Science.gov

Sample records for ac microsized gliding

  1. Water treatment by the AC gliding arc air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharagozalian, Mehrnaz; Dorranian, Davoud; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood

    2017-06-01

    In this study, the effects of gliding arc (G Arc) plasma system on the treatment of water have been investigated experimentally. An AC power supply of 15 kV potential difference at 50 Hz frequency was employed to generate plasma. Plasma density and temperature were measured using spectroscopic method. The water was contaminated with staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive) and salmonella bacteria (Gram-negative), and Penicillium (mold fungus) individually. pH, hydrogen peroxide, and nitride contents of treated water were measured after plasma treatment. Decontamination of treated water was determined using colony counting method. Results indicate that G Arc plasma is a powerful and green tool to decontaminate water without producing any byproducts.

  2. Water treatment by the AC gliding arc air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharagozalian, Mehrnaz; Dorranian, Davoud; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood

    2017-09-01

    In this study, the effects of gliding arc (G Arc) plasma system on the treatment of water have been investigated experimentally. An AC power supply of 15 kV potential difference at 50 Hz frequency was employed to generate plasma. Plasma density and temperature were measured using spectroscopic method. The water was contaminated with staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive) and salmonella bacteria (Gram-negative), and Penicillium (mold fungus) individually. pH, hydrogen peroxide, and nitride contents of treated water were measured after plasma treatment. Decontamination of treated water was determined using colony counting method. Results indicate that G Arc plasma is a powerful and green tool to decontaminate water without producing any byproducts.

  3. AC electric field for rapid assembly of nanostructured polyaniline onto microsized gap for sensor devices.

    PubMed

    La Ferrara, Vera; Rametta, Gabriella; De Maria, Antonella

    2015-07-01

    Interconnected network of nanostructured polyaniline (PANI) is giving strong potential for enhancing device performances than bulk PANI counterparts. For nanostructured device processing, the main challenge is to get prototypes on large area by requiring precision, low cost and high rate assembly. Among processes meeting these requests, the alternate current electric fields are often used for nanostructure assembling. For the first time, we show the assembly of nanostructured PANI onto large electrode gaps (30-60 μm width) by applying alternate current electric fields, at low frequencies, to PANI particles dispersed in acetonitrile (ACN). An important advantage is the short assembly time, limited to 5-10 s, although electrode gaps are microsized. That encouraging result is due to a combination of forces, such as dielectrophoresis (DEP), induced-charge electrokinetic (ICEK) flow and alternate current electroosmotic (ACEO) flow, which speed up the assembly process when low frequencies and large electrode gaps are used. The main achievement of the present study is the development of ammonia sensors created by direct assembling of nanostructured PANI onto electrodes. Sensors exhibit high sensitivity to low gas concentrations as well as excellent reversibility at room temperature, even after storage in air.

  4. Characterization of an AC glow-type gliding arc discharge in atmospheric air with a current-voltage lumped model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Chengdong; Gao, Jinlong; Zhu, Jiajian; Ehn, Andreas; Aldén, Marcus; Li, Zhongshan

    2017-09-01

    Quantitative characterization of a high-power glow-mode gliding arc (GM-GA) discharge operated in open air is performed using a current-voltage lumped model that is built from the perspective of energy balance and electron conservation. The GM-GA discharge is powered by a 35 kHz alternating current power supply. Instantaneous images of the discharge volume are recorded using a high-speed camera at a frame rate of 50 kHz, synchronized with the simultaneously recorded current and voltage waveforms. Detailed analyzation indicates that the electrical input power is dissipated mainly through the transport of vibrationally excited nitrogen and other active radicals (such as O). The plasma is quite non-thermal with the ratio of vibrational and translational temperatures (Tv/Tg) larger than 2 due to the intense energy dissipation. The electron number density reaches 3 × 1019 m-3 and is always above the steady value owing to the short cutting events, which can recover the electron density to a relatively large value and limits the maximum length of the gliding arc. The slow decaying rate of electrons is probably attributed to the decomposed state of a hot gaseous mixture and the related associative ionization.

  5. Teleseismic S wave microseisms.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Kiwamu; Takagi, Ryota

    2016-08-26

    Although observations of microseisms excited by ocean swells were firmly established in the 1940s, the source locations remain difficult to track. Delineation of the source locations and energy partition of the seismic wave components are key to understanding the excitation mechanisms. Using a seismic array in Japan, we observed both P and S wave microseisms excited by a severe distant storm in the Atlantic Ocean. Although nonlinear forcing of an ocean swell with a one-dimensional Earth model can explain P waves and vertically polarized S waves (SV waves), it cannot explain horizontally polarized S waves (SH waves). The precise source locations may provide a new catalog for exploring Earth's interior.

  6. Mid-ocean microseisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromirski, Peter D.; Duennebier, Fred K.; Stephen, Ralph A.

    2005-04-01

    The Hawaii-2 Observatory (H2O) is an excellent site for studying the source regions and propagation of microseisms since it is located far from shorelines and shallow water. During Leg 200 of the Ocean Drilling Program, the officers of the JOIDES Resolution took wind and wave measurements for comparison with double-frequency (DF) microseism data collected at nearby H2O. The DF microseism band can be divided into short-period and long-period bands, SPDF and LPDF, respectively. Comparison of the ship's weather log with the seismic data in the SPDF band from about 0.20 to 0.45 Hz shows a strong correlation of seismic amplitude with wind speed and direction, implying that the energy reaching the ocean floor is generated locally by ocean gravity waves. Nearshore land seismic stations see similar SPDF spectra, also generated locally by wind seas. At H2O, SPDF microseism amplitudes lag sustained changes in wind speed and direction by several hours, with the lag increasing with wave period. This lag may be associated with the time necessary for the development of opposing seas for DF microseism generation. Correlation of swell height above H2O with the LPDF band from 0.085 to 0.20 Hz is often poor, implying that a significant portion of this energy originates at distant locations. Correlation of the H2O seismic data with NOAA buoy data, with hindcast wave height data from the North Pacific, and with seismic data from mainland and island stations, defines likely source areas of the LPDF signals. Most of the LPDF energy at H2O appears to be generated by high-amplitude storm waves impacting long stretches of coastline nearly simultaneously, and the Hawaiian Islands appear to be a significant source of LPDF energy in the North Pacific when waves arrive from particular directions. The highest levels observed at mid-ocean site H2O occur in the SPDF band when two coincident nearby storm systems develop. Deep water, mid-ocean-generated DF microseisms are not observed at

  7. Dynamics of glide avalanches and snow gliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancey, Christophe; Bain, Vincent

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, due to warmer snow cover, there has been a significant increase in the number of cases of damage caused by gliding snowpacks and glide avalanches. On most occasions, these have been full-depth, wet-snow avalanches, and this led some people to express their surprise: how could low-speed masses of wet snow exert sufficiently high levels of pressure to severely damage engineered structures designed to carry heavy loads? This paper reviews the current state of knowledge about the formation of glide avalanches and the forces exerted on simple structures by a gliding mass of snow. One particular difficulty in reviewing the existing literature on gliding snow and on force calculations is that much of the theoretical and phenomenological analyses were presented in technical reports that date back to the earliest developments of avalanche science in the 1930s. Returning to these primary sources and attempting to put them into a contemporary perspective are vital. A detailed, modern analysis of them shows that the order of magnitude of the forces exerted by gliding snow can indeed be estimated correctly. The precise physical mechanisms remain elusive, however. We comment on the existing approaches in light of the most recent findings about related topics, including the physics of granular and plastic flows, and from field surveys of snow and avalanches (as well as glaciers and debris flows). Methods of calculating the forces exerted by glide avalanches are compared quantitatively on the basis of two case studies. This paper shows that if snow depth and density are known, then certain approaches can indeed predict the forces exerted on simple obstacles in the event of glide avalanches or gliding snow cover.

  8. Array Analysis of North Atlantic Microseisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, David; Bean, Chris; Möllhoff, Martin; Donne, Sarah; Lokmer, Ivan; Le Pape, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Oceans generate persistent low frequency background seismic signals known as microseisms through a mechanical coupling with the Earth's crust. Microseism energy originates as regions of low barometric pressure (depressions) over the oceans where it is transmitted to the sea-floor and propagates as elastic energy in the Earths crust. Consequently microseisms carry important meteorological information relating to both the atmosphere and the hydrosphere. The significance of microseisms as climate indicators has previously been investigated in several studies (Essen et al., 1999; Aster et al., 2010) and to estimate ocean wave parameters using onshore seismometer data (Bromirski et al., 1999). Also many modern seismological methods make use of microseism signals, for example "noise tomography" (Shapiro et al., 2005); spectral ratio techniques ; and cross-correlation techniques (Wapenaar et al., 2011; Brenguier et al., 2014). The continental shelf near Ireland is a known generation are for microseisms and an important region for European weather forecasting and climate studies. There has also been seismometers in the region since the 1960s. There is a single station in Valentia observatory in south-west Ireland and a small scale seismic array in Scotland which offer potential climate records for the region. To make use of this information it is first necessary to understand how microseisms recorded in Ireland relate to the local ocean wavefield. The WAVEOBS project was set established with three primary goals; to get a better fundamental understanding of microseism sources; to investigate the use of ocean generated microseisms as real time ocean wave height data; and to investigate their use as a climate proxy. Using spectral analysis and array methods the microseism wavefield in the North-East Atlantic near Ireland is described with reference to the ocean wavefield.

  9. Source location of secondary microseisms in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Ryota; Nishida, Kiwamu

    2017-04-01

    Non-linear interactions of ocean swells generate secondary microseisms. Although observation of microseisms have been established well in several decades, source locations of secondary microseisms remain difficult to determine well. In the present study, we try to locate dominant microseism sources observed in the Japan islands using Hi-net records. In order to locate microseisms source, we first estimate back azimuths of Rayleigh waves in the period of 4-8 s based on polarization analysis. Since fundamental Rayleigh waves generally have retrograde particle motions, back azimuth of incident Rayleigh wave can be determined without uncertainty of 180 degrees from three component records at single stations. We estimated locations which can explain the back azimuth distribution and picked up source locations with small location errors. The microseism sources mainly distribute in two specific regions: 100-200 km off the coast of Fukushima in the Pacific and off Tottori in the Sea of Japan. The off Tottori sources dominate in the winter season whereas the off Fukushima sources are detected stationary. The off Tottori and off Fukushima sources are located at an ocean basin with the depth of 1000-2500 m and at shelf slope with the ocean depth of 2000-6000 m, respectively. The oceanic depths are close to the resonance depth of 1500-3000 m for the period of 4-8 s. Improving source locations and investigating their frequency dependence may deepen our understanding of mechanism of microseisms.

  10. The bacterial gliding machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, Abhishek

    Cells of Flavobacterium johnsoniae, a rod-shaped bacterium, glide over surfaces with speeds reaching up to 2 micrometer's. Gliding is powered by a protonmotive force. The adhesin SprB forms filaments about 160 nm long that move on the cell-surface along a looped track. Interaction of SprB filaments with a surface produces gliding. We tethered F. johnsoniae cells to glass by adding anti-SprB antibody. Tethered cells spun about fixed points, rotating at speeds of about 1 Hz. The torques required to sustain such speeds were large, comparable to those generated by the flagellar rotary motor. Using a flow cell apparatus, we changed load on the gliding motor by adding the viscous agent Ficoll to tethered cells. We found that a gliding motor runs at constant speed rather than constant torque. We attached gold nanoparticles to the SprB filament and tracked its motion. We fluorescently tagged a bacterial Type IX secretion system (T9SS) protein and imaged its dynamics. Fluorescently tagged T9SS protein localized near the point of tether, indicating that T9SS localizes with the gliding motor. Based on our results, we propose a model to explain bacterial gliding.

  11. Ocean waves monitor system by inland microseisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, L. C.; Bouchette, F.; Chang, E. T. Y.

    2016-12-01

    Microseisms are continuous ground oscillations which have been wildly introduced for decades. It is well known that the microseismicity in the frequency band from 0.05 to about 1 Hz partly results from ocean waves, which has been first explained by Longuet-Higgins [1950]. The generation mechanism for such a microseismicity is based on nonlinear wave-wave interactions which drive pressure pulses within the seafloor. The resulting ground pressure fluctuations yield ground oscillations at a double frequency (DF) with respect to that of current ocean waves. In order to understand the characteristics of DF microseisms associated with different wave sources, we aim to analyze and interpret the spectra of DF microseisms by using the simple spectrum method [Rabinovich, 1997] at various inland seismometer along the Taiwan coast. This is the first monitoring system of ocean waves observed by inland seismometers in Taiwan. The method is applied to identify wave sources by estimating the spectral ratios of wave induced microseisms associated with local winds and typhoons to background spectra. Microseism amplitudes above 0.2 Hz show a good correlation with wind-driven waves near the coast. Comparison of microseism band between 0.1 and 0.2 Hz with buoys in the deep sea shows a strong correlation of seismic amplitude with storm generated waves, implying that such energy portion originates in remote regions. Results indicate that microseisms observed at inland sites can be a potential tool for the tracking of typhoon displacements and the monitoring of extreme ocean waves in real time. Real- time Microseism-Ocean Waves Monitoring Website (http://mwave.droppages.com/) Reference Rabinovich, A. B. (1997) "Spectral analysis of tsunami waves: Separation of source and topography effects," J. Geophys. Res., Vol. 102, p. 12,663-12,676. Longuet-Higgins, M.S. (1950) "A theory of origin of microseisms," Philos. Trans. R. Soc., A. 243, pp. 1-35.

  12. Optical diagnostics of a gliding arc.

    PubMed

    Sun, Z W; Zhu, J J; Li, Z S; Aldén, M; Leipold, F; Salewski, M; Kusano, Y

    2013-03-11

    Dynamic processes in a gliding arc plasma generated between two diverging electrodes in ambient air driven by 31.25 kHz AC voltage were investigated using spatially and temporally resolved optical techniques. The life cycles of the gliding arc were tracked in fast movies using a high-speed camera with framing rates of tens to hundreds of kHz, showing details of ignition, motion, pulsation, short-cutting, and extinction of the plasma column. The ignition of a new discharge occurs before the extinction of the previous discharge. The developed, moving plasma column often short-cuts its current path triggered by Townsend breakdown between the two legs of the gliding arc. The emission from the plasma column is shown to pulsate at a frequency of 62.5 kHz, i.e., twice the frequency of the AC power supply. Optical emission spectra of the plasma radiation show the presence of excited N2, NO and OH radicals generated in the plasma and the dependence of their relative intensities on both the distance relative to the electrodes and the phase of the driving AC power. Planar laser-induced fluorescence of the ground-state OH radicals shows high intensity outside the plasma column rather than in the center suggesting that ground-state OH is not formed in the plasma column but in its vicinity.

  13. How myxobacteria glide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolgemuth, Charles; Hoiczyk, Egbert; Oster, George; Kaiser, Dale

    2002-03-01

    Many bacteria, including myxobacteria and cyanobacteria, move by gliding. Although gliding always describes a slow surface-associated translocation in the direction of the cell's long axis, it can result from two distinct mechanisms: social (S) motility and adventurous (A) motility. The force for S-motility is generated by type IV pili but the mechanism driving A-motility has remained a mystery. We propose a model based on recent EM and light microscopic data that A-motility is generated by the secretion and hydration of slime, a polyelectrolyte gel. We derive a physical model for gel hydration and show that it produces sufficient force to drive gliding motility in bacteria. As well, we also provide further experimental evidence that slime extrusion is the proulsive mechanism for A-type motility.

  14. Origin of microseism observed in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, D.; Shin, J.; You, S.; Rhie, J.

    2009-12-01

    Ambient seismic noise has been widely used for imaging crustal structure as an alternative passive source, even where traditional seismic imaging is not possible due to low seismicity. Long before the sensational applications of seismic noise, the origin of the noise has already been studied to understand its nature and characteristics for several decades. In this study, we investigate the origin of microseism observed in South Korea. Annual spectrograms in the microseismic frequency range up to 0.4 Hz show coherent peaks at about 0.2 Hz in the winter, which is at the frequency band of the double-frequency microseism. However, the primary microseism is only rarely observed in South Korea when the Pacific typhoon is close to the Southern Sea of Korea. Polarization analysis and noise cross correlation indicate that the energy of the double-frequency microseism comes dominantly from the east of the Korean Peninsula. Comparison of the results from the operational wave model of the Korea Meteorological Administration and seismic data shows a strong correlation of spectral amplitude of seismic data with the significant wave heights and periods of ocean waves, implying that the primary and the double-frequency microseism observed in South Korea are generated at the Southern Sea of Korea and at nearby shorelines of the east coast of Japan, respectively.

  15. Multidecadal climate-induced variability in microseisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aster, R.C.; McNamara, D.E.; Bromirski, P.D.

    2008-01-01

    Microseisms are the most ubiquitous continuous seismic signals on Earth at periods between approximately 5 and 25 s (Peterson 1993; Kedar and Webb 2005). They arise from atmospheric energy converted to (primarily) Rayleigh waves via the intermediary of wind-driven oceanic swell and occupy a period band that is uninfluenced by common anthropogenic and wind-coupled noise processes on land (Wilson et al. 2002; de la Torre et al. 2005). "Primary" microseisms (near 8-s period) are generated in shallow water by breaking waves near the shore and/or the nonlinear interaction of the ocean wave pressure signal with the sloping sea floor (Hasselmann 1963). Secondary microseisms occur at half of the primary period and are especially strongly radiated in source regions where opposing wave components interfere (Longuett-Higgins 1950; Tanimoto 2007), which principally occurs due to the interaction of incident swell and reflected/scattered wave energy from coasts (Bromirski and Duennebier 2002; Bromirski, Duennebier, and Stephen 2005). Coastal regions having a narrow shelf with irregular and rocky coastlines are known to be especially efficient at radiating secondary microseisms (Bromirski, Duennebier, and Stephen 2005; Shulte-Pelkum et al. 2004). The secondary microseism is globally dominant, and its amplitudes proportional to the square of the standing wave height (Longuett-Higgins 1950), which amplifies its sensitivity to large swell events (Astiz and Creager 1994; Webb 2006).

  16. Gliding Direction of Mycoplasma mobile

    PubMed Central

    Morio, Hanako; Kasai, Taishi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycoplasma mobile glides in the direction of its cell pole by a unique mechanism in which hundreds of legs, each protruding from its own gliding unit, catch, pull, and release sialylated oligosaccharides fixed on a solid surface. In this study, we found that 77% of cells glided to the left with a change in direction of 8.4° ± 17.6° μm−1 displacement. The cell body did not roll around the cell axis, and elongated, thinner cells also glided while tracing a curved trajectory to the left. Under viscous conditions, the range of deviation of the gliding direction decreased. In the presence of 250 μM free sialyllactose, in which the binding of the legs (i.e., the catching of sialylated oligosaccharides) was reduced, 70% and 30% of cells glided to the left and the right, respectively, with changes in direction of ∼30° μm−1. The gliding ghosts, in which a cell was permeabilized by Triton X-100 and reactivated by ATP, glided more straightly. These results can be explained by the following assumptions based on the suggested gliding machinery and mechanism: (i) the units of gliding machinery may be aligned helically around the cell, (ii) the legs extend via the process of thermal fluctuation and catch the sialylated oligosaccharides, and (iii) the legs generate a propulsion force that is tilted from the cell axis to the left in 70% and to the right in 30% of cells. IMPORTANCE Mycoplasmas are bacteria that are generally parasitic to animals and plants. Some Mycoplasma species form a protrusion at a pole, bind to solid surfaces, and glide. Although these species appear to consistently glide in the direction of the protrusion, their exact gliding direction has not been examined. This study analyzed the gliding direction in detail under various conditions and, based on the results, suggested features of the machinery and the mechanism of gliding. PMID:26503848

  17. Electrolytic plating apparatus for discrete microsized particles

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Anton

    1976-11-30

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for electrolytically producing very uniform coatings of a desired material on discrete microsized particles. Agglomeration or bridging of the particles during the deposition process is prevented by imparting a sufficiently random motion to the particles that they are not in contact with a powered cathode for a time sufficient for such to occur.

  18. Electroless plating apparatus for discrete microsized particles

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Anton

    1978-01-01

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for producing very uniform coatings of a desired material on discrete microsized particles by electroless techniques. Agglomeration or bridging of the particles during the deposition process is prevented by imparting a sufficiently random motion to the particles that they are not in contact with each other for a time sufficient for such to occur.

  19. Secondary microseism generation mechanisms and microseism derived ocean wave parameters, NE Atlantic, West of Ireland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donne, S. E.; Bean, C. J.; Lokmer, I.; Nicolau, M.; O'Neill, M.

    2014-12-01

    Ocean waves, driven by atmospheric processes, generate faint continuous Earth vibrations known as microseisms (Bromirski, 1999). Under certain conditions, ocean waves travelling in opposite directions may interact with one another producing a partial or full standing wave. This wave-wave interaction produces a pressure profile, unattenuated with depth, which exerts a pressure change at the seafloor, resulting in secondary microseisms in the 0.1-0.33 Hz band. There are clear correlations between microseism amplitude and storm and ocean wave intensity. We aim to determine ocean wave heights in the Northeast Atlantic offshore Ireland at individual buoy locations, using terrestrially recorded microseism signals. Two evolutionary approaches are used: Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) and Grammatical Evolution (GE). These systems learn to interpret particular input patterns and corresponding outputs and expose the often complex underlying relationship between them. They learn by example and are therefore entirely data driven so data selection is extremely important for the success of the methods. An analysis and comparison of the performance of these methods for a five month period in 2013 will be presented showing that ocean wave characteristics may be reconstructed using microseism amplitudes, adopting a purely data driven approach. There are periods during the year when the estimations made from both the GE and ANN are delayed in time by 10 to 20 hours when compared to the target buoy measurements. These delays hold important information about the totality of the conditions needed for microseism generation, an analysis of which will be presented.

  20. Hang-gliding accidents.

    PubMed Central

    Margreiter, R; Lugger, L J

    1978-01-01

    Seventy-five known hang-gliding accidents causing injury to the pilot occurred in the Tyrol during 1973-6. Most occurred in May, June, or September and between 11 am and 3 pm, when unfavourable thermic conditions are most likely. Thirty-four accidents happened during launching, 13 during flight, and 28 during landing, and most were caused by human errors--especially deficient launching technique; incorrect estimation of wind conditions, altitude, and speed; and choice of unfavourable launching and landing sites. Eight pilots were moderately injured, 60 severely (multiply in 24 cases), and seven fatally; fractures of the spine and arms predominated. Six of the 21 skull injuries were fatal. The risk of hang-gliding seems unjustifiably high, and safety precautions and regulations should be adopted to ensure certain standards of training and equipment and to limit flying to favourable sites and times. Images p401-a PMID:624028

  1. Locating Microseism Sources in Offshore Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, X.; Clayton, R. W.

    2007-12-01

    We use the broadband stations from the S. California network to locate the apparent origin of secondary microseisms energy (5-8 Hz band). The procedure is to grid the offshore region and using each grid point as the source point, predict the response of a Rayleigh wave at each station. These predicted waveforms are then correlated with the data over a time window that is typically a 1/2 hour in length and composited at the grid point. The length of the time window controls a tradeoff between the spatial-temporal resolution of the sources and the robustness on the image. The procedure is valid for multiple sources. This results show that during periods of high microseism activity the sources are distinct at several locations in a region approximately 50-100 km offshore. For an 11/09/2002 Southern Ocean storm, for example, two zones parallel to each other and perpendicular to the coast are imaged.

  2. Micro-sized Microwave Atmospheric Satellite

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    subject to a penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE ...JUL 2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Micro-sized Microwave Atmospheric Satellite 5a. CONTRACT...www.ll.mit.edu July 2014 Weather forecasts are critical to effectively planning activities. From the mission scheduler setting a date for a satellite

  3. High Atom Number in Microsized Atom Traps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-14

    2012 conference of the Division of Atomic , Molecular, and Optical Physics (DAMOP) of the American Physical Society (APS). We have reconfigured the...Final Performance Report on ONR Grant N00014-12-1-0608 High atom number in microsized atom traps for the period 15 May 2012 through 14 September...2015 J. M. Grossman Department of Physics St. Mary’s College of Maryland 18952 E. Fisher Road St. Mary’s City, MD 20686 jmgrossman @smcm. edu

  4. Hydrodynamic glide efficiency in swimming.

    PubMed

    Naemi, Roozbeh; Easson, William J; Sanders, Ross H

    2010-07-01

    The glide is a major part of starts, turns and the stroke cycle in breaststroke. Glide performance, indicated by the average velocity, can be improved by increasing the glide efficiency, that is, the ability of the body to minimise deceleration. This paper reviews the factors that affect glide efficiency. In the first part of the review the sources of resistive force are reviewed including surface friction (skin drag), pressure (form) drag and resistance due to making waves (wave drag). The effect of body surface characteristics on the skin drag, the effect of the depth of the swimmer on wave drag, and the effects of posture and alignment, body size and shape on the form drag are reviewed. The effects of these variables on the added mass, that is, the mass of water entrained with the body are explained. The 'glide factor' as a measure of glide efficiency that takes into account the combined effect of the resistive force and the added mass is described. In the second part methods of quantifying the resistive force are reviewed. Finally, the 'hydro-kinematic method' of measuring glide efficiency is evaluated.

  5. The Physics of Hang Gliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewett, Lionel D.

    2008-03-01

    Dr. Hewett has received both national and international awards from the hang gliding community for his contributions to the safety of towing hang gliders. These contributions were a consequence of his applying his knowledge of physics to the sport of hang gliding. This lecture illustrates how these and other applications of the fundamental principles of physics have influenced the historical evolutions of hang gliding and paragliding from the earliest flights of Otto Lilienthal in 1891 through the more recent record breaking flights of more than 430 miles from Zapata Texas.

  6. Wind-induced Microseisms from Large Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerman, Bryan R.; Mereu, Robert F.; Roy, Denis

    The characteristics of microseisms measured by seismometers near the shore of Lake Ontario and Great Slave Lake are analyzed. For Lake Ontario the rms levels in the 1 to 3 Hz band are coherent between stations widely separated around its western basin indicating a common generative mechanism. A distinct onshore intermittent flux of Rayleigh-like wave energy was detected at the onshore sites for both lakes. Microseismic energy in this band is correlated with the wind speed. The correlation improves as the winds are averaged into the past until an optimum is reached corresponding to the time constant of water wave generation by changing wind speed. For a given fixed wind speed, the microseismic energy correlates with the average fetch of the wind over the lake. The sensitivity to fetch effects is similar for both onshore and offshore stations indicating that shoaling is probably not a source. Niagara Falls which also can have a wind-dependent flow from Lake Erie causes measurable effect to at least 25 km but does not noticeably affect stations at a distance of 150 km. It is suggested that the microseismic flux provides a natural, relatively inexpensive way to monitor the water wave field on such large lakes. Further, such seismic observations may provide useful insights into wave generation mechanisms, in particular a lake's response to variable wind speed, the onset of rough flow and the spatial variability of the wave field. Additionally a large lake may well prove to have a stronger source strength of microseisms than an ocean.

  7. Dissipative shocks behind bacteria gliding.

    PubMed

    Virga, Epifanio G

    2014-11-28

    Gliding is a means of locomotion on rigid substrates used by a number of bacteria, including myxobacteria and cyanobacteria. One of the hypotheses advanced to explain this motility mechanism hinges on the role played by the slime filaments continuously extruded from gliding bacteria. This paper solves, in full, a non-linear mechanical theory that treats as dissipative shocks both the point where the extruded slime filament comes into contact with the substrate, called the filament's foot, and the pore on the bacterium outer surface from where the filament is ejected. I prove that kinematic compatibility for shock propagation requires that the bacterium uniform gliding velocity (relative to the substrate) and the slime ejecting velocity (relative to the bacterium) must be equal, a coincidence that seems to have already been observed. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  8. Microseisms and hum from ocean surface gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traer, James; Gerstoft, Peter; Bromirski, Peter D.; Shearer, Peter M.

    2012-11-01

    Ocean waves incident on coasts generate seismic surface waves in three frequency bands via three pathways: direct pressure on the seafloor (primary microseisms, PM), standing waves from interaction of incident and reflected waves (double-frequency microseisms, DF), and swell-transformed infragravity wave interactions (the Earth's seismic hum). Beamforming of USArray seismic data shows that the source azimuths of the generation regions of hum, PM and DF microseisms vary seasonally, consistent with hemispheric storm patterns. The correlation of beam power with wave height over all azimuths is highest in near-coastal waters. Seismic signals generated by waves from Hurricane Irene and from a storm in the Southern Ocean have good spatial and temporal correlation with nearshore wave height and peak period for all three wave-induced seismic signals, suggesting that ocean waves in shallow water commonly excite hum (via infragravity waves), PM, and DF microseisms concurrently.

  9. Microseism Source Distribution Observed from Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, David; Bean, Chris; Donne, Sarah; Le Pape, Florian; Möllhoff, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Ocean generated microseisms (OGM) are recorded globally with similar spectral features observed everywhere. The generation mechanism for OGM and their subsequent propagation to continental regions has led to their use as a proxy for sea-state characteristics. Also many modern seismological methods make use of OGM signals. For example, the Earth's crust and upper mantle can be imaged using ``ambient noise tomography``. For many of these methods an understanding of the source distribution is necessary to properly interpret the results. OGM recorded on near coastal seismometers are known to be related to the local ocean wavefield. However, contributions from more distant sources may also be present. This is significant for studies attempting to use OGM as a proxy for sea-state characteristics such as significant wave height. Ireland has a highly energetic ocean wave climate and is close to one of the major source regions for OGM. This provides an ideal location to study an OGM source region in detail. Here we present the source distribution observed from seismic arrays in Ireland. The region is shown to consist of several individual source areas. These source areas show some frequency dependence and generally occur at or near the continental shelf edge. We also show some preliminary results from an off-shore OBS network to the North-West of Ireland. The OBS network includes instruments on either side of the shelf and should help interpret the array observations.

  10. The Korean Prevocalic Palatal Glide: A Comparison with the Russian Glide and Palatalization.

    PubMed

    Suh, Yunju; Hwang, Jiwon

    2016-01-01

    Phonetic studies of the Korean prevocalic glides have often suggested that they are shorter in duration than those of languages like English, and lack a prolonged steady state. In addition, the formant frequencies of the Korean labiovelar glide are reported to be greatly influenced by the following vowel. In this study the Korean prevocalic palatal glide is investigated vis-à-vis the two phonologically similar configurations of another language - the glide /j/ and the secondary palatalization of Russian, with regard to the inherent duration of the glide component, F2 trajectory, vowel-to-glide coarticulation and glide-to-vowel coarticulation. It is revealed that the Korean palatal glide is closer to the Russian palatalization in duration and F2 trajectory, indicating a lack of steady state, and to the Russian segmental glide in the vowel-to-glide coarticulation degree. When the glide-to-vowel coarticulation is considered, the Korean palatal glide is distinguished from both Russian categories. The results suggest that both the Korean palatal glide and the Russian palatalization involve significant articulatory overlap, the former with the vowel and the latter with the consonant. Phonological implications of such a difference in coarticulation pattern are discussed, as well as the comparison between the Korean labiovelar and palatal glides.

  11. Discrimination of Secondary Microseism Origins Using Ocean Tide Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beucler, E.; Mocquet, A.; Schimmel, M.; Chevrot, S.; Vergne, J.; Sylvander, M.

    2015-12-01

    The ocean activity produces continuous and ubiquitous seismic energy mostly in the 2-20 s period band, also known as microseismic noise. The secondary microseisms (2-10 s period) are generated by swell reflections close to the shores and/or by opposing swells in the deep ocean. However, unique conditions are required in order for surface waves, generated by deep-ocean microseisms, to be observed on land. Since both type of secondary microseisms (coastal or deep-ocean) can occur simultaneously at different places and are continuously evolving in terms of frequency, it is very difficult to discriminate them usgin seismic stations on land. By comparing short-duration power spectral densities at both Atlantic shoreline and inland seismic stations, we show that ocean tides strongly modulate the seismic energy in a wide period band except between 2.5 and 5 s. This tidal proxy reveals the existence of an ex situ short-period contribution of the secondary microseismic peak. Comparison with swell spectra at surrounding buoys suggests that the largest part of this extra energy comes from deep-ocean-generated microseisms. Focusing on two different storms which occurred in the North Atlantic Ocean, we show that both deep-ocean and coastal microseisms coexist.

  12. Stochastic Simulation of Microseisms Using Theory of Conditional Random Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morikawa, H.; Akamatsu, J.; Nishimura, K.; Onoue, K.; Kameda, H.

    -We examine the applicability of conditional stochastic simulation to interpretation of microseisms observed on soft soil sediments at Kushiro, Hokkaido, Japan. The theory of conditional random fields developed by Kameda and Morikawa (1994) is used, which allows one to perform interpolation of a Gaussian stochastic time-space field that is conditioned by realized values of time functions specified at some discrete locations. The applicability is examined by a blind test, that is, by comparing a set of simulated seismograms and recorded ones obtained from three-point array observa tions. A test of fitness was performed by means of the sign test. It is concluded that the method is applicable to interpretation of microseisms, and that the wave field of microseisms can be treated as Gaussian random fields both in time and space.

  13. Microseisms from the Great Salt Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, K. J.; Koper, K. D.; Burlacu, V.

    2014-12-01

    Dept. of Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112, USA We performed frequency-dependent polarization and power analysis on continuous ambient seismic energy recorded by broadband seismic stations that were part of the Utah Regional Seismic Network (UU) for the years of 2001-2013. The number of broadband seismometers increased from 10 to 28 in this time period. As expected, at all 28 stations the single and double frequency peaks caused by microseisms were observed in the range of 3-20 s. At four of the stations located around the Great Salt Lake (BGU, HVU, NOQ, and SPU) an additional noise peak was intermittently observed in the period range of 0.8-1.2 s. This noise peak was strongest at SPU, a station located on the tip of a peninsula jutting into the lake from the north, and weakest at NOQ, a station located a few kilometers south of the lake in the Oquirrh Mountains. The noise peaks occur in both daytime and nighttime, and have durations lasting from a couple of hours to multiple days. They occur more frequently in the spring, summer, and fall, and less commonly in the winter. The occurrences of noise peaks in the summer show a day night pattern and seem to reach a peak during the night. The time dependence of this 1-s seismic noise was compared to records of wind speed measured at 1-hr intervals from nearby meteorological stations run by the NWS, and to lake level gage height measurements made by the USGS. Correlations with wind speed and lake level were done for every month of the year in 2013. Results showed that the correlations with wind varied throughout the year from a high of 0.49 in November to a low of 0.20 in the month of January. The correlation with lake level also varied throughout the year and the strongest correlation was found in the month of December with a correlation of 0.43. While these correlation values are statistically significant, neither wind nor lake level can completely explain the seismic observations

  14. Advances on Microsized On-Chip Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lixiang; Weng, Qunhong; Lu, Xueyi; Sun, Xiaolei; Zhang, Lin; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2017-09-27

    Development of microsized on-chip batteries plays an important role in the design of modern micro-electromechanical systems, miniaturized biomedical sensors, and many other small-scale electronic devices. This emerging field intimately correlates with the topics of rechargeable batteries, nanomaterials, on-chip microfabrication, etc. In recent years, a number of novel designs are proposed to increase the energy and power densities per footprint area, as well as other electrochemical performances of microsized lithium-ion batteries. These advances may guide the pathway for the future development of microbatteries. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. [Sensory illusions in hang-gliding].

    PubMed

    Bousquet, F; Bizeau, A; Resche-Rigon, P; Taillemite, J P; De Rotalier

    1997-01-01

    Sensory illusions in hang-gliding and para-gliding. Hang-gliding and para-gliding are at the moment booming sports. Sensory illusions are physiological phenomena sharing the wrong perception of the pilote's real position in space. These phenomena are very familiar to aeroplane pilotes, they can also be noticed on certain conditions with hang-gliding pilotes. There are many and various sensory illusions, but only illusions of vestibular origin will be dealt with in this article. Vestibular physiology is reminded with the working principle of a semicircular canal. Physiology and laws of physics explain several sensory illusions, especially when the pilote loses his visual landmarks: flying through a cloud, coriolis effect. Also some specific stages of hang-gliding foster those phenomena: spiraling downwards, self-rotation, following an asymetric closing of the parachute, spin on oneself. Therefore a previous briefing for the pilotes seems necessary.

  16. Bacteria that glide with helical tracks

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Beiyan; McBride, Mark J.; Chen, Jing; Zusman, David R.; Oster, George

    2014-01-01

    Many bacteria glide smoothly on surfaces, but with no discernable propulsive organelles on their surface. Recent experiments with Myxococcus xanthus and Flavobacterium johnsoniae show that both distantly related bacterial species glide utilizing proteins that move in helical tracks, albeit with significantly different motility mechanisms. Both species utilize proton motive force for movement. However, the motors that power gliding in M. xanthus have been identified, while the F. johnsoniae motors remain to be discovered. PMID:24556443

  17. Micro-Sized Enterprises, Innovation and Universities: A Welsh Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Paul; Patz, Ralf; Thomas, Brychan; McCarthy, Simon

    2014-01-01

    This study considers the linkage between micro-sized enterprises and other organizations, especially universities, in relation to the innovation process. The focus of the research is on non-start-up enterprises in Wales and how they develop their products. The research methodology adopted is a thematic literature review and the case study…

  18. Micro-Sized Enterprises, Innovation and Universities: A Welsh Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Paul; Patz, Ralf; Thomas, Brychan; McCarthy, Simon

    2014-01-01

    This study considers the linkage between micro-sized enterprises and other organizations, especially universities, in relation to the innovation process. The focus of the research is on non-start-up enterprises in Wales and how they develop their products. The research methodology adopted is a thematic literature review and the case study…

  19. Glide performance and aerodynamics of non-equilibrium glides in northern flying squirrels (Glaucomys sabrinus)

    PubMed Central

    Bahlman, Joseph W.; Swartz, Sharon M.; Riskin, Daniel K.; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2013-01-01

    Gliding is an efficient form of travel found in every major group of terrestrial vertebrates. Gliding is often modelled in equilibrium, where aerodynamic forces exactly balance body weight resulting in constant velocity. Although the equilibrium model is relevant for long-distance gliding, such as soaring by birds, it may not be realistic for shorter distances between trees. To understand the aerodynamics of inter-tree gliding, we used direct observation and mathematical modelling. We used videography (60–125 fps) to track and reconstruct the three-dimensional trajectories of northern flying squirrels (Glaucomys sabrinus) in nature. From their trajectories, we calculated velocities, aerodynamic forces and force coefficients. We determined that flying squirrels do not glide at equilibrium, and instead demonstrate continuously changing velocities, forces and force coefficients, and generate more lift than needed to balance body weight. We compared observed glide performance with mathematical simulations that use constant force coefficients, a characteristic of equilibrium glides. Simulations with varying force coefficients, such as those of live squirrels, demonstrated better whole-glide performance compared with the theoretical equilibrium state. Using results from both the observed glides and the simulation, we describe the mechanics and execution of inter-tree glides, and then discuss how gliding behaviour may relate to the evolution of flapping flight. PMID:23256188

  20. Glide performance and aerodynamics of non-equilibrium glides in northern flying squirrels (Glaucomys sabrinus).

    PubMed

    Bahlman, Joseph W; Swartz, Sharon M; Riskin, Daniel K; Breuer, Kenneth S

    2013-03-06

    Gliding is an efficient form of travel found in every major group of terrestrial vertebrates. Gliding is often modelled in equilibrium, where aerodynamic forces exactly balance body weight resulting in constant velocity. Although the equilibrium model is relevant for long-distance gliding, such as soaring by birds, it may not be realistic for shorter distances between trees. To understand the aerodynamics of inter-tree gliding, we used direct observation and mathematical modelling. We used videography (60-125 fps) to track and reconstruct the three-dimensional trajectories of northern flying squirrels (Glaucomys sabrinus) in nature. From their trajectories, we calculated velocities, aerodynamic forces and force coefficients. We determined that flying squirrels do not glide at equilibrium, and instead demonstrate continuously changing velocities, forces and force coefficients, and generate more lift than needed to balance body weight. We compared observed glide performance with mathematical simulations that use constant force coefficients, a characteristic of equilibrium glides. Simulations with varying force coefficients, such as those of live squirrels, demonstrated better whole-glide performance compared with the theoretical equilibrium state. Using results from both the observed glides and the simulation, we describe the mechanics and execution of inter-tree glides, and then discuss how gliding behaviour may relate to the evolution of flapping flight.

  1. New model of flap-gliding flight.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Gottfried

    2015-07-21

    A new modelling approach is presented for describing flap-gliding flight in birds and the associated mechanical energy cost of travelling. The new approach is based on the difference in the drag characteristics between flapping and non-flapping due to the drag increase caused by flapping. Thus, the possibility of a gliding flight phase, as it exists in flap-gliding flight, yields a performance advantage resulting from the decrease in the drag when compared with continuous flapping flight. Introducing an appropriate non-dimensionalization for the mathematical relations describing flap-gliding flight, results and findings of generally valid nature are derived. It is shown that there is an energy saving of flap-gliding flight in the entire speed range compared to continuous flapping flight. The energy saving reaches the highest level in the lower speed region. The travelling speed of flap-gliding flight is composed of the weighted average of the differing speeds in the flapping and gliding phases. Furthermore, the maximum range performance achievable with flap-gliding flight and the associated optimal travelling speed are determined. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Quantifying the influence of sea ice on ocean microseism using observations from the Bering Sea, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tsai, Victor C.; McNamara, Daniel E.

    2011-01-01

    Microseism is potentially affected by all processes that alter ocean wave heights. Because strong sea ice prevents large ocean waves from forming, sea ice can therefore significantly affect microseism amplitudes. Here we show that this link between sea ice and microseism is not only a robust one but can be quantified. In particular, we show that 75–90% of the variability in microseism power in the Bering Sea can be predicted using a fairly crude model of microseism damping by sea ice. The success of this simple parameterization suggests that an even stronger link can be established between the mechanical strength of sea ice and microseism power, and that microseism can eventually be used to monitor the strength of sea ice, a quantity that is not as easily observed through other means.

  3. Quantifying the influence of sea ice on ocean microseism using observations from the Bering Sea, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tsai, V.C.; McNamara, D.E.

    2011-01-01

    Microseism is potentially affected by all processes that alter ocean wave heights. Because strong sea ice prevents large ocean waves from forming, sea ice can therefore significantly affect microseism amplitudes. Here we show that this link between sea ice and microseism is not only a robust one but can be quantified. In particular, we show that 75-90% of the variability in microseism power in the Bering Sea can be predicted using a fairly crude model of microseism damping by sea ice. The success of this simple parameterization suggests that an even stronger link can be established between the mechanical strength of sea ice and microseism power, and that microseism can eventually be used to monitor the strength of sea ice, a quantity that is not as easily observed through other means. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Synthesis of micro-sized interconnected Si-C composites

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Donghai; Yi, Ran; Dai, Fang

    2016-02-23

    Embodiments provide a method of producing micro-sized Si--C composites or doped Si--C and Si alloy-C with interconnected nanoscle Si and C building blocks through converting commercially available SiO.sub.x (0

  5. Identifying apparent velocity changes in cross correlated microseism noise data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friderike Volk, Meike; Bean, Christopher; Lokmer, Ivan; Pérez, Nemesio; Ibáñez, Jesús

    2015-04-01

    Currently there is a strong interest of using cross correlation of ambient noise to retrieve Green's functions. These are usually used to calculate the seismic wave velocity of the subsurface and therefore can be used for subsurface imaging or monitoring of various geological settings where we expect rapid velocity changes (e.g. reservoirs or volcanoes). The assumption of this method is that the wavefields which are correlated must be diffuse. This criterion is fulfilled if the ambient noise sources are uniformly distributed or the scattering in the medium is high enough to mitigate any source directivity. The location of the sources is usually unknown and it can change in time. These temporal and spatial variations of the microseism noise sources may lead to changes in the retrieved Green's functions, and so, to the apparent changes in seismic wave velocities. To further investigate the apparent changes in Green's functions we undertook an active seismic experiment in Tenerife lasting three months. A small airgun was used as an active source and was shooting repeatedly every 15 minutes. The shots and the microseism noise were recorded at several seismic stations at the same time. That data set gives us the opportunity to compare the changes in seismic wave velocity recovered through cross correlation of ambient noise and changes we measure through active shots from the airgun. The aim is to distinguish between apparent seismic velocity changes and seismic velocity changes caused by changes in the medium. We also use the data set to track the direction of the microseism noise sources to see if changes which are only recovered through cross correlation can be related to temporal and spatial variations of the microseism noise sources.

  6. Ray-theoretical modeling of secondary microseism P waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farra, V.; Stutzmann, E.; Gualtieri, L.; Schimmel, M.; Ardhuin, F.

    2016-09-01

    Secondary microseism sources are pressure fluctuations close to the ocean surface. They generate acoustic P waves that propagate in water down to the ocean bottom where they are partly reflected and partly transmitted into the crust to continue their propagation through the Earth. We present the theory for computing the displacement power spectral density of secondary microseism P waves recorded by receivers in the far field. In the frequency domain, the P-wave displacement can be modeled as the product of (1) the pressure source, (2) the source site effect that accounts for the constructive interference of multiply reflected P waves in the ocean, (3) the propagation from the ocean bottom to the stations and (4) the receiver site effect. Secondary microseism P waves have weak amplitudes, but they can be investigated by beamforming analysis. We validate our approach by analysing the seismic signals generated by typhoon Ioke (2006) and recorded by the Southern California Seismic Network. Backprojecting the beam onto the ocean surface enables to follow the source motion. The observed beam centroid is in the vicinity of the pressure source derived from the ocean wave model WAVEWATCH IIIR. The pressure source is then used for modeling the beam and a good agreement is obtained between measured and modeled beam amplitude variation over time. This modeling approach can be used to invert P-wave noise data and retrieve the source intensity and lateral extent.

  7. Gliding resistance and modifications of gliding surface of tendon: clinical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Amadio, Peter C

    2013-05-01

    The smooth gliding of the normal human digital flexor is maintained by synovial fluid lubrication and lubricants bound to the tendon surface. This system can be disrupted by degenerative conditions such as trigger finger, or by trauma. The resistance to tendon gliding after surgical repair of the lacerated digital flexor tendon relates to location of suture knots, exposure of suture materials, and type of surgical repair and materials. Restoration of a functioning gliding surface after injury can be helped by using low-friction, high-strength suture designs, therapy that enables gliding, and the addition of lubricants to the tendon surface.

  8. A Mesozoic gliding mammal from northeastern China.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jin; Hu, Yaoming; Wang, Yuanqing; Wang, Xiaolin; Li, Chuankui

    2006-12-14

    Gliding flight has independently evolved many times in vertebrates. Direct evidence of gliding is rare in fossil records and is unknown in mammals from the Mesozoic era. Here we report a new Mesozoic mammal from Inner Mongolia, China, that represents a previously unknown group characterized by a highly specialized insectivorous dentition and a sizable patagium (flying membrane) for gliding flight. The patagium is covered with dense hair and supported by an elongated tail and limbs; the latter also bear many features adapted for arboreal life. This discovery extends the earliest record of gliding flight for mammals to at least 70 million years earlier in geological history, and demonstrates that early mammals were diverse in their locomotor strategies and lifestyles; they had experimented with an aerial habit at about the same time as, if not earlier than, when birds endeavoured to exploit the sky.

  9. Characteristics of microseisms recorded by the Earthscope Transportable Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sufri, Oner

    I analyzed the characteristics of microseisms recorded in the United States by Earthscope Transportable Array (TA) broadband stations during the calendar year of 2009 and a 19-day period of October-November 2012. I used eigen-decomposition of spectral covariance matrices to extract power and polarization information for each hour of data recorded at each seismometer. For the continuous data from 2009, I generated array-averaged spectrograms and geographical animations to locate individual microseisms. Then, I grouped and cataloged those microseisms according to their initiation time, duration, peak power, average power, dominant period, variation in their period content, degree of polarization, and their azimuths obtained from polarization ellipsoids. Over 78 distinct microseismic events were identified and grouped into four different types. The longest duration microseismic signal occurred in the month of December, 2009, for more than 280 hours and was associated with the propagation of two storms: one from the Gulf of Alaska region and another from the Newfoundland region. The most powerful signal was also recorded in the same month with an average peak period near 6-sec on December 28-31, 2009, and resulted from wave action associated with two different unnamed storms in the East-Central Pacific and North Atlantic oceans. The seismic observations were compared to excitation predictions computed with the power spectral density of the equivalent pressure generated by ocean gravity waves using the WAVEWATCH-III ocean wave model from the French Research Institute for Exploitation of the Sea (Ifremer). Microseismic excitation predictions were calculated both with and without coastline reflections. I also processed continuous TA seismic data from 17 October-4 November, 2012, coinciding with the passage of Hurricane Sandy. I determined and tracked locations of microseisms as the hurricane propagated from South to North along the U.S. Atlantic coast. I found that the

  10. A rotary motor drives Flavobacterium gliding.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Abhishek; Lele, Pushkar P; Berg, Howard C

    2015-02-02

    Cells of Flavobacterium johnsoniae, a rod-shaped bacterium devoid of pili or flagella, glide over glass at speeds of 2-4 μm/s [1]. Gliding is powered by a protonmotive force [2], but the machinery required for this motion is not known. Usually, cells move along straight paths, but sometimes they exhibit a reciprocal motion, attach near one pole and flip end over end, or rotate. This behavior is similar to that of a Cytophaga species described earlier [3]. Development of genetic tools for F. johnsoniae led to discovery of proteins involved in gliding [4]. These include the surface adhesin SprB that forms filaments about 160 nm long by 6 nm in diameter, which, when labeled with a fluorescent antibody [2] or a latex bead [5], are seen to move longitudinally down the length of a cell, occasionally shifting positions to the right or the left. Evidently, interaction of these filaments with a surface produces gliding. To learn more about the gliding motor, we sheared cells to reduce the number and size of SprB filaments and tethered cells to glass by adding anti-SprB antibody. Cells spun about fixed points, mostly counterclockwise, rotating at speeds of 1 Hz or more. The torques required to sustain such speeds were large, comparable to those generated by the flagellar rotary motor. However, we found that a gliding motor runs at constant speed rather than at constant torque. Now, there are three rotary motors powered by protonmotive force: the bacterial flagellar motor, the Fo ATP synthase, and the gliding motor.

  11. A rotary motor drives Flavobacterium gliding

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Abhishek; Lele, Pushkar P.; Berg, Howard C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cells of Flavobacterium johnsoniae, a rod-shaped bacterium devoid of pili or flagella, glide over glass at speeds of 2–4 μm/s [1]. Gliding is powered by a protonmotive force [2], but the machinery required for this motion is not known. Usually, cells move along straight paths, but sometimes they exhibit a reciprocal motion, attach near one pole and flip end-over-end, or rotate. This behavior is similar to that of a Cytophaga species described earlier [3]. Development of genetic tools for F. johnsoniae led to discovery of proteins involved in gliding [4]. These include the surface adhesin SprB that forms filaments about 160 nm long by 6 nm in diameter, which, when labeled with a fluorescent antibody [2] or a latex bead [5], are seen to move longitudinally down the length of a cell, occasionally shifting positions to the right or the left. Evidently, interaction of these filaments with a surface produces gliding. To learn more about the gliding motor, we sheared cells to reduce the number and size of SprB filaments and tethered cells to glass by adding anti-SprB antibody. Cells spun about fixed points, mostly counterclockwise, rotating at speeds of 1 Hz or more. The torques required to sustain such speeds were large, comparable to those generated by the flagellar rotary motor. However, we found that a gliding motor runs at constant speed rather than constant torque. Now there are three rotary motors powered by protonmotive force: the bacterial flagellar motor, the Fo ATP synthase, and the gliding motor. PMID:25619763

  12. Remote, real-time monitoring of cyclones with microseisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, B. G.; Lee, W. D.; Schwab, F. A.

    2014-12-01

    Giving proper care to selecting microseisms from well isolated cyclones, these great oceanic storms can be monitored in real time by seismic recordings at stations 1200-4100 km distant from the cyclone's center. We treat ocean depths of 3.4-5.5 km. For the theoretically-computed microseism, which our procedure compares with the experimental data, we use a Green's-function approach in the frequency domain. Relating recorded displacement F and theoretical Green's function G, We have F(ω,r)=S(ω)G(ω,r) in which our only unknown is the generalized source function S(ω) and r is the distance to the center at any specific time. The basic result of this report is that the form of this function is A SN(ω), where A is a real constant increasing with the strength of the cyclone and SN(ω), is a positive real function of frequency, independent of cyclone-receiver separation and of cyclone strength. That is, for a given ocean basin, and a given receiver-region geology, at our current level of accuracy SN(ω) is the same for all cyclone strengths and cyclone-receiver separations. Using the multimode approach, we've developed the numerical method for computing the Green's function for multilayered oceanic structures. For each of the 4 selected cyclones, the source functions for all locations along the path show a consistency which demonstrates that the recorded microseisms are radiated from the cyclone. The extracted source function exhibits spectra that are characteristic of ocean waves generated by cyclonic winds. With knowledge of distance between the source and receiver, cyclone A is therefore trivial to monitor in real time from remote recordings. At the current time, the cyclone's strength—generalized source function—must be related empirically to the cyclone's maximum wind speed, areal extent, and lateral velocity.

  13. Three component microseism analysis in Australia from deconvolution enhanced beamforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, Martin; Reading, Anya; Ellingsen, Simon; Koper, Keith; Burlacu, Relu; Tkalčić, Hrvoje; Gibbons, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Ocean induced microseisms in the range 2-10 seconds are generated in deep oceans and near coastal regions as body and surface waves. The generation of these waves can take place over an extended area and in a variety of geographical locations at the same time. It is therefore common to observe multiple arrivals with a variety of slowness vectors which leads to the desire to measure multiple arrivals accurately. We present a deconvolution enhanced direction of arrival algorithm, for single and 3 component arrays, based on CLEAN. The algorithm iteratively removes sidelobe contributions in the power spectrum, therefore improves the signal-to-noise ratio of weaker sources. The power level on each component (vertical, radial and transverse) can be accurately estimated as the beamformer decomposes the power spectrum into point sources. We first apply the CLEAN aided beamformer to synthetic data to show its performance under known conditions and then evaluate real (observed) data from a range of arrays with apertures between 10 and 70 km (ASAR, WRA and NORSAR) to showcase the improvement in resolution. We further give a detailed analysis of the 3 component wavefield in Australia including source locations, power levels, phase ratios, etc. by two spiral arrays (PSAR and SQspa). For PSAR the analysis is carried out in the frequency range 0.35-1Hz. We find LQ, Lg and fundamental and higher mode Rg wave phases. Additionally, we also observe the Sn phase. This is the first time this has been achieved through beamforming on microseism noise and underlines the potential for extra seismological information that can be extracted using the new implementation of CLEAN. The fundamental mode Rg waves are dominant in power for low frequencies and show equal power levels with LQ towards higher frequencies. Generation locations between Rg and LQ are mildly correlated for low frequencies and uncorrelated for higher frequencies. Results from SQspa will discuss lower frequencies around the

  14. New gliding mammaliaforms from the Jurassic.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qing-Jin; Grossnickle, David M; Liu, Di; Zhang, Yu-Guang; Neander, April I; Ji, Qiang; Luo, Zhe-Xi

    2017-08-17

    Stem mammaliaforms are Mesozoic forerunners to mammals, and they offer critical evidence for the anatomical evolution and ecological diversification during the earliest mammalian history. Two new eleutherodonts from the Late Jurassic period have skin membranes and skeletal features that are adapted for gliding. Characteristics of their digits provide evidence of roosting behaviour, as in dermopterans and bats, and their feet have a calcaneal calcar to support the uropagatium as in bats. The new volant taxa are phylogenetically nested with arboreal eleutherodonts. Together, they show an evolutionary experimentation similar to the iterative evolutions of gliders within arboreal groups of marsupial and placental mammals. However, gliding eleutherodonts possess rigid interclavicle-clavicle structures, convergent to the avian furculum, and they retain shoulder girdle plesiomorphies of mammaliaforms and monotremes. Forelimb mobility required by gliding occurs at the acromion-clavicle and glenohumeral joints, is different from and convergent to the shoulder mobility at the pivotal clavicle-sternal joint in marsupial and placental gliders.

  15. Polymer confinement and bacterial gliding motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, J.; Dobrynin, A. V.

