Science.gov

Sample records for ac flow tests

  1. ac power control in the Core Flow Test Loop

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, D.W.

    1980-01-01

    This work represents a status report on a development effort to design an ac power controller for the Core Flow Test Loop. The Core Flow Test Loop will be an engineering test facility which will simulate the thermal environment of a gas-cooled fast-breeder reactor. The problems and limitations of using sinusoidal ac power to simulate the power generated within a nuclear reactor are addressed. The transformer-thyristor configuration chosen for the Core Flow Test Loop power supply is presented. The initial considerations, design, and analysis of a closed-loop controller prototype are detailed. The design is then analyzed for improved performance possibilities and failure modes are investigated at length. A summary of the work completed to date and a proposed outline for continued development completes the report.

  2. An electrohydrodynamic flow in ac electrowetting

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Horim; Yun, Sungchan; Ko, Sung Hee; Kang, Kwan Hyoung

    2009-01-01

    In ac electrowetting, hydrodynamic flows occur within a droplet. Two distinct flow patterns were observed, depending on the frequency of the applied electrical signal. The flow at low-frequency range was explained in terms of shape oscillation and a steady streaming process in conjunction with contact line oscillation. The origin of the flow at high-frequency range has not yet been explained. We suggest that the high-frequency flow originated mainly from the electrothermal effect, in which electrical charge is generated due to the gradient of electrical conductivity and permittivity, which is induced by the Joule heating of fluid medium. To support our argument, we analyzed the flow field numerically while considering the electrical body force generated by the electrothermal effect. We visualized the flow pattern and measured the flow velocity inside the droplet. The numerical results show qualitative agreement with experimental results with respect to electric field and frequency dependence of flow velocity. The effects of induced-charge electro-osmosis, natural convection, and the Marangoni flow are discussed. PMID:20216975

  3. An electrohydrodynamic flow in ac electrowetting.

    PubMed

    Lee, Horim; Yun, Sungchan; Ko, Sung Hee; Kang, Kwan Hyoung

    2009-01-01

    In ac electrowetting, hydrodynamic flows occur within a droplet. Two distinct flow patterns were observed, depending on the frequency of the applied electrical signal. The flow at low-frequency range was explained in terms of shape oscillation and a steady streaming process in conjunction with contact line oscillation. The origin of the flow at high-frequency range has not yet been explained. We suggest that the high-frequency flow originated mainly from the electrothermal effect, in which electrical charge is generated due to the gradient of electrical conductivity and permittivity, which is induced by the Joule heating of fluid medium. To support our argument, we analyzed the flow field numerically while considering the electrical body force generated by the electrothermal effect. We visualized the flow pattern and measured the flow velocity inside the droplet. The numerical results show qualitative agreement with experimental results with respect to electric field and frequency dependence of flow velocity. The effects of induced-charge electro-osmosis, natural convection, and the Marangoni flow are discussed. PMID:20216975

  4. Large aperture ac interferometer for optical testing.

    PubMed

    Moore, D T; Murray, R; Neves, F B

    1978-12-15

    A 20-cm clear aperture modified Twyman-Green interferometer is described. The system measures phase with an AC technique called phase-lock interferometry while scanning the aperture with a dual galvanometer scanning system. Position information and phase are stored in a minicomputer with disk storage. This information is manipulated with associated software, and the wavefront deformation due to a test component is graphically displayed in perspective and contour on a CRT terminal. PMID:20208642

  5. Dielectrophoretic particle-particle interaction under AC electrohydrodynamic flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Doh-Hyoung; Yu, Chengjie; Papazoglou, Elisabeth; Farouk, Bakhtier; Noh, Hongseok M

    2011-09-01

    We used the Maxwell stress tensor method to understand dielectrophoretic particle-particle interactions and applied the results to the interpretation of particle behaviors under alternating current (AC) electrohydrodynamic conditions such as AC electroosmosis (ACEO) and electrothermal flow (ETF). Distinct particle behaviors were observed under ACEO and ETF. Diverse particle-particle interactions observed in experiments such as particle clustering, particles keeping a certain distance from each other, chain and disc formation and their rotation, are explained based on the numerical simulation data. The improved understanding of particle behaviors in AC electrohydrodynamic flows presented here will enable researchers to design better particle manipulation strategies for lab-on-a-chip applications. PMID:21823132

  6. Characterization of flow-through electrode processes by AC impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Yuh, C.Y. ); Selman, J.R. )

    1993-04-01

    Flow-through porous electrodes, such as packed-bed and fluidized-bed electrodes, are attractive for electrowinning, electro-organic synthesis and flow-battery applications. The extensive surface area of the porous electrodes makes high volumetric reaction rate more possible than in a cell with smooth electrodes. Forced convection also enhances mass-transfer rate and hence reduces concentration polarization. AC-impedance method has been used successfully in characterizing a packed-bed flow-through electrode system. A macrohomogeneous model was developed to simulate the effect of structural, physical and flow parameters. The relative importance of kinetics and mass transfer can be inferred from the AC-impedance analysis. Kinetic information about copper deposition in supported cupric sulfate solution has been obtained successfully using this technique.

  7. Low-frequency ac electro-flow-focusing microfluidic emulsification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Peng; Kim, Haejune; Luo, Dawei; Marquez, Manuel; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2010-04-01

    Applications of electric field, using either dc or high-frequency ac field, have shown many advantages in emulsification. We further develop this technique by a detailed study on low-frequency ac electro-flow-focusing (EFF) microfluidic emulsification. Counter-intuitively, the droplet size variation is not monotonic with the electric field, in contrary to the dc-EFF emulsification. This phenomenon originates from a relaxation oscillation of flow rate through the Taylor cone. Particularly, a continuous droplet size decrease was obtained at the voltage ramp-up stage. This emulsification process was modeled in analog to the accumulation and release of charges in an RC electric circuit with an adjustable resistor.

  8. Resonant AC power system proof-of-concept test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wappes, Loran J.

    1986-01-01

    Proof-of-concept testing was performed on a 20-kHz, resonant power system breadboard from 1981 through 1985. The testing began with the evaluation of a single, 1.0-kW resonant inverter and progressed to the testing of breadboard systems with higher power levels and more capability. The final breadboard configuration tested was a 25.0-kW breadboard with six inverters providing power to three user-interface modules over a 50-meter, 20-kHz bus. The breadboard demonstrated the ability to synchronize multiple resonant inverters to power a common bus. Single-phase and three-phase 20-kHz power distribution was demonstrated. Simple conversion of 20-kHz to dc and variable-frequency ac was demonstrated as was bidirectional power flow between 20-kHz and dc. Steady state measurements of efficiency, power-factor tolerance, and conducted emissions and conducted susceptibility were made. In addition, transient responses were recorded for such conditions as start up, shut down, load changes. The results showed the 20-kHz resonant system to be a desirable technology for a spacecraft power management and distribution system with multiple users and a utility-type bus.

  9. Initial tests of an AC dipole for the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.; Jansson, A.; Kopp, S.; Syphers, M.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    The AC dipole is a device to diagnose transverse motions of a beam. It can achieve large-amplitude oscillations without two inevitable problems of conventional kicker/pinger magnets: decoherence and emittance growth. While not the first synchrotron to operate with an AC dipole, the Tevatron can now make use of its recently upgraded BPM system, providing unprecedented resolution for use with an AC dipole, to measure both linear and nonlinear properties of the accelerator. Plans are to provide AC dipole systems for both transverse degrees of freedom. Preliminary tests have been done using an audio power amplifier with an existing vertical pinger magnet, producing oscillation amplitudes up to 2{sigma} at 150 GeV. In this paper, we will present the configuration of this system. We also show the analysis of a first few data sets, including the direct measurement of beta functions at BPM locations.

  10. On-Chip AC self-test controller

    DOEpatents

    Flanagan, John D.; Herring, Jay R.; Lo, Tin-Chee

    2009-09-29

    A system for performing AC self-test on an integrated circuit that includes a system clock for normal operation is provided. The system includes the system clock, self-test circuitry, a first and second test register to capture and launch test data in response to a sequence of data pulses, and a logic circuit to be tested. The self-test circuitry includes an AC self-test controller and a clock splitter. The clock splitter generates the sequence of data pulses including a long data capture pulse followed by an at speed data launch pulse and an at speed data capture pulse followed by a long data launch pulse. The at speed data launch pulse and the at speed data capture pulse are generated for a common cycle of the system clock.

  11. Test plan for performance testing of the Eaton AC-3 electric vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Crumley, R.L.; Heiselmann, H.W.

    1985-04-01

    An alternating current (ac) propulsion system for an electric vehicle has been developed and tested by the Eaton Corporation. The test bed vehicle is a modified 1981 Mercury Lynx. The test plan has been prepared specifically for the third modification to this test bed and identified as the Eaton AC-3. The scope of the EG and G testing at INEL to be done on the Eaton AC-3 will include coastdown and dynamometer tests but will not include environmental, on-road, or track testing. Coastdown testing will be performed in accordance with SAE J-1263 (SAE Recommended Practice for Road Load Measurement and Dynamometer Simulation Using Coastdown Techniques).

  12. Measurement of AC Induced Flow using Mico PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dazhi; Meinhart, Carl; Sigurdson, Marin

    2002-11-01

    The fluid motion in a wedge-shaped device subject to an AC electric field is measured using Micron-Resolution Particle Image Velocimetry (micro-PIV). The fluorescent polystyrene spherical particles are used as flow tracers. In the non-uniform electric field, the particles in the suspension experience dielectrophoretic forces, which cause difference of velocities between the particles and the fluid. In order to eliminate the velocity difference, two different size particles are used for the micro-PIV measurements to determine the fluid velocity field. A two-color PIV technique is used to determine uniquely the fluid velocity field. The wedge-shaped channel is 100-micron wide at the apex, and fabricated from a 550-micron thick silicon wafer. A voltage of 15Vrms at 100 kHz is applied to the electrodes. The particle volume fraction is set below 0.1% so that the effect of the particles on the fluid can be negligible. Fifty successive images are taken to record particle images and analyzed to estimate the particle velocity fields. The velocity fields of the two different size particles are then used to uniquely determine the underlying fluid velocity. The measured fluid flow is a saddle-point flow, which could be used for precision mixing and transport in microscale devices.

  13. Rapid generation and manipulation of microfluidic vortex flows induced by AC electrokinetics with optical illumination.

    PubMed

    Park, Choongbae; Wereley, Steven T

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate a rapid generation of twin opposing microvortices (TOMVs) induced by non-uniform alternating current (AC) electric fields together with a laser beam on a patterned pair of indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes. A fast and strong jet flow region between twin microvortices is also generated. Its pattern and direction, such as whether it is symmetric or asymmetric, are controlled mainly by the location of a single laser spot relative to the ITO electrodes. With two laser beams, two separate flows are superposed to give a new one. In situ generation and control of the TOMV flow are tested in suspensions of fluorescent polystyrene particles, as well as in milk emulsions. This technique has great potential for dynamically manipulating micro-fluid flows, functioning as a micro-pump or mixer. PMID:23380888

  14. Performance testing of the AC propulsion ELX electric vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, W.E.; MacDowall, R.D.; Burke, A.F.

    1994-06-01

    Performance testing of the AC Propulsion ELX electric vehicle is described. Test data are presented and analyzed. The ELX vehicle is the first of a series of electric vehicles of interest to the California Air Resources Board. The test series is being conducted under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the US Department of energy and the California Air Resources Board. The tests which were conducted showed that the AC Propulsion ELX electric vehicle has exceptional acceleration and range performance. when the vehicle`s battery was fully charged, the vehicle can accelerate from 0 to 96 km/h in about 10 seconds. Energy consumption and range tests using consecutive FUDS and HWFET Driving cycles (the all-electric cycle) indicate that the energy economy of the AC Propulsion ELX electric vehicle with regenerative braking is 97 W{center_dot}h/km, with a range of 153 km (95 miles). Computer simulations performed using the SIMPLEV Program indicate that the vehicle would have a range of 327 km (203 miles) on the all-electric cycle if the lead acid batteries were replaced with NiMH batteries having an energy density of 67 W{center_dot}h/kg. Comparisons of FUDS test data with and without regenerative braking indicated that regenerative braking reduced the energy consumption of the ELX vehicle by approximately 25%.

  15. Performance testing of the AC propulsion ELX electric vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, W. E.; MacDowall, R. D.; Burke, A. F.

    1994-06-01

    Performance testing of the AC Propulsion ELX electric vehicle is described. Test data are presented and analyzed. The ELX vehicle is the first of a series of electric vehicles of interest to the California Air Resources Board. The test series is being conducted under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the US Department of energy and the California Air Resources Board. The tests which were conducted showed that the AC Propulsion ELX electric vehicle has exceptional acceleration and range performance. When the vehicle's battery was fully charged, the vehicle can accelerate from 0 to 96 km/h in about 10 seconds. Energy consumption and range tests using consecutive FUDS and HWFET Driving cycles (the all-electric cycle) indicate that the energy economy of the AC Propulsion ELX electric vehicle with regenerative braking is 97 W(center dot)h/km, with a range of 153 km (95 miles). Computer simulations performed using the SIMPLEV Program indicate that the vehicle would have a range of 327 km (203 miles) on the all-electric cycle if the lead acid batteries were replaced with NiMH batteries having an energy density of 67 W(center dot)h/kg. Comparisons of FUDS test data with and without regenerative braking indicated that regenerative braking reduced the energy consumption of the ELX vehicle by approximately 25%.

  16. Development and test of the ASAT Bipropellant Attitude Control System (ACS) engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, K. F.; Allen, K. A.; Hemmings, B.

    1993-06-01

    The recent Kinetic Energy Anti-Satellite (KE ASAT) Bipropellant Attitude Control System (ACS) Engine testing demonstrated and characterized performance and operational durability. Within the ASAT mission, the bipropellant engines are used to despin the missile after shroud deployment and to provide attitude control of the Kill Vehicle (KV) during all phases of the KV free flight. These engines provide all attitude control thrust from booster separation until target intercept. The ASAT ACS engine is unique both in the amount of on-time that the engine sees during a tactical mission scenario and the high thermal loads which result from performing two diametrically opposed missions with a single thruster - long steady state burns and very short response time pulse mode operations. Two flightweight ASAT ACS Bipropellant engines were individually tested in a developmental test program. Testing was conducted at ambient conditions. Hot-fire testing consisted of steady-state, mission duty cycle (MDC), Chamber Pressure (Pc) excursion, mixture ratio excursion, and pulse performance. Testing was conducted by Rockwell's Rocketdyne Division at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL), Systems Test Laboratory IV (STL IV), Cell 37A. Two additional engine tests are planned and will include altitude testing. This paper will summarize engine development, component development testing, valve orificing and cold flow calibration, and engine hot-fire testing approach and results.

  17. The AC clean-fog test for contaminated insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Cherney, E.A.; Beausejour, Y.; Cheng, T.C.; Lloyd, K.J.; Marrone, G.; Moran, J.H.; Naito, K.; Pargamin, L.

    1983-03-01

    The paper summarizes the results of clean-fog tests conducted by eleven task force laboratories on a common suspension insulator, IEEE insulator. The test series done according to a specific set of guidelines, show considerable dispersion in the fifty per cent flashover voltage between the laboratories. The significant parameters of the clean-fog method that influence the fifty per cent flashover voltage are discussed. More controls in testing are needed before the formalization of the clean-fog method as a standard contamination test for high voltage ac insulators can be made.

  18. RG flow of AC conductivity in soft wall model of QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, Neha; Siwach, Sanjay

    2016-03-01

    We study the Renormalization Group (RG) flow of AC conductivity in soft wall model of holographic QCD. We consider the charged black hole metric and the explicit form of AC conductivity is obtained at the cutoff surface. We plot the numerical solution of conductivity flow as a function of radial coordinate. The equation of gauge field is also considered and the numerical solution is obtained for AC conductivity as a function of frequency. The results for AC conductivity are also obtained for different values of chemical potential and Gauss-Bonnet couplings.

  19. Fluorescent Particles For Flow Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonnell, Jeremy L.; Stern, Susan M.; Torkelson, Jan R.

    1995-01-01

    Small alumina spheres coated with fluorescent dye used in flow testing of transparent plastic model of check valve. Entrained fluroescent particles make flows visible. After completion of flow test, particles remaining in valve easily detectable and removed for measurement of their sizes.

  20. Testing of a First Order AC Magnetic Susceptometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Ryan; Sunny, Smitha; Ho, Pei-Chun

    2011-11-01

    A first-order AC magnetic susceptometer has been constructed and tested to find the magnetic response of strongly correlated electron materials. The instrument works by using a primary coil to apply a small AC magnetic field of .104 Oe to a sample with a cylindrical coil space of length .635 cm and diameter .355 cm. A lock-in amplifier is used to monitor the induced voltage from a set of secondary coils. By coupling a temperature-controlled system with this instrument, the change in the magnetic signal with respect to temperature is measured. Monitoring the signal changes may indicate the temperature that causes the material to transition to either a ferromagnetic, anti-ferromagnetic, or superconducting state. A 122.47 mg Gd polycrystal was used to test our susceptometer. The data qualitatively agrees with the previous results of magnetization vs. temperature of Gd single crystals by Nigh et al. [1]: there is a steep increase in the pick-up signal at 300 K where Gd becomes ferromagnetic and a peak at 210 K [1]. This susceptometer will be used for our future investigation of magnetic properties of rare earth compounds and nanoparticles in the temperature range of 10 K to 300 K. [4pt] [1] H. E. Nigh, S. Legvold, and F. H. Spedding, Physical Review 132, 1092 (1963)

  1. Test of Filter Wheel Flight Software Update {ACS}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2003-07-01

    This test will be run following the installation of a flight software change which will position the filter wheels more accurately. It incorporates an ACS anneal and will substitute for one of the routine anneals that are carried out every four weeks. A series of internal flats will be taken with several filters. The exposures will be just long enough to obtain engineering data concerning the wheel positions. One external earth flat will also be taken to provide visual confirmation that the filter is correctly aligned. In the event of a problem being found, an operations request will be issued to revert to the original software. There are several requirements affecting timing and real-time contact. 1. Visit 1 must be scheduled to start within 12 hours of an SMS boundary. 2. Engineering telemetry contact must be available during visits 4, 5 and 6 3. An uplink opportunity must be available, at least 30 minutes after execution of the test, i.e. completion of visits 4, 5 and 6 {visit 7 should have several orbit gap from the last of 4, 5 and 6. 4. Visit 7 may not proceed, nor may any other ACS observation take place after the start of visit 1 until the uplink opportunity has occurred.

  2. Debris-flow runout predictions based on the average channel slope (ACS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prochaska, A.B.; Santi, P.M.; Higgins, J.D.; Cannon, S.H.

    2008-01-01

    Prediction of the runout distance of a debris flow is an important element in the delineation of potentially hazardous areas on alluvial fans and for the siting of mitigation structures. Existing runout estimation methods rely on input parameters that are often difficult to estimate, including volume, velocity, and frictional factors. In order to provide a simple method for preliminary estimates of debris-flow runout distances, we developed a model that provides runout predictions based on the average channel slope (ACS model) for non-volcanic debris flows that emanate from confined channels and deposit on well-defined alluvial fans. This model was developed from 20 debris-flow events in the western United States and British Columbia. Based on a runout estimation method developed for snow avalanches, this model predicts debris-flow runout as an angle of reach from a fixed point in the drainage channel to the end of the runout zone. The best fixed point was found to be the mid-point elevation of the drainage channel, measured from the apex of the alluvial fan to the top of the drainage basin. Predicted runout lengths were more consistent than those obtained from existing angle-of-reach estimation methods. Results of the model compared well with those of laboratory flume tests performed using the same range of channel slopes. The robustness of this model was tested by applying it to three debris-flow events not used in its development: predicted runout ranged from 82 to 131% of the actual runout for these three events. Prediction interval multipliers were also developed so that the user may calculate predicted runout within specified confidence limits. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Numerical study of dc-biased ac-electrokinetic flow over symmetrical electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Yang Ng, Wee; Ramos, Antonio; Cheong Lam, Yee; Rodriguez, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of DC-biased AC-electrokinetic (DC-biased ACEK) flow over a pair of symmetrical electrodes. The flow mechanism is based on a transverse conductivity gradient created through incipient Faradaic reactions occurring at the electrodes when a DC-bias is applied. The DC biased AC electric field acting on this gradient generates a fluid flow in the form of vortexes. To understand more in depth the DC-biased ACEK flow mechanism, a phenomenological model is developed to study the effects of voltage, conductivity ratio, channel width, depth, and aspect ratio on the induced flow characteristics. It was found that flow velocity on the order of mm/s can be produced at higher voltage and conductivity ratio. Such rapid flow velocity is one of the highest reported in microsystems technology using electrokinetics. PMID:22662084

  4. Design and Control Implementation of AC Electric Power Steering System Test Bench*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weidong; Ai, Yibo

    Using AC motor is an important development trend of electric power steering system, and in this paper, we proposed a design of AC electric power steering system test bench. The paper introduced the bench structure, working principle and main components selection first, and then given the implementation scheme of test bench's three functions: simulation of the road resistance, power assistant control and data acquisition. The test results showed the feasibility of the test bench.

  5. SUBMERGED GRAVEL SCRUBBER DEMONSTRATION AS A PASSIVE AIR CLEANER FOR CONTAINMENT VENTING AND PURGING WITH SODIUM AEROSOLS -- CSTF TESTS AC7 - AC10

    SciTech Connect

    HILLIARD, R K.; MCCORMACK, J D.; POSTMA, A K.

    1981-11-01

    Four large-scale air cleaning tests (AC7 - AC10) were performed in the Containment Systems Test Facility (CS'lF) to demonstrate the performance of a Submerged Gravel Scrubber for cleaning the effluent gas from a vented and purged breeder reactor containment vessel. The test article, comprised of a Submerged Gravel Scrubber (SGS) followed by a high efficiency fiber demister, had a design gas flow rate of 0.47 m{sup 3}/s (1000 ft{sup 3}/min) at a pressure drop of 9.0 kPa (36 in. H{sub 2}O). The test aerosol was sodium oxide, sodium hydroxide, or sodium carbonate generated in the 850-m{sup 3} CSTF vessel by continuously spraying sodium into the air-filled vessel while adding steam or carbon dioxide. Approximately 4500 kg (10,000 lb) of sodium was sprayed over a total period of 100 h during the tests. The SGS/Demister system was shown to be highly efficient (removing ~99.98% of the entering sodium aerosol mass), had a high mass loading capacity, and operated in a passive manner, with no electrical requirement. Models for predicting aerosol capture, gas cooling, and pressure drop are developed and compared with experimental results.

  6. Cold Flow Verification Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsi, A.; Shadle, L.J.

    1996-12-31

    The cold flow verification test facility consists of a 15-foot high, 3-foot diameter, domed vessel made of clear acrylic in two flanged sections. The unit can operate up to pressures of 14 psig. The internals include a 10-foot high jetting fluidized bed, a cylindrical baffle that hangs from the dome, and a rotating grate for control of continuous solids removal. The fluid bed is continuously fed solids (20 to 150 lb/hr) through a central nozzle made up of concentric pipes. It can either be configured as a half or full cylinder of various dimensions. The fluid bed has flow loops for separate air flow control for conveying solids (inner jet, 500 to 100000 scfh) , make-up into the jet (outer jet, 500 to 8000 scfh), spargers in the solids removal annulus (100 to 2000 scfh), and 6 air jets (20 to 200 scfh) on the sloping conical grid. Additional air (500 to 10000 scfh) can be added to the top of the dome and under the rotating grate. The outer vessel, the hanging cylindrical baffles or skirt, and the rotating grate can be used to study issues concerning moving bed reactors. There is ample allowance for access and instrumentation in the outer shell. Furthermore, this facility is available for future Cooperative Research and Development Program Manager Agreements (CRADA) to study issues and problems associated with fluid- and fixed-bed reactors. The design allows testing of different dimensions and geometries.

  7. AC fog withstand test on contaminated insulators by steam fog

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, J.N.

    1982-11-01

    This paper describes the results of an investigation into how steam fog parameters affect the withstand voltage of artificially contaminated insulators by the fog withstand method. Established the correlation between the steam flow rate and liquid water content of the fog. The fog withstand voltage showed a lower value with little dispersion at about 3 to 10 g/m/sup 3/ of the maximum liquid water content. The minimum fog withstand voltage agreed well with the minimum flashover voltage obtained under natural conditions. The authors suggest that, for the fog withstand test using steam fog, the ideal fog condition would be about 3 to 7 g/m/sup 3/ of the maximum liquid water content of the fog.

  8. Development of an AC Phase Controlled Testing Apparatus with an Impulse Voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kando, Masaaki; Matsuo, Takashi

    Overvoltages as lightning surges and/or switching surges will affect power apparatuses and electric appliances, which make them of deterioration. However, recent AC testing apparatuses haven't been functions generating an impulse voltage. Moreover, the apparatuses with controlling an impulse voltage haven't been utilized except the low voltage function generator. Therefore, an AC phase controlled testing apparatus with an impulse voltage (0.8/6μs) has been developed in order to elucidate mechanism of the degradation in insulating materials with a AC power supply simulating the overvoltages.

  9. System and component design and test of a 10 hp, 18,000 rpm AC dynamometer utilizing a high frequency AC voltage link, part 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipo, Thomas A.; Alan, Irfan

    1991-06-01

    Hard and soft switching test results conducted with one of the samples of first generation MOS-controlled thyristor (MCTs) and similar test results with several different samples of second generation MCT's are reported. A simple chopper circuit is used to investigate the basic switching characteristics of MCT under hard switching and various types of resonant circuits are used to determine soft switching characteristics of MCT under both zero voltage and zero current switching. Next, operation principles of a pulse density modulated converter (PDMC) for three phase (3F) to 3F two-step power conversion via parallel resonant high frequency (HF) AC link are reviewed. The details for the selection of power switches and other power components required for the construction of the power circuit for the second generation 3F to 3F converter system are discussed. The problems encountered in the first generation system are considered. Design and performance of the first generation 3F to 3F power converter system and field oriented induction moter drive based upon a 3 kVA, 20 kHz parallel resonant HF AC link are described. Low harmonic current at the input and output, unity power factor operation of input, and bidirectional flow capability of the system are shown via both computer and experimental results. The work completed on the construction and testing of the second generation converter and field oriented induction motor drive based upon specifications for a 10 hp squirrel cage dynamometer and a 20 kHz parallel resonant HF AC link is discussed. The induction machine is designed to deliver 10 hp or 7.46 kW when operated as an AC-dynamo with power fed back to the source through the converter. Results presented reveal that the proposed power level requires additional energy storage elements to overcome difficulties with a peak link voltage variation problem that limits reaching to the desired power level. The power level test of the second generation converter after the

  10. System and component design and test of a 10 hp, 18,000 rpm AC dynamometer utilizing a high frequency AC voltage link, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipo, Thomas A.; Alan, Irfan

    1991-01-01

    Hard and soft switching test results conducted with one of the samples of first generation MOS-controlled thyristor (MCTs) and similar test results with several different samples of second generation MCT's are reported. A simple chopper circuit is used to investigate the basic switching characteristics of MCT under hard switching and various types of resonant circuits are used to determine soft switching characteristics of MCT under both zero voltage and zero current switching. Next, operation principles of a pulse density modulated converter (PDMC) for three phase (3F) to 3F two-step power conversion via parallel resonant high frequency (HF) AC link are reviewed. The details for the selection of power switches and other power components required for the construction of the power circuit for the second generation 3F to 3F converter system are discussed. The problems encountered in the first generation system are considered. Design and performance of the first generation 3F to 3F power converter system and field oriented induction moter drive based upon a 3 kVA, 20 kHz parallel resonant HF AC link are described. Low harmonic current at the input and output, unity power factor operation of input, and bidirectional flow capability of the system are shown via both computer and experimental results. The work completed on the construction and testing of the second generation converter and field oriented induction motor drive based upon specifications for a 10 hp squirrel cage dynamometer and a 20 kHz parallel resonant HF AC link is discussed. The induction machine is designed to deliver 10 hp or 7.46 kW when operated as an AC-dynamo with power fed back to the source through the converter. Results presented reveal that the proposed power level requires additional energy storage elements to overcome difficulties with a peak link voltage variation problem that limits reaching to the desired power level. The power level test of the second generation converter after the

  11. Testing the frozen flow approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchin, Francesco; Matarrese, Sabino; Melott, Adrian L.; Moscardini, Lauro

    1993-01-01

    We investigate the accuracy of the frozen-flow approximation (FFA), recently proposed by Matarrese, et al. (1992), for following the nonlinear evolution of cosmological density fluctuations under gravitational instability. We compare a number of statistics between results of the FFA and n-body simulations, including those used by Melott, Pellman & Shandarin (1993) to test the Zel'dovich approximation. The FFA performs reasonably well in a statistical sense, e.g. in reproducing the counts-in-cell distribution, at small scales, but it does poorly in the crosscorrelation with n-body which means it is generally not moving mass to the right place, especially in models with high small-scale power.

  12. 40 CFR 86.162-00 - Approval of alternative air conditioning test simulations and descriptions of AC1 and AC2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Approval of alternative air conditioning test simulations and descriptions of AC1 and AC2. 86.162-00 Section 86.162-00 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND...

  13. 40 CFR 86.162-00 - Approval of alternative air conditioning test simulations and descriptions of AC1 and AC2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Approval of alternative air conditioning test simulations and descriptions of AC1 and AC2. 86.162-00 Section 86.162-00 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND...

  14. Heat-transfer enhancement in AC electro-osmotic micro-flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. P.; Speetjens, M. F. M.; Frijns, A. J. H.; van Steenhoven, A. A.

    2012-11-01

    Heat transfer in micro-flows is essential to emerging technologies as advanced microelectronics cooling systems and chemical processes in lab-on-a-chip applications. The present study explores the potential of AC electro-osmotic (ACEO) flow forcing, a promising technique for the actuation and manipulation of micro-flows, for heat-transfer enhancement. Subjects of investigation include the 3D flow structure due to ACEO forcing via an array of electrodes in a micro-channel by way of 3D velocity measurements. Presence and properties of vortical structures of the 3D flow are quantified in laboratory experiments. Typical outcomes of the experimental study result from a number of 3D particle trajectories obtained by using 3D micro-Particle-Tracking Velocimetry (3D μ-PTV). The steady nature of the flow enables combination of results from a series of measurements into one dense data set. This facilitates accurate evaluation of quantities relevant for heat transfer by data-processing methods. The primary circulation is given above one half of an electrode in terms of the spanwise component of vorticity. The outline of the vortex boundary is determined via the eigenvalues of the strain-rate tensor. To estimate convective heat transfer, wall shear rate above one half of an electrode is quantitatively analyzed as function of voltage amplitude and frequency. These results yield first insights into the characteristics of 3D ACEO flows and ways to exploit and manipulate them for heat-transfer enhancement.

  15. Finite element analysis of current flowing patterns and AC loss in the multifilament strand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ta, Wurui; Li, Yingxu; Gao, Yuanwen

    2013-12-01

    Intrinsic current flow and field distribution scheme under the imposed low current injection and the applied weak field is meaningful to interpret Ic degradation and AC loss in a strand that performs as a normal composite conductor. A 2D finite element (FE) transport model is built in COMSOL to identify the various transverse resistance components and reveal the interrelation among them. Then the transverse resistivity components are taken as the basic electrical components in a 3D composite strand model. The 3D model follows the realistic trajectories of twisted filaments in strand composite and experimental material properties. To address the potential/current map in the stationary transport, the FE model is thoroughly analyzed for the short-sample and long-sample strand, imposed by two in-plane steady current injections and a potential boundary condition at one strand end with the other end grounded, respectively. The results show that the short-sample longitudinal current is uniform with little resistivity loss, and flows from the positive source and converges to the negative one in the cross section with different paths and current proportions between filaments and matrix. However, for the long-sample, there is a serious reduction in electric potential along the strand axis and the currents mostly concentrate on filaments. The time-varying problem is also implemented by computing AC loss induced by a relatively far-away alternating line current. It is discussed where appropriate that the effect of the twist pitch and contact resistivity on the pattern and magnitude of the current flow and AC loss.

  16. Electrodeposition of Au/Ag bimetallic dendrites assisted by Faradaic AC-electroosmosis flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Jianlong; Li, Pengwei; Sang, Shengbo Zhang, Wendong Li, Gang; Hu, Jie; Zhou, Zhaoying Yang, Xing; Dong, Hualai

    2014-03-15

    Au/Ag bimetallic dendrites were synthesized successfully from the corresponding aqueous solution via the AC electrodeposition method. Both of the morphologies and compositions could be tuned by the electrolyte concentration and AC frequency. The prepared bimetallic dendrites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV–vis spectroscopy. The underlying dendrite growth mechanism was then proposed in the context of the Directed Electrochemical Nanowires Assembly (DENA) models. Owing to the unscreened voltage dropping in the electrolyte bulk, electromigration dominates the species flux process, and cations tend to accumulate in areas with strong electric field intensity, such as electrode edges. Moreover, Faradaic AC-electro-osmosis (ACEO) flow could increase the effective diffusion layer thickness in these areas during the electrochemical reaction, and leads to dendrite growth. Further Micro-Raman observations illustrated that the Au/Ag bimetallic dendrites exhibited pronounced surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity, using 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MP) as model molecules.

  17. Resource Prospector Propulsion Cold Flow Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Hunter; Pederson, Kevin; Dervan, Melanie; Holt, Kimberly; Jernigan, Frankie; Trinh, Huu; Flores, Sam

    2014-01-01

    For the past year, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and Johnson Space Center have been working on a government version of a lunar lander design for the Resource Prospector Mission. A propulsion cold flow test system, representing an early flight design of the propulsion system, has been fabricated. The primary objective of the cold flow test is to simulate the Resource Prospector propulsion system operation through water flow testing and obtain data for anchoring analytical models. This effort will also provide an opportunity to develop a propulsion system mockup to examine hardware integration to a flight structure. This paper will report the work progress of the propulsion cold flow test system development and test preparation. At the time this paper is written, the initial waterhammer testing is underway. The initial assessment of the test data suggests that the results are as expected and have a similar trend with the pretest prediction. The test results will be reported in a future conference.

  18. Performance testing of the Silo Flow Model

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, S.P.; O`Connor, D.; Gould, A.F.

    1994-12-31

    Several instruments are commercially available for on-line analysis of coal properties such as total moisture, ash, sulfur, and mineral matter content. These instruments have found use in coal cleaning and coal-fired utility applications. However, in many instances, the coal is stored in large bunkers or silos after on-line analysis, making the data gathered from on-line analysis a poor predictor of short-term coal quality due to the flow pattern and mixing within the silo. A computerized model, the Silo Flow Model, has been developed to model the flow of coal through a silo or bunker thus providing a prediction of the output coal quality based on on-line measurements of the quality of coal entering the silo. A test procedure was developed and demonstrated to test the performance of the Silo Flow Model. The testing was performed using controlled addition of silver nitrate to the coal, in conjunction with surface profile measurements using an array of ultrasonic gauges and data acquired from plant instrumentation. Results obtained from initial testing provided estimates of flow-related parameters used in the Silo flow Model. Similar test techniques are also used to compare predicted and actual silver content at the silo outlet as a measure of model performance. This paper describes test procedures used to validate the Silo Flow Model, the testing program, and the results obtained to data. The Silo Flow Model performance is discussed and compared against other modeling approaches.

  19. 40 CFR 86.167-17 - AC17 Air Conditioning Emissions Test Procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false AC17 Air Conditioning Emissions Test Procedure. 86.167-17 Section 86.167-17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES Emission Regulations for 1977 and Later...

  20. The Effect of a Shear Flow on the Uptake of LDL and Ac-LDL by Cultured Vascular Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niwa, Koichi; Karino, Takeshi

    The effects of a shear flow on the uptake of fluorescence-labeled low-density lipoprotein (DiI-LDL), acetylated LDL (DiI-Ac-LDL), and lucifer yellow (LY; a tracer of fluid-phase endocytosis) by cultured bovine aortic ECs were studied using a rotating-disk shearing apparatus. It was found that 2hours’ exposure of ECs to a laminar shear flow that imposed ECs an area-mean shear stress of 10dynes/cm2 caused an increase in the uptake of DiI-LDL and LY. By contrast, the uptake of DiI-Ac-LDL was decreased by exposure of the ECs to a shear flow. Addition of dextran sulfate (DS), a competitive inhibitor of scavenger receptors, reversed the effect of a shear flow on the uptake of DiI-Ac-LDL, resulting in an increase by the imposition of a shear flow, while the uptake of DiI-LDL and LY remained unaffected. It was concluded that a shear flow promotes the endocytosis of DiI-LDL and LY by ECs, but suppresses the uptake of DiI-Ac-LDL by ECs by inhibiting scavenger receptor-mediated endocytosis.

  1. LADEE Propulsion System Cold Flow Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Jonathan Hunter; Chapman, Jack M.; Trinh, Hau, P.; Bell, James H.

    2013-01-01

    Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) is a NASA mission that will orbit the Moon. Its main objective is to characterize the atmosphere and lunar dust environment. The spacecraft development is being led by NASA Ames Research Center and scheduled for launch in 2013. The LADEE spacecraft will be operated with a bi-propellant hypergolic propulsion system using MMH and NTO as the fuel and oxidizer, respectively. The propulsion system utilizes flight-proven hardware on major components. The propulsion layout is composed of one 100-lbf main thruster and four 5-lbf RCS thrusters. The propellants are stored in four tanks (two parallel-connected tanks per propellant component). The propellants will be pressurized by regulated helium. A simulated propulsion system has been built for conducting cold flow test series to characterize the transient fluid flow of the propulsion system feed lines and to verify the critical operation modes, such as system priming, waterhammer, and crucial mission duty cycles. Propellant drainage differential between propellant tanks will also be assessed. Since the oxidizer feed line system has a higher flow demand than the fuel system does, the cold flow test focuses on the oxidizer system. The objective of the cold flow test is to simulate the LADEE propulsion fluid flow operation through water cold flow test and to obtain data for anchoring analytical models. The models will be used to predict the transient and steady state flow behaviors in the actual flight operations. The test activities, including the simulated propulsion test article, cold flow test, and analytical modeling, are being performed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. At the time of the abstract submission, the test article checkout is being performed. The test series will be completed by November, 2012

  2. AC losses and heat removal in three-dimensional winding pack of Samsung superconducting test facility under pulsed magnetic field operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiuliang; Seong Yoon, Cheon; Baang, Sungkeun; Kim, Myungkyu; Park, Hyunki; Kim, Yongjin; Lee, Sangil; Kim, Keeman

    2001-04-01

    The Samsung superconducting test facility (SSTF) will be operated under the highly pulsed field to simulate the operating conditions of KSTAR. An analysis has been performed to study the transient heat removal characteristics and temperature margin for the main, blip and compensating coils in the SSTF. This method is based on a quasi-three-dimensional model, which the thermal coupling of turn-to-turn, pancake-to-pancake and channel-to-channel is taken into account, to simulate the conductor temperature rise and the thermal expansion of supercritical helium due to the high AC losses under the pulsed field. The local AC losses, which include coupling loss, eddy current loss and hysteresis loss in the cable-in-conduit conductor, are estimated. The temperature margin, mass flow rate, distribution of AC losses are studied under the given operating scenario. The mass flow reduction and peak temperature rise depending on the inlet pressure and inlet position of CICC are studied. It is shown that the initial mass flow rate remarkably influences on the peak temperature of superconducting strands. The large mass flow rate can reduce the temperature rise when the inlet of helium is located at the high field region. By contrast, because of heat induced flow to improve the cooling condition of the superconducting strands, the small initial mass flow rate results in the low peak temperature in strands when the inlet of helium is located at the low field region.

  3. Flowing electrolyte battery testing and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, P.; Miller, D.; Verardo, A.

    1982-08-01

    A laboratory to evaluate the performance and cycle life of flowing electrolyte battery systems has been established at Sandia National Laboratories. Four unique flow batteries are being tested in the laboratory using a four-variable two-level factorial experimental plan. Two Exxon zinc bromine batteries and one Gould zinc bromine battery are under test. One NASA Redox battery is on test. This paper describes results obtained to date from the test program. Cycle history, efficiency values, and general performance observations for these batteries are reported. The factorial test program and available statistical results are also discussed.

  4. Flowing-electrolyte-battery testing and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, P.C.; Miller, D.W.; Verardo, A.E.

    1982-01-01

    A laboratory to evaluate the performance and cycle life of flowing electrolyte battery systems has been established at Sandia National Laboratories. Four unique flow batteries are being tested in the laboratory using a four-variable two-level factorial experimental plan. Two Exxon zinc bromine batteries and one Gould zinc bromine battery are under test. One NASA Redox battery is on test. This paper describes results obtained to date from the test program. Cycle history, efficiency values, and general performance observations for these batteries are reported. The factorial test program and available statistical results are also discussed.

  5. Flowing electrolyte battery testing and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, P. C.; Miller, D. W.; Verardo, A. E.

    A laboratory to evaluate the performance and cycle life of flowing electrolyte battery systems has been established at Sandia National Laboratories. Four unique flow batteries are being tested in the laboratory using a four-variable two-level factorial experimental plan. Two Exxon zinc bromine batteries and one Gould zinc bromine battery are under test. One NASA Redox battery is on test. This paper describes results obtained to date from the test program. Cycle history, efficiency values, and general performance observations for these batteries are reported. The factorial test program and available statistical results are also discussed.

  6. Optoelectric patterning: Effect of electrode material and thickness on laser-induced AC electrothermal flow.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Avanish; Khor, Jian-Wei; Clayton, Katherine N; Williams, Stuart J; Pan, Xudong; Kinzer-Ursem, Tamara; Wereley, Steve

    2016-02-01

    Rapid electrokinetic patterning (REP) is an emerging optoelectric technique that takes advantage of laser-induced AC electrothermal flow and particle-electrode interactions to trap and translate particles. The electrothermal flow in REP is driven by the temperature rise induced by the laser absorption in the thin electrode layer. In previous REP applications 350-700 nm indium tin oxide (ITO) layers have been used as electrodes. In this study, we show that ITO is an inefficient electrode choice as more than 92% of the irradiated laser on the ITO electrodes is transmitted without absorption. Using theoretical, computational, and experimental approaches, we demonstrate that for a given laser power the temperature rise is controlled by both the electrode material and its thickness. A 25-nm thick Ti electrode creates an electrothermal flow of the same speed as a 700-nm thick ITO electrode while requiring only 14% of the laser power used by ITO. These results represent an important step in the design of low-cost portable REP systems by lowering the material cost and power consumption of the system. PMID:26613811

  7. Precision test of the ac Stark shift in a rubidium atomic vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levi, F.; Camparo, J.; Francois, B.; Calosso, C. E.; Micalizio, S.; Godone, A.

    2016-02-01

    The ac Stark shift (also known as the "light shift") is one of the most important physical processes that arises in precision spectroscopy, affecting the basic understanding of field-matter interactions, measurements of fundamental constants, and even the atomic clocks onboard GPS satellites. Although the theory of the ac Stark shift was fully developed by the 1960s and 1970s, precision tests of theory have, for the most part, been few. Taking advantage of recent developments in atomic clock technology, specifically the pulsed approach to atomic signal generation, which allows frequency measurements with a resolution of ˜10-15 , we demonstrate a methodology for measuring the ac Stark shift. Here, we report results from a precision examination of the ac Stark shift in a vapor phase system, examining the resonant frequency of the 87Rb 0-0 hyperfine transition for a perturbing laser tuned over a broad optical frequency range (18 GHz) around the D1 absorption resonance. Over the full frequency range the agreement between semiclassical theory and experiment is very good (better than 5 ×10-2 ), and in our experiments we test both the frequency dependence of the scalar and tensor components of the light shift.

  8. Quantifiable Lateral Flow Assay Test Strips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    As easy to read as a home pregnancy test, three Quantifiable Lateral Flow Assay (QLFA) strips used to test water for E. coli show different results. The brightly glowing control line on the far right of each strip indicates that all three tests ran successfully. But the glowing test line on the middle left and bottom strips reveal their samples were contaminated with E. coli bacteria at two different concentrations. The color intensity correlates with concentration of contamination.

  9. AC electrified jets in a flow-focusing device: Jet length scaling.

    PubMed

    Castro-Hernández, Elena; García-Sánchez, Pablo; Alzaga-Gimeno, Javier; Tan, Say Hwa; Baret, Jean-Christophe; Ramos, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    We use a microfluidic flow-focusing device with integrated electrodes for controlling the production of water-in-oil drops. In a previous work, we reported that very long jets can be formed upon application of AC fields. We now study in detail the appearance of the long jets as a function of the electrical parameters, i.e., water conductivity, signal frequency, and voltage amplitude. For intermediate frequencies, we find a threshold voltage above which the jet length rapidly increases. Interestingly, this abrupt transition vanishes for high frequencies of the signal and the jet length grows smoothly with voltage. For frequencies below a threshold value, we previously reported a transition from a well-behaved uniform jet to highly unstable liquid structures in which axisymmetry is lost rather abruptly. These liquid filaments eventually break into droplets of different sizes. In this work, we characterize this transition with a diagram as a function of voltage and liquid conductivity. The electrical response of the long jets was studied via a distributed element circuit model. The model allows us to estimate the electric potential at the tip of the jet revealing that, for any combination of the electrical parameters, the breakup of the jet occurs at a critical value of this potential. We show that this voltage is around 550 V for our device geometry and choice of flow rates. PMID:27375826

  10. Method and system for an on-chip AC self-test controller

    DOEpatents

    Flanagan, John D.; Herring, Jay R.; Lo, Tin-Chee

    2008-09-30

    A method and system for performing AC self-test on an integrated circuit that includes a system clock for use during normal operation are provided. The method includes applying a long data capture pulse to a first test register in response to the system clock, applying an at speed data launch pulse to the first test register in response to the system clock, inputting the data from the first register to a logic path in response to applying the at speed data launch pulse to the first test register, applying an at speed data capture pulse to a second test register in response to the system clock, inputting the logic path output to the second test register in response to applying the at speed data capture pulse to the second test register, and applying a long data launch pulse to the second test register in response to the system clock.

  11. Development of a single-phase harmonic power flow program to study the 20 kHz AC power system for large spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, L. Alan; Kankam, M. David

    1991-01-01

    The development of software is described to aid in design and analysis of AC power systems for large spacecraft. The algorithm is an important version of harmonic power flow program, HARMFLO, used for the study of AC power quality. The new program is applicable to three-phase systems typified by terrestrial power systems, and single-phase systems characteristic of space power systems. The modified HARMFLO accommodates system operating frequencies ranging from terrestrial 60 Hz to and beyond aerospace 20 kHz, and can handle both source and load-end harmonic distortions. Comparison of simulation and test results of a representative spacecraft power system shows a satisfactory correlation. Recommendations are made for the direction of future improvements to the software, to enhance its usefulness to power system designer and analysts.

  12. Method and system for an on-chip AC self-test controller

    DOEpatents

    Flanagan, John D.; Herring, Jay R.; Lo, Tin-Chee

    2006-06-06

    A method for performing AC self-test on an integrated circuit, including a system clock for use during normal operation. The method includes applying a long data capture pulse to a first test register in response to the system clock, and further applying at an speed data launch pulse to the first test register in response to the system clock. Inputting the data from the first register to a logic path in response to applying the at speed data launch pulse to the first test register. Applying at speed data capture pulse to a second test register in response to the system clock. Inputting the output from the logic path to the second test register in response to applying the at speed data capture pulse to the second register. Applying a long data launch pulse to the second test register in response to the system clock.

  13. Boundary layer flow visualization for flight testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obara, Clifford J.

    1986-01-01

    Flow visualization is used extensively in flight testing to determine aerodynamic characteristics such as surface flow direction and boundary layer state. Several visualization techniques are available to the aerodynamicist. Two of the most popular are oil flows and sublimating chemicals. Oil is used to visualize boundary layer transition, shock wave location, regions of separated flow, and surface flow direction. Boundary layer transition can also be visualized with sublimating chemicals. A summary of these two techniques is discussed, and the use of sublimating chemicals is examined in some detail. The different modes of boundary layer transition are characterized by different patterns in the sublimating chemical coating. The discussion includes interpretation of these chemical patterns and the temperature and velocity operating limitations of the chemical substances. Information for selection of appropriate chemicals for a desired set of flight conditions is provided.

  14. Cold-Flow Propulsion Research Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    An engineer at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Wind Tunnel Facility uses lasers to measure the velocity and gradient distortion across an eight inch curved pipe with joints and turning valves during a cold-flow propulsion research test; simulating the conditions found in the X-33's hydrogen feedline. Lasers are used because they are non-intrusive and do not disturb the flow like a probe would. The feedline supplies propellants to the turbo pump. The purpose of this project was to design the feedline to provide uniform flow into the turbo pump.

  15. Ion fluxes and electro-osmotic fluid flow in electrolytes around a metallic nanowire tip under large applied ac voltage.

    PubMed

    Poetschke, M; Bobeth, M; Cuniberti, G

    2013-09-10

    Motivated by the analysis of electrochemical growth of metallic nanowires from solution, we studied ion fluxes near nanoelectrodes in a binary symmetric electrolyte on the basis of the modified Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations in the strongly nonlinear region at large applied ac voltage. For an approximate calculation of the electric field near the nanowire tip, concentric spherical blocking electrodes were considered with radius of the inner electrode being of typically a few ten nanometers. The spatiotemporal evolution of the ion concentrations within this spherical model was calculated numerically by using the finite element method. The potential drop at the electric double layer, the electric field enhancement at the electrode surface, and the field screening in the bulk solution were determined for different bulk concentrations, ac voltages, and frequencies. The appearance of ac electro-osmotic fluid flow at the tip of a growing metallic nanowire is discussed, based on an estimation of the body force in the liquid near the nanowire tip, which was modeled by a cylinder with hemispherical cap. Electric field components tangential to the electrode surface exist near the contact between cylinder and hemisphere. Our analysis suggests that ac electro-osmotic flow causes an additional convective transport of metal complexes to the tip of the growing metal nanowire and thus affects the nanowire growth velocity. PMID:23927385

  16. LaRC Separate Flow Testing Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiner, Jack

    2000-01-01

    The main goal of this presentation is to give some of the objectives of the testing program. This includes: develop jet noise data base for separate flow nozzles with bypass ratio's 5 to 14; evaluate effect of pylon on noise; develop low performance impact noise suppression concepts; and evaluate potential for active control of jet noise.

  17. Characterization of Flow Bench Engine Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voris, Alex; Riley, Lauren; Puzinauskas, Paul

    2015-11-01

    This project was an attempt at characterizing particle image velocimetry (PIV) and swirl-meter test procedures. The flow direction and PIV seeding were evaluated for in-cylinder steady state flow of a spark ignition engine. For PIV seeding, both wet and dry options were tested. The dry particles tested were baby powder, glass particulate, and titanium dioxide. The wet particles tested were fogs created with olive oil, vegetable oil, DEHS, and silicon oil. The seeding was evaluated at 0.1 and 0.25 Lift/Diameter and at cylinder pressures of 10, 25 and 40 inches of H2O. PIV results were evaluated through visual and fluid momentum comparisons. Seeding particles were also evaluated based on particle size and cost. It was found that baby powder and glass particulate were the most effective seeding options for the current setup. The oil fogs and titanium dioxide were found to deposit very quickly on the mock cylinder and obscure the motion of the particles. Based on initial calculations and flow measurements, the flow direction should have a negligible impact on PIV and swirl-meter results. The characterizations found in this project will be used in future engine research examining the effects of intake port geometry on in-cylinder fluid motion and exhaust gas recirculation tolerances. Thanks to NSF site grant #1358991.

  18. Resource Prospector Propulsion System Cold Flow Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Hunter; Holt, Kim; Addona, Brad; Trinh, Huu

    2015-01-01

    Resource Prospector (RP) is a NASA mission being led by NASA Ames Research Center with current plans to deliver a scientific payload package aboard a rover to the lunar surface. As part of an early risk reduction activity, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Johnson Space Flight Center (JSC) have jointly developed a government-version concept of a lunar lander for the mission. The spacecraft consists of two parts, the lander and the rover which carries the scientific instruments. The lander holds the rover during launch, cruise, and landing on the surface. Following terminal descent and landing the lander portion of the spacecraft become dormant after the rover embarks on the science mission. The lander will be equipped with a propulsion system for lunar descent and landing, as well as trajectory correction and attitude control maneuvers during transit to the moon. Hypergolic propellants monomethyl hydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide will be used to fuel sixteen 70-lbf descent thrusters and twelve 5-lbf attitude control thrusters. A total of four metal-diaphragm tanks, two per propellant, will be used along with a high-pressure composite-overwrapped pressure vessel for the helium pressurant gas. Many of the major propulsion system components are heritage missile hardware obtained by NASA from the Air Force. In parallel with the flight system design activities, a simulated propulsion system based on flight drawings was built for conducting a series of water flow tests to characterize the transient fluid flow of the propulsion system feed lines and to verify the critical operation modes such as system priming, waterhammer, and crucial mission duty cycles. The primary objective of the cold flow testing was to simulate the RP propulsion system fluid flow operation through water flow testing and to obtain data for anchoring analytical models. The models will be used to predict the transient and steady state flow behaviors in the actual flight operations. All design and

  19. Resonant AC power system proof-of-concept test program, volume 2, appendix 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This report contains two volumes. The main text (Volume 1) summarizes the tests results and gives a detailed discussion of the response of three early, first generation configurations of ac power system IRAD breadboards to the contracted tests imposed on them. It explains photographs, measurements, and data calculations, as well as any observed anomalies or lessons learned. This volume (No 2, Appendix 1, Test Results and Data), published under separate cover, includes all of the data taken on the 1.0 kW single-phase; 5.0 kW three-phase; and 25.0-kW three-phase system breadboards. The format of this data is raw, i.e., it is a direct copy of the data sheets for the test data notebook.

  20. SSME hot gas manifold flow comparison test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, G. B., Jr.; Dill, C. C.

    1988-01-01

    An account is given of the High Pressure Fuel Turbopump (HPFT) component of NASA's Alternate Turbopump Development effort, which is aimed at the proper aerodynamic integration of the current Phase II three-duct SSME Hot Gas Manifold (HGM) and the future 'Phase II-plus' two-duct HGM. Half-scale water flow tests of both HGM geometries were conducted to provide initial design data for the HPFT. The results reveal flowfield results and furnish insight into the performance differences between the two HGM flowpaths. Proper design of the HPFT can potentially secure significant flow improvements in either HGM configuration.

  1. Forced Flow Flame-Spreading Test (FFFT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Forced Flow Flame-Spreading Test was designed to study flame spreading over solid fuels when air is flowing at a low speed in the same direction as the flame spread. Previous research has shown that in low-speed concurrent airflows, some materials are more flammable in microgravity than earth. This image shows a 10-cm flame in microgravity that burns almost entirely blue on both sides of a thin sheet of paper. The glowing thermocouple in the lower half of the flame provides temperature measurements.

  2. Development and Testing of Automatically Generated ACS Flight Software for the MAP Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ODonnell, James R., Jr.; McComas, David C.; Andrews, Stephen F.

    1998-01-01

    By integrating the attitude determination and control system (ACS) analysis and design, flight software development, and flight software testing processes, it is possible to improve the overall spacecraft development cycle, as well as allow for more thorough software testing. One of the ways to achieve this integration is to use code-generation tools to automatically generate components of the ACS flight software directly from a high-fidelity (HiFi) simulation. In the development of the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) spacecraft, currently underway at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, approximately 1/3 of the ACS flight software was automatically generated. In this paper, we will examine each phase of the ACS subsystem and flight software design life cycle: analysis, design, and testing. In the analysis phase, we scoped how much software we would automatically generate and created the initial interface. The design phase included parallel development of the HiFi simulation and the hand-coded flight software components. Everything came together in the test phase, in which the flight software was tested, using results from the HiFi simulation as one of the bases of comparison for testing. Because parts of the spacecraft HiFi simulation were converted into flight software, more care needed to be put into its development and configuration control to support both the HiFi simulation and flight software. The components of the HiFi simulation from which code was generated needed to be designed based on the fact that they would become flight software. This process involved such considerations as protecting against mathematical exceptions, using acceptable module and parameter naming conventions, and using an input/output interface compatible with the rest of the flight software. Maintaining good configuration control was an issue for the HiFi simulation and the flight software, and a way to track the two systems was devised. Finally, an integrated test approach was

  3. 40 CFR 86.162-00 - Approval of alternative air conditioning test simulations and descriptions of AC1 and AC2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... power requirements to roadload dynamometer requirements. AC2 simulates, in standard test cell ambient...)(i) (A) and (B) are replaced with 76 °F and 50 grains of water/pound of dry air and the solar heat...)(5)(i) (A) and (B) are replaced with 76 °F and 50 grains of water/pound of dry air and the solar...

  4. 40 CFR 86.162-00 - Approval of alternative air conditioning test simulations and descriptions of AC1 and AC2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... power requirements to roadload dynamometer requirements. AC2 simulates, in standard test cell ambient...)(i) (A) and (B) are replaced with 76 °F and 50 grains of water/pound of dry air and the solar heat...)(5)(i) (A) and (B) are replaced with 76 °F and 50 grains of water/pound of dry air and the solar...

  5. High efficient biofluid micromixing using ultra-fast AC electrothermal flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salari, Alinaghi; Dalton, Colin

    2015-03-01

    Electrokinetics have been widely used in lab-on-a-chip devices for fluid manipulation applications. The AC electrothermal (ACET) effect is a highly efficient technique for biofluids (σ>0.1 S/m) active micromixing, which can be used in chemical, biological, and medical analysis systems. In this paper, a novel idea of employing microelectrode arrays placed on sidewalls of a fluidic microchannel for increasing the mixing efficiency of biofluids is numerically investigated. It was reported that coplanar asymmetric microelectrode arrays are capable of creating ACET vortices in the bulk of a high conductive electrolyte solution. Two electrode arrays can be placed on the sidewalls of a microchannel, each of which has a different role, one pumps the biofluid while the other mixes it. Two different actuation patterns were applied to the electrodes. One pair of microelectrodes was simulated and the simulation procedure was then verified by conducting experiments for ACET flow measurement in a similar geometry. Microelectrode arrays were fabricated on 1mm thick glass substrates using photolithography. A 800 μm thick fluidic microchannel was fabricated by soft lithography of Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The results showed that such a technique can dramatically increase the mixing of the solution while pumping is taking place. The mechanism was capable of efficiently mixing biofluid solutions (resultant concentration ratio of up to 80%) in a short time (<3 min) and short distance (<600 μm) for a 300×300 μm2 fluidic microchannel cross section area. Medical analysis such as heterogeneous immunoassays can be potential applications of such micromixing technique.

  6. Wing Leading Edge Joint Laminar Flow Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Aaron; Westphal, Russell V.; Zuniga, Fanny A.; Kennelly, Robert A., Jr.; Koga, Dennis J.

    1996-01-01

    An F-104G aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center has been equipped with a specially designed and instrumented test fixture to simulate surface imperfections of the type likely to be present near the leading edge on the wings of some laminar flow aircraft. The simulated imperfections consisted of five combinations of spanwise steps and gaps of various sizes. The unswept fixture yielded a pressure distribution similar to that of some laminar flow airfoils. The experiment was conducted at cruise conditions typical for business-jets and light transports: Mach numbers were in the range 0.5-0.8, and unit Reynolds numbers were 1.5-2.5 million per foot. Skin friction measurements indicated that laminar flow was often maintained for some distance downstream of the surface imperfections. Further work is needed to more precisely define transition location and to extend the experiments to swept-wing conditions and a broader range of imperfection geometries.

  7. Review of flow battery testing at Sandia

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, P.C.; Miller, D.W.; Robinson, C.E.; Rodriguez, G.P.

