Science.gov

Sample records for ac magnetic measurements

  1. Measured losses in superconductor magnets for 60-Hertz ac operation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamlet, I. L.; Kilgore, R. A.

    1971-01-01

    Results of an experimental study of electrical losses in superconductor magnets. Preliminary 60-Hz ac loss data are presented for coils constructed of Nb3Sn ribbon, Nb-Ti cable, and multifilament Nb-Ti. Losses have been measured for different size coils up to approximately 20 cm in diameter. Of the conductor types tested, Nb3Sn ribbon has the lowest losses for ac operation. In Nb3Sn-ribbon coils of different sizes, the loss per unit length of conductor is shown to decrease with a decrease in the rate of change of current and to increase, in general, with increase in coil size. An important aspect of the study is the high degree of repeatability of the data.

  2. Fiber - Optic Devices as Temperature Sensors for Temperature Measurements in AC Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rablau, Corneliu; Lafrance, Joseph; Sala, Anca

    2007-10-01

    We report on the investigation of several fiber-optic devices as potential sensors for temperature measurements in AC magnetic fields. Common temperature sensors, such as thermocouples, thermistors or diodes, will create random and/or systematic errors when placed in a magnetic field. A DC magnetic field is susceptible to create a systematic offset to the measurement, while in an AC magnetic field of variable frequency random errors which cannot be corrected for can also be introduced. Fiber-Bragg-gratings and thin film filters have an inherent temperature dependence. Detrimental for their primary applications, the same dependence allows one to use such devices as temperature sensors. In an AC magnetic field, they present the advantage of being immune to electromagnetic interference. Moreover, for fiber-Bragg-gratings, the shape factor and small mass of the bare-fiber device make it convenient for temperature measurements on small samples. We studied several thin-film filters and fiber-Bragg-gratings and compared their temperature measurement capabilities in AC magnetic fields of 0 to 150 Gauss, 0 to 20 KHz to the results provided by off-the-shelf thermocouples and thermistor-based temperature measurement systems.

  3. Granular Responses of GdBa2Cu3O7-δ Using ac Magnetic Susceptibility Measurement under ac and dc Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namuco, S. B.; Lao, M. L.; Sarmago, R. V.

    Granularity of bulk materials has a great impact on the characterization of superconductors as well as its path towards room temperature applications. Bulk GdBCO that has crystal formation and Tc close to YBCO were fabricated using the conventional solid state route method. AC magnetic susceptibility measurement is done on the sample to observe the granular responses brought about by small magnetic field values that is superimposed with DC magnetic field. Results show that compared to YBCO, GdBCO show more sensitive behaviour with the addition of DC magnetic field. It is shown in the results that abrupt response in the AC loss peaks observed in χ" is more prominent in GdBCO even at lower applied magnetic fields.

  4. Monitoring colloidal stability of polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles using AC susceptibility measurements.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Adriana P; Barrera, Carola; Zayas, Yashira; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2010-02-15

    The application of the response of magnetic nanoparticles to oscillating magnetic fields to probe transitions in colloidal state and structure of polymer-coated nanoparticles is demonstrated. Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with narrow size distribution were prepared and shown to respond to oscillating magnetic fields through a Brownian relaxation mechanism, which is dependent on the mechanical coupling between the particle dipoles and the surrounding matrix. These nanoparticles were coated with covalently-attached poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM) or poly(N-isopropylmethacrylamide) (pNIPMAM) through free radical polymerization. The temperature induced transitions of colloidal suspensions of these nanoparticles were studied through a combination of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and AC susceptibility measurements. In the pNIPAM coated nanoparticles excellent agreement was found for a transition temperature of approximately 30 degrees C by all three methods, although the AC susceptibility measurements indicated aggregation which was not evident from the DLS results. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) results obtained for pNIPAM coated nanoparticles confirmed that aggregation indeed occurs above the lower critical transition temperature of pNIPAM. For the pNIPMAM coated nanoparticles DLS and AC susceptibility measurements indicated aggregation at a temperature of approximately 33-35 degrees C, much lower than the transition temperature peak at 40 degrees C observed by DSC. However, the transition observed by DSC is very broad, hence it is possible that aggregation begins to occur at temperatures lower than the peak, as indicated by the AC susceptibility and DLS results. These experiments and observations demonstrate the possibility of using AC susceptibility measurements to probe transitions in colloidal suspensions induced by external stimuli. Because magnetic measurements do not require optical transparency, these

  5. AC photovoltaic module magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, C.; Chang, G.J.; Reyes, A.B.; Whitaker, C.M.

    1997-12-31

    Implementation of alternating current (AC) photovoltaic (PV) modules, particularly for distributed applications such as PV rooftops and facades, may be slowed by public concern about electric and magnetic fields (EMF). This paper documents magnetic field measurements on an AC PV module, complementing EMF research on direct-current PV modules conducted by PG and E in 1993. Although not comprehensive, the PV EMF data indicate that 60 Hz magnetic fields (the EMF type of greatest public concern) from PV modules are comparable to, or significantly less than, those from household appliances. Given the present EMF research knowledge, AC PV module EMF may not merit considerable concern.

  6. Time-resolved Measurements of Spontaneous Magnetic Deflagration of Mn12 tBuAc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yizhang; Kent, A. D.; Zhang, Qing; Sarachik, M. P.; Baker, M. L.; Garanin, D. A.; Mhesn, Najah; Lampropoulos, Christos

    Magnetic deflagration in molecular magnets has been triggered by heat pulses and acoustic waves. In this work we report spontaneous magnetic deflagration (i.e. deflagration that occurs without an external trigger) in the axially symmetric single molecule magnet Mn12 tBuAc . Magnetic hysteresis measurements show steps due to resonant quantum tunneling (RQT) below 1K, confirming the spin-Hamiltonian parameters for this material and previous results. Deflagration speeds measured with a newly constructed higher bandwidth (2MHz) setup will be presented as a function of transverse and longitudinal fields Hx ⊗Hz both on and off resonance. A large increase in front velocity near RQT steps is observed in experiments with swept transverse fields and will be discussed in light of models of deflagration. Work supported by NSF-DMR-1309202 (NYU); ARO W911NF-13-1-0125 (CCNY); DMR-1161571(Lehman); Cottrell College Science Award (UNF).

  7. Self-consistent magnetic properties of magnetite tracers optimized for magnetic particle imaging measured by ac susceptometry, magnetorelaxometry and magnetic particle spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Frank; Remmer, Hilke; Kuhlmann, Christian; Wawrzik, Thilo; Arami, Hamed; Ferguson, R. Mathew; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2015-01-01

    Sensitivity and spatial resolution in Magnetic Particle Imaging are affected by magnetic properties of the nanoparticle tracers used during imaging. Here, we have carried out a comprehensive magnetic characterization of single-core iron oxide nanoparticles that were designed for MPI. We used ac susceptometry, fluxgate magnetorelaxometry, and magnetic particle spectroscopy to evaluate the tracer’s magnetic core size, hydrodynamic size, and magnetic anisotropy. Our results present a self-consistent set of magnetic and structural parameters for the tracers that is consistent with direct measurements of size using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering and that can be used to better understand their MPI performance. PMID:25729125

  8. Self-consistent magnetic properties of magnetite tracers optimized for magnetic particle imaging measured by ac susceptometry, magnetorelaxometry and magnetic particle spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Frank; Remmer, Hilke; Kuhlmann, Christian; Wawrzik, Thilo; Arami, Hamed; Ferguson, R. Mathew; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2014-06-01

    Sensitivity and spatial resolution in magnetic particle imaging are affected by magnetic properties of the nanoparticle tracers used during imaging. Here, we have carried out a comprehensive magnetic characterization of single-core iron oxide nanoparticles that were designed for MPI. We used ac susceptometry, fluxgate magnetorelaxometry, and magnetic particle spectroscopy to evaluate the tracer's magnetic core size, hydrodynamic size, and magnetic anisotropy. Our results present a self-consistent set of magnetic and structural parameters for the tracers that is consistent with direct measurements of size using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering and that can be used to better understand their MPI performance.

  9. Test Results of the AC Field Measurements of Fermilab Booster Corrector Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    DiMarco, E.Joseph; Harding, D.J.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Lamm, M.J.; Makulski, A.; Nehring, R.; Orris, D.F.; Schlabach, P.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, Michael Albert; /Fermilab

    2008-06-25

    Multi-element corrector magnets are being produced at Fermilab that enable correction of orbits and tunes through the entire cycle of the Booster, not just at injection. The corrector package includes six different corrector elements--normal and skew orientations of dipole, quadrupole, and sextupole--each independently powered. The magnets have been tested during typical AC ramping cycles at 15Hz using a fixed coil system to measure the dynamic field strength and field quality. The fixed coil is comprised of an array of inductive pick-up coils around the perimeter of a cylinder which are sampled simultaneously at 100 kHz with 24-bit ADC's. The performance of the measurement system and a summary of the field results are presented and discussed.

  10. Measurements on magnetized GdBCO pellets subjected to small transverse ac magnetic fields at very low frequency: Evidence for a slowdown of the magnetization decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagnard, Jean-Francois; Kirsch, Sébastien; Morita, Mitsuru; Teshima, Hidekazu; Vanderheyden, Benoit; Vanderbemden, Philippe

    2015-05-01

    Due to their ability to trap large magnetic inductions, superconducting bulk materials can be used as powerful permanent magnets. The permanent magnetization of such materials, however, can be significantly affected by the application of several cycles of a transverse variable magnetic field. In this work, we study, at T = 77 K, the long term influence of transverse ac magnetic fields of small amplitudes (i.e. much smaller than the full penetration field) on the axial magnetization of a bulk single grain superconducting GdBCO pellet over a wide range of low frequencies (1 mHz-20 Hz). Thermocouples are placed against the pellet surface to probe possible self-heating of the material during the experiments. A high sensitivity cryogenic Hall probe is placed close to the surface to record the local magnetic induction normal to the surface. The results show first that, for a given number of applied triangular transverse cycles, higher values of dBapp/dt induce smaller magnetization decays. An important feature of practical interest is that, after a very large number of cycles which cause the loss of a substantial amount of magnetization (depending on the amplitude and the frequency of the field), the rate of the magnetization decay goes back to its initial value, corresponding to the relaxation of the superconducting currents due to flux creep only. In the amplitude and frequency range investigated, the thermocouples measurements and a 2D magneto-thermal modelling show no evidence of sufficient self-heating to affect the magnetization so that the effect of the transverse magnetic field cycles on the trapped magnetic moment is only attributed to a redistribution of superconducting currents in the volume of the sample and not to a thermal effect.

  11. Dual AC Dipole Excitation for the Measurement of Magnetic Multipole Strength from Beam Position Monitor Data

    SciTech Connect

    M. Spata, G.A. Krafft

    2011-09-01

    An experiment was conducted at Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility to develop a technique for characterizing the nonlinear fields of the beam transport system. Two air-core dipole magnets were simultaneously driven at two different frequencies to provide a time-dependent transverse modulation of the electron beam. Fourier decomposition of beam position monitor data was then used to measure the amplitude of these frequencies at different positions along the beamline. For a purely linear transport system one expects to find solely the frequencies that were applied to the dipoles with amplitudes that depend on the phase advance of the lattice. In the presence of nonlinear fields one expects to also find harmonics of the driving frequencies that depend on the order of the nonlinearity. The technique was calibrated using one of the sextupole magnets in a CEBAF beamline and then applied to a dipole to measure the sextupole and octupole strength of the magnet. A comparison is made between the beam-based measurements, results from TOSCA and data from our Magnet Measurement Facility.

  12. Simultaneous ac and dc magnetic field measurements in residential areas: Implications for resonance theories of biological effects

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, P.S.; Sastre, A.

    1995-10-01

    The goal of this study was to obtain data that could be used to evaluate the applicability of ``resonance`` theories of biological effects in residential settings. The authors first describe a measurement system which allows the study of ac and dc magnetic fields simultaneously in space and in time. Sample measurements were taken near two power lines, two objects and in two residential homes. The results show that the earth`s (dc) magnetic field was unaffected near power lines. The compass orientation of the power line influenced the relative values of the ac components parallel and perpendicular to the dc field. The electric heating system greatly affected the ac field levels in the home, causing the levels to increase from less than 1 mG to a maximum of 7.5 mG during heating. The magnitudes of the dc field in the two homes varied from about 380 to 650 mG, with the larger variations near metallic or magnetic objects such as the refrigerator or a metallic air duct. The earth`s field was elevated above its natural level within a distance of 8 feet from a subcompact passenger car, e.g., the level changed from about 540 to 1,100 mG beside the headlight. A steel chair changed the earth`s field by up to 60 mG within a distance of one foot. These results suggest that some of the narrow ``resonances`` described in laboratory studies may be difficult to observe against the variations in do field amplitude and direction resulting from the presence of everyday metallic objects.

  13. AC resistance measuring instrument

    DOEpatents

    Hof, P.J.

    1983-10-04

    An auto-ranging AC resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an AC excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance. After the auto-ranging and auto-compensation functions are complete, the microprocessor calculates the resistance of the load from the selected range resistance, the excitation signal, and the load voltage signal, and displays of the measured resistance on a digital display of the instrument. 8 figs.

  14. AC Resistance measuring instrument

    DOEpatents

    Hof, Peter J.

    1983-01-01

    An auto-ranging AC resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an AC excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance. After the auto-ranging and auto-compensation functions are complete, the microprocessor calculates the resistance of the load from the selected range resistance, the excitation signal, and the load voltage signal, and displays of the measured resistance on a digital display of the instrument.

  15. A HTS scanning magnet and AC operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatanaka, K.; Nakagawa, J.; Fukuda, M.; Yorita, T.; Saito, T.; Sakemi, Y.; Kawaguchi, T.; Noda, K.

    2010-04-01

    A scanning magnet using high-temperature superconductor (HTS) wire was designed, built, and tested for its suitability as a beam scanner. After successful cooling tests, the magnet performance was studied using DC and AC currents. With DC current the magnet was successfully operated to generate designed field distributions and effective length. In AC mode, the magnet was operated at frequencies of 30-59 Hz and a temperature of 77 K as well as 10-20 Hz and 20 K. The power losses dissipated in the coils were measured and compared with the model calculations. The observed losses per cycle were independent of the frequency and the scaling law of the transport current was consistent with theoretical predictions for hysteretic losses in HTS wires.

  16. Effect of the magnetic material on AC losses in HTS conductors in AC magnetic field carrying AC transport current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xing-Xing; Huang, Chen-Guang; Yong, Hua-Dong; Zhou, You-He

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the AC losses in several typical superconducting composite conductors using the H-formulation model. A single superconducting strip with ferromagnetic substrate or cores and a stack of coated conductors with ferromagnetic substrates are studied. We consider all the coated conductors carrying AC transport currents and simultaneously exposed to perpendicular AC magnetic fields. The influences of the amplitude, frequency, phase difference and ferromagnetic materials on the AC losses are investigated. The results show that the magnetization losses of single strip and stacked strips have similar characteristics. The ferromagnetic substrate can increase the magnetization loss at low magnetic field, and decrease the loss at high magnetic field. The ferromagnetic substrate can obviously increase the transport loss in stacked strips. The trends of total AC losses of single strip and stacked strips are similar when they are carrying current or exposed to a perpendicular magnetic field. The effect of the frequency on the total AC losses of single strip is related to the amplitude of magnetic field. The AC losses decrease with increasing frequency in low magnetic field region while increase in high magnetic field region. As the phase difference changes, there is a periodic variation for the AC losses. Moreover, when the strip is under only the transport current and magnetic field, the ferromagnetic cores will increase the AC losses for large transport current or field.

  17. 21 CFR 886.4440 - AC-powered magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false AC-powered magnet. 886.4440 Section 886.4440 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4440 AC-powered magnet. (a) Identification. An AC-powered magnet is an AC-powered device that generates a magnetic field intended to find and...

  18. 21 CFR 886.4440 - AC-powered magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false AC-powered magnet. 886.4440 Section 886.4440 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4440 AC-powered magnet. (a) Identification. An AC-powered magnet is an AC-powered device that generates a magnetic field intended to find and...

  19. 21 CFR 886.4440 - AC-powered magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false AC-powered magnet. 886.4440 Section 886.4440 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4440 AC-powered magnet. (a) Identification. An AC-powered magnet is an AC-powered device that generates a magnetic field intended to find and...

  20. 21 CFR 886.4440 - AC-powered magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false AC-powered magnet. 886.4440 Section 886.4440 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4440 AC-powered magnet. (a) Identification. An AC-powered magnet is an AC-powered device that generates a magnetic field intended to find and...

  1. 21 CFR 886.4440 - AC-powered magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false AC-powered magnet. 886.4440 Section 886.4440 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4440 AC-powered magnet. (a) Identification. An AC-powered magnet is an AC-powered device that generates a magnetic field intended to find and...

  2. Specific absorption rate dependence on temperature in magnetic field hyperthermia measured by dynamic hysteresis losses (ac magnetometry)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaio, Eneko; Sandre, Olivier; Collantes, Juan-Mari; Garcia, Jose Angel; Mornet, Stéphane; Plazaola, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are intensively studied for their potential use for magnetic hyperthermia, a treatment that has passed a phase II clinical trial against severe brain cancer (glioblastoma) at the end of 2011. Their heating power, characterized by the ‘specific absorption rate (SAR)’, is often considered temperature independent in the literature, mainly because of the difficulties that arise from the measurement methodology. Using a dynamic magnetometer presented in a recent paper, we measure here the thermal dependence of SAR for superparamagnetic iron oxide (maghemite) NPs of four different size-ranges corresponding to mean diameters around 12 nm, 14 nm, 15 nm and 16 nm. The article reports a parametrical study extending from 10 to 60 {}^\\circ C in temperature, from 75 to 1031 kHz in frequency, and from 2 to 24 kA m-1 in magnetic field strength. It was observed that SAR values of smaller NPs decrease with temperature whereas for the larger sample (16 nm) SAR values increase with temperature. The measured variation of SAR with temperature is frequency dependent. This behaviour is fully explained within the scope of linear response theory based on Néel and Brown relaxation processes, using independent magnetic measurements of the specific magnetization and the magnetic anisotropy constant. A good quantitative agreement between experimental values and theoretical values is confirmed in a tri-dimensional space that uses as coordinates the field strength, the frequency and the temperature.

  3. Uncertainty evaluation in the measurement of power frequency electric and magnetic fields from AC overhead power lines.

    PubMed

    Ztoupis, I N; Gonos, I F; Stathopulos, I A

    2013-11-01

    Measurements of power frequency electric and magnetic fields from alternating current power lines are carried out in order to evaluate the exposure levels of the human body on the general public. For any electromagnetic field measurement, it is necessary to define the sources of measurement uncertainty and determine the total measurement uncertainty. This paper is concerned with the problems of measurement uncertainty estimation, as the measurement uncertainty budget calculation techniques recommended in standardising documents and research studies are barely described. In this work the total uncertainty of power frequency field measurements near power lines in various measurement sites is assessed by considering not only all available equipment data, but also contributions that depend on the measurement procedures, environmental conditions and characteristics of the field source, which are considered to increase the error of measurement. A detailed application example for power frequency field measurements is presented here by accredited laboratory.

  4. Ac magnetic susceptibility study of in vivo nanoparticle biodistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, L.; Mejías, R.; Barber, D. F.; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, S.; Serna, C. J.; Lázaro, F. J.; Morales, M. P.

    2011-06-01

    We analysed magnetic nanoparticle biodistribution, before and after cytokine conjugation, in a mouse model by ac susceptibility measurements of the corresponding resected tissues. Mice received repeated intravenous injections of nanoparticle suspension for two weeks and they were euthanized 1 h after the last injection. In general, only 10% of the total injected nanoparticles after multiple exposures were found in tissues. The rest of the particles may probably be metabolized or excreted by the organism. Our findings indicate that the adsorption of interferon to DMSA-coated magnetic nanoparticles changes their biodistribution, reducing the presence of nanoparticles in lungs and therefore their possible toxicity. The specific targeting of the particles to tumour tissues by the use of an external magnetic field has also been studied. Magnetic nanoparticles were observed by transmission electron microscopy in the targeted tissue and quantified by ac magnetic susceptibility.

  5. Design of Pickup Coil Made of Litz Wire and Cooled at 77 K for High Sensitive Measurement of AC Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enpuku, Keiji; Hirakawa, Shintaro; Momotomi, Ryuji; Matsuo, Masaaki; Yoshida, Takashi; Kandori, Akihiko

    2011-07-01

    We studied the performance of a copper pickup coil for high sensitive measurements of ac magnetic fields. The coil was made of Litz wire to prevent the skin effect, and was cooled at 77 K to reduce thermal noise. We first obtained an analytical expression for the coil resistance by analyzing the eddy current loss of the coil. The analytical result explains well the measured dependences of the coil resistance on the frequency, number of turns of the coil (N), and filament diameter of the Litz wire (df). Next, we show the design of the pickup coil. When appropriate values are selected for N and df, we can expect the magnetic field noise SB1/2 < 10 fT/Hz1/2 for f > 1 kHz and SB1/2 < 2 fT/Hz1/2 for f > 10 kHz for the pickup coil with diameter of 50 mm. The experimental results agreed with the designed values.

  6. Tevatron optics measurements using an AC dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.; Kopp, S.E.; Jansson, A.; Syphers, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The AC dipole is a device to study beam optics of hadron synchrotrons. It can produce sustained large amplitude oscillations with virtually no emittance growth. A vertical AC dipole for the Tevatron is recently implemented and a maximum oscillation amplitude of 2{sigma} (4{sigma}) at 980 GeV (150 GeV) is achieved [1]. When such large oscillations are measured with the BPM system of the Tevatron (20 {micro}m resolution), not only linear but even nonlinear optics can be directly measured. This paper shows how to measure {beta} function using an AC dipole and the result is compared to the other measurement. The paper also shows a test to detect optics changes when small changes are made in the Tevatron. Since an AC dipole is nondestructive, it allows frequent measurements of the optics which is necessary for such an test.

  7. Testing of a First Order AC Magnetic Susceptometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Ryan; Sunny, Smitha; Ho, Pei-Chun

    2011-11-01

    A first-order AC magnetic susceptometer has been constructed and tested to find the magnetic response of strongly correlated electron materials. The instrument works by using a primary coil to apply a small AC magnetic field of .104 Oe to a sample with a cylindrical coil space of length .635 cm and diameter .355 cm. A lock-in amplifier is used to monitor the induced voltage from a set of secondary coils. By coupling a temperature-controlled system with this instrument, the change in the magnetic signal with respect to temperature is measured. Monitoring the signal changes may indicate the temperature that causes the material to transition to either a ferromagnetic, anti-ferromagnetic, or superconducting state. A 122.47 mg Gd polycrystal was used to test our susceptometer. The data qualitatively agrees with the previous results of magnetization vs. temperature of Gd single crystals by Nigh et al. [1]: there is a steep increase in the pick-up signal at 300 K where Gd becomes ferromagnetic and a peak at 210 K [1]. This susceptometer will be used for our future investigation of magnetic properties of rare earth compounds and nanoparticles in the temperature range of 10 K to 300 K. [4pt] [1] H. E. Nigh, S. Legvold, and F. H. Spedding, Physical Review 132, 1092 (1963)

  8. Peak effect in optimally doped p-type single-crystal Ba0.5K0.5Fe2As2 studied by ac magnetization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, J.; Gutierrez, J.; Li, J.; Yuan, J.; Wang, H.-B.; Yamaura, K.; Takayama-Muromachi, E.; Moshchalkov, V. V.

    2013-10-01

    We have used the ac magnetic susceptibility to investigate the vortex state in an optimally doped p-type Ba0.5K0.5Fe2As2 single crystal under various ac and dc fields. A peak effect is observed in the temperature dependence of the in-phase ac susceptibility, indicating an order-disorder transition on the vortex phase diagram. The peak effect displays an anomalous history effect compared with other type-II superconductors, which we ascribe to the strong pinning existing in the material. We observe the development of a small dissipation peak at the temperature Tp2 slightly below the peak effect region. Similar to the peak effect boundary, Tp2 delimits a region in the H-T phase diagram which is independent on the ac field amplitude. We argue that this small peak may arise from the softening of the vortex lattice, leading to a collective pinning of the whole vortex lattice. This effect assists and further enhances the peak effect occurring in the Ba0.5K0.5Fe2As2 superconductor.

  9. AC conductivity of a niobium thin film in a swept magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Tsindlekht, M I; Genkin, V M; Gazi, S; Chromik, S

    2013-02-27

    We report results of measurements of the ac conductivity of a Nb superconducting thin film in a swept dc magnetic field. In the mixed state the swept dc field creates vortices at the film surface which pass through the film and form the observed ac conductivity. Vortex rate generation does not depend on the value of the dc field and there is a large plateau-like region of dc magnetic fields where the dissipation is approximately constant. A proposed phenomenological model describes quite well the main features of the ac response in these fields, including its dependency on the sweep rate, ac amplitude, frequency, and value of the second and third harmonics.

  10. Development of a nano-tesla magnetic field shielded chamber and highly precise AC-susceptibility measurement coil at μK temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Anil; Prakash, Om; Ramakrishanan, S.

    2014-04-01

    A special sample measurement chamber has been developed to perform experiments at ultralow temperatures and ultralow magnetic field. A high permeability material known as cryoperm 10 and Pb is used to shield the measurement space consisting of the signal detecting set-up and the sample. The detecting setup consists of a very sensitive susceptibility coil wound on OFHC Cu bobbin.

  11. Magnetization ac loss reduction in HTS CORC® cables made of striated coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojenčiak, M.; Kario, A.; Ringsdorf, B.; Nast, R.; van der Laan, D. C.; Scheiter, J.; Jung, A.; Runtsch, B.; Gömöry, F.; Goldacker, W.

    2015-10-01

    High temperature superconductors (HTSs), like for instance REBCO (RE = rare earth) coated conductors, are of high potential for building large superconducting magnets. Some magnets, such as accelerator magnets, require the use of superconducting cables to allow fast ramping, and low magnetization loss to mitigate field quality issues. One of the methods to lower ac loss is to divide the superconducting layer in the tape into filaments. In this paper, conductors with copper stabilization for practical applications are laser scribed into narrow filaments. Striated tapes are then wound into conductor on round core (CORC®) cables. The critical current and magnetization ac loss of single tapes were measured. We found that the stabilizing copper layer causes difficulties for laser scribing. The degradation of the critical current is more pronounced than in the case of non-stabilized tapes. The selection of the number of filaments is therefore a compromise between critical current degradation and reduction of ac loss. Based on the results obtained from single tape experiments, the optimum number of filaments in 4 mm wide tapes was chosen, and CORC® cables with 2, 3 and 4 layers of tapes with and without filaments were manufactured. Magnetization ac loss measurements at 77 K showed a reduction of ac loss in the cables with filaments. This reduction corresponds almost to the number of filaments. Measurement at different frequencies also showed that the coupling loss in CORC® cables with a short twist-pitch is relatively small in comparison to hysteretic loss.

  12. Investigation of magnetic spin glass property in La{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} sample using non-linear AC susceptibility measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Punith V. Manju, M. R. Dayal, Vijaylakshmi

    2014-04-24

    We present a comprehensive study on origin of Spin Glass (SG) property in polycrystalline La{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} perovskite oxide using linear and higher order ac susceptibility (χ) measurements. The third order harmonic susceptibility (χ{sub 3}) vs. temperature (K) with varying magnetic fields from 0.95 to 9.45 Oe and the divergence in their χ{sub 3} (max) allows us to infer the SG behavior occurring in the sample possibly due to co-operative freezing of the spins.

  13. Spectroscopic AC Susceptibility Imaging (sASI) of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ficko, Bradley W.; Nadar, Priyanka M.; Diamond, Solomon G.

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrates a method for alternating current (AC) susceptibility imaging (ASI) of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) using low cost instrumentation. The ASI method uses AC magnetic susceptibility measurement to create tomographic images using an array of drive coils, compensation coils and fluxgate magnetometers. Using a spectroscopic approach in conjunction with ASI, a series of tomographic images can be created for each frequency measurement and is termed sASI. The advantage of sASI is that mNPs can be simultaneously characterized and imaged in a biological medium. System calibration was performed by fitting the in-phase and out-of-phase susceptibility measurements of an mNP sample with a hydrodynamic diameter of 100 nm to a Brownian relaxation model (R2 = 0.96). Samples of mNPs with core diameters of 10 and 40 nm and a sample of 100 nm hydrodynamic diameter were prepared in 0.5 ml tubes. Three mNP samples were arranged in a randomized array and then scanned using sASI with six frequencies between 425 and 925 Hz. The sASI scans showed the location and quantity of the mNP samples (R2 = 0.97). Biological compatibility of the sASI method was demonstrated by scanning mNPs that were injected into a pork sausage. The mNP response in the biological medium was found to correlate with a calibration sample (R2 = 0.97, p <0.001). These results demonstrate the concept of ASI and advantages of sASI. PMID:25477704

  14. Spectroscopic AC Susceptibility Imaging (sASI) of Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ficko, Bradley W; Nadar, Priyanka M; Diamond, Solomon G

    2015-02-01

    This study demonstrates a method for alternating current (AC) susceptibility imaging (ASI) of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) using low cost instrumentation. The ASI method uses AC magnetic susceptibility measurement to create tomographic images using an array of drive coils, compensation coils and fluxgate magnetometers. Using a spectroscopic approach in conjunction with ASI, a series of tomographic images can be created for each frequency measurement and is termed sASI. The advantage of sASI is that mNPs can be simultaneously characterized and imaged in a biological medium. System calibration was performed by fitting the in-phase and out-of-phase susceptibility measurements of an mNP sample with a hydrodynamic diameter of 100 nm to a Brownian relaxation model (R(2) = 0.96). Samples of mNPs with core diameters of 10 and 40 nm and a sample of 100 nm hydrodynamic diameter were prepared in 0.5 ml tubes. Three mNP samples were arranged in a randomized array and then scanned using sASI with six frequencies between 425 and 925 Hz. The sASI scans showed the location and quantity of the mNP samples (R(2) = 0.97). Biological compatibility of the sASI method was demonstrated by scanning mNPs that were injected into a pork sausage. The mNP response in the biological medium was found to correlate with a calibration sample (R(2) = 0.97, p <0.001). These results demonstrate the concept of ASI and advantages of sASI. PMID:25477704

  15. Spectroscopic AC susceptibility imaging (sASI) of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ficko, Bradley W.; Nadar, Priyanka M.; Diamond, Solomon G.

    2015-02-01

    This study demonstrates a method for alternating current (AC) susceptibility imaging (ASI) of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) using low cost instrumentation. The ASI method uses AC magnetic susceptibility measurements to create tomographic images using an array of drive coils, compensation coils and fluxgate magnetometers. Using a spectroscopic approach in conjunction with ASI, a series of tomographic images can be created for each frequency measurement set and is termed sASI. The advantage of sASI is that mNPs can be simultaneously characterized and imaged in a biological medium. System calibration was performed by fitting the in-phase and out-of-phase susceptibility measurements of an mNP sample with a hydrodynamic diameter of 100 nm to a Brownian relaxation model (R2=0.96). Samples of mNPs with core diameters of 10 and 40 nm and a sample of 100 nm hydrodynamic diameter were prepared in 0.5 ml tubes. Three mNP samples were arranged in a randomized array and then scanned using sASI with six frequencies between 425 and 925 Hz. The sASI scans showed the location and quantity of the mNP samples (R2=0.97). Biological compatibility of the sASI method was demonstrated by scanning mNPs that were injected into a pork sausage. The mNP response in the biological medium was found to correlate with a calibration sample (R2=0.97, p<0.001). These results demonstrate the concept of ASI and advantages of sASI.

  16. Distribution of AC loss in a HTS magnet for SMES with different operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Tang, Y.; Ren, L.; Jiao, F.; Song, M.; Cao, K.; Wang, D.; Wang, L.; Dong, H.

    2013-11-01

    The AC loss induced in superconducting tape may affect the performance of a superconducting device applied to power system, such as transformer, cable, motor and even Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES). The operating condition of SMES is changeable due to the need of compensation to the active or reactive power according to the demand of a power grid. In this paper, it is investigated that the distribution of AC loss for a storage magnet on different operating conditions, which is based on finite element method (FEM) and measured properties of BSCCO/Ag tapes. This analytical method can be used to optimize the SMES magnet.

  17. AC magnetic measurement of LiFeAs at pressures up to 5.2 GPa: The relation between T c and the structural parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Yamaguchi, Nobuhiro; Mito, Masaki; Deguchi, Hiroyuki; Baker, Peter. J.; Blundell, Stephen. J.; Pitcher, Michael. J.; Parker, Dinah. R.; Clarke, Simon. J.

    2013-08-01

    The pressure effects on the 111-type Fe-based superconductor LiFeAs were investigated through AC susceptibility measurements and X-ray diffraction experiments, and revealed a correlation between the superconducting transition temperature ( T c ) and the As-Fe-As bond angle ( α) rather than the height of As from the Fe layers ( h As). As the pressure was increased, T c of 17 K at P = 0 GPa decreased down to 10 K at P = 5.2 GPa. According to a previous report from an X-ray diffraction experiment, α changes from 101.5° at 0 GPa to 97.8° at 17 GPa. The obtained change in T c is consistent with Lee et al.'s plot of T c as a function of α, and from this result, we conclude that T c will fall to zero at around α = 98°.

  18. AC Loss Analysis on the Superconducting Coupling Magnet in MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hong; Wang, Li; Green, Michael; Li, LanKai; Xu, FengYu; Liu, XiaoKun; Jia, LinXinag

    2008-07-08

    A pair of coupling solenoids is used in MICE experiment to generate magnetic field which keeps the muons within the iris of thin RF cavity windows. The coupling solenoids have a 1.5-meter inner diameter and will produce 7.4 T peak magnetic field. Three types of AC losses in coupling solenoid are discussed. The affect of AC losses on the temperature distribution within the cold mass during charging and rapid discharging process is analyzed also. The analysis result will be further confirmed by the experiment of the prototype solenoid for coupling solenoid, which will be designed, fabricated and tested at ICST.

  19. Nonlinear magnetization relaxation of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in superimposed ac and dc magnetic bias fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Serguey V.; Déjardin, Pierre-Michel; El Mrabti, Halim; Kalmykov, Yuri P.

    2010-09-01

    The nonlinear ac response of the magnetization M(t) of a uniaxially anisotropic superparamagnetic nanoparticle subjected to both ac and dc bias magnetic fields of arbitrary strengths and orientations is determined by averaging Gilbert’s equation augmented by a random field with Gaussian white-noise properties in order to calculate exactly the relevant statistical averages. It is shown that the magnetization dynamics of the uniaxial particle driven by a strong ac field applied at an angle to the easy axis of the particle (so that the axial symmetry is broken) alters drastically leading to different nonlinear effects due to coupling of the thermally activated magnetization reversal mode with the precessional modes of M(t) via the driving ac field.

  20. AC Magnetic Field Frequency Dependence of Magnetoacoustic Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, M.; Wincheski, B.; Fulton, J. P.; DeNale, R.

    1992-01-01

    Our recent study has proved a strong correlation between the low-frequency AC applied magnetic field amplitude dependence of the asymmetry of the magnetoacoustic emission (MAE) burst and the strength of the domain wall-defect interaction in iron-base ferromagnets. For the present study the AC magnetic field frequency dependence of the asymmetry has been investigated in the range of 1 to 200 Hz. When represented by the third moment of the rectified acoustic emission pulses, the asymmetry becomes a bell-shaped function of frequency with its center located around 25 Hz. This experiment has been performed with low carbon, high yield stress steel specimens of three different levels of domain wall-defect interaction strength. The results show that the increase in the interaction strength causes a vertical down shift of the asymmetry in the entire frequency range investigated.

  1. AC Losses in the MICE Channel Magnets -- Is This a Curse or aBlessing?

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Wu, H.; Wang, L.; Kai, L.L.; Jia, L.X.; Yang, S.Q.

    2008-01-31

    This report discusses the AC losses in the MICE channelmagnets during magnet charging and discharging. This report talks aboutthe three types of AC losses in the MICE magnets; the hysteretic AC lossin the superconductor, the coupling AC loss in the superconductor and theeddy current AC loss in the magnet mandrel and support structure. AClosses increase the heat load at 4 K. The added heat load increases thetemperature of the second stage of the cooler. In addition, AC losscontributes to the temperature rise between the second stage cold headand the high field point of the magnet, which is usually close to themagnet hot spot. These are the curses of AC loss in the MICE magnet thatcan limit the rate at which the magnet can be charge or discharged. Ifone is willing to allow some of the helium that is around the magnet toboil away during a magnet charge or discharge, AC losses can become ablessing. The boil off helium from the AC losses can be used to cool theupper end of the HTS leads and the surrounding shield. The AC losses arepresented for all three types of MICE magnets. The AC loss temperaturedrops within the coupling magnet are presented as an example of how boththe curse and blessing of the AC losses can be combined.

  2. Propagation of magnetic avalanches in Mn12Ac at high field sweep rates.

    PubMed

    Decelle, W; Vanacken, J; Moshchalkov, V V; Tejada, J; Hernández, J M; Macià, F

    2009-01-16

    Time-resolved measurements of the magnetization reversal in single crystals of Mn12Ac in pulsed magnetic fields, at magnetic field sweep rates from 1.5 kT/s up to 7 kT/s, suggest a new process that cannot be scaled onto a deflagrationlike propagation driven by heat diffusion. The sweep rate dependence of the propagation velocity, increasing from a few 100 m/s up to the speed of sound in Mn12Ac, indicates the existence of two new regimes at the highest sweep rates, with a transition around 4 kT/s that can be understood as a magnetic deflagration-to-detonation transition. PMID:19257315

  3. Propagation of magnetic avalanches in Mn12Ac at high field sweep rates.

    PubMed

    Decelle, W; Vanacken, J; Moshchalkov, V V; Tejada, J; Hernández, J M; Macià, F

    2009-01-16

    Time-resolved measurements of the magnetization reversal in single crystals of Mn12Ac in pulsed magnetic fields, at magnetic field sweep rates from 1.5 kT/s up to 7 kT/s, suggest a new process that cannot be scaled onto a deflagrationlike propagation driven by heat diffusion. The sweep rate dependence of the propagation velocity, increasing from a few 100 m/s up to the speed of sound in Mn12Ac, indicates the existence of two new regimes at the highest sweep rates, with a transition around 4 kT/s that can be understood as a magnetic deflagration-to-detonation transition.

  4. Facility Measures Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honess, Shawn B.; Narvaez, Pablo; Mcauley, James M.

    1991-01-01

    Partly automated facility measures and computes steady near magnetic field produced by object. Designed to determine magnetic fields of equipment to be installed on spacecraft including sensitive magnetometers, with view toward application of compensating fields to reduce interfernece with spacecraft-magnetometer readings. Because of its convenient operating features and sensitivity of its measurements, facility serves as prototype for similar facilities devoted to magnetic characterization of medical equipment, magnets for high-energy particle accelerators, and magnetic materials.

  5. A flux-coupled ac/dc magnetizing device.

    PubMed

    Gopman, D B; Liu, H; Kent, A D

    2013-06-01

    We report on an instrument for applying ac and dc magnetic fields by capturing the flux from a rotating permanent magnet and projecting it between two adjustable pole pieces. This can be an alternative to standard electromagnets for experiments with small samples or in probe stations in which an applied magnetic field is needed locally, with advantages that include a compact form-factor, very low power requirements and dissipation as well as fast field sweep rates. This flux capture instrument (FLUXCAP) can produce fields from -400 to +400 mT, with field resolution less than 1 mT. It generates static magnetic fields as well as ramped fields, with ramping rates as high as 10 T/s. We demonstrate the use of this apparatus for studying the magnetotransport properties of spin-valve nanopillars, a nanoscale device that exhibits giant magnetoresistance. PMID:23822372

  6. Ac losses for the self field of an ac transport current with a dc transport current offset in high {Tc} superconducting magnet coils for MagLev application

    SciTech Connect

    Koosh, V.F.

    1993-10-01

    Although much research has been conducted concerning the losses of high-{Tc} superconductors, very little has concentrated on the self-field losses in an actual magnet arrangement. The coils studied in this work were designed for use as actual magnets in an industrial application. Self field loss measurements were made upon tape-wound 2223 superconducting helix coils. The self-field losses were produced by an AC transport current with a DC transport current offset. Losses were taken for single, double and triple tape windings, giving essentially monofilament, dual, and three filament cases. The losses measured here were varied over a range of AC current values for several different DC values, and over a range of frequencies. The currents were all AC sinusoids with a DC offset. All measurements were made at T = 77K.

  7. Quantitatively probing the magnetic behavior of individual nanoparticles by an AC field-modulated magnetic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Lu, Wei; Song, Yiming; Wang, Yuxin; Chen, Aiying; Yan, Biao; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of advances in magnetic imaging, obtaining direct, quantitative information with nanometer scale spatial resolution remains an outstanding challenge. Current approaches, for example, Hall micromagnetometer and nitrogen-vacancy magnetometer, are limited by highly complex experimental apparatus and a dedicated sample preparation process. Here we present a new AC field-modulated magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and report the local and quantitative measurements of the magnetic information of individual magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), which is one of the most iconic objects of nanomagnetism. This technique provides simultaneously a direct visualization of the magnetization process of the individual MNPs, with spatial resolution and magnetic sensitivity of about 4.8 nm and 1.85 × 10−20 A m2, respectively, enabling us to separately estimate the distributions of the dipolar fields and the local switching fields of individual MNPs. Moreover, we demonstrate that quantitative magnetization moment of individual MNPs can be routinely obtained using MFM signals. Therefore, it underscores the power of the AC field-modulated MFM for biological and biomedical applications of MNPs and opens up the possibility for directly and quantitatively probing the weak magnetic stray fields from nanoscale magnetic systems with superior spatial resolution. PMID:26932357

  8. Fabrication and magnetism of α-Fe2O3 nanotubes via a multistep ac electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, C.; Wang, Y.; Lu, T.; Yang, S.; Wang, L. Q.; Song, X. P.

    2015-07-01

    Hematite Fe2O3 nanotubes were successfully synthesized by a multistep ac electro-deposition on anodic aluminum oxide templates remaining the barrier layers. X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and magnetic measurements were used to characterize the morphology, structure, and magnetic properties of α-Fe2O3 nanotubes. Based on the characterization results, a self-assemble mechanism for electro-deposition α-Fe2O3 nanotubes was proposed. The magnetic property investigation showed that hematite Fe2O3 nanotubes exhibit ferromagnetic behavior with the Morin transition.

  9. Measurement of coupling resonance driving terms with the AC dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.

    2010-10-01

    Resonance driving terms for linear coupled betatron motion in a synchrotron ring can be determined from corresponding spectral lines of an excited coherent beam motion. An AC dipole is one of instruments to excite such a motion. When a coherent motion is excited with an AC dipole, measured Courant-Snyder parameters and betatron phase advance have apparent modulations, as if there is an additional quadrupole field at the location of the AC dipole. Hence, measurements of these parameters using the AC dipole require a proper interpretation of observed quantities. The situation is similar in measurements of resonance driving terms using the AC dipole. In this note, we derive an expression of coupled betatron motion excited with two AC dipoles in presence of skew quadrupole fields, discuss an impact of this quadrupole like effect of the AC dipole on a measurement of coupling resonance driving terms, and present an analytical method to determine the coupling resonance driving terms from quantities observed using the AC dipole.

  10. dc and ac magnetic properties of thin-walled Nb cylinders with and without a row of antidots.

    PubMed

    Tsindlekht, M I; Genkin, V M; Felner, I; Zeides, F; Katz, N; Gazi, Š; Chromik, Š; Dobrovolskiy, O V; Sachser, R; Huth, M

    2016-06-01

    dc and ac magnetic properties of two thin-walled superconducting Nb cylinders with a rectangular cross-section are reported. Magnetization curves and the ac response were studied on as-prepared and patterned samples in magnetic fields parallel to the cylinder axis. A row of micron-sized antidots (holes) was made in the film along the cylinder axis. Avalanche-like jumps of the magnetization are observed for both samples at low temperatures for magnetic fields not only above H c1, but in fields lower than H c1 in the vortex-free region. The positions of the jumps are not reproducible and they change from one experiment to another, resembling vortex lattice instabilities usually observed for magnetic fields larger than H c1. At temperatures above [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] the magnetization curves become smooth for the patterned and the as-prepared samples, respectively. The magnetization curve of a reference planar Nb film in the parallel field geometry does not exhibit jumps in the entire range of accessible temperatures. The ac response was measured in constant and swept dc magnetic field modes. Experiment shows that ac losses at low magnetic fields in a swept field mode are smaller for the patterned sample. For both samples the shapes of the field dependences of losses and the amplitude of the third harmonic are the same in constant and swept field near H c3. This similarity does not exist at low fields in a swept mode.

  11. dc and ac magnetic properties of thin-walled Nb cylinders with and without a row of antidots.

    PubMed

    Tsindlekht, M I; Genkin, V M; Felner, I; Zeides, F; Katz, N; Gazi, Š; Chromik, Š; Dobrovolskiy, O V; Sachser, R; Huth, M

    2016-06-01

    dc and ac magnetic properties of two thin-walled superconducting Nb cylinders with a rectangular cross-section are reported. Magnetization curves and the ac response were studied on as-prepared and patterned samples in magnetic fields parallel to the cylinder axis. A row of micron-sized antidots (holes) was made in the film along the cylinder axis. Avalanche-like jumps of the magnetization are observed for both samples at low temperatures for magnetic fields not only above H c1, but in fields lower than H c1 in the vortex-free region. The positions of the jumps are not reproducible and they change from one experiment to another, resembling vortex lattice instabilities usually observed for magnetic fields larger than H c1. At temperatures above [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] the magnetization curves become smooth for the patterned and the as-prepared samples, respectively. The magnetization curve of a reference planar Nb film in the parallel field geometry does not exhibit jumps in the entire range of accessible temperatures. The ac response was measured in constant and swept dc magnetic field modes. Experiment shows that ac losses at low magnetic fields in a swept field mode are smaller for the patterned sample. For both samples the shapes of the field dependences of losses and the amplitude of the third harmonic are the same in constant and swept field near H c3. This similarity does not exist at low fields in a swept mode. PMID:27143621

  12. A self-powered AC magnetic sensor based on piezoelectric nanogenerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Aifang; Song, Ming; Zhang, Yan; Kou, Jinzong; Zhai, Junyi; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2014-11-01

    An AC magnetic field, which is a carrier of information, is distributed everywhere and is continuous. How to use and detect this field has been an ongoing topic over the past few decades. Conventional magnetic sensors are usually based on the Hall Effect, the fluxgate, a superconductor quantum interface or magnetoelectric or magnetoresistive sensing. Here, a flexible, simple, low-cost and self-powered active piezoelectric nanogenerator (NG) is successfully demonstrated as an AC magnetic field sensor at room temperature. The amplitude and frequency of a magnetic field can both be accurately sensed by the NG. The output voltage of the NG has a good linearity with a measured magnetic field. The detected minute magnetic field is as low as 1.2 × 10-7 tesla, which is 400 times greater than a commercial magnetic sensor that uses the Hall Effect. In comparison to the existing technologies, an NG is a room-temperature self-powered active sensor that is very simple and very cheap for practical applications.

  13. A self-powered AC magnetic sensor based on piezoelectric nanogenerator.

    PubMed

    Yu, Aifang; Song, Ming; Zhang, Yan; Kou, Jinzong; Zhai, Junyi; Lin Wang, Zhong

    2014-11-14

    An AC magnetic field, which is a carrier of information, is distributed everywhere and is continuous. How to use and detect this field has been an ongoing topic over the past few decades. Conventional magnetic sensors are usually based on the Hall Effect, the fluxgate, a superconductor quantum interface or magnetoelectric or magnetoresistive sensing. Here, a flexible, simple, low-cost and self-powered active piezoelectric nanogenerator (NG) is successfully demonstrated as an AC magnetic field sensor at room temperature. The amplitude and frequency of a magnetic field can both be accurately sensed by the NG. The output voltage of the NG has a good linearity with a measured magnetic field. The detected minute magnetic field is as low as 1.2 × 10(-7) tesla, which is 400 times greater than a commercial magnetic sensor that uses the Hall Effect. In comparison to the existing technologies, an NG is a room-temperature self-powered active sensor that is very simple and very cheap for practical applications. PMID:25333328

  14. A self-powered AC magnetic sensor based on piezoelectric nanogenerator.

    PubMed

    Yu, Aifang; Song, Ming; Zhang, Yan; Kou, Jinzong; Zhai, Junyi; Lin Wang, Zhong

    2014-11-14

    An AC magnetic field, which is a carrier of information, is distributed everywhere and is continuous. How to use and detect this field has been an ongoing topic over the past few decades. Conventional magnetic sensors are usually based on the Hall Effect, the fluxgate, a superconductor quantum interface or magnetoelectric or magnetoresistive sensing. Here, a flexible, simple, low-cost and self-powered active piezoelectric nanogenerator (NG) is successfully demonstrated as an AC magnetic field sensor at room temperature. The amplitude and frequency of a magnetic field can both be accurately sensed by the NG. The output voltage of the NG has a good linearity with a measured magnetic field. The detected minute magnetic field is as low as 1.2 × 10(-7) tesla, which is 400 times greater than a commercial magnetic sensor that uses the Hall Effect. In comparison to the existing technologies, an NG is a room-temperature self-powered active sensor that is very simple and very cheap for practical applications.

  15. New levitation scheme with AC superconducting magnet for EDS MAGLEV system

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.H.; Lee, J.K.; Hahn, S.Y.; Cha, G.

    1996-09-01

    This paper proposes a new magnetic levitation scheme which is able to generate levitation force for all speeds including a standstill. Auxiliary wheels which are needed in EDS MAGLEV vehicle can be eliminated. This scheme uses AC superconducting magnets to generate levitation force. In this paper, magnetic fields, forces and power dissipations generated by AC magnets moving above a conducting slab are calculated analytically. Results of calculation show characteristics of EDS system with AC magnet, such as levitation force and loss, are superior to those of EDS system with DC magnets for all speeds.

  16. Rapid magnetic microfluidic mixer utilizing AC electromagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Wen, Chih-Yung; Yeh, Cheng-Peng; Tsai, Chien-Hsiung; Fu, Lung-Ming

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents a novel simple micromixer based on stable water suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles (i.e. ferrofluids). The micromixer chip is built using standard microfabrication and simple soft lithography, and the design can be incorporated as a subsystem into any chemical microreactor or a miniaturized biological sensor. An electromagnet driven by an AC power source is used to induce transient interactive flows between a ferrofluid and Rhodamine B. The alternative magnetic field causes the ferrofluid to expand significantly and uniformly toward Rhodamine B, associated with a great number of extremely fine fingering structures on the interface in the upstream and downstream regions of the microchannel. These pronounced fingering patterns, which have not been observed by other active mixing methods utilizing only magnetic force, increase the mixing interfacial length dramatically. Along with the dominant diffusion effects occurring around the circumferential regions of the fine finger structures, the mixing efficiency increases significantly. The miscible fingering instabilities are observed and applied in the microfluidics for the first time. This work is carried with a view to developing functionalized ferrofluids that can be used as sensitive pathogen detectors and the present experimental results demonstrate that the proposed micromixer has excellent mixing capabilities. The mixing efficiency can be as high as 95% within 2.0 s and a distance of 3.0 mm from the inlet of the mixing channel, when the applied peak magnetic field is higher than 29.2 Oe and frequency ranges from 45 to 300 Hz. PMID:19921677

  17. Interlayer thermal conductivity of rubrene measured by ac-calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Brill, J. W.

    2013-07-01

    We have measured the interlayer thermal conductivity of crystals of the organic semiconductor rubrene, using ac-calorimetry. Since ac-calorimetry is most commonly used for measurements of the heat capacity, we include a discussion of its extension for measurements of the transverse thermal conductivity of thin crystals of poor thermal conductors, including the limitations of the technique. For rubrene, we find that the interlayer thermal conductivity, ≈0.7 mW/cm . K, is several times smaller than the (previously measured) in-layer value, but its temperature dependence indicates that the interlayer mean free path is at least a few layers.

  18. AC magnetic field losses in BSCCO-2223 superconducting tapes

    SciTech Connect

    Lelovic, M.; Mench, S.; Deis, T.

    1997-09-01

    The AC magnetic losses at power frequencies (60 Hz) were investigated for mono- and multifilament Ag-sheathed (Bi, Pb){sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} (BSCCO-2223) tapes with similar transport critical current (I{sub c}) values at 77 K. The multifilament sample exhibited higher losses than the monofilament under the same conditions. Loss peaks are discussed in terms of intergranular, intragranular and eddy current losses. Because of BSCCO`s anisotropy, field orientation has a large effect on the magnitude of these peaks, even at relatively small angles. Losses for fields applied parallel to the c-axis of the textured BSCCO grains are larger by more than one order of magnitude than those applied perpendicular.

  19. AC Loss Measurements on a 2G YBCO Coil

    SciTech Connect

    Rey, Christopher M; Duckworth, Robert C; Schwenterly, S W

    2011-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is collaborating with Waukesha Electric Systems (WES) to continue development of HTS power transformers. For compatibility with the existing power grid, a commercially viable HTS transformer will have to operate at high voltages in the range of 138 kV and above, and will have to withstand 550-kV impulse voltages as well. Second-generation (2G) YBCO coated conductors will be required for an economically-competitive design. In order to adequately size the refrigeration system for these transformers, the ac loss of these HTS coils must be characterized. Electrical AC loss measurements were conducted on a prototype high voltage (HV) coil with co-wound stainless steel at 60 Hz in a liquid nitrogen bath using a lock-in amplifier technique. The prototype HV coil consisted of 26 continuous (without splice) single pancake coils concentrically centered on a stainless steel former. For ac loss measurement purposes, voltage tap pairs were soldered across each set of two single pancake coils so that a total of 13 separate voltage measurements could be made across the entire length of the coil. AC loss measurements were taken as a function of ac excitation current. Results show that the loss is primarily concentrated at the ends of the coil where the operating fraction of critical current is the highest and show a distinct difference in current scaling of the losses between low current and high current regimes.

  20. Human/Nonhuman Primate AC-PC Ratio - Considerations for Translational Brain Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Fiandaca, Massimo S.; Salegio, Ernesto Aguilar; Yin, Dali; Richardson, R. Mark; Valles, Francisco E.; Larson, Paul S.; Starr, Philip A.; Lonser, Russell R.; Bankiewicz, Krystof S.

    2011-01-01

    This comparative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analysis evaluated the ratio of AC-PC (anterior commissure to posterior commissure) distance measures in selected groups of humans and nonhuman primates (NHPs). An understanding of the basis of this ratio between primate species may allow more accurate translation of NHP stereotactic targeting measurements to upcoming human trials. MRI datasets of adult humans [n=21], and juvenile and adult NHPs (Macaca fascicularis [n=40], and Macaca mulatta [n=32]), were evaluated in a mid-sagittal plane to obtain the AC-PC distance measure for each examined subject. Two trained evaluators, blinded to each other’s results, carried out three separate measurements of the AC-PC length for each subject. Each observer carried out measurements of the entire dataset [n=93] before repeating the measurements two additional times. Previous dataset measures were not available for review at the time of subsequent measures. Inter- and intra-observer variabilities were not statistically significant. Minimal intraspecies variation was found in the AC-PC measurement of our human and NHP groups. We found significant interspecies differences, however, more between humans and NHPs, and less between the NHP groups. Regression analysis confirms the strong linear relationship of AC-PC distance based primarily on species in our study groups. Human/NHP AC-PC ratios varied between 2.1 to 2.3 based on the compared NHP species groups. We conclude that the scale differences in brain measurements between NHPs and humans described in this study allows improved translation of stereotactic targeting coordinates in future human clinical trials, which may lead to improved efficacy and safety. PMID:21185868

  1. Magnetic nanoparticle thermometer: an investigation of minimum error transmission path and AC bias error.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhongzhou; Su, Rijian; Liu, Wenzhong; Huang, Zhixing

    2015-04-14

    The signal transmission module of a magnetic nanoparticle thermometer (MNPT) was established in this study to analyze the error sources introduced during the signal flow in the hardware system. The underlying error sources that significantly affected the precision of the MNPT were determined through mathematical modeling and simulation. A transfer module path with the minimum error in the hardware system was then proposed through the analysis of the variations of the system error caused by the significant error sources when the signal flew through the signal transmission module. In addition, a system parameter, named the signal-to-AC bias ratio (i.e., the ratio between the signal and AC bias), was identified as a direct determinant of the precision of the measured temperature. The temperature error was below 0.1 K when the signal-to-AC bias ratio was higher than 80 dB, and other system errors were not considered. The temperature error was below 0.1 K in the experiments with a commercial magnetic fluid (Sample SOR-10, Ocean Nanotechnology, Springdale, AR, USA) when the hardware system of the MNPT was designed with the aforementioned method.

  2. Magnetic Nanoparticle Thermometer: An Investigation of Minimum Error Transmission Path and AC Bias Error

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhongzhou; Su, Rijian; Liu, Wenzhong; Huang, Zhixing

    2015-01-01

    The signal transmission module of a magnetic nanoparticle thermometer (MNPT) was established in this study to analyze the error sources introduced during the signal flow in the hardware system. The underlying error sources that significantly affected the precision of the MNPT were determined through mathematical modeling and simulation. A transfer module path with the minimum error in the hardware system was then proposed through the analysis of the variations of the system error caused by the significant error sources when the signal flew through the signal transmission module. In addition, a system parameter, named the signal-to-AC bias ratio (i.e., the ratio between the signal and AC bias), was identified as a direct determinant of the precision of the measured temperature. The temperature error was below 0.1 K when the signal-to-AC bias ratio was higher than 80 dB, and other system errors were not considered. The temperature error was below 0.1 K in the experiments with a commercial magnetic fluid (Sample SOR-10, Ocean Nanotechnology, Springdale, AR, USA) when the hardware system of the MNPT was designed with the aforementioned method. PMID:25875188

  3. Vortex activation energy in the AC magnetic response of superconducting YBa2Cu3O7 thin films with complex pinning structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivan, I.; Ionescu, A. M.; Miu, D.; Mele, P.; Miu, L.

    2016-09-01

    The vortex activation energy U AC in the AC magnetic response of superconductors exhibits a logarithmic variation with the screening current density J (regardless of the pinning structure details), and takes surprisingly high values in the vicinity of the DC irreversibility line, especially at low external DC magnetic fields, as often reported. This is essentially different from the behaviour of the vortex-creep activation energy at long relaxation time scales in DC magnetic measurements, and is not completely understood. We investigated the DC relaxation and the AC response for YBa2Cu3O7 films containing nanorods and nanoparticles, with the DC and AC fields oriented perpendicular to the film surface. It is shown that the large U AC values in the vicinity of the DC irreversibility line, where the critical-state-related AC signal occurs, are generated by a non-diffusive vortex motion during the AC cycle, with the mean vortex hopping length longer than the average distance between the pinning centres. In these conditions, the smearing of the vortex pinning potential by thermally induced vortex fluctuations is weak, and U AC mainly results from the strong influence of the pinning-enhanced viscous drag on the vortex hopping process. The logarithmic U AC(J) dependence is consistent with a high U AC.

  4. Measurement of the 225Ac half-life.

    PubMed

    Pommé, S; Marouli, M; Suliman, G; Dikmen, H; Van Ammel, R; Jobbágy, V; Dirican, A; Stroh, H; Paepen, J; Bruchertseifer, F; Apostolidis, C; Morgenstern, A

    2012-11-01

    The (225)Ac half-life was determined by measuring the activity of (225)Ac sources as a function of time, using various detection techniques: α-particle counting with a planar silicon detector at a defined small solid angle and in a nearly-2π geometry, 4πα+β counting with a windowless CsI sandwich spectrometer and with a pressurised proportional counter, gamma-ray spectrometry with a HPGe detector and with a NaI(Tl) well detector. Depending on the technique, the decay was followed for 59-141 d, which is about 6-14 times the (225)Ac half-life. The six measurement results were in good mutual agreement and their mean value is T(1/2)((225)Ac)=9.920 (3)d. This half-life value is more precise and better documented than the currently recommended value of 10.0 d, based on two old measurements lacking uncertainty evaluations.

  5. Measurement of the 225Ac half-life.

    PubMed

    Pommé, S; Marouli, M; Suliman, G; Dikmen, H; Van Ammel, R; Jobbágy, V; Dirican, A; Stroh, H; Paepen, J; Bruchertseifer, F; Apostolidis, C; Morgenstern, A

    2012-11-01

    The (225)Ac half-life was determined by measuring the activity of (225)Ac sources as a function of time, using various detection techniques: α-particle counting with a planar silicon detector at a defined small solid angle and in a nearly-2π geometry, 4πα+β counting with a windowless CsI sandwich spectrometer and with a pressurised proportional counter, gamma-ray spectrometry with a HPGe detector and with a NaI(Tl) well detector. Depending on the technique, the decay was followed for 59-141 d, which is about 6-14 times the (225)Ac half-life. The six measurement results were in good mutual agreement and their mean value is T(1/2)((225)Ac)=9.920 (3)d. This half-life value is more precise and better documented than the currently recommended value of 10.0 d, based on two old measurements lacking uncertainty evaluations. PMID:22940415

  6. dc and ac magnetic properties of thin-walled Nb cylinders with and without a row of antidots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsindlekht, M. I.; Genkin, V. M.; Felner, I.; Zeides, F.; Katz, N.; Gazi, Š.; Chromik, Š.; Dobrovolskiy, O. V.; Sachser, R.; Huth, M.

    2016-06-01

    dc and ac magnetic properties of two thin-walled superconducting Nb cylinders with a rectangular cross-section are reported. Magnetization curves and the ac response were studied on as-prepared and patterned samples in magnetic fields parallel to the cylinder axis. A row of micron-sized antidots (holes) was made in the film along the cylinder axis. Avalanche-like jumps of the magnetization are observed for both samples at low temperatures for magnetic fields not only above H c1, but in fields lower than H c1 in the vortex-free region. The positions of the jumps are not reproducible and they change from one experiment to another, resembling vortex lattice instabilities usually observed for magnetic fields larger than H c1. At temperatures above 0.66{{T}\\text{c}} and 0.78{{T}\\text{c}} the magnetization curves become smooth for the patterned and the as-prepared samples, respectively. The magnetization curve of a reference planar Nb film in the parallel field geometry does not exhibit jumps in the entire range of accessible temperatures. The ac response was measured in constant and swept dc magnetic field modes. Experiment shows that ac losses at low magnetic fields in a swept field mode are smaller for the patterned sample. For both samples the shapes of the field dependences of losses and the amplitude of the third harmonic are the same in constant and swept field near H c3. This similarity does not exist at low fields in a swept mode.

  7. Heat Capacity Measurements by Simultaneous Relaxation and AC-Calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashuri, H.; Kashuri, K.; Iannacchione, G. S.