    2005-07-01

    Cyanobacteria and myxobacteria use slime secretion for gliding motility over surfaces. The slime is produced by the nozzle-like pores located on the bacteria surface. To understand the mechanism of gliding motion and its relation to slime polymerization, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations of a molecular nozzle with growing inside polymer chains. These simulations show that the compression of polymer chains inside the nozzle is a driving force for propulsion. There is a linear relationship between the average nozzle velocity and the chain polymerization rate with a proportionality coefficient dependent on the geometric characteristics of the nozzle such as its length and friction coefficient. This minimal model of the molecular engine was used to explain the gliding motion of bacteria over surfaces.

  16. New gliding mammaliaforms from the Jurassic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qing-Jin; Grossnickle, David M.; Liu, Di; Zhang, Yu-Guang; Neander, April I.; Ji, Qiang; Luo, Zhe-Xi

    2017-08-01

    Stem mammaliaforms are Mesozoic forerunners to mammals, and they offer critical evidence for the anatomical evolution and ecological diversification during the earliest mammalian history. Two new eleutherodonts from the Late Jurassic period have skin membranes and skeletal features that are adapted for gliding. Characteristics of their digits provide evidence of roosting behaviour, as in dermopterans and bats, and their feet have a calcaneal calcar to support the uropagatium as in bats. The new volant taxa are phylogenetically nested with arboreal eleutherodonts. Together, they show an evolutionary experimentation similar to the iterative evolutions of gliders within arboreal groups of marsupial and placental mammals. However, gliding eleutherodonts possess rigid interclavicle-clavicle structures, convergent to the avian furculum, and they retain shoulder girdle plesiomorphies of mammaliaforms and monotremes. Forelimb mobility required by gliding occurs at the acromion-clavicle and glenohumeral joints, is different from and convergent to the shoulder mobility at the pivotal clavicle-sternal joint in marsupial and placental gliders.

  17. Source distribution of ocean microseisms and implications for time-dependent noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedar, Sharon

    2011-09-01

    A qualitative analysis of ocean microseism source distribution observed in North America during fall and winter months was carried out. I review the theory of the origin of ocean microseisms and show that it can be used in conjunction with wave-wave interaction maps to quantify the source distribution anisotropy. It is demonstrated that microseisms generation in the North Atlantic and in the North Pacific Oceans are inherently different. North Atlantic microseisms are generated predominantly in the deep ocean, while North Pacific microseisms are dominated by coastal reflections. In spite of these differences both result from repeated ocean wave patterns that give rise to an anisotropic noise pattern, which cannot be randomized by time averaging. Considering time-varying ambient noise imaging, which aims to resolve a fraction of a percent changes in the crust over short distances, the source anisotropy would introduce a relatively significant error that needs to be accounted for.

  18. Temporal evolution characteristics of an annular-mode gliding arc discharge in a vortex flow

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Tian-Liang; Liu, Jing-Lin; Li, Xiao-Song; Liu, Jin-Bao; Song, Yuan-Hong; Xu, Yong; Zhu, Ai-Min

    2014-05-15

    An annular-mode gliding arc discharge powered by a 50 Hz alternating current (ac) supply was studied in a vortex flow of dry and humid air. Its temporal evolution characteristics were investigated by electrical measurement, temporally resolved imaging, and temporally resolved optical emission spectroscopic measurements. Three discharge stages of arc-ignition, arc-gliding, and arc-extinction were clearly observed in each half-cycle of the discharge. During the arc-gliding stage, the intensity of light emission from the arc root at the cathode was remarkably higher than that at other areas. The spectral intensity of N{sub 2}(C{sup 3}Π{sub u}−B{sup 3}Π{sub g}) during the arc-ignition stage was much higher than that during the arc-gliding stage, which was contrary to the temporal evolutions of spectral intensities for N{sub 2}{sup +}(B{sup 2}Σ{sub u}{sup +}−X{sup 2}Σ{sub g}{sup +}) and OH(A{sup 2}Σ{sup +}−X{sup 2}Π{sub i}). Temporally resolved vibrational and rotational temperatures of N{sub 2} were also presented and decreased with increasing the water vapor content.

  19. 14 CFR 171.267 - Glide path automatic monitor system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... to more than 0.075θ. (2) For glide paths in which the basic functions are provided by the use of a... element being monitored. (b) At glide path facilities where the selected nominal angular displacement...

  20. 14 CFR 171.267 - Glide path automatic monitor system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... to more than 0.075θ. (2) For glide paths in which the basic functions are provided by the use of a... element being monitored. (b) At glide path facilities where the selected nominal angular displacement...

  1. 14 CFR 171.267 - Glide path automatic monitor system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... to more than 0.075θ. (2) For glide paths in which the basic functions are provided by the use of a... element being monitored. (b) At glide path facilities where the selected nominal angular displacement...

  2. 14 CFR 171.267 - Glide path automatic monitor system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... to more than 0.075θ. (2) For glide paths in which the basic functions are provided by the use of a... element being monitored. (b) At glide path facilities where the selected nominal angular displacement...

  3. Thermal Conductance Measurement of Metal-CNT Composites using Micro-Sized Suspended Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Ki Sung; Bak, Jung Hoon; Lee, Byung Yang; Hong, Seunghun; Park, Yun Daniel

    2008-03-01

    As CNTs have a unique structure and remarkable physical properties, CNT composites have attracted much attention from many researchers. Especially the thermal properties of CNTs and their composite materials have been studied intensively, because CNT has very good thermal transport properties [1-5]. For example, thermal conductivity of CNT is known to be much larger than that of metals such as Ag, Au, Cu and Al. To study the thermal conductance of metal-CNT composites, we have fabricated the micro-sized suspended structures. By using e-beam lithography and metallization, two thermometers have been patterned on the GaAs substrates. Thermal links made of metal or metal-CNT composite also have been patterned between the two thermometers. Then GaAs substrate has been under-etched to form suspended structures. We will show the fabrication methods and measurement scheme using these microstructures. ^* parkyd@phya.snu.ac.kr [1] J.A. Eastman et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 78, 718 (2001). [2] S.U.S. Choi et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 79, 2252 (2001). [3] M.J. Biercuk et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 80, 2767 (2002). [4] R. Ramasubramaniam et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 80, 4647 (2003). [5] H.Q. Xia et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 94, 4967 (2003).

  4. Performance analysis of jump-gliding locomotion for miniature robotics.

    PubMed

    Vidyasagar, A; Zufferey, Jean-Christohphe; Floreano, Dario; Kovač, M

    2015-03-26

    Recent work suggests that jumping locomotion in combination with a gliding phase can be used as an effective mobility principle in robotics. Compared to pure jumping without a gliding phase, the potential benefits of hybrid jump-gliding locomotion includes the ability to extend the distance travelled and reduce the potentially damaging impact forces upon landing. This publication evaluates the performance of jump-gliding locomotion and provides models for the analysis of the relevant dynamics of flight. It also defines a jump-gliding envelope that encompasses the range that can be achieved with jump-gliding robots and that can be used to evaluate the performance and improvement potential of jump-gliding robots. We present first a planar dynamic model and then a simplified closed form model, which allow for quantification of the distance travelled and the impact energy on landing. In order to validate the prediction of these models, we validate the model with experiments using a novel jump-gliding robot, named the 'EPFL jump-glider'. It has a mass of 16.5 g and is able to perform jumps from elevated positions, perform steered gliding flight, land safely and traverse on the ground by repetitive jumping. The experiments indicate that the developed jump-gliding model fits very well with the measured flight data using the EPFL jump-glider, confirming the benefits of jump-gliding locomotion to mobile robotics. The jump-glide envelope considerations indicate that the EPFL jump-glider, when traversing from a 2 m height, reaches 74.3% of optimal jump-gliding distance compared to pure jumping without a gliding phase which only reaches 33.4% of the optimal jump-gliding distance. Methods of further improving flight performance based on the models and inspiration from biological systems are presented providing mechanical design pathways to future jump-gliding robot designs.

  5. A practitioner's tool for assessing glide crack activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hendrikx, Jordy; Peitzsch, Erich H.; Fagre, Daniel B.

    2010-01-01

    Glide cracks can result in full-depth glide avalanche release. Avalanches from glide cracks are notoriously difficult to forecast, but are a reoccurring problem in a number of different avalanche forecasting programs across a range of snow climates. Despite this, there is no consensus for how to best manage, mitigate, or even observe glide cracks and the potential resultant avalanche activity. It is thought that an increase in the rate of snow gliding occurs prior to full-depth avalanche activity, so frequent measuring of glide crack movement provides an index of instability. Therefore, a comprehensive avalanche program with glide crack avalanche activity, should at the least, undertake some form of direct monitoring of glide crack movement. In this paper we present a simple, cheap and repeatable method to track glide crack activity using a series of stakes, reflectors and a laser rangefinder (LaserTech TruPulse360B) linked to a GPS (Trimble Geo XH). We tested the methodology in April 2010, on a glide crack above the Going to the Sun Road in Glacier National Park, Montana, USA. This study suggests a new method to better track the development and movement of glide cracks. It is hoped that by introducing a workable method to easily record glide crack movement, avalanche forecasters will improve their understanding of when, or if, avalanche activity will ensue. Our initial results suggest that these new observations, when combined with local micrometeorological data will result in improved process understanding and forecasting of these phenomena.

  6. Aerodynamic Characteristics and Glide-Back Performance of Langley Glide-Back Booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamadi, Bandu N.; Covell, Peter F.; Tartabini, Paul V.; Murphy, Kelly J.

    2004-01-01

    NASA-Langley Research Center is conducting system level studies on an-house concept of a small launch vehicle to address NASA's needs for rapid deployment of small payloads to Low Earth Orbit. The vehicle concept is a three-stage system with a reusable first stage and expendable upper stages. The reusable first stage booster, which glides back to launch site after staging around Mach 3 is named the Langley Glide-Back Booster (LGBB). This paper discusses the aerodynamic characteristics of the LGBB from subsonic to supersonic speeds, development of the aerodynamic database and application of this database to evaluate the glide back performance of the LGBB. The aerodynamic database was assembled using a combination of wind tunnel test data and engineering level analysis. The glide back performance of the LGBB was evaluated using a trajectory optimization code and subject to constraints on angle of attack, dynamic pressure and normal acceleration.

  7. Preliminary Application of Microseisms into Groundwater Contamination Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Tanimoto, T.; Spetzler, H.

    2004-12-01

    Microseisms, one scientist¡_s annoying noise are another¡_s diagnostic tool. We are conducting a controlled field experiments with the aim of detecting the infiltration of a contaminant - a biosurfactant - into groundwater. Three sets of instruments are placed 3m, 13m and 32m respectively from a 50m by 50m irrigation site. Each set of instruments consists of a 3-component seismometer and a tilt meter. We are seeking to detect temporal changes in local station corrections that are caused by the irrigation. We use natural signals, such as microseisms as seismic sources and solid Earth tides as sources for the tilt signals. Seasonal changes in the amplitude ratios (horizontal to vertical HZ) of signals from microseisms have been found in California. These seasonal changes are likely to be caused by rather shallow changes in the water table as well as a partial saturated level in the vadose zone. In our field experiment we control the influx of water and monitor it as it percolates down to the ground water. This represents a near ideal arrangement to experimentally check if the HZ ratio can indeed be changed by changes in the local groundwater, or if the cause for the observed seasonal variations has to be found elsewhere. In the laboratory we have found that small additions of some chemicals to water can drastically change the surface energies and thus the wettability of solid surfaces. Surface energy changes in a partially saturated porous rock lead to large changes in complex elastic moduli. In the field experiment we are changing the wettability of the subsurface and are analyzing seismic and tilt data at varying distance from the irrigation site for contaminant caused changes in the moduli. Tilt data show a pronounced change between the three stations during the summer months, probably caused by the differential heating that occurs between the covered irrigation site and the bare ground surrounding it. The observed effect trails off as the instrument

  8. Investigation of gliding flight by flying fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyungmin; Jeon, Woo-Pyung; Choi, Haecheon

    2006-11-01

    The most successful flight capability of fish is observed in the flying fish. Furthermore, despite the difference between two medium (air and water), the flying fish is well evolved to have an excellent gliding performance as well as fast swimming capability. In this study, flying fish's morphological adaptation to gliding flight is experimentally investigated using dry-mounted darkedged-wing flying fish, Cypselurus Hiraii. Specifically, we examine the effects of the pectoral and pelvic fins on the aerodynamic performance considering (i) both pectoral and pelvic fins, (ii) pectoral fins only, and (iii) body only with both fins folded. Varying the attack angle, we measure the lift, drag and pitching moment at the free-stream velocity of 12m/s for each case. Case (i) has higher lift-to-drag ratio (i.e. longer gliding distance) and more enhanced longitudinal static stability than case (ii). However, the lift coefficient is smaller for case (i) than for case (ii), indicating that the pelvic fins are not so beneficial for wing loading. The gliding performance of flying fish is compared with those of other fliers and is found to be similar to those of insects such as the butterfly and fruitfly.

  9. Links between atmosphere, ocean, and cryosphere from two decades of microseism observations on the Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Robert E.; Aster, Richard C.; McGrath, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The lack of landmasses, climatological low pressure, and strong circumpolar westerly winds between the latitudes of 50°S to 65°S produce exceptional storm-driven wave conditions in the Southern Ocean. This combination makes the Antarctic Peninsula one of Earth's most notable regions of high-amplitude wave activity and thus, ocean-swell-driven microseism noise in both the primary (direct wave-coastal region interactions) and secondary (direct ocean floor forcing due to interacting wave trains) period bands. Microseism observations are examined across 23 years (1993-2015) from Palmer Station (PMSA), on the west coast of the Antarctic Peninsula, and from East Falkland Island (EFI). These records provide a spatially integrative measure of both Southern Ocean wave amplitudes and the interactions between ocean waves and the solid Earth in the presence of sea ice, which can reduce wave coupling with the continental shelf. We utilize a spatiotemporal correlation-based approach to illuminate how the distribution of sea ice influences seasonal microseism power. We characterize primary and secondary microseism power due to variations in sea ice and find that primary microseism energy is both more sensitive to sea ice and more capable of propagating across ocean basins than secondary microseism energy. During positive phases of the Southern Annular Mode, sea ice is reduced in the Bellingshausen Sea and overall storm activity in the Drake Passage increases, thus strongly increasing microseism power levels.

  10. Densification and grain growth of stainless steel microsize structures fabricated by μMIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Loh, N. H.; Tay, B. Y.; Tor, S. B.; Murakoshi, Y.; Maeda, R.

    2006-04-01

    Micro metal injection molding (μMIM) is being developed by some researchers for possible mass production of metallic microcomponents. Knowledge of densification and grain growth of structures in the micrometer regime is important for the design of microcomponents due to their impacts on dimensional tolerance and mechanical properties. In this paper, the effects of sintering temperature and time on densification and grain growth of stainless steel microsize structures fabricated by μMIM were investigated. In particular, the density of the microsize structures was compared with that of the components, dimensions in the millimeter range, on which the microsize structures reside. Models proposed by Kang, Brook, and Zhao and Harmer were used to study the densification and grain growth kinetics of microsize structures of ∅100μmat the final stage of sintering. Dense layers were formed on the microsize structures. Thus, the density of the microsize structures is higher than that of the microstructured components. The thickness of the dense layers increased with either increasing temperature or time. Zhao and Harmer’s model for lattice diffusion controlled densification and Brook’s grain growth model for lattice diffusion controlled pore drag exhibited good fits for the experimental results of microsize structures.

  11. Long-period microseisms at Umeå, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Båth, Markus; Kulhánek, Ota

    1990-10-01

    Microseisms in the period range 14-20 s recorded by the long-period Press-Ewing seismographs at Umeå (63°48.9'N, 20°14.2'E) are investigated with special regard to their properties and their origin. In the 11-year period (1964-1974) under investigation, 28 clear long-period microseismic storms were detected by visual inspection of Umeå records. With an annual average of 2-3 cases, these represent the best developed storms. However, it is very likely that additional weaker storms could be detected by higher instrument magnification in the long-period range or by record filtering. Among the stations in our seismograph network, Uppsala and Kiruna also operate long-period seismographs, but they are of lower magnification than at Umeå. In fact, it is too low to permit visual detection of long-period microseismic storms, except very rarely at Uppsala.

  12. Micro-size optical fibre strain interrogation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrad, Nezih; Xiao, Gaozhi; Guo, Honglei

    2008-03-01

    Within several countries, the military is undergoing significant economic pressure to extend the use of its air fleet beyond its established design life. The availability of low weight, small size, reliable and cost-effective technologies to detect and monitor incipient damage and to alert prior to catastrophic failures is critical to sustain operational effectiveness. To enable the implementation of distributed and highly multiplexed optical fiber sensors networks to aerospace platforms, the data acquisition (interrogation) system has to meet small size and low weight requirements. This paper reports on our current development of micro-sized Echelle Diffractive Gratings (EDG) based interrogation system for strain monitoring of serially multiplexed fibre Bragg grating sensors. The operation principle of the interrogator and its suitability for strain measurements is demonstrated. Static load measurements obtained using this system are compared to those acquired using a optical multi-wavelength meter and are found to have strong correlation.

  13. Microseism frequency dependent body waves related to storms and icebergs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzmann, E.; Meschede, M.; Farra, V.; Schimmel, M.; Ardhuin, F.

    2016-12-01

    The Earth's seismic wave field is mostly generated in the oceans as a result of ocean wave interactions. We analyze microseisms recorded by the Southern California Seismic Network using a beamforming approach on 3 component seismograms. In order to enhance the detection of phase coherent signals, we stack the beams using the phase weighted stack method in the frequency domain. We detect microseism P-waves at all periods between 3 and 10 s and we show that they are often visible only in narrow frequency bands. The largest number of detected P-waves corresponds to the period of 5 s. We also detect some Sv and even fewer Sh waves. We investigate the source locations by back projecting the beam maxima. Strong sources are located in the vicinity of storms. At 5 s period, sources are both pelagic and coastal in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans but at longer period, they are mostly coastal, around Greenland and along the South American western coast. Sources detected in the South Pacific Ocean are located close to icebergs and can be explained by the interaction of ocean waves arriving and being reflected at iceberg edges. We model body waves considering sources as pressure fluctuations close to the ocean surface. These sources generate acoustic P-waves that propagate in water down to the ocean bottom where they are partly reflected, and partly transmitted into the crust to continue their propagation through the Earth. We show that the body wave amplitude variation with frequency is the result of both the source frequency content and the frequency dependent site effect. We demonstrate that body wave modeling provides independent constraints on the ocean wave model and in particular can be used to determine the amount of sources generated by coastal reflection either at the coast or along icebergs.

  14. Correlation of oceanic microseisms at Californian seismic stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stehly, L.; Shapiro, N. M.; Campillo, M.; Ritzwoller, M. H.

    2004-12-01

    We attempt to reconstruct Green functions between pairs of stations by cross-correlating records of the ambient seismic noise at those stations. We compute cross-correlations between vertical component records for several days of ambient seismic noise observed at various station-pairs located in California and separated by distances of a few hundreds kilometers. Emerging coherent waveforms are dominated by fundamental mode Rayleigh waves with travel times similar to those measured for the same paths from earthquake excited ballistic surface waves. This reconstruction is expected to work perfectly when the correlated wavefield is completely random and isotropic. Therefore, results of the cross-correlations provide also information about the degree of randomness and isotropy of the target ambient seismic noise.At periods corresponding to the oceanic microseisms (around 7-8 s), the amplitude of the emerging Rayleigh wave is larger for paths nearly perpendicular to the coastal line than for those that are nearly parallel to the coastal line. For paths perpendicular to the coastal line, where the ocean-solid Earth coupling occurs, the resulting cross-correlation are strongly asymmetric demonstrating that more energy is propagating from the coast than in the opposite direction. However, coherent Rayleigh waves also emerge from cross-correlations for inter-station paths that are almost parallel to the coastal line suggesting that, in addition to direct waves excited at the coast, oceanic microseisms contain a non-negligible amount of surface waves that were scattered on inhomogeneities within the Earth. We observe that the azimuthal distribution of energy in the noise is changing with the period band considered.Finally we show that meaningful geological information can be obtained by extracting surface waves from cross-correlations of the seismic noise, providing a way for a passive imaging of the Earths structure.

  15. Sources of Secondary Microseisms in the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barruol, G.; Davy, C.; Fontaine, F. R.; Stutzmann, E.; Schimmel, M.

    2014-12-01

    Ocean waves activity is a major source of micro-vibrations that travel through the solid Earth, known as microseismic noise and recorded worldwide by broadband seismometers. Storms are accepted to represent an important source of noise in the ocean basins, and thus, microseisms analysis of continuous seismic records can be used to localize the noise sources in the ocean and to follow their variations in space and time. In order to locate and quantify the noise sources in the Indian Ocean, we analyzed one year (2011) of continuous data recorded by permanent seismic stations localized in the Indian Ocean. From the Rayleigh wave polarization analysis performed at each individual stations, we retrieved the number of polarized signals in the time-frequency domain and their back-azimuths. Polarization spectra show that secondary microseisms are more polarized between 6 and 10 s of period. We observe seasonal variations in the number of polarized signals with much more detections during the austral winter. On the other hand, we do not observe seasonal variations in the noise back-azimuth directions, suggesting that the dominating microseismic noise sources are always located in the southernmost Indian Ocean, except for cyclonic episodes that are restricted in space and time. Compared to the Pacific and Atlantic oceans, this Indian Ocean property can be explained by its closed geometry on the North and by the absence of large storms in the Northern part of the basin during the boreal winter. We show that the results of this polarization analysis are in good agreement with the expected source areas computed from ocean wave numerical model.

  16. Microseisms and sea wave height in the Ligurian Sea: a preliminary analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zunino, A.; Ferretti, G.; Scafidi, D.; Barani, S.; Pasta, M.; Spallarossa, D.

    2012-04-01

    Analysis of the relationship between microseisms and sea wave heights is a fundamental step for understanding the interaction of sea storms with near coastal environment, as well as to gain insights about the possibility of forecasting sea wave heights from microseism. The possibility to predict sea wave heights in the Ligurian Sea is analyzed in this study using about a month of observations from both seismic recordings from a near-coast station (IMI - Imperia Monte Faudo) and significant sea wave heights measured from a buoy (Côte d'Azur buoy, Météo-France network). We focus on the analysis of the vertical component of microseism, which reveals a strong correlation with measured sea wave heights. Looking at the amplitude spectrogram of the vertical component of microseism, we recognize the effects of several meteo-marine events that can be ascribed to Atlantic barometric pressure lows and a series of sea storms in the Ligurian Sea. Moreover, the distinction between primary and secondary microseism is inferred from the spectrogram, even if, because of the superposition of Atlantic and Ligurian effects, it sometimes results difficult. Analysis of microseism polarization reveals a double origin which determines two prevailing orientations, corresponding to Atlantic and Ligurian meteo-marine phenomena. We feature the spectral properties of microseism making a close correlation among (1) the power spectral density spectrum of microseism, (2) the significant sea wave heights measured from the buoy and (3) sea storms occurred in the period under study, showing that there is a good correlation between spectral energy content of microseism and sea wave height. Finally, in order to set up a predictive law, we solve an inverse problem to find the optimal parameters that allow us to estimate the sea wave height given the vertical component of microseism. Specifically, the application of the definition of significant height wave height for the microseism needs the

  17. Analysis of energy sources for Mycoplasma penetrans gliding motility.

    PubMed

    Jurkovic, Dominika A; Hughes, Michael R; Balish, Mitchell F

    2013-01-01

    Mycoplasma penetrans, a potential human pathogen found mainly in HIV-infected individuals, uses a tip structure for both adherence and gliding motility. To improve our understanding of the molecular mechanism of M. penetrans gliding motility, we used chemical inhibitors of energy sources associated with motility of other organisms to determine which of these is used by M. penetrans and also tested whether gliding speed responded to temperature and pH. Mycoplasma penetrans gliding motility was not eliminated in the presence of a proton motive force inhibitor, a sodium motive force inhibitor, or an agent that depletes cellular ATP. At near-neutral pH, gliding speed increased as temperature increased. The absence of a clear chemical energy source for gliding motility and a positive correlation between speed and temperature suggest that energy derived from heat provides the major source of power for the gliding motor of M. penetrans.

  18. Global dynamics of non-equilibrium gliding in animals.

    PubMed

    Yeaton, Isaac J; Socha, John J; Ross, Shane D

    2017-03-17

    Gliding flight-moving horizontally downward through the air without power-has evolved in a broad diversity of taxa and serves numerous ecologically relevant functions such as predator escape, expanding foraging locations, and finding mates, and has been suggested as an evolutionary pathway to powered flight. Historically, gliding has been conceptualized using the idealized conditions of equilibrium, in which the net aerodynamic force on the glider balances its weight. While this assumption is appealing for its simplicity, recent studies of glide trajectories have shown that equilibrium gliding is not the norm for most species. Furthermore, equilibrium theory neglects the aerodynamic differences between species, as well as how a glider can modify its glide path using control. To investigate non-equilibrium glide behavior, we developed a reduced-order model of gliding that accounts for self-similarity in the equations of motion, such that the lift and drag characteristics alone determine the glide trajectory. From analysis of velocity polar diagrams of horizontal and vertical velocity from several gliding species, we find that pitch angle, the angle between the horizontal and chord line, is a control parameter that can be exploited to modulate glide angle and glide speed. Varying pitch results in changing locations of equilibrium glide configurations in the velocity polar diagram that govern passive glide dynamics. Such analyses provide a new mechanism of interspecies comparison and tools to understand experimentally-measured kinematics data and theory. In addition, this analysis suggests that the lift and drag characteristics of aerial and aquatic autonomous gliders can be engineered to passively alter glide trajectories with minimal control effort.

  19. GLIDES – Efficient Energy Storage from ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Momen, Ayyoub M.; Abu-Heiba, Ahmad; Odukomaiya, Wale; Akinina, Alla

    2016-03-01

    The research shown in this video features the GLIDES (Ground-Level Integrated Diverse Energy Storage) project, which has been under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 2013. GLIDES can store energy via combined inputs of electricity and heat, and deliver dispatchable electricity. Supported by ORNL’s Laboratory Director’s Research and Development (LDRD) fund, this energy storage system is low-cost, and hybridizes compressed air and pumped-hydro approaches to allow for storage of intermittent renewable energy at high efficiency. A U.S. patent application for this novel energy storage concept has been submitted, and research findings suggest it has the potential to be a flexible, low-cost, scalable, high-efficiency option for energy storage, especially useful in residential and commercial buildings.

  20. On complex, curved trajectories in microtubule gliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosselin, Pierre; Mohrbach, Hervé; Kulić, Igor M.; Ziebert, Falko

    2016-04-01

    We study the dynamics of microtubules in gliding assays. These biofilaments are typically considered as purely semiflexible, hence their trajectories under the action of motors covering the substrate have been regarded so far as straight, modulo fluctuations. However, this is not always the case experimentally, where microtubules are known to move on large scale circles or spirals, or even display quite regular wavy trajectories and more complex dynamics. Incorporating recent experimental evidence for a (small) preferred curvature as well as the microtubules' well established lattice twist into a dynamic model for microtubule gliding, we could reproduce both types of trajectories. Interestingly, as a function of the microtubules' length we found length intervals of stable rings alternating with regions where wavy and more complex dynamics prevails. Finally, both types of dynamics (rings and waves) can be rationalized by considering simple limits of the full model.

  1. Polymer confinement and bacterial gliding motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Junhwan; Dobrynin, Andrey

    2006-03-01

    Cyanobacteria and myxobacteria use slime secretion for gliding motility over surfaces. In cyanobacteria the slime is extruded from the nozzle-like pores of 14-16 nm outer diameter and approximately 7nm inner diameter located near the septa that separate the cells of a filament. The pores are inclined at an angle of 30-40 degrees relative to the cell axes, and are oppositely directed on both sides of the septum. Such pore orientation provides directionality for the slime secretion as well as cell motion. To understand the mechanism of gliding motion and its relation to slime polymerization, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations of a molecular nozzle with growing inside polymer chains. These simulations show that the compression of polymer chains inside the nozzle is a driving force for its propulsion. There is a linear relationship between the average nozzle velocity and the chain polymerization rate with a proportionality coefficient dependent on the geometric characteristics of the nozzle such as its length and friction coefficient. This minimal model of the molecular engine was used to explain the gliding motion of cyanobacteria and myxobacteria over surfaces.

  2. On Dislocation Glide in Planetary Interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordier, P.; Carrez, P.; Gouriet, K.; Kraych, A.; Ritterbex, S.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of hot planets depends strongly on how heat is transported to their surfaces through large scale convection flows. This is ultimately controlled by the rheology of high-pressure phases under extreme conditions. Whenever solid rocks are concerned, plastic flow results from the propagation of crystal defects (point defects, dislocations, grain boundaries). In this presentation we focus on the role of pressure on dislocation glide which is usually the most efficient strain-producing mechanism. Dislocation glide is assessed through multiscale numerical modeling. First, dislocations are modeled at the atomic scale based on first-principles calculations to incorporate the influence of pressure. Then the mobility law of dislocation at finite temperature is modeled by describing thermally-activated mechanisms for dislocation glide based on the kink-pair model. Then the flow stress at the grain scale is deduced either from application of the Orowan equation or by dislocation dynamics modeling. This approach is applied to wadsleyite, ringwoodite, bridgmanite and post-perovskite. Mechanical properties are either calculated at laboratory strain-rates to be compared with experiments when available or at mantle strain-rate to assess their efficiency under natural conditions.

  3. Uncertainty estimates in broadband seismometer sensitivities using microseisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ringler, Adam T.; Storm, Tyler L.; Gee, Lind S.; Hutt, Charles R.; Wilson, David C.

    2015-01-01

    The midband sensitivity of a seismic instrument is one of the fundamental parameters used in published station metadata. Any errors in this value can compromise amplitude estimates in otherwise high-quality data. To estimate an upper bound in the uncertainty of the midband sensitivity for modern broadband instruments, we compare daily microseism (4- to 8-s period) amplitude ratios between the vertical components of colocated broadband sensors across the IRIS/USGS (network code IU) seismic network. We find that the mean of the 145,972 daily ratios used between 2002 and 2013 is 0.9895 with a standard deviation of 0.0231. This suggests that the ratio between instruments shows a small bias and considerable scatter. We also find that these ratios follow a standard normal distribution (R 2 = 0.95442), which suggests that the midband sensitivity of an instrument has an error of no greater than ±6 % with a 99 % confidence interval. This gives an upper bound on the precision to which we know the sensitivity of a fielded instrument.

  4. Assessing the importance of terrain parameters on glide avalanche release

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peitzsch, Erich H.; Hendrikx, Jordy; Fagre, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    Glide snow avalanches are dangerous and difficult to predict. Despite recent research there is still a lack of understanding regarding the controls of glide avalanche release. Glide avalanches often occur in similar terrain or the same locations annually and observations suggest that topography may be critical. Thus, to gain an understanding of the terrain component of these types of avalanches we examined terrain parameters associated with glide avalanche release as well as areas of consistent glide crack formation but no subsequent avalanches. Glide avalanche occurrences visible from the Going-to-the-Sun Road corridor in Glacier National Park, Montana from 2003-2013 were investigated using an avalanche database derived of daily observations each year from April 1 to June 15. This yielded 192 glide avalanches in 53 distinct avalanche paths. Each avalanche occurrence was digitized in a GIS using satellite, oblique, and aerial imagery as reference. Topographical parameters such as area, slope, aspect, elevation and elevation were then derived for the entire dataset utilizing GIS tools and a 10m DEM. Land surface substrate and surface geology were derived from National Park Service Inventory and Monitoring maps and U.S. Geological Survey surface geology maps, respectively. Surface roughness and glide factor were calculated using a four level classification index. . Then, each avalanche occurrence was aggregated to general avalanche release zones and the frequencies were compared. For this study, glide avalanches released in elevations ranging from 1300 to 2700 m with a mean aspect of 98 degrees (east) and a mean slope angle of 38 degrees. The mean profile curvature for all glide avalanches was 0.15 and a plan curvature of -0.01, suggesting a fairly linear surface (i.e. neither convex nor concave). The glide avalanches occurred in mostly bedrock made up of dolomite and limestone slabs and talus deposits with very few occurring in alpine meadows. However, not all glide

  5. Aerodynamics of gliding flight in common swifts.

    PubMed

    Henningsson, P; Hedenström, A

    2011-02-01

    Gliding flight performance and wake topology of a common swift (Apus apus L.) were examined in a wind tunnel at speeds between 7 and 11 m s(-1). The tunnel was tilted to simulate descending flight at different sink speeds. The swift varied its wingspan, wing area and tail span over the speed range. Wingspan decreased linearly with speed, whereas tail span decreased in a nonlinear manner. For each airspeed, the minimum glide angle was found. The corresponding sink speeds showed a curvilinear relationship with airspeed, with a minimum sink speed at 8.1 m s(-1) and a speed of best glide at 9.4 m s(-1). Lift-to-drag ratio was calculated for each airspeed and tilt angle combinations and the maximum for each speed showed a curvilinear relationship with airspeed, with a maximum of 12.5 at an airspeed of 9.5 m s(-1). Wake was sampled in the transverse plane using stereo digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV). The main structures of the wake were a pair of trailing wingtip vortices and a pair of trailing tail vortices. Circulation of these was measured and a model was constructed that showed good weight support. Parasite drag was estimated from the wake defect measured in the wake behind the body. Parasite drag coefficient ranged from 0.30 to 0.22 over the range of airspeeds. Induced drag was calculated and used to estimate profile drag coefficient, which was found to be in the same range as that previously measured on a Harris' hawk.

  6. ILLUSTRATED GLOSSARY OF FRACTOGRAPHIC TERMS; SECTION 2: GLIDE PLANE DECOHESION, SERPENTINE GLIDE, RIPPLES, STRETCHING, MICROVOID COALESCENCE.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    discussed where they are known. Glide plane decohesion, as it has been used in the literature, is shown to be misleading, and a more descriptive term ...8217stretching’, is used in its place. The use of ’ductile cleavage’ to describe the same process should be discontinued. Several terms have evolved to

  7. Relationships between glide efficiency and swimmers' size and shape characteristics.

    PubMed

    Naemi, Roozbeh; Psycharakis, Stelios G; McCabe, Carla; Connaboy, Chris; Sanders, Ross H

    2012-08-01

    Glide efficiency, the ability of a body to minimize deceleration over the glide, can change with variations in the body's size and shape. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between glide efficiency and the size and shape characteristics of swimmers. Eight male and eight female swimmers performed a series of horizontal glides at a depth of 70 cm below the surface. Glide efficiency parameters were calculated for velocities ranging from 1.4 to 1.6 m/s for female swimmers (and at the Reynolds number of 3.5 million) and from 1.6 to 1.8 m/s for male swimmers (and at the Reynolds number of 4.5 million). Several morphological indices were calculated to account for the shape characteristics, with the use of a photogrammetric method. Relationships between the variables of interest were explored with correlations, while repeated-measures ANOVA was used to assess within-group differences between different velocities for each gender group. Glide efficiency of swimmers increased when velocity decreased. Some morphological indices and postural angles showed a significant correlation with glide efficiency. The glide coefficient was significantly correlated to the chest to waist taper index for both gender groups. For the male group, the glide coefficient correlated significantly to the fineness ratio of upper body, the chest to hip cross-section. For the female group the glide coefficient had a significant correlation with the waist to hip taper index. The findings suggested that gliding efficiency was more dependent on shape characteristics and appropriate postural angles rather than being dependent on size characteristics.

  8. Observations of broad-band micro-seisms during reservoir stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Sleefe, G.E.; Warpinski, N.R.; Engler, B.P.

    1993-04-01

    During hydrocarbon reservoir stimulation such as hydraulic fracturing, the cracking and slippage of the formation results in the emission of seismic energy. The objective of this study was to determine the properties of these induced micro-seisms. A hydraulic fracture experiment was performed in the Piceance Basin of Western Colorado to induce and record micro-seismic events. The formation was subjected to four processes; breakdown/ballout, step-rate test, KCL mini-fracture, and linear-gel mini-fracture. Micro-seisms were acquired with an advanced three-component wall-locked seismic accelerometer package, placed in an observation well 211 ft offset from the well. During the two hours of formation treatment, more than 1200 micro-seisms with signal-to-noise ratios in excess of 20 dB were observed. The observed micro-seisms had a nominally flat frequency from 100 Hz to 1500 Hz and lack the spurious tool-resonance effects evident in previous attempts to measure micro-seisms. Both p-wave and s-wave arrivals are clearly evident in the data set, and hodogram analysis yielded coherent estimates of the event locations. This paper describes the characteristics of the observed micro-seismic events (event occurrence, signal-to-noise ratios, and bandwidth) and illustrates that the new acquisition approach results in enhanced detectability and event location resolution.

  9. Gliding motility and polarized slime secretion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rosa; Kaiser, Dale

    2007-01-01

    Myxococcus leaves a trail of slime on agar as it moves. A filament of slime can be seen attached to the end of a cell, but it is seen only at one end at any particular moment. To identify genes essential for A motility, transposon insertion mutations with defective A motility were studied. Fifteen of the 33 mutants had totally lost A motility. All these mutant cells had filaments of slime emerging from both ends, indicating that bipolar secretion prevents A motility. The remaining 18 A motility mutants, also produced by gene knockout, secreted slime only from one pole, but they swarmed at a lower rate than A(+) and are called 'partial' gliding mutants, or pgl. For each pgl mutant, the reduction in swarm expansion rate was directly proportional to the reduction in the coefficient of elasticotaxis. The pgl mutants have a normal reversal frequency and normal gliding speed when they move. But their probability of movement per unit time is lower than pgl(+) cells. Many of the pgl mutants are produced by transposon insertions in glycosyltransferase genes. It is proposed that these glycosyltransferases carry out the synthesis of a repeat unit polysaccharide that constitutes the slime.

  10. How swifts control their glide performance with morphing wings.

    PubMed

    Lentink, D; Müller, U K; Stamhuis, E J; de Kat, R; van Gestel, W; Veldhuis, L L M; Henningsson, P; Hedenström, A; Videler, J J; van Leeuwen, J L

    2007-04-26

    Gliding birds continually change the shape and size of their wings, presumably to exploit the profound effect of wing morphology on aerodynamic performance. That birds should adjust wing sweep to suit glide speed has been predicted qualitatively by analytical glide models, which extrapolated the wing's performance envelope from aerodynamic theory. Here we describe the aerodynamic and structural performance of actual swift wings, as measured in a wind tunnel, and on this basis build a semi-empirical glide model. By measuring inside and outside swifts' behavioural envelope, we show that choosing the most suitable sweep can halve sink speed or triple turning rate. Extended wings are superior for slow glides and turns; swept wings are superior for fast glides and turns. This superiority is due to better aerodynamic performance-with the exception of fast turns. Swept wings are less effective at generating lift while turning at high speeds, but can bear the extreme loads. Finally, our glide model predicts that cost-effective gliding occurs at speeds of 8-10 m s(-1), whereas agility-related figures of merit peak at 15-25 m s(-1). In fact, swifts spend the night ('roost') in flight at 8-10 m s(-1) (ref. 11), thus our model can explain this choice for a resting behaviour. Morphing not only adjusts birds' wing performance to the task at hand, but could also control the flight of future aircraft.

  11. 14 CFR 171.265 - Glide path performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) The modulating tones must be 90 Hz and 150 Hz within 2.5 percent. (2) The total harmonic content of... angular displacement sensitivity must correspond to a DDM of 0.0875 at an angular displacement above and below the glide path of 0.12θ. The glide path angular displacement sensitivity must be adjusted and...

  12. 14 CFR 23.71 - Glide: Single-engine airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Glide: Single-engine airplanes. 23.71... Glide: Single-engine airplanes. The maximum horizontal distance traveled in still air, in nautical miles... with the engine inoperative, its propeller in the minimum drag position, and landing gear and wing...

  13. 14 CFR 23.71 - Glide: Single-engine airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Glide: Single-engine airplanes. 23.71... Glide: Single-engine airplanes. The maximum horizontal distance traveled in still air, in nautical miles... with the engine inoperative, its propeller in the minimum drag position, and landing gear and wing...

  14. 14 CFR 23.71 - Glide: Single-engine airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Glide: Single-engine airplanes. 23.71... Glide: Single-engine airplanes. The maximum horizontal distance traveled in still air, in nautical miles... with the engine inoperative, its propeller in the minimum drag position, and landing gear and wing...

  15. 14 CFR 23.71 - Glide: Single-engine airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Glide: Single-engine airplanes. 23.71 Section 23.71 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Glide: Single-engine airplanes. The maximum horizontal distance traveled in still air, in nautical...

  16. 14 CFR 23.71 - Glide: Single-engine airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Glide: Single-engine airplanes. 23.71... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 23.71 Glide: Single-engine airplanes. The maximum horizontal distance traveled in still air, in nautical miles...

  17. Aerodynamic flight performance in flap-gliding birds and bats.

    PubMed

    Muijres, Florian T; Henningsson, Per; Stuiver, Melanie; Hedenström, Anders

    2012-08-07

    Many birds use a flight mode called undulating or flap-gliding flight, where they alternate between flapping and gliding phases, while only a few bats make use of such a flight mode. Among birds, flap-gliding is commonly used by medium to large species, where it is regarded to have a lower energetic cost than continuously flapping flight. Here, we introduce a novel model for estimating the energetic flight economy of flap-gliding animals, by determining the lift-to-drag ratio for flap-gliding based on empirical lift-to-drag ratio estimates for continuous flapping flight and for continuous gliding flight, respectively. We apply the model to flight performance data of the common swift (Apus apus) and of the lesser long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris yerbabuenae). The common swift is a typical flap-glider while-to the best of our knowledge-the lesser long-nosed bat does not use flap-gliding. The results show that, according to the model, the flap-gliding common swift saves up to 15% energy compared to a continuous flapping swift, and that this is primarily due to the exceptionally high lift-to-drag ratio in gliding flight relative to that in flapping flight for common swifts. The lesser long-nosed bat, on the other hand, seems not to be able to reduce energetic costs by flap-gliding. The difference in relative costs of flap-gliding flight between the common swift and the lesser long-nosed bat can be explained by differences in morphology, flight style and wake dynamics. The model presented here proves to be a valuable tool for estimating energetic flight economy in flap-gliding animals. The results show that flap-gliding flight that is naturally used by common swifts is indeed the most economic one of the two flight modes, while this is not the case for the non-flap-gliding lesser long-nosed bat. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Light propagation in the micro-size capillary injected by high temperature liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan-jun; Li, Edward; Xiao, Hai

    2016-11-01

    The high temperature liquid is injected into the micro-size capillary and its light propagation behavior is investigated. We focus on two different liquid pumping methods. The first method can pump the high temperature liquid tin into the micro-size capillary by using a high pressure difference system. After pumping, a single mode fiber (SMF) connected with the optical carrier based microwave interferometry (OCMI) system is used to measure different liquid tin levels in the micro-size capillary. The second method can pump the room temperature engine oil into the capillary by using a syringe pump. This method can avoid the air bubbles when the liquids are pumped into the capillary.

  19. Gliding Motility of Mycoplasma mobile on Uniform Oligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Taishi; Hamaguchi, Tasuku

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The binding and gliding of Mycoplasma mobile on a plastic plate covered by 53 uniform oligosaccharides were analyzed. Mycoplasmas bound to and glided on only 21 of the fixed sialylated oligosaccharides (SOs), showing that sialic acid is essential as the binding target. The affinities were mostly consistent with our previous results on the inhibitory effects of free SOs and suggested that M. mobile recognizes SOs from the nonreducing end with four continuous sites as follows. (i and ii) A sialic acid at the nonreducing end is tightly recognized by tandemly connected two sites. (iii) The third site is recognized by a loose groove that may be affected by branches. (iv) The fourth site is recognized by a large groove that may be enhanced by branches, especially those with a negative charge. The cells glided on uniform SOs in manners apparently similar to those of the gliding on mixed SOs. The gliding speed was related inversely to the mycoplasma's affinity for SO, suggesting that the detaching step may be one of the speed determinants. The cells glided faster and with smaller fluctuations on the uniform SOs than on the mixtures, suggesting that the drag caused by the variation in SOs influences gliding behaviors. IMPORTANCE Mycoplasma is a group of bacteria generally parasitic to animals and plants. Some Mycoplasma species form a protrusion at a pole, bind to solid surfaces, and glide in the direction of the protrusion. These procedures are essential for parasitism. Usually, mycoplasmas glide on mixed sialylated oligosaccharides (SOs) derived from glycoprotein and glycolipid. Since gliding motility on uniform oligosaccharides has never been observed, this study gives critical information about recognition and interaction between receptors and SOs. PMID:26148712

  20. [Comparative study of nanosized and microsized silicon dioxide on spermatogenesis function of male rats].

    PubMed

    Fan, Yi-Ou; Zhang, Ying-Hua; Zhang, Xiao-Peng; Liu, Bing; Ma, Yi-xin; Jin, Yi-he

    2006-09-01

    To compare the effects of nanosized and microsized silicon dioxide on spermatogenesis function of male rats exposed by inhalation. 45 male rats were randomly divided into control group and four experimental groups which were exposed by 100 mg/m3 or 300 mg/m3 nanosized and microsized silicon dioxide in inhalation chambers 2 hours every other day. Age-matched rats were exposed to room air with the same condition and served as controls. 65 days later, the testicular and epididymal viscera coefficients, the quantity and quality of sperm were examined and the histopathological assessment was done. The changes in biochemical parameters in serum and testes were also measured. Nanosized silicon dioxide could induce histopathological changes of testes in rats, and the effect was higher than that of microsized particles at the same concentration. Nanosized silicon dioxide could reduce the sperm counts of rats and the testicular LDH-C4 activities, increase MDA levels in the testes and the effect was higher than that of microsized particles at the same concentration. Nanosized silicon dioxide could lead to the reduction of sperm motility, testicular LDH-C4 activities and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) concentration in serum elevation in particles-exposed rats compared with the control animals, but there are no significant difference compared with that of microsized particles at the same concentration. The present findings suggest a different effect of impairment of sperm production and maturation induced by inhalation of nanosized and microsized silicon dioxide, and nanosized silicon dioxide exerted more severe reaction.

  1. Identification and Characterization of Several Large Hurricanes using Microseisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebeling, C. W.; Stein, S. A.; Moore, C.

    2010-12-01

    An ongoing debate within the climatological community centers on whether rising North Atlantic sea-surface temperatures due to anthropogenic global warming are changing the frequency or energy of hurricanes. A short and incomplete observational record makes it difficult to answer this question. Since North Atlantic hurricane records were based entirely on ship logs and land observations before aircraft reconnaissance began in 1944, it is possible that hurricanes may have gone unobserved before then. Even after the initiation of regular aircraft observation, not all areas were monitored. Hence the potential for sampling problems exists up until the advent of satellite-based observation in the mid-1960’s, implying that an undercount in the historical record is likely. To address this issue, we continue to develop methodology to improve the record of the number of North Atlantic hurricanes through the analysis of their signals recorded on decades of historical seismograms. Ambient seismic noise—signals derived from natural sources not related to earthquakes—is generated by atmospheric energy and so has been used as a proxy for oceanic wave climate and an indication of decadal-scale climate variability. Hence ambient seismic noise should be usable to detect hurricanes that may have gone unobserved. Our methodology towards a general hurricane discriminant uses digital data from the HRV (Harvard, Massachusetts) and SJG (San Juan, Puerto Rico) seismic stations to calibrate seismic noise signals correlated with maximum wind speeds of several well-characterized North Atlantic hurricanes. We find that filtering of HRV data recorded during hurricane Andrew (August 1992) in the 200-143 mHz passband retrieves a signal correlatable with Andrew’s maximum wind speed. Spectral amplitudes show that the energy in the secondary microseism band contains increasing low-frequency content as Andrew matures. Results based on this methodology for several additional large hurricanes

  2. Microsized structures assisted nanostructure formation on ZnSe wafer by femtosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shutong; Feng, Guoying E-mail: zhoush@scu.edu.cn

    2014-12-22

    Micro/nano patterning of ZnSe wafer is demonstrated by femtosecond laser irradiation through a diffracting pinhole. The irradiation results obtained at fluences above the ablation threshold are characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The microsized structure with low spatial frequency has a good agreement with Fresnel diffraction theory. Laser induced periodic surface structures and laser-induced periodic curvelet surface structures with high spatial frequency have been found on the surfaces of microsized structures, such as spikes and valleys. We interpret its formation in terms of the interference between the reflected laser field on the surface of the valley and the incident laser pulse.

  3. Electrical charging of skis gliding on snow.

    PubMed

    Colbeck, S C

    1995-01-01

    Ski charging was measured using giant-slalom style skis as gliding capacitors. The voltage measured across the plates was proportional to the charge on the base. While resting on dry snow or suspended in the air, the voltage was slowly reduced by the data logger itself. On wet snow the decay was much faster. While stationary on powder snow the ski developed a slightly negative voltage, showed a small, transient positive peak when motion began, rapidly dropped to negative values, and then assumed a quasi-steady climb to positive voltages. A great deal of noise was superimposed on the general features of the signal when skiing on hard or bumpy surfaces. Thus, the accumulation of charge to high levels was only possible with long runs in deep powder. The rate of charging increased with speed but was not affected by use of one "antistatic" wax, and another such wax actually increased the measured voltage over that of an unwaxed base.

  4. Floquet topological phases protected by time glide symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Takahiro; Po, Hoi Chun; Vishwanath, Ashvin

    2017-05-01

    We study Floquet topological phases in periodically driven systems that are protected by "time glide symmetry", a combination of reflection and half time period translation. Time glide symmetry is an analog of glide symmetry with partial time translation replacing the partial space translation and, hence, is an intrinsically dynamical symmetry which may be engineered in periodically driven systems by exploiting the controllability of driving. We present lattice models of time glide symmetric Floquet topological insulators in two and three dimensions. The topological numbers characterizing those Floquet topological phases are derived from the half-period time-evolution operator along with time glide operator. Moreover, we classify Floquet topological phases protected by time glide symmetry in general dimensions using a Clifford algebra approach. The obtained classification table is similar to that for topological crystalline insulators protected by static reflection symmetry, but shows nontrivial entries in different combination of symmetries, which clarifies that time glide symmetric Floquet topological phases are a distinct set of topological phases from topological crystalline insulators. We also classify Floquet topological phases with "time screw symmetry", defined as a twofold spatial rotation accompanied by half-period time translation.

  5. Degradation of Verapamil hydrochloride in water by gliding arc discharge.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Syam; Maslani, Alan; Izdebski, Tomasz; Horakova, Marta; Klementova, Sarka; Spatenka, Petr

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the influence of gliding arc plasma discharge on the degradation of Verapamil hydrochloride in water. The plasma discharge was characterized by means of optical emission spectroscopy. Spectra of various atomic and molecular species were observed. Aqueous solution of Verapamil hydrochloride was exposed to gliding arc discharge operated in continuous discharge at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The identification of Verapamil, the degradation mechanisms of Verapamil and its transformation products were performed using liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). Experimental results indicate that the atmospheric pressure gliding arc plasma treatment has noticeable effects on Verapamil with satisfactory degradation efficiency. Plausible mechanisms of the degradation were discussed.

  6. Implications of Sea Ice on Southern Ocean Microseisms Detected by a Seismic Array in West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, Martin J.; Wiens, Douglas A.; Winberry, J. Paul; Anandakrishnan, Sridhar; Euler, Garrett G.