    1984-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is evaluating prototype zinc/bromine, Redox, and zinc/ferricyanide flowing electrolyte batteries and cells. This paper will update previous reports of test results of two Exxon zinc/bromine batteries and one NASA Redox iron/chromium battery. Two 60-sq. cm. zinc/ferricyanide cells from Lockheed Missiles and Space Co. are also being evaluated. Performance, life, and operating data will be described for these batteries and cells.

  8. Sultan - forced flow, high field test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, I.; Vecsey, G.; Weymuth, P.; Zellweger, J.

    1981-09-01

    Three European laboratories: CNEN (Frascati, I) ECN (Petten, NL) and SIN (Villigen, CH) decided to coordinate their development efforts and to install a common high field forced flow test facility at Villigen Switzerland. The test facility SULTAN (Supraleiter Testanlage) is presently under construction. As a first step, an 8T/1m bore solenoid with cryogenic periphery will be ready in 1981. The cryogenic system, data acquisition system and power supplies which are contributed by SIN are described. Experimental feasibilities, including cooling, and instrumentation are reviewed. Progress of components and facility construction is described. Planned extension of the background field up to 12T by insert coils is outlined. 5 refs.

  9. Using nonlinear ac electrokinetics vortex flow to enhance catalytic activities of sol-gel encapsulated trypsin in microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shau-Chun; Chen, Hsiao-Ping; Lai, Yi-Wen; Chau, Lai-Kwan; Chuang, Yu-Chun; Chen, Yi-Jie

    2007-01-01

    A novel microstirring strategy is applied to accelerate the digestion rate of the substrate Nα-benzoyl-L-arginine-4-nitroanilide (L-BAPA) catalyzed by sol-gel encapsulated trypsin. We use an ac nonlinear electrokinetic vortex flow to stir the solution in a microfluidic reaction chamber to reduce the diffusion length between the immobilized enzyme and substrate in the solution. High-intensity nonlinear electroosmotic microvortices, with angular speeds in excess of 1 cm∕s, are generated around a small (∼1.2 mm) conductive ion exchange granule when ac electric fields (133 V∕cm) are applied across a miniature chamber smaller than 10 μl. Coupling between these microvortices and the on-and-off electrophoretic motion of the granule in low frequency (0.1 Hz) ac fields produces chaotic stream lines to stir substrate molecules sufficiently. We demonstrate that, within a 5-min digestion period, the catalytic reaction rate of immobilized trypsin increases almost 30-fold with adequate reproducibility (15%) due to sufficient stirring action through the introduction of the nonlinear electrokinetic vortices. In contrast, low-frequency ac electroosmotic flow without the granule, provides limited stirring action and increases the reaction rate approximately ninefold with barely acceptable reproducibility (30%). Dye molecules are used to characterize the increases in solute diffusivity in the reaction reservoir in which sol-gel particles are placed, with and without the presence of granule, and compared with the static case. The solute diffusivity enhancement data show respective increases of ∼30 and ∼8 times, with and without the presence of granule. These numbers are consistent with the ratios of the enhanced reaction rate. PMID:19693360

  10. Scaled Rocket Testing in Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufrene, Aaron; MacLean, Matthew; Carr, Zakary; Parker, Ron; Holden, Michael; Mehta, Manish

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) uses four clustered liquid rocket engines along with two solid rocket boosters. The interaction between all six rocket exhaust plumes will produce a complex and severe thermal environment in the base of the vehicle. This work focuses on a recent 2% scale, hot-fire SLS base heating test. These base heating tests are short-duration tests executed with chamber pressures near the full-scale values with gaseous hydrogen/oxygen engines and RSRMV analogous solid propellant motors. The LENS II shock tunnel/Ludwieg tube tunnel was used at or near flight duplicated conditions up to Mach 5. Model development was strongly based on the Space Shuttle base heating tests with several improvements including doubling of the maximum chamber pressures and duplication of freestream conditions. Detailed base heating results are outside of the scope of the current work, rather test methodology and techniques are presented along with broader applicability toward scaled rocket testing in supersonic and hypersonic flow.

  11. Test Results of the AC Field Measurements of Fermilab Booster Corrector Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    DiMarco, E.Joseph; Harding, D.J.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Lamm, M.J.; Makulski, A.; Nehring, R.; Orris, D.F.; Schlabach, P.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, Michael Albert; /Fermilab

    2008-06-25

    Multi-element corrector magnets are being produced at Fermilab that enable correction of orbits and tunes through the entire cycle of the Booster, not just at injection. The corrector package includes six different corrector elements--normal and skew orientations of dipole, quadrupole, and sextupole--each independently powered. The magnets have been tested during typical AC ramping cycles at 15Hz using a fixed coil system to measure the dynamic field strength and field quality. The fixed coil is comprised of an array of inductive pick-up coils around the perimeter of a cylinder which are sampled simultaneously at 100 kHz with 24-bit ADC's. The performance of the measurement system and a summary of the field results are presented and discussed.

  12. Testing the Markov hypothesis in fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Daniel W.; Saggini, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    Stochastic Markov processes are used very frequently to model, for example, processes in turbulence and subsurface flow and transport. Based on the weak Chapman-Kolmogorov equation and the strong Markov condition, we present methods to test the Markov hypothesis that is at the heart of these models. We demonstrate the capabilities of our methodology by testing the Markov hypothesis for fluid and inertial particles in turbulence, and fluid particles in the heterogeneous subsurface. In the context of subsurface macrodispersion, we find that depending on the heterogeneity level, Markov models work well above a certain scale of interest for media with different log-conductivity correlation structures. Moreover, we find surprising similarities in the velocity dynamics of the different media considered.

  13. Flow boiling test of GDP replacement coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.H.

    1995-08-01

    The tests were part of the CFC replacement program to identify and test alternate coolants to replace CFC-114 being used in the uranium enrichment plants at Paducah and Portsmouth. The coolants tested, C{sub 4}F{sub 10} and C{sub 4}F{sub 8}, were selected based on their compatibility with the uranium hexafluoride process gas and how well the boiling temperature and vapor pressure matched that of CFC-114. However, the heat of vaporization of both coolants is lower than that of CFC-114 requiring larger coolant mass flow than CFC-114 to remove the same amount of heat. The vapor pressure of these coolants is higher than CFC-114 within the cascade operational range, and each coolant can be used as a replacement coolant with some limitation at 3,300 hp operation. The results of the CFC-114/C{sub 4}F{sub 10} mixture tests show boiling heat transfer coefficient degraded to a minimum value with about 25% C{sub 4}F{sub 10} weight mixture in CFC-114 and the degree of degradation is about 20% from that of CFC-114 boiling heat transfer coefficient. This report consists of the final reports from Cudo Technologies, Ltd.

  14. Final report for the flow excursion follow-on testing

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.A.; Walters, T.W.

    1992-08-05

    The purpose of the Mark 22 Flow Excursion Follow-On testing was to investigate the theory that approximately 15% of the flow bypassed the primary flow channels in previous testing, whereas the design called for only a 3% bypass. The results of the follow-on tests clearly confirmed this theory. The testing was performed in two phases. During the first phase, characterization tests performed during the earlier test program were repeated.

  15. The effect of heat treatment and test parameters on the aqueous stress corrosion cracking of D6AC steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbreath, W. P.; Adamson, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    The crack growth behavior of D6AC steel as a function of stress intensity, stress and corrosion history and test technique, under sustained load in natural seawater, 3.3 percent NaCl solution, distilled water, and high humidity air was investigated. Reported investigations of D6AC were considered with emphasis on thermal treatment, specimen configuration, fracture toughness, crack-growth rates, initiation period, threshold, and the extension of corrosion fatigue data to sustained load conditions. Stress history effects were found to be most important in that they controlled incubation period, initial crack growth rates, and apparent threshold.

  16. Optical Air Flow Measurements for Flight Tests and Flight Testing Optical Air Flow Meters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jentink, Henk W.; Bogue, Rodney K.

    2005-01-01

    Optical air flow measurements can support the testing of aircraft and can be instrumental to in-flight investigations of the atmosphere or atmospheric phenomena. Furthermore, optical air flow meters potentially contribute as avionics systems to flight safety and as air data systems. The qualification of these instruments for the flight environment is where we encounter the systems in flight testing. An overview is presented of different optical air flow measurement techniques applied in flight and what can be achieved with the techniques for flight test purposes is reviewed. All in-flight optical airflow velocity measurements use light scattering. Light is scattered on both air molecules and aerosols entrained in the air. Basic principles of making optical measurements in flight, some basic optical concepts, electronic concepts, optoelectronic interfaces, and some atmospheric processes associated with natural aerosols are reviewed. Safety aspects in applying the technique are shortly addressed. The different applications of the technique are listed and some typical examples are presented. Recently NASA acquired new data on mountain rotors, mountain induced turbulence, with the ACLAIM system. Rotor position was identified using the lidar system and the potentially hazardous air flow profile was monitored by the ACLAIM system.

  17. Counter-Flow Cooling Tower Test Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvořák, Lukáš; Nožička, Jiří

    2014-03-01

    The article contains a design of a functional experimental model of a cross-flow mechanical draft cooling tower and the results and outcomes of measurements. This device is primarily used for measuring performance characteristics of cooling fills, but with a simple rebuild, it can be used for measuring other thermodynamic processes that take part in so-called wet cooling. The main advantages of the particular test cell lie in the accuracy, size, and the possibility of changing the water distribution level. This feature is very useful for measurements of fills of different heights without the influence of the spray and rain zone. The functionality of this test cell has been verified experimentally during assembly, and data from the measurement of common film cooling fills have been compared against the results taken from another experimental line. For the purpose of evaluating the data gathered, computational scripts were created in the MATLAB numerical computing environment. The first script is for exact calculation of the thermal balance of the model, and the second is for determining Merkel's number via Chebyshev's method.

  18. 46 CFR 162.018-7 - Flow rating tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flow rating tests. 162.018-7 Section 162.018-7 Shipping...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT Safety Relief Valves, Liquefied Compressed Gas § 162.018-7 Flow rating tests. (a) Flow rating of valves shall be conducted in accordance with UG-131 of section VIII...

  19. AC Clean Fog tests on non-ceramic insulating materials and a comparison with porcelain

    SciTech Connect

    De La O, A.; Gorur, R.S.; Chang, J. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1994-10-01

    AC Clean Fog tests were performed on non-ceramic materials used for outdoor high voltage insulators, namely, Room and High Temperature Vulcanizing (RTV and HTV) silicone rubber, and ethylene propylene rubber (EPR), with porcelain used as the reference. The steam input rate was varied upwards from the value standardized for porcelain insulators. Results indicate that higher steam input rates produce a significant reduction in the flashover voltage of silicone rubber family materials, although it is always higher than that obtained for EPR and porcelain. For EPR, the reduction is less and is similar to that established for porcelain. The mechanisms involved have been examined. The trend in the results is found to be consistent for different formulations and insulator geometries of the generic polymer (e.g. silicone rubber, EPR) evaluated. A new, simple method for consistently applying uniform contamination on silicone rubber (both RTV and HTV) is described, without the use of extensive physical or chemical treatments, or prior conditioning by dry band arcing.

  20. Tests Of Shear-Flow Model For Acoustic Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrot, Tony L.; Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.

    1992-01-01

    Tests described in report conducted to validate two-dimensional shear-flow analytical model for determination of acoustic impedance of acoustic liner in grazing-incidence, grazing-flow environment by use of infinite-waveguide method. Tests successful for both upstream and downstream propagations. Work has potential for utility in testing of engine ducts in commercial aircraft.

  1. Analysis of Flow Angularity Repeatability Tests in the NTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemsch, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    An extensive data base of flow angularity repeatability measurements from four NTF check standard model tests is analyzed for statistical consistency and to characterize the results for prediction of angle-of-attack uncertainty for customer tests. A procedure for quality assurance for flow angularity measurements during customer tests is also presented. The efficacy of the procedure is tested using results from a customer test.

  2. Simulation of fluid flow induced by opposing ac magnetic fields in a continuous casting mold

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, F.C.; Hull, J.R.; Beitelman, L.

    1995-07-01

    A numerical simulation was performed for a novel electromagnetic stirring system employing two rotating magnetic fields. The system controls stirring flow in the meniscus region of a continuous casting mold independently from the stirring induced within the remaining volume of the mold by a main electromagnetic stirrer (M-EMS). This control is achieved by applying to the meniscus region an auxiliary electromagnetic field whose direction of rotation is opposite to that of the main magnetic field produced by the M-EMS. The model computes values and spatial distributions of electromagnetic parameters and fluid flow in the stirred pools of mercury in cylindrical and square geometries. Also predicted are the relationships between electromagnetics and fluid flows pertinent to a dynamic equilibrium of the opposing stirring swirls in the meniscus region. Results of the numerical simulation compared well with measurements obtained from experiments with mercury pools.

  3. Max Launch Abort System (MLAS) Pad Abort Test Vehicle (PATV) II Attitude Control System (ACS) Integration and Pressurization Subsystem Dynamic Random Vibration Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekrami, Yasamin; Cook, Joseph S.

    2011-01-01

    In order to mitigate catastrophic failures on future generation space vehicles, engineers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration have begun to integrate a novel crew abort systems that could pull a crew module away in case of an emergency at the launch pad or during ascent. The Max Launch Abort System (MLAS) is a recent test vehicle that was designed as an alternative to the baseline Orion Launch Abort System (LAS) to demonstrate the performance of a "tower-less" LAS configuration under abort conditions. The MLAS II test vehicle will execute a propulsive coast stabilization maneuver during abort to control the vehicles trajectory and thrust. To accomplish this, the spacecraft will integrate an Attitude Control System (ACS) with eight hypergolic monomethyl hydrazine liquid propulsion engines that are capable of operating in a quick pulsing mode. Two main elements of the ACS include a propellant distribution subsystem and a pressurization subsystem to regulate the flow of pressurized gas to the propellant tanks and the engines. The CAD assembly of the Attitude Control System (ACS) was configured and integrated into the Launch Abort Vehicle (LAV) design. A dynamic random vibration analysis was conducted on the Main Propulsion System (MPS) helium pressurization panels to assess the response of the panel and its components under increased gravitational acceleration loads during flight. The results indicated that the panels fundamental and natural frequencies were farther from the maximum Acceleration Spectral Density (ASD) vibrations which were in the range of 150-300 Hz. These values will direct how the components will be packaged in the vehicle to reduce the effects high gravitational loads.

  4. Flow reversal at low voltage and low frequency in a microfabricated ac electrokinetic pump.

    PubMed

    Gregersen, Misha Marie; Olesen, Laurits Højgaard; Brask, Anders; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Bruus, Henrik

    2007-11-01

    Microfluidic chips have been fabricated in Pyrex glass to study electrokinetic pumping generated by a low-voltage ac bias applied to an in-channel asymmetric metallic electrode array. A measurement procedure has been established and followed carefully resulting in a high degree of reproducibility of the measurements over several days. A large coverage fraction of the electrode array in the microfluidic channels has led to an increased sensitivity allowing for pumping measurements at low bias voltages. Depending on the ionic concentration a hitherto unobserved reversal of the pumping direction has been measured in a regime, where both the applied voltage and the frequency are low, V(rms)<1.5 V and f<20 kHz , compared to previously investigated parameter ranges. The impedance spectrum has been thoroughly measured and analyzed in terms of an equivalent circuit diagram to rule out trivial circuit explanations of our findings. Our observations agree qualitatively, but not quantitatively, with theoretical electrokinetic models published in the literature. PMID:18233754

  5. Capillary flow solderability test for printed wiring boards

    SciTech Connect

    Hosking, F.M.; Yost, F.G.; Hernandez, C.L.; Sackinger, S.J.

    1994-04-01

    This report describes a new technique for evaluating capillary flow solderability on printed circuit boards. The test involves the flow of molten solder from a pad onto different-sized conductor lines. It simulates the spreading dynamics of either plated-through-hole (PTH) or surface mount technology (SMT) soldering. A standard procedure has been developed for the test. Preliminary experiments were conducted and the results demonstrate test feasibility. Test procedures and results are presented in this report.

  6. Oscillating flow loss test results in Stirling engine heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koester, G.; Howell, S.; Wood, G.; Miller, E.; Gedeon, D.

    1990-01-01

    The results are presented for a test program designed to generate a database of oscillating flow loss information that is applicable to Stirling engine heat exchangers. The tests were performed on heater/cooler tubes of various lengths and entrance/exit configurations, on stacked and sintered screen regenerators of various wire diameters and on Brunswick and Metex random fiber regenerators. The test results were performed over a range of oscillating flow parameters consistent with Stirling engine heat exchanger experience. The tests were performed on the Sunpower oscillating flow loss rig which is based on a variable stroke and variable frequency linear drive motor. In general, the results are presented by comparing the measured oscillating flow losses to the calculated flow losses. The calculated losses are based on the cycle integration of steady flow friction factors and entrance/exit loss coefficients.

  7. Oscillating-flow regenerator test rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, J. G.; Gedeon, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes work performed in setting up and performing tests on a regenerator test rig. An earlier status report presented test results, together with heat transfer correlations, for four regenerator samples (two woven screen samples and two felt metal samples). Lessons learned from this testing led to improvements to the experimental setup, mainly instrumentation as well as to the test procedure. Given funding and time constraints for this project it was decided to complete as much testing as possible while the rig was set up and operational, and to forego final data reduction and analysis until later. Additional testing was performed on several of the previously tested samples as well an on five newly fabricated samples. The following report is a summary of the work performed at OU, with many of the final test results included in raw data form.

  8. NASA Flight Tests Explore Supersonic Laminar Flow

    NASA Video Gallery

    In partnership with Aerion Corporation of Reno, Nevada, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center’s tested supersonic airflow over a small experimental airfoil design on its F-15B Test Bed aircraft du...

  9. Altitude Compensating Nozzle Cold Flow Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, J. H.; McDaniels, D. M.

    2002-01-01

    A suite of four altitude compensating nozzle (ACN) concepts were evaluated by NASA MSFC in the Nozzle Test Facility. The ACN concepts were a dual bell, a dual expander, an annular plug nozzle and an expansion deflection nozzle. Two reference bell nozzles were also tested. Axial thrust and nozzle wall static pressures were measured for each nozzle over a wide range of nozzle pressure ratios. The nozzle hardware and test program are described. Sample test results are presented.

  10. Noninvasive blood flow tests in vascular disease.

    PubMed Central

    Steinmetz, O. K.; Cole, C. W.

    1993-01-01

    Noninvasive testing is now routine for assessing vascular conditions. Many noninvasive tests are available for obtaining physiologic and anatomic information that is both precise and reproducible. This paper discusses noninvasive testing with plethysmography, Doppler ultrasonography, and duplex scanning for carotid artery occlusive disease, deep venous thrombosis, and peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8268746

  11. Assessment of the National Transonic Facility for Laminar Flow Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, Jeffrey D.; Sutanto, Mary I.; Witkowski, David P.; Watkins, A. Neal; Rivers, Melissa B.; Campbell, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    A transonic wing, designed to accentuate key transition physics, is tested at cryogenic conditions at the National Transonic Facility at NASA Langley. The collaborative test between Boeing and NASA is aimed at assessing the facility for high-Reynolds number testing of configurations with significant regions of laminar flow. The test shows a unit Reynolds number upper limit of 26 M/ft for achieving natural transition. At higher Reynolds numbers turbulent wedges emanating from the leading edge bypass the natural transition process and destroy the laminar flow. At lower Reynolds numbers, the transition location is well correlated with the Tollmien-Schlichting-wave N-factor. The low-Reynolds number results suggest that the flow quality is acceptable for laminar flow testing if the loss of laminar flow due to bypass transition can be avoided.

  12. Road load simulator tests of the Gould phase 1 functional model silicon controlled rectifier ac motor controller for electric vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gourash, F.

    1984-01-01

    The test results for a functional model ac motor controller for electric vehicles and a three-phase induction motor which were dynamically tested on the Lewis Research Center road load simulator are presented. Results show that the controller has the capability to meet the SAE-J227a D cycle test schedule and to accelerate a 1576-kg (3456-lb) simulated vehicle to a cruise speed of 88.5 km/hr (55 mph). Combined motor controller efficiency is 72 percent and the power inverter efficiency alone is 89 percent for the cruise region of the D cycle. Steady state test results for motoring, regeneration, and thermal data obtained by operating the simulator as a conventional dynamometer are in agreement with the contractor's previously reported data. The regeneration test results indicate that a reduction in energy requirements for urban driving cycles is attainable with regenerative braking. Test results and data in this report serve as a data base for further development of ac motor controllers and propulsion systems for electric vehicles. The controller uses state-of-the-art silicon controlled rectifier (SCR) power semiconductors and microprocessor-based logic and control circuitry. The controller was developed by Gould Laboratories under a Lewis contract for the Department of Energy's Electric and Hybrid Vehicle program.

  13. Road load simulator tests of the Gould phase 1 functional model silicon controlled rectifier ac motor controller for electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourash, F.

    1984-02-01

    The test results for a functional model ac motor controller for electric vehicles and a three-phase induction motor which were dynamically tested on the Lewis Research Center road load simulator are presented. Results show that the controller has the capability to meet the SAE-J227a D cycle test schedule and to accelerate a 1576-kg (3456-lb) simulated vehicle to a cruise speed of 88.5 km/hr (55 mph). Combined motor controller efficiency is 72 percent and the power inverter efficiency alone is 89 percent for the cruise region of the D cycle. Steady state test results for motoring, regeneration, and thermal data obtained by operating the simulator as a conventional dynamometer are in agreement with the contractor's previously reported data. The regeneration test results indicate that a reduction in energy requirements for urban driving cycles is attainable with regenerative braking. Test results and data in this report serve as a data base for further development of ac motor controllers and propulsion systems for electric vehicles. The controller uses state-of-the-art silicon controlled rectifier (SCR) power semiconductors and microprocessor-based logic and control circuitry. The controller was developed by Gould Laboratories under a Lewis contract for the Department of Energy's Electric and Hybrid Vehicle program.

  14. Flow generation in a novel centrifugal diffuser test device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidos, P.

    1983-09-01

    Recognition of the need to develop optimum diffusers for advanced centrifugal compressors, resulted in the design and manufacture of a novel low-speed test facility for centrifugal diffuser testing. The CDTD was designed to allow the flow angle and wall boundary profiles into the test diffuser to be controlled by variable geometry in the flow generator. The present study reports on the design of the flow generator and the analysis of the internal flow using a NASA computer code (MERIDL). First test results are given and are compared with the results of a control volume analysis. The flow angle control technique was found to work effectively but to give somewhat smaller angles (by 4 deg) than were predicted. It was concluded that the information obtained would allow scaling of the device; however, an analysis code was needed which would accept the real physical boundary conditions.

  15. Separate Flow Nozzle Test Status Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saiyed, Naseem H. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    NASA Glenn, in partnership with US industry, completed an exhaustive experimental study on jet noise reduction from separate flow nozzle exhaust systems. The study developed a data base on various bypass ratio nozzles, screened quietest configurations and acquired pertinent data for predicting the plume behavior and ultimately its corresponding jet noise. Several exhaust system configurations provided over 2.5 EPNdB jet noise reduction at take-off power. These data were disseminated to US aerospace industry in a conference hosted by NASA GRC whose proceedings are shown in this report.

  16. Flow Simulation of Solid Rocket Motors. 1; Injection Induced Water-Flow Tests from Porous Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Yeh, Y. P.; Smith, A. W.; Heaman, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    Prior to selecting a proper porous material for use in simulating the internal port flow of a solid rocket motor (SRM), in cold-flow testing, the flow emerging from porous materials is experimentally investigated. The injection-flow emerging from a porous matrix always exhibits a lumpy velocity profile that is spatially stable and affects the development of the longitudinal port flow. This flow instability, termed pseudoturbulence, is an inherent signature of the porous matrix and is found to generally increase with the wall porosity and with the injection flow rate. Visualization studies further show that the flow from porous walls made from shaving-type material (sintered stainless-steel) exhibits strong recirculation zones that are conspicuously absent in walls made from nodular or spherical material (sintered bronze). Detailed flow visualization observations and hot-film measurements are reported from tests of injection-flow and a coupled cross-flow from different porous wall materials. Based on the experimental data, discussion is provided on the choice of suitable material for SRM model testing while addressing the consequences and shortcomings from such a test.

  17. Test flow disturbances in an expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paull, A.; Stalker, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    The operation of an expansion tube is investigated theoretically with emphasis on the factors that have limited the utility of the expansion tube in the past. It is shown why the window of steady test conditions is narrow and how this window can be expanded so that these facilities can be used in a variety of hypersonic research. The theoretical predictions are supported by centerline Pitot pressure measurements using air as the test gas.

  18. Flight tests of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick, M. A.; Banks, D. W.; Garzon, G. A.; Matisheck, J. R.

    2015-06-01

    A flight test campaign of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil has been recently completed. The test surface was an 80 inch (203 cm) chord and 40 inch (102 cm) span article mounted on the centerline store location of an F-15B airplane. The test article was designed with a leading edge sweep of effectively 0° to minimize boundary layer crossflow. The test article surface was coated with an insulating material to avoid significant heat transfer to and from the test article structure to maintain a quasi-adiabatic wall. An aircraft-mounted infrared camera system was used to determine boundary layer transition and the extent of laminar flow. The tests were flown up to Mach 2.0 and chord Reynolds numbers in excess of 30 million. The objectives of the tests were to determine the extent of laminar flow at high Reynolds numbers and to determine the sensitivity of the flow to disturbances. Both discrete (trip dots) and 2D disturbances (forward-facing steps) were tested. A series of oblique shocks, of yet unknown origin, appeared on the surface, which generated sufficient crossflow to affect transition. Despite the unwanted crossflow, the airfoil performed well. The results indicate that the sensitivity of the flow to the disturbances, which can translate into manufacturing tolerances, was similar to that of subsonic natural laminar flow wings.

  19. Flight Tests of a Supersonic Natural Laminar Flow Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, Michael A.; Banks, Daniel W.; Garzon, G. A.; Matisheck, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    A flight-test campaign of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil has been recently completed. The test surface was an 80-inch (203 cm) chord and 40-inch (102 cm) span article mounted on the centerline store location of an F-15B airplane (McDonnell Douglas Corporation, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois). The test article was designed with a leading edge sweep of effectively 0 deg to minimize boundary layer crossflow. The test article surface was coated with an insulating material to avoid significant heat transfer to and from the test article structure to maintain a quasi-adiabatic wall. An aircraft-mounted infrared camera system was used to determine boundary layer transition and the extent of laminar flow. The tests were flown up to Mach 2.0 and chord Reynolds numbers in excess of 30 million. The objectives of the tests were to determine the extent of laminar flow at high Reynolds numbers and to determine the sensitivity of the flow to disturbances. Both discrete (trip dots) and 2-D disturbances (forward-facing steps) were tested. A series of oblique shocks, of yet unknown origin, appeared on the surface, which generated sufficient crossflow to affect transition. Despite the unwanted crossflow, the airfoil performed well. The results indicate the sensitivity of the flow to the disturbances, which can translate into manufacturing tolerances, were similar to that of subsonic natural laminar flow wings.

  20. Label-free whole blood cell differentiation based on multiple frequency AC impedance and light scattering analysis in a micro flow cytometer.

    PubMed

    Simon, Peter; Frankowski, Marcin; Bock, Nicole; Neukammer, Jörg

    2016-06-21

    We developed a microfluidic sensor for label-free flow cytometric cell differentiation by combined multiple AC electrical impedance and light scattering analysis. The measured signals are correlated to cell volume, membrane capacity and optical properties of single cells. For an improved signal to noise ratio, the microfluidic sensor incorporates two electrode pairs for differential impedance detection. One-dimensional sheath flow focusing was implemented, which allows single particle analysis at kHz count rates. Various monodisperse particles and differentiation of leukocytes in haemolysed samples served to benchmark the microdevice applying combined AC impedance and side scatter analyses. In what follows, we demonstrate that AC impedance measurements at selected frequencies allow label-free discrimination of platelets, erythrocytes, monocytes, granulocytes and lymphocytes in whole blood samples involving dilution only. Immunofluorescence staining was applied to validate the results of the label-free cell analysis. Reliable differentiation and enumeration of cells in whole blood by AC impedance detection have the potential to support medical diagnosis for patients with haemolysis resistant erythrocytes or abnormally sensitive leucocytes, i.e. for patients suffering from anaemia or leukaemia. PMID:27229300

  1. Flow tests of the Willis Hulin well

    SciTech Connect

    Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A.

    1992-02-01

    The Hulin well was tested between 20,100 and 20,700 feet down in layers of brine-saturated clean sand with occasional intervening layers of shale. The characteristics of the brine and gas were determined in this interval and an initial determination of the reservoir properties were made.

  2. Flight Tests of a Supersonic Natural Laminar Flow Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, M. A.; Banks, D. W.; Garzon, G. A.; Matisheck, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    A flight test campaign of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil has been recently completed. The test surface was an 80-inch (203 cm) chord and 40-inch (102 cm) span article mounted on the centerline store location of an F-15B airplane. The wing was designed with a leading edge sweep of effectively 0 deg to minimize boundary layer crossflow. The test article surface was coated with an insulating material to avoid significant heat transfer to and from the test article structure to maintain a quasi-adiabatic wall. An aircraft-mounted infrared camera system was used to determine boundary layer transition and the extent of laminar flow. The tests were flown up to Mach 2.0 and chord Reynolds numbers in excess of 30 million. The objectives of the tests were to determine the extent of laminar flow at high Reynolds numbers and to determine the sensitivity of the flow to disturbances. Both discrete (trip dots) and 2-D disturbances (forward-facing steps) were tested. A series of oblique shocks, of yet unknown origin, appeared on the surface, which generated sufficient crossflow to affect transition. Despite the unwanted crossflow, the airfoil performed well. The results indicate the sensitivity of the flow to the disturbances, which can translate into manufacturing tolerances, were similar to that of subsonic natural laminar flow wings.

  3. The Forced Flow Flame-Spreading Test (FFFT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Forced Flow Flame-Spreading Test was designed to study flame spreading over solid fuels when air is flowing at a low speed concurrent airflows, some materials are more flammable in microgravity than earth. 1.5 cm flame in microgravity that melts a polyethylene cylinder into a liquid ball.

  4. Flow-test device fits into restricted access passages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, J. J.; Oberschmidt, M.; Rosenbaum, B. J.

    1967-01-01

    Test device using a mandrel with a collapsible linkage assembly enables a fluid flow sensor to be properly positioned in a restricted passage by external manipulation. This device is applicable to the combustion chamber of a rocket motor.

  5. How is flow experienced and by whom? Testing flow among occupations.

    PubMed

    Llorens, Susana; Salanova, Marisa; Rodríguez, Alma M

    2013-04-01

    The aims of this paper are to test (1) the factorial structure of the frequency of flow experience at work; (2) the flow analysis model in work settings by differentiating the frequency of flow and the frequency of its prerequisites; and (3) whether there are significant differences in the frequency of flow experience depending on the occupation. A retrospective study among 957 employees (474 tile workers and 483 secondary school teachers) using multigroup confirmatory factorial analyses and multiple analyses of variance suggested that on the basis of the flow analysis model in work settings, (1) the frequency of flow experience has a two-factor structure (enjoyment and absorption); (2) the frequency of flow experience at work is produced when both challenge and skills are high and balanced; and (3) secondary school teachers experience flow more frequently than tile workers. PMID:22674654

  6. Tribological behavior of electron beam D6ac weldment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shyh-Chi; Tseng, Kuang-Hung; Wen, Hua-Chiang; Wu, Ming-Jhang; Chou, Chang-Pin

    2013-01-01

    A flow formed D6ac steel tubing was joined using electron beam (EB) welding. Thereafter, the EB weldments were treated by tempering at temperatures of 450 °C and 550 °C. After tempering, the microstructural features, mechanical properties, and tribological characteristics of the EB D6ac weldment were studied. This study used a scratch test to evaluate the sliding wear resistance of the tempered weldment. Results indicate that the tempering softens the microstructure by reducing the dislocation density of the flow formed D6ac steel. For the 450 °C/2 h/air cooling tempering treated D6ac steel, the fracture toughness of the EB weldment can be significantly improved. The tribological behavior of the tempered D6ac weldment depended on the tempered microstructures.

  7. Flammable gas interlock spoolpiece flow response test plan and procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, T.C., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-13

    The purpose of this test plan and procedure is to test the Whittaker electrochemical cell and the Sierra Monitor Corp. flammable gas monitors in a simulated field flow configuration. The sensors are used on the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) Flammable Gas Interlock (FGI), to detect flammable gases, including hydrogen and teminate the core sampling activity at a predetermined concentration level.

  8. Analytical flow/thermal modeling of combustion gas flows in Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor test joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, G. H.; Knox, E. C.; Pond, J. E.; Bacchus, D. L.; Hengel, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    A one-dimensional analytical tool, TOPAZ (Transient One-dimensional Pipe flow AnalyZer), was used to model the flow characteristics of hot combustion gases through Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) joints and to compute the resultant material surface temperatures and o-ring seal erosion of the joints. The capabilities of the analytical tool were validated with test data during the Seventy Pound Charge (SPC) motor test program. The predicted RSRM joint thermal response to ignition transients was compared with test data for full-scale motor tests. The one-dimensional analyzer is found to be an effective tool for simulating combustion gas flows in RSRM joints and for predicting flow and thermal properties.

  9. Testing the instream flow method in trout streams

    SciTech Connect

    Studley, T.K.; Railsback, S.F.; Asce, M.

    1995-12-31

    Pacific Gas and Electric Company`s (PG&E) Department of Research and Development and co-sponsors are fieldtesting the Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) at a number of trout stream study sites. Fish populations, flows, and other variables were measured for an eight-year baseline period. Three levels of increasingly sophisticated predictions of population response to increased flows were made. The flow increases have been implemented and additional data are being collected to test the predictions. The baseline data and prediction analyses indicate that (1) using different habitat suitability criteria produces substantially different predictions of how populations respond to flow changes, (2) overlaps in habitat used by trout species can lead to misleading predictions of a population`s response to flow changes, and (3) factors other than habitat during summer low flows can limit trout populations (these include spawning habitat, high flows, stream channel characteristics, and stream temperature). Comprehensive field studies are expensive, but are more likely to result in instream flows that provide a cost-effective tradeoff between power and fisheries values.

  10. Flow tests of the Gladys McCall well

    SciTech Connect

    Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A. )

    1992-04-01

    This report pulls together the data from all of the geopressured-geothermal field research conducted at the Gladys McCall well. The well produced geopressured brine containing dissolved natural gas from the Lower Miocene sands at a depth of 15,150 to 16,650 feet. More than 25 million barrels of brine and 727 million standard cubic feet of natural gas were produced in a series of flow tests between December 1982 and October 1987 at various brine flow rates up to 28,000 barrels per day. Initial short-term flow tests for the Number 9 Sand found the permeability to be 67 to 85 md (millidarcies) for a brine volume of 85 to 170 million barrels. Initial short-term flow tests for the Number 8 Sand found a permeability of 113 to 132 md for a reservoir volume of 430 to 550 million barrels of brine. The long-term flow and buildup test of the Number 8 Sand found that the high-permeability reservoir connected to the wellbore (measured by the short-term flow test) was connected to a much larger, low-permeability reservoir. Numerical simulation of the flow and buildup tests required this large connected reservoir to have a volume of about 8 billion barrels (two cubic miles of reservoir rock) with effective permeabilities in the range of 0.2 to 20 md. Calcium carbonate scale formation in the well tubing and separator equipment was a problem. During the first 2 years of production, scale formation was prevented in the surface equipment by injection of an inhibitor upstream of the choke. Starting in 1985, scale formation in the production tubing was successfully prevented by injecting inhibitor pills'' directly into the reservoir. Corrosion and/or erosion of surface piping and equipment, as well as disposal well tubing, was also significant.

  11. Hanford Tank Farms Waste Certification Flow Loop Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Scott, Paul A.; Adkins, Harold E.; Wells, Beric E.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Denslow, Kayte M.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Morgen, Gerald P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.

    2010-01-01

    A future requirement of Hanford Tank Farm operations will involve transfer of wastes from double shell tanks to the Waste Treatment Plant. As the U.S. Department of Energy contractor for Tank Farm Operations, Washington River Protection Solutions anticipates the need to certify that waste transfers comply with contractual requirements. This test plan describes the approach for evaluating several instruments that have potential to detect the onset of flow stratification and critical suspension velocity. The testing will be conducted in an existing pipe loop in Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s facility that is being modified to accommodate the testing of instruments over a range of simulated waste properties and flow conditions. The testing phases, test matrix and types of simulants needed and the range of testing conditions required to evaluate the instruments are described

  12. Columbia University flow instability experimental program: Volume 6. Single annulus tests, transient test program

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

    1992-09-01

    The coolant in the Savannah River Site (SRS) production nuclear reactor assemblies is circulated as a subcooled liquid under normal operating conditions. This coolant is evenly distributed throughout multiple annular flow channels with a uniform pressure profile across each coolant flow channel. During the postulated Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), which is initiated by a hypothetical guillotine pipe break, the coolant flow through the reactor assemblies is significantly reduced. The flow reduction and accompanying power reduction (after shutdown is initiated) occur in the first 1 to 2 seconds of the LOCA. This portion of the LOCA is referred to as the Flow Instability phase. This report presents the experimental results for the transient portion of the single annulus test program. The test program was designed to investigate the onset of flow instability in an annular geometry similar to the MARK 22 reactor. The test program involved testing of both a ribless heater and a ribbed heater under steady state as well as transient conditions. The ribbed heater testing is currently underway and will be reported separately. The steady state portion of this test program with ribless heater was completed and reported in report No. CU-HTRF-T3A. The present report presents transient test results obtained from a ribless, uniform annulus test section. A total of thirty five transients were conducted with six cases in which flow excursion occurred. No unstable conditions resulted for tests in which the steady state Q{sub ratio} OFI limit was not exceeded.

  13. Ground vibration test of the laminar flow control JStar airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kehoe, M. W.; Cazier, F. W., Jr.; Ellison, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    A ground vibration test was conducted on a Lockheed JetStar airplane that had been modified for the purpose of conducting laminar flow control experiments. The test was performed prior to initial flight flutter tests. Both sine-dwell and single-point-random excitation methods were used. The data presented include frequency response functions and a comparison of mode frequencies and mode shapes from both methods.

  14. Investigation of ac Stark shifts in excited states of dysprosium relevant to testing fundamental symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, C. T. M.; Leefer, N.; Budker, D.

    2013-12-01

    We report on measurements of the differential polarizability between the nearly degenerate, opposite parity states in atomic dysprosium at 19 797.96 cm-1, and the differential blackbody radiation induced Stark shift of these states. The differential scalar and tensor polarizabilities due to additional states were measured for the |M|=7,⋯,10 sublevels in 164Dy and 162Dy and determined to be α¯BA(0)=180(45)stat(8)sys mHz/(V/cm)2 and α¯BA(2)=-163(65)stat(5)sys mHz/(V/cm)2, respectively. The average blackbody radiation induced Stark shift of the Zeeman spectrum was measured around 300 K and found to be -34(4) mHz/K and +29(4) mHz/K for 164Dy and 162Dy, respectively. We conclude that ac Stark related systematics will not limit a search for variation of the fine-structure constant, using dysprosium, down to the level of |α˙/α|=2.6×10-17 yr-1, for two measurements of the transition frequency one year apart.

  15. Fractional flow in fractured chalk; a flow and tracer test revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odling, N. E.; West, L. J.; Hartmann, S.; Kilpatrick, A.

    2013-04-01

    A multi-borehole pumping and tracer test in fractured chalk is revisited and reinterpreted in the light of fractional flow. Pumping test data analyzed using a fractional flow model gives sub-spherical flow dimensions of 2.2-2.4 which are interpreted as due to the partially penetrating nature of the pumped borehole. The fractional flow model offers greater versatility than classical methods for interpreting pumping tests in fractured aquifers but its use has been hampered because the hydraulic parameters derived are hard to interpret. A method is developed to convert apparent transmissivity and storativity (L4-n/T and S2-n) to conventional transmissivity and storativity (L2/T and dimensionless) for the case where flow dimension, 2 < n < 3. These parameters may then be used in further applications, facilitating application of the fractional flow model. In the case illustrated, improved fits to drawdown data are obtained and the resultant transmissivities and storativities are found to be lower by 30% and an order of magnitude respectively, than estimates from classical methods. The revised hydraulic parameters are used in a reinterpretation of a tracer test using an analytical dual porosity model of solute transport incorporating matrix diffusion and modified for fractional flow. Model results show smaller fracture apertures, spacings and dispersivities than those when 2D flow is assumed. The pumping and tracer test results and modeling presented illustrate the importance of recognizing the potential fractional nature of flow generated by partially penetrating boreholes in fractured aquifers in estimating aquifer properties and interpreting tracer breakthrough curves.

  16. Instrument Pilot: Airplane. Flight Test Guide, Part 61 Revised 1973, AC 61-56.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Flight Standards Service.

    This flight test guide is designed to assist the applicant and his instructor in preparing for the flight test for Instrument Pilot Airplane Rating under Part 61 (revised) of Federal Aviation Regulations. It contains information concerning pilot operations, procedures, and maneuvers relevant to the flight test required for the Instrument Rating.…

  17. 40 CFR 1066.845 - AC17 air conditioning efficiency test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... voluntary procedure for measuring the net impact of air conditioner operation on CO2 emissions. See 40 CFR... tests according to 40 CFR 86.132-00(a) through (g). If the vehicle has been tested within the last 36... solar heating is disabled for certain test intervals as described in this section. (d) Interior...

  18. Laminar flow test installation in the Boeing Research Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George-Falvy, Dezso

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the initial wind tunnels tests in the 5- by 8-ft Boeing Research Wind Tunnel of a near full-scale (20-foot chord) swept wing section having laminar flow control (LFC) by slot suction over its first 30 percent chord. The model and associated test apparatus were developed for use as a testbed for LFC-related experimentation in support of preliminary design studies done under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. This paper contains the description of the model and associated test apparatus as well as the results of the initial test series in which the proper functioning of the test installation was demonstrated and new data were obtained on the sensitivity of suction-controlled laminar flow to surface protuberances in the presence of crossflow due to sweep.

  19. Design verification and cold-flow modeling test report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This report presents a compilation of the following three test reports prepared by TRW for Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority (AIDEA) as part of the Healy Clean Coal Project, Phase 1 Design of the TRW Combustor and Auxiliary Systems, which is co-sponsored by the Department of Energy under the Clean Coal Technology 3 Program: (1) Design Verification Test Report, dated April 1993, (2) Combustor Cold Flow Model Report, dated August 28, 1992, (3) Coal Feed System Cold Flow Model Report, October 28, 1992. In this compilation, these three reports are included in one volume consisting of three parts, and TRW proprietary information has been excluded.

  20. Composite rod insulators for ac power lines; Electrical performance of various designs at a coastal testing station

    SciTech Connect

    Houlgate, R.G.; Swift, D.A. )

    1990-10-01

    The electrical performance of thirty-six composite insulators - of four commercial types for each AC system level of 34.5 kV, 230 kV and 500 kV - has been determined at the CEGB insulator testing station, Brighton, England. The weathershed materials were epoxy-resin, ethylene propylene rubber and silicone rubber; half of the 230 kV insulators had no stress rings. Surface leakage current was recorded for surge levels of 25 mA, 150 mA and 500 mA; a special technique was developed to obtain the flashover statistics of the 500 kV insulators, thereby enabling performance of the composite insulator to be quantified relative to that of a string of cap and pin porcelain insulators of anti-fog design, the deterioration of the insulators was observed by making regular visual inspections. The practical consequences of the findings and the causes of the degradation are discussed.

  1. Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: LDV Measured Flow Field Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary C.; Krupar, Martin J.; Hughes, Christopher E.; Woodward, Richard P.

    2003-01-01

    Results are presented of an experiment conducted to investigate potential sources of noise in the flow developed by two 22-in. diameter turbofan models. The R4 and M5 rotors that were tested were designed to operate at nominal take-off speeds of 12,657 and 14,064 RPMC, respectively. Both fans were tested with a common set of swept stators installed downstream of the rotors. Detailed measurements of the flows generated by the two were made using a laser Doppler velocimeter system. The wake flows generated by the two rotors are illustrated through a series of contour plots. These show that the two wake flows are quite different, especially in the tip region. These data are used to explain some of the differences in the rotor/stator interaction noise generated by the two fan stages. In addition to these wake data, measurements were also made in the R4 rotor blade passages. These results illustrate the tip flow development within the blade passages, its migration downstream, and (at high rotor speeds) its merging with the blade wake of the adjacent (following) blade. Data also depict the variation of this tip flow with tip clearance. Data obtained within the rotor blade passages at high rotational speeds illustrate the variation of the mean shock position across the different blade passages.

  2. Flow Visualization of Liquid Hydrogen Line Chilldown Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rame, Enrique; Hartwig, Jason W.; McQuillen John B.

    2014-01-01

    We present experimental measurements of wall and fluid temperature during chill-down tests of a warm cryogenic line with liquid hydrogen. Synchronized video and fluid temperature measurements are used to interpret stream temperature profiles versus time. When cold liquid hydrogen starts to flow into the warm line, a sequence of flow regimes, spanning from all-vapor at the outset to bubbly with continuum liquid at the end can be observed at a location far downstream of the cold inlet. In this paper we propose interpretations to the observed flow regimes and fluid temperature histories for two chilldown methods, viz. trickle (i.e. continuous) flow and pulse flow. Calculations of heat flux from the wall to the fluid versus wall temperature indicate the presence of the transition/nucleate boiling regimes only. The present tests, run at typical Reynolds numbers of approx O(10 (exp 5)), are in sharp contrast to similar tests conducted at lower Reynolds numbers where a well-defined film boiling region is observed.

  3. Flow reference method testing and analysis: Field test plan, Texas Utilities Decordova Steam Electric Station

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, E.; Werner, A.S.

    1997-05-30

    This report describes the experimental design and test plan for the first of three field tests that the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted in 1997 as part of a major study to evaluate potential improvements to Method 2, EPA`s test method for measuring flue gas volumetric flow in stacks. The experimental design involved four test teams taking concurrent in-stack measurements with velocity sensing probes. Seven types of probes were included in the study. Three test matrices were used to gather data for inter-probe and inter-team comparisons and to assess the impact of velocity decline near the stack wall on volumetric flow measurements.

  4. Commercial Pilot; Airplane. Flight Test Guide, Part 61 Revised, AC 61-55.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Flight Standards Service.

    This flight test guide assists the applicant and his instructor in preparing for the Commercial Pilot Certificate with Airplane Rating under Part 61 (revised) of Federal Aviation Regulations. It contains information concerning pilot operations, procedures, and maneuvers relevant to the flight test required for the certificate. Preflight duties,…

  5. Private and Commercial Pilot: Glider. Flight Test Guide, Part 61 Revised, AC 61-61.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Flight Standards Service.

    This flight test guide assists the applicant and his instructor in preparing for the Private or Commercial Pilot Certificate with Glider Rating under Part 61 (revised) of Federal Aviation Regulations. It contains information and guidance concerning the pilot operations, procedures, and maneuvers relevant to the flight test required for that…

  6. Private and Commercial Pilot; Heliocoptor. Flight Test Guide, Part 61 Revised, AC 61-59.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Flight Standards Service.

    This flight test guide assists the applicant and his instructor in preparing for the Private or Commercial Pilot Rotocraft Certificate with Helicopter Rating under Part 61 (revised) of Federal Aviation Regulations. It contains information and guidance concerning the pilot operations, procedures, and maneuvers relevant to the flight test required…

  7. Private and Commercial Pilot: Gyroplane. Flight Test Guide, Part 61 Revised 1973, AC 61-60.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Flight Standards Service.

    This flight test guide assists the applicant and his instructor in preparing for the Private or Commercial Pilot Rotocraft Certificate with Gyroplane Rating under Part 61 (revised) of Federal Aviation Regulations. It contains information concerning pilot operations, procedures, and maneuvers relevant to the flight test required for these…

  8. Flow measurements in a centrifugal diffusor test device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitting, T.

    1985-06-01

    This work sought to verify concepts used in the design of a large scale, low speed, radial cascade wind tunnel which was to be used to investigate flow phenomena in and the performance of vaned radial diffusors. A major contributor to centrifugal compressor efficiency is the performance of the vaned diffusor which closely follows the impeller of the compressor. The purpose of this diffusor is to efficiently convert most of the kinetic energy of the transonic flow entering the vane into pressure. The need for an experimental facility which could simulate adequately, at low cost and in a controlled way, the environment of the centrifugal compressor motivated the development of the Centrifugal Diffusor Test Device (CDTD). It was expected that the generation of a three dimensional flow would provide improved empirical data on annular cascade performance. This measurement program surveyed the axial and circumferential uniformity of the flow at the inlet of a transonic wedge-type blading mounted in the device. Evaluation of the results showed the flow uniformity to be unsatisfactory. Leakage and other small perturbations in the flow field in the swirl generator are believed to be amplified by the basic flow configuration of the device.

  9. EPA flow reference method testing and analysis: Findings report. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    1999-06-01

    In the summer of 1997, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted a series of week-long field tests at three electric utility sites to evaluate potential improvements to Method 2, EPA`s test method for measuring flue gas volumetric flow in stacks. The findings from that study are presented in document EPA/430-R-99-009a (NTIS Order Number PB99-150286). This document contains 10 appendices for that report.

  10. CONSTRUCTION AND EVALUATION OF A FLOW TEST STAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    A test stand for the examination of flow monitors in a 3-inch pipe was designed, constructed, and evaluated. The calculations necessary for the proper design are based on empirical data and are described in detail. A statistical analysis was used to estimate the error generated f...

  11. Cotton-Harvester-Flow Simulator for Testing Cotton Yield Monitor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An experimental system was developed to simulate the pneumatic flow arrangement found in picker-type cotton harvesters. The simulation system was designed and constructed for testing a prototype cotton yield monitor developed at Mississippi State University. The simulation system was constructed to ...

  12. AC magnetohydrodynamic microfluidic switch

    SciTech Connect

    Lemoff, A V; Lee, A P

    2000-03-02

    A microfluidic switch has been demonstrated using an AC Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pumping mechanism in which the Lorentz force is used to pump an electrolytic solution. By integrating two AC MHD pumps into different arms of a Y-shaped fluidic circuit, flow can be switched between the two arms. This type of switch can be used to produce complex fluidic routing, which may have multiple applications in {micro}TAS.

  13. ACS & WFPC2 Two-gyro PSF, pointing and dither test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biretta, John

    2004-07-01

    12 orbits High priority observations {5 orbits} will be observed together at start of two-gyro SMS as contingency against HST failure. Remaining 7 orbits provide further tests and additional experience in two-gyro mode. It is believed that this will be the only test prior to final failure into two-gyro mode. Goals: PSF, PSF repeatability, pointing and stability within the orbit {requirements 1a, 1c, 2 , 4}

  14. DUAL ALKALI ACCEPTANCE TEST AT LOUISVILLE GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY; VOLUME I. ACCEPTANCE TEST AND APPENDICES A-C

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of the completed acceptance test series run on the dual alkali system serving Louisville Gas and Electric Company's Cane Run Unit 6 boiler. This volume contains the process description and a discussion of the test results, operating history, and performan...

  15. Flow-Field Survey in the Test Region of the SR-71 Aircraft Test Bed Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizukami, Masashi; Jones, Daniel; Weinstock, Vladimir D.

    2000-01-01

    A flat plate and faired pod have been mounted on a NASA SR-71A aircraft for use as a supersonic flight experiment test bed. A test article can be placed on the flat plate; the pod can contain supporting systems. A series of test flights has been conducted to validate this test bed configuration. Flight speeds to a maximum of Mach 3.0 have been attained. Steady-state sideslip maneuvers to a maximum of 2 deg have been conducted, and the flow field in the test region has been surveyed. Two total-pressure rakes, each with two flow-angle probes, have been placed in the expected vicinity of an experiment. Static-pressure measurements have been made on the flat plate. At subsonic and low supersonic speeds with no sideslip, the flow in the surveyed region is quite uniform. During sideslip maneuvers, localized flow distortions impinge on the test region. Aircraft sideslip does not produce a uniform sidewash over the test region. At speeds faster than Mach 1.5, variable-pressure distortions were observed in the test region. Boundary-layer thickness on the flat plate at the rake was less than 2.1 in. For future experiments, a more focused and detailed flow-field survey than this one would be desirable.

  16. Testing the global flow reconstruction method on coupled chaotic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plachy, Emese; Kolláth, Zoltán

    2010-03-01

    Irregular behaviour of pulsating variable stars may occur due to low dimensional chaos. To determine the quantitative properties of the dynamics in such systems, we apply a suitable time series analysis, the global flow reconstruction method. The robustness of the reconstruction can be tested through the resultant quantities, like Lyapunov dimension and Fourier frequencies. The latter is specially important as it is directly derivable from the observed light curves. We have performed tests using coupled Rossler oscillators to investigate the possible connection between those quantities. In this paper we present our test results.

  17. Flow and diffusion of high-stakes test scores

    PubMed Central

    Marder, M.; Bansal, D.

    2009-01-01

    We apply visualization and modeling methods for convective and diffusive flows to public school mathematics test scores from Texas. We obtain plots that show the most likely future and past scores of students, the effects of random processes such as guessing, and the rate at which students appear in and disappear from schools. We show that student outcomes depend strongly upon economic class, and identify the grade levels where flows of different groups diverge most strongly. Changing the effectiveness of instruction in one grade naturally leads to strongly nonlinear effects on student outcomes in subsequent grades. PMID:19805049

  18. Applying well flow adapted filtering to transient pumping tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zech, Alraune; Attinger, Sabine

    2014-05-01

    Transient pumping tests are often used to estimate porous medium characteristics like hydraulic conductivity and storativity. The interpretation of pumping test drawdowns is based on methods which are normally developed under the assumption of homogeneous porous media. However aquifer heterogeneity strongly impacts on well flow pattern, in particular in the vicinity of the pumping well. The purpose of this work is to present a method to interpret drawdowns of transient pumping tests in heterogeneous porous media. With this method we are able to describe the effects that statistical quantities like variance and correlation length have on pumping test drawdowns. Furthermore it allows inferring on the statistical parameters of aquifer heterogeneity from drawdown data by invers estimation, which is not possible using methods for homogeneous media like Theis' solution. The method is based on a representative description of hydraulic conductivity for radial flow regimes. It is derived from a well flow adapted filtering procedure (Coarse Graining), where the heterogeneity of hydraulic conductivity is assumed to be log-normal distributed with a Gaussian correlation structure. applying the up scaled hydraulic conductivity to the groundwater flow equation results in a hydraulic head which depends on the statistical parameters of the porous medium. It describes the drawdown of a transient pumping test in heterogeneous media. We used an ensemble of transient pumping test simulations to verify the up scaled drawdown solution. We generated transient pumping tests in heterogeneous media for various values of the statistical parameters variance and correlation length and evaluated their impact on the drawdown behavior as well as on the temporal evolution. We further examined the impact of several aspects like the location of an observation well or the local conductivity at the pumping well on the drawdown behavior. This work can be understood as an expansion of the work of Zech et

  19. Comparing Recent Organizing Templates for Test Content between ACS Exams in General Chemistry and AP Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holme, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Two different versions of "big ideas" rooted content maps have recently been published for general chemistry. As embodied in the content outline from the College Board, one of these maps is designed to guide curriculum development and testing for advanced placement (AP) chemistry. The Anchoring Concepts Content Map for general chemistry…

  20. Cold Flow Plume Entrainment Test Final Report NTF Test Number 2456

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph H.; McDaniels, David; Mishtawy, Jason; Ramachandran, Narayanan; Hammad, Khaled J.

    2005-01-01

    As part of the Space Shuttle Return to Flight (RTF) program, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) performed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis to define the velocity flowfields around the Shuttle stack at liftoff. These CFD predicted velocity flowfields were used in debris transport analysis (DTA). High speed flows such as plumes induce or 'entrain' mass from the surrounding environment. Previous work had shown that CFD analysis over-predicts plume induced flows. Therefore, the DTA would tend to 1) predict more debris impacts, and 2) the debris velocity (and kinetic energy) of those impacts would be too high. At a November, 2004 peer-review it was recommended that the Liftoff DTA team quantify the uncertainty in the DTA caused by the CFD's over prediction of plume induced flow. To do so, the Liftoff DTA team needed benchmark quality data for plume induced flow to quantify the CFD accuracy and its effect on the DTA. MSFC's Nozzle Test Facility (NTF) conducted the "Nozzle Induced Flows test, P#2456" to obtain experimental data for plume induced flows for nozzle flow exhausting into q quiescent freestream. Planning for the test began in December, 2004 and the experimental data was obtained in February and March of 2005. The funding for this test was provided by MSFC's Space Shuttle Propulsion Systems Integration and Engineering office.

  1. Fluid flow measurements of Test Series A and B for the Small Scale Seal Performance Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, E.W.; Lagus, P.L.; Lie, K.

    1987-12-01

    The degree of waste isolation achieved by a repository seal system is dependent upon the fluid flow characteristics, or permeability, of the seals. In order to obtain meaningful, site-specific data on the performance of various possible seal system components, a series of in situ experiments called the Small Scale Seal Performance Tests (SSSPT) are being conducted at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This report contains the results of gas flow, tracer penetration, and brine flow tests conducted on concrete seals in vertical (Test Series A) and horizontal (Test Series B) configurations. The test objectives were to evaluate the seal performance and to determine if there existed scaling effects which could influence future SSSPT designs. 3 refs., 77 figs.

  2. AC-3-irradiation test of sphere-pac and pellet (U,Pu)C fuel in the US Fast Flux Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bart, G.; Botta, F. B.; Hoth, C. W.; Ledergerber, G.; Mason, R. E.; Stratton, R. W.

    2008-05-01

    The objective of the AC-3 bundle experiment in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was to evaluate a fuel fabrication method by 'direct conversion' of nitrate solutions into spherical uranium-plutonium carbide particles and to compare the irradiation performance of 'sphere-pac' fuel pins prepared at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) with standard pellet fuel pins fabricated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The irradiation and post test examination results show that mixed carbide pellet fuel produced by powder methods and sphere-pac particle fuel developed by internal gelation techniques are both valuable advanced fuel candidates for liquid metal reactors. The PSI fabrication process with direct conversion of actinide nitrate solutions into various sizes of fuel spheres by internal gelation and direct filling of spheres into cladding tubes is seen as more easily transferable to remote operation, showing a significant reduction of process steps. The process is also adaptable for the fabrication of carbonitrides and nitrides (still based on a uranium matrix), as well as for actinides diluted in a (uranium-free) yttrium stabilized zirconium oxide matrix. The AC-3 fuel bundle was irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) during the years 1986-1988 for 630 full power days to a peak burn up of ˜8 at.% fissile material. All of the pins, irradiated at linear powers of up to 84 kW/m, with cladding outer temperatures of 465 °C appeared to be in good condition when removed from the assembly. The rebirth of interest for fast reactor systems motivated the earlier teams to report about the excellent, still perfectly relevant results reached; this paper focusing on the sphere-pac fuel behaviour.