    2012-02-01

    A high-resolution method for measuring the heat capacity Cp using simultaneously AC and Relaxation Calorimetry techniques has been developed. This technique is useful for both first and second-order phase transitions of liquids and complex fluids. The difference of the Cp's measured by the Relaxation and AC calorimetry is a direct measurement of a phase transitions' latent heat. As a test, the Cp of two cyanobiphenyl liquid crystals, 5CB and 8CB, were measured using a square wave modulation pulse train over a base temperature range from 300 to 320 K in which 5CB exhibits a first-order phase transition and 8CB exhibits a first and second-order phase transition. Fourier transform analysis allows for the direct Cp measurement at the fundamental frequency of the square wave pulse train (as well as higher frequency orders) as function of temperature (i.e., AC-mode). The heating and cooling relaxations at the beginning and end of the square pulse heating allows for a relaxation analysis of Cp by applying the dual slope-method that includes all enthalpic conversions.

  8. Waveform magnetic field survey in Russian DC and Swiss AC powered trains: a basis for biologically relevant exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Ptitsyna, N G; Kopytenko, Y A; Villoresi, G; Pfluger, D H; Ismaguilov, V; Iucci, N; Kopytenko, E A; Zaitzev, D B; Voronov, P M; Tyasto, M I

    2003-12-01

    Recent epidemiological studies suggest a link between transport magnetic fields (MF) and certain adverse health effects. We performed measurements in workplaces of engineers on Russian DC and Swiss AC powered (16.67 Hz) electric trains using a computer based waveform capture system with a 200 Hz sampling rate. MF in DC and AC trains show complex combinations of static and varying components. The most probable levels of quasistatic MF (0.001-0.03 Hz) were in the range 40 microT. Maximum levels of 120 microT were found in DC powered locomotives. These levels are much higher than the geomagnetic field at the site of measurements. MF encountered both in DC and AC powered rail systems showed irregular temporal variability in frequency composition and amplitude characteristics across the whole frequency range studied (0-50 Hz); however, more than 90% of the magnetic field power was concentrated in frequencies AC locomotives, such as the most popular engine Re 4/4 II, the major energy falls around the fundamental frequency 16.67 Hz, with an average magnetic field intensity of about 44 microT; moreover, a significant contribution (about 15%) is due to components below the fundamental frequency. In Russian DC powered trains amplitudes of field variations sharply decrease from static to approximately 3-4 Hz fields; for higher frequencies a tendency of slow decrease is observed up to 50 Hz. For frequencies higher than 1 Hz average amplitudes of magnetic field variations are less than 1 microT; maximum levels reach tens of microtesla. At frequencies lower than 15 Hz, the average magnetic field generated by Swiss AC powered locomotives was approximately 10 times greater than fields observed in Russian DC powered trains.

  9. Size-Dependent Relaxation Properties of Monodisperse Magnetite Nanoparticles Measured Over Seven Decades of Frequency by AC Susceptometry.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, R Matthew; Khandhar, Amit P; Jonasson, Christian; Blomgren, Jakob; Johansson, Christer; Krishnan, Kannan M

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic relaxation is exploited in innovative biomedical applications of magnetic particles such as magnetic particle imaging (MPI), magnetic fluid hyperthermia, and bio-sensing. Relaxation behavior should be optimized to achieve high performance imaging, efficient heating, and good SNR in bio-sensing. Using two AC susceptometers with overlapping frequency ranges, we have measured the relaxation behavior of a series of monodisperse magnetic particles and demonstrated that this approach is an effective way to probe particle relaxation characteristics from a few Hz to 10 MHz, the frequencies relevant for MPI, hyperthermia, and sensing. PMID:25473124

  10. Magnet measurement workshop

    SciTech Connect

    1986-12-01

    This report covers the deliberations of the participants the workshop and some subsequent contributions. Section III, the report of the rotating coil group, includes a summary table of the major measuring systems in use today, with separate sections on each. Section IV is the summary report of the group that addressed other measuring techniques. Because one of the limits of all the techniques being considered is electronic data acquisition, Section V addresses this topic. A set of issues relevant to magnetic field measurements of SSC dipoles was raised and addressed during the workshop. These are included as Section VI. Section VII includes a complete list of attendees with their addresses and a separate list of the members of the two working groups.

  11. Rotor position sensing in brushless ac motors with self-shielding magnets using linear Hall sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Z. Q.; Shi, Y. F.; Howe, D.

    2006-04-01

    This paper investigates the use of low cost linear Hall sensors for rotor position sensing in brushless ac motors equipped with self-shielding magnets, addresses practical issues, such as the influence of magnetic and mechanical tolerances, temperature variations, and the armature reaction field, and describes the performance which is achieved.

  12. Direct Detection of Pure ac Spin Current by X-Ray Pump-Probe Measurements.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Shelford, L R; Shafer, P; Tan, A; Deng, J X; Keatley, P S; Hwang, C; Arenholz, E; van der Laan, G; Hicken, R J; Qiu, Z Q

    2016-08-12

    Despite recent progress in spin-current research, the detection of spin current has mostly remained indirect. By synchronizing a microwave waveform with synchrotron x-ray pulses, we use the ferromagnetic resonance of the Py (Ni_{81}Fe_{19}) layer in a Py/Cu/Cu_{75}Mn_{25}/Cu/Co multilayer to pump a pure ac spin current into the Cu_{75}Mn_{25} and Co layers, and then directly probe the spin current within the Cu_{75}Mn_{25} layer and the spin dynamics of the Co layer by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. This element-resolved pump-probe measurement unambiguously identifies the ac spin current in the Cu_{75}Mn_{25} layer. PMID:27563981

  13. Direct Detection of Pure ac Spin Current by X-Ray Pump-Probe Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Shelford, L. R.; Shafer, P.; Tan, A.; Deng, J. X.; Keatley, P. S.; Hwang, C.; Arenholz, E.; van der Laan, G.; Hicken, R. J.; Qiu, Z. Q.

    2016-08-01

    Despite recent progress in spin-current research, the detection of spin current has mostly remained indirect. By synchronizing a microwave waveform with synchrotron x-ray pulses, we use the ferromagnetic resonance of the Py (Ni81Fe19 ) layer in a Py /Cu /Cu75Mn25/Cu /Co multilayer to pump a pure ac spin current into the Cu75Mn25 and Co layers, and then directly probe the spin current within the Cu75Mn25 layer and the spin dynamics of the Co layer by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. This element-resolved pump-probe measurement unambiguously identifies the ac spin current in the Cu75Mn25 layer.

  14. ac impedance measurements of molten salt thermal batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Pritpal; Guidotti, Ronald A.; Reisner c, David

    Non-destructive testing of thermal batteries without activating them is a challenging proposition. Molten salt thermal batteries are activated by raising their temperature to above the melting point of the salt constituting the electrolyte. One approach that we have considered is to raise the temperature of the molten salt electrolyte to a temperature below the melting point so that the battery does not get activated yet may provide sufficient mobility of the ionic species to be able to obtain some useful ac impedance measurements. This hypothesis was put to the test for two Li(Si)/FeS 2 molten salt batteries with two electrolytes of different melting points—a standard LiCl-KCl eutectic that melts at 352 °C and a LiBr-KBr-LiCl eutectic with a melting point of 319 °C. ac impedance measurements as a function of frequency and temperature below the melting point are presented for single cells and batteries.

  15. Encouragement of Enzyme Reaction Utilizing Heat Generation from Ferromagnetic Particles Subjected to an AC Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masashi; Aki, Atsushi; Mizuki, Toru; Maekawa, Toru; Usami, Ron; Morimoto, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method of activating an enzyme utilizing heat generation from ferromagnetic particles under an ac magnetic field. We immobilize α-amylase on the surface of ferromagnetic particles and analyze its activity. We find that when α-amylase/ferromagnetic particle hybrids, that is, ferromagnetic particles, on which α-amylase molecules are immobilized, are subjected to an ac magnetic field, the particles generate heat and as a result, α-amylase on the particles is heated up and activated. We next prepare a solution, in which α-amylase/ferromagnetic particle hybrids and free, nonimmobilized chitinase are dispersed, and analyze their activities. We find that when the solution is subjected to an ac magnetic field, the activity of α-amylase immobilized on the particles increases, whereas that of free chitinase hardly changes; in other words, only α-amylase immobilized on the particles is selectively activated due to heat generation from the particles. PMID:25993268

  16. Encouragement of Enzyme Reaction Utilizing Heat Generation from Ferromagnetic Particles Subjected to an AC Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masashi; Aki, Atsushi; Mizuki, Toru; Maekawa, Toru; Usami, Ron; Morimoto, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method of activating an enzyme utilizing heat generation from ferromagnetic particles under an ac magnetic field. We immobilize α-amylase on the surface of ferromagnetic particles and analyze its activity. We find that when α-amylase/ferromagnetic particle hybrids, that is, ferromagnetic particles, on which α-amylase molecules are immobilized, are subjected to an ac magnetic field, the particles generate heat and as a result, α-amylase on the particles is heated up and activated. We next prepare a solution, in which α-amylase/ferromagnetic particle hybrids and free, nonimmobilized chitinase are dispersed, and analyze their activities. We find that when the solution is subjected to an ac magnetic field, the activity of α-amylase immobilized on the particles increases, whereas that of free chitinase hardly changes; in other words, only α-amylase immobilized on the particles is selectively activated due to heat generation from the particles.

  17. Hard permanent magnet development trends and their application to A.C. machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mildrum, H. F.

    1981-01-01

    The physical and magnetic properties of Mn-Al-C, Fe-Cr-Co, and RE-TM (rare earth-transition metal intermetallics) in polymer and soft metal bonded or sintered form are considered for ac circuit machine usage. The manufacturing processes for the magnetic materials are reviewed, and the mechanical and electrical properties of the magnetic materials are compared, with consideration given to the reference Alnico magnet. The Mn-Al-C magnets have the same magnetic properties and costs as Alnico units, operate well at low temperatures, but have poor high temperature performance. Fe-Cr-Co magnets also have comparable cost to Alnico magnets, and operate at high or low temperature, but are brittle, expensive, and contain Co. RE-Co magnets possess a high energy density, operate well in a wide temperature range, and are expensive. Recommendation for exploring the rare-earth alternatives are offered.

  18. Nonlinear ac stationary response and dynamic magnetic hysteresis of quantum uniaxial superparamagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmykov, Yuri P.; Titov, Serguey V.; Coffey, William T.

    2015-11-01

    The nonlinear ac stationary response of uniaxial paramagnets and superparamagnets—nanoscale solids or clusters with spin number S ˜100-104 —in superimposed uniform ac and dc bias magnetic fields of arbitrary strength, each applied along the easy axis of magnetization, is determined by solving the evolution equation for the reduced density matrix represented as a finite set of three-term differential-recurrence relations for its diagonal matrix elements. The various harmonic components arising from the nonlinear response of the magnetization, dynamic magnetic hysteresis loops, etc., are then evaluated via matrix continued fractions indicating a pronounced dependence of the response on S arising from the quantum spin dynamics, which differ markedly from the magnetization dynamics of classical nanomagnets. In the linear response approximation, the results concur with existing solutions.

  19. Highly sensitive parylene membrane-based ac-calorimeter for small mass magnetic samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopeandia, A. F.; André, E.; Garden, J.-L.; Givord, D.; Bourgeois, O.

    2010-05-01

    We report the microfabrication and operation of a highly sensitive ac-calorimeter designed to characterize small mass magnetic systems operating at very low frequencies (from 0.1 to 5 Hz) in a temperature range from 20 to 300 K. The calorimetric cell is built in the center of a 500 nm thick polymeric membrane of parylene C held up by a Cu frame. On both sides of the membrane defining a three layer structure, electrical leads, heater, and thermometer are deposited as thin film layers of NbNx, with different nitrogen contents, taking benefit of the poor thermal conductance of niobium nitride to thermally isolate the system. This suspended structure ensures very low heat capacity addenda with values in the μJ/K over the 1 mm2 area of the measurement cell. The structuring of the membrane along with suspending of the sensing part only by the parylene bridges leads to a highly reduced thermal link. The calorimeter has been characterized as a function of frequency, temperature, and magnetic field. The thermal link measured is really small reaching values well below 10-8 W/K at 50 K. With these characteristics the frequency of adiabaticity is typically around few hertz and energy exchanges as small as 1 pJ can be detected. Measurements have been performed on Co/Au thin films and on the GdAl2 microcrystal where the ferromagnetic phase transition is clearly evidenced.

  20. ac current generation in chiral magnetic insulators and Skyrmion motion induced by the spin Seebeck effect.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shi-Zeng; Batista, Cristian D; Reichhardt, Charles; Saxena, Avadh

    2014-05-01

    We show that a temperature gradient induces an ac electric current in multiferroic insulators when the sample is embedded in a circuit. We also show that a thermal gradient can be used to move magnetic Skyrmions in insulating chiral magnets: the induced magnon flow from the hot to the cold region drives the Skyrmions in the opposite direction via a magnonic spin transfer torque. Both results are combined to compute the effect of Skyrmion motion on the ac current generation and demonstrate that Skyrmions in insulators are a promising route for spin caloritronics applications.

  1. ac current generation in chiral magnetic insulators and Skyrmion motion induced by the spin Seebeck effect.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shi-Zeng; Batista, Cristian D; Reichhardt, Charles; Saxena, Avadh

    2014-05-01

    We show that a temperature gradient induces an ac electric current in multiferroic insulators when the sample is embedded in a circuit. We also show that a thermal gradient can be used to move magnetic Skyrmions in insulating chiral magnets: the induced magnon flow from the hot to the cold region drives the Skyrmions in the opposite direction via a magnonic spin transfer torque. Both results are combined to compute the effect of Skyrmion motion on the ac current generation and demonstrate that Skyrmions in insulators are a promising route for spin caloritronics applications. PMID:24856718

  2. Environmental applications of magnetic measurements.

    PubMed

    Thompson, R; Stober, J C; Turner, G M; Oldfield, F; Bloemendal, J; Dearing, J A; Rummery, T A

    1980-02-01

    A wide range of examples of the application of magnetic measurements to environmental studies illustrate the advantages of magnetic techniques over conventional methods. Magnetic measurements, in both the field and the laboratory, are particularly useful for reconnaissance work because of their spee and flexibility, Quantification as well as simple diagnosis of the transformation and movement of magnetic minerals within and between the atmosphere, lithosphere, and hydrosphere is practical. Techniques of investigating intrinsic and mineral magnetic properties, in addition to paleomagnetic remanence, are described in subjects as diverse as meteorology, hydrology, sedimentology, geophysics, and ecology. PMID:17795619

  3. Absorption and Attenuation Coefficients Using the WET Labs ac-s in the Mid-Atlantic Bight: Field Measurements and Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohi, Nobuaki; Makinen, Carla P.; Mitchell, Richard; Moisan, Tiffany A.

    2008-01-01

    Ocean color algorithms are based on the parameterization of apparent optical properties as a function of inherent optical properties. WET Labs underwater absorption and attenuation meters (ac-9 and ac-s) measure both the spectral beam attenuation [c (lambda)] and absorption coefficient [a (lambda)]. The ac-s reports in a continuous range of 390-750 nm with a band pass of 4 nm, totaling approximately 83 distinct wavelengths, while the ac-9 reports at 9 wavelengths. We performed the ac-s field measurements at nine stations in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from water calibrations to data analysis. Onboard the ship, the ac-s was calibrated daily using Milli Q-water. Corrections for the in situ temperature and salinity effects on optical properties of water were applied. Corrections for incomplete recovery of the scattered light in the ac-s absorption tube were performed. The fine scale of spectral and vertical distributions of c (lambda) and a (lambda) were described from the ac-s. The significant relationships between a (674) and that of spectrophotometric analysis and chlorophyll a concentration of discrete water samples were observed.

  4. Measurements of magnetic field alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchnir, M.; Schmidt, E.E.

    1987-11-06

    The procedure for installing Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipoles in their respective cryostats involves aligning the average direction of their field with the vertical to an accuracy of 0.5 mrad. The equipment developed for carrying on these measurements is described and the measurements performed on the first few prototypes SSC magnets are presented. The field angle as a function of position in these 16.6 m long magnets is a characteristic of the individual magnet with possible feedback information to its manufacturing procedure. A comparison of this vertical alignment characteristic with a magnetic field intensity (by NMR) characteristic for one of the prototypes is also presented. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Electroporation of cells using EM induction of ac fields by a magnetic stimulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Evans, J. A.; Robinson, M. P.; Smye, S. W.; O'Toole, P.

    2010-02-01

    This paper describes a method of effectively electroporating mammalian cell membranes with pulsed alternating-current (ac) electric fields at field strengths of 30-160 kV m-1. Although many in vivo electroporation protocols entail applying square wave or monotonically decreasing pulses via needles or electrode plates, relatively few have explored the use of pulsed ac fields. Following our previous study, which established the effectiveness of ac fields for electroporating cell membranes, a primary/secondary coil system was constructed to produce sufficiently strong electric fields by electromagnetic induction. The primary coil was formed from the applicator of an established transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) system, while the secondary coil was a purpose-built device of a design which could eventually be implanted into tissue. The effects of field strength, pulse interval and cumulative exposure time were investigated using microscopy and flow cytometry. Results from experiments on concentrated cell suspensions showed an optimized electroporation efficiency of around 50%, demonstrating that electroporation can be practicably achieved by inducing such pulsed ac fields. This finding confirms the possibility of a wide range of in vivo applications based on magnetically coupled ac electroporation.

  6. Numerical and theoretical evaluations of AC losses for single and infinite numbers of superconductor strips with direct and alternating transport currents in external AC magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajikawa, K.; Funaki, K.; Shikimachi, K.; Hirano, N.; Nagaya, S.

    2010-11-01

    AC losses in a superconductor strip are numerically evaluated by means of a finite element method formulated with a current vector potential. The expressions of AC losses in an infinite slab that corresponds to a simple model of infinitely stacked strips are also derived theoretically. It is assumed that the voltage-current characteristics of the superconductors are represented by Bean’s critical state model. The typical operation pattern of a Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) coil with direct and alternating transport currents in an external AC magnetic field is taken into account as the electromagnetic environment for both the single strip and the infinite slab. By using the obtained results of AC losses, the influences of the transport currents on the total losses are discussed quantitatively.

  7. The Measurement of Magnetic Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berridge, H. J. J.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses five experimental methods used by senior high school students to provide an accurate calibration curve of magnet current against the magnetic flux density produced by an electromagnet. Compares the relative merits of the five methods, both as measurements and from an educational viewpoint. (JR)

  8. Study of the Dependency on Magnetic Field and Bias Voltage of an AC-Biased TES Microcalorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottardi, L.; Bruijn, M.; denHartog, R.; Hoevers, H.; deKorte, P.; vanderKuur, J.; Linderman, M.; Adams, J.; Bailey, C.; Bandler, S.; Chervenak, J.; Eckart, M.; Finkbeiner, F.; Kelley, R.; Kilbourne, C.; Porter, F.; Sadlier, J.; Smith, S.

    2012-01-01

    At SRON we are studying the performance of a Goddard Space Flight Center single pixel TES microcalorimeter operated in an AC bias configuration. For x-ray photons at 6 keV the pixel shows an x-ray energy resolution Delta E(sub FWHM) = 3.7 eV, which is about a factor 2 worse than the energy resolution observed in an identical DC-biased pixel. In order to better understand the reasons for this discrepancy we characterized the detector as a function of temperature, bias working point and applied perpendicular magnetic field. A strong periodic dependency of the detector noise on the TES AC bias voltage is measured. We discuss the results in the framework of the recently observed weak-link behaviour of a TES microcalorimeter.

  9. New Technique of AC drive in Tokamak using Permanent Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteucci, Jackson; Zolfaghari, Ali

    2013-10-01

    This study investigates a new technique of capturing the rotational energy of alternating permanent magnets in order to inductively drive an alternating current in tokamak devices. The use of rotational motion bypasses many of the pitfalls seen in typical inductive and non-inductive current drives. Three specific designs are presented and assessed in the following criteria: the profile of the current generated, the RMS loop voltage generated as compared to the RMS power required to maintain it, the system's feasibility from an engineering perspective. All of the analysis has been done under ideal E&M conditions using the Maxwell 3D program. Preliminary results indicate that it is possible to produce an over 99% purely toroidal current with a RMS d Φ/dt of over 150 Tm2/s, driven by 20 MW or less of rotational power. The proposed mechanism demonstrates several key advantages including an efficient mechanical drive system, the generation of pure toroidal currents, and the potential for a quasi-steady state fusion reactor. The following quantities are presented for various driving frequencies and magnet strengths: plasma current generated, loop voltage, torque and power required. This project has been supported by DOE Funding under the SULI program.

  10. Consistent behaviour of AC susceptibility and transport properties in magnetic superconductor RuSr 2GdCu 2O 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Očko, M.; Živkovic, I.; Prester, M.; Drobac, Dj.; Ariosa, D.; Berger, H.; Pavuna, D.

    2004-02-01

    We report on AC susceptibility, resistivity, thermopower and measurements of sintered magnetic superconductor RuSr 2GdCu 2O 8. The antiferromagnetic phase transition at 133 K is seen clearly in the AC susceptibility as well as in the derivative of resistivity and thermopower. Above the antiferromagnetic transition, we have found some new evidences of the similarity between HTC compounds and the magnetic superconductor. The onset of superconductivity is observed by both transport methods at 46 K, and an explanation why it is not seen in the AC susceptibility data is given. The end of the SC transition occurs at about 24 K in all measured properties. We discuss the steps of broad SC transition, especially the maximum in susceptibility at 34 K, and compare our results with related studies reported in the literature.

  11. The Measure of the Magnet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Steve

    1987-01-01

    Describes a hands-on lesson in magnetism designed to be used with upper elementary grade students. Emphasizes structured experiences which involve the student in measuring, data collecting, graphing, and extrapolating information. (TW)

  12. Measuring Earth's Magnetic Field Simply.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Gay B.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a method for measuring the earth's magnetic field using an empty toilet paper tube, copper wire, clear tape, a battery, a linear variable resistor, a small compass, cardboard, a protractor, and an ammeter. (WRM)

  13. Super-resolution high sensitivity AC Magnetic Field Imaging with NV Centers in Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauch, Erik; Jaskula, Jean-Christophe; Trifonov, Alexei; Walsworth, Ronald

    2015-05-01

    The Nitrogen-Vacancy center in diamond (NV center), a defect consisting of a nitrogen atom next to a missing atom, has been successfully applied to sense magnetic field, electric field, temperature and can also be used as fluorescence marker and single photon emitter. We will present super-resolution imaging of NV centers and simultaneous sensing of AC magnetic fields with high sensitivity. To demonstrate the applicability of super-resolution magnetic field imaging, we resolve several NV centers with an optical resolution smaller than 20 nm and probe locally the gradient of a externally applied magnetic field. Additionally, we demonstrate the detection of magnetic field signals from 1H protons with subdiffraction image resolution. We will also show that our super-resolution magnetometer will benefit from a new readout method based on a spin-to-charge mapping that we have developed to increase the readout contrast.

  14. Late gadolinium enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance of lamin A/C gene mutation related dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to identify early features of lamin A/C gene mutation related dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). We characterise myocardial and functional findings in carriers of lamin A/C mutation to facilitate the recognition of these patients using this method. We also investigated the connection between myocardial fibrosis and conduction abnormalities. Methods Seventeen lamin A/C mutation carriers underwent CMR. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and cine images were performed to evaluate myocardial fibrosis, regional wall motion, longitudinal myocardial function, global function and volumetry of both ventricles. The location, pattern and extent of enhancement in the left ventricle (LV) myocardium were visually estimated. Results Patients had LV myocardial fibrosis in 88% of cases. Segmental wall motion abnormalities correlated strongly with the degree of enhancement. Myocardial enhancement was associated with conduction abnormalities. Sixty-nine percent of our asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic patients showed mild ventricular dilatation, systolic failure or both in global ventricular analysis. Decreased longitudinal systolic LV function was observed in 53% of patients. Conclusions Cardiac conduction abnormalities, mildly dilated LV and depressed systolic dysfunction are common in DCM caused by a lamin A/C gene mutation. However, other cardiac diseases may produce similar symptoms. CMR is an accurate tool to determine the typical cardiac involvement in lamin A/C cardiomyopathy and may help to initiate early treatment in this malignant familiar form of DCM. PMID:21689390

  15. Why an ac magnetic field shifts the irreversibility line in type-II superconductors.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Ernst Helmut; Mikitik, Grigorii P

    2002-07-01

    We show that for a thin superconducting strip placed in a transverse dc magnetic field--the typical geometry of experiments with high-T(c) superconductors--the application of a weak ac magnetic field perpendicular to the dc field generates a dc voltage in the strip. This voltage leads to the decay of the critical currents circulating in the strip, and eventually the equilibrium state of the superconductor is established. This relaxation is not due to thermally activated flux creep but to the "walking" motion of vortices in the two-dimensional critical state of the strip with in-plane ac field. Our theory explains the shaking effect that was used for detecting phase transitions of the vortex lattice in superconductors.

  16. Advanced AC permanent magnet axial flux disc motor for electric passenger vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kliman, G. B.

    1982-01-01

    An ac permanent magnet axial flux disc motor was developed to operate with a thyristor load commutated inverter as part of an electric vehicle drive system. The motor was required to deliver 29.8 kW (40 hp) peak and 10.4 kW (14 hp) average with a maximum speed of 11,000 rpm. It was also required to run at leading power factor to commutate the inverter. Three motors were built.

  17. Gastrointestinal transit and disintegration of enteric coated magnetic tablets assessed by ac biosusceptometry.

    PubMed

    Corá, Luciana A; Romeiro, Fernando G; Américo, Madileine F; Oliveira, Ricardo Brandt; Baffa, Oswaldo; Stelzer, Murilo; Miranda, José Ricardo de Arruda

    2006-01-01

    The oral administration is a common route in the drug therapy and the solid pharmaceutical forms are widely used. Although much about the performance of these formulations can be learned from in vitro studies using conventional methods, evaluation in vivo is essential in product development. The knowledge of the gastrointestinal transit and how the physiological variables can interfere with the disintegration and drug absorption is a prerequisite for development of dosage forms. The aim of this work was to employing the ac biosusceptometry (ACB) to monitoring magnetic tablets in the human gastrointestinal tract and to obtain the magnetic images of the disintegration process in the colonic region. The ac biosusceptometry showed accuracy in the quantification of the gastric residence time, the intestinal transit time and the disintegration time (DT) of the magnetic formulations in the human gastrointestinal tract. Moreover, ac biosusceptometry is a non-invasive technique, radiation-free and harmless to the volunteers, as well as an important research tool in the pharmaceutical, pharmacological and physiological investigations.

  18. Superconductor-Mediated Modification of Gravity? AC Motor Experiments with Bulk YBCO Disks in Rotating Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.; Koczor, Ronald J.; Roberson, Rick

    1998-01-01

    We have previously reported results using a high precision gravimeter to probe local gravity changes in the neighborhood of large bulk-processed high-temperature superconductors. Podkietnov, et al (Podkietnov, E. and Nieminen, R. (1992) A Possibility of Gravitational Force Shielding by Bulk YBa2 Cu3 O7-x Superconductor, Physica C, C203:441-444.) have indicated that rotating AC fields play an essential role in their observed distortion of combined gravity and barometric pressure readings. We report experiments on large (15 cm diameter) bulk YBCO ceramic superconductors placed in the core of a three-phase, AC motor stator. The applied rotating field produces up to a 12,000 revolutions per minute magnetic field. The field intensity decays rapidly from the maximum at the outer diameter of the superconducting disk (less than 60 Gauss) to the center (less than 10 Gauss). This configuration was applied with and without a permanent DC magnetic field levitating the superconducting disk, with corresponding gravity readings indicating an apparent increase in observed gravity of less than 1 x 10(exp -6)/sq cm, measured above the superconductor. No effect of the rotating magnetic field or thermal environment on the gravimeter readings or on rotating the superconducting disk was noted within the high precision of the observation. Implications for propulsion initiatives and power storage flywheel technologies for high temperature superconductors will be discussed for various spacecraft and satellite applications.

  19. Measurement of Nanoparticle Magnetic Hyperthermia Using Fluorescent Microthermal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiaowan; van Keuren, Edward

    Nanoparticle magnetic hyperthermia uses the application of an AC magnetic field to ferromagnetic nanoparticles to elevate the temperature of cancer cells. The principle of hyperthermia as a true cell-specific therapy is that tumor cells are more sensitive to high temperature, so it is of great importance to control the locality and magnitude of the temperature differences. One technique to measure temperature variations on microscopic length scales is fluorescent microthermal imaging (FMI). Since it is the local temperature that is measured in FMI, effects such as heating due to nearby field coils can be accounted for. A dye, the rare earth chelate europium thenoyltrifluoroacetonate (Eu:TTA), with a strong temperature-dependent fluorescence emission has been incorporated into magnetic nanoparticles dispersed in a polymer films. FMI experiments were carried out on these samples under an applied high frequency magnetic field. Preliminary results show that FMI is a promising technique for characterizing the local generation of heat in nanoparticle magnetic hyperthermia.

  20. Calculating transport AC losses in stacks of high temperature superconductor coated conductors with magnetic substrates using FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ainslie, Mark D.; Flack, Tim J.; Campbell, Archie M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the authors investigate the electromagnetic properties of stacks of high temperature superconductor (HTS) coated conductors with a particular focus on calculating the total transport AC loss. The cross-section of superconducting cables and coils is often modeled as a two-dimensional stack of coated conductors, and these stacks can be used to estimate the AC loss of a practical device. This paper uses a symmetric two dimensional (2D) finite element model based on the H formulation, and a detailed investigation into the effects of a magnetic substrate on the transport AC loss of a stack is presented. The number of coated conductors in each stack is varied from 1 to 150, and three types of substrate are compared: non-magnetic weakly magnetic and strongly magnetic. The non-magnetic substrate model is comparable with results from existing models for the limiting cases of a single tape (Norris) and an infinite stack (Clem). The presence of a magnetic substrate increases the total AC loss of the stack, due to an increased localized magnetic flux density, and the stronger the magnetic material, the further the flux penetrates into the stack overall. The AC loss is calculated for certain tapes within the stack, and the differences and similarities between the losses throughout the stack are explained using the magnetic flux penetration and current density distributions in those tapes. The ferromagnetic loss of the substrate itself is found to be negligible in most cases, except for small magnitudes of current. Applying these findings to practical applications, where AC transport current is involved, superconducting coils should be wound where possible using coated conductors with a non-magnetic substrate to reduce the total AC loss in the coil.

  1. Mu2e Magnetic Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Buehler, Marc; Tartaglia, Michael; Tompkins, John; Orozco, Charles

    2014-07-01

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab is designed to explore charged lepton flavor violation by searching for muon-to-electron conversion. The magnetic field generated by a system of solenoids is crucial for Mu2e and requires accurate characterization to detect any flaws and to produce a detailed field map. Stringent physics goals are driving magnetic field specifications for the Mu2e solenoids. A field mapper is being designed, which will produce detailed magnetic field maps. The uniform field region of the spectrometer volume requires the highest level of precision (1 Gauss per 1 Tesla). During commissioning, multiple magnetic field maps will be generated to verify proper alignment of all magnet coils, and to create the final magnetic field map. In order to design and build a precise field mapping system consisting of Hall and NRM probes, tolerances and precision for such a system need to be evaluated. In this paper we present a design for the Mu2e field mapping hardware, and discuss results from OPERA-3D simulations to specify parameters for Hall and NMR probes. We also present a fitting procedure for the analytical treatment of our expected magnetic measurements.

  2. Determination of the magnetic ground state in the martensite phase of Ni-Mn-Z (Z = In, Sn and Sb) off-stoichiometric Heusler alloys by nonlinear AC susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Umetsu, R Y; Fujita, A; Ito, W; Kanomata, T; Kainuma, R

    2011-08-17

    DC and AC magnetic measurements were carried out to clarify the difference in the magnetic ground state depending on the kinds of Z element used in the martensite phase in Ni-Mn-Z (Z = In, Sn and Sb) off-stoichiometric Heusler alloys. Magnetic field cooling effects were observed in the DC thermomagnetization curves in the low temperature regions, and a frequency dependence on AC susceptibility was also observed in both real and imaginary parts of the susceptibility. Negative divergence was clearly observed in nonlinear AC susceptibility only for the Ni(50)Mn(40)Sb(10) alloy, suggesting that the magnetic feature of its ground state is the spin-glass state. The magnetic ground state of the martensite phase in these alloys would relate to the magnetic configuration of the Mn atoms in the ferromagnetic austenite phase.

  3. AC transport in p-Ge/GeSi quantum well in high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Drichko, I. L.; Malysh, V. A.; Smirnov, I. Yu.; Golub, L. E.; Tarasenko, S. A.; Suslov, A. V.; Mironov, O. A.; Kummer, M.; Känel, H. von

    2014-08-20

    The contactless surface acoustic wave technique is implemented to probe the high-frequency conductivity of a high-mobility p-Ge/GeSi quantum well structure in the regime of integer quantum Hall effect (IQHE) at temperatures 0.3–5.8 K and magnetic fields up to 18 T. It is shown that, in the IQHE regime at the minima of conductivity, holes are localized and ac conductivity is of hopping nature and can be described within the “two-site” model. The analysis of the temperature and magnetic-field-orientation dependence of the ac conductivity at odd filing factors enables us to determine the effective hole g-factor, |g{sub zz}|≈4.5. It is shown that the in-plane component of the magnetic field leads to a decrease in the g-factor as well as increase in the cyclotron mass, which is explained by orbital effects in the complex valence band of germanium.

  4. AC loss measurements in HTS coil assemblies with hybrid coil structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhenan; Long, Nicholas J.; Staines, Mike; Badcock, Rodney A.; Bumby, Chris W.; Buckley, Robert G.; Amemiya, Naoyuki

    2016-09-01

    Both AC loss and wire cost in coil windings are critical factors for high temperature superconductor (HTS) AC machinery applications. We present AC loss measurement results in three HTS coil assemblies at 77 K and 65 K which have a hybrid coil structure comprising one central winding (CW) and two end windings (EWs) wound with ReBCO and BSCCO wires with different self-field I c values at 77 K. All AC loss results in the coil assemblies are hysteretic and the normalized AC losses in the coil assemblies at different temperatures can be scaled with the I c value of the coil assemblies. The normalised results show that AC loss in a coil assembly with BSCCO CW can be reduced by using EWs wound with high I c ReBCO wires, whilst further AC loss reduction can be achieved by replacing the BSCCO CW with ReBCO CW. The results imply that a flexible hybrid coil structure is possible which considers both AC loss and wire cost in coil assemblies.

  5. An adaptive fuzzy controller for permanent-magnet AC servo drives

    SciTech Connect

    Le-Huy, H.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents a theoretical study on a model-reference adaptive fuzzy logic controller for vector-controlled permanent-magnet ac servo drives. In the proposed system, fuzzy logic is used to implement the direct controller as well as the adaptation mechanism. The operation of the direct fuzzy controller and the fuzzy logic based adaptation mechanism is studied. The control performance of the adaptive fuzzy controller is evaluated by simulation for various operating conditions. The results are compared with that provided by a non-adaptive fuzzy controller. The implementation of proposed adaptive fuzzy controller is discussed.

  6. Temperature Measurements in the Magnetic Measurement Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zachary

    2010-12-13

    Several key LCLS undulator parameter values depend strongly on temperature primarily because of the permanent magnet material the undulators are constructed with. The undulators will be tuned to have specific parameter values in the Magnetic Measurement Facility (MMF). Consequently, it is necessary for the temperature of the MMF to remain fairly constant. Requirements on undulator temperature have been established. When in use, the undulator temperature will be in the range 20.0 {+-} 0.2 C. In the MMF, the undulator tuning will be done at 20.0 {+-} 0.1 C. For special studies, the MMF temperature set point can be changed to a value between 18 C and 23 C with stability of {+-}0.1 C. In order to ensure that the MMF temperature requirements are met, the MMF must have a system to measure temperatures. The accuracy of the MMF temperature measurement system must be better than the {+-}0.1 C undulator tuning temperature tolerance, and is taken to be {+-}0.01 C. The temperature measurement system for the MMF is under construction. It is similar to a prototype system we built two years ago in the Sector 10 alignment lab at SLAC. At that time, our goal was to measure the lab temperature to {+-}0.1 C. The system has worked well for two years and has maintained its accuracy. For the MMF system, we propose better sensors and a more extensive calibration program to achieve the factor of 10 increase in accuracy. In this note we describe the measurement system under construction. We motivate our choice of system components and give an overview of the system. Most of the software for the system has been written and will be discussed. We discuss error sources in temperature measurements and show how these errors have been dealt with. The calibration system is described in detail. All the LCLS undulators must be tuned in the Magnetic Measurement Facility at the same temperature to within {+-}0.1 C. In order to ensure this, we are building a system to measure the temperature of the

  7. Hysteretic ac loss in a coated superconductor subjected to oscillating magnetic fields: ferromagnetic effect and frequency dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Guang-Tong

    2014-06-01

    Numerical simulations of the hysteretic ac loss in a coated superconductor with a more realistic version of the architecture were performed via the finite-element technique in the presence of an oscillating magnetic field. The coated superconductor was electromagnetically modeled by resorting to the quasistatic approximation of a vector potential approach in conjunction with nonlinear descriptions of the superconducting layer and the ferromagnetic substrate therein by a power-law model and the Langevin equation, respectively. A diverse effect of the ferromagnetic substrate on the hysteretic ac loss, depending on the strength of the applied magnetic field, was displayed, and its underlying cause was identified. The dependence of the hysteretic ac loss on the applied frequency is found to be related to a critical amplitude of the applied magnetic field, and the eddy-current loss dissipated in the metal coatings becomes prominent as the frequency increases only at high applied magnetic fields.

  8. Dynamic melting and impurity particle tracking in continuously adjustable AC magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojarevics, V.; Pericleous, K.

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of semi-levitation melting is extended to account for the presence of particles (impurities, broken metal dendrite agglomerates, bubbles) during the full melting cycle simulated numerically using the pseudo-spectral schemes. The AC coil is dynamically moving with the melt front progress, while the generated Joule heat serves to enhance the melting rate. The electromagnetic force is decomposed into the time average and the oscillating parts. The time average effects on the particle transport are investigated previously using approximations derived for a locally uniform magnetic field. This paper presents expressions for the skin-layer type of the AC force containing also the pulsating part which contributes to the particle drag by the ‘history’ and ‘added mass’ contributions. The intense turbulence in the bulk of molten metal additionally contributes to the particle dispersion. The paper attempts to demonstrate the importance of each of the mentioned effects onto the particle transport during the melting until the final pouring stage. The method could be extended to similar AC field controlled melting/solidification processes.

  9. Coherence-population-trapping transients induced by an ac magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margalit, L.; Rosenbluh, M.; Wilson-Gordon, A. D.

    2012-06-01

    Coherent-population-trapping transients induced by an ac magnetic field are investigated theoretically for a realistic three-level Λ system in the D1 line of 87Rb. The contributions to the transient probe absorption from the various subsystems that compose the realistic atomic system are examined and the absorption of each Λ subsystem is compared to that of a simple Λ system. The population redistribution due to optical pumping is shown to be the dominant cause of the difference between the contributions of the various subsystems to the oscillatory character of the probe absorption. We also discuss the series of transients that reappear every half-cycle time of a modulated magnetic field when the system is in two-photon resonance, and we study the transient behavior as a function of the probe detuning. The effect of a buffer gas on the amplitude and shape of the transients is considered.

  10. Influence of Ca 2+ in biological stimulating effects of AC magnetic fields on germination of bean seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhnini, Lama

    This study reports an attempt to investigate the effects of AC magnetic field on the seed germination and seedling growth of beans, at different concentrations of CaCl 2, since Ca 2+ is an essential plant nutrient. Bean seeds were exposed to a combination of local geomagnetic field (DC field) and sinusoidal time-varying extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic field (AC field) 28.3 Hz, 20 μT AC field tuned to the fundamental cyclotron resonance for calcium ions. . The application of AC field promoted the germination of bean seeds for all CaCl 2 concentrations. There was no significant change of average weight of the radicals for all concentrations of CaCl 2, whereas there was a significant increase of radicals' length for deionized (DD) and distilled DD water and DD water+ Ca 10 mM.

  11. Anomalies in vortex lattice dynamics driven by induced ac currents in superconducting films with magnetic arrays of two-fold symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, A. J.; Chiliotte, C. E.; Pasquini, G.; Bekeris, V.; Gomez, A.; del Valle, J.; Gonzalez, E. M.; Prieto, J. L.; Vicent, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    We study the dynamics of the vortex lattice driven by ac induced currents in the critical state regime, for T > 0.70 TC. The samples are superconducting films grown on top of two-fold symmetry array of magnetic dots. In these heterostructures, the induced ac currents flow parallel to the short and to the long side of the pinning array in different areas of the samples simultaneously. This behavior produces remarkable effects in the vortex lattice dynamics. First of all, periodic features are observed in the ac susceptibility versus applied magnetic field measurements which are related to matching effects between the vortex lattices and the magnetic array. However, the vortex lattice reconfiguration observed in magnetotransport experiments is absent. Some of these features are revealed as maxima instead of being minima, indicating higher mobility at certain matching fields. Competing unstable vortex configurations could lead to increase vortex mobility precluding the reconfiguration transition. At high temperatures, where the matching effects show up, the magnetic permeability of the dots is the mechanism that governs the JC(T) behavior. Moreover, the temperature dependence of the pinning force FP(T) shows a temperature crossover related to an unexpected enhancement in vortex mobility. Vortex-vortex interaction and the interplay between trapped and interstitial vortices are a hint to explain these phenomena.

  12. Optoelectronic hybrid fiber laser sensor for simultaneous acoustic and magnetic measurement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaogang; Zhang, Wentao; Huang, Wenzhu; Feng, Shengwen; Li, Fang

    2015-09-21

    An optoelectronic hybrid fiber optic acoustic and magnetic sensor (FOAMS) based on fiber laser sensing is proposed, which can measure acoustic and magnetic field simultaneously. A static magnetic field signal can be carried by an AC Lorentz force, and demodulated in frequency domain together with acoustic signals. Some experiments of acoustic pressure sensitivity, magnetic field sensitivity, and simultaneous acoustic and magnetic measurement on a fabricated FOAMS were carried out. The acoustic pressure sensitivity was about -164.7 dB (0 dB re 1 pm/μPa) and the magnetic field sensitivity was 0.6 dB (0 dB re 1 pm/ (T•A)). The experiment of simultaneous acoustic and magnetic measurement shows that the detections of acoustic and magnetic field have little effect on each other in dynamic range and simultaneously measuring acoustic and magnetic field is feasible. PMID:26406643

  13. The Wechsler ACS Social Perception Subtest: A Preliminary Comparison with Other Measures of Social Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kandalaft, Michelle R.; Didehbani, Nyaz; Cullum, C. Munro; Krawczyk, Daniel C.; Allen, Tandra T.; Tamminga, Carol A.; Chapman, Sandra B.

    2012-01-01

    Relative to other cognitive areas, there are few clinical measures currently available to assess social perception. A new standardized measure, the Wechsler Advanced Clinical Solutions (ACS) Social Perception subtest, addresses some limitations of existing measures; however, little is known about this new test. The first goal of this investigation…

  14. Automatized and desktop AC-susceptometer for the in situ and real time monitoring of magnetic nanoparticles' synthesis by coprecipitation.

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, M P; Teixeira, J M; Machado, P; Oliveira, M R F F; Maia, J M; Pereira, C; Pereira, A M; Freire, C; Araujo, J P

    2015-04-01

    The main purpose of this work was to design, develop, and construct a simple desktop AC susceptometer to monitor in situ and in real time the coprecipitation synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles. The design incorporates one pair of identical pick-up sensing coils and one pair of Helmholtz coils. The picked up signal is detected by a lock-in SR850 amplifier that measures the in- and out-of-phase signals. The apparatus also includes a stirrer with 45°-angle blades to promote the fast homogenization of the reaction mixture. Our susceptometer has been successfully used to monitor the coprecipitation reaction for the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles. PMID:25933868

  15. Dynamic model tracking design for low inertia, high speed permanent magnet ac motors.

    PubMed

    Stewart, P; Kadirkamanathan, V

    2004-01-01

    Permanent magnet ac (PMAC) motors have existed in various configurations for many years. The advent of rare-earth magnets and their associated highly elevated levels of magnetic flux makes the permanent magnet motor attractive for many high performance applications from computer disk drives to all electric racing cars. The use of batteries as a prime storage element carries a cost penalty in terms of the unladen weight of the vehicle. Minimizing this cost function requires the minimum electric motor size and weight to be specified, while still retaining acceptable levels of output torque. This tradeoff can be achieved by applying a technique known as flux weakening which will be investigated in this paper. The technique allows the speed range of a PMAC motor to be greatly increased, giving a constant power range of more than 4:1. A dynamic model reference controller is presented which has advantages in ease of implementation, and is particularly suited to dynamic low inertia applications such as clutchless gear changing in high performance electric vehicles. The benefits of this approach are to maximize the torque speed envelope of the motor, particularly advantageous when considering low inertia operation. The controller is examined experimentally, confirming the predicted performance.

  16. R&D ERL: Magnetic measurements of the ERL magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, A.

    2010-08-01

    The magnet system of ERL consists of G5 solenoids, 6Q12 quadrupoles with 0.58 T/m gradient, 3D60 dipoles with 0.4 T central field, 15 and 30 degree Z-bend injection line dipole/quadrupole combined function magnets, and extraction line magnets. More details about the magnets can be found in a report by G. Mahler. Field quality in all the 6Q12 quadrupoles, 3D60 dipoles and the injection line magnets has been measured with either a rotating coil, or a Hall probe mapper. This report presents the results of these magnetic measurements.

  17. Influence of AC external magnetic field on guidance force relaxation between HTS bulk and NdFeB guideway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Longcai; Wang, Suyu; Wang, Jiasu; Zheng, Jun

    2007-12-01

    Superconducting maglev vehicle is one of the most promising applications of HTS bulks. In such a system, the HTS bulks are always exposed to time-varying external magnetic field, which is generated by the inhomogeneous surface magnetic field of the NdFeB guideway. So it is required to study whether the guidance force of the bulks is influenced by the inhomogeneity. In this paper, we studied the characteristics of the guidance force relaxation between the HTS bulk and the NdFeB guideway by an experiment in which AC external magnetic field generated by an electromagnet was used to simulate the time-varying external magnetic field caused by the inhomogeneity of the guideway. From the experiment results, it was found that the guidance force was decreased with the application of the AC external magnetic field, and the decay increased with the amplitude and was almost independent of the frequency.

  18. Tevatron AC dipole system

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.; Kopp, S.E.; Jansson, A.; Syphers, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The AC dipole is an oscillating dipole magnet which can induce large amplitude oscillations without the emittance growth and decoherence. These properties make it a good tool to measure optics of a hadron synchrotron. The vertical AC dipole for the Tevatron is powered by an inexpensive high power audio amplifier since its operating frequency is approximately 20 kHz. The magnet is incorporated into a parallel resonant system to maximize the current. The use of a vertical pinger magnet which has been installed in the Tevatron made the cost relatively inexpensive. Recently, the initial system was upgraded with a more powerful amplifier and oscillation amplitudes up to 2-3{sigma} were achieved with the 980 GeV proton beam. This paper discusses details of the Tevatron AC dipole system and also shows its test results.

  19. Influence of ambient temperature and AC magnetic field on damping behavior of Fe-13Cr-2.5Mo alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yong-gang; Li, Ning; Shen, Bao-luo; Hua, Hong-xing

    2007-07-01

    The damping behaviors of Fe-13Cr-2.5Mo alloy at ambient temperatures and the AC magnetic field are tested with the improved reversal torsion machine. The precipitations distributing in the annealed alloy are also observed with SEM. The results show that because the defections decrease during the annealing treatment, causing a higher damping capacity of this alloy. This damping drops linearly to 63% when the ambient temperature changes from 23 °C to 500 °C, resulting from the gradual decrease of ferromagnetism. On the other hand, the AC magnetic field causes the damping capacity to drop sharply, and finally it reaches a much lower level.

  20. Cell death induced by AC magnetic fields and magnetic nanoparticles: current state and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Goya, Gerardo F; Asín, Laura; Ibarra, M Ricardo

    2013-12-01

    This review analyses the advances in the field of magnetically induced cell death using intracellular magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Emphasis has been given to in vitro research results, discussing the action of radiofrequency (RF) waves on biological systems as well as those results of thermally induced cell death in terms of MNP cell interactions. Our main goal has been to provide a unified depiction of many recent experiments and theoretical models relevant to the effect of applied electromagnetic fields on MNPs after cellular uptake and the cytotoxicity assessment of MNPs. We have addressed the effects of RF waves used for in vitro magnetic hyperthermia on eukaryotic cells regarding physical modifications of the cellular local environment and cell viability.

  1. Synthesis of Micelles Guided Magnetite (Fe3O4) Hollow Spheres and their application for AC Magnetic Field Responsive Drug Release

    PubMed Central

    Mandal Goswami, Madhuri

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on synthesis of hollow spheres of magnetite, guided by micelles and their application in drug release by the stimulus responsive technique. Here oleyelamine micelles are used as the core substance for the formation of magnetite nano hollow spheres (NHS). Diameter and shell thickness of NHS have been changed by changing concentration of the micelles. Mechanism of NHS formation has been established by investigating the aliquot collected at different time during the synthesis of NHS. It has been observed that oleyelamine as micelles play an important role to generate hollow-sphere particles of different diameter and thickness just by varying its amount. Structural analysis was done by XRD measurement and morphological measurements, SEM and TEM were performed to confirm the shape and size of the NHS. FTIR measurement support the formation of magnetite phase too. Frequency dependent AC magnetic measurements and AC magnetic field stimulated drug release event by these particles provide a direction of the promising application of these NHS for better cancer treatment in near future. Being hollow & porous in structure and magnetic in nature, such materials will also be useful in other applications such as in removal of toxic materials, magnetic separation etc. PMID:27796329

  2. ac magnetic trackers for biomedical application: now and in the near future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murry, Herschell F.

    1996-04-01

    A number of ac magnetic trackers have been, and are now being, used in the medical community for varied applications from describing electronically the exact shape of a subject to tracking movement of objects. A good reason for using this technology is that the magnetic fields pass through the body without occlusions and without ionizing radiation. This paper commences with descriptions of several such tools readily available, including our 3D input stylus and 3DRAW tablet defining object dimensions to 0.01' accuracy and our close-in Short Ranger transmitter operating precisely between 2' - 12' over the subject. For the future, R&D and military electronics sponsored topics such as a metal distortion insensitive magnetic source, a high performance 240 Hz (or up to eight sensors each operating at 30 Hz) tracker with the processing power to virtually eliminate metal distortion effects and an approach for building a biologically insertible tracker are discussed to indicate the potential for new tracking tools. Discussion of needs from the medical community is encouraged in order to better guide efforts in applying our specialty technology to biomedical applications where ewe are neophytes.

  3. Numerical evaluation of AC loss properties in assembled superconductor strips exposed to perpendicular magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajikawa, K.; Funaki, K.; Shikimachi, K.; Hirano, N.; Nagaya, S.

    2009-10-01

    AC losses in superconductor strips assembled face-to-face are numerically evaluated by means of a finite element method. The external magnetic field is applied perpendicular to their flat face. It is also assumed that the superconductor strips have the voltage-current characteristics represented by the critical state model with constant critical current density. The influences of the number of strips and the gap length between strips on the losses are quantitatively discussed as compared with the conventional theoretical expressions for some special cases in order to understand only the geometrical effects on the perpendicular-field losses in actual assembled conductors with the finite numbers of Y-based superconducting tapes.

  4. Modified MgFe2O4 Ferrimagnetic Nanoparticles to Improve Magnetic and AC Magnetically-Induced Heating Characteristics for Hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sanghoon; Jeun, Minhong

    2015-12-01

    A ferrimagnetic nanoparticle with a smaller size, a narrower size distribution, and a higher ac heat generation ability has been still studied for intra-arterial or intra-tumoral hyperthermia. In this study, we manipulate the calcining temperature in the range of 400-600 degrees C to modify MgFe2O4 ferrimagnetic nanoparticles (FMNPs) during modified sol-gel process. The modified MgFe2O4 FMNPs have well controlled with small size and narrow size distribution, so that their magnetic and ac magnetically-induced heating characteristics are significantly improved. In particular, MgFe2O4 nanoparticles synthesized at the calcining temperature of 600 degrees C and sintering temperature of 700 degrees C show the most suitable size (58 nm ± 13 nm) and its distribution (22%) resulting in the highest ac magnetically-induced heating temperature (T(AC,mag), ΔT = 93 degrees C) and SLP (Specific Loss Power, 600 W/g) at the biologically tolerable range of magnetic field (H(appl) = 140 Oe) and frequency (f(appl) = 110 kHz). It is found to be due to the improvement of magnetic softness and saturation magnetization resulting in the largest hysteresis loss power. All the results in this work clearly demonstrate that calcining process is one of the key parameters to control the proper size and size distribution for improving magnetic and ac magnetically-induced heating characteristics of MgFe2O4 FMNPs, which can be applicable to hyperthermia agents in nanomedicine.

  5. Measurements of Solar Vector Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Various aspects of the measurement of solar magnetic fields are presented. The four major subdivisions of the study are: (1) theoretical understanding of solar vector magnetic fields; (3) techniques for interpretation of observational data; and (4) techniques for data display.

  6. Development of Low-Frequency AC Voltage Measurement System Using Single-Junction Thermal Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amagai, Yasutaka; Nakamura, Yasuhiro

    Accurate measurement of low-frequency AC voltage using a digital multimeter at frequencies of 4-200Hz is a challenge in the mechanical engineering industry. At the National Metrology Institute of Japan, we developed a low-frequency AC voltage measurement system for calibrating digital multimeters operating at frequencies down to 1 Hz. The system uses a single-junction thermal converter and employs a theoretical model and a three-parameter sine wave fitting algorithm based on the least-square (LS) method. We calibrated the AC voltage down to 1Hz using our measurement system and reduced the measurement time compared with that using thin-film thermal converters. Our measurement results are verified by comparison with those of a digital sampling method using a high-resolution analog-to-digital converter; our data are in agreement to within a few parts in 105. Our proposed method enables us to measure AC voltage with an uncertainty of 25 μV/V (k = 1) at frequencies down to 4 Hz and a voltage of 10 V.

  7. Production Of Multi-magnetron Plasma By Using Polyphase Ac Glow Discharge In An Improved Multi-pole Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Kazunori; Motoki, Kentaro; Miyamoto, Masahiro; Uetani, Yasuhiro

    1998-10-01

    Effects of an improved multi-pole magnetic field on a plasma production generated by a polyphase ac glow discharge with multiple electrodes have been investigated. Conventional configuration of the multi-pole magnetic filed has been modified to suppress plasma losses at both ends of the chamber due to ExB drift motion. The modified multi-pole magnetic field has enabled us to produce a multiple magnetron-plasma at a considerably low pressure less than mTorr. The low temperature plasma has been widely used as the fine processing technology of a dry etching and as the thin film formation technology of a sputtering coating. Large-scale plasmas which can be generated at a low gas-pressure have been desired for more wider dry etching and greater sputter coating. The purpose of this study is to develop a large-scale and low-cost plasma generator by using a polyphase ac power source with the low frequency. In this session, we will present the experimental result as to a multiple magnetron-plasma generated in the modified twenty-four poles magnetic field by using the twenty-four-phase ac power source with the commercial electric power frequency of 60Hz. The ac power is supplied to twenty-four electrodes which are fixed to the water-cooled chamber-wall through sheet insulators so that the electrodes can be cooled indirectly.

  8. Effects of AC/DC magnetic fields, frequency, and nanoparticle aspect ratio on cellular transfection of gene vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Kris; Mair, Lamar; Fisher, Mike; Rowshon Alam, Md.; Juliano, Rudolph; Superfine, Richard

    2008-10-01

    In order to make non-viral gene delivery a useful tool in the study and treatment of genetic disorders, it is imperative that these methodologies be further refined to yield optimal results. Transfection of magnetic nanoparticles and nanorods are used as non-viral gene vectors to transfect HeLa EGFP-654 cells that stably express a mutated enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene. We deliver antisense oligonucleotides to these cells designed to correct the aberrant splicing caused by the mutation in the EGFP gene. We also transfect human bronchial endothelial cells and immortalized WI-38 lung cells with pEGFP-N1 vectors. To achieve this we bind the genes to magnetic nanoparticles and nanorods and introduce magnetic fields to effect transfection. We wish to examine the effects of magnetic fields on the transfection of these particles and the benefits of using alternating (AC) magnetic fields in improving transfection rates over direct (DC) magnetic fields. We specifically look at the frequency dependence of the AC field and particle aspect ratio as it pertains to influencing transfection rate. We posit that the increase in angular momentum brought about by the AC field and the high aspect ratio of the nanorod particles, is vital to generating the force needed to move the particle through the cell membrane.

  9. A Preliminary Inclusive Measurement of Ac Using the SLD Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K

    2004-01-29

    We report a new measurement of A{sub c} using data obtained by SLD in 1993-1995. This measurement uses a vertex tag technique, where the selection of a c hemisphere is based on the reconstructed mass of the charm hadron decay vertex. The method uses the 3D vertexing capabilities of SLD's CCD vertex detector and the small and stable SLC beams to obtain a high hemisphere c-tagging efficiency and purity of 13% and 69%, respectively. Charged kaons identified by the CRID detector and the charge of the reconstructed vertex provide an efficient quark-antiquark tag. We obtain a preliminary 93-95 result of A{sub c} = 0.662 {+-} 0.068 {+-} 0.042.

  10. Superparamagnetic state by linear and non-linear AC magnetic susceptibility in Mn0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 ferrites nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Suneetha, T; Kundu, S; Kashyap, Subhash C; Gupta, H C; Nath, T K

    2013-01-01

    The Mn0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 nanoparticles has been synthesized using citrate-gel-precursor method. The direct mixing of nitrates and acetates yields homogeneous nanoparticles. Phase formation and crystal structure of the synthesized powder were examined through the X-ray diffraction (XRD). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of the sample confirm the spinel structure. The average particle size was determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The average particle size is found to be about 13 nm. Superparamagnetic-like nature of the nanoparticles of Mn0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 has been revealed through various dc and linear and non-linear ac magnetization measurements. However, the nanoparticles do not behave like ideal non-interacting superparamagnets. The magnetic particle size is found to be about 8 nm with saturation magnetization about 18.1 emu/g. The blocking temperature (T(B)) of the nanoparticle assembly is found to be about 150 K as observed from dc and ac magnetization measurements. The frequency dependence of the blocking temperature (T(B)) is found to follow Vogel-Fulcher law. The associated characteristic time tau0 is found to be 10(-5) s. This value is different from that generally found for non-interacting superparamagnetic (SPM) systems (tau0 = 10(-9)-10(-10) s).

  11. The magnetisation profiles and ac magnetisation losses in a single layer YBCO thin film caused by travelling magnetic field waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Coombs, Timothy

    2015-05-01

    This paper studies the magnetisation and ac magnetisation losses caused by a travelling magnetic wave on a single-layer YBCO thin film. This work provides thorough investigations on how the critical magnetic field gradient has been changed by the application of a travelling wave. Several conditions were studied such as zero-field cooling (ZFC), field cooling (FC) and a delta-shaped trapped field. It was found that the travelling wave tends to attenuate the existing critical magnetic field gradients in all these conditions. This interesting magnetic behaviour can be well predicted by the finite element (FEM) software with the E-J power law and Maxwell’s equations. The numerical simulations show that the existing critical current density has been compromised after applying the travelling wave. The magnetisation profile caused by the travelling wave is very different from the standing wave, while the magnetisation based on the standing wave can be interpreted by the Bean model and constant current density assumption. Based on the numerical method, which has reliability that has been solidly proven in the study, we have extended the study to the ac magnetisation losses. Comparisons were made between the travelling wave and the standing wave for this specific YBCO sample. It was found that by applying the magnetic wave of the same amplitude, the ac magnetisation loss caused by the travelling wave is about 1/3 of that caused by the standing wave. These results are helpful in understanding the general magnetism problems and ac magnetisation loss in the travelling magnetic wave conditions such as inside a high temperature superconducting (HTS) rotating machine, etc.

  12. Measuring system for magnetostriction of silicon steel sheet under ac excitation using optical methods

    SciTech Connect

    Nakase, Tomoya; Nakano, Masanori; Fujiwara, Koji; Takahashi, Norio

    1998-07-01

    A measuring system for magnetostriction of silicon steel sheet using optical methods and a single sheet tester has been developed to establish a standard test method for IEC and JIS. Various factors affecting measurement accuracy and reproducibility of the developed system are examined.s Two optical instruments, such as a laser Doppler vibrometer and a heterodyne displacement meter, are compared. 3-D characteristics of magnetostriction under ac excitation in the rolling direction are measured up to 2.0 T.

  13. Magnetic diode for measurement of magnetic-field strength

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, S.I.; Zalkind, V.M.

    1988-02-01

    The accuracy of fabrication and assembly of the elements of the magnetic systems of thermonuclear installations of the stellarator type is checked by study of the topography of the confining magnetic field and is determined by the space resolution and accuracy of the measuring apparatus. A magnetometer with a galvanomagnetic sensor is described that is used to adjust the magnetic system of the Uragan-3 stellarator. The magnetometer measure magnetic-field induction in the range of 6 x 10/sup -7/-10/sup -2/ T with high space resolution.

  14. MICE Spectrometer Solenoid Magnetic Field Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Leonova, M.

    2013-09-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is designed to demonstrate ionization cooling in a muon beam. Its goal is to measure a 10% change in transverse emittance of a muon beam going through a prototype Neutrino Factory cooling channel section with an absolute measurement accuracy of 0.1%. To measure emittances, MICE uses two solenoidal spectrometers, with Solenoid magnets designed to have 4 T fields, uniform at 3 per mil level in the tracking volumes. Magnetic field measurements of the Spectrometer Solenoid magnet SS2, and analysis of coil parameters for input into magnet models will be discussed.

  15. The attenuation of the levitation force of HTS bulk exposed to AC magnetic field on the above NdFeB guideway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Minxian; Wang, Yan

    2012-01-01

    In the present High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) maglev vehicle system, the air gaps between the adjacent permanent magnets make the magnetic fields above the NdFeB guideway non-uniform. So it is required to study the characteristics of levitation force of the HTS bulk affected by the non-uniform applied magnetic fields along the moving direction. In this paper, we have studied the characteristics of the levitation force relaxation by an experiment in which AC magnetic field generated by an electromagnet is used to simulate the time-varying magnetic field caused by the inhomogeneity of the NdFeB guideway. From the experiment results, it is found that the levitation force is attenuated with the application of the AC field, and the attenuation is increased with the amplitude of the AC field, but the attenuation is almost independent of the frequency the AC magnetic field.