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARYThe proximity of Southern Ocean storms coupled with seasonal variation in sea ice make Antarctica ideal for the study of <span class="hlt">microseism</span> sources. We explore frequency-dependent beamforming results using a short-duration, 60 km aperture, broadband seismic array located on the Whillans Ice Stream, West Antarctica. Locations of single-frequency <span class="hlt">microseism</span> (13-16 s period) generation are in regions where the continental shelf is ice-free, consistent with previous studies, and show Rayleigh wave sources remaining at consistent back azimuths throughout the duration of the array. Beamforming analysis of daily noise correlations shows that long-period double-frequency <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> (9-11 s) consist predominantly of Rayleigh waves excited by storms in the Southern Ocean. Modelling of source locations based on wave-wave interaction provides a good fit to our data at these periods. We show that short-period double-frequency <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> (5-7 s) in Antarctica consist of crustal phase Lg and body waves. Lg arrivals propagate through regions of continental crust and our data show that the Lg energy is generated when storm systems interact with the sea ice-free continental shelf during austral summers. Ultra-short-period (0.3-2 s) microseismic body waves back project to regions that correlate with oceanic storm systems in both the Southern and Northern Hemispheres.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27647567','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27647567"><span><span class="hlt">Microsized</span> Sn as Advanced Anodes in Glyme-Based Electrolyte for Na-Ion Batteries.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhang, Biao; Rousse, Gwenaëlle; Foix, Dominique; Dugas, Romain; Corte, Daniel Alves Dalla; Tarascon, Jean-Marie</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Microsized</span> Sn presents stable cyclic performance in a glyme-based electrolyte, which brings 19% increase in energy density of Sn/Na3 V2 (PO4 )3 cells as compared to the cells using a hard carbon anode. The NaSn intermediate phases are also clarified.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JGRB..121.6741J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JGRB..121.6741J"><span>Where do ocean <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> come from? A study of Love-to-Rayleigh wave ratios</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Juretzek, C.; Hadziioannou, C.</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>Our knowledge of the origin of Love waves in the ambient seismic noise is extremely limited. This applies in particular to constraints on source locations and source mechanisms for Love waves in the secondary <span class="hlt">microseism</span>. Here three-component beamforming is used to distinguish between the differently polarized wave types in the primary and secondary microseismic noise fields, recorded at several arrays across Europe. We compare characteristics of Love and Rayleigh wave noise, such as source directions and frequency content, measure Love to Rayleigh wave ratios for different back azimuths, and look at the seasonal behavior of our measurements by using a full year of data in 2013. The beamforming results confirm previous observations that back azimuths for Rayleigh and Love waves in both microseismic bands mainly coincide. However, we observe differences in relative directional noise strength between both wave types for the primary <span class="hlt">microseism</span>. At those frequencies, Love waves dominate on average, with kinetic Love-to-Rayleigh energy ratios ranging from 0.6 to 2.0. In the secondary <span class="hlt">microseism</span>, the ratios are lower, between 0.4 and 1.2. The wave type ratio is directionally homogeneous, except for locations far from the coast. In the primary <span class="hlt">microseism</span>, our results support the existence of different generation mechanisms. The contribution of a shear traction-type source mechanism is likely.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24912194','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24912194"><span>Unitary step of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> machinery in Mycoplasma mobile.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kinosita, Yoshiaki; Nakane, Daisuke; Sugawa, Mitsuhiro; Masaike, Tomoko; Mizutani, Kana; Miyata, Makoto; Nishizaka, Takayuki</p> <p>2014-06-10</p> <p>Among the bacteria that <span class="hlt">glide</span> on substrate surfaces, Mycoplasma mobile is one of the fastest, exhibiting smooth movement with a speed of 2.0-4.5 μm⋅s(-1) with a cycle of attachment to and detachment from sialylated oligosaccharides. To study the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> mechanism at the molecular level, we applied an assay with a fluorescently labeled and membrane-permeabilized ghost model, and investigated the motility by high precision colocalization microscopy. Under conditions designed to reduce the number of motor interactions on a randomly oriented substrate, ghosts took unitary 70-nm steps in the direction of <span class="hlt">gliding</span>. Although it remains possible that the stepping behavior is produced by multiple interactions, our data suggest that these steps are produced by a unitary <span class="hlt">gliding</span> machine that need not move between sites arranged on a cytoskeletal lattice.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvE..92f2513M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvE..92f2513M"><span>Substrate-induced <span class="hlt">gliding</span> in a nematic liquid crystal layer</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mema, E.; Kondic, L.; Cummings, L. J.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>We consider the interaction between nematic liquid crystals (NLCs) and polymer substrates. Such substrates can interact with NLCs, exhibiting a phenomenon known as director <span class="hlt">gliding</span>: the preferred orientation of the NLC molecules at the interface changes on time scales that are slow relative to the elastic relaxation time scale of the NLC. We present two models for <span class="hlt">gliding</span>, inspired by experiments that investigate the interaction between the NLC and a polymer substrate. These models, though simple, lead to nontrivial results, including loss of bistability under <span class="hlt">gliding</span>. Perhaps surprisingly, we find that externally imposed switching between the steady states of a bistable system may reverse the effect of <span class="hlt">gliding</span>, preventing loss of bistability if switching is sufficiently frequent. Our findings may be of relevance to a variety of technological applications involving liquid crystal devices, and particularly to a new generation of flexible liquid crystal displays that implement polymeric substrates.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4060671','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4060671"><span>Unitary step of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> machinery in Mycoplasma mobile</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kinosita, Yoshiaki; Nakane, Daisuke; Sugawa, Mitsuhiro; Masaike, Tomoko; Mizutani, Kana; Miyata, Makoto; Nishizaka, Takayuki</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Among the bacteria that <span class="hlt">glide</span> on substrate surfaces, Mycoplasma mobile is one of the fastest, exhibiting smooth movement with a speed of 2.0–4.5 μm⋅s−1 with a cycle of attachment to and detachment from sialylated oligosaccharides. To study the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> mechanism at the molecular level, we applied an assay with a fluorescently labeled and membrane-permeabilized ghost model, and investigated the motility by high precision colocalization microscopy. Under conditions designed to reduce the number of motor interactions on a randomly oriented substrate, ghosts took unitary 70-nm steps in the direction of <span class="hlt">gliding</span>. Although it remains possible that the stepping behavior is produced by multiple interactions, our data suggest that these steps are produced by a unitary <span class="hlt">gliding</span> machine that need not move between sites arranged on a cytoskeletal lattice. PMID:24912194</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.S31C..01R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.S31C..01R"><span>Improved Detection and Location of Ocean <span class="hlt">Microseism</span> Signals using Array Techniques</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Reading, A. M.; Gal, M.; Koper, K. D.; Tkalcic, H.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>We present and evaluate a range of approaches that may be used to investigate ocean <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> using seismic array data. At amplitudes below the dominant incoming signal, the ambient seismic energy (background noise) associated with <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> arrives from multiple directions at any one time. Thus we address the challenge of detecting weaker signals from unpredictable directions in the presence of other strong signals. Our aim is to extract the most accurate information possible from such weaker signals in order to expand the capability of ocean storm studies, using seismology, including the ability to extract storm patterns from archive seismic array records. Detection of weaker <span class="hlt">microseism</span> signals may be improved using algorithms widely used in astronomy. One example is the CLEAN algorithm which has wide usage in radio astronomy. This algorithm operates by finding the position and strength of point sources and iteratively deconvolving their contribution to the image. It may be combined to optimum effect with the previously published (Incoherently Averaged Signal) IAS Capon implementation for an accurate detection of weaker sources. Having detected weaker sources, they may be backprojected using a suitable Earth model, taking into account a correction for the mislocation due to slowness-azimuth station corrections. The <span class="hlt">microseism</span> generation locations inferred in this manner are strongly frequency dependent, even within relatively restricted frequency ranges (0.325-0.725 Hz) for some arrays. Our advances in seismic array processing, with a focus on methods appropriate to weaker ambient noise signals, have led to insights, for example, regarding the generation of seismic noise. We find that secondary <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> in the lower frequency band are generated mainly by ocean swell whereas higher frequency bands are generated by local wind conditions. These arrivals are investigated over a two-decade time frame for the Southern Ocean and west Pacific Ocean.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.S31B2350A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.S31B2350A"><span>Global Trends in Ocean Wave State and Extremal Storm Events Examined with <span class="hlt">Microseism</span> Analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Anthony, R. E.; Aster, R. C.; Rowe, C. A.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>The Earth's seismic noise spectrum features two globally ubiquitous peaks near 8 and 16 s periods that arise when storm-generated ocean gravity waves are converted to seismic energy, predominantly as Rayleigh waves. Because of its regionally integrative nature, <span class="hlt">microseism</span> intensity histories at long running sites can provide useful proxies for wave state. Expanding on an earlier study of global <span class="hlt">microseism</span> trends (Aster et al., 2010), we analyze up-to-date multi-decadal seismic data from global stations associated with several seismographic networks to characterize the spatiotemporal evolution of wave climate over the past >20 years. Ground motion power spectral density (PSD) is calculated over 3-hour overlapping time series segments to produce a database of PSD statistics at each broadband station between 2 and 100 s. Isolating power in the primary and secondary <span class="hlt">microseism</span> bands enables regional characterization of spatially-integrated trends in wave states. In addition, specific extremal storm events are detected and are used to assess decadal changes in the location and frequency of oceanic storm activity. The results of these analyses are then interpreted in concert with recognized modes of atmospheric variability (e.g., El Nino-Southern Oscillation, Southern Annular Mode), that can impact storm statistics. We note a number of statistically significant increasing trends in both raw <span class="hlt">microseism</span> power and storm activity occurring at multiple stations in the Northwest Atlantic and Southeast Pacific suggestive of increased wave heights and storminess in these regions. Additionally, we observe especially strong increases in <span class="hlt">microseism</span> activity off of the Antarctic Peninsula, with monthly fluctuations strongly correlated to local anomalies in seasonal sea ice concentration. In turn, these reductions in sea ice concentration and extent appear to correlate with recent strengthening of the Southern Annular Mode. Such trends in wave activity have the potential to</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006PhDT.......116B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006PhDT.......116B"><span>Nonlinear stability and control of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> vehicles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bhatta, Pradeep</p> <p></p> <p>In this thesis we use nonlinear systems analysis to study dynamics and design control solutions for vehicles subject to hydrodynamic or aerodynamic forcing. Application of energy-based methods for such vehicles is challenging due to the presence of energy-conserving lift and side forces. We study how the lift force determines the geometric structure of vehicle dynamics. A Hamiltonian formulation of the integrable phugoid-mode equations provides a Lyapunov function candidate, which is used throughout the thesis for deriving equilibrium stability results and designing stabilizing control laws. A strong motivation for our work is the emergence of underwater gliders as an important observation platform for oceanography. Underwater gliders rely on buoyancy regulation and internal mass redistribution for motion control. These vehicles are attractive because they are designed to operate autonomously and continuously for several weeks. The results presented in this thesis contribute toward the development of systematic control design procedures for extending the range of provably stable maneuvers of the underwater glider. As the first major contribution we derive conditions for nonlinear stability of longitudinal steady <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motions using singular perturbation theory. Stability is proved using a composite Lyapunov function, composed of individual Lyapunov functions that prove stability of rotational and translational subsystem equilibria. We use the composite Lyapunov function to design control laws for stabilizing desired relative equilibria in different actuation configurations for the underwater glider. We propose an approximate trajectory tracking method for an aircraft model. Our method uses exponential stability results of controllable steady <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motions, derived by interpreting the aircraft dynamics as an interconnected system of rotational and translational subsystems. We prove bounded position error for tracking prescribed, straight-line trajectories, and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhSS...59.1577B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhSS...59.1577B"><span>Acoustic emission at interaction of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> deformation with point obstacles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Blagoveshchenskii, V. V.; Panin, I. G.</p> <p>2017-08-01</p> <p>The mathematical model of dislocation <span class="hlt">glide</span> movement is used to calculate the signal of acoustic emission that accompanies the defect overcoming in a crystal. The elastic stress in the emitted signal is estimated. It is established that the acoustic emission signal in the case of dislocation separation from a defect substantially exceeds the signal in the case of deceleration of a <span class="hlt">gliding</span> dislocation on a defect. The shapes of these signals also differ.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeoJI.201..429T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeoJI.201..429T"><span>Directionality of ambient noise on the Juan de Fuca plate: implications for source locations of the primary and secondary <span class="hlt">microseisms</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tian, Ye; Ritzwoller, Michael H.</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Based on cross-correlations of ambient seismic noise computed using 61 ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) within the Juan de Fuca (JdF) plate from the Cascadia Initiative experiment and 42 continental stations near the coast of the western United States, we investigate the locations of generation of the primary (11-20 s period) and secondary (5-10 s period) <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> in the northern Pacific Ocean by analysing the directionality and seasonality of the <span class="hlt">microseism</span> (Rayleigh wave) signals received in this region. We conclude that (1) the ambient noise observed across the array is much different in the primary and secondary <span class="hlt">microseism</span> bands, both in its azimuthal content and seasonal variation. (2) The principal secondary <span class="hlt">microseism</span> signals propagate towards the east, consistent with their generation in deep waters of the North Pacific, perhaps coincident both with the region of observed body wave excitation and the predicted wave-wave interaction region from recent studies. (3) The primary <span class="hlt">microseism</span>, as indicated by observations of the azimuthal dependence of the fundamental mode Rayleigh wave as well as observations of precursory arrivals, derives significantly from the shallow waters of the eastern Pacific near to the JdF plate but also has a component generated at greater distance of unknown origin. (4) These observations suggest different physical mechanisms for generating the two <span class="hlt">microseisms</span>: the secondary <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> are likely to be generated by non-linear wave-wave interaction over the deep Pacific Ocean, while the primary <span class="hlt">microseism</span> may couple directly into the solid earth locally in shallow waters from ocean gravity waves. (5) Above 5 s period, high quality empirical Green's functions are observed from cross-correlations between deep water OBSs and continental stations, which illustrates that <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> propagate efficiently from either deep or shallow water source regions onto the continent and are well recorded by continental seismic stations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22201460','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22201460"><span>Illusory continuity without sufficient sound energy to fill a temporal gap: examples of crossing <span class="hlt">glide</span> tones.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kuroda, Tsuyoshi; Nakajima, Yoshitaka; Eguchi, Shuntarou</p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>The gap transfer illusion is an auditory illusion where a temporal gap inserted in a longer <span class="hlt">glide</span> tone is perceived as if it were in a crossing shorter <span class="hlt">glide</span> tone. Psychophysical and phenomenological experiments were conducted to examine the effects of sound-pressure-level (SPL) differences between crossing <span class="hlt">glides</span> on the occurrence of the gap transfer illusion. We found that the subjective continuity-discontinuity of the crossing <span class="hlt">glides</span> changed as a function of the relative level of the shorter <span class="hlt">glide</span> to the level of the longer <span class="hlt">glide</span>. When the relative level was approximately between -9 and +2 dB, listeners perceived the longer <span class="hlt">glide</span> as continuous and the shorter <span class="hlt">glide</span> as discontinuous, that is, the gap transfer illusion took place. The <span class="hlt">glides</span> were perceived veridically below this range, that is, gap transfer did not take place, whereas above this range the longer <span class="hlt">glide</span> and the shorter <span class="hlt">glide</span> were both perceived as continuous. The fact that the longer <span class="hlt">glide</span> could be perceived as continuous even when the crossing shorter <span class="hlt">glide</span> was 9 dB weaker indicates that the longer <span class="hlt">glide</span>'s subjective continuity cannot be explained within the conventional framework of auditory organization, which assumes reallocation of sound energy from the shorter to the longer <span class="hlt">glide</span>. The implicated mechanisms are discussed in terms of the temporal configuration of onsets and terminations and the time-frequency distribution of sound energy.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4992722','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4992722"><span>Soaring energetics and <span class="hlt">glide</span> performance in a moving atmosphere</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Reynolds, Kate V.; Thomas, Adrian L. R.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Here, we analyse the energetics, performance and optimization of flight in a moving atmosphere. We begin by deriving a succinct expression describing all of the mechanical energy flows associated with <span class="hlt">gliding</span>, dynamic soaring and thermal soaring, which we use to explore the optimization of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> in an arbitrary wind. We use this optimization to revisit the classical theory of the <span class="hlt">glide</span> polar, which we expand upon in two significant ways. First, we compare the predictions of the <span class="hlt">glide</span> polar for different species under the various published models. Second, we derive a <span class="hlt">glide</span> optimization chart that maps every combination of headwind and updraft speed to the unique combination of airspeed and inertial sink rate at which the aerodynamic cost of transport is expected to be minimized. With these theoretical tools in hand, we test their predictions using empirical data collected from a captive steppe eagle (Aquila nipalensis) carrying an inertial measurement unit, global positioning system, barometer and pitot tube. We show that the bird adjusts airspeed in relation to headwind speed as expected if it were seeking to minimize its aerodynamic cost of transport, but find only weak evidence to suggest that it adjusts airspeed similarly in response to updrafts during straight and interthermal <span class="hlt">glides</span>. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Moving in a moving medium: new perspectives on flight’. PMID:27528788</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017AIPC.1863P0005P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017AIPC.1863P0005P"><span><span class="hlt">Glide</span> back booster wind tunnel model testing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pricop, M. V.; Cojocaru, M. G.; Stoica, C. I.; Niculescu, M. L.; Neculaescu, A. M.; Persinaru, A. G.; Boscoianu, M.</p> <p>2017-07-01</p> <p>Affordable space access requires partial or ideally full launch vehicle reuse, which is in line with clean environment requirement. Although the idea is old, the practical use is difficult, requiring very large technology investment for qualification. Rocket gliders like Space Shuttle have been successfullyoperated but the price and correspondingly the energy footprint were found not sustainable. For medium launchers, finally there is a very promising platform as Falcon 9. For very small launchers the situation is more complex, because the performance index (payload to start mass) is already small, versus medium and heavy launchers. For partial reusable micro launchers this index is even smaller. However the challenge has to be taken because it is likely that in a multiyear effort, technology is going to enable the performance recovery to make such a system economically and environmentally feasible. The current paper is devoted to a small unitary <span class="hlt">glide</span> back booster which is foreseen to be assembled in a number of possible configurations. Although the level of analysis is not deep, the solution is analyzed from the aerodynamic point of view. A wind tunnel model is designed, with an active canard, to enablea more efficient wind tunnel campaign, as a national level premiere.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3977308','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3977308"><span>Structures of the Toxoplasma <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility adhesin</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Song, Gaojie; Springer, Timothy A.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Micronemal protein 2 (MIC2) is the key adhesin that supports <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility and host cell invasion by Toxoplasma gondii. With a von Willebrand factor A (VWA) domain and six thrombospondin repeat domains (TSR1–6) in its ectodomain, MIC2 connects to the parasite actomyosin system through its cytoplasmic tail. MIC2-associated protein (M2AP) binds noncovalently to the MIC2 ectodomain. MIC2 and M2AP are stored in micronemes as proforms. We find that the MIC2–M2AP ectodomain complex is a highly elongated 1:1 monomer with M2AP bound to the TSR6 domain. Crystal structures of N-terminal fragments containing the VWA and TSR1 domains for proMIC2 and MIC2 reveal a closed conformation of the VWA domain and how it associates with the TSR1 domain. A long, proline-rich, disulfide-bonded pigtail loop in TSR1 overlaps the VWA domain. Mannose α-C-linked to Trp-276 in TSR1 has an unusual 1C4 chair conformation. The MIC2 VWA domain includes a mobile α5-helix and a 22-residue disordered region containing two disulfide bonds in place of an α6-helix. A hydrophobic residue in the prodomain binds to a pocket adjacent to the α7-helix that pistons in opening of the VWA domain to a putative high-affinity state. PMID:24639528</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li class="active"><span>6</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_6 --> <div id="page_7" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="121"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18162301','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18162301"><span>Decolorization of Acid Orange 7 solution by gas-liquid <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc discharge plasma.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Du, ChangMing; Shi, TaiHong; Sun, YuWei; Zhuang, XiaoFeng</p> <p>2008-06-15</p> <p>The decolorization of 180 microM aqueous solutions of Acid Orange 7 (AO7) by means of a non-thermal plasma technique (i.e., the gas-liquid <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc discharge, which is generated between at least two metal electrodes with <span class="hlt">AC</span> high voltage) was investigated in this paper. The effects of the plasma treatment time and the type of feeding gas, including air, oxygen, nitrogen and argon of the dye removal were determined. It is found that the voltage cycles of the gas-liquid <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc discharge are characterized by a moderate increase in the tension which is represented by a peak followed by an abrupt decrease and a current peak in the half period (10 ms); the concentration of AO7 solution decreases exponentially to reach 58.9, 77.4, 89.1, 95.1 and 99% in 25, 50, 75, 100 and 125 min, respectively, and the ln(Ct/C0) varies linearly with the treatment time t, indicating that decolorization reaction follow first pseudo-order kinetics with a constant rate of 0.03327 min(-1) when air was used as feeding gas; the decolorization rate during the plasma treatment is the greatest for oxygen as the feeding gas, in turn followed by air and argon, and was the least when using nitrogen. The variations of pH and conductivity and the formations of hydrogen peroxide and ozone are measured.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21816808','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21816808"><span><span class="hlt">Gliding</span> flight in Chrysopelea: turning a snake into a wing.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Socha, John J</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>Although many cylindrical animals swim through water, flying snakes of the genus Chrysopelea are the only limbless animals that <span class="hlt">glide</span> through air. Despite a lack of limbs, these snakes can actively launch by jumping, maintain a stable <span class="hlt">glide</span> path without obvious control surfaces, maneuver, and safely land without injury. Jumping takeoffs employ vertically looped kinematics that seem to be different than any other behavior in limbless vertebrates, and their presence in a closely related genus suggests that gap-crossing may have been a behavioral precursor to the evolution of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> in snakes. Change in shape of the body by dorsoventral flattening and high-amplitude aerial undulation comprise two key features of snakes' <span class="hlt">gliding</span> behavior. As the snake becomes airborne, the body flattens sequentially from head to vent, forming a cross-sectional shape that is roughly triangular, with a flat surface and lateral "lips" that protrude ventrally on each side of the body; these may diminish toward the vent. This shape likely provides the snake with lift coefficients that peak at high angles of attack and gentle stall characteristics. A <span class="hlt">glide</span> trajectory is initiated with the snake falling at a steep angle. As the snake rotates in the pitch axis, it forms a wide "S" shape and begins undulating in a complex three-dimensional pattern, with the body angled upward relative to the <span class="hlt">glide</span> path. The head moves side-to-side, sending traveling waves posteriorly toward the tail, while the body (most prominently, the posterior end) oscillates in the vertical axis. These active movements while <span class="hlt">gliding</span> are substantially different and more dynamic than those used by any other animal glider. As the snake gains forward speed, the <span class="hlt">glide</span> path becomes less steep, reaching minimally recorded <span class="hlt">glide</span> angles of 13°. In general, smaller snakes appear to be more proficient gliders. Chrysopelea paradisi can also maneuver and land either on the ground or on vegetation, but these locomotor behaviors have</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.6193G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..18.6193G"><span>Properies of the <span class="hlt">microseism</span> wave field in Australia from three component array data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gal, Martin; Reading, Anya; Ellingsen, Simon; Koper, Keith; Burlacu, Relu; Tkalčić, Hrvoje</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>In the last two decades, ambient noise studies in the range of 1-20 seconds have predominantly focused on the analysis of source regions for Rayleigh and P waves. The theoretical excitation of these phases is well understood for primary <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> (direct coupling of gravity waves in sloping shallow bathymetry) and secondary <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> (wave-wave interaction) and correlates well with observations. For Love waves, the excitation mechanism in the secondary <span class="hlt">microseism</span> band is to date unknown. It has been shown, that LQ waves can exhibit larger amplitudes than Rg waves for certain frequencies. Therefore detailed analysis of the wave field are necessary to find indications on the generation mechanism. We analyse data from two spiral-shaped arrays located in Australia, the Pilbara Array (PSAR) in the North-West and an array in South Queensland (SQspa) in the East. The two arrays are different in aperture and allow for the study of primary and secondary <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> with SQspa and higher secondary <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> with PSAR. We use a deconvolution enhanced beamforming approach, which is based on the CLEAN algorithm. It allows the accurate detection of weaker sources and the estimation of power levels on each component or wave type. For PSAR we evaluate 1 year of data in the frequency range of 0.35-1 Hz and find fundamental and higher mode Rg and LQ waves. For the low end of the frequency range, we find the strongest fundamental mode Rg waves to originate from multiple direction, but confined to coastline reflectors, i.e. coastlines that are perpendicular to the main swell direction, while higher mode Rg waves are mainly generated in the Great Australian Bight. For higher frequencies, the source locations of Rg waves move toward the north coast, which is closest to the array and we see an increase in the Lg phase. The majority of fundamental LQ waves are generated at the west coast of Australia and we find some agreement between low frequency Rg and LQ source locations, which</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=103748','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=103748"><span><span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Motility in Bacteria: Insights from Studies of Myxococcus xanthus</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Spormann, Alfred M.</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Gliding</span> motility is observed in a large variety of phylogenetically unrelated bacteria. <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> provides a means for microbes to travel in environments with a low water content, such as might be found in biofilms, microbial mats, and soil. <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> is defined as the movement of a cell on a surface in the direction of the long axis of the cell. Because this definition is operational and not mechanistic, the underlying molecular motor(s) may be quite different in diverse microbes. In fact, studies on the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> bacterium Myxococcus xanthus suggest that two independent <span class="hlt">gliding</span> machineries, encoded by two multigene systems, operate in this microorganism. One machinery, which allows individual cells to <span class="hlt">glide</span> on a surface, independent of whether the cells are moving alone or in groups, requires the function of the genes of the A-motility system. More than 37 A-motility genes are known to be required for this form of movement. Depending on an additional phenotype, these genes are divided into two subclasses, the agl and cgl genes. Videomicroscopic studies on <span class="hlt">gliding</span> movement, as well as ultrastructural observations of two myxobacteria, suggest that the A-system motor may consist of multiple single motor elements that are arrayed along the entire cell body. Each motor element is proposed to be localized to the periplasmic space and to be anchored to the peptidoglycan layer. The force to <span class="hlt">glide</span> which may be generated here is coupled to adhesion sites that move freely in the outer membrane. These adhesion sites provide a specific contact with the substratum. Based on single-cell observations, similar models have been proposed to operate in the unrelated <span class="hlt">gliding</span> bacteria Flavobacterium johnsoniae (formerly Cytophaga johnsonae), Cytophaga strain U67, and Flexibacter polymorphus (a filamentous glider). Although this model has not been verified experimentally, M. xanthus seems to be the ideal organism with which to test it, given the genetic tools available. The second <span class="hlt">gliding</span></p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10477310','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10477310"><span><span class="hlt">Gliding</span> motility in bacteria: insights from studies of Myxococcus xanthus.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Spormann, A M</p> <p>1999-09-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Gliding</span> motility is observed in a large variety of phylogenetically unrelated bacteria. <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> provides a means for microbes to travel in environments with a low water content, such as might be found in biofilms, microbial mats, and soil. <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> is defined as the movement of a cell on a surface in the direction of the long axis of the cell. Because this definition is operational and not mechanistic, the underlying molecular motor(s) may be quite different in diverse microbes. In fact, studies on the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> bacterium Myxococcus xanthus suggest that two independent <span class="hlt">gliding</span> machineries, encoded by two multigene systems, operate in this microorganism. One machinery, which allows individual cells to <span class="hlt">glide</span> on a surface, independent of whether the cells are moving alone or in groups, requires the function of the genes of the A-motility system. More than 37 A-motility genes are known to be required for this form of movement. Depending on an additional phenotype, these genes are divided into two subclasses, the agl and cgl genes. Videomicroscopic studies on <span class="hlt">gliding</span> movement, as well as ultrastructural observations of two myxobacteria, suggest that the A-system motor may consist of multiple single motor elements that are arrayed along the entire cell body. Each motor element is proposed to be localized to the periplasmic space and to be anchored to the peptidoglycan layer. The force to <span class="hlt">glide</span> which may be generated here is coupled to adhesion sites that move freely in the outer membrane. These adhesion sites provide a specific contact with the substratum. Based on single-cell observations, similar models have been proposed to operate in the unrelated <span class="hlt">gliding</span> bacteria Flavobacterium johnsoniae (formerly Cytophaga johnsonae), Cytophaga strain U67, and Flexibacter polymorphus (a filamentous glider). Although this model has not been verified experimentally, M. xanthus seems to be the ideal organism with which to test it, given the genetic tools available. The second <span class="hlt">gliding</span></p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014APS..MARL13005L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014APS..MARL13005L"><span>Orbital-Parity Selective Superconducting Pairing Structures of Fe-based Superconductors under <span class="hlt">Glide</span> Symmetry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lin, Chiahui; Chou, Chung-Pin; Yin, Wei-Guo; Ku, Wei</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>We show that the superconductivity in Fe-based superconductors consists of zero and finite momentum (π , π , 0) Cooper pairs with the same and different parities of the Fe 3 d orbitals respectively. The former develops the distinct gap structures for each orbital parity, and the latter is characteristic of spin singlet, spacial oddness and time reversal symmetry breaking. This originates from the unit cell containing two Fe atoms and two anions of staggered positioning with respect to the Fe square lattice. The in-plane translation is turned into <span class="hlt">glide</span> translation, which dictates orbital-parity selective quasiparticles. Such novel pairing structures explain the unusual gap angular modulation on the hole pockets in recent ARPES and STS experiments. Work supported by DOE DE-<span class="hlt">AC</span>02-98CH10886 and Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics and Ministry of Science and Technology.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhPl...24a3514Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhPl...24a3514Z"><span>Spatiotemporally resolved characteristics of a <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc discharge in a turbulent air flow at atmospheric pressure</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhu, Jiajian; Gao, Jinlong; Ehn, Andreas; Aldén, Marcus; Larsson, Anders; Kusano, Yukihiro; Li, Zhongshan</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc discharge was generated in a turbulent air flow at atmospheric pressure driven by a 35 kHz alternating current (<span class="hlt">AC</span>) electric power. The spatiotemporally resolved characteristics of the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc discharge, including glow-type discharges, spark-type discharges, short-cutting events and transitions among the different types of discharges, were investigated using simultaneously optical and electrical diagnostics. The glow-type discharge shows sinusoidal-like voltage and current waveforms with a peak current of hundreds of milliamperes. The frequency of the emission intensity variation of the glow-type discharge is the same as that of the electronic power dissipated in the plasma column. The glow-type discharge can transfer into a spark discharge characterized by a sharp peak current of several amperes and a sudden increase of the brightness in the plasma column. Transitions can also be found to take place from spark-type discharges to glow-type discharges. Short-cutting events were often observed as the intermediate states formed during the spark-glow transition. Three different types of short-cutting events have been observed to generate new current paths between two plasma channel segments, and between two electrodes, as well as between the channel segment and the electrodes, respectively. The short-cut upper part of the plasma column that was found to have no current passing through can be detected several hundreds of microseconds after the short-cutting event. The voltage recovery rate, the period of <span class="hlt">AC</span> voltage-driving signal, the flow rates and the rated input powers were found to play an important role in affecting the transitions among the different types of discharges.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeoRL..42..765A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeoRL..42..765A"><span>How ocean waves rock the Earth: Two mechanisms explain <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> with periods 3 to 300 s</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ardhuin, Fabrice; Gualtieri, Lucia; Stutzmann, Eléonore</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>Microseismic activity, recorded everywhere on Earth, is largely due to ocean waves. Recent progress has clearly identified sources of <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> in the most energetic band, with periods from 3 to 10 s. In contrast, the generation of longer-period <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> has been strongly debated. Two mechanisms have been proposed to explain seismic wave generation: a primary mechanism, by which ocean waves propagating over bottom slopes generate seismic waves, and a secondary mechanism which relies on the nonlinear interaction of ocean waves. Here we show that the primary mechanism explains the average power, frequency distribution, and most of the variability in signals recorded by vertical seismometers, for seismic periods ranging from 13 to 300 s. The secondary mechanism only explains seismic motions with periods shorter than 13 s. Our results build on a quantitative numerical model that gives access to time-varying maps of seismic noise sources.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26913647','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26913647"><span><span class="hlt">Microsized</span> BiOCl Square Nanosheets as Ultraviolet Photodetectors and Photocatalysts.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Li, Min; Zhang, Junying; Gao, Hong; Li, Feng; Lindquist, Sten-Eric; Wu, Nianqiang; Wang, Rongming</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>BiOCl microstructures that include microspheres stacked by nanosheet and <span class="hlt">microsized</span> square nanosheets, with a large lateral size of 3-5 μm and a thickness of 35 nm (the side length/thickness ratio is ∼100), are synthesized by a solvothermal method with the assistance of polyvinylpyrrolidone. The exposed face of the large square nanosheet is {001} facet. The BiOCl microstructures show good photocatalytic activity toward decomposition of Rhodamine B under ultraviolet-visible light irradiation. Moreover, individual <span class="hlt">microsized</span> BiOCl square nanosheets are employed as the building block for construction of an ultraviolet photodetector. Because of its large size, thin thickness, and high surface-to-volume ratio, a BiOCl nanosheet shows high sensitivity and fast transient response to ultraviolet light in the spectral range 200-380 nm.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19045545','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19045545"><span>A "hydrokinematic" method of measuring the <span class="hlt">glide</span> efficiency of a human swimmer.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Naemi, Roozbeh; Sanders, Ross H</p> <p>2008-12-01</p> <p>The aim of this study was to develop and test a method of quantifying the <span class="hlt">glide</span> efficiency, defined as the ability of the body to maintain its velocity over time and to minimize deceleration through a rectilinear <span class="hlt">glide</span>. The <span class="hlt">glide</span> efficiency should be determined in a way that accounts for both the inertial and resistive characteristics of the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> body as well as the instantaneous velocity. A displacement function (parametric curve) was obtained from the equation of motion of the body during a horizontal rectilinear <span class="hlt">glide</span>. The values of the parameters in the displacement curve that provide the best fit to the displacement-time data of a body during a rectilinear horizontal <span class="hlt">glide</span> represent the <span class="hlt">glide</span> factor and the initial velocity of the particular <span class="hlt">glide</span> interval. The <span class="hlt">glide</span> factor is a measure of <span class="hlt">glide</span> efficiency and indicates the ability of the body to minimize deceleration at each corresponding velocity. The <span class="hlt">glide</span> efficiency depends on the hydrodynamic characteristic of the body, which is influenced by the body's shape as well as by the body's size. To distinguish the effects of size and shape on the <span class="hlt">glide</span> efficiency, a size-related <span class="hlt">glide</span> constant and a shape-related <span class="hlt">glide</span> coefficient were determined as separate entities. The <span class="hlt">glide</span> factor is the product of these two parameters. The goodness of fit statistics indicated that the representative displacement function found for each <span class="hlt">glide</span> interval closely represents the real displacement data of a body in a rectilinear horizontal <span class="hlt">glide</span>. The accuracy of the method was indicated by a relative standard error of calculation of less than 2.5%. Also the method was able to distinguish between subjects in their <span class="hlt">glide</span> efficiency. It was found that the <span class="hlt">glide</span> factor increased with decreasing velocity. The <span class="hlt">glide</span> coefficient also increased with decreasing Reynolds number. The method is sufficiently accurate to distinguish between individual swimmers in terms of their <span class="hlt">glide</span> efficiency. The separation of <span class="hlt">glide</span> factor to a size</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11222131','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11222131"><span><span class="hlt">Gliding</span> flight in a jackdaw: a wind tunnel study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rosén, M; Hedenström, A</p> <p>2001-03-01</p> <p>We examined the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> flight performance of a jackdaw Corvus monedula in a wind tunnel. The jackdaw was able to <span class="hlt">glide</span> steadily at speeds between 6 and 11 m s(-1). The bird changed its wingspan and wing area over this speed range, and we measured the so-called <span class="hlt">glide</span> super-polar, which is the envelope of fixed-wing <span class="hlt">glide</span> polars over a range of forward speeds and sinking speeds. The <span class="hlt">glide</span> super-polar was an inverted U-shape with a minimum sinking speed (V(ms)) at 7.4 m s(-1) and a speed for best <span class="hlt">glide</span> (V(bg)) at 8.3 m s(-)). At the minimum sinking speed, the associated vertical sinking speed was 0.62 m s(-1). The relationship between the ratio of lift to drag (L:D) and airspeed showed an inverted U-shape with a maximum of 12.6 at 8.5 m s(-1). Wingspan decreased linearly with speed over the whole speed range investigated. The tail was spread extensively at low and moderate speeds; at speeds between 6 and 9 m s(-1), the tail area decreased linearly with speed, and at speeds above 9 m s(-1) the tail was fully furled. Reynolds number calculated with the mean chord as the reference length ranged from 38 000 to 76 000 over the speed range 6-11 m s(-1). Comparisons of the jackdaw flight performance were made with existing theory of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> flight. We also re-analysed data on span ratios with respect to speed in two other bird species previously studied in wind tunnels. These data indicate that an equation for calculating the span ratio, which minimises the sum of induced and profile drag, does not predict the actual span ratios observed in these birds. We derive an alternative equation on the basis of the observed span ratios for calculating wingspan and wing area with respect to forward speed in <span class="hlt">gliding</span> birds from information about body mass, maximum wingspan, maximum wing area and maximum coefficient of lift. These alternative equations can be used in combination with any model of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> flight where wing area and wingspan are considered to calculate sinking rate with</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110004249','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110004249"><span>GLobal Integrated Design Environment (<span class="hlt">GLIDE</span>): A Concurrent Engineering Application</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>McGuire, Melissa L.; Kunkel, Matthew R.; Smith, David A.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>The GLobal Integrated Design Environment (<span class="hlt">GLIDE</span>) is a client-server software application purpose-built to mitigate issues associated with real time data sharing in concurrent engineering environments and to facilitate discipline-to-discipline interaction between multiple engineers and researchers. <span class="hlt">GLIDE</span> is implemented in multiple programming languages utilizing standardized web protocols to enable secure parameter data sharing between engineers and researchers across the Internet in closed and/or widely distributed working environments. A well defined, HyperText Transfer Protocol (HTTP) based Application Programming Interface (API) to the <span class="hlt">GLIDE</span> client/server environment enables users to interact with <span class="hlt">GLIDE</span>, and each other, within common and familiar tools. One such common tool, Microsoft Excel (Microsoft Corporation), paired with its add-in API for <span class="hlt">GLIDE</span>, is discussed in this paper. The top-level examples given demonstrate how this interface improves the efficiency of the design process of a concurrent engineering study while reducing potential errors associated with manually sharing information between study participants.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25241283','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25241283"><span>Osteointegration of PLGA implants with nanostructured or <span class="hlt">microsized</span> β-TCP particles in a minipig model.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kulkova, Julia; Moritz, Niko; Suokas, Esa O; Strandberg, Niko; Leino, Kari A; Laitio, Timo T; Aro, Hannu T</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Bioresorbable suture anchors and interference screws have certain benefits over equivalent titanium-alloy implants. However, there is a need for compositional improvement of currently used bioresorbable implants. We hypothesized that implants made of poly(l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) compounded with nanostructured particles of beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) would induce stronger osteointegration than implants made of PLGA compounded with <span class="hlt">microsized</span> β-TCP particles. The experimental nanostructured self-reinforced PLGA (85L:15G)/β-TCP composite was made by high-energy ball-milling. Self-reinforced <span class="hlt">microsized</span> PLGA (95L:5G)/β-TCP composite was prepared by melt-compounding. The composites were characterized by gas chromatography, Ubbelohde viscometry, scanning electron microscopy, laser diffractometry, and standard mechanical tests. Four groups of implants were prepared for the controlled laboratory study employing a minipig animal model. Implants in the first two groups were prepared from nanostructured and <span class="hlt">microsized</span> PLGA/β-TCP composites respectively. Microroughened titanium-alloy (Ti6Al4V) implants served as positive intra-animal control, and pure PLGA implants as negative control. Cone-shaped implants were inserted in a random order unilaterally in the anterior cortex of the femoral shaft. Eight weeks after surgery, the mechanical strength of osteointegration of the implants was measured by a push-out test. The quality of new bone surrounding the implant was assessed by microcomputed tomography and histology. Implants made of nanostructured PLGA/β-TCP composite did not show improved mechanical osteointegration compared with the implants made of <span class="hlt">microsized</span> PLGA/β-TCP composite. In the intra-animal comparison, the push-out force of two PLGA/β-TCP composites was 35-60% of that obtained with Ti6Al4V implants. The implant materials did not result in distinct differences in quality of new bone surrounding the implant. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/960009','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/960009"><span>Self-Organized Growth of <span class="hlt">Microsized</span> Ge Wires on Si (111) Surfaces</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Xu,Z.; Zhang, Y.; Headrick, R.; Zhou, H.; Zhou, L.; Fukamachi, T.</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Microsized</span> Ge wires can appear spontaneously when grown on a vicinal Si (111) surface miscut by 4 along the [11-2] direction by using molecular-beam epitaxy. Time-resolved in situ grazing incidence small-angle scattering of x rays, atomic force microscopy, and micro-Raman scattering show that the formation of Ge microwires is due to coalescence of islands along the step edges and ripening of the structures accompanied by a partial consumption of the wetting layer.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S52C..02R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S52C..02R"><span>The fine structure of <span class="hlt">microseisms</span>: observations from a three-component array in Central France</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Riahi, N.; Saenger, E. H.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>We study the wave type composition and directionality of <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> in the frequency range 0.1 to 1.1 Hz using data from a temporary three-component seismic array in Central France. The data were acquired in April and November 2010 during four and eight days, respectively. Two seasonal snapshots of the ambient seismic wave field are thus available for a location in the vicinity of several large water bodies (North Sea, Atlantic Sea, and Mediterranean Sea). Fourier-domain beam-forming is applied simultaneously on all components to jointly estimate propagation (back azimuth, phase velocity) and polarization features as a function of frequency. We find that the relative contribution of Rayleigh and Love wave modes strongly varies by frequency as well as back azimuth. Body waves with narrow back azimuth ranges are also observed, in particular around the secondary <span class="hlt">microseism</span> peak (P waves from the North Sea) and around 0.7 Hz (SV waves with back azimuth NNW). Interestingly, the observed wave field composition and directionality does not differ much between the April and November snapshots, although seismic power is about 10 dB higher in November. Implications of these results for <span class="hlt">microseism</span> source studies and interferometry are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeoRL..42..316B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeoRL..42..316B"><span>Observation of deep water <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> in the North Atlantic Ocean using tide modulations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Beucler, Éric; Mocquet, Antoine; Schimmel, Martin; Chevrot, Sébastien; Quillard, Olivier; Vergne, Jérôme; Sylvander, Matthieu</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Ocean activity produces continuous and ubiquitous seismic energy mostly in the 2-20 s period band, known as microseismic noise. Between 2 and 10 s period, secondary <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> (SM) are generated by swell reflections close to the shores and/or by opposing swells in the deep ocean. However, unique conditions are required in order for surface waves generated by deep-ocean <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> to be observed on land. By comparing short-duration power spectral densities at both Atlantic shoreline and inland seismic stations, we show that ocean tides strongly modulate the seismic energy in a wide period band except between 2.5 and 5 s. This tidal proxy reveals the existence of an ex situ short-period contribution of the SM peak. Comparison with swell spectra at surrounding buoys suggests that the largest part of this extra energy comes from deep ocean-generated <span class="hlt">microseisms</span>. The energy modulation might be also used in numerical models of microseismic generation to constrain coastal reflection coefficients.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17376871','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17376871"><span>A <span class="hlt">gliding</span> lizard from the Early Cretaceous of China.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Li, Pi-Peng; Gao, Ke-Qin; Hou, Lian-Hai; Xu, Xing</p> <p>2007-03-27</p> <p><span class="hlt">Gliding</span> is an energetically efficient mode of locomotion that has evolved independently, and in different ways, in several tetrapod groups. Here, we report on an acrodontan lizard from the Early Cretaceous Jehol Group of China showing an array of morphological traits associated with <span class="hlt">gliding</span>. It represents the only known occurrence of this specialization in a fossil lizard and provides evidence of an Early Cretaceous ecological diversification into an aerial niche by crown-group squamates. The lizard has a dorsal-rib-supported patagium, a structure independently evolved in the Late Triassic basal lepidosauromorph kuehneosaurs and the extant agamid lizard Draco, revealing a surprising case of convergent evolution among lepidosauromorphans. A patagial character combination of much longer bilaterally than anteroposteriorly, significantly thicker along the leading edge than along the trailing edge, tapered laterally to form a wing tip, and secondarily supported by an array of linear collagen fibers is not common in gliders and enriches our knowledge of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> adaptations among tetrapods.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.S41A4419T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.S41A4419T"><span>Directionality of Ambient Noise on the Juan de Fuca Plate: Implications for Source Locations of the Primary and Secondary <span class="hlt">Microseism</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tian, Y.; Ritzwoller, M. H.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Based on cross-correlations computed from 61 ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) within the Juan de Fuca plate from the Cascadia Initiative experiment and 42 continental stations near the western US coast, we investigate the generation locations of the primary (11-20 sec period) and secondary (5-10 sec period) <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> in the northern Pacific Ocean by analyzing the directionality of the <span class="hlt">microseism</span> signals received in this region. (1) Ambient noise observed across the array is much different in the primary and secondary <span class="hlt">microseism</span> bands, both in its azimuthal content and seasonal variation, indicating different source generation locations. (2) The principal secondary <span class="hlt">microseism</span> signals propagate toward the east, consistent with source generation in deep water of the North Pacific, perhaps coincident with the region of body wave excitation observed by Gerstoft et al. [2008] and Landès et al. [2010]. (3) Local primary <span class="hlt">microseism</span> sources within and near the Juan de Fuca plate are implied by observations of the azimuthal dependence of the fundamental mode Rayleigh wave amplitudes as well as observations of precursory arrivals in cross-correlations of ambient noise. The strongest local generation region is observed northwest of the Juan de Fuca plate near the coast of British Columbia perhaps near Graham Island. Weaker local sources appear to be oceanward of Vancouver Island and southern Oregon. (4) High quality Green's functions are derived from cross-correlations between deep water OBSs and continental stations proving that deep water generated signals can efficiently propagate onto the continent and are well recorded by continental seismic stations, at least at periods longer than about 5 sec.In conclusion, the primary and secondary <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> are generated at different locations, with the secondary <span class="hlt">microseism</span> dominantly coming from deep-water sources and the source of primary <span class="hlt">microseism</span> having a significant component in the shallow waters of the eastern Pacific</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhDT........54E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhDT........54E"><span>Discriminants and Detectors: Seismological Studies of Tsunami Earthquakes and Hurricane <span class="hlt">Microseisms</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ebeling, Carl W.</p> <p></p> <p>High energy natural hazards have potential to cause great damage and significant loss of life, but understanding of many lags behind what is required to mitigate their impacts. Of specific concern here are the estimation of tsunami hazard in the eastern Mediterranean; the more timely identification of tsunami earthquakes; and the use of <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> to identify “missing” hurricanes, thus augmenting the traditional—but short, incomplete, and biased—observational hurricane record. Earthquake energy estimation and time- and frequency-domain time-series analyses applied to an array of historical analog and modern digital seismological data are used to address these problems. Improved estimations of the location, depth, moment magnitude, and focal mechanism of four of the largest Hellenic Arc earthquakes in the last century help to better understand seismic hazard there. Seismological reassessments combined with hydrodynamic simulations show that the tsunamis associated with two of them were not triggered by the earthquakes themselves but instead involved submarine slumping. Moments and estimates of radiated energy from 67 earthquakes taking place in the last twenty years in oceanic environments and recorded at regional and teleseismic distances are used to develop an empirical correction to the robust tsunami earthquake discriminant Theta. This extends its applicability to regional distances, thereby allowing earlier discrimination of tsunami earthquakes. <span class="hlt">Microseisms</span>, which result from the interaction of ocean swell generated by energetic storms, are shown here to carry information about parent hurricanes and under favorable conditions can be used to detect them. Power variations of <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> recorded at the Harvard, Massachusetts seismic station demonstrate that Saffir-Simpson category 5 hurricane Andrew (1992) can be identified when it is ˜2,000 km from the station and still at sea. Applied to an expanded data set of 66 hurricanes between 1992 and 2007 with</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19740010568','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19740010568"><span>A methodology for boost-<span class="hlt">glide</span> transport technology planning</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Repic, E. M.; Olson, G. A.; Milliken, R. J.</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>A systematic procedure is presented by which the relative economic value of technology factors affecting design, configuration, and operation of boost-<span class="hlt">glide</span> transport can be evaluated. Use of the methodology results in identification of first-order economic gains potentially achievable by projected advances in each of the definable, hypersonic technologies. Starting with a baseline vehicle, the formulas, procedures and forms which are integral parts of this methodology are developed. A demonstration of the methodology is presented for one specific boost-<span class="hlt">glide</span> system.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_7 --> <div id="page_8" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="141"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhRvB..95i4103L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhRvB..95i4103L"><span>Ubiquity of quantum zero-point fluctuations in dislocation <span class="hlt">glide</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Landeiro Dos Reis, Marie; Choudhury, Anshuman; Proville, Laurent</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>Modeling the dislocation <span class="hlt">glide</span> through atomic scale simulations in Al, Cu, and Ni and in solid solution alloys Al(Mg) and Cu(Ag), we show that in the course of the plastic deformation the variation of the crystal zero-point energy (ZPE) and the dislocation potential energy barriers are of opposite sign. The multiplicity of situations where we have observed the same trend allows us to conclude that quantum fluctuations, giving rise to the crystal ZPE, make easier the dislocation <span class="hlt">glide</span> in most materials, even those constituted of atoms heavier than H and He.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title14-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title14-vol1-sec29-71.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title14-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title14-vol1-sec29-71.pdf"><span>14 CFR 29.71 - Helicopter angle of <span class="hlt">glide</span>: Category B.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>... <span class="hlt">glide</span> must be determined in autorotation— (a) At the forward speed for minimum rate of descent as selected by the applicant; (b) At the forward speed for best <span class="hlt">glide</span> angle; (c) At maximum weight; and (d) At...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25788722','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25788722"><span>The descent of ant: field-measured performance of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> ants.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Munk, Yonatan; Yanoviak, Stephen P; Koehl, M A R; Dudley, Robert</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Gliding</span> ants avoid predatory attacks and potentially mortal consequences of dislodgement from rainforest canopy substrates by directing their aerial descent towards nearby tree trunks. The ecologically relevant measure of performance for <span class="hlt">gliding</span> ants is the ratio of net horizontal to vertical distance traveled over the course of a <span class="hlt">gliding</span> trajectory, or <span class="hlt">glide</span> index. To study variation in <span class="hlt">glide</span> index, we measured three-dimensional trajectories of Cephalotes atratus ants <span class="hlt">gliding</span> in natural rainforest habitats. We determined that righting phase duration, <span class="hlt">glide</span> angle, and path directness all significantly influence variation in <span class="hlt">glide</span> index. Unsuccessful landing attempts result in the ant bouncing off its target and being forced to make a second landing attempt. Our results indicate that ants are not passive gliders and that they exert active control over the aerodynamic forces they experience during their descent, despite their apparent lack of specialized control surfaces.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://arc.lib.montana.edu/snow-science/item/1662','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://arc.lib.montana.edu/snow-science/item/1662"><span>Time lapse photography as an approach to understanding <span class="hlt">glide</span> avalanche activity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Hendrikx, Jordy; Peitzsch, Erich H.; Fagre, Daniel B.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Avalanches resulting from <span class="hlt">glide</span> cracks are notoriously difficult to forecast, but are a recurring problem for numerous avalanche forecasting programs. In some cases <span class="hlt">glide</span> cracks are observed to open and then melt away in situ. In other cases, they open and then fail catastrophically as large, full-depth avalanches. Our understanding and management of these phenomena are currently limited. It is thought that an increase in the rate of snow <span class="hlt">gliding</span> occurs prior to full-depth avalanche activity so frequent observation of <span class="hlt">glide</span> crack movement can provide an index of instability. During spring 2011 in Glacier National Park, Montana, USA, we began an approach to track <span class="hlt">glide</span> crack avalanche activity using a time-lapse camera focused on a southwest facing <span class="hlt">glide</span> crack. This crack melted in-situ without failing as a <span class="hlt">glide</span> avalanche, while other nearby <span class="hlt">glide</span> cracks on north through southeast aspects failed. In spring 2012, a camera was aimed at a large and productive <span class="hlt">glide</span> crack adjacent to the Going to the Sun Road. We captured three unique <span class="hlt">glide</span> events in the field of view. Unfortunately, all of them either failed very quickly, or during periods of obscured view, so measurements of <span class="hlt">glide</span> rate could not be obtained. However, we compared the hourly meteorological variables during the period of <span class="hlt">glide</span> activity to the same variables prior to <span class="hlt">glide</span> activity. The variables air temperature, relative humidity, air pressure, incoming and reflected long wave radiation, SWE, total precipitation, and snow depth were found to be statistically different for our cases examined. We propose that these are some of the potential precursors for <span class="hlt">glide</span> avalanche activity, but do urge caution in their use, due to the simple approach and small data set size. It is hoped that by introducing a workable method to easily record <span class="hlt">glide</span> crack movement, combined with ongoing analysis of the associated meteorological data, we will improve our understanding of when, or if, <span class="hlt">glide</span> avalanche activity will ensue.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=level+AND+crossing&id=EJ993777','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=level+AND+crossing&id=EJ993777"><span>Illusory Continuity without Sufficient Sound Energy to Fill a Temporal Gap: Examples of Crossing <span class="hlt">Glide</span> Tones</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kuroda, Tsuyoshi; Nakajima, Yoshitaka; Eguchi, Shuntarou</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The gap transfer illusion is an auditory illusion where a temporal gap inserted in a longer <span class="hlt">glide</span> tone is perceived as if it were in a crossing shorter <span class="hlt">glide</span> tone. Psychophysical and phenomenological experiments were conducted to examine the effects of sound-pressure-level (SPL) differences between crossing <span class="hlt">glides</span> on the occurrence of the gap…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title14-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title14-vol3-sec121-360.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title14-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title14-vol3-sec121-360.pdf"><span>14 CFR 121.360 - Ground proximity warning-<span class="hlt">glide</span> slope deviation alerting system.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ground proximity warning-<span class="hlt">glide</span> slope... Equipment Requirements § 121.360 Ground proximity warning-<span class="hlt">glide</span> slope deviation alerting system. (a) No... turbine-powered airplane unless it is equipped with a ground proximity warning/<span class="hlt">glide</span> slope...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=relative+AND+pressures&pg=4&id=EJ993777','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=relative+AND+pressures&pg=4&id=EJ993777"><span>Illusory Continuity without Sufficient Sound Energy to Fill a Temporal Gap: Examples of Crossing <span class="hlt">Glide</span> Tones</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kuroda, Tsuyoshi; Nakajima, Yoshitaka; Eguchi, Shuntarou</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The gap transfer illusion is an auditory illusion where a temporal gap inserted in a longer <span class="hlt">glide</span> tone is perceived as if it were in a crossing shorter <span class="hlt">glide</span> tone. Psychophysical and phenomenological experiments were conducted to examine the effects of sound-pressure-level (SPL) differences between crossing <span class="hlt">glides</span> on the occurrence of the gap…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title14-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title14-vol3-sec171-267.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title14-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title14-vol3-sec171-267.pdf"><span>14 CFR 171.267 - <span class="hlt">Glide</span> path automatic monitor system.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false <span class="hlt">Glide</span> path automatic monitor system. 171.267 Section 171.267 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) NAVIGATIONAL FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES Interim Standard Microwave...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24964089','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24964089"><span><span class="hlt">Gliding</span> swifts attain laminar flow over rough wings.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lentink, David; de Kat, Roeland</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Swifts are among the most aerodynamically refined <span class="hlt">gliding</span> birds. However, the overlapping vanes and protruding shafts of their primary feathers make swift wings remarkably rough for their size. Wing roughness height is 1-2% of chord length on the upper surface--10,000 times rougher than sailplane wings. Sailplanes depend on extreme wing smoothness to increase the area of laminar flow on the wing surface and minimize drag for extended <span class="hlt">glides</span>. To understand why the swift does not rely on smooth wings, we used a stethoscope to map laminar flow over preserved wings in a low-turbulence wind tunnel. By combining laminar area, lift, and drag measurements, we show that average area of laminar flow on swift wings is 69% (n = 3; std 13%) of their total area during <span class="hlt">glides</span> that maximize flight distance and duration--similar to high-performance sailplanes. Our aerodynamic analysis indicates that swifts attain laminar flow over their rough wings because their wing size is comparable to the distance the air travels (after a roughness-induced perturbation) before it transitions from laminar to turbulent. To interpret the function of swift wing roughness, we simulated its effect on smooth model wings using physical models. This manipulation shows that laminar flow is reduced and drag increased at high speeds. At the speeds at which swifts cruise, however, swift-like roughness prolongs laminar flow and reduces drag. This feature gives small birds with rudimentary wings an edge during the evolution of <span class="hlt">glide</span> performance.