.; Janzhura, Alexander S.

    2012-04-01

    We have studied the dependence of the amplitude of magnetic field variations in the Pc5 band (1.6-6.7 mHz) on the solar wind and solar activity. Solar wind parameters considered are the bulk velocity Vsw and the variation of the solar wind dynamic pressure δPsw. The solar activity dependence is examined by contrasting observations made in 2001 (solar activity maximum) and 2006 (solar activity declining phase). We calculated hourly Pc5 amplitude using data from geostationary satellites at L = 6.8 and ground stations covering 1 < L < 9. The amplitude is positively correlated with both Vsw and δPsw, but the degree of correlation varies with L and magnetic local time. As measured by the correlation coefficient, the amplitude dependence on both Vsw and δPsw is stronger on the dayside than on the nightside, and the dependence on Vsw (δPsw) tends to be stronger at higher (lower) L, with the relative importance of the two solar wind parameters switching at L ˜ 5. We attribute the Vsw control to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability on the magnetopause, occurring both at high and low latitudes, and the δPsw control to buffeting of the magnetosphere by variation of solar wind dynamic pressure. The GOES amplitude is higher at the solar maximum at all local times and the same feature is seen on the ground in the dawn sector at L > 6. A radial shift of the fast mode wave turning point, associated with the solar cycle variation of magnetosphere mass density, is a possible cause of this solar activity dependence.

  3. Mimicking Dirac fields in curved spacetime with fermions in lattices with non-unitary tunneling amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minář, Jiří; Grémaud, Benoît

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we show that a Dirac Hamiltonian in a curved background spacetime can be interpreted, when discretized, as a tight-binding Hamiltonian with non-unitary tunneling amplitudes. We find the form of the non-unitary tunneling matrices in terms of the metric tensor. The main motivation behind this exercise is the feasibility of such Hamiltonians by means of laser-assisted tunnelings in cold atomic experiments. The mapping thus provides a physical interpretation of such Hamiltonians. We demonstrate the use of the mapping on the example of a time-dependent metric in 2+1 dimensions. Studying the spin dynamics, we find qualitative agreement with known theoretical predictions, namely particle pair creation in an expanding Universe.

  4. Comprehensive Analysis of Human Cells Motion under an Irrotational AC Electric Field in an Electro-Microfluidic Chip

    PubMed Central

    Kermarrec, Frédérique; Gidrol, Xavier; Peyrade, David

    2014-01-01

    AC electrokinetics is a versatile tool for contact-less manipulation or characterization of cells and has been widely used for separation based on genotype translation to electrical phenotypes. Cells responses to an AC electric field result in a complex combination of electrokinetic phenomena, mainly dielectrophoresis and electrohydrodynamic forces. Human cells behaviors to AC electrokinetics remain unclear over a large frequency spectrum as illustrated by the self-rotation effect observed recently. We here report and analyze human cells behaviors in different conditions of medium conductivity, electric field frequency and magnitude. We also observe the self-rotation of human cells, in the absence of a rotational electric field. Based on an analytical competitive model of electrokinetic forces, we propose an explanation of the cell self-rotation. These experimental results, coupled with our model, lead to the exploitation of the cell behaviors to measure the intrinsic dielectric properties of JURKAT, HEK and PC3 human cell lines. PMID:24736275

  5. Mesoscopic turbulence and local order in Janus particles self-propelling under an ac electric field.

    PubMed

    Nishiguchi, Daiki; Sano, Masaki

    2015-11-01

    To elucidate mechanisms of mesoscopic turbulence exhibited by active particles, we experimentally study turbulent states of nonliving self-propelled particles. We realize an experimental system with dense suspensions of asymmetrical colloidal particles (Janus particles) self-propelling on a two-dimensional surface under an ac electric field. Velocity fields of the Janus particles in the crowded situation can be regarded as a sort of turbulence because it contains many vortices and their velocities change abruptly. Correlation functions of their velocity field reveal the coexistence of polar alignment and antiparallel alignment interactions, which is considered to trigger mesoscopic turbulence. Probability distributions of local order parameters for polar and nematic orders indicate the formation of local clusters with particles moving in the same direction. A broad peak in the energy spectrum of the velocity field appears at the spatial scales where the polar alignment and the cluster formation are observed. Energy is injected at the particle scale and conserved quantities such as energy could be cascading toward the larger clusters. PMID:26651697

  6. Standard and nonstandard nematic electrohydrodynamic convection in the presence of asymmetric ac electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, Jonathan; Hogan, S. John

    2008-10-01

    In planar nematic electrohydrodynamic convection (EHC), a microscopic liquid crystal cell is driven by a homogeneous ac electric field, which, if strong enough, causes the fluid to destabilize into a regular pattern-forming state. We consider asymmetric electric fields E(t)=E(t+T)≠-E(t+T/2) , which leads to the possibility of three different types of instabilities at onset: conductive, dielectric, and subharmonic. The first two are already well known as they are easily produced when the system is driven by symmetric electric fields; the third can only occur when the electric field symmetry is broken. We present theoretical results on EHC using linear stability analysis and Floquet theory. We consider rigid and free boundary conditions, extending the model to two Fourier modes in the vertical plane, the inclusion of flexoelectricity, and using standard (nematic electric conductivity σa>0 and dielectric anisotorpy γa<0 ) and nonstandard (σa<0) material parameters. We make full use of a three-dimensional linear model where two mutually perpendicular planar wave numbers q and p can be varied. Our results show that there is a qualitative difference between the boundary conditions used, which is also dependent on how many vertical Fourier modes were used in the model. We have obtained threshold values favoring oblique rolls in subharmonic and dielectric regimes in parameter space. For the nonstandard EHC parameter values, both conduction and subharmonic regimes disappear and only the dielectric threshold exists.

  7. Mesoscopic turbulence and local order in Janus particles self-propelling under an ac electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiguchi, Daiki; Sano, Masaki

    2015-11-01

    To elucidate mechanisms of mesoscopic turbulence exhibited by active particles, we experimentally study turbulent states of nonliving self-propelled particles. We realize an experimental system with dense suspensions of asymmetrical colloidal particles (Janus particles) self-propelling on a two-dimensional surface under an ac electric field. Velocity fields of the Janus particles in the crowded situation can be regarded as a sort of turbulence because it contains many vortices and their velocities change abruptly. Correlation functions of their velocity field reveal the coexistence of polar alignment and antiparallel alignment interactions, which is considered to trigger mesoscopic turbulence. Probability distributions of local order parameters for polar and nematic orders indicate the formation of local clusters with particles moving in the same direction. A broad peak in the energy spectrum of the velocity field appears at the spatial scales where the polar alignment and the cluster formation are observed. Energy is injected at the particle scale and conserved quantities such as energy could be cascading toward the larger clusters.

  8. Quantum system driven by incoherent a.c fields: Multi-crossing Landau Zener dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jipdi, M. N.; Fai, L. C.; Tchoffo, M.

    2016-10-01

    The paper investigates the multi-crossing dynamics of a Landau-Zener (LZ) system driven by two sinusoidal a.c fields applying the Dynamic Matrix approach (DMA). The system is shown to follow one-crossing and multi-crossing dynamics for low and high frequency regime respectively. It is shown that in low frequency regime, the resonance phenomenon occurs and leads to the decoupling of basis states; the effective gap vanishes and then the complete blockage of the system. For high frequency, the system achieves multi-crossing dynamics with two fictitious crossings; the system models a Landau-Zener-Stückelberg (LZS) interferometer with critical parameters that tailor probabilities. The system is then shown to depend only on the phase that permits the easiest control with possible application in implementing logic gates.

  9. Far-field sub-diffraction focusing lens based on binary amplitude-phase mask for linearly polarized light.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Zhang, Kun; Yu, Anping; Wang, Xianyou; Zhang, Zhihai; Li, Yuyan; Wen, Zhongquan; Li, Chen; Dai, Luru; Jiang, Senling; Lin, Feng

    2016-05-16

    Planar lenses are attractive photonic devices due to its minimized size and easy to integrate. However, planar lenses designed in traditional ways are restricted by the diffraction limit. They have difficulties in further reducing the focal spot size beyond the diffraction limit. Super-oscillation provides a possible way to solve the problem. However, lenses based on super-oscillation have always been affected by huge sidelobes, which resulted in limited field of view and difficulties in real applications. To address the problem, in the paper, a far-field sub-diffraction lens based on binary amplitude-phase mask was demonstrated under illumination of linearly polarized plane wave at wavelength 632.8 nm. The lens realized a long focal length of 148λ (94 µm), and the full width at half maximum of the focal line was 0.406λ, which was super-oscillatory. More important is that such a flat lens has small sidelobes and wide field of view. Within the measured range of [-132λ, + 120λ], the maximum sidelobe observed on the focal plane was less than 22% of the central peak. Such binary amplitude-phase planar lens can also be extended to long focal length far-field sub-diffraction focusing lens for other spectrum ranges.

  10. Influence of ambient temperature and AC magnetic field on damping behavior of Fe-13Cr-2.5Mo alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yong-gang; Li, Ning; Shen, Bao-luo; Hua, Hong-xing

    2007-07-01

    The damping behaviors of Fe-13Cr-2.5Mo alloy at ambient temperatures and the AC magnetic field are tested with the improved reversal torsion machine. The precipitations distributing in the annealed alloy are also observed with SEM. The results show that because the defections decrease during the annealing treatment, causing a higher damping capacity of this alloy. This damping drops linearly to 63% when the ambient temperature changes from 23 °C to 500 °C, resulting from the gradual decrease of ferromagnetism. On the other hand, the AC magnetic field causes the damping capacity to drop sharply, and finally it reaches a much lower level.

  11. External dc bias field effects in the nonlinear ac stationary response of permanent dipoles in a uniaxial potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Nijun; Coffey, William T.; Déjardin, Pirre-Michel; Kalmykov, Yuri P.

    External dc bias field effects on the nonlinear dielectric relaxation and dynamic Kerr effect of a system of permanent dipoles in a uniaxial mean field potential are studied via the rotational Brownian motion model. Postulated in terms of the infinite hierarchy of differential-recurrence equations for the statistical moments (the expectation value of the Legendre polynomials), the dielectric and Kerr effect ac stationary responses may be evaluated for arbitrary dc bias field strength via perturbation theory in the ac field. We have given two complementary approaches for treating the nonlinear effects. The first is based on perturbation theory allowing one to calculate the nonlinear ac stationary responses using powerful matrix methods. The second approach based on the accurate two-mode approximation [D.A. Garanin, Phys. Rev. E. 54, 3250 (1996)] effectively generalizes the existing results for dipolar systems in superimposed ac and dc fields to a mean field potential. The results apply both to nonlinear dielectric relaxation and dynamic Kerr effect of nematics and to magnetic birefringence relaxation of ferrofluids. Furthermore, the given methods of the solution of infinite hierarchies of multi-term recurrence relations are quite general and can be applied to analogous nonlinear response problems.

  12. Nonlinear elastic effects in phase field crystal and amplitude equations: Comparison to ab initio simulations of bcc metals and graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hüter, Claas; Friák, Martin; Weikamp, Marc; Neugebauer, Jörg; Goldenfeld, Nigel; Svendsen, Bob; Spatschek, Robert

    2016-06-01

    We investigate nonlinear elastic deformations in the phase field crystal model and derived amplitude equation formulations. Two sources of nonlinearity are found, one of them is based on geometric nonlinearity expressed through a finite strain tensor. This strain tensor is based on the inverse right Cauchy-Green deformation tensor and correctly describes the strain dependence of the stiffness for anisotropic and isotropic behavior. In isotropic one- and two-dimensional situations, the elastic energy can be expressed equivalently through the left deformation tensor. The predicted isotropic low-temperature nonlinear elastic effects are directly related to the Birch-Murnaghan equation of state with bulk modulus derivative K'=4 for bcc. A two-dimensional generalization suggests K2D '=5 . These predictions are in agreement with ab initio results for large strain bulk deformations of various bcc elements and graphene. Physical nonlinearity arises if the strain dependence of the density wave amplitudes is taken into account and leads to elastic weakening. For anisotropic deformation, the magnitudes of the amplitudes depend on their relative orientation to the applied strain.

  13. Theoretical study on the amplitude ratio of the seismoelectric field to the Stoneley wave and the formation tortuosity estimation from seismoelectric logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Wei; Yin, Chenggang; Wang, Jun; Cui, Naigang; Hu, Hengshan; Wang, Zhi

    2015-12-01

    Seismoelectric logging has potential applications in exploring the porous formation characteristics. In this study, we theoretically address how the amplitudes of the Stoneley wave and its accompanying borehole seismoelectric field depend on the porous formation parameters such as porosity, permeability and tortuosity. We calculate the ratio of the electric field amplitude to the pressure amplitude (REP amplitude) for the low-frequency Stoneley wave of different formations and find that the REP amplitude is sensitive to porosity and tortuosity but insensitive to permeability. To confirm this conclusion, we derive the approximate expression of the REP amplitude in the wavenumber-frequency domain which shows that the REP amplitude is dependent on tortuosity but independent of permeability. This contradicts the result concluded by previous researchers from experiments that the REP amplitude is directly proportional to the permeability. The reason is probably attributed to the fact that the rock samples with different permeabilities typically have different tortuosities. Since the REP amplitude is sensitive to tortuosity, we propose a method of estimating formation tortuosity from seismoelectric logs. It is implemented by using the REP amplitude and the wavenumber of the Stoneley wave at a given frequency when the porosity and the pore fluid viscosity and salinity are known. We test the method by estimating the tortuosities from the synthetic seismoelectric waveforms in different formations. The result shows that the errors relative to the input tortuosities are lower than 5.0 per cent without considering the uncertainties of other input parameters.

  14. Effects of low-intensity AC and/or DC electromagnetic fields on cell attachment and induction of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, N C; Ricci, J; Breger, L; Zychlinsky, A; Solomon, H; Chen, G G; Kuznetsov, D; Dorfman, R

    1997-01-01

    Rat tendon fibroblast (RTF) and rat bone marrow (RBM) osteoprogenitor cells were cultured and exposed to AC and/or DC magnetic fields in a triaxial Helmholtz coil in an incubator for up to 13 days. The AC fields were at 60 and 1000 Hz and up to 0.25 mT peak to peak, and the DC fields were up to 0.25 mT. At various combinations of field strengths and frequencies, AC and/or DC fields resulted in extensive detachment of preattached cells and prevented the normal attachment of cells not previously attached to substrates. In addition, the fields resulted in altered cell morphologies. When RTF and RBM cells were removed from the fields after several days of exposure, they partially reattached and assumed more normal morphologies. An additional set of experiments described in the Appendix corroborates these findings and also shows that low-frequency EMF also initiates apoptosis, i.e., programmed cell death, at the onset of cell detachment. Taken together, these results suggest that the electromagnetic fields result in significant alterations in cell metabolism and cytoskeleton structure. Further work is required to determine the relative effect of the electric and magnetic fields on these phenomena. The research has implications for understanding the role of fields in affecting bone healing in fracture nonunions, in cell detachment in cancer metastasis, and in the effect of EMF on organisms generally.

  15. Effects of low-intensity AC and/or DC electromagnetic fields on cell attachment and induction of apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, N.C.; Ricci, J.; Breger, L.; Zychlinsky, A.; Solomon, H.; Chen, G.G.; Kuznetsov, D.; Dorfman, R.

    1997-05-01

    Rat tendon fibroblast (RTF) and rat bone marrow (RBM) osteoprogenitor cells were cultured and exposed to AC and/or DC magnetic fields in a triaxial Helmholtz coil in an incubator for up to 13 days. The AC fields were at 60 and 1,000 Hz and up to 0.25 mT peak to peak, and the DC fields were up to 0.25 mT. At various combinations of field strengths and frequencies, AC and/or DC fields resulted in extensive detachment of preattached cells and prevented the normal attachment of cells not previously attached to substrates. In addition, the fields resulted in altered cell morphologies. When RTF and RBM cells were removed from the fields after several days of exposure, they partially reattached and assumed more normal morphologies. An additional set of experiments described in the Appendix corroborates these findings and also shows that low-frequency EMF also initiates apoptosis, i.e., programmed cell death, at the onset of cell detachment. Taken together, these results suggest that the electromagnetic fields result in significant alterations in cell metabolism and cytoskeleton structure. Further work is required to determine the relative effect of the electric and magnetic fields on these phenomena. The research has implications for understanding the role of fields in affecting bone healing in fracture nonunions, in cell detachment in cancer metastasis, and in the effect of EMF on organisms generally.

  16. Analyticity of the scattering amplitude, causality, and high-energy bounds in quantum field theory on noncommutative space-time

    SciTech Connect

    Tureanu, Anca

    2006-09-15

    In the framework of quantum field theory on noncommutative space-time with the symmetry group O(1,1)xSO(2), we prove that the Jost-Lehmann-Dyson representation, based on the causality condition taken in connection with this symmetry, leads to the mere impossibility of drawing any conclusion on the analyticity of the 2{yields}2-scattering amplitude in cos {theta}, {theta} being the scattering angle. Discussions on the possible ways of obtaining high-energy bounds analogous to the Froissart-Martin bound on the total cross section are also presented.

  17. Experimental study of the ponderomotive effects of a large amplitude microwave field on a magnetized electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Hadjoudj, Y.; Pierre, T.; Heuraux, S.; Leclert, G.

    1995-11-01

    Charged particles propagating in an inhomogeneous large amplitude microwave field experience a nonlinear force called the ponderomotive force. This effect can be theoretically evaluated either from the single particle or the fluid theories. For magnetized particles, these two descriptions predict quite different behaviors. A previous experiment [J. Vaclavik {ital et} {ital al}., Phys. Fluids {bold 29}, 2034 (1986)] has shown results in agreement with the fluid theory. Here, an experiment with a magnetized electron beam is described, which brings out a ponderomotive deflection in agreement with the single particle theory. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  18. Large-amplitude electric fields in the inner magnetosphere: Van Allen Probes observations of subauroral polarization streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Califf, S.; Li, X.; Wolf, R. A.; Zhao, H.; Jaynes, A. N.; Wilder, F. D.; Malaspina, D. M.; Redmon, R.

    2016-06-01

    The subauroral polarization stream (SAPS) is an important magnetosphere-ionosphere (MI) coupling phenomenon that impacts a range of particle populations in the inner magnetosphere. SAPS studies often emphasize ionospheric signatures of fast westward flows, but the equatorial magnetosphere is also affected through strong radial electric fields in the dusk sector. This study focuses on a period of steady southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) during the 29 June 2013 geomagnetic storm where the Van Allen Probes observe a region of intense electric fields near the plasmapause over multiple consecutive outbound duskside passes. We show that the large-amplitude electric fields near the equatorial plane are consistent with SAPS by investigating the relationship between plasma sheet ion and electron boundaries, associated field-aligned currents, and the spatial location of the electric fields. By incorporating high-inclination DMSP data we demonstrate the spatial and temporal variability of the SAPS region, and we suggest that discrete, earthward propagating injections are driving the observed strong electric fields at low L shells in the equatorial magnetosphere. We also show the relationship between SAPS and plasmasphere erosion, as well as a possible correlation with flux enhancements for 100s keV electrons.

  19. Large amplitude oscillation of magnetization in spin-torque oscillator stabilized by field-like torque

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, Tomohiro Kubota, Hitoshi; Imamura, Hiroshi; Tsunegi, Sumito

    2015-05-07

    Oscillation frequency of spin torque oscillator with a perpendicularly magnetized free layer and an in-plane magnetized pinned layer is theoretically investigated by taking into account the field-like torque. It is shown that the field-like torque plays an important role in finding the balance between the energy supplied by the spin torque and the dissipation due to the damping, which results in a steady precession. The validity of the developed theory is confirmed by performing numerical simulations based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation.

  20. Destruction of Emulsions by an AC Electric Field: Importance of Partial Merging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiam, Abdou Rachid; Bremond, Nicolas; Bibette, Jerome

    2010-03-01

    Electrocoalescence is basically the process of blending droplets by the application of an electric field. The approach is used in petroleum refineries for the separation of water in oil emulsions (that is, by coalescing water droplets), and more recently in biotechnology industry, for the fusion of micro reactors. In a first step, we will focus on the coalesce condition for two drops under a given electric field. Microfluidics offers a comfortable setup therefore, as we sought to span a range of initial conditions in terms of the distance between the droplets, their sizes, and also a region of the applied electric field. Thus, we could establish a stability diagram according to the initial conditions and droplets' composition, which displays three domains referred to as: coalescence, no coalescence and a third one of partial coalescence, where the droplets coalesce for a brief moment then separate right afterwards. We proceeded then by generalizing the setup to the case of a stream of droplets, and we found that the evolution of the stream can be predicted by the behaviour of the local pairs of droplets, as seen in the previous step. The main outcome of that study is the total destruction of an emulsion above a critical volume fraction for a given amplitude of electric field.

  1. Large amplitude spin torque vortex oscillations at zero external field using a perpendicular spin polarizer

    SciTech Connect

    Dussaux, A.; Rache Salles, B.; Jenkins, A. S.; Bortolotti, P.; Grollier, J.; Cros, V.; Fert, A.; Khvalkovskiy, A. V.; Kubota, H.; Fukushima, A.; Yakushiji, K.; Yuasa, S.

    2014-07-14

    We investigate the microwave response of a spin transfer vortex based oscillator in a magnetic tunnel junction with an in-plane reference layer combined with a spin valve with an out-of-plane magnetization spin polarizing layer. The main advantage of this perpendicular spin polarizer is to induce a large spin transfer force even at zero magnetic field, thus leading to a record emitted power (up to 0.6 μW) associated to a very narrow spectral linewidth of a few hundreds of kHz. The characteristics of this hybrid vortex based spin transfer nano-oscillator obtained at zero field and room temperature are of great importance for applications based on rf spintronic devices as integrated and tunable microwave source and/or microwave detector.

  2. Near-Forward Rescattering Photoelectron Holography in Strong-Field Ionization: Extraction of the Phase of the Scattering Amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yueming; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.; Morishita, Toru

    2016-04-01

    We revisit the concept of near-forward rescattering strong-field photoelectron holography introduced by Y. Huismans et al. [Science 331, 61 (2011)]. The recently developed adiabatic theory is used to show how the phase of the scattering amplitude for near-forward rescattering of an ionized electron by the parent ion is encoded in and can be read out from the corresponding interference pattern in photoelectron momentum distributions (PEMDs) produced in the ionization of atoms and molecules by intense laser pulses. A procedure to extract the phase is proposed. Its application to PEMDs obtained by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for a model atom yields results in good agreement with scattering calculations. This establishes a novel general approach to extracting structural information from strong-field observables capable of providing time-resolved imaging of ultrafast processes.

  3. DC-shifts in amplitude in-field generated by an oscillatory interference model of grid cell firing.

    PubMed

    Onslow, Angela C E; Hasselmo, Michael E; Newman, Ehren L

    2014-01-01

    Oscillatory interference models propose a mechanism by which the spatial firing pattern of grid cells can arise from the interaction of multiple oscillators that shift in relative phase. These models produce aspects of the physiological data such as the phase precession dynamics observed in grid cells. However, existing oscillatory interference models did not predict the in-field DC shifts in the membrane potential of grid cells that have been observed during intracellular recordings in navigating animals. Here, we demonstrate that DC shifts can be generated in an oscillatory interference model when half-wave rectified oscillatory inputs are summed by a leaky integrate-and-fire neuron with a long membrane decay constant (100 ms). The non-linear mean of the half-wave rectified input signal is reproduced in the grid cell's membrane potential trace producing the DC shift within field. For shorter values of the decay constant integration is more effective if the input signal, comprising input from 6 head direction selective populations, is temporally spread during in-field epochs; this requires that the head direction selective populations act as velocity controlled oscillators with baseline oscillations that are phase offset from one another. The resulting simulated membrane potential matches several properties of the empirical intracellular recordings, including: in-field DC-shifts, theta-band oscillations, phase precession of both membrane potential oscillations and grid cell spiking activity relative to network theta and a stronger correlation between DC-shift amplitude and firing-rate than between theta-band oscillation amplitude and firing-rate. This work serves to demonstrate that oscillatory interference models can account for the DC shifts in the membrane potential observed during intracellular recordings of grid cells without the need to appeal to attractor dynamics.

  4. Post-Flash Calibration Darks for the Advanced Camera for Surveys Wide Field Channel (ACS/WFC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogaz, S.; Anderson, J.; Golimowski, D.

    2015-06-01

    We present a summary and analysis of the changes made to the ACS/WFC dark reference files. As of January 15, 2015 the ACS team has begun to produce post- flashed dark reference files for the Wide Field Channel (WFC). This change was made to combat the charge transfer efficiency (CTE) losses caused by radiation damage that the two WFC CCDs have suffered since being put into orbit by artificially increasing the background in the dark images. This has resulted in several changes to the reference file pipeline, and an improved calibration dark.

  5. The Measurement of Surface Cracks in Metals by Using a.c. Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, D. H.; Waechter, R. T.; Collins, R.

    1982-05-01

    This paper describes some recent studies associated with the development of an instrument, the Crack Microgauge, at University College London, for the detection and measurement of surface cracks in metals by using a.c. electric currents in the metal surface. The design of the instrument has enhanced the accuracy of measurement of surface voltages in the neighbourhood of surface-breaking cracks to the point where it is now advantageous to consider the distribution of surface voltages by mathematical analysis. This enables better use to be made of the instrument since measurements can then be more accurately interpreted in terms of crack size and geometry. In contrast, earlier applications of the method relied on the calibration of the instruments against test blocks. The first generation of users of the Crack Microgauge interpreted their readings according to a simple one-dimensional normal crack model. This, however, is an oversimplification for cracks of finite aspect ratio and it leads to underestimates of centre-line crack depth typically of the order of 30-40<%> when the aspect ratio is about 3. The first major contribution of the theory was therefore to provide a model for surface current flow around cracks of finite aspect ratio. For this purpose a useful unfolding theorem was deduced in cases in which the current skin depth is small compared with crack dimensions. This allows the surface field to be unfolded into a plane distribution of potential satisfying Laplace's equation, and it enables us to obtain solutions for many different crack shapes by using standard mathematical methods. An account of these developments is given in ξ 2 of this paper. The unfolding of the surface field gives the global distribution of surface current around a crack, that is, on the length scale of the crack dimensions. On the length scale of the skin depth, however, the solutions need modification in the neighbourhood of the surface and interior edges of the crack. In

  6. Production Of Multi-magnetron Plasma By Using Polyphase Ac Glow Discharge In An Improved Multi-pole Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Kazunori; Motoki, Kentaro; Miyamoto, Masahiro; Uetani, Yasuhiro

    1998-10-01

    Effects of an improved multi-pole magnetic field on a plasma production generated by a polyphase ac glow discharge with multiple electrodes have been investigated. Conventional configuration of the multi-pole magnetic filed has been modified to suppress plasma losses at both ends of the chamber due to ExB drift motion. The modified multi-pole magnetic field has enabled us to produce a multiple magnetron-plasma at a considerably low pressure less than mTorr. The low temperature plasma has been widely used as the fine processing technology of a dry etching and as the thin film formation technology of a sputtering coating. Large-scale plasmas which can be generated at a low gas-pressure have been desired for more wider dry etching and greater sputter coating. The purpose of this study is to develop a large-scale and low-cost plasma generator by using a polyphase ac power source with the low frequency. In this session, we will present the experimental result as to a multiple magnetron-plasma generated in the modified twenty-four poles magnetic field by using the twenty-four-phase ac power source with the commercial electric power frequency of 60Hz. The ac power is supplied to twenty-four electrodes which are fixed to the water-cooled chamber-wall through sheet insulators so that the electrodes can be cooled indirectly.

  7. Effects of AC/DC magnetic fields, frequency, and nanoparticle aspect ratio on cellular transfection of gene vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Kris; Mair, Lamar; Fisher, Mike; Rowshon Alam, Md.; Juliano, Rudolph; Superfine, Richard

    2008-10-01

    In order to make non-viral gene delivery a useful tool in the study and treatment of genetic disorders, it is imperative that these methodologies be further refined to yield optimal results. Transfection of magnetic nanoparticles and nanorods are used as non-viral gene vectors to transfect HeLa EGFP-654 cells that stably express a mutated enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene. We deliver antisense oligonucleotides to these cells designed to correct the aberrant splicing caused by the mutation in the EGFP gene. We also transfect human bronchial endothelial cells and immortalized WI-38 lung cells with pEGFP-N1 vectors. To achieve this we bind the genes to magnetic nanoparticles and nanorods and introduce magnetic fields to effect transfection. We wish to examine the effects of magnetic fields on the transfection of these particles and the benefits of using alternating (AC) magnetic fields in improving transfection rates over direct (DC) magnetic fields. We specifically look at the frequency dependence of the AC field and particle aspect ratio as it pertains to influencing transfection rate. We posit that the increase in angular momentum brought about by the AC field and the high aspect ratio of the nanorod particles, is vital to generating the force needed to move the particle through the cell membrane.

  8. Generation of zonal flow and magnetic field by finite-amplitude waves in the ionospheric E-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahlon, Laila; Kaladze, Tamaz

    2016-07-01

    We review the generation of zonal flow and magnetic field by coupled electromagnetic (EM) ULF waves in the Earth's ionospheric E layer. It is shown that under the typical ionospheric E-layer conditions different planetary low-frequency waves can couple with each other. Propagation of coupled internal-gravity-Alfvén (CIGA), coupled Rossby-Khantadze (CRK) and coupled Rossby-Alfvén-Khantadze (CRAK) waves is revealed and studied. A set of appropriate equations describing the nonlinear interaction of such waves with sheared zonal flow is derived. The conclusion on the instability of short wavelength turbulence of such coupled waves with respect to the excitation of low-frequency and large-scale perturbation of the sheared zonal flow and sheared magnetic field is deduced. The nonlinear mechanism of the instability is based on the parametric triple interaction of finite amplitude coupled waves leading to the inverse energy cascade toward the longer wavelength. The possibility of generation of the intense mean magnetic field is shown. Obtained growth rates are discussed for each case of the considered coupled waves.

  9. Effect of n = 3 perturbation field amplitudes below the ELM triggering threshold on edge and SOL transport in NSTX

    DOE PAGES

    J. M. Canik; Lore, J. D.; Ahn, J. -W.; Bortolon, A.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Jaworski, M. A.; Kramer, G. J.; Maingi, R.; McLean, A. G.; Scotti, F.; et al

    2013-01-12

    Here, the pulsed application of n = 3 magnetic perturbation fields with amplitudes below that which triggers ELMs results in distinct, transient responses observable on several edge and divertor diagnostics in NSTX. We refer to these responses as Sub-Threshold Edge Perturbations (STEPs). An analysis of edge measurements suggests that STEPs result in increased transport in the plasma edge and scrape-off layer, which leads to augmentation of the intrinsic strike point splitting due to error fields, i.e., an intensification of the helical divertor footprint flux pattern. These effects are much smaller in magnitude than those of triggered ELMs, and are observedmore » for the duration of the field perturbation measured internal to the vacuum vessel. In addition, STEPs are correlated with changes to the MHD activity, along with transient reductions in the neutron production rate. Ideally the STEPs could be used to provide density control and prevent impurity accumulation, in the same manner that on-demand ELM triggering is used on NSTX, without the impulsive divertor fluxes and potential for damage to plasma facing components associated with ELMs.« less

  10. Effect of n = 3 perturbation field amplitudes below the ELM triggering threshold on edge and SOL transport in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lore, J. D.; Canik, J. M.; Ahn, J.-W.; Bortolon, A.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Jaworski, M. A.; Kramer, G. J.; Maingi, R.; McLean, A. G.; Scotti, F.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Tritz, K.

    2013-07-01

    The pulsed application of n = 3 magnetic perturbation fields with amplitudes below that which triggers ELMs results in distinct, transient responses observable on several edge and divertor diagnostics in NSTX. We refer to these responses as Sub-Threshold Edge Perturbations (STEPs). An analysis of edge measurements suggests that STEPs result in increased transport in the plasma edge and scrape-off layer, which leads to augmentation of the intrinsic strike point splitting due to error fields, i.e., an intensification of the helical divertor footprint flux pattern. These effects are much smaller in magnitude than those of triggered ELMs, and are observed for the duration of the field perturbation measured internal to the vacuum vessel. In addition, STEPs are correlated with changes to the MHD activity, along with transient reductions in the neutron production rate. Ideally the STEPs could be used to provide density control and prevent impurity accumulation, in the same manner that on-demand ELM triggering is used on NSTX, without the impulsive divertor fluxes and potential for damage to plasma facing components associated with ELMs.

  11. Amplitude modulation detection by human listeners in reverberant sound fields: Carrier bandwidth effects and binaural versus monaural comparison

    PubMed Central

    Zahorik, Pavel; Kim, Duck O.; Kuwada, Shigeyuki; Anderson, Paul W.; Brandewie, Eugene; Collecchia, Regina; Srinivasan, Nirmal

    2012-01-01

    Previous work [Zahorik et al., POMA, 12, 050005 (2011)] has reported that for a broadband noise carrier signal in a simulated reverberant sound field, human sensitivity to amplitude modulation (AM) is higher than would be predicted based on the broadband acoustical modulation transfer function (MTF) of the listening environment. Interpretation of this result was complicated by the fact that acoustical MTFs of rooms are often quite different for different carrier frequency regions, and listeners may have selectively responded to advantageous carrier frequency regions where the effective acoustic modulation loss due to the room was less than indicated by a broadband acoustic MTF analysis. Here, AM sensitivity testing and acoustic MTF analyses were expanded to include narrowband noise carriers (1-octave and 1/3-octave bands centered at 4 kHz), as well as monaural and binaural listening conditions. Narrowband results were found to be consistent with broadband results: In a reverberant sound field, human AM sensitivity is higher than indicated by the acoustical MTFs. The effect was greatest for modulation frequencies above 32 Hz and was present whether the stimulation was monaural or binaural. These results are suggestive of mechanisms that functionally enhance modulation in reverberant listening. PMID:23437416

  12. Angular Dependence of Transport AC Losses in Superconducting Wire with Position-Dependent Critical Current Density in a DC Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xing-liang; Xiong, Li-ting; Gao, Yuan-wen; Zhou, You-he

    2013-07-01

    Transport AC losses play a very important role in high temperature superconductors (HTSs), which usually carry AC transport current under applied magnetic field in typical application-like conditions. In this paper, we propose the analytical formula for transport AC losses in HTS wire by considering critical current density of both inhomogeneous and anisotropic field dependent. The angular dependence of critical current density is described by effective mass theory, and the HTS wire has inhomogeneous distribution cross-section of critical current density. We calculate the angular dependence of normalized AC losses under different DC applied magnetic fields. The numerical results of this formula agree well with the experiment data and are better than the results of Norris formula. This analytical formula can explain the deviation of experimental transport current losses from the Norris formula and apply to calculate transport AC losses in realistic practical condition.

  13. Effect of electric field configuration on streamer and partial discharge phenomena in a hydrocarbon insulating liquid under AC stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Liu, Q.; Wang, Z. D.

    2016-05-01

    This paper concerns pre-breakdown phenomena, including streamer characteristics from a fundamental perspective and partial discharge (PD) measurements from an industrial perspective, in a hydrocarbon insulating liquid. The aim was to investigate the possible changes of the liquid’s streamer and PD characteristics and their correlations when the uniformity of the AC electric field varies. In the experiments, a plane-to-plane electrode system incorporating a needle protrusion was used in addition to a needle-to-plane electrode system. When the applied electric field became more uniform, fewer radial branches occurred and streamer propagation towards the ground electrode was enhanced. The transition from streamer propagation dominated breakdown in divergent fields to streamer initiation dominated breakdown in uniform fields was evidenced. Relationships between streamer and PD characteristics were established, which were found to be electric field dependent. PD of the same apparent charge would indicate longer streamers if the electric field is more uniform.

  14. Mean-field dispersion-induced spatial synchrony, oscillation and amplitude death, and temporal stability in an ecological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Tanmoy; Dutta, Partha Sharathi; Gupta, Anubhav

    2015-05-01

    One of the most important issues in spatial ecology is to understand how spatial synchrony and dispersal-induced stability interact. In the existing studies it is shown that dispersion among identical patches results in spatial synchrony; on the other hand, the combination of spatial heterogeneity and dispersion is necessary for dispersal-induced stability (or temporal stability). Population synchrony and temporal stability are thus often thought of as conflicting outcomes of dispersion. In contrast to the general belief, in this present study we show that mean-field dispersion is conducive to both spatial synchrony and dispersal-induced stability even in identical patches. This simultaneous occurrence of rather conflicting phenomena is governed by the suppression of oscillation states, namely amplitude death (AD) and oscillation death (OD). These states emerge through spatial synchrony of the oscillating patches in the strong-coupling strength. We present an interpretation of the mean-field diffusive coupling in the context of ecology and identify that, with increasing mean-field density, an open ecosystem transforms into a closed ecosystem. We report on the occurrence of OD in an ecological model and explain its significance. Using a detailed bifurcation analysis we show that, depending on the mortality rate and carrying capacity, the system shows either AD or both AD and OD. We also show that the results remain qualitatively the same for a network of oscillators. We identify a new transition scenario between the same type of oscillation suppression states whose geneses differ. In the parameter-mismatched case, we further report on the direct transition from OD to AD through a transcritical bifurcation. We believe that this study will lead to a proper interpretation of AD and OD in ecology, which may be important for the conservation and management of several communities in ecosystems.

  15. Low-amplitude, high-frequency electromagnetic field exposure causes delayed and reduced growth in Rosa hybrida.

    PubMed

    Grémiaux, Alexandre; Girard, Sébastien; Guérin, Vincent; Lothier, Jérémy; Baluška, František; Davies, Eric; Bonnet, Pierre; Vian, Alain

    2016-01-15

    It is now accepted that plants perceive high-frequency electromagnetic field (HF-EMF). We wondered if the HF-EMF signal is integrated further in planta as a chain of reactions leading to a modification of plant growth. We exposed whole small ligneous plants (rose bush) whose growth could be studied for several weeks. We performed exposures at two different development stages (rooted cuttings bearing an axillary bud and 5-leaf stage plants), using two high frequency (900MHz) field amplitudes (5 and 200Vm(-1)). We achieved a tight control on the experimental conditions using a state-of-the-art stimulation device (Mode Stirred Reverberation Chamber) and specialized culture-chambers. After the exposure, we followed the shoot growth for over a one-month period. We observed no growth modification whatsoever exposure was performed on the 5-leaf stage plants. When the exposure was performed on the rooted cuttings, no growth modification was observed on Axis I (produced from the elongation of the axillary bud). Likewise, no significant modification was noted on Axis II produced at the base of Axis I, that came from pre-formed secondary axillary buds. In contrast, Axis II produced at the top of Axis I, that came from post-formed secondary buds consistently displayed a delayed and significant reduced growth (45%). The measurements of plant energy uptake from HF-EMF in this exposure condition (SAR of 7.2 10(-4)Wkg(-1)) indicated that this biological response is likely not due to thermal effect. These results suggest that exposure to electromagnetic field only affected development of post-formed organs.

  16. Mean-field dispersion-induced spatial synchrony, oscillation and amplitude death, and temporal stability in an ecological model.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Tanmoy; Dutta, Partha Sharathi; Gupta, Anubhav

    2015-05-01

    One of the most important issues in spatial ecology is to understand how spatial synchrony and dispersal-induced stability interact. In the existing studies it is shown that dispersion among identical patches results in spatial synchrony; on the other hand, the combination of spatial heterogeneity and dispersion is necessary for dispersal-induced stability (or temporal stability). Population synchrony and temporal stability are thus often thought of as conflicting outcomes of dispersion. In contrast to the general belief, in this present study we show that mean-field dispersion is conducive to both spatial synchrony and dispersal-induced stability even in identical patches. This simultaneous occurrence of rather conflicting phenomena is governed by the suppression of oscillation states, namely amplitude death (AD) and oscillation death (OD). These states emerge through spatial synchrony of the oscillating patches in the strong-coupling strength. We present an interpretation of the mean-field diffusive coupling in the context of ecology and identify that, with increasing mean-field density, an open ecosystem transforms into a closed ecosystem. We report on the occurrence of OD in an ecological model and explain its significance. Using a detailed bifurcation analysis we show that, depending on the mortality rate and carrying capacity, the system shows either AD or both AD and OD. We also show that the results remain qualitatively the same for a network of oscillators. We identify a new transition scenario between the same type of oscillation suppression states whose geneses differ. In the parameter-mismatched case, we further report on the direct transition from OD to AD through a transcritical bifurcation. We believe that this study will lead to a proper interpretation of AD and OD in ecology, which may be important for the conservation and management of several communities in ecosystems. PMID:26066241

  17. Superconductor-Mediated Modification of Gravity? AC Motor Experiments with Bulk YBCO Disks in Rotating Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.; Koczor, Ronald J.; Roberson, Rick

    1998-01-01

    We have previously reported results using a high precision gravimeter to probe local gravity changes in the neighborhood of large bulk-processed high-temperature superconductors. Podkietnov, et al (Podkietnov, E. and Nieminen, R. (1992) A Possibility of Gravitational Force Shielding by Bulk YBa2 Cu3 O7-x Superconductor, Physica C, C203:441-444.) have indicated that rotating AC fields play an essential role in their observed distortion of combined gravity and barometric pressure readings. We report experiments on large (15 cm diameter) bulk YBCO ceramic superconductors placed in the core of a three-phase, AC motor stator. The applied rotating field produces up to a 12,000 revolutions per minute magnetic field. The field intensity decays rapidly from the maximum at the outer diameter of the superconducting disk (less than 60 Gauss) to the center (less than 10 Gauss). This configuration was applied with and without a permanent DC magnetic field levitating the superconducting disk, with corresponding gravity readings indicating an apparent increase in observed gravity of less than 1 x 10(exp -6)/sq cm, measured above the superconductor. No effect of the rotating magnetic field or thermal environment on the gravimeter readings or on rotating the superconducting disk was noted within the high precision of the observation. Implications for propulsion initiatives and power storage flywheel technologies for high temperature superconductors will be discussed for various spacecraft and satellite applications.

  18. Amplitude death and synchronized states in nonlinear time-delay systems coupled through mean-field diffusion.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Tanmoy; Biswas, Debabrata

    2013-12-01

    We explore and experimentally demonstrate the phenomena of amplitude death (AD) and the corresponding transitions through synchronized states that lead to AD in coupled intrinsic time-delayed hyperchaotic oscillators interacting through mean-field diffusion. We identify a novel synchronization transition scenario leading to AD, namely transitions among AD, generalized anticipatory synchronization (GAS), complete synchronization (CS), and generalized lag synchronization (GLS). This transition is mediated by variation of the difference of intrinsic time-delays associated with the individual systems and has no analogue in non-delayed systems or coupled oscillators with coupling time-delay. We further show that, for equal intrinsic time-delays, increasing coupling strength results in a transition from the unsynchronized state to AD state via in-phase (complete) synchronized states. Using Krasovskii-Lyapunov theory, we derive the stability conditions that predict the parametric region of occurrence of GAS, GLS, and CS; also, using a linear stability analysis, we derive the condition of occurrence of AD. We use the error function of proper synchronization manifold and a modified form of the similarity function to provide the quantitative support to GLS and GAS. We demonstrate all the scenarios in an electronic circuit experiment; the experimental time-series, phase-plane plots, and generalized autocorrelation function computed from the experimental time series data are used to confirm the occurrence of all the phenomena in the coupled oscillators.

  19. Amplitude death and synchronized states in nonlinear time-delay systems coupled through mean-field diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Tanmoy; Biswas, Debabrata

    2013-12-01

    We explore and experimentally demonstrate the phenomena of amplitude death (AD) and the corresponding transitions through synchronized states that lead to AD in coupled intrinsic time-delayed hyperchaotic oscillators interacting through mean-field diffusion. We identify a novel synchronization transition scenario leading to AD, namely transitions among AD, generalized anticipatory synchronization (GAS), complete synchronization (CS), and generalized lag synchronization (GLS). This transition is mediated by variation of the difference of intrinsic time-delays associated with the individual systems and has no analogue in non-delayed systems or coupled oscillators with coupling time-delay. We further show that, for equal intrinsic time-delays, increasing coupling strength results in a transition from the unsynchronized state to AD state via in-phase (complete) synchronized states. Using Krasovskii-Lyapunov theory, we derive the stability conditions that predict the parametric region of occurrence of GAS, GLS, and CS; also, using a linear stability analysis, we derive the condition of occurrence of AD. We use the error function of proper synchronization manifold and a modified form of the similarity function to provide the quantitative support to GLS and GAS. We demonstrate all the scenarios in an electronic circuit experiment; the experimental time-series, phase-plane plots, and generalized autocorrelation function computed from the experimental time series data are used to confirm the occurrence of all the phenomena in the coupled oscillators.

  20. Study of the Dependency on Magnetic Field and Bias Voltage of an AC-Biased TES Microcalorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottardi, L.; Bruijn, M.; denHartog, R.; Hoevers, H.; deKorte, P.; vanderKuur, J.; Linderman, M.; Adams, J.; Bailey, C.; Bandler, S.; Chervenak, J.; Eckart, M.; Finkbeiner, F.; Kelley, R.; Kilbourne, C.; Porter, F.; Sadlier, J.; Smith, S.

    2012-01-01

    At SRON we are studying the performance of a Goddard Space Flight Center single pixel TES microcalorimeter operated in an AC bias configuration. For x-ray photons at 6 keV the pixel shows an x-ray energy resolution Delta E(sub FWHM) = 3.7 eV, which is about a factor 2 worse than the energy resolution observed in an identical DC-biased pixel. In order to better understand the reasons for this discrepancy we characterized the detector as a function of temperature, bias working point and applied perpendicular magnetic field. A strong periodic dependency of the detector noise on the TES AC bias voltage is measured. We discuss the results in the framework of the recently observed weak-link behaviour of a TES microcalorimeter.