  16. Analyze and experiment on AC magnetic field's effect to fiber optic gyroscopes in compact stabilization control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Mao, Yao; Tian, Jing; Li, Zhijun

    2015-10-01

    Fiber optic gyroscopes (FOG) are getting more and more attention in areas such as stabilization control systems as they are all solid state and have a wide bandwidth. In stabilization systems that require wide bandwidth control, motors are usually used as actuating mechanism for active disturbance restrain. Voice coil motors (VCMs) are usually used in compact stabilization systems that require large torque and fast response. However, AC magnetic field, which can affect the output of FOG due to Faraday effect, will be generated during operation of VCMs. The frequency range affected by the AC magnetic field to the FOG's output is the same as VCMs drive signal frequency range, which is also exactly the stabilization system's working range. Therefore the effect of the AC magnetic field to FOGs must be evaluated to verify the feasibility of a stable system design that uses both FOGs and VCMs. In this article, the basic structure and operating principle of stabilization system is introduced. The influence of AC magnetic field to FOG is theoretically analyzed. The magnetic field generated by VCMs is numerically simulated based on the theory deduction of the magnetic field near energized wires. To verify the influence of the VCM generated magnetic field to the FOGs in practical designs, a simplified random fiber coil model is built for it's hard to accurately test the exact polarize axis's twisting rate in a fiber coil. The influence to the FOG's output of different random coil model is simulated and the result shows a same trend that the influence of the VCM's magnetic field to the FOG is reduced as the distance between the VCM and the FOG increasing. The influence of a VCM to a FOG with the same parameters is experimentally tested. In the Fourier transformed FOG data the same frequency point as the VCM drive signal frequency can be read. The result fit simulated result that as the distance increases, the influence decreases. The amplitude of the frequency point is just

  17. Flatcoil systems for measurements of Fermilab magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, H.D.; Brown, B.C.; DiMarco, J.

    1995-06-01

    A flux measurement system has been developed for measuring the integrated strength and relative shape of the magnetic field of Fermilab Main Injector dipoles. Improved field shape measurements have been obtained by constructing coil geometries which reduce the flux contribution from unwanted field derivatives. A bucking coil scheme employing reference coils in both the test magnet and a reference magnet reduce the sensitivity to power supply fluctuations. Design strategies for various measurement requirements are described, along with the details of implementing an assembly to measure curved 6 m and 4 m dipoles. Some representative results and comparison with redundant measurement systems are presented.

  18. Magnetic Field Measurements near Mars.

    PubMed

    Smith, E J; Davis, L; Coleman, P J; Jones, D E

    1965-09-10

    During the encounter between Mariner IV and Mars on 14-15 July, no magnetic effect that could be definitely associated with the planet was evident in the magnetometer data. This observation implies that the Martian magnetic dipole moment is, at most, 3 x 10(-4) times that of the earth.

  19. Decay Characteristics of Levitation Force of YBCO Bulk Exposed to AC Magnetic Field above NdFeB Guideway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Minxian; Lu, Yiyun; Wang, Suyu; Ma, Guangtong

    2011-04-01

    The superconducting maglev vehicle is one of the most promising applications of HTS bulks. In such a system, the nonuniformity of the magnetic field along the movement direction above the NdFeB guideway is inevitable due to the assembly error and inhomogeneity of the material property of the NdFeB magnet. So it is required to study the characteristics of levitation force of the bulks affected by the non-uniform applied magnetic fields along the moving direction. In this paper, we will study the characteristics of the levitation force relaxation between the HTS bulk and the NdFeB guideway by an experiment in which AC external magnetic field generated by an electromagnet is used to simulate the time-varying external magnetic field caused by the inhomogeneity of the guideway. From the experimental results, it has found that the levitation force is decreasing with the application of the AC external magnetic field, and the decay increasing with the amplitude of the applied magnetic field and is almost independent of the frequency.

  20. Automatic magnetic flux measurement of micro plastic-magnetic rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingdong; Lin, Mingxing; Song, Aiwei

    2015-07-01

    Micro plastic-magnetic rotors of various sizes and shapes are widely used in industry, their magnetic flux measurement is one of the most important links in the production process, and therefore some technologies should be adopted to improve the measurement precision and efficiency. In this paper, the automatic measurement principle of micro plastic-magnetic rotors is proposed and the integration time constant and the integrator drift’s suppression and compensation in the measurement circuit are analyzed. Two other factors influencing the measurement precision are also analyzed, including the relative angles between the rotor magnetic poles and the measurement coil, and the starting point of the rotors in the coil where the measurement begins. An instrument is designed to measure the magnetic flux of the rotors. Measurement results show that the measurement error is within  ±1%, which meets the basic requirements in industry application, and the measurement efficiency is increased by 10 times, which can cut down labor cost and management cost when compared with manual measurement.

  1. Magnetic permeability measurements and a lunar core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, B. E.; Phillips, R. J.; Russell, C. T.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of the magnetic field induced in the moon while it is in the geomagnetic tail lobes have been interpreted in terms of lunar magnetic permeability due to free iron content; such studies ignored the possibility that a highly conducting lunar core (Fe or FeS) would exclude magnetic fields with an apparent diamagnetic effect. Using lunar chemical and thermal models to determine plausible limits of magnetic permeability, we interpret measurements of the induced moment. The maximum likely radius of a lunar core is 580 km. Subsatellite and ALSEP measurements of the induced field are in disagreement. Resolving the differences is critical to determining whether a core could or does exist.

  2. Suitability of magnetic single- and multi-core nanoparticles to detect protein binding with dynamic magnetic measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remmer, Hilke; Dieckhoff, Jan; Schilling, Meinhard; Ludwig, Frank

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the binding of biotinylated proteins to various streptavidin functionalized magnetic nanoparticles with different dynamic magnetic measurement techniques to examine their potential for homogeneous bioassays. As particle systems, single-core nanoparticles with a nominal core diameter of 30 nm as well as multi-core nanoparticles with hydrodynamic sizes varying between nominally 60 nm and 100 nm were chosen. As experimental techniques, fluxgate magnetorelaxometry (MRX), complex ac susceptibility (ACS) and measurements of the phase lag between rotating field and sample magnetization are applied. MRX measurements are only suited for the detection of small analytes if the multivalency of functionalized nanoparticles and analytes causes cross-linking, thus forming larger aggregates. ACS measurements showed for all nanoparticle systems a shift of the imaginary part's maximum towards small frequencies. In rotating field measurements only the single-core nanoparticle systems with dominating Brownian mechanism exhibit an increase of the phase lag upon binding in the investigated frequency range. The coexistence of Brownian and Néel relaxation processes can cause a more complex phase lag change behavior, as demonstrated for multi-core nanoparticle systems.

  3. AC magnetic response of superconducting YBa2Cu3O7/PrBa2Cu3O7 superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miu, L.; Ivan, I.; Ionescu, A. M.; Miu, D.

    2016-06-01

    Vortex activation energy UAC in the critical-state related AC magnetic response of superconductors (appearing in the vicinity of the DC irreversibility line) takes large values, as often reported, which is not yet understood. This behavior is essentially different from that of the vortex-creep activation energy at long relaxation time scales, and may become important for AC applications of superconductors. To elucidate this aspect, we investigated the AC signal of almost decoupled [Y Ba2Cu3O7]n/[PrBa2Cu3O7]4 superlattices (with n = 11 or 4 units cells) in perpendicular DC and AC magnetic fields. In these model samples, the length of the hopping vortex segment is fixed by the thickness of superconducting layers and vortices are disentangled, at least at low DC fields. It is shown that the high UAC values result from the large contribution of the pinning enhanced viscous drag in the conditions of thermally activated, non-diffusive vortex motion at short time scales, where the influence of thermally induced vortex fluctuations on pinning is weak.

  4. Measurement of magnetic moment via optical transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidsieck, Alexandra; Schmid, Daniel; Gleich, Bernhard

    2016-03-01

    The magnetic moment of nanoparticles is an important property for drug targeting and related applications as well as for the simulation thereof. However, the measurement of the magnetic moment of nanoparticles, nanoparticle-virus-complexes or microspheres in solution can be difficult and often yields unsatisfying or incomparable results. To measure the magnetic moment, we designed a custom measurement device including a magnetic set-up to observe nanoparticles indirectly via light transmission in solution. We present a simple, cheap device of manageable size, which can be used in any laboratory as well as a novel evaluation method to determine the magnetic moment of nanoparticles via the change of the optical density of the particle suspension in a well-defined magnetic gradient field. In contrast to many of the established measurement methods, we are able to observe and measure the nanoparticle complexes in their natural state in the respective medium. The nanoparticles move along the magnetic gradient and thereby away from the observation point. Due to this movement, the optical density of the fluid decreases and the transmission increases over time at the measurement location. By comparing the measurement with parametric simulations, we can deduce the magnetic moment from the observed behavior.

  5. Magnetic field measurements in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, U.; Seely, J.F.; Sheeley,Jr., N.R.; Suckewer, S.; Title, A.M.

    1984-11-01

    The measurement of the poloidal magnetic field in a tokamak plasma from the Zeeman splitting and polarization of the magnetic dipole radiation from heavy ions is discussed. When viewed from a direction perpendicular to the toroidal field, the effect of the poloidal field on the circularly polarized radiation is detectable using a photoelectric polarimeter. The Zeeman splittings for a number of magnetic dipole transitions with wavelengths in the range 2300--9300 A are presented. An imaging polarimeter is proposed that can measure the poloidal magnetic field with space and time resolution.

  6. Magnetic Field Response Measurement Acquisition System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Taylor, Bryant D.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    A measurement acquisition method that alleviates many shortcomings of traditional measurement systems is presented in this paper. The shortcomings are a finite number of measurement channels, weight penalty associated with measurements, electrical arcing, wire degradations due to wear or chemical decay and the logistics needed to add new sensors. The key to this method is the use of sensors designed as passive inductor-capacitor circuits that produce magnetic field responses. The response attributes correspond to states of physical properties for which the sensors measure. A radio frequency antenna produces a time-varying magnetic field used to power the sensor and receive the magnetic field response of the sensor. An interrogation system for discerning changes in the sensor response is presented herein. Multiple sensors can be interrogated using this method. The method eliminates the need for a data acquisition channel dedicated to each sensor. Methods of developing magnetic field response sensors and the influence of key parameters on measurement acquisition are discussed.

  7. Materials with low DC magnetic susceptibility for sensitive magnetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatiwada, R.; Dennis, L.; Kendrick, R.; Khosravi, M.; Peters, M.; Smith, E.; Snow, W. M.

    2016-02-01

    Materials with very low DC magnetic susceptibility have many scientific applications. To our knowledge however, relatively little research has been conducted with the goal to produce a totally nonmagnetic material. This phrase in our case means after spatially averaging over macroscopic volumes, it possesses an average zero DC magnetic susceptibility. We report measurements of the DC magnetic susceptibility of three different types of nonmagnetic materials at room temperature: (I) solutions of paramagnetic salts and diamagnetic liquids, (II) liquid gallium-indium alloys and (III) pressed powder mixtures of tungsten and bismuth. The lowest measured magnetic susceptibility among these candidate materials is in the order of 10-9 cgs volume susceptibility units, about two orders of magnitude smaller than distilled water. In all cases, the measured concentration dependence of the magnetic susceptibility is consistent with that expected for the weighted sum of the susceptibilities of the separate components within experimental error. These results verify the well-known Wiedemann additivity law for the magnetic susceptibility of inert mixtures of materials and thereby realize the ability to produce materials with small but tunable magnetic susceptibility. For our particular scientific application, we are also looking for materials with the largest possible number of neutrons and protons per unit volume. The gallium-indium alloys fabricated and measured in this work possess to our knowledge the smallest ratio of volume magnetic susceptibility to nucleon number density per unit volume for a room temperature liquid, and the tungsten-bismuth pressed powder mixtures possess to our knowledge the smallest ratio of volume magnetic susceptibility to nucleon number density per unit volume for a room temperature solid. This ratio is a figure of merit for a certain class of precision experiments that search for possible exotic spin-dependent forces of Nature.

  8. Inductive heat property of Fe3O4/polymer composite nanoparticles in an ac magnetic field for localized hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dong-Lin; Zhang, Hai-Long; Zeng, Xian-Wei; Xia, Qi-Sheng; Tang, Jin-Tian

    2006-12-01

    The magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) nanoparticles were prepared by coprecipitation of Fe(3+) and Fe(2+) with an aqueous NaOH solution. The Fe(3)O(4)/polyaniline (PANI) magnetic composite nanoparticles with a core-shell structure with a diameter of 30-50 nm were prepared via an in situ polymerization of aniline in an aqueous solution containing the Fe(3)O(4) magnetic fluid. The inductive heat property of Fe(3)O(4)/PANI composite nanoparticles in an alternating current (ac) magnetic field was investigated. The potential of Fe(3)O(4)/PANI nanoparticles was evaluated for localized hyperthermia treatment of cancers. The saturation magnetization, M(s), and coercivity, H(c), are 50.05 emu g(-1) and 137 Oe for Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles and 26.34 emu g(-1) and 0 Oe for Fe(3)O(4)/PANI composite nanoparticles, respectively. Exposed in the ac magnetic field for 29 min, the temperatures of physiological saline suspensions containing Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles or Fe(3)O(4)/PANI composite nanoparticles are 63.6 degrees C and 52.4 degrees C, respectively. The Fe(3)O(4)/PANI composite nanoparticles would be useful as good thermoseeds for localized hyperthermia treatment of cancers. PMID:18458406

  9. Note: A sample holder design for sensitive magnetic measurements at high temperatures in a magnetic properties measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Arauzo, A.; Guerrero, E.; Urtizberea, A.; Stankiewicz, J.; Rillo, C.

    2012-06-15

    A sample holder design for high temperature measurements in a commercial MPMS SQUID magnetometer from Quantum Design is presented. It fulfills the requirements for the simultaneous use of the oven and reciprocating sample option (RSO) options, thus allowing sensitive magnetic measurements up to 800 K. Alternating current susceptibility can also be measured, since the holder does not induce any phase shift relative to the ac driven field. It is easily fabricated by twisting Constantan Copyright-Sign wires into a braid nesting the sample inside. This design ensures that the sample be placed tightly into a tough holder with its orientation fixed, and prevents any sample displacement during the fast movements of the RSO transport, up to high temperatures.

  10. Ac-loss measurement of a DyBCO-Roebel assembled coated conductor cable (RACC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuller, S.; Goldacker, W.; Kling, A.; Krempasky, L.; Schmidt, C.

    2007-10-01

    Low ac-loss HTS cables for transport currents well above 1 kA are required for application in transformers and generators and are taken into consideration for future generations of fusion reactor coils. Coated conductors (CC) are suitable candidates for high field application at an operation temperature around 50-77 K, which is a crucial precondition for economical cooling costs. We prepared a short length of a Roebel bar cable made of industrial DyBCO coated conductor (Theva Company, Germany). Meander shaped tapes of 4 mm width with a twist pitch of 122 mm were cut from 10 mm wide CC tapes using a specially designed tool. Eleven of these strands were assembled to a cable. The electrical and mechanical connection of the tapes was achieved using a silver powder filled conductive epoxy resin. Ac-losses of a short sample in an external ac field were measured as a function of frequency and field amplitude in transverse and parallel field orientations. In addition, the coupling current time constant of the sample was directly measured.

  11. Broadband Interferometer for Measuring Transmitted Wavefronts of Optical Bandpass Filters for HST (ACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boucarut, R. A.; Leviton, D. B.

    1998-01-01

    The transmitted wavefronts of optical filters for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) are characterized using the Wildly and Openly Modified Broadband Achromatic Twyman Green (WOMBAT) Interferometer developed in the NASA/GSFC Optics Branch's Diffraction Grating Evaluation Facility (DGEF). Because only four of thirty-three of ACS's optical bandpass filters transmit the 633 nm light of most commercial interferometers, a broadband interferometer is required to verify specified transmitted wavefront of ACS filters. WOMBAT's design is a hybrid of the BAT interferometer developed by JPL used for HST Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC-2) filters and a WYKO 400 phase shifting interferometer. It includes a broadband light source, monochromator, off-axis, parabolic collimating and camera mirrors, an aluminum-coated fused silica beam splitter, flat retroreflecting mirrors for the test and reference arms, and a LTV-sensitive CCD camera. An outboarded, piezo-electric phase shifter holds the flat mirror in the interferometer's reference arm. The interferometer is calibrated through interaction between the WYKO system's software and WONMAT hardware for the test wavelength of light entering the beam splitter. Phase-shifted interferograms of the filter mounted in the test arm are analyzed using WYKO's Vision' software. Filters as large as 90 mm in diameter have been measured over a wavelength range from 200 to 1100 nm with a sensitivity of lambda/200 rms at lambda = 633 nm. Results of transmitted wavefront measurements are shown for ACS fixed band pass and spatially-variable bandpass filters for a variety of wavelengths.

  12. Magnetic nanobeads present during enzymatic amplification and labeling for a simplified DNA detection protocol based on AC susceptometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejhed, Rebecca S.; Strømme, Maria; Svedlindh, Peter; Ahlford, Annika; Strömberg, Mattias

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic biosensors are promising candidates for low-cost point-of-care biodiagnostic devices. For optimal efficiency it is crucial to minimize the time and complexity of the assay protocol including target recognition, amplification, labeling and read-out. In this work, possibilities for protocol simplifications for a DNA biodetection principle relying on hybridization of magnetic nanobeads to rolling circle amplification (RCA) products are investigated. The target DNA is recognized through a padlock ligation assay resulting in DNA circles serving as templates for the RCA process. It is found that beads can be present during amplification without noticeably interfering with the enzyme used for RCA (phi29 polymerase). As a result, the bead-coil hybridization can be performed immediately after amplification in a one-step manner at elevated temperature within a few minutes prior to read-out in an AC susceptometer setup, i.e. a combined protocol approach. Moreover, by recording the phase angle ξ = arctan(χ″/χ'), where χ and χ″ are the in-phase and out-of-phase components of the AC susceptibility, respectively, at one single frequency the total assay time for the optimized combined protocol would be no more than 1.5 hours, often a relevant time frame for diagnosis of cancer and infectious disease. Also, applying the phase angle method normalization of AC susceptibility data is not needed. These findings are useful for the development of point-of-care biodiagnostic devices relying on bead-coil binding and magnetic AC susceptometry.

  13. Recent Advances in AC-DC Transfer Measurements Using Thin-Film Thermal Converters

    SciTech Connect

    WUNSCH,THOMAS F.; KINARD,JOSEPH R.; MANGINELL,RONALD P.; LIPE,THOMAS E.; SOLOMON JR.,OTIS M.; JUNGLING,KENNETH C.

    2000-12-08

    New standards for ac current and voltage measurements, thin-film multifunction thermal converters (MJTCS), have been fabricated using thin-film and micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Improved sensitivity and accuracy over single-junction thermoelements and targeted performance will allow new measurement approaches in traditionally troublesome areas such as the low frequency and high current regimes. A review is presented of new microfabrication techniques and packaging methods that have resulted from a collaborative effort at Sandia National Laboratories and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (MHZ).

  14. ARTEMIS Low Altitude Magnetic Field Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Constantinescu, Dragos; Auster, Hans-Ulrich

    2016-10-01

    Since 2011, two spacecraft of the five THEMIS mission spacecraft are in orbit around the Moon. These two ARTEMIS probes provide for very interesting observations of plasma physical properties of the lunar environment. In particular, the very low periselene of the ARTEMIS probes allows for the detection of crustal magnetic features of our terrestrial companion. Repeated low passes over the same region are used to confirm the crustal origin of the measured magnetic field variations. Using a model for the decay of the magnetic field intensity and measurements at several altitudes, we estimate the magnetic moment and the depth of the equivalent dipole. Some of these magnetic anomalies are strong enough to produce upstream waves due to the interaction with the solar wind with the anomaly driven mini-magnetospheres.

  15. Simulation of fluid flow induced by opposing ac magnetic fields in a continuous casting mold

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, F.C.; Hull, J.R.; Beitelman, L.

    1995-07-01

    A numerical simulation was performed for a novel electromagnetic stirring system employing two rotating magnetic fields. The system controls stirring flow in the meniscus region of a continuous casting mold independently from the stirring induced within the remaining volume of the mold by a main electromagnetic stirrer (M-EMS). This control is achieved by applying to the meniscus region an auxiliary electromagnetic field whose direction of rotation is opposite to that of the main magnetic field produced by the M-EMS. The model computes values and spatial distributions of electromagnetic parameters and fluid flow in the stirred pools of mercury in cylindrical and square geometries. Also predicted are the relationships between electromagnetics and fluid flows pertinent to a dynamic equilibrium of the opposing stirring swirls in the meniscus region. Results of the numerical simulation compared well with measurements obtained from experiments with mercury pools.

  16. Angular Dependence of Transport AC Losses in Superconducting Wire with Position-Dependent Critical Current Density in a DC Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xing-liang; Xiong, Li-ting; Gao, Yuan-wen; Zhou, You-he

    2013-07-01

    Transport AC losses play a very important role in high temperature superconductors (HTSs), which usually carry AC transport current under applied magnetic field in typical application-like conditions. In this paper, we propose the analytical formula for transport AC losses in HTS wire by considering critical current density of both inhomogeneous and anisotropic field dependent. The angular dependence of critical current density is described by effective mass theory, and the HTS wire has inhomogeneous distribution cross-section of critical current density. We calculate the angular dependence of normalized AC losses under different DC applied magnetic fields. The numerical results of this formula agree well with the experiment data and are better than the results of Norris formula. This analytical formula can explain the deviation of experimental transport current losses from the Norris formula and apply to calculate transport AC losses in realistic practical condition.

  17. Crustal evolution inferred from Apollo magnetic measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyal, P.; Daily, W. D.; Vanyan, L. L.

    1978-01-01

    Magnetic field and solar wind plasma density measurements were analyzed to determine the scale size characteristics of remanent fields at the Apollo 12, 15, and 16 landing sites. Theoretical model calculations of the field-plasma interaction, involving diffusion of the remanent field into the solar plasma, were compared to the data. The information provided by all these experiments shows that remanent fields over most of the lunar surface are characterized by spatial variations as small as a few kilometers. Large regions (50 to 100 km) of the lunar crust were probably uniformly magnetized during early crustal evolution. Bombardment and subsequent gardening of the upper layers of these magnetized regions left randomly oriented, smaller scale (5 to 10 km) magnetic sources close to the surface. The larger scale size fields of magnitude approximately 0.1 gammas are measured by the orbiting subsatellite experiments and the small scale sized remanent fields of magnitude approximately 100 gammas are measured by the surface experiments.

  18. Superconducting-magnetic heterostructures: a method of decreasing AC losses and improving critical current density in multifilamentary conductors.

    PubMed

    Glowacki, B A; Majoros, M

    2009-06-24

    Magnetic materials can help to improve the performance of practical superconductors on the macroscale/microscale as magnetic diverters and also on the nanoscale as effective pinning centres. It has been established by numerical modelling that magnetic shielding of the filaments reduces AC losses in self-field conditions due to decoupling of the filaments and, at the same time, it increases the critical current of the composite. This effect is especially beneficial for coated conductors, in which the anisotropic properties of the superconductor are amplified by the conductor architecture. However, ferromagnetic coatings are often chemically incompatible with YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7) and (Pb,Bi)(2)Sr(2)Ca(2)Cu(3)O(9) conductors, and buffer layers have to be used. In contrast, in MgB(2) conductors an iron matrix may remain in direct contact with the superconducting core. The application of superconducting-magnetic heterostructures requires consideration of the thermal and electromagnetic stability of the superconducting materials used. On one hand, magnetic materials reduce the critical current gradient across the individual filaments but, on the other hand, they often reduce the thermal conductivity between the superconducting core and the cryogen, which may cause destruction of the conductor in the event of thermal instability. A possible nanoscale method of improving the critical current density of superconducting conductors is the introduction of sub-micron magnetic pinning centres. However, the volumetric density and chemical compatibility of magnetic inclusions has to be controlled to avoid suppression of the superconducting properties. PMID:21828430

  19. Magnetization measurements on fine cobalt particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Respaud, M.; Broto, J. M.; Rakoto, H.; Ousset, J. C.; Osuna, J.; Ould Ely, T.; Amiens, C.; Chaudret, B.; Askenazy, S.

    1998-05-01

    We measure the magnetization of fine cobalt particles by SQUID and pulsed magnetic fields up to 35 T. These measurements have been made on two samples (C1, C2) with nonagglomerated particles. The analysis of the magnetic meaurements evidences very narrow log-normal size distribution centered around 1.5 nm (≅150 atoms) and 1.9 nm (≅310 atoms) for C1 and C2, respectively. Magnetization at 4.2 K seems to saturate in fields up to 5 T leading to an enhanced mean magnetic moment per atom compared to bulk value (1.72 μB). However, magnetization measurements up to 35 T do not permit to reach saturation, and show a continuous increase of μCo reaching 2.1±0.1 μB (C1) and 1.9±0.1 μB (C2). The effective magnetic anisotropies are found to be larger than those of bulk materials and decrease with increasing particle size. These features are associated with the large influence of the surface atoms.

  20. MAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENTS FOR FAST-CHANGING MAGNETIC FIELDS.

    SciTech Connect

    JAIN, A.; ESCALLIER, J.; GANETIS, G.; LOUIE, W.; MARONE, A.; THOMAS. R.; WANDERER, P.

    2004-10-03

    Several recent applications for fast ramped magnets have been found that require rapid measurement of the field quality during the ramp. (In one instance, accelerator dipoles will be ramped at 1 T/sec, with measurements needed to the accuracy typically required for accelerators.) We have built and tested a new type of magnetic field measuring system to meet this need. The system consists of 16 stationary pickup windings mounted on a cylinder. The signals induced in the windings in a changing magnetic field are sampled and analyzed to obtain the field harmonics. To minimize costs, printed circuit boards were used for the pickup windings and a combination of amplifiers and ADPs used for the voltage readout system. New software was developed for the analysis. Magnetic field measurements of a model dipole developed for the SIS200 accelerator at GSI are presented. The measurements are needed to insure that eddy currents induced by the fast ramps do not impact the field quality needed for successful accelerator operation.

  1. Magnetic Field Response Measurement Acquisition System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Taylor,Bryant D.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a measurement acquisition method that alleviates many shortcomings of traditional measurement systems. The shortcomings are a finite number of measurement channels, weight penalty associated with measurements, electrical arcing, wire degradations due to wear or chemical decay and the logistics needed to add new sensors. Wire degradation has resulted in aircraft fatalities and critical space launches being delayed. The key to this method is the use of sensors designed as passive inductor-capacitor circuits that produce magnetic field responses. The response attributes correspond to states of physical properties for which the sensors measure. Power is wirelessly provided to the sensing element by using Faraday induction. A radio frequency antenna produces a time-varying magnetic field used to power the sensor and receive the magnetic field response of the sensor. An interrogation system for discerning changes in the sensor response frequency, resistance and amplitude has been developed and is presented herein. Multiple sensors can be interrogated using this method. The method eliminates the need for a data acquisition channel dedicated to each sensor. The method does not require the sensors to be near the acquisition hardware. Methods of developing magnetic field response sensors and the influence of key parameters on measurement acquisition are discussed. Examples of magnetic field response sensors and the respective measurement characterizations are presented. Implementation of this method on an aerospace system is discussed.

  2. Magnetic space-based field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    Satellite measurements of the geomagnetic field began with the launch of Sputnik 3 in May 1958 and have continued sporadically in the intervening years. A list of spacecraft that have made significant contributions to an understanding of the near-earth geomagnetic field is presented. A new era in near-earth magnetic field measurements began with NASA's launch of Magsat in October 1979. Attention is given to geomagnetic field modeling, crustal magnetic anomaly studies, and investigations of the inner earth. It is concluded that satellite-based magnetic field measurements make global surveys practical for both field modeling and for the mapping of large-scale crustal anomalies. They are the only practical method of accurately modeling the global secular variation. Magsat is providing a significant contribution, both because of the timeliness of the survey and because its vector measurement capability represents an advance in the technology of such measurements.

  3. In situ detection method for obtaining permeability of Fe-based amorphous alloys: ac resistance measurement for Fe{sub 84}Nb{sub 7}B{sub 9}

    SciTech Connect

    Ichitsubo, Tetsu; Matsubara, Eiichiro; Tanaka, Satoshi; Nishiyama, Nobuyuki; Amiya, Kenji

    2005-01-17

    In this letter, we propose an in situ detection method for obtaining permeability of soft magnetic Fe-based amorphous alloys. The temperature dependence of ac resistance was measured at different frequencies during heat treatment of Fe{sub 84}Nb{sub 7}B{sub 9} amorphous alloys. A significant increase in the ac ({approx}1000 kHz) resistance appears at around 920 K during the heating process, which arises from the skin effect caused by a marked increase in sample permeability. This skin effect diminishes when the sample is heated to approximately 1100 K, which corresponds to the decrease in its permeability. Consequently, we note that the ac resistance measurement is useful for quick in situ assessment to achieve the soft magnetic property of an Fe-based amorphous alloy.

  4. Ac magnetotransport in La 0.7Sr 0.3Mn 0.95Fe 0.05O 3 at low dc magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barik, S. K.; Mahendiran, R.

    2011-12-01

    We report the ac electrical response of La 0.7Sr 0.3Mn 1- xFe xO 3(x=0.05) as a function of temperature, magnetic field (H) and frequency of radio frequency ( rf) current ( f=0.1-20 MHz). The ac impedance (Z) was measured while rf current directly passes through the sample as well as in a coil surrounding the sample. It is found that with increasing frequency of the rf current, Z(T) shows an abrupt increase accompanied by a peak at the ferromagnetic Curie temperature. The peak decreases in magnitude and shifts down with increasing value of H. We find a magnetoimpedance of ΔZ/Z=-21% for ΔH=500 Oe at f=1 MHz around room temperature when the rf current flows directly through the sample and ΔZ/Z=-65.9% when the rf current flows through a coil surrounding the sample. It is suggested that the magnetoimpedance observed is a consequence of suppression of transverse permeability which enhances skin depth for current flow. Our results indicate that the magnetic field control of high frequency impedance of manganites is more useful than direct current magnetoresistance for low-field applications.

  5. Magnetic Field Response Measurement Acquisition System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Stanley E. (Inventor); Taylor, Bryant D. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic field response sensors designed as passive inductor- capacit or circuits produce magnetic field responses whose harmonic frequenci es correspond to states of physical properties for which the sensors measure. Power to the sensing element is acquired using Faraday induc tion. A radio frequency antenna produces the time varying magnetic fi eld used for powering the sensor, as well as receiving the magnetic field response of the sensor. An interrogation architecture for disce rning changes in sensor's response frequency, resistance and amplitud e is integral to the method thus enabling a variety of measurements. Multiple sensors can be interrogated using this method, thus eliminat ing the need to have a data acquisition channel dedicated to each se nsor. The method does not require the sensors to be in proximity to a ny form of acquisition hardware. A vast array of sensors can be used as interchangeable parts in an overall sensing system.

  6. Magnetic Field Response Measurement Acquisition System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E. (Inventor); Taylor, Bryant D. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Fox, Christopher L. (Inventor); Fox, Melanie L. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic field response sensors designed as passive inductor-capacitor circuits produce magnetic field responses whose harmonic frequencies correspond to states of physical properties for which the sensors measure. Power to the sensing element is acquired using Faraday induction. A radio frequency antenna produces the time varying magnetic field used for powering the sensor, as well as receiving the magnetic field response of the sensor. An interrogation architecture for discerning changes in sensor s response kequency, resistance and amplitude is integral to the method thus enabling a variety of measurements. Multiple sensors can be interrogated using this method, thus eliminating the need to have a data acquisition channel dedicated to each sensor. The method does not require the sensors to be in proximity to any form of acquisition hardware. A vast array of sensors can be used as interchangeable parts in an overall sensing system.

  7. Mechanism and flow measurement of AC electrowetting propulsion on free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Junqi; Cho, Sung Kwon

    2015-03-01

    A free surface in contact with a floating object can be vertically oscillated by applying an alternating current electrowetting-on-dielectric (AC EWOD). The oscillation of the free surface generates a propelling force on the centimeter-sized floating object. This paper describes a propulsion mechanism in free-surface oscillation along with its experimental results. Flow visualizations, wave patterns measured by the free-surface synthetic schlieren method, and PIV measurements show that the oscillation generates a capillary Stokes drift on the water surface and two counter-rotating spiral underwater vortices, leading to an ejecting flow (streaming flow) normal to the wall of the boat. The momentum of the ejecting flow produces a reaction force on the wall and ultimately propels the floating boat. The propulsion speed of the boat highly depends on the amplitude, frequency, and shape of the AC EWOD signal. Curve fittings based on the Stokes drift well match the experimental measurements of propulsion speed. The width of the EWOD electrode also has significant effects on the boat speed.

  8. DC-magnetic field vector measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R.

    1981-01-01

    A magnetometer experiment was designed to determine the local magnetic field by measuring the total of the Earth's magnetic field and that of an unknown spacecraft. The measured field vector components are available to all onboard experiments via the Spacelab command and data management system. The experiment consists of two parts, an electronic box and the magnetic field sensor. The sensor includes three independent measuring flux-gate magnetometers, each measuring one component. The physical background is the nonlinearity of the B-H curve of a ferrite material. Two coils wound around a ferrite rod are necessary. One of them, a tank coil, pumps the ferrite rod at approximately 20 kilohertz. As a consequence of the nonlinearity, many harmonics can be produced. The second coil (i.e., the detection coil) resonates to the first harmonic. If an unknown dc or low-frequency magnetic field exists, the amplitude of the first harmonic is a measure for the unknown magnetic field. The voltages detected by the sensors are to be digitized and transferred to the command and data management system.

  9. An instrument for precision magnetic measurements of large magnetic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrán, D.; Bordas, J.; Campmany, J.; Molins, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Traveria, M.

    2001-02-01

    A high precision-system for measuring the three-dimensional distribution of magnetic fields over large volumes, such as those produced by accelerator magnets, has been designed and commissioned. This instrument can be calibrated to a precision of ±1 G for magnetic fields of up to 1.5 T by means of an NMR system. A moving arm containing a 3D Hall probe scans the volume (up to 500×250×3000 mm 3) with a precision of ±50 μm in any direction. After appropriate identification of the various sources of error, and the optimisation of the various parts of the instrument where they are generated, an overall precision of ±2 G has been achieved, i.e. a relative precision of ±2×10 -4 for a nominal field of 1 T.

  10. Direct measurements of the magnetic entropy change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, K. K.; Bez, H. N.; von Moos, L.; Bjørk, R.; Eriksen, D.; Bahl, C. R. H.

    2015-10-01

    An experimental device that can accurately measure the magnetic entropy change, Δs, as a function of temperature, T, and magnetic field, H, is presented. The magnetic field source is in this case a set of counter-rotating concentric Halbach-type magnets, which produce a highly homogeneous applied field with constant orientation. The field may be varied from 0 to 1.5 T in a continuous way. The temperature stability of the system is controlled to within ±10 mK and the standard range for the current setup is from 230 K to 330 K. The device is under high vacuum and we show that thermal losses to the ambient are negligible in terms of the calorimetric determination of the magnetic entropy change, while the losses cannot be ignored when correcting for the actual sample temperature. We apply the device to two different types of samples; one is commercial grade Gd, i.e., a pure second-order phase transition material, while the other is Gd5Si2Ge2, a first order magnetic phase transition material. We demonstrate the device's ability to fully capture the thermal hysteresis of the latter sample by following appropriate thermal resetting scheme and magnetic resetting scheme.

  11. Comparative magnetic measurements on social insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Jandira; Cernicchiaro, Geraldo; Winklhofer, Michael; Dutra, Humberto; de Oliveira, Paulo S.; S. Esquivel, Darci M.; Wajnberg, Eliane

    2005-03-01

    Biogenic magnetite has been detected in several species of social insects and may well form the basis of a magnetic sensory system in these animals, although other physiological functions are possible, too. We report here on hysteresis measurements on honeybees ( Apis mellifera) and the termite Neocapritermes opacus. The ratio of saturation remanence to saturation magnetization, Jrs/ Js, was determined as 0.11 (0.15) in bees (termite), the coercive force Hc as 90 (50 Oe). The magnetic remanence is generally low (of the order of 10 -6 emu per individual). The values obtained are similar to the ones reported previously on a migratory ant species, which suggests that biomineralization of magnetic material in social insects may underlie a generic process.

  12. Artifacts in magnetic measurements of fluid samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boekelheide, Z.; Dennis, C. L.

    2016-08-01

    Applications of magnetic fluids are ever increasing, as well as the corresponding need to be able to characterize these fluids in situ. Commercial magnetometers are accurate and well-characterized for solid and powder samples, but their use with fluid samples is more limited. Here, we describe artifacts which can occur in magnetic measurements of fluid samples and their impact. The most critical problem in the measurement of fluid samples is the dynamic nature of the sample position and size/shape. Methods to reduce these artifacts are also discussed, such as removal of air bubbles and dynamic centering.

  13. Absolute method of measuring magnetic susceptibility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.; Senftle, F.E.

    1959-01-01

    An absolute method of standardization and measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of small samples is presented which can be applied to most techniques based on the Faraday method. The fact that the susceptibility is a function of the area under the curve of sample displacement versus distance of the magnet from the sample, offers a simple method of measuring the susceptibility without recourse to a standard sample. Typical results on a few substances are compared with reported values, and an error of less than 2% can be achieved. ?? 1959 The American Institute of Physics.

  14. Tools and Setups for Experiments with AC and Rotating Magnetic Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponikvar, D.

    2010-01-01

    A rotating magnetic field is the basis for the transformation of electrical energy to mechanical energy. School experiments on the rotating magnetic field are rare since they require the use of specially prepared mechanical setups and/or relatively large, three-phase power supplies to achieve strong magnetic fields. This paper proposes several…

  15. Measurements of Brownian relaxation of magnetic nanobeads using planar Hall effect bridge sensors.

    PubMed

    Østerberg, F W; Rizzi, G; Zardán Gómez de la Torre, T; Strömberg, M; Strømme, M; Svedlindh, P; Hansen, M F

    2013-02-15

    We compare measurements of the Brownian relaxation response of magnetic nanobeads in suspension using planar Hall effect sensors of cross geometry and a newly proposed bridge geometry. We find that the bridge sensor yields six times as large signals as the cross sensor, which results in a more accurate determination of the hydrodynamic size of the magnetic nanobeads. Finally, the bridge sensor has successfully been used to measure the change in dynamic magnetic response when rolling circle amplified DNA molecules are bound to the magnetic nanobeads. The change is validated by measurements performed in a commercial AC susceptometer. The presented bridge sensor is, thus, a promising component in future lab-on-a-chip biosensors for detection of clinically relevant analytes, including bacterial genomic DNA and proteins.

  16. Measurements of Brownian relaxation of magnetic nanobeads using planar Hall effect bridge sensors.

    PubMed

    Østerberg, F W; Rizzi, G; Zardán Gómez de la Torre, T; Strömberg, M; Strømme, M; Svedlindh, P; Hansen, M F

    2013-02-15

    We compare measurements of the Brownian relaxation response of magnetic nanobeads in suspension using planar Hall effect sensors of cross geometry and a newly proposed bridge geometry. We find that the bridge sensor yields six times as large signals as the cross sensor, which results in a more accurate determination of the hydrodynamic size of the magnetic nanobeads. Finally, the bridge sensor has successfully been used to measure the change in dynamic magnetic response when rolling circle amplified DNA molecules are bound to the magnetic nanobeads. The change is validated by measurements performed in a commercial AC susceptometer. The presented bridge sensor is, thus, a promising component in future lab-on-a-chip biosensors for detection of clinically relevant analytes, including bacterial genomic DNA and proteins. PMID:22841901

  17. Ac irreversibility line of bismuth-based high temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Mehdaoui, A.; Beille, J.; Berling, D.; Loegel, B.; Noudem, J.G.; Tournier, R.

    1997-09-01

    We discuss the magnetic properties of lead doped Bi-2223 bulk samples obtained through combined magnetic melt texturing and hot pressing (MMTHP). The ac complex susceptibility measurements are achieved over a broad ac field range (1 Oe{lt}h{sub ac}{lt}100 Oe) and show highly anisotropic properties. The intergranular coupling is improved in the direction perpendicular to the applied stress and magnetic field direction, and an intragranular loss peak is observed for the first time. A comparison is made with other bismuth-based compounds and it is shown that the MMTHP process shifts the ac irreversibility line (ac IL) toward higher fields. It is also shown that all the ac IL{close_quote}s for quasi 2D bismuth-based compounds show a nearly quadratic temperature dependence and deviate therefore strongly from the linear behavior observed in quasi 3D compounds and expected from a critical state model.{copyright} {ital 1997 Materials Research Society.}

  18. Boosted Hyperthermia Therapy by Combined AC Magnetic and Photothermal Exposures in Ag/Fe3O4 Nanoflowers.

    PubMed

    Das, R; Rinaldi-Montes, N; Alonso, J; Amghouz, Z; Garaio, E; García, J A; Gorria, P; Blanco, J A; Phan, M H; Srikanth, H

    2016-09-28

    Over the past two decades, magnetic hyperthermia and photothermal therapy are becoming very promising supplementary techniques to well-established cancer treatments such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy. These techniques have dramatically improved their ability to perform controlled treatments, relying on the procedure of delivering nanoscale objects into targeted tumor tissues, which can release therapeutic killing doses of heat either upon AC magnetic field exposure or laser irradiation. Although an intense research effort has been made in recent years to study, separately, magnetic hyperthermia using iron oxide nanoparticles and photothermal therapy based on gold or silver plasmonic nanostructures, the full potential of combining both techniques has not yet been systematically explored. Here we present a proof-of-principle experiment showing that designing multifunctional silver/magnetite (Ag/Fe3O4) nanoflowers acting as dual hyperthermia agents is an efficient route for enhancing their heating ability or specific absorption rate (SAR). Interestingly, the SAR of the nanoflowers is increased by at least 1 order of magnitude under the application of both an external magnetic field of 200 Oe and simultaneous laser irradiation. Furthermore, our results show that the synergistic exploitation of the magnetic and photothermal properties of the nanoflowers reduces the magnetic field and laser intensities that would be required in the case that both external stimuli were applied separately. This constitutes a key step toward optimizing the hyperthermia therapy through a combined multifunctional magnetic and photothermal treatment and improving our understanding of the therapeutic process to specific applications that will entail coordinated efforts in physics, engineering, biology, and medicine. PMID:27589410

  19. Measurements of Photospheric and Chromospheric Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagg, Andreas; Lites, Bruce; Harvey, Jack; Gosain, Sanjay; Centeno, Rebecca

    2015-12-01

    The Sun is replete with magnetic fields, with sunspots, pores and plage regions being their most prominent representatives on the solar surface. But even far away from these active regions, magnetic fields are ubiquitous. To a large extent, their importance for the thermodynamics in the solar photosphere is determined by the total magnetic flux. Whereas in low-flux quiet Sun regions, magnetic structures are shuffled around by the motion of granules, the high-flux areas like sunspots or pores effectively suppress convection, leading to a temperature decrease of up to 3000 K. The importance of magnetic fields to the conditions in higher atmospheric layers, the chromosphere and corona, is indisputable. Magnetic fields in both active and quiet regions are the main coupling agent between the outer layers of the solar atmosphere, and are therefore not only involved in the structuring of these layers, but also for the transport of energy from the solar surface through the corona to the interplanetary space. Consequently, inference of magnetic fields in the photosphere, and especially in the chromosphere, is crucial to deepen our understanding not only for solar phenomena such as chromospheric and coronal heating, flares or coronal mass ejections, but also for fundamental physical topics like dynamo theory or atomic physics. In this review, we present an overview of significant advances during the last decades in measurement techniques, analysis methods, and the availability of observatories, together with some selected results. We discuss the problems of determining magnetic fields at smallest spatial scales, connected with increasing demands on polarimetric sensitivity and temporal resolution, and highlight some promising future developments for their solution.

  20. Magnetic measurement of creep damage: modeling and measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sablik, Martin J.; Jiles, David C.

    1996-11-01

    Results of inspection of creep damage by magnetic hysteresis measurements on Cr-Mo steel are presented. It is shown that structure-sensitive parameters such as coercivity, remanence and hysteresis loss are sensitive to creep damage. Previous metallurgical studies have shown that creep changes the microstructure of he material by introducing voids, dislocations, and grain boundary cavities. As cavities develop, dislocations and voids move out to grain boundaries; therefore, the total pinning sources for domain wall motion are reduced.This, together with the introduction of a demagnetizing field due to the cavities, results in the decrease of both coercivity, remanence and hence, concomitantly, hysteresis loss. Incorporating these structural effects into a magnetomechanical hysteresis model developed previously by us produces numerical variations of coercivity, remanence and hysteresis loss consistent with what is measured. The magnetic model has therefore been used to obtain appropriately modified magnetization curves for each element of creep-damaged material in a finite element (FE) calculation. The FE calculation has been used to simulate magnetic detection of non-uniform creep damage around a seam weld in a 2.25 Cr 1Mo steam pipe. In particular, in the simulation, a magnetic C-core with primary and secondary coils was placed with its pole pieces flush against the specimen in the vicinity of the weld. The secondary emf was shown to be reduced when creep damage was present inside the pipe wall at the cusp of the weld and in the vicinity of the cusp. The calculation showed that the C- core detected creep damage best if it spanned the weld seam width and if the current in the primary was such that the C- core was not magnetically saturated. Experimental measurements also exhibited the dip predicted in emf, but the measurements are not yet conclusive because the effects of magnetic property changes of weld materials, heat- affected material, and base material have

  1. Summary of HQ01e magnetic measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Caspi, S.; Cheng, D. W.; Dietderich, D. R.; Felice, H.; Ferracin, P.; Godeke, A.; Hafalia, A.R.; Joseph, J. M.; Lizarazo, J.; Marchevsky, M.; Sabbi, G. L.; Ghosh, A.; Schmalzle, J.; Wanderer, P.; Ambrosio, G.; Bossert, R.; Chlachidze, G.; DiMarco, J.; Zlobin, A.V.; Milanese, A.; Todesco, E.

    2011-11-28

    The magnetic measurements of HQ01e, a 1 m long LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) high-gradient quadrupole model, were performed at 4.4 K and above 40 K at the magnet test facility of LBNL in July 2011. The 120 mm aperture cos2θ Nb{sub 3}Sn magnet was designed with accelerator magnet features including alignment and field quality. Conductor-limited gradient was 195 T/m at 4.4 K. During the measurement, a ramp rate of 10 A/s was used and measurements at the nominal current of 14.2 kA (82% of short-sample limit with a gradient of 160 T/m) were performed using the 250 mm long printed-circuit board rotating probe developed by FNAL. At 14.2 kA, 2.7 units of b{sub 6} and 0.7 units of b{sub 10} were measured. Large persistent current contribution and strong dynamic effects were observed. We analyzed the allowed and non-allowed harmonics obtained during the measurements above 40 K and at the nominal current. Significant change of the skew sextupole occurred between 50 K and 95 K. The allowed multipole and the low-order non-allowed multipoles at the straight section were explained through the rigid displacement of coil blocks with an amplitude less than 100 μm. We also attempted to correlate the coil asymmetry (a{sub 3} and b{sub 3}) with the measured coil pole azimuthal strain. The dynamic multipole measured at the magnetic straight section varied linearly with the ramp rate of magnet current ranging from 10 A/s to 60 A/s. It was attributed to the inter-strand coupling currents with low crossover resistance. The crossover resistance of the cables at the inner layer of the magnet was estimated to range between 0.2 μΩ to 0.7 μΩ.

  2. A magnetic nanobead-based bioassay provides sensitive detection of single- and biplex bacterial DNA using a portable AC susceptometer

    PubMed Central

    Strömberg, Mattias; Zardán Gómez de la Torre, Teresa; Nilsson, Mats; Svedlindh, Peter; Strømme, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Bioassays relying on magnetic read-out using probe-tagged magnetic nanobeads are potential platforms for low-cost biodiagnostic devices for pathogen detection. For optimal assay performance it is crucial to apply an easy, efficient and robust bead-probe conjugation protocol. In this paper, sensitive (1.5 pM) singleplex detection of bacterial DNA sequences is demonstrated in a portable AC susceptometer by a magnetic nanobead-based bioassay principle; the volume-amplified magnetic nanobead detection assay (VAM-NDA). Two bead sizes, 100 and 250 nm, are investigated along with a highly efficient, rapid, robust, and stable conjugation chemistry relying on the avidin–biotin interaction for bead-probe attachment. Avidin-biotin conjugation gives easy control of the number of detection probes per bead; thus allowing for systematic investigation of the impact of varying the detection probe surface coverage upon bead immobilization in rolling circle amplified DNA-coils. The existence of an optimal surface coverage is discussed. Biplex VAM-NDA detection is for the first time demonstrated in the susceptometer: Semi-quantitative results are obtained and it is concluded that the concentration of DNA-coils in the incubation volume is of crucial importance for target quantification. The present findings bring the development of commercial biodiagnostic devices relying on the VAM–NDA further towards implementation in point-of-care and outpatient settings. PMID:24174315

  3. Measurements of magnetic fields in solar prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deglinnocenti, Egidio Landi

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic fields can be measured, in solar prominences, by means of two different basic mechanisms that are responsible for the introduction (or the reduction) of a given amount of polarization in spectral lines: these are the Zeeman effect and the Hanle effect. Through the splitting of the magnetic components of a spectral line, the Zeeman effect is capable of introducing a certain amount of circular polarization across the line profile. The Hanle effect consist of a modification of the linear polarization that is induced in spectral lines by the anisotropic illumination of the prominence plasma by the photospheric radiation field. These two effects are briefly discussed.

  4. AC-Conductivity Measure from Heat Production of Free Fermions in Disordered Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bru, J.-B.; de Siqueira Pedra, W.; Hertling, C.

    2016-05-01

    We extend (Bru et al. in J Math Phys 56:051901-1-51, 2015) in order to study the linear response of free fermions on the lattice within a (independently and identically distributed) random potential to a macroscopic electric field that is time- and space-dependent. We obtain the notion of a macroscopic AC-conductivity measure which only results from the second principle of thermodynamics. The latter corresponds here to the positivity of the heat production for cyclic processes on equilibrium states. Its Fourier transform is a continuous bounded function which is naturally called (macroscopic) conductivity. We additionally derive Green-Kubo relations involving time-correlations of bosonic fields coming from current fluctuations in the system. This is reminiscent of non-commutative central limit theorems.

  5. Micelles driven magnetite (Fe3O4) hollow spheres and a study on AC magnetic properties for hyperthermia application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Madhuri Mandal; Dey, Chaitali; Bandyopadhyay, Ayan; Sarkar, Debasish; Ahir, Manisha

    2016-11-01

    Here we have discussed about designing the magnetic particles for hyperthermia therapy and done some studies in this direction. We have used oleylamine micelles as template to synthesize hollow-nanospheres (HNS) of magnetite by solvo-thermal technique. We have shown that oleylamine plays an important role to generate hollow particles. Structural analysis was done by XRD measurement and morphological measurements like SEM and TEM was performed to confirm the shape and size of hollow sphere particles. The detail magnetic measurements give an idea about the application of these HNS for magnetic heating in hyperthermia therapy. In vitro cytotoxicity studies reveal that tolerable dose rate for these particles can be significantly high and particles are non-toxic in nature. Being hollow in structure and magnetic in nature such materials will also be useful in other application fields like in drug delivery, drug release, arsenic and heavy metal removal by adsorption technique, magnetic separation etc.

  6. An AC phase measuring interferometer for measuring dn/dT of fused silica and calcium fluoride at 193 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Shagam, R.N.

    1998-09-01

    A novel method for the measurement of the change in index of refraction vs. temperature (dn/dT) of fused silica and calcium fluoride at the 193 nm wavelength has been developed in support of thermal modeling efforts for the development of 193 nm-based photolithographic exposure tools. The method, based upon grating lateral shear interferometry, uses a transmissive linear grating to divide a 193 nm laser beam into several beam paths by diffraction which propagate through separate identical material samples. One diffracted order passing through one sample overlaps the undiffracted beam from a second sample and forms interference fringes dependent upon the optical path difference between the two samples. Optical phase delay due to an index change from heating one of the samples causes the interference fringes to change sinusoidally with phase. The interferometer also makes use of AC phase measurement techniques through lateral translation of the grating. Results for several samples of fused silica and calcium fluoride are demonstrated.

  7. Heat generation ability in AC magnetic field of MgAlxFe2-xO4 ferrite powder prepared by sol-gel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirazawa, Hideyuki; Ito, Yoshiki; Sangaa, Deleg; Tsogbadrakh, Namsrai; Aono, Hiromichi; Naohara, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    Al substituted MgAlXFe2-XO4 that have high heat generation ability in the AC magnetic field was obtained by Sol-Gel method. The heat generation ability was improved by Al3+ substitution, the highest heat generation property (ΔT = 127.2°C) was confirmed for X = 0.25 sample. This high heat generation ability was depended on hysteresis loss value, the hysteresis loss for X = 0.25 samples were significantly increased in the AC magnetic field.

  8. Quantitative Thermal Microscopy Measurement with Thermal Probe Driven by dc+ac Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodzenta, Jerzy; Juszczyk, Justyna; Kaźmierczak-Bałata, Anna; Firek, Piotr; Fleming, Austin; Chirtoc, Mihai

    2016-07-01

    Quantitative thermal measurements with spatial resolution allowing the examination of objects of submicron dimensions are still a challenging task. The quantity of methods providing spatial resolution better than 100 nm is very limited. One of them is scanning thermal microscopy (SThM). This method is a variant of atomic force microscopy which uses a probe equipped with a temperature sensor near the apex. Depending on the sensor current, either the temperature or the thermal conductivity distribution at the sample surface can be measured. However, like all microscopy methods, the SThM gives only qualitative information. Quantitative measuring methods using SThM equipment are still under development. In this paper, a method based on simultaneous registration of the static and the dynamic electrical resistances of the probe driven by the sum of dc and ac currents, and examples of its applications are described. Special attention is paid to the investigation of thin films deposited on thick substrates. The influence of substrate thermal properties on the measured signal and its dependence on thin film thermal conductivity and film thickness are analyzed. It is shown that in the case where layer thicknesses are comparable or smaller than the probe-sample contact diameter, a correction procedure is required to obtain actual thermal conductivity of the layer. Experimental results obtained for thin SiO2 and BaTiO_{3 }layers with thicknesses in the range from 11 nm to 100 nm are correctly confirmed with this approach.

  9. The magnet measurement facility for the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.; Doose, C.; Hogrefe, R.; Kim, K.; Merl, R.

    1993-10-01

    A magnet measurement facility has been developed to measure the prototype and production magnets for the Advance Photon Source. The measurement facility is semi-automatic in measurement control and data analysis. One dipole system and three rotating coil measurement systems for quadrupole and sextupole magnets and corresponding probe coils are described.

  10. Handheld magnetic sensor for measurement of tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, K.; Rajamani, R.

    2012-04-01

    This letter develops an analytical formulation for measurement of tension in a string using a handheld sensor. By gently pushing the sensor against the string, the tension in the string can be obtained. An experimental sensor prototype is constructed to verify the analytical formulation. The centimeter-sized prototype utilizes three moving pistons and magnetic field based measurements of their positions. Experimental data show that the sensor can accurately measure tension on a bench top rig. The developed sensor could be useful in a variety of orthopedic surgical procedures, including knee replacement, hip replacement, ligament repair, shoulder stabilization, and tendon repair.

  11. Crustal evolution inferred from Apollo magnetic measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyal, P.; Daily, W. D.; Vanian, L. L.

    1978-01-01

    The topology of lunar remanent fields is investigated by analyzing simultaneous magnetometer and solar wind spectrometer data. The diffusion model proposed by Vanyan (1977) to describe the field-plasma interaction at the lunar surface is extended to describe the interaction with fields characterized by two scale lengths, and the extended model is compared with data from three Apollo landing sites (Apollo 12, 15 and 16) with crustal fields of differing intensity and topology. Local remanent field properties from this analysis are compared with high spatial resolution magnetic maps obtained from the electron reflection experiment. It is concluded that remanent fields over most of the lunar surface are characterized by spatial variations as small as a few kilometers. Large regions (50 to 100 km) of the lunar crust were probably uniformly magnetized early in the evolution of the crust. Smaller scale (5 to 10 km) magnetic sources close to the surface were left by bombardment and subsequent gardening of the upper layers of these magnetized regions. The small scale sized remanent fields of about 100 gammas are measured by surface experiments, whereas the larger scale sized fields of about 0.1 gammas are measured by the orbiting subsatellite experiments.

  12. Tsunami magnetic signals in the Northwestern Pacific seafloor magnetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, N. R.; An, C.; Nair, M. C.; Maus, S.

    2013-12-01

    In the past two decades, underwater cables and seafloor magnetometers have observed motional inductance from ocean tsunamis. This study aimed to characterize the electromagnetic signatures of tsunamis from seafloor stations to assist in the long-term goal of real-time tsunami detection and warning systems. Four ocean seafloor stations (T13, T14, T15, T18) in the Northeastern Philippine Sea collected vector measurements of the electric and magnetic fields every minute during the period of 10/05/2005 to 11/30/2007 (Baba et al., 2010 PEPI). During this time, four major tsunamis occurred as a result of moment magnitude 8.0-8.1 earthquakes. These tsunamis include the 05/03/2006 Tonga event, the 01/13/2007 Kuril Islands event, the 04/01/2007 Solomon Islands event, and the 08/15/2007 Peru event. The Cornell Multi-grid Coupled Tsunami model (COMCOT) was used to predict the arrival time of the tsunamis at each of the seafloor stations. The stations' raw magnetic field signals underwent a high pass filter to then be examined for signals of the tsunami arrival. The high pass filtering showed clear tsunami signals for the Tonga event, but a clear signal was not seen for the other events. This may be due to signals from near Earth space with periods similar to tsunamis. To remove extraneous atmospheric magnetic signals, a cross-wavelet analysis was conducted using the horizontal field components from three INTERMAGNET land stations and the vertical component from the seafloor stations. The cross-wavelet analysis showed that for three of the six stations (two of the four tsunami events) the peak in wavelet amplitude matched the arrival of the tsunami. We discuss implications of our finding in magnetic monitoring of tsunamis.

  13. Tools and setups for experiments with AC and rotating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponikvar, D.

    2010-09-01

    A rotating magnetic field is the basis for the transformation of electrical energy to mechanical energy. School experiments on the rotating magnetic field are rare since they require the use of specially prepared mechanical setups and/or relatively large, three-phase power supplies to achieve strong magnetic fields. This paper proposes several experiments and describes setups and tools which are easy to obtain and work with. Free software is offered to generate the required signals by a personal computer. The experiments can be implemented in introductory physics courses on electromagnetism for undergraduates or specialized courses at high schools.

  14. Measuring the Hidden Aspects of Solar Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenflo, J. O.

    2008 marks the 100th anniversary of the discovery of astrophysical magnetic fields, when George Ellery Hale recorded the Zeeman splitting of spectral lines in sunspots. With the introduction of Babcock's photoelectric magnetograph, it soon became clear that the Sun's magnetic field outside sunspots is extremely structured. The field strengths that were measured were found to get larger when the spatial resolutionwas improved. It was therefore necessary to come up with methods to go beyond the spatial resolution limit and diagnose the intrinsic magnetic-field properties without dependence on the quality of the telescope used. The line-ratio technique that was developed in the early 1970s revealed a picture where most flux that we see in magnetograms originates in highly bundled, kG fields with a tiny volume filling factor. This led to interpretations in terms of discrete, strong-field magnetic flux tubes embedded in a rather field-free medium, and a whole industry of flux tube models at increasing levels of sophistication. This magnetic-field paradigm has now been shattered with the advent of high-precision imaging polarimeters that allow us to apply the so-called "Second Solar Spectrum" to diagnose aspects of solar magnetism that have been hidden to Zeeman diagnostics. It is found that the bulk of the photospheric volume is seething with intermediately strong, tangled fields. In the new paradigm, the field behaves like a fractal with a high degree of self-similarity, spanning about 8 orders of magnitude in scale size, down to scales of order 10m.

  15. Design, fabrication, and calibration of curved integral coils for measuring transfer function, uniformity, and effective length of LBL ALS (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Advanced Light Source) Booster Dipole Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.I.; Nelson, D.; Marks, S.; Gee, B.; Wong, W.; Meneghetti, J.

    1989-03-01

    A matched pair of curved integral coils has been designed, fabricated and calibrated at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for measuring Advanced Light Source (ALS) Booster Dipole Magnets. Distinctive fabrication and calibration techniques are described. The use of multifilar magnet wire in fabrication integral search coils is described. Procedures used and results of AC and DC measurements of transfer function, effective length and uniformity of the prototype booster dipole magnet are presented in companion papers. 8 refs.

  16. Absolute specific heat measurements of a microgram Pb crystal using ac nanocalorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliati, S.; Rydh, A.

    2012-12-01

    Heat capacity measurements using the ac steady state method are often considered difficult to provide absolute accuracy. By adjusting the working frequency to maintain a constant phase and using the phase information to obtain the heat capacity, we have found that it is possible to achieve good absolute accuracy. Here we present a thermodynamic study of a ~ 2.6 μg Pb superconducting crystal to demonstrate the newly opened capabilities. The sample is measured using a differential membrane-based calorimeter. The custom-made calorimetric cell is a pile of thin film Ti heater, insulation layer and Ge1-xAux thermometer fabricated in the center of two Si3N4 membranes. It has a background heat capacity < 100 nJ/K at 300 K, decreasing to 9 pJ/K at 1 K. The sample is characterized at temperatures down to 0.5 K. The zero field transition at Tc = 7.21 K has a width asymp 20 mK and displays no upturn in C. From the heat capacity jump at Tc and the extrapolated Sommerfeld term we find ΔC/γTc = 2.68. The latent heat curve obtained from the zero field heat capacity measurement, and the deviations of the thermodynamic critical field from the empirical expression Hc = Hc (0) [1 - (T/Tc)2] are discussed. Both analyses give results in good agreement with literature.

  17. Linearity of the Faraday-rotation-type ac magnetic-field sensor with a ferrimagnetic or ferromagnetic rotator film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Hiroshi; Asahara, Yousuke

    1996-03-01

    We analyze the linearity and modulation depth of ac magnetic-field sensors or current sensors, using a ferrimagnetic or ferromagnetic film as the Faraday rotator and employing the detection of only the zeroth-order optical diffraction component from the rotator. It is theoretically shown that for this class of sensor the condition of a constant modulation depth and that of a constant ratio error give an identical series of curves for the relationship between Faraday rotation angle greater than or equals V and polarizer/analyzer relative angle Phi . We give some numerical examples to demonstrate the usefulness of the result with reference to a rare-earth iron garnet film as the rotator.