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JMPSo..97..299A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JMPSo..97..299A"><span>Reprint of: Dynamics of discrete screw dislocations on <span class="hlt">glide</span> directions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Alicandro, R.; De Luca, L.; Garroni, A.; Ponsiglione, M.</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>We consider a simple discrete model for screw dislocations in crystals. Using a variational discrete scheme we study the motion of a configuration of dislocations toward low energy configurations. We deduce an effective fully overdamped dynamics that follows the maximal dissipation criterion introduced in Cermelli and Gurtin (1999) and predicts motion along the <span class="hlt">glide</span> directions of the crystal.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=dress+AND+school&pg=3&id=EJ976325','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=dress+AND+school&pg=3&id=EJ976325"><span>Kick, <span class="hlt">Glide</span>, Pole! Cross-Country Skiing Fun (Part II)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Duoos, Bridget A.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Part I of Kick, <span class="hlt">Glide</span>, Pole! Cross-Country Skiing Fun, which was published in last issue, discussed how to select cross-country ski equipment, dress for the activity and the biomechanics of the diagonal stride. Part II focuses on teaching the diagonal stride technique and begins with a progression of indoor activities. Incorporating this fun,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4070913','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4070913"><span><span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Swifts Attain Laminar Flow over Rough Wings</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Lentink, David; de Kat, Roeland</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Swifts are among the most aerodynamically refined <span class="hlt">gliding</span> birds. However, the overlapping vanes and protruding shafts of their primary feathers make swift wings remarkably rough for their size. Wing roughness height is 1–2% of chord length on the upper surface—10,000 times rougher than sailplane wings. Sailplanes depend on extreme wing smoothness to increase the area of laminar flow on the wing surface and minimize drag for extended <span class="hlt">glides</span>. To understand why the swift does not rely on smooth wings, we used a stethoscope to map laminar flow over preserved wings in a low-turbulence wind tunnel. By combining laminar area, lift, and drag measurements, we show that average area of laminar flow on swift wings is 69% (n = 3; std 13%) of their total area during <span class="hlt">glides</span> that maximize flight distance and duration—similar to high-performance sailplanes. Our aerodynamic analysis indicates that swifts attain laminar flow over their rough wings because their wing size is comparable to the distance the air travels (after a roughness-induced perturbation) before it transitions from laminar to turbulent. To interpret the function of swift wing roughness, we simulated its effect on smooth model wings using physical models. This manipulation shows that laminar flow is reduced and drag increased at high speeds. At the speeds at which swifts cruise, however, swift-like roughness prolongs laminar flow and reduces drag. This feature gives small birds with rudimentary wings an edge during the evolution of <span class="hlt">glide</span> performance. PMID:24964089</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19730014874&hterms=vehicle+material&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dvehicle%2Bmaterial','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19730014874&hterms=vehicle+material&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dvehicle%2Bmaterial"><span>The environment and materials for <span class="hlt">glide</span> reentry vehicles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Deutsch, G. C.</p> <p>1973-01-01</p> <p>The environmental conditions to which a large <span class="hlt">glide</span> reentry vehicle such as the space shuttle is subjected is discussed. A comparison is made with the state of the art for materials and structures to meet this environmental threat. The options that are available are stressed as are the areas where additional research and development is required.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JMPSo..92...87A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JMPSo..92...87A"><span>Dynamics of discrete screw dislocations on <span class="hlt">glide</span> directions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Alicandro, R.; De Luca, L.; Garroni, A.; Ponsiglione, M.</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>We consider a simple discrete model for screw dislocations in crystals. Using a variational discrete scheme we study the motion of a configuration of dislocations toward low energy configurations. We deduce an effective fully overdamped dynamics that follows the maximal dissipation criterion introduced in Cermelli and Gurtin (1999) and predicts motion along the <span class="hlt">glide</span> directions of the crystal.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=biomechanics+AND+sport&pg=2&id=EJ976325','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=biomechanics+AND+sport&pg=2&id=EJ976325"><span>Kick, <span class="hlt">Glide</span>, Pole! Cross-Country Skiing Fun (Part II)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Duoos, Bridget A.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Part I of Kick, <span class="hlt">Glide</span>, Pole! Cross-Country Skiing Fun, which was published in last issue, discussed how to select cross-country ski equipment, dress for the activity and the biomechanics of the diagonal stride. Part II focuses on teaching the diagonal stride technique and begins with a progression of indoor activities. Incorporating this fun,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3849649','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3849649"><span>The enigma of eugregarine epicytic folds: where <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility originates?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Background In the past decades, many studies focused on the cell motility of apicomplexan invasive stages as they represent a potential target for chemotherapeutic intervention. Gregarines (Conoidasida, Gregarinasina) are a heterogeneous group that parasitize invertebrates and urochordates, and are thought to be an early branching lineage of Apicomplexa. As characteristic of apicomplexan zoites, gregarines are covered by a complicated pellicle, consisting of the plasma membrane and the closely apposed inner membrane complex, which is associated with a number of cytoskeletal elements. The cell cortex of eugregarines, the epicyte, is more complicated than that of other apicomplexans, as it forms various superficial structures. Results The epicyte of the eugregarines, Gregarina cuneata, G. polymorpha and G. steini, analysed in the present study is organised in longitudinal folds covering the entire cell. In mature trophozoites and gamonts, each epicytic fold exhibits similar ectoplasmic structures and is built up from the plasma membrane, inner membrane complex, 12-nm filaments, rippled dense structures and basal lamina. In addition, rib-like myonemes and an ectoplasmic network are frequently observed. Under experimental conditions, eugregarines showed varied speeds and paths of simple linear <span class="hlt">gliding</span>. In all three species, actin and myosin were associated with the pellicle, and this actomyosin complex appeared to be restricted to the lateral parts of the epicytic folds. Treatment of living gamonts with jasplakinolide and cytochalasin D confirmed that actin actively participates in gregarine <span class="hlt">gliding</span>. Contributions to <span class="hlt">gliding</span> of specific subcellular components are discussed. Conclusions Cell motility in gregarines and other apicomplexans share features in common, i.e. a three-layered pellicle, an actomyosin complex, and the polymerisation of actin during <span class="hlt">gliding</span>. Although the general architecture and supramolecular organisation of the pellicle is not correlated with</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..11.7736B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009EGUGA..11.7736B"><span>Theoretical aspects and the experience of studying spectra of low-frequency <span class="hlt">microseisms</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Birialtsev, E.; Vildanov, A.; Eronina, E.; Rizhov, D.; Rizhov, V.; Sharapov, I.</p> <p>2009-04-01</p> <p>The appearance of low-frequency spectral anomalies in natural microseismic noise over oil and gas deposits is observed since 1989 in different oil and gas regions (S. Arutunov, S. Dangel, G. Goloshubin). Several methods of prospecting and exploration of oil and gas deposits based on this effect (NTK ANCHAR, Spectraseis AG). There are several points of view (S. Arutunov, E. Birialtsev, Y. Podladchikov) about the physical model of effect which are based on fundamentally different geophysical mechanisms. One of them is based on the hypothesis of generation of the microseismic noise in to an oil and gas reservoir. Another point of view is based on the mechanism of the filtering microseismic noise in the geological medium where oil and gas reservoir is the contrast layer. For the first hypothesis an adequate quantity physical-mathematical model is absent. Second hypothesis has a discrepancy of distribution energy on theoretical calculated frequencies of waveguides «ground surface - oil deposit» eigenmodes. The fundamental frequency (less than 1 Hz for most cases) should have a highest amplitude as opposed to the regular observation range is 1-10 Hz. During 2005-2008 years by specialists of «Gradient» JSC were processed microsesmic signals from more 50 geological objects. The parameters of low-frequency anomalies were compared with medium properties (porosity, saturation and viscosity) defined according to drilling, allowed to carry out a statistical analysis and to establish some correlation. This paper presents results of theoretical calculation of spectra of <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> in the zone of oil and gas deposits by mathematical modeling of propagation of seismic waves and comparing spectra of model <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> with actually observed. Mathematical modeling of microseismic vibrations spectra showed good correlation of theoretical spectra and observed in practice. This is proof the applicability of microseismic methods of exploration for oil and gas. Correlation between</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.S43B2527V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.S43B2527V"><span>Investigation of Apparent Seismic Velocity Changes Caused by <span class="hlt">Microseism</span> Noise Source Variability</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Volk, M. F.; Bean, C. J.; Lokmer, I.; Craig, D.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Currently there is strong interest in monitoring temporal changes in seismic wave velocity in various geological settings. These settings can range from volcano monitoring to reservoir monitoring amongst others. Green's functions are often used to observe temporal variations in seismic wave velocity as their arrival times contain information about velocity changes. Green's functions are typically retrieved by cross correlating ambient noise recorded at given pair of stations. Theoretically the recorded wavefields used for the cross correlation should be diffuse. For applications in seismic imagery, the background noise sources should be uniformly distributed in space or the wavefield must be highly scattered but neither condition typically occur in nature. However temporal and spatial variations of non-uniformly distributed noise sources may lead to apparent changes in Green's functions which are related to the source not the path. This could lead to a misinterpretation of temporal changes in wave velocity. We track the spatial and temporal distribution of the noise sources using seismic arrays, located in Ireland. It is a good location in which to study these effects, as it is tectonically very quiet and is relatively close to large <span class="hlt">microseism</span> noise sources in the North Atlantic, allowing a quantification of noise source heterogeneity. The temporal variations in seismic wave velocity are calculated and compared to the temporal and spatial distribution of the <span class="hlt">microseism</span> noise sources. The initial results show how the direct arrival waveform and the arrival time of the Green's functions correlate with spatial and temporal variability of the <span class="hlt">microseism</span> noise sources. Under these conditions we also explore the minimum noise trace length required for the Green's functions to converge. We quantify the degree to which apparent velocity variations using direct arrivals are caused by changes in the sources and assess the use of coda wave arrivals in mitigating source</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.S51C2696M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.S51C2696M"><span>Simultaneous modeling of microbaroms and <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> using CIP-CUP scheme</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Matsumura, M.; Kanao, M.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Oceanic surface gravity waves called as swells with period of several seconds appear anytime and anywhere on the ocean. They continuously radiate atmospheric acoustic waves called as microbaroms, while they also generate seismic surface waves called as <span class="hlt">microseisms</span>. We can continuously observe both microbaroms and <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> near the coast, and using these data we could estimate the wave height of oceanic swells. We could also estimate atmospheric temperature and wind, and solid earth density because they affect the propagation velocity of microbaroms and <span class="hlt">microseisms</span>. For the estimation we have developed a coupled atmosphere-ocean-solid earth model. If we connect independent parts of atmosphere, ocean and solid earth, we need to impose complicated boundary conditions. Instead we have modeled atmosphere, ocean and solid earth as a unified continuum to exclude the boundary conditions, using CIP-CUP (Constrained Interpolation Profile - Combined and Unified Procedure) scheme. This method makes it possible to precisely compute the advection part and to stably compute the ocean-atmosphere and ocean-solid earth boundaries, which have considerable gap of density and sound speed. Our model successfully simulates a theoretical microbarom radiation [Arendt and Fritts, 2000]: 1) A microbarom is radiated by two swells propagating in opposite directions. 2) The period of the microbarom is half of the swells'. 3) The amplitude of the radiated pressure perturbation is in proportion to the squared vertical velocity of the swells. We will also compare the features of computed seismic waves with theory [Longuet-Higgins, 1950], which is very similar to the one for microbaroms.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017APExp..10a7202L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017APExp..10a7202L"><span>Laser-induced actuation of individual <span class="hlt">microsize</span> liquid metal droplets on an open solid surface</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Liu, Wei; Wang, Chunqing; Dou, Guangbin; Tian, Yanhong; Yang, Lei</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>The actuation of <span class="hlt">microsize</span> liquid metal droplets on an open solid surface with laser offset heating is reported in this work. The process allows the droplets to move towards the laser beam center. The analysis of the actuations showed that the droplets were predominantly driven by the thermally induced wettability alteration on the solid; in contrast, Marangoni flow and vapor recoil weakened the motion of the droplets. This indicates that a localized thermal gradient was the driving force for droplet motion and suggests that it may be an alternative actuation technique in manipulating liquid metal droplets for microsystems.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_8 --> <div id="page_9" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="161"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhDT........35T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhDT........35T"><span>Ambient Noise Tomography and <span class="hlt">Microseism</span> Directionalities across the Juan de Fuca Plate</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tian, Ye</p> <p></p> <p>Ambient noise tomography has been well developed over the past decade and proven to be effective in studying the crust and upper mantle structure beneath the Earth’s continents. With new seismic array deployments beginning in the oceans, the application of the tomographic methods based on ambient noise observed at ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) has become an important topic for research. In this thesis, I investigate the application of ambient noise tomography to oceanic bottom seismic data recorded by the Cascadia Initiative experiment across the Juan de Fuca plate. With higher local noise levels recorded by OBSs, I find that traditional data processing procedures used in ambient noise tomography produce measurable Rayleigh wave Green’s functions between deep ocean stations, whereas the shallow water stations are severely contaminated by both tilt noise and compliance noise and require new methods of processing. Because the local noise level varies across the study region, four semi-independent studies are conducted to both utilize the quieter deep-water stations and to address the problem posed by noisy shallow water stations. First, I construct an age-dependent shear wave speed model of the crust and uppermost mantle with 18 deep-water stations near the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The model possess a shallow low shear velocity zone near the ridge and has its sedimentary thickness, lithospheric thickness, and mantle shear wave speeds increase systematically with age Second, I investigate the locations and mechanisms of <span class="hlt">microseism</span> generation using ambient noise cross-correlations constructed between 61 OBSs and 42 continental stations near the western US coast and find that the primary and secondary <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> are generated at different locations and possibly have different physical mechanisms. Third, I show that tilt and compliance noise on the vertical components of the OBSs can be reduced substantially using the horizontal components and the differential</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S53C2524K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S53C2524K"><span>Antarctic <span class="hlt">Microseism</span>: Relationship with Sea Ice Extent and the Southern Annular Mode</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kandell, A.; Lekic, V.; Stine, A.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Background seismic noise intensity provides information about the presence of environmental forcings as well as factors that attenuate the excitation or propagation of seismic waves. We focus on the influence of atmospheric circulation and sea ice on <span class="hlt">microseism</span> in Antarctica. The dominant mode of southern hemisphere extratropical circulation variability is the southern annular mode. When the southern annular mode index is high, the southern jet strengthens and tends to contract closer to the Antarctic land mass, which we hypothesize contributes to the generation of Antarctic <span class="hlt">microseism</span>. In contrast, sea ice inhibits the formation of large ocean waves which tends to damp the intensity of <span class="hlt">microseism</span>. We compute correlations between monthly averages of the southern annular mode and sea ice extent with microseismic power at a range of frequencies. We focus our analysis on three-component data from four broadband Antarctic seismic stations: Palmer Station (PMSA), Scott Base (SBA), Dumont d'Urville Station (DRV), and the South Pole (QSPA). We calculate microseismic power from 2mHz to 250mHz in two-hour segments. At each frequency and for each month, we calculated several percentiles of the segment noise levels. These values were correlated with the corresponding month's southern annular mode strength and sea ice extent over the years each station was operational. We find that the relationship between seismic noise amplitude, the southern annular mode and sea ice extent varies with month of year, frequency, and station location: 1 - Southern Annular Mode: In winter months (June, July, August), the southern annular mode and <span class="hlt">microseism</span> power at frequencies higher than 30mHz are strongly correlated at the coastal stations. At lower frequencies, the correlation exhibits a strong seasonal periodicity at PMSA, while at DRV and SBA significant correlation is only observed in April and May, respectively. QSPA, the only station within the continental interior, exhibits frequency</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25591858','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25591858"><span>A comparison of <span class="hlt">glide</span> force characteristics between 2 prefilled insulin lispro pens.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rees, Tina M; Lennartz, Amanda H; Ignaut, Debra A</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Glide</span> force, average <span class="hlt">glide</span> force, and <span class="hlt">glide</span> force variability of the insulin lispro 200 units/mL pen (Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA) were compared to the Humalog KwikPen 100 units/mL pen (hereafter, KwikPen; Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA). Data were collected on 2 doses, 2 injection speeds, and 2 needle types. Insulin lispro 200 units/mL pen showed significantly lower maximum <span class="hlt">glide</span> force, average <span class="hlt">glide</span> force, and <span class="hlt">glide</span> force variability than the KwikPen across all combinations of dose size, dose speed, and needle type. The lower <span class="hlt">glide</span> force observed with the insulin lispro 200 units/mL pen offers another treatment option for patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes who require greater than 20 units of mealtime insulin daily.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24641086','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24641086"><span>The <span class="hlt">gliding</span> speed of migrating birds: slow and safe or fast and risky?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Horvitz, Nir; Sapir, Nir; Liechti, Felix; Avissar, Roni; Mahrer, Isaac; Nathan, Ran</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>Aerodynamic theory postulates that <span class="hlt">gliding</span> airspeed, a major flight performance component for soaring avian migrants, scales with bird size and wing morphology. We tested this prediction, and the role of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> altitude and soaring conditions, using atmospheric simulations and radar tracks of 1346 birds from 12 species. <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> airspeed did not scale with bird size and wing morphology, and unexpectedly converged to a narrow range. To explain this discrepancy, we propose that soaring-<span class="hlt">gliding</span> birds adjust their <span class="hlt">gliding</span> airspeed according to the risk of grounding or switching to costly flapping flight. Introducing the Risk Aversion Flight Index (RAFI, the ratio of actual to theoretical risk-averse <span class="hlt">gliding</span> airspeed), we found that inter- and intraspecific variation in RAFI positively correlated with wing loading, and negatively correlated with convective thermal conditions and <span class="hlt">gliding</span> altitude, respectively. We propose that risk-sensitive behaviour modulates the evolution (morphology) and ecology (response to environmental conditions) of bird soaring flight.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23882848','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23882848"><span>Dominant formation of the <span class="hlt">microsized</span> carbon coils by a short time SF6 flow incorporation during the initial deposition stage.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jeon, Young-Chul; Yi, Soung Soo; Kim, Sung-Hoon</p> <p>2013-08-01</p> <p>By SF6 gas incorporation for relatively short time during the initial deposition stage, carbon coils could be formed on nickel catalyst layer-deposited silicon oxide substrate using C2H2 and H2 as source gases under thermal chemical vapor deposition system. The characteristics (formation density and morphology) of as-grown carbon coils were investigated as a function of SF6 flow injection time. 5-min SF6 flow injection time is appropriate to produce the dominant <span class="hlt">microsized</span> geometry for carbon coils without the appearance of the nanosized carbon coils. The geometry for the <span class="hlt">microsized</span> carbon coils follows a typical double-helix structure and the shape of the rings constituting the coils is a flat-type. Fluorine's intrinsic etching characteristics for the nanosized carbon coils during the initial deposition stage seems to be the cause for the dominant formation of the <span class="hlt">microsized</span> carbon coils in the case of 5-min SF6 flow injection time.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.S13B2017G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.S13B2017G"><span>Modeling <span class="hlt">microseism</span> generation off Southern California with a numerical wave model: Coastal wave reflection and open ocean interactions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Graham, N.; Clayton, R. W.; Kedar, S.; Webb, F.; Jones, C. E.</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>Application of correlation methods to monitoring temporal variations for relatively short time windows can lead to a violation of the underlying assumption of the technique, that the sources are distributed randomly off either end of the station-station path. If this assumption is not met, the technique estimate can be biased by a favored projection of the Green’s function, which would lead to an incorrect travel time estimate and consequently an incorrect velocity estimate. Since monitoring temporal changes in geological structures of crustal scale is dominated by the ocean microseismic band (~3-10 seconds), analysis of the <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> source distribution is of particular interest. We present the first ever parameterizations of <span class="hlt">microseism</span> generation by coastal reflection of ocean gravity waves. The parameterizations have been implemented in a numerical wave model covering the waters off Southern California. Using the theory of Longuet-Higgins [1950], we modeled the <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> generation by computing the wave-wave interaction component of the swell with its coastal-reflected component, modified by a depth-dependent resonance term, along the Southern California Coast. Three simulations were conducted covering September 2007 to July 2009. In one simulation, no coastal reflection of wave energy was included, with simulated <span class="hlt">microseism</span> generation only via “open ocean” wave-wave interactions. Two other simulations tested simple parameterizations of coastal wave reflection based on a) specular, and b) scattered reflection from coastline segments. We compare the time-dependent <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> amplitude to seismic observations throughout Southern California. We also compare the modeled source locations to those obtained by a location method based on accumulating the zero-lag correlations between data and synthetic surface waves generated at a mesh of potential source locations. Preliminary results show good agreement between model results and observations, and indicate</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16449563','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16449563"><span>The relationship between 3-D kinematics and <span class="hlt">gliding</span> performance in the southern flying squirrel, Glaucomys volans.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bishop, Kristin L</p> <p>2006-02-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Gliding</span> is the simplest form of flight, yet relatively little is known about its mechanics in animals. The goal of this study was to describe the body position and performance of a <span class="hlt">gliding</span> mammal and to identify correlates between kinematics and aerodynamic performance. To do this, I used a pair of high-speed digital cameras to record a portion of the middle of <span class="hlt">glides</span> by southern flying squirrels, Glaucomys volans. The squirrels launched from a height of 4 m and landed on a vertical pole. Reflective markers were applied to anatomical landmarks and the 3-D coordinates of these points were computed to describe the kinematics of the <span class="hlt">glides</span>. From these data I estimated the lift and drag generated during the <span class="hlt">glide</span>, and correlated these variables with <span class="hlt">gliding</span> performance as measured by <span class="hlt">glide</span> angle, <span class="hlt">glide</span> speed and stability. In the majority of the <span class="hlt">glide</span> sequences the squirrels accelerated in the downward direction and accelerated horizontally forward as they moved through the calibrated volume in the middle of the <span class="hlt">glide</span> trajectory, rather than exhibiting a steady <span class="hlt">glide</span> in which the body weight is balanced by the resultant aerodynamic force. Compared to human engineered airfoils, the angles of attack used by the squirrels were unexpectedly high, ranging from 35.4 degrees to 53.5 degrees , far above the angle of attack at which an aircraft wing would typically stall. As expected based on aerodynamic theory, there was a negative correlation between angle of attack and lift coefficient, indicating that the wings are stalled, and a positive correlation between angle of attack and drag coefficient. Also as expected, there was a negative correlation between lift-to-drag ratio and angle of attack, as increasing angle of attack produced both less lift and more drag. Within <span class="hlt">glides</span>, there was a strong correlation between nose-down pitching rotations and limb movements that tended to increase the angle of attack of the wing membrane, suggesting that the animals actively control</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JCHyd.134....1S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JCHyd.134....1S"><span>Coupled factors influencing detachment of nano- and <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> particles from primary minima</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Shen, Chongyang; Lazouskaya, Volha; Jin, Yan; Li, Baoguo; Ma, Zhiqiang; Zheng, Wenjuan; Huang, Yuanfang</p> <p>2012-06-01</p> <p>This study examined the detachments of nano- and <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> colloids from primary minima in the presence of cation exchange by laboratory column experiments. Colloids were initially deposited in columns packed with glass beads at 0.2 M CaCl2 in the primary minima of Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) interaction energies. Then, the columns were flushed with NaCl solutions with different ionic strengths (i.e., 0.001, 0.01, 0.1 and 0.2 M). Detachments were observed at all ionic strengths and were particularly significant for the nanoparticle. The detachments increased with increasing electrolyte concentration for the nanoparticle whereas increased from 0.001 M to 0.01 M and decreased with further increasing electrolyte concentration for the <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> colloid. The observations were attributed to coupled influence of cation exchange, short-range repulsion, surface roughness, surface charge heterogeneity, and deposition in the secondary minima. The detachments of colloids from primary minima challenge the common belief that colloid interaction in primary minimum is irreversible and resistant to disturbance in solution ionic strength and composition. Although the significance of surface roughness, surface charge heterogeneity, and secondary minima on colloid deposition has been widely recognized, our study implies that they also play important roles in colloid detachment. Whereas colloid detachment is frequently associated with decrease of ionic strength, our results show that increase of ionic strength can also cause detachment due to influence of cation exchange.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16572210','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16572210"><span>On-chip extrusion of lipid vesicles and tubes through <span class="hlt">microsized</span> apertures.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dittrich, Petra S; Heule, Martin; Renaud, Philippe; Manz, Andreas</p> <p>2006-04-01</p> <p>In this work we present the formation of micrometre-sized lipid vesicles and tubes with perfectly homogeneous diameter and extraordinary length. The method is a novel approach for unconventional fabrication of soft-matter microstructured devices based on the combination of top-down and bottom-up fabrication processes. Photolithography techniques are applied to fabricate <span class="hlt">microsized</span> apertures that provide the requirements to form lipid structures with predictable size and to align and guide the vesicles and tubes in microstructured channels. The formation is facilitated by self-assembly of polar lipids to a lipid membrane that is afterwards forced to undergo a shape transformation by extrusion through a <span class="hlt">microsized</span> aperture. Both the geometrical restriction by the small aperture and the pressure difference between the top and bottom sides of the aperture determine the form and length of the vesicles and tubes. A strong pressure difference favors the formation of lipid tubes, while a low pressure difference results in the formation of vesicle bunches with spherical and cylindrical shapes. Potential applications for the formed lipid structures could be as microreactors and transport channels as well as in the construction of flexible microfluidic networks.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016Nanos...8.6810M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016Nanos...8.6810M"><span>Single potassium niobate nano/<span class="hlt">microsized</span> particles as local mechano-optical Brownian probes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mor, Flavio M.; Sienkiewicz, Andrzej; Magrez, Arnaud; Forró, László; Jeney, Sylvia</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>Perovskite alkaline niobates, due to their strong nonlinear optical properties, including birefringence and the capability to produce second-harmonic generation (SHG) signals, attract a lot of attention as potential candidates for applications as local nano/<span class="hlt">microsized</span> mechano-optical probes. Here, we report on an implementation of photonic force microscopy (PFM) to explore the Brownian motion and optical trappability of monocrystalline potassium niobate (KNbO3) nano/<span class="hlt">microsized</span> particles having sizes within the range of 50 to 750 nm. In particular, we exploit the anisotropic translational diffusive regime of the Brownian motion to quantify thermal fluctuations and optical forces of singly-trapped KNbO3 particles within the optical trapping volume of a PFM microscope. We also show that, under near-infrared (NIR) excitation of the highly focused laser beam of the PFM microscope, a single optically-trapped KNbO3 particle reveals a strong SHG signal manifested by a narrow peak (λem = 532 nm) at half the excitation wavelength (λex = 1064 nm). Moreover, we demonstrate that the thus induced SHG emission can be used as a local light source that is capable of optically exciting molecules of an organic dye, Rose Bengal (RB), which adhere to the particle surface, through the mechanism of luminescence energy transfer (LET).Perovskite alkaline niobates, due to their strong nonlinear optical properties, including birefringence and the capability to produce second-harmonic generation (SHG) signals, attract a lot of attention as potential candidates for applications as local nano/<span class="hlt">microsized</span> mechano-optical probes. Here, we report on an implementation of photonic force microscopy (PFM) to explore the Brownian motion and optical trappability of monocrystalline potassium niobate (KNbO3) nano/<span class="hlt">microsized</span> particles having sizes within the range of 50 to 750 nm. In particular, we exploit the anisotropic translational diffusive regime of the Brownian motion to quantify thermal</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AGUFM.S43A2814D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AGUFM.S43A2814D"><span>An Investigation Into the Range of Sea State Conditions Necessary for the Generation of Seafloor Pressures and Secondary <span class="hlt">Microseisms</span> in the Northeast Atlantic, West of Ireland</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Donne, S. E.; Bean, C. J.; Dias, F.; Christodoulides, P.</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>Ocean generated <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> propagate mainly as Rayleigh and Love waves and are a result of the mechanical coupling between the ocean and the solid earth. There are two types of <span class="hlt">microseism</span>, primary and secondary. Primary <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> are generated when a travelling ocean wave enters shallow water or coastal regions and the associated pressure profile, which decays exponentially with depth, is non zero at the seafloor. Secondary <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> on the other hand are generated by the second order non linear effect associated with a standing wave, through ocean wave- wave interactions. Secondary <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> can therefore be generated in any water depth. The conditions required to generate secondary <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> through wave- wave interactions are presented in Longuet-Higgins (1950) through the interaction of two travelling waves with the same wave period at an angle of 180 degrees. Equivalent surface pressure density (p2l) is modelled within the numerical ocean wave model, Wavewatch III and is the <span class="hlt">microseism</span> source term. This work investigates the theoretical pressures associated with the interaction of two travelling waves with varying wave periods and wave amplitude at a range of incident angles. Theoretical seafloor pressures are calculated off the Southwest coast of Ireland and are compared with terrestrially recorded <span class="hlt">microseism</span> data as well as oceanographic parameters and measured seafloor pressures. The results indicate that a broad range of sea state conditions can generate second order pressures at the seafloor which are consistent with measured seafloor measurements in the same location. While secondary <span class="hlt">microseism</span> amplitudes may be used to infer ocean wave parameters this work has implications for doing so and these will be presented. Local seismic arrays in Ireland allow us to monitor and track the spatiotemporal evolution of these <span class="hlt">microseism</span> source regions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28867819','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28867819"><span><span class="hlt">Gliding</span> motility powers invasion and egress in Apicomplexa.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Frénal, Karine; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Lebrun, Maryse; Soldati-Favre, Dominique</p> <p>2017-09-04</p> <p>Protozoan parasites have developed elaborate motility systems that facilitate infection and dissemination. For example, amoebae use actin-rich membrane extensions called pseudopodia, whereas Kinetoplastida are propelled by microtubule-containing flagella. By contrast, the motile and invasive stages of the Apicomplexa - a phylum that contains the important human pathogens Plasmodium falciparum (which causes malaria) and Toxoplasma gondii (which causes toxoplasmosis) - have a unique machinery called the glideosome, which is composed of an actomyosin system that underlies the plasma membrane. The glideosome promotes substrate-dependent <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility, which powers migration across biological barriers, as well as active host cell entry and egress from infected cells. In this Review, we discuss the discovery of the principles that govern <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility, the characterization of the molecular machinery involved, and its impact on parasite invasion and egress from infected cells.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhBio..11f6006G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhBio..11f6006G"><span>Circular random motion in diatom <span class="hlt">gliding</span> under isotropic conditions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gutiérrez-Medina, Braulio; Jiménez Guerra, Andrés; Peña Maldonado, Ana Iris; Covarrubias Rubio, Yadiralia; Viridiana García Meza, Jessica</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>How cells migrate has been investigated primarily for the case of trajectories composed by joined straight segments. In contrast, little is known when cellular motion follows intrinsically curved paths. Here, we use time-lapse optical microscopy and automated trajectory tracking to investigate how individual cells of the diatom Nitzschia communis <span class="hlt">glide</span> across surfaces under isotropic environmental conditions. We find a distinct kind of random motion, where trajectories are formed by circular arcs traveled at constant speed, alternated with random stoppages, direction reversals and changes in the orientation of the arcs. Analysis of experimental and computer-simulated trajectories show that the circular random motion of diatom <span class="hlt">gliding</span> is not optimized for long-distance travel but rather for recurrent coverage of limited surface area. These results suggest that one main biological role for this type of diatom motility is to efficiently build the foundation of algal biofilms.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015APS..MARW50008M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015APS..MARW50008M"><span>Substrate induced <span class="hlt">gliding</span> for a nematic liquid crystal layer</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mema, Ensela; Cummings, Linda; Kondic, Lou</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>The interaction between nematic liquid crystals (NLC) and polymer substrates is of current industrial interest, due to a desire to manufacture a new generation of flexible Liquid Crystal Displays (LCDs) for use in portable electronic devices. Polymer substrates present challenges because they can interact with the NLC, exhibiting a phenomenon known as <span class="hlt">gliding</span>: the preferred orientation of the NLC molecules at the interface changes over timescales of minutes to hours. We present two models for <span class="hlt">gliding</span>, inspired by the physics and chemistry of the interaction between the NLC and polymer substrate. These models, though simple, lead to non-trivial results, including loss of bistability, a finding that may have implications for display devices. Supported by NSF Grant No. DMS-1211713.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009usfc.conf...27P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009usfc.conf...27P"><span>Investigation of Aerodynamic Capabilities of Flying Fish in <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Flight</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Park, H.; Choi, H.</p> <p></p> <p>In the present study, we experimentally investigate the aerodynamic capabilities of flying fish. We consider four different flying fish models, which are darkedged-wing flying fishes stuffed in actual <span class="hlt">gliding</span> posture. Some morphological parameters of flying fish such as lateral dihedral angle of pectoral fins, incidence angles of pectoral and pelvic fins are considered to examine their effect on the aerodynamic performance. We directly measure the aerodynamic properties (lift, drag, and pitching moment) for different morphological parameters of flying fish models. For the present flying fish models, the maximum lift coefficient and lift-to-drag ratio are similar to those of medium-sized birds such as the vulture, nighthawk and petrel. The pectoral fins are found to enhance the lift-to-drag ratio and the longitudinal static stability of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> flight. On the other hand, the lift coefficient and lift-to-drag ratio decrease with increasing lateral dihedral angle of pectoral fins.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2781901','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2781901"><span><span class="hlt">Gliding</span> hexapods and the origins of insect aerial behaviour</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Yanoviak, Stephen P; Kaspari, Michael; Dudley, Robert</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Directed aerial descent (i.e. <span class="hlt">gliding</span> and manoeuvring) may be an important stage in the evolution of winged flight. Although hypothesized to occur in ancestrally wingless insects, such behaviour is unexplored in extant basal hexapods, but has recently been described in arboreal ants. Here we show that tropical arboreal bristletails (Archaeognatha) direct their horizontal trajectories to tree trunks in approximately 90 per cent of falls. Experimental manipulation of the median caudal filament significantly reduced both success rate (per cent of individuals landing on a tree trunk) and performance (<span class="hlt">glide</span> index) versus controls. The existence of aerial control in the ancestrally wingless bristletails, and its habitat association with an arboreal lifestyle, are consistent with the hypothesis of a terrestrial origin for winged flight in insects. PMID:19324632</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JMPSo..70..136G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JMPSo..70..136G"><span>Coupled <span class="hlt">glide</span>-climb diffusion-enhanced crystal plasticity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Geers, M. G. D.; Cottura, M.; Appolaire, B.; Busso, E. P.; Forest, S.; Villani, A.</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>This paper presents a fully coupled <span class="hlt">glide</span>-climb crystal plasticity model, whereby climb is controlled by the diffusion of vacancies. An extended strain gradient crystal plasticity model is therefore proposed, which incorporates the climbing of dislocations in the governing transport equations. A global-local approach is adopted to separate the scales and assess the influence of local diffusion on the global plasticity problem. The kinematics of the crystal plasticity model is enriched by incorporating the climb kinematics in the crystallographic split of the plastic strain rate tensor. The potential of the fully coupled theory is illustrated by means of two single slip examples that illustrate the interaction between <span class="hlt">glide</span> and climb in either bypassing a precipitate or destroying a dislocation pile-up.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017ApPhL.111l1603C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017ApPhL.111l1603C"><span>Mimicking <span class="hlt">glide</span> symmetry dispersion with coupled slot metasurfaces</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Camacho, Miguel; Mitchell-Thomas, Rhiannon C.; Hibbins, Alastair P.; Sambles, J. Roy; Quevedo-Teruel, Oscar</p> <p>2017-09-01</p> <p>In this letter, we demonstrate that the dispersion properties associated with <span class="hlt">glide</span> symmetry can be achieved in systems that only possess reflection symmetry by balancing the influence of two sublattices. We apply this approach to a pair of coupled slots cut into an infinite perfectly conducting plane. Each slot is notched on either edge, with the complete two-slot system having only mirror symmetry. By modifying the relative size of the notches on either side of the slots, we show that a linear dispersion relation with a degeneracy with non-zero group velocity at the Brillouin zone boundary can be achieved. These properties, until now, only found in systems with <span class="hlt">glide</span> symmetry are numerically and experimentally validated. We also show that these results can be used for the design of ultra-wideband one-dimensional leaky wave antennas in coplanar waveguide technology.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/sciencecinema/biblio/1244247','SCIGOVIMAGE-SCICINEMA'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/sciencecinema/biblio/1244247"><span><span class="hlt">GLIDES</span> – Efficient Energy Storage from ORNL</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/sciencecinema/">ScienceCinema</a></p> <p>Momen, Ayyoub M.; Abu-Heiba, Ahmad; Odukomaiya, Wale; Akinina, Alla</p> <p>2016-07-12</p> <p>The research shown in this video features the <span class="hlt">GLIDES</span> (Ground-Level Integrated Diverse Energy Storage) project, which has been under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 2013. <span class="hlt">GLIDES</span> can store energy via combined inputs of electricity and heat, and deliver dispatchable electricity. Supported by ORNL’s Laboratory Director’s Research and Development (LDRD) fund, this energy storage system is low-cost, and hybridizes compressed air and pumped-hydro approaches to allow for storage of intermittent renewable energy at high efficiency. A U.S. patent application for this novel energy storage concept has been submitted, and research findings suggest it has the potential to be a flexible, low-cost, scalable, high-efficiency option for energy storage, especially useful in residential and commercial buildings.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5008622','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5008622"><span>Kinematic Analyses of the Thumb during Simulated Posteroanterior <span class="hlt">Glide</span> Mobilization</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Su, Fong-Chin</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Objective Thumb problems are common in some health professionals such as physical therapists. The purpose of this case-control study is to investigate the influence of clinical experience and different mobilization techniques on the kinematics of the thumb. Methods Twenty-three participants without exposure to manual techniques (the Novice Group) and fifteen physical therapists with at least 3 years of orthopedic experience (the Experienced Group) participated. The kinematics of the thumb while performing 3 different simulated posteroanterior (PA) <span class="hlt">glide</span> mobilization techniques on a load cell was monitored. These 3 techniques were: 1) unsupported, 2) with digital support and 3) with thumb interphalangeal joint supported by the index finger. The amount of forces exerted were 25% to 100% of maximum effort at 25% increments. The main effects of experience and technique on thumb kinematics were assessed. Results Both experience and technique had main effects on the flexion/extension angles of the thumb joints. Experienced participants assumed a more flexed position at the carpometacarpal (CMC) joint, and the novice participants performed with angles closer to the neutral position (F = 7.593, p = 0.010). Participants’ metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints were in a more flexed position while performing PA <span class="hlt">glide</span> with thumb interphalangeal (IP) joint supported by the index as compared to the other two techniques (p < .001). Conclusions Negative correlations were generally obtained between the sagittal plane angles of adjacent thumb joints during mobilization/manipulation. Therapists are recommended to treat patient with more stable PA <span class="hlt">glide</span> mobilization techniques, such as PA <span class="hlt">glide</span> with thumb interphalangeal joint supported by the index finger, to prevent potential mobilization-related thumb disorders. PMID:27583407</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_9 --> <div id="page_10" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="181"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27583407','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27583407"><span>Kinematic Analyses of the Thumb during Simulated Posteroanterior <span class="hlt">Glide</span> Mobilization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hu, Meng-Tzu; Hsu, Ar-Tyan; Su, Fong-Chin</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Thumb problems are common in some health professionals such as physical therapists. The purpose of this case-control study is to investigate the influence of clinical experience and different mobilization techniques on the kinematics of the thumb. Twenty-three participants without exposure to manual techniques (the Novice Group) and fifteen physical therapists with at least 3 years of orthopedic experience (the Experienced Group) participated. The kinematics of the thumb while performing 3 different simulated posteroanterior (PA) <span class="hlt">glide</span> mobilization techniques on a load cell was monitored. These 3 techniques were: 1) unsupported, 2) with digital support and 3) with thumb interphalangeal joint supported by the index finger. The amount of forces exerted were 25% to 100% of maximum effort at 25% increments. The main effects of experience and technique on thumb kinematics were assessed. Both experience and technique had main effects on the flexion/extension angles of the thumb joints. Experienced participants assumed a more flexed position at the carpometacarpal (CMC) joint, and the novice participants performed with angles closer to the neutral position (F = 7.593, p = 0.010). Participants' metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints were in a more flexed position while performing PA <span class="hlt">glide</span> with thumb interphalangeal (IP) joint supported by the index as compared to the other two techniques (p < .001). Negative correlations were generally obtained between the sagittal plane angles of adjacent thumb joints during mobilization/manipulation. Therapists are recommended to treat patient with more stable PA <span class="hlt">glide</span> mobilization techniques, such as PA <span class="hlt">glide</span> with thumb interphalangeal joint supported by the index finger, to prevent potential mobilization-related thumb disorders.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21798987','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21798987"><span>The biology of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> in flying lizards (genus Draco) and their fossil and extant analogs.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>McGuire, Jimmy A; Dudley, Robert</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>The flying lizards of the genus Draco are among the most remarkable and successful clades of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> vertebrates. Here, we evaluate the evolution of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> in Draco and other lizards, describe the suite of morphological innovations that characterize Draco, discuss the ecological context of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> in this genus, describe functions of their patagial membranes that are not related to <span class="hlt">gliding</span>, and summarize the interspecific allometry of the Draco <span class="hlt">gliding</span> apparatus, as well as the corresponding consequences for their now empirically quantified <span class="hlt">gliding</span> performance. Several fossil reptilian lineages had morphologies similar to that of modern Draco, with patagial membranes supported by elongated ribs or rib-like dermal structures. Using Draco's snout-vent length/mass relationships, we provide improved estimates of wing loading for three of these fossil gliders (Icarosaurus seifkeri, Kuehneosaurus sp., Coelurosauravus elivensis) and then estimate absolute <span class="hlt">gliding</span> performance for each taxon by extrapolating from Draco's wing loading/<span class="hlt">glide</span> performance relationship. We find that I. seifkeri likely represented the best nonflapping terrestrial vertebrate glider yet described, whereas the larger Kuehneosaurus and Coelurosauravus probably required high descent velocities to achieve sufficient lift for <span class="hlt">gliding</span>, with commensurately greater height loss with each <span class="hlt">glide</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23123910','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23123910"><span><span class="hlt">Gliding</span> motility and Por secretion system genes are widespread among members of the phylum bacteroidetes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>McBride, Mark J; Zhu, Yongtao</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The phylum Bacteroidetes is large and diverse, with rapid <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility and the ability to digest macromolecules associated with many genera and species. Recently, a novel protein secretion system, the Por secretion system (PorSS), was identified in two members of the phylum, the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> bacterium Flavobacterium johnsoniae and the nonmotile oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. The components of the PorSS are not similar in sequence to those of other well-studied bacterial secretion systems. The F. johnsoniae PorSS genes are a subset of the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility genes, suggesting a role for the secretion system in motility. The F. johnsoniae PorSS is needed for assembly of the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility apparatus and for secretion of a chitinase, and the P. gingivalis PorSS is involved in secretion of gingipain protease virulence factors. Comparative analysis of 37 genomes of members of the phylum Bacteroidetes revealed the widespread occurrence of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility genes and PorSS genes. Genes associated with other bacterial protein secretion systems were less common. The results suggest that <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility is more common than previously reported. Microscopic observations confirmed that organisms previously described as nonmotile, including Croceibacter atlanticus, "Gramella forsetii," Paludibacter propionicigenes, Riemerella anatipestifer, and Robiginitalea biformata, exhibit <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility. Three genes (gldA, gldF, and gldG) that encode an apparent ATP-binding cassette transporter required for F. johnsoniae <span class="hlt">gliding</span> were absent from two related <span class="hlt">gliding</span> bacteria, suggesting that the transporter may not be central to <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23902723','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23902723"><span>In vivo ultrasound measurement of posterior femoral <span class="hlt">glide</span> during hip joint mobilization in healthy college students.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Loubert, Peter V; Zipple, J Tim; Klobucher, Michael J; Marquardt, Eric D; Opolka, Matthew J</p> <p>2013-08-01</p> <p>Descriptive study. To measure femoral translational <span class="hlt">glide</span> in vivo during posterior hip joint mobilization and to interpret data in the context of the normal arthrokinematic <span class="hlt">glide</span> necessary for hip flexion. Joint play, or translational <span class="hlt">glide</span> available at a joint, is largely influenced by the geometry of the articular surfaces. The high degree of congruence between the articular surfaces at the hip and the substantial arc of concavity of the acetabulum suggests that the amount of translational <span class="hlt">glide</span> available at the hip should be very small. Twenty subjects received manual posteriorly directed hip mobilization at a force equal to 50% of their body weight, while concurrent ultrasound imaging of the joint was performed. Images were captured before and during application of the target mobilization force. Femoroacetabular distance for each image was measured, and the average of the 3 greatest differences between corresponding before/during mobilization values represented the translational <span class="hlt">glide</span> produced. The amplitude of arthrokinematic <span class="hlt">glide</span> (tangential <span class="hlt">glide</span>) was calculated using the measured femoral head radius and hip flexion passive range of motion for each subject. The average posterior femoral translational <span class="hlt">glide</span> was 2.0 mm (range, 0.8-4.2 mm). The average calculated tangential <span class="hlt">glide</span> required for hip flexion passive range of motion was 53.8 mm (range, 43.2-64.8 mm). The average translational <span class="hlt">glide</span> as a percentage of tangential <span class="hlt">glide</span> was 3.8% (range, 1.5%-7.9%). Translational <span class="hlt">glides</span> at the hip are small, particularly in the context of the amplitude of <span class="hlt">glide</span> necessary for normal hip flexion range of motion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1838464','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1838464"><span>A <span class="hlt">gliding</span> lizard from the Early Cretaceous of China</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Li, Pi-Peng; Gao, Ke-Qin; Hou, Lian-Hai; Xu, Xing</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Gliding</span> is an energetically efficient mode of locomotion that has evolved independently, and in different ways, in several tetrapod groups. Here, we report on an acrodontan lizard from the Early Cretaceous Jehol Group of China showing an array of morphological traits associated with <span class="hlt">gliding</span>. It represents the only known occurrence of this specialization in a fossil lizard and provides evidence of an Early Cretaceous ecological diversification into an aerial niche by crown-group squamates. The lizard has a dorsal-rib-supported patagium, a structure independently evolved in the Late Triassic basal lepidosauromorph kuehneosaurs and the extant agamid lizard Draco, revealing a surprising case of convergent evolution among lepidosauromorphans. A patagial character combination of much longer bilaterally than anteroposteriorly, significantly thicker along the leading edge than along the trailing edge, tapered laterally to form a wing tip, and secondarily supported by an array of linear collagen fibers is not common in gliders and enriches our knowledge of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> adaptations among tetrapods. PMID:17376871</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7988958','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7988958"><span>[Dorsal <span class="hlt">gliding</span> and functional spaces of the metacarpophalangeal transition].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bade, H; Schubert, M; Koebke, J</p> <p>1994-09-01</p> <p>Although the relevance of capillary and <span class="hlt">gliding</span> spaces of the back of the hand and the finger located dorsal to the extensor aponeurosis in the metacarpo-phalangeal region between the layers of the subdermal connective tissue is often emphasized clinically in inflammatory and acute traumatic occurrences, hardly any information has been published concerning the morphology of these spaces. By means of plastic-injection techniques, varying configurations of capillary spaces in the distal region of the dorsum manus of cadavers were found. The deep connective tissue spaces located dorsal to the extensor aponeurosis were shown to have proximal connections to the dorsal tendon sheaths of the carpus, whereas superficial <span class="hlt">gliding</span> spaces tended to vary in their expanse depending on the subcutaneous and epifascial septa. The deep as well as the superficial capillary <span class="hlt">gliding</span> spaces are adapted as mobilizing and limiting structures for the movements of the metacarpo-phalangeal joints and the various mechanical stresses of the skin of the back of the hand. A high degree of exactness in the reconstruction of the marginal elements of such functional spaces appears to be of special importance with regard to a total restoration of the functional capability of the metacarpo-phalangeal joint region.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1989CoMP..102..306B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1989CoMP..102..306B"><span><span class="hlt">Glide</span> twinning and pseudotwinning in peristerite: twin morphology and propagation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Brown, William L.</p> <p>1989-07-01</p> <p>Optically visible Albite <span class="hlt">glide</span> “twins” in a peristerite (˜An9Or1.6), identified from their tapering shape and relationship to grain boundaries, were studied by transmission electron microscopy. Near the tips in sections ⊥ a, the microstructure consists of small (˜400 nm long) lensshaped Albite twins centred exclusively on the oligoclase lamellae. The lenses extend partly outwards into the two adjacent low albite lamellae and induce strong inhomogeneous strain. Where the lenses are closer together, they form, depending on the sense of shear, nearly linear left or right-stepping en échelon arrays, with overlap of the strain fields. Slightly farther in from the tip, the twin domains coalesce to form continuous pinch-and-swell lamellae, being always thicker in the oligoclase. Because of Si,Al order, only elastic <span class="hlt">glide</span> pseudotwins are possible in low albite. In oligoclase <span class="hlt">glide</span> pseudotwins may be mechanically stable (metastable relative to Si,Al order) and may deviate only slightly from true twins. Pseudotwins develop first in the oligoclase, propagate dynamically by jumping across the intervening albite lamellae, extend lengthways and thicken sideways and finally coalesce. They are stabilized by diffusion-controlled inversion of Si,Al order giving rise to true twins described in a companion paper.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PlST...18..473Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PlST...18..473Z"><span>Characteristics of Atmospheric Pressure Rotating <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Arc Plasmas</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhang, Hao; Zhu, Fengsen; Tu, Xin; Bo, Zheng; Cen, Kefa; Li, Xiaodong</p> <p>2016-05-01</p> <p>In this work, a novel direct current (DC) atmospheric pressure rotating <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc (RGA) plasma reactor has been developed for plasma-assisted chemical reactions. The influence of the gas composition and the gas flow rate on the arc dynamic behaviour and the formation of reactive species in the N2 and air <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc plasmas has been investigated by means of electrical signals, high speed photography, and optical emission spectroscopic diagnostics. Compared to conventional <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc reactors with knife-shaped electrodes which generally require a high flow rate (e.g., 10-20 L/min) to maintain a long arc length and reasonable plasma discharge zone, in this RGA system, a lower gas flow rate (e.g., 2 L/min) can also generate a larger effective plasma reaction zone with a longer arc length for chemical reactions. Two different motion patterns can be clearly observed in the N2 and air RGA plasmas. The time-resolved arc voltage signals show that three different arc dynamic modes, the arc restrike mode, takeover mode, and combined modes, can be clearly identified in the RGA plasmas. The occurrence of different motion and arc dynamic modes is strongly dependent on the composition of the working gas and gas flow rate. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51576174), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (No. 20120101110099) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (No. 2015FZA4011)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MS%26E..172a2060S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MS%26E..172a2060S"><span>Development of the <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Hole of the Dynamics Compression Plate</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Salim, U. A.; Suyitno; Magetsari, R.; Mahardika, M.</p> <p>2017-02-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">gliding</span> hole of the dynamics compression plate is designed to facilitate relative movement of pedicle screw during surgery application. The <span class="hlt">gliding</span> hole shape is then geometrically complex. The <span class="hlt">gliding</span> hole manufactured using machining processes used to employ ball-nose cutting tool. Then, production cost is expensive due to long production time. This study proposed to increase productivity of DCP products by introducing forming process (cold forming). The forming process used to involve any press tool devices. In the closed die forming press tool is designed with little allowance, then work-pieces is trapped in the mould after forming. Therefore, it is very important to determine hole geometry and dimensions of raw material in order to success on forming process. This study optimized the hole sizes with both geometry analytics and experiments. The success of the forming process was performed by increasing the holes size on the raw materials. The holes size need to be prepared is diameter of 5.5 mm with a length of 11.4 mm for the plate thickness 3 mm and diameter of 6 mm with a length of 12.5 mm for the plate thickness 4 mm.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.S41A4433L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.S41A4433L"><span><span class="hlt">Microseisms</span> Generated by the 2010 Typhoon Megi in the Western Pacific Ocean</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lin, J.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>The mechanisms controlling the source locations and initiation process of <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> are still a subject of considerable debate. Here, we investigate the characteristics and evolution of <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> generated by Typhoon Megi (Oct 13-23, 2010) using records on both land and offshore stations to investigate the ocean-land coupling process. The typhoon Megi was the strongest typhoon in 2010, being classified as Category 5 on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane wind scale. We tracked Typhoon Megi through spectrogram analysis of seismic records at 49 seismic stations in Southeastern China over spatial dimension of about 950 km. The evolution of the microseismic energy was found to be strongly correlated with the spatial proximity of Megi to the recording stations and coastlines. We further analyzed spatial and temporal variations of microseismic energy in three frequency bands of single frequency (SF, 0.05-0.1 Hz), long period double frequency (LPDF, 0.1-0.18 Hz), and short period double frequency (SPDF, 0.18-0.4 Hz), respectively, for which different physical mechanisms have been proposed. Our analysis reveals the following preliminary results: (1) Temporal variations in LPDF and SF are well correlated, implying that LPDF might be excited primarily by the interaction between incoming ocean swells directly induced by the typhoon and the reflected waves by the coastal topography in shallow waters. (2) When the typhoon changed track from the westward to northward direction between Oct 19 and 20, the SPDF signals strengthened while both the SF and LPDF signals weakened, suggesting that SPDF might be generated by the intensified wave-wave interaction around the typhoon "eyes" when the typhoon turned. We further obtained the directivity of the energy source and found two main source regions: one near the typhoon center and another near the coastal region with shallow water depth. The coupling between ocean wave and seafloor depends on bathymetry, coupling coefficient, and the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997JGR...10224411D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997JGR...10224411D"><span>Stress evolution in southern California and triggering of moderate-, small-, and <span class="hlt">micro-size</span> earthquakes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Deng, Jishu; Sykes, Lynn R.</p> <p>1997-11-01</p> <p>We calculate the evolution of stresses in southern California, extending the study of Deng and Sykes [1997] by increasing from 6 to 36 the number of earthquakes for which coseismic changes in stress are computed and by expanding from M≥6 to M≥1.8 the range of magnitudes M of events whose focal mechanism solutions are examined in the context of the evolving stress field. The cumulative stress on a given date is calculated with respect to an arbitrary zero baseline just before the 1812 Wrightwood earthquake. By taking into account the long-term stress loading associated with 98 fault segments and coseismic stress changes for 36 significant earthquakes, our calculations indicate that more than 85% of M≥5 earthquakes from 1932-1995 occurred in regions of positive change in Coulomb failure function (ΔCFF). Most of the remaining about 15% earthquakes that occurred in areas of negative ΔCFF fall very close to boundaries between positive and negative ΔCFF, some of which are sensitive to the less well controlled slip distributions of the earliest historic events. Calculations also show that from 1981 until just before the 1992 Landers earthquake more than 85% of small- (M≥3) and <span class="hlt">micro-size</span> (M≥1.8) shocks in the Seeber and Armbruster [1995] catalog with mechanisms involving either NW trending right-lateral or NE trending left-lateral strike-slip faulting occurred in regions of positive ΔCFF. The ratio of encouraged to all small- and <span class="hlt">micro-size</span> events reaches a high value of about 88% if an apparent coefficient of friction μ between 0.0 and 0.6 is used. The highest percentage of earthquakes occurred in areas where stress is about 1 MPa above the 1812 baseline. Most (66%) events occurred in regions of ΔCFF between 0.0 and 2.0 MPa. The upper limit indicates that the approximate range of stress variation in the earthquake cycle is of the order of 2.0 MPa. The fact that the locations of most moderate-, small-, and <span class="hlt">micro-size</span> earthquakes are still related to stress</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014GeoJI.197.1869E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014GeoJI.197.1869E"><span>Evidence for bathymetric control on the distribution of body wave <span class="hlt">microseism</span> sources from temporary seismic arrays in Africa</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Euler, Garrett G.; Wiens, Douglas A.; Nyblade, Andrew A.</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Microseisms</span> are the background seismic vibrations mostly driven by the interaction of ocean waves with the solid Earth. Locating the sources of <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> improves our understanding of the range of conditions under which they are generated and has potential applications to seismic tomography and climate research. In this study, we detect persistent source locations of P-wave <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> at periods of 5-10 s (0.1-0.2 Hz) using broad-band array noise correlation techniques and frequency-slowness analysis. Data include vertical component records from four temporary seismic arrays in equatorial and southern Africa with a total of 163 broad-band stations and deployed over a span of 13 yr (1994-2007). While none of the arrays were deployed contemporaneously, we find that the recorded microseismic P waves originate from common, distant oceanic bathymetric features with amplitudes that vary seasonally in proportion with extratropical cyclone activity. Our results show that the majority of the persistent microseismic P-wave source locations are within the 30-60º latitude belts of the Northern and Southern hemispheres while a substantially reduced number are found at lower latitudes. Variations in source location with frequency are also observed and indicate tomographic studies including microseismic body wave sources will benefit from analysing multiple frequency bands. We show that the distribution of these source regions in the North Atlantic as well as in the Southern Ocean correlate with variations in bathymetry and ocean wave heights and corroborate current theory on double-frequency <span class="hlt">microseism</span> generation. The stability of the source locations over the 13-yr time span of our investigation suggests that the long-term body wave <span class="hlt">microseism</span> source distribution is governed by variations in the bathymetry and ocean wave heights while the interaction of ocean waves has a less apparent influence.