  3. Measurements of Turbulent Flow Field in Separate Flow Nozzles with Enhanced Mixing Devices - Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James

    2002-01-01

    As part of the Advanced Subsonic Technology Program, a series of experiments was conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center on the effect of mixing enhancement devices on the aeroacoustic performance of separate flow nozzles. Initial acoustic evaluations of the devices showed that they reduced jet noise significantly, while creating very little thrust loss. The explanation for the improvement required that turbulence measurements, namely single point mean and RMS statistics and two-point spatial correlations, be made to determine the change in the turbulence caused by the mixing enhancement devices that lead to the noise reduction. These measurements were made in the summer of 2000 in a test program called Separate Nozzle Flow Test 2000 (SFNT2K) supported by the Aeropropulsion Research Program at NASA Glenn Research Center. Given the hot high-speed flows representative of a contemporary bypass ratio 5 turbofan engine, unsteady flow field measurements required the use of an optical measurement method. To achieve the spatial correlations, the Particle Image Velocimetry technique was employed, acquiring high-density velocity maps of the flows from which the required statistics could be derived. This was the first successful use of this technique for such flows, and shows the utility of this technique for future experimental programs. The extensive statistics obtained were likewise unique and give great insight into the turbulence which produces noise and how the turbulence can be modified to reduce jet noise.

  4. Flap survey test of a combined surface blowing model: Flow measurements at static flow conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukushima, T.

    1978-01-01

    The Combined Surface Blowing (CSB) V/STOL lift/propulsion system consists of a blown flap system which deflects the exhaust from a turbojet engine over a system of flaps deployed at the trailing edge of the wing. Flow measurements consisting of velocity measurements using split film probes and total measure surveys using a miniature Kiel probe were made at control stations along the flap systems at two spanwise stations, the centerline of the nozzle and 60 percent of the nozzle span outboard of the centerline. Surface pressure measurements were made in the wing cove and the upper surface of the first flap element. The test showed a significant flow separation in the wing cove. The extent of the separation is so large that the flow into the first flap takes place only at the leading edge of the flap. The velocity profile measurements indicate that large spanwise (3 dimensional) flow may exist.

  5. Universal Verification Methodology Based Register Test Automation Flow.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jae Hun; Cho, Yong Kwan; Park, Sun Kyu

    2016-05-01

    In today's SoC design, the number of registers has been increased along with complexity of hardware blocks. Register validation is a time-consuming and error-pron task. Therefore, we need an efficient way to perform verification with less effort in shorter time. In this work, we suggest register test automation flow based UVM (Universal Verification Methodology). UVM provides a standard methodology, called a register model, to facilitate stimulus generation and functional checking of registers. However, it is not easy for designers to create register models for their functional blocks or integrate models in test-bench environment because it requires knowledge of SystemVerilog and UVM libraries. For the creation of register models, many commercial tools support a register model generation from register specification described in IP-XACT, but it is time-consuming to describe register specification in IP-XACT format. For easy creation of register model, we propose spreadsheet-based register template which is translated to IP-XACT description, from which register models can be easily generated using commercial tools. On the other hand, we also automate all the steps involved integrating test-bench and generating test-cases, so that designers may use register model without detailed knowledge of UVM or SystemVerilog. This automation flow involves generating and connecting test-bench components (e.g., driver, checker, bus adaptor, etc.) and writing test sequence for each type of register test-case. With the proposed flow, designers can save considerable amount of time to verify functionality of registers. PMID:27483924

  6. Analysis of Alcove 8/Niche 3 Flow and Transport Tests

    SciTech Connect

    H.H. Liu

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document analyses of the Alcove 8/Niche 3 flow and transport tests, with a focus on the large-infiltration-plot tests and compare pre-test model predictions with the actual test observations. The tests involved infiltration that originated from the floor of Alcove 8 (located in the Enhanced Characterization of Repository Block (ECRB) Cross Drift) and observations of seepage and tracer transport at Niche 3 (located in the Main Drift of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF)). The test results are relevant to drift seepage and solute transport in the unsaturated zone (UZ) of Yucca Mountain. The main objective of this analysis was to evaluate the modeling approaches used and the importance of the matrix diffusion process by comparing simulation and actual test observations. The pre-test predictions for the large plot test were found to differ from the observations and the reasons for the differences were documented in this report to partly address CR 6783, which concerns unexpected test results. These unexpected results are discussed and assessed with respect to the current baseline unsaturated zone radionuclide transport model in Sections 6.2.4, 6.3.2, and 6.4.

  7. Flow through a mechanical distraction enterogenesis device: a pilot test

    PubMed Central

    Miyasaka, Eiichi A.; Okawada, Manabu; Herman, Richard; Utter, Brent; Luntz, Jonathan; Brei, Diann; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.

    2011-01-01

    Background We tested the coupling portion of a prototype intraluminal distraction enterogenesis device to allow flow-through of simulated enteric contents (SEC) in both pig and human jejunum. Materials and methods SEC was made using 80% corn syrup. Ten cm pig and human intestinal segments had a spoke-shaped 2.2cm coupling adaptor sutured in place intraluminally. The adaptor had a flow-through area of 33.6mm2. SEC was pumped into the proximal part of the intestinal segment at 0.083mL/sec. The times to first passage of SEC through the coupler (first drop), 10mL and 20mL of SEC eluted from the distal end were recorded. Results Mean time to first drop elution was 155±38 seconds with pig, and 149±22 seconds with human bowel (p = 0.8). This corresponded to a hydrostatic pressure of 37.5mmHg before the initial drop passed through. Mean flow rates were 0.094mL/sec in pig bowel and 0.084mL/sec in human bowel (p=0.09). To account for occlusion from luminal debris, a 75% occlusion of coupler holes was studied in the smaller pig bowel to investigate if reductions in flow-through area could be tolerated. Mean time to first drop increased slightly to 171±15 seconds, and the elution rate stayed the same (p=0.5). Conclusions After a physiological level of initial pressure buildup allowing the first drop of SEC to pass the coupling adaptor, our prototype intestinal coupling adaptor did not obstruct flow-through of SEC, even after a 75% decrease in flow-through area. This type of attachment represents a viable approach to placing a device in-continuity without obstructing flow of enteric contents. PMID:21571307

  8. Computational analysis of turbine engine test cell flow phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prufert, Matthew Brian

    1998-11-01

    Turbine engine altitude test cells must incorporate an exhaust system collector to remove hot exhaust gases from the vicinity of the jet engine and to provide additional pumping to simulate the reduced pressure which would be encountered in flight. For economic reasons, it is desirable to utilize the same test configuration to simulate as much of the engine operating envelope as possible. To extend the test envelope, a cut-and-try approach is usually taken using available test data, one-dimensional analyses, and past experience. In this study, a computational approach was used to model some of the recognized operational problems which are commonly encountered. Specifically, computational models were used to evaluate the performance of an altitude test cell at low altitude conditions. Particular emphasis was placed on potential test section over-heating and the reduction of diffuser pumping to achieve near sea-level test conditions. A computational model which utilizes the NPARC Navier-Stokes code was applied to several test configurations operating at steady-state and to a single diffuser configuration in the presence of unsteady pressure fluctuations. During 1997/1998, the author developed two-dimensional and three-dimensional NPARC Navier-Stokes flow models and procedures for use in predicting test cell and engine surface cooling effectiveness for a military engine installation in an altitude test chamber. The predicted model flowfields for both steady-state and time variant flows were used to qualitatively verify limited infrared imaging camera data and quantitatively compare numerical results with test cell and diffuser pressure and temperature data. Prediction of surface convention heat transfer rates are currently beyond the capabilities of the NPARC CFD code. To quantify localized wall heat transfer rates, the BLAYER boundary layer code also was utilized. The BLAYER code is capable of quantifying boundary layer convection heat transfer rates based on near

  9. Jet-Surface Interaction Test: Flow Measurements Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Cliff; Wernet, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Modern aircraft design often puts the engine exhaust in close proximity to the airframe surfaces. Aircraft noise prediction tools must continue to develop in order to meet the challenges these aircraft present. The Jet-Surface Interaction Tests have been conducted to provide a comprehensive quality set of experimental data suitable for development and validation of these exhaust noise prediction methods. Flow measurements have been acquired using streamwise and cross-stream particle image velocimetry (PIV) and fluctuating surface pressure data acquired using flush mounted pressure transducers near the surface trailing edge. These data combined with previously reported far-field and phased array noise measurements represent the first step toward the experimental data base. These flow data are particularly applicable to development of noise prediction methods which rely on computational fluid dynamics to uncover the flow physics. A representative sample of the large flow data set acquired is presented here to show how a surface near a jet affects the turbulent kinetic energy in the plume, the spatial relationship between the jet plume and surface needed to generate surface trailing-edge noise, and differences between heated and unheated jet flows with respect to surfaces.

  10. Performance testing of a Savonius windmill rotor in shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojola, O. O.; Onasanya, O. E.

    The effects of flow shear and/or unsteadiness on the power producing performance of a Savonius windmill rotor are studied. Measurements are made in two laboratory statistically-steady shear flows, and in the natural wind, which is both viscous and unsteady. The measurements were made of the speed, torque, and power of the rotor at a number of streamwise stations for each of four values of the bucket overlap ratio. Flow velocity profiles and graphs of wind shear variation are given. It is concluded that even in the presence of shear, the power coefficient of a Savonius windmill rotor is most strongly dependent on the tip speed ratio. As in inviscid flow, the power coefficient peaked at a tip speed ratio = 0.8. The major effect of shear was to reduce the power coefficient below the inviscid flow level, the magnitude of reduction depending on the magnitude of shear present. In field testing of the Savonius rotor, the unsteadiness of the wind proved to be a greater source of power loss than the wind shear.

  11. A review of flow battery testing at Sandia

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, P.C.; Miller, D.W.; Robinson, C.E.; Rodriguez, G.P.

    1984-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is evaluating prototype zinc/bromine, Redox, and zinc/ferricyanide flowing electrolyte batteries and cells. This paper updates previous reports of test results of two Exxon zinc/bromine batteries and one NASA Redox iron/chromium battery. Two 60sq. cm. zinc/ferricyanide cells from Lockheed Missiles and Space Co. are also being evaluated. Performance, life, and operating data are described for these batteries and cells.

  12. Flammable gas interlock spoolpiece flow response test report

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, T.C., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-24

    The purpose of this test report is to document the testing performed under the guidance of HNF-SD-WM-TC-073, {ital Flammable Gas Interlock Spoolpiece Flow Response Test Plan and Procedure}. This testing was performed for Lockheed Martin Hanford Characterization Projects Operations (CPO) in support of Rotary Mode Core Sampling jointly by SGN Eurisys Services Corporation and Numatec Hanford Company. The testing was conducted in the 305 building Engineering Testing Laboratory (ETL). NHC provides the engineering and technical support for the 305 ETL. The key personnel identified for the performance of this task are as follows: Test responsible engineering manager, C. E. Hanson; Flammable Gas Interlock Design Authority, G. P. Janicek; 305 ETL responsible manager, N. J. Schliebe; Cognizant RMCS exhauster engineer, E. J. Waldo/J. D. Robinson; Cognizant 305 ETL engineer, K. S. Witwer; Test director, T. C. Schneider. Other support personnel were supplied, as necessary, from 305/306 ETL. The testing, on the flammable Gas Interlock (FGI) system spoolpiece required to support Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) of single shell flammable gas watch list tanks, took place between 2-13-97 and 2-25-97.

  13. Radial flow permeability testing of an argillaceous limestone.

    PubMed

    Selvadurai, A P S; Jenner, L

    2013-01-01

    Argillaceous Lindsay limestone is the geologic storage formation that will be encountered at the site for the construction of a deep ground repository in Ontario, Canada, for the storage of low to intermediate level nuclear waste. The permeability of the Lindsay limestone is a key parameter that will influence the long-term movement of radionuclides from the repository to the geosphere. This paper describes the use of both steady-state and transient radial flow laboratory tests to determine the permeability of this argillaceous limestone. The interpretation of the tests is carried out using both analytical results and computational models of flow problems that exhibit radial symmetry. The results obtained from this research investigation are compared with the data available in the literature for similar argillaceous limestones mainly found in the Lindsay (Cobourg) formation. The experiments give permeabilities in the range of 1.0 × 10(-22) to 1.68 × 10(-19) m(2) for radial flows that are oriented along bedding planes under zero axial stress. The factors influencing transient pulse tests in particular and the interpretation of the results are discussed. PMID:22489872

  14. Facility for cold flow testing of solid rocket motor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacchus, D. L.; Hill, O. E.; Whitesides, R. Harold

    1992-02-01

    A new cold flow test facility was designed and constructed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center for the purpose of characterizing the flow field in the port and nozzle of solid propellant rocket motors (SRM's). A National Advisory Committee was established to include representatives from industry, government agencies, and universities to guide the establishment of design and instrumentation requirements for the new facility. This facility design includes the basic components of air storage tanks, heater, submicron filter, quiet control valve, venturi, model inlet plenum chamber, solid rocket motor (SRM) model, exhaust diffuser, and exhaust silencer. The facility was designed to accommodate a wide range of motor types and sizes from small tactical motors to large space launch boosters. This facility has the unique capability of testing ten percent scale models of large boosters such as the new Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM), at full scale motor Reynolds numbers. Previous investigators have established the validity of studying basic features of solid rocket motor development programs include the acquisition of data to (1) directly evaluate and optimize the design configuration of the propellant grain, insulation, and nozzle; and (2) provide data for validation of the computational fluid dynamics, (CFD), analysis codes and the performance analysis codes. A facility checkout model was designed, constructed, and utilized to evaluate the performance characteristics of the new facility. This model consists of a cylindrical chamber and converging/diverging nozzle with appropriate manifolding to connect it to the facility air supply. It was designed using chamber and nozzle dimensions to simulate the flow in a 10 percent scale model of the ASRM. The checkout model was recently tested over the entire range of facility flow conditions which include flow rates from 9.07 to 145 kg/sec (20 to 320 Ibm/sec) and supply pressure from 5.17 x 10 exp 5 to 8.27 x 10 exp 6 Pa. The

  15. Investigation of Spiral Bevel Gear Condition Indicator Validation Via AC-29-2C Using Damage Progression Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.

    2014-01-01

    This report documents the results of spiral bevel gear rig tests performed under a NASA Space Act Agreement with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to support validation and demonstration of rotorcraft Health and Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS) for maintenance credits via FAA Advisory Circular (AC) 29-2C, Section MG-15, Airworthiness Approval of Rotorcraft (HUMS) (Ref. 1). The overarching goal of this work was to determine a method to validate condition indicators in the lab that better represent their response to faults in the field. Using existing in-service helicopter HUMS flight data from faulted spiral bevel gears as a "Case Study," to better understand the differences between both systems, and the availability of the NASA Glenn Spiral Bevel Gear Fatigue Rig, a plan was put in place to design, fabricate and test comparable gear sets with comparable failure modes within the constraints of the test rig. The research objectives of the rig tests were to evaluate the capability of detecting gear surface pitting fatigue and other generated failure modes on spiral bevel gear teeth using gear condition indicators currently used in fielded HUMS. Nineteen final design gear sets were tested. Tables were generated for each test, summarizing the failure modes observed on the gear teeth for each test during each inspection interval and color coded based on damage mode per inspection photos. Gear condition indicators (CI) Figure of Merit 4 (FM4), Root Mean Square (RMS), +/- 1 Sideband Index (SI1) and +/- 3 Sideband Index (SI3) were plotted along with rig operational parameters. Statistical tables of the means and standard deviations were calculated within inspection intervals for each CI. As testing progressed, it became clear that certain condition indicators were more sensitive to a specific component and failure mode. These tests were clustered together for further analysis. Maintenance actions during testing were also documented. Correlation coefficients were

  16. 42 CFR 84.93 - Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus. 84.93...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.93 Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus. (a) A static-flow test will be performed on all open-circuit apparatus. (b) The flow from the apparatus shall be greater than 200...

  17. 42 CFR 84.93 - Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus. 84.93...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.93 Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus. (a) A static-flow test will be performed on all open-circuit apparatus. (b) The flow from the apparatus shall be greater than 200...

  18. Lateral flow-based antibody testing for Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Gwyn, Sarah; Mitchell, Alexandria; Dean, Deborah; Mkocha, Harran; Handali, Sukwan; Martin, Diana L

    2016-08-01

    We describe here a lateral flow-based assay (LFA) for the detection of antibodies against immunodominant antigen Pgp3 from Chlamydia trachomatis, the causative agent of urogenital chlamydia infection and ocular trachoma. Optimal signal detection was achieved when the gold-conjugate and test line contained Pgp3, creating a dual sandwich capture assay. The LFA yielded positive signals with serum and whole blood but not with eluted dried blood spots. For serum, the agreement of the LFA with the non-reference multiplex assay was 96%, the specificity using nonendemic pediatric sera was 100%, and the inter-rater agreement was κ=0.961. For whole blood, the agreement of LFA with multiplex was 81.5%, the specificity was 100%, and the inter-rater agreement was κ=0.940. The LFA was tested in a field environment and yielded similar results to those from laboratory-based testing. These data show the successful development of a lateral flow assay for detection of antibodies against Pgp3 with reliable use in field settings, which would make antibody-based testing for trachoma surveillance highly practical, especially after cessation of trachoma elimination programs. PMID:27208400

  19. National Fuel Cell Bus Program: Accelerated Testing Evaluation Report #2, Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) and Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

    2010-06-01

    This is an evaluation of hydrogen fuel cell transit buses operating at AC Transit in revenue service since March 20, 2006, comparing similar diesel buses operating from the same depot. It covers November 2007 through February 2010. Results include implementation experience, fueling station operation, evaluation results at AC Transit (bus usage, availability, fuel economy, maintenance costs, and road calls), and a summary of achievements and challenges encountered during the demonstration.

  20. National Fuel Cell Bus Program: Accelerated Testing Evaluation Report and Appendices, Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit)

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2009-01-01

    This is an evaluation of hydrogen fuel cell transit buses operating at AC Transit in revenue service since March 20, 2006 compared to similar diesel buses operating from the same depot. This evaluation report includes results from November 2007 through October 2008. Evaluation results include implementation experience, fueling station operation, fuel cell bus operations at Golden Gate Transit, and evaluation results at AC Transit (bus usage, availability, fuel economy, maintenance costs, and roadcalls).

  1. Parametric Testing of Chevrons on Single Flow Hot Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James; Brown, Clifford A.

    2004-01-01

    A parametric family of chevron nozzles have been studied, looking for relationships between chevron geometric parameters, flow characteristics, and far-field noise. Both cold and hot conditions have been run at acoustic Mach number 0.9. Ten models have been tested, varying chevron count, penetration, length, and chevron symmetry. Four comparative studies were defined from these datasets which show: that chevron length is not a major impact on either flow or sound; that chevron penetration increases noise at high frequency and lowers it at low frequency, especially for low chevron counts; that chevron count is a strong player with good low frequency reductions being achieved with high chevron count without strong high frequency penalty; and that chevron asymmetry slightly reduces the impact of the chevron. Finally, it is shown that although the hot jets differ systematically from the cold one, the overall trends with chevron parameters is the same.

  2. Testing of models of flow-induced hemolysis in blood flow through hypodermic needles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yangsheng; Kent, Timothy L; Sharp, M Keith

    2013-03-01

    Hemolysis caused by flow in hypodermic needles interferes with a number of tests on blood samples drawn by venipuncture, including assays for metabolites, electrolytes, and enzymes, causes discomfort during dialysis sessions, and limits transfusion flow rates. To evaluate design modifications to address this problem, as well as hemolysis issues in other cardiovascular devices, computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based prediction of hemolysis has potential for reducing the time and expense for testing of prototypes. In this project, three CFD-integrated blood damage models were applied to flow-induced hemolysis in 16-G needles and compared with experimental results, which demonstrated that a modified needle with chamfered entrance increased hemolysis, while a rounded entrance decreased hemolysis, compared with a standard needle with sharp entrance. After CFD simulation of the steady-state velocity field, the time histories of scalar stress along a grid of streamlines were calculated. A strain-based cell membrane failure model and two empirical power-law blood damage models were used to predict hemolysis on each streamline. Total hemolysis was calculated by weighting the predicted hemolysis along each streamline by the flow rate along each streamline. The results showed that only the strain-based blood damage model correctly predicted increased hemolysis in the beveled needle and decreased hemolysis in the rounded needle, while the power-law models predicted the opposite trends. PMID:23419169

  3. Flight Tests of a Supersonic Natural Laminar Flow Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, Mike; Banks, Dan; Garzon, Andres; Matisheck, Jason

    2014-01-01

    IR thermography was used to characterize the transition front on a S-NLF test article at chord Reynolds numbers in excess of 30 million Changes in transition due to Mach number, Reynolds number, and surface roughness were investigated - Regions of laminar flow in excess of 80% chord at chord Reynolds numbers greater than 14 million IR thermography clearly showed the transition front and other flow features such as shock waves impinging upon the surface A series of parallel oblique shocks, of yet unknown origin, were found to cause premature transition at higher Reynolds numbers. NASA has a current goal to eliminate barriers to the development of practical supersonic transport aircraft Drag reduction through the use of supersonic natural laminar flow (S-NLF) is currently being explored as a means of increasing aerodynamic efficiency - Tradeoffs work best for business jet class at M<2 Conventional high-speed designs minimize inviscid drag at the expense of viscous drag - Existence of strong spanwise pressure gradient leads to crossflow (CF) while adverse chordwise pressure gradients amplifies and Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) instabilities Aerion Corporation has patented a S-NLF wing design (US Patent No. 5322242) - Low sweep to control CF - dp/dx < 0 on both wing surfaces to stabilize TS - Thin wing with sharp leading edge to minimize wave drag increase due to reduction in sweep NASA and Aerion have partnered to study S-NLF since 1999 Series of S-NLF experiments flown on the NASA F-15B research test bed airplane Infrared (IR) thermography used to characterize transition - Non-intrusive, global, good spatial resolution - Captures significant flow features well

  4. Preliminary Results of Testing of Flow Effects on Evaporator Scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, M.Z.

    2002-02-15

    This investigation has focused on the effects of fluid flow on solids deposition from solutions that simulate the feed to the 2H evaporator at the Savannah River Site. Literature studies indicate that the fluid flow (or shear) affects particle-particle and particle-surface interactions and thus the phenomena of particle aggregation in solution and particle deposition (i.e., scale formation) onto solid surfaces. Experimental tests were conducted with two configurations: (1) using a rheometer to provide controlled shear conditions and (2) using controlled flow of reactive solution through samples of stainless steel tubing. All tests were conducted at 80 C and at high silicon and aluminum concentrations, 0.133 M each, in solutions containing 4 M sodium hydroxide and 1 A4 each of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite. Two findings from these experiments are important for consideration in developing approaches for reducing or eliminating evaporator scaling problems: (1) The rheometer tests suggested that for the conditions studied, maximum solids deposition occurs at a moderate shear rate, approximately 12 s{sup -1}. That value is expected to be on the order of shear rates that will occur in various parts of the evaporator system; for instance, a 6 gal/min single-phase liquid flow through the 2-in. lift or gravity drain lines would result in a shear rate of approximately 16 s{sup -1}. These results imply that engineering approaches aimed at reducing deposits through increased mixing would need to generate shear near all surfaces significantly greater than 12 s{sup -1}. However, further testing is needed to set a target value for shear that is applicable to evaporator operation. This is because the measured trend is not statistically significant at the 95% confidence interval due to variability in the results. In addition, testing at higher temperatures and lower concentrations of aluminum and silicon would more accurately represent conditions in the evaporator. Without

  5. Flow simulation and solidification phenomena of AC4CH aluminum alloy in semi-solid forging process by explicit MPS method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regmi, Amit; Shintaku, Hiroki; Sasaki, Tsutomu; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2015-09-01

    Semi-solid forging (SSF) is a powerful manufacturing technology to fabricate near-net shaped products in automotive industries. During SSF process, the filling behavior and solidification process of AC4CH aluminum alloy is presented in this paper. The explicit MPS method program solving Navier-Stokes equation is coupled with heat transfer and solidification has been used to predict the filling pattern and temperature distribution of semi-solid material (SSM). The non-Newtonian rheological model was used as the constitutive equation of SSM. In this study, numerical analysis of SSF was carried out in box cavity with various flange thickness (4, 8, 12 and 16 mm) and corresponding experiments were undertaken for AC4CH aluminum alloy with solid fraction less than 0.5. The numerical results of SSM filling pattern and solidification phenomena in flange were validated with the experimental results. During solidification process, flow calculation was stopped and only thermal calculation was carried out. The shrinkage defect was well predicted near the lower mid area of the box cavity with flange thickness 16 mm.

  6. Corrosion erosion test of SS316 in flowing Pb Bi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, K.; Kurata, Y.; Saito, S.; Futakawa, M.; Sasa, T.; Oigawa, H.; Wakai, E.; Miura, K.

    2003-05-01

    Corrosion tests of austenitic stainless tube were done under flowing Pb-Bi conditions for 3000 h at 450 °C. Specimens were 316SS produced as a tubing form with 13.8 mm outer diameter, 2 mm thickness and 40 cm length. During operation, maximum temperature, temperature difference and flow velocity of Pb-Bi at the specimen were kept at 450, 50 °C, and 1 m/s, respectively. After the test, specimen and components of the loop were cut and examined by optical microscope, SEM, EDX, WDX and X-ray diffraction. Pb-Bi adhered on the surface of the specimen even after Pb-Bi was drained out to the storage tank from the circulating loop. Results differed from a stagnant corrosion test in that the specimen surface became rough and the corrosion rate was maximally 0.1 mm/3000 h. Mass transfer from the high temperature to the lower temperature area was observed: crystals of Fe-Cr were found on the tube surface in the low-temperature region. The sizes of crystals varied from 0.1 to 0.2 mm. The depositing crystals were ferrite grains and the chemical composition ratio (mass%) of Fe to Cr was 9:1.

  7. Three-phase ac-to-ac series-resonant power converter with a reduced number of thyristors

    SciTech Connect

    Klaassens, J.B.; de Beer, F. )

    1991-07-01

    This paper reports that ac-ac series-resonant converters have been proven to be functional and useful. Power pulse modulation with internal frequencies of tens of kHz and suited for multikilowatt power levels is applied to a series-resonant converter system for generating synthesized multiphase bipolar waveforms with reversible power flow and flow distortion. The use of a series-resonant circuit for power transfer and control obtains natural current commutation of the thyristors and the prevention of excessive stresses on components. Switches are required which have bidirectional current conduction and voltage blocking ability. The conventional series-resonant ac-ac converter applies a total for 24 anti-parallel thyristors. An alternative circuit configuration for the series-resonant ac-ac converter with only 12 thyristors is also presented. The alternative power circuit has three neutrals, related to the polyphase source, the load and the converter, which may be interconnected. If they are connected, the high-frequency component of the source and load currents will flow through the connection between the neutrals. The test results of a converter system generating three-phase sinusoidal input and output waveforms have demonstrated the significant aspects of this type of power interfaces.

  8. Numerical Modelling of Vegetation Flow Interaction: the Wienfluss Test Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C.; Yagci, O.; Rauch, H.; Stoesser, T.

    2003-04-01

    We apply a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code based on a finite-volume discretisation to a 170m test reach of the a river in Vienna. One of the primary aims of this paper is to test various methods for representing the flow resistance of natural vegetation. The two approaches considered vary in complexity and could be practically implemented and applied within 2D and 3D flood modelling tools. The first approach uses empirical relationships derived from the laboratory data and modifies the existing friction term in the momentum equations. While the second approach introduces a drag related sink term in addition to the bed friction term. The roughness closure models considered do not modify the turbulence model (in this case the k-e model) and hence do not require re-calibration for each application. The test reach is straight and comprises an asymmetrical compound channel that is vegetated on the floodplain by willows and unvegetated within the main channel. The development of the willows has been monitored over a four year period and plant parameters which characterise the dimensions of individual trees and their distribution have been quantified. Further, streamwise velocity data of high-spatial resolution has been collected at one cross-section for a series of flood events. The performance of each approach is quantified in terms of its ability to reproduce the streamwise velocity distribution in a partially vegetated channel. Different parameter tests are conducted to allow the sensitivity of the computed velocities against mesh resolution, and other important plant properties to be examined. For both flow resistance approaches, reasonable agreement is found between the measured and computed floodplain velocities.

  9. Uninstrumented assembly airflow testing in the Annular Flow Distribution facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kielpinski, A.L.

    1992-02-01

    During the Emergency Cooling System phase of a postulated large-break loss of coolant accident (ECS-LOCA), air enters the primary loop and is pumped down the reactor assemblies. One of the experiments performed to support the analysis of this accident was the Annular Flow Distribution (AFD) experiment, conducted in a facility built for this purpose at Babcock and Wilcox Alliance Research Center in Alliance, Ohio. As part of this experiment, a large body of airflow data were acquired in a prototypical mockup of the Mark 22 reactor assembly. This assembly was known as the AFD (or the I-AFD here) reference assembly. The I-AFD assembly was fully prototypical, having been manufactured in SRS`s production fabrication facility. Similar Mark 22 mockup assemblies were tested in several test facilities in the SRS Heat Transfer Laboratory (HTL). Discrepancies were found. The present report documents further work done to address the discrepancy in airflow measurements between the AFD facility and HTL facilities. The primary purpose of this report is to disseminate the data from the U-AFD test, and to compare these test results to the I-AFD data and the U-AT data. A summary table of the test data and the B&W data transmittal letter are included as an attachment to this report. The full data transmittal volume from B&W (including time plots of the various instruments) is included as an appendix to this report. These data are further analyzed by comparing them to two other HTL tests, namely, SPRIHTE 1 and the Single Assembly Test Stand (SATS).

  10. Columbia University Flow Instability Experimental Program, Volume 5: Single annulus tests, steady-state test program

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

    1991-07-01

    This report presents results for the steady state portion of the finless single annulus test program. The objective of the experimental study was to investigate the onset of flow instability in an annular geometry similar to the MARK 22 reactor. The test program involved testing of both a finless or ribless heater and a ribbed heater. The latter program is currently underway and will be reported separately. For finless heater, testing was conducted in both a steady state and transient mode. The present report presents steady state results for a series of experiments with uniform and asymmetric heating. The demand curves obtained under uniform heating yielded OFI flow-rates which were slightly below those obtained for a circular tube geometry with the same L/D ratio; however, the single annulus had a hydraulic diameter which was approximately fifty percent larger than the circular tube. The asymmetric heating cases were selected to provide the same average power input as the uniform cases. The results for these tests indicated that the flow-rate at OFI increased with the degree of asymmetry.

  11. Field Test of a DHW Distribution System: Temperature and Flow Analyses (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Barley, C. D.; Hendron, B.; Magnusson, L.

    2010-05-13

    This presentation discusses a field test of a DHW distribution system in an occupied townhome. It includes measured fixture flows and temperatures, a tested recirculation system, evaluated disaggregation of flow by measured temperatures, Aquacraft Trace Wizard analysis, and comparison.

  12. Laminar flow control leading edge glove flight test article development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, W. E.; Mcnay, D. E.; Thelander, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    A laminar flow control (LFC) flight test article was designed and fabricated to fit into the right leading edge of a JetStar aircraft. The article was designed to attach to the front spar and fill in approx. 70 inches of the leading edge that are normally occupied by the large slipper fuel tank. The outer contour of the test article was constrained to align with an external fairing aft of the front spar which provided a surface pressure distribution over the test region representative of an LFC airfoil. LFC is achieved by applying suction through a finely perforated surface, which removes a small fraction of the boundary layer. The LFC test article has a retractable high lift shield to protect the laminar surface from contamination by airborne debris during takeoff and low altitude operation. The shield is designed to intercept insects and other particles that could otherwise impact the leading edge. Because the shield will intercept freezing rain and ice, a oozing glycol ice protection system is installed on the shield leading edge. In addition to the shield, a liquid freezing point depressant can be sprayed on the back of the shield.

  13. Development of a hardware-based AC microgrid for AC stability assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Robert R.

    As more power electronic-based devices enable the development of high-bandwidth AC microgrids, the topic of microgrid power distribution stability has become of increased interest. Recently, researchers have proposed a relatively straightforward method to assess the stability of AC systems based upon the time-constants of sources, the net bus capacitance, and the rate limits of sources. In this research, a focus has been to develop a hardware test system to evaluate AC system stability. As a first step, a time domain model of a two converter microgrid was established in which a three phase inverter acts as a power source and an active rectifier serves as an adjustable constant power AC load. The constant power load can be utilized to create rapid power flow transients to the generating system. As a second step, the inverter and active rectifier were designed using a Smart Power Module IGBT for switching and an embedded microcontroller as a processor for algorithm implementation. The inverter and active rectifier were designed to operate simultaneously using a synchronization signal to ensure each respective local controller operates in a common reference frame. Finally, the physical system was created and initial testing performed to validate the hardware functionality as a variable amplitude and variable frequency AC system.

  14. 42 CFR 84.93 - Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus. 84.93...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.93 Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus. (a) A static-flow test will be...) water-column height when full container pressure is applied. (c) Where pressure demand apparatus...

  15. 42 CFR 84.93 - Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus. 84.93...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.93 Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus. (a) A static-flow test will be...) water-column height when full container pressure is applied. (c) Where pressure demand apparatus...

  16. 42 CFR 84.93 - Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus. 84.93...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.93 Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus. (a) A static-flow test will be...) water-column height when full container pressure is applied. (c) Where pressure demand apparatus...

  17. 30 CFR 75.152 - Tests of air flow; qualified person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tests of air flow; qualified person. 75.152....152 Tests of air flow; qualified person. A person is a qualified person within the meaning of the provisions of Subpart D—Ventilation of this part requiring that tests of air flow be made by a...

  18. Curved flow wind tunnnel test of F-18 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutze, F. H.

    1980-01-01

    The curved flow capability of a stability wind tunnel was used to investigate the lateral directional characteristics of an F-18 aircraft. The model is described and the procedures used to obtain and correct the data and a graphical presentation of the results are presented. The results include graphs of lateral directional derivatives versus sideslip or static plots, the lateral directional static stability derivatives versus angle of attack, and finally the lateral directional derivatives versus nondimensional yaw rate for different angles of attack and sideslip. Results are presented for several configurations including complete, complete without vertical tails, complete without horizontal tails, fuselage wing and fuselage alone. Each of these were tested with and without wing leading edge extensions.

  19. Evaluation of the Tg.AC transgenic mouse assay for testing the human carcinogenic potential of pharmaceuticals--practical pointers, mechanistic clues, and new questions.

    PubMed

    Sistare, Frank D; Thompson, Karol L; Honchel, Ronald; DeGeorge, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    Transgenic mouse strains with genetic alterations known to play a role in the multistage process of carcinogenesis are being used increasingly as models for evaluating the human carcinogenic potential of chemicals and pharmaceuticals. The Tg.AC transgenic mouse is one of the strains currently being used in such alternative short-term carcinogenicity testing protocols. This review is focused on recent data from studies designed to evaluate this model's ability to discriminate carcinogens from noncarcinogens. Details relating to protocol design that can significantly impact study outcome are described. Data relating to mechanisms of chemical tumor induction in the Tg.AC model are reviewed, and questions have been formulated to encourage research to further guide appropriate future applications of this model. PMID:11936901

  20. Aeroacoustic Characteristics of Model Jet Test Facility Flow Conditioners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinzie, Kevin W.; Henderson, Brenda S.; Haskin, Harry H.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental investigation of flow conditioning devices used to suppress internal rig noise in high speed, high temperature experimental jet facilities is discussed. The aerodynamic and acoustic characteristics of a number of devices including pressure loss and extraneous noise generation are measured. Both aerodynamic and acoustic characteristics are strongly dependent on the porosity of the flow conditioner and the closure ratio of the duct system. For unchoked flow conditioners, the pressure loss follows conventional incompressible flow models. However, for choked flow conditioners, a compressible flow model where the duct and flow conditioner system is modeled as a convergent-divergent nozzle can be used to estimate pressure loss. Choked flow conditioners generate significantly more noise than unchoked conditioners. In addition, flow conditioners with small hole diameters or sintered metal felt material generate less self-noise noise compared to flow conditioners with larger holes.

  1. THE EFFECT OF WATER (VAPOR-PHASE) AND CARBON ON ELEMENTAL MERCURY REMOVAL IN A FLOW REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of studying the effect of vapor-phase moisture on elemental mercury (Hgo) removal by activated carbon (AC) in a flow reactor. tests involved injecting AC into both a dry and a 4% moisture nitrogen (N2) /Hgo gas stream. A bituminous-coal-based AC (Calgon WP...

  2. Cinematics and sticking of heart valves in pulsatile flow test.

    PubMed

    Köhler, J; Wirtz, R

    1991-05-01

    The aim of the project was to develop laboratory test devices for studies of the cinematics and sticking behaviour of technical valve protheses. The second step includes testing technical valves of different types and sizes under static and dynamic conditions. A force-deflection balance was developed in order to load valve rims by static radial forces until sticking or loss of a disc (sticking- and clamping-mould point) with computer-controlled force deflection curves. A second deflection device was developed and used for prosthetic valves in the aortic position of a pulsatile mock circulation loop with simultaneous video-cinematography. The stiffness of technical valve rims varied between 0.20 (St. Jude) and about 1.0 N/micron (metal rim valves). The stiffness decreased significantly with increasing valve size. Sticking under pulsatile flow conditions was in good agreement with the static deflection measurements. Hence, valve sticking with increasing danger of thrombus formation is more likely with a less stiff valve rim. In the case of forces acting perpendicularly to the pendulum axis, the clamping mould-point of the valve can be reached, followed by disc dislodgement. PMID:1864654

  3. 42 CFR 84.94 - Gas flow test; closed-circuit apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gas flow test; closed-circuit apparatus. 84.94...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.94 Gas flow test; closed-circuit apparatus. (a) Where oxygen is supplied... rated service time of the apparatus. (b) Where constant flow is used in conjunction with demand...

  4. Oscillating-flow loss test results in rectangular heat exchanger passages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, J. Gary

    1991-01-01

    Test results of oscillating flow losses in rectangular heat exchanger passages of various aspect ratios are given. This work was performed in support of the design of a free-piston Stirling engine (FPSE) for a dynamic space power conversion system. Oscillating flow loss testing was performed using an oscillating flow rig, which was based on a variable stroke and variable frequency linear drive motor. Tests were run over a range of oscillating flow parameters encompassing the flow regimes of the proposed engine design. Test results are presented in both tabular and graphical form and are compared against analytical predictions.

  5. EFFECTS OF TEST TEMPERATURE ON FLOW OF METALLIC GLASSES

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. NOURI; Y. LIU; P. WESSELING; J. LEWANDOWSKI

    2006-04-12

    Micro-hardness experiments were conducted over a range of temperatures using a Nikon QM micro-hardness machine on a number of metallic glass (e.g. Zr-, Fe-, Al-) systems. Although high micro-hardness was exhibited at room temperature, significant hardness reductions were exhibited near the glass transition temperature, T{sub g}. The effects of changes in test temperature on the micro-hardness will be reported. The effects of exposure time on the hardness evolution at a given temperature will also be summarized to illustrate some of the differences in behavior of the systems shown. The extreme softening near T{sub g}, characteristic of bulk metallic glass systems, enables the exploration of novel deformation processing. In order to develop deformation processing windows, the evaluation of bulk metallic glass mechanical properties under quasi-static conditions and the determination of flow properties at different temperatures and strain rates are reported. The use of such information to create layered/composite bulk metallic glasses will be summarized.

  6. F-16XL-2 Supersonic Laminar Flow Control Flight Test Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Scott G.; Fischer, Michael C.

    1999-01-01

    The F-16XL-2 Supersonic Laminar Flow Control Flight Test Experiment was part of the NASA High-Speed Research Program. The goal of the experiment was to demonstrate extensive laminar flow, to validate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes and design methodology, and to establish laminar flow control design criteria. Topics include the flight test hardware and design, airplane modification, the pressure and suction distributions achieved, the laminar flow achieved, and the data analysis and code correlation.

  7. ac bidirectional motor controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiner, K.

    1988-01-01

    Test data are presented and the design of a high-efficiency motor/generator controller at NASA-Lewis for use with the Space Station power system testbed is described. The bidirectional motor driver is a 20 kHz to variable frequency three-phase ac converter that operates from the high-frequency ac bus being designed for the Space Station. A zero-voltage-switching pulse-density-modulation technique is used in the converter to shape the low-frequency output waveform.

  8. SR-71 LASRE during in-flight cold flow test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This shot, from above and behind the SR-71 in flight, runs 11 seconds and shows the Aerospike engine and its fuel system being charged with gaseous helium and liquid nitrogen during one of two tests. The tests are to check for leaks and check the flow characteristics of cryogenic fuels to be used in the engine. The NASA/Lockheed Martin Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) concluded its flight operations phase at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in November 1998. The goal of this experiment was to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin, Bethesda, Maryland, validate the computational predictive tools it was using to determine the aerodynamic performance of a future potential reusable launch vehicle. Information from the LASRE experiment will help Lockheed Martin maximize its design for a future potential reusable launch vehicle. It gave Lockheed an understanding of the performance of the lifting body and linear aerospike engine combination even before the X-33 Advanced Technology Demonstrator flies. LASRE was a small, half-span model of a lifting body with eight thrust cells of an aerospike engine. The experiment, mounted on the back of an SR-71 aircraft, operates like a kind of 'flying wind tunnel.' The experiment focused on determining how the engine plume of a reusable launch vehicle engine plume would affect the aerodynamics of its lifting body shape at specific altitudes and speeds reaching approximately 750 miles per hour. The interaction of the aerodynamic flow with the engine plume could create drag; design refinements look to minimize that interaction. During the flight research program, the aircraft completed seven research flights. Two initial flights were used to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the LASRE apparatus on the back of the aircraft. The first of those two flights occurred October 31, 1997. The SR-71 took off at 8:31 a.m. PST. The aircraft flew for one hour and fifty minutes, reaching a

  9. Tevatron AC dipole system

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.; Kopp, S.E.; Jansson, A.; Syphers, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The AC dipole is an oscillating dipole magnet which can induce large amplitude oscillations without the emittance growth and decoherence. These properties make it a good tool to measure optics of a hadron synchrotron. The vertical AC dipole for the Tevatron is powered by an inexpensive high power audio amplifier since its operating frequency is approximately 20 kHz. The magnet is incorporated into a parallel resonant system to maximize the current. The use of a vertical pinger magnet which has been installed in the Tevatron made the cost relatively inexpensive. Recently, the initial system was upgraded with a more powerful amplifier and oscillation amplitudes up to 2-3{sigma} were achieved with the 980 GeV proton beam. This paper discusses details of the Tevatron AC dipole system and also shows its test results.

  10. Testing low mass flow train in the DOE Coal Fired Flow Facility. Quarterly technical progress report, July-September 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    UTSI reports on testing of the Low Mass Flow Train in the DOE Coal Fired Flow Facility. During this period eight tests were conducted, which complete the seed/slag interaction test series. Preliminary results of these tests are reported. Additional nitrogen oxide (NO/sub x/) measurements are included, as are SO/sub 2/ removal results. An analysis of deposit accumulation on the tubes in the materials test module is reported. Data obtained from high velocity thermocouple (HVT) probes in the radiant furnace are included for the first time and show essentially a flat temperature profile in the furnace. Heat transfer calculations for the flow train are correlated with experimental measurements, including those obtained from both UTSI and MSU line reversal systems.

  11. Smart licensing and environmental flows: Modeling framework and sensitivity testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilby, R. L.; Fenn, C. R.; Wood, P. J.; Timlett, R.; Lequesne, T.

    2011-12-01

    Adapting to climate change is just one among many challenges facing river managers. The response will involve balancing the long-term water demands of society with the changing needs of the environment in sustainable and cost effective ways. This paper describes a modeling framework for evaluating the sensitivity of low river flows to different configurations of abstraction licensing under both historical climate variability and expected climate change. A rainfall-runoff model is used to quantify trade-offs among environmental flow (e-flow) requirements, potential surface and groundwater abstraction volumes, and the frequency of harmful low-flow conditions. Using the River Itchen in southern England as a case study it is shown that the abstraction volume is more sensitive to uncertainty in the regional climate change projection than to the e-flow target. It is also found that "smarter" licensing arrangements (involving a mix of hands off flows and "rising block" abstraction rules) could achieve e-flow targets more frequently than conventional seasonal abstraction limits, with only modest reductions in average annual yield, even under a hotter, drier climate change scenario.

  12. Columbia University flow instability experimental program: Volume 3. Single tube parallel flow tests

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

    1990-06-01

    The coolant in the Savannah River Site (SRS) production nuclear reactor assemblies is circulated as a subcooled liquid under normal operating conditions. This coolant is evenly distributed throughout multiple annular flow channels with a uniform pressure profile across each coolant flow channel. During the postulated Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), which is initiated by a hypothetical guillotine pipe break, the coolant flow through the reactor assemblies is significantly reduced. The flow reduction and accompanying power reduction (after shutdown is initiated) occur in the first 1--2 seconds of the LOCA. This portion of the LOCA is referred to as the Flow Instability phase. A series of down flow experiments have been conducted on three different size single tubes. The objective of these experiments was to determine the effect of a parallel flow path on the occurrence of flow instability. In all cases, it has been shown that the point of flow instability (OFI) determined under controlled flow operation does not change when operating in a controlled pressure drop mode (parallel path operation).

  13. The application of flow cytometry to histocompatibility testing.

    PubMed

    Horsburgh, T; Martin, S; Robson, A J

    2000-03-01

    Flow cytometry is a powerful technique that enables the sensitive and quantitative detection of both cellular antigens and bound biological moieties. This article reviews how flow cytometry is increasingly being used as histocompatibility laboratories for the analysis of antibody specificity and HLA antigen expression. A basic description of flow cytometry principles and standardisation is given, together with an outline of clinical application in the areas of pre-transplant cross-matching, antibody screening, post-transplant antibody monitoring and HLA-B27 detection. It is concluded that flow cytometry is a useful multi-parametric analytical tool, yielding clinical benefit especially in the identification of patients at risk of early transplant rejection. PMID:10834606

  14. Testing and Performance Verification of a High Bypass Ratio Turbofan Rotor in an Internal Flow Component Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale E.; Podboy, Gary G.; Miller, Christopher J.; Thorp, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    A 1/5 scale model rotor representative of a current technology, high bypass ratio, turbofan engine was installed and tested in the W8 single-stage, high-speed, compressor test facility at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The same fan rotor was tested previously in the GRC 9x15 Low Speed Wind Tunnel as a fan module consisting of the rotor and outlet guide vanes mounted in a flight-like nacelle. The W8 test verified that the aerodynamic performance and detailed flow field of the rotor as installed in W8 were representative of the wind tunnel fan module installation. Modifications to W8 were necessary to ensure that this internal flow facility would have a flow field at the test package that is representative of flow conditions in the wind tunnel installation. Inlet flow conditioning was designed and installed in W8 to lower the fan face turbulence intensity to less than 1.0 percent in order to better match the wind tunnel operating environment. Also, inlet bleed was added to thin the casing boundary layer to be more representative of a flight nacelle boundary layer. On the 100 percent speed operating line the fan pressure rise and mass flow rate agreed with the wind tunnel data to within 1 percent. Detailed hot film surveys of the inlet flow, inlet boundary layer and fan exit flow were compared to results from the wind tunnel. The effect of inlet casing boundary layer thickness on fan performance was quantified. Challenges and lessons learned from testing this high flow, low static pressure rise fan in an internal flow facility are discussed.

  15. Operational evaluation of a proppeller test stand in the quiet flow facility at Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, P. J. W.

    1982-01-01

    Operational proof tests of a propeller test stand (PTS) in a quiet flow facility (QFF) are presented. The PTS is an experimental test bed for acoustic propeller research in the quiet flow environment of the QFF. These proof tests validate thrust and torque predictions, examine the repeatability of measurements on the PTS, and determine the effect of applying artificial roughness to the propeller blades. Since a thrusting propeller causes an open jet to contract, the potential flow core was surveyed to examine the magnitude of the contraction. These measurements are compared with predicted values. The predictions are used to determine operational limitations for testing a given propeller design in the QFF.

  16. Experimental testing of flexible barriers for containment of debris flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeNatale, Jay S.; Iverson, Richard M.; Major, Jon J.; LaHusen, Richard G.; Fliegel, Gregg L.; Duffy, John D.

    1999-01-01

    In June 1996, six experiments conducted at the U.S. Geological Survey Debris Flow Flume demonstrated that flexible, vertical barriers constructed of wire rope netting can stop small debris flows. All experimental debris flows consisted of water-saturated gravelly sand with less than two percent finer sediment by weight. All debris flows had volumes of about 10 cubic meters, masses of about 20 metre tons, and impact velocities of 5 to 9 meters per second. In four experiments, the debris flow impacted pristine, unreformed barriers of varying design; in the other two experiments, the debris flow impacted barriers already loaded with sediment from a previous flow. Differences in barrier design led to differences in barrier performance. Experiments were conducted with barriers constructed of square-mesh wire-rope netting with 30centimeter, 20centimeter, and 15 centimeter mesh openings as well as 30centimeter diameter interlocking steel rings. In all cases, sediment cascading downslope at the leading edge of the debris flows tended to spray through the nets. Nets fitted with finer-mesh chain link or chicken wire liners contained more sediment than did unlined nets, and a ring net fitted with a synthetic silt screen liner contained nearly 100 percent of the sediment. Irreversible net displacements of up to 2 meters and friction brake engagement on the support and anchor cables dissipated some of the impact energy. However, substantial forces developed in the steel support columns and the lateral and tie-back anchor cables attached to these columns. As predicted by elementary mechanics, the anchor cables experienced larger tensile forces when the support columns were hinged at the base rather than bolted rigidly to the foundation. Measured loads in the lateral anchor cables exceeded those in the tie-back anchor cables and the load cell capacity of 45 kilo-Newtons. Measurements also indicated that the peak loads in the tie- back anchors were highly transient and occurred at

  17. Performance testing of a Savonius windmill rotor in shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojola, O. O.; Onasanya, O. E.

    The effects of flow shear and/or unsteady behavior on the power generation capability of a Savonius wind turbine rotor are assessed in view of measurements conducted, both in two statistically steady shear flows and in the wind, of rotor tip speed and torque at a number of streamwise stations for each of four values of the rotor bucket overlap ratio. It is found that, even in the absence of shear, the power coefficient of a Savonius wind turbine rotor is most strongly dependent on tip speed ratio.

  18. Evaluation of early conception factor lateral flow test to determine nonpregnancy in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, Divakar J; Radke, Brian; Pitney, Phyllis A; Goonewardene, Laksiri A

    2007-08-01

    The early conception factor (ECF) lateral flow test was evaluated for its ability to accurately determine nonpregnant status in dairy cattle. Results of 2 field trials involving 191 cows and 832 tests indicated the probability that a cow can be correctly diagnosed as nonpregnant by using the ECF test is only about 50%. Agreement of test results between milk and serum obtained from the same cow was 57.5%. The ECF test was not consistent in identifying nonpregnancy when the same cows were tested repeatedly over a period of 4 weeks. We conclude that the ECF lateral flow test does not accurately identify nonpregnancy in dairy cattle. PMID:17824326

  19. Development, testing and application of DrainFlow: A fully distributed integrated surface-subsurface flow model for drainage study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri, Ali; Bardsley, William Earl

    2016-06-01

    Hydrological and hydrogeological investigation of drained land is a complex and integrated procedure. The scale of drainage studies may vary from a high-resolution small scale project through to comprehensive catchment or regional scale investigations. This wide range of scales and integrated system behaviour poses a significant challenge for the development of suitable drainage models. Toward meeting these requirements, a fully distributed coupled surface-subsurface flow model titled DrainFlow has been developed and is described. DrainFlow includes both the diffusive wave equation for surface flow components (overland flow, open drain, tile drain) and Richard's equation for saturated/unsaturated zones. To overcome the non-linearity problem created from switching between wet and dry boundaries, a smooth transitioning technique is introduced to buffer the model at tile drains and at interfaces between surface and subsurface flow boundaries. This gives a continuous transition between Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. DrainFlow is tested against five well-known integrated surface-subsurface flow benchmarks. DrainFlow as applied to some synthetic drainage study examples is quite flexible for changing all or part of the model dimensions as required by problem complexity, problem scale, and data availability. This flexibility enables DrainFlow to be modified to allow for changes in both scale and boundary conditions, as often encountered in real-world drainage studies. Compared to existing drainage models, DrainFlow has the advantage of estimating actual infiltration directly from the partial differential form of Richard's equation rather than through analytical or empirical infiltration approaches like the Green and Ampt equation.

  20. Testing MODFLOW-LGR for simulating flow around buried Quaternary valleys - synthetic test cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilhelmsen, T. N.; Christensen, S.

    2009-12-01

    In this study the Local Grid Refinement (LGR) method developed for MODFLOW-2005 (Mehl and Hill, 2005) is utilized to describe groundwater flow in areas containing buried Quaternary valley structures. The tests are conducted as comparative analysis between simulations run with a globally refined model, a locally refined model, and a globally coarse model, respectively. The models vary from simple one layer models to more complex ones with up to 25 model layers. The comparisons of accuracy are conducted within the locally refined area and focus on water budgets, simulated heads, and simulated particle traces. Simulations made with the globally refined model are used as reference (regarded as “true” values). As expected, for all test cases the application of local grid refinement resulted in more accurate results than when using the globally coarse model. A significant advantage of utilizing MODFLOW-LGR was that it allows increased numbers of model layers to better resolve complex geology within local areas. This resulted in more accurate simulations than when using either a globally coarse model grid or a locally refined model with lower geological resolution. Improved accuracy in the latter case could not be expected beforehand because difference in geological resolution between the coarse parent model and the refined child model contradicts the assumptions of the Darcy weighted interpolation used in MODFLOW-LGR. With respect to model runtimes, it was sometimes found that the runtime for the locally refined model is much longer than for the globally refined model. This was the case even when the closure criteria were relaxed compared to the globally refined model. These results are contradictory to those presented by Mehl and Hill (2005). Furthermore, in the complex cases it took some testing (model runs) to identify the closure criteria and the damping factor that secured convergence, accurate solutions, and reasonable runtimes. For our cases this is judged to

  1. Seismic monitoring of a flow test in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect

    Jarpe, S.P.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Johnston, C.

    1989-06-01

    The purpose of this seismic monitoring project was to characterize in detail the micro-seismic activity related to the flow-injection test in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field. Our goal was to determine if any sources of seismic energy related to the test were observable at the surface, using both conventional seismic network techniques and relatively newer array techniques. These methods allowed us to detect and locate both impulsive microearthquakes and continuous sources of seismic energy. Our network, which was sensitive enough to be triggered by magnitude 0.0 or larger events, found no impulsive microearthquakes in the vicinity of the flow test in the 8 month period before the test and only one event during the flow test. We have observed some continuous seismic noise sources that may be attributed to the flow test. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Pre-test CFD Calculations for a Bypass Flow Standard Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Rich Johnson

    2011-11-01

    The bypass flow in a prismatic high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) is the flow that occurs between adjacent graphite blocks. Gaps exist between blocks due to variances in their manufacture and installation and because of the expansion and shrinkage of the blocks from heating and irradiation. Although the temperature of fuel compacts and graphite is sensitive to the presence of bypass flow, there is great uncertainty in the level and effects of the bypass flow. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program at the Idaho National Laboratory has undertaken to produce experimental data of isothermal bypass flow between three adjacent graphite blocks. These data are intended to provide validation for computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analyses of the bypass flow. Such validation data sets are called Standard Problems in the nuclear safety analysis field. Details of the experimental apparatus as well as several pre-test calculations of the bypass flow are provided. Pre-test calculations are useful in examining the nature of the flow and to see if there are any problems associated with the flow and its measurement. The apparatus is designed to be able to provide three different gap widths in the vertical direction (the direction of the normal coolant flow) and two gap widths in the horizontal direction. It is expected that the vertical bypass flow will range from laminar to transitional to turbulent flow for the different gap widths that will be available.

  3. Field test of a biological assumption of instream flow models

    SciTech Connect

    Cada, G.F.; Sale, M.J.; Cushman, R.M.; Loar, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Hydraulic-rating methods are an attractive means of deriving instream flow recommendations at many small hydropower sites because they represent a compromise between relatively inexpensive, low-resolution, discharge methods and the costly, complex, habitat evaluation models. Like the other methods, however, they rely on certain biological assumptions about the relationship between aquatic biota and streamflow characteristics. One such assumption is that benthic production available as food for fishes is proportional to stream bottom area. Wetted perimeter is an easily measured physical parameter which represents bottom area and that is a function of discharge. Therefore, wetted perimeter should reflect the benthic food resource available to support stream fishes under varying flows. As part of a larger effort to compare a number of existing instream flow assessment methods in southern Appalachian trout streams, we examined the validity of the benthos/wetted perimeter relationship at four field sites. Benthos samples were taken at permanent riffle transects over a variety of discharges and were used to relate observed benthos densities to the fluctuations in wetted perimeter and streamflow in these systems. For most of the sites and taxa examined, benthic densities did not show a consistent relationship with discharge/wetted perimeter dynamics. Our analysis indicates that simple physical habitat descriptors obtained from hydraulic-rating models do not provide sufficient information on the response of benthic organisms to decreased discharges. Consequently, these methods may not be sufficient to protect aquatic resources in water-use conflicts.

  4. Numerical Calibration of Mass Flow Plug for Inlet Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasson, Jonathan; Barnhart, Paul; Davis, David O.

    2015-01-01

    A simple control volume model has been developed to calculate the discharge coefficient through a mass flow plug (MFP) and validated with a calibration experiment. The maximum error of the model within the operating region of the MFP is 0.54%. The control volume analysis developed work is comprised of a sequence of flow calculations through the MFP. The model uses the MFP geometry and operating pressure and temperature to couple continuity, momentum, energy, an equation of state, and wall shear. The discharge coefficient calculation also includes the effects of boundary layer growth, including the reduction in cross-sectional flow area as characterized by the boundary layer displacement thickness. The last calculation in the sequence uses an integral method to calculate the growth of the boundary layer, from which the displacement thickness is then determined. The result of these successive calculations is an accurate one-dimension model of the velocity, pressure, and temperature through the MFP. For comparison, a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) calibration is shown, which when compared to the presented numerical model, had a lower accuracy with a maximum error of 1.35% in addition to being slower by a factor of 100."

  5. Rayleigh Scattering for Measuring Flow in a Nozzle Testing Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Carlos R.; Panda, Jayanta

    2006-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh-scattering-based air-density measurement system was built in a large nozzle-and-engine-component test facility for surveying supersonic plumes from jet-engine exhaust. A molecular Rayleigh-scattering-based air-density measurement system was built in a large nozzle-and-enginecomponent test facility for surveying supersonic plumes from jet-engine exhaust

  6. Validation of non-Darcian flow effects in slug tests conducted in fractured rock boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Patryk M.; Parker, Beth L.; Cherry, John A.

    2013-04-01

    SummaryA series of rising and falling head slug tests with different initial applied head differentials (ΔHo) were conducted in open fractured dolostone and sandstone boreholes using straddle packers isolating specific depth intervals (1.5 m length) to examine the influence of non-Darcian flow. The open holes were developed and inspected using video and acoustic televiewing (ATV) to ensure that evidence of skin effects due to drilling were absent. The transmissivity (T) values obtained from both the rising and falling head slug tests were very similar at low initial applied head; however, the T values were progressively smaller at larger ΔHo, suggesting error due to non-Darcian flow. Non-Darcian flow behavior was confirmed by constant head step tests conducted in the same test intervals where the injection rate (Q) vs. applied head (dH) relationship became non-linear at relatively low injection rates, and the non-Darcian data also resulted in lower T values. For a series of slug tests conducted at different ΔHo, non-Darcian flow effects gradually increased as ΔHo increased, consistent with the trends for constant head step tests conducted in the same test intervals. To maintain Darcian flow conditions in the fractured dolostone and sandstone tested in this study, ΔHo must be kept small, generally less than 0.2 m. This study demonstrates that by conducting both "stepped" slug tests and constant head step tests, the Darcian flow assumption for both types of tests can be rigorously validated. However, when only slug tests are conducted, it is necessary to conduct a series of "stepped" slug tests, including tests with small applied head differentials, to avoid errors due to non-Darcian flow.