  18. AC current rectification in Nb films with or without symmetrical Nb/Ni periodic pinning arrays in perpendicular magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryadun, Vladimir

    2005-03-01

    Rectification of AC current has been observed in plain superconducting Nb films and in Nb/Ni films with symmetric periodic pinning centers. The rectified DC voltage appears for various sample geometries (cross or strip) both along and transverse to the alternating current direction, is nearly anti-symmetric with perpendicular magnetic field and strongly dependent on temperature below Tc. Analyses of the data at different temperatures, drive frequencies from 100kHz to 150MHz and at the different sample sides [1] shows that not far below Tc the rectification phenomena can be understood in terms of generation of electric fields due to local excess of critical current. Further below Tc anisotropic pinning effects could also contribute to the rectification. [1] F.G.Aliev, et al., Cond. Mat.405656. Supported by Comunidad Autonoma de Madrid -CAM/07N/0050/2002

  19. Analysis and measurements of Eddy current effects of a beam tube in a pulsed magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, S.

    1997-05-01

    The power supply design of the {gamma}{sub f} - jump system in FNAL Main Injector uses a resonant circuit. A critical design parameter is the ac losses of the beam tube in a pulsed quadrupole. This paper gives an analysis to this problem. An equivalent circuit model based on the impedance measurement was established. The measured and calculated losses are in agreement. Another effect of the eddy current is the distortion of the magnetic field inside the beam tube. A Morgan coil was used for field measurements up to 10 KHz. These results are presented in this paper.

  20. Influence of Critical Current Density on Guidance Force Decay of HTS Bulk Exposed to AC Magnetic Field Perturbation in a Maglev Vehicle System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longcai, Zhang; Jianguo, Kong

    2012-07-01

    Superconducting maglev vehicle is one of the most promising applications of HTS bulks. In such a system, the HTS bulks are always exposed to AC external magnetic field, which is generated by the inhomogeneous surface magnetic field of the NdFeB guideway. In our previous work, we studied the guidance force decay of the YBCO bulk over the NdFdB guideway used in the High-temperature superconducting maglev vehicle system with the application of the AC external magnetic field, and calculated the guidance force decay as a function of time based on an analytic model. In this paper, we investigated the influence of the critical current density on the guidance force decay of HTS bulk exposed to AC field perturbation in the maglev vehicle system and try to adopt a method to suppress the decay. From the results, it was found that the guidance force decay rate was higher for the bulk with lower critical current density. Therefore, we could suppress the guidance force decay of HTS bulk exposed to AC external magnetic field perturbation in the maglev vehicle system by improving critical current density of the bulk.

  1. Dipole-dipole interaction and its concentration dependence of magnetic fluid evaluated by alternating current hysteresis measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Satoshi; Yamada, Tsutomu; Takemura, Yasushi

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are used as therapeutic and diagnostic tools, such as for treating hyperthermia and in magnetic particle imaging, respectively. Magnetic relaxation is one of the heating mechanisms of MNPs. Brownian and Néel relaxation times are calculated conventional theories; however, the influence of dipole-dipole interactions has not been considered in conventional models. In this study, water-dispersed MNPs of different concentrations and MNPs fixed with an epoxy bond were prepared. dc and ac hysteresis loops for each sample were measured. With respect to both dc and ac hysteresis loops, magnetization decreased with the increase in MNP concentration because of inhibition of magnetic moment rotation due to dipole-dipole interactions. Moreover, intrinsic loss power (ILP) was estimated from the areas of the ac hysteresis loops. The dependence of ILP on the frequency of the magnetic field was evaluated for each MNP concentration. The peak frequency of ILP increased with the decrease in MNP concentration. These peaks were due to Brownian relaxation, as they were not seen with the fixed sample. This indicates that the Brownian relaxation time became shorter with lower MNP concentration, because the weaker dipole-dipole interactions with lower concentrations suggested that the magnetic moments could rotate more freely.

  2. Modified methods of stellar magnetic field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholtygin, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    The standard methods of the magnetic field measurement, based on an analysis of the relation between the Stokes V-parameter and the first derivative of the total line profile intensity, were modified by applying a linear integral operator \\hat{L} to both sides of this relation. As the operator \\hat{L}, the operator of the wavelet transform with DOG-wavelets is used. The key advantage of the proposed method is an effective suppression of the noise contribution to the line profile and the Stokes parameter V. The efficiency of the method has been studied using model line profiles with various noise contributions. To test the proposed method, the spectropolarimetric observations of the A0 star α2 CVn, the Of?p star HD 148937, and the A0 supergiant HD 92207 were used. The longitudinal magnetic field strengths calculated by our method appeared to be in good agreement with those determined by other methods.

  3. New Methods of Magnetic Field Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholtygin, A. F.

    2015-04-01

    The standard methods of magnetic field measurements, based on the relation between the Stokes V parameter and the first derivative of the line profile intensity were modified by applying a linear integral transform to both sides of this relation. We used the wavelet integral transform with the DOG wavelets. The key advantage of the proposed method is the effective suppression of the noise contribution both to the line profile and the Stokes V parameter. To test the proposed method, spectropolarimetric observations of the young O star θ1 Ori C were used. We also demonstrate that the smoothed Time Variation Spectra (smTVS) can be used as a tool for detecting the local stellar magnetic fields.

  4. RHIC AC DIPOLE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI,M.; METH,M.; PAI,C.; PARKER,B.; PEGGS,S.; ROSER,T.; SANDERS,R.; TRBOJEVIC,D.; ZALTSMAN,A.

    2001-06-18

    Two ac dipoles with vertical and horizontal magnetic field have been proposed at RHIC for applications in linear and non-linear beam dynamics and spin manipulations. A magnetic field amplitude of 380 Gm is required to produce a coherent oscillation of 5 times the rms beam size at the top energy. We take the ac dipole frequency to be 1.0% of the revolution frequency away from the betatron frequency. To achieve the strong magnetic field with minimum power loss, an air-core magnet with two seven turn winding of low loss Litz wire resonating at 64 kHz is designed. The system is also designed to allow one to connect the two magnet winding in series to resonate at 37 kHz for the spin manipulation. Measurements of a half length prototype magnet are also presented.

  5. A portable magnetic induction measurement system (PIMS).

    PubMed

    Cordes, Axel; Foussier, Jérôme; Pollig, Daniel; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2012-04-01

    For contactless monitoring of ventilation and heart activity, magnetic induction measurements are applicable. As the technique is harmless for the human body, it is well suited for long-term monitoring solutions, e.g., bedside monitoring, monitoring of home care patients, and the monitoring of persons in critical occupations. For such settings, a two-channel portable magnetic induction system has been developed, which is small and light enough to be fitted in a chair or bed. Because demodulation, control, and filtering are implemented on a front-end digital signal processor, a PC is not required (except for visualization/data storage during research and development). The system can be connected to a local area network (LAN) or wireless network (WiFi), allowing to connect several devices to a large monitoring system, e.g., for a residential home for the elderly or a hospital with low-risk patients not requiring standard ECG monitoring. To visualize data streams, a Qt-based (Qt-framework by Nokia, Espoo, Finland) monitoring application has been developed, which runs on Netbook computers, laptops, or standard PCs. To induce and measure the magnetic fields, external coils and amplifiers are required. This article describes the system and presents results for monitoring respiration and heart activity in a (divan) bed and for respiration monitoring in a chair. Planar configurations and orthogonal coil setups were examined during the measurement procedures. The measurement data were streamed over a LAN to a monitoring PC running Matlab (The MathWorks Inc, Natick, MA, USA). PMID:22505496

  6. Assessing magnetic nanoparticle aggregation in polymer melts by dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierra-Bermúdez, Sergio; Maldonado-Camargo, Lorena P.; Orange, François; Guinel, Maxime J.-F.; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2015-03-01

    Aggregation of magnetic nanoparticles in polymer melts was assessed using dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements. Magnetic nanocomposites consisting of polybutadiene/CoFe2O4 and polystyrene/CoFe2O4 mixtures were prepared using different techniques and characterized using dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements. The presence of nanoparticle aggregates determined using magnetic measurements was confirmed with transmission electron microscopy examinations. The results were in good agreement with predictions from the Flory-Huggins interaction parameters.

  7. Loss measurement and analysis for the prototype generator with HTS stator and permanent magnet rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Peng; Qu, Timing; Yu, Xiaoyu; Li, Longnian; Gu, Chen; Li, Xiaohang; Wang, Dewen; Hu, Boping; Chen, Duxing; Han, Zhenghe

    2013-11-01

    A prototype HTS synchronous generator with a permanent magnet rotor and HTS armature windings was developed. The rated armature frequency is 10 Hz. The cryogenic Dewar is tightly surrounded outside the iron core. Both HTS coils and the iron core were cooled by using conduction cooling method. During the process of no-load running, the no-load loss power data were obtained through the torque measurement. The temperature evolution characteristics of the stator was measured by PT-100 temperature sensors. These results show that the no-load loss power at around 77 K are much larger than that at room temperature. The possible reason for the no-load loss increment is discussed. The ac loss power of one individual HTS coil used in this generator was also tested. Compared with the iron loss power, the ac loss power is rather small and could be neglected.

  8. Applied AC and DC magnetic fields cause alterations in the mitotic cycle of early sea urchin embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, M.; Ernst, S.G.

    1995-09-01

    This study demonstrates that exposure to 60 Hz magnetic fields (3.4--8.8 mt) and magnetic fields over the range DC-600 kHz (2.5--6.5 mT) can alter the early embryonic development of sea urchin embryos by inducing alterations in the timing of the cell cycle. Batches of fertilized eggs were exposed to the fields produced by a coil system. Samples of the continuous cultures were taken and scored for cell division. The times of both the first and second cell divisions were advanced by ELF AC fields and by static fields. The magnitude of the 60 Hz effect appears proportional to the field strength over the range tested. the relationship to field frequency was nonlinear and complex. For certain frequencies above the ELF range, the exposure resulted in a delay of the onset of mitosis. The advance of mitosis was also dependent on the duration of exposure and on the timing of exposure relative to fertilization.

  9. Magnetoresistive DNA chips based on ac field focusing of magnetic labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, H. A.; Cardoso, F. A.; Ferreira, R.; Cardoso, S.; Freitas, P. P.

    2006-04-01

    A study was made on the sensitivity of a magnetoresistive DNA-chip platform being developed for cystic fibrosis diagnostics. The chip, comprised of an array of 2.5×80 μm2 U-shaped spin-valve sensors integrated within current line structures for magnetic label manipulation, enabled the detection at 30 Hz of 250 nm magnetic nanoparticles from 100 pM down to the pM range (or a target DNA concentration of 500 pM). It was observed that the sensor response increased linearly with label concentration. Noise spectra obtained for these sensors showed a thermal noise of 10-17 V2/Hz with a 1/f knee at 50 kHz at a 1 mA sense current, showing that lower detection limits are possible.

  10. Ac-susceptibility investigations of superspin blocking and freezing in interacting magnetic nanoparticle ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botez, Cristian E.; Morris, Joshua L.

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated the effect of dipolar interactions on the superspin blocking and freezing of 9 nm average size Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticle ensembles. Our dynamic susceptibility data reveals a two-regime behavior of the blocking temperature, T B, upon diluting a Fe3O4/hexane magnetic fluid. As the nanoparticle volume ratio, Φ, is reduced from an as-prepared reference Φ = 1 to Φ = 1/96, the blocking temperature decreases from 46.1 K to 34.2 K, but higher values reenter upon further diluting the magnetic fluid to Φ = 1/384 (where T B = 42.5 K). We found evidence that cooling below T B within the higher concentration range (Φ > 1/48) leads to the collective freezing of the superspins, whereas individual superspin blocking occurs in the presence of weaker interactions (Φ < 1/96). The unexpected increase of the blocking temperature with the decrease of the inter-particle interactions observed at low nanoparticle concentrations is well described by the Mørup-Tronc model.

  11. AC-susceptibility investigations of superspin blocking and freezing in interacting magnetic nanoparticle ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Joshua Logan

    We have investigated the effect of dipolar interactions on the superspin blocking and freezing of 10 nm average size Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticle ensembles. Our dynamic susceptibility data reveals a two-regime behavior of the blocking temperature, TB, upon diluting a Fe 3O4/hexane magnetic nanoparticle fluid. As the nanoparticle volume ratio, Phi, is reduced from an as-prepared reference Phi = 1 to Phi = 1/96, the blocking temperature decreases from 46.1 K to 34.2 K, but higher values reenter upon further diluting the magnetic fluid to Phi = 1/384 (where TB = 42.5 K). We show that cooling below TB within the higher concentration range (Phi > 1/48) leads to the collective freezing of the superspins in a spin-glass-like fashion, whereas individual superspin blocking occurs in the presence of weaker dipolar interactions (Phi < 1/96). The unexpected increase of the blocking temperature with the decrease of the interparticle interactions observed at low nanoparticle concentrations is well described by the Morup-Tronc (MT) model.

  12. Ac-susceptibility investigations of superspin blocking and freezing in interacting magnetic nanoparticle ensembles.

    PubMed

    Botez, Cristian E; Morris, Joshua L

    2016-03-18

    We have investigated the effect of dipolar interactions on the superspin blocking and freezing of 9 nm average size Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticle ensembles. Our dynamic susceptibility data reveals a two-regime behavior of the blocking temperature, T(B), upon diluting a Fe3O4/hexane magnetic fluid. As the nanoparticle volume ratio, Φ, is reduced from an as-prepared reference Φ = 1 to Φ = 1/96, the blocking temperature decreases from 46.1 K to 34.2 K, but higher values reenter upon further diluting the magnetic fluid to Φ = 1/384 (where T(B) = 42.5 K). We found evidence that cooling below T B within the higher concentration range (Φ > 1/48) leads to the collective freezing of the superspins, whereas individual superspin blocking occurs in the presence of weaker interactions (Φ < 1/96). The unexpected increase of the blocking temperature with the decrease of the inter-particle interactions observed at low nanoparticle concentrations is well described by the Mørup-Tronc model. PMID:26876797

  13. The Measurement of Surface Cracks in Metals by Using a.c. Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, D. H.; Waechter, R. T.; Collins, R.

    1982-05-01

    This paper describes some recent studies associated with the development of an instrument, the Crack Microgauge, at University College London, for the detection and measurement of surface cracks in metals by using a.c. electric currents in the metal surface. The design of the instrument has enhanced the accuracy of measurement of surface voltages in the neighbourhood of surface-breaking cracks to the point where it is now advantageous to consider the distribution of surface voltages by mathematical analysis. This enables better use to be made of the instrument since measurements can then be more accurately interpreted in terms of crack size and geometry. In contrast, earlier applications of the method relied on the calibration of the instruments against test blocks. The first generation of users of the Crack Microgauge interpreted their readings according to a simple one-dimensional normal crack model. This, however, is an oversimplification for cracks of finite aspect ratio and it leads to underestimates of centre-line crack depth typically of the order of 30-40<%> when the aspect ratio is about 3. The first major contribution of the theory was therefore to provide a model for surface current flow around cracks of finite aspect ratio. For this purpose a useful unfolding theorem was deduced in cases in which the current skin depth is small compared with crack dimensions. This allows the surface field to be unfolded into a plane distribution of potential satisfying Laplace's equation, and it enables us to obtain solutions for many different crack shapes by using standard mathematical methods. An account of these developments is given in ξ 2 of this paper. The unfolding of the surface field gives the global distribution of surface current around a crack, that is, on the length scale of the crack dimensions. On the length scale of the skin depth, however, the solutions need modification in the neighbourhood of the surface and interior edges of the crack. In

  14. Measuring the Earth's Magnetic Field in a Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartacci, A.; Straulino, S.

    2008-01-01

    Two methods for measuring the Earth's magnetic field are described. In the former, according to Gauss, the Earth's magnetic field is compared with that of a permanent magnet; in the latter, a well-known method, the comparison is made with the magnetic field generated by a current. As all the used instruments are available off the shelf, both…

  15. Polarization bispectrum for measuring primordial magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, Maresuke

    2013-11-01

    We examine the potential of polarization bispectra of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) to constrain primordial magnetic fields (PMFs). We compute all possible bispectra between temperature and polarization anisotropies sourced by PMFs and show that they are weakly correlated with well-known local-type and secondary ISW-lensing bispectra. From a Fisher analysis it is found that, owing to E-mode bispectra, in a cosmic-variance-limited experiment the expected uncertainty in the amplitude of magnetized bispectra is 80% improved in comparison with an analysis in terms of temperature auto-bispectrum alone. In the Planck or the proposed PRISM experiment cases, we will be able to measure PMFs with strength 2.6 or 2.2 nG. PMFs also generate bispectra involving B-mode polarization, due to tensor-mode dependence. We also find that the B-mode bispectrum can reduce the uncertainty more drastically and hence PMFs comparable to or less than 1 nG may be measured in a PRISM-like experiment.

  16. Initial Observations of the Magnetic Field Measurements on the C/NOFS Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, G.; Pfaff, R. F.; Acuna, M.; Rowland, D. E.; Bromund, K.; Freudenreich, H. T.; Martin, S. C.

    2008-12-01

    The Vector Electric Field Instrument (VEFI) suite onboard the C/NOFS spacecraft includes a sensitive fluxgate magnetometer to measure DC and ULF magnetic fields in the low latitude ionosphere. The instrument includes a DC vector measurement at 1 sample/sec with a range of ± 45,000 nT whose primary objective is to enable a V×B measurement that is more accurate than that provided by using a magnetic field model. These data will also be used to provide signatures of large-scale ionospheric current systems, which, when analyzed in conjunction with the C/NOFS DC electric field measurements, promise to advance our understanding of equatorial electrodynamics. The instrument also includes an AC-coupled vector measurement in the 0.05 - 8 Hz frequency range at 16 samples/sec with an output range of ± 900 nT in order to measure small-scale current filaments and possible Alfven waves associated with plasma irregularities. We compare the Earth's magnetic field models such as the most recently updated IGRF (the International Geomagnetic Reference Field) model and the POMME (the POtsdam Magnetic Model of the Earth) model with the measurements in order to provide an in-flight "calibration" of the data as well as compute magnetic field differences to reveal large scale ionospheric currents. Our initial results show that, on average, the POMME model accurately reproduces the C/NOFS-measured magnetic field within 20 nT in magnitude and within 0.1 deg in field direction everywhere in the low latitude ionosphere except in the region of the South Atlantic Anomaly. Initial results of the C/NOFS magnetic field measurements will be shown.

  17. Effect of magnetic field on Langmuir probe measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredin, Jerome; Grondein, Pascaline; Chabert, Pascal; Godyak, Valery; Aanesland, Ane

    2013-09-01

    In the context of PEGASES thruster where an ion-ion plasma is formed across a localized magnetic field, a study to understand how magnetic field affects the Langmuir probe measurements has been made. Several theoretical works have predict that the plasma anisotropy created by a magnetic field will influence Langmuir probe measurement as a function of the orientation of the probe tip. The study has been made in an electropositive plasma of argon for a uniform magnetic field to avoid effects of magnetic field gradient. The electron energy distribution functions (EEDF) measured with various magnetic field show that the measurements with the probe tip along the magnetic field are depleted in the low energy range compared to the one perpendicular to the magnetic field. Comparison of the results obtained with different magnetic field and different probe orientations allows for evaluation the effect of magnetic field on accuracy of EEDF measurement in plasma with magnetic field. These results confirm the theory on Langmuir probes in magnetized plasma that predict a depletion of low electron energy for measurements along the magnetic field lines.

  18. Magnetic space-based field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    Because the near Earth magnetic field is a complex combination of fields from outside the Earth of fields from its core and of fields from its crust, measurements from space prove to be the only practical way to obtain timely, global surveys. Due to difficulty in making accurate vector measurements, early satellites such as Sputnik and Vanguard measured only the magnitude survey. The attitude accuracy was 20 arc sec. Both the Earth's core fields and the fields arising from its crust were mapped from satellite data. The standard model of the core consists of a scalar potential represented by a spherical harmonics series. Models of the crustal field are relatively new. Mathematical representation is achieved in localized areas by arrays of dipoles appropriately located in the Earth's crust. Measurements of the Earth's field are used in navigation, to map charged particles in the magnetosphere, to study fluid properties in the Earth's core, to infer conductivity of the upper mantels, and to delineate regional scale geological features.

  19. Effect of Si addition on AC and DC magnetic properties of (Fe-P)-Si alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Ravi; Prabhu, D.; Chandrasekaran, V.; Gopalan, R.; Sundararajan, G.

    2016-05-01

    We report a new (Fe-P)-Si based alloy with relatively high induction (1.8-1.9 T), low coercivity (< 80 A/m), high resistivity (˜38 μΩ cm) and low core loss (217 W/kg @ 1 T/1 kHz) comparable to the commercially available M530-50 A5 Si-steel. The attractive magnetic and electrical properties are attributed to i) the two phase microstructure of fine nano precipitates of Fe3P dispersed in α-Fe matrix achieved by a two-step heat-treatment process and ii) Si addition enhancing the resistivity of the α-Fe matrix phase. As the alloy processing is by conventional wrought metallurgy method, it has the potential for large scale production.

  20. Photoconductivity in AC-driven modulated two-dimensional electron gas in a perpendicular magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Manuel; Kunold, Alejandro

    2006-04-01

    In this work we study the microwave photoconductivity of a two-dimensional electron system (2DES) in the presence of a magnetic field and a two-dimensional modulation (2D). The model includes the microwave and Landau contributions in a non-perturbative exact way; the periodic potential is treated perturbatively. The Landau-Floquet states provide a convenient base with respect to which the lattice potential becomes time dependent, inducing transitions between the Landau-Floquet levels. Based on this formalism, we provide a Kubo-like formula that takes into account the oscillatory Floquet structure of the problem. The total longitudinal conductivity and resistivity exhibit strong oscillations, determined by epsi = ω/ωc, with ω the radiation frequency and ωc the cyclotron frequency. The oscillations follow a pattern with minima centred at \\omega /\\omega_{\\mathrm {c}}=j+\\frac {1}{2} (l-1)+\\delta , and maxima centred at \\omega /\\omega_{\\mathrm {c}}=j+\\frac {1}{2} (l-1)-\\delta , where j = 1,2,3..., δ~1/5 is a constant shift and l is the dominant multipole contribution. Negative resistance states (NRSs) develop as the electron mobility and the intensity of the microwave power are increased. These NRSs appear in a narrow window region of values of the lattice parameter (a), around a~lB, where lB is the magnetic length. It is proposed that these phenomena may be observed in artificially fabricated arrays of periodic scatterers at the interface of ultraclean GaAs /AlxGa1-xAs heterostructures.

  1. Measuring the Magnetic Force on a Current-Carrying Conductor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreman, W.; Huysentruyt, R.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a fast and simple method for measuring the magnetic force acting on a current-carrying conductor using a digital balance. Discusses the influence of current intensity and wire length on the magnetic force on the conductor. (JRH)

  2. Shingle magnetic recording assessment with spinstand measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyono, Hiroshi; Nakada, Osamu; Mori, Takahiro; Oike, Taro

    2012-02-01

    Shingle Magnetic Recording (SMR) is a candidate to realize recording density of over 1 Tbit/in 2. At the cost of complex HDD firmware, we can expect many gains such as higher write-ability to break through the famous tri-lemma. In this paper, promising empirical data and concerns found on spinstand were introduced and discussed. More than 18 dB of better reverse overwrite (ROW) than conventional write recording (CWR) was confirmed at 40 nm of track pitch. Areal density capability (ADC) was improved by 25.5% by SMR. Another gain from SMR was observed at inner diameter (ID) and outer diameter (OD) that ADC loss due to skew effect was improved by using preferable side write pole edge. The dependence of ADC on magnetic read width measured with micro-track method (MRWu) indicates that side reading is limiting ADC. Reduction in side reading through narrower MRWu and inter-track interference cancellation technology are necessary to further improve ADC. BPI capability improvement by steeper down track field gradient at the track edge needs to be considered.

  3. A measurement setup for acquiring the local magnetic properties of plastically deformed soft magnetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bi Shasha; Sutor, Alexander; Lerch, Reinhard; Xiao Yunshi

    2011-04-01

    This paper introduces a new measurement setup for extraction of the local magnetic properties. With the help of finite element method simulations, modifications are made on the previous double-C-yoke method. Small dimension measuring coils are applied in the stray field produced by the magnetic circuit to evaluate the local magnetic properties of the specified part of the specimen. Through the measurements with the plastically deformed materials at different temperatures, it indicates that the magnetic properties of soft magnetic materials are quite sensitive to plastic straining. After high-temperature thermal treatment on the plastically deformed specimen, the local magnetic properties exhibit an obvious recovery.

  4. Measurement of internal defects in aluminum using a nano-granular in-gap magnetic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, T.; Yabukami, S.; Totsuka, J.; Koyama, S.; Hayasaka, J.; Wako, N.; Arai, K. I.

    2015-05-01

    Techniques for identifying defects in metals are very important in a wide variety of manufacturing areas. The present paper reports an eddy current testing method that employs a nano-granular in-gap magnetic sensor (GIGS) to detect internal defects in aluminum boards. The GIGS consists of a tunnel magnetoresistive film with nanometer sized grains and two yokes. In the presence of an external magnetic field, the nano-granular film exhibits only a small change in resistance due to the tunnel magnetoresistive effect. However, by placing it between two yokes, the magnetic flux can be greatly concentrated, thus increasing the change in resistance. The GIGS is a magnetic-field sensor that exploits this principle to achieve enhanced sensitivity. Moreover, because it has a cross-sectional yolk area of just 80 μm × 0.5 μm, it achieves outstanding spatial resolution. In the present study, it is used in combination with an eddy-current method in order to detect internal defects in aluminum. In this method, an excitation coil is used to apply an AC magnetic field perpendicular to the aluminum surface. This induces eddy currents in the metal, which in turn give rise to an AC magnetic field, which is then measured by the GIGS. The presence of defects in the aluminum distorts the eddy current flow, causing a change in the magnitude and distribution of the magnetic field. Such changes can be detected using the GIGS. In the present study, the proposed method was used to successfully detect indentations with diameters of 5 mm on the rear surface of an aluminum plate.

  5. Geochemical Controls on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Rosemary; Prasad, Manika; Keating, Kristina

    2003-11-11

    OAK-B135 Our research objectives are to determine, through an extensive set of laboratory experiments, the effect of the specific mineralogic form of iron and the effect of the distribution of iron on proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation mechanisms. In the first nine months of this project, we have refined the experimental procedures to be used in the acquisition of the laboratory NMR data; have ordered, and conducted preliminary measurements on, the sand samples to be used in the experimental work; and have revised and completed the theoretical model to use in this project. Over the next year, our focus will be on completing the first phase of the experimental work where the form and distribution of the iron in the sands in varied.

  6. Incorporating residential AC load control into ancillary service markets: Measurement and settlement

    SciTech Connect

    Bode, Josh L.; Sullivan, Michael J.; Berghman, Dries; Eto, Joseph H.

    2013-05-01

    Many pre-existing air conditioner load control programs can provide valuable operational flexibility but have not been incorporated into electricity ancillary service markets or grid operations. Multiple demonstrations have shown that residential air conditioner (AC) response can deliver resources quickly and can provide contingency reserves. A key policy hurdle to be overcome before AC load control can be fully incorporated into markets is how to balance the accuracy, cost, and complexity of methods available for the settlement of load curtailment. Overcoming this hurdle requires a means for assessing the accuracy of shorter-term AC load control demand reduction estimation approaches in an unbiased manner. This paper applies such a method to compare the accuracy of approaches varying in cost and complexity ? including regression analysis, load matching and control group approaches ? using feeder data, household data and AC end-use data. We recommend a practical approach for settlement, relying on an annually updated set of tables, with pre-calculated reduction estimates. These tables allow users to look up the demand reduction per device based on daily maximum temperature, geographic region and hour of day, simplifying settlement and providing a solution to the policy problem presented in this paper.

  7. Analyzing the Effects of Capacitances-to-Shield in Sample Probes on AC Quantized Hall Resistance Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Cage, M. E.; Jeffery, A.

    1999-01-01

    We analyze the effects of the large capacitances-to-shields existing in all sample probes on measurements of the ac quantized Hall resistance RH. The object of this analysis is to investigate how these capacitances affect the observed frequency dependence of RH. Our goal is to see if there is some way to eliminate or minimize this significant frequency dependence, and thereby realize an intrinsic ac quantized Hall resistance standard. Equivalent electrical circuits are used in this analysis, with circuit components consisting of: capacitances and leakage resistances to the sample probe shields; inductances and resistances of the sample probe leads; quantized Hall resistances, longitudinal resistances, and voltage generators within the quantum Hall effect device; and multiple connections to the device. We derive exact algebraic equations for the measured RH values expressed in terms of the circuit components. Only two circuits (with single-series “offset” and quadruple-series connections) appear to meet our desired goals of measuring both RH and the longitudinal resistance Rx in the same cool-down for both ac and dc currents with a one-standard-deviation uncertainty of 10−8 RH or less. These two circuits will be further considered in a future paper in which the effects of wire-to-wire capacitances are also included in the analysis.

  8. Advanced single permanent magnet axipolar ironless stator ac motor for electric passenger vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beauchamp, E. D.; Hadfield, J. R.; Wuertz, K. L.

    1983-01-01

    A program was conducted to design and develop an advanced-concept motor specifically created for propulsion of electric vehicles with increased range, reduced energy consumption, and reduced life-cycle costs in comparison with conventional systems. The motor developed is a brushless, dc, rare-earth cobalt, permanent magnet, axial air gap inductor machine that uses an ironless stator. Air cooling is inherent provided by the centrifugal-fan action of the rotor poles. An extensive design phase was conducted, which included analysis of the system performance versus the SAE J227a(D) driving cycle. A proof-of-principle model was developed and tested, and a functional model was developed and tested. Full generator-level testing was conducted on the functional model, recording electromagnetic, thermal, aerodynamic, and acoustic noise data. The machine demonstrated 20.3 kW output at 1466 rad/s and 160 dc. The novel ironless stator demonstated the capability to continuously operate at peak current. The projected system performance based on the use of a transistor inverter is 23.6 kW output power at 1466 rad/s and 83.3 percent efficiency. Design areas of concern regarding electric vehicle applications include the inherently high windage loss and rotor inertia.

  9. Field quality measurements of a 2-Tesla transmission line magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Velev, G.V.; Foster, W.; Kashikhin, V.; Mazur, P.; Oleck, A.; Piekarz, H.; Schlabach, P.; Sylvester, C.; Wake, M.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-09-01

    A prototype 2-Tesla superconducting transmission line magnet for future hadron colliders was designed, built and tested at Fermilab. The 1.5 m long, combined-function gradient-dipole magnet has a vertical pole aperture of 20 mm. To measure the magnetic field quality in such a small magnet aperture, a specialized rotating coil of 15.2 mm diameter, 0.69 m long was fabricated. Using this probe, a program of magnetic field quality measurements was successfully performed. Results of the measurements are presented and discussed.

  10. Measurement of the extinction coefficients of magnetic fluids

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A novel spectral transmittance approach for measuring the extinction coefficient of magnetic fluids is proposed. The measuring principle and accuracy of the approach are analysed. Experiments are conducted to measure the extinction coefficient of magnetic fluids with different particle volume fractions. The relative uncertainty of experimental data is less than 1.8%. The experimental results indicate that the extinction coefficient of magnetic fluids increases with increase of the volume fraction of suspended magnetic nanoparticles and the optical properties of the particle material have a significant effect on the extinction coefficient of the magnetic fluids. PMID:21711742

  11. Electric and magnetic properties measurement and analysis of a conventional and a superconducting power transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueira, P.; Pronto, A. G.; Vilhena, N.; Pina, J. M.

    2014-05-01

    Power transformers based on High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) technology have revealed potential for several practical applications, offering economic, environmental and operational benefits. In this work, two 650 VA single-phase transformers prototypes were developed, tested and characterized: a conventional one, using copper windings, and another with the same primary copper winding, but with a secondary winding made of HTS BSCCO tape. The two prototypes were compared regarding magnetic properties, losses, electric parameters and efficiency, and the results are presented and interpreted. Also, several measures to determine AC critical current of the HTS tape were made. The results are compared with DC critical current for the same tape.

  12. Effect of magnetic field fluctuation on ultra-low field MRI measurements in the unshielded laboratory environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Chang, Baolin; Qiu, Longqing; Dong, Hui; Qiu, Yang; Zhang, Yi; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Xie, Xiaoming

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic field fluctuations in our unshielded urban laboratory can reach hundreds of nT in the noisy daytime and is only a few nT in the quiet midnight. The field fluctuation causes the Larmor frequency fL to drift randomly for several Hz during the unshielded ultra-low field (ULF) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements, thus seriously spoiling the averaging effect and causing imaging artifacts. By using an active compensation (AC) technique based on the spatial correlation of the low-frequency magnetic field fluctuation, the field fluctuation can be suppressed to tens of nT, which is a moderate situation between the noisy daytime and the quiet midnight. In this paper, the effect of the field fluctuation on ULF MRI measurements was investigated. The 1D and 2D MRI signals of a water phantom were measured using a second-order low-Tc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) in three fluctuation cases: severe fluctuation (noisy daytime), moderate fluctuation (daytime with AC) and minute fluctuation (quiet midnight) when different gradient fields were applied. When the active compensation is applied or when the frequency encoding gradient field Gx reaches a sufficiently strong value in our measurements, the image artifacts become invisible in all three fluctuation cases. Therefore it is feasible to perform ULF-MRI measurements in unshielded urban environment without imaging artifacts originating from magnetic fluctuations by using the active compensation technique and/or strong gradient fields.

  13. Effect of magnetic field fluctuation on ultra-low field MRI measurements in the unshielded laboratory environment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Chang, Baolin; Qiu, Longqing; Dong, Hui; Qiu, Yang; Zhang, Yi; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Xie, Xiaoming

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic field fluctuations in our unshielded urban laboratory can reach hundreds of nT in the noisy daytime and is only a few nT in the quiet midnight. The field fluctuation causes the Larmor frequency fL to drift randomly for several Hz during the unshielded ultra-low field (ULF) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements, thus seriously spoiling the averaging effect and causing imaging artifacts. By using an active compensation (AC) technique based on the spatial correlation of the low-frequency magnetic field fluctuation, the field fluctuation can be suppressed to tens of nT, which is a moderate situation between the noisy daytime and the quiet midnight. In this paper, the effect of the field fluctuation on ULF MRI measurements was investigated. The 1D and 2D MRI signals of a water phantom were measured using a second-order low-Tc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) in three fluctuation cases: severe fluctuation (noisy daytime), moderate fluctuation (daytime with AC) and minute fluctuation (quiet midnight) when different gradient fields were applied. When the active compensation is applied or when the frequency encoding gradient field Gx reaches a sufficiently strong value in our measurements, the image artifacts become invisible in all three fluctuation cases. Therefore it is feasible to perform ULF-MRI measurements in unshielded urban environment without imaging artifacts originating from magnetic fluctuations by using the active compensation technique and/or strong gradient fields. PMID:26037135

  14. Magnetic measurements with atomic-plane resolution.

    PubMed

    Rusz, Ján; Muto, Shunsuke; Spiegelberg, Jakob; Adam, Roman; Tatsumi, Kazuyoshi; Bürgler, Daniel E; Oppeneer, Peter M; Schneider, Claus M

    2016-01-01

    Rapid development of magnetic nanotechnologies calls for experimental techniques capable of providing magnetic information with subnanometre spatial resolution. Available probes of magnetism either detect only surface properties, such as spin-polarized scanning tunnelling microscopy, magnetic force microscopy or spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy, or they are bulk probes with limited spatial resolution or quantitativeness, such as X-ray magnetic circular dichroism or classical electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD). Atomic resolution EMCD methods have been proposed, although not yet experimentally realized. Here, we demonstrate an EMCD technique with an atomic size electron probe utilizing a probe-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope in its standard operation mode. The crucial element of the method is a ramp in the phase of the electron beam wavefunction, introduced by a controlled beam displacement. We detect EMCD signals with atomic-plane resolution, thereby bringing near-atomic resolution magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy to hundreds of laboratories worldwide. PMID:27578421

  15. Magnetic measurements with atomic-plane resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusz, Ján; Muto, Shunsuke; Spiegelberg, Jakob; Adam, Roman; Tatsumi, Kazuyoshi; Bürgler, Daniel E.; Oppeneer, Peter M.; Schneider, Claus M.

    2016-08-01

    Rapid development of magnetic nanotechnologies calls for experimental techniques capable of providing magnetic information with subnanometre spatial resolution. Available probes of magnetism either detect only surface properties, such as spin-polarized scanning tunnelling microscopy, magnetic force microscopy or spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy, or they are bulk probes with limited spatial resolution or quantitativeness, such as X-ray magnetic circular dichroism or classical electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD). Atomic resolution EMCD methods have been proposed, although not yet experimentally realized. Here, we demonstrate an EMCD technique with an atomic size electron probe utilizing a probe-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope in its standard operation mode. The crucial element of the method is a ramp in the phase of the electron beam wavefunction, introduced by a controlled beam displacement. We detect EMCD signals with atomic-plane resolution, thereby bringing near-atomic resolution magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy to hundreds of laboratories worldwide.

  16. Magnetic measurements with atomic-plane resolution

    PubMed Central

    Rusz, Ján; Muto, Shunsuke; Spiegelberg, Jakob; Adam, Roman; Tatsumi, Kazuyoshi; Bürgler, Daniel E.; Oppeneer, Peter M.; Schneider, Claus M.

    2016-01-01

    Rapid development of magnetic nanotechnologies calls for experimental techniques capable of providing magnetic information with subnanometre spatial resolution. Available probes of magnetism either detect only surface properties, such as spin-polarized scanning tunnelling microscopy, magnetic force microscopy or spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy, or they are bulk probes with limited spatial resolution or quantitativeness, such as X-ray magnetic circular dichroism or classical electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD). Atomic resolution EMCD methods have been proposed, although not yet experimentally realized. Here, we demonstrate an EMCD technique with an atomic size electron probe utilizing a probe-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope in its standard operation mode. The crucial element of the method is a ramp in the phase of the electron beam wavefunction, introduced by a controlled beam displacement. We detect EMCD signals with atomic-plane resolution, thereby bringing near-atomic resolution magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy to hundreds of laboratories worldwide. PMID:27578421

  17. New Synoptic Measurements of Umbral Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J. W.; Hughes, A.; Marble, A.; Livingston, W. C.; Pevtsov, A.; SOLIS Team

    2013-07-01

    Apparent cyclic and secular changes of sunspot umbral intensities and magnetic field strengths have been reported for many decades. Monthly measurements since 1998 show changes that have been interpreted as a decline in sunspot vigor that, if continued, may lead to very few visible sunspots in forthcoming cycles (Livingston, Penn, and Svalgaard 2012, ApJ 757, L8). This dramatic notion is controversial (e.g. Nagovitsyn, Pevtsov, and Livingston 2012, ApJ 758, L20), and additional observational evidence is needed based on a minimum of interpretational steps and selection effects. The SOLIS vector spectromagnetograph has recorded photospheric spectra around 630.2 nm over the full solar disk daily since late 2003 with spatial and spectral pixel dimensions of about one arc second and 2.3 pm. We fit the unpolarized intensity spectra in sunspots with a simple Zeeman triplet model using a single field strength, which works well if the field strength exceeds about 2 kG and the individual spectra are not affected by strong Doppler and/or Zeeman variations. The derived total field strengths may be compared with independent spectrograph-based measurements from NSO, Hinode/SP, and Mt. Wilson and with filter-based measurements from SoHO/MDI and SDO/HMI. NSO plans to implement this reduction for all suitable archived SOLIS spectra and to continue daily umbral field strength measurements as cycle 24 proceeds. Preliminary comparisons show good agreements in some cases and systematic differences in others.Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): Apparent cyclic and secular changes of sunspot umbral intensities and magnetic field strengths have been reported for many decades. Monthly measurements since 1998 show changes that have been interpreted as a decline in sunspot vigor that, if continued, may lead to very few visible sunspots in forthcoming cycles (Livingston, Penn, and Svalgaard 2012, ApJ 757, L8). This dramatic notion is controversial (e.g. Nagovitsyn, Pevtsov, and Livingston

  18. Measurement of the Magnet Blocks for SSRF Insertion Devices

    SciTech Connect

    He Yongzhou; Zhang Jidong; Zhou Qiaogen; Qian Zhenmei; Li Yang

    2010-06-23

    Two in-vacuum undulators IVU25s and one elliptically polarized undulator EPU100 have been developed for SSRF. Two IVU25s with the same hybrid design contain about 640 Sm{sub 2}Co{sub 17} magnet blocks and the dimension of blocks is 65 Wx25 Hx9 D. The EPU100 of the APPLE-II type contains about 690 NdFeB magnet blocks with the dimension of 35 Wx35 Hx25 D. This paper describes the magnetic measurements of these magnet blocks with the Helmholtz coil measurement system for IVU25 magnet blocks and the Hall probe measurement system for EPU100 magnet blocks. The measured maximum magnetic moment deviation and the maximum angle deviation are less than {+-}1.0% and 1.1 deg. respectively both for Sm{sub 2}Co{sub 17} blocks and NdFeB blocks and satisfy the specifications of undulators.

  19. A compact bellows-driven diamond anvil cell for high-pressure, low-temperature magnetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yejun; Silevitch, D. M.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2014-03-01

    We present the design of an efficient bellows-controlled diamond anvil cell that is optimized for use inside the bores of high-field superconducting magnets in helium-3 cryostats, dilution refrigerators, and commercial physical property measurement systems. Design of this non-magnetic pressure cell focuses on in situ pressure tuning and measurement by means of a helium-filled bellows actuator and fiber-coupled ruby fluorescence spectroscopy, respectively. We demonstrate the utility of this pressure cell with ac susceptibility measurements of superconducting, ferromagnetic, and antiferromagnetic phase transitions to pressures exceeding 8 GPa. This cell provides an opportunity to probe charge and magnetic order continuously and with high resolution in the three-dimensional Magnetic Field-Pressure-Temperature parameter space.

  20. Nanosecond-resolved temperature measurements using magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenbiao; Liu, Wenzhong; Zhang, Pu

    2016-05-01

    Instantaneous and noninvasive temperature measurements are important when laser thermotherapy or welding is performed. A noninvasive nanosecond-resolved magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) temperature measurement system is described in which a transient change in temperature causes an instantaneous change in the magnetic susceptibilities of the MNPs. These transient changes in the magnetic susceptibilities are rapidly recorded using a wideband magnetic measurement system with an upper frequency limit of 0.5 GHz. The Langevin function (the thermodynamic model characterizing the MNP magnetization process) is used to obtain the temperature information. Experiments showed that the MNP DC magnetization temperature-measurement system can detect a 14.4 ns laser pulse at least. This method of measuring temperature is likely to be useful for acquiring the internal temperatures of materials irradiated with lasers, as well as in other areas of research. PMID:27250457

  1. Electric characterization of (Sr, Sr-Ba, Ba) M-type ferrites by AC measurements[Alternating Current

    SciTech Connect

    Huanosta-Tera, A.; Lira-Hueso, R. de; Perez-Orta, O.; Palomares-Sanchez, S.A.; Ponce-Castaneda, S.; Mirabal-Garcia, M.

    2000-02-01

    Considering the electrical conductivity in ceramics, necessary reference should be given to dynamic processes occurring as a function of frequency and temperature. Although the most immediate interest in ferrites lies in their magnetic properties, technological applications require a wider knowledge of general physical properties as well. This is especially applicable when the materials are studied as a function of composition or when adding different modifiers. In this report, the authors present results of the ac and dc electric characteristics of a family of magneto-plumbite-type hexaferrites, where Ba gradually substitutes Sr in the Ba{sub x}Sr{sub 1{minus}x}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 19} compound (0 {le} x {le} 1). The results were determined over a wide range of frequencies and temperatures.

  2. Magnetic field measurements via visible spectroscopy on the Z machine

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, M. R. Hansen, S. B.; Peterson, K. J.; Bliss, D. E.; Carlson, A. L.; Lamppa, D. C.; Rochau, G. A.; Schroen, D. G.

    2014-11-15

    Sandia's Z Machine uses its high current to magnetically implode targets relevant to inertial confinement fusion. Since target performance is highly dependent on the applied drive field, measuring magnetic field at the target is essential for accurate simulations. Recently, the magnetic field at the target was measured through splitting of the sodium 3s-3p doublet at 5890 and 5896 Å. Spectroscopic dopants were applied to the exterior of the target, and spectral lines were observed in absorption. Magnetic fields in excess of 200 T were measured, corresponding to drive currents of approximately 5 MA early in the pulse.

  3. Measuring thermal diffusivity of mechanical and optical grades of polycrystalline diamond using an AC laser calorimetry method

    SciTech Connect

    Rule, Toby D.; Cai, Wei; Wang, Hsin

    2013-01-01

    Because of its extremely high thermal conductivity, measuring the thermal conductivity or diffusivity of optical-grade diamond can be challenging. Various methods have been used to measure the thermal conductivity of thick diamond films. For the purposes of commercial quality control, the AC laser calorimetry method is appealing because it enables fairly rapid and convenient sample preparation and measurement. In this paper, the method is used to measure the thermal diffusivity of optical diamond. It is found that sample dimensions and measurement parameters are critical, and data analysis must be performed with great care. The results suggest that the method as it is applied to optical-grade diamond could be enhanced by a more powerful laser, higher frequency beam modulation, and post-processing based on 2D thermal simulation.

  4. Demonstrating and Measuring Relative Molar Magnetic Susceptibility Using a Neodymium Magnet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malerich, Charles; Ruff, Patricia K.; Bird, Aubrey

    2004-01-01

    An easy-to-see method for demonstrating and measuring the magnetic force between paramagnetic substance and a rare earth magnet is presented. The readily available trapezoid-shaped neodymium magnet and a low cost, easy-to-set-up, portable apparatus are used in the experiments.

  5. Magnetic design and measurement of nonlinear multipole magnets for the APT beam expander system

    SciTech Connect

    Barlow, D.B.; Shafer, R.E.; Martinez, R.P.; Walstrom, P.L.; Kahn, S.; Jain, A.; Wanderer, P.

    1997-10-01

    Two prototype nonlinear multipole magnets have been designed for use in the 800-MeV beam test of the APT beam-expansion concept at LANSCE. The iron-dominated magnets each consist of three independent coils, two for producing a predominantly octupole field with a tunable duodecapole component, and one for canceling the residual quadrupole field. Two such magnets, one for shaping each transverse plane, are required to produce a rectangular, uniform beam current density distribution with sharp edges on the APT target. This report will describe the magnetic design of these magnets, along with field measurements, and a comparison to the magnetic design.

  6. Magnetic Field Measurement with Ground State Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Huirong; Lazarian, A.

    Observational studies of magnetic fields are crucial. We introduce a process "ground state alignment" as a new way to determine the magnetic field direction in diffuse medium. The alignment is due to anisotropic radiation impinging on the atom/ion. The consequence of the process is the polarization of spectral lines resulting from scattering and absorption from aligned atomic/ionic species with fine or hyperfine structure. The magnetic field induces precession and realign the atom/ion and therefore the polarization of the emitted or absorbed radiation reflects the direction of the magnetic field. The atoms get aligned at their low levels and, as the life-time of the atoms/ions we deal with is long, the alignment induced by anisotropic radiation is susceptible to extremely weak magnetic fields (1 G ≳ B ≳ 10^{-15} G). In fact, the effects of atomic/ionic alignment were studied in the laboratory decades ago, mostly in relation to the maser research. Recently, the atomic effect has been already detected in observations from circumstellar medium and this is a harbinger of future extensive magnetic field studies. A unique feature of the atomic realignment is that they can reveal the 3D orientation of magnetic field. In this chapter, we shall review the basic physical processes involved in atomic realignment. We shall also discuss its applications to interplanetary, circumstellar and interstellar magnetic fields. In addition, our research reveals that the polarization of the radiation arising from the transitions between fine and hyperfine states of the ground level can provide a unique diagnostics of magnetic fields in the Epoch of Reionization.

  7. Magnetic field measurements of 1.5 meter model SSC collider dipole magnets at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Lamm, M.J.; Bleadon, M.; Coulter, K.J.; Delchamps, S.; Hanft, R.; Jaffery, T.S.; Kinney, W.; Koska, W.; Ozelis, J.P.; Strait, J.; Wake, M.; DiMarco, J.

    1991-09-01

    Magnetic field measurements have been performed at Fermilab on 1.5 m magnetic length model dipoles for the Superconducting Supercollider. Harmonic measurements are recorded at room temperature before and after the collared coil is assembled into the yoke and at liquid helium temperature. Measurements are made as a function of longitudinal position and excitation current. High field data are compared with room temperature measurements of both the collared coil and the completed yoked magnet and with the predicted fields for both the body of the magnet and the coil ends.

  8. Magnetic susceptibility and magnetic resonance measurements of the moisture content and hydration condition of a magnetic mixture material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukada, K.; Kusaka, T.; Saari, M. M.; Takagi, R.; Sakai, K.; Kiwa, T.; Bito, Y.

    2014-05-01

    We developed a magnetic measurement method to measure the moisture content and hydration condition of mortar as a magnetic mixture material. Mortar is a mixture of Portland cement, sand, and water, and these materials exhibit different magnetic properties. The magnetization-magnetic field curves of these components and of mortars with different moisture contents were measured, using a specially developed high-temperature-superconductor superconducting quantum interference device. Using the differences in magnetic characteristics, the moisture content of mortar was measured at the ferromagnetic saturation region over 250 mT. A correlation between magnetic susceptibility and moisture content was successfully established. After Portland cement and water are mixed, hydration begins. At the early stage of the hydration/gel, magnetization strength increased over time. To investigate the magnetization change, we measured the distribution between bound and free water in the mortar in the early stage by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI results suggest that the amount of free water in mortar correlates with the change in magnetic susceptibility.

  9. Physical and electrical models for interpreting AC and DC transport measurements in polymer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, Max; Tzolov, Marian; Cossel, Raquel; Peeler, Seth

    We have fabricated and studied bulk heterojunction solar cells using a mixture of the low bandgap material PCPDTBT and PCBM-C60. Our transport studies show that the devices in dark have good rectification and they respond to AC voltage as a simple RC circuit. The illumination causes an additional contribution to the impedance, which varies with the level of illumination. One proposed model is that photo-generated charges can become trapped in potential wells. These charges then follow a Debye relaxation process, which contributes to a varying dielectric constant. Another proposed model is based on a RC circuit model with two capacitors which can describe the varying capacitance behavior. The physical mechanism for this model is that photo-generated charges become accumulated at the interface between PCPDTBT and PCBM-C60 and form an additional layer of charge. We will show that our circuit models and their analogous physical models can predict the AC and DC responses of polymer solar cells.

  10. 3D Magnetic Measurements of Kink and Locked Modes in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. D.; Strait, E. J.; Hanson, J. M.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Logan, N. C.; Lanctot, M. J.; Shiraki, D.

    2013-10-01

    The DIII-D magnetics diagnostic has been greatly expanded to fully characterize non-axisymmetric ``3D'' fields. Five poloidal locations now recover n <= 3 , while new HFS arrays provide poloidal spectral resolution of 7.4 cm. Initial measurements suggest externally driven kink structures deviate from MARS-F and IPEC models. These variations extend to the ideal regime, where toroidal agreement is observed. The plasma response to an n = 3 RMP increases monotonically as beta increases and q95 decreases, contrary to predictions of a screening to kink valley. Finally, the temporal evolution of the 3D eigenstructure of a slowly rotating (5 Hz) quasi-static, born locked, tearing mode provides the first evidence of an appreciable n = 2 error field, and an estimate of the phase for future correction. This new 3D capability will be used to understand and optimize control of RWMs, NTV torque, ELMs, and error field correction to extend stable tokamak operation. Work supported in part by the US Department of Energy under DE-AC05-00OR22725, DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-FG02-95ER54309, DE-AC02-09CH11466, DE-FG02-04ER54761 and DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. Effect of permanent-magnet irregularities in levitation force measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, J. R.

    1999-10-14

    In the measurement of the levitation force between a vertically magnetized permanent magnet (PM) and a bulk high-temperature superconductor (HTS), PM domains with horizontal components of magnetization are shown to produce a nonnegligible contribution to the levitation force in most systems. Such domains are typically found in all PMs, even in those that exhibit zero net horizontal magnetic moment. Extension of this analysis leads to an HTS analog of Earnshaw's theorem, in which at the field-cooling position the vertical stiffness is equal to the sum of the horizontal stiffnesses, independent of angular distribution of magnetic moments within the PM.

  12. Effect of power frequency harmonics on magnetic field measurements.

    PubMed

    Isokorpi, J; Rautee, J; Keikko, T; Korpinen, L

    2000-03-01

    This paper presents a study of the effect of harmonic frequencies on magnetic field measurements. We introduced magnetic field meters in a known magnetic field of different frequencies: power frequency (50 Hz) as well as 3rd (150 Hz) and 5th (250 Hz) harmonic frequencies. Two magnetic field levels (0.25 A and 2.5 A) were used. A Helmholtz coil was applied to generate an exact magnetic field. The difference between the measurement results at harmonic frequencies and at power frequency was analyzed using the t-test for matched pairs. The test results show significant differences (P< or =0.01) for 13 out of 28 tests carried out, which is probably due to a curved frequency response near the power frequency. It is, therefore, essential to consider harmonic frequencies in magnetic field measurements in practice.

  13. Initial Tests of an AC Dipole for the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.; Kopp, S.; Jansson, A.; Syphers, M.

    2006-11-20

    The AC dipole is a device to diagnose transverse motions of a beam. It can achieve large-amplitude oscillations without two inevitable problems of conventional kicker/pinger magnets: decoherence and emittance growth. While not the first synchrotron to operate with an AC dipole, the Tevatron can now make use of its recently upgraded BPM system, providing unprecedented resolution for use with an AC dipole, to measure both linear and nonlinear properties of the accelerator. Plans are to provide AC dipole systems for both transverse degrees of freedom. Preliminary tests have been done using an audio power amplifier with an existing vertical pinger magnet, producing oscillation amplitudes up to 2{sigma} at 150 GeV. In this paper, we will present the configuration of this system. We also show the analysis of a first few data sets, including the direct measurement of beta functions at BPM locations.

  14. Initial Tests of an AC Dipole for the Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, R.; Jansson, A.; Kopp, S.; Syphers, M.

    2006-11-01

    The AC dipole is a device to diagnose transverse motions of a beam. It can achieve large-amplitude oscillations without two inevitable problems of conventional kicker/pinger magnets: decoherence and emittance growth. While not the first synchrotron to operate with an AC dipole, the Tevatron can now make use of its recently upgraded BPM system, providing unprecedented resolution for use with an AC dipole, to measure both linear and nonlinear properties of the accelerator. Plans are to provide AC dipole systems for both transverse degrees of freedom. Preliminary tests have been done using an audio power amplifier with an existing vertical pinger magnet, producing oscillation amplitudes up to 2σ at 150 GeV. In this paper, we will present the configuration of this system. We also show the analysis of a first few data sets, including the direct measurement of beta functions at BPM locations.

  15. Initial tests of an AC dipole for the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.; Jansson, A.; Kopp, S.; Syphers, M.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    The AC dipole is a device to diagnose transverse motions of a beam. It can achieve large-amplitude oscillations without two inevitable problems of conventional kicker/pinger magnets: decoherence and emittance growth. While not the first synchrotron to operate with an AC dipole, the Tevatron can now make use of its recently upgraded BPM system, providing unprecedented resolution for use with an AC dipole, to measure both linear and nonlinear properties of the accelerator. Plans are to provide AC dipole systems for both transverse degrees of freedom. Preliminary tests have been done using an audio power amplifier with an existing vertical pinger magnet, producing oscillation amplitudes up to 2{sigma} at 150 GeV. In this paper, we will present the configuration of this system. We also show the analysis of a first few data sets, including the direct measurement of beta functions at BPM locations.

  16. Modified Solenoid Coil That Efficiently Produces High Amplitude AC Magnetic Fields With Enhanced Uniformity for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Bordelon, David E.; Goldstein, Robert C.; Nemkov, Valentin S.; Kumar, Ananda; Jackowski, John K.; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Ivkov, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a modified solenoid coil that efficiently generates high amplitude alternating magnetic fields (AMF) having field uniformity (≤10%) within a 125-cm3 volume of interest. Two-dimensional finite element analysis (2D-FEA) was used to design a coil generating a targeted peak AMF amplitude along the coil axis of ~100 kA/m (peak-to-peak) at a frequency of 150 kHz while maintaining field uniformity to >90% of peak for a specified volume. This field uniformity was realized by forming the turns from cylindrical sections of copper plate and by adding flux concentrating rings to both ends of the coil. Following construction, the field profile along the axes of the coil was measured. An axial peak field value of 95.8 ± 0.4 kA/m was measured with 650 V applied to the coil and was consistent with the calculated results. The region of axial field uniformity, defined as the distance over which field ≥90% of peak, was also consistent with the simulated results. We describe the utility of such a device for calorimetric measurement of nanoparticle heating for cancer therapy and for magnetic fluid hyperthermia in small animal models of human cancer. PMID:25392562

  17. Magnetic Tweezers for the Measurement of Twist and Torque

    PubMed Central

    Lipfert, Jan; Lee, Mina; Ordu, Orkide; Kerssemakers, Jacob W. J.; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule techniques make it possible to investigate the behavior of individual biological molecules in solution in real time. These techniques include so-called force spectroscopy approaches such as atomic force microscopy, optical tweezers, flow stretching, and magnetic tweezers. Amongst these approaches, magnetic tweezers have distinguished themselves by their ability to apply torque while maintaining a constant stretching force. Here, it is illustrated how such a “conventional” magnetic tweezers experimental configuration can, through a straightforward modification of its field configuration to minimize the magnitude of the transverse field, be adapted to measure the degree of twist in a biological molecule. The resulting configuration is termed the freely-orbiting magnetic tweezers. Additionally, it is shown how further modification of the field configuration can yield a transverse field with a magnitude intermediate between that of the “conventional” magnetic tweezers and the freely-orbiting magnetic tweezers, which makes it possible to directly measure the torque stored in a biological molecule. This configuration is termed the magnetic torque tweezers. The accompanying video explains in detail how the conversion of conventional magnetic tweezers into freely-orbiting magnetic tweezers and magnetic torque tweezers can be accomplished, and demonstrates the use of these techniques. These adaptations maintain all the strengths of conventional magnetic tweezers while greatly expanding the versatility of this powerful instrument. PMID:24894412

  18. Magnetic susceptibility and magnetic resonance measurements of the moisture content and hydration condition of a magnetic mixture material

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukada, K. Kusaka, T.; Saari, M. M.; Takagi, R.; Sakai, K.; Kiwa, T.; Bito, Y.

    2014-05-07

    We developed a magnetic measurement method to measure the moisture content and hydration condition of mortar as a magnetic mixture material. Mortar is a mixture of Portland cement, sand, and water, and these materials exhibit different magnetic properties. The magnetization–magnetic field curves of these components and of mortars with different moisture contents were measured, using a specially developed high-temperature-superconductor superconducting quantum interference device. Using the differences in magnetic characteristics, the moisture content of mortar was measured at the ferromagnetic saturation region over 250 mT. A correlation between magnetic susceptibility and moisture content was successfully established. After Portland cement and water are mixed, hydration begins. At the early stage of the hydration/gel, magnetization strength increased over time. To investigate the magnetization change, we measured the distribution between bound and free water in the mortar in the early stage by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI results suggest that the amount of free water in mortar correlates with the change in magnetic susceptibility.

  19. MEASUREMENTS OF STELLAR MAGNETIC FIELDS USING AUTOCORRELATION OF SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Borra, E. F.; Deschatelets, D.

    2015-11-15

    We present a novel technique that uses the autocorrelation of the spectrum of a star to measure the line broadening caused by the modulus of its average surface magnetic field. The advantage of the autocorrelation comes from the fact that it can detect very small spectral line broadening effects because it averages over many spectral lines and therefore gives an average with a very high signal-to-noise ratio. We validate the technique with the spectra of known magnetic stars and obtain autocorrelation curves that are in full agreement with published magnetic curves obtained with Zeeman splitting. The autocorrelation also gives less noisy curves so that it can be used to obtain very accurate curves. We degrade the resolution of the spectra of these magnetic stars to lower spectral resolutions where the Zeeman splitting is undetectable. At these resolutions, the autocorrelation still gives good quality curves, thereby showing that it can be used to measure magnetic fields in spectra where the Zeeman splitting is significantly smaller than the width of the spectral line. This would therefore allow observing magnetic fields in very faint Ap stars with low-resolution spectrographs, thereby greatly increasing the number of known magnetic stars. It also demonstrates that the autocorrelation can measure magnetic fields in rapidly rotating stars as well as weak magnetic fields that give a Zeeman splitting smaller than the intrinsic width of the spectral lines. Finally, it shows that the autocorrelation can be used to find unknown magnetic stars in low-resolution spectroscopic surveys.

  20. Automated measurement of viscous decay of magnetic remanence: a tool for extending the grain-size interval for magnetic granulometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadima, Martin; Hrouda, Frantisek; Kadlec, Jaroslav

    2015-04-01

    In some geological and environmental processes, such as diagenesis, very low grade metamorphism, pedogenesis, anthropogenic pollution, new ultra-fine magnetic minerals may be formed. The variation in content of these minerals is routinely investigated by frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility. However, the size interval of magnetic particles detectable by this method is relatively narrow. Using the most common instruments, the MS2B susceptibility meter (Bartington Instruments) and the MFK1-FA Kappabridge (Agico), this interval in blocking volumes ranges from 1.7 × 10-24 m3 to 2.3 × 10-24 m3 in magnetite. Using lower operating frequency, for example 10 Hz in the 7130 AC susceptometer (Lake Shore Cryotronics), the upper limit of the blocking volume can be shifted to 3.1 × 10-24 m3. Using higher operating frequency, for example 500 kHz in the SM-105 susceptibility meter (ZH-Instruments), the respective lower limit can be shifted to 1.1 × 10-24 m3. Assuming a broad size distribution of the ultra-fine magnetic particles spanning across the SP/SSD boundary we suggest to assess their presence by quantification of their viscous magnetization decay. For that purpose we use a recently-developed LDA5-PAM1 pulse magnetizer coupled with a JR6 spinner magnetometer (both Agico). Instrument control software is interconnected in such a way that both instruments work in the same time frame, i.e. the exact moment of DC pulse termination is used as a zero time for evaluation of time-dependent viscous decay. Magnetic remanence is then measured repeatedly as a function of time. Exponential decay curves are fitted on the acquired data and the relative ratio of viscous and non-viscous particles is estimated. This method works with much longer relaxation times compared to those of susceptibility measurements, ranging from 20 to 300 s, with the corresponding blocking volumes being 3.9 to 4.4 × 10-24 m3. Our method is tested on the samples from three loess/paleosol sections located

  1. Critical Current Measurements in Commercial Tapes, Coils, and Magnets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubser, D. U.; Soulen, R. J., Jr.; Fuller-Mora, W. W.; Francavilla, T. L.