  1. Scale-dependent Normalized Amplitude and Weak Spectral Anisotropy of Magnetic Field Fluctuations in the Solar Wind Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Tu, Chuanyi; Marsch, Eckart; He, Jiansen; Wang, Linghua

    2016-01-01

    Turbulence in the solar wind was recently reported to be anisotropic, with the average power spectral index close to -2 when sampling parallel to the local mean magnetic field {{\\boldsymbol{B}}}0 and close to -5/3 when sampling perpendicular to the local {{\\boldsymbol{B}}}0. This result was widely considered to be observational evidence for the critical balance theory (CBT), which is derived by making the assumption that the turbulence strength is close to one. However, this basic assumption has not yet been checked carefully with observational data. Here we present for the first time the scale-dependent magnetic-field fluctuation amplitude, which is normalized by the local {{\\boldsymbol{B}}}0 and evaluated for both parallel and perpendicular sampling directions, using two 30-day intervals of Ulysses data. From our results, the turbulence strength is evaluated as much less than one at small scales in the parallel direction. An even stricter criterion is imposed when selecting the wavelet coefficients for a given sampling direction, so that the time stationarity of the local {{\\boldsymbol{B}}}0 is better ensured during the local sampling interval. The spectral index for the parallel direction is then found to be -1.75, whereas the spectral index in the perpendicular direction remains close to -1.65. These two new results, namely that the value of the turbulence strength is much less than one in the parallel direction and that the angle dependence of the spectral index is weak, cannot be explained by existing turbulence theories, like CBT, and thus will require new theoretical considerations and promote further observations of solar-wind turbulence.

  2. Quantitatively probing the magnetic behavior of individual nanoparticles by an AC field-modulated magnetic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Lu, Wei; Song, Yiming; Wang, Yuxin; Chen, Aiying; Yan, Biao; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of advances in magnetic imaging, obtaining direct, quantitative information with nanometer scale spatial resolution remains an outstanding challenge. Current approaches, for example, Hall micromagnetometer and nitrogen-vacancy magnetometer, are limited by highly complex experimental apparatus and a dedicated sample preparation process. Here we present a new AC field-modulated magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and report the local and quantitative measurements of the magnetic information of individual magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), which is one of the most iconic objects of nanomagnetism. This technique provides simultaneously a direct visualization of the magnetization process of the individual MNPs, with spatial resolution and magnetic sensitivity of about 4.8 nm and 1.85 × 10−20 A m2, respectively, enabling us to separately estimate the distributions of the dipolar fields and the local switching fields of individual MNPs. Moreover, we demonstrate that quantitative magnetization moment of individual MNPs can be routinely obtained using MFM signals. Therefore, it underscores the power of the AC field-modulated MFM for biological and biomedical applications of MNPs and opens up the possibility for directly and quantitatively probing the weak magnetic stray fields from nanoscale magnetic systems with superior spatial resolution. PMID:26932357

  3. Annual variations of the amplitude characteristic of the noise magnetic field in the ELF frequency range based on the results of high-latitude observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pchelkin, V. V.

    2014-09-01

    The annual variation of a number of amplitude characteristics of the noise electromagnetic field in the frequency range near the first Schumann resonance (and in particular the mean values of the modulus of horizontal magnetic components and parameters of the distribution function of noise pulses over amplitudes) was obtained and analyzed based on the results of three-year measurements performed at the high-latitude magnetic observatory Lovozero. The summer increase in mean and median values of the magnetic component of noises associated with electrical storms and the lack of annual variations of the exponent that empirically describes the distribution of amplitudes of noise signals were found. The relationship between the seasonal (winter/summer in the northern hemisphere) increase in the mean value of the modulus of the horizontal magnetic field component and seasonal increase in the global number of lightning discharges is shown by the correlation of the results of satellite observations and measurements of the magnetic component.

  4. Dc to ac field conversion due to leaky-wave excitation in a plasma slab behind an ionization front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostin, V. A.; Vvedenskii, N. V.

    2015-03-01

    We present a way for generating coherent tunable electromagnetic radiation through dc to ac field conversion by an ionization front. The conversion is caused by the excitation of leaky waves behind the transversely limited ionization front propagating in a uniform electrostatic field. This differs significantly from the well-known dc-to-ac-radiation-converter models which consider Doppler-like frequency conversion by a transversely unlimited ionization front propagating in a spatially periodic electric field. We explore the dispersion properties and excitation of these leaky waves radiated through the transverse plasma boundary at the Cherenkov angle to the direction of propagation of a superluminal ionization front as dependent on the parameters of the plasma produced and on the speed of the ionization front. It is shown that not only the center frequency but also the duration and waveform of the generated pulse may significantly depend on the speed of the ionization front. The results indicate the possibility of using such converters based on planar photoconductive antennas to create sources of microwave and terahertz radiation with controllable waveforms that are transformed from video to radio pulse when the angle of incident ionizing radiation is tuned.

  5. Inductive heat property of Fe3O4/polymer composite nanoparticles in an ac magnetic field for localized hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dong-Lin; Zhang, Hai-Long; Zeng, Xian-Wei; Xia, Qi-Sheng; Tang, Jin-Tian

    2006-12-01

    The magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) nanoparticles were prepared by coprecipitation of Fe(3+) and Fe(2+) with an aqueous NaOH solution. The Fe(3)O(4)/polyaniline (PANI) magnetic composite nanoparticles with a core-shell structure with a diameter of 30-50 nm were prepared via an in situ polymerization of aniline in an aqueous solution containing the Fe(3)O(4) magnetic fluid. The inductive heat property of Fe(3)O(4)/PANI composite nanoparticles in an alternating current (ac) magnetic field was investigated. The potential of Fe(3)O(4)/PANI nanoparticles was evaluated for localized hyperthermia treatment of cancers. The saturation magnetization, M(s), and coercivity, H(c), are 50.05 emu g(-1) and 137 Oe for Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles and 26.34 emu g(-1) and 0 Oe for Fe(3)O(4)/PANI composite nanoparticles, respectively. Exposed in the ac magnetic field for 29 min, the temperatures of physiological saline suspensions containing Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles or Fe(3)O(4)/PANI composite nanoparticles are 63.6 degrees C and 52.4 degrees C, respectively. The Fe(3)O(4)/PANI composite nanoparticles would be useful as good thermoseeds for localized hyperthermia treatment of cancers. PMID:18458406

  6. Applied AC and DC magnetic fields cause alterations in the mitotic cycle of early sea urchin embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, M.; Ernst, S.G.

    1995-09-01

    This study demonstrates that exposure to 60 Hz magnetic fields (3.4--8.8 mt) and magnetic fields over the range DC-600 kHz (2.5--6.5 mT) can alter the early embryonic development of sea urchin embryos by inducing alterations in the timing of the cell cycle. Batches of fertilized eggs were exposed to the fields produced by a coil system. Samples of the continuous cultures were taken and scored for cell division. The times of both the first and second cell divisions were advanced by ELF AC fields and by static fields. The magnitude of the 60 Hz effect appears proportional to the field strength over the range tested. the relationship to field frequency was nonlinear and complex. For certain frequencies above the ELF range, the exposure resulted in a delay of the onset of mitosis. The advance of mitosis was also dependent on the duration of exposure and on the timing of exposure relative to fertilization.

  7. Zonal flows and magnetic fields driven by large-amplitude Rossby-Alfvén-Khantadze waves in the E-layer ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaladze, T. D.; Horton, W.; Kahlon, L. Z.; Pokhotelov, O.; Onishchenko, O.

    2013-12-01

    waves and vortices in the weakly ionized ionospheric E layer are dominated by the Hall conductivity that couples the Rossby and Alfvén dynamics giving rise to what are called Rossby-Alfvén-Khantadze electromagnetic structures. At finite amplitudes we show that the nonlinearities in the dynamics generate sheared zonal-flow velocities and zonal magnetic field fluctuations. The zonal-flow mechanism is based on the parametric excitation of the zonal variations through three-wave mode coupling in the planetary-scale waves. The coupled dynamics of the nonlinear 3-D incompressible flows and the magnetic field fluctuations are derived and used to derive the structure and growth rates for the zonal flows and zonal magnetic fields. Large-amplitude planetary waves are shown to drive up magnetic fluctuations up to 100 nT.

  8. HST/ACS Observations of RR Lyrae Stars in Six Ultra-Deep Fields of M31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeffery, E. J.; Smith, E.; Brown, T. M.; Sweigart, A. V.; Kalirai, J. S.; Ferguson, H. C.; Guhathakurta, P.; Renzini, A.; Rich, R. M.

    2010-01-01

    We present HST/ACS observations of RR Lyrae variable stars in six ultra deep fields of the Andromeda galaxy (M31), including parts of the halo, disk, and giant stellar stream. Past work on the RR Lyrae stars in M31 has focused on various aspects of the stellar populations that make up the galaxy s halo, including their distances and metallicities. This study builds upon this previous work by increasing the spatial coverage (something that has been lacking in previous studies) and by searching for these variable stars in constituents of the galaxy not yet explored. Besides the 55 RR Lyrae stars we found in our initial field located 11kpc from the galactic nucleus, we find additional RR Lyrae stars in four of the remaining five ultra deep fields as follows: 21 in the disk, 24 in the giant stellar stream, 3 in the halo field 21kpc from the galactic nucleus, and 5 in one of the halo fields at 35kpc. No RR Lyrae were found in the second halo field at 35kpc. The RR Lyrae populations of these fields appear to mostly be of Oosterhoff I type, although the 11kpc field appears to be intermediate or mixed. We will discuss the properties of these stars including period and reddening distributions. We calculate metallicities and distances for the stars in each of these fields using different methods and compare the results, to an extent that has not yet been done. We compare these methods not just on RR Lyrae in our M31 fields, but also on a data set of Milky Way field RR Lyrae stars.

  9. HST/ACS OBSERVATIONS OF RR LYRAE STARS IN SIX ULTRA-DEEP FIELDS OF M31

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffery, E. J.; Smith, E.; Brown, T. M.; Kalirai, J. S.; Ferguson, H. C.; Sweigart, A. V.; Rich, R. M.

    2011-05-15

    We present HST/ACS observations of RR Lyrae variable stars in six ultra-deep fields of the Andromeda galaxy (M31), including parts of the halo, disk, and giant stellar stream. Past work on the RR Lyrae stars in M31 has focused on various aspects of the stellar populations that make up the galaxy's halo, including their distances and metallicities. This study builds upon this previous work by increasing the spatial coverage (something that has been lacking in previous studies) and by searching for these variable stars in constituents of the galaxy not yet explored. Besides the 55 RR Lyrae stars we found in our initial field located 11 kpc from the galactic nucleus, we find additional RR Lyrae stars in four of the remaining five ultra-deep fields as follows: 21 in the disk, 24 in the giant stellar stream, three in the halo field 21 kpc from the galactic nucleus, and five in one of the halo fields at 35 kpc. No RR Lyrae stars were found in the second halo field at 35 kpc. The RR Lyrae populations of these fields appear to be mostly of Oosterhoff I type, although the 11 kpc field appears to be intermediate or mixed. We will discuss the properties of these stars including period and reddening distributions. We calculate metallicities and distances for the stars in each of these fields using different methods and compare the results, to an extent that has not yet been done. We compare these methods not just on RR Lyrae stars in our M31 fields, but also on a data set of Milky Way field RR Lyrae stars.

  10. AC current rectification in Nb films with or without symmetrical Nb/Ni periodic pinning arrays in perpendicular magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryadun, Vladimir

    2005-03-01

    Rectification of AC current has been observed in plain superconducting Nb films and in Nb/Ni films with symmetric periodic pinning centers. The rectified DC voltage appears for various sample geometries (cross or strip) both along and transverse to the alternating current direction, is nearly anti-symmetric with perpendicular magnetic field and strongly dependent on temperature below Tc. Analyses of the data at different temperatures, drive frequencies from 100kHz to 150MHz and at the different sample sides [1] shows that not far below Tc the rectification phenomena can be understood in terms of generation of electric fields due to local excess of critical current. Further below Tc anisotropic pinning effects could also contribute to the rectification. [1] F.G.Aliev, et al., Cond. Mat.405656. Supported by Comunidad Autonoma de Madrid -CAM/07N/0050/2002

  11. Tools and Setups for Experiments with AC and Rotating Magnetic Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponikvar, D.

    2010-01-01

    A rotating magnetic field is the basis for the transformation of electrical energy to mechanical energy. School experiments on the rotating magnetic field are rare since they require the use of specially prepared mechanical setups and/or relatively large, three-phase power supplies to achieve strong magnetic fields. This paper proposes several…

  12. Theory of the large-amplitude plane magnetoacoustic wave propagating transverse to the magnetic field in a hot collisionless plasma. [in astrophysical environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, A.

    1979-01-01

    An exact solution of the kinetic and electromagnetic equations for a large-amplitude plane magnetoacoustic wave propagating transverse to the magnetic field in a hot collisionless plasma is presented. The solution gives simple relations among the magnetic-field strength, density, stress tensor, and plasma velocity, all of which are measurable in the interplanetary plasma. These relations are independent of the electron and ion velocity distributions, subject to certain restrictions on 'high-velocity tails.' The magnetic field of the wave is linearly polarized. The wave steepens to form a shock much as the analogous waves of MHD theory do.

  13. ANALYSIS OF THE STRUCTURE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS THAT INDUCED INHIBITION OF STIMULATED NEURITE OUTGROWTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The important experiments showing nonlinear amplitude dependences of the neurite outgrowth in pheochromocytoma nerve cells due to ELF magnetic field exposure had been carried out in a nonuniform ac magnetic field. The nonuniformity entailed larger than expected variances in magne...

  14. Wave magnetic field amplitude threshold for nonlinear trapping of energetic gyroresonant and Landau resonant electrons by nonducted VLF waves in the magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, T.F.

    1986-04-01

    Using a recently developed theory, we calculate the wave magnetic field amplitude threshold B/sub tau/ necessary to allow the nonlinear trapping of energetic gyroresonant and Landau resonant electrons by VLF whistler mode waves in the magnetosphere, propagating at an arbitrary angle, psi, with respect to the earth's magnetic field, B/sub 0/. This theory predicts that the amplitude threshold is governed near the magnetic equatorial plane by the gradient of psi with respect to distance, z, along B/sub 0/. Using commonly accepted models of the magnetosphere and computer raytracing techniques, we determine the function psi(z) for magnetic shells in the range 2< or =L< or =5 and for frequencies 5 kHz< or =f< or =17.8 kHz.

  15. RHIC AC DIPOLE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI,M.; METH,M.; PAI,C.; PARKER,B.; PEGGS,S.; ROSER,T.; SANDERS,R.; TRBOJEVIC,D.; ZALTSMAN,A.

    2001-06-18

    Two ac dipoles with vertical and horizontal magnetic field have been proposed at RHIC for applications in linear and non-linear beam dynamics and spin manipulations. A magnetic field amplitude of 380 Gm is required to produce a coherent oscillation of 5 times the rms beam size at the top energy. We take the ac dipole frequency to be 1.0% of the revolution frequency away from the betatron frequency. To achieve the strong magnetic field with minimum power loss, an air-core magnet with two seven turn winding of low loss Litz wire resonating at 64 kHz is designed. The system is also designed to allow one to connect the two magnet winding in series to resonate at 37 kHz for the spin manipulation. Measurements of a half length prototype magnet are also presented.

  16. Influence of electrical fields (AC and DC) on phytoremediation of metal polluted soils with rapeseed (Brassica napus) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Bi, Ran; Schlaak, Michael; Siefert, Eike; Lord, Richard; Connolly, Helen

    2011-04-01

    The combined use of electrokinetic remediation and phytoremediation to decontaminate soil polluted with heavy metals has been demonstrated in a laboratory-scale experiment. The plants species selected were rapeseed and tobacco. Three kinds of soil were used: un-contaminated soil from forest area (S1), artificially contaminated soil with 15mgkg(-1) Cd (S2) and multi-contaminated soil with Cd, Zn and Pb from an industrial area (S3). Three treatment conditions were applied to the plants growing in the experimental vessels: control (no electrical field), alternating current electrical field (AC, 1Vcm(-1)) and direct current electrical field (DC, 1Vcm(-1)) with switching polarity every 3h. The electrical fields were applied for 30d for rapeseed and 90d for tobacco, each experiment had three replicates. After a total of 90d growth for rapeseed and of 180d for tobacco, the plants were harvested. The pH variation from anode to cathode was eliminated by switching the polarity of the DC field. The plants reacted differently under the applied electrical field. Rapeseed biomass was enhanced under the AC field and no negative effect was found under DC field. However, no enhancement of the tobacco biomass under the AC treatment was found. The DC field had a negative influence on biomass production on tobacco plants. In general, Cd content was higher in both species growing in S2 treated with AC field compared to the control. Metal uptake (Cd, Cu, Zn and Pb) per rapeseed plant shoot was enhanced by the application of AC field in all soils. PMID:21237480

  17. Tevatron AC dipole system

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.; Kopp, S.E.; Jansson, A.; Syphers, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The AC dipole is an oscillating dipole magnet which can induce large amplitude oscillations without the emittance growth and decoherence. These properties make it a good tool to measure optics of a hadron synchrotron. The vertical AC dipole for the Tevatron is powered by an inexpensive high power audio amplifier since its operating frequency is approximately 20 kHz. The magnet is incorporated into a parallel resonant system to maximize the current. The use of a vertical pinger magnet which has been installed in the Tevatron made the cost relatively inexpensive. Recently, the initial system was upgraded with a more powerful amplifier and oscillation amplitudes up to 2-3{sigma} were achieved with the 980 GeV proton beam. This paper discusses details of the Tevatron AC dipole system and also shows its test results.

  18. Amplitude and Frequency Experimental Field Measurements of a Rotating-Imbalance Seismic Source Associated with Changes in Lithology Surrounding a Borehole

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen R. Novascone; Michael J. Anderson; David M. Weinberg; Jack H. Cole

    2003-10-01

    Field measurements of the vibration amplitude of a rotating-imbalance seismic source in a liquid-filled borehole are described. The borehole was a cased oil well that had been characterized by gamma-ray cement bond and compensated neutron litho-density/gamma-ray logs. The well logs indicated an abrupt transition from shale to limestone at a depth of 2638 ft. The vibration amplitude and frequency of a rotating-imbalance seismic source was measured versus applied voltage as the source was raised from 2654 to 2618 ft through the shale–limestone transition. It was observed that the vibration amplitude changed by approximately 10% in magnitude and the frequency changed approximately 15% as the source passed the shale–limestone transition. The measurements were compared to predictions provided by a two-dimensional analytical model of a rotating-imbalance source located in a liquid-filled bore hole. It was observed that the sensitivity of the experimentally measured vibration amplitude of the seismic source to the properties of the surrounding geologic media was an order of magnitude greater than that predicted by the two-dimensional analytical model.

  19. Linearity of the Faraday-rotation-type ac magnetic-field sensor with a ferrimagnetic or ferromagnetic rotator film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Hiroshi; Asahara, Yousuke

    1996-03-01

    We analyze the linearity and modulation depth of ac magnetic-field sensors or current sensors, using a ferrimagnetic or ferromagnetic film as the Faraday rotator and employing the detection of only the zeroth-order optical diffraction component from the rotator. It is theoretically shown that for this class of sensor the condition of a constant modulation depth and that of a constant ratio error give an identical series of curves for the relationship between Faraday rotation angle greater than or equals V and polarizer/analyzer relative angle Phi . We give some numerical examples to demonstrate the usefulness of the result with reference to a rare-earth iron garnet film as the rotator.

  20. Tools and setups for experiments with AC and rotating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponikvar, D.

    2010-09-01

    A rotating magnetic field is the basis for the transformation of electrical energy to mechanical energy. School experiments on the rotating magnetic field are rare since they require the use of specially prepared mechanical setups and/or relatively large, three-phase power supplies to achieve strong magnetic fields. This paper proposes several experiments and describes setups and tools which are easy to obtain and work with. Free software is offered to generate the required signals by a personal computer. The experiments can be implemented in introductory physics courses on electromagnetism for undergraduates or specialized courses at high schools.

  1. Simulation and mathematical analyses of AC electric field driven apoptosis via microtubule disintegration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Pawan K.

    2015-09-01

    The moderate intensity alternating current electric fields with frequencies ranging between a few tens of kilohertz and a few tens of megahertz, also known as tumor treating fields (TTFs) are utilized as a modality in the electrotherapeutic treatment of the cancer cells. The application of sub-MHz TTF on the cancer cell results in the inducement of higher electric field at the furrow between the daughter cells, and such apoptosis stimulating phenomenon is investigated through the Maxwell two-dimensional (2D) finite element simulations. A furrow distance of the order of size of the nucleus accounts for the intense electric field inducement disintegrating the microtubule via the processes of its surface disruption and tubulin dimer detachment. A simulation and mathematical analyses of the microtubule disintegration mechanism is formulated to ascertain one of the factors causing an apoptosis of the cancer cells, and consequently checking their proliferation.

  2. Theoretical analysis of AC electric field transmission into biological tissue through frozen saline for electroporation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chunyan; Rubinsky, Boris

    2014-12-01

    An analytical model was used to explore the feasibility of sinusoidal electric field transmission across a frozen saline layer into biological tissue. The study is relevant to electroporation and permeabilization of the cell membrane by electric fields. The concept was analyzed for frequencies in the range of conventional electroporation frequencies and electric field intensity. Theoretical analysis for a variety of tissues show that the transmission of electroporation type electric fields through a layer of frozen saline into tissue is feasible and the behavior of this composite system depends on tissue type, frozen domain temperature, and frequency. Freezing could become a valuable method for adherence of electroporation electrodes to moving tissue surfaces, such as the heart in the treatment of atrial fibrillation or blood vessels for the treatment of restenosis.

  3. Study of the heating characteristics and mechanisms of magnetic nanoparticles over a wide range of frequencies and amplitudes of an alternating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, A.; Kita, E.; Isaka, D.; Kikuchi, Y.; Suzuki, K. Z.; Horiuchi, A.; Kishimoto, M.; Yanagihara, H.; Oda, T.; Ohkohchi, N.; Ikehata, H.; Nagano, I.

    2014-06-01

    An effective approach to gaining an understanding of the mechanism of heat generation for magnetic hyperthermia from nanomagnet suspensions is to perform heating tests over a wide frequency range. We constructed a heating test apparatus by using ferrite field cores with air gaps for low frequencies and solenoids for high frequencies. Magnetic field amplitudes up to 600 Oe (400 Oe) can be generated for frequencies lower than 500 kHz (800 kHz). Heat generation tests were performed for ferromagnetic nano-platelets and Co-doped Fe3O4 nanoparticles over a wide range of frequencies.

  4. A new B-dot probe-based diagnostic for amplitude, polarization, and wavenumber measurements of ion cyclotron range-of frequency fields on ASDEX Upgrade.

    PubMed

    Ochoukov, R; Bobkov, V; Faugel, H; Fünfgelder, H; Noterdaeme, J-M

    2015-11-01

    A new B-dot probe-based diagnostic has been installed on an ASDEX Upgrade tokamak to characterize ion cyclotron range-of frequency (ICRF) wave generation and interaction with magnetized plasma. The diagnostic consists of a field-aligned array of B-dot probes, oriented to measure fast and slow ICRF wave fields and their field-aligned wavenumber (k(//)) spectrum on the low field side of ASDEX Upgrade. A thorough description of the diagnostic and the supporting electronics is provided. In order to compare the measured dominant wavenumber of the local ICRF fields with the expected spectrum of the launched ICRF waves, in-air near-field measurements were performed on the newly installed 3-strap ICRF antenna to reconstruct the dominant launched toroidal wavenumbers (k(tor)). Measurements during a strap current phasing scan in tokamak discharges reveal an upshift in k(//) as strap phasing is moved away from the dipole configuration. This result is the opposite of the k(tor) trend expected from in-air near-field measurements; however, the near-field based reconstruction routine does not account for the effect of induced radiofrequency (RF) currents in the passive antenna structures. The measured exponential increase in the local ICRF wave field amplitude is in agreement with the upshifted k(//), as strap phasing moves away from the dipole configuration. An examination of discharges heated with two ICRF antennas simultaneously reveals the existence of beat waves at 1 kHz, as expected from the difference of the two antennas' operating frequencies. Beats are observed on both the fast and the slow wave probes suggesting that the two waves are coupled outside the active antennas. Although the new diagnostic shows consistent trends between the amplitude and the phase measurements in response to changes applied by the ICRF antennas, the disagreement with the in-air near-field measurements remains. An electromagnetic model is currently under development to address this issue.

  5. A new B-dot probe-based diagnostic for amplitude, polarization, and wavenumber measurements of ion cyclotron range-of frequency fields on ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoukov, R.; Bobkov, V.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2015-11-01

    A new B-dot probe-based diagnostic has been installed on an ASDEX Upgrade tokamak to characterize ion cyclotron range-of frequency (ICRF) wave generation and interaction with magnetized plasma. The diagnostic consists of a field-aligned array of B-dot probes, oriented to measure fast and slow ICRF wave fields and their field-aligned wavenumber (k//) spectrum on the low field side of ASDEX Upgrade. A thorough description of the diagnostic and the supporting electronics is provided. In order to compare the measured dominant wavenumber of the local ICRF fields with the expected spectrum of the launched ICRF waves, in-air near-field measurements were performed on the newly installed 3-strap ICRF antenna to reconstruct the dominant launched toroidal wavenumbers (ktor). Measurements during a strap current phasing scan in tokamak discharges reveal an upshift in k// as strap phasing is moved away from the dipole configuration. This result is the opposite of the ktor trend expected from in-air near-field measurements; however, the near-field based reconstruction routine does not account for the effect of induced radiofrequency (RF) currents in the passive antenna structures. The measured exponential increase in the local ICRF wave field amplitude is in agreement with the upshifted k//, as strap phasing moves away from the dipole configuration. An examination of discharges heated with two ICRF antennas simultaneously reveals the existence of beat waves at 1 kHz, as expected from the difference of the two antennas' operating frequencies. Beats are observed on both the fast and the slow wave probes suggesting that the two waves are coupled outside the active antennas. Although the new diagnostic shows consistent trends between the amplitude and the phase measurements in response to changes applied by the ICRF antennas, the disagreement with the in-air near-field measurements remains. An electromagnetic model is currently under development to address this issue.

  6. Heat generation ability in AC magnetic field of MgAlxFe2-xO4 ferrite powder prepared by sol-gel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirazawa, Hideyuki; Ito, Yoshiki; Sangaa, Deleg; Tsogbadrakh, Namsrai; Aono, Hiromichi; Naohara, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    Al substituted MgAlXFe2-XO4 that have high heat generation ability in the AC magnetic field was obtained by Sol-Gel method. The heat generation ability was improved by Al3+ substitution, the highest heat generation property (ΔT = 127.2°C) was confirmed for X = 0.25 sample. This high heat generation ability was depended on hysteresis loss value, the hysteresis loss for X = 0.25 samples were significantly increased in the AC magnetic field.

  7. Simulation of fluid flow induced by opposing ac magnetic fields in a continuous casting mold

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, F.C.; Hull, J.R.; Beitelman, L.

    1995-07-01

    A numerical simulation was performed for a novel electromagnetic stirring system employing two rotating magnetic fields. The system controls stirring flow in the meniscus region of a continuous casting mold independently from the stirring induced within the remaining volume of the mold by a main electromagnetic stirrer (M-EMS). This control is achieved by applying to the meniscus region an auxiliary electromagnetic field whose direction of rotation is opposite to that of the main magnetic field produced by the M-EMS. The model computes values and spatial distributions of electromagnetic parameters and fluid flow in the stirred pools of mercury in cylindrical and square geometries. Also predicted are the relationships between electromagnetics and fluid flows pertinent to a dynamic equilibrium of the opposing stirring swirls in the meniscus region. Results of the numerical simulation compared well with measurements obtained from experiments with mercury pools.

  8. On the stability of self-consistent large amplitude waves in a cold plasma. I - Transverse circularly polarized waves in the absence of a large scale magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. A.; Lerche, I.

    1978-01-01

    It is demonstrated that a self-consistent circularly polarized wave in an otherwise field-free homogeneous cold plasma is unstable to small amplitude perturbations. For either an electron-positron plasma or an electron-proton plasma the instability rate is at least about the order of the effective plasma frequency when the bulk flow speed is zero. For finite bulk flow speeds of the plasma, it is shown that the electron-positron plasma is unstable, again with a growth rate of the order of the effective plasma frequency; it is also shown that the electron-proton plasma is unstable (at least at small wave numbers, k) with a growth rate proportional to k. The calculated instability rates are conservative, for other modes not investigated here may be more unstable. The results of these calculations bear directly on the understanding of plasma systems thought to be driven by large amplitude waves.

  9. Strong-field cyclotron scattering. I - Scattering amplitudes and natural line width. [in spectra of accretion-powered X-ray pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graziani, Carlo

    1993-01-01

    The introduction of resonance line width into the QED cyclotron scattering amplitudes is considered. It is shown that the width arises from loop corrections to the electron propagator, which also bring about shifts in the Landau energy levels. A formalism is developed that allows the dressed electron propagator to be derived. It is shown that the states of Herold et al. (1982) and of Sokolov and Ternov (1968), which diagonalize the component of the magnetic moment operator parallel to the external magnetic field, are appropriate for calculation of the scattering amplitudes, whereas the states of Johnson and Lippmann (1949) are not. In addition, it is shown that the Breit-Wigner broadening approximation E tends to E - i(Gamma)/2 is consistent with the perturbation-theoretic order of the calculation, if the former basis states are chosen, but not the latter.

  10. Influence of Critical Current Density on Guidance Force Decay of HTS Bulk Exposed to AC Magnetic Field Perturbation in a Maglev Vehicle System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longcai, Zhang; Jianguo, Kong

    2012-07-01

    Superconducting maglev vehicle is one of the most promising applications of HTS bulks. In such a system, the HTS bulks are always exposed to AC external magnetic field, which is generated by the inhomogeneous surface magnetic field of the NdFeB guideway. In our previous work, we studied the guidance force decay of the YBCO bulk over the NdFdB guideway used in the High-temperature superconducting maglev vehicle system with the application of the AC external magnetic field, and calculated the guidance force decay as a function of time based on an analytic model. In this paper, we investigated the influence of the critical current density on the guidance force decay of HTS bulk exposed to AC field perturbation in the maglev vehicle system and try to adopt a method to suppress the decay. From the results, it was found that the guidance force decay rate was higher for the bulk with lower critical current density. Therefore, we could suppress the guidance force decay of HTS bulk exposed to AC external magnetic field perturbation in the maglev vehicle system by improving critical current density of the bulk.

  11. Emergence of periodic order in electric-field-driven planar nematic liquid crystals: an exclusive ac effect absent in static fields.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, K S; Kumar, Pramoda

    2007-11-01

    We report, for a nematic liquid crystal with a low conductivity anisotropy, an ac field generated transition from a uniformly planar to a periodically modulated director configuration with the wave vector parallel to the initial director. Significantly, with unblocked electrodes, this instability is not excited by dc fields. Additionally, in very low frequency square wave fields, it occurs transiently after each polarity reversal, vanishing completely during field constancy. The time of occurrence of maximum distortion after polarity reversal decreases exponentially with voltage. The time dependence of optical phase change during transient distortion is nearly Gaussian. The pattern threshold Vc is linear in sqrt[f], f denoting the frequency; the critical wave number qc of the modulation scales nearly linearly as sqrt[f] to a peak at approximately 50 Hz before falling slightly thereafter. The observed Vc(f) and qc(f) characteristics differ from the predictions of the standard model (SM). The instability may be interpreted as a special case of the Carr-Helfrich distortion suppressed in static fields due to weak charge focusing and strong charge injection. Its transient nature in the low frequency regime is suggestive of the possible role of gradient flexoelectric effect in its occurrence. The study includes measurement of certain elastic and viscosity parameters relevant to the application of the SM. PMID:18233671

  12. Cell death induced by AC magnetic fields and magnetic nanoparticles: current state and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Goya, Gerardo F; Asín, Laura; Ibarra, M Ricardo

    2013-12-01

    This review analyses the advances in the field of magnetically induced cell death using intracellular magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Emphasis has been given to in vitro research results, discussing the action of radiofrequency (RF) waves on biological systems as well as those results of thermally induced cell death in terms of MNP cell interactions. Our main goal has been to provide a unified depiction of many recent experiments and theoretical models relevant to the effect of applied electromagnetic fields on MNPs after cellular uptake and the cytotoxicity assessment of MNPs. We have addressed the effects of RF waves used for in vitro magnetic hyperthermia on eukaryotic cells regarding physical modifications of the cellular local environment and cell viability.

  13. Hiding objects in AC magnetic fields of power grid frequency by two-shell ferromagnetic/superconducting cloak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šouc, J.; Solovyov, M.; Gömöry, F.

    2016-07-01

    Performance of magnetic cloak made from commercially available materials has been tested by verifying its ability to suppress the magnetic signatures of metallic and ferromagnetic objects. The range of magnetic field amplitudes from 0.1 to 10 mT and frequencies around 50-60 Hz were used. The cloak combines the inner tube from high-temperature superconductor that should be cooled by liquid nitrogen, with the outer tube made from MnZn ferrite powder mixed in plastic matter. Superconductor is in the form of tapes wound in helical manner on a round former. Such design is promising when the objects with dimensions reaching several centimeters should be cloaked. Performance of the small model manufactured following this design was demonstrated by observing ˜20 times reduction of the magnetic signature of metallic or ferromagnetic objects.

  14. Electro-phoretic rotation and orientation of polarizable spheroidal particles in AC fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloh, Touvia; Goldstein, Ben Weis

    2015-02-01

    A theoretical study is provided for determining the angular rotation rate of an ideally polarized (metallic) spheroidal particle freely suspended in a symmetric electrolyte under general alternating current ambient electric excitations. In particular, we discuss cases of electro-rotation (ROT) and electro-orientation (EOR) of such nano/micro particles incited by two orthogonal electric field components which may be out of phase. The analysis is carried under the Poisson-Nernst-Planck approximation and the "weak" field model. The analytic expressions thus obtained are valid for a conducting prolate spheroid with arbitrary eccentricity including the limiting cases of isotropic spheres and infinitely long cylindrical rods. The total dipolophoretic (DIP) angular velocity is decomposed from contributions due to dielectrophoresis (DEP) induced by the dipole-moment within the particle and by the induced-charge electrophoresis (ICEP) mechanism near the conducting surface. It is demonstrated that the explicit expressions for the DIP angular velocities reduce to the well-known ROT solution for the sphere as well as to the recently found expressions (based on slender-body approximation) for both ROT and EOR of metal nanowires [Arcenegui et al., "Electro-orientation and electrorotation of metal nanowires," Phys. Rev. E 88(6), 063018 (2013)]. Some comparisons with available experimental data are also provided for slender spheroidal geometries including a detailed discussion of DEP and ICEP effects and their relative contributions to the overall DIP rotational velocity.

  15. Frequency-dependent electrodeformation of giant phospholipid vesicles in AC electric field

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A model of vesicle electrodeformation is described which obtains a parametrized vesicle shape by minimizing the sum of the membrane bending energy and the energy due to the electric field. Both the vesicle membrane and the aqueous media inside and outside the vesicle are treated as leaky dielectrics, and the vesicle itself is modeled as a nearly spherical shape enclosed within a thin membrane. It is demonstrated (a) that the model achieves a good quantitative agreement with the experimentally determined prolate-to-oblate transition frequencies in the kilohertz range and (b) that the model can explain a phase diagram of shapes of giant phospholipid vesicles with respect to two parameters: the frequency of the applied alternating current electric field and the ratio of the electrical conductivities of the aqueous media inside and outside the vesicle, explored in a recent paper (S. Aranda et al., Biophys J 95:L19–L21, 2008). A possible use of the frequency-dependent shape transitions of phospholipid vesicles in conductometry of microliter samples is discussed. PMID:21886342

  16. AC electric field for rapid assembly of nanostructured polyaniline onto microsized gap for sensor devices.

    PubMed

    La Ferrara, Vera; Rametta, Gabriella; De Maria, Antonella

    2015-07-01

    Interconnected network of nanostructured polyaniline (PANI) is giving strong potential for enhancing device performances than bulk PANI counterparts. For nanostructured device processing, the main challenge is to get prototypes on large area by requiring precision, low cost and high rate assembly. Among processes meeting these requests, the alternate current electric fields are often used for nanostructure assembling. For the first time, we show the assembly of nanostructured PANI onto large electrode gaps (30-60 μm width) by applying alternate current electric fields, at low frequencies, to PANI particles dispersed in acetonitrile (ACN). An important advantage is the short assembly time, limited to 5-10 s, although electrode gaps are microsized. That encouraging result is due to a combination of forces, such as dielectrophoresis (DEP), induced-charge electrokinetic (ICEK) flow and alternate current electroosmotic (ACEO) flow, which speed up the assembly process when low frequencies and large electrode gaps are used. The main achievement of the present study is the development of ammonia sensors created by direct assembling of nanostructured PANI onto electrodes. Sensors exhibit high sensitivity to low gas concentrations as well as excellent reversibility at room temperature, even after storage in air.

  17. Application of amplitude-modulated radiofrequency fields to the magic-angle spinning NMR of spin- {7}/{2} nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhu, P. K.; Johannessen, Ole G.; Pike, Kevin J.; Dupree, Ray; Smith, Mark E.; Levitt, Malcolm H.

    2003-08-01

    We report pulse sequences for the sensitivity enhancement of magic-angle spinning and multiple-quantum magic-angle spinning spectra of spin- {7}/{2} systems. Sensitivity enhancement is obtained with the use of fast amplitude-modulated (FAM) radiofrequency pulses. In one-dimensional magic-angle spinning experiments, signal enhancement of 3 is obtained by a FAM pulse followed by a soft 90° pulse. In two-dimensional multiple-quantum magic-angle spinning experiments, FAM pulses are used for both the excitation of multiple-quantum coherences and for their conversion into observable single-quantum coherences. The observed signal enhancements are 2.2 in 3Q experiments, 3.1 in 5Q experiments, and 4.1 in 7Q experiments, compared to the conventional two-pulse scheme. The pulse schemes are demonstrated on the 45Sc NMR of Sc 2(SO 4) 3 · 5H 2O and the 139La NMR of LaAlO 3. We also demonstrate the generation of FAM pulses by double-frequency irradiation.

  18. DC-like Phase Space Manipulation and Particle Acceleration Using Chirped AC Fields

    SciTech Connect

    P.F. Schmit and N.J. Fisch

    2009-06-17

    Waves in plasmas can accelerate particles that are resonant with the wave. A DC electric field also accelerates particles, but without a resonance discrimination, which makes the acceleration mechanism profoundly different. We investigate the effect on a Hamiltonian distribution of an accelerating potential waveform, which could, for example, represent the average ponderomotive effect of two counterpropagating electromagnetic waves. In particular, we examine the apparent DC-like time-asymptotic response of the distribution in regimes where the potential structure is accelerated adiabatically. A highly resonant population within the distribution is always present, and we characterize its nonadiabatic response during wave-particle resonance using an integral method in the noninertial reference frame moving with the wave. Finally, we show that in the limit of infinitely slow acceleration of the wave, these highly resonant particles disappear and the response

  19. Coseismic displacement field and slip distribution of the 2005 Kashmir earthquake from SAR amplitude image correlation and differential interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Y.; Pinel, V.; Trouvé, E.; Pathier, E.; Perrin, J.; Bascou, P.; Jouanne, F.

    2013-04-01

    The coseismic surface displacement field and slip distribution at depth due to the Kashmir earthquake (Mw = 7.6, 2005) have been analysed by different authors using subpixel correlation of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images and optical images, teleseismic analysis, GPS measurements, as well as in situ field measurements. In this paper, first, we use 23 sets of measurement from subpixel correlation of SAR images and differential interferometry to retrieve the 3-D coseismic surface displacement field. The obtained horizontal and vertical components along the fault trace are then compared, respectively, to equivalent measurements obtained from subpixel correlation of two optical ASTER images and in situ field measurements. Second, the coseismic fault geometry parameters and slip distribution at depth are estimated. In addition to the one segment slip model as reported in previous work, a two segments slip model that better fits the surface fault break is proposed. The improvement of the two segments slip model in interpreting the measured displacement field is highlighted through comparison of residuals of both slip models. Taking advantage of differential interferometry measurements that provide precise and continuous information in the far field of the fault, firstly, a wedge thrust according to Bendick et al. to the Northwest of the main rupture built on our two segments model is tested. According to the obtained results, the residual of the two segments main rupture plus wedge thrust model is slightly smaller than the residual of the two segments model to the Northwest of the Balakot-Bagh fault. Secondly, we test the sensitivity of our slip model to the presence of slip along a décollement as evidenced by Jouanne et al. through post-seismic analysis. The results indicate that the estimations of the coseismic displacement field and slip distribution in this paper are not significantly biased by such post-seismic displacement and that most coseismic displacement

  20. Feynman amplitudes with confinement included

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonov, Yu. A.

    2009-07-01

    Amplitudes for any multipoint Feynman diagram are written taking into account vacuum background confining field. Higher order gluon exchanges are treated within background perturbation theory. For amplitudes with hadrons in initial or final states vertices are shown to be expressed by the corresponding wave function with the renormalized z factors. Examples of two-point functions, three-point functions (form factors), and decay amplitudes are explicitly considered.

  1. Long-range doublon transfer in a dimer chain induced by topology and ac fields

    PubMed Central

    Bello, M.; Creffield, C. E.; Platero, G.

    2016-01-01

    The controlled transfer of particles from one site of a spatial lattice to another is essential for many tasks in quantum information processing and quantum communication. In this work we study how to induce long-range transfer between the two ends of a dimer chain, by coupling states that are localized just on the chain’s end-points. This has the appealing feature that the transfer occurs only between the end-points – the particle does not pass through the intermediate sites–making the transfer less susceptible to decoherence. We first show how a repulsively bound-pair of fermions, known as a doublon, can be transferred from one end of the chain to the other via topological edge states. We then show how non-topological surface states of the familiar Shockley or Tamm type can be used to produce a similar form of transfer under the action of a periodic driving potential. Finally we show that combining these effects can produce transfer by means of more exotic topological effects, in which the driving field can be used to switch the topological character of the edge states, as measured by the Zak phase. Our results demonstrate how to induce long range transfer of strongly correlated particles by tuning both topology and driving. PMID:26932406

  2. Long-range doublon transfer in a dimer chain induced by topology and ac fields.

    PubMed

    Bello, M; Creffield, C E; Platero, G

    2016-03-02

    The controlled transfer of particles from one site of a spatial lattice to another is essential for many tasks in quantum information processing and quantum communication. In this work we study how to induce long-range transfer between the two ends of a dimer chain, by coupling states that are localized just on the chain's end-points. This has the appealing feature that the transfer occurs only between the end-points - the particle does not pass through the intermediate sites-making the transfer less susceptible to decoherence. We first show how a repulsively bound-pair of fermions, known as a doublon, can be transferred from one end of the chain to the other via topological edge states. We then show how non-topological surface states of the familiar Shockley or Tamm type can be used to produce a similar form of transfer under the action of a periodic driving potential. Finally we show that combining these effects can produce transfer by means of more exotic topological effects, in which the driving field can be used to switch the topological character of the edge states, as measured by the Zak phase. Our results demonstrate how to induce long range transfer of strongly correlated particles by tuning both topology and driving.

  3. Generation of large-amplitude electric field and subsequent enhancement of O+ ion flux in the inner magnetosphere during substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Y.; Ebihara, Y.; Tanaka, T.

    2015-06-01

    Energetic O+ ions are rapidly enhanced in the inner magnetosphere because of abrupt intensification of the dawn-to-dusk electric field and significantly contribute to the ring current during substorms. Here we examine the generation mechanism of the dawn-to-dusk electric field that accelerates the O+ ions and the spatial and temporal evolution of the differential flux of the O+ ions by using a test particle simulation in the electric and magnetic fields that are provided by a global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation. In the MHD simulation, strong dawn-to-dusk electric field appears in the near-Earth tail region by a joint action of the earthward tension force and pileup of magnetic flux near an onset of substorm expansion. The peak of the electric field is ~9-13 mV/m and is located ~1-2 RE earthward of the peak of the plasma bulk speed because of the pileup. O+ ions coming from the lobe are accelerated from ~eV to >100 keV in ~10 min. The reconstructed flux of the O+ ions shows that at ~7 RE near midnight, the flux has a peak near a few tens of keV and the flux below ~10 keV is small. This structure, called a "void" structure, is consistent with the Polar observation and can be regarded as a manifestation of the acceleration of unmagnetized ions perpendicular to the magnetic field. In the inner magnetosphere (at 6.0 RE), reconstructed energy-time spectrograms show the nose dispersion structure that is also consistent with satellite observations.

  4. Photoconductivity in AC-driven modulated two-dimensional electron gas in a perpendicular magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Manuel; Kunold, Alejandro

    2006-04-01

    In this work we study the microwave photoconductivity of a two-dimensional electron system (2DES) in the presence of a magnetic field and a two-dimensional modulation (2D). The model includes the microwave and Landau contributions in a non-perturbative exact way; the periodic potential is treated perturbatively. The Landau-Floquet states provide a convenient base with respect to which the lattice potential becomes time dependent, inducing transitions between the Landau-Floquet levels. Based on this formalism, we provide a Kubo-like formula that takes into account the oscillatory Floquet structure of the problem. The total longitudinal conductivity and resistivity exhibit strong oscillations, determined by epsi = ω/ωc, with ω the radiation frequency and ωc the cyclotron frequency. The oscillations follow a pattern with minima centred at \\omega /\\omega_{\\mathrm {c}}=j+\\frac {1}{2} (l-1)+\\delta , and maxima centred at \\omega /\\omega_{\\mathrm {c}}=j+\\frac {1}{2} (l-1)-\\delta , where j = 1,2,3..., δ~1/5 is a constant shift and l is the dominant multipole contribution. Negative resistance states (NRSs) develop as the electron mobility and the intensity of the microwave power are increased. These NRSs appear in a narrow window region of values of the lattice parameter (a), around a~lB, where lB is the magnetic length. It is proposed that these phenomena may be observed in artificially fabricated arrays of periodic scatterers at the interface of ultraclean GaAs /AlxGa1-xAs heterostructures.