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26168153','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26168153"><span>Cu Nanoparticles Have Different Impacts in Escherichia coli and Lactobacillus brevis than Their <span class="hlt">Microsized</span> and Ionic Analogues.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kaweeteerawat, Chitrada; Chang, Chong Hyun; Roy, Kevin R; Liu, Rong; Li, Ruibin; Toso, Daniel; Fischer, Heidi; Ivask, Angela; Ji, Zhaoxia; Zink, Jeffrey I; Zhou, Z Hong; Chanfreau, Guillaume Francois; Telesca, Donatello; Cohen, Yoram; Holden, Patricia Ann; Nel, Andre E; Godwin, Hilary A</p> <p>2015-07-28</p> <p>Copper formulations have been used for decades for antimicrobial and antifouling applications. With the development of nanoformulations of copper that are more effective than their ionic and <span class="hlt">microsized</span> analogues, a key regulatory question is whether these materials should be treated as new or existing materials. To address this issue, here we compare the magnitude and mechanisms of toxicity of a series of Cu species (at concentration ranging from 2 to 250 μg/mL), including nano Cu, nano CuO, nano Cu(OH)2 (CuPro and Kocide), micro Cu, micro CuO, ionic Cu(2+) (CuCl2 and CuSO4) in two species of bacteria (Escherichia coli and Lactobacillus brevis). The primary size of the particles studied ranged from 10 nm to 10 μm. Our results reveal that Cu and CuO nanoparticles (NPs) are more toxic than their <span class="hlt">microsized</span> counterparts at the same Cu concentration, with toxicities approaching those of the ionic Cu species. Strikingly, these NPs showed distinct differences in their mode of toxicity when compared to the ionic and <span class="hlt">microsized</span> Cu, highlighting the unique toxicity properties of materials at the nanoscale. In vitro DNA damage assays reveal that both nano Cu and <span class="hlt">microsized</span> Cu are capable of causing complete degradation of plasmid DNA, but electron tomography results show that only nanoformulations of Cu are internalized as intact intracellular particles. These studies suggest that nano Cu at the concentration of 50 μg/mL may have unique genotoxicity in bacteria compared to ionic and <span class="hlt">microsized</span> Cu.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GeoJI.206..825B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GeoJI.206..825B"><span>Long-range correlations of <span class="hlt">microseism</span>-band pressure fluctuations in the ocean</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ball, Justin S.; Godin, Oleg A.; Evers, Läslo G.; Lv, Cheng</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>We investigate the spatial coherence of underwater ambient noise using a yearlong time-series measured off Ascension Island. Qualitative agreement with observed cross-correlations is achieved using a simple range-dependent model, constrained by earlier, active tomographic studies in the area. In particular, the model correctly predicts the existence of two weakly dispersive normal modes in the <span class="hlt">microseism</span> frequency range, with the group speed of one of the normal modes being smaller than the sound speed in water. The agreement justifies our interpretation of the peaks of the measured cross-correlation function of ambient noise as modal arrivals, with dispersion that is sensitive to crustal velocity structure. Our observations are consistent with Scholte to Moho head wave coupled propagation, with double mode conversion occurring due to the bathymetric variations between receivers. We thus demonstrate the feasibility of interrogating crustal properties using noise interferometry of moored hydrophone data at ranges in excess of 120 km.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003RScI...74.4542G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003RScI...74.4542G"><span>Thermal effusivity measurements of insulating liquids using <span class="hlt">microsized</span> hot strip probes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gustavsson, M.; Nagai, H.; Okutani, T.</p> <p>2003-10-01</p> <p>A method based on the pulse transient hot strip (PTHS) technique is developed for studies of thermal effusivity of insulating liquids only requiring a drop-size sample. The original technique is here extended to single-sided measurements of liquids with a known solid background, using a probe calibrated against a liquid reference medium. Tests were made on water and silicone oils of varying viscosity (5-3000 CS). The <span class="hlt">microsized</span> probes produce results in agreement with macroscopic bulk data, without any influence from natural convection. It is proposed that relative errors from both radiation and convection are significantly reduced when shortening the experimental time scale by several orders of magnitude. An error analysis is included, presenting design criteria to optimize measurement sensitivity and accuracy.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JPhCS.421a2020B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JPhCS.421a2020B"><span>Electrochemical magneto-immunosensing of Salmonella based on nano and <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> magnetic particles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Brandão, D.; Liébana, S.; Campoy, S.; Cortés, P.; Alegret, S.; Pividori, M. I.</p> <p>2013-03-01</p> <p>A very simple and rapid method for the detection of S. enterica is reported. In this approach, the bacteria were captured and preconcentrated with magnetic particles through an immunological reaction. A second polyclonal antibody labeled with peroxidase was used for the electrochemical immunosensing based on a magneto-electrode. Different nano and <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> magnetic particles were evaluated in this approach. The 'IMS/m-GEC electrochemical immunosensing' system shows a limit of detection of 5×104 and 1×104 CFU mL-1 in BHI culturing media when micro and nanoparticles are used respectively. These LOD were achieved in a total assay time of 1 h without any previous culturing preenrichment step. Moreover, this system was able to clearly distinguish between food pathogenic bacteria such as S. enterica and E. coli. The features of this approach were discussed and compared with conventional culture methods.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22575872','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22575872"><span>Coupled factors influencing detachment of nano- and <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> particles from primary minima.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shen, Chongyang; Lazouskaya, Volha; Jin, Yan; Li, Baoguo; Ma, Zhiqiang; Zheng, Wenjuan; Huang, Yuanfang</p> <p>2012-06-01</p> <p>This study examined the detachments of nano- and <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> colloids from primary minima in the presence of cation exchange by laboratory column experiments. Colloids were initially deposited in columns packed with glass beads at 0.2 M CaCl(2) in the primary minima of Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) interaction energies. Then, the columns were flushed with NaCl solutions with different ionic strengths (i.e., 0.001, 0.01, 0.1 and 0.2 M). Detachments were observed at all ionic strengths and were particularly significant for the nanoparticle. The detachments increased with increasing electrolyte concentration for the nanoparticle whereas increased from 0.001 M to 0.01 M and decreased with further increasing electrolyte concentration for the <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> colloid. The observations were attributed to coupled influence of cation exchange, short-range repulsion, surface roughness, surface charge heterogeneity, and deposition in the secondary minima. The detachments of colloids from primary minima challenge the common belief that colloid interaction in primary minimum is irreversible and resistant to disturbance in solution ionic strength and composition. Although the significance of surface roughness, surface charge heterogeneity, and secondary minima on colloid deposition has been widely recognized, our study implies that they also play important roles in colloid detachment. Whereas colloid detachment is frequently associated with decrease of ionic strength, our results show that increase of ionic strength can also cause detachment due to influence of cation exchange. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JNR....15.1829H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JNR....15.1829H"><span>Effects of serum on cytotoxicity of nano- and <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> ZnO particles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hsiao, I.-Lun; Huang, Yuh-Jeen</p> <p>2013-09-01</p> <p>Although an increasing number of in vitro studies are being published regarding the cytotoxicity of nanomaterials, the components of the media for toxicity assays have often varied according to the needs of the scientists. Our aim for this study was to evaluate the influence of serum—in this case, fetal bovine serum—in a cell culture medium on the toxicity of nano-sized (50-70 nm) and <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> (<1 μm) ZnO on human lung epithelial cells (A549). The nano- and <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> ZnO both exhibited their highest toxicity when exposed to serum-free media, in contrast to exposure in media containing 5 or 10 % serum. This mainly comes not only from the fact that ZnO particles in the serum-free media have a higher dosage-per-cell ratio, which results from large aggregates of particles, rapid sedimentation, absence of protein protection, and lower cell growth rate, but also that extracellular Zn2+ release contributes to cytotoxicity. Although more extracellular Zn2+ release was observed in serum-containing media, it did not contribute to nano-ZnO cytotoxicity. Furthermore, non-dissolved particles underwent size-dependent particle agglomeration, resulting in size-dependent toxicity in both serum-containing and serum-free media. A low correlation between cytotoxicity and inflammation endpoints in the serum-free medium suggested that some signaling pathways were changed or induced. Since cell growth, transcription behavior for protein production, and physicochemical properties of ZnO particles all were altered in serum-free media, we recommend the use of a serum-containing medium when evaluating the cytotoxicity of NPs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JPhD...47P5305L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JPhD...47P5305L"><span>An investigation into a <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> droplet impinging on a surface with sharp wettability contrast</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lim, C. Y.; Lam, Y. C.</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>An experimental investigation was conducted into a <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> droplet jetted onto a surface with sharp wettability contrast. The dynamics of <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> droplet impingement on a sharp wettability contrast surface, which is critical in inkjet printing technology, has not been investigated in the literature. Hydrophilic lines with line widths ranging from 27 to 53 µm, and contact angle ranging from 17° to 77°, were patterned on a hydrophobic surface with a contact angle of 107°. Water droplets with a diameter of 81 µm were impinged at various offset distances from the centre of the hydrophilic line. The evolution of the droplet upon impingement can be divided into three distinct phases, namely the kinematic phase, the translating phase where the droplet moves towards the centre of the hydrophilic line, and the conforming phase where the droplet spreads along the line. The key parameters affecting the conformability of the droplet to the hydrophilic line pattern are the ratio of the line width to the initial droplet diameter and the contact angle of the hydrophilic line. The droplet will only conform completely to the hydrophilic pattern if the line width is not overly small relative to the droplet and the contact angle of the hydrophilic line is sufficiently low. The impact offset distance does not affect the final shape and final location of the droplet, as long as part of the droplet touches the hydrophilic line upon impingement. This process has a significant impact on inkjet printing technology as high accuracy of inkjet droplet deposition and shape control can be achieved through wettability patterning.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014IJMPS..3260345J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014IJMPS..3260345J"><span><span class="hlt">Gliding</span> arc triggered microwave plasma arc at atmospheric pressure for coal gasification application</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jain, Vishal; Visani, A.; Patil, C.; Patel, B. K.; Sharma, P. K.; John, P. I.; Nema, S. K.</p> <p>2014-08-01</p> <p>Plasma torch is device that efficiently converts electrical energy in to thermal energy for various high temperature applications. The conventional plasma torch comprises of consumable electrodes namely anode and cathode electrodes. The replacement of these electrodes is a complex process owing to its cooling and process shut down requirements. However, microwave plasma arc is electrode-less plasma arc system that is an alternative method to conventional arc technology for generating plasma arc. In this technique, microwave power is efficiently coupled to generate plasma arc by using the property of polar molecule to absorb microwave power. The absorption of microwave power is in form of losses due to intermolecular friction and high collisions between the molecules. This is an efficient method because all microwave power can be absorbed by plasma arc. The main feature of microwave plasma arc is its large uniform high temperature column which is not possible with conventional arc discharge methods. Such type of plasma discharge is very useful in applications where sufficient residence time for treat materials is required. Microwave arc does not require any consumable electrodes and hence, it can be operated continuously that makes it very useful for hazardous effluent treatment applications. Further, microwave cannot ionize neutral particles at atmospheric pressure and hence, a <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc is initiated between two thin electrodes in the cavity by applying very low power high voltage (3kV) <span class="hlt">AC</span> source. In this report, the method for generating microwave arc of 1kW power using commercial microwave oven is elaborated.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_10 --> <div id="page_11" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="201"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24197177','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24197177"><span>Cyclic fatigue of instruments for endodontic <span class="hlt">glide</span> path.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gambarini, Gianluca; Plotino, Gianluca; Sannino, GianPaolo; Grande, Nicola Maria; Giansiracusa, Alessio; Piasecki, Lucila; da Silva Neto, Ulisses Xavier; Al-Sudani, Dina; Testarelli, Luca</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Endodontic <span class="hlt">glide</span> path is the creation of a smooth patency from canal orifice to apex, which can be performed manually or with small tapered NiTi rotary instruments. The use of stainless steel (SS) hand K-files inserted in a reciprocating handpiece can be a possible alternative to create a mechanical <span class="hlt">glide</span> path. The aim of this study was to compare the cyclic fatigue resistance between SS K-files used in a reciprocating motion and NiTi rotary instruments in artificial curved canals. Ten SS size 15 K-files used with the M4 handpiece (SybronEndo, Glendora, CA, USA) and ten PathFiles (Maillefer-Dentsply, Ballaigues, CH, Switzerland) NiTi rotary instruments size 16, 0.02 taper were tested for resistance to cyclic fatigue. The time to fracture inside an artificial curved canal was recorded for each instrument. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD test. Mean time (and SD) to failure was 464 s (±40.4) for the Group PF (NiTi rotary PathFile), and 1049 s (±24.8) for the Group M4 (SS K-files reciprocating) with a statistically significant difference between the two groups (p = 0.033). The SS 15 K-files used with the M4 handpiece showed a significant greater resistance to cyclic fatigue when compared to the NiTi rotary PathFiles. Therefore, the use of small size SS files in a reciprocating motion might be a rational choice for the creation of a mechanical endodontic <span class="hlt">glide</span> path in curved root canals.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20833919','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20833919"><span>Aerodynamic characteristics of flying fish in <span class="hlt">gliding</span> flight.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Park, Hyungmin; Choi, Haecheon</p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>The flying fish (family Exocoetidae) is an exceptional marine flying vertebrate, utilizing the advantages of moving in two different media, i.e. swimming in water and flying in air. Despite some physical limitations by moving in both water and air, the flying fish has evolved to have good aerodynamic designs (such as the hypertrophied fins and cylindrical body with a ventrally flattened surface) for proficient <span class="hlt">gliding</span> flight. Hence, the morphological and behavioral adaptations of flying fish to aerial locomotion have attracted great interest from various fields including biology and aerodynamics. Several aspects of the flight of flying fish have been determined or conjectured from previous field observations and measurements of morphometric parameters. However, the detailed measurement of wing performance associated with its morphometry for identifying the characteristics of flight in flying fish has not been performed yet. Therefore, in the present study, we directly measure the aerodynamic forces and moment on darkedged-wing flying fish (Cypselurus hiraii) models and correlated them with morphological characteristics of wing (fin). The model configurations considered are: (1) both the pectoral and pelvic fins spread out, (2) only the pectoral fins spread with the pelvic fins folded, and (3) both fins folded. The role of the pelvic fins was found to increase the lift force and lift-to-drag ratio, which is confirmed by the jet-like flow structure existing between the pectoral and pelvic fins. With both the pectoral and pelvic fins spread, the longitudinal static stability is also more enhanced than that with the pelvic fins folded. For cases 1 and 2, the lift-to-drag ratio was maximum at attack angles of around 0 deg, where the attack angle is the angle between the longitudinal body axis and the flying direction. The lift coefficient is largest at attack angles around 30∼35 deg, at which the flying fish is observed to emerge from the sea surface. From <span class="hlt">glide</span> polar</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11829360','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11829360"><span>Animal flight dynamics I. Stability in <span class="hlt">gliding</span> flight.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Thomas, A L; Taylor, G K</p> <p>2001-10-07</p> <p>Stability is as essential to flying as lift itself, but previous discussions of how flying animals maintain stability have been limited in both number and scope. By developing the pitching moment equations for <span class="hlt">gliding</span> animals and by discussing potential sources of roll and yaw stability, we consider the various sources of static stability used by <span class="hlt">gliding</span> animals. We find that <span class="hlt">gliding</span> animals differ markedly from aircraft in how they maintain stability. In particular, the pendulum stability provided when the centre of gravity lies below the wings is a much more important source of stability in flying animals than in most conventional aircraft. Drag-based stability also appears to be important for many <span class="hlt">gliding</span> animals, whereas in aircraft, drag is usually kept to a minimum. One unexpected consequence of these differences is that the golden measure of static pitching stability in aircraft--the static margin--can only strictly be applied to flying animals if the equilibrium angle of attack is specified. We also derive several rules of thumb by which stable fliers can be identified. Stable fliers are expected to exhibit one or more of the following features: (1) Wings that are swept forward in slow flight. (2) Wings that are twisted down at the tips when swept back (wash-out) and twisted up at the tips when swept forwards (wash-in). (3) Additional lifting surfaces (canard, hindwings or a tail) inclined nose-up to the main wing if they lie forward of it, and nose-down if they lie behind it (longitudinal dihedral). Each of these predictions is directional--the opposite is expected to apply in unstable animals. In addition, animals with reduced stability are expected to display direct flight patterns in turbulent conditions, in contrast to the erratic flight patterns predicted for stable animals, in which large restoring forces are generated. Using these predictions, we find that flying animals possess a far higher degree of inherent stability than has generally been</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JaJAP..55eFM03Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JaJAP..55eFM03Y"><span>Radiation enhanced basal plane dislocation <span class="hlt">glide</span> in GaN</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yakimov, Eugene B.; Vergeles, Pavel S.; Polyakov, Alexander Y.; Lee, In-Hwan; Pearton, Stephen J.</p> <p>2016-05-01</p> <p>A movement of basal plane segments of dislocations in GaN films grown by epitaxial lateral overgrowth under low energy electron beam irradiation (LEEBI) was studied by the electron beam induced current (EBIC) method. Only a small fraction of the basal plane dislocation segments were susceptible to irradiation and the movement was limited to relatively short distances. The effect is explained by the radiation enhanced dislocation <span class="hlt">glide</span> (REDG) in the structure with strong pinning. A dislocation velocity under LEEBI with a beam current lower than 1 nA was estimated as about 10 nm/s. The results assuming the REDG for prismatic plane dislocations were presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16938945','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16938945"><span>Repetition Pitch <span class="hlt">glide</span> from the step pyramid at Chichen Itza.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bilsen, Frans A</p> <p>2006-08-01</p> <p>Standing at the foot of the Mayan step pyramid at Chichen Itza in Mexico, one can produce a pitchy "chirp" echo by handclapping. As exposed by Declercq et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 116, 3328-3335 (2004)], an acoustic model based on optical Bragg diffraction at a periodic structure cannot explain satisfactorily the chirp-echo sonogram. Alternatively, considering the echo as a sequence of reflections, and given the dimensions of the pyramid and source-receiver position, the chirp is predicted correctly as a Repetition Pitch <span class="hlt">glide</span> of which the pitch height is continuously decreasing within 177 ms from 796 to 471 Hz-equivalent.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3323635','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3323635"><span><span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Motility of Babesia bovis Merozoites Visualized by Time-Lapse Video Microscopy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Asada, Masahito; Goto, Yasuyuki; Yahata, Kazuhide; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Kawai, Satoru; Inoue, Noboru; Kaneko, Osamu; Kawazu, Shin-ichiro</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Background Babesia bovis is an apicomplexan intraerythrocytic protozoan parasite that induces babesiosis in cattle after transmission by ticks. During specific stages of the apicomplexan parasite lifecycle, such as the sporozoites of Plasmodium falciparum and tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii, host cells are targeted for invasion using a unique, active process termed “<span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility”. However, it is not thoroughly understood how the merozoites of B. bovis target and invade host red blood cells (RBCs), and <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility has so far not been observed in the parasite. Methodology/Principal Findings <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> motility of B. bovis merozoites was revealed by time-lapse video microscopy. The recorded images revealed that the process included egress of the merozoites from the infected RBC, <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility, and subsequent invasion into new RBCs. The <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility of B. bovis merozoites was similar to the helical <span class="hlt">gliding</span> of Toxoplasma tachyzoites. The trails left by the merozoites were detected by indirect immunofluorescence assay using antiserum against B. bovis merozoite surface antigen 1. Inhibition of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility by actin filament polymerization or depolymerization indicated that the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility was driven by actomyosin dependent process. In addition, we revealed the timing of breakdown of the parasitophorous vacuole. Time-lapse image analysis of membrane-stained bovine RBCs showed formation and breakdown of the parasitophorous vacuole within ten minutes of invasion. Conclusions/Significance This is the first report of the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility of B. bovis. Since merozoites of Plasmodium parasites do not <span class="hlt">glide</span> on a substrate, the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility of B. bovis merozoites is a notable finding. PMID:22506073</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27739811','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27739811"><span>Plastic deformation of tubular crystals by dislocation <span class="hlt">glide</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Beller, Daniel A; Nelson, David R</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>Tubular crystals, two-dimensional lattices wrapped into cylindrical topologies, arise in many contexts, including botany and biofilaments, and in physical systems such as carbon nanotubes. The geometrical principles of botanical phyllotaxis, describing the spiral packings on cylinders commonly found in nature, have found application in all these systems. Several recent studies have examined defects in tubular crystals associated with crystalline packings that must accommodate a fixed tube radius. Here we study the mechanics of tubular crystals with variable tube radius, with dislocations interposed between regions of different phyllotactic packings. Unbinding and separation of dislocation pairs with equal and opposite Burgers vectors allow the growth of one phyllotactic domain at the expense of another. In particular, <span class="hlt">glide</span> separation of dislocations offers a low-energy mode for plastic deformations of solid tubes in response to external stresses, reconfiguring the lattice step by step. Through theory and simulation, we examine how the tube's radius and helicity affects, and is in turn altered by, the mechanics of dislocation <span class="hlt">glide</span>. We also discuss how a sufficiently strong bending rigidity can alter or arrest the deformations of tubes with small radii.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvE..94c3004B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvE..94c3004B"><span>Plastic deformation of tubular crystals by dislocation <span class="hlt">glide</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Beller, Daniel A.; Nelson, David R.</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>Tubular crystals, two-dimensional lattices wrapped into cylindrical topologies, arise in many contexts, including botany and biofilaments, and in physical systems such as carbon nanotubes. The geometrical principles of botanical phyllotaxis, describing the spiral packings on cylinders commonly found in nature, have found application in all these systems. Several recent studies have examined defects in tubular crystals associated with crystalline packings that must accommodate a fixed tube radius. Here we study the mechanics of tubular crystals with variable tube radius, with dislocations interposed between regions of different phyllotactic packings. Unbinding and separation of dislocation pairs with equal and opposite Burgers vectors allow the growth of one phyllotactic domain at the expense of another. In particular, <span class="hlt">glide</span> separation of dislocations offers a low-energy mode for plastic deformations of solid tubes in response to external stresses, reconfiguring the lattice step by step. Through theory and simulation, we examine how the tube's radius and helicity affects, and is in turn altered by, the mechanics of dislocation <span class="hlt">glide</span>. We also discuss how a sufficiently strong bending rigidity can alter or arrest the deformations of tubes with small radii.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22096590','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22096590"><span>Amoeboid cells use protrusions for walking, <span class="hlt">gliding</span> and swimming.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Van Haastert, Peter J M</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Amoeboid cells crawl using pseudopods, which are convex extensions of the cell surface. In many laboratory experiments, cells move on a smooth substrate, but in the wild cells may experience obstacles of other cells or dead material, or may even move in liquid. To understand how cells cope with heterogeneous environments we have investigated the pseudopod life cycle of wild type and mutant cells moving on a substrate and when suspended in liquid. We show that the same pseudopod cycle can provide three types of movement that we address as walking, <span class="hlt">gliding</span> and swimming. In walking, the extending pseudopod will adhere firmly to the substrate, which allows cells to generate forces to bypass obstacles. Mutant cells with compromised adhesion can move much faster than wild type cells on a smooth substrate (<span class="hlt">gliding</span>), but cannot move effectively against obstacles that provide resistance. In a liquid, when swimming, the extending pseudopods convert to side-bumps that move rapidly to the rear of the cells. Calculations suggest that these bumps provide sufficient drag force to mediate the observed forward swimming of the cell.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20644109','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20644109"><span><span class="hlt">Gliding</span> arc in tornado using a reverse vortex flow</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kalra, Chiranjeev S.; Cho, Young I.; Gutsol, Alexander; Fridman, Alexander; Rufael, Tecle S.</p> <p>2005-02-01</p> <p>The present article reports a new <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc (GA) system using a reverse vortex flow ('tornado') in a cylindrical reactor (<span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc in tornado, or GAT), as used to preserve the main advantages of traditional GA systems and overcome their main drawbacks. The primary advantages of traditional GA systems retained in the present GAT are the possibility to generate transitional plasma and to avoid considerable electrode erosion. In contrast to a traditional GA, the new GAT system ensures much more uniform gas treatment and has a significantly larger gas residence time in the reactor. The present article also describes the design of the new reactor and its stable operation regime when the variation of GAT current is very small. These features are understood to be very important for most viable applications. Additionally the GAT provides near-perfect thermal insulation from the reactor wall, indicating that the present GAT does not require the reactor wall to be constructed of high-temperature materials. The new GAT system, with its unique properties such as a high level of nonequilibrium and a large residence time, looks very promising for many industrial applications including fuel conversion, carbon dioxide conversion to carbon monoxide and oxygen, surface treatment, waste treatment, flame stabilization, hydrogen sulfide treatment, etc.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22824838','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22824838"><span>The epidemiology of injury in hang-<span class="hlt">gliding</span> and paragliding.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rekand, Tiina</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Para- and hang-<span class="hlt">gliding</span> are modern air sports that developed in the 20th century. Performers should possess technical skills and manage certified equipment for successful flight. Injuries may happen during the take-off, flight and landing. PubMed was searched using the search terms 'paragliding' and/or 'hang-<span class="hlt">gliding</span>'. The reference lists of articles identified in the search strategy were also searched for relevant articles. The most common injuries are fractures, dislocations or sprains in the extremities, followed by spinal and head traumas. Multiple injuries after accidents are common. Collision with electrical wires may cause burn injuries. Fatal outcomes are caused by brain injuries, spinal cord injuries at the cervical level or aorta rupture. Accidents happen because of risk-taking behavior, lack of education or use of self-modified equipment. Observational studies have suggested the need for protection of the head, trunk and lower extremities. The measures proposed are often based on conclusions of observational studies and not proven through randomized studies. Better education along with focusing on possible risk factors will probably diminish the risks of hang- and paragliding. Large denominator-based case series, case-control and population-based studies are needed for assessment of the risks of hang- and paragliding.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23276603','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23276603"><span>The Gcm/<span class="hlt">Glide</span> molecular and cellular pathway: new actors and new lineages.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Laneve, Pietro; Delaporte, Claude; Trebuchet, Guillaume; Komonyi, Orban; Flici, Hakima; Popkova, Anna; D'Agostino, Giuseppe; Taglini, Francesca; Kerekes, Irene; Giangrande, Angela</p> <p>2013-03-01</p> <p>In Drosophila, the transcription factor Gcm/<span class="hlt">Glide</span> plays a key role in cell fate determination and cellular differentiation. In light of its crucial biological impact, major efforts have been put for analyzing its properties as master regulator, from both structural and functional points of view. However, the lack of efficient antibodies specific to the Gcm/<span class="hlt">Glide</span> protein precluded thorough analyses of its regulation and activity in vivo. In order to relieve such restraints, we designed an epitope-tagging approach to "FLAG"-recognize and analyze the functional protein both in vitro (exogenous Gcm/<span class="hlt">Glide</span>) and in vivo (endogenous protein). We here (i) reveal a tight interconnection between the small RNA and the Gcm/<span class="hlt">Glide</span> pathways. AGO1 and miR-1 are Gcm/<span class="hlt">Glide</span> targets whereas miR-279 negatively controls Gcm/<span class="hlt">Glide</span> expression (ii) identify a novel cell population, peritracheal cells, expressing and requiring Gcm/<span class="hlt">Glide</span>. Peritracheal cells are non-neuronal neurosecretory cells that are essential in ecdysis. In addition to emphasizing the importance of following the distribution and the activity of endogenous proteins in vivo, this study provides new insights and a novel frame to understand the Gcm/<span class="hlt">Glide</span> biology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20491925','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20491925"><span>Temperature regulation of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility in filamentous sulfur bacteria, Beggiatoa spp.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dunker, Rita; Røy, Hans; Jørgensen, Bo Barker</p> <p>2010-08-01</p> <p>The response of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility to changing temperatures was studied in filaments of the large sulfur bacteria Beggiatoa from arctic, temperate and tropical marine environments. The general shape of the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> speed vs. temperature curves from all three locations was similar, but differed in the maximal <span class="hlt">gliding</span> speed of the filaments, optimum temperature and the temperature range of motility. The optimum temperature and the overall temperature range of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility accorded to the climatic origin of the filaments with a high temperature range for tropical, an intermediate range for temperate, and a low temperature range for arctic filaments. The temperature-controlled decrease in <span class="hlt">gliding</span> speed at low temperatures was reversible while the decline in speed at high temperatures was due to irreversible thermal damage in individual filaments. Filaments from the Arctic and cold-acclimatized filaments from the temperate zone were unaffected by transient freezing of the surrounding seawater. At in situ temperatures, filaments <span class="hlt">glided</span> at 17-55% of the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> speed at the optimum temperatures, indicating that they were well adapted to the temperature regime of their origin. Our results point towards an enzymatic control of temperature-dependent <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Larynx&id=EJ1040550','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Larynx&id=EJ1040550"><span>Effortful Pitch <span class="hlt">Glide</span>: A Potential New Exercise Evaluated by Dynamic MRI</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Miloro, Keri Vasquez; Pearson, William G., Jr.; Langmore, Susan E.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanics of the effortful pitch <span class="hlt">glide</span> (EPG) with swallowing using dynamic MRI. The EPG is a combination of a pitch <span class="hlt">glide</span> and a pharyngeal squeeze maneuver for targeting laryngeal and pharyngeal muscles. The authors hypothesized that the EPG would elicit significantly greater structural…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/37733','TREESEARCH'); return false;" href="https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/37733"><span>Quadrupedal locomotor performance in two species of arboreal squirrels: predicting energy savings of <span class="hlt">gliding</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/">Treesearch</a></p> <p>Elizabeth A. Flaherty; Merav Ben-David; Winston P. Smith</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Gliding</span> allows mammals to exploit canopy habitats of old-growth forests possibly as a means to save energy. To assess costs of quadrupedal locomotion for a <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arboreal mammal, we used open-flow respirometry and a variable-speed treadmill to measure oxygen consumption and to calculate cost of transport, excess exercise oxygen consumption, and excess post-exercise...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010APS..DFD.LT008S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010APS..DFD.LT008S"><span><span class="hlt">Gliding</span> flight in snakes: non-equilibrium trajectory dynamics and kinematics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Socha, Jake; Miklasz, Kevin; Jafari, Farid; Vlachos, Pavlos</p> <p>2010-11-01</p> <p>For animal gliders that live in trees, a <span class="hlt">glide</span> trajectory begins in free fall and, given sufficient space, transitions to equilibrium <span class="hlt">gliding</span> with no net forces on the body. However, the dynamics of non-equilibrium <span class="hlt">gliding</span> are not well understood. Of any terrestrial animal glider, snakes may exhibit the most complicated <span class="hlt">glide</span> patterns resulting from their highly active undulatory behavior. Our aim was to determine the characteristics of snake <span class="hlt">gliding</span> during the transition to equilibrium. We launched "flying" snakes (Chrysopelea paradisi) from a 15 m tower and recorded the mid-to-end portion of trajectories with four videocameras to reconstruct the snake's 3D body position. Additionally, we developed a simple analytical model of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> assuming only steady-state forces of lift, drag and weight acting on the body and used it to explore effects of wing loading, lift-to-drag ratio, and initial velocity on trajectory dynamics. Despite the vertical space provided to transition to steady-state <span class="hlt">gliding</span>, snakes did not exhibit equilibrium <span class="hlt">gliding</span> and in fact displayed a net positive acceleration in the vertical axis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title14-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title14-vol1-sec29-71.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title14-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title14-vol1-sec29-71.pdf"><span>14 CFR 29.71 - Helicopter angle of <span class="hlt">glide</span>: Category B.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Helicopter angle of <span class="hlt">glide</span>: Category B. 29... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Performance § 29.71 Helicopter angle of <span class="hlt">glide</span>: Category B. For each category B helicopter, except multiengine helicopters meeting the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title14-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title14-vol1-sec29-71.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title14-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title14-vol1-sec29-71.pdf"><span>14 CFR 29.71 - Helicopter angle of <span class="hlt">glide</span>: Category B.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Helicopter angle of <span class="hlt">glide</span>: Category B. 29... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Performance § 29.71 Helicopter angle of <span class="hlt">glide</span>: Category B. For each category B helicopter, except multiengine helicopters meeting the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title14-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title14-vol1-sec29-71.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title14-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title14-vol1-sec29-71.pdf"><span>14 CFR 29.71 - Helicopter angle of <span class="hlt">glide</span>: Category B.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Helicopter angle of <span class="hlt">glide</span>: Category B. 29... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Performance § 29.71 Helicopter angle of <span class="hlt">glide</span>: Category B. For each category B helicopter, except multiengine helicopters meeting the...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title14-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title14-vol1-sec29-71.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title14-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title14-vol1-sec29-71.pdf"><span>14 CFR 29.71 - Helicopter angle of <span class="hlt">glide</span>: Category B.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Helicopter angle of <span class="hlt">glide</span>: Category B. 29... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Performance § 29.71 Helicopter angle of <span class="hlt">glide</span>: Category B. For each category B helicopter, except multiengine helicopters meeting the...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_11 --> <div id="page_12" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="221"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=mri&pg=4&id=EJ1040550','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=mri&pg=4&id=EJ1040550"><span>Effortful Pitch <span class="hlt">Glide</span>: A Potential New Exercise Evaluated by Dynamic MRI</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Miloro, Keri Vasquez; Pearson, William G., Jr.; Langmore, Susan E.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanics of the effortful pitch <span class="hlt">glide</span> (EPG) with swallowing using dynamic MRI. The EPG is a combination of a pitch <span class="hlt">glide</span> and a pharyngeal squeeze maneuver for targeting laryngeal and pharyngeal muscles. The authors hypothesized that the EPG would elicit significantly greater structural…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA073176','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA073176"><span>The Selection of <span class="hlt">Glide</span> Slope Antenna Patterns for Use in the Frequency Assignment Process</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.dtic.mil/">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>1979-07-01</p> <p>3 CONIUcSIONS ---------------------------------------------------------- 5 RECOMMENDED ANTENNA...is therefore still required. Additional data would also be helpful on the A.I.L. Type 55 <span class="hlt">glide</span> slope and the end-fire slotted cable system. 5 ...Inc.. June 30, 1970. 5 . FAA Preliminary Instruction Book TI 6750.44, "<span class="hlt">Glide</span> Slope Antenna System, Part of Mark I Instrument Landirl System," FAA</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3497132','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3497132"><span>Evolution of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> in Southeast Asian geckos and other vertebrates is temporally congruent with dipterocarp forest development</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Heinicke, Matthew P.; Greenbaum, Eli; Jackman, Todd R.; Bauer, Aaron M.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Gliding</span> morphologies occur in diverse vertebrate lineages in Southeast Asian rainforests, including three gecko genera, plus frogs, snakes, agamid lizards and squirrels. It has been hypothesized that repeated evolution of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> is related to the dominance of Asian rainforest tree floras by dipterocarps. For dipterocarps to have influenced the evolution of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> in Southeast Asian vertebrates, <span class="hlt">gliding</span> lineages must have Eocene or later origins. However, divergence times are not known for most lineages. To investigate the temporal pattern of Asian <span class="hlt">gliding</span> vertebrate evolution, we performed phylogenetic and molecular clock analyses. New sequence data for geckos incorporate exemplars of each <span class="hlt">gliding</span> genus (Cosymbotus, Luperosaurus and Ptychozoon), whereas analyses of other vertebrate lineages use existing sequence data. Stem ages of most <span class="hlt">gliding</span> vertebrates, including all geckos, cluster in the time period when dipterocarps came to dominate Asian tropical forests. These results demonstrate that a <span class="hlt">gliding</span>/dipterocarp correlation is temporally viable, and caution against the assumption of early origins for apomorphic taxa. PMID:22977067</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23576734','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23576734"><span>Flagella stator homologs function as motors for myxobacterial <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility by moving in helical trajectories.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nan, Beiyan; Bandaria, Jigar N; Moghtaderi, Amirpasha; Sun, Im-Hong; Yildiz, Ahmet; Zusman, David R</p> <p>2013-04-16</p> <p>Many bacterial species use <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility in natural habitats because external flagella function poorly on hard surfaces. However, the mechanism(s) of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> remain elusive because surface motility structures are not apparent. Here, we characterized the dynamics of the Myxococcus xanthus <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motor protein AglR, a homolog of the Escherichia coli flagella stator protein MotA. We observed that AglR decorated a helical structure, and the AglR helices rotated when cells were suspended in liquid or when cells moved on agar surfaces. With photoactivatable localization microscopy, we found that single molecules of AglR, unlike MotA/MotB, can move laterally within the membrane in helical trajectories. AglR slowed down transiently at <span class="hlt">gliding</span> surfaces, accumulating in clusters. Our work shows that the untethered <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motors of M. xanthus, by moving within the membrane, can transform helical motion into linear driving forces that push against the surface.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JPS...347..170P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JPS...347..170P"><span>Improved electrochemical performance of <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> SiO-based composite anode by prelithiation of stabilized lithium metal powder</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pan, Qingrui; Zuo, Pengjian; Mu, Tiansheng; Du, Chunyu; Cheng, Xinqun; Ma, Yulin; Gao, Yunzhi; Yin, Geping</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> SiO-based composite anode material (d-SiO/G/C) for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) is achieved via the disproportionation reaction of SiO followed by a pitch pyrolysis reaction. The d-SiO/G/C composite exhibits an initial reversible capacity of 905 mAh g-1 and excellent cycling stability. The initial Coulombic efficiency of the d-SiO/G/C composite can be significantly improved from 68.1% to 98.5% by the prelithiation of the composite anode using stabilized lithium metal powders (SLMP), which counteracts the irreversible capacity loss caused by the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation and irreversible conversion reaction during the first lithiation. The <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> d-SiO/G/C composite anode with SLMP prelithiation maintains an excellent cycling stability, suggesting its great potential in practical application for high specific energy lithium ion batteries.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JGRB..121.2447T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JGRB..121.2447T"><span>Seasonal variations in the Rayleigh-to-Love wave ratio in the secondary <span class="hlt">microseism</span> from colocated ring laser and seismograph</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tanimoto, Toshiro; Hadziioannou, Céline; Igel, Heiner; Wassermann, Joachim; Schreiber, Ulrich; Gebauer, André; Chow, Bryant</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Monthly variations in the ratio of Rayleigh-to-Love waves in the secondary <span class="hlt">microseism</span> are obtained from a colocated ring laser and an STS-2 seismograph at Wettzell, Germany. Two main conclusions are derived for the Rayleigh-to-Love wave kinetic energy ratios in the secondary <span class="hlt">microseism</span>; first, the energy ratio is in the range 0.8-0.9 (<1.0) throughout a year except for June and July. It means that Love wave energy is larger than Rayleigh wave energy most of the year by about 10-20%. Second, this ratio suddenly increases to 1.0-1.2 in June and July, indicating a larger fraction of Rayleigh wave energy. This change suggests that the locations and behaviors of excitation sources are different in these months.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23899322','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23899322"><span>Sustainable design of high-performance <span class="hlt">microsized</span> microbial fuel cell with carbon nanotube anode and air cathode.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mink, Justine E; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa</p> <p>2013-08-27</p> <p>Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a promising alternative energy source that both generates electricity and cleans water. Fueled by liquid wastes such as wastewater or industrial wastes, the microbial fuel cell converts waste into energy. <span class="hlt">Microsized</span> MFCs are essentially miniature energy harvesters that can be used to power on-chip electronics, lab-on-a-chip devices, and/or sensors. As MFCs are a relatively new technology, <span class="hlt">microsized</span> MFCs are also an important rapid testing platform for the comparison and introduction of new conditions or materials into macroscale MFCs, especially nanoscale materials that have high potential for enhanced power production. Here we report a 75 μL <span class="hlt">microsized</span> MFC on silicon using CMOS-compatible processes and employ a novel nanomaterial with exceptional electrochemical properties, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), as the on-chip anode. We used this device to compare the usage of the more commonly used but highly expensive anode material gold, as well as a more inexpensive substitute, nickel. This is the first anode material study done using the most sustainably designed <span class="hlt">microsized</span> MFC to date, which utilizes ambient oxygen as the electron acceptor with an air cathode instead of the chemical ferricyanide and without a membrane. Ferricyanide is unsustainable, as the chemical must be continuously refilled, while using oxygen, naturally found in air, makes the device mobile and is a key step in commercializing this for portable technology such as lab-on-a-chip for point-of-care diagnostics. At 880 mA/m(2) and 19 mW/m(2) the MWCNT anode outperformed the others in both current and power densities with between 6 and 20 times better performance. All devices were run for over 15 days, indicating a stable and high-endurance energy harvester already capable of producing enough power for ultra-low-power electronics and able to consistently power them over time.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://arc.lib.montana.edu/snow-science/item.php?id=500','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://arc.lib.montana.edu/snow-science/item.php?id=500"><span>Natural <span class="hlt">glide</span> slab avalanches, Glacier National Park, USA: A unique hazard and forecasting challenge</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Reardon, Blase; Fagre, Daniel B.; Dundas, Mark; Lundy, Chris</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>In a museum of avalanche phenomena, <span class="hlt">glide</span> cracks and <span class="hlt">glide</span> avalanches might be housed in the “strange but true” section. These oddities are uncommon in most snow climates and tend to be isolated to specific terrain features such as bedrock slabs. Many <span class="hlt">glide</span> cracks never result in avalanches, and when they do, the wide range of time between crack formation and slab failure makes them highly unpredictable. Despite their relative rarity, <span class="hlt">glide</span> cracks and <span class="hlt">glide</span> avalanches pose a regular threat and complex forecasting challenge during the annual spring opening of the Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier National Park, U.S.A. During the 2006 season, a series of unusual <span class="hlt">glide</span> cracks delayed snow removal operations by over a week and provided a unique opportunity to record detailed observations of <span class="hlt">glide</span> avalanches and characterize their occurrence and associated weather conditions. Field observations were from snowpits, crown profiles and where possible, measurements of slab thickness, bed surface slope angle, substrate and other physical characteristics. Weather data were recorded at one SNOTEL site and two automated stations located from 0.6-10 km of observed <span class="hlt">glide</span> slab avalanches. Nearly half (43%) of the 35 <span class="hlt">glide</span> slab avalanches recorded were Class D2-2.5, with 15% Class D3-D3.5. The time between <span class="hlt">glide</span> crack opening and failure ranged from 2 days to over six weeks, and the avalanches occurred in cycles associated with loss of snow water equivalent and spikes in temperature and radiation. We conclude with suggest ions for further study.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.S31C..08T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.S31C..08T"><span>Seasonal variation in Rayleigh-to-Love wave ratio in the secondary <span class="hlt">microseism</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tanimoto, T.; Hadziioannou, C.; Igel, H.; Wassermann, J. M.; Schreiber, U.; Gebauer, A.; Chow, B.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>The Ring Laser (the G-ring) at Wettzell (WET), Germany, is a rotation-measurement instrument that can monitor tiny variations in seismic noise. It essentially records only SH-type signals. Combined with a co-located seismograph (three-component seismograph STS-2), we can monitor the amount of Love waves from this instrument and that of Rayleigh waves from the STS seismograph. We report on seasonal variation of Rayleigh-to-Love wave ratio in the secondary <span class="hlt">microseism</span>. The first step in our analysis is to obtain stacked Fourier spectra that were least affected by earthquakes. We used two earthquake catalogues to do this; the GCMT (Global Centroid Moment Tensor, Earthquakes M > 5.5) catalogue and the EMSC (European-Mediterranean Seismic Centre) catalogue for regional earthquakes (distance < 1000 km) with M > 4.5. We then created monthly averages of noise Fourier spectra for the frequency range 0.13-0.30 Hz using both the G-ring and STS data from 2009 to 2015. Monthly spectra show clear seasonal variations for the secondary <span class="hlt">microseism</span>. We obtained surface vertical acceleration from STS and surface transverse acceleration from G-ring from which we can directly measure the Rayleigh-to-Love wave ratio. The procedure is the same with an account in our recent GRL paper (Tanimoto et al., 2015). Comparison between vertical acceleration and transverse acceleration shows that Rayleigh-wave surface amplitudes are about 20 percent larger than Love waves but in terms of kinetic energy this ratio will be different. We converted these ratios of surface amplitude to those of kinetic energy using an available earth model (Fichtner et al., 2013). The averaged ratio over the frequency band 0.13-0.30 Hz shows is in the range 0.6-0.8 in spring, autumn and winter but it increases to about 1.2 in summer. Except for the summer, the amount of Love waves are higher but the amount of Rayleigh waves increases in summer and appears to exceed that of Love waves.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26287736','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26287736"><span>Biomimetic Nanoporous Anodic Alumina Distributed Bragg Reflectors in the Form of Films and <span class="hlt">Microsized</span> Particles for Sensing Applications.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chen, Yuting; Santos, Abel; Wang, Ye; Kumeria, Tushar; Li, Junsheng; Wang, Changhai; Losic, Dusan</p> <p>2015-09-09</p> <p>In this study, we produce for the first time biomimetic films and <span class="hlt">microsized</span> particles based on nanoporous anodic alumina distributed Bragg reflectors (NAA-DBRs) by a rational galvanostatic pulse-anodization approach. These biomimetic photonic structures can feature a broad range of vivid bright colors, which can be tuned across the UV-visible spectrum by engineering their nanoporous structure through different anodization parameters. The effective medium of NAA-DBRs films is systematically assessed as a function of the anodization period, the anodization temperature, and the current density ratio by reflectometric interference spectroscopy (RIfS). This analysis makes it possible to establish the most sensitive structure toward changes in its effective medium. Subsequently, specific detection of vitamin C molecules is demonstrated. The obtained results reveal that NAA-DBRs with optimized structure can achieve a low limit of detection for vitamin C molecules as low as 20 nM, a sensitivity of 227±4 nm μM(-1), and a linearity of 0.9985. Finally, as proof of concept, we developed a new photonic nanomaterial based on NAA-DBR <span class="hlt">microsized</span> particles, which could provide new opportunities to produce <span class="hlt">microsized</span> photonic analytical tools.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GeoJI.206..345G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GeoJI.206..345G"><span>Deconvolution enhanced direction of arrival estimation using one- and three-component seismic arrays applied to ocean induced <span class="hlt">microseisms</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gal, M.; Reading, A. M.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Koper, K. D.; Burlacu, R.; Gibbons, S. J.</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Microseisms</span> in the period of 2-10 s are generated in deep oceans and near coastal regions. It is common for <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> from multiple sources to arrive at the same time at a given seismometer. It is therefore desirable to be able to measure multiple slowness vectors accurately. Popular ways to estimate the direction of arrival of ocean induced <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> are the conventional (fk) or adaptive (Capon) beamformer. These techniques give robust estimates, but are limited in their resolution capabilities and hence do not always detect all arrivals. One of the limiting factors in determining direction of arrival with seismic arrays is the array response, which can strongly influence the estimation of weaker sources. In this work, we aim to improve the resolution for weaker sources and evaluate the performance of two deconvolution algorithms, Richardson-Lucy deconvolution and a new implementation of CLEAN-PSF. The algorithms are tested with three arrays of different aperture (ASAR, WRA and NORSAR) using 1 month of real data each and compared with the conventional approaches. We find an improvement over conventional methods from both algorithms and the best performance with CLEAN-PSF. We then extend the CLEAN-PSF framework to three components (3C) and evaluate 1 yr of data from the Pilbara Seismic Array in northwest Australia. The 3C CLEAN-PSF analysis is capable in resolving a previously undetected Sn phase.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25367739','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25367739"><span>A <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> bio-solar cell for self-sustaining power generation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lee, Hankeun; Choi, Seokheun</p> <p>2015-01-21</p> <p>Self-sustainable energy sources are essential for a wide array of wireless applications deployed in remote field locations. Due to their self-assembling and self-repairing properties, "biological solar (bio-solar) cells" are recently gaining attention for those applications. The bio-solar cell can continuously generate electricity from microbial photosynthetic and respiratory activities under day-night cycles. Despite the vast potential and promise of bio-solar cells, they, however, have not yet successfully been translated into commercial applications, as they possess persistent performance limitations and scale-up bottlenecks. Here, we report an entirely self-sustainable and scalable microliter-sized bio-solar cell with significant power enhancement by maximizing solar energy capture, bacterial attachment, and air bubble volume in well-controlled microchambers. The bio-solar cell has a ~300 μL single chamber defined by laser-machined poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) substrates and it uses an air cathode to allow freely available oxygen to act as an electron acceptor. We generated a maximum power density of 0.9 mW m(-2) through photosynthetic reactions of cyanobacteria, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, which is the highest power density among all <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> bio-solar cells.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AGUFM.S51C..02L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AGUFM.S51C..02L"><span>Microbarom/<span class="hlt">Microseism</span>: spatio-temporal variations along the Atlantic Coast</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lees, J. M.; Drob, D. P.</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>Spatial and temporal variation of the <span class="hlt">microseism</span> and microbarom orientation and amplitudes are investageted for the period May 2014 through May 2015, when the TA array was in place along the Eastern seaboard of North America. These variation are critical to the investigation of energy dissipation in the atmosphere as reported by Rind [1977] where thermal heating of the thermosphere was estimated to be in the range of 30-40 degree Kelvin per day. We are modeling the attenuation of infrasound signals to estimate energy loss to the thermosphere [Godin, 2014; Sutton et al., 2015]. The ground station analysis will be compared to dissipation measured in the stratosphere ( 35 km elevation) where high pressure balloons, instrumented with microphones, float during NASA supported launches. Experiments in 2014 and 2015 suggest that microbaroms are recorded in the mid-stratosphere. Additionally TA microbarom signals are strongest during night time conditions when noise is at a minimum. Diurnal variations in local turbulent wind noise is examined in the context of linking diurnal variations of microbarom signal strength to upper atmospheric tidal phenomena and nocturnal tropospheric inversion layer effects.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MS%26E..115a2006P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MS%26E..115a2006P"><span>Epoxy matrix composites filled with <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> LD sludge: wear characterization and analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Purohit, Abhilash; Satapathy, Alok</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>Owing to the very high cost of conventional filler materials in polymer composites, exploring the possibility of using low cost minerals and industrial wastes for this purpose has become the need of the hour. In view of this, the present work includes the development and the wear performance evaluation of a new class of composites consisting of epoxy and <span class="hlt">microsized</span> LD sludge. LD sludge or the Linz-Donawitz Sludge (LDS) are the fine solid particles recovered after wet cleaning of the gas emerging from LD convertors during steel making. Epoxy composites filled with different proportions (0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 wt %) of LDS are fabricated by conventional hand lay-up technique. Dry sliding wear trials are performed on the composite specimens under different test conditions as per ASTM G 99 following a design of experiment approach based on Taguchi's orthogonal arrays. The Taguchi approach leads to the recognition of most powerful variables that predominantly control the wear rate. This parametric analysis reveals that LDS content and sliding velocity affects the specific wear rate more significantly than normal load and sliding distance. Furthermore with increase in LDS content specific wear rate of the composite decreases for a constant sliding velocity. The sliding wear behavior of these composites under an extended range of test conditions is predicted by a model based on the artificial neural network (ANN).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18421854','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18421854"><span>[Comparative study of the effect on oxidative damage in rats inhaled by nano-sized and <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> silicon dioxide].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jin, Cuihong; Jin, Yihe; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Cuixia</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>To compare the changes of oxidative damage in rats inhaled by nano-sized and <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> silicon dioxide. 36 male rats were randomly divided into two control groups and four experimental groups which was inhaled by nano-sized and <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> silicon dioxide respectively at the concentration of 300 mg/m3 for 2 hours and the activities of SOD, CAT and GSH-Px and the contents of H2O2, GSH and MDA of the liver, kidney, brain were determinated 24h and 48h after inhalation. The contents of H2O2 in all organs in nano-sized groups increased significantly while increased in <span class="hlt">micro-size</span> groups only in liver and kidney at 24h and in brain at 48h. On the contrary, the activities of CAT in nano-sized group were lower than those in <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> group. Superoxide anion contents increased only in the brain of nano-sized group. The activities of SOD decreased significantly in nano-sized groups in kidney at 24h and brain but not in <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> groups. The content of GSH decreased only in liver at 24h. The activities of GSH-PX decreased significantly in nano-sized compared with control group and were lower significantly in brain than those in <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> group. The contents of MDA increased in all nano-sized groups but only in liver and brain in <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> group. The total anti-oxygen activities decreased in all nano-sized groups, but only in kidney at 24h and brain in <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> group, especially more significantly in brain at 48h in nano-sized than <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> group. While the activity in kidney in nano-sized group increased at 48h comparing to at 24h. Nano-sized silicon dioxide could induce oxidative damage more easily than <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> silicon dioxide. Through comparing different interval, it was found that the degree of oxidative damage at 48h after inhalation inferior to that at 24h after inhalation, which could be associated with the repair of the body against the oxidative damage.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22449629','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22449629"><span>Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of nanosized and <span class="hlt">microsized</span> titanium dioxide and iron oxide particles in Syrian hamster embryo cells.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Guichard, Yves; Schmit, Julien; Darne, Christian; Gaté, Laurent; Goutet, Michèle; Rousset, Davy; Rastoix, Olivier; Wrobel, Richard; Witschger, Olivier; Martin, Aurélie; Fierro, Vanessa; Binet, Stéphane</p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>Potential differences in the toxicological properties of nanosized and non-nanosized particles have been notably pointed out for titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) particles, which are currently widely produced and used in many industrial areas. Nanoparticles of the iron oxides magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) and hematite (Fe(2)O(3)) also have many industrial applications but their toxicological properties are less documented than those of TiO(2). In the present study, the in vitro cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of commercially available nanosized and <span class="hlt">microsized</span> anatase TiO(2), rutile TiO(2), Fe(3)O(4), and Fe(2)O(3) particles were compared in Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells. Samples were characterized for chemical composition, primary particle size, crystal phase, shape, and specific surface area. In acellular assays, TiO(2) and iron oxide particles were able to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). At the same mass dose, all nanoparticles produced higher levels of ROS than their <span class="hlt">microsized</span> counterparts. Measurement of particle size in the SHE culture medium showed that primary nanoparticles and microparticles are present in the form of micrometric agglomerates of highly poly-dispersed size. Uptake of primary particles and agglomerates by SHE exposed for 24 h was observed for all samples. TiO(2) samples were found to be more cytotoxic than iron oxide samples. Concerning primary size effects, anatase TiO(2), rutile TiO(2), and Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles induced higher cytotoxicity than their <span class="hlt">microsized</span> counterparts after 72 h of exposure. Over this treatment time, anatase TiO(2) and Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles also produced more intracellular ROS compared to the <span class="hlt">microsized</span> particles. However, similar levels of DNA damage were observed in the comet assay after 24 h of exposure to anatase nanoparticles and microparticles. Rutile microparticles were found to induce more DNA damage than the nanosized particles. However, no significant increase in DNA damage was detected from nanosized and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1983JBIS...36..369P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1983JBIS...36..369P"><span>Asset and prime - <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> re-entry test vehicles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Powell, J. W.; Hengeveld, E.</p> <p>1983-08-01</p> <p>The history of the USAF development programs for winged controlled-reentry vehicles based on a dynamic-<span class="hlt">gliding</span> principle, ASSET (1957-1965) and PRIME (1964-1967), is recounted. The ASSET program, developed from the initial Dyna-Soar project, comprised three aerothermodynamic-structural vehicles and three aerothermoelastic vehicles, all utilizing exotic refractory metal structures partially coated with silicon-boron, zirconia-ceramic nose caps, and LV-2C Thor launchers. The three PRIME SV-5D vehicles employed elastomeric-blanket ablative heat shields and molded carbon-phenolic-composite nose caps and were launched by SLV-3 Atlas rockets. It is noted that these projects, although successful, did not lead directly to the production of lifting-body or winged reentry vehicles, but rather provided data useful in the later Shuttle development program.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23848618','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23848618"><span>Leaping shampoo <span class="hlt">glides</span> on a lubricating air layer.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lee, S; Li, E Q; Marston, J O; Bonito, A; Thoroddsen, S T</p> <p>2013-06-01</p> <p>When a stream of shampoo is fed onto a pool in one's hand, a jet can leap sideways or rebound from the liquid surface in an intriguing phenomenon known as the Kaye effect. Earlier studies have debated whether non-Newtonian effects are the underlying cause of this phenomenon, making the jet <span class="hlt">glide</span> on top of a shear-thinning liquid layer, or whether an entrained air layer is responsible. Herein we show unambiguously that the jet slides on a lubricating air layer. We identify this layer by looking through the pool liquid and observing its rupture into fine bubbles. The resulting microbubble sizes suggest this air layer is of submicron thickness. This thickness estimate is also supported by the tangential deceleration of the jet during the rebounding.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28125724','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28125724"><span>Numerical Investigation of Swimmer's <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Stage with 6-DOF Movement.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Li, Tianzeng; Cai, Wenhao; Zhan, Jiemin</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study is to analyze the motion status of swimmers during their <span class="hlt">gliding</span> stage using a numerical simulation method. This simulation strategy is conducted by solving the 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations using the Realizable k-ε turbulence closure equations in combination with the Six Degrees of Freedom (6-DOF) method. The uneven mass distribution of a swimmer and the roughness of the surface of the body are taken into consideration. The hydrodynamic characteristics and movement characteristics of the swimmers at different launch speeds were analyzed. The calculated results suggest that an optimal instant for starting propulsive movement is when the velocity of the swimmer decreases by 1.75 m/s to 2.0 m/s from an initial horizontal velocity of 3.1 m/s to 3.5 m/s.