  7. [Flow field test on the tangential section of polypropylene tubular membrane module annular gap in rotating linear tangential flow].

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengduan; Chen, Wenmei; Li, Jianming; Jiang, Guangming

    2002-07-01

    A new type of polypropylene tubular membrane apparatus of rotating cross flow was designed to study experimentally the flow field characteristics of the tangential section of the membrane annular gap. The authors designed rotary linear tangential flow tubular membrane separator and its test system for the first time. Through the system, the flow field of rotary linear tangential flow with the advanced Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was tested for the first time. A lot of streamlines and vorticity maps of the tangential section of separator in different operation conditions were obtained. The velocity distribution characteristics were analyzed quantitatively: 1. At non-vortex area, no matter how the operation parameters change, the velocity near to rotary tangential flow entrance was higher than the velocity far from entrance at the same radial coordinates. At vortex area, generally the flow velocity of inner vortex was lower than the outer vortex. At the vortex center, the velocity was lowest, the tangential velocity were equal to zero generally. At the vortex center zone, the tangential velocity was less than the axial velocity. 2. Under test operations, the tangential velocity and axial velocity of vortices borders are 1-2 times of average axial velocity of membrane module annular gap. The maximum tangential velocity and axial velocity of ellipse vortices were 2-6 times of average axial velocity of membrane module annular gap. 3. The vortices that are formed on the tangential section, there existed mass transfer between inner and outer parts of fluid. Much fluid of outer vortices got into the inner ones, which was able to prevent membrane tube from particles blocking up very soon. PMID:12371104

  8. Design of Material Strength Test in Lead-Bismuth Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Masatoshi Kondo; Minoru Takahashi; Koji Hata

    2002-07-01

    Liquid lead and lead-bismuth have drawn the attention as one of the candidate coolants of the fast breeder reactors (FBRs), and the accelerator driven transmutation systems (ADSs). In order to use the coolant to the systems, the physical and chemical characteristics of the heavy metals are necessary. This plan has been proposed for the strength test of materials in the liquid metal surroundings. The lead-bismuth circulation loop with the strength test has been designed, and the strength test of candidate materials has been planned. (authors)

  9. Development of Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment on the International Space Station- Normal and Low Gravity Flow Boiling Experiment Development and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Hall, Nancy R.; Hasan, Mohammad M.; Wagner, James D.; May, Rochelle L.; Mackey, Jeffrey R.; Kolacz, John S.; Butcher, Robert L.; Frankenfield, Bruce J.; Mudawar, Issam; Konichi, Chris; Hyounsoon, Lee

    2013-01-01

    Flow boiling and condensation have been identified as two key mechanisms for heat transport that are vital for achieving weight and volume reduction as well as performance enhancement in future space systems. Since inertia driven flows are demanding on power usage, lower flows are desirable. However, in microgravity, lower flows are dominated by forces other than inertia (like the capillary force). It is of paramount interest to investigate limits of low flows beyond which the flow is inertial enough to be gravity independent. One of the objectives of the Flow Boiling and Condensation Flight Experiment sets to investigate these limits for flow boiling and condensation. A two-phase flow loop consisting of a Flow Boiling Module and two Condensation Modules has been developed to experimentally study flow boiling condensation heat transfer in the reduced gravity environment provided by the reduced gravity platform. This effort supports the development of a flow boiling and condensation facility for the International Space Station (ISS). The closed loop test facility is designed to deliver the test fluid, FC-72 to the inlet of any one of the test modules at specified thermodynamic and flow conditions. The zero-g-aircraft tests will provide subcooled and saturated flow boiling critical heat flux and flow condensation heat transfer data over wide range of flow velocities. Additionally, these tests will verify the performance of all gravity sensitive components, such as evaporator, condenser and accumulator associated with the two-phase flow loop. We will present in this paper the breadboard development and testing results which consist of detailed performance evaluation of the heater and condenser combination in reduced and normal gravity. We will also present the design of the reduced gravity aircraft rack and the results of the ground flow boiling heat transfer testing performed with the Flow Boiling Module that is designed to investigate flow boiling heat transfer and

  10. An evaluation of pressure and flow measurement in the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system.

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.; Briggs, Ronald J.

    2013-07-01

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories has a unique test capability called the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system. MSTL allows customers and researchers to test components in flowing, molten nitrate salt at plant-like conditions for pressure, flow, and temperature. An important need in thermal storage systems that utilize molten salts is for accurate flow and pressure measurement at temperatures above 535%C2%B0C. Currently available flow and pressure instrumentation for molten salt is limited to 535%C2%B0C and even at this temperature the pressure measurement appears to have significant variability. It is the design practice in current Concentrating Solar Power plants to measure flow and pressure on the cold side of the process or in dead-legs where the salt can cool, but this practice won't be possible for high temperature salt systems. For this effort, a set of tests was conducted to evaluate the use of the pressure sensors for flow measurement across a device of known flow coefficient Cv. To perform this task, the pressure sensors performance was evaluated and was found to be lacking. The pressure indicators are severely affected by ambient conditions and were indicating pressure changes of nearly 200psi when there was no flow or pressure in the system. Several iterations of performance improvement were undertaken and the pressure changes were reduced to less than 15psi. The results of these pressure improvements were then tested for use as flow measurement. It was found that even with improved pressure sensors, this is not a reliable method of flow measurement. The need for improved flow and pressure measurement at high temperatures remains and will need to be solved before it will be possible to move to high temperature thermal storage systems with molten salts.

  11. Flow Quality Studies of the NASA Glenn Research Center Icing Research Tunnel Circuit (1995 Tests)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrington, E. Allen; Kee-Bowling, Bonnie A.; Gonsalez, Jose C.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of conducting the flow-field surveys described in this report was to more fully document the flow quality in several areas of the tunnel circuit in the NASA Glenn Research Center Icing Research Tunnel. The results from these surveys provide insight into areas of the tunnel that were known to exhibit poor flow quality characteristics and provide data that will be useful to the design of flow quality improvements and a new heat exchanger for the facility. An instrumented traversing mechanism was used to survey the flow field at several large cross sections of the tunnel loop over the entire speed range of the facility. Flow-field data were collected at five stations in the tunnel loop, including downstream of the fan drive motor housing, upstream and downstream of the heat exchanger, and upstream and downstream of the spraybars located in the settling chamber upstream of the test section. The data collected during these surveys greatly expanded the data base describing the flow quality in each of these areas. The new data matched closely the flow quality trends recorded from earlier tests. Data collected downstream of the heat exchanger and in the settling chamber showed how the configuration of the folded heat exchanger affected the pressure, velocity, and flow angle distributions in these areas. Smoke flow visualization was also used to qualitatively study the flow field in an area downstream of the drive fan and in the settling chamber/contraction section.

  12. Fluctuating Pressure Data from 2-D Nozzle Cold Flow Tests (Dual Bell)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesman, Tomas E.

    2001-01-01

    Rocket engines nozzle performance changes as a vehicle climbs through the atmosphere. An altitude compensating nozzle, ACN, is intended to improve on a fixed geometry bell nozzle that performs at optimum at only one trajectory point. In addition to nozzle performance, nozzle transient loads are an important consideration. Any nozzle experiences large transient toads when shocks pass through the nozzle at start and shutdown. Additional transient toads will occur at transitional flow conditions. The objectives of cold flow nozzle testing at MSFC are CFD benchmark / calibration and Unsteady flow / sideloads. Initial testing performed with 2-D inserts to 14" transonic wind tunnel. Recent review of 2-D data in preparation for nozzle test facility 3-D testing. This presentation shows fluctuating pressure data and some observations from 2-D dual-bell nozzle cold flow tests.

  13. Field testing the hypothesis of Darcian flow through a carbonate aquifer.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickey, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    The acceptability of the hypothesis of Darcian flow through a semiconfined carbonate aquifer was tested prior to running a multiple-day aquifer test in Pinellas County, Florida. The approach used to test the hypothesis was to run a number of hour-long aquifer tests at different discharges with drawdown measured at the same time during each test in two observation wells, one at 35 feet and the other at 733 feet from the pumped well. The hypothesis of Darcian flow through the semiconfined carbonate aquifer was deemed acceptable.-from Author

  14. Design and Implementation of a Characterization Test Rig for Evaluating High Bandwidth Liquid Fuel Flow Modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saus, Joseph R.; Chang, Clarence T.; DeLaat, John C.; Vrnak, Daniel R.

    2010-01-01

    A test rig was designed and developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) for the purpose of characterizing high bandwidth liquid fuel flow modulator candidates to determine their suitability for combustion instability control research. The test rig is capable of testing flow modulators at up to 600 psia supply pressure and flows of up to 2 gpm. The rig is designed to provide a quiescent flow into the test section in order to isolate the dynamic flow modulations produced by the test article. Both the fuel injector orifice downstream of the test article and the combustor are emulated. The effect of fuel delivery line lengths on modulator dynamic performance can be observed and modified to replicate actual fuel delivery systems. For simplicity, water is currently used as the working fluid, although future plans are to use jet fuel. The rig is instrumented for dynamic pressures and flows and a high-speed data system is used for dynamic data acquisition. Preliminary results have been obtained for one candidate flow modulator.

  15. Phase 2: HGM air flow tests in support of HEX vane investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, G. B., Jr.; Steele, L. L.; Eisenhart, D. W.

    1993-01-01

    Following the start of SSME certification testing for the Pratt and Whitney Alternate Turbopump Development (ATD) High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP), cracking of the leading edge of the inner HEX vane was experienced. The HEX vane, at the inlet of the oxidizer bowl in the Hot Gas Manifold (HGM), accepts the HPOTP turbine discharge flow and turns it toward the Gaseous Oxidizer Heat Exchanger (GOX HEX) coil. The cracking consistently initiated over a specific circumferential region of the hex vane, with other circumferential locations appearing with increased run time. Since cracking had not to date been seen with the baseline HPOTP, a fluid-structural interaction involving the ATD HPOTP turbine exit flowfield and the HEX inner vane was suspected. As part of NASA contract NAS8-36801, Pratt and Whitney conducted air flow tests of the ATD HPOTP turbine turnaround duct flowpath in the MSFC Phase 2 HGM air flow model. These tests included HEX vane strain gages and additional fluctuating pressure gages in the turnaround duct and HEX vane flowpath area. Three-dimensional flow probe measurements at two stations downstream of the turbine simulator exit plane were also made. Modifications to the HPOTP turbine simulator investigated the effects on turbine exit flow profile and velocity components, with the objective of reproducing flow conditions calculated for the actual ATD HPOTP hardware. Testing was done at the MSFC SSME Dynamic Fluid Air Flow (Dual-Leg) Facility, at air supply pressures between 50 and 250 psia. Combinations of turbine exit Mach number and pressure level were run to investigate the effect of flow regime. Information presented includes: (1) Descriptions of turbine simulator modifications to produce the desired flow environment; (2) Types and locations for instrumentation added to the flow model for improved diagnostic capability; (3) Evaluation of the effect of changes to the turbine simulator flowpath on the turbine exit flow environment; and (4

  16. Effects of shaft supporting structure on performance test of axial flow fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, R.; Liu, S. L.; Li, M. X.; Zheng, S. Y.

    2016-05-01

    CFD numerical simulation combined with theoretical analysis are used to research and discuss the obstructing effect, caused by the supporting structure of torsion meter and connecting shaft, on the outlet airflow of axial-flow fan in type-C ducted inlet device. The relations between axial flow fan's total pressure efficiency and flow rate are studied when the distance between supporting structure and outlet section is different, which may provide a reference for the proper design of the performance test device.

  17. Phase 2: HGM air flow tests in support of HEX vane investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, G. B., Jr.; Steele, L. L.; Eisenhart, D. W.

    1993-07-01

    Following the start of SSME certification testing for the Pratt and Whitney Alternate Turbopump Development (ATD) High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP), cracking of the leading edge of the inner HEX vane was experienced. The HEX vane, at the inlet of the oxidizer bowl in the Hot Gas Manifold (HGM), accepts the HPOTP turbine discharge flow and turns it toward the Gaseous Oxidizer Heat Exchanger (GOX HEX) coil. The cracking consistently initiated over a specific circumferential region of the hex vane, with other circumferential locations appearing with increased run time. Since cracking had not to date been seen with the baseline HPOTP, a fluid-structural interaction involving the ATD HPOTP turbine exit flowfield and the HEX inner vane was suspected. As part of NASA contract NAS8-36801, Pratt and Whitney conducted air flow tests of the ATD HPOTP turbine turnaround duct flowpath in the MSFC Phase 2 HGM air flow model. These tests included HEX vane strain gages and additional fluctuating pressure gages in the turnaround duct and HEX vane flowpath area. Three-dimensional flow probe measurements at two stations downstream of the turbine simulator exit plane were also made. Modifications to the HPOTP turbine simulator investigated the effects on turbine exit flow profile and velocity components, with the objective of reproducing flow conditions calculated for the actual ATD HPOTP hardware. Testing was done at the MSFC SSME Dynamic Fluid Air Flow (Dual-Leg) Facility, at air supply pressures between 50 and 250 psia. Combinations of turbine exit Mach number and pressure level were run to investigate the effect of flow regime. Information presented includes: (1) Descriptions of turbine simulator modifications to produce the desired flow environment; (2) Types and locations for instrumentation added to the flow model for improved diagnostic capability; (3) Evaluation of the effect of changes to the turbine simulator flowpath on the turbine exit flow environment; and (4

  18. Cerebral blood flow response pattern during balloon test occlusion of the internal carotid artery

    SciTech Connect

    Witt, J.P.; Yonas, H.; Jungreis, C.

    1994-05-01

    To evaluate the risk of temporary or permanent internal carotid artery occlusion. In 156 patients intraarterial balloon test occlusion in combination with a stable xenon-enhanced CT cerebral blood flow study was performed before radiologic or surgical treatment. All 156 patients passed the clinical balloon test occlusion and underwent a xenon study in combination with a second balloon test. Quantitative flow data were analyzed for absolute changes as well as changes in symmetry. Fourteen patients exhibited reduced flow values between 20 and 30 mL/100 g per minute, an absolute decrease in flow, and significant asymmetry in the middle cerebral artery territory during balloon test occlusion. These patients would be considered at high risk for cerebral infarction if internal carotid artery occlusion were to be performed. With one exception they belonged to a group (class I) of 61 patients who showed bilateral or ipsilateral flow decrease and significant asymmetry with lower flow on the side of occlusion. The other 95 patients, who showed a variety of cerebral blood flow response patterns including ipsilateral or bilateral flow increase, were at moderate (class II) or low (class III) stroke risk. In contrast to these findings, exclusively qualitative flow analysis failed to identify the patients at high risk: a threshold with an asymmetry index of 10% revealed only 16% specificity whereas an asymmetry index of 45% showed only 61% sensitivity for detection of low flow areas (<30 mL/100 g per minute). For achieving a minimal hemodynamic related-stroke rate associated with permanent clinical internal carotid artery occlusion we suggest integration of a thorough analysis of quantitative cerebral blood flow data before and during balloon test occlusion. 68 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Development of an example flow test object and comparison of five of these test objects, constructed in various laboratories.

    PubMed

    Teirlinck, C J; Bezemer, R A; Kollmann, C; Lubbers, J; Hoskins, P R; Ramnarine, K V; Fish, P; Fredeldt, K E; Schaarschmidt, U G

    1998-02-01

    Doppler test objects are used to characterise Doppler systems, both stand-alone systems and the Doppler part of so-called duplex scanners. The aim of the project partially presented here is the development and validation of an example of a Doppler test object fulfilling the requirements of the IEC 1685. The project has been carried out by nine partners of five European countries and has been funded by the European Commission. The flow Doppler test object is composed of: tissue mimicking material (TMM), blood mimicking fluid (BMF), tube (embedded in the TMM and carrying the BMF), tank flow system, including a pump and a flow meter. In the normative part of the IEC 1685, requirements are given for the values of acoustical parameters of TMM and BMF such as sound velocity, attenuation and backscattering. For BMF, requirements are given also for values of density and viscosity. In an informative (but not compulsory) annex, a description is given of a flow test object meeting these requirements as an example. 'example test object' developed during the project is composed of TMM based on agar and including SiC- and Al2O3-powders, BMF based on nylon particles suspended in water and glycerine, and a tube of c-flex, a silicon copolymer. Two tube sizes are used: 4.0 mm ID and 8.0 mm ID. During the project, very precise recipes have been developed for the composition and preparation of both TMM and BMF. Based on these recipes and a description of the construction in a design five flow test objects have been constructed in the laboratories of five participants. The test objects have been compared by measurements of the physical parameters and by Doppler measurements of the five test objects with the Doppler system. The measurements have been carried out by five observers. Inter-test object and inter-observer variabilities are determined, yielding information about usefulness of the parameters. PMID:9651595

  20. A Study of a Network-Flow Algorithm and a Noncorrecting Algorithm for Test Assembly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, R. D.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    When the network-flow algorithm (NFA) and the average growth approximation algorithm (AGAA) were used for automated test assembly with American College Test and Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery item banks, results indicate that reasonable error in item parameters is not harmful for test assembly using NFA or AGAA. (SLD)

  1. Blood trauma testing of CentriMag and RotaFlow centrifugal flow devices: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sobieski, Michael A; Giridharan, Guruprasad A; Ising, Mickey; Koenig, Steven C; Slaughter, Mark S

    2012-08-01

    Mechanical circulatory assist devices that provide temporary support in heart failure patients are needed to enable recovery or provide a bridge to decision. Minimizing risk of blood damage (i.e., hemolysis) with these devices is critical, especially if the length of support needs to be extended. Hematologic responses of the RotaFlow (Maquet) and CentriMag (Thoratec) temporary support devices were characterized in an in vitro feasibility study. Paired static mock flow loops primed with fresh bovine blood (700 mL, hematocrit [Hct] = 25 ± 3%, heparin titrated for activated clotting time >300 s) pooled from a single-source donor were used to test hematologic responses to RotaFlow (n = 2) and CentriMag (n = 2) simultaneously. Pump differential pressures, temperature, and flow were maintained at 250 ± 10 mm Hg, 25 ± 2°C, and 4.2 ± 0.25 L/min, respectively. Blood samples (3 mL) were collected at 0, 60, 120, 180, 240, 300, and 360 min after starting pumps in accordance with recommended Food and Drug Administration and American Society for Testing and Materials guidelines. The CentriMag operated at a higher average pump speed (3425 rpm) than the RotaFlow (3000 rpm) while maintaining similar constant flow rates (4.2 L/min). Hematologic indicators of blood trauma (hemoglobin, Hct, platelet count, plasma free hemoglobin, and white blood cell) for all measured time points as well as normalized and modified indices of hemolysis were similar (RotaFlow: normalized index of hemolysis [NIH] =  0.021 ± 0.003 g/100 L, modified index of hemolysis [MIH] = 3.28 ± 0.52 mg/mg compared to CentriMag: NIH =  0.041 ± 0.010 g/100 L, MIH = 6.08 ± 1.45 mg/mg). In this feasibility study, the blood trauma performance of the RotaFlow was similar or better than the CentriMag device under clinically equivalent, worst-case test conditions. The RotaFlow device may be a more cost-effective alternative to

  2. 42 CFR 84.94 - Gas flow test; closed-circuit apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gas flow test; closed-circuit apparatus. 84.94 Section 84.94 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.94 Gas flow...

  3. Flow for Exercise Adherence: Testing an Intrinsic Model of Health Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petosa, R. Lingyak; Holtz, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Background: Health behavior theory generally does not include intrinsic motivation as a determinate of health practices. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test the flow theory of exercise adherence. Flow theory posits that exercise can be intrinsically rewarding if the experiences of self/time transcendence and control/mastery are achieved…

  4. ANGULAR FLOW INSENSITIVE PITOT TUBE SUITABLE FOR USE WITH STANDARD STACK TESTING EQUIPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five pitot tube designs were tested under various gas flow conditions for accuracy in measuring static and total pressure. The static- and impact-pressure measuring tubes least affected by angular flow were combined and then evaluated in the presence of standard particulate sampl...

  5. Near-well nonlinear flow identified by various displacement well response testing.

    PubMed

    Zenner, Matthias A

    2009-01-01

    The impact of nonlinear flow phenomena on well response tests is still not completely understood today. With the present paper, a set of 10 well response tests is investigated. The tests were conducted in a fractured Devonian limestone formation close to the western national border of Germany. The test design incorporates a packer as well as different solid cylinders to initiate a series of slug-injection and slug-withdrawal tests by various initial displacements. Nonlinear response characteristics were observed in the course of the tests, which cannot be explained by tubing-controlled flow inside the cased well. The analysis shows that the nonlinear response characteristics are likely to be either formation controlled according to non-Darcian flow developing in a high-conductivity fracture compartment of the tested limestone formation or a consequence of a severe well inefficiency caused by some sort of screen clogging. This inference is obtained from analyzing the data by a nonlinear well response test model, which differentiates between wellbore internal hydraulic head losses and a generalized rate-dependent skin effect accounting for nonlinear flow processes in the vicinity of the well. The potential of identifying near-well nonlinear flow by various displacement well response testing may indicate this methodology to be a valuable complement to modern high-resolution borehole imaging techniques used when characterizing fractured reservoirs and the tightness of fractured reservoir cap rocks. PMID:19245376

  6. Correlation of steel corrosion in pipe flow with jet impingement and rotating cylinder tests

    SciTech Connect

    Efird, K.D.; Wright, E.J.; Boros, J.A.; Hailey, T.G.

    1993-12-01

    The relationship of laboratory fluid flow corrosion test techniques to flow-accelerated corrosion in field applications and the parameters required to apply laboratory data effectively in the field were studied. Single-phase, aqueous, sweet corrosion of steel in turbulent pipe flow was correlated to corrosion in jet impingement and rotating cylinder tests. All tests were conducted simultaneously, using the same test fluid to minimize environmental variables and to allow a direct, realistic comparison of test methods. Rotating cylinder electrode corrosion rates did not correlate with pipe flow based on wall shear stress or mass transfer for flow-accelerated corrosion of carbon (C) steel in the environment studied. Jet impingement corrosion rates for the test ring at r/r{sub 0} = 3 correlated with pipe flow based on wall shear stress. The general equation for flow-accelerated corrosion of C steel under turbulent flow conditions in this environment was expressed as: R = a{tau}{sub w}{sup b} where R was the C steel corrosion rate in mm/y and {tau}{sub w} was the wall shear stress in N/m{sup 2}. Effects of solution chemistry were contained in the equation coefficient and exponent and require further experimental definition. The physical fluid and hydrodynamic parameters were included in {tau}{sub w}. Use of wall shear stress as the correlating factor did not imply a shear mechanism for corrosion acceleration. Wall shear stress was found to be a hydrodynamic factor that can be used effectively to relate fluid flow in different geometries, allowing valid comparison of laboratory tests and field operations.

  7. Experimental onset of flow instability testing by Creare, Inc. Book 1

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D.A.

    1992-11-01

    Flow excursions can occur during subcooled heated flow if the supply system is not adequate to meet the heated channel pressure demand. Available experimental flow instability (FI) data for ribbed annuli such as used in the SRS production reactors is very limited. Creare Inc. completed a series of FI tests which included two annular geometries; one of these included metallic ribs which separated the annulus into four sub-channels. This report summarizes the results of the onset of flow instability (OFI) testing which was completed by Creare in support of the SRS Reactor Restart Program. A copy of the final test report has been attached and the archival locations for the supporting documentation and electronic test data is also included. The purpose of this report is to: Archive the Creare Program data; inspect the data which has been archived; review the results presented by Creare; and evaluate if the Creare Program data may be used in critical applications.

  8. A flight test of laminar flow control leading-edge systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, M. C.; Wright, A. S., Jr.; Wagner, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    NASA's program for development of a laminar flow technology base for application to commercial transports has made significant progress since its inception in 1976. Current efforts are focused on development of practical reliable systems for the leading-edge region where the most difficult problems in applying laminar flow exist. Practical solutions to these problems will remove many concerns about the ultimate practicality of laminar flow. To address these issues, two contractors performed studies, conducted development tests, and designed and fabricated fully functional leading-edge test articles for installation on the NASA JetStar aircraft. Systems evaluation and performance testing will be conducted to thoroughly evaluate all system capabilities and characteristics. A simulated airline service flight test program will be performed to obtain the operational sensitivity, maintenance, and reliability data needed to establish that practical solutions exist for the difficult leading-edge area of a future commercial transport employing laminar flow control.

  9. In vitro blood flow model with physiological wall shear stress for hemocompatibility testing-An example of coronary stent testing.

    PubMed

    Engels, Gerwin Erik; Blok, Sjoerd Leendert Johannes; van Oeveren, Willem

    2016-01-01

    Hemocompatibility of blood contacting medical devices has to be evaluated before their intended application. To assess hemocompatibility, blood flow models are often used and can either consist of in vivo animal models or in vitro blood flow models. Given the disadvantages of animal models, in vitro blood flow models are an attractive alternative. The in vitro blood flow models available nowadays mostly focus on generating continuous flow instead of generating a pulsatile flow with certain wall shear stress, which has shown to be more relevant in maintaining hemostasis. To address this issue, the authors introduce a blood flow model that is able to generate a pulsatile flow and wall shear stress resembling the physiological situation, which the authors have coined the "Haemobile." The authors have validated the model by performing Doppler flow measurements to calculate velocity profiles and (wall) shear stress profiles. As an example, the authors evaluated the thrombogenicity of two drug eluting stents, one that was already on the market and one that was still under development. After identifying proper conditions resembling the wall shear stress in coronary arteries, the authors compared the stents with each other and often used reference materials. These experiments resulted in high contrast between hemocompatible and incompatible materials, showing the exceptional testing capabilities of the Haemobile. In conclusion, the authors have developed an in vitro blood flow model which is capable of mimicking physiological conditions of blood flow as close as possible. The model is convenient in use and is able to clearly discriminate between hemocompatible and incompatible materials, making it suitable for evaluating the hemocompatible properties of medical devices. PMID:27435456

  10. Ac traction gets on track

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, L.

    1995-09-01

    This article describes inverter-based ac traction systems which give freight locomotives greater adhesion, pulling power, and braking capacity. In the 1940s, dc traction replaced the steam engine as a source of train propulsion, and it has ruled the freight transportation industry ever since. But now, high-performance ac-traction systems, with their unprecedented levels of pulling power and adhesion, are becoming increasingly common on America`s freight railroads. In thousands of miles of demonstration tests, today`s ac-traction systems have outperformed traditional dc-motor driven systems. Major railroad companies are convinced enough of the benefits of ac traction to have integrated it into their freight locomotives.

  11. Computer tomography of flows external to test models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prikryl, I.; Vest, C. M.

    1982-01-01

    Computer tomographic techniques for reconstruction of three-dimensional aerodynamic density fields, from interferograms recorded from several different viewing directions were studied. Emphasis is on the case in which an opaque object such as a test model in a wind tunnel obscures significant regions of the interferograms (projection data). A method called the Iterative Convolution Method (ICM), existing methods in which the field is represented by a series expansions, and analysis of real experimental data in the form of aerodynamic interferograms are discussed.

  12. Experiment 2074: post-drilling reservoir flow testing through EE-3A first revision

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Donald W.; Robinson, Bruce A.

    1987-11-20

    As previously outlined in memorandum ESS-4-87-305 (11/12/87), EE-3A will be pressurized with the Kobe pumps for the next week, and then a sequence of reservoir flow tests and logs will be conducted for a one to two week period beginning Tuesday, 12/1/87. The purpose of this memorandum is to better define this flow test and sequence of logs, organized as a "formal" experiment.

  13. Numerical tests of constitutive laws for dense granular flows.

    PubMed

    Lois, Gregg; Lemaître, Anaël; Carlson, Jean M

    2005-11-01

    We numerically and theoretically study the macroscopic properties of dense, sheared granular materials. In this process we first consider an invariance in Newton's equations, explain how it leads to Bagnold's scaling, and discuss how it relates to the dynamics of granular temperature. Next we implement numerical simulations of granular materials in two different geometries--simple shear and flow down an incline--and show that measurements can be extrapolated from one geometry to the other. Then we observe nonaffine rearrangements of clusters of grains in response to shear strain and show that fundamental observations, which served as a basis for the shear transformation zone (STZ) theory of amorphous solids [M. L. Falk and J. S. Langer, Phys. Rev. E. 57, 7192 (1998); M.R.S. Bull 25, 40 (2000)], can be reproduced in granular materials. Finally we present constitutive equations for granular materials as proposed by Lemaître [Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 064303 (2002)], based on the dynamics of granular temperature and STZ theory, and show that they match remarkably well with our numerical data from both geometries. PMID:16383599

  14. Models, assumptions, and experimental tests of flows near magnetized boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, M. Umair

    2015-11-01

    We present a history of research on the magnetized plasma boundary and recent first measurements of particle flows in such structures in laboratory plasmas using multi-dimensional laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). Our measurements show that the canonical model for this boundary proposed in 1982 [Chodura, Phys. Fluids (1982)] is inaccurate for systems where the ion-neutral collision length is less than at least 4 times the ion gyro radius. Rather, our measurements validate more sophisticated plasma boundary fluid models that take neutral collisions into account [Riemann, Phys. Plasmas (1994); Ahedo, Phys. Plasmas (1997); Siddiqui et al., Phys. Plasmas (2014)]. In light of these results, we show that both three-dimensional ion and neutral velocity distribution functions are strongly affected near the boundary. We discuss effects of these perturbed distributions on wall loading and erosion in experiments and applications such as divertor tokamak scrape-off layers and Hall thrusters. Finally, we propose modern definitions of the oft-used term, ``magnetic presheath.'' This work is supported by U.S. National Science Foundation grant number PHY-1360278.

  15. Water Flow Simulation Test on Flow-Induced Oscillation of Thermowell in Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor “MONJU”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Masaya; Anoda, Yoshinari

    Water flow simulation tests were performed on the flow-induced oscillations of the thermowell in the prototype fast breeder reactor (FBR), MONJU. The displacements of the target cylinder were measured, and the oscillation amplitudes, the frequency characteristics, and the phase relationships were estimated. The estimations showed that the oscillations of the target cylinder had a one-dimensional oscillation region in the in-line direction with symmetric vortices shedding and a two-dimensional oscillation region induced by alternative vortices. The phase estimation, carried out by a methodology using wavelet analysis and statistical analysis, indicated that the effect of the alternative vortices on the in-line oscillation was changed with the flow velocity.

  16. Experimental AC (Asphalt Concrete) overlays of PCC pavement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. D.

    1983-11-01

    A series of experimental asphalt concrete (AC) overlays was constructed over an existing distressed portland cement concrete pavement on Interstate 80 near Boca, California. The experimental overlays included rubberized dense-graded AC, rubberized open-graded AC, a rubber flush coat interlayer, dense-graded AC with short polyester fibers and Bituthene interlayer strips. The report presents a description and discussion of AC mix batching, construction observations, laboratory testing, overlay covering, and initial performance evaluation.

  17. Acoustic tests of a 15.2 centimeter-diameter potential flow convergent nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karchmer, A. M.; Dorsch, R. G.; Friedman, R.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the jet noise radiated to the far field from a 15.2-cm-diam potential flow convergent nozzle has been conducted. Tests were made with unheated airflow over a range of subsonic nozzle exhaust velocities from 62 to 310m/sec. Mean and turbulent velocity measurements in the flow field of the nozzle exhaust indicated no apparent flow anomalies. Acoustic measurements yielded data uncontaminated by internal and/or background noise to velocities as low as 152m/sec. Finally, no significantly different acoustic characteristics between the potential flow nozzle and simple convergent nozzles were found.

  18. A mercury flow meter for ion thruster testing. [response time, thermal sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    The theory of operation of the thermal flow meter is presented, and a theoretical model is used to determine design parameters for a device capable of measuring mercury flows in the range of 0 to 5 gm/hr. Flow meter construction is described. Tests performed using a positive displacement mercury pump as well as those performed with the device in the feed line of an operating thruster are discussed. A flow meter response time of about a minute and a sensitivity of about 10 mv/gm/hr are demonstrated. Additional work to relieve a sensitivity of the device to variations in ambient temperature is indicated to improve its quantitative performance.

  19. Hot-Film and Hot-Wire Anemometry for a Boundary Layer Active Flow Control Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenahan, Keven C.; Schatzman, David M.; Wilson, Jacob Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Unsteady active flow control (AFC) has been used experimentally for many years to minimize bluff-body drag. This technology could significantly improve performance of rotorcraft by cleaning up flow separation. It is important, then, that new actuator technologies be studied for application to future vehicles. A boundary layer wind tunnel was constructed with a 1ft-x-3ft test section and unsteady measurement instrumentation to study how AFC manipulates the boundary layer to overcome adverse pressure gradients and flow separation. This unsteady flow control research requires unsteady measurement methods. In order to measure the boundary layer characteristics, both hot-wire and hot-film Constant Temperature Anemometry is used. A hot-wire probe is mounted in the flow to measure velocity while a hot-film array lays on the test surface to measure skin friction. Hot-film sensors are connected to an anemometer, a Wheatstone bridge circuit with an output that corresponds to the dynamic flow response. From this output, the time varying flow field, turbulence, and flow reversal can be characterized. Tuning the anemometers requires a fan test on the hot-film sensors to adjust each output. This is a delicate process as several variables drastically affect the data, including control resistance, signal input, trim, and gain settings.

  20. Testing of SLA-561V in NASA-Ames' Turbulent Flow Duct with Augmented Radiative Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepka, Steven A.; Kornienko, Robert S.; Radbourne, Chris A.

    2010-01-01

    As part of Mars Science Laboratory s (MSL) heatshield development program, SLA-561 was tested in NASA Ames Turbulent Flow Duct (TFD) Facility. For these tests, the TFD facility was modified to include a ceramic plate located in the wall opposite to the test model. Normally the TFD wall opposite to the test model is water-cooled steel. Installing a noncooled ceramic plate allows the ceramic to absorb convective heating and radiate the energy back to the test model as the plate heats up. This work was an effort to increase the severity of TFD test conditions. Presented here are the results from these tests.

  1. Rolling flow wind tunnel tests of F-18 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutze, F. H.

    1980-01-01

    The lateral directional characteristics of an F-18 aircraft was investigated. Aerodynamic derivatives associated with pure roll rate, or the 'p' derivatives were obtained. The model is described and the procedures used to obtain and correct the data, and a graphical presentation of the results are presented. These results include graphs of the lateral directional static stability derivatives versus angle of attack, and the lateral directional force and moment coefficients versus nondimensional roll rate. Results are presented for several configurations including complete, complete without vertical tails, complete without horizontal tails, fuselage wing and fuselage alone. Each of these configuations was tested with and without wing leading edge extensions. The basic control surfaces were deflected and the results were investigated.

  2. Field testing the role of heterogeneity at the inter-well scale during two phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovorka, S. D.; Gulf Coast Carbon Center; Geoseq

    2011-12-01

    Connectivity of rocks with different fluid flow properties (reservoir architecture) is a major source of uncertainty in predicting multi-phase fluid flow. Multi-institution research teams have completed three major DOE-funded test programs in which movement of supercritical CO2 through brine-saturated fluvial sandstones was observed with multiple tools. In each test, closely spaced wells (30 to 100 m) were drilled to reservoir depth so that the amount of reservoir complexity sampled between the wells would be reduced and higher resolution measurements of change could be obtained during time-lapse monitoring. During one test (Frio 1), an exceptionally homogeneous injection zone produced by marine reworking of a fine-grained fluvial sandstone of the Upper Frio Formation produced a classic-wedge-shaped CO2 plume. The maximum area occupied by CO2 was the result of radial expansion of the plume near the injection well; this produced plume down-building. Away from the injection well , the importance of gravity-override increased. A second test at the same well array in a deeper sandstone (Frio 2) was sited in heterogeneous (gravel to muddy sandstone) high permeability (>3 Darcy), weakly cemented fluvial sandstone. A slow injection rate over a small interval at the flow unit base was used to accentuate buoyancy effects. Measurements of plume migration through time using tracers and cross-well seismic documented interaction between near-well radial flow and vertical rise. However, because of discontinuous fast paths in gravel zones and CO2 ponding against muddy sandstone baffles, reservoir heterogeneity was a dominant influence in short-term plume evolution. The third test interval in the SECARB "Early" test documented response of amalgamated gravel and sandstone point bars in which heterogeneity was reduced by cementation. CO2 injection rate was increased incrementally and flow-rate dependent reservoir responses observed. These suggest that capillary-entry pressure and

  3. Water Flow Testing and Unsteady Pressure Analysis of a Two-Bladed Liquid Oxidizer Pump Inducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, Jordan B.; Mulder, Andrew; Zoladz, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The unsteady fluid dynamic performance of a cavitating two-bladed oxidizer turbopump inducer was characterized through sub-scale water flow testing. While testing a novel inlet duct design that included a cavitation suppression groove, unusual high-frequency pressure oscillations were observed. With potential implications for inducer blade loads, these high-frequency components were analyzed extensively in order to understand their origins and impacts to blade loading. Water flow testing provides a technique to determine pump performance without the costs and hazards associated with handling cryogenic propellants. Water has a similar density and Reynolds number to liquid oxygen. In a 70%-scale water flow test, the inducer-only pump performance was evaluated. Over a range of flow rates, the pump inlet pressure was gradually reduced, causing the flow to cavitate near the pump inducer. A nominal, smooth inducer inlet was tested, followed by an inlet duct with a circumferential groove designed to suppress cavitation. A subsequent 52%-scale water flow test in another facility evaluated the combined inducer-impeller pump performance. With the nominal inlet design, the inducer showed traditional cavitation and surge characteristics. Significant bearing loads were created by large side loads on the inducer during synchronous cavitation. The grooved inlet successfully mitigated these loads by greatly reducing synchronous cavitation, however high-frequency pressure oscillations were observed over a range of frequencies. Analytical signal processing techniques showed these oscillations to be created by a rotating, multi-celled train of pressure pulses, and subsequent CFD analysis suggested that such pulses could be created by the interaction of rotating inducer blades with fluid trapped in a cavitation suppression groove. Despite their relatively low amplitude, these high-frequency pressure oscillations posed a design concern due to their sensitivity to flow conditions and

  4. Promoted Ignition and Burning Tests of Stainless Steel in Flowing and Nonflowing Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsyth, Elliot T.; Maes, Miguel; Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Bachelier, Frederic

    2003-01-01

    The Industry-Sponsored Metals Combustion Test Program 96-1 was coordinated through Wendell Hull & Associates, Inc. on behalf of several contributing companies, and all design and testing was performed at the NASA White Sands Test Facility. Phase I of this test program studied the threshold pressure for self-sustained burning of various types and sizes of stain less steel rods in nonflowing oxygen, as observed in Standard Test Method for Determining the Combustion Behavior of Metallic Materials in Oxygen-Enriched Atmospheres (ASTM G 124-95). Phase II studied the ignition and propagation of burning of 316L stainless steel rods and pipe in flowing gaseous oxygen. The test sample configurations were chosen to replicate previous promoted ignition and burning tests as well as to represent geometries and cross-sectional thicknesses common in industrial piping applications. The gas pressw'es and velocities for the test matrix were selected to generally compare with CGA G-4.4 guidelines for the use of stain less steel in oxygen service. This paper summarizes the results from the Phase I nonflowing oxygen tests and presents in detail the results of the Phase II flowing oxygen tests. The maximum sample burn-length is shown as a function of test pressure in Phase 1 and also as a function of gas velocity in Phase IT. These results indicate that flowing oxygen, under the given test conditions, significantly affects maximum sample burn length as compared to nonflowing oxygen. Supplementary flowing oxygen test data on stainless steel rods from a follow-up test program are consistent with these results and are presented herein.

  5. A FLOW-THROUGH TESTING PROCEDURE WITH DUCKWEED (LEMNA MINOR L.)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lemna minor is one of the smallest flowering plants. Because of its floating habit, ease of culture, and small size it is well adapted for laboratory investigations. Procedures for flow-through tests were developed. Testing procedures were developed with this apparatus. By using ...

  6. Investigation of the Flow-Induced Vibration in the E2 Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castillo, Luciano

    2001-01-01

    An investigation of flow induced vibration due to coupling between the fluid flow and the propellants lines (LOX and RP-1) was performed. Various flow rate conditions were studied to check whether flow induced vibration was possible due to vortex shedding in both valves and pipe lines. Resonance test was conducted for all segments of the LOX-feedline for the preburner under test. In addition, critical values of frequency and velocity are calculated using a mass damping model. A simple chart characterizing the relation between frequency and velocity is developed for each component; i.e. propellant lines, valves and flow meters. It was found that flow induced vibration occurs for various segments with flow rates of 113 lb/s, 275 lb/s and 40 lb/s. Even more interesting using critical conditions for buckling, it was found that the valve or pipe may collapse for a flow rate of 275 lb/s and valve height of 10% of pipe diameter. Furthermore, two models for the acoustic pressure acting on the segments particularly for the valve are proposed.

  7. Investigation of the Flow-Induced Vibration in the E2 Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castillo, Luciano

    2001-01-01

    An investigation of flow induced vibration due to coupling between the fluid flow and the propellants lines (LOX and RP-1) was performed. Various flow rate conditions were studied to check whether flow induced vibration was possible due to vortex shedding in both valves and pipe lines. Resonances test was conducted for all segments of the LOX-feedline for the preburner under test. In addition, critical values of frequency and velocity are calculated using a mass damping model. A simple chart characterizing the relation between frequency and velocity is developed for each component; i.e. propellant lines, valves and flow meters. It was found that flow induced vibration occurs for various segments with flow rates of 113 1b/s, 275 lb/s and 40 lb/s. Even more interesting using critical conditions for buckling, it was found that the valve or pipe may collapse for a flow rate of 275 lb/s and valve height of 10% of pipe diameter. Furthermore, two models for the acoustic pressure acting on the segments particularly for the valve are proposed.

  8. Space Launch System Base Heating Test: Environments and Base Flow Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Manish; Knox, Kyle; Seaford, Mark; Dufrene, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    NASA MSFC and CUBRC designed and developed a 2% scale SLS propulsive wind tunnel test program to investigate base flow effects during flight from lift-off to MECO. This type of test program has not been conducted in 40+ years during the NASA Shuttle Program. Dufrene et al paper described the operation, instrumentation type and layout, facility and propulsion performance, test matrix and conditions and some raw results. This paper will focus on the SLS base flow physics and the generation and results of the design environments being used to design the thermal protection system.

  9. Mechanical Design of a Performance Test Rig for the Turbine Air-Flow Task (TAFT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, John C.; Xenofos, George D.; Farrow, John L.; Tyler, Tom; Williams, Robert; Sargent, Scott; Moharos, Jozsef

    2004-01-01

    To support development of the Boeing-Rocketdyne RS84 rocket engine, a full-flow, reaction turbine geometry was integrated into the NASA-MSFC turbine air-flow test facility. A mechanical design was generated which minimized the amount of new hardware while incorporating all test and instrumentation requirements. This paper provides details of the mechanical design for this Turbine Air-Flow Task (TAFT) test rig. The mechanical design process utilized for this task included the following basic stages: Conceptual Design. Preliminary Design. Detailed Design. Baseline of Design (including Configuration Control and Drawing Revision). Fabrication. Assembly. During the design process, many lessons were learned that should benefit future test rig design projects. Of primary importance are well-defined requirements early in the design process, a thorough detailed design package, and effective communication with both the customer and the fabrication contractors.

  10. Pre-test estimates of temperature decline for the LANL Fenton Hill Long-Term Flow Test

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, B.A.; Kruger, P.

    1992-06-01

    Pre-test predications for the Long-Term Flow Test (LTFT) of the experimental Hot Dry Rock (HDR) reservoir at Fenton Hill were made using two models. Both models are dependent on estimates of the ``effective`` reservoir volume accessed by the fluid and the mean fracture spacing (MFS) of major joints for fluid flow. The effective reservoir volume was estimated using a variety of techniques, and the range of values for the MFS was set through experience in modeling the thermal cooldown of other experimental HDR reservoirs. The two pre-test predictions for cooldown to 210{degrees}C (a value taken to compare the models) from initial temperature of 240{degrees}C are 6.1 and 10.7 years. Assuming that a minimum of 10{degrees}C is required to provide an unequivocal indication of thermal cooldown, both models predict that the reservoir will not exhibit observable cooldown for at least two years.

  11. Overview on test cases for computation of internal flows in turbomachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fottner, Leonhard

    1992-09-01

    Aero engine component design and development makes increasing use of computer codes for flow field calculations, such as two- or three-dimensional flow fields and flow fields with strong viscous effects. The accuracy of these calculation methods depends on the mathematical models and numerical schemes used to describe the physical reality. The proof of validity and the refinement of such methods depend on verification against relevant test cases, primarily experimental test cases. The AGARD Propulsion and Energetics Panel established Working Group 18 to specify relevant reference test cases to serve as validation bases for new methods, but also as check for existing production codes. The present paper gives an overview on the results of the Working Group and briefly describes the different test cases. These test cases refer to analytical and experimental test cases for steady flow in linear compressor and turbine cascades, single blade rows, single and multistage axial compressors and turbines and ducts. In addition, suggestions for future tests designed to reduce the limitations are discussed.

  12. Test Data of Flow Field of Shuttle SRM Nozzle Joint with Bond Defects, Using Unheated Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hair, Leroy M.; McAnally, James V.; Hengel, John E.

    1989-01-01

    The nozzle-to-case joint on the Shuttle SRM (as redesigned after the Challenger accident) features an adhesive sealant filling and bonding the joint, with a wiper O-ring to prevent the adhesive from reaching and disabling the closure O-ring. Flawless implementation of that joint design would ensure that hot, corrosive propellant combustion gases never reach the closure O-ring. However, understanding the flow field related to bonding defects is prudent. A comprehensive test program was conducted to quantify such flow fields and associated heating environments. A two-dimensional, full-scale model represented 65 inches of the nozzle joint, using unheated air as the test medium, in a blowdown mode. Geometry variations modeled RSRM assembly tolerances, and two types of bonding defects: pullaways and blowholes. A range of the magnitude of each type defect was tested. Also a range of operational parameters was tested, representative of the RSRM flow environment, including duplication of RSRM Mach and Reynolds numbers. Extensive instrumentation was provided to quantify pressures, heat rates, and velocities. The resulting data established that larger geometric defects cause larger pressure and larger heating, at the closure O-ring region. Velocity trends were not so straight-forward. Variations in assembly tolerances did not generally affect flow fields or heating. Operational parameters affected flow fields and heating as might be expected, increasing density or velocity increased heating. Complete details of this test effort are presented.

  13. Compact test apparatus for evaluation of flow erosion of marine coatings.

    PubMed

    Dębowski, M A; Quintana, R; Lee, H P

    2015-10-01

    An apparatus designed and manufactured for evaluation of flow erosion of coatings or layers is presented in this paper. The setup was primarily designed for coatings intended to perform in dynamic marine environments but can be also used for evaluation using fresh water. The concept is based on an in-line flow test cell and modular design allowing good flexibility of varying testing parameters. The flow rate that can be achieved depends on the flow cell geometry and can reach 28 km/h (15 kn) with the presented setup. Temperature may be adjusted between 15 and 35 °C. Particle and metal ion filters are parts of this setup. The dimensions of the apparatus including all components do not exceed 2 m × 2 m × 2 m. The use of the apparatus is illustrated with the results of evaluation of self-polishing anti-fouling coatings and model, silicon wafer grafted layers. PMID:26520992

  14. Wind Tunnel Test Results for Gas Flows Inside Axisymmetric Cavities on Cylindric Bodies with Nose Cones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shvets, A. L.; Gilinsky, M.; Blankson, I. M.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental test results of air flow inside and at the cylindrical cavity located on axisymmetric body are presented. These tests were conducted in the wind tunnel A-7 of Institute of Mechanics at Moscow State University. Pressure distribution along the cavities and optical measurements were obtained. Dependence of these characteristics of length of a cavity in the range: L/D = 0.5 - 14 and free stream Mach in the range: M(sub infinity) = 0.6 - 3.0 was determined. Flow structure inside the cavity, cause of flow regime change, separation zones geometry and others were studied. In particular, the flow modes of with open and closed separation zones are determined.

  15. Estimation of Critical Flow Velocity for Collapse of Gas Test Loop Booster Fuel Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Guillen; Mark J. Russell

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents calculations performed to determine the critical flow velocity for plate collapse due to static instability for the Gas Test Loop booster fuel assembly. Long, slender plates arranged in a parallel configuration can experience static divergence and collapse at sufficiently high coolant flow rates. Such collapse was exhibited by the Oak Ridge High Flux Reactor in the 1940s and the Engineering Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory in the 1950s. Theoretical formulas outlined by Miller, based upon wide-beam theory and Bernoulli’s equation, were used for the analysis. Calculations based upon Miller’s theory show that the actual coolant flow velocity is only 6% of the predicted critical flow velocity. Since there is a considerable margin between the theoretically predicted plate collapse velocity and the design velocity, the phenomena of plate collapse due to static instability is unlikely.

  16. Compact test apparatus for evaluation of flow erosion of marine coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debowski, M. A.; Quintana, R.; Lee, H. P.

    2015-10-01

    An apparatus designed and manufactured for evaluation of flow erosion of coatings or layers is presented in this paper. The setup was primarily designed for coatings intended to perform in dynamic marine environments but can be also used for evaluation using fresh water. The concept is based on an in-line flow test cell and modular design allowing good flexibility of varying testing parameters. The flow rate that can be achieved depends on the flow cell geometry and can reach 28 km/h (15 kn) with the presented setup. Temperature may be adjusted between 15 and 35 °C. Particle and metal ion filters are parts of this setup. The dimensions of the apparatus including all components do not exceed 2 m × 2 m × 2 m. The use of the apparatus is illustrated with the results of evaluation of self-polishing anti-fouling coatings and model, silicon wafer grafted layers.

  17. SRM Internal Flow Tests and Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis. Volume 4; Cold Flow Analyses and CFD Analysis Capability Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    An evaluation of the effect of model inlet air temperature drift during a test run was performed to aid in the decision on the need for and/or the schedule for including heaters in the SRMAFTE. The Sverdrup acceptance test data was used to determine the drift in air temperature during runs over the entire range of delivered flow rates and pressures. The effect of this temperature drift on the model Reynolds number was also calculated. It was concluded from this study that a 2% change in absolute temperature during a test run could be adequately accounted for by the data analysis program. A handout package of these results was prepared and presented to ED35 management.

  18. Rapid Flow Cytometry Test for Identification of Different Carbapenemases in Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana P; Faria-Ramos, Isabel; Ricardo, Elisabete; Miranda, Isabel M; Espinar, Maria J; Costa-de-Oliveira, Sofia; Cantón, Rafael; Rodrigues, Acácio G; Pina-Vaz, Cidália

    2016-06-01

    A flow cytometry test was developed to identify carbapenemase production by Enterobacteriaceae and to discriminate between the different types of carbapenemases (classes A, B, and D). It is based on the detection of meropenem activity against bacteria, coupled with different carbapenemase inhibitors, which is assessed by flow cytometry. It represents a convenient, fast, and reliable approach (100% sensitivity and 100% specificity) for the detection and characterization of different carbapenemases. PMID:27021318

  19. Analysis of a Transonic Alternating Flow Phenomenon Observed During Ares Crew Launch Vehicle Wind Tunnel Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekula, Martin K.; Piatak, David J.; Rausch, Russ D.

    2010-01-01

    A transonic wind tunnel test of the Ares I-X Rigid Buffet Model (RBM) identified a Mach number regime where unusually large buffet loads are present. A subsequent investigation identified the cause of these loads to be an alternating flow phenomenon at the Crew Module-Service Module junction. The conical design of the Ares I-X Crew Module and the cylindrical design of the Service Module exposes the vehicle to unsteady pressure loads due to the sudden transition from separated to attached flow about the cone-cylinder junction with increasing Mach number. For locally transonic conditions at this junction, the flow randomly fluctuates back and forth between a subsonic separated flow and a supersonic attached flow. These fluctuations produce a square-wave like pattern in the pressure time histories which, upon integration result in large amplitude, impulsive buffet loads. Subsequent testing of the Ares I RBM found much lower buffet loads since the evolved Ares I design includes an ogive fairing that covers the Crew Module-Service Module junction, thereby making the vehicle less susceptible to the onset of alternating flow. An analysis of the alternating flow separation and attachment phenomenon indicates that the phenomenon is most severe at low angles of attack and exacerbated by the presence of vehicle protuberances. A launch vehicle may experience either a single or, at most, a few impulsive loads since it is constantly accelerating during ascent rather than dwelling at constant flow conditions in a wind tunnel. A comparison of a wind-tunnel-test-data-derived impulsive load to flight-test-data-derived load indicates a significant over-prediction in the magnitude and duration of the buffet load

  20. Construction and demolition waste: Comparison of standard up-flow column and down-flow lysimeter leaching tests.

    PubMed

    Butera, Stefania; Hyks, Jiri; Christensen, Thomas H; Astrup, Thomas F

    2015-09-01

    Five samples of construction and demolition waste (C&DW) were investigated in order to quantify leaching of inorganic elements under percolation conditions according to two different experimental setups: standardised up-flow saturated columns (<4mm particle size) and unsaturated, intermittent down-flow lysimeters (<40mm particle size). While standardised column tests are meant primarily to provide basic information on characteristic leaching properties and mechanisms and not to reproduce field conditions, the lysimeters were intended to mimic the actual leaching conditions when C&DW is used in unbound geotechnical layers. In practice, results from standardised percolation tests are often interpreted as estimations of actual release from solid materials in percolation scenarios. In general, the two tests yielded fairly similar results in terms of cumulative release at liquid-to-solid ratio (L/S) 10l·kgTS; however, significant differences were observed for P, Pb, Ba, Mg and Zn. Further differences emerged in terms of concentration in the early eluates (L/S<5l·kg(-1)TS) for Al, As, Ba, Cd, Cu, DOC, Mg, Mn, Ni, P, Pb, Sb, Se, Si, Zn. Observed differences between tests are likely to be due to differences in pH related to crushing and exposure of fresh particle surfaces, as well as in equilibrium conditions. In the case of C&DW, the standardised column tests, which are more practical, are considered to acceptably describe cumulative releases at L/S 10l·kg(-1)TS in percolation scenarios. However, when the focus is on estimation of initial concentrations for (for example) risk assessment, data from standardised column tests may not be fully applicable, and data from lysimeters may be used for validation purposes. Se, Cr and, to a lesser extent, SO4 and Sb were leaching from C&DW in critical amounts compared with existing limit values. PMID:26031330

  1. Flow tests of a single fuel element coolant channel for a compact fast reactor for space power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springborn, R. H.

    1971-01-01

    Water flow tests were conducted on a single-fuel-element cooling channel for a nuclear concept to be used for space power. The tests established a method for measuring coolant flow rate which is applicable to water flow testing of a complete mockup of the reference reactor. The inlet plenum-to-outlet plenum pressure drop, which approximates the overall core pressure drop, was measured and correlated with flow rate. This information can be used for reactor coolant flow and heat transfer calculations. An analytical study of the flow characteristics was also conducted.

  2. Research on optical fiber flow test method with non-intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Ying; Liu, Xiaohui; Wang, Chang; Zhao, Wenan

    2014-06-01

    In the field of oil well logging, real-time monitoring of the fluid flow parameter provides a scientific basis for oil and gas optimization exploration and increase in reservoir recovery, so a non-intrusive flow test method based on turbulent vibration was proposed. The specific length of the sensor fiber wound tightly around the outer wall of the pipe was connected with the optical fiber gratings at both ends, and the sensor fiber and the optical fiber gratings composed the flow sensing unit. The dynamic pressure was generated by the turbulence when fluid flows through the pipe, and the dynamic pressure resulted in the light phase shift of the sensor fiber. The phase information was demodulated by the fiber optic interferometer technology, time division multiplexing technology, and phase generated carrier modulation and demodulation techniques. The quadratic curve relationship between the phase change and flow rate was found by experimental data analysis, and the experiment confirmed the feasibility of the optical fiber flow test method with non-intrusion and achieved the real-time monitoring of the fluid flow.

  3. Research on optical fiber flow test method with non-intrusive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Ying; Liu, Xiao-hui; Wang, Chang; Zhao, Wen-an

    2013-09-01

    In the field of oil well logging, real-time monitoring of fluid flow parameter provides a scientific basis for oil and gas optimization exploration and increase of reservoir recovery, so the non-intrusive flow test method based on turbulent vibration is proposed. The specific length of sensor fiber wound tightly around the outer wall of the pipe is connected with the optical fiber gratings at both ends, the sensor fiber and the optical fiber gratings compose the flow sensing unit. The dynamic pressure is generated by the turbulence when fluid flows through the pipe, and the dynamic pressure results in the light phase shift of the sensor fiber. The phase information is demodulated by fiber optic interferometer technology, time division multiplexing technology and Phase Generated Carrier modulation and demodulation techniques. The quadratic curve relationship between phase change and flow rate is found by experimental data analysis, and the experiment confirms the feasibility of optical fiber flow test method with non-intrusive and implements the realtime monitoring of flow.

  4. Regional groundwater flow and tritium transport modeling and risk assessment of the underground test area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    The groundwater flow system of the Nevada Test Site and surrounding region was evaluated to estimate the highest potential current and near-term risk to the public and the environment from groundwater contamination downgradient of the underground nuclear testing areas. The highest, or greatest, potential risk is estimated by assuming that several unusually rapid transport pathways as well as public and environmental exposures all occur simultaneously. These conservative assumptions may cause risks to be significantly overestimated. However, such a deliberate, conservative approach ensures that public health and environmental risks are not underestimated and allows prioritization of future work to minimize potential risks. Historical underground nuclear testing activities, particularly detonations near or below the water table, have contaminated groundwater near testing locations with radioactive and nonradioactive constituents. Tritium was selected as the contaminant of primary concern for this phase of the project because it is abundant, highly mobile, and represents the most significant contributor to the potential radiation dose to humans for the short term. It was also assumed that the predicted risk to human health and the environment from tritium exposure would reasonably represent the risk from other, less mobile radionuclides within the same time frame. Other contaminants will be investigated at a later date. Existing and newly collected hydrogeologic data were compiled for a large area of southern Nevada and California, encompassing the Nevada Test Site regional groundwater flow system. These data were used to develop numerical groundwater flow and tritium transport models for use in the prediction of tritium concentrations at hypothetical human and ecological receptor locations for a 200-year time frame. A numerical, steady-state regional groundwater flow model was developed to serve as the basis for the prediction of the movement of tritium from the

  5. Fluid Structure Interaction in a Cold Flow Test and Transient CFD Analysis of Out-of-Round Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph; Brown, Andrew; McDaniels, David; Wang, Ten-See

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes two nozzle fluid flow interactions. They include: 1) Cold flow nozzle tests with fluid-structure interaction at nozzle separated flow; and 2) CFD analysis for nozzle flow and side loads of nozzle extensions with various out-of-round cases.

  6. Seismic monitoring of the June, 1988 Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program flow/injection test

    SciTech Connect

    Jarpe, S.P.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Hutchings, L.J.; Hauk, T.F.

    1988-10-04

    The purpose of the seismic monitoring project was to characterize in detail the micro-seismic activity related to the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program (SSSDP) flow-injection test in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field. Our goal was to determine if any sources of seismic energy related to the test were observable at the surface. We deployed our recording stations so that we could detect and locate both impulsive microearthquakes and continuous seismic noise energy. Our network, which was sensitive enough to be triggered by magnitude 0.0 or larger events, found no impulsive microearthquakes in the vicinity of the flow test in the 8 month period before the test and only one event during the flow test. This event has provided the opportunity to compare the detection and location capabilities of small networks and arrays in a geothermal environment. At present, we are carefully scanning all of the data that we collected during the flow test for evidence of anomalous seismic noise sources and for impulsive events smaller than the network detection threshold (magnitude 0.0). 8 refs., 4 figs.