  5. Seismic texture and amplitude analysis of large scale fluid escape pipes using time lapses seismic surveys: examples from the Loyal Field (Scotland, UK)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maestrelli, Daniele; Jihad, Ali; Iacopini, David; Bond, Clare

    2016-04-01

    Fluid escape pipes are key features of primary interest for the analysis of vertical fluid flow and secondary hydrocarbon migration in sedimentary basin. Identified worldwide (Løset et al., 2009), they acquired more and more importance as they represent critical pathways for supply of methane and potential structure for leakage into the storage reservoir (Cartwright & Santamarina, 2015). Therefore, understanding their genesis, internal characteristics and seismic expression, is of great significance for the exploration industry. Here we propose a detailed characterization of the internal seismic texture of some seal bypass system (e.g fluid escape pipes) from a 4D seismic survey (released by the BP) recently acquired in the Loyal Field. The seal by pass structure are characterized by big-scale fluid escape pipes affecting the Upper Paleogene/Neogene stratigraphic succession in the Loyal Field, Scotland (UK). The Loyal field, is located on the edge of the Faroe-Shetland Channel slope, about 130 km west of Shetland (Quadrants 204/205 of the UKCS) and has been recently re-appraised and re developed by a consortium led by BP. The 3D detailed mapping analysis of the full and partial stack survey (processed using amplitude preservation workflows) shows a complex system of fluid pipe structure rooted in the pre Lista formation and developed across the paleogene and Neogene Units. Geometrical analysis show that pipes got diameter varying between 100-300 m and a length of 500 m to 2 km. Most pipes seem to terminate abruptly at discrete subsurface horizons or in diffuse termination suggesting multiple overpressured events and lateral fluid migration (through Darcy flows) across the overburden units. The internal texture analysis of the large pipes, (across both the root and main conduit zones), using near, medium and far offset stack dataset (processed through an amplitude preserved PSTM workflow) shows a tendency of up-bending of reflection (rather than pulls up artefacts

  6. A new B-dot probe-based diagnostic for amplitude, polarization, and wavenumber measurements of ion cyclotron range-of frequency fields on ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Ochoukov, R.; Bobkov, V.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2015-11-15

    A new B-dot probe-based diagnostic has been installed on an ASDEX Upgrade tokamak to characterize ion cyclotron range-of frequency (ICRF) wave generation and interaction with magnetized plasma. The diagnostic consists of a field-aligned array of B-dot probes, oriented to measure fast and slow ICRF wave fields and their field-aligned wavenumber (k{sub //}) spectrum on the low field side of ASDEX Upgrade. A thorough description of the diagnostic and the supporting electronics is provided. In order to compare the measured dominant wavenumber of the local ICRF fields with the expected spectrum of the launched ICRF waves, in-air near-field measurements were performed on the newly installed 3-strap ICRF antenna to reconstruct the dominant launched toroidal wavenumbers (k{sub tor}). Measurements during a strap current phasing scan in tokamak discharges reveal an upshift in k{sub //} as strap phasing is moved away from the dipole configuration. This result is the opposite of the k{sub tor} trend expected from in-air near-field measurements; however, the near-field based reconstruction routine does not account for the effect of induced radiofrequency (RF) currents in the passive antenna structures. The measured exponential increase in the local ICRF wave field amplitude is in agreement with the upshifted k{sub //}, as strap phasing moves away from the dipole configuration. An examination of discharges heated with two ICRF antennas simultaneously reveals the existence of beat waves at 1 kHz, as expected from the difference of the two antennas’ operating frequencies. Beats are observed on both the fast and the slow wave probes suggesting that the two waves are coupled outside the active antennas. Although the new diagnostic shows consistent trends between the amplitude and the phase measurements in response to changes applied by the ICRF antennas, the disagreement with the in-air near-field measurements remains. An electromagnetic model is currently under development to

  7. Direct simulation of phase delay effects on induced-charge electro-osmosis under large ac electric fields.

    PubMed

    Sugioka, Hideyuki

    2016-08-01

    The standard theory of induced-charge electro-osmosis (ICEO) often overpredicts experimental values of ICEO velocities. Using a nonsteady direct multiphysics simulation technique based on the coupled Poisson-Nernst-Planck and Stokes equations for an electrolyte around a conductive cylinder subject to an ac electric field, we find that a phase delay effect concerning an ion response provides a fundamental mechanism for electrokinetic suppression. A surprising aspect of our findings is that the phase delay effect occurs even at much lower frequencies (e.g., 50 Hz) than the generally believed charging frequency of an electric double layer (typically, 1 kHz) and it can decrease the electrokinetic velocities in one to several orders. In addition, we find that the phase delay effect may also cause a change in the electrokinetic flow directions (i.e., flow reversal) depending on the geometrical conditions. We believe that our findings move toward a more complete understanding of complex experimental nonlinear electrokinetic phenomena.

  8. Direct simulation of phase delay effects on induced-charge electro-osmosis under large ac electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, Hideyuki

    2016-08-01

    The standard theory of induced-charge electro-osmosis (ICEO) often overpredicts experimental values of ICEO velocities. Using a nonsteady direct multiphysics simulation technique based on the coupled Poisson-Nernst-Planck and Stokes equations for an electrolyte around a conductive cylinder subject to an ac electric field, we find that a phase delay effect concerning an ion response provides a fundamental mechanism for electrokinetic suppression. A surprising aspect of our findings is that the phase delay effect occurs even at much lower frequencies (e.g., 50 Hz) than the generally believed charging frequency of an electric double layer (typically, 1 kHz) and it can decrease the electrokinetic velocities in one to several orders. In addition, we find that the phase delay effect may also cause a change in the electrokinetic flow directions (i.e., flow reversal) depending on the geometrical conditions. We believe that our findings move toward a more complete understanding of complex experimental nonlinear electrokinetic phenomena.

  9. Direct simulation of phase delay effects on induced-charge electro-osmosis under large ac electric fields.

    PubMed

    Sugioka, Hideyuki

    2016-08-01

    The standard theory of induced-charge electro-osmosis (ICEO) often overpredicts experimental values of ICEO velocities. Using a nonsteady direct multiphysics simulation technique based on the coupled Poisson-Nernst-Planck and Stokes equations for an electrolyte around a conductive cylinder subject to an ac electric field, we find that a phase delay effect concerning an ion response provides a fundamental mechanism for electrokinetic suppression. A surprising aspect of our findings is that the phase delay effect occurs even at much lower frequencies (e.g., 50 Hz) than the generally believed charging frequency of an electric double layer (typically, 1 kHz) and it can decrease the electrokinetic velocities in one to several orders. In addition, we find that the phase delay effect may also cause a change in the electrokinetic flow directions (i.e., flow reversal) depending on the geometrical conditions. We believe that our findings move toward a more complete understanding of complex experimental nonlinear electrokinetic phenomena. PMID:27627362

  10. Compression and acceleration of electron bunches to high energies in the interference field of intense laser pulses with tilted amplitude fronts: concept and modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Korobkin, V V; Romanovsky, Mikhail Yu; Trofimov, V A; Shiryaev, O B

    2013-03-31

    A new concept of accelerating electrons by laser radiation is proposed, namely, direct acceleration by a laser field under the conditions of interference of several relativistic-intensity laser pulses with amplitude fronts tilted by the angle 45 Degree-Sign with respect to the phase fronts. Due to such interference the traps moving with the speed of light arise that capture the electrons, produced in the process of ionisation of low-density gas by the same laser radiation. The modelling on the basis of solving the relativistic Newton equation with the appropriate Lorenz force shows that these traps, moving in space, successively collect electrons from the target, compress the resulting electron ensemble in all directions up to the dimensions smaller than the wavelength of the laser radiation and accelerate it up to the energies of the order of a few GeV per electron. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  11. Formation of 85Rb2 ultracold molecules via photoassociation by two-color laser fields modulating the Gaussian amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yin; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Gao-Ren; Xie, Ting; Cong, Shu-Lin

    2012-10-01

    The formations of 85Rb2 molecules via photoassociation (PA) steered by two-color laser fields are explored theoretically in order to find an efficient and robust PA scheme. The PA processes steered by the PA pulses modulated by two Gaussian pulses and by two chirped pulses are discussed and compared in detail. The two pulses are coherent in the picosecond range and reach their maxima at the same time. The influences of the linear chirp rate, the frequency difference between two pulses, and the phase shift of the modulated envelope with respect to the maximum of the Gaussian envelope on the PA process are investigated. The yield of photoassociated molecules on vibrational levels with a binding energy of >1.0 cm-1 with respect to the 5S+5P1/2 dissociation limit can apparently be enhanced by choosing proper pulse parameters. Especially, the two-color laser field modulated by two chirped pulses can raise the PA efficiency on one side, and weaken the dependence of the PA process on phase shift on the other side.

  12. AC Electric Field Enhances Cryopreservation Efficiency of Sprague-Dawley Rat Liver During a Slow Freezing Procedure.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ya H; Qin, Guo F; Li, Jing; Ding, Gui R; Xu, Sheng L; Zhou, Yan; Guo, Guo Z

    2016-02-01

    Slow freezing coupled with an AC electric field (ACEF) has been demonstrated to miniaturize the ice crystals of a 0.9% (w/v) NaCl solution in a prior study. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of ACEF on Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat liver in vitro during the slow cooling procedure. SD rat liver exposed to an oscillating electric field was frozen in a programmed freezer initially down to -30°C at a cooling rate of -1°C/min and continuing down to -80°C at a cooling rate of -5°C/min. The cryovials were finally transferred into liquid nitrogen for 7 days. The frequency range was 0-20 MHz, and peak field strength was 1,000 V/m. For the sham and electric-exposed groups, the freezing solution consisted of 0%, 2.5%, 5.0%, 7.5%, or 10% (v/v) dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) Dulbecco's modified Eagles' medium culture solution, and fresh tissue was selected as the control group. The changes in cell survival rate, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content, and morphology of fresh and frozen-thawed liver tissue were examined. Compared with the sham group with 5.0% DMSO, the result showed that slow freezing coupled with 2.45 MHz or 5 MHz ACEF significantly increased the relative survival rate by 43.27% and 26.31% (P < 0.001), respectively. However, ACEF exposure increased the ATP content compared with the sham group. Especially in 5% and 10% DMSO with 2.45 MHz ACEF exposure, the ATP content approximated the fresh group (7.3 ± 2.7 nmol/piece), corresponding to 94.52% and 80.82%. In addition, the cellular membrane and some organelles (e.g., mitochondria) in the electric-exposed group appeared to be more intact according to the transmission electron microscopy images. The underlying mechanism might be that the ACEF affects the formation and growth of the ice crystallization, and thus inhibits cryoinjury. These results show that ACEF would provide an efficient method for cryopreservation banking with a low concentration of CPA during the slow freezing process

  13. MAVEN observations of magnetic flux ropes with a strong field amplitude in the Martian magnetosheath during the ICME passage on 8 March 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Takuya; Luhmann, Janet G.; Halekas, Jasper S.; Espley, Jared R.; Seki, Kanako; Brain, David A.; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; McFadden, James P.; Mitchell, David L.; Mazelle, Christian; Harada, Yuki; Livi, Roberto; DiBraccio, Gina A.; Connerney, John E. P.; Andersson, Lailla; Jakosky, Bruce M.

    2016-05-01

    We present initial results of strong field amplitude flux ropes observed by Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission around Mars during the interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) passage on 8 March 2015. The observed durations were shorter than 5 s and the magnetic field magnitudes peaked above 80 nT, which is a few times stronger than those usually seen in the magnetosheath barrier. These are the first unique observations that MAVEN detected such flux ropes with a strong field at high altitudes (>5000 km). Across these structures, MAVEN coincidentally measured planetary heavy ions with energies higher than a few keV. The spatial properties inferred from the Grad-Shafranov equation suggest that the speed of the structure can be estimated at least an order of magnitude faster than those previously reported quiet-time counterparts. Hence, the space weather event like the ICME passage can be responsible for generating the observed strong field, fast-traveling flux ropes.

  14. Towards high concentration enhancement of microfluidic temperature gradient focusing of sample solutes using combined AC and DC field induced Joule heating.

    PubMed

    Ge, Zhengwei; Wang, Wei; Yang, Chun

    2011-04-01

    It is challenging to continuously concentrate sample solutes in microfluidic channels. We present an improved electrokinetic technique for enhancing microfluidic temperature gradient focusing (TGF) of sample solutes using combined AC and DC field induced Joule heating effects. The introduction of an AC electric field component services dual functions: one is to produce Joule heat for generating temperature gradient; the other is to suppress electroosmotic flow. Consequently the required DC voltages for achieving sample concentration by Joule heating induced TGF are reduced, thereby leading to smaller electroosmotic flow (EOF) and thus backpressure effects. As a demonstration, the proposed technique can lead to concentration enhancement of sample solutes of more than 2500-fold, which is much higher than the existing literature reported microfluidic concentration enhancement by utilizing the Joule heating induced TGF technique. PMID:21331425

  15. Roebel assembled coated conductor cables (RACC): Ac-Losses and current carrying potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, A.; Heller, R.; Goldacker, W.; Kling, A.; Schmidt, C.

    2008-02-01

    Low ac-loss HTS cables for transport currents well above 1 kA are required for application in transformers and generators and are taken into consideration for future generations of fusion reactor coils. Coated conductors (CC) are suitable candidates for high field application at an operation temperature in the range 50-77 K. Ac-field applications require cables with low ac-losses and hence twisting of the individual strands. We solved this problem using the Roebel technique. Short lengths of Roebel bar cables were prepared from industrial DyBCO and YBCO-CC. Meander shaped tapes of 4 or 5 mm width with twist pitches of 123 or 127 mm were cut from the 10 or 12 mm wide CC tapes using a specially designed tool. Eleven or twelve of these strands were assembled to a cable. The electrical and mechanical connection of the tapes was achieved using a silver powder filled conductive epoxy resin. Ac-losses of a short sample in an external ac-field were measured as a function of frequency and field amplitude as well as the coupling current decay time constant. We discuss the results in terms of available theories and compare measured time constants in transverse field with measured coupling losses. Finally the potential of this cable type for ac-use is discussed with respect to ac-losses and current carrying capability.

  16. Effect of n = 3 perturbation field amplitudes below the ELM triggering threshold on edge and SOL transport in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    J. M. Canik; Lore, J. D.; Ahn, J. -W.; Bortolon, A.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Jaworski, M. A.; Kramer, G. J.; Maingi, R.; McLean, A. G.; Scotti, F.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Tritz, K.

    2013-01-12

    Here, the pulsed application of n = 3 magnetic perturbation fields with amplitudes below that which triggers ELMs results in distinct, transient responses observable on several edge and divertor diagnostics in NSTX. We refer to these responses as Sub-Threshold Edge Perturbations (STEPs). An analysis of edge measurements suggests that STEPs result in increased transport in the plasma edge and scrape-off layer, which leads to augmentation of the intrinsic strike point splitting due to error fields, i.e., an intensification of the helical divertor footprint flux pattern. These effects are much smaller in magnitude than those of triggered ELMs, and are observed for the duration of the field perturbation measured internal to the vacuum vessel. In addition, STEPs are correlated with changes to the MHD activity, along with transient reductions in the neutron production rate. Ideally the STEPs could be used to provide density control and prevent impurity accumulation, in the same manner that on-demand ELM triggering is used on NSTX, without the impulsive divertor fluxes and potential for damage to plasma facing components associated with ELMs.

  17. AC/RF Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  18. A.C. Susceptibility in MAGNESIUM(1+T)TITANIUM(T)IRON(2 -2T)OXYGEN(4) Near the Breakdown of Ferrimagnetic Order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lautzenhiser, Frans Peter

    1990-01-01

    The complex a.c. susceptibility _ {Xac} in t = 0.45 and 0.5 powder samples of the ferrimagnetic magnesium-titanium-iron oxide spinel have been measured. Frequency, a.c. amplitude, and d.c. field were varied with temperatures ranging from 5K to above the ferrimagnetic Neel temperature T _{N} (285K and 225K, respectively). For fixed frequency f, temperature T, and a.c. amplitude H _{ac}, a monotonic decrease in _{Xac} with increasing d.c. field, characteristic of superparamagnetism (SPM), was seen over the range of field 0.5 Oe < H_{dc} < 65 Oe. The derivative -d_ {Xac}/dH_{ dc} shows a sharp peak near T _{p} = 225K in the t = 0.45 sample. For fixed f, H_{dc}, and T, an increase in _ {Xac} with H_ {ac} was observed over the range of amplitudes 10^{-3} Oe < H_{ac } < 10 Oe. At 200Hz, this nonlinear a.c. response reaches a peak at T_{ac} = 55K and 70K in the t = 0.45 and 0.5 samples respectively. The peak temperature T_{ac} is reduced by lowering f. This frequency dependence is seen neither in the ferrimagnetic Neel temperature nor in the broad peaks of the a.c. susceptibility which occur near T = 0.8T_{N}. Although similar to a SPM blocking transition, the transition at T_{ac} is interpreted as a spin glass freezing temperature. The samples used in this study were previously analyzed by Brand et al. (J. Phys. F 15 1987 (1985).) using d.c. susceptibility and Mossbauer effect measurements.

  19. Adding flexibility to the "particles-on-a-sphere" model for large-amplitude motion: POSflex force field for protonated methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhl, Felix; Walewski, Łukasz; Forbert, Harald; Marx, Dominik

    2014-09-01

    The so-called "particles-on-a-sphere" (POS) model has been introduced a while ago in order to describe in simple terms large-amplitude motion of polyatomic hydrides, XHn. The POS model of protonated methane, CH_5^+, has been shown to capture well the essence of the fluxional nature of this enigmatic floppy molecule. Here, we extend this model to the POSflex force field by adding flexibility to the C-H bonds, which are constrained to a common fixed bond length in the original model. This makes the present model extremely efficient for computer simulation, including path integral molecular dynamics in order to assess the crucial quantum effects on nuclear motion at low temperatures. Moreover, the POSflex force field can be conveniently used to study microsolvation effects upon combining it with intermolecular pair potentials to account for solute-solvent interactions. Upon computing static properties as well as thermal and quantum fluctuation effects at ambient and low temperatures, respectively, it is shown that the POSflex model is very well suited to describe the structural properties of bare CH_5^+, including hydrogen scrambling and thus fluxionality in the first place. The far- to mid-infrared spectrum up to the bending band is roughly described, whereas the model fails to account for the well-structured stretching band by construction.

  20. Adding flexibility to the “particles-on-a-sphere” model for large-amplitude motion: POSflex force field for protonated methane

    SciTech Connect

    Uhl, Felix; Walewski, Łukasz; Forbert, Harald; Marx, Dominik

    2014-09-14

    The so-called “particles-on-a-sphere” (POS) model has been introduced a while ago in order to describe in simple terms large-amplitude motion of polyatomic hydrides, XH{sub n}. The POS model of protonated methane, CH{sub 5}{sup +}, has been shown to capture well the essence of the fluxional nature of this enigmatic floppy molecule. Here, we extend this model to the POSflex force field by adding flexibility to the C–H bonds, which are constrained to a common fixed bond length in the original model. This makes the present model extremely efficient for computer simulation, including path integral molecular dynamics in order to assess the crucial quantum effects on nuclear motion at low temperatures. Moreover, the POSflex force field can be conveniently used to study microsolvation effects upon combining it with intermolecular pair potentials to account for solute-solvent interactions. Upon computing static properties as well as thermal and quantum fluctuation effects at ambient and low temperatures, respectively, it is shown that the POSflex model is very well suited to describe the structural properties of bare CH{sub 5}{sup +}, including hydrogen scrambling and thus fluxionality in the first place. The far- to mid-infrared spectrum up to the bending band is roughly described, whereas the model fails to account for the well-structured stretching band by construction.

  1. The wave magnetic field amplitude threshold for nonlinear trapping of energetic gyroresonant and Landau resonant electrons by nonducted VLF waves in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, T. F.

    1986-01-01

    A recently developed theory is used to calculate the wave magnetic field amplitude threshold, B-tau, necessary to allow the nonlinear trapping of energetic gyroresonant and Landau resonant electrons by VLF whistler mode waves in the magnetosphere propagating at an arbitrary angle, psi, with respect to the earth's magnetic field. A detailed raytracing study is carried out to establish the variation of psi with position along each magnetic shell in the range L = 2-5 and for frequencies 5-17.8 kHz. It is found that the minimum values of B-tau along each L shell generally occur at points of second-order resonance. In general, for nonducted fixed frequency signals there is only one point of second-order resonance on each L shell, and this is located within a few degrees of the magnetic equator. However, over a narrow range of L, there are as many as three points of second-order resonance and as many as three associated minima in B-tau. At least one of these points is located more than 10 deg from the magnetic equator.

  2. Ac magnetotransport in La 0.7Sr 0.3Mn 0.95Fe 0.05O 3 at low dc magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barik, S. K.; Mahendiran, R.

    2011-12-01

    We report the ac electrical response of La 0.7Sr 0.3Mn 1- xFe xO 3(x=0.05) as a function of temperature, magnetic field (H) and frequency of radio frequency ( rf) current ( f=0.1-20 MHz). The ac impedance (Z) was measured while rf current directly passes through the sample as well as in a coil surrounding the sample. It is found that with increasing frequency of the rf current, Z(T) shows an abrupt increase accompanied by a peak at the ferromagnetic Curie temperature. The peak decreases in magnitude and shifts down with increasing value of H. We find a magnetoimpedance of ΔZ/Z=-21% for ΔH=500 Oe at f=1 MHz around room temperature when the rf current flows directly through the sample and ΔZ/Z=-65.9% when the rf current flows through a coil surrounding the sample. It is suggested that the magnetoimpedance observed is a consequence of suppression of transverse permeability which enhances skin depth for current flow. Our results indicate that the magnetic field control of high frequency impedance of manganites is more useful than direct current magnetoresistance for low-field applications.

  3. Amplitude inversion of fast and slow converted waves for fracture characterization of the Montney Formation in Pouce Coupe field, Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacFarlane, Tyler L.

    The Montney Formation of western Canada is one of the largest economically viable gas resource plays in North America with reserves of 449TCF. As an unconventional tight gas play, the well development costs are high due to the hydraulic stimulations necessary for economic success. The Pouce Coupe research project is a multidisciplinary collaboration between the Reservoir Characterization Project (RCP) and Talisman Energy Inc. with the objective of understanding the reservoir to enable the optimization of well placement and completion design. The work in this thesis focuses on identifying the natural fractures in the reservoir that act as the delivery systems for hydrocarbon flow to the wellbore. Characterization of the Montney Formation at Pouce Coupe is based on time-lapse multicomponent seismic surveys that were acquired before and after the hydraulic stimulation of two horizontal wells. Since shear-wave velocities and amplitudes of the PS-waves are known to be sensitive to near-vertical fractures, I utilize isotropic simultaneous seismic inversions on azimuthally-sectored PS1 and PS2 data sets to obtain measurements of the fast and slow shear-velocities. Specifically, I analyze two orthogonal azimuths that are parallel and perpendicular to the strike of the dominant fracture system in the field. These volumes are used to approximate the shear-wave splitting parameter (gamma(s*)) that is closely related to crack density. Since crack density has a significant impact on defining the percolation zone, the work presented in this thesis provides information that can be utilized to reduce uncertainty in the reservoirs fracture model. Isotropic AVO inversion of azimuthally limited PS-waves demonstrates sufficient sensitivity to detect contrast between the anisotropic elastic properties of the reservoir and is capable of identifying regions with high crack density. This is supported by integration with spinner production logs, hydraulic stimulation history of the field

  4. Field and laboratory studies on the impact of two Bt rice lines expressing a fusion protein Cry1Ab/1Ac on aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongmo; Huang, Jiacheng; Hu, Huawei; Li, Jianhong; Liu, Biao; Zhang, Guoan

    2013-06-01

    Genetically modified (GM) rice expressing Bt toxins is at the edge of commercial release in China. However, little information is available concerning the impact of Bt rice on aquatic organisms which are abundant in paddy field. A two-year study was conducted to assess the effects of two GM rice lines expressing a fusion protein Cry1Ab/1Ac (Bt rice) on three groups of zooplankton, rotifers, cladocerans and copepods in field conditions. Multi-factor ANOVA revealed that the population densities of rotifers, cladocerans and copepods in paddy field varied significantly between years and rice developmental stages, but did not differ significantly between Bt and non-Bt rice treatments. In all the field investigations, only one significant difference was found on copepods in the tillering stage of 2009, but the difference was not related to the presence of the Cry toxin. Under open-air conditions, we simulated the farming practice of straw mulch, using Bt rice straw as a food source for the water flea Daphnia hyalina. After one and two months of culture, the density of D. hyalina did not differ between Bt rice treatments and non-Bt rice treatments. A laboratory experiment found that purified Bt toxins Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac had no toxic effect on D. hyalina even in the treatment in which the Bt toxin concentration was as high as 2500ng/ml. Those above results indicate that the two Bt rice lines have no negative effect on the three groups of zooplankton. However, further studies are needed to compare the effects of Bt rice and non-Bt rice on the paddy zooplankton community in the context of integrated pest management which includes the use of pesticides. PMID:23523003

  5. RHIC spin flipper AC dipole controller

    SciTech Connect

    Oddo, P.; Bai, M.; Dawson, C.; Gassner, D.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Mernick, K.; Minty, M.; Roser, T.; Severino, F.; Smith, K.

    2011-03-28

    The RHIC Spin Flipper's five high-Q AC dipoles which are driven by a swept frequency waveform require precise control of phase and amplitude during the sweep. This control is achieved using FPGA based feedback controllers. Multiple feedback loops are used to and dynamically tune the magnets. The current implementation and results will be presented. Work on a new spin flipper for RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) incorporating multiple dynamically tuned high-Q AC-dipoles has been developed for RHIC spin-physics experiments. A spin flipper is needed to cancel systematic errors by reversing the spin direction of the two colliding beams multiple times during a store. The spin flipper system consists of four DC-dipole magnets (spin rotators) and five AC-dipole magnets. Multiple AC-dipoles are needed to localize the driven coherent betatron oscillation inside the spin flipper. Operationally the AC-dipoles form two swept frequency bumps that minimize the effect of the AC-dipole dipoles outside of the spin flipper. Both AC bumps operate at the same frequency, but are phase shifted from each other. The AC-dipoles therefore require precise control over amplitude and phase making the implementation of the AC-dipole controller the central challenge.

  6. Synthesis of Micelles Guided Magnetite (Fe3O4) Hollow Spheres and their application for AC Magnetic Field Responsive Drug Release

    PubMed Central

    Mandal Goswami, Madhuri

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on synthesis of hollow spheres of magnetite, guided by micelles and their application in drug release by the stimulus responsive technique. Here oleyelamine micelles are used as the core substance for the formation of magnetite nano hollow spheres (NHS). Diameter and shell thickness of NHS have been changed by changing concentration of the micelles. Mechanism of NHS formation has been established by investigating the aliquot collected at different time during the synthesis of NHS. It has been observed that oleyelamine as micelles play an important role to generate hollow-sphere particles of different diameter and thickness just by varying its amount. Structural analysis was done by XRD measurement and morphological measurements, SEM and TEM were performed to confirm the shape and size of the NHS. FTIR measurement support the formation of magnetite phase too. Frequency dependent AC magnetic measurements and AC magnetic field stimulated drug release event by these particles provide a direction of the promising application of these NHS for better cancer treatment in near future. Being hollow & porous in structure and magnetic in nature, such materials will also be useful in other applications such as in removal of toxic materials, magnetic separation etc. PMID:27796329

  7. Dynamic characteristics of double-barrier nanostructures with asymmetric barriers of finite height and widths in a strong ac electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Chuenkov, V. A.

    2013-12-15

    The theory of the interaction of a monoenergetic flow of injected electrons with a strong high-frequency ac electric field in resonant-tunneling diode (RTD) structures with asymmetric barriers of finite height and width is generalized. In the quasi-classical approximation, electron wavefunctions and tunneling functions in the quantum well and barriers are found. Analytical expressions for polarization currents in RTDs are derived in both the general case and in a number of limiting cases. It is shown that the polarization currents and radiation power in RTDs with asymmetric barriers strongly depend on the ratio of the probabilities of electron tunneling through the emitter and collector barriers. In the quantum mode, when δ = ε − ε{sub r} = ħω ≪ Γ (ε is the energy of electrons injected in the RTD, ħ is Planck’s constant, ω is the ac field frequency, ε{sub r} and Γ are the energy and width of the resonance level, respectively), the active polarization current in a field of E ≈ 2.8ħω/ea (e is the electron charge and a is the quantum-well width) reaches a maximum equal in magnitude to 84% of the direct resonant current, if the probability of electron tunneling through the emitter barrier is much higher than that through the collector barrier. The radiation-generation power at frequencies of ω = 10{sup 12}–10{sup 13} s{sup −1} can reach 10{sup 5}–10{sup 6} W/cm{sup 2} in this case.

  8. Experimental observation of further frequency upshift from dc to ac radiation converter with perpendicular dc magnetic field

    PubMed

    Higashiguchi; Yugami; Gao; Niiyama; Sasaki; Takahashi; Ito; Nishida

    2000-11-20

    A frequency upshift of a short microwave pulse is generated by the interaction between a relativistic underdense ionization front and a periodic electrostatic field with a perpendicular dc magnetic field. When the dc magnetic field is applied, further frequency upshift of 3 GHz is observed with respect to an unmagnetized case which has typically a GHz range. The radiation frequency depends on both the plasma density and the strength of the dc magnetic field, i.e., the plasma frequency and the cyclotron frequency. The frequency of the emitted radiation is in reasonable agreement with the theoretical values. PMID:11082591

  9. Factorization of chiral string amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu-tin; Siegel, Warren; Yuan, Ellis Ye

    2016-09-01

    We re-examine a closed-string model defined by altering the boundary conditions for one handedness of two-dimensional propagators in otherwise-standard string theory. We evaluate the amplitudes using Kawai-Lewellen-Tye factorization into open-string amplitudes. The only modification to standard string theory is effectively that the spacetime Minkowski metric changes overall sign in one open-string factor. This cancels all but a finite number of states: as found in earlier approaches, with enough supersymmetry (e.g., type II) the tree amplitudes reproduce those of the massless truncation of ordinary string theory. However, we now find for the other cases that additional fields, formerly thought to be auxiliary, describe new spin-2 states at the two adjacent mass levels (tachyonic and tardyonic). The tachyon is always a ghost, but can be avoided in the heterotic case.

  10. Calculating scattering amplitudes efficiently

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, L.

    1996-01-01

    We review techniques for more efficient computation of perturbative scattering amplitudes in gauge theory, in particular tree and one- loop multi-parton amplitudes in QCD. We emphasize the advantages of (1) using color and helicity information to decompose amplitudes into smaller gauge-invariant pieces, and (2) exploiting the analytic properties of these pieces, namely their cuts and poles. Other useful tools include recursion relations, special gauges and supersymmetric rearrangements. 46 refs., 11 figs.

  11. Uncertainty evaluation in the measurement of power frequency electric and magnetic fields from AC overhead power lines.

    PubMed

    Ztoupis, I N; Gonos, I F; Stathopulos, I A

    2013-11-01

    Measurements of power frequency electric and magnetic fields from alternating current power lines are carried out in order to evaluate the exposure levels of the human body on the general public. For any electromagnetic field measurement, it is necessary to define the sources of measurement uncertainty and determine the total measurement uncertainty. This paper is concerned with the problems of measurement uncertainty estimation, as the measurement uncertainty budget calculation techniques recommended in standardising documents and research studies are barely described. In this work the total uncertainty of power frequency field measurements near power lines in various measurement sites is assessed by considering not only all available equipment data, but also contributions that depend on the measurement procedures, environmental conditions and characteristics of the field source, which are considered to increase the error of measurement. A detailed application example for power frequency field measurements is presented here by accredited laboratory.

  12. Analysis of the effect of a 60 Hz AC field on histamine release by rat peritoneal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Price, J A; Strattan, R D

    1998-01-01

    Reports have indicated effects of electromagnetic fields on inflammatory processes in vivo. To begin a systematic approach toward separating and examining the many components of such responses, we created and tested a temperature-controlled device to develop 5 mT 60 Hz magnetic fields for studies of the effects of fields on mast cells, a key component in acute inflammatory responses. Such fields have been reported to modulate cell activity, including changes in membrane function, in various systems. The magnetic field was generated using a solenoid and calibrated with an induction probe. Tests of mast cell function were determined by histamine release response to stimulation by compound 48/80, using both an "expose then test" and a "test during exposure" protocol. Aliquots not treated with 48/80 were used to evaluate field treatment effects on spontaneous histamine release. Freshly harvested rat peritoneal mast cells were exposed to the magnetic field for periods of 30 min to 2 h at 37 degrees C. They showed no significant degranulation during treatment, nor did they show reduced sensitivity to the degranulating agent 48/80. These observations are consistent with a model in which such processes are exclusively reflexive by the cells using field-independent membrane systems. This observation is very useful and was needed before examining longer term exposures in which gene expression in the cells might be influenced; this is the first such report of in vitro exposure of purified mast cells under these conditions and will further the study of the effects of electromagnetic fields on cell types active in acute inflammation.

  13. Safety considerations for magnetic fields of 10 mT to 100 mT amplitude in the frequency range of 10 kHz to 100 kHz for magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Dössel, Olaf; Bohnert, Julia

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new imaging modality using oscillating magnetic fields in the frequency range of 10 kHz to 100 kHz. The duration of data acquisition becomes smaller, and signal-to-noise ratio improves if the amplitude of these fields is increased - technically amplitudes of up to 100 mT might be feasible for human-sized systems. On the other hand, with increasing field strength, adverse health effects must be expected: oscillating magnetic fields can stimulate nerves and muscle and heat up tissue. Thresholds for stimulation with magnetic fields in this frequency range are not precisely known, neither is the local temperature rise following exposure. The ICNIRP guidelines define reference levels for magnetic field exposure for the general public that contain large safety factors - for medical diagnostics, they might be exceeded for a short time. In this article, research and guidelines in this field are briefly reviewed, and new results are presented in order to contribute to a future definition of safety limits for oscillating magnetic fields in MPI. PMID:24176960

  14. Safety considerations for magnetic fields of 10 mT to 100 mT amplitude in the frequency range of 10 kHz to 100 kHz for magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Dössel, Olaf; Bohnert, Julia

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new imaging modality using oscillating magnetic fields in the frequency range of 10 kHz to 100 kHz. The duration of data acquisition becomes smaller, and signal-to-noise ratio improves if the amplitude of these fields is increased - technically amplitudes of up to 100 mT might be feasible for human-sized systems. On the other hand, with increasing field strength, adverse health effects must be expected: oscillating magnetic fields can stimulate nerves and muscle and heat up tissue. Thresholds for stimulation with magnetic fields in this frequency range are not precisely known, neither is the local temperature rise following exposure. The ICNIRP guidelines define reference levels for magnetic field exposure for the general public that contain large safety factors - for medical diagnostics, they might be exceeded for a short time. In this article, research and guidelines in this field are briefly reviewed, and new results are presented in order to contribute to a future definition of safety limits for oscillating magnetic fields in MPI.

  15. Gravity and Yang-Mills amplitude relations

    SciTech Connect

    Bjerrum-Bohr, N. E. J.; Damgaard, Poul H.; Soendergaard, Thomas; FengBo

    2010-11-15

    Using only general features of the S matrix and quantum field theory, we prove by induction the Kawai-Lewellen-Tye relations that link products of gauge theory amplitudes to gravity amplitudes at tree level. As a bonus of our analysis, we provide a novel and more symmetric form of these relations. We also establish an infinite tower of new identities between amplitudes in gauge theories.

  16. Tevatron optics measurements using an AC dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.; Kopp, S.E.; Jansson, A.; Syphers, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The AC dipole is a device to study beam optics of hadron synchrotrons. It can produce sustained large amplitude oscillations with virtually no emittance growth. A vertical AC dipole for the Tevatron is recently implemented and a maximum oscillation amplitude of 2{sigma} (4{sigma}) at 980 GeV (150 GeV) is achieved [1]. When such large oscillations are measured with the BPM system of the Tevatron (20 {micro}m resolution), not only linear but even nonlinear optics can be directly measured. This paper shows how to measure {beta} function using an AC dipole and the result is compared to the other measurement. The paper also shows a test to detect optics changes when small changes are made in the Tevatron. Since an AC dipole is nondestructive, it allows frequent measurements of the optics which is necessary for such an test.

  17. dc and ac magnetic properties of thin-walled Nb cylinders with and without a row of antidots.

    PubMed

    Tsindlekht, M I; Genkin, V M; Felner, I; Zeides, F; Katz, N; Gazi, Š; Chromik, Š; Dobrovolskiy, O V; Sachser, R; Huth, M

    2016-06-01

    dc and ac magnetic properties of two thin-walled superconducting Nb cylinders with a rectangular cross-section are reported. Magnetization curves and the ac response were studied on as-prepared and patterned samples in magnetic fields parallel to the cylinder axis. A row of micron-sized antidots (holes) was made in the film along the cylinder axis. Avalanche-like jumps of the magnetization are observed for both samples at low temperatures for magnetic fields not only above H c1, but in fields lower than H c1 in the vortex-free region. The positions of the jumps are not reproducible and they change from one experiment to another, resembling vortex lattice instabilities usually observed for magnetic fields larger than H c1. At temperatures above [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] the magnetization curves become smooth for the patterned and the as-prepared samples, respectively. The magnetization curve of a reference planar Nb film in the parallel field geometry does not exhibit jumps in the entire range of accessible temperatures. The ac response was measured in constant and swept dc magnetic field modes. Experiment shows that ac losses at low magnetic fields in a swept field mode are smaller for the patterned sample. For both samples the shapes of the field dependences of losses and the amplitude of the third harmonic are the same in constant and swept field near H c3. This similarity does not exist at low fields in a swept mode.

  18. dc and ac magnetic properties of thin-walled Nb cylinders with and without a row of antidots.

    PubMed

    Tsindlekht, M I; Genkin, V M; Felner, I; Zeides, F; Katz, N; Gazi, Š; Chromik, Š; Dobrovolskiy, O V; Sachser, R; Huth, M

    2016-06-01

    dc and ac magnetic properties of two thin-walled superconducting Nb cylinders with a rectangular cross-section are reported. Magnetization curves and the ac response were studied on as-prepared and patterned samples in magnetic fields parallel to the cylinder axis. A row of micron-sized antidots (holes) was made in the film along the cylinder axis. Avalanche-like jumps of the magnetization are observed for both samples at low temperatures for magnetic fields not only above H c1, but in fields lower than H c1 in the vortex-free region. The positions of the jumps are not reproducible and they change from one experiment to another, resembling vortex lattice instabilities usually observed for magnetic fields larger than H c1. At temperatures above [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] the magnetization curves become smooth for the patterned and the as-prepared samples, respectively. The magnetization curve of a reference planar Nb film in the parallel field geometry does not exhibit jumps in the entire range of accessible temperatures. The ac response was measured in constant and swept dc magnetic field modes. Experiment shows that ac losses at low magnetic fields in a swept field mode are smaller for the patterned sample. For both samples the shapes of the field dependences of losses and the amplitude of the third harmonic are the same in constant and swept field near H c3. This similarity does not exist at low fields in a swept mode. PMID:27143621

  19. PULSE AMPLITUDE ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Greenblatt, M.H.

    1958-03-25

    This patent pertains to pulse amplitude analyzers for sorting and counting a serles of pulses, and specifically discloses an analyzer which ls simple in construction and presents the puise height distribution visually on an oscilloscope screen. According to the invention, the pulses are applied to the vertical deflection plates of an oscilloscope and trigger the horizontal sweep. Each pulse starts at the same point on the screen and has a maximum amplitude substantially along the same vertical line. A mask is placed over the screen except for a slot running along the line where the maximum amplitudes of the pulses appear. After the slot has been scanned by a photocell in combination with a slotted rotating disk, the photocell signal is displayed on an auxiliary oscilloscope as vertical deflection along a horizontal time base to portray the pulse amplitude distribution.

  20. PULSE AMPLITUDE ANALYSERS

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, I.A.D.

    1956-05-15

    This patent pentains to an electrical pulse amplitude analyzer, capable of accepting input pulses having a separation between adjacent pulses in the order of one microsecond while providing a large number of channels of classification. In its broad aspect the described pulse amplitude analyzer utilizes a storage cathode ray tube und control circuitry whereby the amplitude of the analyzed pulses controls both the intensity and vertical defiection of the beam to charge particular spots in horizontal sectors of the tube face as the beam is moved horizontally across the tube face. As soon as the beam has swept the length of the tube the information stored therein is read out by scanning individually each horizontal sector corresponding to a certain range of pulse amplitudes and applying the output signal from each scan to separate indicating means.

  1. 21 CFR 886.4440 - AC-powered magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false AC-powered magnet. 886.4440 Section 886.4440 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4440 AC-powered magnet. (a) Identification. An AC-powered magnet is an AC-powered device that generates a magnetic field intended to find and...

  2. 21 CFR 886.4440 - AC-powered magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false AC-powered magnet. 886.4440 Section 886.4440 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4440 AC-powered magnet. (a) Identification. An AC-powered magnet is an AC-powered device that generates a magnetic field intended to find and...

  3. 21 CFR 886.4440 - AC-powered magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false AC-powered magnet. 886.4440 Section 886.4440 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4440 AC-powered magnet. (a) Identification. An AC-powered magnet is an AC-powered device that generates a magnetic field intended to find and...

  4. 21 CFR 886.4440 - AC-powered magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false AC-powered magnet. 886.4440 Section 886.4440 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4440 AC-powered magnet. (a) Identification. An AC-powered magnet is an AC-powered device that generates a magnetic field intended to find and...

  5. 21 CFR 886.4440 - AC-powered magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false AC-powered magnet. 886.4440 Section 886.4440 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4440 AC-powered magnet. (a) Identification. An AC-powered magnet is an AC-powered device that generates a magnetic field intended to find and...

  6. Design of Pickup Coil Made of Litz Wire and Cooled at 77 K for High Sensitive Measurement of AC Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enpuku, Keiji; Hirakawa, Shintaro; Momotomi, Ryuji; Matsuo, Masaaki; Yoshida, Takashi; Kandori, Akihiko

    2011-07-01

    We studied the performance of a copper pickup coil for high sensitive measurements of ac magnetic fields. The coil was made of Litz wire to prevent the skin effect, and was cooled at 77 K to reduce thermal noise. We first obtained an analytical expression for the coil resistance by analyzing the eddy current loss of the coil. The analytical result explains well the measured dependences of the coil resistance on the frequency, number of turns of the coil (N), and filament diameter of the Litz wire (df). Next, we show the design of the pickup coil. When appropriate values are selected for N and df, we can expect the magnetic field noise SB1/2 < 10 fT/Hz1/2 for f > 1 kHz and SB1/2 < 2 fT/Hz1/2 for f > 10 kHz for the pickup coil with diameter of 50 mm. The experimental results agreed with the designed values.

  7. Specific absorption rate dependence on temperature in magnetic field hyperthermia measured by dynamic hysteresis losses (ac magnetometry)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaio, Eneko; Sandre, Olivier; Collantes, Juan-Mari; Garcia, Jose Angel; Mornet, Stéphane; Plazaola, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are intensively studied for their potential use for magnetic hyperthermia, a treatment that has passed a phase II clinical trial against severe brain cancer (glioblastoma) at the end of 2011. Their heating power, characterized by the ‘specific absorption rate (SAR)’, is often considered temperature independent in the literature, mainly because of the difficulties that arise from the measurement methodology. Using a dynamic magnetometer presented in a recent paper, we measure here the thermal dependence of SAR for superparamagnetic iron oxide (maghemite) NPs of four different size-ranges corresponding to mean diameters around 12 nm, 14 nm, 15 nm and 16 nm. The article reports a parametrical study extending from 10 to 60 {}^\\circ C in temperature, from 75 to 1031 kHz in frequency, and from 2 to 24 kA m-1 in magnetic field strength. It was observed that SAR values of smaller NPs decrease with temperature whereas for the larger sample (16 nm) SAR values increase with temperature. The measured variation of SAR with temperature is frequency dependent. This behaviour is fully explained within the scope of linear response theory based on Néel and Brown relaxation processes, using independent magnetic measurements of the specific magnetization and the magnetic anisotropy constant. A good quantitative agreement between experimental values and theoretical values is confirmed in a tri-dimensional space that uses as coordinates the field strength, the frequency and the temperature.

  8. Creation and Annihilation of Fluxons in ac-driven Semiannular Josephson Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Chitra R.; Kuriakose, V. C.

    2011-04-01

    A new geometry (semiannular) for Josephson junction has been proposed and theoretical studies have shown that the new geometry is useful for electronic applications [1, 2]. In this work we study the voltage-current response of the junction with a periodic modulation. The fluxon experiences an oscillating potential in the presence of the ac-bias which increases the depinning current value. We show that in a system with periodic boundary conditions, average progressive motion of fluxon commences after the amplitude of the ac drive exceeds a certain threshold value. The analytic studies are justified by simulating the equation using finite-difference method. We observe creation and annihilation of fluxons in semiannular Josephson junction with an ac-bias in the presence of an external magnetic field.

  9. Mixed Brownian alignment and Néel rotations in superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle suspensions driven by an ac field

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Saqlain A.; Reeves, Daniel B.; Ferguson, R. Matthew; Weaver, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with highly nonlinear magnetic behavior are attractive for biomedical applications like magnetic particle imaging and magnetic fluid hyperthermia. Such particles display interesting magnetic properties in alternating magnetic fields and here we document experiments that show differences between the magnetization dynamics of certain particles in frozen and melted states. This effect goes beyond the small temperature difference (ΔT ~ 20 °C) and we show the dynamics to be a mixture of Brownian alignment of the particles and Néel rotation of their moments occurring in liquid particle suspensions. These phenomena can be modeled in a stochastic differential equation approach by postulating log-normal distributions and partial Brownian alignment of an effective anisotropy axis. We emphasize that precise particle-specific characterization through experiments and nonlinear simulations is necessary to predict dynamics in solution and optimize their behavior for emerging biomedical applications including magnetic particle imaging. PMID:26504371

  10. Field Performance of Bt Eggplants (Solanum melongena L.) in the Philippines: Cry1Ac Expression and Control of the Eggplant Fruit and Shoot Borer (Leucinodes orbonalis Guenée).