    1996-03-01

    We have measured a number of tapes, coils, and magnets produced by commercial vendors and determined their properties as functions of magnetic field and temperature. The tapes were measured at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in magnetic fields to 20 tesla and at temperatures of 4.2 K, 27 K, 65 K, and 77 K. For the tapes we report critical currents and current-voltage characteristics. Six inch diameter coils were measured at NRL in zero magnetic field. Critical currents, current-voltage characteristics, and reliability studies are reported for the coils. Larger 10 inch diameter coils, which are to be used in a 200 hp superconducting motor, were also measured and results will be presented. The talk will also review the status of the most recent tests of the superconducting motor.

  2. Magnetic transit-time flowmeter

    DOEpatents

    Forster, George A.

    1976-07-06

    The flow rate of a conducting fluid in a stream is determined by disposing two permanent-magnet flowmeters in the stream, one downstream of the other. Flow of the conducting fluid causes the generation of both d-c and a-c electrical signals, the a-c comprising flow noise. Measurement of the time delay between similarities in the a-c signals by cross-correlation methods provides a measure of the rate of flow of the fluid.

  3. Constraints on the origins of lunar magnetism from electron reflection measurements of surface magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes a new method of detecting lunar surface magnetic fields, summarizes electron reflection measurements and correlations of surface field anomalies to moon geologic features, and discusses the constraints on the origin of lunar magnetism. Apollo 15 and 16 measurements of lunar surface magnetic fields by the electron reflection method show patches of strong surface fields distributed over the lunar surface, and a positive statistical correlation is found in lunar mare regions between the surface field strength and the geologic age of the surface. However, there is a lack of correlation of surface field with impact craters indicating that the mare does not have a strong large-scale uniform magnetization as may be expected from an ancient lunar dynamo. Fields were found in lunar highlands which imply that the rille has a strong magnetization associated with it as intrusive, magnetized rock or as a gap in a uniformly magnetic layer of rock.

  4. Laboratory Measurements of Astrophysical Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, C. D.; Miniati, F.; Edwards, M.; Mithen, J.; Bell, A. R.; Constantin, C.; Everson, E.; Schaeffer, D.; Niemann, C.; Ravasio, A.; Brambrink, E.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Koenig, M.; Gregory, C.; Woolsey, N.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B.; Ryutov, D.; Bingham, R.; Gargate, L.; Spitkovsky, A.; Gregori, G.

    2010-11-01

    It has been proposed that high Mach number collisionless shocks propagating in an initially unmagnetized plasma play a major role in the magnetization of large scale structures in the Universe. A detailed study of the experimental configuration necessary to scale such environments down to laboratory dimensions will be presented. We will show initial results from preliminary experiments conducted at the Phoenix laser (UCLA) and the LULI laser (Ecole Polytechnique) where collisionless shocks are generated by the expansion of exploding foils driven by energetic laser beams. The time evolution of the magnetic field is probed with induction coils placed at 10 cm from the laser focus. We will discuss various mechanisms of magnetic field generation and compare them with the experimental results.

  5. Measurement of dynamic magnetization induced by a pulsed field: Proposal for a new rock magnetism method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Kazuto

    2015-02-01

    This study proposes a new method for measuring transient magnetization of natural samples induced by a pulsed field with duration of 11 ms using a pulse magnetizer. An experimental system was constructed, consisting of a pair of differential sensing coils connected with a high-speed digital oscilloscope for data acquisition. The data were transferred to a computer to obtain an initial magnetization curve and a descending branch of a hysteresis loop in a rapidly changing positive field. This system was tested with synthetic samples (permalloy ribbon, aluminum plate, and nickel powder) as well as two volcanic rock samples. Results from the synthetic samples showed considerable differences from those measured by a quasi-static method using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). These differences were principally due to the time-dependent magnetic properties or to electromagnetic effects, such as magnetic viscosity, eddy current loss, or magnetic relaxation. Results from the natural samples showed that the transient magnetization-field curves were largely comparable to the corresponding portions of the hysteresis loops. However, the relative magnetization (scaled to the saturation magnetization) at the end of a pulse was greater than that measured by a VSM. This discrepancy, together with the occurrence of rapid exponential decay after a pulse, indicates magnetic relaxations that could be interpreted in terms of domain wall displacement. These results suggest that with further developments, the proposed technique can become a useful tool for characterizing magnetic particles contained in a variety of natural materials.

  6. Magnetic Properties of Strontium Hexaferrite Nanostructures Measured with Magnetic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Song, Jie; Saura-Múzquiz, Matilde; Besenbacher, Flemming; Christensen, Mogens; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic property is one of the important properties of nanomaterials. Direct investigation of the magnetic property on the nanoscale is however challenging. Herein we present a quantitative measurement of the magnetic properties including the magnitude and the orientation of the magnetic moment of strontium hexaferrite (SrFe12O19) nanostructures using magnetic force microscopy (MFM) with nanoscale spatial resolution. The measured magnetic moments of the as-synthesized individual SrFe12O19 nanoplatelets are on the order of ~10−16 emu. The MFM measurements further confirm that the magnetic moment of SrFe12O19 nanoplatelets increases with increasing thickness of the nanoplatelet. In addition, the magnetization directions of nanoplatelets can be identified by the contrast of MFM frequency shift. Moreover, MFM frequency imaging clearly reveals the tiny magnetic structures of a compacted SrFe12O19 pellet. This work demonstrates the mesoscopic investigation of the intrinsic magnetic properties of materials has a potential in development of new magnetic nanomaterials in electrical and medical applications. PMID:27174466

  7. Magnetic Properties of Strontium Hexaferrite Nanostructures Measured with Magnetic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Song, Jie; Saura-Múzquiz, Matilde; Besenbacher, Flemming; Christensen, Mogens; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic property is one of the important properties of nanomaterials. Direct investigation of the magnetic property on the nanoscale is however challenging. Herein we present a quantitative measurement of the magnetic properties including the magnitude and the orientation of the magnetic moment of strontium hexaferrite (SrFe12O19) nanostructures using magnetic force microscopy (MFM) with nanoscale spatial resolution. The measured magnetic moments of the as-synthesized individual SrFe12O19 nanoplatelets are on the order of ~10(-16) emu. The MFM measurements further confirm that the magnetic moment of SrFe12O19 nanoplatelets increases with increasing thickness of the nanoplatelet. In addition, the magnetization directions of nanoplatelets can be identified by the contrast of MFM frequency shift. Moreover, MFM frequency imaging clearly reveals the tiny magnetic structures of a compacted SrFe12O19 pellet. This work demonstrates the mesoscopic investigation of the intrinsic magnetic properties of materials has a potential in development of new magnetic nanomaterials in electrical and medical applications. PMID:27174466

  8. Magnetic Properties of Strontium Hexaferrite Nanostructures Measured with Magnetic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Song, Jie; Saura-Múzquiz, Matilde; Besenbacher, Flemming; Christensen, Mogens; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic property is one of the important properties of nanomaterials. Direct investigation of the magnetic property on the nanoscale is however challenging. Herein we present a quantitative measurement of the magnetic properties including the magnitude and the orientation of the magnetic moment of strontium hexaferrite (SrFe12O19) nanostructures using magnetic force microscopy (MFM) with nanoscale spatial resolution. The measured magnetic moments of the as-synthesized individual SrFe12O19 nanoplatelets are on the order of ~10-16 emu. The MFM measurements further confirm that the magnetic moment of SrFe12O19 nanoplatelets increases with increasing thickness of the nanoplatelet. In addition, the magnetization directions of nanoplatelets can be identified by the contrast of MFM frequency shift. Moreover, MFM frequency imaging clearly reveals the tiny magnetic structures of a compacted SrFe12O19 pellet. This work demonstrates the mesoscopic investigation of the intrinsic magnetic properties of materials has a potential in development of new magnetic nanomaterials in electrical and medical applications.

  9. Magnetic Properties of Strontium Hexaferrite Nanostructures Measured with Magnetic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Song, Jie; Saura-Múzquiz, Matilde; Besenbacher, Flemming; Christensen, Mogens; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic property is one of the important properties of nanomaterials. Direct investigation of the magnetic property on the nanoscale is however challenging. Herein we present a quantitative measurement of the magnetic properties including the magnitude and the orientation of the magnetic moment of strontium hexaferrite (SrFe12O19) nanostructures using magnetic force microscopy (MFM) with nanoscale spatial resolution. The measured magnetic moments of the as-synthesized individual SrFe12O19 nanoplatelets are on the order of ~10‑16 emu. The MFM measurements further confirm that the magnetic moment of SrFe12O19 nanoplatelets increases with increasing thickness of the nanoplatelet. In addition, the magnetization directions of nanoplatelets can be identified by the contrast of MFM frequency shift. Moreover, MFM frequency imaging clearly reveals the tiny magnetic structures of a compacted SrFe12O19 pellet. This work demonstrates the mesoscopic investigation of the intrinsic magnetic properties of materials has a potential in development of new magnetic nanomaterials in electrical and medical applications.

  10. Magnetic Susceptibility Measurements for in Situ Characterization of Lunar Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oder, R. R.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic separation is a viable method for concentration of components of lunar soils and rocks for use as feedstocks for manufacture of metals, oxygen, and for recovery of volatiles such as He-3. Work with lunar materials indicates that immature soils are the best candidates for magnetic beneficiation. The magnetic susceptibility at which selected soil components such as anorthite, ilmenite, or metallic iron are separated is not affected by soil maturity, but the recovery of the concentrated components is. Increasing soil maturity lowers recovery. Mature soils contain significant amounts of glass-encased metallic iron. Magnetic susceptibility, which is sensitive to metallic iron content, can be used to measure soil maturity. The relationship between the ratio of magnetic susceptibility and iron oxide and the conventional maturity parameter, I(sub s)/FeO, ferromagnetic resonant intensity divided by iron oxide content is given. The magnetic susceptibilities were determined using apparatus designed for magnetic separation of the lunar soils.

  11. Electron-scale measurements of magnetic reconnection in space.

    PubMed

    Burch, J L; Torbert, R B; Phan, T D; Chen, L-J; Moore, T E; Ergun, R E; Eastwood, J P; Gershman, D J; Cassak, P A; Argall, M R; Wang, S; Hesse, M; Pollock, C J; Giles, B L; Nakamura, R; Mauk, B H; Fuselier, S A; Russell, C T; Strangeway, R J; Drake, J F; Shay, M A; Khotyaintsev, Yu V; Lindqvist, P-A; Marklund, G; Wilder, F D; Young, D T; Torkar, K; Goldstein, J; Dorelli, J C; Avanov, L A; Oka, M; Baker, D N; Jaynes, A N; Goodrich, K A; Cohen, I J; Turner, D L; Fennell, J F; Blake, J B; Clemmons, J; Goldman, M; Newman, D; Petrinec, S M; Trattner, K J; Lavraud, B; Reiff, P H; Baumjohann, W; Magnes, W; Steller, M; Lewis, W; Saito, Y; Coffey, V; Chandler, M

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental physical process in plasmas whereby stored magnetic energy is converted into heat and kinetic energy of charged particles. Reconnection occurs in many astrophysical plasma environments and in laboratory plasmas. Using measurements with very high time resolution, NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission has found direct evidence for electron demagnetization and acceleration at sites along the sunward boundary of Earth's magnetosphere where the interplanetary magnetic field reconnects with the terrestrial magnetic field. We have (i) observed the conversion of magnetic energy to particle energy; (ii) measured the electric field and current, which together cause the dissipation of magnetic energy; and (iii) identified the electron population that carries the current as a result of demagnetization and acceleration within the reconnection diffusion/dissipation region. PMID:27174677

  12. Measurements of Fast Ion Transport Due to n = 3 Magnetic Perturbations on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zeeland, M. A.; Evans, T. E.; Ferraro, N. M.; Lanctot, M. J.; Pace, D. C.; Collins, C.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Hanson, J. M.; Grierson, B. A.; Kramer, G. J.; Nazikian, R.; Allen, S. L.; Lasnier, C. J.; Meyer, W. H.

    2014-10-01

    Measurements of fast ion (FI) transport due to applied n = 3 magnetic perturbations on DIII-D have been made in both ELM suppressed H-mode as well as L-mode discharges. FIDA measurements probe the confined FI profile in the edge and losses to the wall are obtained with scintillator detectors as well as an infrared periscope. In ELM suppressed plasmas FIDA data show a significant depletion of the edge FI profile during application of n = 3 fields. IR imaging of the beam ion prompt loss footprint shows a difference in wall heating depending on phase of the n = 3 perturbation. Measurements of both the impact on the confined FI profile and prompt losses will be compared to full-orbit modeling which predicts up to 10%-15% of the injected beam ions are lost before thermalization. Orbit following simulations also predict an increase in losses due to resonance between the FI drift orbits and the applied n = 3 fields. Measurements during L-mode current ramp plasmas used to scan for signatures of these resonances will be discussed. Work supported in part by the US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698, SC-G903402, DE-FG02-04ER54761, DE-AC02-09CH11466, DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. A.C. Susceptometry Utilizing GMR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christy, Daniel; Shivaram, Bellave

    2001-11-01

    Superconducting quantum interference (SQUID) magnetometers remain as the most sensitive instruments to measure magnetic properties. However, the ready availability and rapid improvements in the sensitivity of magnetic field sensors based on giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect combined with their low cost and ability to operate at room temperature opens up opportunities to exploit these new devices where the utmost sensitivity of SQUID based detection is not needed. In this article we present one such application of GMR sensors and demonstrate how they can enhance the signals obtained in a simple a.c. magnetic susceptibility apparatus.

  14. Proceedings of Pulsed Magnet Design and Measurement Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Shaftan, T.; Heese, R.; Ozaki,S.

    2010-01-19

    The goals of the Workshop are to assess the design of pulsed system at the NSLS-II and establish mitigation strategies for critical issues during development. The focus of the Workshop is on resolving questions related to the set-up of the pulsed magnet laboratory, on measuring the pulsed magnet's current waveforms and fields, and on achieving tight tolerances on the magnet's alignment and field quality.

  15. Therapeutic magnetic microcarriers characterization by measuring magnetophoretic attributes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal Ibacache, Guillermo

    Micro/nano robots are considered a promising approach to conduct minimally invasive interventions. We have proposed to embed magnetic nanoparticles in therapeutic or diagnostic agents in order to magnetically control them. A modified clinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanner is used to provide the driving force that allows these magnetically embedded microcarriers to navigate the vascular human network. By using specific Magnetic Resonance (MR) gradient sequences this method has been validated in previous research works. Magnetophoresis is the term used to describe the fact that a magnetic particle changes its trajectory under the influence of a magnetic force while being carried by a fluid flow. This movement depends on the particle's magnetic characteristics, the particle's geometric shape, the fluid flow's attributes and other factors. In our proposed method, magnetic microcarriers can be produced in several different ways, and so their response will differ to the same magnetic force and fluid flow conditions. The outcome of the therapeutic treatment using our method depends on the adequate selection of the therapeutic and/or diagnosis agents to be used. The selected therapeutic and/or diagnosis magnetic microcarrier also influences the selection of the MR gradient sequence that best fit for a given treatment. This master's thesis presents the design of a device intended to assess the magnetophoretic properties of magnetic therapeutic microcarriers and/or diagnostic agents. Such characterization is essential for determining the optimal sequences of magnetic gradients to deflect their trajectory through relatively complex vascular networks in order to reach a pre-defined target. A microfluidic device was fabricated to validate the design. Magnetophoretic velocities are measured and a simple tracking method is proposed. The preliminary experimental results indicate that, despite some limitations, the proposed technique has the potential to be appropriate

  16. Measuring the Forces Between Magnetic Dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayetsky, Lisa E.; Caylor, Craig L.

    2007-09-01

    We describe a simple undergraduate lab in which students determine how the force between two magnetic dipoles depends on their separation. We consider the case where both dipoles are permanent and the case where one of the dipoles is induced by the field of the other (permanent) dipole. Agreement with theoretically expected results is quite good.

  17. Measuring the Forces between Magnetic Dipoles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gayetsky, Lisa E.; Caylor, Craig L.

    2007-01-01

    We describe a simple undergraduate lab in which students determine how the force between two magnetic dipoles depends on their separation. We consider the case where both dipoles are permanent and the case where one of the dipoles is induced by the field of the other (permanent) dipole. Agreement with theoretically expected results is quite good.

  18. Property and microstructural nonuniformity in the yttrium-barium-copper-oxide superconductor determined from electrical, magnetic, and ultrasonic measurements. Ph.D. Thesis - Case Western Reserve Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was the following: (1) to characterize the effect of pore fraction on a comprehensive set of electrical and magnetic properties for the yttrium-barium-copper-oxide (YBCO) high temperature ceramic superconductor; and (2) to determine the viability of using a room-temperature, nondestructive characterization method to aid in the prediction of superconducting (cryogenic) properties. The latter involved correlating ultrasonic velocity measurements at room temperature with property-affecting pore fraction and oxygen content variations. The use of ultrasonic velocity for estimating pore fraction in YBCO is presented, and other polycrystalline materials are reviewed, modeled, and statistically analyzed. This provides the basis for using ultrasonic velocity to interrogate microstructure. The effect of pore fraction (0.10-0.25) on superconductor properties of YBCO samples was characterized. Spatial (within-sample) variations in microstructure and superconductor properties were investigated, and the effect of oxygen content on elastic behavior was examined. Experimental methods used included a.c. susceptibility, electrical, and ultrasonic velocity measurements. Superconductor properties measured included transition temperature, magnetic transition width, transport and magnetic critical current density, magnetic shielding, a.c. loss, and sharpness of the voltage-current characteristics. An ultrasonic velocity image constructed from measurements at 1mm increments across a YBCO sample revealed microstructural variations that correlated with variations in magnetic shielding and a.c. loss behavior. Destructive examination using quantitative image analysis revealed pore fraction to be the varying microstructural feature.

  19. Continuous measurement of viscous magnetization decay: an alternative tool in magnetic granulometry of sediments and soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadima, M.

    2013-12-01

    The ultra-fine magnetic grains in sediments and soils usually span across the superparamagnetic/stable single domain (SP/SSD) boundary. The SP grains carry no remanent magnetization but possess a very high magnetic susceptibility. While the SSD grains carry a very stable magnetic remanence, the magnetization of the grains just around the SP/SSD boundary is highly viscous. The presence of the SP magnetic particles has been traditionally investigated using the in-phase magnetic susceptibility measured in several operating frequencies. In addition, it has been suggested that the out-of-phase susceptibility measured on a single frequency can provide us with comparable results since there is a direct relationship between the frequency-dependent in-phase susceptibility and the out-of-phase susceptibility. Assuming a broad distribution of the ultra-fine magnetic particles spanning across the SP/SSD boundary we suggest to assess their presence using the continuous measurement of the decay of viscous magnetization. For that purpose we use a newly-developed Agico pulse magnetizer coupled with a JR6 spinner magnetometer which allows the automatic repeated measurements of magnetic remanence. Since both instruments are controlled from the same computer, the exact time of DC pulse termination is known and used as a zero time for evaluation of time-dependent viscous decay. Magnetic remanence is then measured repeatedly as a function of time for about five minutes. Exponential decay curve is fitted on the acquired data and the relative ratio of viscous and non-viscous grains is estimated. Our method is tested on the loess/paleosol samples from the European loess belt. The relative amount of the ultra-fine grains assessed by the suggested viscous decay method can be very well correlated with the results obtained from the frequency-dependent and out-of-phase susceptibility measurements.

  20. Performance of field measuring probes for SSC magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.; Ganetis, G.; Herrera, J.; Hogue, R.; Jain, A.; Louie, W.; Marone, A.; Wanderer, P.

    1993-12-31

    Several years of experience have been acquired on the operation of probes (``moles``) constructed for the measurement of the multipole components of the magnetic fields of SSC magnets. The field is measured by rotating coils contained in a 2.4-m long tube that is pulled through the aperture of the magnet by an external device-the transporter. In addition to the measuring coils, the tube contains motors for rotating the coil and a system for sensing local vertical using gravity sensors to provide an absolute reference for the field measurements. We describe the steps that must be taken in order to ensure accurate, repeatable measurements; the design changes that have been motivated by difficulties encountered (noise, vibration, variations in temperature); and other performance issues. The mechanical interface between the probe and the hewn tube of the magnet is also described.

  1. Measuring Viscosity with a Levitating Magnet: Application to Complex Fluids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Even, C.; Bouquet, F.; Remond, J.; Deloche, B.

    2009-01-01

    As an experimental project proposed to students in fourth year of university, a viscometer was developed, consisting of a small magnet levitating in a viscous fluid. The viscous force acting on the magnet is directly measured: viscosities in the range 10-10[superscript 6] mPa s are obtained. This experiment is used as an introduction to complex…

  2. Precision Magnet Measurements for X-Band Accelerator Quadrupole Triplets

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, R A; Anderson, S G; Armstrong, J P

    2012-05-16

    An X-band test station is being developed at LLNL to investigate accelerator optimization for future upgrades to mono-energetic gamma-ray (MEGa-Ray) technology at LLNL. Beamline magnets will include an emittance compensation solenoid, windowpane steering dipoles, and quadrupole magnets. Demanding tolerances have been placed on the alignment of these magnets, which directly affects the electron bunch beam quality. A magnet mapping system has been established at LLNL in order to ensure the delivered magnets match their field specification, and the mountings are aligned and capable of reaching the specified alignment tolerances. The magnet measurement system will be described which uses a 3-axis Lakeshore gauss probe mounted on a 3-axis translation stage. Alignment accuracy and precision will be discussed, as well as centering measurements and analysis. The dependence on data analysis over direct multi-pole measurement allows a significant improvement in useful alignment information. Detailed analysis of measurements on the beamline quadrupoles will be discussed, including multi-pole content both from alignment of the magnets, and the intrinsic level of multi-pole magnetic field.

  3. Advanced Active-Magnetic-Bearing Thrust-Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imlach, Joseph; Kasarda, Mary; Blumber, Eric

    2008-01-01

    An advanced thrust-measurement system utilizes active magnetic bearings to both (1) levitate a floating frame in all six degrees of freedom and (2) measure the levitation forces between the floating frame and a grounded frame. This system was developed for original use in measuring the thrust exerted by a rocket engine mounted on the floating frame, but can just as well be used in other force-measurement applications. This system offers several advantages over prior thrust-measurement systems based on mechanical support by flexures and/or load cells: The system includes multiple active magnetic bearings for each degree of freedom, so that by selective use of one, some, or all of these bearings, it is possible to test a given article over a wide force range in the same fixture, eliminating the need to transfer the article to different test fixtures to obtain the benefit of full-scale accuracy of different force-measurement devices for different force ranges. Like other active magnetic bearings, the active magnetic bearings of this system include closed-loop control subsystems, through which the stiffness and damping characteristics of the magnetic bearings can be modified electronically. The design of the system minimizes or eliminates cross-axis force-measurement errors. The active magnetic bearings are configured to provide support against movement along all three orthogonal Cartesian axes, and such that the support along a given axis does not produce force along any other axis. Moreover, by eliminating the need for such mechanical connections as flexures used in prior thrust-measurement systems, magnetic levitation of the floating frame eliminates what would otherwise be major sources of cross-axis forces and the associated measurement errors. Overall, relative to prior mechanical-support thrust-measurement systems, this system offers greater versatility for adaptation to a variety of test conditions and requirements. The basic idea of most prior active-magnetic

  4. Quench margin measurement in Nb3Sn quadrupole magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V.V.; Bossert, R.; Chlachidze, G.; Lamm, M.; Novitski, I.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    One of the possible practical applications of the Nb{sub 3}Sn accelerator magnets is the LHC luminosity upgrade that involves replacing the present NbTi focusing quadrupoles in two high-luminosity interaction regions (IR). The IR magnets are exposed to strong radiation from the interaction point that requires a detailed investigation of the magnet operating margins under the expected radiation-induced heat depositions. This paper presents the results of simulation and measurement of quench limits and temperature margins for a Nb{sub 3}Sn model magnet using a special midplane strip heater.

  5. Measurement of the Ω- magnetic moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, H. T.; Teige, S.; Thomson, G. B.; Zou, Y.; James, C.; Luk, K. B.; Rameika, R.; Ho, P. M.; Longo, M. J.; Nguyen, A.; Duryea, J.; Guglielmo, G.; Johns, K.; Heller, K.; Thorne, K.

    1991-08-01

    A sample of 24 700 Ω- hyperons was produced by a prolarized neutral beam in a spin-transfer reaction. The Ω- polarizations are found to be -0.054+/-0.019 and -0.149+/-0.055 at mean Ω- momenta of 322 and 398 GeV/c, respectively. The directions of these polarizations give an Ω- magnetic moment of -(1.94+/-0.17+/-0.14)μN

  6. Fluctuation spectroscopy with the ACS ramp filters: a new way to measure the IMF in elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dokkum, Pieter

    2014-10-01

    Images of old stellar populations show pixel-to-pixel fluctuations due to Poisson variations in the number of giant stars. These surface brightness fluctuations can be used to study the spectra of stars as a function of their luminosity, by obtaining differential spectroscopy of pixels with high and low fluctuations. If the average number of stars per pixel is sufficiently low, there will be individual pixels that have almost no light from luminous giants, providing sightlines that are dominated by main sequence stars. In this regime the observed spectral response is strongly dependent on the number of cool, low mass stars, and hence the stellar initial mass function (IMF). We propose to observe the nearest elliptical galaxy, Centaurus A, through four narrowband ACS ramp filters tuned to the 0.8 - 0.9 micron range. From the relation between ACS narrowband indices and the amplitude of the surface brightness fluctuation we will be able to obtain quantitative constraints on the IMF from 0.1-1 Solar masses, and distinguish between a Kroupa-like IMF or a bottom-heavy, Salpeter-like IMF, with ~5 sigma significance. We have demonstrated the feasibility of the technique used in this proposal in a Cycle 19 program, where we used the same observational strategy to measure the properties of luminous giants in the Virgo galaxy NGC 4472.

  7. High-Sensitivity Measurement of Density by Magnetic Levitation.

    PubMed

    Nemiroski, Alex; Kumar, A A; Soh, Siowling; Harburg, Daniel V; Yu, Hai-Dong; Whitesides, George M

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents methods that use Magnetic Levitation (MagLev) to measure very small differences in density of solid diamagnetic objects suspended in a paramagnetic medium. Previous work in this field has shown that, while it is a convenient method, standard MagLev (i.e., where the direction of magnetization and gravitational force are parallel) cannot resolve differences in density <10(-4) g/cm(3) for macroscopic objects (>mm) because (i) objects close in density prevent each other from reaching an equilibrium height due to hard contact and excluded volume, and (ii) using weaker magnets or reducing the magnetic susceptibility of the medium destabilizes the magnetic trap. The present work investigates the use of weak magnetic gradients parallel to the faces of the magnets as a means of increasing the sensitivity of MagLev without destabilization. Configuring the MagLev device in a rotated state (i.e., where the direction of magnetization and gravitational force are perpendicular) relative to the standard configuration enables simple measurements along the axes with the highest sensitivity to changes in density. Manipulating the distance of separation between the magnets or the lengths of the magnets (along the axis of measurement) enables the sensitivity to be tuned. These modifications enable an improvement in the resolution up to 100-fold over the standard configuration, and measurements with resolution down to 10(-6) g/cm(3). Three examples of characterizing the small differences in density among samples of materials having ostensibly indistinguishable densities-Nylon spheres, PMMA spheres, and drug spheres-demonstrate the applicability of rotated Maglev to measuring the density of small (0.1-1 mm) objects with high sensitivity. This capability will be useful in materials science, separations, and quality control of manufactured objects. PMID:26815205

  8. High-Sensitivity Measurement of Density by Magnetic Levitation.

    PubMed

    Nemiroski, Alex; Kumar, A A; Soh, Siowling; Harburg, Daniel V; Yu, Hai-Dong; Whitesides, George M

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents methods that use Magnetic Levitation (MagLev) to measure very small differences in density of solid diamagnetic objects suspended in a paramagnetic medium. Previous work in this field has shown that, while it is a convenient method, standard MagLev (i.e., where the direction of magnetization and gravitational force are parallel) cannot resolve differences in density <10(-4) g/cm(3) for macroscopic objects (>mm) because (i) objects close in density prevent each other from reaching an equilibrium height due to hard contact and excluded volume, and (ii) using weaker magnets or reducing the magnetic susceptibility of the medium destabilizes the magnetic trap. The present work investigates the use of weak magnetic gradients parallel to the faces of the magnets as a means of increasing the sensitivity of MagLev without destabilization. Configuring the MagLev device in a rotated state (i.e., where the direction of magnetization and gravitational force are perpendicular) relative to the standard configuration enables simple measurements along the axes with the highest sensitivity to changes in density. Manipulating the distance of separation between the magnets or the lengths of the magnets (along the axis of measurement) enables the sensitivity to be tuned. These modifications enable an improvement in the resolution up to 100-fold over the standard configuration, and measurements with resolution down to 10(-6) g/cm(3). Three examples of characterizing the small differences in density among samples of materials having ostensibly indistinguishable densities-Nylon spheres, PMMA spheres, and drug spheres-demonstrate the applicability of rotated Maglev to measuring the density of small (0.1-1 mm) objects with high sensitivity. This capability will be useful in materials science, separations, and quality control of manufactured objects.

  9. Measuring Earth's Local Magnetic Field Using a Helmholtz Coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jonathan E.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, I present a low-cost interactive experiment for measuring the strength of Earth's local magnetic field. This activity can be done in most high schools or two-year physics laboratories with limited resources, yet will have a tremendous learning impact. This experiment solidifies the three-dimensional nature of Earth's magnetic field vector and helps reinforce the aspect of the vertical component of Earth's magnetic field. Students should realize that Earth's magnetic field is not fully horizontal (except at the magnetic equator) and that a compass simply indicates the direction of the horizontal component of Earth's magnetic field. A magnetic dip needle compass can be used to determine the angle (known as the "dip angle" or "inclination angle") measured from the direction in which Earth's magnetic field vector points to the horizontal. In this activity, students will be able to determine the horizontal component of the field using a Helmholtz coil and, knowing the dip angle, the Earth's magnetic field strength can be determined.

  10. Magnetic Measurement Results of the LCLS Undulator Quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Scott; Caban, Keith; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Reese, Ed; Wolf, Zachary; /SLAC

    2011-08-18

    This note details the magnetic measurements and the magnetic center fiducializations that were performed on all of the thirty-six LCLS undulator quadrupoles. Temperature rise, standardization reproducibility, vacuum chamber effects and magnetic center reproducibility measurements are also presented. The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) undulator beam line has 33 girders, each with a LCLS undulator quadrupole which focuses and steers the beam through the beam line. Each quadrupole has main quadrupole coils, as well as separate horizontal and vertical trim coils. Thirty-six quadrupoles, thirty-three installed and three spares were, manufactured for the LCLS undulator system and all were measured to confirm that they met requirement specifications for integrated gradient, harmonics and for magnetic center shifts after current changes. The horizontal and vertical dipole trims of each quadrupole were similarly characterized. Each quadrupole was also fiducialized to its magnetic center. All characterizing measurements on the undulator quads were performed with their mirror plates on and after a standardization of three cycles from -6 to +6 to -6 amps. Since the undulator quadrupoles could be used as a focusing or defocusing magnet depending on their location, all quadrupoles were characterized as focusing and as defocusing quadrupoles. A subset of the undulator quadrupoles were used to verify that the undulator quadrupole design met specifications for temperature rise, standardization reproducibility and magnetic center reproducibility after splitting. The effects of the mirror plates on the undulator quadrupoles were also measured.

  11. The insertion device magnetic measurement facility: Prototype and operational procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Burkel, L.; Dejus, R.; Maines, J.; O'Brien, J.; Vasserman, I. . Advanced Photon Source Accelerator Systems Div.); Pfleuger, J. , Hamburg . Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor)

    1993-03-01

    This report is a description of the current status of the magnetic measurement facility and is a basic instructional manual for the operation of the facility and its components. Please refer to the appendices for more detailed information about specific components and procedures. The purpose of the magnetic measurement facility is to take accurate measurements of the magnetic field in the gay of the IDs in order to determine the effect of the ID on the stored particle beam and the emitted radiation. The facility will also play an important role when evaluating new ideas, novel devices, and inhouse prototypes as part of the ongoing research and development program at the APS. The measurements will be performed with both moving search coils and moving Hall probes. The IDs will be evaluated by computer modeling of the emitted radiation for any given (measured) magnetic field map. The quality of the magnetic field will be described in terms of integrated multipoles for the effect on Storage Ring performance and in terms of the derived trajectories for the emitted radiation. Before being installed on the Storage Ring, every device will be measured and characterized to assure that it is compatible with Storage Ring requirements and radiation specifications. The accuracy that the APS needs to achieve for magnetic measurements will be based on these specifications.

  12. Measurement of the magnetic interaction between two electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotler, Shlomi; Akerman, Nitzan; Navon, Nir; Glickman, Yinnon; Ozeri, Roee

    2014-03-01

    In this talk we will report on the first measurement of the magnetic interaction between two electronic spins. While the dipolar magnetic interactions between different spin systems, such as an electron and its nucleus or several multi-electron spin complexes, were experimentally studied, the magnetic interaction between two isolated electronic spins was never observed. We will explain why columb exchange forces on the one hand, and magnetic field noise on the other hand, make the electron-electron magnetic interaction measurement a challenging one. This challenge was resolved by the use of Quantum Information techniques. In our experiment, we used the ground state valence electrons of two 88 Sr+ ions, co-trapped in an electric Paul trap and separated by more than two micrometers. We measured a weak, millihertz scale, magnetic interaction between their electronic spins, in the presence of magnetic noise that was six orders of magnitude larger than the respective magnetic fields the electrons apply on each other. Spin dynamics was restricted to a Decoherence Free Subspace where a coherent evolution of 15 s led to spin-entanglement. Finally, by varying the separation between the two ions, we were able to recover the cubic distance dependence of the interaction Current position: NIST, Boulder, CO.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Field Strength Effects on Diffusion Measures and Brain Connectivity Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Liang; Mueller, Bryon A.; Jahanshad, Neda; Jin, Yan; Lenglet, Christophe; Yacoub, Essa; Sapiro, Guillermo; Ugurbil, Kamil; Harel, Noam; Toga, Arthur W.; Lim, Kelvin O.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The quest to map brain connectivity is being pursued worldwide using diffusion imaging, among other techniques. Even so, we know little about how brain connectivity measures depend on the magnetic field strength of the scanner. To investigate this, we scanned 10 healthy subjects at 7 and 3 tesla—using 128-gradient high-angular resolution diffusion imaging. For each subject and scan, whole-brain tractography was used to estimate connectivity between 113 cortical and subcortical regions. We examined how scanner field strength affects (i) the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the non-diffusion-sensitized reference images (b0); (ii) diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-derived fractional anisotropy (FA), mean, radial, and axial diffusivity (MD/RD/AD), in atlas-defined regions; (iii) whole-brain tractography; (iv) the 113×113 brain connectivity maps; and (v) five commonly used network topology measures. We also assessed effects of the multi-channel reconstruction methods (sum-of-squares, SOS, at 7T; adaptive recombine, AC, at 3T). At 7T with SOS, the b0 images had 18.3% higher SNR than with 3T-AC. FA was similar for most regions of interest (ROIs) derived from an online DTI atlas (ICBM81), but higher at 7T in the cerebral peduncle and internal capsule. MD, AD, and RD were lower at 7T for most ROIs. The apparent fiber density between some subcortical regions was greater at 7T-SOS than 3T-AC, with a consistent connection pattern overall. Suggesting the need for caution, the recovered brain network was apparently more efficient at 7T, which cannot be biologically true as the same subjects were assessed. Care is needed when comparing network measures across studies, and when interpreting apparently discrepant findings. PMID:23205551

  14. Earth's Magnetic Field Measurements for the LCLS Undulators

    SciTech Connect

    Hacker, Kirsten

    2010-12-13

    Measurements of the earth's magnetic field at several locations at SLAC were conducted to determine the possible field error contribution from tuning the undulators in a location with a different magnetic field than that which will be found in the undulator hall. An average difference of 0.08 {+-} 0.04 Gauss has been measured between the downward earth's field components in the test facility and SLAC tunnel locations.

  15. Diagnostics of the Fermilab Tevatron using an AC dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Ryoichi

    The Fermilab Tevatron is currently the world's highest energy colliding beam facility. Its counter-rotating proton and antiproton beams collide at 2 TeV center-of-mass. Delivery of such intense beam fluxes to experiments has required improved knowledge of the Tevatron's beam optical lattice. An oscillating dipole magnet, referred to as an AC dipole, is one of such a tool to non-destructively assess the optical properties of the synchrotron. We discusses development of an AC dipole system for the Tevatron, a fast-oscillating (f˜20 kHz) dipole magnet which can be adiabatically turned on and off to establish sustained coherent oscillations of the beam particles without affecting the transverse emittance. By utilizing an existing magnet and a higher power audio amplifier, the cost of the Tevatron AC dipole system became relatively inexpensive. We discuss corrections which must be applied to the driven oscillation measurements to obtain the proper interpretation of beam optical parameters from AC dipole studies. After successful operations of the Tevatron AC dipole system, AC dipole systems, similar to that in the Tevatron, will be build for the CERN LHC. We present several measurements of linear optical parameters (beta function and phase advance) for the Tevatron, as well as studies of non-linear perturbations from sextupole and octupole elements.

  16. Diagnostics of the Fermilab Tevatron using an AC dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Ryoichi

    2008-08-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron is currently the world's highest energy colliding beam facility. Its counter-rotating proton and antiproton beams collide at 2 TeV center-of-mass. Delivery of such intense beam fluxes to experiments has required improved knowledge of the Tevatron's beam optical lattice. An oscillating dipole magnet, referred to as an AC dipole, is one of such a tool to non-destructively assess the optical properties of the synchrotron. We discusses development of an AC dipole system for the Tevatron, a fast-oscillating (f ~ 20 kHz) dipole magnet which can be adiabatically turned on and off to establish sustained coherent oscillations of the beam particles without affecting the transverse emittance. By utilizing an existing magnet and a higher power audio amplifier, the cost of the Tevatron AC dipole system became relatively inexpensive. We discuss corrections which must be applied to the driven oscillation measurements to obtain the proper interpretation of beam optical parameters from AC dipole studies. After successful operations of the Tevatron AC dipole system, AC dipole systems, similar to that in the Tevatron, will be build for the CERN LHC. We present several measurements of linear optical parameters (beta function and phase advance) for the Tevatron, as well as studies of non-linear perturbations from sextupole and octupole elements.

  17. Optical position measurement for a Large Gap Magnetic Suspension System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Sharon S.; Shelton, Kevin J.; Clemmons, James I.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the design of an optical position measurement system which is being built as part of the NASA Langley Large Gap Magnetic Suspension System (LGMSS). The LGMSS is a five degree-of-freedom, large-gap magnetic suspension system which is being built for Langley Research Center as part of the Advanced Controls Test Facility (ACTF). The LGMSS consists of a planar array of electromagnets which levitate and position a cylindrically shaped model containing a permanent magnet core. The optical position measurement system provides information on the location and orientation of the model to the LGMSS control system to stabilize levitation of the model.

  18. Electronic Magnetization of a Quantum Point Contact Measured by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Minoru; Ono, Keiji; Stano, Peter; Kono, Kimitoshi; Aono, Tomosuke

    2015-07-17

    We report an electronic magnetization measurement of a quantum point contact (QPC) based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. We find that NMR signals can be detected by measuring the QPC conductance under in-plane magnetic fields. This makes it possible to measure, from Knight shifts of the NMR spectra, the electronic magnetization of a QPC containing only a few electron spins. The magnetization changes smoothly with the QPC potential barrier height and peaks at the conductance plateau of 0.5×2e^{2}/h. The observed features are well captured by a model calculation assuming a smooth potential barrier, supporting a no bound state origin of the 0.7 structure.

  19. Electronic Magnetization of a Quantum Point Contact Measured by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Minoru; Ono, Keiji; Stano, Peter; Kono, Kimitoshi; Aono, Tomosuke

    2015-07-01

    We report an electronic magnetization measurement of a quantum point contact (QPC) based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. We find that NMR signals can be detected by measuring the QPC conductance under in-plane magnetic fields. This makes it possible to measure, from Knight shifts of the NMR spectra, the electronic magnetization of a QPC containing only a few electron spins. The magnetization changes smoothly with the QPC potential barrier height and peaks at the conductance plateau of 0.5 ×2 e2/h . The observed features are well captured by a model calculation assuming a smooth potential barrier, supporting a no bound state origin of the 0.7 structure.

  20. Magnetic Measurement of the Background Field in the Undulator Hall

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Andrew; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Welch, James; /SLAC

    2010-11-18

    The steel present in the construction of the undulator hall facility has the potential for changing the ambient fields present in the undulator hall. This note describes a measurement done to make a comparison between the fields in the hall and in the Magnetic Measurement Facility. In order for the undulators to have the proper tuning, the background magnetic field in the Undulator Hall should agree with the background field in the Magnetic Measurements Facility within .5 gauss. In order to verify that this was the case measurements were taken along the length of the undulator hall, and the point measurements were compared to the mean field which was measured on the MMF test bench.

  1. Intravenous Administration of Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived AC133+ Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Rat Stroke Model Reduces Infarct Volume: Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Histological Findings

    PubMed Central

    Iskander, Asm; Knight, Robert A.; Zhang, Zheng Gang; Ewing, James R.; Shankar, Adarsh; Varma, Nadimpalli Ravi S.; Bagher-Ebadian, Hassan; Ali, Meser M.; Arbab, Ali S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) hold enormous therapeutic potential for ischemic vascular diseases. Previous studies have indicated that stem/progenitor cells derived from human umbilical cord blood (hUCB) improve functional recovery in stroke models. Here, we examined the effect of hUCB AC133+ EPCs on stroke development and resolution in a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) rat model. Since the success of cell therapies strongly depends on the ability to monitor in vivo the migration of transplanted cells, we also assessed the capacity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to track in vivo the magnetically labeled cells that were administered. Animals were subjected to transient MCAo and 24 hours later injected intravenously with 107 hUCB AC133+ EPCs. MRI performed at days 1, 7, and 14 after the insult showed accumulation of transplanted cells in stroke-affected hemispheres and revealed that stroke volume decreased at a significantly higher rate in cell-treated animals. Immunohistochemistry analysis of brain tissues localized the administered cells in the stroke-affected hemispheres only and indicated that these cells may have significantly affected the magnitude of endogenous proliferation, angiogenesis, and neurogenesis. We conclude that transplanted cells selectively migrated to the ischemic brain parenchyma, where they exerted a therapeutic effect on the extent of tissue damage, regeneration, and time course of stroke resolution. PMID:23934909

  2. Evaluation of the electrode performance for PAFC by using acid absorption, acceleration and ac-impedance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chang-Soo; Song, Rak-Hyun; Choi, Byung-Woo

    1996-12-31

    In PAFC, the degradation on cathode electrode caused by carbon corrosion, platinum dissolution and growth is especially severe. An acceleration test is a good technique for evaluating the degradation of electrode performance, because it does not need long time. Coleman et al used thermal cycling and on-off cycling as an acceleration test. Song et al showed that hydrogen shortage decreased the electrode performance more rapidly than that of air shortage in gas shortage test. Honji et al reported that the rate of coarsening of Pt particle is rapid in open circuit potential and this is one of major causes on the performance degradation of electrode. The cathode performance has been studied by using acid absorption, acceleration and ac-impedance measurements as functions of the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) contents and sintering temperatures of the electrode.

  3. Stress effects on magnetic Barkhausen noise measurements from magnetized pipeline steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Annie

    The magnetic flux leakage (MFL) technique is used to determine nondestructively the maximum allowable operating pressure of steel pipelines for oil and gas [1,2]. This method involves magnetically saturating the pipe wall and measuring the leakage flux near the pipe wall surface with Hall probes or induction coils. The goal of the nondestructive testing (NDT) industry is to estimate the losses in the pipe wall to better than 5% precision. Pipelines are essentially pressure vessels that operate up to 70% of their yield strength [3]. The magnitude of leakage flux depends on several parameters including the magnetic anisotropy of pipeline steel which is stress dependent [4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]. Magnetic Barkhausen noise (MBN), the irreversible motion of 180-degree walls, is sensitive to residual and applied stress in a ferromagnetic material, such as steel. Thus MBN has been proposed as a viable nondestructive evaluation technique for monitoring magnetic anisotropy [10] and inhomogeneity in magnetic materials [11, 12, 13, 14]. MBN occurs at the greatest rate of change in magnetization, essentially where B ˜ 0 T [15]. This is not the same condition under which MFL is performed on pipeline steel when it is almost magnetically saturated. In this work MBN signals from magnetized (˜1.6 T) pipeline steel are acquired and the effects of stress are also studied. A coercive field or pinning model was developed for the MBN anisotropy data acquired from the magnetized but unstressed steel pipe that has proven to yield the magnetic easy axis of the sample prior to magnetization. Finally, both the MBN and MFL techniques were used on a magnetized (1.8 T) and stressed (up to 270 MPa) pipe sample such that differences in the permeability of regions of magnetic inhomogeneity could be compared.

  4. MCG measurement in the environment of active magnetic shield.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, K; Kato, K; Kobayashi, K; Igarashi, A; Sato, T; Haga, A; Kasai, N

    2004-01-01

    MCG (Magnetocardiography) measurement by a SQUID gradiometer was attempted with only active magnetic shielding (active shielding). A three-axis-canceling-coil active shielding system, where three 16-10-16 turns-coil sets were put in the orthogonal directions, produces a homogeneous magnetic field in a considerable volume surrounding the center. Fluxgate sensors were used as the reference sensors of the system. The system can reduce environmental magnetic noise at low frequencies of less than a few Hz, at 50 Hz and at 150 Hz. Reducing such disturbances stabilizes biomagnetic measurement conditions for SQUIDs in the absence of magnetically shielded rooms (MSR). After filtering and averaging the measured MCG data by a first-order SQUID gradiometer with only the active shielding during the daytime, the QRS complex and T wave was clearly presented. PMID:16012640

  5. Detecting low concentrations of plutonium hydride with magnetization measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jae Wook; Mun, E. D.; Baiardo, J. P.; Zapf, V. S.; Mielke, C. H.; Smith, A. I.; Richmond, S.; Mitchell, J.; Schwartz, D.

    2015-02-07

    We report the formation of plutonium hydride in 2 at. % Ga-stabilized δ-Pu, with 1 at. % H charging. We show that magnetization measurements are a sensitive, quantitative measure of ferromagnetic plutonium hydride against the nonmagnetic background of plutonium. It was previously shown that at low hydrogen concentrations, hydrogen forms super-abundant vacancy complexes with plutonium, resulting in a bulk lattice contraction. Here, we use magnetization, X-ray, and neutron diffraction measurements to show that in addition to forming vacancy complexes, at least 30% of the H atoms bond with Pu to precipitate PuH{sub x} on the surface of the sample with x ∼ 1.9. We observe magnetic hysteresis loops below 40 K with magnetic remanence, consistent with ferromagnetic PuH{sub 1.9}.

  6. Prospects for x-ray polarimetry measurements of magnetic fields in magnetized liner inertial fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, Alan G. Gilmore, Mark

    2014-11-15

    Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments, where a metal liner is imploded to compress a magnetized seed plasma may generate peak magnetic fields ∼10{sup 4} T (100 Megagauss) over small volumes (∼10{sup −10}m{sup 3}) at high plasma densities (∼10{sup 28}m{sup −3}) on 100 ns time scales. Such conditions are extremely challenging to diagnose. We discuss the possibility of, and issues involved in, using polarimetry techniques at x-ray wavelengths to measure magnetic fields under these extreme conditions.

  7. A general way for quantitative magnetic measurement by transmitted electrons

    PubMed Central

    Song, Dongsheng; Li, Gen; Cai, Jianwang; Zhu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    EMCD (electron magnetic circular dichroism) technique opens a new door to explore magnetic properties by transmitted electrons. The recently developed site-specific EMCD technique makes it possible to obtain rich magnetic information from the Fe atoms sited at nonequivalent crystallographic planes in NiFe2O4, however it is based on a critical demand for the crystallographic structure of the testing sample. Here, we have further improved and tested the method for quantitative site-specific magnetic measurement applicable for more complex crystallographic structure by using the effective dynamical diffraction effects (general routine for selecting proper diffraction conditions, making use of the asymmetry of dynamical diffraction for design of experimental geometry and quantitative measurement, etc), and taken yttrium iron garnet (Y3Fe5O12, YIG) with more complex crystallographic structure as an example to demonstrate its applicability. As a result, the intrinsic magnetic circular dichroism signals, spin and orbital magnetic moment of iron with site-specific are quantitatively determined. The method will further promote the development of quantitative magnetic measurement with high spatial resolution by transmitted electrons. PMID:26726959

  8. Measurement of the Magnetic Interaction Between Two Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotler, Shlomi; Akerman, Nitzan; Navon, Nir; Glickman, Yinnon; Ozeri, Roee

    2014-05-01

    In this talk we will report on the first measurement of the magnetic interaction between two electronic spins. While the dipolar magnetic interaction between different spin systems, such as an electron and its nucleus or several multi-electron spin complexes, were experimentally studied, the magnetic interaction between two isolated electronic spins was never observed. We will explain why the Coulomb exchange forces on the one hand, and magnetic field noise on the other hand, make the electron-electron magnetic interaction measurement a challenging one. This challenge was resolved by the use of Quantum Information techniques. In our experiment, we used the ground state valence electrons of two 88Sr+ ions, co-trapped in an electric Paul trap and separated by more than two micrometers. We measured a weak, millihertz scale, magnetic interaction between their electronic spins, in the presence of magnetic noise that was six orders of magnitude larger than the respective fields the electrons apply on each other. Spin dynamics was restricted to a Decoherence Free Subspace where a coherent evolution of 15 seconds led to spin-entanglement. Finally, by varying the separation between the ions, we were able to recover the inverse cubic distance dependence of the interaction. Current position: National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO.

  9. A general way for quantitative magnetic measurement by transmitted electrons.

    PubMed

    Song, Dongsheng; Li, Gen; Cai, Jianwang; Zhu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    EMCD (electron magnetic circular dichroism) technique opens a new door to explore magnetic properties by transmitted electrons. The recently developed site-specific EMCD technique makes it possible to obtain rich magnetic information from the Fe atoms sited at nonequivalent crystallographic planes in NiFe2O4, however it is based on a critical demand for the crystallographic structure of the testing sample. Here, we have further improved and tested the method for quantitative site-specific magnetic measurement applicable for more complex crystallographic structure by using the effective dynamical diffraction effects (general routine for selecting proper diffraction conditions, making use of the asymmetry of dynamical diffraction for design of experimental geometry and quantitative measurement, etc), and taken yttrium iron garnet (Y3Fe5O12, YIG) with more complex crystallographic structure as an example to demonstrate its applicability. As a result, the intrinsic magnetic circular dichroism signals, spin and orbital magnetic moment of iron with site-specific are quantitatively determined. The method will further promote the development of quantitative magnetic measurement with high spatial resolution by transmitted electrons.

  10. Microfabricated AC impedance sensor

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter; Ackler, Harold D.; Becker, Frederick; Boser, Bernhard E.; Eldredge, Adam B.; Fuller, Christopher K.; Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Hamilton, Julie K.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Wang, Xiao-Bo

    2002-01-01

    A microfabricated instrument for detecting and identifying cells and other particles based on alternating current (AC) impedance measurements. The microfabricated AC impedance sensor includes two critical elements: 1) a microfluidic chip, preferably of glass substrates, having at least one microchannel therein and with electrodes patterned on both substrates, and 2) electrical circuits that connect to the electrodes on the microfluidic chip and detect signals associated with particles traveling down the microchannels. These circuits enable multiple AC impedance measurements of individual particles at high throughput rates with sufficient resolution to identify different particle and cell types as appropriate for environmental detection and clinical diagnostic applications.

  11. Pressure and Magnetics Measurements of Single and Merged Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messer, S.; Case, A.; Brockington, S.; Bomgardner, R.; Witherspoon, F. D.

    2010-11-01

    We present pressure and magnetic data from both a single full scale coaxial gun and from the merging of jets from several minirailguns. The magnetic probes measure all three components of field, and include an array of probes inside the coaxial gun. Magnetic measurements beyond the muzzle of the gun show the scale of currents trapped in the plasma plume. The pressure probe measures adiabatic stagnation pressure and shows how this quantity decreases with distance from the gun as well as the changes in stagnation pressure through the merge process. Stagnation pressure is influenced by density, temperature, and velocity, and serves as a check on spectroscopic and interferometer measurements. Unlike optical measurements, stagnation pressure is taken at a definite location. These guns are early prototypes of guns to be installed on the Plasma Liner eXperiment at LANL. The jet-merging results are reviewed in the context of what is expected for PLX.

  12. Quasi-static magnetic measurements to predict specific absorption rates in magnetic fluid hyperthermia experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coral, D. F.; Mendoza Zélis, P.; de Sousa, M. E.; Muraca, D.; Lassalle, V.; Nicolás, P.; Ferreira, M. L.; Fernández van Raap, M. B.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the issue on whether dynamic magnetic properties of polydispersed magnetic colloids modeled using physical magnitudes derived from quasi-static magnetic measurement can be extrapolated to analyze specific absorption rate data acquired at high amplitudes and frequencies of excitation fields is addressed. To this end, we have analyzed two colloids of magnetite nanoparticles coated with oleic acid and chitosan in water displaying, under a radiofrequency field, high and low specific heat power release. Both colloids are alike in terms of liquid carrier, surfactant and magnetic phase composition but differ on the nanoparticle structuring. The colloid displaying low specific dissipation consists of spaced magnetic nanoparticles of mean size around 4.8 nm inside a large chitosan particle of 52.5 nm. The one displaying high specific dissipation consists of clusters of magnetic nanoparticles of mean size around 9.7 nm inside a chitosan particle of 48.6 nm. The experimental evaluation of Néel and Brown relaxation times (˜10-10 s and 10-4 s, respectively) indicate that the nanoparticles in both colloids magnetically relax by Néel mechanism. The isothermal magnetization curves analysis for this mechanism show that the magnetic nanoparticles behave in the interacting superparamagnetic regime. The specific absorption rates were determined calorimetrically at 260 kHz and up to 52 kA/m and were well modeled within linear response theory using the anisotropy density energy retrieved from quasi-static magnetic measurement, validating their use to predict heating ability of a given polydispersed particle suspension. Our findings provide new insight in the validity of quasi-static magnetic characterization to analyze the high frequency behavior of polydispersed colloids within the framework of the linear response and Wohlfarth theories and indicate that dipolar interactions play a key role being their strength larger for the colloid displaying higher dissipation, i

  13. Design and performance of an eight pole resistive magnet for softx-ray magnetic dichroism measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Arenholz, Elke; Prestemon, Soren O.

    2005-06-01

    To take full advantage of the strengths of soft x-ray magnetic dichroism (XMD) measurements for the detailed and quantitative characterization of multi-element magnetic materials, we developed an eight pole electromagnet that provides magnetic fields up to 0.9 T in any direction relative to the incoming x-ray beam. The setup allows us to measure magnetic circular and linear dichroism spectra as well as to thoroughly study magnetization reversal processes with very high precision. Design constraints and system optimization for maximum peak field are discussed. The predicted current-field relation is in excellent agreement with experimental findings. A brief discussion of the key technical difficulties in developing a similar superconducting device with peak fields of 5 T and ramping rates suitable for point-by-point full field reversal in an XMD experiment is presented.

  14. Calculated and measured fields in superferric wiggler magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, E.B.; Solomon, L.

    1995-02-01

    Although Klaus Halbach is widely known and appreciated as the originator of the computer program POISSON for electromagnetic field calculation, Klaus has always believed that analytical methods can give much more insight into the performance of a magnet than numerical simulation. Analytical approximations readily show how the different aspects of a magnet`s design such as pole dimensions, current, and coil configuration contribute to the performance. These methods yield accuracies of better than 10%. Analytical methods should therefore be used when conceptualizing a magnet design. Computer analysis can then be used for refinement. A simple model is presented for the peak on-axis field of an electro-magnetic wiggler with iron poles and superconducting coils. The model is applied to the radiator section of the superconducting wiggler for the BNL Harmonic Generation Free Electron Laser. The predictions of the model are compared to the measured field and the results from POISSON.

  15. Simultaneous Measurement of Magnetic Resonance and Neuronal Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espy, Michelle

    2007-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at ultra low magnetic fields (ULF, ˜ microT) have advantages over their counterparts at higher magnetic fields, despite the reduction in signal strength. Among these advantages are that the instrumentation uses superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), and is now compatible with simultaneous measurements of biomagnetic signals, such as magnetoencephalography (MEG). This presents a new opportunity for noninvasive simultaneous functional and anatomical brain imaging. We present here the physical basis and experimental evidence for a variety of ULF-MRI techniques being developed at Los Alamos to enable simultaneous anatomical and functional imaging of the human brain. We conclude by presenting a novel technique, based on the resonant interaction between the magnetic fields such as those that arise from neural activity and the spin population in ULF-MRI experiments, that may enable direct tomographic imaging of the consequences of neural activity.

  16. Slow relaxation of the magnetization in an Isostructural series of Zinc-lanthanide complexes: an integrated EPR and AC susceptibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amjad, Asma; Madalan, Augustin; Andruh, Marius; Caneschi, Andrea; Sorace, Lorenzo; University of Bucharest, Faculty of Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, Bucharest, Romania Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Lanthanide based molecular complexes have shown potential to behave as single molecule magnets proficient to function above cryogenic temperatures. In this work we explore the dynamics of one such family, [Zn(LH)2Ln](NO3)3 .6H2O - (Ln = Nd3+, Dy3+, Tb3+, Ho3+, Er3+, Yb3+) . The series has a single lanthanide ion as a magnetic center in a low symmetry environment; the dynamics and energy landscape of the series is explored using X-band EPR, AC and DC susceptibility over a range of temperature, field and frequency. DC magnetic data show χT value consistent with expected behavior. EPR spectra for Er3+ and Yb3+ complexes shows EPR spectra typical for easy-plane and quasi-isotropic systems respectively, thus explaining the lack of out of phase susceptibility even in an external applied filed. However, Dy3+ derivative show slow relaxation of the magnetization in zero field up to 15 K and is, accordingly EPR silent.

  17. Magnetic-Field-Response Measurement-Acquisition System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Stanley E.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.; Taylor, Bryant D.

    2006-01-01

    A measurement-acquisition system uses magnetic fields to power sensors and to acquire measurements from sensors. The system alleviates many shortcomings of traditional measurement-acquisition systems, which include a finite number of measurement channels, weight penalty associated with wires, use limited to a single type of measurement, wire degradation due to wear or chemical decay, and the logistics needed to add new sensors. Eliminating wiring for acquiring measurements can alleviate potential hazards associated with wires, such as damaged wires becoming ignition sources due to arcing. The sensors are designed as electrically passive inductive-capacitive or passive inductive-capacitive-resistive circuits that produce magnetic-field-responses. One or more electrical parameters (inductance, capacitance, and resistance) of each sensor can be variable and corresponds to a measured physical state of interest. The magnetic-field- response attributes (frequency, amplitude, and bandwidth) of the inductor correspond to the states of physical properties for which each sensor measures. For each sensor, the measurement-acquisition system produces a series of increasing magnetic-field harmonics within a frequency range dedicated to that sensor. For each harmonic, an antenna electrically coupled to an oscillating current (the frequency of which is that of the harmonic) produces an oscillating magnetic field. Faraday induction via the harmonic magnetic fields produces an electromotive force and therefore a current in the sensor. Once electrically active, the sensor produces its own harmonic magnetic field as the inductor stores and releases magnetic energy. The antenna of the measurement- acquisition system is switched from a transmitting to a receiving mode to acquire the magnetic-field response of the sensor. The rectified amplitude of the received response is compared to previous responses to prior transmitted harmonics, to ascertain if the measurement system has detected a

  18. MAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENTS OF HD2, A HIgh Nb3Sn DIPOLE MAGNET

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Caspi, S.; Cheng, D. W.; Felice, H.; Ferracin, P.; Hafalia, R. R.; Joseph, J. M.; Lietzke, A. F.; Lizarazo, J.; McInturff, A. D.; Sabbi, G. L.; Sasaki, K.

    2009-05-04

    The Superconducting Magnet Program at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has designed and tested HD2, a 1 m long Nb{sub 3}Sn accelerator-type dipole based on a simple block-type coil geometry with flared ends. HD2 represents a step toward the development of cost-effective accelerator quality magnets operating in the range of 13-15 T. The design was optimized to minimize geometric harmonics and to address iron saturation and conductor magnetization effects. Field quality was measured during recent cold tests. The measured harmonics are presented and compared to the design values.

  19. Measuring the off axis magnetic field within a Helmholtz Coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluhar, Edward; Martell, Eric

    2013-03-01

    Helmholtz coils are used because they produce nearly uniform magnetic fields on-axis. Prior research, namely Graf's thin coil experiment [The Physics Teacher, pp. 360 (2012)], has accurately measured the axial magnetic field produced by a thin coil; however, the magnetic field off-axis is known to be significantly more complicated and cannot be calculated analytically. In this research, I have numerically determined the magnetic field off-axis in the region between the two coils and compared those calculations with measured values. I then determined the effect the deviation from uniformity has on the behavior of a charged particle moving through this region, such as in the well-known electron charge-to-mass ratio experiment.

  20. Measurement of magnetic field using Rayleigh backscattering in optical fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Wuilpart, M.; Caucheteur, C.; Goussarov, A.; Aerssens, M.; Massaut, V.; Megret, P.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the use of optical reflectometry in optical fibres for the measurement of magnetic field. The dedicated application concerns the measurement of plasma current in the fusion reactor. The measurement is based on the rotation of the polarization state of the Rayleigh backscattered signal when an optical pulse is launched in the fibre. Particular care has been undertaken to evaluate the impact of linear birefringence on the measurement performance. (authors)

  1. Measurement of small radius gradient magnets using ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Charles W. Schmidt et al.

    2001-07-16

    Several small and precise 90{degree}, 20-inch-radius bending and focusing magnet systems will be needed for the transport line of the Fermilab Electron Cooling Project to transport 4.36 MeV electrons. Originally, it was anticipated that these magnets would have a gradient index of {minus}1/2. To measure these magnets and complete achromatic bend modules, a well defined beam transport system was developed to determine the transfer matrix knowing the position and angle of several input and output beam rays passing through the magnet. The beam for this was a 12.5 keV proton beam that has the same magnetic rigidity as the electron beam in the final setup. The magnetic field is approximately 300 Gauss. For this purpose a high-brightness proton source was used and the beam collimated to give a low emittance ({approximately}10{sup {minus}8} m rad) pencil beam of {approximately}1 mm diameter with a current of {approximately}100 nA. Details of the system and results of measuring a magnet will be presented.