  7. A semi-analytical solution for slug tests in an unconfined aquifer considering unsaturated flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hongbing

    2016-01-01

    A semi-analytical solution considering the vertical unsaturated flow is developed for groundwater flow in response to a slug test in an unconfined aquifer in Laplace space. The new solution incorporates the effects of partial penetrating, anisotropy, vertical unsaturated flow, and a moving water table boundary. Compared to the Kansas Geological Survey (KGS) model, the new solution can significantly improve the fittings of the modeled to the measured hydraulic heads at the late stage of slug tests in an unconfined aquifer, particularly when the slug well has a partially submerged screen and moisture drainage above the water table is significant. The radial hydraulic conductivities estimated with the new solution are comparable to those from the KGS, Bouwer and Rice, and Hvorslev methods. In addition, the new solution also can be used to examine the vertical conductivity, specific storage, specific yield, and the moisture retention parameters in an unconfined aquifer based on slug test data.

  8. Flow reference method testing and analysis: Wind tunnel experimental results. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    This report describes the results of wind tunnel tests that the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted in 1997 as part of a major study to evaluate potential improvements to Method 2, EPA`s test method for measuring flue gas volumetric flow in stacks. Conducted in the Merrill Subsonic Wind Tunnel at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, the wind tunnel tests were designed to evaluate how accurately various probes can measure angles and velocity of flow under prescribed conditions and, additionally, to calibrate the probes for use in planned field experiments. To provide a basis for selecting probes for subsequent field tests, the wind tunnel testing was performed over a range of velocity, pitch, and yaw angle settings approximating the conditions encountered at actual utility sites.

  9. Continuous-flow stirred-tank reactor 20-L demonstration test: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.D.; Collins, J.L.

    2000-02-01

    One of the proposed methods of removing the cesium, strontium, and transuranics from the radioactive waste storage tanks at Savannah River is the small-tank tetraphenylborate (TPB) precipitation process. A two-reactor-in-series (15-L working volume each) continuous-flow stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) system was designed, constructed, and installed in a hot cell to test the Savannah River process. The system also includes two cross-flow filtration systems to concentrate and wash the slurry produced in the process, which contains the bulk of radioactivity from the supernatant processed through the system. Installation, operational readiness reviews, and system preparation and testing were completed. The first test using the filtration systems, two CSTRs, and the slurry concentration system was conducted over a 61-h period with design removal of Cs, Sr, and U achieved. With the successful completion of Test 1a, the following tests, 1b and 1c, were not required.

  10. Interpreting Variations in Groundwater Flows from Repeated Distributed Thermal Perturbation Tests.

    PubMed

    Hausner, Mark B; Kryder, Levi; Klenke, John; Reinke, Richard; Tyler, Scott W

    2016-07-01

    To better understand the groundwater resources of southern Nye County, Nevada, a multipart distributed thermal perturbation sensing (DTPS) test was performed on a complex of three wells. These wells penetrate an alluvial aquifer that drains the Nevada National Security Site, and characterizing the hydraulic properties and flow paths of the regional groundwater flow system has proven very difficult. The well complex comprised one pumping well and two observation wells, both located 18 m from the pumping well. Using fiber-optic cables and line heaters, DTPS tests were performed under both stressed and unstressed conditions. Each test injects heat into the water column over a period of one to two days, and observes the rising temperature during heat injection and falling temperatures after heating ceases. Aquifer thermal properties are inferred from temperature patterns in the cased section of the wells, and fluxes through the 30-m screened section are estimated based on a model that incorporates conductive and advective heat fluxes. Vertical variations in flux are examined on a scale of tens of cm. The actively flowing zones of the aquifer change between the stressed and unstressed test, and anisotropy in the aquifer permeability is apparent from the changing fluxes between tests. The fluxes inferred from the DTPS tests are compared to solute tracer tests previously performed on the same site. The DTPS-based fluxes are consistent with the fastest solute transport observed in the tracer test, but appear to overestimate the mean flux through the system. PMID:26714003

  11. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VI - Groundwater Flow Model Documentation Package

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    Volume VI of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the groundwater flow model data. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  12. Methodology of a combined ground based testing and numerical modelling analysis of supersonic combustion flow paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannemann, Klaus; Karl, Sebastian; Martinez Schramm, Jan; Steelant, Johan

    2010-10-01

    In the framework of the European Commission co-funded LAPCAT (Long-Term Advanced Propulsion Concepts and Technologies) project, the methodology of a combined ground-based testing and numerical modelling analysis of supersonic combustion flow paths was established. The approach is based on free jet testing of complete supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) configurations consisting of intake, combustor and nozzle in the High Enthalpy Shock Tunnel Göttingen (HEG) of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and computational fluid dynamics studies utilising the DLR TAU code. The capability of the established methodology is demonstrated by applying it to the flow path of the generic HyShot II scramjet flight experiment configuration.

  13. ACS Quicklook PDF products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchkov, Anatoly

    1999-12-01

    This report details the features of the ACS quicklook PDF products produced by the HST data pipeline. The requirements closely follow the design of paper products recommended by the Data Quality Committee, with appropriate changes required to fully support ACS.

  14. Test Outline for Flutter Analysis of Rectangular Panels in Rarefied Flow Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akl, Fred A.

    1996-01-01

    Jet plume impingement forces acting on large flexible space structures may precipitate dynamically unstable behavior during space flights. Typical operating conditions in space involve rarefied gas flow regimes which are intrinsically distinct from continuum gas flow and are normally modeled using the kinetic theory of gas flow. Docking and undocking operations of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Mir space laboratory represent a scenario in which the stability boundaries of solar panels may be of interest. Extensive literature review of research work on the dynamic stability of rectangular panels in rarefied gas flow conditions indicated the lack of published reports dealing with this phenomenon. A recently completed preliminary study for NASA JSC dealing with the mathematical analysis of the stability of two-degree-of-freedom elastically supported rigid panels under the effect of rarefied gas flow was reviewed. A test plan outline is prepared for the purpose of conducting a series of experiments on four rectangular rigid test articles in a vacuum chamber under the effect of continuous and pulsating Nitrogen jet plumes. The purpose of the test plan is to gather enough data related to a number of key parameters to allow the validation of the two-degree-of-freedom mathematical model. The hardware required careful design to select a very lightweight material while satisfying rigidity and frequency requirements within the constraints of the test environment. The data to be obtained from the vacuum chamber tests can be compared with the predicted behavior of the theoretical two-degree-of-freedom model. Using the data obtained in this study, further research can identify the limitations of the mathematical model. In addition modifications to the mathematical model can be made, if warranted, to accurately predict the behavior of rigid panels under rarefied gas flow regimes.

  15. Nanoscale Capillary Flows in Alumina: Testing the Limits of Classical Theory.

    PubMed

    Lei, Wenwen; McKenzie, David R

    2016-07-21

    Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes have well-formed cylindrical channels, as small as 10 nm in diameter, in a close packed hexagonal array. The channels in AAO membranes simulate very small leaks that may be present for example in an aluminum oxide device encapsulation. The 10 nm alumina channel is the smallest that has been studied to date for its moisture flow properties and provides a stringent test of classical capillary theory. We measure the rate at which moisture penetrates channels with diameters in the range of 10 to 120 nm with moist air present at 1 atm on one side and dry air at the same total pressure on the other. We extend classical theory for water leak rates at high humidities by allowing for variable meniscus curvature at the entrance and show that the extended theory explains why the flow increases greatly when capillary filling occurs and enables the contact angle to be determined. At low humidities our measurements for air-filled channels agree well with theory for the interdiffusive flow of water vapor in air. The flow rate of water-filled channels is one order of magnitude less than expected from classical capillary filling theory and is coincidentally equal to the helium flow rate, validating the use of helium leak testing for evaluating moisture flows in aluminum oxide leaks. PMID:27336652

  16. Forced Flow Flame Spreading Test: Preliminary Findings From the USMP-3 Shuttle Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacksteder, Kurt R.; Greenberg, Paul S.; Pettegrew, Richard D.; Tien, James S.; Ferkul, Paul V.; Shih, Hsin-Yi

    1998-01-01

    The Forced Flow Flame spreading Test (FFFT) is a study of flame spreading over solid fuels in very low-speed air flows. The FFFT experiment is part of research entitled Solid Inflammability Boundary at Low Speeds, (SIBAL) intended for operations on the Space Station. In the FFFT experiment, a series of 15 experiments conducted aboard the space shuttle during the United States Microgravity Payload (USMP-3) mission provided information about the structure and spreading characteristics of flames in low-speed, concurrent flows. The test samples included flat sheets of cellulose and cast cylinders of cellulose, burned in air at velocities of approximately 1 to 8 cm/sec. The test results have been successfully compared to theoretical predictions of the SIBAL program, a fundamentally based numerical simulation of concurrent flow flame spread. Additionally, some guidance for the design characteristics of the SIBAL flight experiment have been obtained including some verification of the theoretical predictions of flame size versus the required size of the SIBAL flow duct, and the effect of the presence of thermocouples in the vicinity of near-limit flames in microgravity.

  17. In Situ Local Fracture Flow Measurement by the Double Packer Dilution Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englert, A.; Le Borgne, T.; Bour, O.; Klepikova, M.; Lavenant, N.

    2011-12-01

    For prediction of flow and transport in fractured media, prior estimation of the fracture network is essential, but challenging. Recent developments in hydraulic tomography have shown promising results for understanding connectivities between boreholes. However, as the hydraulic tomographic survey is typically based on the propagation of head only, it becomes a strongly non unique problem. To reduce the non uniqueness of tomographic surveys point conditioning has been found beneficial. Just as well, measurement of local flow in a fracture can serve as point conditioning for hydraulic and tracer tomographic surveys. Nevertheless, only few measurements of local fracture flow have been performed since this type of measurements implies several important technical issues. Dilution test in a packed off interval is a possible method for measuring fracture flow (e.g. Drost et al. 1968, Novakowski et al., 2005). However, a key issue for estimating flow with dilution tests is to ensure a full mixing of the tracer in the packed interval. This is typically done by including a mixing system within the packer. The design of such system can be challenging for deep wells and small diameters. Here, we propose a method where mixing is ensured by a recirculation loop including a surface tank. This method is adapted from the design proposed by Brouyere et al. (2008), who measured dilution in open wells. Dilution is quantified by measuring the concentration in the surface barrel as function of time. Together with the measurement of the circulating flow and the water filled volume in the surface barrel, the measured tracer dilution allows for calculation of the fracture flow. Since the method can be applied using a classical double packer system, it may provide a broader application of local flow measurements in heterogeneous media. We tested the approach on the Ploemeur fractured crystalline rock site. A one meter interval at depth 80 m with a single flowing fracture was isolated with

  18. Flow in a discrete slotted nozzle with massive injection. [water table tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, H. C.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted to determine the effect of massive wall injection on the flow characteristics in a slotted nozzle. Some of the experiments were performed on a water table with a slotted-nozzle test section. This has 45 deg and 15 deg half angles of convergence and divergence, respectively, throat radius of 2.5 inches, and throat width of 3 inches. The hydraulic analogy was employed to qualitatively extend the results to a compressible gas flow through the nozzle. Experimental results from the water table include contours of constant Froude and Mach number with and without injection. Photographic results are also presented for the injection through slots of CO2 and Freon-12 into a main-stream air flow in a convergent-divergent nozzle in a wind tunnel. Schlieren photographs were used to visualize the flow, and qualititative agreement between the results from the gas tunnel and water table is good.

  19. Novel Optical Technique Developed and Tested for Measuring Two-Point Velocity Correlations in Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Goldburg, Walter I.

    2002-01-01

    A novel technique for characterizing turbulent flows was developed and tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The work is being done in collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh, through a grant from the NASA Microgravity Fluid Physics Program. The technique we are using, Homodyne Correlation Spectroscopy (HCS), is a laser-light-scattering technique that measures the Doppler frequency shift of light scattered from microscopic particles in the fluid flow. Whereas Laser Doppler Velocimetry gives a local (single-point) measurement of the fluid velocity, the HCS technique measures correlations between fluid velocities at two separate points in the flow at the same instant of time. Velocity correlations in the flow field are of fundamental interest to turbulence researchers and are of practical importance in many engineering applications, such as aeronautics.

  20. Design, testing, and model validation of an MR squeeze-flow vibration damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, Neil D.; Stanway, Roger; Johnson, Andrew R.; Mellor, Phillip

    2001-07-01

    Ongoing research at the University of Sheffield is currently concerned with the design and construction of magneto- rheological (MR) squeeze-flow vibration damper. Previous work has demonstrated the feasibility of employing such a device as the key component in a controllable vibration isolator. The work also demonstrated the inadequacies of existing mathematical models which do not account for the observed behavior of MR fluids in squeeze flow. In parallel with investigations into the behavior of MR dampers, a collaborative programme between the Universities of Liverpool and Sheffield is also in progress. Here attention is focussed on ER fluids in squeeze-flow and a new test facility has been constructed for use in the development and validation of mathematical models. It is anticipated that this collaborative programme will assist in the development of both ER and MR squeeze-flow models. In this paper, the authors present a summary of progress to date.

  1. Sampling Point Compliance Tests for 325 Building at Set-Back Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Glissmeyer, John A.; Barnett, J. M.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2011-05-31

    The stack sampling system at the 325 Building (Radiochemical Processing Laboratory [RPL]) was constructed to comply with the American National Standards Institute’s (ANSI’s) Guide to Sampling Airborne Radioactive Materials in Nuclear Facilities (ANSI N13.1-1969). This standard provided prescriptive criteria for the location of radionuclide air-sampling systems. In 1999, the standard was revised (Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances From the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities [ANSI/Health Physics Society [HPS] 13.1-1999]) to provide performance-based criteria for the location of sampling systems. Testing was conducted for the 325 Building stack to determine whether the sampling system would meet the updated criteria for uniform air velocity and contaminant concentration in the revised ANSI/HPS 13.1-1999 standard under normal operating conditions (Smith et al. 2010). Measurement results were within criteria for all tests. Additional testing and modeling was performed to determine whether the sampling system would meet criteria under set-back flow conditions. This included measurements taken from a scale model with one-third of the exhaust flow and computer modeling of the system with two-thirds of the exhaust flow. This report documents the results of the set-back flow condition measurements and modeling. Tests performed included flow angularity, uniformity of velocity, gas concentration, and particle concentration across the duct at the sampling location. Results are within ANSI/HPS 13.1-1999 criteria for all tests. These tests are applicable for the 325 Building stack under set-back exhaust flow operating conditions (980 - 45,400 cubic feet per minute [cfm]) with one fan running. The modeling results show that criteria are met for all tests using a two-fan configuration exhaust (flow modeled at 104,000 cfm). Combined with the results from the earlier normal operating conditions, the ANSI/HPS 13.1-1999 criteria for all tests

  2. 3D Particle image velocimetry test of inner flow in a double blade pump impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Houlin; Wang, Kai; Yuan, Shouqi; Tan, Minggao; Wang, Yong; Ru, Weimin

    2012-05-01

    The double blade pump is widely used in sewage treatment industry, however, the research on the internal flow characteristics of the double blade pump with particle image velocimetry (PIV) technology is very little at present. To reveal inner flow characteristics in double blade pump impeller under off-design and design conditions, inner flows in a double blade pump impeller, whose specific speed is 111, are measured under the five off-design conditions and design condition by using 3D PIV test technology. In order to ensure the accuracy of the 3D PIV test, the external trigger synchronization system which makes use of fiber optic and equivalent calibration method are applied. The 3D PIV relative velocity synthesis procedure is compiled by using Visual C++ 2005. Then absolute velocity distribution and relative velocity distribution in the double blade pump impeller are obtained. Test results show that vortex exists in each condition, but the location, size and velocity of vortex core are different. Average absolute velocity value of impeller outlet increases at first, then decreases, and then increases again with increase of flow rate. Again average relative velocity values under 0.4, 0.8, and 1.2 design condition are higher than that under 1.0 design condition, while under 0.6 and 1.4 design condition it is lower. Under low flow rate conditions, radial vectors of absolute velocities at impeller outlet and blade inlet near the pump shaft decrease with increase of flow rate, while that of relative velocities at the suction side near the pump shaft decreases. Radial vectors of absolute velocities and relative velocities change slightly under the two large flow rate conditions. The research results can be applied to instruct the hydraulic optimization design of double blade pumps.

  3. Characterization of scale-dependent dispersivity in fractured formations through a divergent flow tracer test.

    PubMed

    Sharifi Haddad, Amin; Hassanzadeh, Hassan; Abedi, Jalal; Chen, Zhangxin; Ware, Antony

    2015-04-01

    Scale-dependency of dispersivity has been reported from field tracer tests. We present a simple methodology for characterization of dispersivity as a linear function of scale around an injection well using divergent flow tracer test data conducted in fractured formations. Results show that the slope of this linear dispersivity function can be estimated using tracer concentration measurements in a monitoring well. The characterized dispersivity function has applications in modeling of field-scale transport processes in fractured formations. PMID:24660811

  4. NASA Ares I Launch Vehicle First Stage Roll Control System Cold Flow Development Test Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butt, Adam; Popp, Christopher G.; Holt, Kimberly A.; Pitts, Hank M.

    2010-01-01

    The Ares I launch vehicle is the selected design, chosen to return humans to the moon, Mars, and beyond. It is configured in two inline stages: the First Stage is a Space Shuttle derived five-segment Solid Rocket Booster and the Upper Stage is powered by a Saturn V derived J-2X engine. During launch, roll control for the First Stage (FS) is handled by a dedicated Roll Control System (RoCS) located on the connecting Interstage. That system will provide the Ares I with the ability to counteract induced roll torque while any induced yaw or pitch moments are handled by vectoring of the booster nozzle. This paper provides an overview of NASA s Ares I FS RoCS cold flow development test program including detailed test objectives, types of tests run to meet those objectives, an overview of the results, and applicable lessons learned. The test article was built and tested at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL. The FS RoCS System Development Test Article (SDTA) is a full scale, flight representative water flow test article whose primary objective was to obtain fluid system performance data to evaluate integrated system level performance characteristics and verify analytical models. Development testing and model correlation was deemed necessary as there is little historical precedent for similar large flow, pulsing systems such as the FS RoCS. The cold flow development test program consisted of flight-similar tanks, pressure regulators, and thruster valves, as well as plumbing simulating flight geometries, combined with other facility grade components and structure. Orifices downstream of the thruster valves were used to simulate the pressure drop through the thrusters. Additional primary objectives of this test program were to: evaluate system surge pressure (waterhammer) characteristics due to thruster valve operation over a range of mission duty cycles at various feed system pressures, evaluate temperature transients and heat transfer in the

  5. Effect of banana on cold stress test & peak expiratory flow rate in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, C; Bairy, K L; Rao, N M; Udupa, E G

    1999-07-01

    The effect of banana on cold stress induced hypertension, peak expiratory flow rate and plasma ACE activity in healthy human volunteers was tested. Systolic blood pressure (P < 0.005), diastolic blood pressure (P < 0.025) and mean arterial blood pressure (P < 0.005) were significantly decreased during cold stress after banana treatment compared to controls subjected to cold stress. There was no significant changes in heart rate and peak expiratory flow rate but only significant decrease in plasma ACE activity after banana treatment. Banana decreased the rise of systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure in healthy volunteers subjected to cold stress test without much effect on heart rate and peak expiratory flow rate. PMID:10709336

  6. Model-Invariant Hybrid Computations of Separated Flows for RCA Standard Test Cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Revolutionary Computational Aerosciences (RCA) subproject has identified several smooth-body separated flows as standard test cases to emphasize the challenge these flows present for computational methods and their importance to the aerospace community. Results of computations of two of these test cases, the NASA hump and the FAITH experiment, are presented. The computations were performed with the model-invariant hybrid LES-RANS formulation, implemented in the NASA code VULCAN-CFD. The model- invariant formulation employs gradual LES-RANS transitions and compensation for model variation to provide more accurate and efficient hybrid computations. Comparisons revealed that the LES-RANS transitions employed in these computations were sufficiently gradual that the compensating terms were unnecessary. Agreement with experiment was achieved only after reducing the turbulent viscosity to mitigate the effect of numerical dissipation. The stream-wise evolution of peak Reynolds shear stress was employed as a measure of turbulence dynamics in separated flows useful for evaluating computations.

  7. Study and application of a high-pressure water jet multi-functional flow test system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Huaizhong; Li, Gensheng; Huang, Zhongwei; Li, Jingbin; Zhang, Yi

    2015-12-01

    As the exploration and development of oil and gas focus more and more on deeper formation, hydraulic issues such as high-pressure water jet rock breaking, wellbore multiphase flow law, cuttings carrying efficiency, and hydraulic fracturing technique during the drilling and completion process have become the key points. To accomplish related researches, a high-pressure water jet multi-functional flow test system was designed. The following novel researches are carried out: study of high-pressure water jet characteristics under confining pressure, wellbore multiphase flow regime, hydraulic pressure properties of down hole tools during jet fracturing and pulsed cavitation jet drilling, and deflector's friction in radial jet drilling. The validity and feasibility of the experimental results provided by the system with various test modules have proved its importance in the research of the high-pressure water jet and well completion technology.

  8. Study and application of a high-pressure water jet multi-functional flow test system.

    PubMed

    Shi, Huaizhong; Li, Gensheng; Huang, Zhongwei; Li, Jingbin; Zhang, Yi

    2015-12-01

    As the exploration and development of oil and gas focus more and more on deeper formation, hydraulic issues such as high-pressure water jet rock breaking, wellbore multiphase flow law, cuttings carrying efficiency, and hydraulic fracturing technique during the drilling and completion process have become the key points. To accomplish related researches, a high-pressure water jet multi-functional flow test system was designed. The following novel researches are carried out: study of high-pressure water jet characteristics under confining pressure, wellbore multiphase flow regime, hydraulic pressure properties of down hole tools during jet fracturing and pulsed cavitation jet drilling, and deflector's friction in radial jet drilling. The validity and feasibility of the experimental results provided by the system with various test modules have proved its importance in the research of the high-pressure water jet and well completion technology. PMID:26724077

  9. An assessment of TRAC-PD2 refill calculations based on Creare countercurrent flow tests

    SciTech Connect

    Bott, T.F.

    1982-04-01

    An important step in computer code development is the assessment of code capabilities through comparison of calculated results with experimental data A number of Creare countercurrent flow tests were simulated with the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC)-PD2 code to assess the emergency core coolant (ECC) lower plenum penetration and refill predictive capabilities. The tests examined in this study indicate a prediction of complete bypass and delivery at countercurrent steam flows where these phenomena occurred experimentally. Steam flows leading to partial delivery experimentally did not always lead to partial delivery in the calculations, however. A number of parameters can potentially effect TRAC refill calculations. Sensitivity studies indicate the TRAC results are most sensitive to droplet Weber number variations that affect interfacial shear and heat transfer rates. The condensation model also affects calculations with subcooled ECC liquid.

  10. Modern challenges for flow investigations in model hydraulic turbines on classical test rig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschênes, C.; Houde, S.; Aeschlimann, V.; Fraser, R.; Ciocan, G. D.

    2014-03-01

    The BulbT project involved several investigations of flow phenomena in different parts of a model bulb turbine installed on the test rig of Laval University Laboratory. The aim is to create a comprehensive data base in order to increase the knowledge of the flow phenomena in this type of turbines and to validate or improve numerical flow simulation strategies. This validation being based on a kinematic comparison between experimental and numerical data, the project had to overcome challenges to facilitate the use of the experimental data for that purpose. Many parameters were checked, such as the test bench repeatability, the intrusiveness of a priori non-intrusive methods, the geometry of the runner and draft tube. This paper illustrates how some of those problematic were solved.

  11. Application of a cold flow model in testing the feasiblity of an oil shale retorting process

    SciTech Connect

    Furlong, M.W.; Tatterson, D.F.; Vasalos, I.A.

    1985-01-01

    An oil shale fluid bed process successfully tested in 1.5 ton/day pilot plant in Amoco Research Center is discussed. Emphasis is given on information showing the application of cold flow unit results in the interpretation of retort product yields.

  12. 7 CFR 28.603 - Procedures for air flow tests of micronaire reading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Procedures for air flow tests of micronaire reading... micronaire reading. In determining in terms of micronaire readings, the fiber fineness and maturity, in... cotton in terms of micronaire reading on the curvilinear scale adopted in September 1950 by...

  13. Flow-Visualization Techniques Used at High Speed by Configuration Aerodynamics Wind-Tunnel-Test Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes a variety of optically based flow-visualization techniques used for high-speed research by the Configuration Aerodynamics Wind-Tunnel Test Team of the High-Speed Research Program during its tenure. The work of other national experts is included for completeness. Details of each technique with applications and status in various national wind tunnels are given.

  14. 7 CFR 28.603 - Procedures for air flow tests of micronaire reading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedures for air flow tests of micronaire reading... micronaire reading. In determining in terms of micronaire readings, the fiber fineness and maturity, in... cotton in terms of micronaire reading on the curvilinear scale adopted in September 1950 by...

  15. Mechanical Design of a Performance Test Rig for the Turbine Air-Flow Task (TAFT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xenofos, George; Forbes, John; Farrow, John; Williams, Robert; Tyler, Tom; Sargent, Scott; Moharos, Jozsef

    2003-01-01

    To support development of the Boeing-Rocketdyne RS84 rocket engine, a fill-flow, reaction turbine geometry was integrated into the NASA-MSFC turbine air-flow test facility. A mechanical design was generated which minimized the amount of new hardware while incorporating all test and instrUmentation requirements. This paper provides details of the mechanical design for this Turbine Air-Flow Task (TAFT) test rig. The mechanical design process utilized for this task included the following basic stages: Conceptual Design. Preliminary Design. Detailed Design. Baseline of Design (including Configuration Control and Drawing Revision). Fabrication. Assembly. During the design process, many lessons were learned that should benefit future test rig design projects. Of primary importance are well-defined requirements early in the design process, a thorough detailed design package, and effective communication with both the customer and the fabrication contractors. The test rig provided steady and unsteady pressure data necessary to validate the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The rig also helped characterize the turbine blade loading conditions. Test and CFD analysis results are to be presented in another JANNAF paper.

  16. The Sympathetic Release Test: A Test Used to Assess Thermoregulation and Autonomic Control of Blood Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tansey, E. A.; Roe, S. M.; Johnson, C. J.

    2014-01-01

    When a subject is heated, the stimulation of temperature-sensitive nerve endings in the skin, and the raising of the central body temperature, results in the reflex release of sympathetic vasoconstrictor tone in the skin of the extremities, causing a measurable temperature increase at the site of release. In the sympathetic release test, the…

  17. A comparison of measured and predicted test flow in an expansion tube with air and oxygen test gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aaggard, K. V.; Goad, W. K.

    1975-01-01

    Simultaneous time-resolved measurements of temperature, density, pitot pressure, and wall pressure in both air and O2 test gases were obtained in the Langley pilot model expansion tube. These tests show nonequilibrium chemical and vibrational relaxation significantly affect the test-flow condition. The use of an electromagnetic device to preopen the secondary diaphragm before the arrival of the primary shock wave resulted in an improvement in the agreement between the measured pitot pressure and the value inferred from measured density and interface velocity. Boundary-layer splitter plates used to reduce the wall boundary layer show that this disagreement in the measured and inferred pitot pressures is not a result of boundary-layer effects.

  18. Single element injector cold flow testing for STME swirl coaxial injector element design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulka, J.; Schneider, J. A.

    1993-06-01

    An oxidizer-swirled coaxial element injector is being investigated for application in the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME). Single element cold flow experiments were conducted to provide characterization of the STME injector element for future analysis, design, and optimization. All tests were conducted to quiescent, ambient backpressure conditions. Spray angle, circumferential spray uniformity, dropsize, and dropsize distribution were measured in water-only and water/nitrogen flows. Rupe mixing efficiency was measured using water/sucrose solution flows with a large grid patternator for simple comparative evaluation of mixing. Factorial designs of experiment were used for statistical evaluation of injector geometrical design features and propellant flow conditions on mixing and atomization. Increasing the free swirl angle of the liquid oxidizer had the greatest influence on increasing the mixing efficiency. The addition of gas assistance had the most significant effect on reducing oxidizer droplet size parameters and increasing droplet size distribution. Increasing the oxidizer injection velocity had the greatest influence for reducing oxidizer droplet size parameters and increasing size distribution for non-gas assisted flows. Single element and multi-element subscale hot fire testing are recommended to verify optimized designs before committing to the STME design.

  19. Single element injector cold flow testing for STME swirl coaxial injector element design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulka, J.; Schneider, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    An oxidizer-swirled coaxial element injector is being investigated for application in the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME). Single element cold flow experiments were conducted to provide characterization of the STME injector element for future analysis, design, and optimization. All tests were conducted to quiescent, ambient backpressure conditions. Spray angle, circumferential spray uniformity, dropsize, and dropsize distribution were measured in water-only and water/nitrogen flows. Rupe mixing efficiency was measured using water/sucrose solution flows with a large grid patternator for simple comparative evaluation of mixing. Factorial designs of experiment were used for statistical evaluation of injector geometrical design features and propellant flow conditions on mixing and atomization. Increasing the free swirl angle of the liquid oxidizer had the greatest influence on increasing the mixing efficiency. The addition of gas assistance had the most significant effect on reducing oxidizer droplet size parameters and increasing droplet size distribution. Increasing the oxidizer injection velocity had the greatest influence for reducing oxidizer droplet size parameters and increasing size distribution for non-gas assisted flows. Single element and multi-element subscale hot fire testing are recommended to verify optimized designs before committing to the STME design.

  20. Flow-Log Analysis for Hydraulic Characterization of Selected Test Wells at the Indian Point Energy Center, Buchanan, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, John H.

    2008-01-01

    Flow logs from 24 test wells were analyzed as part of the hydraulic characterization of the metamorphosed and fractured carbonate bedrock at the Indian Point Energy Center in Buchanan, New York. The flow logs were analyzed along with caliper, optical- and acoustic-televiewer, and fluid-resistivity and temperature logs to determine the character and distribution of fracture-flow zones and estimate their transmissivities and hydraulic heads. Many flow zones were associated with subhorizontal to shallow-dipping fractured zones, southeast-dipping bedding fractures, northwest-dipping conjugate fractures, or combinations of bedding and conjugate fractures. Flow-log analysis generally provided reasonable first-order estimates of flow-zone transmissivity and head differences compared with the results of conventional hydraulic-test analysis and measurements. Selected results of an aquifer test and a tracer test provided corroborating information in support of the flow-log analysis.

  1. Orifice In-flow Efficiency Tests. Volume 1: Test Results. Volume 2: Application to Shuttle Venting During Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haukohl, J.; Forkois, J. L.; Robertson, S. J.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was made of the capability for computing internal pressures throughout flight for compartments located within space shuttle vehicles. A test program was conducted at a 6 x 6 foot supersonic wind tunnel to determine orifice efficiencies for the flow of air into a compartment from a flowing external stream. Measurements were made over a Mach number range of 0.7 to 1.9 for varying orifice geometry, vent orientation, vent plate thickness, flat plate boundary layer thickness, and pressure ratio across the vent plate. A computer program developed for outflow venting was modified for use in computing compartment pressures for inflow conditions. Results from both the outflow and inflow computer programs are included. A user's manual and program listing of the inflow venting program are also included.

  2. Inlet Flow Test Calibration for a Small Axial Compressor Facility. Part 1: Design and Experimental Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. P.; Prahst, P. S.

    1994-01-01

    An axial compressor test rig has been designed for the operation of small turbomachines. The inlet region consisted of a long flowpath region with two series of support struts and a flapped inlet guide vane. A flow test was run to calibrate and determine the source and magnitudes of the loss mechanisms in the inlet for a highly loaded two-stage axial compressor test. Several flow conditions and IGV angle settings were established in which detailed surveys were completed. Boundary layer bleed was also provided along the casing of the inlet behind the support struts and ahead of the IGV. A detailed discussion of the flowpath design along with a summary of the experimental results are provided in Part 1.

  3. Conception of a test bench to generate known and controlled conditions of refrigerant mass flow.

    PubMed

    Martins, Erick F; Flesch, Carlos A; Flesch, Rodolfo C C; Borges, Maikon R

    2011-07-01

    Refrigerant compressor performance tests play an important role in the evaluation of the energy characteristics of the compressor, enabling an increase in the quality, reliability, and efficiency of these products. Due to the nonexistence of a refrigerating capacity standard, it is common to use previously conditioned compressors for the intercomparison and evaluation of the temporal drift of compressor performance test panels. However, there are some limitations regarding the use of these specific compressors as standards. This study proposes the development of a refrigerating capacity standard which consists of a mass flow meter and a variable-capacity compressor, whose speed is set based on the mass flow rate measured by the meter. From the results obtained in the tests carried out on a bench specifically developed for this purpose, it was possible to validate the concept of a capacity standard. PMID:21334618

  4. The NASA Juncture Flow Experiment: Goals, Progress, and Preliminary Testing (Invited)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.; Neuhart, Danny H.; Kegerise, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    NASA has been working toward designing and conducting a juncture flow experiment on a wing-body aircraft configuration. The experiment is planned to provide validation-quality data for CFD that focuses on the onset and progression of a separation bubble near the wing-body juncture trailing edge region. This paper describes the goals and purpose of the experiment. Although currently considered unreliable, preliminary CFD analyses of several different configurations are shown. These configurations have been subsequently tested in a series of "risk-reduction" wind tunnel tests, in order to help down-select to a final configuration that will attain the desired flow behavior. The risk-reduction testing at the higher Reynolds number has not yet been completed (at the time of this writing), but some results from one of the low-Reynolds-number experiments are shown.

  5. Brief Communication: A new testing field for debris flow warning systems and algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arattano, M.; Coviello, V.; Cavalli, M.; Comiti, F.; Macconi, P.; Marchi, L.; Theule, J.; Crema, S.

    2015-03-01

    Early warning systems (EWSs) are among the measures adopted for the mitigation of debris flow hazards. EWSs often employ algorithms that require careful and long testing to grant their effectiveness. A permanent installation has been so equipped in the Gadria basin (Eastern Italian Alps) for the systematic test of event-EWSs. The installation is conceived to produce didactic videos and host informative visits. The populace involvement and education is in fact an essential step in any hazard mitigation activity and it should envisaged in planning any research activity. The occurrence of a debris flow in the Gadria creek, in the summer of 2014, allowed a first test of the installation and the recording of an informative video on EWSs.

  6. Nozzle start flow investigation in the conditions of high-altitude test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volodin, V. V.; Bazhenova, T. V.; Fortov, V. E.; Golub, V. V.; Makeich, A. A.; Shcherbak, S. B.

    Rocket engines for future-technology vehicles development requires special ground-based test facilities to simulate the conditions at high altitude. The unsteady flow phenomena in the nozzle during starting process can cause the dangerous loads on the nozzles. The real propulsion engines high-altitude tests in the vacuum chamber are very expensive due to the huge vacuum chamber should be used. Usually ejector pumps are used for the initial rarefaction creation. The investigations of real propulsions in the test facilities with ejector are not so expensive but they can cause external loads on the nozzle wall at the nozzle start. Both of these techniques do not allow the flow pattern in the diffuser observing. Because the modern nozzles usually are thin any pressure excess around the nozzle may cause nozzle damage. In the present paper, a method of experimental and numerical analyses of disturbances at the start of a rocket engine is proposed.

  7. Why is the Cascadia subduction zone backarc hot? Numerical tests of mantle wedge flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, C. A.; Wang, K.; Hyndman, R. D.; He, J.

    2003-12-01

    -arc temperatures (>1250° C). However, the flow pattern produces low backarc mantle temperatures and heat flow, inconsistent with observations. For all models, full coupling between the subducting plate and wedge was assumed. If partial decoupling occurs, due to the presence of hydrated mantle or serpentine/talc, wedge flow velocities will be slower, and the wedge will be cooler than predicted by the models. None of the traction-driven flow models simultaneously produced high temperatures below the volcanic arc and a uniformly hot backarc. Numerous studies indicate that the mantle wedge viscosity is less than 1019 Pa s. Initial tests suggest that at such low viscosities, wedge flow driven by thermal buoyancy may be more important than traction-driven flow.

  8. Nature and extent of lava-flow aquifers beneath Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Prothro, L.B.; Drellack, S.L. Jr.

    1997-09-01

    Work is currently underway within the Underground Test Area subproject of the US Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office Environmental Restoration Program to develop corrective action plans in support of the overall corrective action strategy for the Nevada Test Site as established in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). A closure plan is currently being developed for Pahute Mesa, which has been identified in the FFACO as consisting of the Western and Central Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Units. Part of this effort requires that hydrogeologic data be compiled for inclusion in a regional model that will be used to predict a contaminant boundary for these Corrective Action Units. Hydrogeologic maps have been prepared for use in the model to define the nature and extent of aquifers and confining units that might influence the flow of contaminated groundwater from underground nuclear tests conducted at Pahute Mesa. Much of the groundwater flow beneath Pahute Mesa occurs within lava-flow aquifers. An understanding of the distribution and hydraulic character of these important hydrogeologic units is necessary to accurately model groundwater flow beneath Pahute Mesa. This report summarizes the results of a study by Bechtel Nevada geologists to better define the hydrogeology of lava-flow aquifers at Pahute Mesa. The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) aid in the development of the hydrostratigraphic framework for Pahute Mesa, and (2) provide information on the distribution and hydraulic character of lava-flow aquifers beneath Pahute Mesa for more accurate computer modeling of the Western and Central Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Units.

  9. Testing and benchmarking of a three-dimensional groundwater flow and solute transport model

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, P.N.; Andersen, P.F.; Faust, C.R.; Stephenson, D.E.

    1988-12-31

    A three-dimensional finite-difference model was developed to simulate groundwater flow and solute transport. The model is intended for application to a variety of groundwater resource and solute migration evaluations, including several complex sites at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Because the model, FTWORK, is relatively new, there is a need to provide confidence in the model results. Methodologies that test models include comparisons with analytical solutions, comparisons with empirical data, and checking that conservation properties hold. Another level of testing is the comparison of one code against another. This paper describes the testing and benchmarking procedure used to verify the validate FTWORK.

  10. Wind-Tunnel Survey of an Oscillating Flow Field for Application to Model Helicopter Rotor Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirick, Paul H.; Hamouda, M-Nabil H.; Yeager, William T., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A survey was conducted of the flow field produced by the Airstream Oscillator System (AOS) in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT). The magnitude of a simulated gust field was measured at 15 locations in the plane of a typical model helicopter rotor when tested in the TDT using the Aeroelastic Rotor Experimental System (ARES) model. These measurements were made over a range of tunnel dynamic pressures typical of those used for an ARES test. The data indicate that the gust field produced by the AOS is non-uniform across the tunnel test section, but should be sufficient to excite a model rotor.

  11. Field Test Results from a 10 kW Wind Turbine with Active Flow Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Thomas; Bychkova, Veronika; Taylor, Keith; Clingman, Dan; Amitay, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Active flow control devices including synthetic jets and dynamic vortex generators were tested on a 10 kW wind turbine at RPI. Previous work has shown that load oscillations caused by dynamic stall could be modified through the use of active flow control by injecting momentum into the flow field near the leading edge of a dynamically pitching model. In this study, this work has been extended to its logical conclusion, field-testing active flow control on a real wind turbine. The blades in the current study have a 0.28m chord and 3.05m span, no twist or taper, and were retrofitted with six synthetic jets on one blade and ten dynamic vortex generators on a second blade. The third blade of this turbine was not modified, in order to serve as a control. Strain gauges were installed on each blade to measure blades' deflection. A simple closed loop control was demonstrated and preliminary results indicate reduced vibrational amplitude. Future testing will be conducted on a larger scale, 600kW machine at NREL, incorporating information collected during this study.

  12. Columbia University flow instability experimental program: Volume 7. Single tube tests, critical heat flux test program

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

    1992-09-01

    This report deals with critical heat flux (CHF) measurements in vertical down flow of water at low pressures in a round Inconel tube, 96 inches long and 0.62 inch inside diameter. A total of 28 CHF points were obtained. These data were found to correlate linearly with the single variable q, defined as the heat flux required to raise the enthalpy from the inlet value to the saturation value. These results were compared to the published results of Swedish investigators for vertical upflow of water at low pressures in round tubes of similar diameters and various lengths. The parameter q depends on the inlet enthalpy and is a nonlocal variable, thus this correlation is nonlocal unless the coefficients depend upon tube length in a particular prescribed manner. For the low pressure Swedish data, the coefficients are practically independent of length and hence the correlation is nonlocal. In the present investigation only one length was employed, so it is not possible to determine whether the correlation for these data is local or nonlocal, although there is reason to believe that it is local. The same correlation was applied to a large data base (thousands of CHF points) compiled from the published data of a number of groups and found to apply, with reasonable accuracy over a wide range of conditions, yielding sometimes local and sometimes nonlocal correlations. The basic philosophy of data analysis here was not to generate a single correlation which would reproduce all data, but to search for correlations which apply adequately over some range and which might have some mechanistic significance. The tentative conclusion is that at least two mechanisms appear operative, leading to two types of correlations, one local, the other nonlocal.

  13. Non-Flow-Through Fuel Cell System Test Results and Demonstration on the SCARAB Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheidegger, Brianne, T.; Burke, Kenneth A.; Jakupca, Ian J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the results of the demonstration of a non-flow-through PEM fuel cell as part of a power system on the SCARAB rover. A 16-cell non-flow-through fuel cell stack from Infinity Fuel Cell and Hydrogen, Inc. was incorporated into a power system designed to act as a range extender by providing power to the rover s hotel loads. This work represents the first attempt at a ground demonstration of this new technology aboard a mobile test platform. Development and demonstration were supported by the Office of the Chief Technologist s Space Power Systems Project and the Advanced Exploration System Modular Power Systems Project.

  14. A flight test investigation of certification requirements for laminar-flow general aviation airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manuel, Gregory S.; Doty, Wayne A.

    1990-01-01

    A modified T210R general aviation aircraft incorporating natural laminar flow (NLF) technology has been subjected to flight tests in order to evaluate its stability and control characteristics. Attention is given to this aircraft's ability to meet certification requirements with significant NLF, as well as with the boundary-layer transition fixed near the leading edge. It is established that the large regions of NLF achieved yielded a significant cruise performance enhancement; loss of laminar flow did not result in significant changes in the stability and control characteristics of the aircraft. FAR Part 23 certification requirements were met.

  15. Computational investigation of the discharge coefficient of bellmouth flow meters in engine test facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebourn, Charles Lynn

    2002-11-01

    In this thesis computation of the discharge coefficient of bellmouth flow meters installed in engine test facilities is presented. The discharge coefficient is a critical parameter for accurately calculating flow rate in any flow meter which operates by means of creating a pressure differential. Engine airflow is a critical performance parameter and therefore, it is necessary for engine test facilities to accurately measure airflow. In this report the author investigates the use of computational fluid dynamics using finite difference methods to calculate the flow in bellmouth flow meters and hence the discharge coefficient at any measurement station desired. Experimental boundary layer and core flow data was used to verify the capability of the WIND code to calculate the discharge coefficient accurately. Good results were obtained for Reynolds numbers equal to or greater than about three million which is the primary range of interest. After verifying the WIND code performance, results were calculated for a range of Reynolds numbers and Mach numbers. Also the variation in discharge coefficient as a function of measurement location was examined. It is demonstrated that by picking the proper location for pressure measurement, sensitivity to measurement location can be minimized. Also of interest was the effect of bellmouth geometry. Calculations were performed to investigate the effect of duct to bellmouth diameter ratio and the eccentricity of the bellmouth contraction. In general the effects of the beta ratio were seen to be quite small. For the eccentricity, the variation in discharge coefficient was as high as several percent for axial locations less than half a diameter downstream from the throat. The second portion of the thesis examined the effect of a turbofan engine stationed just downstream of the bellmouth flow meter. The study approximated this effect by examining a single fan stage installed in the duct. This calculation was performed by making use of a

  16. An F2D analysis of the Flow Instability Test (FIT) experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Suo-Anttila, A.

    1993-10-01

    The F2D code was used to analyze the Flow-Instability-Test (FIT) experiments at Brookhaven National Laboratories. A one-dimensional analysis of the experiment indicated that at the higher temperature levels the element should be unstable. The experimental data corroborated this theory. The two-dimensional simulation behaved in a manner that was very similar to the experimentally measured behavior. In conclusion, the FIT experimental analysis yields partial code validation of F2D, and it also validates the methodology that is used in analyzing thermal flow stability.

  17. Evaluation of groundwater flow and transport at the Shoal underground nuclear test: An interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Pohll, G.; Chapman, J.; Hassan, A.; Papelis, C.; Andricevic, R.; Shirley, C.

    1998-07-01

    Since 1962, all United States nuclear tests have been conducted underground. A consequence of this testing has been the deposition of large amounts of radioactive materials in the subsurface, sometimes in direct contact with groundwater. The majority of this testing occurred on the Nevada Test Site, but a limited number of experiments were conducted in other locations. One of these is the subject of this report, the Project Shoal Area (PSA), located about 50 km southeast of Fallon, Nevada. The Shoal test consisted of a 12-kiloton-yield nuclear detonation which occurred on October 26, 1963. Project Shoal was part of studies to enhance seismic detection of underground nuclear tests, in particular, in active earthquake areas. Characterization of groundwater contamination at the Project Shoal Area is being conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) with the State of Nevada Department of Environmental Protection and the US Department of Defense (DOD). This order prescribes a Corrective Action Strategy (Appendix VI), which, as applied to underground nuclear tests, involves preparing a Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP), Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD), Corrective Action Plan, and Closure Report. The scope of the CAIP is flow and transport modeling to establish contaminant boundaries that are protective of human health and the environment. This interim report describes the current status of the flow and transport modeling for the PSA.

  18. Space Launch System Base Heating Test: Environments and Base Flow Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Manish; Knox, Kyle S.; Seaford, C. Mark; Dufrene, Aaron T.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) vehicle is composed of four RS-25 liquid oxygen-hydrogen rocket engines in the core-stage and two 5-segment solid rocket boosters and as a result six hot supersonic plumes interact within the aft section of the vehicle during flight. Due to the complex nature of rocket plume-induced flows within the launch vehicle base during ascent and a new vehicle configuration, sub-scale wind tunnel testing is required to reduce SLS base convective environment uncertainty and design risk levels. This hot-fire test program was conducted at the CUBRC Large Energy National Shock (LENS) II short-duration test facility to simulate flight from altitudes of 50 kft to 210 kft. The test program is a challenging and innovative effort that has not been attempted in 40+ years for a NASA vehicle. This paper discusses the various trends of base convective heat flux and pressure as a function of altitude at various locations within the core-stage and booster base regions of the two-percent SLS wind tunnel model. In-depth understanding of the base flow physics is presented using the test data, infrared high-speed imaging and theory. The normalized test design environments are compared to various NASA semi-empirical numerical models to determine exceedance and conservatism of the flight scaled test-derived base design environments. Brief discussion of thermal impact to the launch vehicle base components is also presented.

  19. 42 CFR 84.155 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirator; minimum requirements. 84.155 Section... Respirators § 84.155 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type... shall not exceed 25 mm. (1 inch) of water-column height when the air flow into the...

  20. Cold Flow Testing for Liquid Propellant Rocket Injector Scaling and Throttling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Jeremy R.; Moser, Marlow D.; Hulka, James; Jones, Gregg

    2006-01-01

    Scaling and throttling of combustion devices are important capabilities to demonstrate in development of liquid rocket engines for NASA's Space Exploration Mission. Scaling provides the ability to design new injectors and injection elements with predictable performance on the basis of test experience with existing injectors and elements, and could be a key aspect of future development programs. Throttling is the reduction of thrust with fixed designs and is a critical requirement in lunar and other planetary landing missions. A task in the Constellation University Institutes Program (CUIP) has been designed to evaluate spray characteristics when liquid propellant rocket engine injectors are scaled and throttled. The specific objectives of the present study are to characterize injection and primary atomization using cold flow simulations of the reacting sprays. These simulations can provide relevant information because the injection and primary atomization are believed to be the spray processes least affected by the propellant reaction. Cold flow studies also provide acceptable test conditions for a university environment. Three geometric scales - 1/4- scale, 1/2-scale, and full-scale - of two different injector element types - swirl coaxial and shear coaxial - will be designed, fabricated, and tested. A literature review is currently being conducted to revisit and compile the previous scaling documentation. Because it is simple to perform, throttling will also be examined in the present work by measuring primary atomization characteristics as the mass flow rate and pressure drop of the six injector element concepts are reduced, with corresponding changes in chamber backpressure. Simulants will include water and gaseous nitrogen, and an optically accessible chamber will be used for visual and laser-based diagnostics. The chamber will include curtain flow capability to repress recirculation, and additional gas injection to provide independent control of the

  1. A system for conducting flow-through toxicity tests with larval fish

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, S.A.; Oris, J.T.; Guttman, S.I.

    1995-08-01

    Assessment of toxicological effects in aquatic systems commonly include larval fish 96-h LC50 determinations. The LC50 tests are conducted using static renewal as well as flow-through methods. However, in the case of chemicals with high vapor pressures or fugacity, static renewal methods may produce inconsistent results arising from the pulsed nature of exposure. In addition, in exposures involving these types of compounds, the fluctuation in concentration that can occur between renewals is unlike most exposure scenarios in nature. For these reasons, flow-through systems are often preferable. The authors report here on an inexpensive, easily constructed, flow-through system for toxicant exposure of small organisms. Data are presented to illustrate the capacity of the system to maintain uniform toxicant concentrations relative to static renewal methods.

  2. Evaluation of pumping induced flow in observation wells during aquifer testing.

    PubMed

    Székely, Ferenc

    2013-01-01

    The vertical variation of drawdown around pumping wells generates an induced flow in the observation wells. A set of governing equations is presented to couple the drawdown variation and the vertical flux distribution in observation wells. A numerical example is performed to justify the governing equations and to verify the solution methods used by the simulation software WT. The example analyzes the effect of skin loss, wellbore storage, and vertical segmentation on the drawdown and induced flow in observation well during pumping. The evaluation of the Fairborn pumping test involves a vertically homogeneous and anisotropic water table aquifer, uniform well-face drawdown conditions in the pumping well and simulation of the drawdown evolution in the observation well with and without the effect of induced flow. The computer calibrations resulted in small differences between the measured and simulated drawdown curves. PMID:23198759

  3. UNSATURATED FLOW IN A CENTRIFUGAL FIELD: MEASUREMENT OF HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY AND TESTING OF DARCY'S LAW.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimmo, J.R.; Rubin, J.; Hammermeister, D.P.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been developed to establish steady flow of water in unsaturated soil sample spinning in a centrifuge. Theoretical analysis predicts moisture conditions in the sample that depend strongly on soil type and certain operating parameter. For Oakley sand, measurements of flux, water content, and matric potential during and after centrifugation verify that steady state flow can be achieved. Experiments have confirmed the theoretical prediction of a nearly uniform moisture distribution for this medium and have demonstrated that the flow can be effectively one-dimensional. The method was used for steady state measurements of hydraulic conductivity K for relatively dry soil, giving values at low as 7. 6 multiplied by 10** minus **1**1 m/s with data obtained in a few hours. Darcy's law was tested by measuring K for different centrifugal driving forces but with the same water content.

  4. DETERMINATION OF THE AGR-1 CAPSULE TO FPMS SPECTROMETER TRANSPORT VOLUMES FROM LEADOUT FLOW TEST DATA

    SciTech Connect

    J. K. Hartwell; J. B. Walter; D. M. Scates; M. W. Drigert

    2007-05-01

    The AGR-1 experiment is a fueled multiple-capsule irradiation experiment being conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in support of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. A flow experiment conducted during the AGR-1 irradiation provided data that included the effect of flow rate changes on the decay of a short-lived radionuclide (23Ne). This data has been analyzed to determine the capsule-specific downstream transport volume through which the capsule effluents must pass before arrival at the fission product monitoring system spectrometers. These resultant transport volumes when coupled with capsule outlet flow rates determine the transport times from capsule-to-detector. In this work an analysis protocol is developed and applied in order to determine capsule-specific transport volumes to precisions of better than +/- 7%.

  5. Graphical method for determining the coefficient of consolidation cv from a flow-pump permeability test

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morin, Roger H.; Olsen, Harold W.; Nelson, Karl R.; Gill, James D.

    1989-01-01

    A graphical method has been developed for determining the coefficient of consolidation from the transient phases of a flow-pump permeability test. The flow pump can be used to infuse fluid into or withdraw fluid from a laboratory sediment specimen at a constant volumetric rate in order to obtain data that can be used to calculate permeability using Darcy's law. Representative type-curve solutions to the associated forced-flow and pressure-decay models are derived. These curves provide the basis for graphically evaluating the permeability k, the coefficient of consolidation cv, and the coefficient of volume change mv. The curve-matching technique is easy and rapid. Values of k, cv and mv for a laterally confined kaolinite specimen were determined by this graphical method and appear to be in reasonably good agreement with numerically derived estimates (within 20%). Discrepancies between the two sets of results seem to be largely a function of data quality.

  6. Waterhammer modeling for the Ares I Upper Stage Reaction Control System cold flow development test article

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jonathan Hunter

    The Upper Stage Reaction Control System provides in-flight three-axis attitude control for the Ares I Upper Stage. The system design must accommodate rapid thruster firing to maintain proper launch trajectory and thus allow for the possibility to pulse multiple thrusters simultaneously. Rapid thruster valve closure creates an increase in static pressure, known as waterhammer, which propagates throughout the propellant system at pressures exceeding nominal design values. A series of development tests conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center in 2009 were performed using a water-flow test article to better understand fluid characteristics of the Upper Stage Reaction Control System. A subset of the tests examined the waterhammer pressure and frequency response in the flight-representative system and provided data to anchor numerical models. This thesis presents a comparison of waterhammer test results with numerical model and analytical results. An overview of the flight system, test article, modeling and analysis are also provided.

  7. Validation Analysis of the Groundwater Flow and Transport Model of the Central Nevada Test Area

    SciTech Connect

    A. Hassan; J. Chapman; H. Bekhit; B. Lyles; K. Pohlmann

    2006-09-30

    The Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site undergoing environmental restoration. The CNTA is located about 95 km northeast of Tonopah, Nevada, and 175 km southwest of Ely, Nevada (Figure 1.1). It was the site of the Faultless underground nuclear test conducted by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (DOE's predecessor agency) in January 1968. The purposes of this test were to gauge the seismic effects of a relatively large, high-yield detonation completed in Hot Creek Valley (outside the Nevada Test Site [NTS]) and to determine the suitability of the site for future large detonations. The yield of the Faultless underground nuclear test was between 200 kilotons and 1 megaton (DOE, 2000). A three-dimensional flow and transport model was created for the CNTA site (Pohlmann et al., 1999) and determined acceptable by DOE and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for predicting contaminant boundaries for the site.

  8. Two-dimensional modeling of sodium boiling in a simulated LMFBR loss-of-flow test

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, S.D.

    1984-01-01

    Loss-of-flow (LOF) accidents are of major importance in LMFBR safety. Tests have been performed to simulate the simultaneous failure of all primary pumps and reactor shutdown systems in a 37-pin electrically heated test bundle installed in the KNS sodium boiling loop at the Institute of Reactor Development, Karlsruhe. The tests simulated LOF conditions of the German prototype LMFBR, the SNR 300. The main objectives of these tests were to characterize the transient boiling development to cladding dryout and to provide data for validation of sodium boiling codes. One particular LOF test, designated L22, at full power was selected as a benchmark exercise for comparison of several codes at the Eleventh Meeting of the Liquid Metal Boiling Working Group (LMBWG) held in Grenoble, France, in October 1984. In this paper, the results of the calculations performed at ORNL with the two-dimensional (2-D) boiling code THORAX are presented.

  9. Laboratory Tests of Multiplex Detection of PCR Amplicons Using the Luminex 100 Flow Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Venkateswaran, K.S.; Nasarabadi, S.; Langlois, R.G.

    2000-05-05

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) demonstrated the power of flow cytometry in detecting the biological agents simulants at JFT III. LLNL pioneered in the development of advanced nucleic acid analyzer (ANM) for portable real time identification. Recent advances in flow cytometry provide a means for multiplexed nucleic acid detection and immunoassay of pathogenic microorganisms. We are presently developing multiplexed immunoassays for the simultaneous detection of different simulants. Our goal is to build an integrated instrument for both nucleic acid analysis and immuno detection. In this study we evaluated the Luminex LX 100 for concurrent identification of more than one PCR amplified product. ANAA has real-time Taqman fluorescent detection capability for rapid identification of field samples. However, its multiplexing ability is limited by the combination of available fluorescent labels. Hence integration of ANAA with flow cytometry can give the rapidity of ANAA amplification and the multiplex capability of flow cytometry. Multiplexed flow cytometric analysis is made possible using a set of fluorescent latex microsphere that are individually identified by their red and infrared fluorescence. A green fluorochrome is used as the assay signal. Methods were developed for the identification of specific nucleic acid sequences from Bacillus globigii (Bg), Bacillus thuringensis (Bt) and Erwinia herbicola (Eh). Detection sensitivity using different reporter fluorochromes was tested with the LX 100, and also different assay formats were evaluated for their suitability for rapid testing. A blind laboratory trial was carried out December 22-27, 1999 to evaluate bead assays for multiplex identification of Bg and Bt PCR products. This report summarizes the assay development, fluorochrome comparisons, and the results of the blind trial conducted at LLNL for the laboratory evaluation of the LX 100 flow analyzer.

  10. Regional blood flow in rats after a single low-protein, high-carbohydrate test meal.

    PubMed

    Glick, Z; Wickler, S J; Stern, J S; Horwitz, B A

    1984-07-01

    It was previously observed that a single low-protein, high-carbohydrate test meal results in increased in vitro thermic activity of brown adipose tissue. In the present study, we have examined whether such a meal increases the in vivo thermic activity, estimated from measurement of the rate of blood flow. With radioactively labeled microspheres, blood flows into brown fat and several other tissues were determined in meal-deprived (n = 11) and meal-fed (n = 11) rats. The microspheres were injected into the heart of anesthetized animals about 2-2.5 h after the test meal, one injection in the resting state and one during maximal norepinephrine stimulation. In the resting state, blood flow per gram tissue more than doubled in the brown fat (P less than 0.05) and was increased more than 50% in the heart (P less than 0.01) of the fed group. Blood flows into liver and retroperitoneal white fat were reduced by 40 (P less than 0.01) and 30%, respectively, in the fed group. During norepinephrine infusion, significant meal-associated increases in blood flow were evident only in brown fat (P less than 0.05) and the soleus muscle (P less than 0.05), whereas a significant decrease was observed in the liver (P less than 0.05). No statistically significant meal-associated changes in norepinephrine-stimulated blood flow were found in the other tissues examined (i.e., heart, gastrocnemius, and diaphragm muscles, kidneys, white fat, spleen, and adrenals). Our in vivo data thus support the view that brown fat plays a role in the thermic effect of a meal. PMID:6742226

  11. Multiple well-shutdown tests and site-scale flow simulation in fractured rocks.

    PubMed

    Tiedeman, Claire R; Lacombe, Pierre J; Goode, Daniel J

    2010-01-01

    A new method was developed for conducting aquifer tests in fractured-rock flow systems that have a pump-and-treat (P&T) operation for containing and removing groundwater contaminants. The method involves temporary shutdown of individual pumps in wells of the P&T system. Conducting aquifer tests in this manner has several advantages, including (1) no additional contaminated water is withdrawn, and (2) hydraulic containment of contaminants remains largely intact because pumping continues at most wells. The well-shutdown test method was applied at the former Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), West Trenton, New Jersey, where a P&T operation is designed to contain and remove trichloroethene and its daughter products in the dipping fractured sedimentary rocks underlying the site. The detailed site-scale subsurface geologic stratigraphy, a three-dimensional MODFLOW model, and inverse methods in UCODE_2005 were used to analyze the shutdown tests. In the model, a deterministic method was used for representing the highly heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity distribution and simulations were conducted using an equivalent porous media method. This approach was very successful for simulating the shutdown tests, contrary to a common perception that flow in fractured rocks must be simulated using a stochastic or discrete fracture representation of heterogeneity. Use of inverse methods to simultaneously calibrate the model to the multiple shutdown tests was integral to the effectiveness of the approach. PMID:20002208

  12. Design and Testing of a Shell-Flow Hollow-Fiber Venting Gas Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Cross, Cindy; Hansen, Scott; Vogel, Matthew; Dillon, Paul

    2013-01-01

    A Venting Gas Trap (VGT) was designed, built, and tested at NASA Johnson Space Center to eliminate dissolved and free gas from the circulating coolant loop of the Orion Environmental Control Life Support System. The VGT was downselected from two different designs. The VGT has robust operation, and easily met all the Orion requirements, especially size and weight. The VGT has a novel design with the gas trap made of a five-layer spiral wrap of porous hydrophobic hollow fibers that form a cylindrically shaped curtain terminated by a dome-shaped distal plug. Circulating coolant flows into the center of the cylindrical curtain and flows between the hollow fibers, around the distal plug, and exits the VGT outlet. Free gas is forced by the coolant flow to the distal plug and brought into contact with hollow fibers. The proximal ends of the hollow fibers terminate in a venting chamber that allows for rapid venting of the free gas inclusion, but passively limits the external venting from the venting chamber through two small holes in the event of a long-duration decompression of the cabin. The VGT performance specifications were verified in a wide range of flow rates, bubble sizes, and inclusion volumes. Long-duration and integrated Orion human tests of the VGT are also planned for the coming year.