    PubMed

    Hautea, Desiree M; Taylo, Lourdes D; Masanga, Anna Pauleen L; Sison, Maria Luz J; Narciso, Josefina O; Quilloy, Reynaldo B; Hautea, Randy A; Shotkoski, Frank A; Shelton, Anthony M

    2016-01-01

    Plants expressing Cry proteins from the bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), have become a major tactic for controlling insect pests in maize and cotton globally. However, there are few Bt vegetable crops. Eggplant (Solanum melongena) is a popular vegetable grown throughout Asia that is heavily treated with insecticides to control the eggplant fruit and shoot borer, Leucinodes orbonalis (EFSB). Herein we provide the first publicly available data on field performance in Asia of eggplant engineered to produce the Cry1Ac protein. Replicated field trials with five Bt eggplant open-pollinated (OP) lines from transformation event EE-1 and their non-Bt comparators were conducted over three cropping seasons in the Philippines from 2010-2012. Field trials documented levels of Cry1Ac protein expressed in plants and evaluated their efficacy against the primary target pest, EFSB. Cry1Ac concentrations ranged from 0.75-24.7 ppm dry weight with the highest in the terminal leaves (or shoots) and the lowest in the roots. Cry1Ac levels significantly increased from the vegetative to the reproductive stage. Bt eggplant lines demonstrated excellent control of EFSB. Pairwise analysis of means detected highly significant differences between Bt eggplant lines and their non-Bt comparators for all field efficacy parameters tested. Bt eggplant lines demonstrated high levels of control of EFSB shoot damage (98.6-100%) and fruit damage (98.1-99.7%) and reduced EFSB larval infestation (95.8-99.3%) under the most severe pest pressure during trial 2. Moths that emerged from larvae collected from Bt plants in the field and reared in their Bt eggplant hosts did not produce viable eggs or offspring. These results demonstrate that Bt eggplant lines containing Cry1Ac event EE-1 provide outstanding control of EFSB and can dramatically reduce the need for conventional insecticides.

  11. Field Performance of Bt Eggplants (Solanum melongena L.) in the Philippines: Cry1Ac Expression and Control of the Eggplant Fruit and Shoot Borer (Leucinodes orbonalis Guenée).

    PubMed

    Hautea, Desiree M; Taylo, Lourdes D; Masanga, Anna Pauleen L; Sison, Maria Luz J; Narciso, Josefina O; Quilloy, Reynaldo B; Hautea, Randy A; Shotkoski, Frank A; Shelton, Anthony M

    2016-01-01

    Plants expressing Cry proteins from the bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), have become a major tactic for controlling insect pests in maize and cotton globally. However, there are few Bt vegetable crops. Eggplant (Solanum melongena) is a popular vegetable grown throughout Asia that is heavily treated with insecticides to control the eggplant fruit and shoot borer, Leucinodes orbonalis (EFSB). Herein we provide the first publicly available data on field performance in Asia of eggplant engineered to produce the Cry1Ac protein. Replicated field trials with five Bt eggplant open-pollinated (OP) lines from transformation event EE-1 and their non-Bt comparators were conducted over three cropping seasons in the Philippines from 2010-2012. Field trials documented levels of Cry1Ac protein expressed in plants and evaluated their efficacy against the primary target pest, EFSB. Cry1Ac concentrations ranged from 0.75-24.7 ppm dry weight with the highest in the terminal leaves (or shoots) and the lowest in the roots. Cry1Ac levels significantly increased from the vegetative to the reproductive stage. Bt eggplant lines demonstrated excellent control of EFSB. Pairwise analysis of means detected highly significant differences between Bt eggplant lines and their non-Bt comparators for all field efficacy parameters tested. Bt eggplant lines demonstrated high levels of control of EFSB shoot damage (98.6-100%) and fruit damage (98.1-99.7%) and reduced EFSB larval infestation (95.8-99.3%) under the most severe pest pressure during trial 2. Moths that emerged from larvae collected from Bt plants in the field and reared in their Bt eggplant hosts did not produce viable eggs or offspring. These results demonstrate that Bt eggplant lines containing Cry1Ac event EE-1 provide outstanding control of EFSB and can dramatically reduce the need for conventional insecticides. PMID:27322533

  12. Field Performance of Bt Eggplants (Solanum melongena L.) in the Philippines: Cry1Ac Expression and Control of the Eggplant Fruit and Shoot Borer (Leucinodes orbonalis Guenée)

    PubMed Central

    Hautea, Desiree M.; Taylo, Lourdes D.; Masanga, Anna Pauleen L.; Sison, Maria Luz J.; Narciso, Josefina O.; Quilloy, Reynaldo B.; Hautea, Randy A.; Shotkoski, Frank A.; Shelton, Anthony M.

    2016-01-01

    Plants expressing Cry proteins from the bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), have become a major tactic for controlling insect pests in maize and cotton globally. However, there are few Bt vegetable crops. Eggplant (Solanum melongena) is a popular vegetable grown throughout Asia that is heavily treated with insecticides to control the eggplant fruit and shoot borer, Leucinodes orbonalis (EFSB). Herein we provide the first publicly available data on field performance in Asia of eggplant engineered to produce the Cry1Ac protein. Replicated field trials with five Bt eggplant open-pollinated (OP) lines from transformation event EE-1 and their non-Bt comparators were conducted over three cropping seasons in the Philippines from 2010–2012. Field trials documented levels of Cry1Ac protein expressed in plants and evaluated their efficacy against the primary target pest, EFSB. Cry1Ac concentrations ranged from 0.75–24.7 ppm dry weight with the highest in the terminal leaves (or shoots) and the lowest in the roots. Cry1Ac levels significantly increased from the vegetative to the reproductive stage. Bt eggplant lines demonstrated excellent control of EFSB. Pairwise analysis of means detected highly significant differences between Bt eggplant lines and their non-Bt comparators for all field efficacy parameters tested. Bt eggplant lines demonstrated high levels of control of EFSB shoot damage (98.6–100%) and fruit damage (98.1–99.7%) and reduced EFSB larval infestation (95.8–99.3%) under the most severe pest pressure during trial 2. Moths that emerged from larvae collected from Bt plants in the field and reared in their Bt eggplant hosts did not produce viable eggs or offspring. These results demonstrate that Bt eggplant lines containing Cry1Ac event EE-1 provide outstanding control of EFSB and can dramatically reduce the need for conventional insecticides. PMID:27322533

  13. Electrical Characteristics, Electrode Sheath and Contamination Layer Behavior of a Meso-Scale Premixed Methane-Air Flame Under AC/DC Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qi; Yan, Limin; Zhang, Hao; Li, Guoxiu

    2016-05-01

    Electrical characteristics of a nozzle-attached meso-scale premixed methane-air flame under low-frequency AC (0-4300 V, 0-500 Hz) and DC (0-3300 V) electric fields were studied. I-V curves were measured under different experimental conditions to estimate the magnitude of the total current 100-102 μA, the electron density 1015-1016 m-3 and further the power dissipation ≤ 0.7 W in the reaction zone. At the same time, the meso-scale premixed flame conductivity 10-4-10-3 Ω-1·m-1 as a function of voltage and frequency was experimentally obtained and was believed to represent a useful order-of magnitude estimate. Moreover, the influence of the collision sheath relating to Debye length (31-98 μm) and the contamination layer of an active electrode on measurements was discussed, based on the combination of simulation and theoretical analysis. As a result, the electrode sheath dimension was evaluated to less than 0.5 mm, which indicated a complex effect of the collision sheath on the current measurements. The surface contamination effect of an active electrode was further analyzed using the SEM imaging method, which showed elements immigration during the contamination layer formation process. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51376021), and the Fundamental Research Fund for Major Universities (No. 2013JBM079)

  14. Electrical Characteristics, Electrode Sheath and Contamination Layer Behavior of a Meso-Scale Premixed Methane-Air Flame Under AC/DC Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qi; Yan, Limin; Zhang, Hao; Li, Guoxiu

    2016-05-01

    Electrical characteristics of a nozzle-attached meso-scale premixed methane-air flame under low-frequency AC (0-4300 V, 0-500 Hz) and DC (0-3300 V) electric fields were studied. I-V curves were measured under different experimental conditions to estimate the magnitude of the total current 100-102 μA, the electron density 1015-1016 m‑3 and further the power dissipation ≤ 0.7 W in the reaction zone. At the same time, the meso-scale premixed flame conductivity 10‑4-10‑3 Ω‑1·m‑1 as a function of voltage and frequency was experimentally obtained and was believed to represent a useful order-of magnitude estimate. Moreover, the influence of the collision sheath relating to Debye length (31–98 μm) and the contamination layer of an active electrode on measurements was discussed, based on the combination of simulation and theoretical analysis. As a result, the electrode sheath dimension was evaluated to less than 0.5 mm, which indicated a complex effect of the collision sheath on the current measurements. The surface contamination effect of an active electrode was further analyzed using the SEM imaging method, which showed elements immigration during the contamination layer formation process. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51376021), and the Fundamental Research Fund for Major Universities (No. 2013JBM079)

  15. Investigation of Spiral Bevel Gear Condition Indicator Validation via AC-29-2C Using Fielded Rotorcraft HUMS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Wade, Daniel R.; Antolick, Lance J.; Thomas, Josiah

    2014-01-01

    This report presents the analysis of gear condition indicator data collected on a helicopter when damage occurred in spiral bevel gears. The purpose of the data analysis was to use existing in-service helicopter HUMS flight data from faulted spiral bevel gears as a Case Study, to better understand the differences between HUMS data response in a helicopter and a component test rig, the NASA Glenn Spiral Bevel Gear Fatigue Rig. The reason spiral bevel gear sets were chosen to demonstrate differences in response between both systems was the availability of the helicopter data and the availability of a test rig that was capable of testing spiral bevel gear sets to failure. The objective of the analysis presented in this paper was to re-process helicopter HUMS data with the same analysis techniques applied to the spiral bevel rig test data. The damage modes experienced in the field were mapped to the failure modes created in the test rig. A total of forty helicopters were evaluated. Twenty helicopters, or tails, experienced damage to the spiral bevel gears in the nose gearbox. Vibration based gear condition indicators data was available before and after replacement. The other twenty tails had no known anomalies in the nose gearbox within the time frame of the datasets. These twenty tails were considered the baseline dataset. The HUMS gear condition indicators evaluated included gear condition indicators (CI) Figure of Merit 4 (FM4), Root Mean Square (RMS) or Diagnostic Algorithm 1 (DA1) and +/- 3 Sideband Index (SI3). Three additional condition indicators, not currently calculated on-board, were calculated from the archived data. These three indicators were +/- 1 Sideband Index (SI1), the DA1 of the difference signal (DiffDA1) and the peak-to-peak of the difference signal (DP2P). Results found the CI DP2P, not currently available in the on-board HUMS, performed the best, responding to varying levels of damage on thirteen of the fourteen helicopters evaluated. Two

  16. Genetic and Biochemical Approach for Characterization of Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin Cry1Ac in a Field Population of the Diamondback Moth, Plutella xylostella

    PubMed Central

    Sayyed, Ali H.; Haward, Robert; Herrero, Salvador; Ferré, Juan; Wright, Denis J.

    2000-01-01

    Four subpopulations of a Plutella xylostella (L.) strain from Malaysia (F4 to F8) were selected with Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki HD-1, Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. aizawai, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Ac, respectively, while a fifth subpopulation was left as unselected (UNSEL-MEL). Bioassays at F9 found that selection with Cry1Ac, Cry1Ab, B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki, and B. thuringiensis subsp. aizawai gave resistance ratios of >95, 10, 7, and 3, respectively, compared with UNSEL-MEL (>10,500, 500, >100, and 26, respectively, compared with a susceptible population, ROTH). Resistance to Cry1Ac, Cry1Ab, B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki, and B. thuringiensis subsp. aizawai in UNSEL-MEL declined significantly by F9. The Cry1Ac-selected population showed very little cross-resistance to Cry1Ab, B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki, and B. thuringiensis subsp. aizawai (5-, 1-, and 4-fold compared with UNSEL-MEL), whereas the Cry1Ab-, B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki-, and B. thuringiensis subsp. aizawai-selected populations showed high cross-resistance to Cry1Ac (60-, 100-, and 70-fold). The Cry1Ac-selected population was reselected (F9 to F13) to give a resistance ratio of >2,400 compared with UNSEL-MEL. Binding studies with 125I-labeled Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac revealed complete lack of binding to brush border membrane vesicles prepared from Cry1Ac-selected larvae (F15). Binding was also reduced, although less drastically, in the revertant population, which indicates that a modification in the common binding site of these two toxins was involved in the resistance mechanism in the original population. Reciprocal genetic crosses between Cry1Ac-reselected and ROTH insects indicated that resistance was autosomal and showed incomplete dominance. At the highest dose of Cry1Ac tested, resistance was recessive while at the lowest dose it was almost completely dominant. The F2 progeny from a backcross of F1 progeny with ROTH was tested with a concentration of Cry1Ac which would kill

  17. Rock formation characterization for CO2-EOR and carbon geosequestration; 3D seismic amplitude and coherency anomalies, Wellington Field, Kansas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ohl, D.; Raef, A.; Watnef, L.; Bhattacharya, S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a workflow for a Mississipian carbonates characterization case-study integrating post-stack seismic attributes, well-logs porosities, and seismic modeling to explore relating changes in small-scale "lithofacies" properties and/or sub-seismic resolution faulting to key amplitude and coherency 3D seismic attributes. The main objective of this study is to put emphasis on reservoir characterization that is both optimized for and subsequently benefiting from pilot tertiary CO2-EOR in preparation for future carbon geosequestration in a depleting reservoir and a deep saline aquifer. The extracted 3D seismic coherency attribute indicated anomalous features that can be interpreted as a lithofacies change or a sub-seismic resolution faulting. A 2D finite difference modeling has been undertaken to understand and potentially build discriminant attributes to map structural and/or lithofacies anomalies of interest especially when embarking upon CO2-EOR and/or carbon sequestration monitoring and management projects. ?? 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  18. Does the temperature dependence at constant volume of the hyperfine field of heavy impurities in ferromagnetic metals depend explicitly upon the amplitude of lattice vibrations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedi, P. C.; Webber, G. D.

    1983-12-01

    Lattice dynamics seem to have little effect on the temperature dependence of the hyperfine field of pure iron and nickel and of most impurities in these metals but it is shown that Au in iron may be an exception to this rule. The hyperfine fields of other heavy impurities ( FeRu, FeIr, NiPt) were found to have a normal temperature dependence.

  19. AC Electrokinetics of Physiological Fluids for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Liu, Tingting; Lamanda, Ariana C; Sin, Mandy L Y; Gau, Vincent; Liao, Joseph C; Wong, Pak Kin

    2015-12-01

    Alternating current (AC) electrokinetics is a collection of processes for manipulating bulk fluid mass and embedded objects with AC electric fields. The ability of AC electrokinetics to implement the major microfluidic operations, such as pumping, mixing, concentration, and separation, makes it possible to develop integrated systems for clinical diagnostics in nontraditional health care settings. The high conductivity of physiological fluids presents new challenges and opportunities for AC electrokinetics-based diagnostic systems. In this review, AC electrokinetic phenomena in conductive physiological fluids are described followed by a review of the basic microfluidic operations and the recent biomedical applications of AC electrokinetics. The future prospects of AC electrokinetics for clinical diagnostics are presented.

  20. Reinforcing Saccadic Amplitude Variability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paeye, Celine; Madelain, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Saccadic endpoint variability is often viewed as the outcome of neural noise occurring during sensorimotor processing. However, part of this variability might result from operant learning. We tested this hypothesis by reinforcing dispersions of saccadic amplitude distributions, while maintaining constant their medians. In a first experiment we…

  1. Use of an AC electric field in galvanotactic on/off switching of the motion of a microstructure blotted by Serratia marcescens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Trung-Hieu; Hyung Kim, Dal; Kim, Jihoon; Jun Kim, Min; Byun, Doyoung

    2011-08-01

    In this study, we manipulated the swimming direction of bacteria and controlled the switching off movement by using dc and ac galvanotaxis. The microstructures blotted by Serratia marcescens could be spontaneously manipulated and switched off at the desired position. The optimum ac frequency for switching off the microstructural motion was 7 Hz. We built a mathematical model to analyze and understand the oscillating motion of microstructure.

  2. Producing directed migration with correlated atoms in a tilted ac-driven lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; Yang, Shi-Jie

    2016-06-01

    The correlated atoms in a tilted optical lattice driven by an ac field are studied within the Hubbard model. By making use of both photon-assisted tunneling and coherent destructive tunneling effects, we can move a pair of strongly correlated atoms in the lattice via manipulating the global amplitude of the driving field. We propose a scheme for creating entanglement between the particle pair and a single particle through interacting oscillations. Our model may provide a new building block for investigating quantum computing and quantum information processing with ultracold atoms in optical lattices.

  3. Computation of the radiation amplitude of oscillons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, Gyula; Forgács, Péter; Horváth, Zalán; Mezei, Márk

    2009-03-01

    The radiation loss of small-amplitude oscillons (very long-living, spatially localized, time-dependent solutions) in one-dimensional scalar field theories is computed in the small-amplitude expansion analytically using matched asymptotic series expansions and Borel summation. The amplitude of the radiation is beyond all orders in perturbation theory and the method used has been developed by Segur and Kruskal in Phys. Rev. Lett. 58, 747 (1987)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.58.747. Our results are in good agreement with those of long-time numerical simulations of oscillons.

  4. Syzygies probing scattering amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gang; Liu, Junyu; Xie, Ruofei; Zhang, Hao; Zhou, Yehao

    2016-09-01

    We propose a new efficient algorithm to obtain the locally minimal generating set of the syzygies for an ideal, i.e. a generating set whose proper subsets cannot be generating sets. Syzygy is a concept widely used in the current study of scattering amplitudes. This new algorithm can deal with more syzygies effectively because a new generation of syzygies is obtained in each step and the irreducibility of this generation is also verified in the process. This efficient algorithm can also be applied in getting the syzygies for the modules. We also show a typical example to illustrate the potential application of this method in scattering amplitudes, especially the Integral-By-Part(IBP) relations of the characteristic two-loop diagrams in the Yang-Mills theory.

  5. Efficacy of Soybean's Event DAS-81419-2 Expressing Cry1F and Cry1Ac to Manage Key Tropical Lepidopteran Pests Under Field Conditions in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Marques, L H; Castro, B A; Rossetto, J; Silva, O A B N; Moscardini, V F; Zobiole, L H S; Santos, A C; Valverde-Garcia, P; Babcock, J M; Rule, D M; Fernandes, O A

    2016-08-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) event DAS-81419-2 (Conkesta technology) in soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merrill, expresses Cry1F and Cry1Ac proteins to provide protection from feeding by several lepidopteran pests. A total of 27 field experiments across nine locations were conducted from 2011 to 2015 in southern and central Brazil to characterize the efficacy of DAS-81419-2 soybean infested with Anticarsia gemmatalis Hübner (Lepidoptera: Erebidae), Chrysodeixis includens (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), Heliothis virescens (F.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), and Spodoptera cosmioides (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) during vegetative (V4) and reproductive (R2 and R4) crop developmental stages. The efficacy of DAS-81419-2 was compared to that of a non-Bt isogenic variety managed with or without applications of commercial foliar insecticides for lepidopteran control. DAS-81419-2 soybean consistently experienced defoliation levels of 0.5% or less (compared with 20.05-56.74% in the non-Bt, nonsprayed treatment) and larval survival of < 0.1% in all four species across the vegetative and reproductive plant stages evaluated. The efficacy of DAS-81419-2 was significantly higher than commercial foliar insecticides applied to the non-Bt variety. DAS-81419-2 soybeans containing two highly effective Bt proteins are expected to be a more robust IRM tool compared to single-trait Bt technologies. The consistent efficacy of DAS-81419-2 soybeans across years, locations, and crop stages suggests that it will be a valuable product for management of hard-to-control key lepidopteran pests in South American soybean production. PMID:27401112

  6. Amplitude Modulator Chassis

    SciTech Connect

    Erbert, G

    2009-09-01

    The Amplitude Modulator Chassis (AMC) is the final component in the MOR system and connects directly to the PAM input through a 100-meter fiber. The 48 AMCs temporally shape the 48 outputs of the MOR using an arbitrary waveform generator coupled to an amplitude modulator. The amplitude modulation element is a two stage, Lithium Niobate waveguide device, where the intensity of the light passing through the device is a function of the electrical drive applied. The first stage of the modulator is connected to a programmable high performance Arbitrary Waveform Generator (AWG) consisting of 140 impulse generators space 250 ps apart. An arbitrary waveform is generated by independently varying the amplitude of each impulse generator and then summing the impulses together. In addition to the AWG a short pulse generator is also connected to the first stage of the modulator to provide a sub 100-ps pulse used for timing experiments. The second stage of the modulator is connect to a square pulse generator used to further attenuate any pre or post pulse light passing through the first stage of the modulator. The fast rise and fall time of the square pulse generator is also used to produce fast rise and fall times of the AWG by clipping the AWG pulse. For maximum extinction, a pulse bias voltage is applied to each stage of the modulator. A pulse voltage is applied as opposed to a DC voltage to prevent charge buildup on the modulator. Each bias voltage is adjustable to provide a minimum of 50-dB extinction. The AMC is controlled through ICCS to generate the desired temporal pulse shape. This process involves a closed-loop control algorithm, which compares the desired temporal waveform to the produced optical pulse, and iterates the programming of the AWG until the two waveforms agree within an allowable tolerance.

  7. Ion trajectory simulations of axial ac dipolar excitation in the Orbitrap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guangxiang; Noll, Robert J.; Plass, Wolfgang R.; Hu, Qizhi; Perry, Richard H.; Cooks, R. Graham

    2006-07-01

    The newly developed version of the multi-particle ion trajectory simulation program, ITSIM 6.0, was applied to simulate ac dipolar excitation of ion axial motion in the Orbitrap. The Orbitrap inner and outer electrodes were generated in AutoCAD, a 3D drawing program. The electrode geometry was imported into the 3D field solver COMSOL; the field array was then imported into ITSIM 6.0. Ion trajectories were calculated by solving Newton's equations using Runge-Kutta integration methods. Compared to the analytical solution, calculated radial components of the field at the device's "equator" (z = 0) were within 0.5% and calculated axial components midway between the inner and outer electrodes were within 0.2%. The experiments simulated here involved the control of axial motion of ions in the Orbitrap by the application of dipolar ac signals to the split outer electrodes, as described in a recently published paper from this laboratory [Hu et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 110 (2006) 2682]. In these experiments, ac signal was applied at the axial resonant frequency of a selected ion. Axial excitation and eventual ion ejection resulted when the ac was in phase with, i.e., had 0° phase relative to ion axial motion. De-excitation of ion axial motion until the ions were at z = 0 and at rest with respect to the z-axis resulted if the applied ac was out of phase with ion motion, with re-excitation of ion axial motion occurring if the dipolar ac was continued beyond this point. Both de-excitation and re-excitation could be achieved mass-selectively and depended on the amplitude and duration (number of cycles) of the applied ac. The effects of ac amplitude, frequency, phase relative to ion motion, and bandwidth of applied waveform were simulated. All simulation results were compared directly with the experimental data and good agreement was observed. Such ion motion control experiments and their simulation provide the possibility to improve Orbitrap performance and to develop tandem mass

  8. Electron acceleration and emission in a field of a plane and converging dipole wave of relativistic amplitudes with the radiation reaction force taken into account

    SciTech Connect

    Bashinov, Aleksei V; Gonoskov, Arkady A; Kim, A V; Marklund, Mattias; Mourou, G; Sergeev, Aleksandr M

    2013-04-30

    A comparative analysis is performed of the electron emission characteristics as the electrons move in laser fields with ultra-relativistic intensity and different configurations corresponding to a plane or tightly focused wave. For a plane travelling wave, analytical expressions are derived for the emission characteristics, and it is shown that the angular distribution of the radiation intensity changes qualitatively even when the wave intensity is much less than that in the case of the radiation-dominated regime. An important conclusion is drawn that the electrons in a travelling wave tend to synchronised motion under the radiation reaction force. The characteristic features of the motion of electrons are found in a converging dipole wave, associated with the curvature of the phase front and nonuniformity of the field distribution. The values of the maximum achievable longitudinal momenta of electrons accelerated to the centre, as well as their distribution function are determined. The existence of quasi-periodic trajectories near the focal region of the dipole wave is shown, and the characteristics of the emission of both accelerated and oscillating electrons are analysed. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  9. AC susceptibility study at the inter- and intragranular properties in (Bi,Pb):2223 superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Pop, A.V.; Ciurchea, D.; Ilonca, G.; Deltour, R.; Harabor, A.

    1997-11-20

    The temperature and amplitude of AC field dependencies of both inter- and intragranular T{sub p} and T{sub g} temperatures of the imaginary peaks of {chi}{double_prime} has been studied for a sintered single phase (Bi,Pb):2223 superconductor. The AC field dependencies for T{sub p} and T{sub g} and the relation between inter- and intragrain force densities were discussed by using Mueller critical-state model. From the {chi}{double_prime} curve, the values of intergrain magnetic critical current density J{sub cJ} was obtained via the application of Beans` critical state model. J{sub cJ}(T) dependence near {Tc} agree with the assumption of SNS intergrain junctions.

  10. Large Amplitude Oscillations in Prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    Large-amplitude Oscillations in prominences are spectacular manifestations of the solar activity. In such events nearby energetic disturbances induce periodic motions on filaments with displacements comparable to the size of the filaments themselves and with velocities larger than 20 km/s. Recent studies have shown that such oscillations open a new window on coronal connectivity, as well as novel diagnostics for hard-to-measure prominence properties such as magnetic field strength and geometry. In addition, this oscillation could be related with activation of filaments prior to eruptions. In this talk I will show past and current research on this subject in order to understand the nature of the solar prominences. Additionally, a large catalogue of such events will be presented.

  11. Superconductor coil geometry and ac losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, T. V., Jr.; Zapata, R. N.

    1976-01-01

    An empirical relation is presented which allows simple computation of volume-averaged winding fields from central fields for coils of small rectangular cross sections. This relation suggests that, in certain applications, ac-loss minimization can be accomplished by use of low winding densities, provided that hysteresis losses are independent of winding density. The ac-loss measurements on coils wound of twisted multifilamentary composite superconductors show no significant dependence on ac losses on winding density, thus permitting the use of winding density as an independent design parameter in loss minimization.

  12. Cooling Floor AC Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Lu; Hao, Ding; Hong, Zhang; Ce, Gao Dian

    The present HVAC equipments for the residential buildings in the Hot-summer-and-Cold-winter climate region are still at a high energy consuming level. So that the high efficiency HVAC system is an urgently need for achieving the preset government energy saving goal. With its advantage of highly sanitary, highly comfortable and uniform of temperature field, the hot-water resource floor radiation heating system has been widely accepted. This paper has put forward a new way in air-conditioning, which combines the fresh-air supply unit and such floor radiation system for the dehumidification and cooling in summer or heating in winter. By analyze its advantages and limitations, we found that this so called Cooling/ Heating Floor AC System can improve the IAQ of residential building while keep high efficiency quality. We also recommend a methodology for the HVAC system designing, which will ensure the reduction of energy cost of users.

  13. Closed string amplitudes as single-valued open string amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stieberger, Stephan; Taylor, Tomasz R.

    2014-04-01

    We show that the single trace heterotic N-point tree-level gauge amplitude ANHET can be obtained from the corresponding type I amplitude ANI by the single-valued (sv) projection: ANHET=sv(ANI). This projection maps multiple zeta values to single-valued multiple zeta values. The latter represent a subclass of multiple zeta values originating from single-valued multiple polylogarithms at unity. Similar relations between open and closed string amplitudes or amplitudes of different string vacua can be established. As a consequence the α‧-expansion of a closed string amplitude is dictated by that of the corresponding open string amplitude. The combination of single-valued projections, Kawai-Lewellen-Tye relations and Mellin correspondence reveal a unity of all tree-level open and closed superstring amplitudes together with the maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills and supergravity theories.

  14. Normalized amplitude quotient for parametrization of the glottal flow.

    PubMed

    Alku, Paavo; Bäckström, Tom; Vilkman, Erkki

    2002-08-01

    Normalized amplitude quotient (NAQ) is presented as a method to parametrize the glottal closing phase using two amplitude-domain measurements from waveforms estimated by inverse filtering. In this technique, the ratio between the amplitude of the ac flow and the negative peak amplitude of the flow derivative is first computed using the concept of equivalent rectangular pulse, a hypothetical signal located at the instant of the main excitation of the vocal tract. This ratio is then normalized with respect to the length of the fundamental period. Comparison between NAQ and its counterpart among the conventional time-domain parameters, the closing quotient, shows that the proposed parameter is more robust against distortion such as measurement noise that make the extraction of conventional time-based parameters of the glottal flow problematic. Experiments with breathy, normal, and pressed vowels indicate that NAQ is also able to separate the type of phonation effectively. PMID:12186049

  15. Ac-loss measurement of a DyBCO-Roebel assembled coated conductor cable (RACC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuller, S.; Goldacker, W.; Kling, A.; Krempasky, L.; Schmidt, C.

    2007-10-01

    Low ac-loss HTS cables for transport currents well above 1 kA are required for application in transformers and generators and are taken into consideration for future generations of fusion reactor coils. Coated conductors (CC) are suitable candidates for high field application at an operation temperature around 50-77 K, which is a crucial precondition for economical cooling costs. We prepared a short length of a Roebel bar cable made of industrial DyBCO coated conductor (Theva Company, Germany). Meander shaped tapes of 4 mm width with a twist pitch of 122 mm were cut from 10 mm wide CC tapes using a specially designed tool. Eleven of these strands were assembled to a cable. The electrical and mechanical connection of the tapes was achieved using a silver powder filled conductive epoxy resin. Ac-losses of a short sample in an external ac field were measured as a function of frequency and field amplitude in transverse and parallel field orientations. In addition, the coupling current time constant of the sample was directly measured.

  16. PULSE AMPLITUDE DISTRIBUTION RECORDER

    DOEpatents

    Cowper, G.

    1958-08-12

    A device is described for automatica1ly recording pulse annplitude distribution received from a counter. The novelty of the device consists of the over-all arrangement of conventional circuit elements to provide an easy to read permanent record of the pulse amplitude distribution during a certain time period. In the device a pulse analyzer separates the pulses according to annplitude into several channels. A scaler in each channel counts the pulses and operates a pen marker positioned over a drivable recorder sheet. Since the scalers in each channel have the sanne capacity, the control circuitry permits counting of the incoming pulses until one scaler reaches capacity, whereupon the input is removed and an internal oscillator supplies the necessary pulses to fill up the other scalers. Movement of the chart sheet is initiated wben the first scaler reaches capacity to thereby give a series of marks at spacings proportional to the time required to fill the remaining scalers, and accessory equipment marks calibration points on the recorder sheet to facilitate direct reading of the number of external pulses supplied to each scaler.

  17. Full one-loop amplitudes from tree amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Giele, Walter T.; Kunszt, Zoltan; Melnikov, Kirill; /Hawaii U.

    2008-01-01

    We establish an efficient polynomial-complexity algorithm for one-loop calculations, based on generalized D-dimensional unitarity. It allows automated computations of both cut-constructible and rational parts of one-loop scattering amplitudes from on-shell tree amplitudes. We illustrate the method by (re)-computing all four-, five- and six-gluon scattering amplitudes in QCD at one-loop.

  18. Depolarization of a piezoelectric film under an alternating current field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, K. W.; Cheung, M. K.; Chan, H. L. W.; Choy, C. L.

    2007-03-01

    In this article, we demonstrate that a sol-gel-derived niobium-doped lead zirconate titanate film can be depolarized by the application of alternating current (ac) fields of diminishing amplitude and we explain the phenomenon based on the concept of the Preisach model. The amplitude of the ac fields is decreased from 20 to 2 MV/m in ten steps. The observed piezoelectric coefficient of the film decreases after each ac field step. Depending on the initial polarization and the direction of the ac fields, the piezoelectric coefficient can decrease to a very small value indicating the complete depolarization of the film. Our results reveal the existence of a distribution of the switching fields in the microdomains (Preisach dipolar units), and that because of mutual interactions the magnitudes of the switch-up and switch-down fields for each microdomain are not necessarily the same. Our results also suggest that the sputter deposition of the top electrode can induce more "down-state" microdomains, thus giving rise to an initial polarization in the film. Because of interactions with other microdomains or other effects, part of these microdomains exhibit very high switching fields.

  19. Initial Tests of an AC Dipole for the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.; Kopp, S.; Jansson, A.; Syphers, M.

    2006-11-20

    The AC dipole is a device to diagnose transverse motions of a beam. It can achieve large-amplitude oscillations without two inevitable problems of conventional kicker/pinger magnets: decoherence and emittance growth. While not the first synchrotron to operate with an AC dipole, the Tevatron can now make use of its recently upgraded BPM system, providing unprecedented resolution for use with an AC dipole, to measure both linear and nonlinear properties of the accelerator. Plans are to provide AC dipole systems for both transverse degrees of freedom. Preliminary tests have been done using an audio power amplifier with an existing vertical pinger magnet, producing oscillation amplitudes up to 2{sigma} at 150 GeV. In this paper, we will present the configuration of this system. We also show the analysis of a first few data sets, including the direct measurement of beta functions at BPM locations.

  20. Initial Tests of an AC Dipole for the Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, R.; Jansson, A.; Kopp, S.; Syphers, M.

    2006-11-01

    The AC dipole is a device to diagnose transverse motions of a beam. It can achieve large-amplitude oscillations without two inevitable problems of conventional kicker/pinger magnets: decoherence and emittance growth. While not the first synchrotron to operate with an AC dipole, the Tevatron can now make use of its recently upgraded BPM system, providing unprecedented resolution for use with an AC dipole, to measure both linear and nonlinear properties of the accelerator. Plans are to provide AC dipole systems for both transverse degrees of freedom. Preliminary tests have been done using an audio power amplifier with an existing vertical pinger magnet, producing oscillation amplitudes up to 2σ at 150 GeV. In this paper, we will present the configuration of this system. We also show the analysis of a first few data sets, including the direct measurement of beta functions at BPM locations.

  1. Initial tests of an AC dipole for the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.; Jansson, A.; Kopp, S.; Syphers, M.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    The AC dipole is a device to diagnose transverse motions of a beam. It can achieve large-amplitude oscillations without two inevitable problems of conventional kicker/pinger magnets: decoherence and emittance growth. While not the first synchrotron to operate with an AC dipole, the Tevatron can now make use of its recently upgraded BPM system, providing unprecedented resolution for use with an AC dipole, to measure both linear and nonlinear properties of the accelerator. Plans are to provide AC dipole systems for both transverse degrees of freedom. Preliminary tests have been done using an audio power amplifier with an existing vertical pinger magnet, producing oscillation amplitudes up to 2{sigma} at 150 GeV. In this paper, we will present the configuration of this system. We also show the analysis of a first few data sets, including the direct measurement of beta functions at BPM locations.

  2. ACS: ALMA Common Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiozzi, Gianluca; Šekoranja, Matej

    2013-02-01

    ALMA Common Software (ACS) provides a software infrastructure common to all ALMA partners and consists of a documented collection of common patterns and components which implement those patterns. The heart of ACS is based on a distributed Component-Container model, with ACS Components implemented as CORBA objects in any of the supported programming languages. ACS provides common CORBA-based services such as logging, error and alarm management, configuration database and lifecycle management. Although designed for ALMA, ACS can and is being used in other control systems and distributed software projects, since it implements proven design patterns using state of the art, reliable technology. It also allows, through the use of well-known standard constructs and components, that other team members whom are not authors of ACS easily understand the architecture of software modules, making maintenance affordable even on a very large project.

  3. Rocket probe electric field measurements in PMSE and NLC regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekkeng, J. K.; Pedersen, A.; Moen, J.

    2003-08-01

    Complex AC and DC electric fields are known to be associated with polar mesospheric summer echo (PMSE) density irregularities and noctilucent cloud (NLC) layers. A two-channel prototype electric field instrument based on the double probe technique was developed to measure electric fields on-board a MIDAS (Middle atmosphere Investigation of Dynamics And Structure) sounding rocket. The instrument measures electric field variations up to 4 kHz, with 8 bit resolution. The payload was launched on 2 July 2002 from Andøya Rocket Range (69°N, 16°E) in Norway, in the presence of a PMSE radar backscatter layer located between 82 and 85 km height. The AC measurements in the PMSE region are characterized by spiky waveforms with amplitudes of a few mV/m, and the AC variations were also present in the height region 81-82 km, i.e. below the PMSE and NLC layers.

  4. dc and ac magnetic properties of thin-walled Nb cylinders with and without a row of antidots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsindlekht, M. I.; Genkin, V. M.; Felner, I.; Zeides, F.; Katz, N.; Gazi, Š.; Chromik, Š.; Dobrovolskiy, O. V.; Sachser, R.; Huth, M.

    2016-06-01

    dc and ac magnetic properties of two thin-walled superconducting Nb cylinders with a rectangular cross-section are reported. Magnetization curves and the ac response were studied on as-prepared and patterned samples in magnetic fields parallel to the cylinder axis. A row of micron-sized antidots (holes) was made in the film along the cylinder axis. Avalanche-like jumps of the magnetization are observed for both samples at low temperatures for magnetic fields not only above H c1, but in fields lower than H c1 in the vortex-free region. The positions of the jumps are not reproducible and they change from one experiment to another, resembling vortex lattice instabilities usually observed for magnetic fields larger than H c1. At temperatures above 0.66{{T}\\text{c}} and 0.78{{T}\\text{c}} the magnetization curves become smooth for the patterned and the as-prepared samples, respectively. The magnetization curve of a reference planar Nb film in the parallel field geometry does not exhibit jumps in the entire range of accessible temperatures. The ac response was measured in constant and swept dc magnetic field modes. Experiment shows that ac losses at low magnetic fields in a swept field mode are smaller for the patterned sample. For both samples the shapes of the field dependences of losses and the amplitude of the third harmonic are the same in constant and swept field near H c3. This similarity does not exist at low fields in a swept mode.

  5. BOLD signal effects of transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) in the alpha range: A concurrent tACS-fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Vosskuhl, Johannes; Huster, René J; Herrmann, Christoph S

    2016-10-15

    Many studies have proven transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) to manipulate brain activity. Until now it is not known, however, how these manipulations in brain activity are represented in brain metabolism or how spatially specific these changes are. Alpha-tACS has been shown to enhance the amplitude of the individual alpha frequency (IAF) and a negative correlation between alpha amplitude and occipital BOLD signal was reported in numerous EEG/fMRI experiments. Thus, alpha-tACS was chosen to test the effects of tACS on the BOLD signal. A reduction thereof was expected during alpha-tACS which shows the spatial extent of tACS effects beyond modeling studies. Three groups of subjects were measured in an MRI scanner, receiving tACS at either their IAF (N=11), 1Hz (control; N=12) or sham (i.e., no stimulation - a second control; N=11) while responding to a visual vigilance task. Stimulation was administered in an interleaved pattern of tACS-on runs and tACS-free baseline periods. The BOLD signal was analyzed in response to tACS-onset during resting state and in response to seldom target stimuli. Alpha-tACS at 1.0mA reduced the task-related BOLD response to visual targets in the occipital cortex as compared to tACS-free baseline periods. The deactivation was strongest in an area where the BOLD signal was shown to correlate negatively with alpha amplitude. A direct effect of tACS on resting state BOLD signal levels could not be shown. Our findings suggest that tACS-related changes in BOLD activity occur only as a modulation of an existing BOLD response.

  6. On the Period-Amplitude and Amplitude-Period Relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.; Hathaway, David H.

    2008-01-01

    Examined are Period-Amplitude and Amplitude-Period relationships based on the cyclic behavior of the 12-month moving averages of monthly mean sunspot numbers for cycles 0.23, both in terms of Fisher's exact tests for 2x2 contingency tables and linear regression analyses. Concerning the Period-Amplitude relationship (same cycle), because cycle 23's maximum amplitude is known to be 120.8, the inferred regressions (90-percent prediction intervals) suggest that its period will be 131 +/- 24 months (using all cycles) or 131 +/- 18 months (ignoring cycles 2 and 4, which have the extremes of period, 108 and 164 months, respectively). Because cycle 23 has already persisted for 142 months (May 1996 through February 2008), based on the latter prediction, it should end before September 2008. Concerning the Amplitude-Period relationship (following cycle maximum amplitude versus preceding cycle period), because cycle 23's period is known to be at least 142 months, the inferred regressions (90-percent prediction intervals) suggest that cycle 24's maximum amplitude will be about less than or equal to 96.1 +/- 55.0 (using all cycle pairs) or less than or equal to 91.0 +/- 36.7 (ignoring statistical outlier cycle pairs). Hence, cycle 24's maximum amplitude is expected to be less than 151, perhaps even less than 128, unless cycle pair 23/24 proves to be a statistical outlier.

  7. Amplitude interpretation and visualization of three-dimensional reflection data

    SciTech Connect

    Enachescu, M.E. )

    1994-07-01

    Digital recording and processing of modern three-dimensional surveys allow for relative good preservation and correct spatial positioning of seismic reflection amplitude. A four-dimensional seismic reflection field matrix R (x,y,t,A), which can be computer visualized (i.e., real-time interactively rendered, edited, and animated), is now available to the interpreter. The amplitude contains encoded geological information indirectly related to lithologies and reservoir properties. The magnitude of the amplitude depends not only on the acoustic impedance contrast across a boundary, but is also strongly affected by the shape of the reflective boundary. This allows the interpreter to image subtle tectonic and structural elements not obvious on time-structure maps. The use of modern workstations allows for appropriate color coding of the total available amplitude range, routine on-screen time/amplitude extraction, and late display of horizon amplitude maps (horizon slices) or complex amplitude-structure spatial visualization. Stratigraphic, structural, tectonic, fluid distribution, and paleogeographic information are commonly obtained by displaying the amplitude variation A = A(x,y,t) associated with a particular reflective surface or seismic interval. As illustrated with several case histories, traditional structural and stratigraphic interpretation combined with a detailed amplitude study generally greatly enhance extraction of subsurface geological information from a reflection data volume. In the context of three-dimensional seismic surveys, the horizon amplitude map (horizon slice), amplitude attachment to structure and [open quotes]bright clouds[close quotes] displays are very powerful tools available to the interpreter.

  8. Critical behavior of a noncritical field: destruction of smectic order at the smectic A-C tricritical point and implications for de Vries behavior.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Karl

    2014-04-01

    Critical behavior near the smectic A-C tricritical point is studied using renormalization group techniques. Critical fluctuations induce a singular softening of the smectic bulk modulus in the A phase. At the tricritical point, the quasi-long-range positional order of the smectic layers is destroyed. Despite this loss of order, dislocations remain bound so that smectic elasticity is retained but becomes anomalous, i.e., length scale dependent. The critically induced large layer fluctuations lead to negative thermal expansion of the layers in the A phase and may explain the origin of de Vries behavior. Experimental predictions are given for the temperature dependence of the smectic bulk modulus, x-ray structure factor, and layer spacing in the A phase.

  9. A self-powered AC magnetic sensor based on piezoelectric nanogenerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Aifang; Song, Ming; Zhang, Yan; Kou, Jinzong; Zhai, Junyi; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2014-11-01

    An AC magnetic field, which is a carrier of information, is distributed everywhere and is continuous. How to use and detect this field has been an ongoing topic over the past few decades. Conventional magnetic sensors are usually based on the Hall Effect, the fluxgate, a superconductor quantum interface or magnetoelectric or magnetoresistive sensing. Here, a flexible, simple, low-cost and self-powered active piezoelectric nanogenerator (NG) is successfully demonstrated as an AC magnetic field sensor at room temperature. The amplitude and frequency of a magnetic field can both be accurately sensed by the NG. The output voltage of the NG has a good linearity with a measured magnetic field. The detected minute magnetic field is as low as 1.2 × 10-7 tesla, which is 400 times greater than a commercial magnetic sensor that uses the Hall Effect. In comparison to the existing technologies, an NG is a room-temperature self-powered active sensor that is very simple and very cheap for practical applications.

  10. A self-powered AC magnetic sensor based on piezoelectric nanogenerator.

    PubMed

    Yu, Aifang; Song, Ming; Zhang, Yan; Kou, Jinzong; Zhai, Junyi; Lin Wang, Zhong

    2014-11-14

    An AC magnetic field, which is a carrier of information, is distributed everywhere and is continuous. How to use and detect this field has been an ongoing topic over the past few decades. Conventional magnetic sensors are usually based on the Hall Effect, the fluxgate, a superconductor quantum interface or magnetoelectric or magnetoresistive sensing. Here, a flexible, simple, low-cost and self-powered active piezoelectric nanogenerator (NG) is successfully demonstrated as an AC magnetic field sensor at room temperature. The amplitude and frequency of a magnetic field can both be accurately sensed by the NG. The output voltage of the NG has a good linearity with a measured magnetic field. The detected minute magnetic field is as low as 1.2 × 10(-7) tesla, which is 400 times greater than a commercial magnetic sensor that uses the Hall Effect. In comparison to the existing technologies, an NG is a room-temperature self-powered active sensor that is very simple and very cheap for practical applications. PMID:25333328

  11. A self-powered AC magnetic sensor based on piezoelectric nanogenerator.

    PubMed

    Yu, Aifang; Song, Ming; Zhang, Yan; Kou, Jinzong; Zhai, Junyi; Lin Wang, Zhong

    2014-11-14

    An AC magnetic field, which is a carrier of information, is distributed everywhere and is continuous. How to use and detect this field has been an ongoing topic over the past few decades. Conventional magnetic sensors are usually based on the Hall Effect, the fluxgate, a superconductor quantum interface or magnetoelectric or magnetoresistive sensing. Here, a flexible, simple, low-cost and self-powered active piezoelectric nanogenerator (NG) is successfully demonstrated as an AC magnetic field sensor at room temperature. The amplitude and frequency of a magnetic field can both be accurately sensed by the NG. The output voltage of the NG has a good linearity with a measured magnetic field. The detected minute magnetic field is as low as 1.2 × 10(-7) tesla, which is 400 times greater than a commercial magnetic sensor that uses the Hall Effect. In comparison to the existing technologies, an NG is a room-temperature self-powered active sensor that is very simple and very cheap for practical applications.