  2. Magnetic field measurements of ɛ Eridani from Zeeman broadening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, L. T.; Künstler, A.; Carroll, T. A.

    2015-04-01

    We present new magnetic field measurements of the K2 main-sequence star ɛ Eri based on principal components analysis (PCA) line-profile reconstructions. The aim of this paper is to quantify the surface-averaged magnetic field and search for possible variations. A total of 338 optical échelle spectra from our robotic telescope facility STELLA with a spectral resolution of 55 000 were available for analysis. This time-series was used to search for the small line-profile variations due to a surface magnetic field with the help of a PCA. Evidence for a spatial and temporal inhomogeneous magnetic field distribution is presented. The mean, surface averaged, magnetic field strength was found to be < B > = 186 ± 47 G in good agreement with previous Zeeman-broadening measurements. Clear short-term variations of the surface averaged magnetic field of up to few tens Gauss were detected together with evidence for a three-year cycle in the surface-averaged magnetic field of ɛ Eri. Based on data obtained with the STELLA robotic telescopes in Tenerife, an AIP facility jointly operated with IAC.

  3. Ultrafast Magnetism Dynamics Measure Using Tabletop Ultrafast EUV Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Thomas J.; Murnane, Margaret

    2013-08-21

    In our work to date, we made two significant advances. First we demonstrated element-selective demagnetization dynamics for the first time, with a record time resolution for x-ray probing of 55 fs. Second, in new work, we were able to probe the timescale of the exchange interaction in magnetic materials, also for the first time. Our measurements were made using the transverse magneto-optic Kerr effect (T-MOKE) geometry, since the reflectivity of a magnetic material changes with the direction of the magnetization vector of a surface. In our experiment, we periodically reversed the magnetization direction of a grating structure made of Permalloy (Ni80Fe20) using an external magnetic field. To achieve maximum contrast, we used HHG light spanning the M-shell (3p) absorption edges of Fe and Ni. Our characterization of the static magnetization of a Permalloy sample shows high magnetic asymmetry at photon energies just above and below the absorption edges at 55 eV and 65 eV, respectively. This result is in excellent agreement with measurements done on the same using a synchrotron source.

  4. Satellite measurements of the earth's crustal magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnetzler, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    The literature associated with the Magsat mission has evaluated the capabilities and limitations of satellite measurements of the earth's crustal magnetic field, and demonstrated that there exists a 300-3000 km magnetic field, related to major features in the earth's crust, which is primarily caused by induction. Due to its scale and sensitivity, satellite data have been useful in the development of models for such large crustal features as subduction zones, submarine platforms, continental accretion boundaries, and rifts. Attention is presently given to the lack of agreement between laboratory and satellite estimates of lower crustal magnetization.

  5. Toroidal magnetic detector for high resolution measurement of muon momenta

    DOEpatents

    Bonanos, P.

    1992-01-07

    A muon detector system including central and end air-core superconducting toroids and muon detectors enclosing a central calorimeter/detector. Muon detectors are positioned outside of toroids and all muon trajectory measurements are made in a nonmagnetic environment. Internal support for each magnet structure is provided by sheets, located at frequent and regularly spaced azimuthal planes, which interconnect the structural walls of the toroidal magnets. In a preferred embodiment, the shape of the toroidal magnet volume is adjusted to provide constant resolution over a wide range of rapidity. 4 figs.

  6. Toroidal magnetic detector for high resolution measurement of muon momenta

    DOEpatents

    Bonanos, Peter

    1992-01-01

    A muon detector system including central and end air-core superconducting toroids and muon detectors enclosing a central calorimeter/detector. Muon detectors are positioned outside of toroids and all muon trajectory measurements are made in a nonmagnetic environment. Internal support for each magnet structure is provided by sheets, located at frequent and regularly spaced azimuthal planes, which interconnect the structural walls of the toroidal magnets. In a preferred embodiment, the shape of the toroidal magnet volume is adjusted to provide constant resolution over a wide range of rapidity.

  7. Magsat: A satellite for measuring near earth magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.; Regan, R. D.; Murphy, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    Magsat, designed for making measurements of the geomagnetic vector field, is evaluated. For accurate vector measurements the attitude of the fluxgate magnetometer will be determined to about 15 arc-seconds. Expected measurement accuracy will be 6 (gamma) in each component and 3 in magnitude. The Magsat data will be applied to solid earth studies including modeling of the Earth's main magnetic field, delineation of regional magnetic anomalies of crustal origin, and interpretation of those anomalies in terms of geologic and geophysical models. An opportunity will be presented to the scientific community to participate in data use investigations.

  8. Force Measurements in Magnetic Suspension and Balance System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuzin, Alexander; Shapovalov, George; Prohorov, Nikolay

    1996-01-01

    The description of an infrared telemetry system for measurement of drag forces in Magnetic Suspension and Balance Systems (MSBS) is presented. This system includes a drag force sensor, electronic pack and transmitter placed in the model which is of special construction, and receiver with a microprocessor-based measuring device, placed outside of the test section. Piezosensitive resonators as sensitive elements and non-magnetic steel as the material for the force sensor are used. The main features of the proposed system for load measurements are discussed and the main characteristics are presented.

  9. Characterization of Residual Stresses in Ferrous Components by Magnetic Anisotropy Measurements Using a Hall Effect Sensor Array Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, C. C. H.

    2011-06-01

    A new surface sensor probe comprising an angular array of Hall effect sensors has been developed for characterization of residual stresses in ferrous materials by means of stress-induced magnetic anisotropy measurements. The sensor probe applies a radially spreading ac magnetic field to a test sample, and detects stray fields in different directions simultaneously to determine the principal stress axes. In situ measurements were conducted on a annealed steel plate under four-point bending stresses to evaluate the probe performance. The ratio of stray field signals measured along and perpendicular to the stress axis varies linearly with the surface stress, indicating the possibility of characterizing residual stresses in ferrous components using the sensor array probe.

  10. Method and apparatus for measuring nuclear magnetic properties

    DOEpatents

    Weitekamp, D.P.; Bielecki, A.; Zax, D.B.; Zilm, K.W.; Pines, A.

    1987-12-01

    A method for studying the chemical and structural characteristics of materials is disclosed. The method includes placement of a sample material in a high strength polarizing magnetic field to order the sample nuclei. The condition used to order the sample is then removed abruptly and the ordering of the sample allowed to evolve for a time interval. At the end of the time interval, the ordering of the sample is measured by conventional nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. 5 figs.

  11. Electric and magnetic fields measured during a sudden impulse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutz, S.; Adams, G. J.; Mozer, F. S.

    1974-01-01

    The electric field in the ionosphere and the magnetic field at the earth's surface in the mid-latitude region were both measured during a sudden impulse. Ionospheric conductivities deduced from this data were consistent with expectations, thus suggesting that the fluctuations in the magnetic field at the earth's surface were caused by overhead ionospheric currents that were driven by an electric field associated with the sudden impulse.

  12. Photospheric Magnetic Diffusion by Measuring Moments of Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engell, Alexander; Longcope, D.

    2013-07-01

    Photospheric magnetic surface diffusion is an important constraint for the solar dynamo. The HMI Active Region Patches (HARPs) program automatically identify all magnetic regions above a certain flux. In our study we measure the moments of ARs that are no longer actively emerging and can thereby give us good statistical constraints on photospheric diffusion. We also present the diffusion properties as a function of latitude, flux density, and single polarity (leading or following) within each HARP.

  13. Magnetic prism alignment system for measuring large-angle strabismus.

    PubMed

    Bishop, John Edward

    2014-02-01

    Prismatic measurement of large-angle strabismus requires the simultaneous use of two or more prisms for neutralization. To facilitate the clinical measurement of large-angle strabismus a new prism system was designed utilizing a flat plate and a ferrous metal surface coupled with prisms containing rare earth magnets implanted in their base and bottom surfaces. PMID:24569000

  14. Magnetic prism alignment system for measuring large-angle strabismus.

    PubMed

    Bishop, John Edward

    2014-02-01

    Prismatic measurement of large-angle strabismus requires the simultaneous use of two or more prisms for neutralization. To facilitate the clinical measurement of large-angle strabismus a new prism system was designed utilizing a flat plate and a ferrous metal surface coupled with prisms containing rare earth magnets implanted in their base and bottom surfaces.

  15. Magnetic Field Measurement in Magnetized Laser Plasmas Using Zeeman Broadening Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, S.; Wallace, M. S.; Arias, A.; Morita, T.; Plechaty, C.; Huntington, C.; Martinez, D.; Ross, S. J.; Park, H.-S.; Presura, R.

    2013-10-01

    The Zeeman effect has been used to measure the magnetic field in high energy density plasmas. The measurements are difficult when the field orientation is fluctuating in the plasma volume or when the line broadening due to the high plasma density and temperature surpasses the Zeeman splitting. Based on an idea proposed by Tessarin et al. (2011), we implemented a solution to this problem to the field measurement in magnetized laser plasmas. High resolution spectra were obtained at the Nevada Terawatt Facility for plasmas created by 20 J, 400 fs Leopard laser pulses in the azimuthal magnetic field produced by the 0.6 MA Zebra pulsed power generator. The components of the Al III 3s 2S1/2 - 3p 2P1 / 2 , 3 / 2 were recorded with space resolution along the direction normal to the target, which coincided with the magnetic field radius. In several shots, the spectra were time gated for 10 ns at different values of the magnetic field. In these measurements the Zeeman splitting was not resolved, but the magnetic field strength can be measured from the difference between the widths of the line profiles. This work was supported by the DOE/OFES grant DE-SC0008829 and DOE/NNSA contract DE-FC52-06NA27616.

  16. Measurement Of Magnetic Fields In Magnetized Plasmas Using Zeeman Broadening Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Showera; Wallace, Matthew S.; Neill, Paul; Presura, Radu

    2015-11-01

    The Zeeman effect has been used to measure the magnetic field in high energy density plasmas. The measurements are difficult in this regime because the line broadening due to the high plasma density and temperature surpasses the Zeeman splitting. Using an idea proposed by Tessarin et al. (2011), we have measured the field in magnetized laser plasmas and the magnetized precursor of wire array z-pinches. Time-gated spectra with one-dimensional space-resolution were obtained at the Nevada Terawatt Facility for laser plasmas created by 20 J, 1 ns Leopard laser pulses, and expanding in the azimuthal magnetic field produced by the 0.6 MA Zebra pulsed power generator, and for wire array plasmas driven by the 1 MA configuration of the Zebra generator. We explore the response of the Al III 4s 2S1/2- 4p 2P1 / 2 , 3 / 2 doublet components and the C IV 3s 2S1/2- 3p 2P1 / 2 , 3 / 2 doublet components to the external magnetic field spatially along the plasma. In these measurements the Zeeman splitting was not resolved, but the magnetic field strength was measured from the difference between the widths of the line profiles. This work was supported by the DOE/OFES grant DE-SC0008829 and DOE/NNSA contract DE-FC52-06NA27616.

  17. Matched dipole probe for precise electron density measurements in magnetized and non-magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafalskyi, Dmytro; Aanesland, Ane

    2015-09-01

    We present a plasma diagnostics method based on impedance measurements of a short matched dipole placed in the plasma. This allows measuring the local electron density in the range from 1012-1015 m-3 with a magnetic field of at least 0-50 mT. The magnetic field strength is not directly influencing the data analysis and requires only that the dipole probe is oriented perpendicularly to the magnetic field. As a result, the magnetic field can be non-homogeneous or even non-defined within the probe length without any effect on the final tolerance of the measurements. The method can be applied to plasmas of relatively small dimensions (< 10 cm) and doesn't require any special boundary conditions. The high sensitivity of the impedance measurements is achieved by using a miniature matching system installed close to the probe tip, which also allows to suppress sheath resonance effects. We experimentally show here that the tolerance of the electron density measurements reaches values lower than 1%, both with and without the magnetic field. The method is successfully validated by both analytical modeling and experimental comparison with Langmuir probes. The validation experiments are conducted in a low pressure (1 mTorr) Ar discharge sustained in a 10 cm size plasma chamber with and without a transversal magnetic field of about 20 mT. This work was supported by a Marie Curie International Incoming Fellowships within FP7 (NEPTUNE PIIF-GA-2012-326054).

  18. Inter-strand current sharing and ac loss measurements in superconducting YBCO Roebel cables

    SciTech Connect

    sumption, Mike; Majoros, Milan; Collings, E. W.; Van der Laan, D. C.

    2014-11-07

    A Roebel cable, one twist pitch long, was modified from its as-received state by soldering copper strips between the strands to provide inter-strand connections enabling current sharing. Various DC transport currents (representing different percentages of its critical current) were applied to a single strand of such a modified cable at 77 K in a liquid nitrogen bath. Simultaneous monitoring of I–V curves in different parts of the strand as well as in its interconnections with other strands was made using a number of sensitive Keithley nanovoltmeters in combination with a multichannel high-speed data acquisition card, all controlled via LabView software. Current sharing onset was observed at about 1.02 of strand Ic. At a strand current of 1.3Ic about 5% of the current was shared through the copper strip interconnections. A finite element method modeling was performed to estimate the inter-strand resistivities required to enable different levels of current sharing. The relative contributions of coupling and hysteretic magnetization (and loss) were compared, and for our cable and tape geometry, and at dB/dt=1 T s-1, and our inter-strand resistance of 0.77 mΩ, (enabling a current sharing of 5% at 1.3Ic ) the coupling component was 0.32% of the hysteretic component. However, inter-strand contact resistance values of 100–1000 times smaller (close to those of NbTi and Nb3Sn based accelerator cables) would make the coupling components comparable in size to the hysteretic components.

  19. Inter-strand current sharing and ac loss measurements in superconducting YBCO Roebel cables

    SciTech Connect

    Majoros, M.; Sumption, M. D.; Collings, E. W.; Long, N. J.

    2015-04-08

    A Roebel cable, one twist pitch long, was modified from its as-received state by soldering copper strips between the strands to provide inter-strand connections enabling current sharing. Various DC transport currents (representing different percentages of its critical current) were applied to a single strand of such a modified cable at 77 K in a liquid nitrogen bath. Simultaneous monitoring of I–V curves in different parts of the strand as well as in its interconnections with other strands was made using a number of sensitive Keithley nanovoltmeters in combination with a multichannel high-speed data acquisition card, all controlled via LabView software. Current sharing onset was observed at about 1.02 of strand Ic. At a strand current of 1.3Ic about 5% of the current was shared through the copper strip interconnections. A finite element method modeling was performed to estimate the inter-strand resistivities required to enable different levels of current sharing. The relative contributions of coupling and hysteretic magnetization (and loss) were compared, and for our cable and tape geometry, and at dB/dt=1 T s-1, and our inter-strand resistance of 0.77 mΩ, (enabling a current sharing of 5% at 1.3Ic) the coupling component was 0.32% of the hysteretic component. However, inter-strand contact resistance values of 100–1000 times smaller (close to those of NbTi and Nb3Sn based accelerator cables) would make the coupling components comparable in size to the hysteretic components.

  20. Inter-strand current sharing and ac loss measurements in superconducting YBCO Roebel cables

    DOE PAGES

    Majoros, M.; Sumption, M. D.; Collings, E. W.; Long, N. J.

    2015-04-08

    A Roebel cable, one twist pitch long, was modified from its as-received state by soldering copper strips between the strands to provide inter-strand connections enabling current sharing. Various DC transport currents (representing different percentages of its critical current) were applied to a single strand of such a modified cable at 77 K in a liquid nitrogen bath. Simultaneous monitoring of I–V curves in different parts of the strand as well as in its interconnections with other strands was made using a number of sensitive Keithley nanovoltmeters in combination with a multichannel high-speed data acquisition card, all controlled via LabView software.more » Current sharing onset was observed at about 1.02 of strand Ic. At a strand current of 1.3Ic about 5% of the current was shared through the copper strip interconnections. A finite element method modeling was performed to estimate the inter-strand resistivities required to enable different levels of current sharing. The relative contributions of coupling and hysteretic magnetization (and loss) were compared, and for our cable and tape geometry, and at dB/dt=1 T s-1, and our inter-strand resistance of 0.77 mΩ, (enabling a current sharing of 5% at 1.3Ic) the coupling component was 0.32% of the hysteretic component. However, inter-strand contact resistance values of 100–1000 times smaller (close to those of NbTi and Nb3Sn based accelerator cables) would make the coupling components comparable in size to the hysteretic components.« less

  1. Inter-strand current sharing and ac loss measurements in superconducting YBCO Roebel cables

    DOE PAGES

    sumption, Mike; Majoros, Milan; Collings, E. W.; Van der Laan, D. C.

    2014-11-07

    A Roebel cable, one twist pitch long, was modified from its as-received state by soldering copper strips between the strands to provide inter-strand connections enabling current sharing. Various DC transport currents (representing different percentages of its critical current) were applied to a single strand of such a modified cable at 77 K in a liquid nitrogen bath. Simultaneous monitoring of I–V curves in different parts of the strand as well as in its interconnections with other strands was made using a number of sensitive Keithley nanovoltmeters in combination with a multichannel high-speed data acquisition card, all controlled via LabView software.more » Current sharing onset was observed at about 1.02 of strand Ic. At a strand current of 1.3Ic about 5% of the current was shared through the copper strip interconnections. A finite element method modeling was performed to estimate the inter-strand resistivities required to enable different levels of current sharing. The relative contributions of coupling and hysteretic magnetization (and loss) were compared, and for our cable and tape geometry, and at dB/dt=1 T s-1, and our inter-strand resistance of 0.77 mΩ, (enabling a current sharing of 5% at 1.3Ic ) the coupling component was 0.32% of the hysteretic component. However, inter-strand contact resistance values of 100–1000 times smaller (close to those of NbTi and Nb3Sn based accelerator cables) would make the coupling components comparable in size to the hysteretic components.« less

  2. Optimization of the AC-gradient method for velocity profile measurement and application to slow flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartäusch, Ralf; Helluy, Xavier; Jakob, Peter Michael; Fidler, Florian

    2014-11-01

    This work presents a spectroscopic method to measure slow flow. Within a single shot the velocity distribution is acquired. This allows distinguishing rapidly between single velocities within the sampled volume with a high sensitivity. The technique is based on signal acquisition in the presence of a periodic gradient and a train of refocussing RF pulses. The theoretical model for trapezoidal bipolar pulse shaped gradients under consideration of diffusion and the outflow effect is introduced. A phase correction technique is presented that improves the spectral accuracy. Therefore, flow phantom measurements are used to validate the new sequence and the simulation based on the theoretical model. It was demonstrated that accurate parabolic flow profiles can be acquired and flow variations below 200 μm/s can be detected. Three post-processing methods that eliminate static background signal are also presented for applications in which static background signal dominates. Finally, this technique is applied to flow measurement of a small alder tree demonstrating a typical application of in vivo plant measurements.

  3. Magnetic field measurements for study of fast electron transport in magnetized HED plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Hiroshi; Griffin, Brandon; Presura, Radu; Haque, Showera; Sentoku, Yasuhiko

    2014-10-01

    Interaction of megagauss magnetic fields with high energy density (HED) plasma is of great interest in the field of magnetized plasma. The field changes fundamental properties of the HED plasma such as thermal and magnetic diffusion. A coupled capability utilizing the 1.0 MA Zebra pulsed power generator and the 50 TW Leopard laser at Nevada Terawatt Facility enables to create such a condition for studies of magnetized plasma properties. We have conducted an experiment to measure magnetic fields generated by a 1.0 MA, 100 ns Zebra pulsed current in stainless steel coils. Using a 532 nm continuous laser from a single longitudinal mode laser system, the temporal change in the magnetic field was measured with the Faraday rotation in F2 glass. The probe laser passing through the 1.5 mm in radius and 1.75 mm thick glass placed in the vicinity of the inductive coils was split with a Glan-Taylor prism to measure vertical and horizontal polarization components with photodiodes. We will present the analysis of the experimental result and a design of a coupled experiment for study of fast electron transport in the magnetized plasma.

  4. Pressure dependent resistivity and magnetic measurements on superconducting KFe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaluarachchi, Udhara; Taufour, Valentin; Tanatar, Makariy A.; Kim, Stella K.; Liu, Yong; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Bud'Ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.; Foroozani, Neda; Lim, Jinhyuk; Schilling, James S.

    2014-03-01

    Ba1-xKxFe2As2 shows superconductivity at Tc ~ 38 K at the optimal doping (x ~ 0 . 4). However, superconductivity is still observed up to the extreme hole doping (x = 1) in KFe2As2 with a reduced Tc ~ 3 . 4 K. At this extreme limit, there is no observed electron pocket in this compound. The superconducting state is believed to be of a different symmetry than in the other 122 iron based superconductors. By means of resistivity, magnetization and AC susceptibility under pressure, we investigate the properties of this material. The pressure dependence of Tc has a change of slope around 2 GPa possibly consistent with a transition to a superconducting state of a different symmetry [F. F. Tafti, et al., Nature Physics 9, 349 (2013)]. We will compare measurements performed in different pressure media and discuss the evolution of the electronic correlations with applied pressure. Work at Ames Laboratory supported by AFOSR-MURI grant FA9550-09-1-0603 and by US DOE under the Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358. Work at Washington University supported by NSF Grant No. DMR-1104742 and by the Carnegie/DOE Alliance Center through NNSA/DOE Grant No. DE-FC52-08NA28554.

  5. Measurements of EUV coronal holes and open magnetic flux

    SciTech Connect

    Lowder, C.; Qiu, J.; Leamon, R.; Liu, Y.

    2014-03-10

    Coronal holes are regions on the Sun's surface that map the footprints of open magnetic field lines. We have developed an automated routine to detect and track boundaries of long-lived coronal holes using full-disk extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) images obtained by SOHO/EIT, SDO/AIA, and STEREO/EUVI. We measure coronal hole areas and magnetic flux in these holes, and compare the measurements with calculations by the potential field source surface (PFSS) model. It is shown that, from 1996 through 2010, the total area of coronal holes measured with EIT images varies between 5% and 17% of the total solar surface area, and the total unsigned open flux varies between (2-5)× 10{sup 22} Mx. The solar cycle dependence of these measurements is similar to the PFSS results, but the model yields larger hole areas and greater open flux than observed by EIT. The AIA/EUVI measurements from 2010-2013 show coronal hole area coverage of 5%-10% of the total surface area, with significant contribution from low latitudes, which is under-represented by EIT. AIA/EUVI have measured much enhanced open magnetic flux in the range of (2-4)× 10{sup 22} Mx, which is about twice the flux measured by EIT, and matches with the PFSS calculated open flux, with discrepancies in the location and strength of coronal holes. A detailed comparison between the three measurements (by EIT, AIA-EUVI, and PFSS) indicates that coronal holes in low latitudes contribute significantly to the total open magnetic flux. These low-latitude coronal holes are not well measured with either the He I 10830 line in previous studies, or EIT EUV images; neither are they well captured by the static PFSS model. The enhanced observations from AIA/EUVI allow a more accurate measure of these low-latitude coronal holes and their contribution to open magnetic flux.

  6. Atmospheric chemistry suite (ACS): a set of infrared spectrometers for atmospheric measurements on board ExoMars trace gas orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korablev, Oleg; Grigoriev, Alexei V.; Trokhimovsky, Alexander; Ivanov, Yurii S.; Moshkin, Boris; Shakun, Alexei; Dziuban, Ilia; Kalinnikov, Yurii K.; Montmessin, Franck

    2013-09-01

    The ACS package for ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter is a part of Russian contribution to ExoMars ESA-Roscosmos mission. On the Orbiter it complements NOMAD investigation and is intended to recover in much extent the science lost with the cancellation of NASA MATMOS and EMCS infrared sounders. ACS includes three separate spectrometers, sharing common mechanical, electrical, and thermal interfaces. NIR is a versatile spectrometer for the spectral range of 0.7-1.6 μm with resolving power of ~20000. It is conceived on the principle of RUSALKA/ISS or SOIR/Venus Express experiments combining an echelle spectrometer and an AOTF (Acousto-Optical Tuneable Filter) for order selection. Up to 8 diffraction orders, each 10-20 nm wide can be measured in one sequence record. NIR will be operated principally in nadir, but also in solar occultations, and possibly on the limb. MIR is a high-resolution echelle instrument exclusively dedicated to solar occultation measurements in the range of 2.2-4.4 μm targeting the resolving power of 50000. The order separation is done by means of a steerable grating cross-disperser, allowing instantaneous coverage of up to 300-nm range of the spectrum for one or two records per second. MIR is dedicated to sensitive measurements of trace gases, approaching MATMOS detection thresholds for many species. TIRVIM is a 2- inch double pendulum Fourier-transform spectrometer for the spectral range of 1.7-17 μm with apodized resolution varying from 0.2 to 1.6 cm-1. TIRVIM is primarily dedicated to monitoring of atmospheric temperature and aerosol state in nadir, and would contribute in solar occultation to detection/reducing of upper limits of some components absorbing beyond 4 μm, complementing MIR and NOMAD. Additionally, TIRVIM targets the methane mapping in nadir, using separate detector optimized for 3.3-μm range. The concept of the instrument and in more detail the optical design and the expected parameters of its three parts, channel by channel are

  7. Experimental observation of further frequency upshift from dc to ac radiation converter with perpendicular dc magnetic field

    PubMed

    Higashiguchi; Yugami; Gao; Niiyama; Sasaki; Takahashi; Ito; Nishida

    2000-11-20

    A frequency upshift of a short microwave pulse is generated by the interaction between a relativistic underdense ionization front and a periodic electrostatic field with a perpendicular dc magnetic field. When the dc magnetic field is applied, further frequency upshift of 3 GHz is observed with respect to an unmagnetized case which has typically a GHz range. The radiation frequency depends on both the plasma density and the strength of the dc magnetic field, i.e., the plasma frequency and the cyclotron frequency. The frequency of the emitted radiation is in reasonable agreement with the theoretical values. PMID:11082591

  8. Measuring g Using a Magnetic Pendulum and Telephone Pickup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinacore, J.; Takai, H.

    2010-10-01

    The simple pendulum has long been used to measure g, the acceleration due to gravity, with a precision of a few percent. Achieving agreement with the accepted value of less than 1% is feasible in the high school laboratory, though it requires some care. The precision of the measurement is bound by how accurately the period and the pendulum length are determined. To improve on the period measurement, we have developed a simple and inexpensive method using a magnet and telephone pickup.2

  9. Measuring Magnetic Fields in Photoionized Interstellar Plasmas (HII Regions)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Steven; Costa, Allison

    2015-11-01

    Hot luminous stars photoionize the interstellar gas around them, creating plasmas with a very high ionization fraction. In astronomical terminology, these are called HII regions. They are dynamic plasmas, expanding due to overpressure with respect to the interstellar medium. We are making diagnostic measurements to determine the strength and structure of magnetic fields in these objects. This paper presents our results on the Rosette Nebula. We diagnose the magnetic field in the Rosette by measurements of Faraday rotation on lines of sight passing through the nebula. These measurements are made with the Very Large Array radio telescope of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. We have measurements of the rotation measure for 18 lines of sight. Values of the mean, line of sight component of the magnetic field range from about 3 to 5 microGauss. We will discuss comparison of these measurements with models for modification of the interstellar magnetic field by an HII region. This work was supported by grants AST09-07911 and ATM09-56901 from the National Science Foundation.

  10. Using optical soliton stability for magnetic field measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şchiopu, IonuÅ£ Romeo; ǎgulinescu, Andrei, Dr; Marinescu, Andrei

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we propose a novel optical method for measuring the circular magnetic field. In practice, many situations may appear in which there are difficulties in measuring the magnetic field, as inside coils, motors etc., where the magnetic field lines are circular or elliptical. The proposed method, applied for measuring the current on high voltage lines, strongly benefits from the advantages that it offers as compared to classical solutions based on the inductive principle. Some of the advantages of optoelectronic and optic measurement methods have a real importance. These advantages consist in: avoiding the use of energy intensive materials (Cu, Fe etc.), reducing the weight of the measuring system, reducing at the minimum the fire danger due to the use of paper-oil insulation in high voltage devices etc. The novelty of our proposed method consists in using the electromagnetic radiation in ultrashort pulses, having a relatively large frequency band and a much improved resistance to external perturbations, for measuring the circular magnetic field generated from the current of high voltage lines, inside power transformers or high power motors.

  11. Magnetic Characteristics of Nd-Fe-B Magnets Related to Field Theory, Digital Computations, and Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ri, Euijae

    Some magnetic characteristics of Nd-Fe-B sintered magnets have been clarified, especially in the near vicinity within three times their length for cylindrical magnets. The flux densities as a function of distance (z) along the z-axis from the center of a single magnet were determined by utilizing Hall sensors. The repulsions between two magnets possessing identical shape were directly measured, also as a function of z, by using a home-made apparatus adopting piezoelectric device. The respective result has turned out well, coinciding with that of corresponding finite element method analysis and some analytical solutions. Also in this investigation, the correct formula directly applicable to the near H-field strength along the magnetic moment of a cylindrical magnet has been determined to be the exact solution that defies all confusing approximations or assumptions in theory, which were seen in textbooks or published in papers. Furthermore an analytical solution for the repulsion of magnet twins (cylindrical or hexagonal in shape), which can be handy in designing a variety of superconducting and/or electromagnetic devices, has been derived basically from Biot-Savart Law.

  12. Magnetic Field Measurements in Plasmas: Beyond the Traditional Zeeman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Doron, R.; Stambulchik, E.; Tessarin, S.; Kroupp, E.; Citrin, J.; Maron, Y.; Tsigutkin, K.

    2009-09-10

    We discuss a new approach to measure magnetic fields in situations where the magnetic-field properties and/or the plasma regime make the traditional Zeeman spectroscopy inapplicable. The approach is particularly useful when the field direction and/or magnitude vary significantly in the region viewed or during the diagnostic system's integration time, and hence no Zeeman splitting can be observed. Similar difficulty may also occur for high-energy-density conditions, where the Zeeman pattern is often completely smeared, regardless of the field distribution, due to the dominant contributions of the Stark and Doppler broadenings to the spectral-line shapes. In the new approach, the magnetic field is inferred from the comparison of the line-shapes of different fine-structure components of the same multiplet, which practically have the same Stark and Doppler broadenings, but different magnetic-field-induced contributions. Limitations of the new method are discussed.

  13. Finite magnetic relaxation in x-space magnetic particle imaging: comparison of measurements and ferrohydrodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhavalikar, R.; Hensley, D.; Maldonado-Camargo, L.; Croft, L. R.; Ceron, S.; Goodwill, P. W.; Conolly, S. M.; Rinaldi, C.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is an emerging tomographic imaging technology that detects magnetic nanoparticle tracers by exploiting their non-linear magnetization properties. In order to predict the behavior of nanoparticles in an imager, it is possible to use a non-imaging MPI relaxometer or spectrometer to characterize the behavior of nanoparticles in a controlled setting. In this paper we explore the use of ferrohydrodynamic magnetization equations for predicting the response of particles in an MPI relaxometer. These include a magnetization equation developed by Shliomis (Sh) which has a constant relaxation time and a magnetization equation which uses a field-dependent relaxation time developed by Martsenyuk, Raikher and Shliomis (MRSh). We compare the predictions from these models with measurements and with the predictions based on the Langevin function that assumes instantaneous magnetization response of the nanoparticles. The results show good qualitative and quantitative agreement between the ferrohydrodynamic models and the measurements without the use of fitting parameters and provide further evidence of the potential of ferrohydrodynamic modeling in MPI.

  14. Measurement of magnetic fluctuations on ZT-40(M)

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.

    1990-01-01

    The mathematical basis for experimental measurement of magnetic fluctuations in a Reversed Field Pinch is reviewed. A quasi-static drift model is introduced as the frame-work for analysis of the five-fixed-probe technique. The extrapolation of edge-measured {rvec B}{sub r} fluctuations into the plasma is discussed. Correlations between magnetic and other fluctuations expected from a quasi-static model are derived and transport-relevant correlations are discussed. Data from ZT-40(M) are presented.

  15. A single-shot spatial chirp method for measuring initial AC conductivity evolution of femtosecond laser pulse excited warm dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z.; Hering, P.; Brown, S. B.; Curry, C.; Tsui, Y. Y.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-11-01

    To study the rapid evolution of AC conductivity from ultrafast laser excited warm dense matter (WDM), a spatial chirp single-shot method is developed utilizing a crossing angle pump-probe configuration. The pump beam is shaped individually in two spatial dimensions so that it can provide both sufficient laser intensity to excite the material to warm dense matter state and a uniform time window of up to 1 ps with sub-100 fs FWHM temporal resolution. Temporal evolution of AC conductivity in laser excited warm dense gold was also measured.

  16. A hybrid data acquisition system for magnetic measurements of accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Hafalia, R.; Joseph, J.; Lizarazo, J.; Martchevsky, M.; Sabbi, G. L.

    2011-06-03

    A hybrid data acquisition system was developed for magnetic measurement of superconducting accelerator magnets at LBNL. It consists of a National Instruments dynamic signal acquisition (DSA) card and two Metrolab fast digital integrator (FDI) cards. The DSA card records the induced voltage signals from the rotating probe while the FDI cards records the flux increment integrated over a certain angular step. This allows the comparison of the measurements performed with two cards. In this note, the setup and test of the system is summarized. With a probe rotating at a speed of 0.5 Hz, the multipole coefficients of two magnets were measured with the hybrid system. The coefficients from the DSA and FDI cards agree with each other, indicating that the numerical integration of the raw voltage acquired by the DSA card is comparable to the performance of the FDI card in the current measurement setup.

  17. Direct Measurement of Ab and Ac Using Vertex/Kaon Charge Tags at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.

    2004-10-13

    Exploiting the manipulation of the SLC electron-beam polarization, we present precise direct measurements of the parity violation parameters A{sub c} and A{sub b} in the Z boson-c quark and Z boson-b quark coupling. Quark/antiquark discrimination is accomplished via a unique algorithm that takes advantage of the precise SLD CCD vertex detector, employing the net charge of displaced vertices as well as the charge of kaons that emanate from those vertices. From the 1996-98 sample of 400,000 Z decays, produced with an average beam polarization of 73.4%, we find A{sub c} = 0.673 {+-} 0.029(stat.) {+-} 0.023(syst.) and A{sub b} = 0.919 {+-} 0.018(stat.) {+-} 0.017(syst.).

  18. Hiding objects in AC magnetic fields of power grid frequency by two-shell ferromagnetic/superconducting cloak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šouc, J.; Solovyov, M.; Gömöry, F.

    2016-07-01

    Performance of magnetic cloak made from commercially available materials has been tested by verifying its ability to suppress the magnetic signatures of metallic and ferromagnetic objects. The range of magnetic field amplitudes from 0.1 to 10 mT and frequencies around 50-60 Hz were used. The cloak combines the inner tube from high-temperature superconductor that should be cooled by liquid nitrogen, with the outer tube made from MnZn ferrite powder mixed in plastic matter. Superconductor is in the form of tapes wound in helical manner on a round former. Such design is promising when the objects with dimensions reaching several centimeters should be cloaked. Performance of the small model manufactured following this design was demonstrated by observing ˜20 times reduction of the magnetic signature of metallic or ferromagnetic objects.

  19. Mars environment and magnetic orbiter scientific and measurement objectives.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, F; Langlais, B; Fouchet, T; Barabash, S; Breuer, D; Chassefière, E; Coates, A; Dehant, V; Forget, F; Lammer, H; Lewis, S; Lopez-Valverde, M; Mandea, M; Menvielle, M; Pais, A; Paetzold, M; Read, P; Sotin, C; Tarits, P; Vennerstrom, S

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we summarize our present understanding of Mars' atmosphere, magnetic field, and surface and address past evolution of these features. Key scientific questions concerning Mars' surface, atmosphere, and magnetic field, along with the planet's interaction with solar wind, are discussed. We also define what key parameters and measurements should be performed and the main characteristics of a martian mission that would help to provide answers to these questions. Such a mission--Mars Environment and Magnetic Orbiter (MEMO)--was proposed as an answer to the Cosmic Vision Call of Opportunity as an M-class mission (corresponding to a total European Space Agency cost of less than 300 Meuro). MEMO was designed to study the strong interconnection between the planetary interior, atmosphere, and solar conditions, which is essential to our understanding of planetary evolution, the appearance of life, and its sustainability. The MEMO main platform combined remote sensing and in situ measurements of the atmosphere and the magnetic field during regular incursions into the martian upper atmosphere. The micro-satellite was designed to perform simultaneous in situ solar wind measurements. MEMO was defined to conduct: * Four-dimensional mapping of the martian atmosphere from the surface up to 120 km by measuring wind, temperature, water, and composition, all of which would provide a complete view of the martian climate and photochemical system; Mapping of the low-altitude magnetic field with unprecedented geographical, altitude, local time, and seasonal resolutions; A characterization of the simultaneous responses of the atmosphere, magnetic field, and near-Mars space to solar variability by means of in situ atmospheric and solar wind measurements. PMID:19317625

  20. Mars environment and magnetic orbiter scientific and measurement objectives.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, F; Langlais, B; Fouchet, T; Barabash, S; Breuer, D; Chassefière, E; Coates, A; Dehant, V; Forget, F; Lammer, H; Lewis, S; Lopez-Valverde, M; Mandea, M; Menvielle, M; Pais, A; Paetzold, M; Read, P; Sotin, C; Tarits, P; Vennerstrom, S

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we summarize our present understanding of Mars' atmosphere, magnetic field, and surface and address past evolution of these features. Key scientific questions concerning Mars' surface, atmosphere, and magnetic field, along with the planet's interaction with solar wind, are discussed. We also define what key parameters and measurements should be performed and the main characteristics of a martian mission that would help to provide answers to these questions. Such a mission--Mars Environment and Magnetic Orbiter (MEMO)--was proposed as an answer to the Cosmic Vision Call of Opportunity as an M-class mission (corresponding to a total European Space Agency cost of less than 300 Meuro). MEMO was designed to study the strong interconnection between the planetary interior, atmosphere, and solar conditions, which is essential to our understanding of planetary evolution, the appearance of life, and its sustainability. The MEMO main platform combined remote sensing and in situ measurements of the atmosphere and the magnetic field during regular incursions into the martian upper atmosphere. The micro-satellite was designed to perform simultaneous in situ solar wind measurements. MEMO was defined to conduct: * Four-dimensional mapping of the martian atmosphere from the surface up to 120 km by measuring wind, temperature, water, and composition, all of which would provide a complete view of the martian climate and photochemical system; Mapping of the low-altitude magnetic field with unprecedented geographical, altitude, local time, and seasonal resolutions; A characterization of the simultaneous responses of the atmosphere, magnetic field, and near-Mars space to solar variability by means of in situ atmospheric and solar wind measurements.

  1. Measuring densities of solids and liquids using magnetic levitation: fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Mirica, Katherine A; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S; Phillips, Scott T; Gupta, Malancha; Whitesides, George M

    2009-07-29

    This paper describes an analytical system that uses magnetic levitation to measure densities of solids and water-immiscible organic liquids with accuracies ranging from +/-0.0002 to +/-0.02 g/cm(3), depending on the type of experiment. The technique is compatible with densities of 0.8-3 g/cm(3) and is applicable to samples with volumes of 1 pL to 1 mL; the samples can be either spherical or irregular in shape. The method employs two permanent NdFeB magnets positioned with like poles facing one another--with the axis between the poles aligned with the gravitational field--and a container filled with paramagnetic medium (e.g., MnCl(2) dissolved in water) placed between these magnets. Density measurements are obtained by placing the sample into the container and measuring the position of the sample relative to the bottom magnet. The balance of magnetic and gravitational forces determines the vertical position of the sample within the device; knowing this position makes it possible to calculate the density of the sample. PMID:19621960

  2. In Situ Magnetic Field Measurement using the Hanle Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Jarom; Durfee, Dallin

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a simple method of in situ magnetic field mapping near zero points in magnetic fields. It is ideal for measuring trapping parameters such the field gradient and curvature, and should be applicable in most experiments with a magneto-optical trap (MOT) or similar setup. This method works by probing atomic transitions in a vacuum, and is based on the Hanle effect, which alters the polarization of spontaneous emission in the presence of a magnetic field. Unlike most techniques based on the Hanle effect, however, we look only at intensity. Instead of measuring polarization we use the change in directional radiation patterns caused by a magnetic field. Using one of the cooling beams for our MOT, along with a linear polarizer, a narrow slit, and an inexpensive webcam, we measure the three dimensional position of a magnetic field zero point within our vacuum to within +/-1 mm and the gradient through the zero point to an accuracy of 4%. This work was supported by NSF Grant Number PHY-1205736.

  3. Measuring densities of solids and liquids using magnetic levitation: fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Mirica, Katherine A; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S; Phillips, Scott T; Gupta, Malancha; Whitesides, George M

    2009-07-29

    This paper describes an analytical system that uses magnetic levitation to measure densities of solids and water-immiscible organic liquids with accuracies ranging from +/-0.0002 to +/-0.02 g/cm(3), depending on the type of experiment. The technique is compatible with densities of 0.8-3 g/cm(3) and is applicable to samples with volumes of 1 pL to 1 mL; the samples can be either spherical or irregular in shape. The method employs two permanent NdFeB magnets positioned with like poles facing one another--with the axis between the poles aligned with the gravitational field--and a container filled with paramagnetic medium (e.g., MnCl(2) dissolved in water) placed between these magnets. Density measurements are obtained by placing the sample into the container and measuring the position of the sample relative to the bottom magnet. The balance of magnetic and gravitational forces determines the vertical position of the sample within the device; knowing this position makes it possible to calculate the density of the sample.

  4. An integrated device for magnetically-driven drug release and in situ quantitative measurements: Design, fabrication and testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruvera, I. J.; Hernández, R.; Mijangos, C.; Goya, G. F.

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a device capable of remote triggering and in situ quantification of therapeutic drugs, based on magnetically-responsive hydrogels of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) and alginate (PNiPAAm). The heating efficiency of these hydrogels measured by their specific power absorption (SPA) values showed that the values between 100 and 300 W/g of the material were high enough to reach the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the polymeric matrix within few minutes. The drug release through application of AC magnetic fields could be controlled by time-modulated field pulses in order to deliver the desired amount of drug. Using B12 vitamin as a concept drug, the device was calibrated to measure amounts of drug released as small as 25(2)×10-9 g, demonstrating the potential of this device for very precise quantitative control of drug release.

  5. C/NOFS Measurements of Magnetic Perturbations in the Low-Latitude Ionosphere During Magnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Guan; Burke, William J.; Pfaff, Robert F.; Freudenreich, Henry; Maus, Stefan; Luhr, Hermann

    2011-01-01

    The Vector Electric Field Investigation suite on the C/NOFS satellite includes a fluxgate magnetometer to monitor the Earth s magnetic fields in the low-latitude ionosphere. Measurements yield full magnetic vectors every second over the range of +/-45,000 nT with a one-bit resolution of 1.37 nT (16 bit A/D) in each component. The sensor s primary responsibility is to support calculations of both V x B and E x B with greater accuracy than can be obtained using standard magnetic field models. The data also contain information about large-scale current systems that, when analyzed in conjunction with electric field measurements, promise to significantly expand understanding of equatorial electrodynamics. We first compare in situ measurements with the POMME (Potsdam Magnetic Model of the Earth) model to establish in-flight sensor "calibrations" and to compute magnetic residuals. At low latitudes the residuals are predominately products of the storm time ring current. Since C/NOFS provides a complete coverage of all local times every 97 min, magnetic field data allow studies of the temporal evolution and local time variations of storm time ring current. The analysis demonstrates the feasibility of using instrumented spacecraft in low-inclination orbits to extract a timely proxy for the provisional Dst index and to specify the ring current s evolution.

  6. Measurement of dielectric and magnetic properties of soil

    SciTech Connect

    Patitz, W.E.; Brock, B.C.; Powell, E.G.

    1995-11-01

    The possibility of subsurface imaging using SAR technology has generated a considerable amount of interest in recent years. One requirement for the successful development of a subsurface imagin system is an understanding of how the soil affects the signal. In response to a need for an electromagnetic characterization of the soil properties, the Radar/Antenna department has developed a measurement system which determines the soils complex electric permittivity and magnetic permeability at UHF frequencies. The one way loss in dB is also calculated using the measured values. There are many reports of measurements of the electric properties of soil in the literature. However, most of these are primarily concerned with measuring only a real dielectric constant. Because some soils have ferromagnetic constituents it is desirable to measure both the electric and magnetic properties of the soil.

  7. Terrestrial Magnetism in Ottoman Empire: Documents and Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozcep, Ferhat

    2016-04-01

    In the modern sense, geophysics started with geomagnetic works in the 1600s in Ottoman geography. The period between 1600 and 1800 includes the measurement of magnetic declination, inclination and magnetic field strength. Before these years, there is a little information, such as how to use a compass, in the Kitab-i Bahriye (the Book of Navigation) of Piri Reis, who is one of the most important mariners of the Ottoman Empire. However, this may not mean that magnetic declination was generally understood. The first Turkish scientific book relating to terrestrial magnetism is the book of Fuyuzat-i Miknatissiye that was translated by Ibrahim Müteferrika and printed in 1731. The subject of this book is earth's magnetism. Magnetic compass was mentioned in several books. These areMuhammed al Awfi's "Jami al- Hikayat" (translated into Turkish by Ibn Arabşah); Piri Reis's Kitab-I Bahriye (The Book of "Navigation" or "Seafaring" or "Sea"); Seydi Ali Reis's "Risale-i Mirat-I Kainat min Alat-I Irtifa" (The Treatise called the Mirror of Universe according to the instrument for measuring Altitude) and Kitab Al-"Muhit" Fi˙Ilm'al-Eflak Va'l Abhur (Book of the Regional Seas and the Science of Astronomy and Navigation). There are two original magnetic declination determinations in Istanbul in 1727 and 1893 by Ottoman Turks. Also, many geomagnetic measurements between 1600 and 1917 were carried out during international campaigns in Ottoman geography.This study was carried out in History and Philosophy of Science, University of Cambridge and supported by Istanbul University Reseach Project Unite (project Numbver: IRP-49162).

  8. Paramagnetic ionic liquids for measurements of density using magnetic levitation.

    PubMed

    Bwambok, David K; Thuo, Martin M; Atkinson, Manza B J; Mirica, Katherine A; Shapiro, Nathan D; Whitesides, George M

    2013-09-01

    Paramagnetic ionic liquids (PILs) provide new capabilities to measurements of density using magnetic levitation (MagLev). In a typical measurement, a diamagnetic object of unknown density is placed in a container containing a PIL. The container is placed between two magnets (typically NdFeB, oriented with like poles facing). The density of the diamagnetic object can be determined by measuring its position in the magnetic field along the vertical axis (levitation height, h), either as an absolute value or relative to internal standards of known density. For density measurements by MagLev, PILs have three advantages over solutions of paramagnetic salts in aqueous or organic solutions: (i) negligible vapor pressures; (ii) low melting points; (iii) high thermal stabilities. In addition, the densities, magnetic susceptibilities, glass transition temperatures, thermal decomposition temperatures, viscosities, and hydrophobicities of PILs can be tuned over broad ranges by choosing the cation-anion pair. The low melting points and high thermal stabilities of PILs provide large liquidus windows for density measurements. This paper demonstrates applications and advantages of PILs in density-based analyses using MagLev.

  9. Paramagnetic ionic liquids for measurements of density using magnetic levitation.

    PubMed

    Bwambok, David K; Thuo, Martin M; Atkinson, Manza B J; Mirica, Katherine A; Shapiro, Nathan D; Whitesides, George M

    2013-09-01

    Paramagnetic ionic liquids (PILs) provide new capabilities to measurements of density using magnetic levitation (MagLev). In a typical measurement, a diamagnetic object of unknown density is placed in a container containing a PIL. The container is placed between two magnets (typically NdFeB, oriented with like poles facing). The density of the diamagnetic object can be determined by measuring its position in the magnetic field along the vertical axis (levitation height, h), either as an absolute value or relative to internal standards of known density. For density measurements by MagLev, PILs have three advantages over solutions of paramagnetic salts in aqueous or organic solutions: (i) negligible vapor pressures; (ii) low melting points; (iii) high thermal stabilities. In addition, the densities, magnetic susceptibilities, glass transition temperatures, thermal decomposition temperatures, viscosities, and hydrophobicities of PILs can be tuned over broad ranges by choosing the cation-anion pair. The low melting points and high thermal stabilities of PILs provide large liquidus windows for density measurements. This paper demonstrates applications and advantages of PILs in density-based analyses using MagLev. PMID:23972068

  10. Back-streaming ion beam measurements in a Self Magnetic Insulated (SMP) electron diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazarakis, Michael; Johnston, Mark; Kiefer, Mark; Leckbee, Josh; Webb, Timothy; Bennett, Nichelle; Droemer, Darryl; Welch, Dale; Nielsen, Dan; Ziska, Derek; Wilkins, Frank; Advance radiography department Team

    2014-10-01

    A self-magnetic pinch diode (SMP) is presently the electron diode of choice for high energy flash x-ray radiography utilizing pulsed power drivers. The Sandia National Laboratories RITS accelerator is presently fit with an SMP diode that generates very small electron beam spots. RITS is a Self-Magnetically Insulated Transmission Line (MITL) voltage adder that adds the voltage pulse of six 1.3 MV inductively insulated cavities. The diode's anode is made of high Z metal in order to produce copious and energetic flash x-rays for radiographic imaging of high areal density objects. In any high voltage inductive voltage adder (IVA) utilizing MITLs to transmit the power to the diode load, the precise knowledge of the accelerating voltage applied on the anode-cathode (A-K) gap is problematic. This is even more difficult in an SMP diode where the A-K gap is very small (~1 cm) and the diode region very hostile. We are currently measuring the back-streaming ion currents emitted from the anode and propagating through a hollow cathode tip. We then are evaluating the A-K gap voltage by ion time of flight measurements supplemented with filtered Rogowski coils. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract No. DE- AC04-94AL850.

  11. Eddy currents in the anisotropy of out-of-phase magnetic susceptibility measurement - A model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jezek, Josef; Hrouda, Frantisek

    2016-04-01

    Analytical solutions of Maxwell equations for eddy currents caused by AC field in a conductive sphere, known from 1950s, provide a general formula for magnetic susceptibility. It contains the parameters describing the sphere (its size, conductivity and permeability), surrounding medium (permeability) and the applied field (frequency). The formula is complex and without numerical evaluation it is difficult to distinguish the real (in-phase) and imaginary (out-of-phase) part of susceptibility. Representing all the parameters by only two, relative permeability (sphere vs. medium) and skin ratio (summarizing the effect of sphere size, conductivity and permeability, and frequency of the field), we derive approximate formulas for both phases and the phase angle. These are valid for a reasonable range of parameters (from rock magnetism point of view) and enable us to study their influence. The in-phase susceptibility depends very weakly on the fourth power of the skin ratio while the out-of-phase susceptibility depends more strongly on its second power. The coefficients of the dependence are expressed by means of relative permeability. The approximations of in-phase and out-of-phase susceptibilities provide a possibility to assess possible effects of eddy currents in rocks in case of low content of conductive minerals and solve problems of the type by which size one piece of a mineral in the measured sample can produce a phase shift that is observed by measurement. Examples of magnetite and pyrrhotite are given.

  12. Precise measurement of the positive muon anomalous magnetic moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Huaizhang

    A precise measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment, am = (g - 2)/2, for the positive muon has been made at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. Highly polarized m+ of 3.09 GeV/c from a secondary beam line are injected through a superconducting inflector into a storage ring 14.2 m in diameter. The superferric storage ring has a homogeneous magnetic field of 1.45 T, which is measured by an NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) system relative to the free proton NMR angular frequency wp . The muon spin precesses faster than its momentum rotates by an angular frequency wa in the magnetic field. The frequency wa is determined by measuring the decay positrons from the stored muons. The value of the muon anomalous magnetic moment is obtained by am =wae mmcB , 1 where is the magnetic field weighted over the union distribution in space and time, e and mm are the charge and the the mass of the union, and c is the speed of light in vacuum. During the data-taking period in 1999, the number of collected positrons increased by a factor of 20 compared to the previous data-taking period in 1998. The result from the data taken in 1999, am+=11659 202146 x10-101.3 ppm, 2 is in good agreement with previous measurements and reduces the combined error by a factor of about 3. The difference between the weighted mean of all experimental results, am (exp) = 11 659 203(15) x 10-10, and the theoretical value from the standard model, am (SM) = 11 659 176.6(6.7) x 10-10, is amexp -amSM =2616x10-10 . 3 The error is the addition in quadrature of experimental and theoretical uncertainties. The difference is 1.6 times the stated error.

  13. Measurements of Beam Coupling in the Marshall Magnetic Mirror Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, T. A.; Vaughn, J. A.; Carruth, M. R., Jr.; Edwards, D. L.; Heard, J. W.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Experimental investigations of the coupling of an electron beam into a magnetically confined plasma have been undertaken at the Marshall Space Flight Center using the Marshall Magnetic Mirror (M3) system. The M3 system is composed of the following: two magnet coils; a cylindrical vacuum vessel; microwave source; and electron beam source. The magnet coils, which form the magnetic mirror, have an inner diameter of 25.4 cm and an outer diameter of 50.8 cm. The coils are composed of 9 coil segments with 33 turns in each segment. Each coil segment is connected in series. To create the target plasma, a 2 kW microwave source (2.45 gHz) is coupled into the vacuum chamber via waveguide. The electron beam source is a hollow cathode device created by the EPL Corporation. The hollow cathode is capable of producing a 50 amp beam with a pulse length of 1 second. It is also capable of continuous operation at 5 amps. The hollow cathode is mounted on one end of the cylindrical vacuum vessel 24 cm outside of a magnet coil. A current sensor is placed in the hollow cathode keeper bias circuit to measure emission current.

  14. Mathematical Model for Absolute Magnetic Measuring Systems in Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fügenschuh, Armin; Fügenschuh, Marzena; Ludszuweit, Marina; Mojsic, Aleksandar; Sokół, Joanna

    2015-09-01

    Scales for measuring systems are either based on incremental or absolute measuring methods. Incremental scales need to initialize a measurement cycle at a reference point. From there, the position is computed by counting increments of a periodic graduation. Absolute methods do not need reference points, since the position can be read directly from the scale. The positions on the complete scales are encoded using two incremental tracks with different graduation. We present a new method for absolute measuring using only one track for position encoding up to micrometre range. Instead of the common perpendicular magnetic areas, we use a pattern of trapezoidal magnetic areas, to store more complex information. For positioning, we use the magnetic field where every position is characterized by a set of values measured by a hall sensor array. We implement a method for reconstruction of absolute positions from the set of unique measured values. We compare two patterns with respect to uniqueness, accuracy, stability and robustness of positioning. We discuss how stability and robustness are influenced by different errors during the measurement in real applications and how those errors can be compensated.

  15. Understanding the Magnetic Susceptibility Measurements by Using an Analytical Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cano, M. E.; Cordova-Fraga, T.; Sosa, M.; Bernal-Alvarado, J.; Baffa, O.

    2008-01-01

    A description of the measurement procedure, related theory and experimental data analysis of the magnetic susceptibility of materials is given. A short review of previous papers in the line of this subject is presented. This work covers the whole experimental process, in detail, and presents a pragmatic approach for pedagogical sake. (Contains 2…

  16. Triggering for Magnetic Field Measurements of the LCLS Undulators

    SciTech Connect

    Hacker, Kirsten

    2010-12-13

    A triggering system for magnetic field measurements of the LCLS undulators has been built with a National Instruments PXI-1002 and a Xylinx FPGA board. The system generates single triggers at specified positions, regardless of encoder sensor jitter about a linear scale.

  17. Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Measuring Ternary Phase Diagrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodworth, Jennifer K.; Terrance, Jacob C.; Hoffmann, Markus M.

    2006-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is presented for the upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry curriculum in which the ternary phase diagram of water, 1-propanol and n-heptane is measured using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The experiment builds upon basic concepts of NMR spectral analysis, typically taught in the undergraduate…

  18. Simple System to Measure the Earth's Magnetic Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akoglu, R.; Halilsoy, M.; Mazharimousavi, S. Habib

    2010-01-01

    Our aim in this proposal is to use Faraday's law of induction as a simple lecture demonstration to measure the Earths magnetic field (B). This will also enable the students to learn about how electric power is generated from rotational motion. Obviously the idea is not original, yet it may be attractive in the sense that no sophisticated devices…

  19. Electronic measurements in an alternating magnetic field (AMF) for studying magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boekelheide, Z.; Hussein, Z. A.; Hartzell, S.

    Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia is a promising cancer treatment in which magnetic nanoparticles are injected into a tumor and then exposed to an alternating magnetic field (AMF). This process releases heat and damages tumor cells, but the exact mechanisms behind the effectiveness of this therapy are still unclear. Accurate sensors are required to monitor the temperature and, potentially, other parameters such as magnetic field or mechanical stress during clinical therapy or lab research. Often, optical rather than electronic temperature sensors are used to avoid eddy current self-heating in conducting parts in the AMF. However, eddy current heating is strongly dependent on the size and geometry of the conducting part, thus micro- and nano-scale electronics are a promising possibility for further exploration into magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia. This presentation quantitatively discusses the eddy current self-heating of thin wires (thermocouples) and will also present a proof of concept thin film resistive thermometer and magnetic field sensor along with measurements of their eddy current self-heating. The results show that electronic measurements are feasible in an AMF with both thin wires and patterned thin film sensors under certain conditions.

  20. Titanium pyrochlore magnets: how much can be learned from magnetization measurements?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrenko, O. A.; Lees, M. R.; Balakrishnan, G.

    2011-04-01

    We report magnetization data for several titanium pyrochlore systems measured down to 0.5 K. The measurements, performed on single crystal samples in fields of up to 7 kOe, have captured the essential elements of the previously reported phase transitions in these compounds and have also revealed additional important features overlooked previously either because of the insufficiently low temperatures used, or due to limitations imposed by polycrystalline samples. For the spin-ice pyrochlores Dy2Ti2O7 and Ho2Ti2O7, an unusually slow relaxation of the magnetization has been observed in lower fields, while the magnetization process in higher fields is essentially hysteresis-free and does not depend on sample history. For the XY pyrochlore Er2Ti2O7, the magnetic susceptibility shows nearly diverging behaviour on approach to a critical field, HC = 13.5 kOe, above which the magnetization does not saturate but continues to grow at a significant rate. For the Heisenberg pyrochlore Gd2Ti2O7, the magnetic susceptibility shows a pronounced change of slope at both transition temperatures, TN1 = 1.02 K and TN2 = 0.74 K, contrary to the earlier reports.

  1. Integrated Geophysical Measurements for Bioremediation Monitoring: Combining Spectral Induced Polarization, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, Kristina; Slater, Lee; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitris; Williams, Kenneth H.

    2015-02-24

    This documents contains the final report for the project "Integrated Geophysical Measurements for Bioremediation Monitoring: Combining Spectral Induced Polarization, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Methods" (DE-SC0007049) Executive Summary: Our research aimed to develop borehole measurement techniques capable of monitoring subsurface processes, such as changes in pore geometry and iron/sulfur geochemistry, associated with remediation of heavy metals and radionuclides. Previous work has demonstrated that geophysical method spectral induced polarization (SIP) can be used to assess subsurface contaminant remediation; however, SIP signals can be generated from multiple sources limiting their interpretation value. Integrating multiple geophysical methods, such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic susceptibility (MS), with SIP, could reduce the ambiguity of interpretation that might result from a single method. Our research efforts entails combining measurements from these methods, each sensitive to different mineral forms and/or mineral-fluid interfaces, providing better constraints on changes in subsurface biogeochemical processes and pore geometries significantly improving our understanding of processes impacting contaminant remediation. The Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site was used as a test location for our measurements. The Rifle IFRC site is located at a former uranium ore-processing facility in Rifle, Colorado. Leachate from spent mill tailings has resulted in residual uranium contamination of both groundwater and sediments within the local aquifer. Studies at the site include an ongoing acetate amendment strategy, native microbial populations are stimulated by introduction of carbon intended to alter redox conditions and immobilize uranium. To test the geophysical methods in the field, NMR and MS logging measurements were collected before, during, and after acetate amendment. Next, laboratory NMR, MS, and SIP measurements

  2. Measurement Of Transverse Jc Profiles Of Coated Conductors Using A Magnetic Knife Of Permanent Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Hanisch, J; Mueller, F M; Ashworth, S P; Coulter, J Y; Matias, Vlad

    2008-01-01

    The transverse J{sub c} distribution in YBCO coated conductors was measured nondestructively with high resolution using a 'magnetic knife' made of permanent magnets. The method utilizes the strong depression of J{sub c} in applied magnetic fields. A narrow region of low (including zero) magnetic field, in a surrounding higher field, is moved transversely across the sample in order to reveal the critical-current density distribution. The net resolution of this device is approximately 65 {mu}m, and the J{sub c} resolution is better than 0.5%. A Fourier series inversion process was used to determine the transverse J{sub c} distribution in the sample. The J{sub c} profile was correlated with other sample properties of coated conductors prepared by pulsed laser deposition. Because of its straight-forward and inexpensive design, this J{sub c} imaging technique can be a powerful tool for quality control in coated-conductor production.

  3. Weighted averages of magnetization from magnetic field measurements: A fast interpretation tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedi, Maurizio

    2003-08-01

    Magnetic anomalies may be interpreted in terms of weighted averages of magnetization (WAM) by a simple transformation. The WAM transformation consists of dividing at each measurement point the experimental magnetic field by a normalizing field, computed from a source volume with a homogeneous unit-magnetization. The transformation yields a straightforward link among source and field position vectors. A main WAM outcome is that sources at different depths appear well discriminated. Due to the symmetry of the problem, the higher the considered field altitude, the deeper the sources outlined by the transformation. This is shown for single and multi-source synthetic cases as well as for real data. We analyze the real case of Mt. Vulture volcano (Southern Italy), where the related anomaly strongly interferes with that from deep intrusive sources. The volcanic edifice is well identified. The deep source is estimated at about 9 km depth, in agreement with other results.

  4. Magnetic vortex chirality determination via local hysteresis loops measurements with magnetic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Coïsson, Marco; Barrera, Gabriele; Celegato, Federica; Manzin, Alessandra; Vinai, Franco; Tiberto, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic vortex chirality in patterned square dots has been investigated by means of a field-dependent magnetic force microscopy technique that allows to measure local hysteresis loops. The chirality affects the two loop branches independently, giving rise to curves that have different shapes and symmetries as a function of the details of the magnetisation reversal process in the square dot, that is studied both experimentally and through micromagnetic simulations. The tip-sample interaction is taken into account numerically, and exploited experimentally, to influence the side of the square where nucleation of the vortex preferably occurs, therefore providing a way to both measure and drive chirality with the present technique. PMID:27426442

  5. Measurement of magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Yates, T. Y.

    2008-10-15

    Magnetic field fluctuation-induced particle transport has been directly measured in the high-temperature core of the MST reversed field pinch plasma. Measurement of radial particle transport is achieved by combining various interferometry techniques, including Faraday rotation, conventional interferometry, and differential interferometry. It is observed that electron convective particle flux and its divergence exhibit a significant increase during a sawtooth crash. In this paper, we describe the basic techniques employed to determine the particle flux.