  13. Velocimetry modalities for secondary flows in a curved artery test section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulusu, Kartik V.; Elkins, Christopher J.; Banko, Andrew J.; Plesniak, Michael W.; Eaton, John K.

    2014-11-01

    Secondary flow structures arise due to curvature-related centrifugal forces and pressure imbalances. These flow structures influence wall shear stress and alter blood particle residence times. Magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) and particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques were implemented independently, under the same physiological inflow conditions (Womersley number = 4.2). A 180-degree curved artery test section with curvature ratio (1/7) was used as an idealized geometry for curved arteries. Newtonian blood analog fluids were used for both MRV and PIV experiments. The MRV-technique offers the advantage of three-dimensional velocity field acquisition without requiring optical access or flow markers. Phase-averaged, two-dimensional, PIV-data at certain cross-sectional planes and inflow phases were compared to phase-averaged MRV-data to facilitate the characterization of large-scale, Dean-type vortices. Coherent structures detection methods that included a novel wavelet decomposition-based approach to characterize these flow structures was applied to both PIV- and MRV-data. The overarching goal of this study is the detection of motific, three-dimensional shapes of secondary flow structures using MRV techniques with guidance obtained from high fidelity, 2D-PIV measurements. This material is based in part upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number CBET-0828903, and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering (COBRE).

  14. Design, testing and two-dimensional flow modeling of a multiple-disk fan

    SciTech Connect

    Engin, Tahsin; Oezdemir, Mustafa; Cesmeci, Sevki

    2009-11-15

    A multiple-disk Tesla type fan has been designed, tested and analyzed two-dimensionally using the conservation of angular momentum principle. Experimental results showed that such multiple-disk fans exhibited exceptionally low performance characteristics, which could be attributed to the low viscosity, tangential nature of the flow, and large mechanical energy losses at both suction and discharge sections that are comparable to the total input power. By means of theoretical analysis, local and overall shearing stresses on the disk surfaces have been determined based on tangential and radial velocity distributions of the air flow of different volume flow rates at prescribed disk spaces and rotational speeds. Then the total power transmitted by rotating disks to air flow, and the power acquired by the air flow in the gap due to transfer of angular momentum have been obtained by numerically integrating shearing stresses over the disk surfaces. Using the measured shaft and hydraulic powers, these quantities were utilized to evaluate mechanical energy losses associated with the suction and discharge sections of the fan. (author)

  15. THEORETICAL ANALYSIS OF THE TRANSIENT PRESSURE RESPONSE FROM A CONSTANT FLOW RATE HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY TEST.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morin, Roger H.; Olsen, Harold W.

    1987-01-01

    Incorporating a flow pump into a conventional triaxial laboratory system allows fluid to be supplied to or withdrawn from the base of a sediment sample at small and constant rates. An initial transient record of hydraulic head versus time is observed which eventually stabilizes to a constant steady state gradient across the sample; values of hydraulic conductivity can subsequently be determined from Darcy's law. In this paper, analytical methods are presented for determining values of specific storage and hydraulic conductivity from the initial transient phase of such a constant flow rate test. These methods are based on a diffusion equation involving pore pressure and are analogous to those used to describe the soil consolidation process and also to interpret aquifer properties from pumping tests.

  16. Oscillating-Flow Regenerator Test Rig: Hardware and Theory With Derived Correlations for Screens and Felts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedeon, D.; Wood, J. G.

    1996-01-01

    A number of wire mesh and metal felt test samples, with a range of porosities, yield generic correlations for friction factor, Nusselt number, enhanced axial conduction ratio, and overall heat flux ratio. This information is directed primarily toward stirling cycle regenerator modelers, but will be of use to anyone seeking to better model fluid flow through these porous materials. Behind these results lies an oscillating-flow test rig, which measures pumping dissipation and thermal energy transport in sample matrices, and several stages of data-reduction software, which correlate instantaneous values for the above dimensionless groups. Within the software, theoretical model reduces instantaneous quantifies from cycle-averaged measurables using standard parameter estimation techniques.

  17. Development and testing of highway storm-sewer flow measurement and recording system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilpatrick, F.A.; Kaehrle, W.R.; Hardee, Jack; Cordes, E.H.; Landers, M.N.

    1985-01-01

    A comprehensive study and development of measuring instruments and techniques for measuring all components of flow in a storm-sewer drainage system was undertaken by the U.S. Geological Survey under the sponsorship of the Federal Highway Administration. The study involved laboratory and field calibration and testing of measuring flumes, pipe insert meters, weirs, electromagnetic velocity meters as well as the development and calibration of pneumatic-bubbler pressure transducer head measuring systems. Tracer-dilution and acoustic flow meter measurements were used in field verification tests. A single micrologger was used to record data from all the above instruments as well as from a tipping-bucket rain gage and also to activate on command the electromagnetic velocity meter and tracer-dilution systems. (Author 's abstract)

  18. An analytical verification test for numerically simulated convective flow above a thermally heterogeneous surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, A.; Fedorovich, E.; Gibbs, J. A.

    2015-06-01

    An analytical solution of the Boussinesq equations for the motion of a viscous stably stratified fluid driven by a surface thermal forcing with large horizontal gradients (step changes) is obtained. This analytical solution is one of the few available for wall-bounded buoyancy-driven flows. The solution can be used to verify that computer codes for Boussinesq fluid system simulations are free of errors in formulation of wall boundary conditions and to evaluate the relative performances of competing numerical algorithms. Because the solution pertains to flows driven by a surface thermal forcing, one of its main applications may be for testing the no-slip, impermeable wall boundary conditions for the pressure Poisson equation. Examples of such tests are presented.

  19. Brief Communication: A new testing field for debris flow warning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arattano, M.; Coviello, V.; Cavalli, M.; Comiti, F.; Macconi, P.; Theule, J.; Crema, S.

    2015-07-01

    A permanent field installation for the systematic test of debris flow warning systems and algorithms has been equipped on the eastern Italian Alps. The installation was also designed to produce didactic videos and it may host informative visits. The populace education is essential and should be envisaged in planning any research on hazard mitigation interventions: this new installation responds to this requirement and offers an example of integration between technical and informative needs. The occurrence of a debris flow in 2014 allowed the first tests of a new warning system under development and to record an informative video on its performances. This paper will provide a description of the installation and an account of the first technical and informative results obtained.

  20. Aft-End Flow of a Large-Scale Lifting Body During Free-Flight Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Daniel W.; Fisher, David F.

    2006-01-01

    Free-flight tests of a large-scale lifting-body configuration, the X-38 aircraft, were conducted using tufts to characterize the flow on the aft end, specifically in the inboard region of the vertical fins. Pressure data was collected on the fins and base. Flow direction and movement were correlated with surface pressure and flight condition. The X-38 was conceived to be a rescue vehicle for the International Space Station. The vehicle shape was derived from the U.S. Air Force X-24 lifting body. Free-flight tests of the X-38 configuration were conducted at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base, California from 1997 to 2001.

  1. Improvement of Subsonic Basic Research Tunnel Flow Quality as Applied to Wall Mounted Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howerton, Brian M.

    1995-01-01

    A survey to determine the characteristics of a boundary layer that forms on the wall of the Subsonic Basic Research Tunnel has been performed. Early results showed significant differences in the velocity profiles as measured spanwise across the wall. An investigation of the flow in the upstream contraction revealed the presence of a separation bubble at the beginning of the contraction which caused much of the observed unsteadiness. Vortex generators were successfully applied to the contraction inlet to alleviate the separation. A final survey of the wall boundary layer revealed variations in the displacement and momentum thicknesses to be less than +/- 5% for all but the most upper portion of the wall. The flow quality was deemed adequate to continue the planned follow-on tests to help develop the semi-span test technique.

  2. Nano-iron Tracer Test for Characterizing Preferential Flow Path in Fractured Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, Y.; Chuang, P. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Deterministic description of the discrete features interpreted from site characterization is desirable for developing a discrete fracture network conceptual model. It is often difficult, however, to delineate preferential flow path through a network of discrete fractures in the field. A preliminary cross-borehole nano-iron tracer test was conducted to characterize the preferential flow path in fractured shale bedrock at a hydrogeological research station. Prior to the test, heat-pulse flowmeter measurements were performed to detect permeable fracture zones at both the injection well and the observation well. While a few fracture zones are found permeable, most are not really permeable. Chemical reduction method was used to synthesize nano zero-valent iron particles with a diameter of 50~150 nm. The conductivity of nano-iron solution is about 3100 μs/cm. The recorded fluid conductivity shows the arrival of nano-iron solution in the observation well 11.5 minutes after it was released from the injection well. The magnetism of zero-valent iron enables it to be absorbed on magnet array designed to locate the depth of incoming tracer. We found nearly all of absorbed iron on the magnet array in the observation well were distributed near the most permeable fracture zone. The test results revealed a preferential flow path through a permeable fracture zone between the injection well and the observation well. The estimated hydraulic conductivity of the connected fracture is 2.2 × 10-3 m/s. This preliminary study indicated that nano-iron tracer test has the potential to characterize preferential flow path in fractured rock.

  3. 42 CFR 84.155 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirator; minimum requirements. 84.155 Section... Respirators § 84.155 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and...

  4. Performance and test section flow characteristics of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zell, Peter T.; Flack, Karen

    1989-01-01

    Results from the performance and test section flow calibration of the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel are presented. A flow calibration test was conducted in May and June 1987. The goal of the flow calibration test was to determine detailed spatial variations in the 40- by 80-ft test section flow quality throughout the tunnel operational envelope. Data were collected for test section speeds up to 300 knots and for air exchange rates of 0, 5, and 10 percent. The tunnel performance was also calibrated during the detailed mapping of the test section flow field. Experimental results presented indicate that the flow quality in the test section, with the exception of temperature, is relatively insensitive to the level of dynamic pressure and the air exchange rate. The dynamic pressure variation in the test section is within + or - 0.5 deg at all test section velocities. Cross-stream temperature gradients in the test section caused by the air exchange system were documented, and a correction method was established. Streamwise static pressure variation on the centerline is about 1 percent of test section dynamic pressure over 30 ft of the test section length.

  5. Application of a cold flow model in testing the feasibility of an oil shale retorting process

    SciTech Connect

    Vasalos, I.A.; Tatterson, D.F.; Furlong, M.W.; Kowalski, T.L.; So, B.Y.C. )

    1992-06-01

    An oil shale fluid bed process was successfully tested in a 1.5 tons/day retort. A pilot plant previously used for catalytic cracking studies was modified for this purpose. The successful conversion of the existing pilot plant to a retort and the remarkably smooth startup and operation were attributed to the concurrent construction and operation of a full-scale cold flow model to test the design of solid feeders and a unique injector/mixer. Operation of the cold flow model over the range of anticipated pilot plant operating conditions provided pressure drop and solids hold data for the mixer. The process was based on rapid heating of small oil shale particles with a hot heat carrier. key to the process was the design of a mixer, of proprietary geometry, which effects rapid interparticle heat transfer, substantial retorting of oil shale, and rapid removal of the hydrocarbon vapors. Several tests were carried out showing that shale oil yields up to 110% of Fisher assay are feasible by using this unique process scheme. In this paper, data are presented showing the application of cold flow results in the interpretation of pilot plant data such as gas and liquid yields.

  6. An analytical verification test for numerically simulated convective flow above a thermally heterogeneous surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, A.; Fedorovich, E.; Gibbs, J. A.

    2015-03-01

    An analytical solution of the Boussinesq equations for the motion of a viscous stably stratified fluid driven by a surface thermal forcing with large horizontal gradients (step changes) is obtained. The solution can be used to verify that computer codes for Boussinesq fluid system simulations are free of errors in formulation of wall boundary conditions, and to evaluate the relative performances of competing numerical algorithms. Because the solution pertains to flows driven by a surface thermal forcing, one of its main applications may be for testing the no-slip, impermeable wall boundary conditions for the pressure Poisson equation. Examples of such tests are presented.

  7. Experimental testing procedures and dynamic model validation for vanadium redox flow battery storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baccino, Francesco; Marinelli, Mattia; Nørgård, Per; Silvestro, Federico

    2014-05-01

    The paper aims at characterizing the electrochemical and thermal parameters of a 15 kW/320 kWh vanadium redox flow battery (VRB) installed in the SYSLAB test facility of the DTU Risø Campus and experimentally validating the proposed dynamic model realized in Matlab-Simulink. The adopted testing procedure consists of analyzing the voltage and current values during a power reference step-response and evaluating the relevant electrochemical parameters such as the internal resistance. The results of different tests are presented and used to define the electrical characteristics and the overall efficiency of the battery system. The test procedure has general validity and could also be used for other storage technologies. The storage model proposed and described is suitable for electrical studies and can represent a general model in terms of validity. Finally, the model simulation outputs are compared with experimental measurements during a discharge-charge sequence.

  8. Grout Long Radius Flow Testing to Support Saltstone Disposal Unit 6 Design - 13352

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanko, D.B.; Langton, C.A.; Serrato, M.G.; Brooks, T.E. II; Huff, T.H.

    2013-07-01

    The Saltstone Facility, located within the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina, consists of two facility segments: The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The SPF receives decontaminated legacy low level sodium salt waste solution that is a byproduct of prior nuclear material processing. The salt solution is mixed with cementitious materials to form a grout slurry known as 'Saltstone'. The grout is pumped to the SDF where it is placed in a Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) to solidify. SDU 6 is referred to as a 'mega vault' and is currently in the design stage. The conceptual design for SDU 6 is a single cell, cylindrical geometry approximately 114.3 meters in diameter by 13.1 meter high and is larger than previous cylindrical SDU designs, 45.7 meters in diameter by 7.01 meters high (30 million gallons versus 2.9 million gallons of capacity). Saltstone slurry will be pumped into the new waste disposal unit through roof openings at a projected flow rate of about 34.1 cubic meters per hour. Nine roof openings are included in the design to discharge material into the SDU with an estimated grout pour radius of 22.9 to 24.4 meters and initial drop height of 13.1 meters. The conceptual design for the new SDU does not include partitions to limit the pour radius of the grout slurry during placement other than introducing material from different pour points. This paper addresses two technical issues associated with the larger diameter of SDU 6; Saltstone flow distance in a tank 114.3 meters in diameter and quality of the grout. A long-radius flow test scaled to match the velocity of an advancing grout front was designed to address these technology gaps. The emphasis of the test was to quantify the flow distance and to collect samples to evaluate cured properties including compressive strength, porosity, density, and saturated hydraulic conductivity. Two clean cap surrogate mixes (Saltstone premix plus water) were

  9. Grout long radius flow testing to support Saltstone disposal Unit 5 design

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanko, D. B.; Langton, C. A.; Serrato, M. G.; Brooks, T. E. II; Huff, T. H.

    2013-02-24

    The Saltstone Facility, located within the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina, consists of two facility segments: The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The SPF receives decontaminated legacy low level sodium salt waste solution that is a byproduct of prior nuclear material processing. The salt solution is mixed with cementitious materials to form a grout slurry known as “Saltstone”. The grout is pumped to the SDF where it is placed in a Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) to solidify. SDU 6 is referred to as a “mega vault” and is currently in the design stage. The conceptual design for SDU 6 is a single cell, cylindrical geometry approximately 114.3 meters in diameter by 13.1 meter high and is larger than previous cylindrical SDU designs, 45.7 meters in diameter by 7.01 meters high (30 million gallons versus 2.9 million gallons of capacity). Saltstone slurry will be pumped into the new waste disposal unit through roof openings at a projected flow rate of about 34.1 cubic meters per hour. Nine roof openings are included in the design to discharge material into the SDU with an estimated grout pour radius of 22.9 to 24.4 meters and initial drop height of 13.1 meters. The conceptual design for the new SDU does not include partitions to limit the pour radius of the grout slurry during placement other than introducing material from different pour points. This paper addresses two technical issues associated with the larger diameter of SDU 6; saltstone flow distance in a tank 114.3 meters in diameter and quality of the grout. A long-radius flow test scaled to match the velocity of an advancing grout front was designed to address these technology gaps. The emphasis of the test was to quantify the flow distance and to collect samples to evaluate cured properties including compressive strength, porosity, density, and saturated hydraulic conductivity. Two clean cap surrogate mixes (saltstone premix plus water

  10. Shuttle Return-to-Flight IH-108 Aerothermal Test at CUBRC - Flow Field Calibration and CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Kei Y.; Holden, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses one specific aspect of the Shuttle Retrun-To-Flight IH-108 Aerothermal Test at CUBRC, the test flow field calibration. It showed the versatility of the CUBRC LENS II wind tunnel for an aerothermal test with unique and demanding requirements. CFD analyses were used effectively to extend the test range at the low end of the Mach range. It demonstrated how ground test facility and CFD synergy can be utilitzed iteratively to enhance the confidence in the fedility of both tools. It addressed the lingering concerns of the aerothermal community on use of inpulse facility and CFD analysis. At the conclusion of the test program, members from the NASA Marshall (MSFC), CUBRC and USA (United Space Alliance) Consultants (The Grey Beards) were asked to independently verify the flight scaling data generated by Boeing for flight certification of the re-designed external tank (ET) components. The blind test comparison showed very good results. A more comprehensive discussion of the topics in this paper can be found in Chapter 6 of Reference [1]. The overall aspect of the test program has been discussed in an AIAA paper by Tim Wadhams [2]. The Shuttle Ascent Stack performance and related issues discussed in the Report [1] are not included in this paper. No ITAR data is included in this paper.

  11. Immunochromatographic lateral flow test for detection of antibodies to Equine infectious anemia virus.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, I; Gutierrez, G; Barrandeguy, M; Trono, K

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a simple immunochromatographic lateral flow (ICLF) test for specific detection of Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) antibodies in equine sera. Viral recombinant p26 capsid protein (rp26) was used as the capture protein in the test line and as the detector reagent conjugated to colloidal gold. The performance of rp26-ICLF was evaluated, and the results obtained were compared with a commercially available agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test used as a standard of comparison according to international guidelines. The values obtained for comparative diagnostic sensitivity (98.3%), diagnostic specificity (87.4%) and concordance (92.4%) were similar to those reported for other ICLF tests for animal infectious diseases. Very good repeatability and reproducibility, as well as a total agreement with blind previous results from three proficiency test panels, were obtained, thus indicating that rp26-ICLF is a precise test. The end point of the twofold serial dilution of serum samples was the same as, and even better than, the AGID test, thus demonstrating the same analytical sensitivity as that of the reference method for EIA diagnosis. No cross-reactivity was observed when serum samples from horses with other infectious diseases were analyzed. rp26-ICLF proved to be a precise and rapid test suitable for field screening in veterinary practice, since minimal equipment and operator expertise are required. However, further research should be carried out to increase the level of sensitivity. PMID:20362005

  12. Assessment of RELAP5-3D{copyright} using data from two-dimensional RPI flow tests

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, C.B.

    1998-07-01

    The capability of the RELAP5-3D{copyright} computer code to perform multi-dimensional thermal-hydraulic analysis was assessed using data from steady-state flow tests conducted at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). The RPI data were taken in a two-dimensional test section in a low-pressure air/water loop. The test section consisted of a thin vertical channel that simulated a two-dimensional slice through the core of a pressurized water reactor. Single-phase and two-phase flows were supplied to the test section in an asymmetric manner to generate a two-dimensional flow field. A traversing gamma densitometer was used to measure void fraction at many locations in the test section. High speed photographs provided information on the flow patterns and flow regimes. The RPI test section was modeled using the multi-dimensional component in RELAP5-3D Version BF06. Calculations of three RPI experiments were performed. The flow regimes predicted by the base code were in poor agreement with those observed in the tests. The two-phase regions were observed to be in the bubbly and slug flow regimes in the test. However, nearly all of the junctions in the horizontal direction were calculated to be in the stratified flow regime because of the relatively low velocities in that direction. As a result, the void fraction predictions were also in poor agreement with the measured values. Significantly improved results were obtained in sensitivity calculations with a modified version of the code that prevented the horizontal junctions from entering the stratified flow regime. These results indicate that the code`s logic in the determination of flow regimes in a multi-dimensional component must be improved. The results of the sensitivity calculations also indicate that RELAP5-3D will provide a significant multi-dimensional hydraulic analysis capability once the flow regime prediction is improved.

  13. SRM Internal Flow Tests and Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis. Volume 2; RSRM Full Scale Motor Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the RSRM Nozzle Slag Ejection Precursor Test is to investigate the effect that slag ejection from the RSRM nozzle has on the chamber pressure and trust of the SRB's. In past firings of the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) both static test and flight motors have shown small pressure perturbations occurring primarily between 65 and 80 seconds. A joint NASA/Thiokol team investigation concluded that the cause of the pressure perturbations was the periodic ingestion and ejection of molten aluminum oxide slag from the cavity around the submerged nozzle nose which tends to trap and collect individual aluminum oxide droplets from the approach flow. The conclusions of the team were supported by numerous data and observations from special tests including high speed photographic films, real time radiography, plume calorimeters, accelerometers, strain gauges, nozzle TVC system force gauges, and motor pressure and thrust data. A simplistic slag ballistics model was formulated to relate a given pressure perturbation to a required slag quantity. Also, a cold flow model using air and water was developed to provide data on the relationship between the slag flow rate and the chamber pressure increase. Both the motor and the cold flow model exhibited low frequency oscillations in conjunction with periods of slag ejection. Motor and model frequencies were related to scaling parameters. The data indicate that there is a periodicity to the slag entrainment and ejection phenomena which is possibly related to organized oscillations from instabilities in the dividing streamline shear layer which impinges on the underneath surface of the nozzle.

  14. Long-term durability testing of ceramic cross-flow filter. Final report, September 29, 1987--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lippert, T.E.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.

    1993-08-01

    Long term durability testing of the cross flow filter is described. Two high temperature, high pressure test facilities were built and operated. The facilities were designed to simulate dirty gas environments typical of Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) and coal gasification. Details of the design and operation of the test facilities and filter testing results are described.

  15. Performance tests of a gas blending system based on mass-flow controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, A., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The system provides many of the gas mixtures required for calibrating analytical instruments used in engine exhaust gas analysis and is capable of blending from one to four additive gases with either of two carrier gases in concentrations from 20 ppm to 50%. Two mixtures can be flowing simultaneously. Performance tests were made to determine the stability accuracy of the system while it was in limited use for a period of 2 years. The accuracy of the blender was measured by comparing binary mixtures from the blender with National Bureau of Standards standard reference materials. Analytical instruments were used to make these comparisons. The expected accuracy of 2% was obtained in some of the tests, by the majority showed a systematic biAs of -5%. Although these tests revealed subtle instabilities in the flow controllers that contributed to the random scatter of data, the accuracy of wet test meters and bubble flowmeters used for calibration is marginal for this purpose. A simple procedure is recommended that should enable the full potential of the system to be realized.

  16. Flow channeling and analysis of tracer tests in heterogeneous porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, Luis; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2001-11-03

    Flow and solute transport through porous medium with strongly varying hydraulic conductivity are studied by numerical simulations. The heterogeneity of the porous medium is defined by {sigma} and {lambda}{prime}, which are, respectively, the standard deviation of natural log of permeability values and its correlation range {lambda} divided by transport distance L. The development of flow channeling as a function of these two parameters is demonstrated. The results show that for large heterogeneities, the flow is highly channelized and solute is transported through a few fast paths, and the corresponding breakthrough curves show a high peak at very early times, much shorter than the mean residence time. This effect was studied for a converging radial flow, to simulate tracer tests in a fracture zone or contact-thickness aquifer. It is shown that {sigma}{sup 2}{lambda}{prime} is an appropriate parameter to characterize the tracer dispersion and breakthrough curves. These results are used to study tracer breakthrough data from field experiments performed with nonsorbing tracers. A new procedure is proposed to analyze the results. From the moments of the residence-time distribution represented by the breakthrough curves, the heterogeneity of the porous medium, as characterized by {sigma}{sup 2}{lambda}{prime} and the mean residence time t{sub o}, may be determined.

  17. Performance of laminar-flow leading-edge test articles in cloud encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Richard E.; Maddalon, Dal V.; Wagner, Richard D.

    1987-01-01

    An extensive data bank of concurrent measurements of laminar flow (LF), particle concentration, and aircraft charging state was gathered for the first time. From this data bank, 13 flights in the simulated airline service (SAS) portion were analyzed to date. A total of 6.86 hours of data at one-second resolution were analyzed. An extensive statistical analysis, for both leading-edge test articles, shows that there is a significant effect of cloud and haze particles on the extent of laminar flow obtained. Approximately 93 percent of data points simulating LFC flight were obtained in clear air conditions; approximately 7 percent were obtained in cloud and haze. These percentages are consistent with earlier USAF and NASA estimates and results. The Hall laminar flow loss criteria was verified qualitatively. Larger particles and higher particle concentrations have a more marked effect on LF than do small particles. A particle spectrometer of a charging patch are both acceptable as diagnostic indicators of the presence of particles detrimental to laminar flow.

  18. Tevatron optics measurements using an AC dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.; Kopp, S.E.; Jansson, A.; Syphers, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The AC dipole is a device to study beam optics of hadron synchrotrons. It can produce sustained large amplitude oscillations with virtually no emittance growth. A vertical AC dipole for the Tevatron is recently implemented and a maximum oscillation amplitude of 2{sigma} (4{sigma}) at 980 GeV (150 GeV) is achieved [1]. When such large oscillations are measured with the BPM system of the Tevatron (20 {micro}m resolution), not only linear but even nonlinear optics can be directly measured. This paper shows how to measure {beta} function using an AC dipole and the result is compared to the other measurement. The paper also shows a test to detect optics changes when small changes are made in the Tevatron. Since an AC dipole is nondestructive, it allows frequent measurements of the optics which is necessary for such an test.

  19. Test-Retest Repeatability of Myocardial Blood Flow Measurements using Rubidium-82 Positron Emission Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efseaff, Matthew

    Rubidium-82 positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been proposed for routine myocardial blood flow (MBF) quantification. Few studies have investigated the test-retest repeatability of this method. Same-day repeatability of rest MBF imaging was optimized with a highly automated analysis program using image-derived input functions and a dual spillover correction (SOC). The effects of heterogeneous tracer infusion profiles and subject hemodynamics on test-retest repeatability were investigated at rest and during hyperemic stress. Factors affecting rest MBF repeatability included gender, suspected coronary artery disease, and dual SOC (p < 0.001). The best repeatability coefficient for same-day rest MBF was 0.20 mL/min/g using a six-minute scan-time, iterative reconstruction, dual SOC, resting rate-pressure-product (RPP) adjustment, and a left atrium image-derived input function. The serial study repeatabilities of the optimized protocol in subjects with homogeneous RPPs and tracer infusion profiles was 0.19 and 0.53 mL/min/g at rest and stress, and 0.95 for stress / rest myocardial flow reserve (MFR). Subjects with heterogeneous tracer infusion profiles and hemodynamic conditions had significantly less repeatable MBF measurements at rest, stress, and stress/rest flow reserve (p < 0.05).

  20. Transonic flight test of a laminar flow leading edge with surface excrescences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuniga, Fanny A.; Drake, Aaron; Kennelly, Robert A., Jr.; Koga, Dennis J.; Westphal, Russell V.

    1994-01-01

    A flight experiment, conducted at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, investigated the effects of surface excrescences, specifically gaps and steps, on boundary-layer transition in the vicinity of a leading edge at transonic flight conditions. A natural laminar flow leading-edge model was designed for this experiment with a spanwise slot manufactured into the leading-edge model to simulate gaps and steps like those present at skin joints of small transonic aircraft wings. The leading-edge model was flown with the flight test fixture, a low-aspect ratio fin mounted beneath an F-104G aircraft. Test points were obtained over a unit Reynolds number range of 1.5 to 2.5 million/ft and a Mach number range of 0.5 to 0.8. Results for a smooth surface showed that laminar flow extended to approximately 12 in. behind the leading edge at Mach number 0.7 over a unit Reynolds number range of 1.5 to 2.0 million/ft. The maximum size of the gap-and-step configuration over which laminar flow was maintained consisted of two 0.06-in. gaps with a 0.02-in. step at a unit Reynolds number of 1.5 million/ft.

  1. Status of Proof-Of-Concept testing at the Coal-Fired-Flow Facility, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Attig, R.C.; Chapman, J.N.; Johanson, N.R.

    1993-06-01

    Proof-of-concept (POC) testing, and collection and evaluation of data continued at the Coal-Fired-Flow Facility during the past year. Following four preliminary tests firing Rosebud coal in 1991 to establish base conditions for the Rosebud coal POC tests, three POC tests were run in 1992, and a fourth test early in 1993. Major equipment additions or modifications included installation of a wet electrostatic precipitator (ESP), which replaced a badly deteriorated venturi. This component also provides improved capability to meet Tennessee pollution regulations while operating the dry ESP and/or baghouse off design, or if one of these two control devices does not function properly. Improvements were also made to the dry ESP prior to the 1993 test, which appear to have improved the performance of this equipment. This paper will present an overview of the major results obtained during the Rosebud coal POC tests, including the performance of the dry and wet electrostatic precipitators. Differences between the Rosebud and Illinois coals will be described, but it is emphasized that these observations are based on incomplete results for the Rosebud coal.

  2. Shuttle Return-to-Flight IH-108 Aerothermal Test at CUBRC - Flow Field Calibration and CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Kei Y.; Holden, M. S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses one specific aspect of the Shuttle Retrun-To-Flight IH-108 Aerothermal Test at Calspan-University of Buffalo Research Center (CUBRC), the test flow field calibration. It showed the versatility of the CUBRC Large Energy National Shock Tunnel (LENS) II wind tunnel for an aerothermal test with unique and demanding requirements. CFD analyses were used effectively to extend the test range at the low end of the Mach range. It demonstrated how ground test facility and CFD synergy can be utilitzed iteratively to enhance the confidence in the fedility of both tools. It addressed the lingering concerns of the aerothermal community on use of inpulse facility and CFD analysis. At the conclusion of the test program, members from the NASA Marshall (MSFC), CUBRC and USA (United Space Alliance) Consultants (The Grey Beards) were asked to independently verify the flight scaling data generated by Boeing for flight certification of the re-designed external tank (ET) components. The blind test comparison showed very good results.

  3. Curved-flow, rolling-flow, and oscillatory pure-yawing wind-tunnel test methods for determination of dynamic stability derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, J. R.; Grafton, S. B.; Lutze, F. H.

    1981-01-01

    The test capabilities of the Stability Wind Tunnel of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University are described, and calibrations for curved and rolling flow techniques are given. Oscillatory snaking tests to determine pure yawing derivatives are considered. Representative aerodynamic data obtained for a current fighter configuration using the curved and rolling flow techniques are presented. The application of dynamic derivatives obtained in such tests to the analysis of airplane motions in general, and to high angle of attack flight conditions in particular, is discussed.

  4. Simulator test to study hot-flow problems related to a gas cooled reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, J. W.; Freeman, M. P.; Doak, K. W.; Thorpe, M. L.

    1973-01-01

    An advance study of materials, fuel injection, and hot flow problems related to the gas core nuclear rocket is reported. The first task was to test a previously constructed induction heated plasma GCNR simulator above 300 kW. A number of tests are reported operating in the range of 300 kW at 10,000 cps. A second simulator was designed but not constructed for cold-hot visualization studies using louvered walls. A third task was a paper investigation of practical uranium feed systems, including a detailed discussion of related problems. The last assignment resulted in two designs for plasma nozzle test devices that could be operated at 200 atm on hydrogen.

  5. CFD Validation with LDV Test Data for Payload/Fairing Internal Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, max; Hammad, Khaled; Schallhorn, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Flowfield testing of a 1/5th scale model of a payload/fairing configuration, typical of an expendable launch vehicle, has been performed. Two-dimensional (planar) velocity measurements were carried out in four planes with the aid of Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis results for the scale model flowfleld are compared with the test data. The CFD results are in general agreement with the test data. The ability of the CFD methodology in identifying the global flow features (including critical points such as vortex, saddle point, etc.) has been demonstrated. Practical problems and difficulties associated with the LDV method applied to the complex geometry under consideration have been summarized.

  6. Natural laminar flow wing for supersonic conditions: Wind tunnel experiments, flight test and stability computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeersch, Olivier; Yoshida, Kenji; Ueda, Yoshine; Arnal, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    In the framework of next supersonic transport airplane generation, the Japan Aerospace eXploration Agency (JAXA) has developed a new natural laminar flow highly swept wing. The design has been experimentally validated firstly in a supersonic wind tunnel and secondly accomplishing flight test. These experimental data were then analyzed and completed by numerical stability analyses in a joint research program between Onera and JAXA. At the design condition, for a Mach number M=2 at an altitude of h=18 km, results have confirmed the laminar design of the wing due to a strong attenuation of cross-flow instabilities ensuring an extended laminar zone. As the amplification of disturbances inside the boundary layer and transition process is very sensitive to external parameters, the impact of wall roughness of the models and the influence of Reynolds number on transition process have been carefully analyzed.

  7. Self-healing mortar with pH-sensitive superabsorbent polymers: testing of the sealing efficiency by water flow tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruyaert, Elke; Debbaut, Brenda; Snoeck, Didier; Díaz, Pilar; Arizo, Alejandro; Tziviloglou, Eirini; Schlangen, Erik; De Belie, Nele

    2016-08-01

    Superabsorbent polymers (SAPs) have potential to be used as healing agent in self-healing concrete due to their property to attract moisture from the environment and their capacity to promote autogenous healing. A possible drawback, however, is their uptake of mixing water during concrete manufacturing, resulting in an increased volume of macro-pores in the hardened concrete. To limit this drawback, newly developed SAPs with a high swelling and pH-sensitiveness were developed and tested within the FP7 project HEALCON. Evaluation of their self-sealing performance occurred through a water permeability test via water flow, a test method also developed within HEALCON. Three different sizes of the newly developed SAP were compared with a commercial SAP. Swelling tests in cement filtrate solution indicated that the commercial and in-house synthesized SAPs performed quite similar, but the difference between the swelling capacity at pH 9 and pH 13 is more pronounced for the self-synthesized SAPs. Moreover, in comparison to the commercial SAPs, less macro-pores are formed in the cement matrix of mixes with self-synthesized SAPs and the effect on the mechanical properties is lower, but not negligible, when using high amounts of SAPs. Although the immediate sealing effect of cracks in mortar was the highest for the commercial SAPs, the in-house made SAPs with a particle size between 400 and 600 μm performed the best with regard to crack closure (mainly CaCO3 precipitation) and self-sealing efficiency, after exposing the specimens to 28 wet–dry cycles. Some specimens could even withstand a water pressure of 2 bar.

  8. The lateral flow card test: an alternative method for the detection of Trichinella infection in swine.

    PubMed

    Patrascu, I; Gamble, H R; Sofronic-Milosavljevic, L; Radulescu, R; Andrei, A; Ionescu, V; Timoceanu, V; Boireau, P; Cuperlovic, K; Djordjevic, M; Murrell, K D; Noeckler, K; Pozio, E

    2001-06-01

    A novel lateral flow card (TS-Card pork) test was developed for the serological detection of Trichinella infected pigs. Based on extensive studies performed in Romania during 1999-2000 this test proved to be highly specific sensitive, rapid (3-12 minutes) and easy to use (no need for laboratory facilities). It can be used both for the detection of Trichinella infection in carcasses and for epizooliological studies using a variety of samples including whole or dried blood, serum, or tissue fluids. The TS-Card pork test, used as a screening test, can be the foundation of an on-farm or field based inspection system to significantly improve food safety in countries with a high prevalence of Trichinella in pigs or other food animal species. The results presented are also promising for application of the test in an on-line laboratory based inspection system since the speed of the test allows sufficient time to rail out suspected hog carcasses during the slaughter process. PMID:11484368

  9. ICFT: An initial closed-loop flow test of the Fenton Hill Phase II HDR reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Dash, Z.V.; Aguilar, R.G.; Dennis, B.R.; Dreesen, D.S.; Fehler, M.C.; Hendron, R.H.; House, L.S.; Ito, H.; Kelkar, S.M.; Malzahn, M.V.

    1989-02-01

    A 30-day closed-loop circulation test of the Phase II Hot Dry Rock reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, was conducted to determine the thermal, hydraulic, chemical, and seismic characteristics of the reservoir in preparation for a long-term energy-extraction test. The Phase II heat-extraction loop was successfully tested with the injection of 37,000 m/sup 3/ of cold water and production of 23,300 m/sup 3/ of hot water. Up to 10 MW/sub t/ was extracted when the production flow rate reached 0.0139 m/sup 3//s at 192/degree/C. By the end of the test, the water-loss rate had decreased to 26% and a significant portion of the injected water was recovered; 66% during the test and an additional 20% during subsequent venting. Analysis of thermal, hydraulic, geochemical, tracer, and seismic data suggests the fractured volume of the reservoir was growing throughout the test. 19 refs., 64 figs., 19 tabs.

  10. Results of Tests Performed on the Acoustic Quiet Flow Facility Three-Dimensional Model Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barna, P. S.

    1995-01-01

    The test results briefly described in this report were obtained on the three-dimensional 1:48 scale tunnel modeled on the design proposed by Messrs. D.S.M.A. Corporation. More particularly, while the test chamber dimensions were indeed scaled down in the ration of 1:48, including the contraction and the collector as well, the duct system itself leading to and from the chamber was adapted to suit laboratory conditions and space limitations. Earlier tests with the two-dimensional model showed that blowing mode was preferred as against the suction mode, hence all tests were performed with blowing only. At the exit of the contraction the maximum airspeed attained with the 1 HP blower unit was about 200 ft/sec. This airspeed may be increased in future if desired. The test results show that pressure recovery in the diffuser was about 34 percent due to the large blockage at its entrance. Velocity traverses taken across the diffuser entrance explain the reason for this blockage. Recirculation, studied with both, hot-wire anemometry and flow-visualization techniques, was largely affected by the design of the test chamber itself and the amount of vent-air admitted to the chamber. Vent-air helped to decrease the level of turbulence.

  11. Analysis of dynamic nonlinearity of flow control loop through modified relay test probing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiko, I.; Sayedain, S.

    2010-12-01

    Most of the controller tuning methods in process control are based on linear models. Through the development of a detail model of the actuator-pneumatic valve dynamics, we show that even if the static characteristic of the valve is linear (including possible linearity of the flow dependence on the valve opening) the actuator-valve dynamics are strongly nonlinear. Therefore, tuning of the flow loop will be affected by the selection of the operating point and the amplitude of the relay in the relay feedback test (RFT) or modifications of this test. It is shown that Lyapunov linearisation around an equilibrium point fails to provide a local linear model of the system, and modified RFT probing is used for investigation of the system dynamics. The same test is used for the proportional-integral controller tuning in various operating points. It is recommended that the difference in the dynamic response of the loop for different relay amplitudes and operating points should be accounted for by larger stability margins.

  12. Research on regulating technique of material flow for 2-person and 30-day integrated CELSS test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shuangsheng; Dong, Wenping; Ai, Weidang; Feng, Hongqi; Tang, Yongkang; Huang, Zhide; Shen, Yunze; Ren, Jin; Qin, Lifeng; Zeng, Gu; Zhang, Lihong; Zhu, Jingtao; Fei, Jinxue; Xu, Guoxin

    2014-07-01

    A man-plant integration test was processed using the CELSS integration experiment platform in which 4 kinds of plants were grown (Lactuca sativa L var. Dasusheng, L. sativa L var. Youmaicai, Gynura bicolor and Cichorium endivia L) to exchange material with 2 persons in order to research the dynamic changing laws and balanced regulation of air and water between man and plant in an inclosed system. In the test the material flow was measured so that the dynamically changing laws and balanced regulation of air and water between man and plant in the closed system were mostly mastered. The material closure degree of air, water and food reached 100%, 90% and 13.9% respectively with the whole system closure degree up to 95.1%. Meanwhile, it was proved that a 13.5 m2 planting area could meet the demand of one person for O2 in the system, and the energy efficiency ratio of which reached 59.56 g/(kW m2 day). The material flow dynamic balance-regulating technology was initially mastered between man and plant through the test. The interaction was realized among man, plant and environment in the closed system, which is of great significance to the advancement of long-term manned environment control and life support technology for China.

  13. Evaluation of a Prototype Flow Cytometry Test for Serodiagnosis of Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Ker, Henrique Gama; Coura-Vital, Wendel; Aguiar-Soares, Rodrigo Dian de Oliveira; Roatt, Bruno Mendes; das Dores Moreira, Nádia; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins; Machado, Evandro Marques de Menezes; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Giunchetti, Rodolfo Cordeiro; Araújo, Márcio Sobreira Silva; Coelho, Eduardo Antonio Ferraz; da Silveira-Lemos, Denise

    2013-01-01

    Diagnosing canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) is a critical challenge since conventional immunoserological tests still present some deficiencies. The current study evaluated a prototype flow cytometry serology test, using antigens and fluorescent antibodies that had been stored for 1 year at 4°C, on a broad range of serum samples. Noninfected control dogs and Leishmania infantum-infected dogs were tested, and the prototype test showed excellent performance in differentiating these groups with high sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy (100% in all analyses). When the CVL group was evaluated according to the dogs' clinical status, the prototype test showed outstanding accuracy in all groups with positive serology (asymptomatic II, oligosymptomatic, and symptomatic). However, in dogs which had positive results by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) but negative results by conventional serology (asymptomatic I), serological reactivity was not observed. Additionally, sera from 40 dogs immunized with different vaccines (Leishmune, Leish-Tec, or LBSap) did not present serological reactivity in the prototype test. Eighty-eight dogs infected with other pathogens (Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania braziliensis, Ehrlichia canis, and Babesia canis) were used to determine cross-reactivity and specificity, and the prototype test performed well, particularly in dogs infected with B. canis and E. canis (100% and 93.3% specificities, respectively). In conclusion, our data reinforce the potential of the prototype test for use as a commercial kit and highlight its outstanding performance even after storage for 1 year at 4°C. Moreover, the prototype test efficiently provided accurate CVL serodiagnosis with an absence of false-positive results in vaccinated dogs and minor cross-reactivity against other canine pathogens. PMID:24108778

  14. Simulated-airline-service flight tests of laminar-flow control with perforated-surface suction system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, Dal V.; Braslow, Albert L.

    1990-01-01

    The effectiveness and practicality of candidate leading edge systems for suction laminar flow control transport airplanes were investigated in a flight test program utilizing a modified JetStar airplane. The leading edge region imposes the most severe conditions on systems required for any type of laminar flow control. Tests of the leading edge systems, therefore, provided definitive results as to the feasibility of active laminar flow control on airplanes. The test airplane was operated under commercial transport operating procedures from various commercial airports and at various seasons of the year.

  15. Debris Flow Risk mitigation by the means of flexible barriers. Experimental and field tests.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canelli, L.; Ferrero, A. M.; Segalini, A.

    2012-04-01

    Debris flow risk mitigation using net barriers is an option that was not considered until few years ago, probably because of the lack of scientific evidences about their efficiency and solid guidelines for their design and construction. On site evidences (Segalini et al, 2008) showed that a rock fall deformable barrier can efficiently intercept the whole volume or just a portion of the mobilized debris without losing its stability and efficiency, actually performing a different task form that it was originally designed for. Although the final purpose of both types of barriers (rock fall and debris) is to reduce the impact energy of the moving mass by dissipating impact energy through the deformation of the net and of the dissipating elements, it is noteworthy that the physics of the impact is extremely different between the two phenomena. The rock fall barrier needs to dissipate the energy of a single block generally concentrated on the center of the net panel (design conditions). The debris flow barrier, generally installed inside a debris channel, should be able to dissipate the impact energy that the debris induces across the whole section of the channel. Moreover, the recurring characteristic of the debris flows will cause multiple impact on the barrier and therefore, the structure should be able to absorb a significant amount of energy even if partially filled and considerably deformed. In order to introduce useful guidelines for the design and production of debris flow net barriers, this paper describes: 1. Part of the results obtained from the laboratory experiment carried out in a scaled channel and aimed to estimate the most realistic thrust vs time relationship induced by a debris flow on a deformable and rigid structure; these results were partially presented last year at the EGU 2011; 2. A large scale field test carried out in a quarry located in Tambre d'Alpago (Belluno Province) on the Eastern Italian Dolomites for the analysis of the behavior of a

  16. Hybrid laminar flow control tests in the Boeing Research Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, P. G.; Lund, D. W.; George-Falvy, D.; Nagel, A. L.

    1990-01-01

    The hybrid laminar flow control (HLFC) concept has undergone wind tunnel testing at near full-scale Reynolds number on an infinite wing of 30-deg sweep on which boundary-layer suction was furnished over the first 20 percent of chord of the upper surface. Depending on the external pressure distribution, the HLFC extended the laminarity of the boundary layer as far back as 45 percent of chord; this corresponds to a transition Reynolds number of about 11 million. The maximum chordwise extent of laminar run was found to be insensitive to the suction level over a wide range.

  17. Microfabricated AC impedance sensor

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter; Ackler, Harold D.; Becker, Frederick; Boser, Bernhard E.; Eldredge, Adam B.; Fuller, Christopher K.; Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Hamilton, Julie K.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Wang, Xiao-Bo

    2002-01-01

    A microfabricated instrument for detecting and identifying cells and other particles based on alternating current (AC) impedance measurements. The microfabricated AC impedance sensor includes two critical elements: 1) a microfluidic chip, preferably of glass substrates, having at least one microchannel therein and with electrodes patterned on both substrates, and 2) electrical circuits that connect to the electrodes on the microfluidic chip and detect signals associated with particles traveling down the microchannels. These circuits enable multiple AC impedance measurements of individual particles at high throughput rates with sufficient resolution to identify different particle and cell types as appropriate for environmental detection and clinical diagnostic applications.

  18. Fast response vanes for sensing flow patterns in helicopter rotor environment. [wind tunnel tests of modified helicopter rotary wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barna, P. S.; Crossman, G. R.

    1974-01-01

    Wind tunnel experiments were conducted on four small-scale flow-direction vanes for the determination of aerodynamic response. The tests were further extended to include a standard sized low-inertia vane currently employed in aircraft flight testing. The four test vanes had different aspect ratios and were about 35 percent of the surface area of the standard vane. The test results indicate satisfactory damping and frequency response for all vanes tested and compare favorably with the standard design.

  19. ac electroosmosis in rectangular microchannels.

    PubMed

    Campisi, Michele; Accoto, Dino; Dario, Paolo

    2005-11-22

    Motivated by the growing interest in ac electroosmosis as a reliable no moving parts strategy to control fluid motion in microfluidic devices for biomedical applications, such as lab-on-a-chip, we study transient and steady-state electrokinetic phenomena (electroosmosis and streaming currents) in infinitely extended rectangular charged microchannels. With the aid of Fourier series and Laplace transforms we provide a general formal solution of the problem, which is used to study the time-dependent response to sudden ac applied voltage differences in case of finite electric double layer. The Debye-Huckel approximation has been adopted to allow for an algebraic solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann problem in Fourier space. We obtain the expressions of flow velocity profiles, flow rates, streaming currents, as well as expressions of the complex hydraulic and electrokinetic conductances. We analyze in detail the dependence of the electrokinetic conductance on the extension of linear dimensions relative to the Debye length, with an eye on finite electric double layer effects. PMID:16351310

  20. Modeling unsaturated flow and transport processes at the Busted Butte Field Test Site, Nevada.

    PubMed

    Tseng, P-H; Soll, W E; Gable, C W; Turin, H J; Bussod, G Y

    2003-01-01

    A numerical model was used to simulate the flow and transport processes at the Busted Butte Field Test Site for the purpose of quantifying the effects of hydrogeologic conditions beneath the potential Yucca Mountain repository horizon. In situ experiments were conducted on a 10 x 10 x 7 m block comprising a layered Topopah Springs/Calico Hills formation with two imbedded faults. Tracer solution was continuously injected in eight parallel boreholes arranged on two horizontal planes. Twelve collection boreholes were emplaced perpendicular to the injection holes and were both horizontal and inclined. Solution samples were collected regularly using a sampling assembly consisting of an inverted membrane and sorbing-paper sampling pads. Comparisons between measurements and predictions show that, except for the occasional drops of concentrations observed in the field, the current model is able to capture the general characteristics of the system with varying levels of agreement using laboratory-measured mean hydraulic properties. Simulation results and field observations revealed a capillary-driven flow in the system. Good quantitative agreement is generally observed for near-field boreholes, however, this agreement deteriorates and the simulated solute concentration is underestimated at boreholes farther away from the injection points. Increasing the spatial resolution of the simulation improves the model predictions only to a limited extent. Scaling issues may need to be considered to describe flow and transport events, as the travel distance becomes large. PMID:12714297

  1. Tests of a 2-Stage, Axial-Flow, 2-Phase Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, D. G.

    1982-01-01

    A two phase flow turbine with two stages of axial flow impulse rotors was tested with three different working fluid mixtures at a shaft power of 30 kW. The turbine efficiency was 0.55 with nitrogen and water of 0.02 quality and 94 m/s velocity, 0.57 with Refrigerant 22 of 0.27 quality and 123 m/s velocity, and 0.30 with steam and water of 0.27 quality and 457 m/s velocity. The efficiencies with nitrogen and water and Refrigerant 22 were 86 percent of theoretical. At that fraction of theoretical, the efficiencies of optimized two phase turbines would be in the low 60 percent range with organic working fluids and in the mid 50 percent range with steam and water. The recommended turbine design is a two stage axial flow impulse turbine followed by a rotary separator for discharge of separate liquid and gas streams and recovery of liquid pressure.

  2. Testing of RANS Turbulence Models for Stratified Flows Based on DNS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venayagamoorthy, S. K.; Koseff, J. R.; Ferziger, J. H.; Shih, L. H.

    2003-01-01

    In most geophysical flows, turbulence occurs at the smallest scales and one of the two most important additional physical phenomena to account for is strati cation (the other being rotation). In this paper, the main objective is to investigate proposed changes to RANS turbulence models which include the effects of stratifi- cation more explicitly. These proposed changes were developed using a DNS database on strati ed and sheared homogenous turbulence developed by Shih et al. (2000) and are described more fully in Ferziger et al. (2003). The data generated by Shih, et al. (2000) (hereinafter referred to as SKFR) are used to study the parameters in the k- model as a function of the turbulent Froude number, Frk. A modified version of the standard k- model based on the local turbulent Froude number is proposed. The proposed model is applied to a stratified open channel flow, a test case that differs significantly from the flows from which the modified parameters were derived. The turbulence modeling and results are discussed in the next two sections followed by suggestions for future work.

  3. Groundwater flow characterization in a fractured bedrock aquifer using active DTS tests in sealed boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Thomas I.; Parker, Beth L.; Maldaner, Carlos H.; Mondanos, Michael J.

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, wireline temperature profiling methods have evolved to offer new insight into fractured rock hydrogeology. Important advances in wireline temperature logging in boreholes make use of active line source heating alone and then in combination with temporary borehole sealing with flexible impervious fabric liners to eliminate the effects of borehole cross-connection and recreate natural flow conditions. Here, a characterization technique was developed based on combining fiber optic distributed temperature sensing (DTS) with active heating within boreholes sealed with flexible borehole liners. DTS systems provide a temperature profiling method that offers significantly enhanced temporal resolution when compared with conventional wireline trolling-based techniques that obtain a temperature-depth profile every few hours. The ability to rapidly and continuously collect temperature profiles can better our understanding of transient processes, allowing for improved identification of hydraulically active fractures and determination of relative rates of groundwater flow. The advantage of a sealed borehole environment for DTS-based investigations is demonstrated through a comparison of DTS data from open and lined conditions for the same borehole. Evidence for many depth-discrete active groundwater flow features under natural gradient conditions using active DTS heat pulse testing is presented along with high resolution geologic and geophysical logging and hydraulic datasets. Implications for field implementation are discussed.

  4. F-111 natural laminar flow glove flight test data analysis and boundary layer stability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runyan, L. J.; Navran, B. H.; Rozendaal, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis of 34 selected flight test data cases from a NASA flight program incorporating a natural laminar flow airfoil into partial wing gloves on the F-111 TACT airplane is given. This analysis determined the measured location of transition from laminar to turbulent flow. The report also contains the results of a boundary layer stability analysis of 25 of the selected cases in which the crossflow (C-F) and Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) disturbance amplification factors are correlated with the measured transition location. The chord Reynolds numbers for these cases ranges from about 23 million to 29 million, the Mach numbers ranged from 0.80 to 0.85, and the glove leading-edge sweep angles ranged from 9 deg to 25 deg. Results indicate that the maximum extent of laminar flow varies from 56% chord to 9-deg sweep on the upper surface, and from 51% chord at 16-deg sweep to 6% chord at 25-deg sweep on the lower. The results of the boundary layer stability analysis indicate that when both C-F and T-S disturbances are amplified, an interaction takes place which reduces the maximum amplification factor of either type of disturbance that can be tolerated without causing transition.

  5. Three-Dimensionally Printed Microfluidic Cross-flow System for Ultrafiltration/Nanofiltration Membrane Performance Testing.

    PubMed

    Wardrip, Nathaniel C; Arnusch, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Minimization and management of membrane fouling is a formidable challenge in diverse industrial processes and other practices that utilize membrane technology. Understanding the fouling process could lead to optimization and higher efficiency of membrane based filtration. Here we show the design and fabrication of an automated three-dimensionally (3-D) printed microfluidic cross-flow filtration system that can test up to 4 membranes in parallel. The microfluidic cells were printed using multi-material photopolymer 3-D printing technology, which used a transparent hard polymer for the microfluidic cell body and incorporated a thin rubber-like polymer layer, which prevents leakages during operation. The performance of ultrafiltration (UF), and nanofiltration (NF) membranes were tested and membrane fouling could be observed with a model foulant bovine serum albumin (BSA). Feed solutions containing BSA showed flux decline of the membrane. This protocol may be extended to measure fouling or biofouling with many other organic, inorganic or microbial containing solutions. The microfluidic design is especially advantageous for testing materials that are costly or only available in small quantities, for example polysaccharides, proteins, or lipids due to the small surface area of the membrane being tested. This modular system may also be easily expanded for high throughput testing of membranes. PMID:26968008

  6. Waterhammer Modeling for the Ares I Upper Stage Reaction Control System Cold Flow Development Test Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Jonathan H.

    2010-01-01

    The Upper Stage Reaction Control System provides three-axis attitude control for the Ares I launch vehicle during active Upper Stage flight. The system design must accommodate rapid thruster firing to maintain the proper launch trajectory and thus allow for the possibility to pulse multiple thrusters simultaneously. Rapid thruster valve closure creates an increase in static pressure, known as waterhammer, which propagates throughout the propellant system at pressures exceeding nominal design values. A series of development tests conducted in the fall of 2009 at Marshall Space Flight Center were performed using a water-flow test article to better understand fluid performance characteristics of the Upper Stage Reaction Control System. A subset of the tests examined waterhammer along with the subsequent pressure and frequency response in the flight-representative system and provided data to anchor numerical models. This thesis presents a comparison of waterhammer test results with numerical model and analytical results. An overview of the flight system, test article, modeling and analysis are also provided.

  7. Non invasive blood flow measurement in cerebellum detects minimal hepatic encephalopathy earlier than psychometric tests

    PubMed Central

    Felipo, Vicente; Urios, Amparo; Giménez-Garzó, Carla; Cauli, Omar; Andrés-Costa, Maria-Jesús; González, Olga; Serra, Miguel A; Sánchez-González, Javier; Aliaga, Roberto; Giner-Durán, Remedios; Belloch, Vicente; Montoliu, Carmina

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess whether non invasive blood flow measurement by arterial spin labeling in several brain regions detects minimal hepatic encephalopathy. METHODS: Blood flow (BF) was analyzed by arterial spin labeling (ASL) in different brain areas of 14 controls, 24 cirrhotic patients without and 16 cirrhotic patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE). Images were collected using a 3 Tesla MR scanner (Achieva 3T-TX, Philips, Netherlands). Pulsed ASL was performed. Patients showing MHE were detected using the battery Psychometric Hepatic Encephalopathy Score (PHES) consisting of five tests. Different cognitive and motor functions were also assessed: alterations in selective attention were evaluated using the Stroop test. Patients and controls also performed visuo-motor and bimanual coordination tests. Several biochemical parameters were measured: serum pro-inflammatory interleukins (IL-6 and IL-18), 3-nitrotyrosine, cGMP and nitrates+nitrites in plasma, and blood ammonia. Bivariate correlations were evaluated. RESULTS: In patients with MHE, BF was increased in cerebellar hemisphere (P = 0.03) and vermis (P = 0.012) and reduced in occipital lobe (P = 0.017). BF in cerebellar hemisphere was also increased in patients without MHE (P = 0.02). Bimanual coordination was impaired in patients without MHE (P = 0.05) and much more in patients with MHE (P < 0.0001). Visuo-motor coordination was impaired only in patients with MHE (P < 0.0001). Attention was slightly affected in patients without MHE and more strongly in patients with MHE (P < 0.0001). BF in cerebellar hemisphere and vermis correlated with performance in most tests of PHES [(number connection tests A (NCT-A), B (NCT-B)and line tracing test] and in the congruent task of Stroop test. BF in frontal lobe correlated with NCT-A. Performance in bimanual and visuomotor coordination tests correlated only with BF in cerebellar hemisphere. BF in occipital lobe correlates with performance in the PHES battery and with

  8. An AC magnetohydrodynamic micropump: towards a true integrated microfluidic system

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, A P; Lemoff, A V; McConaghy, C F; Miles, R R

    1999-03-01

    An AC Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) micropump has been demonstrated in which the Lorentz force is used to propel an electrolytic solution along a microchannel etched in silicon. This micropump has no moving parts, produces a continuous (not pulsatile) flow, and is compatible with solutions containing biological specimens. micropump, using the Lorentz force as the pumping mechanism for biological analysis. The AC Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) micropump investigated produces a continuous flow and allows for complex microchannel design.