  12. Influence of static magnetic field strength on the temperature resolution of a magnetic nanoparticle thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jing; Dieckhoff, Jan; Schilling, Meinhard; Ludwig, Frank

    2016-10-01

    This paper investigates the influence of dc magnetic field strength on the resolution of a magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) thermometer, which employs the fundamental f0 and 2f0 harmonics of the MNP magnetization induced by ac and superimposed dc magnetic fields. In ac and parallel dc magnetic fields, the strength of dc magnetic field modulates the harmonics of the MNP magnetization, which affects their temperature sensitivities and measurement signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). A temperature-adjustable fluxgate-based magnetic particle spectrometer was used to measure the spectra of the MNP magnetization at different temperatures. To determine the temperature, the amplitudes of the measured f0 and 2f0 harmonics were modeled based on the static Langevin function. AC susceptibility measurements on a MNP sample demonstrate the applicability of the static Langevin function for the description of the MNP magnetization spectra at a low frequency ac magnetic field without taking into account the MNP dynamics. Our simulations and experiments show that with increasing dc magnetic field from 0.2 mT to 2.0 mT, both the amplitude of the 2f0 harmonic and the temperature sensitivity of the amplitude ratio of the 2f0 to f0 harmonics increase by a factor of about 10 in an ac magnetic field with a frequency of 70 Hz and an amplitude of 1 mT. Concomitantly, the SNR of the 2f0 harmonic significantly increases by about 20 dB. Consequently, the temperature resolution of the MNP thermometer is improved from 1.97 K to 0.26 K.

  13. ACS CCD Stability Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grogin, Norman

    2012-10-01

    A moderately crowded stellar field in the cluster 47 Tuc {6 arcmin West of the cluster core} is observed every four months with the WFC. The first visit exercises the full suite of broad and narrow band imaging filters and sub-array modes; following visits observe with only the six most popular Cycle 18 filters in full-frame mode. The positions and magnitudes of objects will be used to monitor local and large scale variations in the plate scale and the sensitivity of the detectors and to derive an independent measure of the detector CTE. One exposure in each sub-array mode with the WFC will allow us to verify that photometry obtained in full-frame and in sub-array modes are repeatable to better than 1%. This test is important for the ACS Photometric Cross-Calibration program, which uses sub-array exposures. This program may receive additional orbits to investigate ORIENT-dependent geometric distortion, which motivates the ORIENT and BETWEEN requirement on the first visit.

  14. Ac irreversibility line of bismuth-based high temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Mehdaoui, A.; Beille, J.; Berling, D.; Loegel, B.; Noudem, J.G.; Tournier, R.

    1997-09-01

    We discuss the magnetic properties of lead doped Bi-2223 bulk samples obtained through combined magnetic melt texturing and hot pressing (MMTHP). The ac complex susceptibility measurements are achieved over a broad ac field range (1 Oe{lt}h{sub ac}{lt}100 Oe) and show highly anisotropic properties. The intergranular coupling is improved in the direction perpendicular to the applied stress and magnetic field direction, and an intragranular loss peak is observed for the first time. A comparison is made with other bismuth-based compounds and it is shown that the MMTHP process shifts the ac irreversibility line (ac IL) toward higher fields. It is also shown that all the ac IL{close_quote}s for quasi 2D bismuth-based compounds show a nearly quadratic temperature dependence and deviate therefore strongly from the linear behavior observed in quasi 3D compounds and expected from a critical state model.{copyright} {ital 1997 Materials Research Society.}

  15. Amplitudes of MHD Waves in Sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Aimee Ann; Cally, Paul; Baldner, Charles; Kleint, Lucia; Tarbell, Theodore D.; De Pontieu, Bart; Scherrer, Philip H.; Rajaguru, Paul

    2016-05-01

    The conversion of p-modes into MHD waves by strong magnetic fields occurs mainly in the sub-photospheric layers. The photospheric signatures of MHD waves are weak due to low amplitudes at the beta=1 equipartion level where mode-conversion occurs. We report on small amplitude oscillations observed in the photosphere with Hinode SOT/SP in which we analyze time series for sunspots ARs 12186 (11.10.2014) and 12434 (17.10.2015). No significant magnetic field oscillations are recovered in the umbra or penumbra in the ME inversion. However, periodicities in the inclination angle are found at the umbral/penumbral boundary with 5 minute periods. Upward propagating waves are indicated in the intensity signals correlated between HMI and AIA at different heights. We compare SP results with the oscillations observed in HMI data. Simultaneous IRIS data shows transition region brightening above the umbral core.

  16. Microfabricated AC impedance sensor

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter; Ackler, Harold D.; Becker, Frederick; Boser, Bernhard E.; Eldredge, Adam B.; Fuller, Christopher K.; Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Hamilton, Julie K.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Wang, Xiao-Bo

    2002-01-01

    A microfabricated instrument for detecting and identifying cells and other particles based on alternating current (AC) impedance measurements. The microfabricated AC impedance sensor includes two critical elements: 1) a microfluidic chip, preferably of glass substrates, having at least one microchannel therein and with electrodes patterned on both substrates, and 2) electrical circuits that connect to the electrodes on the microfluidic chip and detect signals associated with particles traveling down the microchannels. These circuits enable multiple AC impedance measurements of individual particles at high throughput rates with sufficient resolution to identify different particle and cell types as appropriate for environmental detection and clinical diagnostic applications.

  17. Dependence of the ac loss on the aspect ratio in a cable in conduit conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cau, F.; Bruzzone, P.

    2010-04-01

    The coupling current loss in rectangular superconducting cables is strictly dependent on their aspect ratio, which has an impact on the area linked by the field variation and consequently on the currents induced between strands. The relation between the ac loss and aspect ratio is studied with reference to the testing of three short cable in conduit conductor (CICC) samples at the SULTAN test facility. The first conductor is a 25 kA NbTi cable for the JT60-SA tokamak; the second is a 20 kA Nb3Sn cable for the HZB hybrid magnet. The last CICC is a 68 kA Nb3Sn cable with layout similar to that of the ITER toroidal field (TF) conductor (called the 'European toroidal field (EUTF) alternate'). All the samples are assembled with two conductor sections differing only in their orientation with respect to the external variable field. In the first and third samples, the cable of one leg is rotated by 90°, while in the HZB sample it is rotated by 45° with respect to the other leg. The ac loss is measured at the SULTAN test facility using a gas flow calorimetric method. A sample length of 39 cm is exposed to a sinusoidal field with an amplitude of ± 0.3 or ± 0.2 T (depending on the superconductor) and frequency variable in the range 0.1-0.8 Hz. A background field of 2 T perpendicular both to the sinusoidal field and to the sample axis is also applied. The ac loss is assessed by measuring the variation of the He enthalpy, assuming the metal enthalpy to be negligible. The loss curve for both legs is discussed in terms of the respective aspect ratios and the results, including data from former test campaigns, are compared with the aim of finding an analytical relation between the loss and the conductor dimensions.

  18. Small amplitude quasibreathers and oscillons

    SciTech Connect

    Fodor, Gyula; Lukacs, Arpad; Forgacs, Peter; Horvath, Zalan

    2008-07-15

    Quasibreathers (QB) are time-periodic solutions with weak spatial localization introduced in G. Fodor et al. in [Phys. Rev. D 74, 124003 (2006)]. QB's provide a simple description of oscillons (very long-living spatially localized time dependent solutions). The small amplitude limit of QB's is worked out in a large class of scalar theories with a general self-interaction potential, in D spatial dimensions. It is shown that the problem of small amplitude QB's is reduced to a universal elliptic partial differential equation. It is also found that there is the critical dimension, D{sub crit}=4, above which no small amplitude QB's exist. The QB's obtained this way are shown to provide very good initial data for oscillons. Thus these QB's provide the solution of the complicated, nonlinear time dependent problem of small amplitude oscillons in scalar theories.

  19. Model selection for amplitude analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guegan, B.; Hardin, J.; Stevens, J.; Williams, M.

    2015-09-01

    Model complexity in amplitude analyses is often a priori under-constrained since the underlying theory permits a large number of possible amplitudes to contribute to most physical processes. The use of an overly complex model results in reduced predictive power and worse resolution on unknown parameters of interest. Therefore, it is common to reduce the complexity by removing from consideration some subset of the allowed amplitudes. This paper studies a method for limiting model complexity from the data sample itself through regularization during regression in the context of a multivariate (Dalitz-plot) analysis. The regularization technique applied greatly improves the performance. An outline of how to obtain the significance of a resonance in a multivariate amplitude analysis is also provided.

  20. AC magnetohydrodynamic microfluidic switch

    SciTech Connect

    Lemoff, A V; Lee, A P

    2000-03-02

    A microfluidic switch has been demonstrated using an AC Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pumping mechanism in which the Lorentz force is used to pump an electrolytic solution. By integrating two AC MHD pumps into different arms of a Y-shaped fluidic circuit, flow can be switched between the two arms. This type of switch can be used to produce complex fluidic routing, which may have multiple applications in {micro}TAS.

  1. Positive amplitudes in the amplituhedron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Hodges, Andrew; Trnka, Jaroslav

    2015-08-01

    The all-loop integrand for scattering amplitudes in planar SYM is determined by an "amplitude form" with logarithmic singularities on the boundary of the amplituhedron. In this note we provide strong evidence for a new striking property of the superamplitude, which we conjecture to be true to all loop orders: the amplitude form is positive when evaluated inside the amplituhedron. The statement is sensibly formulated thanks to the natural "bosonization" of the superamplitude associated with the amplituhedron geometry. However this positivity is not manifest in any of the current approaches to scattering amplitudes, and in particular not in the cellulations of the amplituhedron related to on-shell diagrams and the positive grassmannian. The surprising positivity of the form suggests the existence of a "dual amplituhedron" formulation where this feature would be made obvious. We also suggest that the positivity is associated with an extended picture of amplituhedron geometry, with the amplituhedron sitting inside a co-dimension one surface separating "legal" and "illegal" local singularities of the amplitude. We illustrate this in several simple examples, obtaining new expressions for amplitudes not associated with any triangulations, but following in a more invariant manner from a global view of the positive geometry.

  2. Tempo and amplitude in growth.

    PubMed

    Hermanussen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Growth is defined as an increase of size over time with time usually defined as physical time. Yet, the rigid metric of physical time is not directly relevant to the internal dynamics of growth. Growth is linked to maturation. Children and adolescents differ in the tempo at which they mature. One calendar year differs in its meaning in a fast maturing, and in a slow maturing child. The slow child needs more calendar years for completing the same stage of maturity. Many characteristics in the human growth curve are tempo characteristics. Tempo - being fast or slow maturing - has to be carefully separated from amplitude - being tall or short. Several characteristic phenomena such as catch-up growth after periods of illness and starvation are largely tempo phenomena, and do usually not affect the amplitude component of growth. Applying Functional Data Analysis and Principal Component Analysis, the two main sources of height variance: tempo and amplitude can statistically be separate and quantified. Tempo appears to be more sensitive than amplitude to nutrition, health and environmental stress. An appropriate analysis of growth requires disentangling its two major components: amplitude and tempo. The assessment of the developmental tempo thus is an integral part of assessing child and adolescent growth. Though an Internet portal is currently available to process small amounts of height data (www.willi-will-wachsen.com) for separately determining amplitude and tempo in growth, there is urgent need of better and practical solutions for analyzing individual growth.

  3. Beyond Planck-Einstein quanta: Amplitude-driven quantum excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Wen; Devereaux, T. P.; Freericks, J. K.

    2014-11-01

    Linear-response quantum excitation is proportional to the amplitude of the field, with the energy of the excitation given by the driving frequency. As the amplitude is increased, there is a crossover, where the excitation energy is governed by the amplitude of the driving field, not its frequency. As the amplitude is increased even further, then complex quantum oscillations develop. We illustrate this phenomena with the exact solution of the simplest model of a charge-density-wave insulator driven by a spatially uniform time-dependent electric field. The driving by the field can be mapped onto a series of Landau-Zener problems, but with a complex, nonmonochromatic drive that varies for each momentum point in the reduced Brillouin zone.

  4. Isolation of sequences flanking Ac insertion sites by Ac casting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dafang; Peterson, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Localizing Ac insertions is a fundamental task in studying Ac-induced mutation and chromosomal rearrangements involving Ac elements. Researchers may sometimes be faced with the situation in which the sequence flanking one side of an Ac/Ds element is known, but the other flank is unknown. Or, a researcher may have a small sequence surrounding the Ac/Ds insertion site and needs to obtain additional flanking genomic sequences. One way to rapidly clone unknown Ac/Ds flanking sequences is via a PCR-based method termed Ac casting. This approach utilizes the somatic transposition activity of Ac during plant development, and provides an efficient means for short-range genome walking. Here we describe the principle of Ac casting, and show how it can be applied to isolate Ac macrotransposon insertion sites.

  5. Development of a hardware-based AC microgrid for AC stability assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Robert R.

    As more power electronic-based devices enable the development of high-bandwidth AC microgrids, the topic of microgrid power distribution stability has become of increased interest. Recently, researchers have proposed a relatively straightforward method to assess the stability of AC systems based upon the time-constants of sources, the net bus capacitance, and the rate limits of sources. In this research, a focus has been to develop a hardware test system to evaluate AC system stability. As a first step, a time domain model of a two converter microgrid was established in which a three phase inverter acts as a power source and an active rectifier serves as an adjustable constant power AC load. The constant power load can be utilized to create rapid power flow transients to the generating system. As a second step, the inverter and active rectifier were designed using a Smart Power Module IGBT for switching and an embedded microcontroller as a processor for algorithm implementation. The inverter and active rectifier were designed to operate simultaneously using a synchronization signal to ensure each respective local controller operates in a common reference frame. Finally, the physical system was created and initial testing performed to validate the hardware functionality as a variable amplitude and variable frequency AC system.

  6. Differential equations, associators, and recurrences for amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puhlfürst, Georg; Stieberger, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    We provide new methods to straightforwardly obtain compact and analytic expressions for ɛ-expansions of functions appearing in both field and string theory amplitudes. An algebraic method is presented to explicitly solve for recurrence relations connecting different ɛ-orders of a power series solution in ɛ of a differential equation. This strategy generalizes the usual iteration by Picard's method. Our tools are demonstrated for generalized hypergeometric functions. Furthermore, we match the ɛ-expansion of specific generalized hypergeometric functions with the underlying Drinfeld associator with proper Lie algebra and monodromy representations. We also apply our tools for computing ɛ-expansions for solutions to generic first-order Fuchsian equations (Schlesinger system). Finally, we set up our methods to systematically get compact and explicit α‧-expansions of tree-level superstring amplitudes to any order in α‧.

  7. Shape of Pion Distribution Amplitude

    SciTech Connect

    Radyushkin, Anatoly

    2009-11-01

    A scenario is investigated in which the leading-twist pion distribution amplitude $\\varphi_\\pi (x)$ is approximated by the pion decay constant $f_\\pi$ for all essential values of the light-cone fraction $x$. A model for the light-front wave function $\\Psi (x, k_\\perp)$ is proposed that produces such a distribution amplitude and has a rapidly decreasing (exponential for definiteness) dependence on the light-front energy combination $ k_\\perp^2/x(1-x)$. It is shown that this model easily reproduces the fit of recent large-$Q^2$ BaBar data on the photon-pion transition form factor. Some aspects of scenario with flat pion distribution amplitude are discussed.

  8. Fluctuation of an ion beam extracted from an AC filament driven Bernas-type ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, N. Okajima, Y.; Wada, M.

    2014-02-15

    Argon ion beam fluctuation from an AC filament driven Bernas-type ion source is observed. The ion beam was measured by an 8 measurement elements beam profile monitor. The amplitude of the beam current fluctuation stayed in the same level from 100 Hz to 1 kHz of the filament heating frequency. The beam current fluctuation frequency measured by the beam profile monitor was equal to the frequency of the AC filament operation. The fluctuation amplitudes of the beam current by AC operation were less than 7% and were in the same level of the DC operation.

  9. AC-3 audio coder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Craig

    1995-12-01

    AC-3 is a system for coding up to 5.1 channels of audio into a low bit-rate data stream. High quality may be obtained with compression ratios approaching 12-1 for multichannel audio programs. The high compression ratio is achieved by methods which do not increase decoder memory, and thus cost. The methods employed include: the transmission of a high frequency resolution spectral envelope; and a novel forward/backward adaptive bit allocation algorithm. In order to satisfy practical requirements of an emissions coder, the AC-3 syntax includes a number of features useful to broadcasters and consumers. These features include: loudness uniformity between programs; dynamic range control; and broadcaster control of downmix coefficients. The AC-3 coder has been formally selected for inclusion of the U.S. HDTV broadcast standard, and has been informally selected for several additional applications.

  10. Development of a nano-tesla magnetic field shielded chamber and highly precise AC-susceptibility measurement coil at μK temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Anil; Prakash, Om; Ramakrishanan, S.

    2014-04-01

    A special sample measurement chamber has been developed to perform experiments at ultralow temperatures and ultralow magnetic field. A high permeability material known as cryoperm 10 and Pb is used to shield the measurement space consisting of the signal detecting set-up and the sample. The detecting setup consists of a very sensitive susceptibility coil wound on OFHC Cu bobbin.

  11. ac bidirectional motor controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiner, K.

    1988-01-01

    Test data are presented and the design of a high-efficiency motor/generator controller at NASA-Lewis for use with the Space Station power system testbed is described. The bidirectional motor driver is a 20 kHz to variable frequency three-phase ac converter that operates from the high-frequency ac bus being designed for the Space Station. A zero-voltage-switching pulse-density-modulation technique is used in the converter to shape the low-frequency output waveform.

  12. Renormalization of massless Feynman amplitudes in configuration space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolov, Nikolay M.; Stora, Raymond; Todorov, Ivan

    2014-05-01

    A systematic study of recursive renormalization of Feynman amplitudes is carried out both in Euclidean and in Minkowski configuration spaces. For a massless quantum field theory (QFT), we use the technique of extending associate homogeneous distributions to complete the renormalization recursion. A homogeneous (Poincaré covariant) amplitude is said to be convergent if it admits a (unique covariant) extension as a homogeneous distribution. For any amplitude without subdivergences — i.e. for a Feynman distribution that is homogeneous off the full (small) diagonal — we define a renormalization invariant residue. Its vanishing is a necessary and sufficient condition for the convergence of such an amplitude. It extends to arbitrary — not necessarily primitively divergent — Feynman amplitudes. This notion of convergence is finer than the usual power counting criterion and includes cancellation of divergences.

  13. High Frequency Amplitude Detector for GMI Magnetic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Asfour, Aktham; Zidi, Manel; Yonnet, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    A new concept of a high-frequency amplitude detector and demodulator for Giant-Magneto-Impedance (GMI) sensors is presented. This concept combines a half wave rectifier, with outstanding capabilities and high speed, and a feedback approach that ensures the amplitude detection with easily adjustable gain. The developed detector is capable of measuring high-frequency and very low amplitude signals without the use of diode-based active rectifiers or analog multipliers. The performances of this detector are addressed throughout the paper. The full circuitry of the design is given, together with a comprehensive theoretical study of the concept and experimental validation. The detector has been used for the amplitude measurement of both single frequency and pulsed signals and for the demodulation of amplitude-modulated signals. It has also been successfully integrated in a GMI sensor prototype. Magnetic field and electrical current measurements in open- and closed-loop of this sensor have also been conducted. PMID:25536003

  14. Employing helicity amplitudes for resummation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moult, Ian; Stewart, Iain W.; Tackmann, Frank J.; Waalewijn, Wouter J.

    2016-05-01

    Many state-of-the-art QCD calculations for multileg processes use helicity amplitudes as their fundamental ingredients. We construct a simple and easy-to-use helicity operator basis in soft-collinear effective theory (SCET), for which the hard Wilson coefficients from matching QCD onto SCET are directly given in terms of color-ordered helicity amplitudes. Using this basis allows one to seamlessly combine fixed-order helicity amplitudes at any order they are known with a resummation of higher-order logarithmic corrections. In particular, the virtual loop amplitudes can be employed in factorization theorems to make predictions for exclusive jet cross sections without the use of numerical subtraction schemes to handle real-virtual infrared cancellations. We also discuss matching onto SCET in renormalization schemes with helicities in 4- and d -dimensions. To demonstrate that our helicity operator basis is easy to use, we provide an explicit construction of the operator basis, as well as results for the hard matching coefficients, for p p →H +0 , 1, 2 jets, p p →W /Z /γ +0 , 1, 2 jets, and p p →2 , 3 jets. These operator bases are completely crossing symmetric, so the results can easily be applied to processes with e+e- and e-p collisions.

  15. Small amplitude quasibreathers and oscillons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, Gyula; Forgács, Péter; Horváth, Zalán; Lukács, Árpád

    2008-07-01

    Quasibreathers (QB) are time-periodic solutions with weak spatial localization introduced in G. Fodor et al. in [Phys. Rev. D 74, 124003 (2006)PRVDAQ0556-282110.1103/PhysRevD.74.124003]. QB’s provide a simple description of oscillons (very long-living spatially localized time dependent solutions). The small amplitude limit of QB’s is worked out in a large class of scalar theories with a general self-interaction potential, in D spatial dimensions. It is shown that the problem of small amplitude QB’s is reduced to a universal elliptic partial differential equation. It is also found that there is the critical dimension, Dcrit=4, above which no small amplitude QB’s exist. The QB’s obtained this way are shown to provide very good initial data for oscillons. Thus these QB’s provide the solution of the complicated, nonlinear time dependent problem of small amplitude oscillons in scalar theories.

  16. Toward complete pion nucleon amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, Vincent; Danilkin, Igor V.; Fernández-Ramírez, Cesar; Pennington, Michael R.; Schott, Diane M.; Szczepaniak, Adam P.; Fox, G.

    2015-10-05

    We compare the low-energy partial wave analyses πN scattering with a high-energy data via finite energy sum rules. We also construct a new set of amplitudes by matching the imaginary part from the low-energy analysis with the high-energy, Regge parametrization and then reconstruct the real parts using dispersion relations.

  17. Extracting amplitudes from photoproduction data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Workman, R. L.

    2011-09-01

    We consider the problems associated with amplitude extraction, from meson photoproduction data, over the first resonance regions. The notion of a complete experiment has motivated the FROST program at Jefferson Lab. Exercises applied to pion photoproduction data illustrate the problems to be confronted in any attempt to extract underlying resonance signals from these data (without introducing a model for the resonant process).

  18. Electrostatic coalescence system with independent AC and DC hydrophilic electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Hovarongkura, A. David; Henry, Jr., Joseph D.

    1981-01-01

    An improved electrostatic coalescence system is provided in which independent AC and DC hydrophilic electrodes are employed to provide more complete dehydration of an oil emulsion. The AC field is produced between an AC electrode array and the water-oil interface wherein the AC electrode array is positioned parallel to the interface which acts as a grounded electrode. The emulsion is introduced into the AC field in an evenly distributed manner at the interface. The AC field promotes drop-drop and drop-interface coalescence of the water phase in the entering emulsion. The continuous oil phase passes upward through the perforated AC electrode array and enters a strong DC field produced between closely spaced DC electrodes in which small dispersed droplets of water entrained in the continuous phase are removed primarily by collection at hydrophilic DC electrodes. Large droplets of water collected by the electrodes migrate downward through the AC electrode array to the interface. All phase separation mechanisms are utilized to accomplish more complete phase separation.

  19. Pion-pion scattering amplitude

    SciTech Connect

    Pelaez, J.R.; Yndurain, F.J.

    2005-04-01

    We obtain reliable {pi}{pi} scattering amplitudes consistent with experimental data, both at low and high energies, and fulfilling appropriate analyticity properties. We do this by first fitting experimental low energy (s{sup 1/2}{<=}1.42 GeV) phase shifts and inelasticities with expressions that incorporate analyticity and unitarity. In particular, for the S wave with isospin 0, we discuss in detail several sets of experimental data. This provides low energy partial wave amplitudes that summarize the known experimental information. Then, we impose Regge behavior as follows from factorization and experimental data for the imaginary parts of the scattering amplitudes at higher energy, and check fulfillment of dispersion relations up to 0.925 GeV. This allows us to improve our fits. The ensuing {pi}{pi} scattering amplitudes are then shown to verify dispersion relations up to 1.42 GeV, as well as s-t-u crossing sum rules and other consistency conditions. The improved parametrizations therefore provide a reliable representation of pion-pion amplitudes with which one can test chiral perturbation theory calculations, pionium decays, or use as input for CP-violating K decays. In this respect, we find [a{sub 0}{sup (0)}-a{sub 0}{sup (2)}]{sup 2}=(0.077{+-}0.008)M{sub {pi}}{sup -2} and {delta}{sub 0}{sup (0)}(m{sub K}{sup 2})-{delta}{sub 0}{sup (2)}(m{sub K}{sup 2})=52.9{+-}1.6{sup o}.

  20. ALOHA: Automatic libraries of helicity amplitudes for Feynman diagram computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Aquino, Priscila; Link, William; Maltoni, Fabio; Mattelaer, Olivier; Stelzer, Tim

    2012-10-01

    We present an application that automatically writes the HELAS (HELicity Amplitude Subroutines) library corresponding to the Feynman rules of any quantum field theory Lagrangian. The code is written in Python and takes the Universal FeynRules Output (UFO) as an input. From this input it produces the complete set of routines, wave-functions and amplitudes, that are needed for the computation of Feynman diagrams at leading as well as at higher orders. The representation is language independent and currently it can output routines in Fortran, C++, and Python. A few sample applications implemented in the MADGRAPH 5 framework are presented. Program summary Program title: ALOHA Catalogue identifier: AEMS_v1_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMS_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: http://www.opensource.org/licenses/UoI-NCSA.php No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 6094320 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 7479819 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Python2.6 Computer: 32/64 bit Operating system: Linux/Mac/Windows RAM: 512 Mbytes Classification: 4.4, 11.6 Nature of problem: An effcient numerical evaluation of a squared matrix element can be done with the help of the helicity routines implemented in the HELAS library [1]. This static library contains a limited number of helicity functions and is therefore not always able to provide the needed routine in the presence of an arbitrary interaction. This program provides a way to automatically create the corresponding routines for any given model. Solution method: ALOHA takes the Feynman rules associated to the vertex obtained from the model information (in the UFO format [2]), and multiplies it by the different wavefunctions or propagators. As a result the analytical expression of the helicity routines is obtained. Subsequently, this expression is

  1. Frequency adaptation for enhanced radiation force amplitude in dynamic elastography.

    PubMed

    Ouared, Abderrahmane; Montagnon, Emmanuel; Kazemirad, Siavash; Gaboury, Louis; Robidoux, André; Cloutier, Guy

    2015-08-01

    In remote dynamic elastography, the amplitude of the generated displacement field is directly related to the amplitude of the radiation force. Therefore, displacement improvement for better tissue characterization requires the optimization of the radiation force amplitude by increasing the push duration and/or the excitation amplitude applied on the transducer. The main problem of these approaches is that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) thresholds for medical applications and transducer limitations may be easily exceeded. In the present study, the effect of the frequency used for the generation of the radiation force on the amplitude of the displacement field was investigated. We found that amplitudes of displacements generated by adapted radiation force sequences were greater than those generated by standard nonadapted ones (i.e., single push acoustic radiation force impulse and supersonic shear imaging). Gains in magnitude were between 20 to 158% for in vitro measurements on agar-gelatin phantoms, and 170 to 336% for ex vivo measurements on a human breast sample, depending on focus depths and attenuations of tested samples. The signal-to-noise ratio was also improved more than 4-fold with adapted sequences. We conclude that frequency adaptation is a complementary technique that is efficient for the optimization of displacement amplitudes. This technique can be used safely to optimize the deposited local acoustic energy without increasing the risk of damaging tissues and transducer elements.

  2. S-COSMOS: The Spitzer Legacy Survey of the Hubble Space Telescope ACS 2 deg2 COSMOS Field I: Survey Strategy and First Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, D. B.; Salvato, M.; Aussel, H.; Ilbert, O.; Scoville, N.; Surace, J. A.; Frayer, D. T.; Sheth, K.; Helou, G.; Brooke, T.; Bhattacharya, B.; Yan, L.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Barnes, J. E.; Blain, A. W.; Calzetti, D.; Capak, P.; Carilli, C.; Carollo, C. M.; Comastri, A.; Daddi, E.; Ellis, R. S.; Elvis, M.; Fall, S. M.; Franceschini, A.; Giavalisco, M.; Hasinger, G.; Impey, C.; Koekemoer, A.; Le Fèvre, O.; Lilly, S.; Liu, M. C.; McCracken, H. J.; Mobasher, B.; Renzini, A.; Rich, M.; Schinnerer, E.; Shopbell, P. L.; Taniguchi, Y.; Thompson, D. J.; Urry, C. M.; Williams, J. P.

    2007-09-01

    The COSMOS Spitzer survey (S-COSMOS) is a Legacy program (Cycles 2+3) designed to carry out a uniform deep survey of the full 2 deg2 COSMOS field in all seven Spitzer bands (3.6, 4.5, 5.6, 8.0, 24.0, 70.0, and 160.0 μm). This paper describes the survey parameters, mapping strategy, data reduction procedures, achieved sensitivities to date, and the complete data set for future reference. We show that the observed infrared backgrounds in the S-COSMOS field are within 10% of the predicted background levels. The fluctuations in the background at 24 μm have been measured and do not show any significant contribution from cirrus, as expected. In addition, we report on the number of asteroid detections in the low Galactic latitude COSMOS field. We use the Cycle 2 S-COSMOS data to determine preliminary number counts, and compare our results with those from previous Spitzer Legacy surveys (e.g., SWIRE, GOODS). The results from this ``first analysis'' confirm that the S-COSMOS survey will have sufficient sensitivity with IRAC to detect ~L* disks and spheroids out to z>~3, and with MIPS to detect ultraluminous starbursts and AGNs out to z~3 at 24 μm and out to z~1.5-2 at 70 and 160 μm. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555 also based on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan; the XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and NASA; the European Southern Observatory under Large Program 175.A-0839, Chile; Kitt Peak National Observatory, Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, which are operated by AURA under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation; the National Radio Astronomy

  3. Genus dependence of superstring amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Simon

    2006-11-15

    The problem of the consistency of the finiteness of the supermoduli space integral in the limit of vanishing super-fixed point distance and the genus-dependence of the integral over the super-Schottky coordinates in the fundamental region containing a neighborhood of |K{sub n}|=0 is resolved. Given a choice of the categories of isometric circles representing the integration region, the exponential form of bounds for superstring amplitudes is derived.

  4. Pulse amplitude modulated chlorophyll fluorometer

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, Elias; Wu, Jie

    2015-12-29

    Chlorophyll fluorometry may be used for detecting toxins in a sample because of changes in micro algae. A portable lab on a chip ("LOAC") based chlorophyll fluorometer may be used for toxin detection and environmental monitoring. In particular, the system may include a microfluidic pulse amplitude modulated ("PAM") chlorophyll fluorometer. The LOAC PAM chlorophyll fluorometer may analyze microalgae and cyanobacteria that grow naturally in source drinking water.

  5. Cosmic Shear - with ACS Pure Parallel Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnatunga, Kavan

    2002-07-01

    The ACS, with greater sensitivity and sky coverage, will extend our ability to measure the weak gravitational lensing of galaxy images caused by the large scale distribution of dark matter. We propose to use the ACS in pure parallel {non- proprietary} mode, following the guidelines of the ACS Default Pure Parallel Program. Using the HST Medium Deep Survey WFPC2 database we have measured cosmic shear at arc-min angular scales. The MDS image parameters, in particular the galaxy orientations and axis ratios, are such that any residual corrections due to errors in the PSF or jitter are much smaller than the measured signal. This situation is in stark contrast with ground-based observations. We have also developed a statistical analysis procedure to derive unbiased estimates of cosmic shear from a large number of fields, each of which has a very small number of galaxies. We have therefore set the stage for measurements with the ACS at fainter apparent magnitudes and smaller, 10 arc-second scales corresponding to larger cosmological distances. We will adapt existing MDS WFPC2 maximum likelihood galaxy image analysis algorithms to work with the ACS. The analysis would also yield an online database similar to that in archive.stsci.edu/mds/

  6. Interplay between electron overheating and ac Josephson effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Cecco, A.; Le Calvez, K.; Sacépé, B.; Winkelmann, C. B.; Courtois, H.

    2016-05-01

    We study the response of high-critical-current proximity Josephson junctions to a microwave excitation. Electron overheating in such devices is known to create hysteretic dc voltage-current characteristics. Here we demonstrate that it also strongly influences the ac response. The interplay of electron overheating and ac Josephson dynamics is revealed by the evolution of the Shapiro steps with the microwave drive amplitude. Extending the resistively shunted Josephson junction model by including a thermal balance for the electronic bath coupled to phonons, a strong electron overheating is obtained.

  7. Lipid nanotube formation using space-regulated electric field above interdigitated electrodes.

    PubMed

    Bi, Hongmei; Fu, Dingguo; Wang, Lei; Han, Xiaojun

    2014-04-22

    Lipid nanotubes have great potential in biology and nanotechnology. Here we demonstrate a method to form lipid nanotubes using space-regulated AC electric fields above coplanar interdigitated electrodes. The AC electric field distribution can be regulated by solution height above the electrodes. The ratio of field component in x axis (Ex) to field component in z axis (Ez) increases dramatically at solution height below 50 μm; therefore, at lower solution height, the force from Ex predominantly drives lipids to form lipid nanotubes along with the electric field direction. The forces exerted on the lipid nanotube during its formation were analyzed in detail, and an equation was obtained to describe the relationship among nanotube length and field frequency, amplitude, and time. We believe that the presented approach opens a way to design and prepare nanoscale materials with unique structural and functional properties using space-regulated electric fields.

  8. Investigation of Spiral Bevel Gear Condition Indicator Validation via AC-29-2C Combining Test Rig Damage Progression Data with Fielded Rotorcraft Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.

    2015-01-01

    This is the final of three reports published on the results of this project. In the first report, results were presented on nineteen tests performed in the NASA Glenn Spiral Bevel Gear Fatigue Test Rig on spiral bevel gear sets designed to simulate helicopter fielded failures. In the second report, fielded helicopter HUMS data from forty helicopters were processed with the same techniques that were applied to spiral bevel rig test data. Twenty of the forty helicopters experienced damage to the spiral bevel gears, while the other twenty helicopters had no known anomalies within the time frame of the datasets. In this report, results from the rig and helicopter data analysis will be compared for differences and similarities in condition indicator (CI) response. Observations and findings using sub-scale rig failure progression tests to validate helicopter gear condition indicators will be presented. In the helicopter, gear health monitoring data was measured when damage occurred and after the gear sets were replaced at two helicopter regimes. For the helicopters or tails, data was taken in the flat pitch ground 101 rotor speed (FPG101) regime. For nine tails, data was also taken at 120 knots true airspeed (120KTA) regime. In the test rig, gear sets were tested until damage initiated and progressed while gear health monitoring data and operational parameters were measured and tooth damage progression documented. For the rig tests, the gear speed was maintained at 3500RPM, a one hour run-in was performed at 4000 in-lb gear torque, than the torque was increased to 8000 in-lbs. The HUMS gear condition indicator data evaluated included Figure of Merit 4 (FM4), Root Mean Square (RMS) or Diagnostic Algorithm 1(DA1), + 3 Sideband Index (SI3) and + 1 Sideband Index (SI1). These were selected based on their sensitivity in detecting contact fatigue damage modes from analytical, experimental and historical helicopter data. For this report, the helicopter dataset was reduced to

  9. AC power systems handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, J.

    1991-01-01

    Transient disturbances are what headaches are made of. Whatever you call them-spikes, surges, are power bumps-they can take your equipment down and leave you with a complicated and expensive repair job. Protection against transient disturbances is a science that demands attention to detail. This book explains how the power distribution system works, what can go wrong with it, and how to protect a facility against abnormalities. system grounding and shielding are covered in detail. Each major method of transient protection is analyzed and its relative merits discussed. The book provides a complete look at the critical elements of the ac power system. Provides a complete look at the ac power system from generation to consumption. Discusses the mechanisms that produce transient disturbances and how to protect against them. Presents diagrams to facilitate system design. Covers new areas, such as the extent of the transient disturbance problem, transient protection options, and stand-by power systems.

  10. Optimized anisotropic magnetoelectric response of Fe61.6Co16.4Si10.8B11.2/PVDF/Fe61.6Co16.4Si10.8B11.2 laminates for AC/DC magnetic field sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, S.; Silva, M. P.; Castro, N.; Correia, V.; Gutierrez, J.; Lasheras, A.; Lanceros-Mendez, S.; Martins, P.

    2016-05-01

    The anisotropic magnetoelectric (ME) effect on a Fe61.6Co16.4Si10.8B11.2/PVDF Fe61.6Co16.4Si10.8B11.2 laminate composite has been used for the development of a magnetic field sensor able to detect both the magnitude and direction of AC and DC magnetic fields. The accuracy (99% for both AC and DC sensors), linearity (92% for the DC sensor and 99% for the AC sensor) and reproducibility (99% for both sensors) indicate the suitability of the sensor for applications. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the Fe61.6Co16.4Si10.8B11.2/PVDF/Fe61.6Co16.4Si10.8B11.2 anisotropic magnetic sensor—15 and 1400 mV Oe-1 for the DC and AC fields, respectively—are the highest reported in the literature for polymer-based ME materials. Such features, combined with its flexibility, versatility, light weight, low cost and low-temperature fabrication, lead to the suitability of the developed sensor for use in magnetic sensor applications.

  11. Peak effect in optimally doped p-type single-crystal Ba0.5K0.5Fe2As2 studied by ac magnetization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, J.; Gutierrez, J.; Li, J.; Yuan, J.; Wang, H.-B.; Yamaura, K.; Takayama-Muromachi, E.; Moshchalkov, V. V.

    2013-10-01

    We have used the ac magnetic susceptibility to investigate the vortex state in an optimally doped p-type Ba0.5K0.5Fe2As2 single crystal under various ac and dc fields. A peak effect is observed in the temperature dependence of the in-phase ac susceptibility, indicating an order-disorder transition on the vortex phase diagram. The peak effect displays an anomalous history effect compared with other type-II superconductors, which we ascribe to the strong pinning existing in the material. We observe the development of a small dissipation peak at the temperature Tp2 slightly below the peak effect region. Similar to the peak effect boundary, Tp2 delimits a region in the H-T phase diagram which is independent on the ac field amplitude. We argue that this small peak may arise from the softening of the vortex lattice, leading to a collective pinning of the whole vortex lattice. This effect assists and further enhances the peak effect occurring in the Ba0.5K0.5Fe2As2 superconductor.

  12. Increased Ac excision (iae): Arabidopsis thaliana mutations affecting Ac transposition.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, P; Belzile, F; Page, T; Dean, C

    1997-05-01

    The maize transposable element Ac is highly active in the heterologous hosts tobacco and tomato, but shows very much reduced levels of activity in Arabidopsis. A mutagenesis experiment was undertaken with the aim of identifying Arabidopsis host factors responsible for the observed low levels of Ac activity. Seed from a line carrying a single copy of the Ac element inserted into the streptomycin phosphotransferase (SPT) reporter fusion, and which displayed typically low levels of Ac activity, were mutagenized using gamma rays. Nineteen mutants displaying high levels of somatic Ac activity, as judged by their highly variegated phenotypes, were isolated after screening the M2 generation on streptomycin-containing medium. The mutations fall into two complementation groups, iae1 and iae2, are unlinked to the SPT::Ac locus and segregate in a Mendelian fashion. The iae1 mutation is recessive and the iae2 mutation is semi-dominant. The iae1 and iae2 mutants show 550- and 70-fold increases, respectively, in the average number of Ac excision sectors per cotyledon. The IAE1 locus maps to chromosome 2, whereas the SPT::Ac reporter maps to chromosome 3. A molecular study of Ac activity in the iae1 mutant confirmed the very high levels of Ac excision predicted using the phenotypic assay, but revealed only low levels of Ac re-insertion. Analyses of germinal transposition in the iae1 mutant demonstrated an average germinal excision frequency of 3% and a frequency of independent Ac re-insertions following germinal excision of 22%. The iae mutants represents a possible means of improving the efficiency of Ac/Ds transposon tagging systems in Arabidopsis, and will enable the dissection of host involvement in Ac transposition and the mechanisms employed for controlling transposable element activity.

  13. AC corrosion -- A new challenge to pipeline integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Gummow, R.A.; Wakelin, R.G.; Segall, S.M.

    1998-12-31

    Corrosion of steel by alternating current was investigated as far back as the early 1900`s. These early studies and others in the 1950--60`s indicated that AC corrosion of steel was only a fraction of an equivalent amount of direct current (i.e. less than 1% of a like amount of DC) and in addition was controlled to negligible levels when cathodic protection was applied to industry standards. In 1986 however, an investigation into a corrosion failure on a high pressure gas pipeline in Germany indicated that the sole cause of the failure was AC corrosion. This corrosion failure on an otherwise well protected pipeline resulted in the initiation of several laboratory and field studies which indicated, that above a certain minimum AC current density, normal levels of cathodic protection will not control AC corrosion to acceptable levels and that AC mitigation is often required to prevent serious corrosion. Several other AC corrosion sites were discovered at coating holidays during the follow-up investigations in Germany. A graph, relating AC voltage to holiday size at the minimum AC current density for corrosion, is presented to assist the pipeline operator in determining whether or not a pipeline is susceptible to AC corrosion activity.

  14. AC corrosion -- a new threat to pipeline integrity?

    SciTech Connect

    Gummow, R.A.; Wakelin, R.G.; Segall, S.M.

    1996-12-31

    Corrosion of steel by alternating current was investigated as far back as the early 1900`s. These early studies and others in the 1950--60`s indicated that AC corrosion of steel was only a fraction of an equivalent amount of direct current (i.e., less than 1% of a like amount of DC) and in addition was controlled to negligible levels with cathodic protection applied to industry standards. In 1986 however, an investigation into a corrosion failure on a high pressure gas pipeline in Germany indicated that the sole cause of the failure was AC corrosion. This corrosion failure on an otherwise well protected pipeline resulted in several laboratory and field studies which indicated, that above a certain minimum AC current density, standard levels of cathodic protection will not control AC corrosion and AC mitigation is required to prevent further corrosion. Several other corrosion anomalies were discovered at coating holidays during the follow-up investigations in Germany. The authors have investigated several corrosion occurrences on pipelines in Ontario during the last 2--3 years which appear to be caused by AC corrosion. This presentation traces the literature record on AC electrolysis from the past to the present and discusses the key parameters which determine the likelihood of corrosion attack. Several case histories of suspected AC corrosion will be discussed and guidelines on how to assess whether or not a pipeline is susceptible to AC corrosion will be offered.

  15. AC plasma anemometer—characteristics and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Curtis; Matlis, Eric; Corke, Thomas; Gogineni, Sivaram

    2015-08-01

    The characteristics and design of a high-bandwidth flow sensor that uses an AC glow discharge (plasma) as the sensing element is presented. The plasma forms in the air gap between two protruding low profile electrodes attached to a probe body. The output from the anemometer is an amplitude modulated version of the AC voltage input that contains information about the mean and fluctuating velocity components. The anemometer circuitry includes resistance and capacitance elements that simulate a dielectric-barrier to maintain a diffuse plasma, and a constant-current feedback control that maintains operation within the desired glow discharge regime over an extended range of air velocities. Mean velocity calibrations are demonstrated over a range from 0 to 140 m s-1. Over this velocity range, the mean output voltage varied linearly with air velocity, providing a constant static sensitivity. The effect of the electrode gap and input AC carrier frequency on the anemometer static sensitivity and dynamic response are investigated. Experiments are performed to compare measurements obtained with a plasma sensor operating at two AC carrier frequencies against that of a constant-temperature hot-wire. All three sensors were calibrated against the same known velocity reference. An uncertainty based on the standard deviation of the velocity calibration fit was applied to the mean and fluctuating velocity measurements of the three sensors. The motivation is not to replace hot-wires as a general measurement tool, but rather as an alternative to hot-wires in harsh environments or at high Mach numbers where they either have difficulty in surviving or lack the necessary frequency response.

  16. Recent applications of AC electrokinetics in biomolecular analysis on microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    AC electrokinetics is a generic term that refers to an induced motion of particles and fluids under nonuniform AC electric fields. The AC electric fields are formed by application of AC voltages to microelectrodes, which can be easily integrated into microfluidic devices by standard microfabrication techniques. Moreover, the magnitude of the motion is large enough to control the mass transfer on the devices. These advantages are attractive for biomolecular analysis on the microfluidic devices, in which the characteristics of small space and microfluidics have been mainly employed. In this review, I describe recent applications of AC electrokinetics in biomolecular analysis on microfluidic devices. The applications include fluid pumping and mixing by AC electrokinetic flow, and manipulation of biomolecules such as DNA and proteins by various AC electrokinetic techniques. Future prospects for highly functional biomolecular analysis on microfluidic devices with the aid of AC electrokinetics are also discussed.

  17. Diffusive suppression of AC-Stark shifts in atomic magnetometers

    PubMed Central

    Sulai, I. A.; Wyllie, R.; Kauer, M.; Smetana, G. S.; Wakai, R. T.; Walker, T. G.