  6. Measuring and modeling the magnetic settling of superparamagnetic nanoparticle dispersions.

    PubMed

    Prigiobbe, Valentina; Ko, Saebom; Huh, Chun; Bryant, Steven L

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we present settling experiments and mathematical modeling to study the magnetic separation of superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) from a brine. The experiments were performed using SPIONs suspensions of concentration between 3 and 202g/L dispersed in water and separated from the liquid under the effect of a permanent magnet. A 1D model was developed in the framework of the sedimentation theory with a conservation law for SPIONs and a mass flux function based on the Newton's law for motion in a magnetic field. The model describes both the hindering effect of suspension concentration (n) during settling due to particle collisions and the increase in settling rate due to the attraction of the SPIONs towards the magnet. The flux function was derived from the settling experiments and the numerical model validated against the analytical solution and the experimental data. Suspensions of SPIONs were of 2.8cm initial height, placed on a magnet, and monitored continuously with a digital camera. Applying a magnetic field of 0.5T of polarization, the SPION's velocity was of approximately 3·10(-5)m/s close to the magnet and decreases of two orders of magnitude across the domain. The process was characterized initially by a classical sedimentation behavior, i.e., an upper interface between the clear water and the suspension slowly moving towards the magnet and a lower interface between the sediment layer and the suspension moving away from the magnet. Subsequently, a rapid separation of nanoparticle occured suggesting a non-classical settling phenomenon induced by magnetic forces which favor particle aggregation and therefore faster settling. The rate of settling decreased with n and an optimal condition for fast separation was found for an initial n of 120g/L. The model agrees well with the measurements in the early stage of the settling, but it fails to describe the upper interface movement during the later stage, probably because of particle

  7. Measuring and modeling the magnetic settling of superparamagnetic nanoparticle dispersions.

    PubMed

    Prigiobbe, Valentina; Ko, Saebom; Huh, Chun; Bryant, Steven L

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we present settling experiments and mathematical modeling to study the magnetic separation of superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) from a brine. The experiments were performed using SPIONs suspensions of concentration between 3 and 202g/L dispersed in water and separated from the liquid under the effect of a permanent magnet. A 1D model was developed in the framework of the sedimentation theory with a conservation law for SPIONs and a mass flux function based on the Newton's law for motion in a magnetic field. The model describes both the hindering effect of suspension concentration (n) during settling due to particle collisions and the increase in settling rate due to the attraction of the SPIONs towards the magnet. The flux function was derived from the settling experiments and the numerical model validated against the analytical solution and the experimental data. Suspensions of SPIONs were of 2.8cm initial height, placed on a magnet, and monitored continuously with a digital camera. Applying a magnetic field of 0.5T of polarization, the SPION's velocity was of approximately 3·10(-5)m/s close to the magnet and decreases of two orders of magnitude across the domain. The process was characterized initially by a classical sedimentation behavior, i.e., an upper interface between the clear water and the suspension slowly moving towards the magnet and a lower interface between the sediment layer and the suspension moving away from the magnet. Subsequently, a rapid separation of nanoparticle occured suggesting a non-classical settling phenomenon induced by magnetic forces which favor particle aggregation and therefore faster settling. The rate of settling decreased with n and an optimal condition for fast separation was found for an initial n of 120g/L. The model agrees well with the measurements in the early stage of the settling, but it fails to describe the upper interface movement during the later stage, probably because of particle

  8. DESIGN OF AN AC-DIPOLE FOR USE IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    PARKER,B.; BAI,M.; JAIN,A.; MCINTYRE,G.; METH,M.; PEGGS,S.; ROSER,T.; SANDERS,R.; TRBOJEVIC,D.

    1999-03-29

    We present two options for implementing a pair of AC-dipoles in RHIC for spin flipping, measuring linear optical functions and nonlinear diagnostics. AC-dipoles are magnets that can be adiabatically excited and de-excited with a continuous sine-wave in order to coherently move circulating beam out to large betatron amplitudes without incurring emittance blow up [1]. The AGS already uses a similar device for getting polarized proton beams through depolarizing resonances [2]. By placing the magnets in the IP4 common beam region, two AC-dipoles are sufficient to excite both horizontal and vertical motion in both RHIC rings. While we initially investigated an iron-dominated magnet design using available steel tape cores; we now favor a new air coil plus ferrite design featuring mechanical frequency tuning, in order to best match available resources to demanding frequency sweeping requirements. Both magnet designs are presented here along with model magnet test results. The challenge is to make AC-dipoles available for year 2000 RHIC running.

  9. Magnetic field models of nine CP stars from "accurate" measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glagolevskij, Yu. V.

    2013-01-01

    The dipole models of magnetic fields in nine CP stars are constructed based on the measurements of metal lines taken from the literature, and performed by the LSD method with an accuracy of 10-80 G. The model parameters are compared with the parameters obtained for the same stars from the hydrogen line measurements. For six out of nine stars the same type of structure was obtained. Some parameters, such as the field strength at the poles B p and the average surface magnetic field B s differ considerably in some stars due to differences in the amplitudes of phase dependences B e (Φ) and B s (Φ), obtained by different authors. It is noted that a significant increase in the measurement accuracy has little effect on the modelling of the large-scale structures of the field. By contrast, it is more important to construct the shape of the phase dependence based on a fairly large number of field measurements, evenly distributed by the rotation period phases. It is concluded that the Zeeman component measurement methods have a strong effect on the shape of the phase dependence, and that the measurements of the magnetic field based on the lines of hydrogen are more preferable for modelling the large-scale structures of the field.

  10. Slow Relaxation of Magnetization in an Isostructural Series of Zinc-Lanthanide Complexes: An Integrated EPR and AC Susceptibility Study.

    PubMed

    Amjad, Asma; Madalan, Augustin M; Andruh, Marius; Caneschi, Andrea; Sorace, Lorenzo

    2016-08-26

    We report the synthesis, structure, and spectroscopic and dynamic magnetic properties of a series of heterodinuclear complexes, [ZnLn(LH4 )2 ](NO3 )3 ⋅6 H2 O (Ln=Nd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, and Yb), with the singly deprotonated form of a new compartmentalized Schiff-base ligand, LH5 . The Ln(III) ions in these systems show a distorted square-antiprism geometry with an LnO8 coordination sphere. EPR spectroscopy and DC magnetic studies have shown that the anisotropic nature of the complexes is far more complicated than predicted on the basis of a simple electrostatic model. Among the investigated systems, only the Dy(III) derivative showed single-ion magnet behavior, in zero and an applied magnetic field, both in pure polycrystalline samples and in a series of polycrystalline samples with different degrees of dilution at the single-crystal level in the isostructural Y(III) derivative. The rich dynamics observed as functions of frequency, field, and temperature reveals that multiple relaxation mechanisms are at play, resulting in a barrier of 189 cm(-1) , which is among the highest reported for a dinuclear Zn-Dy system. Analysis of the dynamic behavior as a function of dilution degree further evidenced the persistence of non-negligible intermolecular interactions, even at the lowest concentration of 1 %. PMID:27465998

  11. ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC INDUSTRIAL CONTROL. A-C CONVENTIONAL MAGNETIC MOTOR CONTROL, PART II, UNIT 6, ASSIGNMENTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SUTTON, MACK C.

    THIS STUDY GUIDE IS FOR INDIVIDUAL STUDENT USE IN STUDYING ALTERNATING CURRENT CONVENTIONAL MAGNETIC MOTOR CONTROL IN ELECTRICAL-ELECTRONIC PROGRAMS. IT WAS DEVELOPED BY AN INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS SPECIALIST AND ADVISERS. EACH OF THE 10 ASSIGNMENT SHEETS PROVIDES THE LESSON SUBJECT, PURPOSE, INTRODUCTORY INFORMATION, STUDY REFERENCES,…

  12. ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC INDUSTRIAL CONTROL. A-C CONVENTIONAL MAGNETIC MOTOR CONTROL, PART II, UNIT 6, INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SUTTON, MACK C.

    THIS GUIDE IS FOR TEACHER USE IN DIRECTING INDIVIDUAL STUDY OF ALTERNATING CURRENT CONVENTIONAL MAGNETIC MOTOR CONTROL IN ELECTRICAL-ELECTRONIC PROGRAMS. IT WAS DEVELOPED BY AN INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS SPECIALIST AND ADVISERS. EACH OF THE 10 INSTRUCTOR'S SHEETS GIVES THE LESSON SUBJECT, PURPOSE, INTRODUCTORY INFORMATION, REFERENCES, SUPPLEMENTARY…

  13. ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC INDUSTRIAL CONTROL. A-C CONVENTIONAL MAGNETIC MOTOR CONTROL, PART I, UNIT 5, INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SUTTON, MACK C.

    THIS GUIDE IS FOR TEACHER USE IN DIRECTING INDIVIDUAL STUDY OF ALTERNATING CURRENT CONVENTIONAL MAGNETIC MOTOR CONTROL IN ELECTRICAL-ELECTRONIC PROGRAMS. IT WAS DEVELOPED BY AN INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS SPECIALIST AND ADVISERS. EACH OF THE 10 INSTRUCTOR'S SHEETS GIVES THE LESSON SUBJECT, PURPOSE, INTRODUCTORY INFORMATION, REFERENCES, AND…

  14. ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC INDUSTRIAL CONTROL. A-C CONVENTIONAL MAGNETIC MOTOR CONTROL, PART I, UNIT 5, ASSIGNMENTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SUTTON, MACK C.

    THIS GUIDE IS FOR INDIVIDUAL STUDENT USE IN STUDYING ALTERNATING CURRENT CONVENTIONAL MAGNETIC MOTOR CONTROL IN ELECTRICAL-ELECTRONIC PROGRAMS. IT WAS DEVELOPED BY AN INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS SPECIALIST AND ADVISERS. EACH OF THE 10 ASSIGNMENT SHEETS PROVIDES THE LESSON SUBJECT, PURPOSE, INTRODUCTORY INFORMATION, STUDY REFERENCES, SUPPLEMENTARY…

  15. Small gap magnet prototype measurements for eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Y.; He, P.; Jain, A.; Mahler, G.; Meng, W.; Tuozzolo, J.; Litvinenko, V.

    2010-05-23

    In this paper we present the design and prototype measurement of small gap (5mm to 10 mm aperture) dipole and quadrupole for the future high energy ERL (Energy Recovery Linac). The small gap magnets have the potential of largely reducing the cost of the future electron-ion collider project, eRHIC, which requires a 10GeV to 30 GeV ERL with up to 6 energy recovery passes (3.8 km each pass). We also studied the sensitivity of the energy recovery pass and the alignment error in this small magnets structure and countermeasure methods.

  16. High-precision measurements of global stellar magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plachinda, S. I.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a brief history of the development of devices and techniques for high-precision measurements of stellar magnetic fields. Two main approaches for the processing of spectral-polarimetric observations are described: the method of least-squares deconvolution (LSD), which is used to find a mean-weighted average of the normalized polarization profile using a set of spectral lines, and a method in which each individual spectral line is used to determine the magnetic field, viz., the single line method (SL). The advantages and disadvantages of the LSD and SL methods are discussed.

  17. Modeling and Measurement of Ocean Generated Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, R.; Avera, W. E.; Nelson, J.; Brozena, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Motion of conductive seawater through the earth's magnetic field will produce magnetic fields. Magnetic fields from motions such as ocean waves and swells are detectable near the ocean's surface but decay rapidly with distance. Non-linear internal waves (NLIWs) generated by mechanisms such as tides over bathymetric features have been predicted to produce magnetic anomalies of .1-1 nT at altitudes of ~ 100 m above the surface (Chave, 1986) due to the large volumes of coherently moving water. An experiment was performed in 2009 by the Defense Research and Development Canada (DRDC) and the US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) to see if magnetic signatures predicted from oceanographic measurements could be detected by airborne and ocean bottom mounted magnetometers. The test was conducted near the shelf-break off the coast of New Jersey where NLIWs have been observed. Oceanographic measurements were collected by a set of bottom-mounted ADCPs, towed C-T sensors mounted on a "SCANFISH" tow-body, and a hull-mounted ADCP. Magnetic measurements consisted of total-field magnetometers co-located with the bottom mounted ADCPs, three magnetic base-stations (total field and vector) in New Jersey for geomagnetic noise cancellation, and magnetometers aboard two aircraft ( a Canadian National Research Council Convair 580 and the NRL P-3) flown simultaneously with a 20-30 second separation ( corresponding to 2-3 km) along a repeat track over the bottom-mounted sensors. The multiple aircraft and repeat tracks were intended to remove the spatially stationary geologic component. The time-varying geomagnetic signal was extrapolated from the magnetic base-stations to the aircraft measurements. Both aircraft had high quality magnetometers and magnetic-field compensation systems based on co-located vector magnetometers and kinematic GPS. The Convair had two magnetometer and compensation systems mounted in wing-pods with a base-line of ~ 32 m that allowed the calculation of a cross

  18. Spin/orbital and magnetic quantum number selective magnetization measurements for CoFeB/MgO multilayer films.

    PubMed

    Yamazoe, M; Kato, T; Suzuki, K; Adachi, M; Shibayama, A; Hoshi, K; Itou, M; Tsuji, N; Sakurai, Y; Sakurai, H

    2016-11-01

    Spin selective magnetic hysteresis (SSMH) curves, orbital selective magnetic hysteresis (OSMH) curves and magnetic quantum number selective SSMH curves are obtained for CoFeB/MgO multilayer films by combining magnetic Compton profile measurements and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer measurements. Although the SQUID magnetometer measurements do not show perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) in the CoFeB/MgO multilayer film, PMA behavior is observed in the OSMH and SSMH curves for the |m|  =  2 magnetic quantum number states. These facts indicate that magnetization switching behavior is dominated by the orbital magnetization of the |m|  =  2 magnetic quantum number states. PMID:27602698

  19. Spin/orbital and magnetic quantum number selective magnetization measurements for CoFeB/MgO multilayer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazoe, M.; Kato, T.; Suzuki, K.; Adachi, M.; Shibayama, A.; Hoshi, K.; Itou, M.; Tsuji, N.; Sakurai, Y.; Sakurai, H.

    2016-11-01

    Spin selective magnetic hysteresis (SSMH) curves, orbital selective magnetic hysteresis (OSMH) curves and magnetic quantum number selective SSMH curves are obtained for CoFeB/MgO multilayer films by combining magnetic Compton profile measurements and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer measurements. Although the SQUID magnetometer measurements do not show perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) in the CoFeB/MgO multilayer film, PMA behavior is observed in the OSMH and SSMH curves for the |m|  =  2 magnetic quantum number states. These facts indicate that magnetization switching behavior is dominated by the orbital magnetization of the |m|  =  2 magnetic quantum number states.

  20. Study of AC/RF properties of SRF ingot niobium

    SciTech Connect

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Tsindlekht, Menachem I; Genkin, Valery M; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2013-09-01

    In an attempt to correlate the performance of superconducting radiofrequency cavities made of niobium with the superconducting properties, we present the results of the magnetization and ac susceptibility of the niobium used in the superconducting radiofrequency cavity fabrication. The samples were subjected to buffer chemical polishing (BCP) surface and high temperature heat treatments, typically applied to the cavities fabrications. The analysis of the results show the different surface and bulk ac conductivity for the samples subjected to BCP and heat treatment. Furthermore, the RF surface impedance is measured on the sample using a TE011 microwave cavity for a comparison to the low frequency measurements.

  1. Introducing AC inductive reactance with a power tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Wesley; Baker, Blane

    2016-09-01

    The concept of reactance in AC electrical circuits is often non-intuitive and difficult for students to grasp. In order to address this lack of conceptual understanding, classroom exercises compare the predicted resistance of a power tool, based on electrical specifications, to measured resistance. Once students discover that measured resistance is smaller than expected, they are asked to explain these observations using previously studied principles of magnetic induction. Exercises also introduce the notion of inductive reactance and impedance in AC circuits and, ultimately, determine self-inductance of the motor windings within the power tool.

  2. In situ measurements of magnetic nanoparticles after placenta perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Robert; Gläser, Marcus; Göhner, Claudia; Seyfarth, Lydia; Schleussner, Ekkehard; Hofmann, Andreas; Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    Nanoparticles (NP) present promising tools for medical applications. However, the investigation of their spatial and temporal distribution is hampered by missing in-situ particle detection and quantification technologies. The placenta perfusion experiment represents an interesting model for the study of the particle distribution at a biological barrier. It allows the ex-vivo investigation of the permeability of the placenta for materials of interest. We introduce an approach based on a magnetic system for an in situ measurement of the concentration of magnetic NPs in such an experiment. A previously off-line utilized magnetic readout device (sensitivity of ≈10-8 Am2) was used for long term measurements of magnetic NP of 100-150 nm size range in a closed circuit of a placenta perfusion. It represents a semiquantitative approach. The behavior of particles in the placenta and in the measurement system was studied, as well as the influence of particle surface modifications. The results suggest a transfer of a low amount of particles from the maternal to the fetal blood circuit.

  3. Embedded north-seeker for automatic absolute magnetic DI measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonsette, Alexandre; Rasson, Jean

    2014-05-01

    In magnetic observatory Earth magnetic field is recorded with a resolution of 0.1nT for 1min sampling (new standards impose 1pT for 1s sampling). The method universally adopted for measuring it is a combination of three instruments. Vectorial magnetometer (variometer) records variations of the three components around a reference value or a baseline. A proton or an overhauser magnetometer is an absolute instrument able to measure the modulus of the field and used to determine the F component baseline of the variometer. The declination and inclination baselines require a manual procedure to be computed. An operator manipulates a non-magnetic theodolite (also called a DIFlux) to measure the D and I angles in different configurations with a resolution of a few arcsec. The AutoDIF is a non-magnetic automatic DIFlux using the same protocol as the manual procedure. The declination defined according to the true north is determined by means of a target pointing system. Even if the technique is fast and accurate, it becomes problematic in case of unmanned deployment. In particular the area between the target and the DIFlux is out of control. Snow storm, fog, vegetation or condensation on windows are examples of perturbation preventing for finding the target. It is obvious in case of (future) seafloor observatories. A FOG based north-seeker has been implemented and mounted on the AutoDIF. The first results using a low cost gyro don't meet the Intermagnet specifications yet but are however hopeful. A 0.1° standard deviation has been reached and statistically reduced to 0.01° after less than two days in laboratory. The magnetic disturbance of the sensor is taken into account and compensated by the measurement protocol.

  4. New Limits on Extragalactic Magnetic Fields from Rotation Measures.

    PubMed

    Pshirkov, M S; Tinyakov, P G; Urban, F R

    2016-05-13

    We take advantage of the wealth of rotation measures data contained in the NRAO VLA Sky Survey catalog to derive new, statistically robust, upper limits on the strength of extragalactic magnetic fields. We simulate the extragalactic magnetic field contribution to the rotation measures for a given field strength and correlation length, by assuming that the electron density follows the distribution of Lyman-α clouds. Based on the observation that rotation measures from distant radio sources do not exhibit any trend with redshift, while the extragalactic contribution instead grows with distance, we constrain fields with Jeans' length coherence length to be below 1.7 nG at the 2σ level, and fields coherent across the entire observable Universe below 0.65 nG. These limits do not depend on the particular origin of these cosmological fields. PMID:27232014

  5. New Limits on Extragalactic Magnetic Fields from Rotation Measures.

    PubMed

    Pshirkov, M S; Tinyakov, P G; Urban, F R

    2016-05-13

    We take advantage of the wealth of rotation measures data contained in the NRAO VLA Sky Survey catalog to derive new, statistically robust, upper limits on the strength of extragalactic magnetic fields. We simulate the extragalactic magnetic field contribution to the rotation measures for a given field strength and correlation length, by assuming that the electron density follows the distribution of Lyman-α clouds. Based on the observation that rotation measures from distant radio sources do not exhibit any trend with redshift, while the extragalactic contribution instead grows with distance, we constrain fields with Jeans' length coherence length to be below 1.7 nG at the 2σ level, and fields coherent across the entire observable Universe below 0.65 nG. These limits do not depend on the particular origin of these cosmological fields.

  6. New Limits on Extragalactic Magnetic Fields from Rotation Measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pshirkov, M. S.; Tinyakov, P. G.; Urban, F. R.

    2016-05-01

    We take advantage of the wealth of rotation measures data contained in the NRAO VLA Sky Survey catalog to derive new, statistically robust, upper limits on the strength of extragalactic magnetic fields. We simulate the extragalactic magnetic field contribution to the rotation measures for a given field strength and correlation length, by assuming that the electron density follows the distribution of Lyman-α clouds. Based on the observation that rotation measures from distant radio sources do not exhibit any trend with redshift, while the extragalactic contribution instead grows with distance, we constrain fields with Jeans' length coherence length to be below 1.7 nG at the 2 σ level, and fields coherent across the entire observable Universe below 0.65 nG. These limits do not depend on the particular origin of these cosmological fields.

  7. Field measuring probe for SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Ganetis, G.; Herrera, J.; Hogue, R.; Skaritka, J.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.

    1987-03-01

    The field probe developed for measuring the field in SSC dipole magnets is an adaptation of the rotating tangential coil system in use at Brookhaven for several years. Also known as the MOLE, it is a self-contained room-temperature mechanism that is pulled through the aperture of the magnet with regular stops to measure the local field. Several minutes are required to measure the field at each point. The probe measures the multipole components of the field as well as the field angle relative to gravity. The sensitivity of the coil and electronics is such that the field up to the full 6.6 T excitation of the magnet as well as the field when warm with only 0.01 T excitation can be measured. Tethers are attached to both ends of the probe to carry electrical connections and to supply dry nitrogen to the air motors that rotate the tangential windings as well as the gravity sensor. A small computer is attached to the probe for control and for data collection, analysis and storage. Digital voltmeters are used to digitize the voltages from the rotating coil and several custom circuits control motor speeds in the probe. The overall diameter of the probe is approximately 2 cm and its length is 2.4 m; the field sensitive windings are 0.6 m in length.

  8. LBL Magnetic-Measurements Data-Acquisition System

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.I.; Nelson, D.H.

    1983-03-01

    The LBL Magnetic Measurements Engineering (MME) Group has developed a Real-Time Data Acquisition System (DAS) for magnetic measurements. The design objective was for a system that was versatile, portable, modular, expandable, quickly and easily reconfigurable both in hardware and software, and inexpensive. All objectives except the last were attained. An LSI 11/23 microcomputer is interfaced to a clock-calendar, printer, CRT control terminal, plotter with hard copy, floppy and hard disks, GPIB, and CAMAC buses. Off-the-shelf hardware and software have been used where possible. Operational capabilities include: (1) measurement of high permeability materials; (2) harmonic error analysis of (a) superconducting dipoles and (b) rare earth cobalt (REC) and conventional quadrupole magnets; and (3) 0.1% accuracy x-y mapping with Hall probes. Results are typically presented in both tabular and graphical form during measurements. Only minutes are required to switch from one measurement capability to another. Brief descriptions of the DAS capabilities, some of the special instrumentation developed to implement these capabilities, and planned developments are given below.

  9. Measurements of magnetic permeability and H[sub c] of magnet steels using digital techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.; Morgan, G.

    1992-01-01

    The magnet-to-magnet variations in the dipole field of superconducting accelerator magnets must fall within specified tolerances to avoid excessive beam losses during injection. At injection field levels ([approximately] 0.4 T for RHIC), the variations in the field attributable to the iron arise from variations in the chemical impurities, cold working and heat treatment. These structure-sensitive effects can be characterized by measuring the permeability and coercive force, H[sub c], of iron samples. A digital permeameter was developed to perform precise measurements of the magnetic properties of ring samples. An arbitrary function generator and two high-precision digital multimeters were connected to a desktop computer using the IEEE-488 bus, and software was written to automatically acquire and analyze the data. Through the use of the arbitrary waveform generator, the effect of varying the period of the B-H loop and the effect of varying the shape of the H waveform were explored. The effects of annealing, bending and flattening, and temperature on H[sub c] and the relative permeability have been investigated for samples of magnet steel from several manufacturers.

  10. Measurements of magnetic permeability and H{sub c} of magnet steels using digital techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.; Morgan, G.

    1992-11-01

    The magnet-to-magnet variations in the dipole field of superconducting accelerator magnets must fall within specified tolerances to avoid excessive beam losses during injection. At injection field levels ({approximately} 0.4 T for RHIC), the variations in the field attributable to the iron arise from variations in the chemical impurities, cold working and heat treatment. These structure-sensitive effects can be characterized by measuring the permeability and coercive force, H{sub c}, of iron samples. A digital permeameter was developed to perform precise measurements of the magnetic properties of ring samples. An arbitrary function generator and two high-precision digital multimeters were connected to a desktop computer using the IEEE-488 bus, and software was written to automatically acquire and analyze the data. Through the use of the arbitrary waveform generator, the effect of varying the period of the B-H loop and the effect of varying the shape of the H waveform were explored. The effects of annealing, bending and flattening, and temperature on H{sub c} and the relative permeability have been investigated for samples of magnet steel from several manufacturers.

  11. Light nuclear charge measurement with Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basara, Laurent; Choutko, Vitaly; Li, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a high energy particle detector installed and operating on board of the International Space Station (ISS) since May 2011. So far more than 70 billion cosmic ray events have been recorded by AMS. In the present paper the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) detector of AMS is used to measure cosmic ray nuclear charge magnitudes up to Z=10. The obtained charge magnitude resolution is about 0.1 and 0.3 charge unit for Helium and Carbon, respectively. These measurements are important for an accurate determination of the interaction probabilities of various nuclei with the AMS materials. The ECAL charge calibration and measurement procedures are presented.

  12. Ion-pair formation in aqueous strontium chloride and strontium hydroxide solutions under hydrothermal conditions by AC conductivity measurements.

    PubMed

    Arcis, H; Zimmerman, G H; Tremaine, P R

    2014-09-01

    Frequency-dependent electrical conductivities of solutions of aqueous strontium hydroxide and strontium chloride have been measured from T = 295 K to T = 625 K at p = 20 MPa, over a very wide range of ionic strength (3 × 10(-5) to 0.2 mol kg(-1)), using a high-precision flow AC conductivity instrument. Experimental values for the concentration-dependent equivalent conductivity, Λ, of the two electrolytes were fitted with the Turq-Blum-Bernard-Kunz ("TBBK") ionic conductivity model, to determine ionic association constants, K(A,m). The TBBK fits yielded statistically significant formation constants for the species SrOH(+) and SrCl(+) at all temperatures, and for Sr(OH)2(0) and SrCl2(0) at temperatures above 446 K. The first and second stepwise association constants for the ion pairs followed the order K(A1)(SrOH(+)) > K(A1)(SrCl(+)) > K(A2)[Sr(OH)2(0)] > K(A2)[SrCl2(0)], consistent with long-range solvent polarization effects associated with the lower static dielectric constant and high compressibility of water at elevated temperatures. The stepwise association constants to form SrCl(+) agree with previously reported values for CaCl(+) to within the combined experimental error at high temperatures and, at temperatures below ∼375 K, the values of log10 KA1 for strontium are lower than those for calcium by up to ∼0.3-0.4 units. The association constants for the species SrOH(+) and Sr(OH)2(0) are the first accurate values to be reported for hydroxide ion pairs with any divalent cation under these conditions.

  13. Measuring exposed magnetic fields of welders in working time.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi-Sekino, Sachiko; Ojima, Jun; Sekino, Masaki; Hojo, Minoru; Saito, Hiroyuki; Okuno, Tsutomu

    2011-01-01

    The assessment of the occupational electromagnetic field exposure of welders is of great importance, especially in shielded-arc welding, which uses relatively high electric currents of up to several hundred amperes. In the present study, we measured the magnetic field exposure level of welders in the course of working. A 3-axis Hall magnetometer was attached to a subject's wrist in order to place the sensor probe at the closest position to the magnetic source (a cable from the current source). Data was acquired every 5 s from the beginning of the work time. The maximum exposed field was 0.35-3.35 mT (Mean ± SD: 1.55 ± 0.93 mT, N=17) and the average value per day was 0.04-0.12 mT (Mean ± SD: 0.07 ± 0.02 mT, N=17). We also conducted a finite element method-based analysis of human hand tissue for the electromagnetic field dosimetry. In addition, the magnetic field associated with grinders, an air hammer, and a drill using electromagnetic anchorage were measured; however, the magnetic fields were much lower than those generated in the welding process. These results agreed well with the results of the electromagnetic field dosimetry (1.49 mT at the wrist position), and the calculated eddy current (4.28 mA/m(2)) was much lower than the well-known guideline thresholds for electrical nerve or muscular stimulation.

  14. Magnetic tweezers: micromanipulation and force measurement at the molecular level.

    PubMed Central

    Gosse, Charlie; Croquette, Vincent

    2002-01-01

    Cantilevers and optical tweezers are widely used for micromanipulating cells or biomolecules for measuring their mechanical properties. However, they do not allow easy rotary motion and can sometimes damage the handled material. We present here a system of magnetic tweezers that overcomes those drawbacks while retaining most of the previous dynamometers properties. Electromagnets are coupled to a microscope-based particle tracking system through a digital feedback loop. Magnetic beads are first trapped in a potential well of stiffness approximately 10(-7) N/m. Thus, they can be manipulated in three dimensions at a speed of approximately 10 microm/s and rotated along the optical axis at a frequency of 10 Hz. In addition, our apparatus can work as a dynamometer relying on either usual calibration against the viscous drag or complete calibration using Brownian fluctuations. By stretching a DNA molecule between a magnetic particle and a glass surface, we applied and measured vertical forces ranging from 50 fN to 20 pN. Similarly, nearly horizontal forces up to 5 pN were obtained. From those experiments, we conclude that magnetic tweezers represent a low-cost and biocompatible setup that could become a suitable alternative to the other available micromanipulators. PMID:12023254

  15. Full vector low-temperature magnetic measurements of geologic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, Joshua M.; Solheid, Peter A.; Swanson-Hysell, Nicholas L.; Jackson, Mike J.; Bowles, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    magnetic properties of geologic materials offer insights into an enormous range of important geophysical phenomena ranging from inner core dynamics to paleoclimate. Often it is the low-temperature behavior (<300 K) of magnetic minerals that provides the most useful and highest sensitivity information for a given problem. Conventional measurements of low-temperature remanence are typically conducted on instruments that are limited to measuring one single-axis component of the magnetization vector and are optimized for measurements in strong fields. These instrumental limitations have prevented fully optimized applications and have motivated the development of a low-temperature probe that can be used for low-temperature remanence measurements between 17 and 300 K along three orthogonal axes using a standard 2G Enterprises SQuID rock magnetometer. In this contribution, we describe the design and implementation of this instrument and present data from five case studies that demonstrate the probe's considerable potential for future research: a polycrystalline hematite sample, a polycrystalline hematite and magnetite mixture, a single crystal of magnetite, a single crystal of pyrrhotite, and samples of Umkondo Large Igneous Province diabase sills.

  16. Measurements of laser-driven magnetic fields in quasi-hohlraum geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Bradley; Turnbull, D.; Goyon, C.; Ross, S.; Farmer, W.; Hazi, A.; Tubman, E.; Woolsey, N.; Law, K.; Fujioka, S.; Moody, J.

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic fields of 10-100 T have been produced with a laser-driven scheme using a parallel-plate target geometry, where a laser is directed through a hole in the front plate and irradiates the plate behind it. Hot electrons generated from the rear plate collect on the front plate, creating a voltage difference (~ 10-100 keV) between them. When the plates are connected via a quasi-loop conductor, this voltage sources current in the range of ~ 0.1-1 MA which produces a magnetic field along the axis of the loop. The field is generated on fast (~ ns) timescales, and can be scaled by changing the drive laser parameters. Recent experiments at the Jupiter Laser Facility have allowed temporally-resolved measurements of the voltage between the plates with ~ 1 J laser drive. Separate experiments at the Omega EP laser system have allowed direct Faraday rotation (in fused SiO2) measurements of the field strength inside the current loop by employing the 4w polarimetry capability of EP. We have also measured the extent and structure of the field with proton deflectometry at EP. The maximum field recorded along the axis of the quasi-loop is ~ 5 T at moderate (100 J) laser drive, and measurements of fringing fields outside the loop at 1 kJ indicate that the field increases to ~ 40 T. These results are compared with modeling to determine the current driven in the target, and infer information about the plasma conditions which sourced the current. This work was performed under the auspices of the United States Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. Magnetic-field measurements for the Lewis Research Center cyclotron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fessler, T. E.

    1973-01-01

    The magnetic field of the Lewis Center cyclotron was mapped by using a Hall-effect magnetic-field transducer. Main-field Fourier coefficients were determined on a polar mesh of 40 radii for each of seven levels of main-field coil current. Incremental fields for eight sets of trim coils and two sets of harmonic coils were also determined at four of these main-field levels. A stored-program, digital computer was used to perform the measurements. The process was entirely automatic; all data-taking and data-reduction activities were specified by the computer programs. A new method for temperature compensation of a Hall element was used. This method required no temperature control of the element. Measurements of the Hall voltage and Hall-element resistance were sufficient to correct for temperature effects.

  18. SSC dipole magnet measurement and alignment using laser technology

    SciTech Connect

    Lipski, A.; Carson, J.A.; Robotham, W.F.

    1990-06-01

    Advancing into the prototype production stage of the SSC dipole magnets has introduced the need for a reliable, readily available, accurate alignment measuring system which gives results in real time. Components and subassemblies such as the cold mass and vacuum vessel are being measured for various geometric conditions such as straightness and twist. Variations from nominal dimensions are also being recorded so they can be compensated for during the final assembly process. Precision laser alignment takes specific advantages of the greatest accuracy. When combined with an optically produced perpendicular plane, this results in a system of geometric references of unparalleled accuracy. This paper describes the geometric requirements for SSC dipole magnet components, sub and final assemblies as well as the use of laser technology for surveying as part of the assembly process.

  19. Measurements of ground motion and magnet vibrations at the APS

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.

    1996-09-01

    This article presents results of ground motion and magnet vibrations measurements at the Advanced Photon Source. The experiments were done over a wide, frequency range (0-05-100 Hz) with the use of SM-3KV-type seismic probes from the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russia). Spectral power densities of vertical and horizontal motions of the APS hall floor and quadrupoles on regular supports were obtained. Also investigated were magnet vibrations induced by designed cooling water flow and spectral characteristics of spatial correlation of the quadrupole vibrations at different sectors of the ring. The influence of personnel activity in the hall and traffic under the ring on the slow motion of storage ring elements were observed. Amplitudes of vibrations at the APS are compared with results of seismic measurements at some other accelerators.

  20. The magnetic behavior of the intermetallic compound NdMn2Ge2 studied by magnetization and hyperfine interactions measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch-Santos, B.; Carbonari, A. W.; Cabrera-Pasca, G. A.; Saxena, R. N.; Freitas, R. S.

    2015-05-01

    The magnetic behavior of the intermetallic compound NdMn2Ge2 was investigated by bulk magnetization measurements and measurements of hyperfine interactions using perturbed γ-γ angular correlation (PAC) spectroscopy. Magnetization measurements indicate the presence of four magnetic transitions associated with the Mn and Nd magnetic sublattices. At high temperatures, magnetic measurements show a change in the slope of the magnetization due to an antiferromagnetic transition around TN ˜ 425 K and a well defined ferromagnetic transition at TC ˜ 320 K. Moreover, at ˜210 K a peak is observed in the magnetization curve, which is assigned to the reorientation of the Mn spin, and at ˜25 K an increase in the magnetic moment is also observed, which is ascribed to the ordering of Nd ions. PAC measurements using 140La(140Ce) and 111In(111Cd) probe nuclei allowed the determination of the temperature dependence of the magnetic hyperfine field (Bhf) at Nd and Mn sites, respectively. PAC results with 111Cd probe nuclei at Mn sites show that the dependence of Bhf with temperature follows the expected behavior for the host magnetization associated with the magnetic ordering of Mn ions. From these results, the antiferromagnetic transition followed by a ferromagnetic ordering is clearly observed. PAC results with 140Ce probe nuclei at Nd sites, however, showed a strong deviation from the Brillouin function, which is attributed to the Ce 4f-electron contribution to Bhf.

  1. Measuring Cytokine Concentrations Using Magnetic Spectroscopy of Nanoparticle Brownian Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurshid, Hafsa; Shi, Yipeng; Weaver, John

    The magnetic particle spectroscopy is a newly developed non-invasive technique for obtaining information about the nanoparticles' micro environment. In this technique the nanoparticles' magnetization, induced by an alternating magnetic field at various applied frequencies, is processed to analyze rotational freedom of nanoparticles. By analyzing average rotational freedom, it is possible to measure the nanoparticle's relaxation time, and hence get an estimate of the temperature and viscosity of the medium. In molecular concentration sensing, the rotational freedom indicates the number of nanoparticles that are bound by a selected analyte. We have developed microscopic nanoparticles probes to measure the concentration of selected molecules. The nanoparticles are targeted to bind the selected molecule and the resulting reduction in rotational freedom can be quantified remotely. Previously, sensitivity measurements has been reported to be of the factor of 200. However, with our newer perpendicular field setup (US Patent Application Serial No 61/721,378), it possible to sense cytokine concentrations as low as 5 Pico-Molar in-vitro. The excellent sensitivity of this apparatus is due to isolation of the drive field from the signal so the output can be amplified to a higher level. Dartmouth College.

  2. Signature of cluster disruption within magnetic fluid samples: The key information provided by low frequency alternating current susceptibility measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Zhongzhou; Liu, Wenzhong; Zhong, Jing; Zhou, Ming; Zhang, Pu; Cesar Morais, Paulo

    2014-05-01

    This paper is focused on the signature of thermal-assisted cluster disruption while analyzing the inverse alternating current (AC) susceptibility (1/χ) versus temperature (T) curves recorded at lower AC frequencies (f), below 300 Hz. A commercial oil-based magnetic fluid (MF) sample was used in the experiments to investigate the critical temperature (T*) that characterizes the thermal disruption of aggregates suspended within the MF sample. T* was found to reduce as f increased within the frequency range of our investigation (63-263 Hz). Furthermore, T* was found to scale with the square of the applied AC frequency. Both theoretical and experimental evidences support that the excitation field frequency (f) dependence of the critical temperature (T*) is well described by T*(f)=T*(0)-Af/21+Bf2. The model is based on energy absorption of magnetic nanoparticles in an AC magnetic field.

  3. Measurements of Magnetic Fields in the Solar Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, R. R.; Andrade Lima, E.; Weiss, B. P.

    2013-12-01

    Efficient radial transfer of angular momentum in the protoplanetary disk is a fundamental requirement for the formation of stars and planets. Theoretical work indicates that magnetic fields may have played a critical role in this process. For example, the magnetorotational instability (MRI) may have generated turbulence in the gas medium to facilitate angular momentum transport. Direct measurements of the magnetic field in the protoplanetary disk are necessary for evaluating the relative importance of this and other proposed mechanisms of angular momentum transport. Such fields could have been recorded by chondrules, millimeter-sized meteoritic inclusions that formed during flash-melting of nebular dust. We performed the first detailed paleomagnetic experiments on isolated chondrules from a primitive meteorite, the LL3.0 chondrite Semarkona. This meteorite has escaped extensive post-accretional aqueous alteration and metamorphism to above ~200 C, implying the preservation of primary ferromagnetic phases and pre-accretional magnetic remanence. We applied alternating field (AF) demagnetization up to 290 mT to bulk (mixed matrix and chondrule) samples and to isolated chondrules that contain dusty olivine grains, which are relict silicates that contain abundant low-Ni α-Fe (kamacite) grains in the single domain and pseudo-single domain size ranges. All samples were mutually oriented within 5 deg. Chondrule samples were measured using the SQUID Microscope in the MIT Paleomagnetism Laboratory. Bulk samples within ~4.5 mm of the fusion crust carry a unidirectional, medium-coercivity (MC) component of magnetization that decays in intensity with increasing distance from the fusion crust. We therefore attribute the MC component to atmospheric heating. This fusion crust baked contact test establishes that our sample has not been significantly remagnetized since arrival on Earth. One dusty olivine-bearing chondrule carries a stable high-coercivity (HC) component of

  4. Applications of ultrasensitive magnetic measurement technologies (invited) (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschkoff, Eugene C.

    1993-05-01

    The development of reliable, easy-to-use magnetic measurement systems with significantly enhanced levels of sensitivity has opened up a number of broad new areas of application for magnetic sensing. Magnetometers based on optical pumping offer sensitivities at the picotesla level, while those that utilize superconducting quantum interference devices can operate at the femtotesla level. These systems are finding applications in areas as diverse as geophysical exploration, communications, and medical diagnostics. This review briefly surveys the capabilities and application areas for a number of magnetic sensing technologies. The emphasis then focuses on the application of the most sensitive of these to the field of medical diagnostics and functional imaging. Protocols for specific applications to noninvasive presurgical planning and to the noninvasive assay of cortical dysfunction in diseases ranging from epilepsy to migraine and schizophrenia will be described in detail. Data will be presented reporting independent validation of these techniques in ten patients who subsequently underwent surgery. Routine and reliable utilization of this ultrasensitive magnetic sensing technology in the clinic is now feasible and practical.

  5. Heteronuclear J-coupling measurements in grossly inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Mandal, S; Song, Y-Q

    2015-06-01

    It is difficult to measure chemical shifts in the small and inhomogeneous magnetic fields found in ex situ and single-sided NMR systems, such as those used for well-logging. However, it is still possible to obtain chemical information from J-coupling constants, which are independent of static field strength and temperature. We describe and analyze (1)H-(13)C double-resonance pulse sequences that are suitable for measuring heteronuclear J-coupling in grossly inhomogeneous fields. We also present preliminary experimental results from a low-frequency fringe-field system. PMID:25898398

  6. Development of optical modulators for measurements of solar magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, E. A.; Smith, J. E.

    1987-01-01

    The measurement of polarized light allows solar astronomers to infer the magnetic field on the Sun. The accuracy of these measurements is dependent on the stable retardation characteristics of the polarization modulators used to minimize the atmospheric effects seen in ground-based observations. This report describes the work by the Space Science Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center to improve two types of polarization modulators. As a result, the timing characteristics for both electrooptic crystals (KD*Ps) and liquid crystal devices (LCDs) have been studied and will be used to enhance the capabilities of the MSFC Vector Magnetograph.

  7. Thermodynamics for Spatially Inhomogeneous Magnetization and Young-Gibbs Measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montino, Alessandro; Soprano-Loto, Nahuel; Tsagkarogiannis, Dimitrios

    2016-09-01

    We derive thermodynamic functionals for spatially inhomogeneous magnetization on a torus in the context of an Ising spin lattice model. We calculate the corresponding free energy and pressure (by applying an appropriate external field using a quadratic Kac potential) and show that they are related via a modified Legendre transform. The local properties of the infinite volume Gibbs measure, related to whether a macroscopic configuration is realized as a homogeneous state or as a mixture of pure states, are also studied by constructing the corresponding Young-Gibbs measures.

  8. Correlating spin transport and electrode magnetization in a graphene spin valve: Simultaneous magnetic microscopy and non-local measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Andrew J. Page, Michael R.; Bhallamudi, Vidya P.; Chris Hammel, P.; Wen, Hua; Kawakami, Roland K.; McCreary, Kathleen M.

    2015-10-05

    Using simultaneous magnetic force microscopy and transport measurements of a graphene spin valve, we correlate the non-local spin signal with the magnetization of the device electrodes. The imaged magnetization states corroborate the influence of each electrode within a one-dimensional spin transport model and provide evidence linking domain wall pinning to additional features in the transport signal.

  9. A magnetic coupling thrust stand for microthrust measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, W. P.; Ferrer, P.

    2016-01-01

    A direct thrust measurement system that is based on a horizontal lever and utilizes a novel magnetic coupling mechanism to measure thrust has been developed. The system is capable of measuring thrusts as low as 10’s of μN. While zero drift is observed in the balance, tests have shown that they do not have an appreciable effect on thrust measurements. The thrust stand’s sensitivity can be adjusted by shifting the position of the coupling magnet inside the stand’s thrust support member, which allows flexibility for testing both higher and lower powered thrusters. The thrust stand has been modeled theoretically and the predicted results from the model are compared with experimentally measured data. The system was tested using a simple cold gas thruster and provided credible results that can be compared with other systems studied in the literature. Advantages include that the thrust stand is very cheap and easy to construct and further, the calibration process takes no longer than half an hour, facilitating rapid turnaround times while still retaining accuracy. Repeatability tests have shown that the balance gives consistent results.

  10. Proposal for a cryogenic magnetic field measurement system for SSC dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.I.; Hansen, L.

    1991-03-01

    This proposal describes the research and development required, and the subsequent fabrication of, a system capable of making integrated magnetic multipole measurements of cryogenic 40-mm-bore SSC dipole magnets utilizing a cryogenic probe. Our experience and some preliminary studies indicate that it is highly unlikely that a 16-meter-long probe can be fabricated that will have a twist below several milliradians at cryogenic temperatures. We would anticipate a twist of several milliradians just as a result of cooldown stresses. Consequently, this proposal describes a segmented 16-meter-long probe, for which we intend to calibrate the phase of each segment to within 0.1 milliradians. The data for all segments will be acquired simultaneously, and integrated data will be generated from the vector sums of the individual segments. The calibration techniques and instrumentation required to implement this system will be described. The duration of an integral measurement at one current is expected to be under 10 seconds. The system is based on an extrapolation of the techniques used at LBL to measure cryogenic 1-meter models of SSC magnets with a cryogenic probe. It should be noted that the expansion of the dipole bore from 40 to 50 mm may make a warm-finger device practical at a cost of approximately one quarter of the cryogenic probe. A warm quadrupole measurement system can be based upon the same principles. 5 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Magnetic response measurements of mesoscopic superconducting and normal metal rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluhm, Hendrik

    The main part of this thesis reports three experiments on the magnetic response of mesoscopic superconducting and normal metal rings using a scanning SQUID microscope. The first experiment explores the magnetic response and fluxoid transitions of superconducting, mesoscopic bilayer aluminum rings in the presence of two coupled order parameters arising from the layered structure. For intermediate couplings, metastable states that have different phase winding numbers around the ring in each of the two order parameters were observed. Larger coupling locks the relative phase, so that the two order parameters are only manifest in the temperature dependence of the response. With increasing proximitization, this signature gradually disappears. The data can be described with a two-order-parameter Ginzburg-Landau theory. The second experiment concentrates on fluxoid transitions in similar, but single-layer rings. Near the critical temperature, the transitions, which are induced by applying a flux to the ring, only admit a single fluxoid at a time. At lower temperatures, several fluxoids enter or leave at once, and the final state approaches the ground state. Currently available theoretical frameworks cannot quantitatively explain the data. Heating and quasiparticle diffusion are likely important for a quantitative understanding of this experiment, which could provide a model system for studying the nonlinear dynamics of superconductors far from equilibrium. The third and most important scanning SQUID study concerns 33 individual mesoscopic gold rings. All measured rings show a paramagnetic linear susceptibility and a poorly understood anomaly around zero field, both of which are likely due to unpaired defect spins. The response of sufficiently small rings also has a component that is periodic in the flux through the ring, with a period close to h/e. Its amplitude varies in sign and magnitude from ring to ring, and its typical value and temperature dependence agree with

  12. Plasma, magnetic, and electromagnetic measurements at nonmagnetic bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.

    1993-01-01

    The need to explore the magnetospheres of the Earth and the giant planets is widely recognized and is an integral part of our planetary exploration program. The equal need to explore the plasma, magnetic, and electromagnetic environments of the nonmagnetic bodies is not so widely appreciated. The previous, albeit incomplete, magnetic and electric field measurements at Venus, Mars, and comets have proven critical to our understanding of their atmospheres and ionospheres in areas ranging from planetary lightning to solar wind scavenging and accretion. In the cases of Venus and Mars, the ionospheres can provide communication paths over the horizon for low-altitude probes and landers, but we know little about their lower boundaries. The expected varying magnetic fields below these planetary ionospheres penetrates the planetary crusts and can be used to sound the electrical conductivity and the thermal profiles of the interiors. However, we have no knowledge of the levels of such fields, let alone their morphology. Finally, we note that the absence of an atmosphere and an ionosphere does not make an object any less interesting for the purposes of electromagnetic exploration. Even weak remanent magnetism such as that found on the Moon during the Apollo program provides insight into the present and past states of planetary interiors. We have very intriguing data from our space probes during times of both close and distant passages of asteroids that suggest they may have coherent magnetization. If true, this observation will put important constraints on how the asteroids formed and have evolved. Our planetary exploration program must exploit its full range of exploration tools if it is to characterize the bodies of the solar system thoroughly. We should especially take advantage of those techniques that are proven and require low mass, low power, and low telemetry rates to undertake.

  13. Plasma, magnetic, and electromagnetic measurements at nonmagnetic bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.

    The need to explore the magnetospheres of the Earth and the giant planets is widely recognized and is an integral part of our planetary exploration program. The equal need to explore the plasma, magnetic, and electromagnetic environments of the nonmagnetic bodies is not so widely appreciated. The previous, albeit incomplete, magnetic and electric field measurements at Venus, Mars, and comets have proven critical to our understanding of their atmospheres and ionospheres in areas ranging from planetary lightning to solar wind scavenging and accretion. In the cases of Venus and Mars, the ionospheres can provide communication paths over the horizon for low-altitude probes and landers, but we know little about their lower boundaries. The expected varying magnetic fields below these planetary ionospheres penetrates the planetary crusts and can be used to sound the electrical conductivity and the thermal profiles of the interiors. However, we have no knowledge of the levels of such fields, let alone their morphology. Finally, we note that the absence of an atmosphere and an ionosphere does not make an object any less interesting for the purposes of electromagnetic exploration. Even weak remanent magnetism such as that found on the Moon during the Apollo program provides insight into the present and past states of planetary interiors. We have very intriguing data from our space probes during times of both close and distant passages of asteroids that suggest they may have coherent magnetization. If true, this observation will put important constraints on how the asteroids formed and have evolved. Our planetary exploration program must exploit its full range of exploration tools if it is to characterize the bodies of the solar system thoroughly. We should especially take advantage of those techniques that are proven and require low mass, low power, and low telemetry rates to undertake.

  14. Magnetic Implosion for Novel Strength Measurements at High Strain Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.; Preston, D.L.; Bartsch, R.R.; Bowers, R.L.; Holtkamp, D.; Wright, B.L.

    1998-10-19

    Recently Lee and Preston have proposed to use magnetic implosions as a new method for measuring material strength in a regime of large strains and high strain rates inaccessible to previously established techniques. By its shockless nature, this method avoids the intrinsic difficulties associated with an earlier approach using high explosives. The authors illustrate how the stress-strain relation for an imploding liner can be obtained by measuring the velocity and temperature history of its inner surface. They discuss the physical requirements that lead us to a composite liner design applicable to different test materials, and also compare the code-simulated prediction with the measured data for the high strain-rate experiments conducted recently at LANL. Finally, they present a novel diagnostic scheme that will enable us to remove the background in the pyrometric measurement through data reduction.

  15. Local viscoelasticity of living cells measured by rotational magnetic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berret, J.-F.

    2016-01-01

    When submitted to a magnetic field, micron-size wires with superparamagnetic properties behave as embedded rheometers and represent interesting sensors for microrheology. Here we use rotational magnetic spectroscopy to measure the shear viscosity of the cytoplasm of living cells. We address the question of whether the cytoplasm is a viscoelastic liquid or an elastic gel. The main result of the study is the observation of a rotational instability between a synchronous and an asynchronous regime of rotation, found for murine fibroblasts and human cancer cells. For wires of susceptibility 3.6, the transition occurs in the range 0.01-1 rad s-1. The determination of the shear viscosity (10-100 Pa s) and elastic modulus (5-20 Pa) confirms the viscoelastic character of the cytoplasm. In contrast to earlier studies, it is concluded that the interior of living cells can be described as a viscoelastic liquid, and not as an elastic gel.

  16. Removing Overprints, and Measuring Their Magnetic Vectors Using Microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, D.; Bohnel, H.

    2008-05-01

    Microwaves are strongly absorbed by generating spin waves in magnetic particles. They are also absorbed in dielectrics, but this is usually much weaker. Apart from the uniform mode where all the spins rotate in phase spin waves cannot exist whose wavelength is greater than twice the dimension of the particle in the propagation direction. Thus, the spin wave levels are quantized. For small particles the level separation is very large, and this means that particles of a given size can only absorb microwaves over a narrow range of frequencies. Thus, it is possible to selectively demagnetize the contributions of grains of different sizes to the magnetic moment of the sample, thereby identifying the original remanence and any subsequent overprints. In particular it should be possible to measure the viscous contribution in ceramics, thereby providing an accurate dating method. Details of the required instrumentation will be discussed, and recent experimental results will be presented.

  17. Simultaneous Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Consolidation Measurement of Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Wellard, Robert Mark; Ravasio, Jean-Philippe; Guesne, Samuel; Bell, Christopher; Oloyede, Adekunle; Tevelen, Greg; Pope, James M.; Momot, Konstantin I.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers the opportunity to study biological tissues and processes in a non-disruptive manner. The technique shows promise for the study of the load-bearing performance (consolidation) of articular cartilage and changes in articular cartilage accompanying osteoarthritis. Consolidation of articular cartilage involves the recording of two transient characteristics: the change over time of strain and the hydrostatic excess pore pressure (HEPP). MRI study of cartilage consolidation under mechanical load is limited by difficulties in measuring the HEPP in the presence of the strong magnetic fields associated with the MRI technique. Here we describe the use of MRI to image and characterize bovine articular cartilage deforming under load in an MRI compatible consolidometer while monitoring pressure with a Fabry-Perot interferometer-based fiber-optic pressure transducer. PMID:24803188

  18. Frequency Domain Magnetic Measurements from Kilohertz to Gigahertz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, John F.

    "......we applied much prolonged labor on investigating the magnetical forces; so wonderful indeed are they, compared with the forces in all other minerals, surpassing even the virtues of all bodies around us. Nor have we found this labor idle or unfruitful; since daily in our experimenting new unexpected properties came to light."William Gilbert, De Magnete, 1600Abstract. This review deals with practical aspects of making frequency-domain measurements of magnetic susceptibility and magnetic losses from 200 kHz up to 10 GHz. It sets out the types of measurement concerned, distinguishing resonant from nonresonant phenomena. The techniques available are categorized according to suitability for the different frequency regimes and types of investigation. Practical recipes are provided for undertaking such experiments across the entire frequency range. Marginal oscillator spectrometry is discussed which is applicable across the whole frequency range. Different instruments are presented, and particular emphasis is placed on designs which function on the Robinson principle. Analysis of oscillation condition and signal-to-noise performance is dealt with, also sample considerations such as filling factor. Practical circuits are presented and their merits and demerits evaluated. Layout and radio-frequency design considerations are dealt with. Ultrahigh/microwave frequency marginal oscillator spectrometry is given special treatment and several practical designs are given. The essentials of good microwave design are emphasized. A general discussion of resonant structures is included which treats multiple layer coil design, slow wave line structures, stripline and cavities. Unusual cavity designs such as the rhumbatron are treated. Use of striplines with microwave marginal spectrometry is described and compared with conventional network-analysis techniques. The use of parameter matrices for high-frequency analysis is alluded to. Some details of good construction practice are

  19. Radial ion transport measurements in a nonaxisymmetric magnetic mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, D.L.; Petty, C.C.; Post, R.S. )

    1990-09-01

    Experimental radial ion transport rates and diffusion coefficients are presented for the Constance-B magnetic mirror (Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 58}, 1853 (1987)). The transport experiments are performed by measuring steady state equilibrium radial profiles of plasma density, ionization source, end loss current, electric field, electron temperature, and ion temperature. A charge coupled device (CCD) camera system (Rev. Sci. Instrum. {bold 60}, 2835 (1989)) is used to measure the two-dimensional radial density, source, and electron temperature profiles. End loss diagnostics including movable Faraday cups, electrostatic end loss analyzers, and an ion time-of-flight analyzer (Rev. Sci. Instrum. {bold 59}, 601 (1988)) are used to measure radial profiles of potential and ion temperature. The ion confinement time perpendicular to the magnetic field is found to be an order of magnitude shorter than predicted by classical and neoclassical transport theories. The radial profiles of the perpendicular diffusion coefficient ({ital D}{sub {perpendicular}}) are presented for hydrogen, helium, and argon plasmas. The coefficients are a factor of 10 larger than the maximum classical and neoclassical coefficients in all three plasmas. Plasma fluctuations resulting from whistler mode microinstability (Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 59}, 1821 (1987)) as well as nonaxisymmetric potentials are suggested as possible explanations for the experimentally measured radial transport rate.

  20. Preliminary study of an integral harmonic analysis magnetic field measurement system for long SSC magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.I.

    1991-04-01

    We described the research and development required to design and build a prototype system capable of making integrated magnetic multipole measurements of warm and cryogenic 50 mm bore SSC dipole and quadrupole magnets utilizing a warm probe in a warm finger. Our experience and some preliminary studies indicate that it is highly unlikely that a 16 meter long probe can be fabricated that will have a twist below several milliradians at any temperature. Consequently we describe a segmented 16 meter long probe for which we intend to calibrate the phase of each segment to within 0.1 milliradians. The data for all segments will be acquired simultaneously, and integrated data will be generated from the vector sums of the individual segments. The calibration techniques and instrumentation required to implement this system are described. The duration of an integral measurement at one current is less than ten seconds, which is three orders of magnitude shorter than that required by the mole technique presently being used. The system is based on an extrapolation of the techniques used at LBL to measure cryogenic 1 meter models of SSC magnets with a cryogenic probe. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Measuring and controlling the transport of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Jason R.

    Despite the large body of literature describing the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles, few analytical tools are commonly used for their purification and analysis. Due to their unique physical and chemical properties, magnetic nanoparticles are appealing candidates for biomedical applications and analytical separations. Yet in the absence of methods for assessing and assuring their purity, the ultimate use of magnetic particles and heterostructures is likely to be limited. For magnetic nanoparticles, it is the use of an applied magnetic flux or field gradient that enables separations. Flow based techniques are combined with applied magnetic fields to give methods such as magnetic field flow fractionation and high gradient magnetic separation. Additional techniques have been explored for manipulating particles in microfluidic channels and in mesoporous membranes. This thesis further describes development of these and new analytical tools for separation and analysis of colloidal particles is critically important to enable the practical use of these, particularly for medicinal purposes. Measurement of transport of nanometer scale particles through porous media is important to begin to understand the potential environmental impacts of nanomaterials. Using a diffusion cell with two compartments separated by either a porous alumina or polycarbonate membrane as a model system, diffusive flux through mesoporous materials is examined. Experiments are performed as a function of particle size, pore diameter, and solvent, and the particle fluxes are monitored by the change in absorbance of the solution in the receiving cell. Using the measured extinction coefficient and change in absorbance of the solution as a function of time, the fluxes of 3, 8, and 14 nm diameter CoFe2O4 particles are determined as they are translocated across pores with diameters 30, 50, 100, and 200 nm in hexane and aqueous solutions. In general, flux decreases with increasing particle size and

  2. Lorentz force electrical impedance tomography using magnetic field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zengin, Reyhan; Güneri Gençer, Nevzat

    2016-08-01

    In this study, magnetic field measurement technique is investigated to image the electrical conductivity properties of biological tissues using Lorentz forces. This technique is based on electrical current induction using ultrasound together with an applied static magnetic field. The magnetic field intensity generated due to induced currents is measured using two coil configurations, namely, a rectangular loop coil and a novel xy coil pair. A time-varying voltage is picked-up and recorded while the acoustic wave propagates along its path. The forward problem of this imaging modality is defined as calculation of the pick-up voltages due to a given acoustic excitation and known body properties. Firstly, the feasibility of the proposed technique is investigated analytically. The basic field equations governing the behaviour of time-varying electromagnetic fields are presented. Secondly, the general formulation of the partial differential equations for the scalar and magnetic vector potentials are derived. To investigate the feasibility of this technique, numerical studies are conducted using a finite element method based software. To sense the pick-up voltages a novel coil configuration (xy coil pairs) is proposed. Two-dimensional numerical geometry with a 16-element linear phased array (LPA) ultrasonic transducer (1 MHz) and a conductive body (breast fat) with five tumorous tissues is modeled. The static magnetic field is assumed to be 4 Tesla. To understand the performance of the imaging system, the sensitivity matrix is analyzed. The sensitivity matrix is obtained for two different locations of LPA transducer with eleven steering angles from -{{25}\\circ} to {{25}\\circ} at intervals of {{5}\\circ} . The characteristics of the imaging system are shown with the singular value decomposition (SVD) of the sensitivity matrix. The images are reconstructed with the truncated SVD algorithm. The signal-to-noise ratio in measurements is assumed 80 dB. Simulation studies

  3. Lorentz force electrical impedance tomography using magnetic field measurements.

    PubMed

    Zengin, Reyhan; Gençer, Nevzat Güneri

    2016-08-21

    In this study, magnetic field measurement technique is investigated to image the electrical conductivity properties of biological tissues using Lorentz forces. This technique is based on electrical current induction using ultrasound together with an applied static magnetic field. The magnetic field intensity generated due to induced currents is measured using two coil configurations, namely, a rectangular loop coil and a novel xy coil pair. A time-varying voltage is picked-up and recorded while the acoustic wave propagates along its path. The forward problem of this imaging modality is defined as calculation of the pick-up voltages due to a given acoustic excitation and known body properties. Firstly, the feasibility of the proposed technique is investigated analytically. The basic field equations governing the behaviour of time-varying electromagnetic fields are presented. Secondly, the general formulation of the partial differential equations for the scalar and magnetic vector potentials are derived. To investigate the feasibility of this technique, numerical studies are conducted using a finite element method based software. To sense the pick-up voltages a novel coil configuration (xy coil pairs) is proposed. Two-dimensional numerical geometry with a 16-element linear phased array (LPA) ultrasonic transducer (1 MHz) and a conductive body (breast fat) with five tumorous tissues is modeled. The static magnetic field is assumed to be 4 Tesla. To understand the performance of the imaging system, the sensitivity matrix is analyzed. The sensitivity matrix is obtained for two different locations of LPA transducer with eleven steering angles from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] at intervals of [Formula: see text]. The characteristics of the imaging system are shown with the singular value decomposition (SVD) of the sensitivity matrix. The images are reconstructed with the truncated SVD algorithm. The signal-to-noise ratio in measurements is assumed 80 d

  4. Lorentz force electrical impedance tomography using magnetic field measurements.

    PubMed

    Zengin, Reyhan; Gençer, Nevzat Güneri

    2016-08-21

    In this study, magnetic field measurement technique is investigated to image the electrical conductivity properties of biological tissues using Lorentz forces. This technique is based on electrical current induction using ultrasound together with an applied static magnetic field. The magnetic field intensity generated due to induced currents is measured using two coil configurations, namely, a rectangular loop coil and a novel xy coil pair. A time-varying voltage is picked-up and recorded while the acoustic wave propagates along its path. The forward problem of this imaging modality is defined as calculation of the pick-up voltages due to a given acoustic excitation and known body properties. Firstly, the feasibility of the proposed technique is investigated analytically. The basic field equations governing the behaviour of time-varying electromagnetic fields are presented. Secondly, the general formulation of the partial differential equations for the scalar and magnetic vector potentials are derived. To investigate the feasibility of this technique, numerical studies are conducted using a finite element method based software. To sense the pick-up voltages a novel coil configuration (xy coil pairs) is proposed. Two-dimensional numerical geometry with a 16-element linear phased array (LPA) ultrasonic transducer (1 MHz) and a conductive body (breast fat) with five tumorous tissues is modeled. The static magnetic field is assumed to be 4 Tesla. To understand the performance of the imaging system, the sensitivity matrix is analyzed. The sensitivity matrix is obtained for two different locations of LPA transducer with eleven steering angles from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] at intervals of [Formula: see text]. The characteristics of the imaging system are shown with the singular value decomposition (SVD) of the sensitivity matrix. The images are reconstructed with the truncated SVD algorithm. The signal-to-noise ratio in measurements is assumed 80 d

  5. Performance measurements and operational characteristics of the Storage Tek ACS 4400 tape library with the Cray Y-MP EL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, Gary; Ranade, Sanjay

    1993-01-01

    With over 5000 units sold, the Storage Tek Automated Cartridge System (ACS) 4400 tape library is currently the most popular large automated tape library. Based on 3480/90 tape technology, the library is used as the migration device ('nearline' storage) in high-performance mass storage systems. In its maximum configuration, one ACS 4400 tape library houses sixteen 3480/3490 tape drives and is capable of holding approximately 6000 cartridge tapes. The maximum storage capacity of one library using 3480 tapes is 1.2 TB and the advertised aggregate I/O rate is about 24 MB/s. This paper reports on an extensive set of tests designed to accurately assess the performance capabilities and operational characteristics of one STK ACS 4400 tape library holding approximately 5200 cartridge tapes and configured with eight 3480 tape drives. A Cray Y-MP EL2-256 was configured as its host machine. More than 40,000 tape jobs were run in a variety of conditions to gather data in the areas of channel speed characteristics, robotics motion, time taped mounts, and timed tape reads and writes.