  9. The Mach number of the cosmic flow - A critical test for current theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Suto, Yusushi

    1990-01-01

    A new cosmological, self-contained test using the ratio of mean velocity and the velocity dispersion in the mean flow frame of a group of test objects is presented. To allow comparison with linear theory, the velocity field must first be smoothed on a suitable scale. In the context of linear perturbation theory, the Mach number M(R) which measures the ratio of power on scales larger than to scales smaller than the patch size R, is independent of the perturbation amplitude and also of bias. An apparent inconsistency is found for standard values of power-law index n = 1 and cosmological density parameter Omega = 1, when comparing values of M(R) predicted by popular models with tentative available observations. Nonstandard models based on adiabatic perturbations with either negative n or small Omega value also fail, due to creation of unacceptably large microwave background fluctuations.

  10. Use of Melt Flow Rate Test in Reliability Study of Thermoplastic Encapsulation Materials in Photovoltaic Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Moseley, J.; Miller, D.; Shah, Q.-U.-A. S. J.; Sakurai, K.; Kempe, M.; Tamizhmani, G.; Kurtz, S.

    2011-10-01

    Use of thermoplastic materials as encapsulants in photovoltaic (PV) modules presents a potential concern in terms of high temperature creep, which should be evaluated before thermoplastics are qualified for use in the field. Historically, the issue of creep has been avoided by using thermosetting polymers as encapsulants, such as crosslinked ethylene-co-vinyl acetate (EVA). Because they lack crosslinked networks, however, thermoplastics may be subject to phase transitions and visco-elastic flow at the temperatures and mechanical stresses encountered by modules in the field, creating the potential for a number of reliability and safety issues. Thermoplastic materials investigated in this study include PV-grade uncured-EVA (without curing agents and therefore not crosslinked); polyvinyl butyral (PVB); thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU); and three polyolefins (PO), which have been proposed for use as PV encapsulation. Two approaches were used to evaluate the performance of these materials as encapsulants: module-level testing and a material-level testing.

  11. Testing paleointensity determinations on recent lava flows and scorias from Miyakejima, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuma, K.

    2013-12-01

    Still no consensus has been reached on paleointensity method. Even the classical Thellier method has not been fully tested on recent lava flows with known geomagnetic field intensity based on a systematic sampling scheme. In this study, Thellier method was applied for 1983, 1962 and 1940 basaltic lava flows and scorias from Miyakejima, Japan. Several vertical lava sections and quenched scorias, which are quite variable in magnetic mineralogy and grain size, provide an unparalleled opportunity to test paleointensity methods. Thellier experiments were conducted on a completely automated three-component spinner magnetometer with thermal demagnetizer 'tspin'. Specimens were heated in air, applied laboratory field was 45 microT, and pTRM checks were performed at every two heating steps. Curie points and hysteresis properties were obtained on small fragments removed from cylindrical specimens. For lava flows sigmoidal curves were commonly observed on the Arai diagrams. Especially the interior part of lava flows always revealed sigmoidal patterns and sometimes resulted in erroneously blurred behaviors. The directions after zero-field heating were not necessarily stable in the course of the Thellier experiments. It was very difficult, for the interior part, to ascertain linear segments on Arai diagrams corresponding to the geomagnetic field intensity at the eruption. Upper and lower clinker samples also generally revealed sigmoidal or upward concave curves on Arai diagrams. Neither lower nor higher temperature portions of the sigmoids or concaves gave the expected geomagnetic field intensities. However, there were two exceptional cases of lava flows giving correct field intensities: upper clinkers with relatively low unblocking temperatures (< 400 deg.C) and lower clinkers with broad unblocking temperature ranges from room temperature to 600 deg.C. A most promising target for paleointensity experiments within the volcanic rocks is scoria. Scoria samples always carry single

  12. Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA): Development of a Flow Model for Bovine Livers for Extensive Bench Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Lubienski, Andreas Bitsch, Rudi G.; Lubienski, Katrin; Kauffmann, Guenter; Duex, Markus

    2006-12-15

    Purpose. To develop a flow model for bovine livers for extensive bench testing of technical improvements or procedure-related developments of radiofrequency ablation excluding animal experiments. Methods. The perfusion of bovine livers directly from the slaughterhouse was simulated in a liver perfusion tank developed for the experimental work. The liver perfusion medium used was a Tyrode solution prepared in accordance with physiologic criteria (as for liver transplants) which was oxygenated by an oxygenator and heated to 36.5 deg. C. Portal vein circulation was regulated via a flow- and pressure-controlled pump and arterial circulation using a dialysis machine. Flow rate and pressure were adjusted as for the physiology of a human liver converted to bovine liver conditions. The fluid discharged from the liver was returned into the perfusion system through the vena cava. Extendable precision swivel arms with the radiofrequency probe attached were mounted on the liver perfusion tank. RFA was conducted with the RF3000 generator and a 2 cm LeVeen needle (Boston Scientific, Ratingen, Germany) in a three-dimensional grid for precise localization of the generated thermolesions. Results. Four bovine livers weighing 8.4 {+-} 0.4 kg each were prepared, connected to the perfusion system, and consecutively perfused for the experiments. Mean arterial flow was 569 {+-} 43 ml/min, arterial pressure 120 mmHg, portovenous flow 1440 {+-} 305 ml/min, and portal pressure 10 mmHg. Macroscopic evaluation after the experiments revealed no thrombi within the hepatic vessels. A total of 136 RF thermolesions were generated with an average number of 34 per liver. Mean RF duration was 2:59 {+-} 2:01 min:sec with an average baseline impedance of 28.2 {+-} 3.4 ohms. The mean diameter of the thermolesions along the puncture channel was 22.98 {+-} 4.34 mm and perpendicular to the channel was 23.27 {+-} 4.82 mm. Conclusion. Extracorporeal perfusion of bovine livers with consecutive standardized RF

  13. POTENTIAL EFFECTS OF FAULTS ON GROUNDWATER FLOW FOR THE YUCCA FLAT BASIN, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, R. P.; Fryer, W.

    2009-12-01

    The permeability changes resulting from finely comminuted material in fault cores and the fractured and brecciated rock in fault damage zones allows faults to channelize groundwater flow along the plane of the fault. The efficiency of faults as permeability structures depends on fault zone width, fault offset, depth at which the fault developed, type of faulted rock, extent of secondary mineralization, and fault orientation within current stress field. Studies of faulted volcanic rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, indicate that fault zone width and brecciation increase with fault offset, that faulted welded tuff is more permeable than nonwelded or bedded tuff, and that non-hydrothermal secondary mineralization commonly diminishes fracture permeability. These results are applied to the groundwater conceptual flow model for Yucca Flat (YF) on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Yucca Flat contains Tertiary volcanic rocks similar to thoise at Yucca Mountain deposited on Paleozoic carbonate rocks whose thickness is increased by local thrust-faults. The YF basin contains north-striking normal faults and is bordered by southwest-striking strike-slip faults to the south and east. Fault permeability values derived from faulted volcanic rocks at Yucca Mountain suggests that major normal faults in Yucca Flat potentially manifest permeability values along the fault plane equal to the highest values determined for volcanic aquifers. Numerous minor faults not assigned specific permeability values are assumed to imbue the basin with a hydraulic anisotropy favoring fault-parallel flow. In this scenario groundwater flows generally from north to south in the Yucca Flat basin, even as the head gradient is primarily towards the centrally located Yucca Fault, which acts as the main subsurface drainage feature within the basin. Studies show that the regional stress field has rotated clockwise such that southwest-striking strike-slip faults are currently under tension. In this scenario these

  14. Inlet flow test calibration for a small axial compressor rig. Part 2: CFD compared with experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. P.; Prahst, P. S.

    1995-01-01

    An axial compressor test rig has been designed for the operation of small turbomachines. A flow test was run to calibrate and determine the source and magnitudes of the loss mechanisms in the compressor inlet for a highly loaded two-stage axial compressor test. Several flow conditions and inlet guide vane (IGV) angle settings were established, for which detailed surveys were completed. Boundary layer bleed was also provided along the casing of the inlet behind the support struts and ahead of the IGV. Several computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations were made for selected flow conditions established during the test. Good agreement between the CFD and test data were obtained for these test conditions.

  15. Modeling and testing of two-phase flow in manifolds under microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, Frederick; Kurwitz, Cable

    2001-02-01

    Previous work relating to two-phase flow in manifolds has dealt primarily with 1-g phase distribution at each junction. Understanding the redistribution of gas and liquid at each junction in microgravity allows the investigator to calculate specific thermal-hydraulic phenomena in each branch or run. A model was developed at Texas A&M to determine the phasic distribution in an arbitrary manifold. Previously developed phase distribution equations are used to describe the redistribution at a dividing T-junction (Young et al., 1999). Mass flow rate, void fraction, and pressure drop are calculated iteratively for the entire manifold. Output from the model was compared to data taken from tests aboard NASA's KC-135. The test manifold consisted of a run with three branches. The system allowed the output to be directed to a phase separator or to collection bags. The distribution of liquid and gas in each collection bag could be used to determine the mass fraction in each branch and run. Results show good agreement between predicted mass fraction and flight data. .

  16. Chlorine-36 data at Yucca Mountain: Statistical tests of conceptual models for unsaturated-zone flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, K.; Wolfsberg, A.; Fabryka-Martin, J.; Sweetkind, D.

    2003-01-01

    An extensive set of chlorine-36 (36Cl) data has been collected in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), an 8-km-long tunnel at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the purpose of developing and testing conceptual models of flow and transport in the unsaturated zone (UZ) at this site. At several locations, the measured values of 36Cl/Cl ratios for salts leached from rock samples are high enough to provide strong evidence that at least a small component of bomb-pulse 36Cl, fallout from atmospheric testing of nuclear devices in the 1950s and 1960s, was measured, implying that some fraction of the water traveled from the ground surface through 200-300 m of unsaturated rock to the level of the ESF during the last 50 years. These data are analyzed here using a formal statistical approach based on log-linear models to evaluate alternative conceptual models for the distribution of such fast flow paths. The most significant determinant of the presence of bomb-pulse 36Cl in a sample from the welded Topopah Spring unit (TSw) is the structural setting from which the sample was collected. Our analysis generally supports the conceptual model that a fault that cuts through the nonwelded Paintbrush tuff unit (PTn) that overlies the TSw is required in order for bomb-pulse 36Cl to be transmitted to the sample depth in less than 50 years. Away from PTn-cutting faults, the ages of water samples at the ESF appear to be a strong function of the thickness of the nonwelded tuff between the ground surface and the ESF, due to slow matrix flow in that unit. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Chlorine-36 data at Yucca Mountain: statistical tests of conceptual models for unsaturated-zone flow.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Katherine; Wolfsberg, Andrew; Fabryka-Martin, June; Sweetkind, Donald

    2003-01-01

    An extensive set of chlorine-36 (36Cl) data has been collected in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), an 8-km-long tunnel at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the purpose of developing and testing conceptual models of flow and transport in the unsaturated zone (UZ) at this site. At several locations, the measured values of 36Cl/Cl ratios for salts leached from rock samples are high enough to provide strong evidence that at least a small component of bomb-pulse 36Cl, fallout from atmospheric testing of nuclear devices in the 1950s and 1960s, was measured, implying that some fraction of the water traveled from the ground surface through 200-300 m of unsaturated rock to the level of the ESF during the last 50 years. These data are analyzed here using a formal statistical approach based on log-linear models to evaluate alternative conceptual models for the distribution of such fast flow paths. The most significant determinant of the presence of bomb-pulse 36Cl in a sample from the welded Topopah Spring unit (TSw) is the structural setting from which the sample was collected. Our analysis generally supports the conceptual model that a fault that cuts through the nonwelded Paintbrush tuff unit (PTn) that overlies the TSw is required in order for bomb-pulse 36Cl to be transmitted to the sample depth in less than 50 years. Away from PTn-cutting faults, the ages of water samples at the ESF appear to be a strong function of the thickness of the nonwelded tuff between the ground surface and the ESF, due to slow matrix flow in that unit. PMID:12714284

  18. NASA/MSFC's Calculation for Test Case 1a of ATAC-FSDC Workshop on After-body and Nozzle Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph H.

    2006-01-01

    Mr. Ruf of NASA/MSFC executed the CHEM computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to provide a prediction of the test case 1 a for the ATAC-FSDC Workshop on After-body and Nozzle Flows. CHEM is used extensively at MSFC for a wide variety of fluid dynamic problems. These problems include; injector element flows, nozzle flows, feed line flows, turbomachinery flows, solid rocket motor internal flows, plume vehicle flow interactions, etc.

  19. DEMONSTRATION OF SPLIT-FLOW VENTILATION AND RECIR CULATION AS FLOW-REDUCTION METHODS IN AN AIR FORCE PAINT SPRAY BOOTH - VOLUME I. MAIN REPORT, APPENDICES A-C

    EPA Science Inventory

    During a series of painting operations in a horizontal-flow paint spray booth at Travis AFB, CA, baseline concentrations of four classes of toxic airborne pollutants were measured at 24 locations across a plane immediately forward of the exhaust filters, in the exhaust duct, and ...

  20. Evaluation of GenoFlow DR-MTB Array Test for Detection of Rifampin and Isoniazid Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Molina-Moya, B; Kazdaglis, G; Lacoma, A; Prat, C; Gómez, A; Villar-Hernández, R; García-García, E; Haba, L; Maldonado, J; Samper, S; Ruiz-Manzano, J; Ausina, V; Domínguez, J

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the GenoFlow DR-MTB array test (DiagCor Bioscience, Hong Kong) on 70 cultured isolates and 50 sputum specimens. The GenoFlow array test showed good sensitivity and specificity compared to the phenotypic Bactec 460TB. This array accurately detected mutations inrpoB,katG, andinhAassociated with resistance to rifampin and isoniazid. PMID:26865688

  1. ACS Symposium Support

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth D. Jordan

    2010-02-20

    The funds from this DOE grant were used to help cover the travel costs of five students and postdoctoral fellows who attended a symposium on 'Hydration: From Clusters to Aqueous Solutions' held at the Fall 2007 American Chemical Society Meeting in Boston, MA, August 19-23. The Symposium was sponsored by the Physical Chemistry Division, ACS. The technical program for the meeting is available at http://phys-acs.org/fall2007.html.

  2. Groundwater Flow Systems at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada: A Synthesis of Potentiometric Contours, Hydrostratigraphy, and Geologic Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Fenelon, Joseph M.; Sweetkind, Donald S.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2010-01-25

    Contaminants introduced into the subsurface of the Nevada Test Site by underground nuclear testing are of concern to the U.S. Department of Energy and regulators responsible for protecting human health and safety. The potential for contaminant movement away from the underground test areas and into the accessible environment is greatest by groundwater transport. The primary hydrologic control on this transport is evaluated and examined through a series of contour maps developed to represent the hydraulic-head distribution within each of the major aquifers underlying the area. Aquifers were identified and their extents delineated by merging and analyzing multiple hydrostratigraphic framework models developed by other investigators from existing geologic information. A map of the hydraulic-head distribution in each major aquifer was developed from a detailed evaluation and assessment of available water-level measurements. Multiple spreadsheets that accompany this report provide pertinent water-level and geologic data by well or drill hole. Aquifers are mapped and discussed in general terms as being one of two types: alluvial-volcanic, or carbonate. Both aquifer types are subdivided and mapped as independent regional and local aquifers, based on the continuity of their component rock. Groundwater-flow directions, approximated from potentiometric contours that were developed from the hydraulic-head distribution, are indicated on the maps and discussed for each of the regional aquifers and for selected local aquifers. Hydraulic heads vary across the study area and are interpreted to range in altitude from greater than 5,000 feet in a regional alluvial-volcanic aquifer beneath a recharge area in the northern part of the study area to less than 2,300 feet in regional alluvial-volcanic and carbonate aquifers in the southwestern part of the study area. Flow directions throughout the study area are dominantly south-southwest with some local deviations. Vertical hydraulic

  3. Groundwater Flow Systems at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada: A Synthesis of Potentiometric Contours, Hydrostratigraphy, and Geologic Structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fenelon, Joseph M.; Sweetkind, Donald S.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2010-01-01

    Contaminants introduced into the subsurface of the Nevada Test Site by underground nuclear testing are of concern to the U.S. Department of Energy and regulators responsible for protecting human health and safety. The potential for contaminant movement away from the underground test areas and into the accessible environment is greatest by groundwater transport. The primary hydrologic control on this transport is evaluated and examined through a series of contour maps developed to represent the hydraulic-head distribution within each of the major aquifers underlying the area. Aquifers were identified and their extents delineated by merging and analyzing multiple hydrostratigraphic framework models developed by other investigators from existing geologic information. A map of the hydraulic-head distribution in each major aquifer was developed from a detailed evaluation and assessment of available water-level measurements. Multiple spreadsheets that accompany this report provide pertinent water-level and geologic data by well or drill hole. Aquifers are mapped and discussed in general terms as being one of two types: alluvial-volcanic, or carbonate. Both aquifer types are subdivided and mapped as independent regional and local aquifers, based on the continuity of their component rock. Groundwater-flow directions, approximated from potentiometric contours that were developed from the hydraulic-head distribution, are indicated on the maps and discussed for each of the regional aquifers and for selected local aquifers. Hydraulic heads vary across the study area and are interpreted to range in altitude from greater than 5,000 feet in a regional alluvial-volcanic aquifer beneath a recharge area in the northern part of the study area to less than 2,300 feet in regional alluvial-volcanic and carbonate aquifers in the southwestern part of the study area. Flow directions throughout the study area are dominantly south-southwest with some local deviations. Vertical hydraulic

  4. Study and development of an air conditioning system operating on a magnetic heat pump cycle (design and testing of flow directors)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Pao-Lien

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the fabrication, design of flow director, fluid flow direction analysis and testing of flow director of a magnetic heat pump. The objectives of the project are: (1) to fabricate a demonstration magnetic heat pump prototype with flow directors installed; and (2) analysis and testing of flow director and to make sure working fluid loops flow through correct directions with minor mixing. The prototype was fabricated and tested at the Development Testing Laboratory of Kennedy Space Center. The magnetic heat pump uses rear earth metal plates rotate in and out of a magnetic field in a clear plastic housing with water flowing through the rotor plates to provide temperature lift. Obtaining the proper water flow direction has been a problem. Flow directors were installed as flow barriers between separating point of two parallel loops. Function of flow directors were proven to be excellent both analytically and experimentally.

  5. Performance and test section flow characteristics of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zell, Peter T.

    1993-01-01

    Results from the performance and test section flow calibration of the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel are presented. Measurements indicating the 80- by 120-ft test section flow quality were obtained throughout the tunnel operational envelope and for atmospheric wind speeds up to approximately 20 knots. Tunnel performance characteristics and a dynamic pressure system calibration were also documented during the process of mapping the test section flow field. Experimental results indicate that the test section flow quality is relatively insensitive to dynamic pressure and the level of atmospheric winds experienced during the calibration. The dynamic pressure variation in the test section is within +/-75 percent of the average. The axial turbulence intensity is less than 0.5 percent up to the maximum test section speed of 100 knots, and the vertical and lateral flow angle variations are within +/-5 deg and +/-7 deg, respectively. Atmospheric winds were found to affect the pressure distribution in the test section only at high ratios of wind speed to test section speed.

  6. Non-Antithrombotic Medical Options in ACS: Old Agents and New Lines on the Horizon

    PubMed Central

    Soukoulis, Victor; Boden, William E.; Smith, Sidney C.; O'Gara, Patrick T.

    2014-01-01

    Acute coronary syndromes (ACS) constitute a spectrum of clinical presentations ranging from unstable angina and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction to ST-segment myocardial infarction. Myocardial ischemia in this context occurs as a result of an abrupt decrease in coronary blood flow and resultant imbalance in the myocardial oxygen supply-demand relationship. Coronary blood flow is further compromised by other mechanisms that increase coronary vascular resistance or reduce coronary driving pressure. The goals of treatment are to decrease myocardial oxygen demand, increase coronary blood flow and oxygen supply, and limit myocardial injury. Treatments are generally divided into “disease-modifying” agents or interventions that improve hard clinical outcomes and other strategies that can reduce ischemia. In addition to traditional drugs such as beta-blockers and inhibitors of the reninangiotensin-aldosterone system, newer agents have expanded the number of molecular pathways targeted for treatment of ACS. Ranolazine, trimetazidine, nicorandil, and ivabradine are medications that have been shown to reduce myocardial ischemia through diverse mechanisms and have been tested in limited fashion in patients with ACS. Attenuating the no-reflow phenomenon and reducing the injury compounded by acute reperfusion after a period of coronary occlusion are active areas of research. Additionally, interventions aimed at ischemic pre- and post-conditioning may be useful means by which to limit myocardial infarct size. Trials are also underway to examine altered metabolic and oxygen-related pathways in ACS. This review will discuss traditional and newer anti-ischemic therapies for patients with ACS, exclusive of revascularization, anti-thrombotic agents, and the use of high-intensity statins. PMID:24902977

  7. THREE-DIMENSIONAL IGNITION AND GROWTH REACTIVE FLOW MODELING OF PRISM FAILURE TESTS ON PBX 9502

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M L; Tarver, C M

    2006-06-20

    The Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for shock initiation and detonation of solid explosives based on triaminotirnitrobenzene (TATB) is applied to three-dimensional detonation wave propagation. The most comprehensive set of three-dimensional detonation wave propagation data is that measured using the trapezoidal prism test. In this test, a PBX 9501 (95% HMX, 2.5% Estane, and 2.5% BDNPA/F) line detonator initiates a detonation wave along the trapezoidal face of a PBX 9502 (95% TATB and 5% Kel-F binder) prism. The failure thickness, which has been shown experimentally to be roughly half of the failure diameter of a long cylindrical charge, is measured after 50 mm of detonation wave propagation by impact with an aluminum witness plate. The effects of confinement impedance on the PBX 9502 failure thickness have been measured using air (unconfined), water, PMMA, magnesium, aluminum, lead, and copper placed in contact with the rectangular faces of the prism parallel to the direction of detonation propagation. These prism test results are modeled using the two-dimensional PBX 9502 Ignition and Growth model parameters determined by calculating failure diameter and tested on recent corner turning experiments. Good agreement between experimentally measured and calculated prism failure thicknesses for unconfined and confined PBX 9502 is reported.

  8. Cloud particle effects on laminar flow in the NASA LEFT program - Preliminary results. [Leading Edge Flight Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. E.; Fischer, M. C.; Fisher, D. F.; Young, R.

    1986-01-01

    Laminar flow offers the promise of significant fuel savings on future commercial transport aircraft, but laminar flow can be lost while encountering clouds or haze at cruise conditions. To quantify the effect of cloud particles on laminar flow during typical airline operating conditions, and evaluate candidate cloud particle detection instrument concepts for future laminar flow aircraft, two types of cloud particle detectors are being flown aboard a NASA JetStar aircraft in the Leading Edge Flight Test (LEFT) program. The instrumentation is described, and preliminary results and conclusions are presented.

  9. Results of hydrologic testing of the Cold Creek interbed and Umatilla basalt flow top at Borehole DC-15

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, R.L. . Rockwell Hanford Operations); Prater, L.S.; Raymond, J.R. )

    1983-08-01

    Results and a description of hydrologic testing of the Cold Creek interbed and Umatilla basalt flow top are presented in this report. The isolated test interval is from 713 to 787 ft below land surface. Hydrologic test results are assigned to the Cold Creek interbed (721 to 769 ft) and Umatilla basalt flow top (769 to 787 ft). Hydrologic tests conducted between March 21 and March 26, 1980 included a constant discharge airlift pumping tests and a constant discharge submersible pumping test. An observed hydraulic head for the interval was about 359 ft above mean sea level. Transmissivity values determined from tests performed range from 28 to 29 ft{sup 2}/day, with an assigned best estimate of 29 ft{sup 2}/day. The best estimate of equivalent hydraulic conductivity, based on an effective test thickness of 66 ft, is 0.4 ft/day. 3 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. 3D modelling of the flow of self-compacting concrete with or without steel fibres. Part I: slump flow test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeb, R.; Kulasegaram, S.; Karihaloo, B. L.

    2014-12-01

    In part I of this two-part paper, a three-dimensional Lagrangian smooth particle hydrodynamics method has been used to model the flow of self-compacting concrete (SCC) with or without short steel fibres in the slump cone test. The constitutive behaviour of this non-Newtonian viscous fluid is described by a Bingham-type model. The 3D simulation of SCC without fibres is focused on the distribution of large aggregates (larger than or equal to 8 mm) during the flow. The simulation of self-compacting high- and ultra-high- performance concrete containing short steel fibres is focused on the distribution of fibres and their orientation during the flow. The simulation results show that the fibres and/or heavier aggregates do not precipitate but remain homogeneously distributed in the mix throughout the flow.

  11. Analysis and Down Select of Flow Passages for Thermal Hydraulic Testing of a SNAP Derived Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfroy, T. J.; Sadasivan, P.; Masterson, S.

    2007-01-01

    As past of the Vision for Space Exploration, man will return to the moon. To enable safe and productive time on the lunar surface will require adequate power resources. To provide the needed power and to give mission planners all landing site possibilities, including a permanently dark crater, a nuclear reactor provides the most options. Designed to be l00kWt providing approx. 25kWe this power plants would be very effective in delivering dependable, site non-specific power to crews or robotic missions on the lunar surface. An affordable reference reactor based upon the successful SNAP program of the 1960's and early 1970's has been designed by Los Alamos National Laboratory that will meet such a requirement. Considering current funding, environmental, and schedule limitations this lunar surface power reactor will be tested using non-nuclear simulators to simulate the heat from fission reactions. Currently a 25kWe surface power SNAP derivative reactor is in the early process of design and testing with collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, Glenn Research Center, Marshall Space Flight Center, and Sandia National Laboratory to ensure that this new design is affordable and can be tested using non-nuclear methods as have proven so effective in the past. This paper will discuss the study and down selection of a flow passage concept for a approx. 25kWe lunar surface power reactor. Several different flow passages designs were evaluated using computational fluid dynamics to determine pressure drop and a structural assessment to consider thermal and stress of the passage walls. The reactor design basis conditions are discussed followed by passage problem setup and results for each concept. A recommendation for passage design is made with rationale for selection.

  12. Flow Components in a NaK Test Loop Designed to Simulate Conditions in a Nuclear Surface Power Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Godfroy, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    A test loop using NaK as the working fluid is presently in use to study material compatibility effects on various components that comprise a possible nuclear reactor design for use on the lunar surface. A DC electromagnetic (EM) pump has been designed and implemented as a means of actively controlling the NaK flow rate through the system and an EM flow sensor is employed to monitor the developed flow rate. These components allow for the matching of the flow rate conditions in test loops with those that would be found in a full-scale surface-power reactor. The design and operating characteristics of the EM pump and flow sensor are presented. In the EM pump, current is applied to a set of electrodes to produce a Lorentz body force in the fluid. A measurement of the induced voltage (back-EMF) in the flow sensor provides the means of monitoring flow rate. Both components are compact, employing high magnetic field strength neodymium magnets thermally coupled to a water-cooled housing. A vacuum gap limits the heat transferred from the high temperature NaK tube to the magnets and a magnetically-permeable material completes the magnetic circuit. The pump is designed to produce a pressure rise of 5 psi, and the flow sensor's predicted output is roughly 20 mV at the loop's nominal flow rate of 0.5 GPM.

  13. Flow Components in a NaK Test Loop Designed to Simulate Conditions in a Nuclear Surface Power Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Godfroy, Thomas J.

    2008-01-21

    A test loop using NaK as the working fluid is presently in use to study material compatibility effects on various components that comprise a possible nuclear reactor design for use on the lunar surface. A DC electromagnetic (EM) pump has been designed and implemented as a means of actively controlling the NaK flow rate through the system and an EM flow sensor is employed to monitor the developed flow rate. These components allow for the matching of the flow rate conditions in test loops with those that would be found in a full-scale surface-power reactor. The design and operating characteristics of the EM pump and flow sensor are presented. In the EM pump, current is applied to a set of electrodes to produce a Lorentz body force in the fluid. A measurement of the induced voltage (back-EMF) in the flow sensor provides the means of monitoring flow rate. Both components are compact, employing high magnetic field strength neodymium magnets thermally coupled to a water-cooled housing. A vacuum gap limits the heat transferred from the high temperature NaK tube to the magnets and a magnetically-permeable material completes the magnetic circuit. The pump is designed to produce a pressure rise of 34.5 kPa, and the flow sensor's predicted output is roughly 20 mV at the loop's nominal flow rate of 0.114 m{sup 3}/hr.

  14. System and method for determining stator winding resistance in an AC motor using motor drives

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Bin; Habetler, Thomas G; Zhang, Pinjia

    2013-02-26

    A system and method for determining the stator winding resistance of AC motors is provided. The system includes an AC motor drive having an input connectable to an AC source and an output connectable to an input terminal of an AC motor, a pulse width modulation (PWM) converter having switches therein to control current flow and terminal voltages in the AC motor, and a control system connected to the PWM converter. The control system generates a command signal to cause the PWM converter to control an output of the AC motor drive corresponding to an input to the AC motor, selectively generates a modified command signal to cause the PWM converter to inject a DC signal into the output of the AC motor drive, and determines a stator winding resistance of the AC motor based on the DC signal of at least one of the voltage and current.

  15. T-tail flutter: Potential-flow modelling, experimental validation and flight tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murua, Joseba; Martínez, Pablo; Climent, Héctor; van Zyl, Louw; Palacios, Rafael

    2014-11-01

    Flutter of T-tail configurations is caused by the aeroelastic coupling between the vertical fin and the horizontal stabiliser. The latter is mounted on the fin instead of the fuselage, and hence the arrangement presents distinct characteristics compared to other typical empennage setups; specifically, T-tail aeroelasticity is governed by inplane dynamics and steady aerodynamic loading, which are typically not included in flutter clearance methodologies based on the doublet lattice method. As the number of new aircraft featuring this tail configuration increases, there is a need for precise understanding of the phenomenon, appropriate tools for its prediction, and reliable benchmarking data. This paper addresses this triple challenge by providing a detailed explanation of T-tail flutter physics, describing potential-flow modelling alternatives, and presenting detailed numerical and experimental results to compensate for the shortage of reproducible data in the literature. A historical account of the main milestones in T-tail aircraft development is included, followed by a T-tail flutter research review that emphasises the latest contributions from industry as well as academia. The physical problem is dissected next, highlighting the individual and combined effects that drive the phenomenon. Three different methodologies, all based on potential-flow aerodynamics, are considered for T-tail subsonic flutter prediction: (i) direct incorporation of supplementary T-tail effects as additional terms in the flutter equations; (ii) a generalisation of the boundary conditions and air loads calculation on the double lattice; and (iii) a linearisation of the unsteady vortex lattice method with arbitrary kinematics. Comparison with wind-tunnel experimental results evidences that all three approaches are consistent and capture the key characteristics in the T-tail dynamics. The validated numerical models are then exercised in easy-to-duplicate canonical test cases. These

  16. The distributed-order fractional diffusion-wave equation of groundwater flow: Theory and application to pumping and slug tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ninghu; Nelson, Paul N.; Connor, Sarah

    2015-10-01

    We present a distributed-order fractional diffusion-wave equation (dofDWE) to describe radial groundwater flow to or from a well, and three sets of solutions of the dofDWE for flow from a well for aquifer tests: one for pumping tests, and two for slug tests. The dofDWE is featured by two temporal orders of fractional derivatives, β1 and β2, which characterise small and large pores, respectively. By fitting the approximate solutions of the dofDWE to data from slug tests in the field, we determined the effective saturated hydraulic conductivity, Ke, transmissivity, Tf, and the order of fractional derivatives, β2 in one test and β2 and β1 in the second test. We found that the patterns of groundwater flow from a well during the slug tests at this site belong to the class of sub-diffusion with β2 < 1 and β1 < 1 using both the short-time and large-time solutions. We introduce the concept of the critical time to link Ke as a function of β2 and β1. The importance of the orders of fractional derivatives is obvious in the approximate solutions: for short time slug tests only the parameter β2 for flow in large pores is present while for long time slug tests the parameters β2 and β1 are present indicating both large and small pores are functioning.

  17. Identification of groundwater flow parameters using reciprocal data from hydraulic interference tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinoni, Marianna; Delay, Frederick; Ackerer, Philippe; Riva, Monica; Guadagnini, Alberto

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the effect of considering reciprocal drawdown curves for the characterization of hydraulic properties of aquifer systems through inverse modeling based on interference well testing. Reciprocity implies that drawdown observed in a well B when pumping takes place from well A should strictly coincide with the drawdown observed in A when pumping in B with the same flow rate as in A. In this context, a critical point related to applications of hydraulic tomography is the assessment of the number of available independent drawdown data and their impact on the solution of the inverse problem. The issue arises when inverse modeling relies upon mathematical formulations of the classical single-continuum approach to flow in porous media grounded on Darcy's law. In these cases, introducing reciprocal drawdown curves in the database of an inverse problem is equivalent to duplicate some information, to a certain extent. We present a theoretical analysis of the way a Least-Square objective function and a Levenberg-Marquardt minimization algorithm are affected by the introduction of reciprocal information in the inverse problem. We also investigate the way these reciprocal data, eventually corrupted by measurement errors, influence model parameter identification in terms of: (a) the convergence of the inverse model, (b) the optimal values of parameter estimates, and (c) the associated estimation uncertainty. Our theoretical findings are exemplified through a suite of computational examples focused on block-heterogeneous systems with increased complexity level. We find that the introduction of noisy reciprocal information in the objective function of the inverse problem has a very limited influence on the optimal parameter estimates. Convergence of the inverse problem improves when adding diverse (nonreciprocal) drawdown series, but does not improve when reciprocal information is added to condition the flow model. The uncertainty on optimal parameter estimates is

  18. Closed form flow model of a damped slug test in a fractured bedrock borehole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostendorf, David W.; Lukas, William G.; Hinlein, Erich S.

    2015-10-01

    An existing closed form model is modified to describe the damped response of groundwater in a fractured bedrock borehole with variable apertures and dips to a slug test. The existing theory, which requires single sized horizontal fractures, is accurately calibrated by slug test data from three uncased bedrock boreholes in the Dedham Granite and an observation well screened just below the contact surface with a till drumlin. Apertures and dips vary however, so the ability of the modified theory to accommodate different sizes and inclinations improves upon the physical validity of its predecessor when fracture information accompanies slug test data. Geophysical logs identify a large number and dip of fractures in the uncased boreholes in the Dedham Granite in this regard. A lognormally distributed, horizontal aperture calibration of the slug tests in the uncased boreholes retains the accuracy of the single size model, and yields aperture statistics more consistent with literature values. The slug test in the screened observation well is accurately calibrated with the modified horizontal theory for discrete (two) sizes, based upon the average fracture spacing found in the uncased boreholes. All four results yield comparable compressibility estimates, which depend on fracture spacing but not size or dip. The calibrated aperture size and calculated fracture porosity and permeability decrease with length of the borehole into the Dedham Granite. The measured dip and aperture for flowing and nonflowing fractures in one of the boreholes accurately calibrates the modified theory. The inclusion of dip reduces the calibrated permeability because of the increased ellipsoidal area at the interface of the borehole and the inclined fractures.

  19. Hierarchical Testing with Automated Document Generation for Amanzi, ASCEM's Subsurface Flow and Reactive Transport Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulton, J. D.; Steefel, C. I.; Yabusaki, S.; Castleton, K.; Scheibe, T. D.; Keating, E. H.; Freedman, V. L.

    2013-12-01

    The Advanced Simulation Capabililty for Environmental Management (ASCEM) program is developing an approach and open-source tool suite for standardized risk and performance assessments at legacy nuclear waste sites. These assessments use a graded and iterative approach, beginning with simplified highly abstracted models, and adding geometric and geologic complexity as understanding is gained. To build confidence in this assessment capability, extensive testing of the underlying tools is needed. Since the tools themselves, such as the subsurface flow and reactive-transport simulator, Amanzi, are under active development, testing must be both hierarchical and highly automated. In this presentation we show how we have met these requirements, by leveraging the python-based open-source documentation system called Sphinx with several other open-source tools. Sphinx builds on the reStructured text tool docutils, with important extensions that include high-quality formatting of equations, and integrated plotting through matplotlib. This allows the documentation, as well as the input files for tests, benchmark and tutorial problems, to be maintained with the source code under a version control system. In addition, it enables developers to build documentation in several different formats (e.g., html and pdf) from a single source. We will highlight these features, and discuss important benefits of this approach for Amanzi. In addition, we'll show that some of ASCEM's other tools, such as the sampling provided by the Uncertainty Quantification toolset, are naturally leveraged to enable more comprehensive testing. Finally, we will highlight the integration of this hiearchical testing and documentation framework with our build system and tools (CMake, CTest, and CDash).

  20. Pilot model expansion tunnel test flow properties obtained from velocity, pressure, and probe measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friesen, W. J.; Moore, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Velocity-profile, pitot-pressure, and supplemental probe measurements were made at the nozzle exist of an expansion tunnel (a modification to the Langley pilot model expansion tube) for a nozzle net condition of a nitrogen test sample with a velocity of 4.5 km/sec and a density 0.005 times the density of nitrogen at standard conditions, both with the nozzle initially immersed in a helium atmosphere and with the nozzle initially evacuated. The purpose of the report is to present the results of these measurements and some of the physical properties of the nitrogen test sample which can be inferred from the measured results. The main conclusions reached are that: the velocity profiles differ for two nozzle conditions; regions of the flow field can be found where the velocity is uniform to within 5 percent and constant for several hundred microseconds; the velocity of the nitrogen test sample is reduced due to passage through the nozzle; and the velocity profiles do not significantly reflect the large variations which occur in the inferred density profiles.

  1. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) Material Test Results for the Capillary Flow Experiments (CFE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Bradley A.; Thesken, John C.; Bunnell, Charles T.

    2007-01-01

    In support of the Capillary Flow Experiments (CFE) program, several polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) flight vessels were constructed. Some vessels used a multipiece design, which was chemically welded together. Due to questions regarding the effects of the experiment fluid (silicone oil) on the weld integrity, a series of tests were conducted to provide evidence of the adequacy of the current vessel design. Tensile tests were conducted on PMMA samples that were both in the as-received condition, and also aged in air or oil for up to 8 weeks. Both welded and unwelded samples were examined. Fracture of the joints was studied using notched tensile specimens and Brazilian disk tests. Results showed that aging had no effect on tensile properties. While the welded samples were weaker than the base parent material, the weld strength was found to be further degraded by bubbles in the weld zone. Finally a fracture analysis using the worst-case fracture conditions of the vessel was performed, and the vessel design was found to have a factor of three safety margin.

  2. Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Fluconazole by Flow Cytometry Correlates with Clinical Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Wenisch, Christoph; Moore, Caroline B.; Krause, Robert; Presterl, Elisabeth; Pichna, Peter; Denning, David W.

    2001-01-01

    Susceptibility testing of fungi by flow cytometry (also called fluorescence-activated cell sorting [FACS]) using vital staining with FUN-1 showed a good correlation with the standard M27-A procedure for assessing MICs. In this study we determined MICs for blood culture isolates from patients with candidemia by NCCLS M27-A and FACS methods and correlated the clinical outcome of these patients with in vitro antifungal resistance test results. A total of 24 patients with candidemia for whom one or more blood cultures were positive for a Candida sp. were included. Susceptibility testing was performed by NCCLS M27-A and FACS methods. The correlation of MICs (NCCLS M27-A and FACS) and clinical outcome was calculated. In 83% of the cases, the MICs of fluconazole determined by FACS were within 1 dilution of the MICs determined by the NCCLS M27-A method. For proposed susceptibility breakpoints, there was 100% agreement between the M27-A and FACS methods. In the FACS assay, a fluconazole MIC of <1 μg/ml was associated with cure (P < 0.001) whereas an MIC of ≥1 μg/ml was associated with death (P < 0.001). The M27-A-derived fluconazole MICs did not correlate with outcome (P = 1 and P = 0.133). PMID:11427554

  3. Flow/thermal analysis with verification by testing for redesign of the Space Shuttle SRM igniter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Malley, M. J.

    1993-06-01

    As a result of the success of the insulation j-joints in the Redesigned Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor field and nozzle to case joints, the igniter joints were redesigned to incorporate j-joints in the inner and outer igniter joints. The j-joints eliminated the putty that had previously been used to block hot motor gases from reaching the gasket seals. The gasket seals required the addition of a heater during the SRM redesign to increase the dynamic response of the seals to a gap opening in the joints upon motor ignition. The igniter redesign also reduced or eliminated these gap openings thus allowing a lower launch commit temperature criterion. The flow/thermal analyses discussed in this paper are ones used to support the igniter redesign and development phase specifically including tests where motor pressure was allowed to reach the primary seals as a result of intentionally flawing the j-joints. The test data, including pressure, temperature and erosion measurements, were used to support model verification. A good correlation between analysis results and test data was found.

  4. Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing of the Gram-Negative Bacteria Based on Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Ruf, Claude; Crussard, Steve; Franceschi, Christine; Orenga, Sylvain; Ouattara, Jasmine; Ramjeet, Mahendrasingh; Surre, Jérémy; Matic, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Rapidly treating infections with adequate antibiotics is of major importance. This requires a fast and accurate determination of the antibiotic susceptibility of bacterial pathogens. The most frequently used methods are slow because they are based on the measurement of growth inhibition. Faster methods, such as PCR-based detection of determinants of antibiotic resistance, do not always provide relevant information on susceptibility, particularly that which is not genetically based. Consequently, new methods, such as the detection of changes in bacterial physiology caused by antibiotics using flow cytometry and fluorescent viability markers, are being explored. In this study, we assessed whether Alexa Fluor® 633 Hydrazide (AFH), which targets carbonyl groups, can be used for antibiotic susceptibility testing. Carbonylation of cellular macromolecules, which increases in antibiotic-treated cells, is a particularly appropriate to assess for this purpose because it is irreversible. We tested the susceptibility of clinical isolates of Gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to antibiotics from the three classes: β-lactams, aminoglycosides, and fluoroquinolones. In addition to AFH, we used TO-PRO®-3, which enters cells with damaged membranes and binds to DNA, and DiBAC4 (3), which enters cells with depolarized membranes. We also monitored antibiotic-induced morphological alterations of bacterial cells by analyzing light scattering signals. Although all tested dyes and light scattering signals allowed for the detection of antibiotic-sensitive cells, AFH proved to be the most suitable for the fast and reliable detection of antibiotic susceptibility. PMID:27507962

  5. Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing of the Gram-Negative Bacteria Based on Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Saint-Ruf, Claude; Crussard, Steve; Franceschi, Christine; Orenga, Sylvain; Ouattara, Jasmine; Ramjeet, Mahendrasingh; Surre, Jérémy; Matic, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Rapidly treating infections with adequate antibiotics is of major importance. This requires a fast and accurate determination of the antibiotic susceptibility of bacterial pathogens. The most frequently used methods are slow because they are based on the measurement of growth inhibition. Faster methods, such as PCR-based detection of determinants of antibiotic resistance, do not always provide relevant information on susceptibility, particularly that which is not genetically based. Consequently, new methods, such as the detection of changes in bacterial physiology caused by antibiotics using flow cytometry and fluorescent viability markers, are being explored. In this study, we assessed whether Alexa Fluor® 633 Hydrazide (AFH), which targets carbonyl groups, can be used for antibiotic susceptibility testing. Carbonylation of cellular macromolecules, which increases in antibiotic-treated cells, is a particularly appropriate to assess for this purpose because it is irreversible. We tested the susceptibility of clinical isolates of Gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to antibiotics from the three classes: β-lactams, aminoglycosides, and fluoroquinolones. In addition to AFH, we used TO-PRO®-3, which enters cells with damaged membranes and binds to DNA, and DiBAC4 (3), which enters cells with depolarized membranes. We also monitored antibiotic-induced morphological alterations of bacterial cells by analyzing light scattering signals. Although all tested dyes and light scattering signals allowed for the detection of antibiotic-sensitive cells, AFH proved to be the most suitable for the fast and reliable detection of antibiotic susceptibility. PMID:27507962

  6. Structural tests and development of a laminar flow control wing surface composite chordwise joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lineberger, L. B.

    1984-01-01

    The dramatic increases in fuel costs and the potential for periods of limited fuel availability provided the impetus to explore technologies to reduce transport aircraft fuel consumption. NASA sponsored the Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) program beginning in 1976 to develop technologies to improve fuel efficiency. The Lockheed-Georgia Company accomplished under NAS1-16235 Laminar-Flow-Control (LFC) Wing Panel Structural Design and Development (WSSD); design, manufacturing, and testing activities. An in-depth preliminary design of the baseline 1993 LFC wing was accomplished. A surface panel using the Lockheed graphite/epoxy integrated LFC wing box structural concept was designed. The concept was shown by analysis to be structurally efficient and cost effective. Critical details of the surface and surface joint was demonstrated by fabricating and testing complex, concept selection specimens. The Lockheed-Georgia Company accomplishments, Development of LFC Wind Surface Composite Structures (WSCS), are documented. Tests were conducted on two CV2 panels to verify the static tension and fatigue strength of LFC wing surface chordwise joints.

  7. Local Flow Conditions for Propulsion Experiments on the NASA F-15B Propulsion Flight Test Fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vachon, Michael J.; Moes, Timothy R.; Corda, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Local flow conditions were measured underneath the National Aeronautics and Space Administration F-15B airplane to support development of future experiments on the Propulsion Flight Test Fixture (PFTF). The local Mach number and flow angles were measured using a conventional air data boom on a cone-cylinder mounted under the PFTF and compared with the airplane air data nose boom measurements. At subsonic flight speeds, the airplane and PFTF Mach numbers were approximately equal. Transonic Mach number values were up to 0.1 greater at the PFTF than the airplane, which is a counterintuitive result. The PFTF local supersonic Mach numbers were as much as 0.46 less than the airplane values. The maximum local Mach number at the PFTF was approximately 1.6 at an airplane Mach number near 2.0. The PFTF local angle of attack was negative at all Mach numbers, ranging from -3 to -8 degrees. When the airplane angle of sideslip was zero, the PFTF local value was zero between Mach 0.8 and Mach 1.1, -2 degrees between Mach 1.1 and Mach 1.5, and increased from zero to 1 degree from Mach 1.5 to Mach 2.0. Airplane inlet shock waves crossed the aerodynamic interface plane between Mach 1.85 and Mach 1.90.

  8. Field scale test of multi-dimensional flow and morphodynamic simulations used for restoration design analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDonald, Richard R.; Nelson, Jonathan M.; Fosness, Ryan L.; Nelson, Peter O.

    2016-01-01

    Two- and three-dimensional morphodynamic simulations are becoming common in studies of channel form and process. The performance of these simulations are often validated against measurements from laboratory studies. Collecting channel change information in natural settings for model validation is difficult because it can be expensive and under most channel forming flows the resulting channel change is generally small. Several channel restoration projects designed in part to armor large meanders with several large spurs constructed of wooden piles on the Kootenai River, ID, have resulted in rapid bed elevation change following construction. Monitoring of these restoration projects includes post- restoration (as-built) Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) as well as additional channel surveys following high channel forming flows post-construction. The resulting sequence of measured bathymetry provides excellent validation data for morphodynamic simulations at the reach scale of a real river. In this paper we test the performance a quasi-three-dimensional morphodynamic simulation against the measured elevation change. The resulting simulations predict the pattern of channel change reasonably well but many of the details such as the maximum scour are under predicted.

  9. Integrated flow and structural modeling for rocket engine component test facility propellant systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dequay, L.; Lusk, A.; Nunez, S.

    1991-01-01

    A set of PC-based computational Dynamic Fluid Flow Simulation models is presented for modeling facility gas and cryogenic systems. Data obtained provide important information regarding performance envelope parameters for the facility using different engine components; time-dependent valve setting for controlling steady-state, quasi-steady state, and transient profiles; optimum facility pipe and pipe component sizes and parameters; momentum transfer loads; and fluid conditions at critical points. A set of COSMIC NASTRAN-based finite element models is also presented to evaluate the loads and stresses on test facility piping systems from fluid and gaseous effects, thermal chill down, and occasional wind loads. The models are based on Apple Macintosh software which makes it possible to change numerous parameters.

  10. High resolution gamma ray tomography scanner for flow measurement and non-destructive testing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hampel, U.; Bieberle, A.; Hoppe, D.; Kronenberg, J.; Schleicher, E.; Suehnel, T.; Zimmermann, F.; Zippe, C.

    2007-10-15

    We report on the development of a high resolution gamma ray tomography scanner that is operated with a Cs-137 isotopic source at 662 keV gamma photon energy and achieves a spatial image resolution of 0.2 line pairs/mm at 10% modulation transfer function for noncollimated detectors. It is primarily intended for the scientific study of flow regimes and phase fraction distributions in fuel element assemblies, chemical reactors, pipelines, and hydrodynamic machines. Furthermore, it is applicable to nondestructive testing of larger radiologically dense objects. The radiation detector is based on advanced avalanche photodiode technology in conjunction with lutetium yttrium orthosilicate scintillation crystals. The detector arc comprises 320 single detector elements which are operated in pulse counting mode. For measurements at fixed vessels or plant components, we built a computed tomography scanner gantry that comprises rotational and translational stages, power supply via slip rings, and data communication to the measurement personal computer via wireless local area network.

  11. Error-Rate Estimation Based on Multi-Signal Flow Graph Model and Accelerated Radiation Tests.

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Wang, Yueke; Xing, Kefei; Deng, Wei; Zhang, Zelong

    2016-01-01

    A method of evaluating the single-event effect soft-error vulnerability of space instruments before launched has been an active research topic in recent years. In this paper, a multi-signal flow graph model is introduced to analyze the fault diagnosis and meantime to failure (MTTF) for space instruments. A model for the system functional error rate (SFER) is proposed. In addition, an experimental method and accelerated radiation testing system for a signal processing platform based on the field programmable gate array (FPGA) is presented. Based on experimental results of different ions (O, Si, Cl, Ti) under the HI-13 Tandem Accelerator, the SFER of the signal processing platform is approximately 10-3(error/particle/cm2), while the MTTF is approximately 110.7 h. PMID:27583533

  12. Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) dumps water after first in-flight cold flow test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The NASA SR-71A successfully completed its first cold flow flight as part of the NASA/Rocketdyne/Lockheed Martin Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California on March 4, 1998. During a cold flow flight, gaseous helium and liquid nitrogen are cycled through the linear aerospike engine to check the engine's plumbing system for leaks and to check the engine operating characterisitics. Cold-flow tests must be accomplished successfully before firing the rocket engine experiment in flight. The SR-71 took off at 10:16 a.m. PST. The aircraft flew for one hour and fifty-seven minutes, reaching a maximum speed of Mach 1.58 before landing at Edwards at 12:13 p.m. PST. 'I think all in all we had a good mission today,' Dryden LASRE Project Manager Dave Lux said. Flight crew member Bob Meyer agreed, saying the crew 'thought it was a really good flight.' Dryden Research Pilot Ed Schneider piloted the SR-71 during the mission. Lockheed Martin LASRE Project Manager Carl Meade added, 'We are extremely pleased with today's results. This will help pave the way for the first in-flight engine data-collection flight of the LASRE.' The LASRE experiment was designed to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin evaluate the aerodynamic characteristics and the handling of the SR-71 linear aerospike experiment configuration. The goal of the project was to provide in-flight data to help Lockheed Martin validate the computational predictive tools it was using to determine the aerodynamic performance of a future reusable launch vehicle. The joint NASA, Rocketdyne (now part of Boeing), and Lockheed Martin Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) completed seven initial research flights at Dryden Flight Research Center. Two initial flights were used to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the LASRE apparatus (pod) on the back of the SR-71. Five later flights focused on the experiment itself. Two were used to cycle gaseous

  13. High resolution gamma ray tomography scanner for flow measurement and non-destructive testing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampel, U.; Bieberle, A.; Hoppe, D.; Kronenberg, J.; Schleicher, E.; Sühnel, T.; Zimmermann, F.; Zippe, C.

    2007-10-01

    We report on the development of a high resolution gamma ray tomography scanner that is operated with a Cs-137 isotopic source at 662keV gamma photon energy and achieves a spatial image resolution of 0.2linepairs/mm at 10% modulation transfer function for noncollimated detectors. It is primarily intended for the scientific study of flow regimes and phase fraction distributions in fuel element assemblies, chemical reactors, pipelines, and hydrodynamic machines. Furthermore, it is applicable to nondestructive testing of larger radiologically dense objects. The radiation detector is based on advanced avalanche photodiode technology in conjunction with lutetium yttrium orthosilicate scintillation crystals. The detector arc comprises 320 single detector elements which are operated in pulse counting mode. For measurements at fixed vessels or plant components, we built a computed tomography scanner gantry that comprises rotational and translational stages, power supply via slip rings, and data communication to the measurement personal computer via wireless local area network.

  14. Three-dimensional Fast Flux Test Facility plenum model turbulent flow prediction and data comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Eyler, L.L.; Sawdye, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    Two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations of turbulent flow in a scaled Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) upper plenum model were performed using the TEMPEST hydrothermal code. A standard k-element of model was used to describe turbulence through an effective viscosity. Comparisons with previously reported mean velocity and turbulence field data measured in the plenum model and two-dimensional numerical simulations using the TEACH code were made. Predicted horizontal and vertical mean velocities and turbulent kinetic energy are shown to be in good agreement with available experimental data when inlet conditions of the dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy are appropriately prescribed. The three-dimensional quarter-symmetry simulation predicts the turbulent kinetic energy field significantly better than the two-dimensional centerplane simulations. These results lead to conclusions concerning deficiencies in the experimental data and the turbulence model.

  15. Test of Zero-point Energy Emission from Gases Flowing Through Casimir Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriyeva, Olga; Moddel, Garret

    A recently issued patent [1] describes a method by which vacuum energy is extracted from gas flowing through a Casimir cavity. According to stochastic electrodynamics, the electronic orbitals in atoms are supported by the ambient zero-point (ZP) field. When the gas atoms are pumped into a Casimir cavity, where long-wavelength ZP field modes are excluded, the electrons spin down into lower energy orbitals and release energy in the process. This energy is collected in a local absorber. When the electrons exit the Casimir cavity they are re-energized to their original orbitals by the ambient ZP fields. The process is repeated to produce continuous power. In this way, the device functions like a heat pump for ZP energy, extracting it globally from the electromagnetic quantum vacuum and collecting it in a local absorber. This energy can be used for heating, or converted to electric power. We carried out a series of experiments to test whether energy is, in fact, radiated from Casimir cavities when the appropriate gas flows through them. The Casimir cavity devices we tested were nanopore polycarbonate membranes with submicron pores having a density of 3x108pores/cm2. Gas was pumped through the membranes in a stainless steel vacuum system, and emitted energy was measured using a broadband pyroelectric detector and lock-in amplifier. Emission in the infrared was clearly observed. We analyzed the emission from different gases and cavities to determine its origin. None of the conventional thermodynamic models we applied to our data fully explain it, leaving open the possibility that it is due to Casimir-cavity-induced emission from ZP fields.

  16. Oscillatory pressure transients after flow interruption during bronchial challenge test in children.

    PubMed

    Frey, U; Kraemer, R

    1997-01-01

    The measurement of the conventional interrupter resistance (Rint) is dependent on pressure equilibration between alveolar and airway opening pressure, which is often not achieved in the presence of severe airways obstruction or in small children. The damping properties (d) of postocclusional oscillatory pressure transients after rapid flow interrruption can be assessed independent of complete pressure equilibration, and we have previously shown them to be correlated to resistive properties of the respiratory system. We wanted to determine whether these transients were an expression of acoustic properties of the air in the airways, or whether they were caused by an interaction of gas and lung tissue, and whether d was more sensitive than Rint to changes in airway mechanics. Bronchial challenge tests were carried out with cumulative doses of inhaled carbachol in 10 healthy children (aged 7-14 yrs) and 50 asthmatic children (aged 5-15 yrs). The airflow interruptions were performed with a combined nebulizer-shutter head, allowing resistance measurements with each breath. The frequency, and the damping factor of the postocclusional pressure transients changed significantly during carbachol challenge in both groups of children. The provocation dose (PD) at which the damping factor (d) of the oscillatory pressure transients increased more than 2 SD above the baseline mean ("variance-based", PDvb) was lower than the PDvb of the end-interruption resistance (Rint, EI). These changes in frequency and damping factor were reversible after inhaling salbutamol. These findings suggest that the damping properties of the postocclusional pressure transients after flow interruption can be used as a sensitive parameter to assess changes in airway mechanics during bronchial challenge test in children in whom pressure equilibration is frequently not achieved during airflow interruption due to airways obstruction. PMID:9032496

  17. Facility Activation and Characterization for IPD Oxidizer Turbopump Cold-Flow Testing at NASA Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sass, J. P.; Raines, N. G.; Farner, B. R.; Ryan, H. M.

    2004-01-01

    The Integrated Powerhead Demonstrator (IPD) is a 250K lbf (1.1 MN) thrust cryogenic hydrogen/oxygen engine technology demonstrator that utilizes a full flow staged combustion engine cycle. The Integrated Powerhead Demonstrator (IPD) is part of NASA's Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) program, which seeks to provide safe, dependable, cost-cutting technologies for future space launch systems. The project also is part of the Department of Defense's Integrated High Payoff Rocket Propulsion Technology (IHPRPT) program, which seeks to increase the performance and capability of today s state-of-the-art rocket propulsion systems while decreasing costs associated with military and commercial access to space. The primary industry participants include Boeing-Rocketdyne and GenCorp Aerojet. The intended full flow engine cycle is a key component in achieving all of the aforementioned goals. The IPD Program achieved a major milestone with the successful completion of the IPD Oxidizer Turbopump (OTP) cold-flow test project at the NASA John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC) E-1 test facility in November 2001. A total of 11 IPD OTP cold-flow tests were completed. Following an overview of the NASA SSC E-1 test facility, this paper addresses the facility aspects pertaining to the activation and the cold-flow testing of the IPD OTP. In addition, some of the facility challenges encountered during the test project are addressed.

  18. Performance tests for the NASA Ames Research Center 20 cm x 40 cm oscillating flow wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, W. J.; Giddings, T. A.

    1984-01-01

    An evaluation is presented of initial tests conducted to assess the performance of the NASA Ames 20 cm x 40 cm oscillating flow wind tunnel. The features of the tunnel are described and two aspects of tunnel operation are discussed. The first is an assessment of the steady mainstream and boundary layer flows and the second deals with oscillating mainstream and boundary layer flows. Experimental results indicate that in steady flow the test section mainstream velocity is uniform in the flow direction and in cross section. The freestream turbulence intensity is about 0.2 percent. With minor exceptions the steady turbulent boundary layer generated on the top wall of the test section exhibits the characteristics of a zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer generated on a flat plate. The tunnel was designed to generate sinusoidal oscillating mainstream flows. Experiments confirm that the tunnel produces sinusoidal mainstream velocity variations for the range of frequencies (up to 15 Hz). The results of this study demonstrate that the tunnel essentially produces the flows that it was designed to produce.

  19. Standardized performance tests of collectors of solar thermal energy: An evacuated flatplate copper collector with a serpentine flow distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, S. M.

    1976-01-01

    Basic test results are given for a flat plate solar collector whose performance was determined in the NASA-Lewis solar simulator. The collector was tested over ranges of inlet temperatures, fluxes and one coolant flow rate. Collector efficiency is correlated in terms of inlet temperature and flux level.

  20. 10 CFR 431.264 - Uniform test method for the measurement of flow rate for commercial prerinse spray valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Uniform test method for the measurement of flow rate for commercial prerinse spray valves. 431.264 Section 431.264 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial Prerinse Spray Valves Test Procedures § 431.264 Uniform...