    2016-01-01

    In atomic magnetometers, the vector AC-Stark shift associated with circularly polarized light generates spatially varying effective magnetic fields, which limit the magnetometer response and serve as sources of noise. We describe a scheme whereby optically pumping a small subvolume of the magnetometer cell and relying on diffusion to transport polarized atoms allows a magnetometer to be operated with minimal sensitivity to the AC-Stark field. © 2013 Optical Society of America PMID:23503278

  18. Measurement of coupling resonance driving terms with the AC dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.

    2010-10-01

    Resonance driving terms for linear coupled betatron motion in a synchrotron ring can be determined from corresponding spectral lines of an excited coherent beam motion. An AC dipole is one of instruments to excite such a motion. When a coherent motion is excited with an AC dipole, measured Courant-Snyder parameters and betatron phase advance have apparent modulations, as if there is an additional quadrupole field at the location of the AC dipole. Hence, measurements of these parameters using the AC dipole require a proper interpretation of observed quantities. The situation is similar in measurements of resonance driving terms using the AC dipole. In this note, we derive an expression of coupled betatron motion excited with two AC dipoles in presence of skew quadrupole fields, discuss an impact of this quadrupole like effect of the AC dipole on a measurement of coupling resonance driving terms, and present an analytical method to determine the coupling resonance driving terms from quantities observed using the AC dipole.

  19. Broadband metasurface holograms: toward complete phase and amplitude engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiu; Zhang, Xueqian; Xu, Yuehong; Gu, Jianqiang; Li, Yanfeng; Tian, Zhen; Singh, Ranjan; Zhang, Shuang; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili

    2016-09-01

    As a revolutionary three-dimensional imaging technique, holography has attracted wide attention for its ability to photographically record a light field. However, traditional phase-only or amplitude-only modulation holograms have limited image quality and resolution to reappear both amplitude and phase information required of the objects. Recent advances in metasurfaces have shown tremendous opportunities for using a planar design of artificial meta-atoms to shape the wave front of light by optimal control of both its phase and amplitude. Inspired by the concept of designer metasurfaces, we demonstrate a novel amplitude-phase modulation hologram with simultaneous five-level amplitude modulation and eight-level phase modulation. Such a design approach seeks to turn the perceived disadvantages of the traditional phase or amplitude holograms, and thus enable enhanced performance in resolution, homogeneity of amplitude distribution, precision, and signal-to-noise ratio. In particular, the unique holographic approach exhibits broadband characteristics. The method introduced here delivers more degrees of freedom, and allows for encoding highly complex information into designer metasurfaces, thus having the potential to drive next-generation technological breakthroughs in holography.

  20. Broadband metasurface holograms: toward complete phase and amplitude engineering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiu; Zhang, Xueqian; Xu, Yuehong; Gu, Jianqiang; Li, Yanfeng; Tian, Zhen; Singh, Ranjan; Zhang, Shuang; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili

    2016-01-01

    As a revolutionary three-dimensional imaging technique, holography has attracted wide attention for its ability to photographically record a light field. However, traditional phase-only or amplitude-only modulation holograms have limited image quality and resolution to reappear both amplitude and phase information required of the objects. Recent advances in metasurfaces have shown tremendous opportunities for using a planar design of artificial meta-atoms to shape the wave front of light by optimal control of both its phase and amplitude. Inspired by the concept of designer metasurfaces, we demonstrate a novel amplitude-phase modulation hologram with simultaneous five-level amplitude modulation and eight-level phase modulation. Such a design approach seeks to turn the perceived disadvantages of the traditional phase or amplitude holograms, and thus enable enhanced performance in resolution, homogeneity of amplitude distribution, precision, and signal-to-noise ratio. In particular, the unique holographic approach exhibits broadband characteristics. The method introduced here delivers more degrees of freedom, and allows for encoding highly complex information into designer metasurfaces, thus having the potential to drive next-generation technological breakthroughs in holography.

  1. Broadband metasurface holograms: toward complete phase and amplitude engineering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiu; Zhang, Xueqian; Xu, Yuehong; Gu, Jianqiang; Li, Yanfeng; Tian, Zhen; Singh, Ranjan; Zhang, Shuang; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili

    2016-01-01

    As a revolutionary three-dimensional imaging technique, holography has attracted wide attention for its ability to photographically record a light field. However, traditional phase-only or amplitude-only modulation holograms have limited image quality and resolution to reappear both amplitude and phase information required of the objects. Recent advances in metasurfaces have shown tremendous opportunities for using a planar design of artificial meta-atoms to shape the wave front of light by optimal control of both its phase and amplitude. Inspired by the concept of designer metasurfaces, we demonstrate a novel amplitude-phase modulation hologram with simultaneous five-level amplitude modulation and eight-level phase modulation. Such a design approach seeks to turn the perceived disadvantages of the traditional phase or amplitude holograms, and thus enable enhanced performance in resolution, homogeneity of amplitude distribution, precision, and signal-to-noise ratio. In particular, the unique holographic approach exhibits broadband characteristics. The method introduced here delivers more degrees of freedom, and allows for encoding highly complex information into designer metasurfaces, thus having the potential to drive next-generation technological breakthroughs in holography. PMID:27615519

  2. Broadband metasurface holograms: toward complete phase and amplitude engineering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiu; Zhang, Xueqian; Xu, Yuehong; Gu, Jianqiang; Li, Yanfeng; Tian, Zhen; Singh, Ranjan; Zhang, Shuang; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili

    2016-01-01

    As a revolutionary three-dimensional imaging technique, holography has attracted wide attention for its ability to photographically record a light field. However, traditional phase-only or amplitude-only modulation holograms have limited image quality and resolution to reappear both amplitude and phase information required of the objects. Recent advances in metasurfaces have shown tremendous opportunities for using a planar design of artificial meta-atoms to shape the wave front of light by optimal control of both its phase and amplitude. Inspired by the concept of designer metasurfaces, we demonstrate a novel amplitude-phase modulation hologram with simultaneous five-level amplitude modulation and eight-level phase modulation. Such a design approach seeks to turn the perceived disadvantages of the traditional phase or amplitude holograms, and thus enable enhanced performance in resolution, homogeneity of amplitude distribution, precision, and signal-to-noise ratio. In particular, the unique holographic approach exhibits broadband characteristics. The method introduced here delivers more degrees of freedom, and allows for encoding highly complex information into designer metasurfaces, thus having the potential to drive next-generation technological breakthroughs in holography. PMID:27615519

  3. Berends-Giele recursion for double-color-ordered amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mafra, Carlos R.

    2016-07-01

    Tree-level double-color-ordered amplitudes are computed using Berends-Giele recursion relations applied to the bi-adjoint cubic scalar theory. The standard notion of Berends-Giele currents is generalized to double-currents and their recursions are derived from a perturbiner expansion of linearized fields that solve the non-linear field equations. Two applications are given. Firstly, we prove that the entries of the inverse KLT matrix are equal to Berends-Giele double-currents (and are therefore easy to compute). And secondly, a simple formula to generate tree-level BCJ-satisfying numerators for arbitrary multiplicity is proposed by evaluating the field-theory limit of tree-level string amplitudes for various color orderings using double-color-ordered amplitudes.

  4. Amplitude Equation for Instabilities Driven at Deformable Surfaces - Rosensweig Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleiner, Harald; Bohlius, Stefan; Brand, Helmut R.

    2008-11-01

    The derivation of amplitude equations from basic hydro-, magneto-, or electrodynamic equations requires the knowledge of the set of adjoint linear eigenvectors. This poses a particular problem for the case of a free and deformable surface, where the adjoint boundary conditions are generally non-trivial. In addition, when the driving force acts on the system via the deformable surface, not only Fredholm's alternative in the bulk, but also the proper boundary conditions are required to get amplitude equations. This is explained and demonstrated for the normal field (or Rosensweig) instability in ferrofluids as well as in ferrogels. An important aspect of the problem is its intrinsic dynamic nature, although at the end the instability is stationary. The resulting amplitude equation contains cubic and quadratic nonlinearities as well as first and (in the gel case) second order time derivatives. Spatial variations of the amplitudes cannot be obtained by using simply Newell's method in the bulk.

  5. Influence of the ac Stark effect on multiphoton transitions in molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerts, W. Leo; Ozier, Irving; Hougen, Jon T.

    1989-05-01

    A multiphoton mechanism for molecular beam transitions is presented which relies on a large first-order ac Stark effect to modulate the energy separation of the initial and final states of the multiphoton transition, but which does not require the presence of any intermediate level(s). The theoretical formalism uses ideas from the laser multiphoton literature for a two-level system interacting with a monochromatic electromagnetic radiation field, together with a close analog of the rotating wave approximation. The diagonal matrix elements of the Hamiltonian operator corresponding to the large ac Stark effect are removed by a mathematical substitution which in effect transforms appropriate differences of these diagonal elements into transition moments involving higher harmonics of the frequency of the monochromatic radiation field. The electric field strength of the true monochromatic radiation field is ``distributed'' among the higher harmonics of the effective field according to an expression involving Bessel functions. Because these Bessel functions are bounded, there exists for a given time t of exposure to the radiation, a threshold for the magnitude of the transition dipole matrix element coupling the two levels: Below this threshold, the transition probability in a traditional one-photon molecular beam electric resonance experiment cannot be made unity simply by increasing the amplitude of the radiation field. In fact, if the coupling matrix element is small enough, the molecular beam electric resonance signal cannot be detected within exposure time t. The algebraic formalism described above is checked by computer solution of an initial value problem involving four real coupled linear differential equations. It is then used to explain the multiphoton transitions previously observed in molecular beam electric resonance studies on the two symmetric top molecules OPF3 and CH3 CF3, where the number of photons involved in a given transition varies from 1

  6. Cytotoxicity of 213Bi- and 225Ac-immunoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Kaspersen, F M; Bos, E; Doornmalen, A V; Geerlings, M W; Apostolidis, C; Molinet, R

    1995-06-01

    This paper describes in vitro cytotoxicity experiments with 213Bi- and 225Ac-immunoconjugates on the human epidermoid tumour cell line A431 using a blood group A-reactive murine IgG (2D11) as the specific antibody and MOPC 21 as the control antibody. With both radionuclides, specific cell-killing was achieved. The observed cytotoxicity of 213Bi (T1/2 - 47 min) indicates that this radionuclide is a useful alternative for the alpha-emitter 212Bi in the treatment of blood-borne malignancies. 225Ac-immunoconjugates (T1/2 of 225Ac is 10 days) may be applicable for the treatment of solid tumours, since the daughter radionuclides of 225Ac contribute to the cytotoxic efficacy by a field effect (i.e. toxicity in an area distal from the antibody-binding site). The lack of an adequate chelator for 225Ac is a major drawback.

  7. Constructing Amplitudes from Their Soft Limits

    SciTech Connect

    Boucher-Veronneau, Camille; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC

    2011-12-09

    The existence of universal soft limits for gauge-theory and gravity amplitudes has been known for a long time. The properties of the soft limits have been exploited in numerous ways; in particular for relating an n-point amplitude to an (n-1)-point amplitude by removing a soft particle. Recently, a procedure called inverse soft was developed by which 'soft' particles can be systematically added to an amplitude to construct a higher-point amplitude for generic kinematics. We review this procedure and relate it to Britto-Cachazo-Feng-Witten recursion. We show that all tree-level amplitudes in gauge theory and gravity up through seven points can be constructed in this way, as well as certain classes of NMHV gauge-theory amplitudes with any number of external legs. This provides us with a systematic procedure for constructing amplitudes solely from their soft limits.

  8. AC resistance measuring instrument

    DOEpatents

    Hof, P.J.

    1983-10-04

    An auto-ranging AC resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an AC excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance. After the auto-ranging and auto-compensation functions are complete, the microprocessor calculates the resistance of the load from the selected range resistance, the excitation signal, and the load voltage signal, and displays of the measured resistance on a digital display of the instrument. 8 figs.

  9. AC Resistance measuring instrument

    DOEpatents

    Hof, Peter J.

    1983-01-01

    An auto-ranging AC resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an AC excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance. After the auto-ranging and auto-compensation functions are complete, the microprocessor calculates the resistance of the load from the selected range resistance, the excitation signal, and the load voltage signal, and displays of the measured resistance on a digital display of the instrument.

  10. THE ACS NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY TREASURY

    SciTech Connect

    Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Rosema, Keith; Gogarten, Stephanie M.; Christensen, Charlotte; Gilbert, Karoline; Hodge, Paul; Seth, Anil C.; Dolphin, Andrew; Holtzman, Jon; Skillman, Evan D.; Weisz, Daniel; Cole, Andrew; Girardi, Leo; Karachentsev, Igor D.; Olsen, Knut; Freeman, Ken; Gallart, Carme; De Jong, Roelof S. E-mail: ben@astro.washington.edu E-mail: stephanie@astro.washington.edu E-mail: fabio@astro.washington.edu E-mail: aseth@cfa.harvard.edu

    2009-07-15

    The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury (ANGST) is a systematic survey to establish a legacy of uniform multi-color photometry of resolved stars for a volume-limited sample of nearby galaxies (D < 4 Mpc). The survey volume encompasses 69 galaxies in diverse environments, including close pairs, small and large groups, filaments, and truly isolated regions. The galaxies include a nearly complete range of morphological types spanning a factor of {approx}10{sup 4} in luminosity and star formation rate. The survey data consist of images taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), supplemented with archival data and new Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) imaging taken after the failure of ACS. Survey images include wide field tilings covering the full radial extent of each galaxy, and single deep pointings in uncrowded regions of the most massive galaxies in the volume. The new wide field imaging in ANGST reaches median 50% completenesses of m {sub F475W} = 28.0 mag, m {sub F606W} = 27.3 mag, and m {sub F814W} = 27.3 mag, several magnitudes below the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB). The deep fields reach magnitudes sufficient to fully resolve the structure in the red clump. The resulting photometric catalogs are publicly accessible and contain over 34 million photometric measurements of >14 million stars. In this paper we present the details of the sample selection, imaging, data reduction, and the resulting photometric catalogs, along with an analysis of the photometric uncertainties (systematic and random), for both ACS and WFPC2 imaging. We also present uniformly derived relative distances measured from the apparent magnitude of the TRGB.

  11. Gauge dependence in QED amplitudes in expanding de Sitter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaevici, Nistor

    2016-04-01

    We consider first-order transition amplitudes in external fields in QED in the expanding de Sitter space and point out that they are gauge dependent quantities. We examine the gauge variations of the amplitudes assuming a decoupling of the interaction at large times, which allows to conclude that the source of the problem lies in the fact that the frequencies of the modes in the infinite future become independent of the comoving momenta. We show that a possibility to assure the gauge invariance of the external field amplitudes is to restrict to potentials which vanish sufficiently fast at infinite times, and briefly discuss a number of options in the face of the possible gauge invariance violation in the full interacting theory.

  12. PtCu substrates subjected to AC and DC electric fields in a solution of benzene sulfonic acid-phenol as novel batteries and their use in glucose biofuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammam, Malika; Fransaer, Jan

    2013-11-01

    We describe how bi-metal PtCu connected wires, immersed in a solution of benzene sulfonic acid (BSA)-phenol (P) or 2,2‧-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS)-phenol (P), then subjected to simultaneous alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) electric fields generate power. We discovered that PtCu substrate covered by the deposit containing (BSA-PP-Pt-Cu), abbreviated as PtCu(BSA-PP-Pt-Cu) electrode, plays the role of a substantial anode and cathode. The latter was related to the formation of micro-batteries in the deposited film (BSA-PP-Pt-Cu) that are able to take or deliver electrons from the deposited Pt and Cu, respectively. PP-BSA plays probably the role of bridge for proton conduction in the formed micro-batteries. The power density of the fuel cell (FC)-based PtCu(BSA-PP-Pt-Cu) anode and PtCu(BSA-PP-Pt-Cu) cathode in phosphate buffer solution pH 7.4 at room temperature reaches ˜10.8 μW mm-2. Addition of enzymes, glucose oxidase at the anode and laccase at the cathode and, replacement of BSA by ABTS at the cathode in the deposited films increases the power density to 13.3 μW mm-2. This new procedure might be of great relevance for construction of a new generation of FCs operating at mild conditions or boost the power outputs of BFCs and make them suitable for diverse applications.

  13. Identification of /sup 233/Ac

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Y.Y.; Zhou, M.L.

    1983-09-01

    We report in this paper identification of the new isotope /sup 233/Ac. Uranium targets were irradiated with 28 GeV protons; after rapid retrieval of the target and separation of actinium from thorium, /sup 233/Ac was allowed to decay into the known /sup 233/Th daughter. Exhaustive chemical purification was employed to permit the identification of /sup 233/Th via its characteristic ..gamma.. radiations. The half-life derived for /sup 233/Ac from several experiments is 2.3 +- 0.3 min. The production cross section for /sup 233/Ac is 100 ..mu..b.

  14. AC and DC power transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The technical and economic assessment of AC and DC transmission systems; long distance transmission, cable transmission, system inter-connection, voltage support, reactive compensation, stabilisation of systems; parallel operation of DC links with AC systems; comparison between alternatives for particular schemes. Design and application equipment: design, testing and application of equipment for HVDC, series and shunt static compensated AC schemes, including associated controls. Installations: overall design of stations and conductor arrangements for HVDC, series and shunt static AC schemes including insulation co-ordination. System analysis and modelling.

  15. The pulsed amplitude unit for the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Rolfe, J.; Browne, M.J.; Jobe, R.K.

    1987-02-01

    There is a recurring requirement in the SLC for the control of devices such as magnets, phase shifters, and attenuators on a beam-by-beam basis. The Pulsed Amplitude Unit (PAU) is a single width CAMAC module developed for this purpose. It provides digitally programmed analog output voltages on a beam-by-beam basis. Up to 32 preprogrammed values of output voltage are available from the single analog output of the module, and any of these values can be associated with any of the 256 possible SLC beam definitions. A 12-bit Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) digitizes an analog input signal at the appropriate beam time and stores it in a buffer memory. This feature is normally used to monitor the response of the device being controlled by the PAU at each beam time. Initial application of the PAU is a part of the system that controls the output of Klystrons in the SLC. The PAU combines several different functions in a single module. In order to accommodate these functions in a single width CAMAC module, field programmed logic is used extensively. Field Programmable Logic Arrays, Programmed Array Logic, and a Field Programmable Logic Sequencer are employed.

  16. Stochastic heating of electrons by a large-amplitude extraordinary wave in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Krasovitskiy, V. B.; Turikov, V. A.

    2010-12-15

    Stochastic heating of plasma electrons by a large-amplitude electromagnetic wave propagating across a strong external magnetic field is studied theoretically and numerically. An analytic estimate of the threshold wave amplitude at which heating begins is obtained. The dependence of the average electron energy on the magnetic field and plasma density is investigated using particle-in-cell simulations.

  17. Digital ac monitor

    DOEpatents

    Hart, G.W.; Kern, E.C. Jr.

    1987-06-09

    An apparatus and method is provided for monitoring a plurality of analog ac circuits by sampling the voltage and current waveform in each circuit at predetermined intervals, converting the analog current and voltage samples to digital format, storing the digitized current and voltage samples and using the stored digitized current and voltage samples to calculate a variety of electrical parameters; some of which are derived from the stored samples. The non-derived quantities are repeatedly calculated and stored over many separate cycles then averaged. The derived quantities are then calculated at the end of an averaging period. This produces a more accurate reading, especially when averaging over a period in which the power varies over a wide dynamic range. Frequency is measured by timing three cycles of the voltage waveform using the upward zero crossover point as a starting point for a digital timer. 24 figs.

  18. Digital ac monitor

    DOEpatents

    Hart, George W.; Kern, Jr., Edward C.

    1987-06-09

    An apparatus and method is provided for monitoring a plurality of analog ac circuits by sampling the voltage and current waveform in each circuit at predetermined intervals, converting the analog current and voltage samples to digital format, storing the digitized current and voltage samples and using the stored digitized current and voltage samples to calculate a variety of electrical parameters; some of which are derived from the stored samples. The non-derived quantities are repeatedly calculated and stored over many separate cycles then averaged. The derived quantities are then calculated at the end of an averaging period. This produces a more accurate reading, especially when averaging over a period in which the power varies over a wide dynamic range. Frequency is measured by timing three cycles of the voltage waveform using the upward zero crossover point as a starting point for a digital timer.

  19. Concurrent Electroencephalography Recording During Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation (tACS)

    PubMed Central

    Fehér, Kristoffer D.; Morishima, Yosuke

    2016-01-01

    Oscillatory brain activities are considered to reflect the basis of rhythmic changes in transmission efficacy across brain networks and are assumed to integrate cognitive neural processes. Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) holds the promise to elucidate the causal link between specific frequencies of oscillatory brain activity and cognitive processes. Simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG) recording during tACS would offer an opportunity to directly explore immediate neurophysiological effects of tACS. However, it is not trivial to measure EEG signals during tACS, as tACS creates a huge artifact in EEG data. Here we explain how to set up concurrent tACS-EEG experiments. Two necessary considerations for successful EEG recording while applying tACS are highlighted. First, bridging of the tACS and EEG electrodes via leaking EEG gel immediately saturates the EEG amplifier. To avoid bridging via gel, the viscosity of the EEG gel is the most important parameter. The EEG gel must be viscous to avoid bridging, but at the same time sufficiently fluid to create contact between the tACS electrode and the scalp. Second, due to the large amplitude of the tACS artifact, it is important to consider using an EEG system with a high resolution analog-to-digital (A/D) converter. In particular, the magnitude of the tACS artifact can exceed 100 mV at the vicinity of a stimulation electrode when 1 mA tACS is applied. The resolution of the A/D converter is of importance to measure good quality EEG data from the vicinity of the stimulation site. By following these guidelines for the procedures and technical considerations, successful concurrent EEG recording during tACS will be realized. PMID:26862814

  20. Small-amplitude oscillatory shear magnetorheology of inverse ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Jose; de Vicente, Juan; Hidalgo-Alvarez, Roque

    2010-06-15

    A comprehensive investigation is performed on highly monodisperse silica-based inverse ferrofluids under small-amplitude oscillatory shear in the presence of external magnetic fields up to 1 T. The effect of particle volume fraction and continuous medium Newtonian viscosity is thoroughly investigated. Experimental results for storage modulus are used to validate existing micromechanical magnetorheological models assuming different particle-level field-induced structures. PMID:20345105

  1. Phase-sensitive detection of both inductive and non-inductive ac voltages in ferromagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, Mathias; Shaw, Justin M.; Nembach, Hans T.; Schoen, Martin A.; Boone, Carl T.; Silva, Thomas J.

    2014-03-01

    Spin pumping causes significant damping in ultrathin ferromagnetic/normal metal (NM) multilayers via spin-current generation of both dc and ac character in the NM system. While the nonlinear dc component has been investigated in detail by utilization of the inverse spin Hall effect (iSHE) in NMs, much less is known about the linear ac component that is presumably much larger in the small-excitation limit. We measured generated ac voltages in a wide variety of Permalloy/NM multilayers via vector-network-analyzer ferromagnetic resonance. We employ a custom, impedance-matched, broadband microwave coupler that features a ferromagnetic thin film reference resonator to accurately compare ac voltage amplitudes and phases between varieties of multilayers. By use of the fact that inductive and ac iSHE signals are phase-shifted by π/2, we find that inductive signals are major contributors in all investigated samples. It is only by comparison of the phase and amplitude of the recorded ac voltages between multiple samples that we can extract the non-inductive contributions due to spin-currents. Voltages due to the ac iSHE in Permalloy(10nm)/platinum(5nm) bilayers are weaker than inductive signals, in agreement with calculations based upon recent theoretical predictions. M.W. acknowledges financial support by the German Academic Exchange service (DAAD).

  2. Recursive Construction of Higgs-Plus-Multiparton Loop Amplitudes:The Last of the \\phi-nite Loop Amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Carola F.; Del Duca, Vittorio; Dixon, Lance J.

    2006-08-18

    We consider a scalar field, such as the Higgs boson H, coupled to gluons via the effective operator H tr G{sub {mu}{nu}} G{sup {mu}{nu}} induced by a heavy-quark loop. We treat H as the real part of a complex field {phi} which couples to the self-dual part of the gluon field-strength, via the operator {phi} tr G{sub SD {mu}{nu}} G{sub SD}{sup {mu}{nu}}, whereas the conjugate field {phi} couples to the anti-self-dual part. There are three infinite sequences of amplitudes coupling {phi} to quarks and gluons that vanish at tree level, and hence are finite at one loop, in the QCD coupling. Using on-shell recursion relations, we find compact expressions for these three sequences of amplitudes and discuss their analytic properties.

  3. A HTS scanning magnet and AC operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatanaka, K.; Nakagawa, J.; Fukuda, M.; Yorita, T.; Saito, T.; Sakemi, Y.; Kawaguchi, T.; Noda, K.

    2010-04-01

    A scanning magnet using high-temperature superconductor (HTS) wire was designed, built, and tested for its suitability as a beam scanner. After successful cooling tests, the magnet performance was studied using DC and AC currents. With DC current the magnet was successfully operated to generate designed field distributions and effective length. In AC mode, the magnet was operated at frequencies of 30-59 Hz and a temperature of 77 K as well as 10-20 Hz and 20 K. The power losses dissipated in the coils were measured and compared with the model calculations. The observed losses per cycle were independent of the frequency and the scaling law of the transport current was consistent with theoretical predictions for hysteretic losses in HTS wires.

  4. Role of fluctuations and nonlinearities on field emission nanomechanical self-oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barois, T.; Perisanu, S.; Vincent, P.; Purcell, S. T.; Ayari, A.

    2013-11-01

    A theoretical and experimental description of the threshold, amplitude, and stability of a self-oscillating nanowire in a field emission configuration is presented. Two thresholds for the onset of self-oscillation are identified, one induced by fluctuations of the electromagnetic environment and a second revealed by these fluctuations by measuring the probability density function of the current. The ac and dc components of the current and the phase stability are quantified. An ac to dc ratio above 100% and an Allan deviation of 1.3×10-5 at room temperature can be attained. Finally, it is shown that a simple nonlinear model cannot describe the equilibrium effective potential in the self-oscillating regime due to the high amplitude of oscillations.

  5. AC Losses in the MICE Channel Magnets -- Is This a Curse or aBlessing?

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Wu, H.; Wang, L.; Kai, L.L.; Jia, L.X.; Yang, S.Q.

    2008-01-31

    This report discusses the AC losses in the MICE channelmagnets during magnet charging and discharging. This report talks aboutthe three types of AC losses in the MICE magnets; the hysteretic AC lossin the superconductor, the coupling AC loss in the superconductor and theeddy current AC loss in the magnet mandrel and support structure. AClosses increase the heat load at 4 K. The added heat load increases thetemperature of the second stage of the cooler. In addition, AC losscontributes to the temperature rise between the second stage cold headand the high field point of the magnet, which is usually close to themagnet hot spot. These are the curses of AC loss in the MICE magnet thatcan limit the rate at which the magnet can be charge or discharged. Ifone is willing to allow some of the helium that is around the magnet toboil away during a magnet charge or discharge, AC losses can become ablessing. The boil off helium from the AC losses can be used to cool theupper end of the HTS leads and the surrounding shield. The AC losses arepresented for all three types of MICE magnets. The AC loss temperaturedrops within the coupling magnet are presented as an example of how boththe curse and blessing of the AC losses can be combined.

  6. Quantitative phase-amplitude microscopy I: optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Barone-Nugent, E D; Barty, A; Nugent, K A

    2002-06-01

    In this paper, the application of a new optical microscopy method (quantitative phase-amplitude microscopy) to biological imaging is explored, and the issue of resolution and image quality is examined. The paper begins by presenting a theoretical analysis of the method using the optical transfer function formalism of Streibl (1985). The effect of coherence on the formation of the phase image is explored, and it is shown that the resolution of the method is not compromised over that of a conventional bright-field image. It is shown that the signal-to-noise ratio of the phase recovery, however, does depend on the degree of coherence in the illumination. Streibl (1985) notes that partially coherent image formation is a non-linear process because of the intermingling of amplitude and phase information. The work presented here shows that the quantitative phase-amplitude microscopy method acts to linearize the image formation process, and that the phase and amplitude information is properly described using a transfer function analysis. The theoretical conclusions are tested experimentally using an optical microscope and the theoretical deductions are confirmed. Samples for microscopy influence both the phase and amplitude of the light wave and it is demonstrated that the new phase recovery method can separate the amplitude and phase information, something not possible using traditional phase microscopy. In the case of a coherent wave, knowledge of the phase and amplitude constitutes complete information that can be used to emulate other forms of microscopy. This capacity is demonstrated by recovering the phase of a sample and using the data to emulate a differential interference contrast image.

  7. Collinear limit of scattering amplitudes at strong coupling.

    PubMed

    Basso, Benjamin; Sever, Amit; Vieira, Pedro

    2014-12-31

    In this Letter, we consider the collinear limit of gluon scattering amplitudes in planar N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory at strong coupling. We argue that in this limit scattering amplitudes map into correlators of twist fields in the two dimensional nonlinear O(6) sigma model, similar to those appearing in recent studies of entanglement entropy. We provide evidence for this assertion by combining the intuition springing from the string world-sheet picture and the predictions coming from the operator product expansion series. One of the main implications of these considerations is that scattering amplitudes receive equally important contributions at strong coupling from both the minimal string area and its fluctuations in the sphere. PMID:25615305

  8. Mammalian cycles: internally defined periods and interaction-driven amplitudes.

    PubMed

    Ginzburg, L R; Krebs, C J

    2015-01-01

    The cause of mammalian cycles-the rise and fall of populations over a predictable period of time-has remained controversial since these patterns were first observed over a century ago. In spite of extensive work on observable mammalian cycles, the field has remained divided upon what the true cause is, with a majority of opinions attributing it to either predation or to intra-species mechanisms. Here we unite the eigenperiod hypothesis, which describes an internal, maternal effect-based mechanism to explain the cycles' periods with a recent generalization explaining the amplitude of snowshoe hare cycles in northwestern North America based on initial predator abundance. By explaining the period and the amplitude of the cycle with separate mechanisms, a unified and consistent view of the causation of cycles is reached. Based on our suggested theory, we forecast the next snowshoe hare cycle (predicted peak in 2016) to be of extraordinarily low amplitude.

  9. Chronotaxic systems with separable amplitude and phase dynamics.

    PubMed

    Suprunenko, Yevhen F; Clemson, Philip T; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, deterministic nonautonomous oscillatory systems with stable amplitudes and time-varying frequencies were not recognized as such and have often been mistreated as stochastic. These systems, named chronotaxic, were introduced in Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 024101 (2013). In contrast to conventional limit cycle models of self-sustained oscillators, these systems posses a time-dependent point attractor or steady state. This allows oscillations with time-varying frequencies to resist perturbations, a phenomenon which is ubiquitous in living systems. In this work a detailed theory of chronotaxic systems is presented, specifically in the case of separable amplitude and phase dynamics. The theory is extended by the introduction of chronotaxic amplitude dynamics. The wide applicability of chronotaxic systems to a range of fields from biological and condensed matter systems to robotics and control theory is discussed.

  10. Mammalian cycles: internally defined periods and interaction-driven amplitudes.

    PubMed

    Ginzburg, L R; Krebs, C J

    2015-01-01

    The cause of mammalian cycles-the rise and fall of populations over a predictable period of time-has remained controversial since these patterns were first observed over a century ago. In spite of extensive work on observable mammalian cycles, the field has remained divided upon what the true cause is, with a majority of opinions attributing it to either predation or to intra-species mechanisms. Here we unite the eigenperiod hypothesis, which describes an internal, maternal effect-based mechanism to explain the cycles' periods with a recent generalization explaining the amplitude of snowshoe hare cycles in northwestern North America based on initial predator abundance. By explaining the period and the amplitude of the cycle with separate mechanisms, a unified and consistent view of the causation of cycles is reached. Based on our suggested theory, we forecast the next snowshoe hare cycle (predicted peak in 2016) to be of extraordinarily low amplitude. PMID:26339557

  11. Mammalian cycles: internally defined periods and interaction-driven amplitudes

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, CJ

    2015-01-01

    The cause of mammalian cycles—the rise and fall of populations over a predictable period of time—has remained controversial since these patterns were first observed over a century ago. In spite of extensive work on observable mammalian cycles, the field has remained divided upon what the true cause is, with a majority of opinions attributing it to either predation or to intra-species mechanisms. Here we unite the eigenperiod hypothesis, which describes an internal, maternal effect-based mechanism to explain the cycles’ periods with a recent generalization explaining the amplitude of snowshoe hare cycles in northwestern North America based on initial predator abundance. By explaining the period and the amplitude of the cycle with separate mechanisms, a unified and consistent view of the causation of cycles is reached. Based on our suggested theory, we forecast the next snowshoe hare cycle (predicted peak in 2016) to be of extraordinarily low amplitude. PMID:26339557

  12. Amplitude and polarization asymmetries in a ring laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, L. L.; Buholz, N. E.

    1971-01-01

    Asymmetric amplitude effects between the oppositely directed traveling waves in a He-Ne ring laser are analyzed both theoretically and experimentally. These effects make it possible to detect angular orientations of an inner-cavity bar with respect to the plane of the ring cavity. The amplitude asymmetries occur when a birefringent bar is placed in the three-mirror ring cavity, and an axial magnetic field is applied to the active medium. A simplified theoretical analysis is performed by using a first order perturbation theory to derive an expression for the polarization of the active medium, and a set of self-consistent equations are derived to predict threshold conditions. Polarization asymmetries between the oppositely directed waves are also predicted. Amplitude asymmetries similar in nature to those predicted at threshold occur when the laser is operating in 12-15 free-running modes, and polarization asymmetry occurs simultaneously.

  13. Amplitude-dependent station magnitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radzyner, Yael; Ben Horin, Yochai; Steinberg, David M.

    2016-04-01

    Magnitude, a concept first presented by Gutenberg and Richter, adjusts measurements of ground motion for epicentral distance and source depth. Following this principle, the IDC defines the j'th station body wave magnitude for event i as mb(stai,j) = log 10(Aj,i/Tj,i) + V C(Δj,i,hi) , where VC is the Veith-Clawson (VC) correction to compensate for the epicentral distance of the station and the depth of the source. The network magnitude is calculated as the average of station magnitudes. The IDC magnitude estimation is used for event characterization and discrimination and it should be as accurate as possible. Ideally, the network magnitude should be close in value to the station magnitudes. In reality, it is observed that the residuals range between -1 and 1 mu or ±25% of a given mb(neti) value. We show that the residual, mb(neti) -mb(staj,i), depends linearly on log 10(Aj,i/Tj,i), and we correct for this dependence using the following procedure: Calculate a "jackknifed" network magnitude, mbj,n(neti), i.e. an average over all participating stations except station n. Using all measurements at station n, calculate the parameters an, bn of the linear fit of the residual mbj,n(neti) - mb(stan,i to log 10(An,i/Tn,i). For each event i at station n calculate the new station magnitude mbnew(stan,i) = (an + 1)log(An,i/Tn,i) + V C(Δn,i,hi) + bn Calculate the new network magnitude: mbnew(neti) = 1N- ∑ n=1nmbnew(stan,i) The procedure was used on more than two million station-event pairs. Correcting for the station-specific dependence on log amplitude reduces the residuals by roughly a third. We have calculated the spread of the distributions, and compared the original values and those for the corrected magnitudes. The spread is the ratio between the variance of the network magnitudes, and the variance of the residual. Calculations show an increase in the ratio of the variance, meaning that the correction process presented in this document did not lead to loss of variance

  14. Minimal Basis for Gauge Theory Amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Bjerrum-Bohr, N. E. J.; Damgaard, Poul H.; Vanhove, Pierre

    2009-10-16

    Identities based on monodromy for integrations in string theory are used to derive relations between different color-ordered tree-level amplitudes in both bosonic and supersymmetric string theory. These relations imply that the color-ordered tree-level n-point gauge theory amplitudes can be expanded in a minimal basis of (n-3)exclamation amplitudes. This result holds for any choice of polarizations of the external states and in any number of dimensions.

  15. Discontinuities of multi-Regge amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadin, V. S.

    2015-04-01

    In the BFKL approach, discontinuities of multiple production amplitudes in invariant masses of produced particles are discussed. It turns out that they are in evident contradiction with the BDS ansatz for n-gluon amplitudes in the planar N = 4 SYM at n ≥ 6. An explicit expression for the NLO discontinuity of the two-to-four amplitude in the invariant mass of two produced gluons is is presented.

  16. Operation Method for AC Motor Control during Power Interruption in Direct AC/AC Converter System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shizu, Keiichiro; Azuma, Satoshi

    Direct AC/AC converters have been studied due to their potential use in power converters with no DC-link capacitor, which can contribute to the miniaturization of power converters. However, the absence of a DC-link capacitor makes it difficult to control the AC motor during power interruption. First, this paper proposes a system that realizes AC motor control during power interruption by utilizing a clamp capacitor. In general, direct AC/AC converters have a clamp circuit consisting of a rectifier diode(s) and a clamp capacitor in order to avoid over-voltages. In the proposed system, there is an additional semiconductor switch reverse-parallel to the rectifier diode(s), and the clamp capacitor voltage can be utilized for AC motor control by turning on the additional switch. Second, this paper discusses an operation method for AC motor control and clamp capacitor voltage control during power interruption. In the proposed method “DC-link voltage control”, the kinetic energy in the AC motor is transformed into electrical energy and stored in the clamp capacitor; the clamp capacitor is therefore charged and the capacitor voltage is controlled to remain constant at an instruction value. Third, this paper discusses a switching operation during power interruption. A dead-time is introduced between the operation of turning off all switches on the rectifier side and the operation of turning on the additional switch, which prevents the occurrence of a short circuit between the interrupted power source and the clamp capacitor. Finally, experimental results are presented. During power interruptions, an output current was continuously obtained and the clamp capacitor voltage was maintained to be equal to the instruction value of the capacitor voltage. These results indicate that both AC motor control and capacitor voltage control were successfully achieved by using the proposed system.

  17. Simulation of absolute amplitudes of ultrasound signals using equivalent circuits.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Jonny; Martinsson, Pär-Erik; Delsing, Jerker

    2007-10-01

    Equivalent circuits for piezoelectric devices and ultrasonic transmission media can be used to cosimulate electronics and ultrasound parts in simulators originally intended for electronics. To achieve efficient system-level optimization, it is important to simulate correct, absolute amplitude of the ultrasound signal in the system, as this determines the requirements on the electronics regarding dynamic range, circuit noise, and power consumption. This paper presents methods to achieve correct, absolute amplitude of an ultrasound signal in a simulation of a pulse-echo system using equivalent circuits. This is achieved by taking into consideration loss due to diffraction and the effect of the cable that connects the electronics and the piezoelectric transducer. The conductive loss in the transmission line that models the propagation media of the ultrasound pulse is used to model the loss due to diffraction. Results show that the simulated amplitude of the echo follows measured values well in both near and far fields, with an offset of about 10%. The use of a coaxial cable introduces inductance and capacitance that affect the amplitude of a received echo. Amplitude variations of 60% were observed when the cable length was varied between 0.07 m and 2.3 m, with simulations predicting similar variations. The high precision in the achieved results show that electronic design and system optimization can rely on system simulations alone. This will simplify the development of integrated electronics aimed at ultrasound systems. PMID:18019234

  18. Perceptions of breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) levels among a sample of bar patrons with BrAC values of 0.08% or higher.

    PubMed

    Martin, Ryan J; Chaney, Beth H; Cremeens-Matthews, Jennifer; Vail-Smith, Karen

    2016-09-01

    Breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) is a commonly used measure of alcohol intoxication. Because of the potential negative consequences of excessive alcohol consumption, it is important to examine how accurately intoxicated individuals can estimate their BrAC values, especially individuals over the legal BrAC driving threshold (i.e., 0.08%). To better understand perceptions of BrAC values among intoxicated individuals, this field study examined actual BrAC values and BrAC range estimates (0.08% and above, 0.02-0.07%, less than 0.02%) among a sample of bar patrons (N = 454) with BrAC levels at 0.08% or higher. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to examine the relationship between actual BrAC values and perceived BrAC levels. We also examined whether the following demographic and drinking variables were associated with underestimating BrAC in this sample: gender, age, race, college student status, plans to get home, and hazardous drinking. Results indicated that the majority (60.4%) of participants underestimated their BrAC (i.e., less than 0.08%) and lower BrAC values correlated with underestimating BrAC ranges (p < .001, 95% CI[0.2, 0.6]). Further, females (p = .001, 95% CI[1.3, 3.3]) and participants under 21 (p = .039, 95% CI = 1.0, 2.6) were significantly more likely to estimate their BrAC to be less than 0.08%, which is concerning given that young (less than 21) intoxicated females are a group at high risk for sexual assault on college campuses. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27631614

  19. Vertex amplitudes in spin foam loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, David

    2016-03-01

    We discuss properties of the vertex expansion for homogeneous, isotropic loop quantum cosmological models sourced by a massless, minimally coupled scalar field, which in this model plays the role of an internal matter ``clock''. We show that the vertex expansion, first written down by Ashtekar, Campiglia and Henderson, must be thought of as a short-time expansion in the sense that the amplitude for volume transitions is constrained both by the order of the expansion and by the elapsed scalar field. To calculate the amplitude for significant volume changes or between large differences in the value of the scalar field requires the expansion be evaluated to very high order. This contribution describes work in collaboration with P. Singh.

  20. Self-demodulation of amplitude-modulated signal components in amplitude-modulated bone-conducted ultrasonic hearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Kazuhito; Nakagawa, Seiji

    2015-07-01

    A novel hearing aid system utilizing amplitude-modulated bone-conducted ultrasound (AM-BCU) is being developed for use by profoundly deaf people. However, there is a lack of research on the acoustic aspects of AM-BCU hearing. In this study, acoustic fields in the ear canal under AM-BCU stimulation were examined with respect to the self-demodulation effect of amplitude-modulated signal components generated in the ear canal. We found self-demodulated signals with an audible sound pressure level related to the amplitude-modulated signal components of bone-conducted ultrasonic stimulation. In addition, the increases in the self-demodulated signal levels at low frequencies in the ear canal after occluding the ear canal opening, i.e., the positive occlusion effect, indicate the existence of a pathway by which the self-demodulated signals pass through the aural cartilage and soft tissue, and radiate into the ear canal.

  1. Sewing relations and duality for BRST off-shell string tadpole amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Ordonez, C.R. ); Rey, S.; Rubin, M.A.; Zucchini, R.

    1989-09-15

    Using a Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin- (BRST-)invariant first-quantized formalism for closed-bosonic-string theory, we construct amplitudes for closed-string tadpoles in the conformal gauge and discuss the connection with covariant string field theory in the Siegel gauge. We also show that the application of the sewing rules, previously found for propagators, to pairs of these tadpole amplitudes yields the Klein-bottle and annulus one-loop vacuum amplitudes as required by duality and factorization.

  2. Phosphor-in-glass for high-powered remote-type white AC-LED.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hang; Wang, Bo; Xu, Ju; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Hui; Yu, Yunlong; Wang, Yuansheng

    2014-12-10

    The high-powered alternating current (AC) light-emitting diode (LED) (AC-LED), featuring low cost, high energy utilization efficiency, and long service life, will become a new economic growth point in the field of semiconductor lighting. However, flicker of AC-LED in the AC cycles is not healthy for human eyes, and therefore need to be restrained. Herein we report an innovation of persistent "phosphor-in-glass" (PiG) for the remote-type AC-LED, whose afterglow can be efficiently activated by the blue light. It is experimentally demonstrated that the afterglow decay of PiG in the microsecond range can partly compensate the AC time gap. Moreover, the substitution of inorganic glass for organic resins or silicones as the encapsulants would bring out several technological benefits to AC-LED, such as good heat-dissipation, low glare, and excellent physical/chemical stability. PMID:25329651

  3. Phosphor-in-glass for high-powered remote-type white AC-LED.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hang; Wang, Bo; Xu, Ju; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Hui; Yu, Yunlong; Wang, Yuansheng

    2014-12-10

    The high-powered alternating current (AC) light-emitting diode (LED) (AC-LED), featuring low cost, high energy utilization efficiency, and long service life, will become a new economic growth point in the field of semiconductor lighting. However, flicker of AC-LED in the AC cycles is not healthy for human eyes, and therefore need to be restrained. Herein we report an innovation of persistent "phosphor-in-glass" (PiG) for the remote-type AC-LED, whose afterglow can be efficiently activated by the blue light. It is experimentally demonstrated that the afterglow decay of PiG in the microsecond range can partly compensate the AC time gap. Moreover, the substitution of inorganic glass for organic resins or silicones as the encapsulants would bring out several technological benefits to AC-LED, such as good heat-dissipation, low glare, and excellent physical/chemical stability.

  4. Scattering amplitudes in gauge theories: progress and outlook Scattering amplitudes in gauge theories: progress and outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roiban, Radu; Spradlin, Marcus; Volovich, Anastasia

    2011-11-01

    This issue aims to serve as an introduction to our current understanding of the structure of scattering amplitudes in gauge theory, an area which has seen particularly rapid advances in recent years following decades of steady progress. The articles contained herein provide a snapshot of the latest developments which we hope will serve as a valuable resource for graduate students and other scientists wishing to learn about the current state of the field, even if our continually evolving understanding of the subject might soon render this compilation incomplete. Why the fascination with scattering amplitudes, which have attracted the imagination and dedicated effort of so many physicists? Part of it stems from the belief, supported now by numerous examples, that unexpected simplifications of otherwise apparently complicated calculations do not happen by accident. Instead they provide a strong motivation to seek out an underlying explanation. The insight thereby gained can subsequently be used to make the next class of seemingly impossible calculations not only possible, but in some cases even trivial. This two-pronged strategy of exploring and exploiting the structure of gauge theory amplitudes appeals to a wide audience from formal theorists interested in mathematical structure for the sake of its own beauty to more phenomenologically-minded physicists eager to speed up the next generation of analysis software. Understandably it is the maximally supersymmetric 𝒩 = 4 Yang-Mills theory (SYM) which has the simplest structure and has correspondingly received the most attention. Rarely in theoretical physics are we fortunate enough to encounter a toy model which is simple enough to be solved completely yet rich enough to possess interesting non-trivial structure while simultaneously, and most importantly, being applicable (even if only as a good approximation) to a wide range of 'real' systems. The canonical example in quantum mechanics is of course the harmonic

  5. Interlimb coupling strength scales with movement amplitude.

    PubMed

    Peper, C Lieke E; de Boer, Betteco J; de Poel, Harjo J; Beek, Peter J

    2008-05-23

    The relation between movement amplitude and the strength of interlimb interactions was examined by comparing bimanual performance at different amplitude ratios (1:2, 1:1, and 2:1). For conditions with unequal amplitudes, the arm moving at the smaller amplitude was predicted to be more strongly affected by the contralateral arm than vice versa. This prediction was based on neurophysiological considerations and the HKB model of coupled oscillators. Participants performed rhythmic bimanual forearm movements at prescribed amplitude relations. After a brief mechanical perturbation of one arm, the relaxation process back to the initial coordination pattern was examined. This analysis focused on phase adaptations in the unperturbed arm, as these reflect the degree to which the movements of this arm were affected by the coupling influences stemming from the contralateral (perturbed) arm. The thus obtained index of coupling (IC) reflected the relative contribution of the unperturbed arm to the relaxation process. As predicted IC was larger when the perturbed arm moved at a larger amplitude than did the unperturbed arm, indicating that coupling strength scaled with movement amplitude. This result was discussed in relation to previous research regarding sources of asymmetry in coupling strength and the effects of amplitude disparity on interlimb coordination.