  6. Measurement of transverse Jc profiles of coated conductors using a magnetic knife of permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Haenisch, J; Mueller, F M; Ashworth, S P; Coulter, J Y; Matias, Vlad

    2008-01-01

    The transverse J{sub c} distribution in YBCO coated conductors was measured non-destructively with high resolution using a 'magnetic knife' made of permanent magnets. The method utilizes the strong depression of J{sub c} in applied magnetic fields. A narrow region of low (including zero) magnetic field, in a surrounding higher field, is moved transversely across the sample in order to reveal the critical-current density distribution. The net resolution of this device is approximately 65 {micro}m, and the J{sub c} resolution is better than 0.5%. A Fourier series inversion process was used to determine the transverse J{sub c} distribution in the sample. The J{sub c} profile was correlated with other sample properties of coated conductors prepared by pulsed laser deposition. Because of its straight-forward and inexpensive design, this J{sub c} imaging technique can be a powerful tool for quality control in coated-conductor production.

  7. Measurement of submilliwatt, picosecond terahertz emission from a femtosecond-laser-pumped solid-state dc to ac radiation converter based on a ZnSe crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Yugami, Noboru; Ohata, Nobuo; Yaegashi, Kenta; Kawanago, Hiroshi

    2006-11-15

    We measured the terahertz pulse emission from a femtosecond-laser-pumped solid-state dc to ac radiation converter using a 150 fs Ti:sapphire laser pulse for dense plasma diagnostics. The laser-produced ionization front was directly modulated from a periodic electrostatic field to pulsed emission. The central frequency of the emission was measured to be 0.13 THz having a bandwidth of 0.1 THz and a peak power of 0.2 mW. This emission source is suitable for use in various novel diagnostic techniques, such as dense plasma diagnostics.

  8. Torque Transient of Magnetically Drive Flow for Viscosity Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ban, Heng; Li, Chao; Su, Ching-Hua; Lin, Bochuan; Scripa, Rosalia N.; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    2004-01-01

    Viscosity is a good indicator of structural changes for complex liquids, such as semiconductor melts with chain or ring structures. This paper discusses the theoretical and experimental results of the transient torque technique for non-intrusive viscosity measurement. Such a technique is essential for the high temperature viscosity measurement of high pressure and toxic semiconductor melts. In this paper, our previous work on oscillating cup technique was expanded to the transient process of a magnetically driven melt flow in a damped oscillation system. Based on the analytical solution for the fluid flow and cup oscillation, a semi-empirical model was established to extract the fluid viscosity. The analytical and experimental results indicated that such a technique has the advantage of short measurement time and straight forward data analysis procedures

  9. Magnetic field measurements near stand-alone transformer stations.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Shaiela; Hareuveny, Ronen; Yitzhak, Nir-Mordechay; Ruppin, Raphael

    2013-12-01

    Extremely low-frequency (ELF) magnetic field (MF) measurements around and above three stand-alone 22/0.4-kV transformer stations have been performed. The low-voltage (LV) cables between the transformer and the LV switchgear were found to be the major source of strong ELF MFs of limited spatial extent. The strong fields measured above the transformer stations support the assessment method, to be used in future epidemiological studies, of classifying apartments located right above the transformer stations as highly exposed to MFs. The results of the MF measurements above the ground around the transformer stations provide a basis for the assessment of the option of implementing precautionary procedures.

  10. Electric and magnetic field measurements in a high voltage center.

    PubMed

    Safigianni, Anastasia S; Spyridopoulos, Anastasios I; Kanas, Vasilis L

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the electric and magnetic fields inside a large high voltage center constituted both of 400/150 and 150/20 kV substation areas. Results of previous field measurements and calculations in substations, made by the authors of this paper or other researchers, are presented first. The basic data distinguishing the examined center from previously examined substations follow. The main results of the field measurements in the areas of the above-mentioned center are presented in relevant diagrams. General conclusions arising from the comparison of the measured field values with relevant reference levels in force for safe public and occupational exposure as well as with the results of previous research are finally given. PMID:21917821

  11. Improved measurement of the positive muon anomalous magnetic moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, H. N.; Bunce, G.; Carey, R. M.; Cushman, P.; Danby, G. T.; Debevec, P. T.; Deng, H.; Deninger, W.; Dhawan, S. K.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Duong, L.; Earle, W.; Efstathiadis, E.; Fedotovich, G. V.; Farley, F. J.; Giron, S.; Gray, F.; Grosse-Perdekamp, M.; Grossmann, A.; Haeberlen, U.; Hare, M. F.; Hazen, E. S.; Hertzog, D. W.; Hughes, V. W.; Iwasaki, M.; Jungmann, K.; Kawall, D.; Kawamura, M.; Khazin, B. I.; Kindem, J.; Krienen, F.; Kronkvist, I.; Larsen, R.; Lee, Y. Y.; Logashenko, I.; McNabb, R.; Meng, W.; Mi, J.; Miller, J. P.; Morse, W. M.; Onderwater, C. J.; Orlov, Y.; Özben, C.; Polly, C.; Pai, C.; Paley, J. M.; Pretz, J.; Prigl, R.; Zu Putlitz, G.; Redin, S. I.; Rind, O.; Roberts, B. L.; Ryskulov, N.; Sedykh, S.; Semertzidis, Y. K.; Shatunov, Yu. M.; Solodov, E.; Sossong, M.; Steinmetz, A.; Sulak, L. R.; Timmermans, C.; Trofimov, A.; Urner, D.; von Walter, P.; Warburton, D.; Winn, D.; Yamamoto, A.; Zimmerman, D.

    2000-11-01

    A new measurement of the positive muon's anomalous magnetic moment has been made at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron using the direct injection of polarized muons into the superferric storage ring. The angular frequency difference ωa between the angular spin precession frequency ωs and the angular orbital frequency ωc is measured as well as the free proton NMR frequency ωp. These determine R=ωa/ωp=3.707 201(19)×10-3. With μμ/μp=3.183 345 39(10) this gives aμ+=11 659 191(59)×10-10 (+/-5 ppm), in good agreement with the previous CERN and BNL measurements for μ+ and μ-, and with the standard model prediction.

  12. Single Cell Magnetic Measurements with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmstrom, Johanna C.; Arps, Jennifer; Dwyer, Bo; Kalisky, Beena; Kirtley, John R.; Moler, Kathryn A.; Qian, Lisa C.; Rosenberg, Aaron J.; Rutt, Brian; Tee, Sui Seng; Theis, Eric; Urbach, Elana; Wang, Yihua

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles play an important role in numerous biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging and targeted drug delivery. There is a need for tools to characterize individual magnetic nanoparticles and the magnetic properties of individual cells. We use a scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) to observe the magnetic fields from single mammalian cells loaded with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. We show that the SQUID is a useful tool for imaging biological magnetism and is capable of resolving cell to cell variations in magnetic dipole moments. We hope to correlate these magnetic images with real space imaging techniques such as optical and scanning electron microscopy. The visualization of single cell magnetism can be used to optimize biological magnetic imaging techniques, such as MRI, by quantifying the strength of magnetic dipole moments of in vitro magnetic labeling. This work is supported by a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship and a Gabilan Stanford Graduate Fellowship.

  13. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Measures in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    WU, STEVE W; GILBERT, DONALD L; SHAHANA, NASRIN; HUDDLESTON, DAVID A; MOSTOFSKY, STEWART H

    2012-01-01

    Children affected by Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder have diminished intra-hemispheric inhibition (Short Interval Cortical Inhibition) as measured by Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation. This study’s objective is to determine whether inter-hemispheric inhibition (Ipsilateral Silent Period Latency) correlates with clinical behavioral rating and motor control deficits of affected children. In 114 8–12 year old, right-handed children (age/sex-matched, 50 affected, 64 controls), we performed comprehensive assessments of behavior, motor skills and cognition. Using Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation, we reliably elicited Ipsilateral Silent Period in 54 children (23 affected) - all were on average older than those who had unobtainable measures. Mean Ipsilateral Silent Period latency was 5 milliseconds longer in the affected group (p=0.007). Longer latencies correlated with more severe behavioral symptom scores (r=0.38, p=0.007), particularly hyperactivity (r=0.39, p=0.006), as well as with worse motor ratings on the Physical and Neurological Examination for Soft Signs (r=0.27, p=0.05). Longer latency also correlated with Short Interval Cortical Inhibition (r=0.36, p=0.008). In conclusion, longer Ipsilateral Silent Period latencies suggest interhemispheric inhibitory signaling is slower in affected children. The deficit in this inhibitory measure may underlie developmental, behavioral and motor impairments in children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. PMID:22883282

  14. Magnetic noise measurements using cross-correlated Hall sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, G.; Ocio, M.; Paltiel, Y.; Shtrikman, H.; Zeldov, E.

    2001-01-01

    An experimental technique for measuring magnetic fluctuations by means of a double-layer Hall sensor array is described. The technique relies on cross-correlating Hall signals from two independent sensors positioned one above the other in two separate two-dimensional-electron-gas layers of a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. The effectiveness of the technique is demonstrated by a reduction of the magnitude of the background noise floor of the correlated sensors with respect to the noise level of the best single sensor.

  15. System having unmodulated flux locked loop for measuring magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R.; Snapp, Lowell D.

    2006-08-15

    A system (10) for measuring magnetic fields, wherein the system (10) comprises an unmodulated or direct-feedback flux locked loop (12) connected by first and second unbalanced RF coaxial transmission lines (16a, 16b) to a superconducting quantum interference device (14). The FLL (12) operates for the most part in a room-temperature or non-cryogenic environment, while the SQUID (14) operates in a cryogenic environment, with the first and second lines (16a, 16b) extending between these two operating environments.

  16. Quantification of magnetic nanoparticles with broadband measurements of magnetic susceptibility in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Kazuto; An, Zhisheng; Chang, Hong; Qiang, Xiaoke

    2015-04-01

    Measurement of low-field magnetic susceptibility over a wide band of frequencies spanning four orders of magnitude is a useful method for the assessment of the grain size distribution of ultrafine magnetic particles smaller than the SP/SSD boundary. This method has been applied to a loess/paleosol sequence at Luochuan in the Chinese Loess Plateau. The studied succession consists of sequences from the latest paleosol unit to the upper part of the loess unit, spanning the last glacial-interglacial cycle. Reconstructed grain size distributions (GSDs) consist of volume fractions on the order of 10-24 m3, and the mean GSDs are modal but with distinctive skewness among the loess, the weakly developed paleosol (weak paleosol), and the mature paleosol. This indicates that the mean volume of SP particles in this sequence tends to increase during the transition from the loess to the paleosol. An index, defined as the difference between χ130 at the lowest (130 Hz) and χ500k at the highest (500 kHz) frequencies normalized to χ130, is judged to be a more suitable index than previous frequency dependence parameters for the concentration of SP particles. This index has a strong correlation with χ130, showing a continuous 'growth curve' with the rate of increase being highest for the loess, moderate for the weak paleosol, and saturated for the paleosol. The characteristic curve suggests that smaller SP particles are preferentially formed in the earlier stage of pedogenesis rather than the later phase when even larger particles are formed in the mature paleosol. These results demonstrate that the broad-band-frequency susceptibility measurement will be useful for the quantitative assessment of magnetic nanoparticles in soils and sediments. Additionally, we point out that the measurement in the frequency domain generally requires time and may not be most suitable to routine measurements. We thus propose an alternative manner, the measurement in the time domain that can be

  17. Magnetic characteristics and measurements of filamentary Nb-Ti wire for the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Goldfarb, R.B.; Spomer, R.L.

    1989-12-31

    In synchrotron accelerator applications, such as the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), superconducting magnets are cycled in magnetic field. Desirable properties of the magnets include field uniformity, field stability with time, small residual field, and fairly small energy losses upon cycling. This paper discusses potential sources of problems in achieving these goals, describes important magnetic characteristics to be considered, and reviews measurement techniques for magnetic evaluation of candidate SSC wires. Instrumentation that might be practical for use in a wire-fabrication environment is described. The authors report on magnetic measurements of prototype SSC wires and cables and speculate on causes for instability in multipole fields of dipole magnets constructed with such cables.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF A PRECISE MAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENT SYSTEM FOR FAST-CHANGING MAGNETIC FIELDS.

    SciTech Connect

    WANDERER,P.; ESCALLIER,J.; GANETIS,G.; JAIN,A.; LOUIE,W.; MARONE,A.; THOMAS,R.

    2003-06-15

    Several recent applications for fast ramped magnets have been found that require precise measurement of the time-dependent fields. In one instance, accelerator dipoles will be ramped at 1 T/sec, with measurements needed to the typical level of accuracy for accelerators, {Delta} B/B better than 0.01%. To meet this need, we have begun development of a system containing 16 stationary pickup windings that will be sampled at a high rate. It is hoped that harmonics through the decapole can be measured with this system. Precise measurement of the time-dependent harmonics requires that both the pickup windings and the voltmeters be nearly identical. To minimize costs, printed circuit boards are being used for the pickup windings and a combination of amplifiers and ADC's for voltmeters. In addition, new software must be developed for the analysis. The paper will present a status report on this work.

  19. Magnetization measurements of uranium dioxide single crystals (P08358-E002-PF)

    SciTech Connect

    Gofryk, K.; Zapf, V.; Jaime, M.

    2014-12-01

    Our preliminary magnetic susceptibility measurements of UO2 point to complex nature of the magnetic ordering in this material, consistent with the proposed non-collinear 3-k magnetic structure. Further extensive magnetic studies are planned to address the puzzling behavior of UO2 in both antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic states.

  20. Spectroscopy of magnetic excitations in magnetic superconductors using vortex motion.

    PubMed

    Bulaevskii, L N; Hruska, M; Maley, M P

    2005-11-11

    In magnetic superconductors a moving vortex lattice is accompanied by an ac magnetic field which leads to the generation of spin waves. At resonance conditions the dynamics of vortices in magnetic superconductors changes drastically, resulting in strong peaks in the dc I-V characteristics at voltages at which the washboard frequency of the vortex lattice matches the spin wave frequency omegaS(g), where g are the reciprocal vortex lattice vectors. We show that if the washboard frequency lies above the magnetic gap, measurement of the I-V characteristics provides a new method to obtain information on the spectrum of magnetic excitations in borocarbides and cuprate layered magnetic superconductors.

  1. Magnetic-field sensing coil embedded in ceramic for measuring ambient magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hironori

    2004-02-10

    A magnetic pick-up coil for measuring magnetic field with high specific sensitivity, optionally with an electrostatic shield (24), having coupling elements (22) with high winding packing ratio, oriented in multiple directions, and embedded in ceramic material for structural support and electrical insulation. Elements of the coil are constructed from green ceramic sheets (200) and metallic ink deposited on surfaces and in via holes of the ceramic sheets. The ceramic sheets and the metallic ink are co-fired to create a monolithic hard ceramic body (20) with metallized traces embedded in, and placed on exterior surfaces of, the hard ceramic body. The compact and rugged coil can be used in a variety of environments, including hostile conditions involving ultra-high vacuum, high temperatures, nuclear and optical radiation, chemical reactions, and physically demanding surroundings, occurring either individually or in combinations.

  2. Trapped magnetic field measurements on HTS bulk by peak controlled pulsed field magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, Tetsuya; Watasaki, Masahiro; Kimura, Yosuke; Miki, Motohiro; Izumi, Mitsuru

    2010-06-01

    For the past several years, we have studied the high-temperature superconducting (HTS) synchronous motor assembled with melt-textured Gd-Ba-Cu-O bulk magnets. If the single pulse field magnetizes a bulk effectively, size of electrical motor will become small for the strong magnetic field of the HTS magnets without reducing output power of motor. In the previous study, we showed that the HTS bulk was magnetized to excellent cone-shape magnetic field distribution by using the waveform control pulse magnetization (WCPM) method. The WCPM technique made possible the active control of the waveform on which magnetic flux motion depended. We generated the pulse waveform with controlled risetime for HTS bulk magnetization to suppress the magnetic flux motion which decreases magnetization efficiency. The pulsed maximum magnetic flux density with slow risetime is not beyond the maximum magnetic flux density which is trapped by the static field magnetization. But, as for applying the pulse which has fast risetime, the magnetic flux which exceed greatly the threshold penetrates the bulk and causes the disorder of the trapped magnetic distribution. This fact suggests the possibility that the threshold at pulsed magnetization influences the dynamic magnetic flux motion. In this study, Gd-Ba-Cu-O bulk is magnetized by the controlled arbitrary trapezoidal shape pulse, of which the maximum magnetic flux density is controlled not to exceed the threshold. We will present the trapped magnetic characteristics and the technique to generate the controlled pulsed field.

  3. Accuracy of MRI-based Magnetic Susceptibility Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russek, Stephen; Erdevig, Hannah; Keenan, Kathryn; Stupic, Karl

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is increasingly used to map tissue susceptibility to identify microbleeds associated with brain injury and pathologic iron deposits associated with neurologic diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Field distortions with a resolution of a few parts per billion can be measured using MRI phase maps. The field distortion map can be inverted to obtain a quantitative susceptibility map. To determine the accuracy of MRI-based susceptibility measurements, a set of phantoms with paramagnetic salts and nano-iron gels were fabricated. The shapes and orientations of features were varied. Measured susceptibility of 1.0 mM GdCl3 solution in water as a function of temperature agreed well with the theoretical predictions, assuming Gd+3 is spin 7/2. The MRI susceptibility measurements were compared with SQUID magnetometry. The paramagnetic susceptibility sits on top of the much larger diamagnetic susceptibility of water (-9.04 x 10-6), which leads to errors in the SQUID measurements. To extract out the paramagnetic contribution using standard magnetometry, measurements must be made down to low temperature (2K). MRI-based susceptometry is shown to be as or more accurate than standard magnetometry and susceptometry techniques.

  4. Magnetic Field Measurements in Wire-Array Z-Pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syed, Wasif; Hammer, David; Lipson, Michal

    2006-10-01

    Understanding the evolution of the magnetic field topology and magnitude in the high energy density plasmas produced by wire-array Z-pinches is of critical importance for their ultimate application to stockpile stewardship and inertial confinement fusion^1. A method to determine the magnetic field profile in megampere level wire-array Z-pinches with high spatial and temporal resolution is under development. An ideal method would be passive and non-perturbing, such as Faraday rotation of laser light. We are developing a method involving temporally-resolved Faraday rotation through a sensing waveguide placed in the vicinity of, and eventually in, a wire-array Z-pinch^2. We present measurements of the magnetic field outside of a wire-array, and progress on measurements within the array. Our ideal device is a ``thin film waveguide'' coupled to an optical fiber system. While these sensing devices may not survive for long in a dense Z-pinch, they may provide useful information for a significant fraction of the current pulse. We present preliminary theoretical and experimental results. 1. M. Keith Matzen, M. A. Sweeney, R. G. Adams et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 055503 (2005). 2. W. Syed, D. A. Hammer, M. Lipson, R. B. van Dover, AIP Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Dense Z-Pinches, University of Oxford, UK, July 25-28, 2005. *This research was sponsored by the National Nuclear Security Administration under the Stockpile Stewardship Academic Alliances program through DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-F03-02NA00057.

  5. Direct Experimental Observation of a Practical AC Zeeman Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fancher, Charles; Pyle, Andrew; Rotunno, Andrew; Du, Shuangli; Aubin, Seth

    2016-05-01

    We present measurements of the spin-dependent AC Zeeman force produced by microwave magnetic near-field gradients on an atom chip. We measure the AC Zeeman force on ultracold 87 Rb atoms by observing its effect on the motion of atoms in free-fall and on those confined in a trap. We have studied the force as a function of microwave frequency detuning from a hyperfine transition at 6.8 GHz at several magnetic field strengths and have observed its characteristic bipolar and resonant features predicted by two-level dressed atom theory. We find that the force is several times the strength of gravity in our setup, and that it can be targeted to a specific hyperfine transition while leaving other hyperfine states and transitions relatively unaffected. We find that our measurements are reasonably consistent with theory and are working towards a parameter-free comparison. AC Zeeman potentials offer the possibility of targeting qualitatively different trapping potentials to different spin states, a capability currently absent from the toolbox of atomic quantum control techniques. In particular, an AC Zeeman potential could be used as the beamsplitter for a spin-dependent atom interferometer or for engineering a quantum gate. Work supported by AFOSR and W&M, and in part by AFRL.

  6. Magnetic Properties and Archeointensity Determination of Selected Mesoamerican Potteries (300 A.C to 1500 D.C.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Ceja, M.; Gogichaishvili, A.; Morales Contreras, J. J.; Manzanilla Naim, L.; Chauvin, A.; Urrutia Fucugauchi, J.

    2008-05-01

    In spite of abundant archeological material available in Mexico, archeomagnetic studies are extremely scarce. In this work, we conducted systematic archeointensity measurements on some well-known archeological sites in central and eastern Mexico (e.g., Teotihuacan, Templo Mayor among others) to contribute to the relative and absolute chronology of Mesoamerica. Our sampling strategy was guided largely by Linda Manzanilla's detailed study of two of the most important archeological sites in Central Mexico, Teotihuacan, and Templo Mayor, since we sampled only materials that are already studied and provide more or less coherent archeological ages. Moreover, we incorporated data from some Mexican lava flows that erupted during historic times in order to extend the archeointensity master curve for Mexico and Mesoamerica to the present.

  7. RHIC spin flipper AC dipole controller

    SciTech Connect

    Oddo, P.; Bai, M.; Dawson, C.; Gassner, D.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Mernick, K.; Minty, M.; Roser, T.; Severino, F.; Smith, K.

    2011-03-28

    The RHIC Spin Flipper's five high-Q AC dipoles which are driven by a swept frequency waveform require precise control of phase and amplitude during the sweep. This control is achieved using FPGA based feedback controllers. Multiple feedback loops are used to and dynamically tune the magnets. The current implementation and results will be presented. Work on a new spin flipper for RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) incorporating multiple dynamically tuned high-Q AC-dipoles has been developed for RHIC spin-physics experiments. A spin flipper is needed to cancel systematic errors by reversing the spin direction of the two colliding beams multiple times during a store. The spin flipper system consists of four DC-dipole magnets (spin rotators) and five AC-dipole magnets. Multiple AC-dipoles are needed to localize the driven coherent betatron oscillation inside the spin flipper. Operationally the AC-dipoles form two swept frequency bumps that minimize the effect of the AC-dipole dipoles outside of the spin flipper. Both AC bumps operate at the same frequency, but are phase shifted from each other. The AC-dipoles therefore require precise control over amplitude and phase making the implementation of the AC-dipole controller the central challenge.

  8. Validation of conducting wall models using magnetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, J. M.; Bialek, J.; Turco, F.; King, J.; Navratil, G. A.; Strait, E. J.; Turnbull, A.

    2016-10-01

    The impact of conducting wall eddy currents on perturbed magnetic field measurements is a key issue for understanding the measurement and control of long-wavelength MHD stability in tokamak devices. As plasma response models have growth in sophistication, the need to understand and resolve small changes in these measurements has become more important, motivating increased fidelity in simulations of externally applied fields and the wall eddy current response. In this manuscript, we describe thorough validation studies of the wall models in the mars-f and valen stability codes, using coil-sensor vacuum coupling measurements from the DIII-D tokamak (Luxon et al 2005 Fusion Sci. Technol. 48 807). The valen formulation treats conducting structures with arbitrary three-dimensional geometries, while mars-f uses an axisymmetric wall model and a spectral decomposition of the problem geometry with a fixed toroidal harmonic n. The vacuum coupling measurements have a strong sensitivity to wall eddy currents induced by time-changing coil currents, owing to the close proximities of both the sensors and coils to the wall. Measurements from individual coil and sensor channels are directly compared with valen predictions. It is found that straightforward improvements to the valen model, such as refining the wall mesh and simulating the vertical extent of the DIII-D poloidal field sensors, lead to good agreement with the experimental measurements. In addition, couplings to multi-coil, n  =  1 toroidal mode perturbations are calculated from the measurements and compared with predictions from both codes. The toroidal mode comparisons favor the fully three-dimensional simulation approach, likely because this approach naturally treats n  >  1 sidebands generated by the coils and wall eddy currents, as well as the n  =  1 fundamental.

  9. Ubbelohde viscometer measurement of water-based Fe3O4 magnetic fluid prepared by coprecipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, H.; Tang, X.; Hong, R. Y.; Feng, W. G.; Xie, H. D.; Chen, D. X.; Badami, D.

    2013-12-01

    Fe3O4 nanoparticles were prepared by co-precipitation and coated by sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) to obtain water-based magnetic fluid. The viscosity of the magnetic fluid was measured using an Ubbelohde viscometer. The effects of magnetic particles volume fraction, surfactant mass fraction and temperature on the viscosity were studied. Experimental results showed that the magnetic fluid with low magnetic particle volume fraction behaved as a Newtonian fluid and the viscosity of the magnetic fluid increased with an increase of the suspended magnetic particles volume fraction. The experimental data was compared with the results of a theoretically derived equation. The viscosity of the magnetic fluid also increased with an increase in surfactant mass portion, while it decreased with increasing temperature. Moreover, the viscosity increased with increasing the magnetic field intensity. Increasing the temperature and the surfactant mass fraction weakened the influence of the magnetic field on the viscosity of the magnetic fluid.

  10. [Cerebral white matter bundle measurements by magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Yoshii, F; Duara, R

    1989-04-01

    The width of the anterior whole white matter bundle (AWM), interhemispheric (AWM-TER), and intrahemispheric (AWM-TRA) components at the level of the foramen of Monro on horizontal inversion recovery (IR) magnetic resonance (MR) scans were measured in 32 healthy males. The mean age of subjects were 54.4 +/- 18.8, ranged 25 to 83 years old. MR scans were performed using a 0.5 Tesla superconductive magnet, with inversion time of 400 msec, repetition time of 2.1 sec and echo time of 35 msec. The slice thickness was 10mm. Horizontal maximum internal skull diameter (HISD) at the same level was also measured and normalized values of AWM, AWM-TER, AWM-TRA were calculated by dividing the width of AWM, AWM-TER, AWM-TRA by the width of HISD. When absolute values of each AWM width were compared between right and left sides, there were no differences in AWM and AWM-TER. However, AWM-TRA of the right side was significantly wider than that of the left side (t = 4.28, p less than 0.001). The width of AWM was not correlated with age, but the width of AWM-TER showed a significant decline in the left (r = -0.36, p = 0.04) and non-significant trend to decline in the right side (r = -0.33, p = 0.07). The width of AWM-TRA of the left side was tended to decrease with age. Normalized values of AWM, AWM-TER, AWM-TRA showed a similar results as that of the absolute values. The measurement of the white matter bundle width provide some insights into the connectivity of the brain.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2612107

  11. Preliminary Results of Performance Measurements on a Cylindrical Hall-Effect Thruster with Magnetic Field Generated by Permanent Magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, K. A.; Raitses, Y.; Merino, E.; Fisch, N. J.

    2008-01-01

    The performance of a low-power cylindrical Hall thruster, which more readily lends itself to miniaturization and low-power operation than a conventional (annular) Hall thruster, was measured using a planar plasma probe and a thrust stand. The field in the cylindrical thruster was produced using permanent magnets, promising a power reduction over previous cylindrical thruster iterations that employed electromagnets to generate the required magnetic field topology. Two sets of ring-shaped permanent magnets are used, and two different field configurations can be produced by reorienting the poles of one magnet relative to the other. A plasma probe measuring ion flux in the plume is used to estimate the current utilization for the two magnetic configurations. The measurements indicate that electron transport is impeded much more effectively in one configuration, implying a higher thrust efficiency. Preliminary thruster performance measurements on this configuration were obtained over a power range of 100-250 W. The thrust levels over this power range were 3.5-6.5 mN, with anode efficiencies and specific impulses spanning 14-19% and 875- 1425 s, respectively. The magnetic field in the thruster was lower for the thrust measurements than the plasma probe measurements due to heating and weakening of the permanent magnets, reducing the maximum field strength from 2 kG to roughly 750-800 G. The discharge current levels observed during thrust stand testing were anomalously high compared to those levels measured in previous experiments with this thruster.

  12. NMR measurement of oil shale magnetic relaxation at high magnetic field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seymour, Joseph D.; Washburn, Kathryn E.; Kirkland, Catherine M.; Vogt, Sarah J.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Codd, Sarah L.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) at low field is used extensively to provide porosity and pore-size distributions in reservoir rocks. For unconventional resources, due to low porosity and permeability of the samples, much of the signal exists at very short T2 relaxation times. In addition, the organic content of many shales will also produce signal at short relaxation times. Despite recent improvements in low-field technology, limitations still exist that make it difficult to account for all hydrogen-rich constituents in very tight rocks, such as shales. The short pulses and dead times along with stronger gradients available when using high-field NMR equipment provides a more complete measurement of hydrogen-bearing phases due to the ability to probe shorter T2 relaxation times (-5 sec) than can be examined using low-field equipment. Access to these shorter T2 times allows for confirmation of partially resolved peaks observed in low-field NMR data that have been attributed to solid organic phases in oil shales. High-field (300 MHz or 7 T) NMR measurements of spin-spin T2 and spin-lattice T1 magnetic relaxation of raw and artificially matured oil shales have potential to provide data complementary to low field (2 MHz or 0.05T) measurements. Measurements of high-field T2 and T1-T2 correlations are presented. These data can be interpreted in terms of organic matter phases and mineral-bound water known to be present in the shale samples, as confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and show distributions of hydrogen-bearing phases present in the shales that are similar to those observed in low field measurements.

  13. Measurement of evoked electroencephalography induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iramina, Keiji; Maeno, Takashi; Nonaka, Yukio; Ueno, Shoogo

    2003-05-01

    This study focused on the measurement of evoked potentials induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) for observing the neuronal connectivity in the brain. We developed an electroencephalography (EEG) measurement system to eliminate the electromagnetic interaction emitted from TMS. EEG activities 5 ms after TMS stimulation were measured. Using this artifact free amplifier, we investigated the intensity dependence of brain activation induced by TMS. When the stimulus intensity was changed at three levels, TMS-evoked EEG responses were measured. Several components of the evoked potential appeared at 9 ms, 20 ms, and 50 ms after stimulation. A large response appeared at about 9 ms after cerebellar TMS. There was a significant dependence of these responses on the stimulus intensity. During right-hand side motor area stimulation, there was no clear peak of the wave forms within 10 ms latency. Occipital stimulation caused more evoked responses to spread to the center of the brain than at other areas of stimulation. The evoked signal by TMS was possibly conducted posteriorly to anteriorly along the pathways of the neuronal fiber exiting the cerebellum into the cerebral cortex.

  14. LIF Diagnostic for Measuring Beam-Transport Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, T. G.; Noonan, W. A.; Ottinger, P. F.

    1996-11-01

    A novel, spatially-resolved diagnostic is being developed to measure magnetic fields associated with intense ion beam propagation through a low-pressure gas, as is envisioned for light ion-driven ICF. The diagnostic technique uses laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy, and can be varied to measure either small or large fields. Small fields, as expected in ballistic transport with solenoidal lens focusing using ~ 1 Torr gas, produce Zeeman shifts, Δ λ_Z, smaller than the transition linewidth, Δ λ. High sensitivity to measure these shifts is achieved by a variation on the Babcock technique.^1 Large fields, as expected in self-pinched transport using 10--100 mTorr gas, produce Δ λZ larger than Δ λ, which can be measured with a high-resolution spectrometer. Results of proof-of-principle experiments using calibrated B-fields for both the small- and large-field techniques will be presented. Progress in fielding this diagnostic on the Gamble-II accelerator for beam-transport studies will also be presented. This work is supported by DoE through Sandia National Laboratories. ^ NRC-NRL Research Associate. ^ Present address University of Maryland, College Park, MD. ^1 W.A. Noonan, et al., accepted for publication in Rev. Sci. Instrum.

  15. Magnetic effects on thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beguš, Samo; Bojkovski, Jovan; Drnovšek, Janko; Geršak, Gregor

    2014-03-01

    Thermometers in laboratory environment and industrial applications are often subject to extraneous, usually unwanted and uncontrolled magnetic fields. Magnetic field influence can be minimized, but cannot be fully cancelled out. Even more, in most cases, there is no awareness of the existence of magnetic fields, let alone their effect on measurement instrumentation. In the past, sensitivity to high dc magnetic fields has been investigated in cryogenics and at high temperatures. More recently, the magnetic effect on weak dc magnetic fields was presented. The goal of this paper was to analyse and empirically and experimentally prove the magnetic sensitivity of thermocouples exposed to low magnetic fields: both dc and ac. Precision and uniform alternating and direct magnetic flux densities were generated by means of permanent magnets and power amplifiers with air-cored coils. The magnetic effect on ferromagnetic and non-ferromagnetic thermocouples at liquid-nitrogen-boiling point (-196 °C), ice point (0 °C), in water (17 °C) and at melting point of gallium fixed point cell (29.7646 °C) was investigated. Magnetic-field-dependent temperature errors of up to 700 mK (at 5.3 mT: dc) and up to 1 °C (at 10 mT: ac 50 Hz magnetic fields) were detected. From the results, it can be concluded that, ideally for temperature measurements of the highest accuracy in the above-cryogenic temperature range, magnetic sensitivity should be estimated and taken into account either as the correction of an error and/or as an additional source of measurement uncertainty. Special consideration should be given to thermocouple orientation relative to the magnetic field direction, influence of metal enclosures and magnetization effects on ferromagnetic components of thermocouples.

  16. Local viscoelasticity of living cells measured by rotational magnetic spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Berret, J.-F.

    2016-01-01

    When submitted to a magnetic field, micron-size wires with superparamagnetic properties behave as embedded rheometers and represent interesting sensors for microrheology. Here we use rotational magnetic spectroscopy to measure the shear viscosity of the cytoplasm of living cells. We address the question of whether the cytoplasm is a viscoelastic liquid or an elastic gel. The main result of the study is the observation of a rotational instability between a synchronous and an asynchronous regime of rotation, found for murine fibroblasts and human cancer cells. For wires of susceptibility 3.6, the transition occurs in the range 0.01–1 rad s−1. The determination of the shear viscosity (10–100 Pa s) and elastic modulus (5–20 Pa) confirms the viscoelastic character of the cytoplasm. In contrast to earlier studies, it is concluded that the interior of living cells can be described as a viscoelastic liquid, and not as an elastic gel. PMID:26729062

  17. EFFECTS OF THE NON-RADIAL MAGNETIC FIELD ON MEASURING MAGNETIC HELICITY TRANSPORT ACROSS THE SOLAR PHOTOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Y. L.; Zhang, M.

    2015-05-10

    It is generally believed that the evolution of magnetic helicity has a close relationship with solar activity. Before the launch of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), earlier studies had mostly used Michelson Doppler Imager/SOHO line of sight (LOS) magnetograms and assumed that magnetic fields are radial when calculating the magnetic helicity injection rate from photospheric magnetograms. However, this assumption is not necessarily true. Here we use the vector magnetograms and LOS magnetograms, both taken by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on SDO, to estimate the effects of the non-radial magnetic field on measuring the magnetic helicity injection rate. We find that: (1) the effect of the non-radial magnetic field on estimating tangential velocity is relatively small; (2) when estimating the magnetic helicity injection rate, the effect of the non-radial magnetic field is strong when active regions are observed near the limb and is relatively weak when active regions are close to disk center; and (3) the effect of the non-radial magnetic field becomes minor if the amount of accumulated magnetic helicity is the only concern.

  18. Understanding Measurements Returned by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Daniel Parke; Criscuoli, Serena

    2014-06-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observes the Sun at the FeI 6173 Å line and returns full disk maps of line-of-sight observables including the magnetic field flux, FeI line width, line depth, and continuum intensity. To properly interpret such data it is important to understand any issues with the HMI and the pipeline that produces these observables. At this aim, HMI data were analyzed at both daily intervals for a span of 3 years at disk center in the quiet Sun and hourly intervals for a span of 200 hours around an active region. Systematic effects attributed to issues with instrument adjustments and re-calibrations, variations in the transmission filters and the orbital velocities of the SDO were found while the actual physical evolutions of such observables were difficult to determine. Velocities and magnetic flux measurements are less affected, as the aforementioned effects are partially compensated for by the HMI algorithm; the other observables are instead affected by larger uncertainties. In order to model these uncertainties, the HMI pipeline was tested with synthetic spectra generated through various 1D atmosphere models with radiative transfer code (the RH code). It was found that HMI estimates of line width, line depth, and continuum intensity are highly dependent on the shape of the line, and therefore highly dependent on the line-of-sight angle and the magnetic field associated to the model. The best estimates are found for Quiet regions at disk center, for which the relative differences between theoretical and HMI algorithm values are 6-8% for line width, 10-15% for line depth, and 0.1-0.2% for continuum intensity. In general, the relative difference between theoretical values and HMI estimates increases toward the limb and with the increase of the field; the HMI algorithm seems to fail in regions with fields larger than ~2000 G. This work is carried out through the National Solar Observatory

  19. Measurements of deuteron magnetic form factor high momentum transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, R.G.; Benton, D.; Bosted, P.; Clogher, L.; DeChambrier, G.; Katramatou, A.T.; Lambert, J.; Lung, A.; Petratos, G.G.; Rahbar, A.; and others

    1987-04-27

    The deuteron magnetic form factor B(Q/sup 2/) has been measured at momentum transfers Q/sup 2/ = 1.21, 1.49, 1.61, 1.74, 1.98, 2.23, 2.48, 2.53, and 2.77 (GeV/c)/sup 2/ at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center by detection of electrons backscattered at 180/sup 0/ in coincidence with recoiling deuterons at 0/sup 0/. The data for B(Q/sup 2/) are found to decrease rapidly from Q/sup 2/ = 1.2 to 2 (GeV/c)/sup 2/, then rise to a secondary maximum around Q/sup 2/ = 2.5 (GeV/c)/sup 2/, in qualitative agreement with impulse-approximation calculations.

  20. INTERPRETING MAGNETIC VARIANCE ANISOTROPY MEASUREMENTS IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    TenBarge, J. M.; Klein, K. G.; Howes, G. G.; Podesta, J. J.

    2012-07-10

    The magnetic variance anisotropy (A{sub m}) of the solar wind has been used widely as a method to identify the nature of solar wind turbulent fluctuations; however, a thorough discussion of the meaning and interpretation of the A{sub m} has not appeared in the literature. This paper explores the implications and limitations of using the A{sub m} as a method for constraining the solar wind fluctuation mode composition and presents a more informative method for interpreting spacecraft data. The paper also compares predictions of the A{sub m} from linear theory to nonlinear turbulence simulations and solar wind measurements. In both cases, linear theory compares well and suggests that the solar wind for the interval studied is dominantly Alfvenic in the inertial and dissipation ranges to scales of k{rho}{sub i} {approx_equal} 5.

  1. The use of a permanent magnet for water content measurements ofwood chips

    SciTech Connect

    Barale, P.J.; Fong, C.G.; Green, M.A.; Luft, P.A.; McInturff,A.D.; Reimer, J.A.; Yahnke, M.

    2001-09-20

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has developed a device that measures the water content of wood chips, pulp and brown stock for the paper industry. This device employs a permanent magnet as the central part of a NMR measurement system. This report describes the magnet and the NMR measurement system. The results of water content measurements in wood chips in a magnetic field of 0.47 T are presented.

  2. Magnetic measurement data of the 0.8-m prototype quadrupole magnets for the APS storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.

    1995-07-01

    From magnetic measurement data of the two 0.8-m prototype quadrupole magnets (P-SRQ-1 and P-SRQ-2) and the study of the geometries for the pole-end bevels and pole chamfers, the following conclusions have been made. Mechanical stability of the magnet poles has been achieved by modification of the weld procedures between two quadrants of the magnets. Stability of the magnet-pole positions was measured optically and was also concluded from the fact that the allowed coefficients, mainly sextupole and octupole terms, were independent of the magnet excitation currents. Unallowed multipole field coefficients for the second magnet, without correction of the magnet-pole positions, are smaller than for the first magnet. The field gradient integrals of the two magnets at 400A differ by less than 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} for r = 2.5 cm. This indicates that an acceptable magnet assembly procedure has been established. The 2-D calculations and ``body`` measurements for allowed coefficients after the main field, b{sub 5} and b{sub 9}, agree within 1.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} at r = 2.5 cm. This implies that the 2-D design geometry is basically correct and acceptable. As expected for a magnet with long and narrow poles, saturation effects of pole shims have been observed. In order to reduce fabrication cost for the end-plates, the geometries for the pole-end bevels and pole chamfers have been studied. By choosing a bevel angle of 61{degree}, instead of 45{degree}, it is possible to have acceptable allowed coefficients with dimensions of pole-chamfers up to 16.5 mm. This allows the design of the end-plate as one piece without removable pole-tip.

  3. LIF Diagnostic for Measuring Beam-Transport Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, T. G.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Neri, J. M.; Ottinger, P. F.; Noonan, W. A.

    1997-11-01

    A novel, spatially-resolved diagnostic is being developed to measure magnetic fields associated with intense ion beam propagation through a low-pressure gas, as is envisioned for light ion-driven ICF. The diagnostic technique uses laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy, and can be varied to measure either small or large fields. Small fields, as expected in ballistic transport with solenoidal lens focusing using ~ 1 Torr gas, produce Zeeman shifts, Δ λ_Z, smaller than the transition linewidth, Δ λ. High sensitivity to measure these shifts is achieved by a variation on the Babcock technique.^1 Large fields, as expected in self-pinched transport using 1--100 mTorr gas, produce Δ λZ larger than Δ λ. These Δ λZ will be resolved using an etalon as a narrowband, high-throughput optical filter. Available results from benchtop experiments using calibrated B-fields for both the small- and large-field techniques, and progress in fielding this diagnostic on the Gamble-II accelerator for beam-transport studies will be presented. Work supported by DOE through Sandia National Laboratories. ^ National Research Council Research Associate. ^ Present address University of Maryland, College Park, MD. ^1 W.A. Noonan, et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 68, 1032 (1997).

  4. ac Stark shift measurements of the clock transition in cold Cs atoms: Scalar and tensor light shifts of the D2 transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanzo, G. A.; Micalizio, S.; Godone, A.; Camparo, J. C.; Levi, F.

    2016-06-01

    The ac Stark shift, or light shift, is a physical phenomenon that plays a fundamental role in many applications ranging from basic atomic physics to applied quantum electronics. Here, we discuss experiments testing light-shift theory in a cold-atom cesium fountain clock for the Cs D2 transition (i.e., 6 2S1 /2→6 2P3 /2 at 852 nm). Cold-atom fountains represent a nearly ideal system for the study of light shifts: (1) The atoms can be perturbed by a field of arbitrary character (e.g., coherent field or nonclassical field); (2) there are no trapping fields to complicate data interpretation; (3) the probed atoms are essentially motionless in their center-of-mass reference frame, T ˜ 1 μK; and (4) the atoms are in an essentially collisionless environment. Moreover, in the present work the resolution of the Cs excited-state hyperfine splittings implies that the D2 ac Stark shift contains a nonzero tensor polarizability contribution, which does not appear in vapor phase experiments due to Doppler broadening. Here, we test the linearity of the ac Stark shift with field intensity, and measure the light shift as a function of field frequency, generating a "light-shift curve." We have improved on the previous best test of theory by a factor of 2, and after subtracting the theoretical scalar light shift from the experimental light-shift curves, we have isolated and tested the tensor light shift for an alkali D2 transition.

  5. Measurement of the magnetic field of small magnets with a smartphone: a very economical laboratory practice for introductory physics courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arribas, Enrique; Escobar, Isabel; Suarez, Carmen P.; Najera, Alberto; Beléndez, Augusto

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we propose an inexpensive laboratory practice for an introductory physics course laboratory for any grade of science and engineering study. This practice was very well received by our students, where a smartphone (iOS, Android, or Windows) is used together with mini magnets (similar to those used on refrigerator doors), a 20 cm long school rule, a paper, and a free application (app) that needs to be downloaded and installed that measures magnetic fields using the smartphone’s magnetic field sensor or magnetometer. The apps we have used are: Magnetometer (iOS), Magnetometer Metal Detector, and Physics Toolbox Magnetometer (Android). Nothing else is needed. Cost of this practice: free. The main purpose of the practice is that students determine the dependence of the component x of the magnetic field produced by different magnets (including ring magnets and sphere magnets). We obtained that the dependency of the magnetic field with the distance is of the form x-3, in total agreement with the theoretical analysis. The secondary objective is to apply the technique of least squares fit to obtain this exponent and the magnetic moment of the magnets, with the corresponding absolute error.

  6. Chip-Based Measurements of Brownian Relaxation of Magnetic Beads Using a Planar Hall Effect Magnetic Field Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Østerberg, Frederik W.; Dalslet, Bjarke T.; Snakenborg, Detlef; Johansson, Christer; Hansen, Mikkel F.

    2010-12-01

    We present a simple `click-on' fluidic system with integrated electrical contacts, which is suited for electrical measurements on chips in microfluidic systems. We show that microscopic magnetic field sensors based on the planar Hall effect can be used for detecting the complex magnetic response using only the self-field arising from the bias current applied to the sensors as excitation field. We present measurements on a suspension of magnetic beads with a nominal diameter of 250 nm vs. temperature and find that the observations are consistent with the Cole-Cole model for Brownian relaxation with a constant hydrodynamic bead diameter when the temperature dependence of the viscosity of water is taken into account. These measurements demonstrate the feasibility of performing measurements of the Brownian relaxation response in a lab-on-a-chip system and constitute the first step towards an integrated biosensor based on the detection of the dynamic response of magnetic beads.

  7. Towards an AC-MOT of CaF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderegg, Loic; Chae, Eunmi; Ravi, Aakash; Augenbraun, Benjamin; Hemmerling, Boerge; Drayna, Garrett; Hutzler, Nicholas; Collopy, Alejandra; Wu, Yewei; Ding, Shiqian; Ye, Jun; Ketterle, Wolfgang; Doyle, John

    2016-05-01

    Ultra-cold diatomic molecules have rich prospects as candidates to study controlled ultra-cold chemistry, strongly correlated systems and precision measurements. They are also considered as possible qubits in quantum computing and simulation schemes. We report on progress towards loading CaF into a molecular magneto-optical trap (MOT). An AC-MOT will be used to actively remix magnetic dark states via both polarization and magnetic field switching. In order to load a molecular MOT, we have successfully laser slowed a CaF beam to near the expected capture velocity. We describe our AC-MOT apparatus, which is designed to co-trap CaF and Li. We outline our planned study of CaF-Li collisions to explore the feasibility of sympathetically cooling molecules to ultra-cold temperatures.

  8. AC susceptibility and critical current in the organic superconductor {kappa}-(ET){sub 2}Cu(NCS){sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, M.A.; Velez, M.; Vicent, J.L.; Schleuter, J.; Williams, J.M.; Crabtree, G.W.

    1994-05-01

    The AC susceptibility (X{prime}, X{double_prime}) has bee measured in a single crystal of the organic superconductor K-(ET){sub 2}Cu(NCS){sub 2} ({Tc} = 9.5 K) as a function of the DC magnetic field, for several frequencies (10 {sup 2} Hz AC fields (l{mu}T

  9. Forecasting auroras from regional and global magnetic field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauristie, Kirsti; Myllys, Minna; Partamies, Noora; Viljanen, Ari; Peitso, Pyry; Juusola, Liisa; Ahmadzai, Shabana; Singh, Vikramjit; Keil, Ralf; Martinez, Unai; Luginin, Alexej; Glover, Alexi; Navarro, Vicente; Raita, Tero

    2016-06-01

    We use the connection between auroral sightings and rapid geomagnetic field variations in a concept for a Regional Auroral Forecast (RAF) service. The service is based on statistical relationships between near-real-time alerts issued by the NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center and magnetic time derivative (dB/dt) values measured by five MIRACLE magnetometer stations located in Finland at auroral and sub-auroral latitudes. Our database contains NOAA alerts and dB/dt observations from the years 2002-2012. These data are used to create a set of conditional probabilities, which tell the service user when the probability of seeing auroras exceeds the average conditions in Fennoscandia during the coming 0-12 h. Favourable conditions for auroral displays are associated with ground magnetic field time derivative values (dB/dt) exceeding certain latitude-dependent threshold values. Our statistical analyses reveal that the probabilities of recording dB/dt exceeding the thresholds stay below 50 % after NOAA alerts on X-ray bursts or on energetic particle flux enhancements. Therefore, those alerts are not very useful for auroral forecasts if we want to keep the number of false alarms low. However, NOAA alerts on global geomagnetic storms (characterized with Kp values > 4) enable probability estimates of > 50 % with lead times of 3-12 h. RAF forecasts thus rely heavily on the well-known fact that bright auroras appear during geomagnetic storms. The additional new piece of information which RAF brings to the previous picture is the knowledge on typical storm durations at different latitudes. For example, the service users south of the Arctic Circle will learn that after a NOAA ALTK06 issuance in night, auroral spotting should be done within 12 h after the alert, while at higher latitudes conditions can remain favourable during the next night.

  10. Quantitative Proton Magnetic Resonance Techniques for Measuring Fat

    PubMed Central

    Harry, Houchun; Kan, Hermien E.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate, precise, and reliable techniques for quantifying body and organ fat distributions are important tools in physiology research. They are critically needed in studies of obesity and diseases involving excess fat accumulation. Proton magnetic resonance methods address this need by providing an array of relaxometry-based (T1, T2) and chemical-shift-based approaches. These techniques can generate informative visualizations of regional and whole-body fat distributions, yield measurements of fat volumes within specific body depots, and quantify fat accumulation in abdominal organs and muscles. MR methods are commonly used to investigate the role of fat in nutrition and metabolism, to measure the efficacy of short and long-term dietary and exercise interventions, to study the implications of fat in organ steatosis and muscular dystrophies, and to elucidate pathophysiological mechanisms in the context of obesity and its comorbidities. The purpose of this review is to provide a summary of mainstream MR strategies for fat quantification. The article will succinctly describe the principles that differentiate water and fat proton signals, summarize advantages and limitations of various techniques, and offer a few illustrative examples. The article will also highlight recent efforts in MR of brown adipose tissue and conclude by briefly discussing some future research directions. PMID:24123229

  11. Measurement of the magnetic form factor of the neutron

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, Alan; Ni, Benwen; Anderson, Brian; Flanders, Bruce; Chang, C.; Chang, C.C.; Hyde, Charles; Manley, D.; Tieger, Daniel; Barkhuff, David; Keane, Declan; Dodson, George; Arenhovel, Hartmuth; Kelly, James; Mougey, Jean; Cameron, John; Dow, Karen; Beard, Kevin; Weinstein, Lawrence; Farkhondeh, Manouchehr; Spraker, Mark; Finn, Michael; Rutt, Paul; Ulmer, Paul; Markowitz, Pete; Pella, Peter; Whitney, R.; Madey, Richard; Lourie, Robert; Van Verst, Scott; Kowalski, Stanley; Eden, Thomas; Payerle, Thomas; Reichelt, Tilmann; Jiang, W.; Zhang, Wei-Ming; Bertozzi, William; Turchinetz, William; Watson, William; Korsch, Wolfgang

    1992-01-01

    The 2H(e,e'n)1H quasielastic cross section was measured at Q2 values of 0.109, 0.176, and 0.255 (GeV/c)2. The neutron detection efficiency was determined by the associated particle technique with the 2H( gamma ,pn) reaction for each of the three neutron kinetic energies. These 2H(e,e'n) measurements of the coincidence cross sections are the first at low Q2. The cross sections are sensitive primarily to the neutron magnetic form factor GnM at these kinematics. The extracted GnM values have smaller uncertainties than previous data and are consistent with the dipole parametrization at the two higher momentum transfers; at the lowest momentum transfer, the value of GnM is ~10% higher than t

  12. Influence of static magnetic field strength on the temperature resolution of a magnetic nanoparticle thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jing; Dieckhoff, Jan; Schilling, Meinhard; Ludwig, Frank

    2016-10-01

    This paper investigates the influence of dc magnetic field strength on the resolution of a magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) thermometer, which employs the fundamental f0 and 2f0 harmonics of the MNP magnetization induced by ac and superimposed dc magnetic fields. In ac and parallel dc magnetic fields, the strength of dc magnetic field modulates the harmonics of the MNP magnetization, which affects their temperature sensitivities and measurement signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). A temperature-adjustable fluxgate-based magnetic particle spectrometer was used to measure the spectra of the MNP magnetization at different temperatures. To determine the temperature, the amplitudes of the measured f0 and 2f0 harmonics were modeled based on the static Langevin function. AC susceptibility measurements on a MNP sample demonstrate the applicability of the static Langevin function for the description of the MNP magnetization spectra at a low frequency ac magnetic field without taking into account the MNP dynamics. Our simulations and experiments show that with increasing dc magnetic field from 0.2 mT to 2.0 mT, both the amplitude of the 2f0 harmonic and the temperature sensitivity of the amplitude ratio of the 2f0 to f0 harmonics increase by a factor of about 10 in an ac magnetic field with a frequency of 70 Hz and an amplitude of 1 mT. Concomitantly, the SNR of the 2f0 harmonic significantly increases by about 20 dB. Consequently, the temperature resolution of the MNP thermometer is improved from 1.97 K to 0.26 K.

  13. Two-dimensional magnetic property measurement for magneto-rheological elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jianbin; Guo, Youguang; Li, Yancheng; Zhu, Jianguo; Li, Jianchun

    2013-05-01

    Magneto-rheological elastomer (MRE) is a new kind of smart material. Its rheological properties can be altered and controlled in a real time manner when it is applied an external magnetic field. For calculating magnetic properties of MRE material, usually Maxwell-Garnet equation is used to acquire an approximately effective permeability. This equation treats the magnetic property of particles as linear. However, when the applied magnetic field is alternating or rotating, the nonlinearity of magnetic property and magnetic hysteresis cannot be neglected. Hence, the measurement and modelling of the magnetic properties under alternating and rotating magnetic fields are essential to explore new applications of the material. This paper presents the investigation on the magnetic hysteresis properties of MRE material under one-dimensional (1-D) alternating and two-dimensional (2-D) rotating magnetic field excitations. A kind of MRE material, consisting of 70% carbonyl iron particles, 10% silicone oil, and 20% silicone rubber, was used to investigate the magnetic properties. The diameter of carbonyl iron particles is 3-5 μm. The measurement results, such as the relations between magnetic field intensity (H) and magnetic flux density (B) under different magnetic field excitations on the MRE sample, have been obtained and analyzed. These data would be useful for design and analysis of MRE smart structures like MR dampers.

  14. 3D magnetic geometric effects during 3D field application and comparison to measurements in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, R. S.; Unterberg, E. A.; Wingen, A.; Shafer, M. W.; Cianciosa, M. R.; Hillis, D. L.; McKee, G. R.; Bird, T. M.; Evans, T. E.

    2015-11-01

    Density pumpout during the application of 3D fields in tokamaks may be caused by changes to the plasma equilibrium shaping that destabilize microinstabilities, thereby increasing transport. Local geometric quantities of the magnetic field that are relevant for microinstabilities (curvature and local shear) are calculated using VMEC equilibria in typical RMP discharges on DIII-D. Measurements of phase-differenced soft X-ray emission in the pedestal region show a clear helical structure that is compared with a model of localized impurity transport based on the 3D geometry. Broadband density fluctuations measured by beam emission spectroscopy also show changes in magnitude with I-coil phase, in support of the theory that microstability changes with the magnetic geometry. A scan of 3D equilibria over a large range of DIII-D geometric parameter space has been preformed in order to map out the operating space of the microstability mechanism. Supported by US DOE DE-AC05-00OR22725, DE-FG02-89ER53296, DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  15. Magnetic field measurements of full length 50 mm aperture SSC dipole magnets at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, J.; Bossert, R.; Carson, J.; Delchamps, S.W.; Gourlay, S.; Hanft, R.; Koska, W.; Kuchnir, M.; Lamm, M.J.; Mazur, P.O.; Mokhtarani, A.; Orris, D.; Ozelis, J.; Wake, M. ); Devred, A.; DiMarco, J.; Kuzminski, J.; Puglisi, M.; Tompkins, J.C.; Yu, Y.; Zhao, Y.; Zheng, H. ); Ogitsu, T. (Supe

    1992-09-01

    Thirteen 16 m long, 50 mm aperture SSC dipole magnets, designed jointly by Fermilab, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the SSC Laboratory, have been built at Fermilab. The first nine magnets have been fully tested to date. The allowed harmonics are systematically shifted from zero by amounts larger than the specification. The unallowed harmonics, with the exception of the skew sextupole, are consistent with zero. The magnet-to-magnet RMS variation of all harmonics is much smaller than the specification.

  16. Estimate of Coronal Magnetic Field Strength Using Plasmoid Acceleration Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, G.; Lee, K.; Jang, M.

    2010-12-01

    A method of estimating the lower bound of coronal magnetic field strength in the neighborhood of an ejecting plasmoid is presented. Based on the assumption that the plasma ejecta is within a magnetic island, an analytical expression for the force acting on the ejecta is derived. A rather simple calculation shows that the vertical force acting on a cylinder-like volume, whose lateral surface is a flux surface and whose magnetic axis is parallel to the horizontal, is just the difference in total pressure (magnetic pressure plus plasma pressure) below and above the volume. The method is applied to a limb coronal mass ejection event, and a lower bound of the magnetic field strength just below the CME core is estimated. The method is expected to provide useful information on the strength of reconnecting magnetic field if applied to X-ray plasma ejecta.

  17. Design and realization of a two-dimensional spatial magnetic field mapping apparatus to measure magnetic fields of metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Quan; Zhou, Xiao Yang; Chin, Jessie Yao; Cui, Tie Jun

    2011-07-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) spatial electric-field mapping apparatus [Opt. Express 14, 8694 (2006)] plays an important role in experiments involving metamaterials, such as the verification of free-space and ground-plane invisibility cloaks. However, such an apparatus is valid only for the transverse-electric (TE) mode and is invalid for the transverse-magnetic (TM) mode, as it requires perfectly magnetic conducting (PMC) planes, which do not exist in nature. In this paper, we propose a 2D spatial magnetic-field mapping apparatus based on artificial magnetic conductor (AMC) plates. The AMC structure is designed using periodically perfectly electrical conducting patches with a sub-wavelength size on a dielectric substrate backed with the ground plane, which can simulate a PMC plane. Using two parallel PMC plates to form a TM-wave planar waveguide, we realize the 2D spatial magnetic-field mapping apparatus in order to measure the external and internal magnetic fields of metamaterials. Two types of excitations, a plane-wave source and a magnetic dipole, are used to feed the system. In order to validate the performance of the magnetic-field mapper, two gradient-index metamaterial lenses are measured, and the experimental results are in good agreement with the full-wave simulations.

  18. High Field Magnetization measurements of uranium dioxide single crystals (P08358- E003-PF)

    SciTech Connect

    Gofryk, K.; Harrison, N.; Jaime, M.

    2014-12-01

    Our preliminary high field magnetic measurements of UO2 are consistent with a complex nature of the magnetic ordering in this material, compatible with the previously proposed non-collinear 3-k magnetic structure. Further extensive magnetic studies on well-oriented (<100 > and <111>) UO2 crystals are planned to address the puzzling behavior of UO2 in both antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic states at high fields.

  19. Unveiling the Nature of Soft Gamma Repeaters and Magnetars: Scientists Measure the Most Powerful Magnet Known

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swank, Jean (Technical Monitor); Parke, William

    2002-01-01

    This newsletter from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) announces measurements of the magnetic field of a magnetar. The magnetic field was approx. 10(exp 15) gauss, up to 10 times more powerful than previous estimates. The newsletter also describes how the star's magnetic field slows its rotation, and how starquakes emit protons, which are trapped in this neutron star's magnetic field, and make it a soft gamma repeater (SGR).

  20. Velocity measurement on Taylor Couette flow of a magnetic fluid with small aspect ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikura, Hiroshige; Aritomi, Masanori; Takeda, Yasushi

    2005-03-01

    In this paper, the application of ultrasonic velocity profile (UVP) method to investigate magnetic-fluids flow is described. The objective of the research is to measure the internal flow of a magnetic fluid on Taylor-Couette flow with small aspect ratio using the UVP method and to analyze the influence of the applied magnetic field. The flow structure of a magnetic fluid in a concentric annular geometry with a small aspect ratio of 3 and a radius ratio of 0.6 for an inner-cylinder rotation was investigated. Axial velocity distributions were measured using the UVP measurement technique. A non-uniform magnetic field was applied to the flow field using a permanent magnet, located outside of the cylinders. The results demonstrated that the UVP method was capable to provide the information on the structure of Taylor-Couette flow with small aspect ratio, in a magnetic fluid.