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1248826','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1248826"><span>Employment of hypersonic <span class="hlt">glide</span> vehicles: Proposed criteria for use</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Olguin, Abel</p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>Hypersonic <span class="hlt">Glide</span> Vehicles (HGVs) are a type of reentry vehicle that couples the high speed of ballistic missiles with the maneuverability of aircraft. The HGV has been in development since the 1970s, and its technology falls under the category of Conventional Prompt Global Strike (CPGS) weapons. As noted by James M. Acton, a senior associate in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment, CPGS is a “missile in search of a mission.” With the introduction of any significant new military capability, a doctrine for use—including specifics regarding how, when and where it would be used, as well as tactics, training and procedures—must be clearly defined and understood by policy makers, military commanders, and planners. In this paper, benefits and limitations of the HGV are presented. Proposed criteria and four scenarios illustrate a possible method for assessing when to use an HGV.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_12 --> <div id="page_13" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="241"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhRvE..87f1001L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhRvE..87f1001L"><span>Leaping shampoo <span class="hlt">glides</span> on a lubricating air layer</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lee, S.; Li, E. Q.; Marston, J. O.; Bonito, A.; Thoroddsen, S. T.</p> <p>2013-06-01</p> <p>When a stream of shampoo is fed onto a pool in one's hand, a jet can leap sideways or rebound from the liquid surface in an intriguing phenomenon known as the Kaye effect. Earlier studies have debated whether non-Newtonian effects are the underlying cause of this phenomenon, making the jet <span class="hlt">glide</span> on top of a shear-thinning liquid layer, or whether an entrained air layer is responsible. Herein we show unambiguously that the jet slides on a lubricating air layer. We identify this layer by looking through the pool liquid and observing its rupture into fine bubbles. The resulting microbubble sizes suggest this air layer is of submicron thickness. This thickness estimate is also supported by the tangential deceleration of the jet during the rebounding.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JPhCS.370a2014P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JPhCS.370a2014P"><span>Degradation of tetrafluoroethane using three-phase <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc plasma</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pacheco, J.; García, M.; Pacheco, M.; Valdivia, R.; Rivera, C.; Garduño, M.</p> <p>2012-06-01</p> <p>The use of many chlorofluorocarbons (CFC's) has negatively impacted the ozone layer. The Montreal Protocol was implemented, as a temporary solution for this problem by replacing CFC's by hydrofluorocarbons (HFC's). These kinds of gases have the propriety to be free of chlorine. However, in a next future, the Montreal Protocol also considers the replacement of HFC's because they have a high global warming potential when they enter in contact with the atmosphere. One of the methods to remove those compounds is the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc plasma because it presents some advantages. The inlet system works near the atmospheric pressure and has a transition region from plasma at thermodynamic local partial equilibrium to non-thermal plasma; allowing high gas and electronic temperatures. Results present a promissory possibility to be scaled and to give an industrial service.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2884410','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2884410"><span><span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Motility Revisited: How Do the Myxobacteria Move without Flagella?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Mauriello, Emilia M. F.; Mignot, Tâm; Yang, Zhaomin; Zusman, David R.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Summary: In bacteria, motility is important for a wide variety of biological functions such as virulence, fruiting body formation, and biofilm formation. While most bacteria move by using specialized appendages, usually external or periplasmic flagella, some bacteria use other mechanisms for their movements that are less well characterized. These mechanisms do not always exhibit obvious motility structures. Myxococcus xanthus is a motile bacterium that does not produce flagella but <span class="hlt">glides</span> slowly over solid surfaces. How M. xanthus moves has remained a puzzle that has challenged microbiologists for over 50 years. Fortunately, recent advances in the analysis of motility mutants, bioinformatics, and protein localization have revealed likely mechanisms for the two M. xanthus motility systems. These results are summarized in this review. PMID:20508248</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016CryRp..61..153B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016CryRp..61..153B"><span><span class="hlt">Glide</span> planes symmetry in the organization of some sulfide structures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Borisov, S. V.; Magarill, S. A.; Pervukhina, N. V.</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>The role of <span class="hlt">glide</span> planes in the organization of structures is shown based on a crystallographic analysis of the monoclinic structures of TlAs3S5 and Tl2(As,Sb)3S13 sulfides. In the first structure, cations and anions form systems (with identical geometries) of two face-centered sublattices, linked by the c plane, with the effect of unified "two-dimensional" (2D) ordering. The second structure, exhibiting signs of order-disorder (OD) type, is interpreted as a superposition of two noncentrosymmetric components with independent cation and anion sublattices, which, however, also form a regular 2D order due to the n plane. The stabilizing role of Tl cations in the geometry of cation matrices is indicated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25400507','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25400507"><span><span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope Use improves intubation success rates: an observational study using propensity score matching.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ibinson, James W; Ezaru, Catalin S; Cormican, Daniel S; Mangione, Michael P</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Rigid video laryngoscopes are popular alternatives to direct laryngoscopy for intubation, but further large scale prospective studies comparing these devices to direct laryngoscopy in routine anesthesiology practice are needed. We hypothesized that the first pass success rate with one particular video laryngoscope, the <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope, would be higher than the success rate with direct laryngoscopy. 3831 total intubation attempts were tracked in an observational study comparing first-pass success rate using a Macintosh or Miller-style laryngoscope with the <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope. Propensity scoring was then used to select 626 subjects matched between the two groups based on their morphologic traits. Comparing the <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope and direct laryngoscopy groups suggested that intubation would be more difficult in the <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope group based on the Mallampati class, cervical range of motion, mouth opening, dentition, weight, and past intubation history. Thus, a propensity score based on these factors was used to balance the groups into two 313 patient cohorts. Direct laryngoscopy was successful in 80.8% on the first-pass intubation attempt, while the <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope was successful in 93.6% (p <0.001; risk difference of 0.128 with a 95% CI of 0.0771 - 0.181). A greater first-attempt success rate was found when using the <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope versus direct laryngoscopy. In addition, the <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope was found to be 99% successful for intubation after initial failure of direct laryngoscopy, helping to reduce the incidence of failed intubation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16796684','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16796684"><span>Mycoplasma genitalium mg200 and mg386 genes are involved in <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility but not in cytadherence.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pich, Oscar Q; Burgos, Raul; Ferrer-Navarro, Mario; Querol, Enrique; Piñol, Jaume</p> <p>2006-06-01</p> <p>Isolation and characterization of transposon-generated Mycoplasma genitalium <span class="hlt">gliding</span>-deficient mutants has implicated mg200 and mg386 genes in <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility. The proposed role of these genes was confirmed by restoration of the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> phenotype in deficient mutants through gene complementation with their respective mg386 or mg200 wild-type copies. mg200 and mg386 are the first reported <span class="hlt">gliding</span>-associated mycoplasma genes not directly involved in cytadherence. Orthologues of MG200 and MG386 proteins are also found in the slow <span class="hlt">gliding</span> mycoplasmas, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Mycoplasma gallisepticum, suggesting the existence of a unique set of proteins involved in slow <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility. MG200 and MG386 proteins share common features, such as the presence of enriched in aromatic and glycine residues boxes and an acidic and proline-rich domain, suggesting that these motifs could play a significant role in <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110011455','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110011455"><span>Onboard Determination of Vehicle <span class="hlt">Glide</span> Capability for Shuttle Abort Flight Managment (SAFM)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Straube, Timothy; Jackson, Mark; Fill, Thomas; Nemeth, Scott</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>When one or more main engines fail during ascent, the flight crew of the Space Shuttle must make several critical decisions and accurately perform a series of abort procedures. One of the most important decisions for many aborts is the selection ofa landing site. Several factors influence the ability to reach a landing site, including the spacecraft point of atmospheric entry, the energy state at atmospheric entry, the vehicle <span class="hlt">glide</span> capability from that energy state, and whether one or more suitable landing sites are within the <span class="hlt">glide</span> capability. Energy assessment is further complicated by the fact that phugoid oscillations in total energy influence <span class="hlt">glide</span> capability. Once the <span class="hlt">glide</span> capability is known, the crew must select the "best" site option based upon <span class="hlt">glide</span> capability and landing site conditions and facilities. Since most of these factors cannot currently be assessed by the crew in flight, extensive planning is required prior to each mission to script a variety of procedures based upon spacecraft velocity at the point of engine failure (or failures). The results of this preflight planning are expressed in tables and diagrams on mission-specific cockpit checklists. Crew checklist procedures involve leafing through several pages of instructions and navigating a decision tree for site selection and flight procedures - all during a time critical abort situation. With the advent of the Cockpit Avionics Upgrade (CAU), the Shuttle will have increased on-board computational power to help alleviate crew workload during aborts and provide valuable situational awareness during nominal operations. One application baselined for the CAU computers is Shuttle Abort Flight Management (SAFM), whose requirements have been designed and prototyped. The SAFM application includes powered and <span class="hlt">glided</span> flight algorithms. This paper describes the <span class="hlt">glided</span> flight algorithm which is dispatched by SAFM to determine the vehicle <span class="hlt">glide</span> capability and make recommendations to the crew for site</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5099814','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5099814"><span>Parallel <span class="hlt">glide</span>: flow of dislocations with internal stress source/sink distribution</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Raić, Karlo T</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>The unexpected <span class="hlt">glide</span> of dislocations on a plane parallel to the film/substrate interface in ultrathin copper films, which has been called parallel <span class="hlt">glide</span> (Balk et al 2003 Acta Metall. 51 447), is described using an analytical model. The phenomenon is observed as a problem involving inlet/outlet flow from different positions of a grain boundary into the grain channel. In this sense, parallel <span class="hlt">glide</span> is presented as the flow of dislocations with an internal stress source/sink distribution. PMID:27877945</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..1811553N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EGUGA..1811553N"><span>Identifying seismic noise sources and their amplitude from P wave <span class="hlt">microseisms</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Neale, Jennifer; Harmon, Nicholas; Srokosz, Meric</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Understanding sources of seismic noise is important for a range of applications including seismic imagery, time-lapse, and climate studies. For locating sources from seismic data, body waves offer an advantage over surface waves because they can reveal the distance to the source as well as direction. Studies have found that body waves do originate from regions predicted by models (Obrebski et al., 2013), where wave interaction intensity and site effect combine to produce the source (Ardhuin & Herbers, 2013). Here, we undertake a quantitative comparison between observed body wave <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> and modelled sources- in terms of location, amplitude, and spectral shape- with the aim of understanding how well sources are observed and potentially what they reveal about the underlying ocean wavefield. We used seismic stations from the Southern California Seismic Network, and computed beamformer output as a function of time, frequency, slowness and azimuth. During winter months (October - mid March) the dominant arrivals at frequencies 0.18-0.22 Hz were P waves that originated from the North Pacific, whilst arrivals from the North Atlantic dominated at slightly lower frequencies of 0.16-0.18 Hz. Based on this, we chose to focus on P waves during winter, and back-projected the beamformer energy onto a global grid using P wave travel timetables (following Gerstoft et al., 2008). We modelled the seismic sources using Wavewatch III and site effect coefficients calculated following Ardhuin and Herbers (2013). We output the beamformer and the modelled sources on a 2° global grid averaged over 6 hour periods from September 2012 to September 2014, at seismic frequencies of 0.06 to 0.3 Hz. We then integrated the spectra over the full frequency range. Here we focus on results from the first winter in the North Pacific. Preliminary results indicate that the logarithm of the modelled source and the logarithm of the beamformer output are well described by a two-term exponential model</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17628585','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17628585"><span>Stability of nano-/<span class="hlt">microsized</span> particles in deionized water and electroless nickel solutions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Necula, B S; Apachitei, I; Fratila-Apachitei, L E; Teodosiu, C; Duszczyk, J</p> <p>2007-10-15</p> <p>A major problem in the co-deposition of nano- and <span class="hlt">microsized</span> particles within electroless NiP coatings is particle dispersion in the electroless nickel solution because of the strong tendency of particles toward agglomeration and sedimentation. The stability of colloidal Al(2)O(3), CeO(2), and BN particles and Al(2)O(3)CeO(2) and Al(2)O(3)BN particle mixtures in deionized water and electroless nickel solution was investigated by zeta potential measurements and sedimentation tests. Dispersions of Al(2)O(3) and CeO(2) particles showed good stability in deionized water with zeta potential values of 55 and 39 mV, respectively. BN dispersion in deionized water was found to be relatively unstable at pH 4 with zeta potential values of -13 mV, but at higher pH (i.e., pH 5.5), the values decreased up to about -40 mV. When the dispersions were made in electroless nickel solution, a significant decrease of the zeta potential values was observed for both single particles and mixtures of particles, indicating a change in the surface charge from high positive to low negative with detrimental effects on dispersion stability. Further, the findings suggested that the stability of particle mixtures is dominated by one type of particle, i.e., the Al(2)O(3)CeO(2) dispersion is governed by the single CeO(2) particles, whereas the Al(2)O(3)BN dispersion is governed by the Al(2)O(3) particles. All the zeta potential measurements were in line with the results of the sedimentation tests (i.e., low zeta potential values corresponded to short settling times, whereas high zeta potential values corresponded to long settling times).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001Tectp.336..163N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001Tectp.336..163N"><span>Moment tensor inversion of <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> from the B-sand propped hydrofracture, M-site, Colorado</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nolen-Hoeksema, Richard C.; Ruff, Larry J.</p> <p>2001-07-01</p> <p>We apply a moment-tensor inversion algorithm to microseismic events generated by hydrofracturing. Our dataset consists of microseismic events associated with a hydraulic fracturing experiment conducted at the GRI/DOE M-site near Rifle, Colorado. The event recordings were from a vertical string of 3-component accelerometer pods that are cemented in a borehole. The accelerograms clearly show P and S waves, which can be rotated into the SH and SV components. To invert the P and S amplitudes for moment tensors, we use just the first two peaks after the first arrival. Using this amplitude information and the average pulse width, we formed a symmetric, stylized pulse for integration and we inverted for the moment tensor. Resolution tests revealed that with the source (<span class="hlt">microseism</span>) to receiver geometry we have at the M-site, where all receivers are in one borehole and at the same azimuth from the source, we can extract the five deviatoric components of the moment tensor using combinations of P, SH and SV amplitudes (for example, a minimum data set of 3 P-wave, 2 SV-wave, and 1 SH-wave amplitudes). To obtain the sixth component, which is the isotropic component, requires amplitude information from receivers at another azimuth. We studied seven high-quality events in detail and tested their results against two alternative source geometries. These microseismic events tend to have a major-double-couple nodal plane aligned parallel to the main hydrofracture plane, rather than have their tension (T) axes aligned parallel to the regional minimum principal-compressive-stress direction. The events have seismic moments (M0) on the order of 10-5 Nm and moment magnitudes (Mw) of about -2.5.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25453314','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25453314"><span>Waste generation and utilisation in <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> furniture-manufacturing enterprises in Turkey.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Top, Y</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The number of small-scale businesses within most national economies is generally high, especially in developing countries. Often these businesses have a weak economic status and limited environmental awareness. The type and amount of waste produced, and the recycling methods adopted by these businesses during their operation can have negative effects on the environment. This study investigated the types of waste generated and the recycling methods adopted in <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> enterprises engaged in the manufacture of furniture. An assessment was also made of whether the characteristics of the enterprise had any effect on the waste recycling methods that were practised. A survey was conducted of 31 enterprises in the furniture industry in Gumushane province, Turkey, which is considered a developing economy. Surveys were undertaken via face-to-face interviews. It was found that medium-density fibreboard (MDF), and to a lesser extent, chipboard, were used in the manufacture of furniture, and two major types of waste in the form of fine dust and small fragments of board are generated during the cutting of these boards. Of the resulting composite board waste, 96.9% was used for heating homes and workplaces, where it was burnt under conditions of incomplete combustion. Enterprises were found to have adopted other methods to utilise their wastes in addition to using them as fuel. Such enterprises include those operating from a basement or first floor of a building in the cities, those continuing production throughout the year, those in need for capital and those enterprises not operating a dust-collection system. Copyright © 2014 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22320088','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22320088"><span><span class="hlt">Microsized</span> graphite sensors for potentiometric determination of cyclobenzaprine hydrochloride in pure powder, tablets, and plasma.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ramadan, Nesrin K; Zaazaa, Hala E; Merey, Hanan A</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Two cyclobenzaprine hydrochloride (CZ) <span class="hlt">microsized</span> graphite selective sensors were investigated with dibutylsebacate as a plasticizer in a polymeric matrix of carboxylated polyvinyl chloride (PVC-COOH) in the case of sensor 1, based on the interaction between the drug and the dissociated COOH groups in the PVC-COOH. Sensor 2 was based on the interaction between the drug and ammonium reineckate, which acted as anionic electroactive material in the presence of polyvinyl chloride matrix. The two sensors were constructed by using 2-hydroxy propyl beta-cyclodextrin as an ionophore, which has a significant influence on increasing the membrane sensitivity and selectivity of both sensors. Fast and stable Nernstian responses of 1 x 10(-5) - 1 x 10(-2) and 1 x 10(-4) - 1 x 10(-2) M for the two sensors, respectively, with slopes of 58.6 and 55.5 mV/decade, respectively, over the pH range 2-4 were obtained. The proposed method displayed useful analytical characteristics for determination of CZ in its pure powder form with average recoveries 99.95 +/- 0.23 and 99.61 +/- 0.34% for sensors 1 and 2, respectively, and in plasma with good recoveries. The sensors were also used to determine the intact drug in the presence of its degradate and, thus, could be used as stability-indicating methods. The obtained results by the proposed methods were statistically analyzed and compared with those obtained by the U.S. Pharmacopeia method; no significant difference for either accuracy or precision was observed. Results obtained with the two electrodes revealed their performance characteristics, which were evaluated according to International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry recommendations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=STS041%28S%29094&hterms=concrete&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dconcrete','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=STS041%28S%29094&hterms=concrete&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dconcrete"><span>STS-41 Discovery, OV-103, <span class="hlt">glides</span> over concrete runway 22 at EAFB, California</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>STS-41 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, with nose landing gear (NLG) and main landing gear (MLG) deployed, <span class="hlt">glides</span> over concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California, prior to touchdown.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-s41-s-090.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-s41-s-090.html"><span>STS-41 Discovery, OV-103, <span class="hlt">glides</span> over concrete runway 22 at EAFB, California</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>1990-10-10</p> <p>STS-41 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, with nose landing gear (NLG) and main landing gear (MLG) deployed, <span class="hlt">glides</span> over concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California, prior to touchdown.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=STS041%28S%29094&hterms=concrete&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dconcrete','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=STS041%28S%29094&hterms=concrete&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dconcrete"><span>STS-41 Discovery, OV-103, <span class="hlt">glides</span> over concrete runway 22 at EAFB, California</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>STS-41 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, with nose landing gear (NLG) and main landing gear (MLG) deployed, <span class="hlt">glides</span> over concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California, prior to touchdown.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24587260','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24587260"><span>Efficiency of lift production in flapping and <span class="hlt">gliding</span> flight of swifts.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Henningsson, Per; Hedenström, Anders; Bomphrey, Richard J</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Many flying animals use both flapping and <span class="hlt">gliding</span> flight as part of their routine behaviour. These two kinematic patterns impose conflicting requirements on wing design for aerodynamic efficiency and, in the absence of extreme morphing, wings cannot be optimised for both flight modes. In <span class="hlt">gliding</span> flight, the wing experiences uniform incident flow and the optimal shape is a high aspect ratio wing with an elliptical planform. In flapping flight, on the other hand, the wing tip travels faster than the root, creating a spanwise velocity gradient. To compensate, the optimal wing shape should taper towards the tip (reducing the local chord) and/or twist from root to tip (reducing local angle of attack). We hypothesised that, if a bird is limited in its ability to morph its wings and adapt its wing shape to suit both flight modes, then a preference towards flapping flight optimization will be expected since this is the most energetically demanding flight mode. We tested this by studying a well-known flap-<span class="hlt">gliding</span> species, the common swift, by measuring the wakes generated by two birds, one in <span class="hlt">gliding</span> and one in flapping flight in a wind tunnel. We calculated span efficiency, the efficiency of lift production, and found that the flapping swift had consistently higher span efficiency than the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> swift. This supports our hypothesis and suggests that even though swifts have been shown previously to increase their lift-to-drag ratio substantially when <span class="hlt">gliding</span>, the wing morphology is tuned to be more aerodynamically efficient in generating lift during flapping. Since body drag can be assumed to be similar for both flapping and <span class="hlt">gliding</span>, it follows that the higher total drag in flapping flight compared with <span class="hlt">gliding</span> flight is primarily a consequence of an increase in wing profile drag due to the flapping motion, exceeding the reduction in induced drag.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2840342','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2840342"><span>Model tests of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> with different hindwing configurations in the four-winged dromaeosaurid Microraptor gui</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Alexander, David E.; Gong, Enpu; Martin, Larry D.; Burnham, David A.; Falk, Amanda R.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Fossils of the remarkable dromaeosaurid Microraptor gui and relatives clearly show well-developed flight feathers on the hind limbs as well as the front limbs. No modern vertebrate has hind limbs functioning as independent, fully developed wings; so, lacking a living example, little agreement exists on the functional morphology or likely flight configuration of the hindwing. Using a detailed reconstruction based on the actual skeleton of one individual, cast in the round, we developed light-weight, three-dimensional physical models and performed <span class="hlt">glide</span> tests with anatomically reasonable hindwing configurations. Models were tested with hindwings abducted and extended laterally, as well as with a previously described biplane configuration. Although the hip joint requires the hindwing to have at least 20° of negative dihedral (anhedral), all configurations were quite stable gliders. <span class="hlt">Glide</span> angles ranged from 3° to 21° with a mean estimated equilibrium angle of 13.7°, giving a lift to drag ratio of 4.1:1 and a lift coefficient of 0.64. The abducted hindwing model’s equilibrium <span class="hlt">glide</span> speed corresponds to a <span class="hlt">glide</span> speed in the living animal of 10.6 m·s−1. Although the biplane model <span class="hlt">glided</span> almost as well as the other models, it was structurally deficient and required an unlikely weight distribution (very heavy head) for stable <span class="hlt">gliding</span>. Our model with laterally abducted hindwings represents a biologically and aerodynamically reasonable configuration for this four-winged <span class="hlt">gliding</span> animal. M. gui’s feathered hindwings, although effective for <span class="hlt">gliding</span>, would have seriously hampered terrestrial locomotion. PMID:20133792</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15027866','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15027866"><span><span class="hlt">Glide</span>: a new approach for rapid, accurate docking and scoring. 2. Enrichment factors in database screening.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Halgren, Thomas A; Murphy, Robert B; Friesner, Richard A; Beard, Hege S; Frye, Leah L; Pollard, W Thomas; Banks, Jay L</p> <p>2004-03-25</p> <p><span class="hlt">Glide</span>'s ability to identify active compounds in a database screen is characterized by applying <span class="hlt">Glide</span> to a diverse set of nine protein receptors. In many cases, two, or even three, protein sites are employed to probe the sensitivity of the results to the site geometry. To make the database screens as realistic as possible, the screens use sets of "druglike" decoy ligands that have been selected to be representative of what we believe is likely to be found in the compound collection of a pharmaceutical or biotechnology company. Results are presented for releases 1.8, 2.0, and 2.5 of <span class="hlt">Glide</span>. The comparisons show that average measures for both "early" and "global" enrichment for <span class="hlt">Glide</span> 2.5 are 3 times higher than for <span class="hlt">Glide</span> 1.8 and more than 2 times higher than for <span class="hlt">Glide</span> 2.0 because of better results for the least well-handled screens. This improvement in enrichment stems largely from the better balance of the more widely parametrized <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Score 2.5 function and the inclusion of terms that penalize ligand-protein interactions that violate established principles of physical chemistry, particularly as it concerns the exposure to solvent of charged protein and ligand groups. Comparisons to results for the thymidine kinase and estrogen receptors published by Rognan and co-workers (J. Med. Chem. 2000, 43, 4759-4767) show that <span class="hlt">Glide</span> 2.5 performs better than GOLD 1.1, FlexX 1.8, or DOCK 4.01.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28957108','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28957108"><span>Designer surface plasmon dispersion on a one-dimensional periodic slot metasurface with <span class="hlt">glide</span> symmetry.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Camacho, Miguel; Mitchell-Thomas, Rhiannon C; Hibbins, Alastair P; Roy Sambles, J; Quevedo-Teruel, Oscar</p> <p>2017-09-01</p> <p>In this Letter, we explore the dispersion of spoof surface plasmons supported by a single-layer <span class="hlt">glide</span>-symmetric structure. This structure consists of an infinitely long double-notched slot perforated in a metal layer. The presence of a degeneracy of the two lowest-order modes at the Brillouin zone boundary, which have non-zero group velocity is explained and experimentally demonstrated. Further, the dependence of the band structure when <span class="hlt">glide</span>-symmetric configuration is broken is also explored.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_13 --> <div id="page_14" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="261"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3938594','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3938594"><span>Efficiency of Lift Production in Flapping and <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Flight of Swifts</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Henningsson, Per; Hedenström, Anders; Bomphrey, Richard J.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Many flying animals use both flapping and <span class="hlt">gliding</span> flight as part of their routine behaviour. These two kinematic patterns impose conflicting requirements on wing design for aerodynamic efficiency and, in the absence of extreme morphing, wings cannot be optimised for both flight modes. In <span class="hlt">gliding</span> flight, the wing experiences uniform incident flow and the optimal shape is a high aspect ratio wing with an elliptical planform. In flapping flight, on the other hand, the wing tip travels faster than the root, creating a spanwise velocity gradient. To compensate, the optimal wing shape should taper towards the tip (reducing the local chord) and/or twist from root to tip (reducing local angle of attack). We hypothesised that, if a bird is limited in its ability to morph its wings and adapt its wing shape to suit both flight modes, then a preference towards flapping flight optimization will be expected since this is the most energetically demanding flight mode. We tested this by studying a well-known flap-<span class="hlt">gliding</span> species, the common swift, by measuring the wakes generated by two birds, one in <span class="hlt">gliding</span> and one in flapping flight in a wind tunnel. We calculated span efficiency, the efficiency of lift production, and found that the flapping swift had consistently higher span efficiency than the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> swift. This supports our hypothesis and suggests that even though swifts have been shown previously to increase their lift-to-drag ratio substantially when <span class="hlt">gliding</span>, the wing morphology is tuned to be more aerodynamically efficient in generating lift during flapping. Since body drag can be assumed to be similar for both flapping and <span class="hlt">gliding</span>, it follows that the higher total drag in flapping flight compared with <span class="hlt">gliding</span> flight is primarily a consequence of an increase in wing profile drag due to the flapping motion, exceeding the reduction in induced drag. PMID:24587260</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JCAMD..26..787R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JCAMD..26..787R"><span>Docking performance of the <span class="hlt">glide</span> program as evaluated on the Astex and DUD datasets: a complete set of <span class="hlt">glide</span> SP results and selected results for a new scoring function integrating WaterMap and <span class="hlt">glide</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Repasky, Matthew P.; Murphy, Robert B.; Banks, Jay L.; Greenwood, Jeremy R.; Tubert-Brohman, Ivan; Bhat, Sathesh; Friesner, Richard A.</p> <p>2012-06-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Glide</span> SP mode enrichment results for two preparations of the DUD dataset and native ligand docking RMSDs for two preparations of the Astex dataset are presented. Following a best-practices preparation scheme, an average RMSD of 1.140 Å for native ligand docking with <span class="hlt">Glide</span> SP is computed. Following the same best-practices preparation scheme for the DUD dataset an average area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.80 and average early enrichment via the ROC (0.1 %) metric of 0.12 were observed. 74 and 56 % of the 39 best-practices prepared targets showed AUC over 0.7 and 0.8, respectively. Average AUC was greater than 0.7 for all best-practices protein families demonstrating consistent enrichment performance across a broad range of proteins and ligand chemotypes. In both Astex and DUD datasets, docking performance is significantly improved employing a best-practices preparation scheme over using minimally-prepared structures from the PDB. Enrichment results for WScore, a new scoring function and sampling methodology integrating WaterMap and <span class="hlt">Glide</span>, are presented for four DUD targets, hivrt, hsp90, cdk2, and fxa. WScore performance in early enrichment is consistently strong and all systems examined show AUC > 0.9 and superior early enrichment to DUD best-practices <span class="hlt">Glide</span> SP results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AGUFM.S52A..04R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AGUFM.S52A..04R"><span>Detection of <span class="hlt">Microseism</span> Sources using Spurious Arrivals of Teleseismic Noise Correlations between an array and a distant station</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Retailleau, L.; Boué, P.; Stehly, L.; Campillo, M.</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>The accuracy of Green's function retrieved from noise correlations is mainly limited by the uneven distribution of noise sources at the surface of the Earth. This is particularly true when the scattering is weak, for instance when considering mid-to-long period teleseismic correlations. In this case, noise correlations often exhibit spurious arrivals. For example, cross-correlations computed between seismic stations in Europe and in the United States, and averaged over 2014, show a strong surface wave spurious arrival related to the well known <span class="hlt">microseism</span> source located South-East of Greenland. Based on this cross-atlantic correlation dataset, we propose a simple methodology to image the actual oceanic source by analyzing the apparent slowness of the spurious arrivals. We beamform the spurious phase in the time-distance gather obtained with one station as a virtual source in the US versus a distant array in Europe. The time and apparent slowness of the spurious arrivals lead to the location of the source which we obtain through a grid search procedure. Our method is easy to implement and only needs a combination of an array and a distant station. We discuss the different advantages of this methodology compared to classical back-projection of <span class="hlt">microseism</span> energy. In particular we show with synthetic tests, that the gain of resolution is directly related to the sharpness of the sensitivity kernel (in terms of source perturbations) of the teleseismic cross-correlations. This strategy leads to a high resolution imaging of the main source of energy in the first <span class="hlt">microseism</span> band in the North Atlantic ocean observed in 2014. The existence of a long-period surface wave reflected at the oceanic/continental crust interface is discussed. The advantage of this technique is that it requires solely an array and a distant station, conditions that are easily met.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JGRB..120.5764G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JGRB..120.5764G"><span>The frequency dependence and locations of short-period <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> generated in the Southern Ocean and West Pacific</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gal, M.; Reading, A. M.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Gualtieri, L.; Koper, K. D.; Burlacu, R.; Tkalčić, H.; Hemer, M. A.</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p>The origin of the microseismic wavefield is associated with deep ocean and coastal regions where, under certain conditions, ocean waves can excite seismic waves that propagate as surface and body waves. Given that the characteristics of seismic signals generally vary with frequency, here we explore the frequency- and azimuth-dependent properties of <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> recorded at a medium aperture (25 km) array in Australia. We examine the frequency-dependent properties of the wavefield, and its temporal variation, over two decades (1991-2012), with a focus on relatively high-frequency <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> (0.325-0.725 Hz) recorded at the Warramunga Array, which has good slowness resolution capabilities in this frequency range. The analysis is carried out using the incoherently averaged signal Capon beamforming, which gives robust estimates of slowness and back azimuth and is able to resolve multiple wave arrivals within a single time window. For surface waves, we find that fundamental mode Rayleigh waves (Rg) dominate for lower frequencies (<0.55 Hz) while higher frequencies (>0.55 Hz) show a transition to higher mode surface waves (Lg). For body waves, source locations are identified in deep ocean regions for lower frequencies and in shallow waters for higher frequencies. We further examine the association between surface wave arrivals and a WAVEWATCH III ocean wave hindcast. Correlations with the ocean wave hindcast show that secondary <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> in the lower-frequency band are generated mainly by ocean swell, while higher-frequency bands are generated by the wind sea, i.e., local wind conditions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JGRB..122.4660G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JGRB..122.4660G"><span>Full wavefield decomposition of high-frequency secondary <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> reveals distinct arrival azimuths for Rayleigh and Love waves</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gal, M.; Reading, A. M.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Koper, K. D.; Burlacu, R.</p> <p>2017-06-01</p> <p>In the secondary <span class="hlt">microseism</span> band (0.1-1.0 Hz) the theoretical excitation of Rayleigh waves (Rg/LR), through oceanic wave-wave interaction, is well understood. For Love waves (LQ), the excitation mechanism in the secondary <span class="hlt">microseism</span> band is less clear. We explore high-frequency secondary <span class="hlt">microseism</span> excitation between 0.35 and 1 Hz by analyzing a full year (2013) of records from a three-component seismic array in Pilbara (PSAR), Australia. Our recently developed three-component waveform decomposition algorithm (CLEAN-3C) fully decomposes the beam power in slowness space into multiple point sources. This method allows for a directionally dependent power estimation for all separable wave phases. In this contribution, we compare quantitatively microseismic energy recorded on vertical and transverse components. We find the mean power representation of Rayleigh and Love waves to have differing azimuthal distributions, which are likely a result of their respective generation mechanisms. Rayleigh waves show correlation with convex coastlines, while Love waves correlate with seafloor sedimentary basins. The observations are compared to the WAVEWATCH III ocean model, implemented at the Institut Français de Recherche pour l'Exploitation de la Mer (IFREMER), which describes the spatial and temporal characteristics of microseismic source excitation. We find Love wave energy to originate from raypaths coinciding with seafloor sedimentary basins where strong Rayleigh wave excitation is predicted by the ocean model. The total power of Rg waves is found to dominate at 0.35-0.6 Hz, and the Rayleigh/Love wave power ratio strongly varies with direction and frequency.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2600906','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2600906"><span>Take-off and landing kinetics of a free-ranging <span class="hlt">gliding</span> mammal, the Malayan colugo (Galeopterus variegatus)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Byrnes, Greg; Lim, Norman T.-L; Spence, Andrew J</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Arboreal animals negotiate a highly three-dimensional world that is discontinuous on many spatial scales. As the scale of substrate discontinuity increases, many arboreal animals rely on leaping or <span class="hlt">gliding</span> locomotion between distant supports. In order to successfully move through their habitat, <span class="hlt">gliding</span> animals must actively modulate both propulsive and aerodynamic forces. Here we examined the take-off and landing kinetics of a free-ranging <span class="hlt">gliding</span> mammal, the Malayan colugo (Galeopterus variegatus) using a custom-designed three-dimensional accelerometry system. We found that colugos increase the propulsive impulse to affect longer <span class="hlt">glides</span>. However, we also found that landing forces are negatively associated with <span class="hlt">glide</span> distance. Landing forces decrease rapidly as <span class="hlt">glide</span> distance increases from the shortest <span class="hlt">glides</span>, then level off, suggesting that the ability to reorient the aerodynamic forces prior to landing is an important mechanism to reduce velocity and thus landing forces. This ability to substantially alter the aerodynamic forces acting on the patagial wing in order to reorient the body is a key to the transition between leaping and <span class="hlt">gliding</span> and allows <span class="hlt">gliding</span> mammals to travel long distances between trees with reduced risk of injury. Longer <span class="hlt">glides</span> may increase the access to distributed resources and reduce the exposure to predators in the canopy or on the forest floor. PMID:18252673</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20006417','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20006417"><span>Simulation for F.C.C. deformation texture by modified pencil <span class="hlt">glide</span> theory[Face Centered Cubic</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Masui, H.</p> <p>1999-11-26</p> <p>Inspired by the pencil <span class="hlt">glide</span> theory for b.c.c. metal, modified pencil <span class="hlt">glide</span> theory for f.c.c. metal was proposed, dividing the 12 <span class="hlt">glide</span> systems of f.c.c. metal into three groups individually composed of eight {l{underscore}brace}111{r{underscore}brace}{l{underscore}angle}110{r{underscore}angle} <span class="hlt">glide</span> systems around the principal axes X[100], Y[010] and Z[001]. These assumptions yielded two mathematical solutions {Omega}(3) and {Omega}(1). In {Omega}(3), from the three groups with four complete conjugated <span class="hlt">glide</span> systems composed of, respectively, two <span class="hlt">glide</span> systems of common {l{underscore}angle}110{r{underscore}angle} direction, only one group with the maximum plastic work may operate if the requirements are satisfied, otherwise <span class="hlt">glide</span> systems in {Omega}(1) where one of the four conjugated <span class="hlt">glide</span> systems is zero are activated. The model considering the 12 <span class="hlt">glide</span> systems of f.c.c. as a whole explained many experimentally stable orientations in axisymmetric and rolling deformation. The differences between the two pencil <span class="hlt">glide</span> theories for b.c.c. and f.c.c. are also discussed with data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15937792','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15937792"><span>The cost of living large: comparative <span class="hlt">gliding</span> performance in flying lizards (Agamidae: Draco).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>McGuire, Jimmy A; Dudley, Robert</p> <p>2005-07-01</p> <p>Despite exhibiting considerable interspecific variation in body mass, flying lizards of the genus Draco are isometric in their area-mass scaling relationships and exhibit no significant compensatory variation in wing aspect ratio. Thus, larger species are expected to be relatively poor gliders, in lieu of behavioral or physiological compensation, when compared with smaller congeners. Here we tested this hypothesis by conducting <span class="hlt">gliding</span> performance trials for 11 Draco species spanning virtually the entire size range of the genus. We considered three primary performance variables: maximum velocity adjusted for wind conditions, height lost over a standard horizontal <span class="hlt">glide</span> distance, and <span class="hlt">glide</span> angle. Comparative analysis confirmed that larger species are relatively poor gliders and do not compensate substantially for their higher wing loadings via either behavioral or physiological mechanisms. Flying lizards were found to exhibit substantial context-dependent variation in <span class="hlt">glide</span> performance, with smaller species often exhibiting extensive variation in height lost and <span class="hlt">glide</span> angle between trials. Variation also was observed in empirically derived velocity profiles, with only a subset of individuals appearing to perform equilibrium <span class="hlt">glides</span>. Such size-dependent variation in performance has important consequences for the ecology and evolution of flying lizards and other glissant taxa.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27473437','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27473437"><span>Aerodynamic consequences of wing morphing during emulated take-off and <span class="hlt">gliding</span> in birds.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Klaassen van Oorschot, Brett; Mistick, Emily A; Tobalske, Bret W</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>Birds morph their wings during a single wingbeat, across flight speeds and among flight modes. Such morphing may allow them to maximize aerodynamic performance, but this assumption remains largely untested. We tested the aerodynamic performance of swept and extended wing postures of 13 raptor species in three families (Accipitridae, Falconidae and Strigidae) using a propeller model to emulate mid-downstroke of flapping during take-off and a wind tunnel to emulate <span class="hlt">gliding</span>. Based on previous research, we hypothesized that (1) during flapping, wing posture would not affect maximum ratios of vertical and horizontal force coefficients (CV:CH), and that (2) extended wings would have higher maximum CV:CH when <span class="hlt">gliding</span>. Contrary to each hypothesis, during flapping, extended wings had, on average, 31% higher maximum CV:CH ratios and 23% higher CV than swept wings across all biologically relevant attack angles (α), and, during <span class="hlt">gliding</span>, maximum CV:CH ratios were similar for the two postures. Swept wings had 11% higher CV than extended wings in <span class="hlt">gliding</span> flight, suggesting flow conditions around these flexed raptor wings may be different from those in previous studies of swifts (Apodidae). Phylogenetic affiliation was a poor predictor of wing performance, due in part to high intrafamilial variation. Mass was only significantly correlated with extended wing performance during <span class="hlt">gliding</span>. We conclude that wing shape has a greater effect on force per unit wing area during flapping at low advance ratio, such as take-off, than during <span class="hlt">gliding</span>. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70047250','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70047250"><span>Strongly <span class="hlt">gliding</span> harmonic tremor during the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Hotovec, Alicia J.; Prejean, Stephanie G.; Vidale, John E.; Gomberg, Joan S.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>During the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, <span class="hlt">gliding</span> harmonic tremor occurred prominently before six nearly consecutive explosions during the second half of the eruptive sequence. The fundamental frequency repeatedly <span class="hlt">glided</span> upward from < 1 Hz to as high as 30 Hz in less than 10 min, followed by a relative seismic quiescence of 10 to 60 s immediately prior to explosion. High frequency (5 to 20 Hz) <span class="hlt">gliding</span> returned during the extrusive phase, and lasted for 20 min to 3 h at a time. Although harmonic tremor is not uncommon at volcanoes, tremor at such high frequencies is a rare observation. These frequencies approach or exceed the plausible upper limits of many models that have been suggested for volcanic tremor. We also analyzed the behavior of a swarm of repeating earthquakes that immediately preceded the first instance of pre-explosion <span class="hlt">gliding</span> harmonic tremor. We find that these earthquakes share several traits with upward <span class="hlt">gliding</span> harmonic tremor, and favor the explanation that the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> harmonic tremor at Redoubt Volcano is created by the superposition of increasingly frequent and regular, repeating stick–slip earthquakes through the Dirac comb effect.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AcAau.102...81L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AcAau.102...81L"><span>Novel approach for designing a hypersonic <span class="hlt">gliding</span>-cruising dual waverider vehicle</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Liu, Jun; Ding, Feng; Huang, Wei; Jin, Liang</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p>For a hypersonic <span class="hlt">gliding</span>-cruising vehicle, the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> Mach number is larger than the cruising Mach number. It may be useful to design the inlet shroud to act as the compression surface of the waverider, to ensure that the vehicle rides on the shock wave, during both the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> and cruising phases. A new design concept, namely a <span class="hlt">gliding</span>-cruising dual waverider, is proposed in the current study. During the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> phase, the hypersonic vehicle rides on the shock wave at the design <span class="hlt">gliding</span> Mach number, as the inlet shroud is designed to act as waverider's compression surface. During the cruising phase, when the inlet shroud is cast away or jettisoned, the hypersonic vehicle rides on the shock wave at the design cruising Mach number, as the forebody is designed to act as waverider's compression surface. Thus, the design methodology of the dual-cone-derived waverider is described based on the theory of conical flow. Finally, the numerical methods are utilized to verify the new design method of the aerodynamic configuration. This methodology proposed is useful to design a hypersonic vehicle for two regimes of flight.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24484668','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24484668"><span>Visualizing single rod-shaped fission yeast vertically in <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> holes on agarose pad made by soft lithography.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wang, Li; Tran, Phong T</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Fission yeast cells are rod-shaped unicellular organism that is normally imaged horizontally with its long axis parallel to image plane. This orientation, while practical, limits the imaging resolution of biological structures which are oriented perpendicular to the long axis of the cell. We present here a method to prepare agarose pads with <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> holes to load single fission yeast cell vertically and image cell with its long axis perpendicular to the image plane. As a demonstration, actomyosin ring contraction is shown with this new imaging device.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27770326','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27770326"><span>Aspirin and paracetamol removal using a commercial <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> TiO2 catalyst in deionized and tap water.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bianchi, Claudia L; Sacchi, Benedetta; Pirola, Carlo; Demartin, Francesco; Cerrato, Giuseppina; Morandi, Sara; Capucci, Valentino</p> <p>2017-05-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Micro-sized</span> TiO2 catalyst was employed to degrade pharmaceutical compounds, i.e. aspirin and paracetamol, two of the most widely used drugs, purchasable without prescription. Their active agents, acetylsalicylic acid and acetaminophen, are characterized by different substituent groups, linked to the aromatic ring, which affect both the photodegradation and mineralization processes. The experimental conditions highlight the relationship between the nature of the pristine molecules, their degradation mechanisms, their mutual interference and the water's role. The research started from model systems with a single pollutant to the mixture of them and finally by moving from deionized water to tap water.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2978710','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2978710"><span>Flight Modes in Migrating European Bee-Eaters: Heart Rate May Indicate Low Metabolic Rate during Soaring and <span class="hlt">Gliding</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Sapir, Nir; Wikelski, Martin; McCue, Marshall D.; Pinshow, Berry; Nathan, Ran</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Background Many avian species soar and <span class="hlt">glide</span> over land. Evidence from large birds (mb>0.9 kg) suggests that soaring-<span class="hlt">gliding</span> is considerably cheaper in terms of energy than flapping flight, and costs about two to three times the basal metabolic rate (BMR). Yet, soaring-<span class="hlt">gliding</span> is considered unfavorable for small birds because migration speed in small birds during soaring-<span class="hlt">gliding</span> is believed to be lower than that of flapping flight. Nevertheless, several small bird species routinely soar and <span class="hlt">glide</span>. Methodology/Principal Findings To estimate the energetic cost of soaring-<span class="hlt">gliding</span> flight in small birds, we measured heart beat frequencies of free-ranging migrating European bee-eaters (Merops apiaster, mb∼55 g) using radio telemetry, and established the relationship between heart beat frequency and metabolic rate (by indirect calorimetry) in the laboratory. Heart beat frequency during sustained soaring-<span class="hlt">gliding</span> was 2.2 to 2.5 times lower than during flapping flight, but similar to, and not significantly different from, that measured in resting birds. We estimated that soaring-<span class="hlt">gliding</span> metabolic rate of European bee-eaters is about twice their basal metabolic rate (BMR), which is similar to the value estimated in the black-browed albatross Thalassarche (previously Diomedea) melanophrys, mb∼4 kg). We found that soaring-<span class="hlt">gliding</span> migration speed is not significantly different from flapping migration speed. Conclusions/Significance We found no evidence that soaring-<span class="hlt">gliding</span> speed is slower than flapping flight in bee-eaters, contradicting earlier estimates that implied a migration speed penalty for using soaring-<span class="hlt">gliding</span> rather than flapping flight. Moreover, we suggest that small birds soar and <span class="hlt">glide</span> during migration, breeding, dispersal, and other stages in their annual cycle because it may entail a low energy cost of transport. We propose that the energy cost of soaring-<span class="hlt">gliding</span> may be proportional to BMR regardless of bird size, as theoretically deduced by earlier studies</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985Tecto...4..705B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985Tecto...4..705B"><span>Strain Patterns in Models of Spreading-<span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Nappes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Brun, Jean-Pierre; Merle, Olivier</p> <p>1985-12-01</p> <p>Three experiments have been carried out in order to study the progressive and finite strain in nappes where gravitational spreading and <span class="hlt">gliding</span> occur together. These experimental models were made from analogue materials able to collapse under their own weight on an inclined plane. Throughout most of the models the stretch trajectories in a vertical plane parallel to the flow show a low-amplitude sigmoidal pattern consistent with a previous theoretical model. Other stretch trajectories exist at the front and back ends of each model. The kinematic significance of all these trajectories is discussed in detail. Highest strain intensities are always found next to the base of the model. Strain paths calculated at different stages of flow indicate clearly that nowhere in the model is the motion simple. There is a complex combination in time and space of simple and pure shear, except at the base of the model where the motion approximates a simple shearing. Near the two parallel lateral sides of the model a lateral boundary effect can be observed from the strong curvature of the transverse markers (surface grid and vertical layers). Strain paths have also been estimated in this complex zone where wrench shearing is superimposed upon vertical shortening and thrust shearing. The geological implications of these experimental models are discussed in relation to recent theoretical studies and field work.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009APS..MARJ24005D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009APS..MARJ24005D"><span>Dislocation Onset and <span class="hlt">Glide</span> in Carbon Nanotubes under Torsion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dumitrica, Traian; Zhang, Dong-Bo; James, Richard</p> <p>2009-03-01</p> <p>The torsional plastic response of carbon nanotubes is comprehensively described in the objective molecular dynamics framework [1-3]. It is shown that an (n,m) tube is prone to slip along a nearly-axial helical path, which introduces a distinct (+1,-1) change in the wrapping index. The low energy realization occurs without loss of mass, via nucleation of a 5-7-7-5 dislocation dipole, followed by a nearly-axial <span class="hlt">glide</span> of the 5-7 dislocation. The onset of plasticity depends not only on chirality but also on handedness. For a given handedness of the applied twist, chiral tubes of opposed handedness are most susceptible to yield. A right-handed applied twist on an armchair (zig-zag) tube leads to a right- (left-) handed tube. [4pt] [1] T. Dumitrica and R.D. James, Objective Molecular Dynamics, Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids 55, 2206 (2007). [0pt] [2] D.-B. Zhang, M. Hua, and T. Dumitrica, Stability of Polycrystalline and Wurtzite Si Nanowires via Symmetry-Adapted Tight-Binding Objective Molecular Dynamics, Journal of Chemical Physics 128, 084104 (2008). [0pt] [3] D.-B. Zhang and T. Dumitrica, Elasticity of Ideal Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes via Symmetry-Adapted Tight-Binding Objective Modeling, Applied Physics Letters 93, 031919 (2008).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1347662-transition-dislocation-glide-shear-transformation-shocked-tantalum','SCIGOV-DOEP'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1347662-transition-dislocation-glide-shear-transformation-shocked-tantalum"><span>Transition of dislocation <span class="hlt">glide</span> to shear transformation in shocked tantalum</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/pages">DOE PAGES</a></p> <p>Hsiung, Luke L.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.</p> <p>2017-02-28</p> <p>A TEM study of pure tantalum and tantalum-tungsten alloys explosively shocked at a peak pressure of 30 GPa (strain rate: ~1 x 104 sec-1) is presented. While no ω (hexagonal) phase was found in shock-recovered pure Ta and Ta-5W that contain mainly a low-energy cellular dislocation structure, shock-induced ω phase was found to form in Ta-10W that contains evenly distributed dislocations with a stored dislocation density higher than 1 x 1012 cm-2. The TEM results clearly reveal that shock-induced α (bcc) → ω (hexagonal) shear transformation occurs when dynamic recovery reactions which lead the formation low-energy cellular dislocation structure becomemore » largely suppressed in Ta-10W shocked under dynamic (i.e., high strain-rate and high-pressure) conditions. A novel dislocation-based mechanism is proposed to rationalize the transition of dislocation <span class="hlt">glide</span> to twinning and/or shear transformation in shock-deformed tantalum. Lastly, twinning and/or shear transformation take place as an alternative deformation mechanism to accommodate high-strain-rate straining when the shear stress required for dislocation multiplication exceeds the threshold shear stresses for twinning and/or shear transformation.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JPCM...23K4104L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JPCM...23K4104L"><span>Loop formation of microtubules during <span class="hlt">gliding</span> at high density</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Liu, Lynn; Tüzel, Erkan; Ross, Jennifer L.</p> <p>2011-09-01</p> <p>The microtubule cytoskeleton, including the associated proteins, forms a complex network essential to multiple cellular processes. Microtubule-associated motor proteins, such as kinesin-1, travel on microtubules to transport membrane bound vesicles across the crowded cell. Other motors, such as cytoplasmic dynein and kinesin-5, are used to organize the cytoskeleton during mitosis. In order to understand the self-organization processes of motors on microtubules, we performed filament-<span class="hlt">gliding</span> assays with kinesin-1 motors bound to the cover glass with a high density of microtubules on the surface. To observe microtubule organization, 3% of the microtubules were fluorescently labeled to serve as tracers. We find that microtubules in these assays are not confined to two dimensions and can cross one other. This causes microtubules to align locally with a relatively short correlation length. At high density, this local alignment is enough to create 'intersections' of perpendicularly oriented groups of microtubules. These intersections create vortices that cause microtubules to form loops. We characterize the radius of curvature and time duration of the loops. These different behaviors give insight into how crowded conditions, such as those in the cell, might affect motor behavior and cytoskeleton organization.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JPhCS.304a2036L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JPhCS.304a2036L"><span>Toxicity of nano- and <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> silver particles in human hepatocyte cell line L02</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Liu, Pengpeng; Guan, Rongfa; Ye, Xingqian; Jiang, Jiaxin; Liu, Mingqi; Huang, Guangrong; Chen, Xiaoting</p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) previously classified as antimicrobial agents have been widely used in consumers and industrial products, especially food storage material. Ag NPs used as antimicrobial agents may be found in liver. Thus, examination of the ability of Ag NPs to penetrate the liver is warranted. The aim of the study was to determine the optimal viability assay for using with Ag NPs in order to assess their toxicity to liver cells. For toxicity evaluations, cellular morphology, mitochondrial function (3-(4, 5-dimethylazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide, MTT assay), membrane leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (lactate dehydrogenase, LDH release assay), Oxidative stress markers (malonaldehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)), DNA damage (single cell gel eletrophoresis, SCGE assay), and protein damage were assessed under control and exposed conditions (24 h of exposure). The results showed that mitochondrial function decreased significantly in cells exposed to Ag NPs at 25 μg·mL-1. LDH leakage significantly increased in cells exposed to Ag NPs (>= 25 μg mL-1) while <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> silver particles tested displayed LDH leakage only at higher doses (100 μg·mL-1). The microscopic studies demonstrated that nanoparticle-exposed cells at higher doses became abnormal in size, displaying cellular shrinkage, and an acquisition of an irregular shape. Due to toxicity of silver, further study conducted with reference to its oxidative stress. The results exhibited significant depletion of GSH level, increase in SOD levels and lead to lipid peroxidation, which suggested that cytotoxicity of Ag NPs in liver cells might be mediated through oxidative stress. The results demonstrates that Ag NPs lead to cellular morphological modifications, LDH leakage, mitochondrial dysfunction, and cause increased generation of ROS, depletion of GSH, lipid peroxidation, oxidative DNA damage and protein damage. Though the exact mechanism behind Ag NPs</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23735810','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23735810"><span>Effect of triggering and entrapment on tendon <span class="hlt">gliding</span> properties following digital flexor tendon laceration: in vitro study on turkey tendon.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kennedy, J A; Dias, J J</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p>The optimal management of partial flexor tendon laceration is controversial and remains a clinical challenge. Abnormal tendon <span class="hlt">gliding</span> (triggering and entrapment) was assessed at the A2 pulley in 40 turkey tendons in three groups: intact, partially divided (palmar or lateral), and trimmed. Testing was of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> resistance and friction coefficient at 30° and 70° of flexion, loaded with 2 and 4 N. We observed for triggering and entrapment. The changes in <span class="hlt">gliding</span> properties were compared and analysed using Wilcoxon matched pair testing. A significant difference was found in the change in <span class="hlt">gliding</span> properties of intact to lacerated and lacerated to trimmed tendons and between tendons that <span class="hlt">glided</span> normally compared with those exhibiting triggering or entrapment. This suggests that palmar and lateral lacerations which, through clinical examination and visualization, are found to <span class="hlt">glide</span> normally should be treated with early mobilization. However, partial lacerations that exhibit triggering or entrapment should be trimmed. © The Author(s) 2013.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_14 --> <div id="page_15" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="281"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PSST...26a5003S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PSST...26a5003S"><span>Coupled gas flow-plasma model for a <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc: investigations of the back-breakdown phenomenon and its effect on the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc characteristics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sun, S. R.; Kolev, St.; Wang, H. X.; Bogaerts, A.</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>We present a 3D and 2D Cartesian quasi-neutral plasma model for a low current argon <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc discharge, including strong interactions between the gas flow and arc plasma column. The 3D model is applied only for a short time of 0.2 ms due to its huge computational cost. It mainly serves to verify the reliability of the 2D model. As the results in 2D compare well with those in 3D, they can be used for a better understanding of the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc basic characteristics. More specifically, we investigate the back-breakdown phenomenon induced by an artificially controlled plasma channel, and we discuss its effect on the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc characteristics. The back-breakdown phenomenon, or backward-jump motion of the arc, as observed in the experiments, results in a drop of the gas temperature, as well as in a delay of the arc velocity with respect to the gas flow velocity, allowing more gas to pass through the arc, and thus increasing the efficiency of the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc for gas treatment applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4299211','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4299211"><span>The polarity of myxobacterial <span class="hlt">gliding</span> is regulated by direct interactions between the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motors and the Ras homolog MglA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Nan, Beiyan; Bandaria, Jigar N.; Guo, Kathy Y.; Fan, Xue; Moghtaderi, Amirpasha; Yildiz, Ahmet; Zusman, David R.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Gliding</span> motility in Myxococcus xanthus is powered by flagella stator homologs that move in helical trajectories using proton motive force. The Frz chemosensory pathway regulates the cell polarity axis through MglA, a Ras family GTPase; however, little is known about how MglA establishes the polarity of <span class="hlt">gliding</span>, because the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motors move simultaneously in opposite directions. Here we examined the localization and dynamics of MglA and <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motors in high spatial and time resolution. We determined that MglA localizes not only at the cell poles, but also along the cell bodies, forming a decreasing concentration gradient toward the lagging cell pole. MglA directly interacts with the motor protein AglR, and the spatial distribution of AglR reversals is positively correlated with the MglA gradient. Thus, the motors moving toward lagging cell poles are less likely to reverse, generating stronger forward propulsion. MglB, the GTPase-activating protein of MglA, regulates motor reversal by maintaining the MglA gradient. Our results suggest a mechanism whereby bacteria use Ras family proteins to modulate cellular polarity. PMID:25550521</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28821153','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28821153"><span>Combination of <span class="hlt">microsized</span> mineral particles and rosin as a basis for converting cellulosic fibers into "sticky" superhydrophobic paper.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yu, Xiaoyan; Bian, Peiwen; Xue, Yang; Qian, Xueren; Yu, Haipeng; Chen, Wenshuai; Hu, Xiaohai; Wang, Peng; Wu, Dong; Duan, Qinghui; Li, Limei; Shen, Jing; Ni, Yonghao</p> <p>2017-10-15</p> <p>The unique features of cellulosic paper including flexibility, biodegradability, and low cost enables it as a versatile, sustainable biomaterial for promising applications. In the paper industry, <span class="hlt">microsized</span> mineral particles are widely used in the production of printing/writing paper grades, while rosin derived from trees is the earliest internal sizing agent for paper hydrophobication. On the basis of existing commercial practices associated with the use of mineral particles and rosin in paper production, we present a process concept of converting cellulosic fibers (paper-grade pulp) into "sticky" superhydrophobic paper involving the use of <span class="hlt">microsized</span> mineral particles and rosin (a tree-derived natural product, mainly a mixture of resin acids, especially abietic acid with chemical formula of C19H29COOH). Internal filling of cellulosic networks with mineral particles was basically used to hold out the mineral particles added at the surface, and the delicate integration of wet-end/surface applications of mineral particles with paper surface engineering with rosin/alum led to the development of "sticky" superhydrophobicity, i.e., ultrahigh water-repellency and strong adhesion to water. This proposed concept may provide valuable implications for expanding the use of paper-based products to unconventional applications, e.g., ultrahigh-performance ink jet printing paper for mitigating the "coffee-ring effect" and paper-based microfluidic devices for biomedical testing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26328407','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26328407"><span>Conversion to Aromatic Hydrocarbons Over Nano- and <span class="hlt">Micro-Sized</span> Particle La/Zn/HZSM-5 Catalysts.