  6. Modelling ac ripple currents in HTS coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhihan; Grilli, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    Dc transmission using high temperature superconducting (HTS) coated conductors (CCs) offers a promising solution to the globally growing demand for effective, reliable and economic transmission of green energy up to the gigawatt level over very long distances. The credible estimation of the losses and thereby the heat dissipation involved, where ac ripples (introduced in rectification/ac-dc conversion) are viewed as a potential source of notable contribution, is highly essential for the rational design of practical HTS dc transmission cables and corresponding cryogenic systems to fulfil this demand. Here we report a targeted modelling study into the ac losses in a HTS CC subject to dc and ac ripple currents simultaneously, by solving Maxwell’s equations using the finite element method (FEM) in the commercial software package COMSOL. It is observed that the instantaneous loss exhibits only one peak per cycle in the HTS CC subject to sinusoidal ripples, given that the amplitude of the ac ripples is smaller than approximately 20% of that of the dc current. This is a distinct contrast to the usual observation of two peaks per cycle in a HTS CC subject to ac currents only. The unique mechanism is also revealed, which is directly associated with the finding that, around any local minima of the applied ac ripples, the critical state of -J c is never reached at the edges of the HTS CC, as it should be according to the Bean model. When running further into the longer term, it is discovered that the ac ripple loss of the HTS CC in full-wave rectification decays monotonically, at a speed which is found to be insensitive to the frequency of the applied ripples within our targeted situations, to a relatively low level of approximately 1.38 × 10-4 W m-1 in around 1.7 s. Comparison between this level and other typical loss contributions in a HTS dc cable implies that ac ripple currents in HTS CCs should only be considered as a minor source of dissipation in superconducting dc

  7. New relations for gauge-theory amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Bern, Z.; Carrasco, J. J. M.; Johansson, H.

    2008-10-15

    We present an identity satisfied by the kinematic factors of diagrams describing the tree amplitudes of massless gauge theories. This identity is a kinematic analog of the Jacobi identity for color factors. Using this we find new relations between color-ordered partial amplitudes. We discuss applications to multiloop calculations via the unitarity method. In particular, we illustrate the relations between different contributions to a two-loop four-point QCD amplitude. We also use this identity to reorganize gravity tree amplitudes diagram by diagram, offering new insight into the structure of the Kawai-Lewellen-Tye (KLT) relations between gauge and gravity tree amplitudes. This insight leads to similar but novel relations. We expect this to be helpful in higher-loop studies of the ultraviolet properties of gravity theories.

  8. Geoacoustic inversion by mode amplitude perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, Travis L.; Lynch, James F.; Pierce, Allan D.; Frisk, George V.

    2005-09-01

    In a shallow-water waveguide the geoacoustic properties of the seafloor have a significant effect on the way sound propagates through the water. Because of this, measurements of the pressure field in the water can be used to estimate bottom properties. In this talk a perturbative method is presented which allows one to use measurements of the modal amplitudes to estimate a set of bottom parameters. A key component of the method is an expression for the derivative of the mode functions with respect to some bottom parameter. Following from the work of Thode and Kim [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 116, 3370-2283 (2004)], the derivative is expressed as a weighted sum over all modes (both propagating and leaky). It is thought that this method can be used alongside eigenvalue perturbation [Rajan et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 82, 998-1017 (1987)] to provide an inversion scheme more robust to measurement noise. To demonstrate its feasibility, the method is applied to synthetic and real data. [Work supported by the WHOI education office.

  9. Distortion of the pixel grid in HST WFC3/UVIS and ACS/WFC CCD detectors and its astrometric correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhurina-Platais, Vera; Mackenty, John; Golimovski, David; Sirianni, Marco; Borncamp, David; Anderson, Jay; Grogin, Norman

    2016-07-01

    The geometric distortion of the CCD detectors used in the Hubble Space TelescopeWide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) and Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) instruments is characterized by both large and fine-scale distortions. The large-scale distortion, due to the complexity of the HST optical assembly, can be modeled by a high-order polynomial. The majority of fine-distortion is inherent to the CCD detectors themselves, which manifests itself as fine-scale, correlated systematic offsets in the residuals from the best-fit polynomial solution. Such systematic offsets across the CCD chip introduce astrometric errors at the level of about 0.1 pix (up to 1.5 μm within the 15 μm pixels). These fine-scale and low-amplitude distortions apparently arise from the spatial irregularities in the pixel grid. For the WFC3/UVIS CCD chips, there is a clear pattern of periodic skew in the lithographic-mask stencil imprinted onto the detector. Similar irregularities in the pixel grid of ACS/WFC CCD chips are even more pronounced by the narrow (68×2048 pixel) lithographic-mask stencil. To remove these distortions, a 2-D correction in the form of a look-up table has been developed using HST images of very dense stellar fields. The post-correction of fine-scale astrometric errors can be removed down to the level of 0.01 pix (0.15 μm) or better.

  10. Thermal cracking and amplitude dependent attenuation

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, D.H.; Toksoez, M.N.

    1980-02-10

    The role of crack and grain boundary contacts in determining seismic wave attenuation in rock is investigated by examining Q as a function of thermal cycling (cracking) and wave strain amplitude. Q values are obtained using a longitudinal resonant bar technique in the 10- to 20-kHz range for maximum strain amplitudes varying from roughly 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -5/. The samples studied include the Berea and Navajo sandstones, Plexiglas, Westerly granite, Solenhofen limestone, and Frederick diabase, the latter two relatively crack free in their virgin state. Measurements were made at room temperature and pressure in air. Q values for both sandstones are constant at low strains (<10/sup -6/) but decrease rapidly with amplitude at higher strains. There is no hysteresis of Q with amplitude. Q values for Plexiglas show no indication of amplitude dependent behavior. The granite, limestone, and diabase are thermally cycled at both fast and slow heating rates in order to induce cracking. Samples slowly cycled at 400/sup 0/C show a marked increase in Q that cannot be entirely explained by outgassing of volatiles. Cycling may also widen thin cracks and grain boundaries, reducing contact areas. Samples heated beyond 400/sup 0/C, or rapidly heated, result in generally decreasing Q values. The amplitude dependence of Q is found to be coupled to the effects of thermal cycling. For rock slowly cycled 400)C or less, the transition from low-amplitude contant Q to high-amplitude variable Q behavior decreases to lower amplitudes as a function of maximum temperature. Above 400/sup 0/C, and possibly in th rapidly heated samples also, the transition moves to higher amplitudes.

  11. DESIGN OF AN AC-DIPOLE FOR USE IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    PARKER,B.; BAI,M.; JAIN,A.; MCINTYRE,G.; METH,M.; PEGGS,S.; ROSER,T.; SANDERS,R.; TRBOJEVIC,D.

    1999-03-29

    We present two options for implementing a pair of AC-dipoles in RHIC for spin flipping, measuring linear optical functions and nonlinear diagnostics. AC-dipoles are magnets that can be adiabatically excited and de-excited with a continuous sine-wave in order to coherently move circulating beam out to large betatron amplitudes without incurring emittance blow up [1]. The AGS already uses a similar device for getting polarized proton beams through depolarizing resonances [2]. By placing the magnets in the IP4 common beam region, two AC-dipoles are sufficient to excite both horizontal and vertical motion in both RHIC rings. While we initially investigated an iron-dominated magnet design using available steel tape cores; we now favor a new air coil plus ferrite design featuring mechanical frequency tuning, in order to best match available resources to demanding frequency sweeping requirements. Both magnet designs are presented here along with model magnet test results. The challenge is to make AC-dipoles available for year 2000 RHIC running.

  12. Leading Wave Amplitude of a Tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanoglu, U.

    2015-12-01

    Okal and Synolakis (EGU General Assembly 2015, Geophysical Research Abstracts-Vol. 17-7622) recently discussed that why the maximum amplitude of a tsunami might not occur for the first wave. Okal and Synolakis list observations from 2011 Japan tsunami, which reached to Papeete, Tahiti with a fourth wave being largest and 72 min later after the first wave; 1960 Chilean tsunami reached Hilo, Hawaii with a maximum wave arriving 1 hour later with a height of 5m, first wave being only 1.2m. Largest later waves is a problem not only for local authorities both in terms of warning to the public and rescue efforts but also mislead the public thinking that it is safe to return shoreline or evacuated site after arrival of the first wave. Okal and Synolakis considered Hammack's (1972, Ph.D. Dissertation, Calif. Inst. Tech., 261 pp., Pasadena) linear dispersive analytical solution with a tsunami generation through an uplifting of a circular plug on the ocean floor. They performed parametric study for the radius of the plug and the depth of the ocean since these are the independent scaling lengths in the problem. They identified transition distance, as the second wave being larger, regarding the parameters of the problem. Here, we extend their analysis to an initial wave field with a finite crest length and, in addition, to a most common tsunami initial wave form of N-wave as presented by Tadepalli and Synolakis (1994, Proc. R. Soc. A: Math. Phys. Eng. Sci., 445, 99-112). We compare our results with non-dispersive linear shallow water wave results as presented by Kanoglu et al. (2013, Proc. R. Soc. A: Math. Phys. Eng. Sci., 469, 20130015), investigating focusing feature. We discuss the results both in terms of leading wave amplitude and tsunami focusing. Acknowledgment: The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement no 603839 (Project ASTARTE - Assessment, Strategy and Risk

  13. AC Loss Analysis on the Superconducting Coupling Magnet in MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hong; Wang, Li; Green, Michael; Li, LanKai; Xu, FengYu; Liu, XiaoKun; Jia, LinXinag

    2008-07-08

    A pair of coupling solenoids is used in MICE experiment to generate magnetic field which keeps the muons within the iris of thin RF cavity windows. The coupling solenoids have a 1.5-meter inner diameter and will produce 7.4 T peak magnetic field. Three types of AC losses in coupling solenoid are discussed. The affect of AC losses on the temperature distribution within the cold mass during charging and rapid discharging process is analyzed also. The analysis result will be further confirmed by the experiment of the prototype solenoid for coupling solenoid, which will be designed, fabricated and tested at ICST.

  14. Trapping polar molecules in an ac trap

    SciTech Connect

    Bethlem, Hendrick L.; Veldhoven, Jacqueline van; Schnell, Melanie; Meijer, Gerard

    2006-12-15

    Polar molecules in high-field seeking states cannot be trapped in static traps as Maxwell's equations do not allow a maximum of the electric field in free space. It is possible to generate an electric field that has a saddle point by superposing an inhomogeneous electric field to an homogeneous electric field. In such a field, molecules are focused along one direction, while being defocused along the other. By reversing the direction of the inhomogeneous electric field the focusing and defocusing directions are reversed. When the fields are being switched back and forth at the appropriate rate, this leads to a net focusing force in all directions. We describe possible electrode geometries for creating the desired fields and discuss their merits. Trapping of {sup 15}ND{sub 3} ammonia molecules in a cylindrically symmetric ac trap is demonstrated. We present measurements of the spatial distribution of the trapped cloud as a function of the settings of the trap and compare these to both a simple model assuming a linear force and to full three-dimensional simulations of the experiment. With the optimal settings, molecules within a phase-space volume of 270 mm{sup 3} (m/s){sup 3} remain trapped. This corresponds to a trap depth of about 5 mK and a trap volume of about 20 mm{sup 3}.

  15. A.C. Susceptometry Utilizing GMR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christy, Daniel; Shivaram, Bellave

    2001-11-01

    Superconducting quantum interference (SQUID) magnetometers remain as the most sensitive instruments to measure magnetic properties. However, the ready availability and rapid improvements in the sensitivity of magnetic field sensors based on giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect combined with their low cost and ability to operate at room temperature opens up opportunities to exploit these new devices where the utmost sensitivity of SQUID based detection is not needed. In this article we present one such application of GMR sensors and demonstrate how they can enhance the signals obtained in a simple a.c. magnetic susceptibility apparatus.

  16. Large amplitude electromagnetic solitons in intense laser plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bai-Wen; S, Ishiguro; M, Skoric M.

    2006-09-01

    This paper shows that the standing, backward- and forward-accelerated large amplitude relativistic electromagnetic solitons induced by intense laser pulse in long underdense collisionless homogeneous plasmas can be observed by particle simulations. In addition to the inhomogeneity of the plasma density, the acceleration of the solitons also depends upon not only the laser amplitude but also the plasma length. The electromagnetic frequency of the solitons is between about half and one of the unperturbed electron plasma frequency. The electrostatic field inside the soliton has a one-cycle structure in space, while the transverse electric and magnetic fields have half-cycle and one-cycle structure respectively. Analytical estimates for the existence of the solitons and their electromagnetic frequencies qualitatively coincide with our simulation results.

  17. Tailoring quantum superpositions with linearly polarized amplitude-modulated light

    SciTech Connect

    Pustelny, S.; Koczwara, M.; Cincio, L.; Gawlik, W.

    2011-04-15

    Amplitude-modulated nonlinear magneto-optical rotation is a powerful technique that offers a possibility of controllable generation of given quantum states. In this paper, we demonstrate creation and detection of specific ground-state magnetic-sublevel superpositions in {sup 87}Rb. By appropriate tuning of the modulation frequency and magnetic-field induction the efficiency of a given coherence generation is controlled. The processes are analyzed versus different experimental parameters.

  18. Form factor and boundary contribution of amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rijun; Jin, Qingjun; Feng, Bo

    2016-06-01

    The boundary contribution of an amplitude in the BCFW recursion relation can be considered as a form factor involving boundary operator and unshifted particles. At the tree-level, we show that by suitable construction of Lagrangian, one can relate the leading order term of boundary operators to some composite operators of mathcal{N} = 4 superYang-Mills theory, then the computation of form factors is translated to the computation of amplitudes. We compute the form factors of these composite operators through the computation of corresponding double trace amplitudes.

  19. Amplitude- and rise-time-compensated filters

    DOEpatents

    Nowlin, Charles H.

    1984-01-01

    An amplitude-compensated rise-time-compensated filter for a pulse time-of-occurrence (TOOC) measurement system is disclosed. The filter converts an input pulse, having the characteristics of random amplitudes and random, non-zero rise times, to a bipolar output pulse wherein the output pulse has a zero-crossing time that is independent of the rise time and amplitude of the input pulse. The filter differentiates the input pulse, along the linear leading edge of the input pulse, and subtracts therefrom a pulse fractionally proportional to the input pulse. The filter of the present invention can use discrete circuit components and avoids the use of delay lines.

  20. A link representation for gravity amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Song

    2013-10-01

    We derive a link representation for all tree amplitudes in supergravity, from a recent conjecture by Cachazo and Skinner. The new formula explicitly writes amplitudes as contour integrals over constrained link variables, with an integrand naturally expressed in terms of determinants, or equivalently tree diagrams. Important symmetries of the amplitude, such as supersymmetry, parity and (partial) permutation invariance, are kept manifest in the formulation. We also comment on rewriting the formula in a GL( k)-invariant manner, which may serve as a starting point for the generalization to possible Grassmannian contour integrals.

  1. AC electrophoretic deposition of organic-inorganic composite coatings.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, T; Chávez-Valdez, A; Roether, J A; Schubert, D W; Boccaccini, A R

    2013-02-15

    Alternating current electrophoretic deposition (AC-EPD) of polyacrylic acid (PAA)-titanium oxide (TiO(2)) nanoparticle composites on stainless steel electrodes was investigated in basic aqueous solution. AC square wave with duty cycle of 80% was applied at a frequency of 1 kHz. FTIR-ATR spectra showed that both AC and direct current (DC) EPD successfully deposited PAA-TiO(2) composites. The deposition rate using AC-EPD was lower than that obtained in direct current DC-EPD. However, the microstructure and surface morphology of the deposited composite coatings were different depending on the type of electric field applied. AC-EPD applied for not more than 5 min led to smooth films without bubble formation, while DC-EPD for 1 min or more showed deposits with microstructural defects possibly as result of water electrolysis. AC-EPD was thus for the first time demonstrated to be a suitable technique to deposit organic-inorganic composite coatings from aqueous suspensions, showing that applying a square wave and frequency of 1 kHz leads to uniform PAA-TiO(2) composite coatings on conductive materials. PMID:23218240

  2. AC electrophoretic deposition of organic-inorganic composite coatings.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, T; Chávez-Valdez, A; Roether, J A; Schubert, D W; Boccaccini, A R

    2013-02-15

    Alternating current electrophoretic deposition (AC-EPD) of polyacrylic acid (PAA)-titanium oxide (TiO(2)) nanoparticle composites on stainless steel electrodes was investigated in basic aqueous solution. AC square wave with duty cycle of 80% was applied at a frequency of 1 kHz. FTIR-ATR spectra showed that both AC and direct current (DC) EPD successfully deposited PAA-TiO(2) composites. The deposition rate using AC-EPD was lower than that obtained in direct current DC-EPD. However, the microstructure and surface morphology of the deposited composite coatings were different depending on the type of electric field applied. AC-EPD applied for not more than 5 min led to smooth films without bubble formation, while DC-EPD for 1 min or more showed deposits with microstructural defects possibly as result of water electrolysis. AC-EPD was thus for the first time demonstrated to be a suitable technique to deposit organic-inorganic composite coatings from aqueous suspensions, showing that applying a square wave and frequency of 1 kHz leads to uniform PAA-TiO(2) composite coatings on conductive materials.

  3. Sequential control by speed drive for ac motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsoum, Nader

    2012-11-01

    The speed drive for ac motor is widely used in the industrial field to allow direct control for the speed and torque without any feedback from the motor shaft. By using the ABB ACS800 speed drive unit, the speed and torque can be controlled using sequential control method. Sequential control is one of the application control method provided in the ABB ACS800 Drive, where a set of events or action performed in a particular order one after the other to control the speed and torque of the ac motor. It was claimed that sequential control method is using the preset seven constant speeds being provided in ABB ACS800 drive to control the speed and torque in a continuous and sequential manner. The characteristics and features of controlling the speed and torque using sequential control method can be investigated by observing the graphs and curves plotted which are obtained from the practical result. Sequential control can run either in the Direct Torque Control (DTC) or Scalar motor control mode. By using sequential control method, the ABB ACS800 drive can be programmed to run the motor automatically according to the time setting of the seven preset constant speeds. Besides, the intention of this project is to generate a new form of the experimental set up.

  4. A dipole probe for electric field measurements in the LVPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, P. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Ravi, G.; Kumar, Sunil; Mattoo, S. K.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design, construction, and calibration of an electric dipole probe and demonstrates its capability by presenting results on the measurement of electric field excited by a ring electrode in the Large Volume Plasma Device (LVPD). It measures the electric field in vacuum and plasma conditions in a frequency range lying between 1-10 \\text{MHz} . The results show that it measures electric field ≥slant 2 mV cm-1 for frequency ≤slant 10 \\text{MHz} . The developed dipole probe works on the principle of amplitude modulation. The probe signal is transmitted through a carrier of 418 MHz, a much higher frequency than the available sources of noise present in the surrounding environment. The amplitude modulation concept of signal transmission is used to make the measurement; it is qualitatively better and less corrupted as it is not affected by the errors introduced by ac pickups. The probe is capable of measuring a variety of electric fields, namely (1) space charge field, (2) time varying field, (3) inductive field and (4) a mixed field containing both space charge and inductive fields. This makes it a useful tool for measuring electric fields in laboratory plasma devices.

  5. Joint inversion of surface and borehole magnetic amplitude data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zelin; Yao, Changli; Zheng, Yuanman; Yuan, Xiaoyu

    2016-04-01

    3D magnetic inversion for susceptibility distribution is a powerful tool in quantitative interpretation of magnetic data in mineral exploration. However, the inversion and interpretation of such data are faced with two problems. One problem is the poor imaging results of deep sources when only surface data are inverted. The other is the unknown total magnetization directions of sources when strong remanence exists. To deal with these problems simultaneously, we propose a method through the joint inversion of surface and borehole magnetic amplitude data. In this method, we first transform both surface and borehole magnetic data to magnetic amplitude data that are less sensitive to the directions of total magnetization, and then preform a joint inversion of the whole amplitude data to generate a 3D susceptibility distribution. The amplitude inversion algorithm uses Tikhonov regularization and imposes a positivity constraint on the effective susceptibility defined as the ratio of magnetization magnitude over the geomagnetic field strength. In addition, a distance-based weighting function is used to make the algorithm applicable to joint data sets. To solve this positivity-constraint inversion problem efficiently, an appropriate optimization method must be chosen. We first use an interior-point method to incorporate the positivity constraint into the total objective function, and then minimize the objective function via a Gauss-Newton method due to the nonlinearity introduced by the positivity constraint and the amplitude data. To further improve the efficiency of the inversion algorithm, we use a conjugate gradient method to carry out the fast matrix-vector multiplication during the minimization. To verify the utility of the proposed method, we invert the synthetic and field data using three inversion methods, including the joint inversion of surface and borehole three-component magnetic data, the inversion of surface magnetic amplitude data, and the proposed joint

  6. External versus self-induced ac Stark shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, L.; Lippi, G. L.

    2015-07-01

    An oscillating electromagnetic (e.m.) field driving a dipole transition induces a well-known energy level shift, commonly described in a dressed state representation [1]. Experimentally, the effect arises when irradiating a sample (atomic, molecular, etc.) with an e.m. field which is resonant (or quasi-resonant) with a transition between energy levels. The source of the e.m. field is, in such a case, unaffected by the interaction and the field's amplitude (or intensity) is used by the experimenter as a control parameter to vary the level shift. Even in those situations where one (or multiple) pump field(s) and one (or multiple) probe field(s) are employed, the picture remains the same, regardless of the more complex mathematical description of the levels involved: the e.m. field amplitude remains an independent control parameter. This is by far the most common situation encountered in spectroscopy when studying an energy level shift.

  7. Light-Front Holography and Hadronization at the Amplitude Level

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Teramond, Guy F. de; Shrock, Robert

    2008-10-13

    The correspondence between theories in anti-de Sitter space and conformal field theories in physical space-time leads to an analytic, semiclassical model for strongly-coupled QCD which has scale invariance at short distances and color confinement at large distances. Light-front holography is a remarkable feature of AdS/CFT: it allows hadronic amplitudes in the AdS fifth dimension to be mapped to frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of hadrons in physical space-time, thus providing a relativistic description of hadrons at the amplitude level. Some novel features of QCD are discussed, including the consequences of confinement for quark and gluon condensates and the behavior of the QCD coupling in the infrared. We suggest that the spatial support of QCD condensates is restricted to the interior of hadrons, since they arise due to the interactions of confined quarks and gluons. Chiral symmetry is thus broken in a limited domain of size 1/m{sub {pi}}, in analogy to the limited physical extent of superconductor phases. A new method for computing the hadronization of quark and gluon jets at the amplitude level, an event amplitude generator, is outlined.

  8. Amplitude dynamics favors synchronization in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambuzza, Lucia Valentina; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesus; Frasca, Mattia

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we study phase synchronization in random complex networks of coupled periodic oscillators. In particular, we show that, when amplitude dynamics is not negligible, phase synchronization may be enhanced. To illustrate this, we compare the behavior of heterogeneous units with both amplitude and phase dynamics and pure (Kuramoto) phase oscillators. We find that in small network motifs the behavior crucially depends on the topology and on the node frequency distribution. Surprisingly, the microscopic structures for which the amplitude dynamics improves synchronization are those that are statistically more abundant in random complex networks. Thus, amplitude dynamics leads to a general lowering of the synchronization threshold in arbitrary random topologies. Finally, we show that this synchronization enhancement is generic of oscillators close to Hopf bifurcations. To this aim we consider coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo units modeling neuron dynamics.

  9. Amplitude dynamics favors synchronization in complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Gambuzza, Lucia Valentina; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesus; Frasca, Mattia

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study phase synchronization in random complex networks of coupled periodic oscillators. In particular, we show that, when amplitude dynamics is not negligible, phase synchronization may be enhanced. To illustrate this, we compare the behavior of heterogeneous units with both amplitude and phase dynamics and pure (Kuramoto) phase oscillators. We find that in small network motifs the behavior crucially depends on the topology and on the node frequency distribution. Surprisingly, the microscopic structures for which the amplitude dynamics improves synchronization are those that are statistically more abundant in random complex networks. Thus, amplitude dynamics leads to a general lowering of the synchronization threshold in arbitrary random topologies. Finally, we show that this synchronization enhancement is generic of oscillators close to Hopf bifurcations. To this aim we consider coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo units modeling neuron dynamics. PMID:27108847

  10. GENERAL Holomorphic Factorization of Superstring Scattering Amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Davis

    2011-01-01

    The holomorphic factorization of the superstring partition function is verified at arbitrary genus. The evaluation of scattering amplitudes and the implications of genus-dependent estimates on the string coupling are given.

  11. Motivic multiple zeta values and superstring amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlotterer, O.; Stieberger, S.

    2013-11-01

    The structure of tree-level open and closed superstring amplitudes is analyzed. For the open superstring amplitude we find a striking and elegant form, which allows one to disentangle its α‧-expansion into several contributions accounting for different classes of multiple zeta values. This form is bolstered by the decomposition of motivic multiple zeta values, i.e. the latter encapsulate the α‧-expansion of the superstring amplitude. Moreover, a morphism induced by the coproduct maps the α‧-expansion onto a non-commutative Hopf algebra. This map represents a generalization of the symbol of a transcendental function. In terms of elements of this Hopf algebra the α‧-expansion assumes a very simple and symmetric form, which carries all the relevant information. Equipped with these results we can also cast the closed superstring amplitude into a very elegant form.

  12. Amplitude metrics for cellular circadian bioluminescence reporters.

    PubMed

    St John, Peter C; Taylor, Stephanie R; Abel, John H; Doyle, Francis J

    2014-12-01

    Bioluminescence rhythms from cellular reporters have become the most common method used to quantify oscillations in circadian gene expression. These experimental systems can reveal phase and amplitude change resulting from circadian disturbances, and can be used in conjunction with mathematical models to lend further insight into the mechanistic basis of clock amplitude regulation. However, bioluminescence experiments track the mean output from thousands of noisy, uncoupled oscillators, obscuring the direct effect of a given stimulus on the genetic regulatory network. In many cases, it is unclear whether changes in amplitude are due to individual changes in gene expression level or to a change in coherence of the population. Although such systems can be modeled using explicit stochastic simulations, these models are computationally cumbersome and limit analytical insight into the mechanisms of amplitude change. We therefore develop theoretical and computational tools to approximate the mean expression level in large populations of noninteracting oscillators, and further define computationally efficient amplitude response calculations to describe phase-dependent amplitude change. At the single-cell level, a mechanistic nonlinear ordinary differential equation model is used to calculate the transient response of each cell to a perturbation, whereas population-level dynamics are captured by coupling this detailed model to a phase density function. Our analysis reveals that amplitude changes mediated at either the individual-cell or the population level can be distinguished in tissue-level bioluminescence data without the need for single-cell measurements. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the method by modeling experimental bioluminescence profiles of light-sensitive fibroblasts, reconciling the conclusions of two seemingly contradictory studies. This modeling framework allows a direct comparison between in vitro bioluminescence experiments and in silico ordinary

  13. Amplitude-temporal method of speech coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ababii, Victor; Sudacevschi, Viorica

    2005-02-01

    A method of speech coding and decoding is proposed. The speech coding algorithm is based on first derivate calculation of input speech signal, identification of critical points and input signal amplitude in these points, time period measurement between critical points. The result of codification represents a sequence of amplitudes and time periods. The decoding algorithm utilizes values of COS or SIN functions for reconstruction on the input speech. The codec structure that consists from encoder and decoder units is proposed.

  14. Modeling and Correcting the Time-Dependent ACS PSF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Jason; Massey, Richard; Albert, Justin; Taylor, James E.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Leauthaud, Alexie

    2006-01-01

    The ability to accurately measure the shapes of faint objects in images taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) depends upon detailed knowledge of the Point Spread Function (PSF). We show that thermal fluctuations cause the PSF of the ACS Wide Field Camera (WFC) to vary over time. We describe a modified version of the TinyTim PSF modeling software to create artificial grids of stars across the ACS field of view at a range of telescope focus values. These models closely resemble the stars in real ACS images. Using 10 bright stars in a real image, we have been able to measure HST s apparent focus at the time of the exposure. TinyTim can then be used to model the PSF at any position on the ACS field of view. This obviates the need for images of dense stellar fields at different focus values, or interpolation between the few observed stars. We show that residual differences between our TinyTim models and real data are likely due to the effects of Charge Transfer Efficiency (CTE) degradation. Furthermore, we discuss stochastic noise that is added to the shape of point sources when distortion is removed, and we present MultiDrizzle parameters that are optimal for weak lensing science. Specifically, we find that reducing the MultiDrizzle output pixel scale and choosing a Gaussian kernel significantly stabilizes the resulting PSF after image combination, while still eliminating cosmic rays/bad pixels, and correcting the large geometric distortion in the ACS. We discuss future plans, which include more detailed study of the effects of CTE degradation on object shapes and releasing our TinyTim models to the astronomical community.

  15. Twistor-strings and gravity tree amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamo, Tim; Mason, Lionel

    2013-04-01

    Recently we discussed how Einstein supergravity tree amplitudes might be obtained from the original Witten and Berkovits twistor-string theory when external conformal gravitons are restricted to be Einstein gravitons. Here we obtain a more systematic understanding of the relationship between conformal and Einstein gravity amplitudes in that twistor-string theory. We show that although it does not in general yield Einstein amplitudes, we can nevertheless obtain some partial twistor-string interpretation of the remarkable formulae recently been found by Hodges and generalized to all tree amplitudes by Cachazo and Skinner. The Hodges matrix and its higher degree generalizations encode the world sheet correlators of the twistor string. These matrices control both Einstein amplitudes and those of the conformal gravity arising from the Witten and Berkovits twistor-string. Amplitudes in the latter case arise from products of the diagonal elements of the generalized Hodges matrices and reduced determinants give the former. The reduced determinants arise if the contractions in the worldsheet correlator are restricted to form connected trees at MHV. The (generalized) Hodges matrices arise as weighted Laplacian matrices for the graph of possible contractions in the correlators and the reduced determinants of these weighted Laplacian matrices give the sum of the connected tree contributions by an extension of the matrix-tree theorem.

  16. ac electroosmotic pumping induced by noncontact external electrodes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shau-Chun; Chen, Hsiao-Ping; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2007-01-01

    Electroosmotic (EO) pumps based on dc electroosmosis is plagued by bubble generation and other electrochemical reactions at the electrodes at voltages beyond 1 V for electrolytes. These disadvantages limit their throughput and offset their portability advantage over mechanical syringe or pneumatic pumps. ac electroosmotic pumps at high frequency (>100 kHz) circumvent the bubble problem by inducing polarization and slip velocity on embedded electrodes,1 but they require complex electrode designs to produce a net flow. We report a new high-throughput ac EO pump design based on induced-polarization on the entire channel surface instead of just on the electrodes. Like dc EO pumps, our pump electrodes are outside of the load section and form a cm-long pump unit consisting of three circular reservoirs (3 mm in diameter) connected by a 1x1 mm channel. The field-induced polarization can produce an effective Zeta potential exceeding 1 V and an ac slip velocity estimated as 1 mmsec or higher, both one order of magnitude higher than earlier dc and ac pumps, giving rise to a maximum throughput of 1 mulsec. Polarization over the entire channel surface, quadratic scaling with respect to the field and high voltage at high frequency without electrode bubble generation are the reasons why the current pump is superior to earlier dc and ac EO pumps. PMID:19693362

  17. Amplitude Modulations of Acoustic Communication Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turesson, Hjalmar K.

    2011-12-01

    In human speech, amplitude modulations at 3 -- 8 Hz are important for discrimination and detection. Two different neurophysiological theories have been proposed to explain this effect. The first theory proposes that, as a consequence of neocortical synaptic dynamics, signals that are amplitude modulated at 3 -- 8 Hz are propagated better than un-modulated signals, or signals modulated above 8 Hz. This suggests that neural activity elicited by vocalizations modulated at 3 -- 8 Hz is optimally transmitted, and the vocalizations better discriminated and detected. The second theory proposes that 3 -- 8 Hz amplitude modulations interact with spontaneous neocortical oscillations. Specifically, vocalizations modulated at 3 -- 8 Hz entrain local populations of neurons, which in turn, modulate the amplitude of high frequency gamma oscillations. This suggests that vocalizations modulated at 3 -- 8 Hz should induce stronger cross-frequency coupling. Similar to human speech, we found that macaque monkey vocalizations also are amplitude modulated between 3 and 8 Hz. Humans and macaque monkeys share similarities in vocal production, implying that the auditory systems subserving perception of acoustic communication signals also share similarities. Based on the similarities between human speech and macaque monkey vocalizations, we addressed how amplitude modulated vocalizations are processed in the auditory cortex of macaque monkeys, and what behavioral relevance modulations may have. Recording single neuron activity, as well as, the activity of local populations of neurons allowed us to test both of the neurophysiological theories presented above. We found that single neuron responses to vocalizations amplitude modulated at 3 -- 8 Hz resulted in better stimulus discrimination than vocalizations lacking 3 -- 8 Hz modulations, and that the effect most likely was mediated by synaptic dynamics. In contrast, we failed to find support for the oscillation-based model proposing a

  18. RG flow of AC conductivity in soft wall model of QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, Neha; Siwach, Sanjay

    2016-03-01

    We study the Renormalization Group (RG) flow of AC conductivity in soft wall model of holographic QCD. We consider the charged black hole metric and the explicit form of AC conductivity is obtained at the cutoff surface. We plot the numerical solution of conductivity flow as a function of radial coordinate. The equation of gauge field is also considered and the numerical solution is obtained for AC conductivity as a function of frequency. The results for AC conductivity are also obtained for different values of chemical potential and Gauss-Bonnet couplings.

  19. Using triaxial magnetic fields to create high susceptibility particle composites.

    PubMed

    Martin, James E; Venturini, Eugene; Gulley, Gerald L; Williamson, Jonathan

    2004-02-01

    We report on the use of triaxial magnetic fields to create a variety of isotropic and anisotropic magnetic particle/polymer composites with significantly enhanced magnetic susceptibilities. A triaxial field is a superposition of three orthogonal ac magnetic fields, each generated by a Helmholtz coil in series resonance with a tunable capacitor bank. Field frequencies are in the range of 150-400 Hz. Because both the field amplitudes and frequencies can be varied, a rich variety of structures can be created. Perhaps the most unusual effects occur when either two or three of the field components are heterodyned to give beat frequencies on the order of 1 Hz. This leads to a striking particle dynamics that evolves into surprising structures during resin gelation. These structures are found to have perhaps the highest susceptibility that a particle composite can have. The susceptibility anisotropy of these composites can be controlled over a wide range by judicious adjustment of the relative field amplitudes. These experimental data are supported by large-scale Brownian dynamics simulations of the complex many-body interactions that occur in triaxial magnetic fields. These simulations show that athermal three-dimensional field heterodyning leads to structures with a susceptibility that is as high as that achieved with thermal annealing. Thus with coherent particle motions we can achieve magnetostatic energies that are quite close to the ground state. PMID:14995450

  20. Observing rapid quasi-wave ionospheric disturbance using amplitude charts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurkin, Vladimir; Laryunin, Oleg; Podlesnyi, Alexey

    Data from vertical (quasi-vertical) sounding are traditionally used for determining a number of ionospheric parameters such as critical frequencies of E and F layers, peaks of these layers, and for reconstructing electron density profiles. In this respect, radio sounding is not used to its full capacity. Modern ionosondes provide additional information encoded in ionospheric echoes, including information on reflected-signal amplitude. The time dependence of the amplitude-frequency characteristic of reflected signal has been named "amplitude chart" (A-chart). Ionosondes used by the ISTP SB RAS Geophysical Observatory for constructing A-charts employ the frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) signal in a range 1.3-15 MHz. One-minute sounding interval allows a more detailed study of dynamic processes in the ionosphere. The ionosonde has a direct digital synthesizer and direct sampling receiver without automatic gain control (AGC). The absence of AGC and the high dynamic range enable determination of the relative field strength at a receiving point and registration of relative long-term variations in reflected-signal amplitude over the entire range of operating frequencies of the ionosonde. We have revealed that the passage of travelling ionospheric disturbances (TID) along with height-frequency distortion modulates amplitude characteristics of signal. The characteristic depth of the modulation reaches 40 dB. The pronounced alternate vertical stripes typical for A-charts are likely to be associated with focusing properties of TID. In order to examine the space-time structure of TID able to induce such a focusing of the radio waves, we performed ray tracing simulations. We used geometrical-optics approximation, took magneto-ionic effects into account and prescribed electron density to be a stratified electron density profile on which an undulating disturbance was superimposed. This work was supported by the RFBR grant №14-05-00259-а.

  1. Wigner function and transition amplitude of three mutually coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassar, M. M.; Sebawe Abdalla, M.

    2007-04-01

    A full quantum mechanical treatment of three electromagnetic fields is considered. The proposed model consists of three different coupling parameters for which the rotating and counter-rotating terms are retained. An exact solution of the wave function in the Schrödinger picture is obtained and the connection with the coherent states wave function is given. The symmetrical ordered quasi-probability distribution function ( W-Wigner function) is calculated via the wave function in the coherent states representation. The squeezing phenomenon is also examined for both single mode and squared-amplitude, where the collapse and revival phenomena are observed. For the case in which λ3=0 and ω1=ω2=ω3 (exact resonances) we find that the late phenomenon is apparent but only after long period of the time considered. The transition amplitude between two different coherent states (a state in which all the coupling parameters are involved and a state when the coupling parameter λ3=0) is calculated. It is shown that the probability amplitude is sensitive to the variation of the mean photon numbers, and the coupling parameters as well as to the field frequencies.

  2. Radial convection of finite ion temperature, high amplitude plasma blobs

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesenberger, M. Kendl, A.; Madsen, J.

    2014-09-15

    We present results from simulations of seeded blob convection in the scrape-off-layer of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. We consistently incorporate high fluctuation amplitude levels and finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects using a fully nonlinear global gyrofluid model. This is in line with conditions found in tokamak scrape-off-layers (SOL) regions. Varying the ion temperature, the initial blob width, and the initial amplitude, we found an FLR dominated regime where the blob behavior is significantly different from what is predicted by cold-ion models. The transition to this regime is very well described by the ratio of the ion gyroradius to the characteristic gradient scale length of the blob. We compare the global gyrofluid model with a partly linearized local model. For low ion temperatures, we find that simulations of the global model show more coherent blobs with an increased cross-field transport compared to blobs simulated with the local model. The maximal blob amplitude is significantly higher in the global simulations than in the local ones. When the ion temperature is comparable to the electron temperature, global blob simulations show a reduced blob coherence and a decreased cross-field transport in comparison with local blob simulations.

  3. Amplitude spectroscopy of a solid-state artificial atom.

    PubMed

    Berns, David M; Rudner, Mark S; Valenzuela, Sergio O; Berggren, Karl K; Oliver, William D; Levitov, Leonid S; Orlando, Terry P

    2008-09-01

    The energy-level structure of a quantum system, which has a fundamental role in its behaviour, can be observed as discrete lines and features in absorption and emission spectra. Conventionally, spectra are measured using frequency spectroscopy, whereby the frequency of a harmonic electromagnetic driving field is tuned into resonance with a particular separation between energy levels. Although this technique has been successfully employed in a variety of physical systems, including natural and artificial atoms and molecules, its application is not universally straightforward and becomes extremely challenging for frequencies in the range of tens to hundreds of gigahertz. Here we introduce a complementary approach, amplitude spectroscopy, whereby a harmonic driving field sweeps an artificial atom through the avoided crossings between energy levels at a fixed frequency. Spectroscopic information is obtained from the amplitude dependence of the system's response, thereby overcoming many of the limitations of a broadband-frequency-based approach. The resulting 'spectroscopy diamonds', the regions in parameter space where transitions between specific pairs of levels can occur, exhibit interference patterns and population inversion that serve to distinguish the atom's spectrum. Amplitude spectroscopy provides a means of manipulating and characterizing systems over an extremely broad bandwidth, using only a single driving frequency that may be orders of magnitude smaller than the energy scales being probed.

  4. The ac53, ac78, ac101, and ac103 Genes Are Newly Discovered Core Genes in the Family Baculoviridae

    PubMed Central

    Garavaglia, Matías Javier; Miele, Solange Ana Belén; Iserte, Javier Alonso; Belaich, Mariano Nicolás

    2012-01-01

    The family Baculoviridae is a large group of insect viruses containing circular double-stranded DNA genomes of 80 to 180 kbp, which have broad biotechnological applications. A key feature to understand and manipulate them is the recognition of orthology. However, the differences in gene contents and evolutionary distances among the known members of this family make it difficult to assign sequence orthology. In this study, the genome sequences of 58 baculoviruses were analyzed, with the aim to detect previously undescribed core genes because of their remote homology. A routine based on Multi PSI-Blast/tBlastN and Multi HaMStR allowed us to detect 31 of 33 accepted core genes and 4 orthologous sequences in the Baculoviridae which were not described previously. Our results show that the ac53, ac78, ac101 (p40), and ac103 (p48) genes have orthologs in all genomes and should be considered core genes. Accordingly, there are 37 orthologous genes in the family Baculoviridae. PMID:22933288

  5. Semiconductor ac static power switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrancik, J.

    1968-01-01

    Semiconductor ac static power switch has long life and high reliability, contains no moving parts, and operates satisfactorily in severe environments, including high vibration and shock conditions. Due to their resistance to shock and vibration, static switches are used where accidental switching caused by mechanical vibration or shock cannot be tolerated.

  6. The potential and electric field in the cochlear outer hair cell membrane

    PubMed Central

    Harland, Ben; Lee, Wen-han; Brownell, William E.; Sun, Sean X.; Spector, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    Outer hair cell electromechanics, critically important to mammalian active hearing, is driven by the cell membrane potential. The membrane protein prestin is a crucial component of the active outer hair cell’s motor. The focus of the paper is the analysis of the local membrane potential and electric field resulting from the interaction of electric charges involved. Here the relevant charges are the ions inside and outside the cell, lipid bilayer charges, and prestin-associated charges (mobile-transferred by the protein under the action of the applied field and stationary-relatively unmoved by the field). The electric potentials across and along the membrane are computed for the case of an applied DC-field. The local amplitudes and phases of the potential under different frequencies are analyzed for the case of a DC+AC-field. We found that the effect of the system of charges alters the electric potential and internal field, which deviate significantly from their traditional linear and constant distributions. Under DC+AC conditions, the strong frequency dependence of the prestin mobile charge has a relatively small effect on the amplitude and phase of the resulting potential. The obtained results can help in a better understanding and experimental verification of the mechanism of prestin performance. PMID:25687712

  7. The potential and electric field in the cochlear outer hair cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Harland, Ben; Lee, Wen-han; Brownell, William E; Sun, Sean X; Spector, Alexander A

    2015-05-01

    Outer hair cell electromechanics, critically important to mammalian active hearing, is driven by the cell membrane potential. The membrane protein prestin is a crucial component of the active outer hair cell's motor. The focus of the paper is the analysis of the local membrane potential and electric field resulting from the interaction of electric charges involved. Here the relevant charges are the ions inside and outside the cell, lipid bilayer charges, and prestin-associated charges (mobile-transferred by the protein under the action of the applied field, and stationary-relatively unmoved by the field). The electric potentials across and along the membrane are computed for the case of an applied DC-field. The local amplitudes and phases of the potential under different frequencies are analyzed for the case of a DC + AC-field. We found that the effect of the system of charges alters the electric potential and internal field, which deviate significantly from their traditional linear and constant distributions. Under DC + AC conditions, the strong frequency dependence of the prestin mobile charge has a relatively small effect on the amplitude and phase of the resulting potential. The obtained results can help in a better understanding and experimental verification of the mechanism of prestin performance. PMID:25687712

  8. Behavioral evidence that magnetic field effects in the land snail, Cepaea nemoralis, might not depend on magnetite or induced electric currents

    SciTech Connect

    Prato, F.S.; Kavaliers, M.; Carson, J.J.L.

    1996-05-01

    Although extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields (< 300 Hz) appear to exert a variety of biological effects, the magnetic field sensing/transduction mechanism(s) remains to be established. Here, using the inhibitory effects of magnetic fields on endogenous opioid peptide-mediated analgesic response of the land snail, Cepaea nemoralis, the authors addressed the mechanism(s) of action of ELF magnetic fields. Indirect mechanisms involving both induced electric fields and direct magnetic field detection mechanisms (e.g., magnetite, parametric resonance) were evaluated. Snails were exposed to a static magnetic field (B{sub DC} = 78 {+-} 1 {micro}T) and a 60 Hz magnetic field (B{sub AC} = 299 {+-} 1 {micro}T peak) with the angle between the static and 60 Hz magnetic fields varied in eight steps between 0{degree} and 90{degree}. At 0{degree} and 90{degree}, the magnetic field reduced opioid-induced analgesia by approximately 20%, and this inhibition was increased to a maximum of 50% when the angle was between 50{degree} and 70{degree}. Because B{sub AC} was fixed in amplitude, direction, and frequency, any induced electric currents would be constant independent of the B{sub AC}/B{sub DC} angle. Also, an energy transduction mechanism involving magnetite should show greatest sensitivity at 90{degree}. Therefore, the energy transduction mechanism probably does not involve induced electric currents or magnetite. Rather, their results suggest a direct magnetic field detection mechanism consistent with the parametric resonance model proposed by Lednev.