  1. 10 CFR 431.264 - Uniform test method for the measurement of flow rate for commercial prerinse spray valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ASTM F2324-03, “Standard Test Method for Prerinse Spray Valves.” (Incorporated by reference, see § 431... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Uniform test method for the measurement of flow rate for commercial prerinse spray valves. 431.264 Section 431.264 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY...

  2. 10 CFR 431.264 - Uniform test method for the measurement of flow rate for commercial prerinse spray valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ASTM F2324-03, “Standard Test Method for Prerinse Spray Valves.” (Incorporated by reference, see § 431... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Uniform test method for the measurement of flow rate for commercial prerinse spray valves. 431.264 Section 431.264 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY...

  3. 10 CFR 431.264 - Uniform test method for the measurement of flow rate for commercial prerinse spray valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ASTM F2324-03, “Standard Test Method for Prerinse Spray Valves.” (Incorporated by reference, see § 431... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Uniform test method for the measurement of flow rate for commercial prerinse spray valves. 431.264 Section 431.264 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY...

  4. Evaluation of cloud detection instruments and performance of laminar-flow leading-edge test articles during NASA Leading-Edge Flight-Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Richard E.; Maddalon, Dal V.; Wagner, Richard D.; Fisher, David F.; Young, Ronald

    1989-01-01

    Summary evaluations of the performance of laminar-flow control (LFC) leading edge test articles on a NASA JetStar aircraft are presented. Statistics, presented for the test articles' performance in haze and cloud situations, as well as in clear air, show a significant effect of cloud particle concentrations on the extent of laminar flow. The cloud particle environment was monitored by two instruments, a cloud particle spectrometer (Knollenberg probe) and a charging patch. Both instruments are evaluated as diagnostic aids for avoiding laminar-flow detrimental particle concentrations in future LFC aircraft operations. The data base covers 19 flights in the simulated airline service phase of the NASA Leading-Edge Flight-Test (LEFT) Program.

  5. Analysis of the TREAT loss-of-flow tests L6 and L7 using SAS3D

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, E.E.; Simms, R.; Gruber, E.E.

    1985-01-01

    The TREAT loss-of-flow tests L6 and L7 have been analyzed using the SAS3D accident analysis code. The impetus for the analysis was the need for experimentally supported fuel motion modeling in whole core accident studies performed in support of licensing of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project. The input prescription chosen for the SAS3D/SLUMPY fuel motion model gave reasonable agreement with the test results. Tests L6 and L7, each conducted with a cluster of three fuel pins, were planned to simulate key events in the loss-of-flow accident scenario for the Clinch River homogeneous reactor.

  6. Two phase liquid helium flow testing to simulate the operation of a cryocondensation pump in the D3-D tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laughon, G. J.; Baxi, C. B.; Campbell, G. L.; Mahdavi, M. A.; Makariou, C. C.; Smith, J. P.; Schaffer, M. J.; Schaubel, K. M.; Menon, M. M.

    1994-06-01

    A liquid helium-cooled cryocondensation pump has been installed in the D3-D tokamak fusion energy research experiment at General Atomics. The pump is located within the tokamak vacuum chamber beneath the divertor baffle plates and is utilized for plasma density and contamination control. Two-phase helium flows through the pump at 5 to 10 g/s utilizing the heat transfer and constant temperature characteristics of boiling liquid . helium. The pump is designed for a pumping speed of 32,000 1/s. Extensive testing was performed with a prototypical pump test fixture. Several pump geometries (simple tube, coaxial flow plug, and coaxial slotted insert) were tested, in an iterative process, to determine which was the most satisfactory for stable cryocondensation pumping. Results from the different tests illustrating the temperature distribution and flow characteristics for each configuration are presented.

  7. Two phase liquid helium flow testing to simulate the operation of a cryocondensation pump in the DIII-D tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laughon, G. J.; Baxi, C. B.; Campbell, G. L.; Mahdavi, M. A.; Makariou, C. C.; Menon, M. M.; Smith, J. P.; Schaffer, M. J.; Schaubel, K. M.

    A liquid helium-cooled cryocondensation pump has been installed in the DIII=D tokamak fusion energy research experiment at General Atomics. The pump is located within the tokamak vacuum chamber beneath the divertor baffle plates and is utilized for plasma density and contamination control. Two-phase helium flows through the pump at 5 to 10 g/s utilizing the beat transfer and constant temperature characteristics of boiling liquid helium. The pump is designed for a pumping speed of 32,0001/s. Extensive testing was performed with a prototypical pump test fixture. Several pump geometries (simple tube, coaxial flow plug, and coaxial slotted insert) were tested, in an iterative process, to determine which was the most satisfactory for stable cryocondensation pumping. Results from the different tests illustrating the temperature distribution and flow characteristics for each configuration are presented.

  8. Manipulating Flames with AC Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Kyle

    2013-11-01

    Time-oscillating electric fields applied to plasmas present in flames create steady flows of gas capable of shaping, directing, enhancing, or even extinguishing flames. Interestingly, electric winds induced by AC electric fields can be stronger that those due to static fields of comparable magnitude. Furthermore, unlike static fields, the electric force due to AC fields is localized near the surface of the flame. Consequently, the AC response depends only on the local field at the surface of the flame - not on the position of the electrodes used to generate the field. These results suggest that oscillating electric fields can be used to manipulate and control combustion processes at a distance. To characterize and explain these effects, we investigate a simple experimental system comprising a laminar methane-air flame positioned between two parallel-plate electrodes. We quantify both the electric and hydrodynamic response of the flame as a function of frequency and magnitude of the applied field. A theoretical model shows how steady gas flows emerge from the time-averaged electrical force due to the field-induced motion of ions generated within the flame and by their disappearance by recombination. These results provide useful insights into the application of AC fields to direct combustion processes.

  9. Comparison of wind tunnel test results at free stream Mach 0.7 with results from the Boeing TEA-230 subsonic flow method. [wing flow method tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohn, L. W.

    1975-01-01

    The use of the Boeing TEA-230 Subsonic Flow Analysis method as a primary design tool in the development of cruise overwing nacelle configurations is presented. Surface pressure characteristics at 0.7 Mach number were determined by the TEA-230 method for a selected overwing flow-through nacelle configuration. Results of this analysis show excellent overall agreement with corresponding wind tunnel data. Effects of the presence of the nacelle on the wing pressure field were predicted accurately by the theoretical method. Evidence is provided that differences between theoretical and experimental pressure distributions in the present study would not result in significant discrepancies in the nacelle lines or nacelle drag estimates.

  10. Interpretation of Flow Logs from Nevada Test Site Boreholes to Estimate Hydraulic Conductivity Using Numerical Simulations Constrained by Single-Well Aquifer Tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia, C. Amanda; Halford, Keith J.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2010-01-01

    Hydraulic conductivities of volcanic and carbonate lithologic units at the Nevada Test Site were estimated from flow logs and aquifer-test data. Borehole flow and drawdown were integrated and interpreted using a radial, axisymmetric flow model, AnalyzeHOLE. This integrated approach is used because complex well completions and heterogeneous aquifers and confining units produce vertical flow in the annular space and aquifers adjacent to the wellbore. AnalyzeHOLE simulates vertical flow, in addition to horizontal flow, which accounts for converging flow toward screen ends and diverging flow toward transmissive intervals. Simulated aquifers and confining units uniformly are subdivided by depth into intervals in which the hydraulic conductivity is estimated with the Parameter ESTimation (PEST) software. Between 50 and 150 hydraulic-conductivity parameters were estimated by minimizing weighted differences between simulated and measured flow and drawdown. Transmissivity estimates from single-well or multiple-well aquifer tests were used to constrain estimates of hydraulic conductivity. The distribution of hydraulic conductivity within each lithology had a minimum variance because estimates were constrained with Tikhonov regularization. AnalyzeHOLE simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates for lithologic units across screened and cased intervals are as much as 100 times less than those estimated using proportional flow-log analyses applied across screened intervals only. Smaller estimates of hydraulic conductivity for individual lithologic units are simulated because sections of the unit behind cased intervals of the wellbore are not assumed to be impermeable, and therefore, can contribute flow to the wellbore. Simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates vary by more than three orders of magnitude across a lithologic unit, indicating a high degree of heterogeneity in volcanic and carbonate-rock units. The higher water transmitting potential of carbonate-rock units relative

  11. Interpretation of Flow Logs from Nevada Test Site Boreholes to Estimate Hydraulic conductivity Using Numerical Simulations Constrained by Single-Well Aquifer Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, C. Amanda; Halford, Keith J.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2010-02-12

    Hydraulic conductivities of volcanic and carbonate lithologic units at the Nevada Test Site were estimated from flow logs and aquifer-test data. Borehole flow and drawdown were integrated and interpreted using a radial, axisymmetric flow model, AnalyzeHOLE. This integrated approach is used because complex well completions and heterogeneous aquifers and confining units produce vertical flow in the annular space and aquifers adjacent to the wellbore. AnalyzeHOLE simulates vertical flow, in addition to horizontal flow, which accounts for converging flow toward screen ends and diverging flow toward transmissive intervals. Simulated aquifers and confining units uniformly are subdivided by depth into intervals in which the hydraulic conductivity is estimated with the Parameter ESTimation (PEST) software. Between 50 and 150 hydraulic-conductivity parameters were estimated by minimizing weighted differences between simulated and measured flow and drawdown. Transmissivity estimates from single-well or multiple-well aquifer tests were used to constrain estimates of hydraulic conductivity. The distribution of hydraulic conductivity within each lithology had a minimum variance because estimates were constrained with Tikhonov regularization. AnalyzeHOLE simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates for lithologic units across screened and cased intervals are as much as 100 times less than those estimated using proportional flow-log analyses applied across screened intervals only. Smaller estimates of hydraulic conductivity for individual lithologic units are simulated because sections of the unit behind cased intervals of the wellbore are not assumed to be impermeable, and therefore, can contribute flow to the wellbore. Simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates vary by more than three orders of magnitude across a lithologic unit, indicating a high degree of heterogeneity in volcanic and carbonate-rock units. The higher water transmitting potential of carbonate-rock units relative

  12. Analysing Thermal Response Test Data Affected by Groundwater Flow and Surface Temperature Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdoya, Massimo; Imitazione, Gianmario; Chiozzi, Paolo; Orsi, Marco; Armadillo, Egidio

    2014-05-01

    Tests that record the underground temperature variation due to a constant heat injected into a borehole (or extracted from it) by means of a carrier fluid are routinely performed to infer subsurface thermal conductivity and borehole thermal resistance, which are needed to size geothermal heat pump systems. The most popular model to analyse temperature-time curves obtained from these tests is the infinite line source (ILS). This model gives appropriate estimations of thermal parameters only if particular hydro-geological conditions are fulfilled. Several flaws can however affect data interpretation with ILS, which is based on strong assumptions like those of a purely conductive heat transfer regime in a homogeneous medium, no vertical heat flow and infinite length of the borehole. Other drawbacks can arise from the difficulty in the proper thermal insulation of the test equipment, and consequently with oscillations of the carrier fluid temperature due to surface temperature changes. In this paper, we focused on the treatment of thermal response test data when both advection and periodic changes of surface temperature occur. We used a moving line source model to simulate temperature-time signals under different hypothesis of Darcy velocity and thermal properties. A random noise was added to the signal in order to mimic high frequency disturbances, possibly caused by equipment operating conditions and/or geological variability. The subsurface thermal conductivity, the Darcy velocity and the borehole thermal resistance were inferred by minimising the root mean square error between the synthetic dataset and the theoretical model. The optimisation was carried out with the Nelder-Mead algorithm, and thermal and hydraulic properties were determined by iterative reprocessing according to a trial-and-error procedure. The inferred thermal and hydraulic parameters are well consistent with the 'a priory' values, and the presence of noise in the synthetic data does not produce

  13. Wavefront sensor testing in hypersonic flows using a laser-spark guide star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Daniel R.; Armstrong, Darrell J.; Hedlund, Eric; Lederer, Melissa; Collier, Arnold S.; Spring, Charles; Gruetzner, James K.; Hebner, Gregory A.; Mansell, Justin D.

    1997-11-01

    The flight environment of next-generation theater missile defense interceptors involves hypersonic speeds that place severe aero-thermodynamic loads on missile components including the windows used for optical seekers. These heating effects can lead to significant boresight error and aberration. Ground-based tests are required to characterize these effects. We have developed methods to measure aberrations in seeker windows using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. Light from a laser or other source with a well known wavefront is passed through the window and falls on the sensor. The sensor uses an array of micro-lenses to generate a grid of focal spots on a CCD detector. The positions of the focal spots provide a measure of the wavefront slope over each micro-lens. The wavefront is reconstructed by integrating the slopes, and analyzed to characterize aberrations. During flight, optical seekers look upstream through a window at 'look angles' angles near 0 degrees relative to the free stream flow. A 0 degree angle corresponds to large angles approaching 90 degrees when measured relative to the normal of the window, and is difficult to simulate using conventional techniques to illuminate the wavefront sensor during wind tunnel tests. For this reason, we developed a technique using laser- induced optical breakdown that allows arbitrary look angles down to 0 degrees.

  14. Re-evaluation of a subsurface injection experiment for testing flow and transport models

    SciTech Connect

    Fayer, M.J.; Lewis, R.E.; Engelman, R.E.; Pearson, A.L.; Murray, C.J.; Smoot, J.L. Lu, A.H.; Randall, P.R.; Wegener, W.H.

    1995-12-01

    The current preferred method for disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) at the Hanford Site is to vitrify the wastes so they can be stored in a near-surface, shallow-land burial facility (Shord 1995). Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) managed the PNL Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project to assist Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) in designing and assessing the performance of a disposal facility for the vitrified LLW. Vadose zone flow and transport models are recognized as necessary tools for baseline risk assessments of stored waste forms. The objective of the Controlled Field Testing task of the PVTD Project is to perform and analyze field experiments to demonstrate the appropriateness of conceptual models for the performance assessment. The most convincing way to demonstrate appropriateness is to show that the model can reproduce the movement of water and contaminants in the field. Before expensive new experiments are initiated, an injection experiment conducted at the Hanford Site in 1980 (designated the ``Sisson and the Lu experiment``) should be completely analyzed and understood. Briefly, in that test, a solution containing multiple tracers was injected at a single point into the subsurface sediments. The resulting spread of the water and tracers was monitored in wells surrounding the injection point. Given the advances in knowledge, computational capabilities, and models over the last 15 years, it is important to re-analyze the data before proceeding to other experiments and history-matching exercises.

  15. HDR opportunities and challenges beyond the long-term flow test

    SciTech Connect

    Duchane, D.V.

    1992-01-01

    The long term flow test (LTFT) of the world's largest, deepest, and hottest hot dry rock (HDR) reservoir currently underway at Fenton Hill, NM, is expected to demonstrate that thermal energy can be mined from hot rock within the earth on a sustainable basis with minimal water consumption. This test will simulate the operations of a commercial facility in some ways, but it will not show that energy from HDR can be produced at a variety of locations with different geological settings. Since the Fenton Hill system was designed as a research facility rather than strictly for production purposes, it will also not demonstrate economic viability, although it may well give indications of system modifications needed for economic HDR operations. A second production site must be constructed, ideally under the direction of the private geothermal community, to begin the process of proving that the vast HDR resources can be accessed on a worldwide scale. Finally, research and development work in areas such as reservoir interrogation, and system modeling must be accelerated to increase the competitiveness and geographical applications of HDR and the geothermal industry in general. This paper addresses the above issues in detail and outlines possible paths to future prosperity for the commercial geothermal industry.

  16. Columbia University Flow Instability Experimental Program, Volume 1. Single tube uniformly heated tests: Part 1, Technical discussion

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental program has been conducted to investigate flow instability in circular tubes under vertical down-flow conditions. The test section L/D ratio range was 86 to 270. The maximum test section surface heat flux was one million Btu/hr-ft{sup 2}. Over 1700 data points were obtained. The effect of flowrate, inlet temperature, exit pressure, and heat flux on the initiation of flow instability was determined. In addition, the data was used to evaluate various methods of predicting the onset of flow instability. Using the measured wall temperatures, surface temperatures and heat transfer coefficients have been obtained. Correlations for the heat transfer coefficient along the tube under both single and two phase conditions were developed.

  17. Reservoir engineering and computer model analyses of flow tests on the Miogypsinoides sandstone: Sweet Lake geothermal-geopressured prospect

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, T.L.; Kenner, C.B.; Clark, J.D.; Bebout, D.G.; Bachman, A.L.

    1981-01-01

    Engineering analysis and interpretation of two flow tests on the fifth sand of MG-T/DOE Amoco Fee No. 1 well have been completed. The gas-water ratio of the fifth sand was reported to be about 10.7 scf/bbl, which is very undersaturated. Testing of a single zone is inconclusive as to the commercial viability of the well. Testing of other zones for both productive capacity and solution gas-water ratio is continuing at this time.

  18. Testing research for oil-gas-water flow pattern in Daqing oilfield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Mao, Qianjun; Liu, Lijun; Xu, Ying; Chen, Wei

    2013-07-01

    During the period of the high water cut later stage, it is significant for decreasing energy consumption of gathering system to research oil-gas-water flow pattern. At the moment, the studies on oil-gas-water flow pattern are mainly focused on the temperature range of crude oil freezing point. A experimental system is designed, constructed and operated in oilfields in horizontal pipeline., which is used for experimental investigation and analysis of oil-gas-water flow pattern under freezing point in horizontal pipeline. According to the crude oil condition, the results show that oil-gas-water flow pattern includes four types that are oil contact wave flow, oil-oil particle dispersion flow, oil lamellar flow, oil puddle slugging flow.

  19. Design and testing of a unique randomized gravity, continuous flow bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lassiter, Carroll B.

    1993-01-01

    A rotating, null gravity simulator, or Couette bioreactor was successfully used for the culture of mammalian cells in a simulated microgravity environment. Two limited studies using Lipomyces starkeyi and Streptomyces clavuligerus were also conducted under conditions of simulated weightlessness. Although these studies with microorganisms showed promising preliminary results, oxygen limitations presented significant limitations in studying the biochemical and cultural characteristics of these cell types. Microbial cell systems such as bacteria and yeast promise significant potential as investigative models to study the effects of microgravity on membrane transport, as well as substrate induction of inactive enzyme systems. Additionally, the smaller size of the microorganisms should further reduce the gravity induced oscillatory particle motion and thereby improve the microgravity simulation on earth. Focus is on the unique conceptual design, and subsequent development of a rotating bioreactor that is compatible with the culture and investigation of microgravity effects on microbial systems. The new reactor design will allow testing of highly aerobic cell types under simulated microgravity conditions. The described reactor affords a mechanism for investigating the long term effects of reduced gravity on cellular respiration, membrane transfer, ion exchange, and substrate conversions. It offers the capability of dynamically altering nutrients, oxygenation, pH, carbon dioxide, and substrate concentration without disturbing the microgravity simulation, or Couette flow, of the reactor. All progeny of the original cell inoculum may be acclimated to the simulated microgravity in the absence of a substrate or nutrient. The reactor has the promise of allowing scientists to probe the long term effects of weightlessness on cell interactions in plants, bacteria, yeast, and fungi. The reactor is designed to have a flow field growth chamber with uniform shear stress, yet transfer

  20. Static and Wind Tunnel Aero-Performance Tests of NASA AST Separate Flow Nozzle Noise Reduction Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikkelsen, Kevin L.; McDonald, Timothy J.; Saiyed, Naseem (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report presents the results of cold flow model tests to determine the static and wind tunnel performance of several NASA AST separate flow nozzle noise reduction configurations. The tests were conducted by Aero Systems Engineering, Inc., for NASA Glenn Research Center. The tests were performed in the Channels 14 and 6 static thrust stands and the Channel 10 transonic wind tunnel at the FluiDyne Aerodynamics Laboratory in Plymouth, Minnesota. Facility checkout tests were made using standard ASME long-radius metering nozzles. These tests demonstrated facility data accuracy at flow conditions similar to the model tests. Channel 14 static tests reported here consisted of 21 ASME nozzle facility checkout tests and 57 static model performance tests (including 22 at no charge). Fan nozzle pressure ratio varied from 1.4 to 2.0, and fan to core total pressure ratio varied from 1.0 to 1.19. Core to fan total temperature ratio was 1.0. Channel 10 wind tunnel tests consisted of 15 tests at Mach number 0.28 and 31 tests at Mach 0.8. The sting was checked out statically in Channel 6 before the wind tunnel tests. In the Channel 6 facility, 12 ASME nozzle data points were taken and 7 model data points were taken. In the wind tunnel, fan nozzle pressure ratio varied from 1.73 to 2.8, and fan to core total pressure ratio varied from 1.0 to 1.19. Core to fan total temperature ratio was 1.0. Test results include thrust coefficients, thrust vector angle, core and fan nozzle discharge coefficients, total pressure and temperature charging station profiles, and boat-tail static pressure distributions in the wind tunnel.

  1. Aerobic biodegradability of methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) used in natural gas sweetening plants in batch tests and continuous flow experiments.

    PubMed

    Fürhacker, M; Pressl, A; Allabashi, R

    2003-09-01

    Mixtures of different amines including tertiary amines (methyldiethanolamine, MDEA) are commonly used for the removal of CO2 from gas mixtures or in gas sweetening processes for the extraction of CO2 and H2S. The absorber solutions used can be released into the industrial waste water due to continuous substitution of degraded MDEA, periodically cleaning processes or an accidental spill. In this study, the aerobic biodegradability of MDEA was investigated in a standardised batch test and a continuous flow experiment (40 l/d). The results of the batch test indicated that the MDEA-solution was non-biodegradable during the test period of 28 days, whereas the continuous flow experiments showed biodegradation of more than 96% based on TOC-measurements. This was probably due to the adaptation of the microorganisms to this particular waste water contamination during continuous flow experiment. PMID:12871741

  2. AC/RF Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  3. AC solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Schutten, H.P.; Benjamin, J.A.; Lade, R.W.

    1986-03-18

    An AC solar cell is described comprising: a pair of PN junction type solar cells connected in antiparallel between a pair of main terminals; and means for electrically directing light alternatingly without mechanical movement on the PN junctions to generate an alternating potential across the main terminals.

  4. AC 67 Launch Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Live footage of the Unmanned Atlas Centaur (AC) 67 launch is presented on March 26, 1987 at the WESH television station in Florida. Lightning is shown after 49 seconds into the flight. The vehicle is totally destroyed due to a cloud-to-ground lightning flash.

  5. Construction, Modeling and Testing of a Low-Flow, Large-Diameter Aerosol Flow System for the Study of the Formation and Reactions of Tropospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezell, M. J.; Johnson, S. N.; Yu, Y.; Pokkunuri, P.; Perraud, V.; Bruns, E.; Alexander, M.; Zelenyuk, A.; Dabdub, D.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    A unique, high-volume, low-flow, stainless steel aerosol flow system for the study of the formation and reactions of aerosols relevant to the troposphere has been constructed, modeled and experimentally tested. The total flow tube length is 7.3 m which includes a 1.2 m section used for mixing. The flow tube is equipped with ultraviolet lamps for photolysis. The diameter of 0.45 m results in a smaller surface to volume ratio than is found in many other flow systems and reduces the contribution of wall reactions. The latter is also reduced by frequent cleaning of the flow tube walls which is feasible due to the ease of disassembly of the flow tube. Flow systems present a major advantage over chamber studies in that continuous sampling under stable conditions over long periods of time is possible, increasing the amount of sample available for analysis and permitting a wide variety of analytical techniques to be applied simultaneously. In this system, the large volume (1000 L) and low flow speed (2 cm/minute) result in a residence time of nearly an hour; and equally spaced sampling ports allow for time-resolved measurements of aerosol and gas-phase products. The central features of this system have been modeled using computational fluid dynamics software and experimentally probed using inert gases and aerosols. Instrumentation attached directly to this flow system includes a NOx analyzer, an ozone analyzer, relative humidity and temperature probes, a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) spectrometer, an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) spectrometer, GC-MS, integrating nephelometer, and FTIR. Particles are collected using impactors and filters, and analyzed by a variety of techniques including FTIR, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS), GC-MS, HPLC-UV and HPLC-MS. In addition, for selected studies, an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), a single particle mass spectrometer (SPLAT II) and

  6. Microfluidic pumping optimization in microgrooved channels with ac electrothermal actuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, E.; Manoochehri, Souran

    2010-01-01

    An optimization methodology is developed and applied to an ac electrothermal pump design with patterned microgrooved features. The microgrooved configuration can overcome the restrictions of the conventional planar configuration on pumping performance by diminishing fast backward flows and suppressing prolonged streamlines. At all frequency excitations (0.2-1000 MHz) and ion concentration conditions (5×10-3-0.1 M), the optimum microgrooved configuration generates much faster flow rate than planar configuration. This happens without additional increases in the maximum temperature values. The effects of elevated temperature on ac ET flow behavior is investigated and analyzed.

  7. A comparison of the degree of effort involved in the TOMM and the ACS Word Choice Test using a dual-task paradigm.

    PubMed

    Barhon, Lucienne Isabel; Batchelor, Jennifer; Meares, Susanne; Chekaluk, Eugene; Shores, E Arthur

    2015-01-01

    The aims of the current study were to: (a) examine the predictive validity and efficacy of the Advanced Clinical Solutions Word Choice Test (WCT) as a measure of effort relative to the Test of Memory Malingering (TOMM); (b) investigate whether performing a dual (distraction) task would undermine performance on either test; (c) assess the effect of coaching on the diagnostic accuracy of both the WCT and the TOMM; and (d) establish an optimal cut score for the WCT. The current study used a simulation design based on an analogue design in which normal participants were instructed to either apply full effort or simulate a brain injury on the tasks without being detected. Participants included 93 undergraduate university students who were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 conditions: (a) distraction, (b) uncoached traumatic brain injury (TBI) simulators, (c) coached TBI simulators, or (d) full effort. The results demonstrated that the WCT and the TOMM were effective in detecting simulated cognitive impairment. Both tests were resistant to the effects of distraction and were equally effective in detecting coached and uncoached simulators. A cut score of 42 on the WCT was found to provide optimal specificity and sensitivity on the test. PMID:25117219

  8. HDR Opportunities and Challenges Beyond the Long-Term Flow Test

    SciTech Connect

    Duchane, David

    1992-03-24

    The long term flow test (LTFT) of the worlds largest, deepest, and hottest hot dry rock (HDR) reservoir currently underway at Fenton Hill, NM, is expected to demonstrate that thermal energy can be mined from hot rock within the earth on a sustainable basis with minimal water consumption. This test will simulate the operations of a commercial facility in some ways, but it will not show that energy from HDR can be produced at a variety of locations with different geological settings. Since the Fenton Hill system was designed as a research facility rather than strictly for production purposes, it will also not demonstrate economic viability, although it may well give indications of system modifications needed for economic HDR operations. A second production site must be constructed, ideally under the direction of the private geothermal community, to begin the process of proving that the vast HDR resources can be accessed on a worldwide scale. This facility should be designed and engineered to produce and market energy at competitive prices. At the same time, a wide variety of techniques to advance the state-of-the-art of HDR technology must be pursued to develop this infant technology rapidly to its maximum potential. A number of design and operational techniques have been conceived which may lead to improved economics in HDR systems. After careful technical and economic scrutiny, those showing merit should be vigorously pursued. Finally, research and development work in areas such as reservoir interrogation, and system modeling must be accelerated to increase the competitiveness and geographical applications of HDR and the geothermal industry in general. This paper addresses the above issues in detail and outlines possible paths to future prosperity for the commercial geothermal industry.

  9. Sensitive immunochemical approaches for quantitative (FPIA) and qualitative (lateral flow tests) determination of gentamicin in milk.

    PubMed

    Beloglazova, N V; Shmelin, P S; Eremin, S A

    2016-03-01

    Three kinds of immunoassays for the determination of gentamicin in milk samples were developed and validated. First, a fast and easily-performed fluorescence polarization immunoassay was used for characterization of the employed polyclonal antibody. The calculated Kaff were (1.9±0.4)×10(9)М(-1) and (6.0±0.2)×10(6)М(-1) for the high- and low-affinity fractions respectively. The assay was characterized with a good sensitivity, the limit of detection being 5μgkg(-1). Two different kinds of detection labels, i.e. colloidal gold (CG) and quantum dots (QDs), were evaluated for use in lateral-flow format with respect to rapid visual on-site testing. The cut-off levels for both qualitative formats were selected based on the maximum level for gentamicin in milk established by the European Commission, 100μgkg(-1), resulting in a 10μgkg(-1) cut-off considering sample dilution. The intra-laboratory validation was performed with sterilized milk samples artificially spiked with gentamicin at concentrations less than, equal to, and greater than the cut-off level. It was shown that milk products could be analyzed without any sample preparation, except for dilution with the buffer solution. The rates of false-positive and false-negative results were below 5% for both labels. The different developed immunoassays were tested towards gentamicin determination in artificially-spiked and naturally contaminated milk samples. PMID:26717834

  10. A-priori testing of sub-grid models for chemically reacting nonpremixed turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jimenez, J.; Linan, A.; Rogers, M. M.; Higuera, F. J.

    1996-01-01

    The beta-assumed-pdf approximation of (Cook & Riley 1994) is tested as a subgrid model for the LES computation of nonpremixed turbulent reacting flows, in the limit of cold infinitely fast chemistry, for two plane turbulent mixing layers with different degrees of intermittency. Excellent results are obtained for the computation of integrals properties such as product mass fraction, and the model is applied to other quantities such as powers of the temperature and the pdf of the scalar itself. Even in these cases the errors are small enough to be useful in practical applications. The analysis is extended to slightly out of equilibrium problems such as the generation of radicals, and formulated in terms of the pdf of the scalar gradients. It is shown that the conditional gradient distribution is universal in a wide range of cases whose limits are established. Within those limits, engineering approximations to the radical concentration are also possible. It is argued that the experiments in this paper are essentially in the limit of infinite Reynolds number.

  11. In situ flow testing of a cement borehole seal in welded tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Crouthamel, D.R.; Fuenkajorn, K.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1993-12-31

    Exploratory boreholes, shafts and tunnels drilled or excavated prior to or during the construction of a subsurface nuclear repository may create direct passages for radionuclide transport to the biosphere. Waste isolation at the Yucca Mountain repository suite will require that penetrations (boreholes, shafts, etc.) of the geological barrier be sealed, primarily to prevent excessive flow of groundwater and/or air into the emplaced wastes and to retard the migration of radionuclides to the accessible environment. Cement is being considered as part of multicomponent seals or plugs for the repository due to its relatively low permeability, high strength, longevity, and swelling capacity. Cement or concrete has long been used as a hydrological barrier in underground mines and in the oil and gas industry. However, insufficient tests data exists about the hydraulic performance of cement plugs under in-situ conditions (i.e. as affected by scale, and field installation and environment), and particularly about their long-term sealing effectiveness. The objectives of the research are to determine the hydraulic conductivities of the cement plug, host stuff, and their interface, and to identify the effects of size and field installation on the borehole plug performance.

  12. Interictal regional cerebral blood flow during non specific activation test in partial epilepsy.

    PubMed Central

    Valmier, J; Touchon, J; Baldy-Moulinier, M

    1989-01-01

    In order to investigate, during activation testing, the interictal cortical cerebral blood flows (rCBF) of epileptic patients suffering from complex partial seizures, 40 epileptic patients (divided into "lesional", this is, with abnormal CT findings, and "non lesional", that is, with normal CT findings) were submitted to rCBF measurements with the 133 xenon intravenous technique, at rest and during intermittent light stimulation (ILS). The findings compared with normal volunteers seem to demonstrate that, during ILS, (1) in non lesional patients, the suspected epileptic focus shows a significant rCBF increase (2) in lesional patients, the significant rCBF increases were not in the region of the suspected epileptic focus but in adjacent or in contralateral ones. It was concluded that activation interictal rCBF measurements are more useful than resting ones for the determination of epileptic foci when CT findings are normal and that the nature of the epileptic focus influences markedly the interhemispheric activation pattern. PMID:2926422

  13. Biodegradation of oxo-alcohol ethoxylates in the continuous flow activated sludge simulation test.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, Andrzej; Wyrwas, Bogdan; Bubien, Ewa; Kurosz, Tatiana; Hreczuch, Wieslaw; Zembrzuski, Wlodzimierz; Lukaszewski, Zenon

    2002-07-01

    Biodegradation of two alpha-methyl branched oxo-alcohol ethoxylates (OAE) of different polydispersity: LIAL 125/14 BRD (LIALB) (broad M.W. distribution) and LIAL 125/14 NRD (LIALN) (narrow M.W. distribution), both having an average of 14 oxyethylene subunits (EO) and a C(12-15) alkyl moiety were tested under the continuous flow activated sludge conditions of the classical Husmann plant. Primary biodegradation and concentration of metabolites: free oxo-alcohol fraction (FOA) and poly(ethylene glycols) (PEG), were measured. PEG were divided into two fractions: short-chained PEG (PEGshch) (1-4 EO) and long-chained PEG (PEGlch) (>4 EO). The indirect tensammetric technique combined with an adequate separation was used for analysis. Central fission was found to be a highly dominating pathway, as is the case with fatty alcohol ethoxylates. OAE are highly primarily biodegraded (above 95%). High concentrations of FOA and PEG are formed. Once formed the PEGlch are further fragmented into the PEGshch. Free alcohol fraction compounds are biodegraded sooner when alkyl moiety is shorter. OAE polydispersity has an influence on the kinetics of biodegradation; PEG formed from LIALN are biodegraded slower and to a lower degree than those from LIALB. PMID:12188138

  14. Science Operations for the 2008 NASA Lunar Analog Field Test at Black Point Lava Flow, Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garry W. D.; Horz, F.; Lofgren, G. E.; Kring, D. A.; Chapman, M. G.; Eppler, D. B.; Rice, J. W., Jr.; Nelson, J.; Gernhardt, M. L.; Walheim, R. J.

    2009-01-01

    Surface science operations on the Moon will require merging lessons from Apollo with new operation concepts that exploit the Constellation Lunar Architecture. Prototypes of lunar vehicles and robots are already under development and will change the way we conduct science operations compared to Apollo. To prepare for future surface operations on the Moon, NASA, along with several supporting agencies and institutions, conducted a high-fidelity lunar mission simulation with prototypes of the small pressurized rover (SPR) and unpressurized rover (UPR) (Fig. 1) at Black Point lava flow (Fig. 2), 40 km north of Flagstaff, Arizona from Oct. 19-31, 2008. This field test was primarily intended to evaluate and compare the surface mobility afforded by unpressurized and pressurized rovers, the latter critically depending on the innovative suit-port concept for efficient egress and ingress. The UPR vehicle transports two astronauts who remain in their EVA suits at all times, whereas the SPR concept enables astronauts to remain in a pressurized shirt-sleeve environment during long translations and while making contextual observations and enables rapid (less than or equal to 10 minutes) transfer to and from the surface via suit-ports. A team of field geologists provided realistic science scenarios for the simulations and served as crew members, field observers, and operators of a science backroom. Here, we present a description of the science team s operations and lessons learned.

  15. Investigation of Spiral Bevel Gear Condition Indicator Validation via AC-29-2C Combining Test Rig Damage Progression Data with Fielded Rotorcraft Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.

    2015-01-01

    This is the final of three reports published on the results of this project. In the first report, results were presented on nineteen tests performed in the NASA Glenn Spiral Bevel Gear Fatigue Test Rig on spiral bevel gear sets designed to simulate helicopter fielded failures. In the second report, fielded helicopter HUMS data from forty helicopters were processed with the same techniques that were applied to spiral bevel rig test data. Twenty of the forty helicopters experienced damage to the spiral bevel gears, while the other twenty helicopters had no known anomalies within the time frame of the datasets. In this report, results from the rig and helicopter data analysis will be compared for differences and similarities in condition indicator (CI) response. Observations and findings using sub-scale rig failure progression tests to validate helicopter gear condition indicators will be presented. In the helicopter, gear health monitoring data was measured when damage occurred and after the gear sets were replaced at two helicopter regimes. For the helicopters or tails, data was taken in the flat pitch ground 101 rotor speed (FPG101) regime. For nine tails, data was also taken at 120 knots true airspeed (120KTA) regime. In the test rig, gear sets were tested until damage initiated and progressed while gear health monitoring data and operational parameters were measured and tooth damage progression documented. For the rig tests, the gear speed was maintained at 3500RPM, a one hour run-in was performed at 4000 in-lb gear torque, than the torque was increased to 8000 in-lbs. The HUMS gear condition indicator data evaluated included Figure of Merit 4 (FM4), Root Mean Square (RMS) or Diagnostic Algorithm 1(DA1), + 3 Sideband Index (SI3) and + 1 Sideband Index (SI1). These were selected based on their sensitivity in detecting contact fatigue damage modes from analytical, experimental and historical helicopter data. For this report, the helicopter dataset was reduced to

  16. NASA Ares I Launch Vehicle Upper Stage Reaction Control System (ReCS) Cold Flow Development Test Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dervan, Melanie; Williams, Hunter; Holt, Kim; Sivak, Amy; Morris, Jon D.

    2010-01-01

    NASA s Ares I launch vehicle, consisting of a five segment solid rocket booster first stage and a liquid bi-propellant J2-X engine Upper Stage, is the vehicle that s been chosen to launch the Orion Crew Module, which will return humans to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. After First Stage booster separation, the Reaction Control System (ReCS), a monopropellant hydrazine system, will provide the Upper Stage element with three degrees of freedom control as needed. This paper provides an overview of the system level development testing that has taken place on the Ares I launch vehicle Upper Stage ReCS. The ReCS System Development Test Article (SDTA) was built as a flight representative water flow test article whose primary test objective was to obtain fluid system performance data to evaluate the integrate system performance characteristics and verify analytical models. Water is the industry standard for cold flow testing of hydrazine systems, because the densities are very close and the speeds of sound are well characterized. The completion of this development level test program was considered necessary to support the ReCS Critical Design Review. This paper will address the design approach taken in building the test article, the objectives of the test program, types of testing completed, general results, the ability of the program to meet the test objectives, and lessons learned

  17. Evaluation of ring shear testing as a characterization method for powder flow in small-scale powder processing equipment.

    PubMed

    Søgaard, Søren Vinter; Pedersen, Troels; Allesø, Morten; Garnaes, Joergen; Rantanen, Jukka

    2014-11-20

    Powder flow in small-scale equipment is challenging to predict. To meet this need, the impact of consolidation during powder flow characterization, the level of consolidation existing during discharge of powders from a tablet press hopper and the uncertainty of shear and wall friction measurements at small consolidation stresses were investigated. For this purpose, three grades of microcrystalline cellulose were used. Results showed that powder flow properties depend strongly on the consolidation during testing. The consolidation during discharge in terms of the major principal stress and wall normal stress were approximately 200 Pa and 114 Pa, respectively, in the critical transition from the converging to the lower vertical section of the hopper. The lower limit of consolidation for the shear and wall friction test was approximately 500 Pa and 200 Pa, respectively. At this consolidation level, the wall and shear stress resolution influences the precision of the measured powder flow properties. This study highlights the need for an improved experimental setup which would be capable of measuring the flow properties of powders under very small consolidation stresses with a high shear stress resolution. This will allow the accuracy, precision and applicability of the shear test to be improved for pharmaceutical applications. PMID:25178826

  18. Report on flow tests Tuscarora, Nevada, 66-5, April 22, 1980, lithologic well and temperature depth data

    SciTech Connect

    1980-07-01

    Enthalpy Inc., of Santa Rose, California, was engaged by Amax Exploration Inc., of Denver, Colorado in April of 1980 to conduct flow tests on a geothermal prospect in Northern Nevada. The well site, Tuscarora 66-5, is located approximately 11 miles northeast of the town of Tuscarora within Independence Valley, Elko County, Nevada. The testing program was set up by Enthalpy Inc. and run by D. Ensrud of Enthalpy Inc. The initial tests included measuring temperature, pressure, total dissolved solids (T.D.S.) and pH of the fluid produced. These parameters were used to examine the well's mass flow and deliverability. The tests were terminated at 7:00 p.m. April 22, 1980 because of low temperatures. Subsurface surveys (pressure temperature) were run on April 21st and again on April 23rd.

  19. Flow Quality Surveys in the Settling Chamber of the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (2011 Tests)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steen, Laura E.; VanZante, Judith Foss; Broeren, Andy P.; Kubiak, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, the heat exchanger and refrigeration plant for NASA Glenn Research Centers Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) were upgraded. Flow quality surveys were performed in the settling chamber of the IRT in order to understand the effect that the new heat exchanger had on the flow quality upstream of the spray bars. Measurements were made of the total pressure, static pressure, total temperature, airspeed, and flow angle (pitch and yaw). These measurements were directly compared to measurements taken in 2000, after the previous heat exchanger was installed. In general, the flow quality appears to have improved with the new heat exchanger.

  20. Flow Quality Surveys in the Settling Chamber of the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (2011 Tests)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steen, Laura E.; VanZante, Judith Foss; Broeren, Andy P.; Kubiak, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, the heat exchanger and refrigeration plant for NASA Glenn Research Center's Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) were upgraded. Flow quality surveys were performed in the settling chamber of the IRT in order to understand the effect that the new heat exchanger had on the flow quality upstream of the spray bars. Measurements were made of the total pressure, static pressure, total temperature, airspeed, and flow angle (pitch and yaw). These measurements were directly compared to measurements taken in 2000, after the previous heat exchanger was installed. In general, the flow quality appears to have improved with the new heat exchanger.

  1. Development of the Baylor/NASA axial flow ventricular assist device: in vitro performance and systematic hemolysis test results.

    PubMed

    Mizuguchi, K; Damm, G A; Bozeman, R J; Akkerman, J W; Aber, G S; Svejkovsky, P A; Bacak, J W; Orime, Y; Takatani, S; Nosé, Y

    1994-01-01

    Our newly developed axial flow pump consists of a flow tube, an internal rotating impeller, and a fixed flow stator (we call the stator) behind the impeller. This pump produces a flow of 3 to 8 L/min against 50 to 150 mm Hg pressure difference, respectively, in the range of 10,000 to 16,000 rpm. An axial flow pump that will be used as a ventricular assist device (VAD) has to have low hemolytic and good antithrombogenic characteristics. This paper will show how to decrease the hemolytic properties of this axial flow pump systematically using a test matrix. The test variables evaluated were impeller blade tip geometry, impeller flow tube clearance (radial clearance), impeller stator clearance (axial clearance), impeller blade number, stator blade number, and impeller length. All in vitro hemolysis tests were performed at 5.0 L/min against 100 mm Hg pressure difference using a total of 83 bags of fresh bovine blood. The results were as follows: the impeller blade tip geometry did not significantly effect hemolysis, a 0.005-inch and a 0.009-inch radial clearance were significantly (p < 0.01 or 0.001) less hemolytic than the other clearances, a 0.075-inch axial clearance was significantly (p < 0.05) more hemolytic than the other clearances, two- and six-bladed impellers were significantly (p < 0.01 and 0.02, respectively) less hemolytic than a four-bladed impeller, a five-bladed stator was significantly (p < 0.05 or 0.01) less hemolytic than the other stators, and the impeller length did not make a significant difference. Currently, the best index of hemolysis is 0.031 +/- 0.018 g/100 L, and using parameters from these results, implantable devices are being fabricated. PMID:8141655

  2. AC Electroosmotic Pumping in Nanofluidic Funnels.

    PubMed

    Kneller, Andrew R; Haywood, Daniel G; Jacobson, Stephen C

    2016-06-21

    We report efficient pumping of fluids through nanofluidic funnels when a symmetric AC waveform is applied. The asymmetric geometry of the nanofluidic funnel induces not only ion current rectification but also electroosmotic flow rectification. In the base-to-tip direction, the funnel exhibits a lower ion conductance and a higher electroosmotic flow velocity, whereas, in the tip-to-base direction, the funnel has a higher ion conductance and a lower electroosmotic flow velocity. Consequently, symmetric AC waveforms easily pump fluid through the nanofunnels over a range of frequencies, e.g., 5 Hz to 5 kHz. In our experiments, the nanofunnels were milled into glass substrates with a focused ion beam (FIB) instrument, and the funnel design had a constant 5° taper with aspect ratios (funnel tip width to funnel depth) of 0.1 to 1.0. We tracked ion current rectification by current-voltage (I-V) response and electroosmotic flow rectification by transport of a zwitterionic fluorescent probe. Rectification of ion current and electroosmotic flow increased with increasing electric field applied to the nanofunnel. Our results support three-dimensional simulations of ion transport and electroosmotic transport through nanofunnels, which suggest the asymmetric electroosmotic transport stems from an induced pressure at the junction of the nanochannel and nanofunnel tip. PMID:27230495

  3. Gate assisted Kelvin test structure to measure the electron and hole flows at the same nanowire contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Hui E-mail: qli6@gmu.edu; Zhu, Hao; Badwan, Ahmad; Ioannou, Dimitris E.; Li, Qiliang E-mail: qli6@gmu.edu; Richter, Curt A.; Kirillov, Oleg

    2014-09-29

    A gate assisted Kelvin test structure based on Si nanowire field effect transistors has been designed and fabricated for the characterization of the transistor source/drain contacts. Because the Si nanowire field effect transistors exhibit ambipolar characteristics with electron current slightly lower than the hole current, we can select the type of carriers (electrons or holes) flowing through the same contacts and adjust the current by the applied gate voltage. In this way, we are able to measure the characteristics of the same contact with either pure electron or hole flow. In addition, we found that the nanowire contacts behave very differently depending on the current flow directions. This indicates that the source and drain contact resistance can be dramatically different. Such a gate assisted Kelvin Test structure will lead to future metrology and applications in nanoelectronics.

  4. The effect of ejector augmentation on test-section flow quality in the Calspan 8-ft transonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, W. C.; Hanly, R. D.; Steinle, F. W., Jr.; Chudyk, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    Tests to determine the flow disturbances effects of four ejectors located in the corners just downstream of the diffuser in the Calspan wind tunnel are described. The flow quality in the nonejector mode is employed as the base-line configuration, and operating parameters are compared with data from other wind tunnels. During tests with the ejectors working, fluctuation levels increased between Mach 0.4-0.6, while temperature and vorticity levels remained constant. The ejector exhibited broad spectrum noise typical of free jet noise, yet static pressure measurements revealed only a slight increase in the broadband rms levels with the ejectors on, indicating negligible disturbances upstream caused by the ejectors. Choking the diffuser eliminated the jet noise, and the use of ejectors in the Mach range considered is concluded to cause no significant degradation in the Calspan tunnel flow quality.

  5. Test plan for evaluation of primary exhaust ventilation flow meters for double shell hydrogen watch list tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Willingham, W.E.

    1996-05-02

    This document is a plan for testing four different flow meters for use in the primary exhaust ventilation ducts of Double Shell Tanks on the hydrogen watch list that do not already have this capability. This currently includes tanks 241-AW-101, 241-AN-103, 241-AN-104, 241-AN-105, and 241-SY-103. The anticipated airflow velocity in these tanks range from 0.25 m/s(50 ft/min) to 1.78 m/s (350 ft/min). Past experiences at Hanford are forcing the evaluation and selection of instruments to be used at the low flow and relatively high humidity conditions found in these tanks. Based on the results of this test, a flow meter shall be chosen for installation in the primary exhaust ventilation ducts of the above mentioned waste tanks.

  6. Force and moment, flow-visualization, and boundary-layer tests on a shuttle orbiter model at Mach 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calloway, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    Force and moment, flow visualization, and boundary layer state tests were conducted using two 0.004 scale shuttle orbiter models. The force and moment tests were conducted for an angle of attack range from 20 to 40 deg and for Reynolds numbers based on reference length from 0.4 million to 3.6 million. Schlieren photographs were obtained for each angle of attack and Reynolds number. The boundary layer state tests, which were conducted using hot film sensors mounted in a separate model, were conducted over the same range of conditions as the force tests. Test results were combined to show that changes in the boundary layer on a typical hypersonic force test model affect measurement of the axial force coefficient and that the state of the local boundary layer is important for interpreting hypersonic aerodynamic test results.

  7. AC power systems handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, J.

    1991-01-01

    Transient disturbances are what headaches are made of. Whatever you call them-spikes, surges, are power bumps-they can take your equipment down and leave you with a complicated and expensive repair job. Protection against transient disturbances is a science that demands attention to detail. This book explains how the power distribution system works, what can go wrong with it, and how to protect a facility against abnormalities. system grounding and shielding are covered in detail. Each major method of transient protection is analyzed and its relative merits discussed. The book provides a complete look at the critical elements of the ac power system. Provides a complete look at the ac power system from generation to consumption. Discusses the mechanisms that produce transient disturbances and how to protect against them. Presents diagrams to facilitate system design. Covers new areas, such as the extent of the transient disturbance problem, transient protection options, and stand-by power systems.

  8. Studies with the USF/NASA toxicity screening test method - Effect of air flow and effect of fabric dye

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Lopez, M. T.

    1976-01-01

    One sample each of commercial polyurethane and polychloroprene flexible foams were evaluated using the USF/NASA toxicity screening test method. Air flow rates of 0, 0.16, 16, and 48 ml/sec were used to determine the effect of air flow on relative toxicity. Time to first sign of incapacitation and time to death were substantially reduced with both polyurethane and polychloroprene flexible foams by the introduction of 16 to 48 ml/sec air flow. The relative toxicity rankings of these materials were not altered by changes in air flow. Under these test conditions, the polyurethane foam consistently appeared more toxic than the polychloroprene foam. Samples of six different colors from the same fabric were evaluated separately, using the USF/NASA toxicity screening test method, to determine the effect of fabric dye, if any. The material was an upholstery fabric, consisting of 46 percent cotton, 33 percent wool, and 21 percent nylon. There appeared to be no significant effect of fabric dye on relative toxicity, for this material under these test conditions.

  9. 10 CFR 431.264 - Uniform test method for the measurement of flow rate for commercial prerinse spray valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Uniform test method for the measurement of flow rate for commercial prerinse spray valves. 431.264 Section 431.264 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial Prerinse...

  10. Test Problems for Reactive Flow HE Model in the ALE3D Code and Limited Sensitivity Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gerassimenko, M.

    2000-03-01

    We document quick running test problems for a reactive flow model of HE initiation incorporated into ALE3D. A quarter percent change in projectile velocity changes the outcome from detonation to HE burn that dies down. We study the sensitivity of calculated HE behavior to several parameters of practical interest where modeling HE initiation with ALE3D.

  11. TESTING SOLIDS SETTING APPARATUSES FOR DESIGN AND OPERATION OF WET-WEATHER FLOW SOLIDS-LIQUID SEPARATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was a side-by-side comparison of two settling evaluation methods: one traditional and one new. The project investigated whether these column tests were capable of capturing or representing the rapidly settling particles present in wet-weather flows (WWF). The report r...

  12. Summary of hydrogeologic controls on ground-water flow at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Laczniak, R.J.; Cole, J.C.; Sawyer, D.A.; Trudeau, D.A.

    1996-07-01

    The underground testing of nuclear devices has generated substantial volumes of radioactive and other chemical contaminants below ground at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Many of the more radioactive contaminants are highly toxic and are known to persist in the environment for thousands of years. In response to concerns about potential health hazards, the US Department of Energy, under its Environmental Restoration Program, has made NTS the subject of a long-term investigation. Efforts will assess whether byproducts of underground testing pose a potential hazard to the health and safety of the public and, if necessary, will evaluate and implement steps to remediate any of the identified dangers. Ground-water flow is the primary mechanism by which contaminants can be transported significant distances away from the initial point of injection. Flow paths between contaminant sources and potential receptors are separated by remote areas that span tens of miles. The diversity and structural complexity of the rocks along these flow paths complicates the hydrology of the region. Although the hydrology has been studied in some detail, much still remains uncertain about flow rates and directions through the fractured-rock aquifers that transmit water great distances across this arid region. Unique to the hydrology of NTS are the effects of underground testing, which severely alter local rock characteristics and affect hydrologic conditions throughout the region. This report summarizes what is known and inferred about ground-water flow throughout the NTS region. The report identifies and updates what is known about some of the major controls on ground-water flow, highlights some of the uncertainties in the current understanding, and prioritizes some of the technical needs as related to the Environmental Restoration Program. 113 refs.

  13. Automated Low-Cost Smartphone-Based Lateral Flow Saliva Test Reader for Drugs-of-Abuse Detection

    PubMed Central

    Carrio, Adrian; Sampedro, Carlos; Sanchez-Lopez, Jose Luis; Pimienta, Miguel; Campoy, Pascual

    2015-01-01

    Lateral flow assay tests are nowadays becoming powerful, low-cost diagnostic tools. Obtaining a result is usually subject to visual interpretation of colored areas on the test by a human operator, introducing subjectivity and the possibility of errors in the extraction of the results. While automated test readers providing a result-consistent solution are widely available, they usually lack portability. In this paper, we present a smartphone-based automated reader for drug-of-abuse lateral flow assay tests, consisting of an inexpensive light box and a smartphone device. Test images captured with the smartphone camera are processed in the device using computer vision and machine learning techniques to perform automatic extraction of the results. A deep validation of the system has been carried out showing the high accuracy of the system. The proposed approach, applicable to any line-based or color-based lateral flow test in the market, effectively reduces the manufacturing costs of the reader and makes it portable and massively available while providing accurate, reliable results. PMID:26610513

  14. Automated Low-Cost Smartphone-Based Lateral Flow Saliva Test Reader for Drugs-of-Abuse Detection.

    PubMed

    Carrio, Adrian; Sampedro, Carlos; Sanchez-Lopez, Jose Luis; Pimienta, Miguel; Campoy, Pascual

    2015-01-01

    Lateral flow assay tests are nowadays becoming powerful, low-cost diagnostic tools. Obtaining a result is usually subject to visual interpretation of colored areas on the test by a human operator, introducing subjectivity and the possibility of errors in the extraction of the results. While automated test readers providing a result-consistent solution are widely available, they usually lack portability. In this paper, we present a smartphone-based automated reader for drug-of-abuse lateral flow assay tests, consisting of an inexpensive light box and a smartphone device. Test images captured with the smartphone camera are processed in the device using computer vision and machine learning techniques to perform automatic extraction of the results. A deep validation of the system has been carried out showing the high accuracy of the system. The proposed approach, applicable to any line-based or color-based lateral flow test in the market, effectively reduces the manufacturing costs of the reader and makes it portable and massively available while providing accurate, reliable results. PMID:26610513

  15. Nonuniform steam generator U-tube flow distribution during natural circulation tests in ROSA-IV large scale test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kukita, Y.; Nakamura, H.; Tasaka, K. ); Chauliac, C. )

    1988-08-01

    Natural circulation experiments were conducted in a large-scale (1/48 scale in volume) full-height simulator of a Westinghouse-type pressurized water reactor. This facility has two steam generators each containing 141 full-size U-tubes of 9 different heights. Transition of the natural circulation mode was observed in the experiments as the primary of side mass inventory was decreased. Three major circulation modes were observed: single-phase liquid natural circulation, two-phase natural circulation, and reflux condensation. For all these circulation modes, and during the transitions between the modes, the mass flow distribution among the steam generator U-tubes was significantly nonuniform. The longer U-tubes indicated reversed flow at higher primary side mass inventories and also tended to empty earlier than the shorter U-tubes when the primary side mass inventory was decreased.

  16. Determining Seed Cotton Mass Flow Rate by Pressure Drop Across a Blowbox: Gin Testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate measurement of the mass flow rate of seed cotton is needed for control and monitoring purposes in gins. A system was developed that accurately predicted mass flow rate based on the static pressure drop measured across the blowbox and the air velocity and temperature entering the blowbox. Ho...

  17. The Nature, Meaning, and Measure of Teacher Flow in Elementary Schools: A Test of Rival Hypotheses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beard, Karen Stansberry; Hoy, Wayne K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This inquiry is the first comprehensive, empirical analysis of the nature and measurement of flow in elementary teachers. The clearest sign of flow is the merging of action and awareness, that is, the degree to which an activity becomes spontaneous and automatic and individuals lose conscious awareness of themselves as they perform a task…

  18. Direct test of a nonlinear constitutive equation for simple turbulent shear flows using DNS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, François G.

    2007-10-01

    Several nonlinear constitutive equations have been proposed to overcome the limitations of the linear eddy-viscosity models to describe complex turbulent flows. These nonlinear equations have often been compared to experimental data through the outputs of numerical models. Here we perform a priori analysis of nonlinear eddy-viscosity models using direct numerical simulation (DNS) of simple shear flows. In this paper, the constitutive equation is directly checked using a tensor projection which involves several invariants of the flow. This provides a 3 terms development which is exact for 2D flows, and a best approximation for 3D flows. We provide the quadratic nonlinear constitutive equation for the near-wall region of simple shear flows using DNS data, and estimate their coefficients. We show that these coefficients have several common properties for the different simple shear flow databases considered. We also show that in the central region of pipe flows, where the shear rate is very small, the coefficients of the constitutive equation diverge, indicating the failure of this representation for vanishing shears.

  19. Testing the channel flow model in the eastern Himalaya, eastern Bhutan: insights from preliminary thermobarometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agustsson, K. S.; Gordon, S. M.; Long, S. P.; Seward, G. G.; Zeiger, K. J.; Penfold, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    The study of modern continent-continent collision provides insight into the links between the upper and lower crust, including the processes involved in the deep burial and exhumation of crustal rocks. Rocks of the Greater Himalayan Sequence (GHS), which were buried to mid- to lower-crustal levels, are exposed throughout the Himalayan orogenic belt, between the top-to-the-south Main Central Thrust and the top-to-the-north South Tibetan Detachment. The GHS consists of orthogneiss, metasedimentary rocks, and large-scale (>100 km2) leucogranite bodies. Within the Bhutan Himalaya, the top-to-the south Kakhtang Thrust (KT) separates the GHS into upper (GHSu) and lower (GHSl) structural levels. Previous studies have mapped the location of the KT by the crossing of the second sillimanite isograd and by a significant increase in the volume of crystallized melt. Previous work in Bhutan has mainly focused on the GHSl, whereas the extrusion of the higher-temperature GHSu has not been well studied, and there is little quantitative data describing the P-T history of these rocks. In order to test between different end-member models for the exhumation of the GHSu, including channel flow and critical taper, new thermobarometry data was collected from a transect of samples across the KT. The channel-flow model predicts that the GHSu would have achieved peak upper-amphibolite facies P-T conditions followed by retrograde, near-isothermal decompression. In contrast, the critical-taper model predicts near-isobaric cooling of the GHSu. The electron microprobe at UC-Santa Barbara was used to measure the composition of and test for zoning within garnet, plagioclase, and biotite. Garnets in all four samples are typically subhedral to euhedral and show relatively weak zonation and flat Mg, Fe, and Ca profiles. A few garnets do exhibit bell-shaped Mn and Ca profiles. In addition, a ca. 100 μm rim high in Mg, Ca and Mn but low in Fe is present on all garnets and is indicative of diffusional

  20. Fan noise reduction achieved by removing tip flow irregularities behind the rotor - forward arc test configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, J. H.; Woodward, R. P.; Mackinnon, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    The noise source caused by the interaction of the rotor tip flow irregularities (vortices and velocity defects) with the downstream stator vanes was studied. Fan flow was removed behind a 0.508 meter (20 in.) diameter model turbofan through an outer wall slot between the rotor and stator. Noise measurements were made with far-field microphones positioned in an arc about the fan inlet and with a pressure transducer in the duct behind the stator. Little tone noise reduction was observed in the forward arc during flow removal; possibly because the rotor-stator interaction noise did not propagate upstream through the rotor. Noise reductions were maded in the duct behind the stator and the largest decrease occurred with the first increment of flow removal. This result indicates that the rotor tip flow irregularity-stator interaction is as important a noise producing mechanism as the normally considered rotor wake-stator interaction.