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kim, Han-Gyu; Yang, Yoon-Cheol; Jeong, Kwang-Eun; Kim, Tae-Wan; Chae, Ho-Jeong; Jeong, Soon-Yong; Kim, Chul-Ung; Lee, Kwan-Young</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The effect of the template of HZSM-5 and its synthesis method on the catalytic conversions of ethanol to aromatic hydrocarbons has been investigated over a 0.8%Zn/0.6%La/HZSM-5 (Si/Al2 = 50) catalyst in a fixed-bed flow reactor under operating conditions of T = 710 K, P = 1 bar, and WHSV = 0.8 hr(-1). Nano- and <span class="hlt">micro-size</span> HZSM-5 were prepared by hydrothermal and microwave synthesis with different templates: TPAOH, TPABr, and HMDA. Zinc and lanthanum modified HZSM-5 catalysts were prepared by a simple co-impregnation method. It was found that the size of the particles and the crystal structure of HZSM-5 were influenced by the template type and synthesis method. When using the TPAOH template, the nano-sized particles were prepared by microwave synthesis, whereas HZSM-5 prepared from TPABr and HMDA by a hydrothermal method, were composed of cubic shaped nanocrystals inside a <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> particle. The effect of the template on the selectivity to aromatics over a La/Zn/HZSM-5 catalyst was shown as follows: HMDA > TPABr > TPAOH.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4731531','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4731531"><span>Effects of <span class="hlt">Glide</span> Path on the Centering Ability and Preparation Time of Two Reciprocating Instruments</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Coelho, Marcelo Santos; Fontana, Carlos Eduardo; Kato, Augusto Shoji; de Martin, Alexandre Sigrist; da Silveira Bueno, Carlos Eduardo</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Introduction: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of establishing <span class="hlt">glide</span> path on the centering ability and preparation time of two single-file reciprocating systems in mesial root canals of mandibular molars. Methods and Materials: Sixty extracted mandibular molars with curvatures of 25-39 degrees and separate foramina for the mesiobuccal and mesiolingual canals, were divided into four groups (n=15); WaveOne+<span class="hlt">glide</span> path; WaveOne; Reciproc+<span class="hlt">glide</span> path and Reciproc. Non-patent canals were excluded and only one canal in each tooth was instrumented. A manual <span class="hlt">glide</span> path was established in first and third groups with #10, 15 and 20 hand K-files. Preparation was performed with reciprocating in-and-out motion, with a 3-4 mm amplitude and slight apical pressure. Initial and final radiographs were taken to analyze the amount of dentin removed in the instrumented canals. The radiographs were superimposed with an image editing software and examined to assess discrepancies at 3-, 6- and 9-mm distances from the apex. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used for statistical analysis. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Preparation in groups without <span class="hlt">glide</span> paths was swifter than the other groups (P=0.001). However, no difference was observed regarding centering ability. Conclusion: Establishing a <span class="hlt">glide</span> path increased the total instrumentation time for preparing curved canals with WaveOne and Reciproc instruments. <span class="hlt">Glide</span> path had no influence on the centering ability of these systems. PMID:26843875</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4923136','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4923136"><span>Integrated Information and Prospects for <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Mechanism of the Pathogenic Bacterium Mycoplasma pneumoniae</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Miyata, Makoto; Hamaguchi, Tasuku</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Mycoplasma pneumoniae forms a membrane protrusion at a cell pole and is known to adhere to solid surfaces, including animal cells, and can <span class="hlt">glide</span> on these surfaces with a speed up to 1 μm per second. Notably, <span class="hlt">gliding</span> appears to be involved in the infectious process in addition to providing the bacteria with a means of escaping the host's immune systems. However, the genome of M. pneumoniae does not encode any of the known genes found in other bacterial motility systems or any conventional motor proteins that are responsible for eukaryotic motility. Thus, further analysis of the mechanism underlying M. pneumoniae <span class="hlt">gliding</span> is warranted. The <span class="hlt">gliding</span> machinery formed as the membrane protrusion can be divided into the surface and internal structures. On the surface, P1 adhesin, a 170 kDa transmembrane protein forms an adhesin complex with other two proteins. The internal structure features a terminal button, paired plates, and a bowl (wheel) complex. In total, the organelle is composed of more than 15 proteins. By integrating the currently available information by genetics, microscopy, and structural analyses, we have suggested a working model for the architecture of the organelle. Furthermore, in this article, we suggest and discuss a possible mechanism of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> based on the structural model, in which the force generated around the bowl complex transmits through the paired plates, reaching the adhesin complex, resulting in the repeated catch of sialylated oligosaccharides on the host surface by the adhesin complex. PMID:27446003</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JCAMD..26..821V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JCAMD..26..821V"><span>Multiple ligand docking by <span class="hlt">Glide</span>: implications for virtual second-site screening</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Vass, Márton; Tarcsay, Ákos; Keserű, György M.</p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>Performance of <span class="hlt">Glide</span> was evaluated in a sequential multiple ligand docking paradigm predicting the binding modes of 129 protein-ligand complexes crystallized with clusters of 2-6 cooperative ligands. Three sampling protocols (single precision—SP, extra precision—XP, and SP without scaling ligand atom radii—SP hard) combined with three different scoring functions (<span class="hlt">Glide</span>Score, Emodel and <span class="hlt">Glide</span> Energy) were tested. The effects of ligand number, docking order and druglikeness of ligands and closeness of the binding site were investigated. On average 36 % of all structures were reproduced with RMSDs lower than 2 Å. Correctly docked structures reached 50 % when docking druglike ligands into closed binding sites by the SP hard protocol. Cooperative binding to metabolic and transport proteins can dramatically alter pharmacokinetic parameters of drugs. Analyzing the cytochrome P450 subset the SP hard protocol with Emodel ranking reproduced two-thirds of the structures well. Multiple ligand binding is also exploited by the fragment linking approach in lead discovery settings. The HSP90 subset from real life fragment optimization programs revealed that <span class="hlt">Glide</span> is able to reproduce the positions of multiple bound fragments if conserved water molecules are considered. These case studies assess the utility of <span class="hlt">Glide</span> in sequential multiple docking applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10692373','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10692373"><span>Transposon insertions in the Flavobacterium johnsoniae ftsX gene disrupt <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility and cell division.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kempf, M J; McBride, M J</p> <p>2000-03-01</p> <p>Flavobacterium johnsoniae is a gram-negative bacterium that exhibits <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility. To determine the mechanism of flavobacterial <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility, we isolated 33 nongliding mutants by Tn4351 mutagenesis. Seventeen of these mutants exhibited filamentous cell morphology. The region of DNA surrounding the transposon insertion in the filamentous mutant CJ101-207 was cloned and sequenced. The transposon was inserted in a gene that was similar to Escherichia coli ftsX. Two of the remaining 16 filamentous mutants also carried insertions in ftsX. Introduction of the wild-type F. johnsoniae ftsX gene restored motility and normal cell morphology to each of the three ftsX mutants. CJ101-207 appears to be blocked at a late stage of cell division, since the filaments produced cross walls but cells failed to separate. In E. coli, FtsX is thought to function with FtsE in translocating proteins involved in potassium transport, and perhaps proteins involved in cell division, into the cytoplasmic membrane. Mutations in F. johnsoniae ftsX may prevent translocation of proteins involved in cell division and proteins involved in <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility into the cytoplasmic membrane, thus resulting in defects in both processes. Alternatively, the loss of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility may be an indirect result of the defect in cell division. The inability to complete cell division may alter the cell architecture and disrupt <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility by preventing the synthesis, assembly, or functioning of the motility apparatus.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27446003','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27446003"><span>Integrated Information and Prospects for <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Mechanism of the Pathogenic Bacterium Mycoplasma pneumoniae.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Miyata, Makoto; Hamaguchi, Tasuku</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Mycoplasma pneumoniae forms a membrane protrusion at a cell pole and is known to adhere to solid surfaces, including animal cells, and can <span class="hlt">glide</span> on these surfaces with a speed up to 1 μm per second. Notably, <span class="hlt">gliding</span> appears to be involved in the infectious process in addition to providing the bacteria with a means of escaping the host's immune systems. However, the genome of M. pneumoniae does not encode any of the known genes found in other bacterial motility systems or any conventional motor proteins that are responsible for eukaryotic motility. Thus, further analysis of the mechanism underlying M. pneumoniae <span class="hlt">gliding</span> is warranted. The <span class="hlt">gliding</span> machinery formed as the membrane protrusion can be divided into the surface and internal structures. On the surface, P1 adhesin, a 170 kDa transmembrane protein forms an adhesin complex with other two proteins. The internal structure features a terminal button, paired plates, and a bowl (wheel) complex. In total, the organelle is composed of more than 15 proteins. By integrating the currently available information by genetics, microscopy, and structural analyses, we have suggested a working model for the architecture of the organelle. Furthermore, in this article, we suggest and discuss a possible mechanism of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> based on the structural model, in which the force generated around the bowl complex transmits through the paired plates, reaching the adhesin complex, resulting in the repeated catch of sialylated oligosaccharides on the host surface by the adhesin complex.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JNuM..449..252D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JNuM..449..252D"><span>Dislocation dynamics simulations of interactions between <span class="hlt">gliding</span> dislocations and radiation induced prismatic loops in zirconium</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Drouet, Julie; Dupuy, Laurent; Onimus, Fabien; Mompiou, Frédéric; Perusin, Simon; Ambard, Antoine</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>The mechanical behavior of Pressurized Water Reactor fuel cladding tubes made of zirconium alloys is strongly affected by neutron irradiation due to the high density of radiation induced dislocation loops. In order to investigate the interaction mechanisms between <span class="hlt">gliding</span> dislocations and loops in zirconium, a new nodal dislocation dynamics code, adapted to Hexagonal Close Packed metals, has been used. Various configurations have been systematically computed considering different <span class="hlt">glide</span> planes, basal or prismatic, and different characters, edge or screw, for <span class="hlt">gliding</span> dislocations with <a>-type Burgers vectors. Simulations show various interaction mechanisms such as (i) absorption of a loop on an edge dislocation leading to the formation of a double super-jog, (ii) creation of a helical turn, on a screw dislocation, that acts as a strong pinning point or (iii) sweeping of a loop by a <span class="hlt">gliding</span> dislocation. It is shown that the clearing of loops is more favorable when the dislocation <span class="hlt">glides</span> in the basal plane than in the prismatic plane explaining the easy dislocation channeling in the basal plane observed after neutron irradiation by transmission electron microscopy.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20661935','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20661935"><span><span class="hlt">Gliding</span> resistance of flexor tendon associated with carpal tunnel pressure: a biomechanical cadaver study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhao, Chunfeng; Ettema, Anke M; Berglund, Lawrence J; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of carpal tunnel pressure on the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> characteristics of flexor tendons within the carpal tunnel. Eight fresh human cadaver wrists and hands were used. A balloon was inserted into the carpal tunnel to elevate the pressure. The mean <span class="hlt">gliding</span> resistance of the middle finger flexor digitorum superficialis tendon was measured with the following six conditions: (1) as a baseline, before balloon insertion; (2) balloon with 0 mmHg pressure; (3) 30 mmHg; (4) 60 mmHg; (5) 90 mmHg; (6) 120 mmHg. The <span class="hlt">gliding</span> resistance of flexor tendon gradually increased as the carpal tunnel pressure was elevated. At pressures above 60 mmHg, the increase in <span class="hlt">gliding</span> resistance became significant compared to the baseline condition. This study helps us to understand the relationship between carpal tunnel pressure, which is elevated in the patient with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and tendon <span class="hlt">gliding</span> resistance, which is a component of the work of flexion. These findings suggest that patients with CTS may have to expend more energy to accomplish specific motions, which may in turn affect symptoms of hand pain, weakness and fatigue, seen commonly in such patients. Copyright © 2010 Orthopaedic Research Society.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2966530','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2966530"><span><span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Resistance of Flexor Tendon Associated with Carpal Tunnel Pressure: A Biomechanical Cadaver Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Zhao, Chunfeng; Ettema, Anke M.; Berglund, Lawrence J.; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of carpal tunnel pressure on the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> characteristics of flexor tendons within the carpal tunnel. Eight fresh human cadaver wrists and hands were used. A balloon was inserted into the carpal tunnel to elevate the pressure. The mean <span class="hlt">gliding</span> resistance of the middle finger flexor digitorum superficialis tendon was measured with the following six conditions 1) as a baseline, before balloon insertion; 2) balloon with 0 mmHg pressure; 3) 30 mmHg; 4) 60 mmHg; 5) 90 mmHg; 6) 120 mmHg. The <span class="hlt">gliding</span> resistance of flexor tendon gradually increased as the carpal tunnel pressure was elevated. At pressures above 60 mmHg, the increase in <span class="hlt">gliding</span> resistance became significant compared to the baseline condition. This study helps us to understand the relationship between carpal tunnel pressure, which is elevated in the patient with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and tendon <span class="hlt">gliding</span> resistance, which is a component of the work of flexion. These findings suggest that patients with CTS may have to expend more energy to accomplish specific motions, which may in turn affect symptoms of hand pain, weakness and fatigue, seen commonly in such patients. PMID:20661935</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3256606','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3256606"><span>Mycoplasma mobile Cells Elongated by Detergent and Their Pivoting Movements in <span class="hlt">Gliding</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Nakane, Daisuke</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Mycoplasma mobile <span class="hlt">glides</span> on solid surfaces by the repeated binding of leg structures to sialylated oligosaccharide fixed on a solid surface. To obtain information about the propulsion caused by the leg, we made elongated and stiff cells using a detergent. Within 30 min after the cells were treated with 0.1% Tween 60, the cells were elongated from 0.8 μm to 2.2 μm in length while maintaining their <span class="hlt">gliding</span> activity. Fluorescence and electron microscopy showed that a part of the cytoskeletal structure was elongated, while the localization of proteins involved in the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> was not modified significantly. The elongated cells <span class="hlt">glided</span> with repeated pivoting around the cellular position of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> machinery by 10 degrees of amplitude at a frequency of 2 to 3 times per second, suggesting that the propulsion in a line perpendicular to the cell axis can occur with different timings. The pivoting speed decreased as the cell length increased, probably from the load generated by the friction. The torque required to achieve the actual pivoting increased with the cell length without saturation, reaching 54.7 pN nm at 4.3 μm in cell length. PMID:22001513</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18543949','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18543949"><span>Toward single molecule detection of staphylococcal enterotoxin B: mobile sandwich immunoassay on <span class="hlt">gliding</span> microtubules.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Soto, Carissa M; Martin, Brett D; Sapsford, Kim E; Blum, Amy Szuchmacher; Ratna, Banahalli R</p> <p>2008-07-15</p> <p>An immunoassay based on <span class="hlt">gliding</span> microtubules (MTs) is described for the detection of staphylococcal enterotoxin B. Detection is performed in a sandwich immunoassay format. <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> microtubules carry the antigen-specific "capture" antibody, and bound analyte is detected using a fluorescent viral scaffold as the tracer. A detailed modification scheme for the MTs postpolymerization is described along with corresponding quantification by fluorescence spectroscopy. The resultant antibody-MTs maintain their morphology and <span class="hlt">gliding</span> capabilities. We report a limit of detection down to 0.5 ng/mL during active transport in a 30 min assay time and down to 1 ng/mL on static surfaces. This study demonstrates the kinesin/MT-mediated capture, transport, and detection of the biowarfare agent SEB in a microfluidic format.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20050028453','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20050028453"><span>Investigations of Lateral Stability of a <span class="hlt">Glide</span> Bomb Using Automatic Control Having No Time Lag</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Sponder, E. W.</p> <p>1950-01-01</p> <p>The investigation of the lateral stability of an automatically controlled <span class="hlt">glide</span> bomb led also to the attempt of clarifying the influence of a phugoid oscillation or of any general longitudinal oscillation on the lateral stability of a <span class="hlt">glide</span> bomb. Under the assumption that its period of oscillation considerably exceeds the rolling and yawing oscillation and that c(sub a) is, at least in sections, practically constant, the result of this test is quite simple. It becomes clear that the influence of the phugoid oscillation may be replaced by suitable variation of the rolling-yawing moment on a rectilinear flight path instead of the phugoid oscillation. If the flying weight of the <span class="hlt">glide</span> bomb of unchanged dimensions is increased, an increase of the flight velocity will be more favorable than an increase of the lift coefficient. The arrangement of the control permits lateral stability to be achieved in every case; a minimum rolling moment due to sideslip proves of great help.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009PhPl...16k3506T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009PhPl...16k3506T"><span>Dynamic and spectroscopic characteristics of atmospheric <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc in gas-liquid two-phase flow</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tu, X.; Yu, L.; Yan, J. H.; Cen, K. F.; Chéron, B. G.</p> <p>2009-11-01</p> <p>In this study, an atmospheric alternating-current <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc device in gas-liquid two-phase flow has been developed for the purpose of waste water degradation. The dynamic behavior of the gas-liquid <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc is investigated through the oscillations of electrical signals, while the spatial evolution of the arc column is analyzed by high speed photography. Different arc breakdown regimes are reported, and the restrike mode is identified as the typical fluctuation characteristic of the hybrid <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc in air-water mixture. Optical emission spectroscopy is employed to investigate the active species generated in the gas-liquid plasma. The axial evolution of the OH (309 nm) intensity is determined, while the rotational and vibrational temperatures of the OH are obtained by a comparison between the experimental and simulated spectra. The significant discrepancy between the rotational and translational temperatures has also been discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhRvA..95f1601Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhRvA..95f1601Z"><span>Two-leg Su-Schrieffer-Heeger chain with <span class="hlt">glide</span> reflection symmetry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhang, Shao-Liang; Zhou, Qi</p> <p>2017-06-01</p> <p>The Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) model lays the foundation of many important concepts in quantum topological matters. Here, we show that a spin-dependent double-well optical lattice allows one to couple two topologically distinct SSH chains in the bulk and realize a <span class="hlt">glided</span>-two-leg SSH model that respects the <span class="hlt">glide</span> reflection symmetry. Such a model gives rise to intriguing quantum phenomena beyond the paradigm of a traditional SSH model. It is characterized by Wilson lines that require non-Abelian Berry connections, and the interplay between the <span class="hlt">glide</span> symmetry and interaction automatically leads to charge fractionalization without jointing two lattice potentials at an interface. Our work demonstrates the versatility of ultracold atoms to create new theoretical models for studying topological matters.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3970804','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3970804"><span>Effect of 2H and 18O water isotopes in kinesin-1 <span class="hlt">gliding</span> assay</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Herskowitz, Lawrence J.; Koch, Steven J.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>We show for the first time the effects of heavy-hydrogen water (2H2O) and heavy-oxygen water (H218O) on the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> speed of microtubules on kinesin-1 coated surfaces. Increased fractions of isotopic waters used in the motility solution decreased the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> speed of microtubules by a maximum of 21% for heavy-hydrogen and 5% for heavy-oxygen water. We also show that <span class="hlt">gliding</span> microtubule speed returns to its original speed after being treated with heavy-hydrogen water. We discuss possible interpretations of these results and the importance for future studies of water effects on kinesin and microtubules. We also discuss the implication for using heavy waters in biomolecular devices incorporating molecular motors. PMID:24711961</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017NJPh...19g3002L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017NJPh...19g3002L"><span>Classification and surface anomaly of <span class="hlt">glide</span> symmetry protected topological phases in three dimensions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lu, Fuyan; Shi, Bowen; Lu, Yuan-Ming</p> <p>2017-07-01</p> <p>We study <span class="hlt">glide</span> protected topological (GSPT) phases of interacting bosons and fermions in three spatial dimensions with certain on-site symmetries. They are crystalline SPT phases, which are distinguished from a trivial product state only in the presence of non-symmorphic <span class="hlt">glide</span> symmetry. We classify these GSPT phases with various on-site symmetries such as U(1) and time reversal, and show that they can all be understood by stacking and coupling two-dimensional (2D) short-range-entangled phases in a <span class="hlt">glide</span>-invariant way. Using such a coupled layer construction we study the anomalous surface topological orders of these GSPT phases, which gap out the 2D surface states without breaking any symmetries. While this framework can be applied to any non-symmorphic SPT phase, we demonstrate it in many examples of GSPT phases including the non-symmorphic topological insulator with ‘hourglass fermion’ surface states.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AGUFM.S51C..04A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AGUFM.S51C..04A"><span>Multi-Decadal analysis of Global Trends in <span class="hlt">Microseism</span> Intensity: A Proxy for Changes in Extremal Storm Activity and Oceanic Wave State</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Anthony, R. E.; Aster, R. C.; Rowe, C. A.</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>The Earth's seismic noise spectrum features two globally ubiquitous peaks near 8 and 16 s periods (secondary and primary bands) that arise when storm-generated ocean gravity waves are converted to seismic energy, predominantly into Rayleigh waves. Because of its regionally integrative nature, <span class="hlt">microseism</span> intensity and other seismographic data from long running sites can provide useful proxies for wave state. Expanding an earlier study of global <span class="hlt">microseism</span> trends (Aster et al., 2010), we analyze digitally-archived, up-to-date (through late 2016) multi-decadal seismic data from stations of global seismographic networks to characterize the spatiotemporal evolution of wave climate over the past >20 years. The IRIS Noise Tool Kit (Bahavair et al., 2013) is used to produce ground motion power spectral density (PSD) estimates in 3-hour overlapping time series segments. The result of this effort is a longer duration and more broadly geographically distributed PSD database than attained in previous studies, particularly for the primary <span class="hlt">microseism</span> band. Integrating power within the primary and secondary <span class="hlt">microseism</span> bands enables regional characterization of spatially-integrated trends in wave states and storm event statistics of varying thresholds. The results of these analyses are then interpreted within the context of recognized modes of atmospheric variability, including the particularly strong 2015-2016 El Niño. We note a number of statistically significant increasing trends in both raw <span class="hlt">microseism</span> power and storm activity occurring at multiple stations in the Northwest Atlantic and Southeast Pacific consistent with generally increased wave heights and storminess in these regions. Such trends in wave activity have the potential to significantly influence coastal environments particularly under rising global sea levels.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_15 --> <div id="page_16" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="301"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ascl.soft02003C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ascl.soft02003C"><span><span class="hlt">ACS</span>: ALMA Common Software</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chiozzi, Gianluca; Šekoranja, Matej</p> <p>2013-02-01</p> <p>ALMA Common Software (<span class="hlt">ACS</span>) provides a software infrastructure common to all ALMA partners and consists of a documented collection of common patterns and components which implement those patterns. The heart of <span class="hlt">ACS</span> is based on a distributed Component-Container model, with <span class="hlt">ACS</span> Components implemented as CORBA objects in any of the supported programming languages. <span class="hlt">ACS</span> provides common CORBA-based services such as logging, error and alarm management, configuration database and lifecycle management. Although designed for ALMA, <span class="hlt">ACS</span> can and is being used in other control systems and distributed software projects, since it implements proven design patterns using state of the art, reliable technology. It also allows, through the use of well-known standard constructs and components, that other team members whom are not authors of <span class="hlt">ACS</span> easily understand the architecture of software modules, making maintenance affordable even on a very large project.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PSST...25f5012W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PSST...25f5012W"><span>CO2 conversion in a <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc plasma: 1D cylindrical discharge model</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wang, Weizong; Berthelot, Antonin; Kolev, Stanimir; Tu, Xin; Bogaerts, Annemie</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>CO2 conversion by a <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc plasma is gaining increasing interest, but the underlying mechanisms for an energy-efficient process are still far from understood. Indeed, the chemical complexity of the non-equilibrium plasma poses a challenge for plasma modeling due to the huge computational load. In this paper, a one-dimensional (1D) <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc model is developed in a cylindrical frame, with a detailed non-equilibrium CO2 plasma chemistry set, including the CO2 vibrational kinetics up to the dissociation limit. The model solves a set of time-dependent continuity equations based on the chemical reactions, as well as the electron energy balance equation, and it assumes quasi-neutrality in the plasma. The loss of plasma species and heat due to convection by the transverse gas flow is accounted for by using a characteristic frequency of convective cooling, which depends on the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc radius, the relative velocity of the gas flow with respect to the arc and on the arc elongation rate. The calculated values for plasma density and plasma temperature within this work are comparable with experimental data on <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc plasma reactors in the literature. Our calculation results indicate that excitation to the vibrational levels promotes efficient dissociation in the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc, and this is consistent with experimental investigations of the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc based CO2 conversion in the literature. Additionally, the dissociation of CO2 through collisions with O atoms has the largest contribution to CO2 splitting under the conditions studied. In addition to the above results, we also demonstrate that lumping the CO2 vibrational states can bring a significant reduction of the computational load. The latter opens up the way for 2D or 3D models with an accurate description of the CO2 vibrational kinetics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25484251','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25484251"><span>Cruising the rain forest floor: butterfly wing shape evolution and <span class="hlt">gliding</span> in ground effect.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cespedes, Ann; Penz, Carla M; DeVries, Philip J</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>Flight is a key innovation in the evolutionary success of insects and essential to dispersal, territoriality, courtship and oviposition. Wing shape influences flight performance and selection likely acts to maximize performance for conducting essential behaviours that in turn results in the evolution of wing shape. As wing shape also contributes to fitness, optimal shapes for particular flight behaviours can be assessed with aerodynamic predictions and placed in an ecomorphological context. Butterflies in the tribe Haeterini (Nymphalidae) are conspicuous members of understorey faunas in lowland Neotropical forests. Field observations indicate that the five genera in this clade differ in flight height and behaviour: four use <span class="hlt">gliding</span> flight at the forest floor level, and one utilizes flapping flight above the forest floor. Nonetheless, the association of ground level <span class="hlt">gliding</span> flight behaviour and wing shape has never been investigated in this or any other butterfly group. We used landmark-based geometric morphometrics to test whether wing shapes in Haeterini and their close relatives reflected observed flight behaviours. Four genera of Haeterini and some distantly related Satyrinae showed significant correspondence between wing shape and theoretical expectations in performance trade-offs that we attribute to selection for <span class="hlt">gliding</span> in ground effect. Forewing shape differed between sexes for all taxa, and male wing shapes were aerodynamically more efficient for <span class="hlt">gliding</span> flight than corresponding females. This suggests selection acts differentially on male and female wing shapes, reinforcing the idea that sex-specific flight behaviours contribute to the evolution of sexual dimorphism. Our study indicates that wing shapes in Haeterini butterflies evolved in response to habitat-specific flight behaviours, namely <span class="hlt">gliding</span> in ground effect along the forest floor, resulting in ecomorphological partitions of taxa in morphospace. The convergent flight behaviour and wing morphology</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21831478','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21831478"><span><span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope versus flexible fiber optic for awake upright laryngoscopy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Silverton, Natalie A; Youngquist, Scott T; Mallin, Michael P; Bledsoe, Joseph R; Barton, Erik D; Schroeder, Erika D; Bledsoe, Amber D; Axelrod, Deborah A</p> <p>2012-03-01</p> <p>We compare laryngoscopic quality and time to highest-grade view between a face-to-face approach with the <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope and traditional flexible fiber-optic laryngoscopy in awake, upright volunteers. This was a prospective, randomized, crossover study in which we performed awake laryngoscopy under local anesthesia on 23 healthy volunteers, using both a <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope video laryngoscopy face-to-face technique with the blade held upside down and flexible fiber-optic laryngoscopy. Operator reports of Cormack-Lehane laryngoscopic views and video-reviewed time to highest-grade view, as well as number of attempts, were recorded. Ten women and 13 men participated. A grade II or better view was obtained with <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope video laryngoscopy in 22 of 23 (95.6%) participants and in 23 of 23 (100%) participants with flexible fiber-optic laryngoscopy (relative risk <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope video laryngoscopy versus flexible fiber-optic laryngoscopy 0.96; 95% confidence interval 0.88 to 1.04). Median time to highest-grade view for <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope video laryngoscopy was 16 seconds (interquartile range 9 to 34) versus 51 seconds (interquartile range 35 to 96) for flexible fiber-optic laryngoscopy. A distribution of interindividual differences demonstrated that <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope video laryngoscopy was, on average, 39 seconds faster than flexible fiber-optic laryngoscopy (95% confidence interval 0.2 to 76.9 seconds). <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope video laryngoscopy can be used to obtain a Cormack-Lehane grade II or better view in the majority of awake, healthy volunteers when an upright face-to-face approach is used and was slightly faster than traditional flexible fiber-optic laryngoscopy. However, flexible fiber-optic laryngoscopy may be more reliable at obtaining high-grade views of the larynx. Awake, face-to-face <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope use may offer an alternative approach to the difficulty airway, particularly among providers uncomfortable with flexible fiber-optic laryngoscopy. Copyright © 2011 American College of Emergency Physicians</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19658843','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19658843"><span>Aerodynamic performance due to forewing and hindwing interaction in <span class="hlt">gliding</span> dragonfly flight.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhang, Jie; Lu, Xi-Yun</p> <p>2009-07-01</p> <p>Aerodynamic performance due to forewing and hindwing interaction in <span class="hlt">gliding</span> dragonfly flight has been studied using a multiblock lattice Boltzmann method. We find that the interactions between forewing and hindwing effectively enhance the total lift force and reduce the drag force on the wings compared to two independent wings. The interaction mechanism may be associated with the triangular camber effect by modulating the relative arrangement of the forewing and hindwing. The results obtained in this Brief Report provide physical insight into the understanding of aerodynamic behaviors for <span class="hlt">gliding</span> dragonfly flight.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=414612','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=414612"><span>Phospholipid composition of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> bacteria: oral isolates of Capnocytophaga compared with Sporocytophaga.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Holt, S C; Doundowlakis, J; Takacs, B J</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p>The distribution of acetone-soluble (neutral glycolipid) and acetone-insoluble (phospholipid isoprenoids) lipids in oral isolates of gram-negative <span class="hlt">gliding</span> bacteria of the genus Capnocytophaga was compared with those in a non-host-related <span class="hlt">gliding</span> bacterium, Sporocytophaga myxococcoides. The acetone-soluble material accounted for 34 to 55% of the extracted lipids; the remainder was acetone-insoluble material. The major phospholipid was phosphatidylethanolamine (67%), with lesser amounts of lysophosphatidylethanolamine and several unidentified phosphate-containing compounds. Capnocytophaga also contained significant amounts of an ornithine-amino lipid. PMID:500209</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MS%26E..139a2027K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MS%26E..139a2027K"><span><span class="hlt">Gliding</span> arc surface modification of carrot nanofibre coating - perspective for composite processing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kusano, Y.; Berglund, L.; Aitomäki, Y.; Oksman, K.; Madsen, B.</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>Surfaces of carrot nanofibre coatings were modified by a <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc in atmospheric pressure air. The treatment strengthened wetting of deionized water and glycerol, increased an oxygen content, C-O and C=O, and moderately roughened the surfaces. In the perspective of composite materials, these changes to the nanofibres can potentially improve their processability when they are to be impregnated with a polymeric matrix. However, longer exposure to the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc reduced oxidation and roughness of the surface, and thus there exists an optimum condition to achieve good wetting to solvents.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4298188','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4298188"><span>Marked colour divergence in the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> membranes of a tropical lizard mirrors population differences in the colour of falling leaves</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Klomp, D. A.; Stuart-Fox, D.; Das, I.; Ord, T. J.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Populations of the Bornean <span class="hlt">gliding</span> lizard, Draco cornutus, differ markedly in the colour of their <span class="hlt">gliding</span> membranes. They also differ in local vegetation type (mangrove forest versus lowland rainforest) and consequently, the colour of falling leaves (red and brown/black in mangrove versus green, brown and black in rainforest). We show that the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> membranes of these lizards closely match the colours of freshly fallen leaves in the local habitat as they appear to the visual system of birds (their probable predators). Furthermore, <span class="hlt">gliding</span> membranes more closely resembled colours of local fallen leaves than standing foliage or fallen leaves in the other population's habitat. This suggests that the two populations have diverged in <span class="hlt">gliding</span> membrane coloration to match the colours of their local falling leaves, and that mimicking falling leaves is an adaptation that functions to reduce predation by birds. PMID:25540157</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25540157','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25540157"><span>Marked colour divergence in the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> membranes of a tropical lizard mirrors population differences in the colour of falling leaves.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Klomp, D A; Stuart-Fox, D; Das, I; Ord, T J</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Populations of the Bornean <span class="hlt">gliding</span> lizard, Draco cornutus, differ markedly in the colour of their <span class="hlt">gliding</span> membranes. They also differ in local vegetation type (mangrove forest versus lowland rainforest) and consequently, the colour of falling leaves (red and brown/black in mangrove versus green, brown and black in rainforest). We show that the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> membranes of these lizards closely match the colours of freshly fallen leaves in the local habitat as they appear to the visual system of birds (their probable predators). Furthermore, <span class="hlt">gliding</span> membranes more closely resembled colours of local fallen leaves than standing foliage or fallen leaves in the other population's habitat. This suggests that the two populations have diverged in <span class="hlt">gliding</span> membrane coloration to match the colours of their local falling leaves, and that mimicking falling leaves is an adaptation that functions to reduce predation by birds. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8685806','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8685806"><span>Functional <span class="hlt">gliding</span> spaces of the dorsal side of the human finger.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Schubert, M; Bade, H; Notermans, H P; Knifka, J; Koebke, J</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>Although the clinical and functional importance of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> and connective tissue spaces has been repeatedly emphasized (e.g. their role in the spreading of suppurative phlegmonic inflammation) only few literary findings can be presented dealing with the connective tissue spaces in the finger in the metacarpo-phalangeal transition region. Three separate <span class="hlt">gliding</span> spaces of the finger above the dorsal aponeurosis and their various regional connections can be displayed by means of a plastic injection technique followed by plastination and production of sectional series. These <span class="hlt">gliding</span> spaces were also examined on fixed and unfixed hands using plastic injection and subsequent dissection. A space was depicted between the proximal interphalangeal joint and the insertion of the dorsal aponeurosis on the distal phalanx of the finger, as well as a further bursa-like space over the proximal interphalangeal joint. A third space was also depicted between the metacarpophalangeal joint and the proximal interphalangeal joint, which displays a variable connection to the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> canal of the respective extensor tendons. Methodical, functional and clinical aspects will be discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23486656','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23486656"><span>The Hydrodynamic Study of the Swimming <span class="hlt">Gliding</span>: a Two-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Analysis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Marinho, Daniel A; Barbosa, Tiago M; Rouboa, Abel I; Silva, António J</p> <p>2011-09-01</p> <p>Nowadays the underwater <span class="hlt">gliding</span> after the starts and the turns plays a major role in the overall swimming performance. Hence, minimizing hydrodynamic drag during the underwater phases should be a main aim during swimming. Indeed, there are several postures that swimmers can assume during the underwater <span class="hlt">gliding</span>, although experimental results were not conclusive concerning the best body position to accomplish this aim. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to analyse the effect in hydrodynamic drag forces of using different body positions during <span class="hlt">gliding</span> through computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodology. For this purpose, two-dimensional models of the human body in steady flow conditions were studied. Two-dimensional virtual models had been created: (i) a prone position with the arms extended at the front of the body; (ii) a prone position with the arms placed alongside the trunk; (iii) a lateral position with the arms extended at the front and; (iv) a dorsal position with the arms extended at the front. The drag forces were computed between speeds of 1.6 m/s and 2 m/s in a two-dimensional Fluent(®) analysis. The positions with the arms extended at the front presented lower drag values than the position with the arms aside the trunk. The lateral position was the one in which the drag was lower and seems to be the one that should be adopted during the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> after starts and turns.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27935723','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27935723"><span>Remote Photoregulated Ring <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> in a [2]Rotaxane via a Molecular Effector.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tron, Arnaud; Pianet, Isabelle; Martinez-Cuezva, Alberto; Tucker, James H R; Pisciottani, Luca; Alajarin, Mateo; Berna, Jose; McClenaghan, Nathan D</p> <p>2017-01-06</p> <p>A molecular barbiturate messenger, which is reversibly released/captured by a photoswitchable artificial molecular receptor, is shown to act as an effector to control ring <span class="hlt">gliding</span> on a distant hydrogen-bonding [2]rotaxane. Thus, light-driven chemical communication governing the operation of a remote molecular machine is demonstrated using an information-rich neutral molecule.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004ASAJ..116..491L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004ASAJ..116..491L"><span>The effects of real and illusory <span class="hlt">glides</span> on pure-tone frequency discrimination</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lyzenga, J.; Carlyon, R. P.; Moore, B. C. J.</p> <p>2004-07-01</p> <p>Experiment 1 measured pure-tone frequency difference limens (DLs) at 1 and 4 kHz. The stimuli had two steady-state portions, which differed in frequency for the target. These portions were separated by a middle section of varying length, which consisted of a silent gap, a frequency <span class="hlt">glide</span>, or a noise burst (conditions: gap, <span class="hlt">glide</span>, and noise, respectively). The noise burst created an illusion of the tone continuing through the gap. In the first condition, the stimuli had an overall duration of 500 ms. In the second condition, stimuli had a fixed 50-ms middle section, and the overall duration was varied. DLs were lower for the <span class="hlt">glide</span> than for the gap condition, consistent with the idea that the auditory system contains a mechanism specific for the detection of dynamic changes. DLs were generally lower for the noise than for the gap condition, suggesting that this mechanism extracts information from an illusory <span class="hlt">glide</span>. In a second experiment, pure-tone frequency direction-discrimination thresholds were measured using similar stimuli as for the first experiment. For this task, the type of the middle section hardly affected the thresholds, suggesting that the frequency-change detection mechanism does not facilitate the identification of the direction of frequency changes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=312937','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=312937"><span>Flavobacterium columnare type IX secretion system mutations result in defects in <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility and virulence</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/find-a-publication/">USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Background: The <span class="hlt">gliding</span> bacterium Flavobacterium columnare causes columnaris disease in wild and aquaculture-reared freshwater fish. The mechanisms responsible for columnaris disease are not known. The related bacterium Flavobacterium johnsoniae uses a type IX secretion system (T9SS) to secrete enzy...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21998582','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21998582"><span>Evolutionarily divergent, unstable filamentous actin is essential for <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility in apicomplexan parasites.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Skillman, Kristen M; Diraviyam, Karthikeyan; Khan, Asis; Tang, Keliang; Sept, David; Sibley, L David</p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>Apicomplexan parasites rely on a novel form of actin-based motility called <span class="hlt">gliding</span>, which depends on parasite actin polymerization, to migrate through their hosts and invade cells. However, parasite actins are divergent both in sequence and function and only form short, unstable filaments in contrast to the stability of conventional actin filaments. The molecular basis for parasite actin filament instability and its relationship to <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility remain unresolved. We demonstrate that recombinant Toxoplasma (TgACTI) and Plasmodium (PfACTI and PfACTII) actins polymerized into very short filaments in vitro but were induced to form long, stable filaments by addition of equimolar levels of phalloidin. Parasite actins contain a conserved phalloidin-binding site as determined by molecular modeling and computational docking, yet vary in several residues that are predicted to impact filament stability. In particular, two residues were identified that form intermolecular contacts between different protomers in conventional actin filaments and these residues showed non-conservative differences in apicomplexan parasites. Substitution of divergent residues found in TgACTI with those from mammalian actin resulted in formation of longer, more stable filaments in vitro. Expression of these stabilized actins in T. gondii increased sensitivity to the actin-stabilizing compound jasplakinolide and disrupted normal <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility in the absence of treatment. These results identify the molecular basis for short, dynamic filaments in apicomplexan parasites and demonstrate that inherent instability of parasite actin filaments is a critical adaptation for <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4937208','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4937208"><span>Directed Binding of <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Bacterium, Mycoplasma mobile, Shown by Detachment Force and Bond Lifetime</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Tanaka, Akihiro; Nakane, Daisuke; Mizutani, Masaki; Nishizaka, Takayuki</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>ABSTRACT Mycoplasma mobile, a fish-pathogenic bacterium, features a protrusion that enables it to <span class="hlt">glide</span> smoothly on solid surfaces at a velocity of up to 4.5 µm s−1 in the direction of the protrusion. M. mobile <span class="hlt">glides</span> by a repeated catch-pull-release of sialylated oligosaccharides fixed on a solid surface by hundreds of 50-nm flexible “legs” sticking out from the protrusion. This <span class="hlt">gliding</span> mechanism may be explained by a possible directed binding of each leg with sialylated oligosaccharides, by which the leg can be detached more easily forward than backward. In the present study, we used a polystyrene bead held by optical tweezers to detach a starved cell at rest from a glass surface coated with sialylated oligosaccharides and concluded that the detachment force forward is 1.6- to 1.8-fold less than that backward, which may be linked to a catch bond-like behavior of the cell. These results suggest that this directed binding has a critical role in the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> mechanism. PMID:27353751</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4290775','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4290775"><span>An In Vitro Comparison of Root Canal Transportation by Reciproc File With and Without <span class="hlt">Glide</span> Path</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Nazarimoghadam, Kiumars; Daryaeian, Mohammad; Ramazani, Nahid</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Objective: The aim of ideal canal preparation is to prevent iatrogenic aberrations such as transportation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the root canal transportation by Reciproc file with and without <span class="hlt">glide</span> path. Materials and Methods: Thirty acrylic-resin blocks with a curvature of 60° and size#10 (2% taper) were assigned into two groups (n= 15). In group 1, the <span class="hlt">glide</span> path was performed using stainless steel k-files size#10 and 15 at working length In group 2, canals were prepared with Reciproc file system at working length. By using digital imaging software (AutoCAD 2008), the pre-instrumentation and post-instrumentation digital images were superimposed over, taking the landmarks as reference points. Then the radius of the internal and external curve of the specimens was calculated at three α, β and γ points (1mm to apex as α, 3mm to apex as β, and 5mm to apex as γ). The data were statically analyzed using the independent T-test and Mann-Whitney U test by SPSS version 16. Results: <span class="hlt">Glide</span> path was found significant for only external curve in the apical third of the canal; that is, 5mm to apex (P=0.005). But in the other third, canal modification was not significant (P> 0.008). Conclusion: Canal transportation in the apical third of the canal seems to be significantly reduced when <span class="hlt">glide</span> path is performed using reciprocating files. PMID:25628682</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3588622','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3588622"><span>The Hydrodynamic Study of the Swimming <span class="hlt">Gliding</span>: a Two-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Marinho, Daniel A.; Barbosa, Tiago M.; Rouboa, Abel I.; Silva, António J.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Nowadays the underwater <span class="hlt">gliding</span> after the starts and the turns plays a major role in the overall swimming performance. Hence, minimizing hydrodynamic drag during the underwater phases should be a main aim during swimming. Indeed, there are several postures that swimmers can assume during the underwater <span class="hlt">gliding</span>, although experimental results were not conclusive concerning the best body position to accomplish this aim. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to analyse the effect in hydrodynamic drag forces of using different body positions during <span class="hlt">gliding</span> through computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodology. For this purpose, two-dimensional models of the human body in steady flow conditions were studied. Two-dimensional virtual models had been created: (i) a prone position with the arms extended at the front of the body; (ii) a prone position with the arms placed alongside the trunk; (iii) a lateral position with the arms extended at the front and; (iv) a dorsal position with the arms extended at the front. The drag forces were computed between speeds of 1.6 m/s and 2 m/s in a two-dimensional Fluent® analysis. The positions with the arms extended at the front presented lower drag values than the position with the arms aside the trunk. The lateral position was the one in which the drag was lower and seems to be the one that should be adopted during the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> after starts and turns. PMID:23486656</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2702476','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2702476"><span>Carborane Clusters in Computational Drug Design: A Comparative Docking Evaluation Using Autodock, Flexx, <span class="hlt">Glide</span> and Surflex#</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Tiwari, Rohit; Mahasenan, Kiran; Pavlovicz, Ryan; Li, Chenglong; Tjarks, Werner</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Compounds containing boron atoms play increasingly important roles in the therapy and diagnosis of various diseases, particularly cancer. However, computational drug design of boron-containing therapeutics and diagnostics is hampered by the fact that many software packages used for this purpose lack parameters for all or part of the various types of boron atoms. In the present paper, we describe simple and efficient strategies to overcome this problem, which are based on the replacement of the boron atom types with carbon atom types. The developed methods were validated by docking closo- and nido-carboranyl antifolates into the active site of a human dihydrofolate reductase (hDHFR) using AutoDock, <span class="hlt">Glide</span>, FlexX, and Surflex and comparing the obtained docking poses with the poses of their counterparts in the original hDHFR-carboranyl antifolate crystal structures. Under optimized conditions, AutoDock and <span class="hlt">Glide</span> were equally good in docking of the closo-carboranyl antifolates followed by Surflex and FlexX whereas Autodock, <span class="hlt">Glide</span>, and Surflex proved to be comparably efficient in the docking of nido-carboranyl antifolates followed by FlexX. Differences in geometries and partial atom charges in the structures of the carboranyl antifolates resulting from different data sources and/or optimization methods did not impact the docking performances of AutoDock or <span class="hlt">Glide</span> significantly. Scoring functions generated by all four programs were in accordance with experimental data. PMID:19449853</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26481666','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26481666"><span>Comparison of Hypoalgesic Effects of Neural Stretching vs Neural <span class="hlt">Gliding</span>: A Randomized Controlled Trial.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Beltran-Alacreu, Hector; Jiménez-Sanz, Laura; Fernández Carnero, Josue; La Touche, Roy</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate mechanical hypoalgesic effect of neural mobilization in asymptomatic subjects. We also compared neural <span class="hlt">gliding</span> vs neural stretching to see which produced greater hypoalgesic effects in asymptomatic subjects. Forty-five asymptomatic subjects (20 men and 25 women; mean ± SD age, 20.8 ± 2.83 years) were randomly allocated into 3 groups: the neural <span class="hlt">glide</span> group, the neural stretch group, and the placebo group. Each subject received 1 treatment session. Outcome measures included bilateral pressure pain threshold measured at the trigeminal, cervical, and tibialis anterior points, assessed pre-treatment and immediately post-treatment by a blinded assessor. Three-way repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to evaluate changes in pressure pain threshold, with group (experimental or control) as the between-subjects variable and time (pre-, post-treatment) or side (dominant, nondominant) as the within-subjects variable. Group differences were identified between neural mobilization groups and the placebo group. Changes occurred in all of the pressure pain threshold measures for neural <span class="hlt">gliding</span>, and in all but the trigeminal point for neural stretch. No changes in the pressure pain threshold measures occurred in the placebo group. This research provides new experimental evidence that neural mobilization produces an immediate widespread hypoalgesic effect vs placebo but neural <span class="hlt">gliding</span> produces hypoalgesic effects in more body sites than neural stretching. Copyright © 2015 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_16 --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="321"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-s26-s-120.html','SCIGOVIMAGE-NASA'); return false;" href="https://images.nasa.gov/#/details-s26-s-120.html"><span>STS-26 Discovery, OV-103, with landing gear deployed <span class="hlt">glides</span> above EAFB runway</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://images.nasa.gov/">NASA Image and Video Library</a></p> <p></p> <p>1988-10-03</p> <p>STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, with nose landing gear (NLG) and main landing gear (MLG) deployed <span class="hlt">glides</span> above dry lakebed runway 17 at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California. This profile view shows OV-103's port side just before MLG touchdown.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24349551','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24349551"><span>The effect of lubricin on the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> resistance of mouse intrasynovial tendon.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hayashi, Masanori; Zhao, Chunfeng; Thoreson, Andrew R; Chikenji, Takako; Jay, Gregory D; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of lubricin on the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> resistance of intrasynovial tendons by comparing lubricin knockout, heterozygous, and wild type mice. A total of thirty-six deep digital flexor (DDF) tendons in the third digits of each hind paw from eighteen adult mice were used, including six lubricin knockout mice (Prg4 -/-), six heterozygous mice (Prg4 +/-), and six wild type mice (Prg4 +/+). The tendon <span class="hlt">gliding</span> resistance was measured using a custom-made device. Tendon structural changes were evaluated by scanning electron and light microscopy. The <span class="hlt">gliding</span> resistance of intrasynovial tendons from lubricin knockout mice was significantly higher than the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> resistance of either wild type or heterozygous mice. The surface of the lubricin knockout tendons appeared to be rougher, compared to the wild type and heterozygous tendons. Synovial hyperplasia was found in the lubricin knockout mice. Cartilage-like tissue was found in the tendon and pulley of the lubricin knockout mice. Our findings confirm the importance of lubricin in intrasynovial tendon lubrication. This knockout model may be useful in determining the effect of lubricin on tendon healing and the response to injury.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title14-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title14-vol3-sec121-360.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title14-vol3/pdf/CFR-2010-title14-vol3-sec121-360.pdf"><span>14 CFR 121.360 - Ground proximity warning-<span class="hlt">glide</span> slope deviation alerting system.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ground proximity warning-<span class="hlt">glide</span> slope deviation alerting system. 121.360 Section 121.360 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS:...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/983374','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/983374"><span>Use of <span class="hlt">glide</span>-ins in CMS for production and analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Bradley, D.; Gutsche, O.; Hahn, K.; Holzman, B.; Padhi, S.; Pi, H.; Spiga, D.; Sfiligoi, I.; Vaandering, E.; Wurthwein, F.; /UC, San Diego</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>With the evolution of various grid federations, the Condor <span class="hlt">glide</span>-ins represent a key feature in providing a homogeneous pool of resources using late-binding technology. The CMS collaboration uses the <span class="hlt">glide</span>-in based Workload Management System, glideinWMS, for production (ProdAgent) and distributed analysis (CRAB) of the data. The Condor <span class="hlt">glide</span>-in daemons traverse to the worker nodes, submitted via Condor-G. Once activated, they preserve the Master-Worker relationships, with the worker first validating the execution environment on the worker node before pulling the jobs sequentially until the expiry of their lifetimes. The combination of late-binding and validation significantly reduces the overall failure rate visible to CMS physicists. We discuss the extensive use of the glideinWMS since the computing challenge, CCRC-08, in order to prepare for the forthcoming LHC data-taking period. The key features essential to the success of large-scale production and analysis on CMS resources across major grid federations, including EGEE, OSG and NorduGrid are outlined. Use of <span class="hlt">glide</span>-ins via the CRAB server mechanism and ProdAgent, as well as first hand experience of using the next generation CREAM computing element within the CMS framework is discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JPhCS.219g2013B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JPhCS.219g2013B"><span>Use of <span class="hlt">glide</span>-ins in CMS for production and analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bradley, D.; Gutsche, O.; Hahn, K.; Holzman, B.; Padhi, S.; Pi, H.; Spiga, D.; Sfiligoi, I.; Vaandering, E.; Würthwein, F.; CMS Offline Computing Projects</p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>With the evolution of various grid federations, the Condor <span class="hlt">glide</span>-ins represent a key feature in providing a homogeneous pool of resources using late-binding technology. The CMS collaboration uses the <span class="hlt">glide</span>-in based Workload Management System, glideinWMS, for production (ProdAgent) and distributed analysis (CRAB) of the data. The Condor <span class="hlt">glide</span>-in daemons traverse to the worker nodes, submitted via Condor-G. Once activated, they preserve the Master-Worker relationships, with the worker first validating the execution environment on the worker node before pulling the jobs sequentially until the expiry of their lifetimes. The combination of late-binding and validation significantly reduces the overall failure rate visible to CMS physicists. We discuss the extensive use of the glideinWMS since the computing challenge, CCRC-08, in order to prepare for the forthcoming LHC data-taking period. The key features essential to the success of large-scale production and analysis on CMS resources across major grid federations, including EGEE, OSG and NorduGrid are outlined. Use of <span class="hlt">glide</span>-ins via the CRAB server mechanism and ProdAgent, as well as first hand experience of using the next generation CREAM computing element within the CMS framework is discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3188518','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3188518"><span>Evolutionarily Divergent, Unstable Filamentous Actin Is Essential for <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Motility in Apicomplexan Parasites</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Skillman, Kristen M.; Diraviyam, Karthikeyan; Khan, Asis; Tang, Keliang; Sept, David; Sibley, L. David</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Apicomplexan parasites rely on a novel form of actin-based motility called <span class="hlt">gliding</span>, which depends on parasite actin polymerization, to migrate through their hosts and invade cells. However, parasite actins are divergent both in sequence and function and only form short, unstable filaments in contrast to the stability of conventional actin filaments. The molecular basis for parasite actin filament instability and its relationship to <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility remain unresolved. We demonstrate that recombinant Toxoplasma (TgACTI) and Plasmodium (PfACTI and PfACTII) actins polymerized into very short filaments in vitro but were induced to form long, stable filaments by addition of equimolar levels of phalloidin. Parasite actins contain a conserved phalloidin-binding site as determined by molecular modeling and computational docking, yet vary in several residues that are predicted to impact filament stability. In particular, two residues were identified that form intermolecular contacts between different protomers in conventional actin filaments and these residues showed non-conservative differences in apicomplexan parasites. Substitution of divergent residues found in TgACTI with those from mammalian actin resulted in formation of longer, more stable filaments in vitro. Expression of these stabilized actins in T. gondii increased sensitivity to the actin-stabilizing compound jasplakinolide and disrupted normal <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility in the absence of treatment. These results identify the molecular basis for short, dynamic filaments in apicomplexan parasites and demonstrate that inherent instability of parasite actin filaments is a critical adaptation for <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility. PMID:21998582</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7561397','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7561397"><span>The double sheath system and tendon <span class="hlt">gliding</span> in zone 2C.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tang, J B</p> <p>1995-06-01</p> <p>Anatomical structures, the morphology of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> tunnel, the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> amplitude of tendons and the range of finger motion after sheath incision in zone 2C were studied in 40 fingers of ten preserved cadaver hands. The tendon of FDS in zone 2C courses around that of FDP, and FDS serves functionally as a second sheath for FDP. This "double sheath" system in zone 2C accounts for the poor results of tendon repair in zone 2C. The tendon repairs in zone 2C <span class="hlt">glide</span> into zone 2D during finger flexion. Therefore, the condition of the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> tunnel of zone 2D is also important to the function of tendon repairs in zone 2C. The range of motion was shown to be insignificantly influenced by partial incision of the A2 pulley, and this did not decrease the total strength of the sheath markedly. These suggest that partial incision or enlargement of the A2 pulley can be carried out for tendon repairs in zone 2C without causing mechanical problems of function.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4784043','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4784043"><span>Involvement of the Type IX Secretion System in Capnocytophaga ochracea <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Motility and Biofilm Formation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kita, Daichi; Shibata, Satoshi; Kikuchi, Yuichiro; Kokubu, Eitoyo; Nakayama, Koji; Saito, Atsushi</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Capnocytophaga ochracea is a Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium that demonstrates <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility when cultured on solid agar surfaces. C. ochracea possesses the ability to form biofilms; however, factors involved in biofilm formation by this bacterium are unclear. A type IX secretion system (T9SS) in Flavobacterium johnsoniae was shown to be involved in the transport of proteins (e.g., several adhesins) to the cell surface. Genes orthologous to those encoding T9SS proteins in F. johnsoniae have been identified in the genome of C. ochracea; therefore, the T9SS may be involved in biofilm formation by C. ochracea. Here we constructed three ortholog-deficient C. ochracea mutants lacking sprB (which encodes a <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility adhesin) or gldK or sprT (which encode T9SS proteins in F. johnsoniae). <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> motility was lost in each mutant, suggesting that, in C. ochracea, the proteins encoded by sprB, gldK, and sprT are necessary for <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility, and SprB is transported to the cell surface by the T9SS. For the ΔgldK, ΔsprT, and ΔsprB strains, the amounts of crystal violet-associated biofilm, relative to wild-type values, were 49%, 34%, and 65%, respectively, at 48 h. Confocal laser scanning and scanning electron microscopy revealed that the biofilms formed by wild-type C. ochracea were denser and bacterial cells were closer together than in those formed by the mutant strains. Together, these results indicate that proteins exported by the T9SS are key elements of the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility and biofilm formation of C. ochracea. PMID:26729712</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28272779','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28272779"><span>Nitrogen Fixation by <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Arc Plasma: Better Insight by Chemical Kinetics Modelling.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wang, Weizong; Patil, Bhaskar; Heijkers, Stjin; Hessel, Volker; Bogaerts, Annemie</p> <p>2017-03-08</p> <p>The conversion of atmospheric nitrogen into valuable compounds, that is, so-called nitrogen fixation, is gaining increased interest, owing to the essential role in the nitrogen cycle of the biosphere. Plasma technology, and more specifically <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc plasma, has great potential in this area, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms. Therefore, we developed a detailed chemical kinetics model for a pulsed-power <span class="hlt">gliding</span>-arc reactor operating at atmospheric pressure for nitrogen oxide synthesis. Experiments are performed to validate the model and reasonable agreement is reached between the calculated and measured NO and NO2 yields and the corresponding energy efficiency for NOx formation for different N2 /O2 ratios, indicating that the model can provide a realistic picture of the plasma chemistry. Therefore, we can use the model to investigate the reaction pathways for the formation and loss of NOx . The results indicate that vibrational excitation of N2 in the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc contributes significantly to activating the N2 molecules, and leads to an energy efficient way of NOx production, compared to the thermal process. Based on the underlying chemistry, the model allows us to propose solutions on how to further improve the NOx formation by <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc technology. Although the energy efficiency of the <span class="hlt">gliding</span>-arc-based nitrogen fixation process at the present stage is not comparable to the world-scale Haber-Bosch process, we believe our study helps us to come up with more realistic scenarios of entering a cutting-edge innovation in new business cases for the decentralised production of fertilisers for agriculture, in which low-temperature plasma technology might play an important role.