  9. Vortex ratchet reversal in an asymmetric washboard pinning potential subject to combined dc and ac stimuli.

    PubMed

    Shklovskij, Valerij A; Sosedkin, Vladimir V; Dobrovolskiy, Oleksandr V

    2014-01-15

    The mixed-state resistive response of a superconductor thin film with an asymmetric washboard pinning potential subject to superimposed dc and ac currents of arbitrary amplitudes and frequency at finite temperature is theoretically investigated. The problem is considered in the single-vortex approximation, relying upon the exact solution of the Langevin equation in terms of a matrix continued fraction. The dc voltage response and the absorbed power in ac response are analyzed as functions of dc bias and ac current amplitude and frequency in a wide range of corresponding dimensionless parameters. Predictions are made of (i) a reversal of the rectified voltage at small dc biases and strong ac drives and (ii) a non-monotonic enhancement of the absorbed power in the nonlinear ac response at far sub-depinning frequencies. It is elucidated how and why both these effects appear due to the competition of the fixed internal and the tunable, dc bias-induced external asymmetry of the potential as the only reason. This is distinct from other scenarios used for explaining the vortex ratchet reversal effect so far. PMID:24304564

  10. Connecting physical resonant amplitudes and lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, Daniel R.; Briceño, Raúl A.; Wilson, David J.

    2016-06-01

    We present a determination of the isovector, P-wave ππ scattering phase shift obtained by extrapolating recent lattice QCD results from the Hadron Spectrum Collaboration using mπ = 236 MeV. The finite volume spectra are described using extensions of Lüscher's method to determine the infinite volume Unitarized Chiral Perturbation Theory scattering amplitude. We exploit the pion mass dependence of this effective theory to obtain the scattering amplitude at mπ = 140 MeV. The scattering phase shift is found to agree with experiment up to center of mass energies of 1.2 GeV. The analytic continuation of the scattering amplitude to the complex plane yields a ρ-resonance pole at Eρ = [ 755 (2) (1) (02) -i/2 129 (3) (1) (7 1) ] MeV. The techniques presented illustrate a possible pathway towards connecting lattice QCD observables of few-body, strongly interacting systems to experimentally accessible quantities.

  11. Periodic amplitude variations in Jovian continuum radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Scarf, F. L.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis of periodic variations in the amplitude of continuum radiation near 3 kHz trapped in the Jovian magnetosphere shows structure with periods near both five and ten hours. Contrary to a plausible initial idea, the continuum amplitudes are not organized by position of the observer relative to the dense plasma sheet. Instead, there seem to be preferred orientations of system III longitude with respect to the direction to the sun which account for the peaks. This implies a clock-like modulation of the continuum radiation intensity as opposed to a searchlight effect. The importance of the dipole longitude-solar wind alignment to the amplitude of the continuum radiation implies the source region of the radiation is near the magnetopause and may indirectly tie the generation of the radio waves to the clocklike modulation of energetic electron fluxes from Jupiter.

  12. A description of seismic amplitude techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadlow, James

    2014-02-01

    The acquisition of seismic data is a non-invasive technique used for determining the sub surface geology. Changes in lithology and fluid fill affect the seismic wavelet. Analysing seismic data for direct hydrocarbon indicators (DHIs), such as full stack amplitude anomalies, or amplitude variation with offset (AVO), can help a seismic interpreter relate the geophysical response to real geology and, more importantly, to distinguish the presence of hydrocarbons. Inversion is another commonly used technique that attempts to tie the seismic data back to the geology. Much has been written about these techniques, and attempting to gain an understanding on the theory and application of them by reading through various journals can be quite daunting. The purpose of this paper is to briefly outline DHI analysis, including full stack amplitude anomalies, AVO and inversion and show the relationship between all three. The equations presented have been included for completeness, but the reader can pass over the mathematical detail.

  13. Connecting physical resonant amplitudes and lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, Daniel R.; Briceño, Raúl A.; Wilson, David J.

    2016-06-01

    We present a determination of the isovector, P-wave ππ scattering phase shift obtained by extrapolating recent lattice QCD results from the Hadron Spectrum Collaboration using mπ = 236 MeV. The finite volume spectra are described using extensions of Lüscher's method to determine the infinite volume Unitarized Chiral Perturbation Theory scattering amplitude. We exploit the pion mass dependence of this effective theory to obtain the scattering amplitude at mπ = 140 MeV. The scattering phase shift is found to agree with experiment up to center of mass energies of 1.2 GeV. The analytic continuation of the scattering amplitude to the complex plane yields a ρ-resonance pole at Eρ = [ 755 (2) (1) (20 02) -i/2 129 (3) (1) (7 1) ] MeV. The techniques presented illustrate a possible pathway towards connecting lattice QCD observables of few-body, strongly interacting systems to experimentally accessible quantities.

  14. Cut-constructible part of QCD amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Britto, Ruth; Feng Bo; Mastrolia, Pierpaolo

    2006-05-15

    Unitarity cuts are widely used in analytic computation of loop amplitudes in gauge theories such as QCD. We expand upon the technique introduced in hep-ph/0503132 to carry out any finite unitarity cut integral. This technique naturally separates the contributions of bubble, triangle and box integrals in one-loop amplitudes and is not constrained to any particular helicity configurations. Loop momentum integration is reduced to a sequence of algebraic operations. We discuss the extraction of the residues at higher-order poles. Additionally, we offer concise algebraic formulas for expressing coefficients of three-mass triangle integrals. As an application, we compute all remaining coefficients of bubble and triangle integrals for nonsupersymmetric six-gluon amplitudes.

  15. ACS Expands Role In High School Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Describes some of the services and programs of special interests to high school chemistry teachers that are being provided by ACS, and meant to make ACS membership more attractive to the teachers. (GA)

  16. Quantum discord protection from amplitude damping decoherence.

    PubMed

    Yune, Jiwon; Hong, Kang-Hee; Lim, Hyang-Tag; Lee, Jong-Chan; Kwon, Osung; Han, Sang-Wook; Kim, Yong-Su; Moon, Sung; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2015-10-01

    Entanglement is known to be an essential resource for many quantum information processes. However, it is now known that some quantum features may be acheived with quantum discord, a generalized measure of quantum correlation. In this paper, we study how quantum discord, or more specifically, the measures of entropic discord and geometric discord are affected by the influence of amplitude damping decoherence. We also show that a protocol deploying weak measurement and quantum measurement reversal can effectively protect quantum discord from amplitude damping decoherence, enabling to distribute quantum correlation between two remote parties in a noisy environment. PMID:26480116

  17. Topographic quantitative EEG amplitude in recovered alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Pollock, V E; Schneider, L S; Zemansky, M F; Gleason, R P; Pawluczyk, S

    1992-05-01

    Topographic measures of electroencephalographic (EEG) amplitude were used to compare recovered alcoholics (n = 14) with sex- and age-matched control subjects. Delta, alpha, and beta activity did not distinguish the groups, but regional differences in theta distribution did. Recovered alcoholics showed more uniform distributions of theta amplitudes in bilateral anterior and posterior regions compared with controls. Because a minimum of 5 years had elapsed since the recovered alcoholic subjects fulfilled DSM-III-R criteria for alcohol abuse or dependence, it is unlikely these EEG theta differences reflect the effects of withdrawal.

  18. Dual amplitude pulse generator for radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Hoggan, Jerry M.; Kynaston, Ronnie L.; Johnson, Larry O.

    2001-01-01

    A pulsing circuit for producing an output signal having a high amplitude pulse and a low amplitude pulse may comprise a current source for providing a high current signal and a low current signal. A gate circuit connected to the current source includes a trigger signal input that is responsive to a first trigger signal and a second trigger signal. The first trigger signal causes the gate circuit to connect the high current signal to a pulse output terminal whereas the second trigger signal causes the gate circuit to connect the low current signal to the pulse output terminal.

  19. Towards NMHV amplitudes at strong coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belitsky, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    Pentagon Operator Product Expansion provides a non-perturbative framework for analysis of scattering amplitudes in planar maximally supersymmetric gauge theory building up on their duality to null polygonal superWilson loop and integrability. In this paper, we construct a systematic expansion for the main ingredients of the formalism, i.e., pentagons, at large 't Hooft coupling as a power series in its inverse value. The calculations are tested against relations provided by the so-called Descent Equation which mixes transitions at different perturbative orders. We use leading order results to have a first glimpse into the structure of scattering amplitude at NMHV level at strong coupling.

  20. Superconducting shielded core reactor with reduced AC losses

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Yung S.; Hull, John R.

    2006-04-04

    A superconducting shielded core reactor (SSCR) operates as a passive device for limiting excessive AC current in a circuit operating at a high power level under a fault condition such as shorting. The SSCR includes a ferromagnetic core which may be either closed or open (with an air gap) and extends into and through a superconducting tube or superconducting rings arranged in a stacked array. First and second series connected copper coils each disposed about a portion of the iron core are connected to the circuit to be protected and are respectively wound inside and outside of the superconducting tube or rings. A large impedance is inserted into the circuit by the core when the shielding capability of the superconducting arrangement is exceeded by the applied magnetic field generated by the two coils under a fault condition to limit the AC current in the circuit. The proposed SSCR also affords reduced AC loss compared to conventional SSCRs under continuous normal operation.

  1. Flux-motion related ac losses in high Tc superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q. Y.

    1993-03-01

    The ac losses of high-temperature superconductors in the flux-depinned mixed-state have been treated using the classical magnetic diffusion equation in conjunction with various models of flux-motion. With the imaginary part representing the ac losses, the field- and frequency-dependent ac susceptibilities were investigated. The imaginary component was found to obey a scaling rule with a characteristic frequency, estimated to be about 10 exp 5-10 exp 9 Hz, that depended on the sample size and normal state resistivity. This frequency range agrees with earlier experimental results, which could not be accounted for previously based upon the notion of thermally activated hopping of vortices. The frequency scaling behaviors using flux-creep and flux-flow models are presented.

  2. Theory of the ac spin-valve effect.

    PubMed

    Kochan, Denis; Gmitra, Martin; Fabian, Jaroslav

    2011-10-21

    The spin-valve complex magnetoimpedance of symmetric ferromagnet-normal-metal-ferromagnet junctions is investigated within the drift-diffusion (standard) model of spin injection. The ac magnetoresistance-the real part difference of the impedances of the parallel and antiparallel magnetization configurations-exhibits an overall damped oscillatory behavior, as an interplay of the diffusion and spin relaxation times. In wide junctions the ac magnetoresistance oscillates between positive and negative values, reflecting resonant amplification and depletion of the spin accumulation, while the line shape for thin tunnel junctions is predicted to be purely Lorentzian. The ac spin-valve effect could be a technique to extract spin transport and spin relaxation parameters in the absence of a magnetic field and for a fixed sample size. PMID:22107552

  3. Modeling and experimental verification of frequency-, amplitude-, and magneto-dependent viscoelasticity of magnetorheological elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Fu-Long; Bai, Xian-Xu; Qian, Li-Jun

    2016-10-01

    Magnetorheological elastomers (MREs), a smart composite, exhibit dual characteristics of both MR materials and particle reinforced composites, i.e., the viscoelasticity of MREs depends on external magnetic field as well as strain amplitude and excitation frequency. In this article, the principle of a frequency-, amplitude-, and magneto-dependent linear dynamic viscoelastic model for isotropic MREs is proposed and investigated. The viscoelasticity of MREs is divided into frequency- and amplitude-dependent mechanical viscoelasticity and frequency-, amplitude-, and magneto-dependent magnetic viscoelasticity. Based on the microstructures of ferrous particles and matrix, the relationships between mechanical shear modulus corresponding to the mechanical viscoelasticity and strain amplitude and excitation frequency are obtained. The relationships between magnetic shear modulus corresponding to the magnetic viscoelasticity with strain amplitude, excitation frequency, and further external magnetic field are derived using the magneto-elastic theory. The influence of magnetic saturation on the MR effect is also considered. The dynamic characteristics of a fabricated isotropic MRE sample under different strain amplitudes, excitation frequencies and external magnetic fields are tested. The parameters of the proposed model are identified with the experimental data and the theoretical expressions of shear storage modulus and shear loss modulus of the MRE sample are obtained. In the light of the theoretical expressions, the loss factors of the MRE sample under different loading conditions are analyzed and compared with the test results to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed model.

  4. AC Electroosmotic Pumping in Nanofluidic Funnels.

    PubMed

    Kneller, Andrew R; Haywood, Daniel G; Jacobson, Stephen C

    2016-06-21

    We report efficient pumping of fluids through nanofluidic funnels when a symmetric AC waveform is applied. The asymmetric geometry of the nanofluidic funnel induces not only ion current rectification but also electroosmotic flow rectification. In the base-to-tip direction, the funnel exhibits a lower ion conductance and a higher electroosmotic flow velocity, whereas, in the tip-to-base direction, the funnel has a higher ion conductance and a lower electroosmotic flow velocity. Consequently, symmetric AC waveforms easily pump fluid through the nanofunnels over a range of frequencies, e.g., 5 Hz to 5 kHz. In our experiments, the nanofunnels were milled into glass substrates with a focused ion beam (FIB) instrument, and the funnel design had a constant 5° taper with aspect ratios (funnel tip width to funnel depth) of 0.1 to 1.0. We tracked ion current rectification by current-voltage (I-V) response and electroosmotic flow rectification by transport of a zwitterionic fluorescent probe. Rectification of ion current and electroosmotic flow increased with increasing electric field applied to the nanofunnel. Our results support three-dimensional simulations of ion transport and electroosmotic transport through nanofunnels, which suggest the asymmetric electroosmotic transport stems from an induced pressure at the junction of the nanochannel and nanofunnel tip. PMID:27230495

  5. Imaging cobalt nanoparticles by amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy: comparison between low and high amplitude solutions.

    PubMed

    Tello, M; San Paulo, A; Rodríguez, T R; Blanco, M C; García, R

    2003-01-01

    In many situations of interest amplitude modulation AFM is characterized by the coexistence of two solutions with different physical properties. Here, we compare the performance of those solutions in the imaging of cobalt nanoparticles. We show that imaging with the high amplitude solution implies an irreversible deformation of the nanoparticles while repeated imaging with the low solution does not produce noticeable changes in the nanoparticles. Theoretical simulations show that the maximum tip-surface force in the high amplitude solution is about 14nN while in the low amplitude solution is about -4nN. We attribute the differences in the high and low amplitude images to the differences in the exerted forces on the sample. PMID:12801669

  6. Imaging cobalt nanoparticles by amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy: comparison between low and high amplitude solutions.

    PubMed

    Tello, M; San Paulo, A; Rodríguez, T R; Blanco, M C; García, R

    2003-01-01

    In many situations of interest amplitude modulation AFM is characterized by the coexistence of two solutions with different physical properties. Here, we compare the performance of those solutions in the imaging of cobalt nanoparticles. We show that imaging with the high amplitude solution implies an irreversible deformation of the nanoparticles while repeated imaging with the low solution does not produce noticeable changes in the nanoparticles. Theoretical simulations show that the maximum tip-surface force in the high amplitude solution is about 14nN while in the low amplitude solution is about -4nN. We attribute the differences in the high and low amplitude images to the differences in the exerted forces on the sample.

  7. The Finite Amplitude Method for the Qrpa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avogadro, Paolo; Nakatsukasa, Takashi

    We present the finite amplitude method (FAM) for the Quasi Particle Random Phase Approximation (QRPA). This method allows to extract a QRPA code starting from a Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) code. The code obtained is fully self consistent, moreover since the FAM is not restricted to spherical symmetry it can be used to obtain deformed QRPA codes.

  8. Cardiac phase: Amplitude analysis using macro programming

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, K.W.; Hickey, K.A.

    1981-11-01

    The analysis of EKG gated radionuclide cardiac imaging data with Fourier amplitude and phase images is becoming a valuable clinical technique, demonstrating location, size, and severity of regional ventricular abnormalities. Not all commercially available nuclear medicine computer systems offer software for phase and amplitude analysis; however, many systems do have the capability of linear image arithmetic using simple macro commands which can easily be sequenced into stored macro-strings or programs. Using simple but accurate series approximations for the Fourier operations, macro programs have been written for a Digital Equipment Corporation Gamma-11 system to obtain phase and amplitude images from routine gated cardiac studies. In addition, dynamic cine-mode presentation of the onset of mechanical systole is generated from the phase data, using only a second set of macro programs. This approach is easily adapted to different data acquisition protocols, and can be used on any system with macro commands for image arithmetic. Key words: Fourier analysis, cardiac cycle, gated blood pool imaging, amplitude image, phase image

  9. Particle Distribution Modification by Low Amplitude Modes

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.; Gorelenkov, N.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2009-08-28

    Modification of a high energy particle distribution by a spectrum of low amplitude modes is investigated using a guiding center code. Only through resonance are modes effective in modifying the distribution. Diagnostics are used to illustrate the mode-particle interaction and to find which effects are relevant in producing significant resonance, including kinetic Poincare plots and plots showing those orbits with time averaged mode-particle energy transfer. Effects of pitch angle scattering and drag are studied, as well as plasma rotation and time dependence of the equilibrium and mode frequencies. A specific example of changes observed in a DIII-D deuterium beam distribution in the presence of low amplitude experimentally validated Toroidal Alfven (TAE) eigenmodes and Reversed Shear Alfven (RSAE) eigenmodes is examined in detail. Comparison with experimental data shows that multiple low amplitude modes can account for significant modification of high energy beam particle distributions. It is found that there is a stochastic threshold for beam profile modification, and that the experimental amplitudes are only slightly above this threshold.

  10. Kaon decay amplitudes using staggered fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, S.R.

    1986-12-01

    A status report is given of an attempt, using staggered fermions to calculate the real and imaginary parts of the amplitudes for K ..-->.. ..pi pi..,. Semi-quantitative results are found for the imaginary parts, and these suggest that epsilon' might be smaller than previously expected in the standard model.

  11. Amplitude Frequency Response Measurement: A Simple Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satish, L.; Vora, S. C.

    2010-01-01

    A simple method is described to combine a modern function generator and a digital oscilloscope to configure a setup that can directly measure the amplitude frequency response of a system. This is achieved by synchronously triggering both instruments, with the function generator operated in the "Linear-Sweep" frequency mode, while the oscilloscope…

  12. A Generic Receiver Tracking Model for GPS Ionospheric Amplitude Scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paula, E. R.; Moraes, A. D.; Perrella, W. J.; Galera Monico, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    Ionospheric scintillations result in rapid variations in phase and amplitude of the radio signal, which propagates through the ionosphere. Depending on the temporal and spatial situation, the scintillation can represent a problem in the availability and precision of the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). Scintillations affect the receiver performance, specially the tracking loop level. Depending on the scintillation level, the receiver might increase the measurement errors or even can lead to a loss of lock of the carrier and code loops. In extreme cases, the scintillation can result in full disrupting of the receiver. In this work we introduce a generic model to evaluate the effects of ionospheric amplitude scintillation on GPS receiver tracking loops. This model is based on α-μ distribution, which can be seen as a generalized fading model, that includes a variety of distributions such as Gamma, Nakagami-m, Exponential, Weibull, one-sided Gaussian and Rayleigh. Differently from the model based only on Nakagami-m, this one is not limited to S4< 0,71 which allows using it to predict amplitude scintillation effects for stronger scenarios. The estimation of α-μ coefficients, the empirical parameterization based on field measurements and the typical values estimated based on observations made during the last solar maximum are presented and discussed.

  13. Stochastic Closures for Finite Amplitude Internal Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polzin, K. L.; Lvov, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The theoretical paradigm of a self-consistent theory for the interaction of finite amplitude oceanic internal waves and its evolution from the resonant, infinitesimal amplitude limit are considered. The two limits are investigated using ray tracing techniques, analytic approximations to kinetic equations, and solutions for moments of a diffusive approximation to the resonant kinetic equation. We focus here on high frequency internal waves interacting with larger vertical and horizontal scale waves having inertial frequency. Tracing high frequency waves in one and two inertial wave backgrounds demonstrates that the infinitesimal amplitude and finite amplitude limits are phenomenologically distinct: the finite amplitude state is characterized by the coalescing of the two small scale members of the triad and a transition to a bound wave phenomena. This coalescence marks the transition to a strongly nonlinear parameter regime. Tracing high frequency waves in a stochastic background of inertial oscillations provides estimates of the evolution of the time mean and variance of wavenumber and intrinsic frequency. These estimates are compared to the evolution of the first and second moments of a diffusive approximation of the kinetic equation. In the finite but weakly nonlinear regime we find a diffusive characterization. In the strongly nonlinear limit we find an advective characterization. We next turn to the Finescale Paramterization of Polzin (2004, J. Phys. Oceanogr.), which has been used to successfully predict observations of turbulent dissipation. The Finescale Parameterization is an advective closure, and we demonstrate how it can be derived from resonant formula, which is a diffusive characterization. We conclude by considering application to the atmospheric internal wavefield.

  14. Photon assisted processes: Probability amplitudes for the absorption and emission of photons and dc-photocurrents

    SciTech Connect

    Micu, C.; Racolta, D.; Papp, E.

    2014-11-24

    In this paper one deals with the derivation of probability amplitudes characterizing the photon assisted injection of electrons in a two-terminal quantum conductor. For this purpose one accounts for spatially constant but time dependent periodic voltages applied on an Ohmic contact. Resorting to the discrete Fourier transform provides the probability amplitudes for the emission and absorption of photons in terms of squared Bessel functions of the first kind and integer order. Several kinds of ac-pulses like sinusoidal and dc+sinusoidal are assumed. Mean square values concerning photon numbers have been discussed in some more detail. Time averages of squared time dependent classical currents and leading corrections to the rescaled dc-photocurrent have also been accounted for.

  15. Single-Axis Three-Beam Amplitude Monopulse Antenna-Signal Processing Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin W.; Bickel, Douglas L.

    2015-05-01

    Typically, when three or more antenna beams along a single axis are required, the answer has been multiple antenna phase-centers, essentially a phase-monopulse system. Such systems and their design parameters are well-reported in the literature. Less appreciated is that three or more antenna beams can also be generated in an amplitude-monopulse fashion. Consequently, design guidelines and performance analysis of such antennas is somewhat under-reported in the literature. We provide discussion herein of three beams arrayed in a single axis with an amplitude-monopulse configuration. Acknowledgements The preparation of this report is the result of an unfunded research and development activity. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administ ration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Electric-field Induced Microdynamics of Charged Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Kyongok

    2014-12-01

    Electric-field induced phase/state transitions are observed in AC electric fields with small amplitudes and low frequencies in suspensions of charged fibrous viruses (fd), which are model systems for highly charged rod-like colloids. Texture- and particle-dynamics in these field-induced states, and on crossing transition lines, are explored by image time-correlation and dynamic light scattering, respectively. At relatively low frequencies, starting from a system within the isotropic-nematic coexistence region, a transition from a nematic to a chiral nematic is observed, as well as a dynamical state where nematic domains melt and reform. These transitions are preliminary due to field-induced dissociation/association of condensed ions. At higher frequencies a uniform state is formed that is stabilized by hydrodynamic interactions through field-induced electro-osmotic flow where the rods align along the field direction. There is a point in the field-amplitude versus frequency plane where various transition lines meet. This point can be identified as a “non-equilibrium critical point”, in the sense that a length scale and a time scale diverge on approach of that point. The microscopic dynamics exhibits discontinuities on crossing transition lines that were identified independently by means of image and signal correlation spectroscopy.

  17. High Amplitude Events in relation to Interplanetary disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Rajesh Kumar; Agarwal Mishra, Rekha

    2012-07-01

    The Sun emits the variable solar wind which interacts with the very local interstellar medium to form the heliosphere. Hence variations in solar activity strongly influence interplanetary space, from the Sun's surface out to the edge of the heliosphere. Superimposed on the solar wind are mass ejections from the Sun and/or its corona which, disturb the interplanetary medium - hence the name "interplanetary disturbances". Interplanetary disturbances are the sources of large-scale particle acceleration, of disturbances in the Earth's magnetosphere, of modulations of galactic cosmic rays in short, they are the prime focus for space weather studies. The investigation deals with the study of cosmic ray intensity, solar wind plasma and interplanetary magnetic field parameters variation due to interplanetary disturbances (magnetic clouds) during an unusual class of days i.e. high amplitude anisotropic wave train events. The high amplitude anisotropic wave train events in cosmic ray intensity has been identified using the data of ground based Goose Bay neutron monitor and studied during the period 1981-94. Even though, the occurrence of high amplitude anisotropic wave trains does not depend on the onset of interplanetary magnetic clouds. But the possibility of occurrence of these events cannot be overlooked during the periods of interplanetary magnetic cloud events. It is observed that solar wind velocity remains higher (> 300) than normal and interplanetary magnetic field B remains lower than normal on the onset of interplanetary magnetic cloud during the passage of these events. It is also noted from the superposed epoch analysis of cosmic ray intensity and geomagnetic activity for high amplitude anisotropic wave train events during the onset of interplanetary magnetic clouds that the increase in cosmic ray intensity and decrease in geomagnetic activity start not at the onset of magnetic clouds but after few days. The north south component of IMF (Bz), IMF (B), proton

  18. Phase and amplitude binning for 4D-CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelnour, A. F.; Nehmeh, S. A.; Pan, T.; Humm, J. L.; Vernon, P.; Schöder, H.; Rosenzweig, K. E.; Mageras, G. S.; Yorke, E.; Larson, S. M.; Erdi, Y. E.

    2007-07-01

    We compare the consistency and accuracy of two image binning approaches used in 4D-CT imaging. One approach, phase binning (PB), assigns each breathing cycle 2π rad, within which the images are grouped. In amplitude binning (AB), the images are assigned bins according to the breathing signal's full amplitude. To quantitate both approaches we used a NEMA NU2-2001 IEC phantom oscillating in the axial direction and at random frequencies and amplitudes, approximately simulating a patient's breathing. 4D-CT images were obtained using a four-slice GE Lightspeed CT scanner operating in cine mode. We define consistency error as a measure of ability to correctly bin over repeated cycles in the same field of view. Average consistency error μe ± σe in PB ranged from 18% ± 20% to 30% ± 35%, while in AB the error ranged from 11% ± 14% to 20% ± 24%. In PB nearly all bins contained sphere slices. AB was more accurate, revealing empty bins where no sphere slices existed. As a proof of principle, we present examples of two non-small cell lung carcinoma patients' 4D-CT lung images binned by both approaches. While AB can lead to gaps in the coronal images, depending on the patient's breathing pattern, PB exhibits no gaps but suffers visible artifacts due to misbinning, yielding images that cover a relatively large amplitude range. AB was more consistent, though often resulted in gaps when no data existed due to patients' breathing pattern. We conclude AB is more accurate than PB. This has important consequences to treatment planning and diagnosis.

  19. Simultaneous distribution of AC and DC power

    DOEpatents

    Polese, Luigi Gentile

    2015-09-15

    A system and method for the transport and distribution of both AC (alternating current) power and DC (direct current) power over wiring infrastructure normally used for distributing AC power only, for example, residential and/or commercial buildings' electrical wires is disclosed and taught. The system and method permits the combining of AC and DC power sources and the simultaneous distribution of the resulting power over the same wiring. At the utilization site a complementary device permits the separation of the DC power from the AC power and their reconstruction, for use in conventional AC-only and DC-only devices.

  20. Amplitude-dependent orbital period in alternating gradient accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, S.; Kelliher, D. J.; Edmonds, C. S.; Kirkman, I. W.; Berg, J. S.; Jones, J. K.; Muratori, B. D.; Garland, J. M.

    2016-03-01

    Orbital period in a ring accelerator and time of flight in a linear accelerator depend on the amplitude of betatron oscillations. The variation is negligible in ordinary particle accelerators with relatively small beam emittance. In an accelerator for large emittance beams like muons and unstable nuclei, however, this effect cannot be ignored. We measured orbital period in a linear non-scaling fixed-field alternating-gradient accelerator, which is a candidate for muon acceleration, and compared it with the theoretical prediction. The good agreement between them gives important ground for the design of particle accelerators for a new generation of particle and nuclear physics experiments.

  1. Short Large-Amplitude Magnetic Structures (SLAMS) at Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collinson, G. A.; Wilson, L. B.; Sibeck, D. G.; Shane, N.; Zhang, T. L.; Moore, T. E.; Coates, A. J.; Barabash, S.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first observation of magnetic fluctuations consistent with Short Large-Amplitude Magnetic Structures (SLAMS) in the foreshock of the planet Venus. Three monolithic magnetic field spikes were observed by the Venus Express on the 11th of April 2009. The structures were approx.1.5->11s in duration, had magnetic compression ratios between approx.3->6, and exhibited elliptical polarization. These characteristics are consistent with the SLAMS observed at Earth, Jupiter, and Comet Giacobini-Zinner, and thus we hypothesize that it is possible SLAMS may be found at any celestial body with a foreshock.

  2. Extremely Large Amplitude Whistler Waves in the Earth's Inner Radiation Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breneman, A. W.; Cattell, C. A.; Wygant, J. R.; Kersten, K.; Wilson, L. B., III; Kellogg, P. J.; Goetz, K.

    2010-12-01

    We report STEREO observations of extremely large amplitude whistler mode waves in the Earth's nightside inner radiation belt (L<2 on November 6th, 2006) associated with lightning strikes and signals from the Navy transmitter NPM in Hawaii. The waves have amplitudes of up to >100 mV/m (zero-peak), 100-1000 times larger in amplitude than previously observed in this region. Past measurements have shown that the amplitudes of lightning whistlers can be much greater than the amplitudes of the NPM signal at the base of the ionosphere. However amplitudes of the two types of waves observed at STEREO are comparable, suggesting that the waves grow to such large amplitudes within the ionosphere or while in the inner radiation belts. Waveforms observed on STEREO A undergo semi-periodic polarization reversals at the lower hybrid and NPM transmitter frequencies when the transmitter is operating in continuous transmission mode. This may be related to small-scale-field-aligned density striations and plasma heating caused by the NPM transmitter. Recent simulations have shown that large amplitude, oblique whistlers can interact very strongly with high energy electrons via pitch angle and/or energy diffusion. Thus these whistlers may be an important previously unaccounted for source of energization or pitch angle scattering for the inner radiation belt. In addition, the polarization reversals caused by the NPM transmitter have implications for wave/particle interaction in the inner radiation belt since left- and right-handed waves interact with different particle populations.

  3. Power control for ac motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dabney, R. W. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A motor controller employing a triac through which power is supplied to a motor is described. The open circuit voltage appearing across the triac controls the operation of a timing circuit. This timing circuit triggers on the triac at a time following turn off which varies inversely as a function of the amplitude of the open circuit voltage of the triac.

  4. Direct Experimental Observation of a Practical AC Zeeman Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fancher, Charles; Pyle, Andrew; Rotunno, Andrew; Du, Shuangli; Aubin, Seth

    2016-05-01

    We present measurements of the spin-dependent AC Zeeman force produced by microwave magnetic near-field gradients on an atom chip. We measure the AC Zeeman force on ultracold 87 Rb atoms by observing its effect on the motion of atoms in free-fall and on those confined in a trap. We have studied the force as a function of microwave frequency detuning from a hyperfine transition at 6.8 GHz at several magnetic field strengths and have observed its characteristic bipolar and resonant features predicted by two-level dressed atom theory. We find that the force is several times the strength of gravity in our setup, and that it can be targeted to a specific hyperfine transition while leaving other hyperfine states and transitions relatively unaffected. We find that our measurements are reasonably consistent with theory and are working towards a parameter-free comparison. AC Zeeman potentials offer the possibility of targeting qualitatively different trapping potentials to different spin states, a capability currently absent from the toolbox of atomic quantum control techniques. In particular, an AC Zeeman potential could be used as the beamsplitter for a spin-dependent atom interferometer or for engineering a quantum gate. Work supported by AFOSR and W&M, and in part by AFRL.

  5. Speckle-reduced holographic display by modulating complex amplitude in single-lens system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chenliang; Xia, Jun; Qi, Yijun; Yuan, Caojin; Nie, Shouping

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes a method for calculating phase-only computer-generated hologram (CGH) in holographic display with reduced speckle noise. The method works by encoding the desired complex-amplitude field of object into a phase-only CGH by a linear canonical transform algorithm. The complex-amplitude field can then be reconstructed independently from the encoded CGH using a filter at the Fourier plane of a single-lens optical system. The feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method was verified by a simulation experiment. An optical experiment for holographic display was also conducted with reduced speckle using a single phase-only spatial-light modulator. The object was, in fact, reconstructed with different depth of focus clearly without speckle noise due to the simultaneous modulation of both amplitude and phase, confirming our method's ability to suppress speckle noise in holographic displays by modulating complex amplitude in three-dimensional space.

  6. Comparison of phase and amplitude structures of Pc 5 pulsations in the morning and afternoon sectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saka, O.; Kim, J. S.; Sugiura, M.

    1983-01-01

    North American IMS magnetometer network data are used in comparisons of the spatial phase and amplitude structures of the morning and afternoon Pc 5 pulsations, using cross spectral analysis of phase and amplitude readings between different stations. The spatial phase structures are found to be very similar in the morning and afternoon sectors for each of the three components. Amplitudes are larger in the magnetic north than in the magnetic east components for both sectors. Latitudinal amplitude and phase difference variations between the magnetic north and east components exhibit dissimilarities in the morning and afternoon sectors. These results suggest that compressional mode magnetic field oscillations are not observable on the ground in this time sector. The pulsations in both time sectors are instead seen as caused by transverse mode magnetospheric field oscillations.

  7. Design of a four-phase high frequency amplitude-stable power supply.

    PubMed

    Qihua, Yang

    2005-09-01

    This paper presents a four-phase high frequency amplitude-stable power supply that acts as a rotary electric field generator in biochip research and development. Four channels of high precision frequency signals are generated by DDS(Direct Digital Synthesis). Via two-stage amplifiers these signals are amplified to 50 V(p-p) output within 100 Hz--100 MHz bandwidth on standard 50 Omega load. Via amplitude and phase detection feedback, the output amplitude and phase errors among multiple channels can be stabilized even if load is changeable.

  8. AC electrified jets in a flow-focusing device: Jet length scaling.

    PubMed

    Castro-Hernández, Elena; García-Sánchez, Pablo; Alzaga-Gimeno, Javier; Tan, Say Hwa; Baret, Jean-Christophe; Ramos, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    We use a microfluidic flow-focusing device with integrated electrodes for controlling the production of water-in-oil drops. In a previous work, we reported that very long jets can be formed upon application of AC fields. We now study in detail the appearance of the long jets as a function of the electrical parameters, i.e., water conductivity, signal frequency, and voltage amplitude. For intermediate frequencies, we find a threshold voltage above which the jet length rapidly increases. Interestingly, this abrupt transition vanishes for high frequencies of the signal and the jet length grows smoothly with voltage. For frequencies below a threshold value, we previously reported a transition from a well-behaved uniform jet to highly unstable liquid structures in which axisymmetry is lost rather abruptly. These liquid filaments eventually break into droplets of different sizes. In this work, we characterize this transition with a diagram as a function of voltage and liquid conductivity. The electrical response of the long jets was studied via a distributed element circuit model. The model allows us to estimate the electric potential at the tip of the jet revealing that, for any combination of the electrical parameters, the breakup of the jet occurs at a critical value of this potential. We show that this voltage is around 550 V for our device geometry and choice of flow rates.

  9. AC electrified jets in a flow-focusing device: Jet length scaling.

    PubMed

    Castro-Hernández, Elena; García-Sánchez, Pablo; Alzaga-Gimeno, Javier; Tan, Say Hwa; Baret, Jean-Christophe; Ramos, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    We use a microfluidic flow-focusing device with integrated electrodes for controlling the production of water-in-oil drops. In a previous work, we reported that very long jets can be formed upon application of AC fields. We now study in detail the appearance of the long jets as a function of the electrical parameters, i.e., water conductivity, signal frequency, and voltage amplitude. For intermediate frequencies, we find a threshold voltage above which the jet length rapidly increases. Interestingly, this abrupt transition vanishes for high frequencies of the signal and the jet length grows smoothly with voltage. For frequencies below a threshold value, we previously reported a transition from a well-behaved uniform jet to highly unstable liquid structures in which axisymmetry is lost rather abruptly. These liquid filaments eventually break into droplets of different sizes. In this work, we characterize this transition with a diagram as a function of voltage and liquid conductivity. The electrical response of the long jets was studied via a distributed element circuit model. The model allows us to estimate the electric potential at the tip of the jet revealing that, for any combination of the electrical parameters, the breakup of the jet occurs at a critical value of this potential. We show that this voltage is around 550 V for our device geometry and choice of flow rates. PMID:27375826

  10. Amplitude-phase characteristics of SAT annual cycle in Asia: tendencies of change derived from observations and reanalyses and from numerical experiments with IAP RAS CM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliseev, Alexey V.; Mokhov, Igor I.

    2002-02-01

    Amplitude-phase characteristics (APCs) of surface air temperature (SAT) annual cycle (SAT) are analyzed. From meteorological observations from the XX century and meteorological reanalyses for its second half it is found that alongside with the well-known negative correlation of SAT AC amplitude Ts,1 with annual mean SAT Ts,m a peculiarity in the North Pacific exists where Ts,1 and Ts,m are positively intercorrelated. In contrast, SAT AC phase characteristics show more regional behavior. In particular southward of the characteristic annual mean position of the snow-ice boundary (SIB) SAT AC is harmonized under climate warming while northward it is deharmonized. In the Far East (southward about 50 degree(s)N) SAT AC shifts as a whole with its extrema occurring earlier with increasing annual mean SAT. From the energy-balance climate considerations these tendencies of change of the SAT AC APCs in the middle and high latitudes are associated to the influence of the albedo-SAT feedback due to the SIB movement and in the Far East - to the interannual cloudiness variability. Tendencies of change for SAT AC related to the SIB movement are simulated reasonably well by the climate model of intermediate complexity in the experiments with greenhouse gases atmospheric loading. In contrast, the tendencies resulting from the cloudiness variability are not reproduced by this model.

  11. All-optical atomic magnetometers based on nonlinear magneto-optical rotation with amplitude modulated light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustelny, Szymon; Wojciechowski, Adam; Kotyrba, Mateusz; Sycz, Krystian; Zachorowski, Jerzy; Gawlik, Wojciech; Cingoz, Arman; Leefer, Nathan; Higbie, James M.; Corsini, Eric; Ledbetter, Micah P.; Rochester, Simon M.; Sushkov, Alexander O.; Budker, Dmitry

    2007-03-01

    We demonstrate a magnetometric technique based on nonlinear magneto-optical rotation using amplitude modulated light. The magnetometers can be operated in either open-loop (typical nonlinear magneto-optical rotation with amplitude-modulated light) or closed-loop (self-oscillating) modes. The latter mode is particularly well suited for conditions where the magnetic field is changing by large amounts over a relatively short timescale.

  12. Extracting amplitudes for single and double ionization from a time-dependent wave packet

    SciTech Connect

    Palacios, A.; Rescigno, T. N.; McCurdy, C. W.

    2007-10-15

    A method is described for extracting double ionization amplitudes from a quantum wave packet for an atom after a short radiation pulse, but while the electrons are still interacting. The procedure involves the use of exterior complex scaling to effectively propagate the field-free solution to infinite times, and allows the use of existing integral formulas for double ionization amplitudes for two electron atoms and molecules.

  13. Flutter of articulated pipes at finite amplitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousselet, J.; Herrmann, G.

    1975-01-01

    Previous studies of the behavior of pipes conveying fluid have assumed that the fluid velocity relative to the pipe is a known quantity and is unaffected by the motion of the pipe. This approach eliminates the need to find the flow equations of motion, and is adequate for infinitesimal transverse amplitudes of motion of the pipe system, but is incapable of predicting what will be the effect of larger amplitudes. This last shortcoming may be of importance when flow velocities are near critical velocities, that is, velocities at which the system begins to flutter. It is the purpose of the present study to investigate in greater detail the dynamic behavior of pipes in the vicinity of critical velocities.

  14. Constructing QCD one-loop amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Forde, Darren; /SLAC /UCLA

    2008-02-22

    In the context of constructing one-loop amplitudes using a unitarity bootstrap approach we discuss a general systematic procedure for obtaining the coefficients of the scalar bubble and triangle integral functions of one-loop amplitudes. Coefficients are extracted after examining the behavior of the cut integrand as the unconstrained parameters of a specifically chosen parameterization of the cut loop momentum approach infinity. Measurements of new physics at the forthcoming experimental program at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will require a precise understanding of processes at next-to-leading order (NLO). This places increased demands for the computation of new one-loop amplitudes. This in turn has spurred recent developments towards improved calculational techniques. Direct calculations using Feynman diagrams are in general inefficient. Developments of more efficient techniques have usually centered around unitarity techniques [1], where tree amplitudes are effectively 'glued' together to form loops. The most straightforward application of this method, in which the cut loop momentum is in D = 4, allows for the computation of 'cut-constructible' terms only, i.e. (poly)logarithmic containing terms and any related constants. QCD amplitudes contain, in addition to such terms, rational pieces which cannot be derived using such cuts. These 'missing' rational parts can be extracted using cut loop momenta in D = 4-2 {var_epsilon}. The greater difficulty of such calculations has restricted the application of this approach, although recent developments [3, 4] have provided new promise for this technique. Recently the application of on-shell recursion relations [5] to obtaining the 'missing' rational parts of one-loop processes [6] has provided an alternative very promising solution to this problem. In combination with unitarity methods an 'on-shell bootstrap' approach provides an efficient technique for computing complete one-loop QCD amplitudes [7]. Additionally

  15. Integrable spin chains and scattering amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, J.; Lipatov, L. N.; Prygarin, A.

    2011-11-01

    In this review, we show that the multi-particle scattering amplitudes in {N}=4 SYM at large Nc and in the multi-Regge kinematics for some physical regions have the high energy behavior appearing from the contribution of the Mandelstam cuts in the complex angular momentum plane of the corresponding t-channel partial waves. These Mandelstam cuts or Regge cuts result from gluon composite states in the adjoint representation of the gauge group SU(Nc). In the leading logarithmic approximation (LLA), their contribution to the six-point amplitude is in full agreement with the known two-loop result. The Hamiltonian for the Mandelstam states constructed from n gluons in LLA coincides with the local Hamiltonian of an integrable open spin chain. We construct the corresponding wavefunctions using the integrals of motion and the Baxter-Sklyanin approach.

  16. Multilayered models for electromagnetic reflection amplitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linlor, W. I.

    1976-01-01

    The remote sensing of snowpack characteristics with surface installations or with an airborne system could have important applications in water resource management and flood prediction. To derive some insight into such applications, the electromagnetic response of multilayer snow models is analyzed. Normally incident plane waves are assumed at frequencies ranging from 10 to the 6th power to 10 to the 10th power Hz, and amplitude reflection coefficients are calculated for models having various snow-layer combinations, including ice sheets. Layers are defined by a thickness, permittivity, and conductivity; the electrical parameters are constant or prescribed functions of frequency. To illustrate the effect of various layering combinations, results are given in the form of curves of amplitude reflection coefficients, versus frequency for a variety of models. Under simplifying assumptions, the snow thickness and effective dielectric constant can be estimated from the reflection coefficient variations as a function of frequency.

  17. Automatic generation of tree level helicity amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzer, T.; Long, W. F.

    1994-11-01

    The program MadGraph is presented which automatically generates postscript Feynman diagrams and Fortran code to calculate arbitrary tree level helicity amplitudes by calling HELAS[1] subroutines. The program is written in Fortran and is available in Unix and VMS versions. MadGraph currently includes standard model interactions of QCD and QFD, but is easily modified to include additional models such as supersymmetry.

  18. Automatic generation of tree level helicity amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzer, T.; Long, W. F.

    1994-07-01

    The program MadGraph is presented which automatically generates postscript Feynman diagrams and Fortran code to calculate arbitrary tree level helicity amplitudes by calling HELAS[1] subroutines. The program is written in Fortran and is available in Unix and VMS versions. MadGraph currently includes standard model interactions of QCD and QFD, but is easily modified to include additional models such as supersymmetry.

  19. Phase analysis of amplitude binary mask structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthankovilakam, Krishnaparvathy; Scharf, Toralf; Herzig, Hans Peter; Vogler, Uwe; Bramati, Arianna; Voelkel, Reinhard

    2016-03-01

    Shaping of light behind masks using different techniques is the milestone of the printing industry. The aerial image distribution or the intensity distribution at the printing distances defines the resolution of the structure after printing. Contrast and phase are the two parameters that play a major role in shaping of light to get the desired intensity pattern. Here, in contrast to many other contributions that focus on intensity, we discuss the phase evolution for different structures. The amplitude or intensity characteristics of the structures in a binary mask at different proximity gaps have been analyzed extensively for many industrial applications. But the phase evolution from the binary mask having OPC structures is not considered so far. The mask we consider here is the normal amplitude binary mask but having high resolution Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) structures for corners. The corner structures represent a two dimensional problem which is difficult to handle with simple rules of phase masks design and therefore of particular interest. The evolution of light from small amplitude structures might lead to high contrast by creating sharp phase changes or phase singularities which are points of zero intensity. We show the phase modulation at different proximity gaps and can visualize the shaping of light according to the phase changes. The analysis is done with an instrument called High Resolution Interference Microscopy (HRIM), a Mach-Zehnder interferometer that gives access to three-dimensional phase and amplitude images. The current paper emphasizes on the phase measurement of different optical proximity correction structures, and especially on corners of a binary mask.

  20. A Brief Introduction to Modern Amplitude Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Lance J.

    I provide a basic introduction to modern helicity amplitude methods, including color organization, the spinor helicity formalism, and factorization properties. I also describe the BCFW (on-shell) recursion relation at tree level, and explain how similar ideas -- unitarity and on-shell methods -- work at the loop level. These notes are based on lectures delivered at the 2012 CERN Summer School and at TASI 2013, and are close to the material Zvi Bern lectured on at TASI 2014.