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25721237','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25721237"><span>Flexor digitorum superficialis repair outside the A2 pulley after zone II laceration: <span class="hlt">gliding</span> and bowstringing.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Geary, Michael B; English, Christopher; Yaseen, Zaneb; Stanbury, Spencer; Awad, Hani; Elfar, John C</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>To evaluate the changes in maximum flexion angle, <span class="hlt">gliding</span> coefficient, and bowstringing after a combined repair of both flexor tendons with the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) rerouted outside the A2 pulley in cadaveric hands. We performed 4 different repairs on cadaveric hands, with each repair tested on 9 unique digits. In total, 12 cadaveric hands and 36 digits were used. The thumb and little finger were removed from each hand and excluded from testing. Group 1 was sham surgery. Group 2 combined flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) and FDS laceration and repair with both slips of the FDS repaired inside the A2 pulley. Group 3 was FDP repair with one slip of the FDS repaired inside A2 and the other slip left unrepaired. Group 4 was FDP repair with both slips of the FDS rerouted and repaired outside the A2 pulley. Maximum flexion angle, <span class="hlt">gliding</span> coefficient, and bowstringing were measured in simulated active digital motion for each group. Rerouting and repairing the FDS outside the A2 pulley (group 4) significantly lowered <span class="hlt">gliding</span> coefficient compared with repairs with both slips inside A2, with values similar to sham surgery. We observed no significant differences in maximum flexion angle among the 4 groups. Increased bowstringing was observed with both slips of the FDS repaired and rerouted outside the A2 pulley. In this cadaveric model, repair of both slips of the FDS outside the A2 pulley improved the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> coefficient relative to repair within the A2 pulley, which suggests decreased resistance to finger flexion. Repair of the FDS outside the A2 pulley led to a slight increase in bowstringing of the FDS tendon. We describe a technique for managing combined laceration of the FDP and FDS tendons that improves <span class="hlt">gliding</span> function and merits consideration. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3588683','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3588683"><span>The Effect of Depth on Drag During the Streamlined <span class="hlt">Glide</span>: A Three-Dimensional CFD Analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Novais, Maria L.; Silva, António J.; Mantha, Vishveshwar R.; Ramos, Rui J.; Rouboa, Abel I.; Vilas-Boas, J. Paulo; Luís, Sérgio R.; Marinho, Daniel A.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of depth on drag during the streamlined <span class="hlt">glide</span> in swimming using Computational Fluid Dynamics. The Computation Fluid Dynamic analysis consisted of using a three-dimensional mesh of cells that simulates the flow around the considered domain. We used the K-epsilon turbulent model implemented in the commercial code Fluent® and applied it to the flow around a three-dimensional model of an Olympic swimmer. The swimmer was modeled as if he were <span class="hlt">gliding</span> underwater in a streamlined prone position, with hands overlapping, head between the extended arms, feet together and plantar flexed. Steady-state computational fluid dynamics analyses were performed using the Fluent® code and the drag coefficient and the drag force was calculated for velocities ranging from 1.5 to 2.5 m/s, in increments of 0.50m/s, which represents the velocity range used by club to elite level swimmers during the push-off and <span class="hlt">glide</span> following a turn. The swimmer model middle line was placed at different water depths between 0 and 1.0 m underwater, in 0.25m increments. Hydrodynamic drag decreased with depth, although after 0.75m values remained almost constant. Water depth seems to have a positive effect on reducing hydrodynamic drag during the <span class="hlt">gliding</span>. Although increasing depth position could contribute to decrease hydrodynamic drag, this reduction seems to be lower with depth, especially after 0.75 m depth, thus suggesting that possibly performing the underwater <span class="hlt">gliding</span> more than 0.75 m depth could not be to the benefit of the swimmer. PMID:23487502</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23487502','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23487502"><span>The Effect of Depth on Drag During the Streamlined <span class="hlt">Glide</span>: A Three-Dimensional CFD Analysis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Novais, Maria L; Silva, António J; Mantha, Vishveshwar R; Ramos, Rui J; Rouboa, Abel I; Vilas-Boas, J Paulo; Luís, Sérgio R; Marinho, Daniel A</p> <p>2012-06-01</p> <p>The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of depth on drag during the streamlined <span class="hlt">glide</span> in swimming using Computational Fluid Dynamics. The Computation Fluid Dynamic analysis consisted of using a three-dimensional mesh of cells that simulates the flow around the considered domain. We used the K-epsilon turbulent model implemented in the commercial code Fluent(®) and applied it to the flow around a three-dimensional model of an Olympic swimmer. The swimmer was modeled as if he were <span class="hlt">gliding</span> underwater in a streamlined prone position, with hands overlapping, head between the extended arms, feet together and plantar flexed. Steady-state computational fluid dynamics analyses were performed using the Fluent(®) code and the drag coefficient and the drag force was calculated for velocities ranging from 1.5 to 2.5 m/s, in increments of 0.50m/s, which represents the velocity range used by club to elite level swimmers during the push-off and <span class="hlt">glide</span> following a turn. The swimmer model middle line was placed at different water depths between 0 and 1.0 m underwater, in 0.25m increments. Hydrodynamic drag decreased with depth, although after 0.75m values remained almost constant. Water depth seems to have a positive effect on reducing hydrodynamic drag during the <span class="hlt">gliding</span>. Although increasing depth position could contribute to decrease hydrodynamic drag, this reduction seems to be lower with depth, especially after 0.75 m depth, thus suggesting that possibly performing the underwater <span class="hlt">gliding</span> more than 0.75 m depth could not be to the benefit of the swimmer.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4991859','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4991859"><span>Ancient phylogenetic divergence of the enigmatic African rodent Zenkerella and the origin of anomalurid <span class="hlt">gliding</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Fernández, David; Sallam, Hesham M.; Cronin, Drew T.; Esara Echube, José Manuel</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The “scaly-tailed squirrels” of the rodent family Anomaluridae have a long evolutionary history in Africa, and are now represented by two <span class="hlt">gliding</span> genera (Anomalurus and Idiurus) and a rare and obscure genus (Zenkerella) that has never been observed alive by mammalogists. Zenkerella shows no anatomical adaptations for <span class="hlt">gliding</span>, but has traditionally been grouped with the glider Idiurus on the basis of craniodental similarities, implying that either the Zenkerella lineage lost its <span class="hlt">gliding</span> adaptations, or that Anomalurus and Idiurus evolved theirs independently. Here we present the first nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences of Zenkerella, based on recently recovered whole-body specimens from Bioko Island (Equatorial Guinea), which show unambiguously that Zenkerella is the sister taxon of Anomalurus and Idiurus. These data indicate that <span class="hlt">gliding</span> likely evolved only once within Anomaluridae, and that there were no subsequent evolutionary reversals. We combine this new molecular evidence with morphological data from living and extinct anomaluromorph rodents and estimate that the lineage leading to Zenkerella has been evolving independently in Africa since the early Eocene, approximately 49 million years ago. Recently discovered fossils further attest to the antiquity of the lineage leading to Zenkerella, which can now be recognized as a classic example of a “living fossil,” about which we know remarkably little. The osteological markers of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> are estimated to have evolved along the stem lineage of the Anomalurus–Idiurus clade by the early Oligocene, potentially indicating that this adaptation evolved in response to climatic perturbations at the Eocene–Oligocene boundary (∼34 million years ago). PMID:27602286</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3647177','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3647177"><span>Displacement-Weighted Velocity Analysis of <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Assays Reveals that Chlamydomonas Axonemal Dynein Preferentially Moves Conspecific Microtubules</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Alper, Joshua D.; Tovar, Miguel; Howard, Jonathon</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>In vitro <span class="hlt">gliding</span> assays, in which microtubules are observed to <span class="hlt">glide</span> over surfaces coated with motor proteins, are important tools for studying the biophysics of motility. <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> assays with axonemal dyneins have the unusual feature that the microtubules exhibit large variations in <span class="hlt">gliding</span> speed despite measures taken to eliminate unsteadiness. Because axonemal dynein <span class="hlt">gliding</span> assays are usually done using heterologous proteins, i.e., dynein and tubulin from different organisms, we asked whether the source of tubulin could underlie the unsteadiness. By comparing <span class="hlt">gliding</span> assays with microtubules polymerized from Chlamydomonas axonemal tubulin with those from porcine brain tubulin, we found that the unsteadiness is present despite matching the source of tubulin to the source of dynein. We developed a novel, to our knowledge, displacement-weighted velocity analysis to quantify both the velocity and the unsteadiness of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> assays systematically and without introducing bias toward low motility. We found that the quantified unsteadiness is independent of tubulin source. In addition, we found that the short Chlamydomonas microtubules translocate significantly faster than their porcine counterparts. By modeling the effect of length on velocity, we propose that the observed effect may be due to a higher rate of binding of Chlamydomonas axonemal dynein to Chlamydomonas microtubules than to porcine microtubules. PMID:23663842</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/874672','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/874672"><span>Microfabricated <span class="hlt">AC</span> impedance sensor</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Krulevitch, Peter; Ackler, Harold D.; Becker, Frederick; Boser, Bernhard E.; Eldredge, Adam B.; Fuller, Christopher K.; Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Hamilton, Julie K.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Wang, Xiao-Bo</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>A microfabricated instrument for detecting and identifying cells and other particles based on alternating current (<span class="hlt">AC</span>) impedance measurements. The microfabricated <span class="hlt">AC</span> impedance sensor includes two critical elements: 1) a microfluidic chip, preferably of glass substrates, having at least one microchannel therein and with electrodes patterned on both substrates, and 2) electrical circuits that connect to the electrodes on the microfluidic chip and detect signals associated with particles traveling down the microchannels. These circuits enable multiple <span class="hlt">AC</span> impedance measurements of individual particles at high throughput rates with sufficient resolution to identify different particle and cell types as appropriate for environmental detection and clinical diagnostic applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23882739','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23882739"><span>[Posterior lamellar keratoplasty with DSEK technique and use of the Tan Endo<span class="hlt">Glide</span> - short-term results].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kałuiny, Bartłomiej J; Piotrowiak, Ilona; Sołdańska, Beata; Grzybek, Katarzyna; Czajkowska, Monika; Galas, Małgorzata; Malukiewicz, Grazyna</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>To present the differences in surgical technique of DSEK (Descemet's Stripping Endothelial Keratoplasty) with the use of Tan Endo<span class="hlt">Glide</span> (Coronet, UK) and Busin <span class="hlt">Glide</span> (Moria, FR). Short-term results will also be presented, DSEK was performed in 24 eyes, in 8 cases the surgery was combined with cataract phacoemulsification and lOL implantation. Surgery course and 6 months postoperative results of first 12 eyes performed with the use of Tan Endo<span class="hlt">Glide</span> were compared with 12 consecutive eyes preformed with Busin <span class="hlt">Glide</span>. Tan Endo<span class="hlt">Glide</span> provided much more stable anterior chamber, donor tissue unfolding process was better controlled but the incision was wider incision. Surgically induced mean refractory cylinder 6. months after the surgery was 1.56 - 1.15 Dsph in Tan Endo<span class="hlt">Glide</span> group and 1.18 +/- 1.10 Dsph in Busin <span class="hlt">Glide</span> group (P <0.05). The endothelial cell loss was 20.5% and 21.12% respectively (P>0.05). Mean CDVA was 0.65+/- 0.27 and 0.63 +/- 0.25, respectively (P>0,05). Statistically significant differences in intra- and post-operative complications between both groups were not found. The Tan Endo<span class="hlt">Glide</span> used during posterior lamellar keratoplasty with DSEK technique is a good alternative to currently used methods. It provides better stabilization of the anterior chamber, however its use is linked with higher postoperative astigmatism in comparison with Busin <span class="hlt">Glide</span>. The visual outcomes and endothelial cell loss 6 months after the surgery were similar in both groups.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16215212','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16215212"><span>Submerged swimming of the great cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo sinensis is a variant of the burst-and-<span class="hlt">glide</span> gait.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ribak, Gal; Weihs, Daniel; Arad, Zeev</p> <p>2005-10-01</p> <p>Cormorants are water birds that forage by submerged swimming in search and pursuit of fish. Underwater they swim by paddling with both feet simultaneously in a gait that includes long <span class="hlt">glides</span> between consecutive strokes. At shallow swimming depths the birds are highly buoyant as a consequence of their aerial lifestyle. To counter this buoyancy cormorants swim underwater with their body at an angle to the swimming direction. This mechanical solution for foraging at shallow depth is expected to increase the cost of swimming by increasing the drag of the birds. We used kinematic analysis of video sequences of cormorants swimming underwater at shallow depth in a controlled research setup to analyze the swimming gait and estimate the resultant drag of the birds during the entire paddling cycle. The <span class="hlt">gliding</span> drag of the birds was estimated from swimming speed deceleration during the <span class="hlt">glide</span> stage while the drag during active paddling was estimated using a mathematical ;burst-and-<span class="hlt">glide</span>' model. The model was originally developed to estimate the energetic saving from combining <span class="hlt">glides</span> with burst swimming and we used this fact to test whether the paddling gait of cormorants has similar advantages. We found that swimming speed was correlated with paddling frequency (r=0.56, P<0.001, N=95) where the increase in paddling frequency was achieved mainly by shortening the <span class="hlt">glide</span> stage (r=-0.86, P<0.001, N=95). The drag coefficient of the birds during paddling was higher on average by two- to threefold than during <span class="hlt">gliding</span>. However, the magnitude of the drag coefficient during the <span class="hlt">glide</span> was positively correlated with the tilt of the body (r=0.5, P<0.003, N=35) and negatively correlated with swimming speed (r=-0.65, P<0.001, N=35), while the drag coefficient during the stroke was not correlated with tilt of the body (r=-0.11, P>0.5, N=35) and was positively correlated with swimming speed (r=0.41, P<0.015, N=35). Therefore, the difference between the drag coefficient during the <span class="hlt">glide</span> and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PSST...26d5014P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PSST...26d5014P"><span>Experimental study of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc plasma channel motion: buoyancy and gas flow phenomena under normal and hypergravity conditions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Potočňáková, Lucia; Šperka, Jiří; Zikán, Petr; van Loon, Jack J. W. A.; Beckers, Job; Kudrle, Vít</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>The details of plasma channel motion are investigated by frame-by-frame image analysis of high speed recording of a <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc. The <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc is operated in several noble gases at various flow rates, voltages and artificial gravity levels. Several peculiarities in evolution of individual <span class="hlt">glides</span> are observed, described and discussed, such as accelerating motion of plasma channel or shortcutting events of various kinds. Statistics of averaged parameters are significantly different for buoyancy and gas drag dominated regimes, which is put into relation with differing flow patterns for hypergravity and high gas flow.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/15013397','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/15013397"><span><span class="hlt">AC</span> magnetohydrodynamic microfluidic switch</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Lemoff, A V; Lee, A P</p> <p>2000-03-02</p> <p>A microfluidic switch has been demonstrated using an <span class="hlt">AC</span> Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pumping mechanism in which the Lorentz force is used to pump an electrolytic solution. By integrating two <span class="hlt">AC</span> MHD pumps into different arms of a Y-shaped fluidic circuit, flow can be switched between the two arms. This type of switch can be used to produce complex fluidic routing, which may have multiple applications in {micro}TAS.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/972224','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/972224"><span><span class="hlt">ACS</span> Symposium Support</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kenneth D. Jordan</p> <p>2010-02-20</p> <p>The funds from this DOE grant were used to help cover the travel costs of five students and postdoctoral fellows who attended a symposium on 'Hydration: From Clusters to Aqueous Solutions' held at the Fall 2007 American Chemical Society Meeting in Boston, MA, August 19-23. The Symposium was sponsored by the Physical Chemistry Division, <span class="hlt">ACS</span>. The technical program for the meeting is available at http://phys-<span class="hlt">acs</span>.org/fall2007.html.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_17 --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="341"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4130718','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4130718"><span>Support for the initial attachment, growth and differentiation of MG-63 cells: a comparison between nano-size hydroxyapatite and <span class="hlt">micro-size</span> hydroxyapatite in composites</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Filová, Elena; Suchý, Tomáš; Sucharda, Zbyněk; Šupová, Monika; Žaloudková, Margit; Balík, Karel; Lisá, Věra; Šlouf, Miroslav; Bačáková, Lucie</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Hydroxyapatite (HA) is considered to be a bioactive material that favorably influences the adhesion, growth, and osteogenic differentiation of osteoblasts. To optimize the cell response on the hydroxyapatite composite, it is desirable to assess the optimum concentration and also the optimum particle size. The aim of our study was to prepare composite materials made of polydimethylsiloxane, polyamide, and nano-sized (N) or <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> (M) HA, with an HA content of 0%, 2%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25% (v/v) (referred to as N0–N25 or M0–M25), and to evaluate them in vitro in cultures with human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells. For clinical applications, fast osseointegration of the implant into the bone is essential. We observed the greatest initial cell adhesion on composites M10 and N5. Nano-sized HA supported cell growth, especially during the first 3 days of culture. On composites with <span class="hlt">micro-size</span> HA (2%–15%), MG-63 cells reached the highest densities on day 7. Samples M20 and M25, however, were toxic for MG-63 cells, although these composites supported the production of osteocalcin in these cells. On N2, a higher concentration of osteopontin was found in MG-63 cells. For biomedical applications, the concentration range of 5%–15% (v/v) nano-size or <span class="hlt">micro-size</span> HA seems to be optimum. PMID:25125978</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JPS...331..198C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JPS...331..198C"><span>Double-plasma enhanced carbon shield for spatial/interfacial controlled electrodes in lithium ion batteries via <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> silicon from wafer waste</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chen, Bing-Hong; Chuang, Shang-I.; Duh, Jenq-Gong</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>Using spatial and interfacial control, the <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> silicon waste from wafer slurry could greatly increase its retention potential as a green resource for silicon-based anode in lithium ion batteries. Through step by step spatial and interfacial control for electrode, the cyclability of recycled waste gains potential performance from its original poor retention property. In the stages of spatial control, the electrode stabilizers of active, inactive and conductive additives were mixed into slurries for maintaining architecture and conductivity of electrode. In addition, a fusion electrode modification of interfacial control combines electrolyte additive, technique of double-plasma enhanced carbon shield (D-PECS) to convert the chemical bond states and to alter the formation of solid electrolyte interphases (SEIs) in the first cycle. The depth profiles of chemical composition from external into internal electrode illustrate that the fusion electrode modification not only forms a boundary to balance the interface between internal and external electrodes but also stabilizes the SEIs formation and soothe the expansion of <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> electrode. Through these effect approaches, the performance of <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> Si waste electrode can be boosted from its serious capacity degradation to potential retention (200 cycles, 1100 mAh/g) and better meet the requirements for facile and cost-effective in industrial production.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25125978','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25125978"><span>Support for the initial attachment, growth and differentiation of MG-63 cells: a comparison between nano-size hydroxyapatite and <span class="hlt">micro-size</span> hydroxyapatite in composites.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Filová, Elena; Suchý, Tomáš; Sucharda, Zbyněk; Supová, Monika; Zaloudková, Margit; Balík, Karel; Lisá, Věra; Slouf, Miroslav; Bačáková, Lucie</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Hydroxyapatite (HA) is considered to be a bioactive material that favorably influences the adhesion, growth, and osteogenic differentiation of osteoblasts. To optimize the cell response on the hydroxyapatite composite, it is desirable to assess the optimum concentration and also the optimum particle size. The aim of our study was to prepare composite materials made of polydimethylsiloxane, polyamide, and nano-sized (N) or <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> (M) HA, with an HA content of 0%, 2%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25% (v/v) (referred to as N0-N25 or M0-M25), and to evaluate them in vitro in cultures with human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells. For clinical applications, fast osseointegration of the implant into the bone is essential. We observed the greatest initial cell adhesion on composites M10 and N5. Nano-sized HA supported cell growth, especially during the first 3 days of culture. On composites with <span class="hlt">micro-size</span> HA (2%-15%), MG-63 cells reached the highest densities on day 7. Samples M20 and M25, however, were toxic for MG-63 cells, although these composites supported the production of osteocalcin in these cells. On N2, a higher concentration of osteopontin was found in MG-63 cells. For biomedical applications, the concentration range of 5%-15% (v/v) nano-size or <span class="hlt">micro-size</span> HA seems to be optimum.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17644674','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17644674"><span>Aerodynamic force generation, performance and control of body orientation during <span class="hlt">gliding</span> in sugar gliders (Petaurus breviceps).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bishop, Kristin L</p> <p>2007-08-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Gliding</span> has often been discussed in the literature as a possible precursor to powered flight in vertebrates, but few studies exist on the mechanics of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> in living animals. In this study I analyzed the 3D kinematics of sugar gliders (Petaurus breviceps) during short <span class="hlt">glides</span> in an enclosed space. Short segments of the <span class="hlt">glide</span> were captured on video, and the positions of marked anatomical landmarks were used to compute linear distances and angles, as well as whole body velocities and accelerations. From the whole body accelerations I estimated the aerodynamic forces generated by the animals. I computed the correlations between movements of the limbs and body rotations to examine the control of orientation during flight. Finally, I compared these results to those of my earlier study on the similarly sized and distantly related southern flying squirrel (Glaucomys volans). The sugar gliders in this study accelerated downward slightly (1.0+/-0.5 m s(-2)), and also accelerated forward (2.1+/-0.6 m s(-2)) in all but one trial, indicating that the body weight was not fully supported by aerodynamic forces and that some of the lift produced forward acceleration rather than just balancing body weight. The gliders used high angles of attack (44.15+/-3.12 degrees ), far higher than the angles at which airplane wings would stall, yet generated higher lift coefficients (1.48+/-0.18) than would be expected for a stalled wing. Movements of the limbs were strongly correlated with body rotations, suggesting that sugar gliders make extensive use of limb movements to control their orientation during <span class="hlt">gliding</span> flight. In addition, among individuals, different limb movements were associated with a given body rotation, suggesting that individual variation exists in the control of body rotations. Under similar conditions, flying squirrels generated higher lift coefficients and lower drag coefficients than sugar gliders, yet had only marginally shallower <span class="hlt">glides</span>. Flying squirrels have a</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23768316','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23768316"><span>Comparative hazard identification of nano- and <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> cerium oxide particles based on 28-day inhalation studies in rats.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gosens, Ilse; Mathijssen, Liesbeth E A M; Bokkers, Bas G H; Muijser, Hans; Cassee, Flemming R</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p>There are many uncertainties regarding the hazard of nanosized particles compared to the bulk material of the parent chemical. Here, the authors assess the comparative hazard of two nanoscale (NM-211 and NM-212) and one microscale (NM-213) cerium oxide materials in 28-day inhalation toxicity studies in rats (according to Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development technical guidelines). All three materials gave rise to a dose-dependent pulmonary inflammation and lung cell damage but without gross pathological changes immediately after exposure. Following NM-211 and NM-212 exposure, epithelial cell injury was observed in the recovery groups. There was no evidence of systemic inflammation or other haematological changes following exposure of any of the three particle types. The comparative hazard was quantified by application of the benchmark concentration approach. The relative toxicity was explored in terms of three exposure metrics. When exposure levels were expressed as mass concentration, nanosized NM-211 was the most potent material, whereas when expression levels were based on surface area concentration, <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> NM-213 material induced the greatest extent of pulmonary inflammation/damage. Particles were equipotent based on particle number concentrations. In conclusion, similar pulmonary toxicity profiles including inflammation are observed for all three materials with little quantitative differences. Systemic effects were virtually absent. There is little evidence for a dominant predicting exposure metric for the observed effects.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1366401-impact-alloy-composition-one-dimensional-glide-small-dislocation-loops-concentrated-solid-solution-alloys','SCIGOV-DOEP'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1366401-impact-alloy-composition-one-dimensional-glide-small-dislocation-loops-concentrated-solid-solution-alloys"><span>Impact of alloy composition on one-dimensional <span class="hlt">glide</span> of small dislocation loops in concentrated solid solution alloys</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/pages">DOE PAGES</a></p> <p>Shi, Shi; Bei, Hongbin; Robertson, Ian M.</p> <p>2017-06-08</p> <p>One-dimensional <span class="hlt">glide</span> of loops during ion irradiation at 773 K in a series of Ni-containing concentrated solid solution alloys has been observed directly during experiments conducted inside a transmission electron microscope. It was found that the frequency of the oscillatory motion of the loop, the loop <span class="hlt">glide</span> velocity as well as the loop jump distance were dependent on the composition of the alloy and the size of the loop. Loop <span class="hlt">glide</span> was most common for small loops and occurred more frequently in the less complex alloys, being highest in Ni, then NiCo, NiFe and NiCoFeCr. As a result, no measurablemore » loop <span class="hlt">glide</span> occurred in the NiCoCr, NiCoFeCrMn and NiCoFeCrPd alloys.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/929270','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/929270"><span>Pulsating-<span class="hlt">gliding</span> transition in the dynamics of levitating liquid nitorgen droplets.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Snezhko, A.; Jacob, E. B.; Aranson, I. S.; Materials Science Division; Tel-Aviv Univ.</p> <p>2008-04-21</p> <p>Hot surfaces can cause levitation of small liquid droplets if the temperature is kept above the Leidenfrost point (220 C for water) due to the pressure formed because of rapid evaporation. Here, we demonstrate a new class of pulsating-<span class="hlt">gliding</span> dynamic transitions in a special setting of the Leidenfrost effect at room temperatures and above a viscous fluid for droplets of liquid nitrogen. A whole range of highly dynamic patterns unfolds when droplets of liquid nitrogen are poured on the surface of another, more viscous liquid at room temperature. We also discovered that the levitating droplets induce vortex motion in the supporting viscous liquid. Depending on the viscosity of the supporting liquid, the nitrogen droplets either adopt an oscillating (pulsating) star-like shape with different azimuthal symmetries (from 2-9 petals) or <span class="hlt">glide</span> on the surface with random trajectories. Thus, by varying the viscosity of the supporting liquid, we achieve controlled morphology and dynamics of Leidenfrost droplets.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26395910','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26395910"><span><span class="hlt">Glide</span> Path Management with Single- and Multiple-instrument Rotary Systems in Curved Canals: A Micro-Computed Tomographic Study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kirchhoff, Alison Luís; Chu, Rene; Mello, Isabel; Garzon, Andres Dario Plazas; dos Santos, Marcelo; Cunha, Rodrigo Sanches</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>Securing a reproducible <span class="hlt">glide</span> path before instrumentation is recommended to maintain the original geometry of the root canal system and to prevent file separation. Mechanical <span class="hlt">glide</span> path management systems have been introduced to expedite this step. The aim of this study was to compare apical transportation, canal volume increase, and working time during <span class="hlt">glide</span> path management with ProGlider (PG; Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties, Tulsa, OK) and PathFiles (PF, Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties). Forty curved mesial canals of mandibular molars were randomly allocated into 2 experimental groups (n = 20) according to the <span class="hlt">glide</span> path management system: PG or PF. A <span class="hlt">glide</span> path was achieved according to the manufacturers' protocol. Micro-computed tomographic analysis was performed to assess apical transportation at 1, 3, and 5 mm and volume increase. The time required to achieve the <span class="hlt">glide</span> path was measured. The overall apical transportation mean values (± standard error) were 13.33 ± 3.37 μm for PG and 19.21 ± 4.4 μm for PF (P > .05). The mean (± standard error) volume increase values were 0.49 ± 0.06 mm(3) for PG and 0.48 ± 0.06 mm(3) for PF (P > .05). A statistically significant difference in the working time was found between the groups (P < .0001) where the mean (± standard error) values for time were 7.38 ± 1.73 seconds for PG and 20.61 ± 5.54 seconds for PF. Similar apical transportation and volume increase occurred during <span class="hlt">glide</span> path management with PG single-file and PF multi-file systems; however, PG achieved <span class="hlt">glide</span> path faster than PF. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1348155-reduced-dislocation-density-gaxin1-xp-compositionally-graded-buffer-layers-through-engineered-glide-plane-switch','SCIGOV-DOEP'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1348155-reduced-dislocation-density-gaxin1-xp-compositionally-graded-buffer-layers-through-engineered-glide-plane-switch"><span>Reduced Dislocation Density in GaxIn1-xP Compositionally Graded Buffer Layers through Engineered <span class="hlt">Glide</span> Plane Switch</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/pages">DOE PAGES</a></p> <p>Schulte, Kevin L.; France, Ryan M.; McMahon, William E.; ...</p> <p>2016-11-17</p> <p>In this work we develop control over dislocation <span class="hlt">glide</span> dynamics in GaxIn1-xP compositionally graded buffer layers (CGBs) through control of CuPt ordering on the group-III sublattice. The ordered structure is metastable in the bulk, so any glissile dislocation that disrupts the ordered pattern will release stored energy, and experience an increased <span class="hlt">glide</span> force. Here we show how this connection between atomic ordering and dislocation <span class="hlt">glide</span> force can be exploited to control the threading dislocation density (TDD) in GaxIn1-xP CGBs. When ordered GaxIn1-xP is graded from the GaAs lattice constant to InP, the order parameter ..eta.. decreases as x decreases, andmore » dislocation <span class="hlt">glide</span> switches from one set of <span class="hlt">glide</span> planes to the other. This <span class="hlt">glide</span> plane switch (GPS) is accompanied by the nucleation of dislocations on the new <span class="hlt">glide</span> plane, which typically leads to increased TDD. We develop control of the GPS position within a GaxIn1-xP CGB through manipulation of deposition temperature, surfactant concentration, and strain-grading rate. We demonstrate a two-stage GaxIn1-xP CGB from GaAs to InP with sufficiently low TDD for high performance devices, such as the 4-junction inverted metamorphic multi-junction solar cell, achieved through careful control the GPS position. Experimental results are analyzed within the context of a model that considers the force balance on dislocations on the two competing <span class="hlt">glide</span> planes as a function of the degree of ordering.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27002277','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27002277"><span>Use of the <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope Ranger Video Laryngoscope for Emergency Intubation in the Prehospital Setting: A Randomized Control Trial.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Trimmel, Helmut; Kreutziger, Janett; Fitzka, Robert; Szüts, Stephan; Derdak, Christoph; Koch, Elisabeth; Erwied, Boris; Voelckel, Wolfgang G</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>We sought to assess whether the <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope Ranger video laryngoscope may be a reliable alternative to direct laryngoscopy in the prehospital setting. Multicenter, prospective, randomized, control trial with patient recruitment over 18 months. Four study centers operating physician-staffed rescue helicopters or ground units in Austria and Norway. Adult emergency patients requiring endotracheal intubation. Airway management strictly following a prehospital algorithm. First and second intubation attempt employing <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope or direct laryngoscopy as randomized; third attempt crossover. After three failed intubation attempts, immediate use of an extraglottic airway device. A total of 326 patients were enrolled. Success rate with the <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope (n = 168) versus direct laryngoscopy (n = 158) group was 61.9% (104/168) versus 96.2% (152/158), respectively (p < 0.001). The main reasons for failed <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope intubation were failure to advance the tube into the larynx or trachea (26/168 vs 0/158; p < 0.001) and/or impaired sight due to blood or fluids (21/168 vs 3/158; p < 0.001). When <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope intubation failed, direct laryngoscopy was successful in 61 of 64 patients (95.3%), whereas <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope enabled intubation in four of six cases (66.7%) where direct laryngoscopy failed (p = 0.055). In addition, <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope was prone to impaired visualization of the monitor because of ambient light (29/168; 17.3%). There was no correlation between success rates and body mass index, age, indication for airway management, or experience of the physicians, respectively. Video laryngoscopy is an established tool in difficult airway management, but our results shed light on the specific problems in the emergency medical service setting. Prehospital use of the <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope was associated with some major problems, thus resulting in a lower intubation success rate when compared with direct laryngoscopy.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JCrGr.464...20S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017JCrGr.464...20S"><span>Reduced dislocation density in GaxIn1-xP compositionally graded buffer layers through engineered <span class="hlt">glide</span> plane switch</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Schulte, K. L.; France, R. M.; McMahon, W. E.; Norman, A. G.; Guthrey, H. L.; Geisz, J. F.</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>In this work we develop control over dislocation <span class="hlt">glide</span> dynamics in GaxIn1-xP compositionally graded buffer layers (CGBs) through control of CuPt ordering on the group-III sublattice. The ordered structure is metastable in the bulk, so any glissile dislocation that disrupts the ordered pattern will release stored energy, and experience an increased <span class="hlt">glide</span> force. Here we show how this connection between atomic ordering and dislocation <span class="hlt">glide</span> force can be exploited to control the threading dislocation density (TDD) in GaxIn1-xP CGBs. When ordered GaxIn1-xP is graded from the GaAs lattice constant to InP, the order parameter η decreases as x decreases, and dislocation <span class="hlt">glide</span> switches from one set of <span class="hlt">glide</span> planes to the other. This <span class="hlt">glide</span> plane switch (GPS) is accompanied by the nucleation of dislocations on the new <span class="hlt">glide</span> plane, which typically leads to increased TDD. We develop control of the GPS position within a GaxIn1-xP CGB through manipulation of deposition temperature, surfactant concentration, and strain-grading rate. We demonstrate a two-stage GaxIn1-xP CGB from GaAs to InP with sufficiently low TDD for high performance devices, such as the 4-junction inverted metamorphic multi-junction solar cell, achieved through careful control the GPS position. Experimental results are analyzed within the context of a model that considers the force balance on dislocations on the two competing <span class="hlt">glide</span> planes as a function of the degree of ordering.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26347563','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26347563"><span>Feather roughness reduces flow separation during low Reynolds number <span class="hlt">glides</span> of swifts.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>van Bokhorst, Evelien; de Kat, Roeland; Elsinga, Gerrit E; Lentink, David</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>Swifts are aerodynamically sophisticated birds with a small arm and large hand wing that provides them with exquisite control over their <span class="hlt">glide</span> performance. However, their hand wings have a seemingly unsophisticated surface roughness that is poised to disturb flow. This roughness of about 2% chord length is formed by the valleys and ridges of overlapping primary feathers with thick protruding rachides, which make the wing stiffer. An earlier flow study of laminar-turbulent boundary layer transition over prepared swift wings suggested that swifts can attain laminar flow at a low angle of attack. In contrast, aerodynamic design theory suggests that airfoils must be extremely smooth to attain such laminar flow. In hummingbirds, which have similarly rough wings, flow measurements on a 3D printed model suggest that the flow separates at the leading edge and becomes turbulent well above the rachis bumps in a detached shear layer. The aerodynamic function of wing roughness in small birds is, therefore, not fully understood. Here, we performed particle image velocimetry and force measurements to compare smooth versus rough 3D-printed models of the swift hand wing. The high-resolution boundary layer measurements show that the flow over rough wings is indeed laminar at a low angle of attack and a low Reynolds number, but becomes turbulent at higher values. In contrast, the boundary layer over the smooth wing forms open laminar separation bubbles that extend beyond the trailing edge. The boundary layer dynamics of the smooth surface varies non-linearly as a function of angle of attack and Reynolds number, whereas the rough surface boasts more consistent turbulent boundary layer dynamics. Comparison of the corresponding drag values, lift values and <span class="hlt">glide</span> ratios suggests, however, that <span class="hlt">glide</span> performance is equivalent. The increased structural performance, boundary layer robustness and equivalent aerodynamic performance of rough wings might have provided small (proto) birds with</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20361193','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20361193"><span>Quadrupedal locomotor performance in two species of arboreal squirrels: predicting energy savings of <span class="hlt">gliding</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Flaherty, Elizabeth A; Ben-David, Merav; Smith, Winston P</p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Gliding</span> allows mammals to exploit canopy habitats of old-growth forests possibly as a means to save energy. To assess costs of quadrupedal locomotion for a <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arboreal mammal, we used open-flow respirometry and a variable-speed treadmill to measure oxygen consumption and to calculate cost of transport, excess exercise oxygen consumption, and excess post-exercise oxygen consumption for nine northern flying squirrels (Glaucomys sabrinus) and four fox squirrels (Sciurus niger). Our results indicate that oxygen consumption during exercise by flying squirrels was 1.26-1.65 times higher than predicted based on body mass, and exponentially increased with velocity (from 0.84 ± 0.03 ml O(2) kg(-1) s(-1) at 0.40 m s(-1) to 1.55 ± 0.03 ml O(2) kg(-1) s(-1) at 0.67 m s(-1)). Also, cost of transport in flying squirrels increased with velocity, although excess exercise oxygen consumption and excess post-exercise oxygen consumption did not. In contrast, oxygen consumption during exercise for fox squirrels was similar to predicted, varying from 0.51 (±0.02) ml O(2) kg(-1) s(-1) at 0.63 m s(-1) to 0.54 (±0.03) ml O(2) kg(-1) s(-1) at 1.25 m s(-1). In addition, the cost of transport for fox squirrels decreased with velocity, while excess exercise oxygen consumption and excess post-exercise oxygen consumption did not. Collectively, these observations suggest that unlike fox squirrels, flying squirrels are poorly adapted to prolonged bouts of quadrupedal locomotion. The evolution of skeletal adaptations to climbing, leaping, and landing and the development of a <span class="hlt">gliding</span> membrane likely has increased the cost of quadrupedal locomotion by >50% while resulting in energy savings during <span class="hlt">gliding</span> and reduction in travel time between foraging patches.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22927953','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22927953"><span>Critical motor number for fractional steps of cytoskeletal filaments in <span class="hlt">gliding</span> assays.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Li, Xin; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Kierfeld, Jan</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>In <span class="hlt">gliding</span> assays, filaments are pulled by molecular motors that are immobilized on a solid surface. By varying the motor density on the surface, one can control the number N of motors that pull simultaneously on a single filament. Here, such <span class="hlt">gliding</span> assays are studied theoretically using brownian (or Langevin) dynamics simulations and taking the local force balance between motors and filaments as well as the force-dependent velocity of the motors into account. We focus on the filament stepping dynamics and investigate how single motor properties such as stalk elasticity and step size determine the presence or absence of fractional steps of the filaments. We show that each <span class="hlt">gliding</span> assay can be characterized by a critical motor number, N(c). Because of thermal fluctuations, fractional filament steps are only detectable as long as N < N(c). The corresponding fractional filament step size is l/N where l is the step size of a single motor. We first apply our computational approach to microtubules pulled by kinesin-1 motors. For elastic motor stalks that behave as linear springs with a zero rest length, the critical motor number is found to be N(c) = 4, and the corresponding distributions of the filament step sizes are in good agreement with the available experimental data. In general, the critical motor number N(c) depends on the elastic stalk properties and is reduced to N(c) = 3 for linear springs with a nonzero rest length. Furthermore, N(c) is shown to depend quadratically on the motor step size l. Therefore, <span class="hlt">gliding</span> assays consisting of actin filaments and myosin-V are predicted to exhibit fractional filament steps up to motor number N = 31. Finally, we show that fractional filament steps are also detectable for a fixed average motor number <N> as determined by the surface density (or coverage) of the motors on the substrate surface.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060042702&hterms=dreams&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Ddreams','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060042702&hterms=dreams&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Ddreams"><span><span class="hlt">GLIDE</span>: a grid-based light-weight infrastructure for data-intensive environments</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Mattmann, Chris A.; Malek, Sam; Beckman, Nels; Mikic-Rakic, Marija; Medvidovic, Nenad; Chrichton, Daniel J.</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>The promise of the grid is that it will enable public access and sharing of immense amounts of computational and data resources among dynamic coalitions of individuals and institutions. However, the current grid solutions make several limiting assumptions that curtail their widespread adoption. To address these limitations, we present <span class="hlt">GLIDE</span>, a prototype light-weight, data-intensive middleware infrastructure that enables access to the robust data and computational power of the grid on DREAM platforms.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060042702&hterms=Dreams&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3DDreams','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060042702&hterms=Dreams&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3DDreams"><span><span class="hlt">GLIDE</span>: a grid-based light-weight infrastructure for data-intensive environments</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Mattmann, Chris A.; Malek, Sam; Beckman, Nels; Mikic-Rakic, Marija; Medvidovic, Nenad; Chrichton, Daniel J.</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>The promise of the grid is that it will enable public access and sharing of immense amounts of computational and data resources among dynamic coalitions of individuals and institutions. However, the current grid solutions make several limiting assumptions that curtail their widespread adoption. To address these limitations, we present <span class="hlt">GLIDE</span>, a prototype light-weight, data-intensive middleware infrastructure that enables access to the robust data and computational power of the grid on DREAM platforms.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA464395','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA464395"><span>Combustion Enhancement Via Stabilized Piecewise Nonequilibrium <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Arc Plasma Discharge (Postprint)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.dtic.mil/">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include Area Code) N/A Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-18 AIAA JOURNAL Vol. 44, No. 1...surface area Fa = ampere force per unit arc length Fd = drag force I = current i, j = indices representing the two nozzles streams L = distance between...continually loses heat to the surroundings because of the increased arc surface area . The voltage is also continually Fig. 1 <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> arc plasma system: path</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhFl...25g1905M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhFl...25g1905M"><span>Aerodynamic effects of wing corrugation at <span class="hlt">gliding</span> flight at low Reynolds numbers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Meng, Xue Guang; Sun, Mao</p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>Corrugation gives an insect-wing the advantages of low mass, high stiffness, and low membrane stress. Researchers are interested to know if it is also advantageous aerodynamically. Previous works reported that corrugation enhanced the aerodynamic performance of wings at <span class="hlt">gliding</span> flight. However, Reynolds numbers considered in these studies were higher than that of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> insects. The present study showed that in the Reynolds number range of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> insects, corrugation had negative aerodynamic effects. We studied aerodynamic effects of corrugation at <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motion using the method of computational fluid dynamics, in the Reynolds number range of Re = 200-2400. Different corrugation patterns were considered. The effect of corrugation on aerodynamic performance was identified by comparing the aerodynamic forces between the corrugated and flat-plate wings, and the underlying flow mechanisms of the corrugation effects were revealed by analyzing the flow fields and surface pressure distributions. The findings are as follows: (1) the effect of corrugation is to decrease the lift, and change the drag only slightly (at 15°-25° angles of attack, lift is decreased by about 16%; at smaller angles of attack, the percentage of lift reduction is even larger because the lift is small). (2) Two mechanisms are responsible for the lift reduction. One is that the pleats at the lower surface of the corrugated wing produce relatively strong vortices, resulting in local low-pressure regions on the lower surface of the wing. The other is that corrugation near the leading edge pushes the leading-edge-separation layer slightly upwards and increases the size of the separation bubble above the upper surface, reducing the "suction pressure," or increasing the pressure, on the upper surface.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21937667','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21937667"><span>Using physical models to study the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> performance of extinct animals.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Koehl, M A R; Evangelista, Dennis; Yang, Karen</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>Aerodynamic studies using physical models of fossil organisms can provide quantitative information about how performance of defined activities, such as <span class="hlt">gliding</span>, depends on specific morphological features. Such analyses allow us to rule out hypotheses about the function of extinct organisms that are not physically plausible and to determine if and how specific morphological features and postures affect performance. The purpose of this article is to provide a practical guide for the design of dynamically scaled physical models to study the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> of extinct animals using examples from our research on the theropod dinosaur, †Microraptor gui, which had flight feathers on its hind limbs as well as on its forelimbs. Analysis of the aerodynamics of †M. gui can shed light on the design of gliders with large surfaces posterior to the center of mass and provide functional information to evolutionary biologists trying to unravel the origins of flight in the dinosaurian ancestors and sister groups to birds. Measurements of lift, drag, side force, and moments in pitch, roll, and yaw on models in a wind tunnel can be used to calculate indices of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> and parachuting performance, aerodynamic static stability, and control effectiveness in maneuvering. These indices permit the aerodynamic performance of bodies of different shape, size, stiffness, texture, and posture to be compared and thus can provide insights about the design of gliders, both biological and man-made. Our measurements of maximum lift-to-drag ratios of 2.5-3.1 for physical models of †M. gui suggest that its <span class="hlt">gliding</span> performance was similar to that of flying squirrels and that the various leg postures that might have been used by †M. gui make little difference to that aspect of aerodynamic performance. We found that body orientation relative to the movement of air past the animal determines whether it is difficult or easy to maneuver.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1325425-irradiation-creep-climb-enabled-glide-dislocations','SCIGOV-DOEP'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1325425-irradiation-creep-climb-enabled-glide-dislocations"><span>On the irradiation creep by climb-enabled <span class="hlt">glide</span> of dislocations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/pages">DOE PAGES</a></p> <p>Barashev, A. V.; Golubov, S. I.; Stoller, R. E.</p> <p>2016-05-03</p> <p>The plastic deformation is defined by the proportional to stress elastic deflections of pinned dislocations in climb-enabled <span class="hlt">glide</span> models of irradiation creep. Here, we argue that this relation is incorrect; instead, as in other pinning-unpinning-type models, the dislocations move from one set of obstacles to another, so that the inter-obstacle spacing determines creep rate, whereas the dependence on the applied stress is only implicit in the unpinning time.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_18 --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="361"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JNuM..477..234B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JNuM..477..234B"><span>On the irradiation creep by climb-enabled <span class="hlt">glide</span> of dislocations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Barashev, A. V.; Golubov, S. I.; Stoller, R. E.</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>In the climb-enabled <span class="hlt">glide</span> model of irradiation creep, the plastic deformation is defined by the elastic deflections of pinned dislocations, which is an inconsistency. We argue that this relation is incorrect; instead, as in other pinning-unpinning-type models, the dislocations move from one set of obstacles to another, so that the inter-obstacle spacing determines creep rate, whereas the dependence on the applied stress is only implicit in the unpinning time.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3961026','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3961026"><span>Postoperative Sore Throat After Laryngoscopy With Macintosh or <span class="hlt">Glide</span> Scope Video Laryngoscope Blade in Normal Airway Patients</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Najafi, Atabak; Imani, Farsad; Makarem, Jalil; Khajavi, Mohammad Reza; Etezadi, Farhad; Habibi, Shirin; Shariat Moharari, Reza</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Background: The <span class="hlt">Glide</span> Scope videolaryngoscope provides a suitable view for intubation, with less force required. Objectives: The present study was conducted, to compare postoperative sore throat and hoarseness after laryngoscopy and intubation, by Macintosh blade or <span class="hlt">Glide</span> Scope video laryngoscope in normal airway patients. Patients and Methods: Three hundred patients were randomly allocated into two groups of 150: Macintosh blade laryngoscope or <span class="hlt">Glide</span> Scope video laryngoscope. The patients were evaluated for 48 hours for sore throat and hoarseness by an interview. Results: The incidence and severity of sore throat in the <span class="hlt">Glide</span> Scope group, at 6, 24 and 48 hours after the operation, were significantly lower than in the Macintosh laryngoscope group. In addition, the incidence of hoarseness in the <span class="hlt">Glide</span> Scope group, at 6 and 24 hours after the operation, were significantly lower than in the Macintosh laryngoscope group. The incidence and severity of sore throat in men, at 6 and 24 hours after the operation, were significantly lower than in the women. Conclusions: The incidence and severity of sore throat and hoarseness after tracheal intubation by <span class="hlt">Glide</span> Scope were lower than in the Macintosh laryngoscope. The incidence and severity of sore throat were increased by intubation and longer operation times. PMID:24660157</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4290320','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4290320"><span>Modifications in Canal Anatomy of Curved Canals of Mandibular First Molars by two <span class="hlt">Glide</span> Path Instruments using CBCT</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Manchanda, Nayasha</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Background: The creation of <span class="hlt">glide</span> path reduces the risk of instrument breakage. <span class="hlt">Glide</span> path is created before using NiTi rotary instrumentation Aim: This study compared the changes in the root canal anatomy after creation of <span class="hlt">glide</span> path using Path Files (PF) and V <span class="hlt">Glide</span> Path 2 (VGP2) using Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods: Hundred extracted mandibular first molars with curved mesial roots, curvature angles ranging within 20-30 degrees were assigned into two groups (n = 50 each). <span class="hlt">Glide</span> path was prepared using PF (Group I) and VGP2 (Group II). CBCT images were obtained before and after instrumentation. The technical outcomes were compared at 0, 1, 2, 3, 5 and 7mm intervals. The data was analyzed using t-test and Chi-square test. Result: There was a statistical difference between the root canal curvatures and working time between the two groups (p < 0.05). Canals transported towards the distal side in Group II but there was a slight mesial transportation in Group I at 0mm. Group I exhibited a better centric ability except at 1mm interval (p > 0.05). The changes in the volume were statistically significant only at 2mm interval (p < 0.05). The difference in the cross sectional area was not statistically significant at any interval (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Within the limits of this study the rotary Nickel Titanium Path Files appeared to be suitable instruments for safe and easy creation of <span class="hlt">glide</span> path. PMID:25584304</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3954763','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3954763"><span>The Toxoplasma Acto-MyoA Motor Complex Is Important but Not Essential for <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Motility and Host Cell Invasion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Jackson, Allison J.; Whitelaw, Jamie A.; Pall, Gurman; Black, Jennifer Ann; Ferguson, David J. P.; Tardieux, Isabelle; Mogilner, Alex; Meissner, Markus</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Apicomplexan parasites are thought to actively invade the host cell by <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility. This movement is powered by the parasite's own actomyosin system, and depends on the regulated polymerisation and depolymerisation of actin to generate the force for <span class="hlt">gliding</span> and host cell penetration. Recent studies demonstrated that Toxoplasma gondii can invade the host cell in the absence of several core components of the invasion machinery, such as the motor protein myosin A (MyoA), the microneme proteins MIC2 and AMA1 and actin, indicating the presence of alternative invasion mechanisms. Here the roles of MyoA, MLC1, GAP45 and Act1, core components of the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> machinery, are re-dissected in detail. Although important roles of these components for <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility and host cell invasion are verified, mutant parasites remain invasive and do not show a block of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility, suggesting that other mechanisms must be in place to enable the parasite to move and invade the host cell. A novel, hypothetical model for parasite <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility and invasion is presented based on osmotic forces generated in the cytosol of the parasite that are converted into motility. PMID:24632839</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26994178','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26994178"><span>Wake analysis of aerodynamic components for the <span class="hlt">glide</span> envelope of a jackdaw (Corvus monedula).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>KleinHeerenbrink, Marco; Warfvinge, Kajsa; Hedenström, Anders</p> <p>2016-05-15</p> <p><span class="hlt">Gliding</span> flight is a relatively inexpensive mode of flight used by many larger bird species, where potential energy is used to cover the cost of aerodynamic drag. Birds have great flexibility in their flight configuration, allowing them to control their flight speed and <span class="hlt">glide</span> angle. However, relatively little is known about how this flexibility affects aerodynamic drag. We measured the wake of a jackdaw (Corvus monedula) <span class="hlt">gliding</span> in a wind tunnel, and computed the components of aerodynamic drag from the wake. We found that induced drag was mainly affected by wingspan, but also that the use of the tail has a negative influence on span efficiency. Contrary to previous work, we found no support for the separated primaries being used in controlling the induced drag. Profile drag was of similar magnitude to that reported in other studies, and our results suggest that profile drag is affected by variation in wing shape. For a folded tail, the body drag coefficient had a value of 0.2, rising to above 0.4 with the tail fully spread, which we conclude is due to tail profile drag. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9318238','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9318238"><span>Dragonfly flight. I. <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> flight and steady-state aerodynamic forces.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wakeling, JM; Ellington, CP</p> <p>1997-02-01</p> <p>The free <span class="hlt">gliding</span> flight of the dragonfly Sympetrum sanguineum was filmed in a large flight enclosure. Reconstruction of the <span class="hlt">glide</span> paths showed the flights to involve accelerations. Where the acceleration could be considered constant, the lift and drag forces acting on the dragonfly were calculated. The maximum lift coefficient (CL) recorded from these <span class="hlt">glides</span> was 0.93; however, this is not necessarily the maximum possible from the wings. Lift and drag forces were additionally measured from isolated wings and bodies of S. sanguineum and the damselfly Calopteryx splendens in a steady air flow at Reynolds numbers of 700-2400 for the wings and 2500-15 000 for the bodies. The maximum lift coefficients (CL,max) were 1.07 for S. sanguineum and 1.15 for C. splendens, which are greater than those recorded for all other insects except the locust. The drag coefficient at zero angle of attack ranged between 0.07 and 0.14, being little more than the Blassius value predicted for flat plates. Dragonfly wings thus show exceptional steady-state aerodynamic properties in comparison with the wings of other insects. A resolved-flow model was tested on the body drag data. The parasite drag is significantly affected by viscous forces normal to the longitudinal body axis. The linear dependence of drag on velocity must thus be included in models to predict the parasite drag on dragonflies at non-zero body angles.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27659726','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27659726"><span>Omnidirectional autonomous entry guidance based on 3-D analytical <span class="hlt">glide</span> formulas.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yu, Wenbin; Chen, Wanchun; Jiang, Zhiguo; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhou, Hao</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>An autonomous entry guidance law is developed based on 3-D analytical <span class="hlt">glide</span> formulas, where the downrange formula is used to plan the longitudinal reference profile in order to meet the downrange and final energy requirements, and the crossrange formula is used to regulate the bank reversals in order to eliminate the crossrange error. As the analytical <span class="hlt">glide</span> formulas ignore the effects of the Earth׳s rotation, a series of strategies is proposed for compensating these effects, which provides the guidance with the capability of steering the hypersonic <span class="hlt">glide</span> vehicle with high Lift to Drag ratio (L/D) to any place of the world accurately. The compensation strategies can be summarized into two parts: (1) the reference profiles are properly adjusted by roughly evaluating the effects of the Earth׳s rotation on the aerodynamic profiles over the whole flight, which can compensate most of the effects; (2) the current effects are accurately evaluated and then the guidance commands are slightly modulated for compensating the remaining effects. Due to careful design, the strategies will not result in drastic changes in the Angle of Attack (AOA) and can keep the bank angle almost constant during most of flight.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28622409','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28622409"><span>Ultrasound-guided hydrodissection decreases <span class="hlt">gliding</span> resistance of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Evers, Stefanie; Thoreson, Andrew R; Smith, Jay; Zhao, Chunfeng; Geske, Jennifer R; Amadio, Peter C</p> <p>2017-06-16</p> <p>The aim of this study was to assess alterations in median nerve (MN) biomechanics within the carpal tunnel resulting from ultrasound-guided hydrodissection in a cadaveric model. Twelve fresh frozen human cadaver hands were used. MN <span class="hlt">gliding</span> resistance was measured at baseline and posthydrodissection, by pulling the nerve proximally and then returning it to the origin. Six specimens were treated with hydrodissection, and 6 were used as controls. In the hydrodissection group there was a significant reduction in mean peak <span class="hlt">gliding</span> resistance of 92.9 ± 34.8 mN between baseline and immediately posthydrodissection (21.4% ± 10.5%; P = 0.001). No significant reduction between baseline and the second cycle occurred in the control group: 9.6 ± 29.8 mN (0.4% ± 5.3%; P = 0.467). Hydrodissection can decrease the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> resistance of the MN within the carpal tunnel, at least in wrists unaffected by carpal tunnel syndrome. A clinical trial of hydrodissection seems justified. Muscle Nerve, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26180334','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26180334"><span>Effects of cervical sustained natural apophyseal <span class="hlt">glide</span> on forward head posture and respiratory function.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kim, Se-Yoon; Kim, Nan-Soo; Kim, Laurentius Jongsoon</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>[Purpose] To determine the effects of cervical sustained natural apophyseal <span class="hlt">glide</span> on forward head posture and respiratory function. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty male and female adults in their 20s with forward head posture were included in the study. The subjects were divided randomly into experimental and control groups (n=15 each). Subjects in the experimental group performed cervical sustained natural apophyseal <span class="hlt">glide</span> three times/week for four weeks while subjects in the control group did not perform the intervention. The craniovertebral angle, forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in the first second, as well as the % predicted value of each measurement were assessed to determine the changes in respiration functions before and after the exercise. [Results] The craniovertebral angle four weeks after the experiment was increased in the experimental group, whereas the control group showed no significant difference compared to baseline. The forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in the first second, and the % predicted values thereof were significantly increased in the experimental group four weeks after the experiment, but not in the control group. [Conclusion] Cervical sustained natural apophyseal <span class="hlt">glide</span> was determined to be effective in improving neck posture and respiratory functions for patients with forward head posture.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21057479','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21057479"><span>Interactions between <span class="hlt">glide</span> dislocations and parallel interfacial dislocations in nanoscale strained layers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Akasheh, F.; Zbib, H. M.; Hirth, J. P.; Hoagland, R. G.; Misra, A.</p> <p>2007-08-01</p> <p>Plastic deformation in nanoscale multilayered structures is thought to proceed by the successive propagation of single dislocation loops at the interfaces. Based on this view, we simulate the effect of predeposited interfacial dislocation on the stress (channeling stress) needed to propagate a new loop parallel to existing loops. Single interfacial dislocations as well as finite parallel arrays are considered in the computation. When the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> dislocation and the predeposited interfacial array have collinear Burgers vectors, the channeling stress increases monotonically as the density of dislocations in the array increases. In the case when their Burgers vectors are inclined at 60 deg. , a regime of perfect plasticity is observed which can be traced back to an instability in the flow stress arising from the interaction between the <span class="hlt">glide</span> dislocation and a single interfacial dislocation dipole. This interaction leads to a tendency for dislocations of alternating Burgers vectors to propagate during deformation leading to nonuniform arrays. Inclusion of these parallel interactions in the analysis improves the strength predictions as compared with the measured strength of a Cu-Ni multilayered system in the regime where isolated <span class="hlt">glide</span> dislocation motion controls flow, but does not help to explain the observed strength saturation when the individual layer thickness is in the few nanometer range.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17106876','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17106876"><span><span class="hlt">Gliding</span> characteristics between flexor tendons and surrounding tissues in the carpal tunnel: a biomechanical cadaver study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhao, Chunfeng; Ettema, Anke M; Osamura, Naoki; Berglund, Lawrence J; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C</p> <p>2007-02-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to investigate the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> characteristics of flexor tendons within the carpal tunnel with varied wrist positions and tendon motion styles, which may help us to understand the relationship between carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and repetitive hand motion. Eight fresh human cadaveric wrists and hands were used. The peak (PGR) and mean (MGR) <span class="hlt">gliding</span> resistance of the middle finger flexor digitorum superficialis tendon were measured with the wrist in 0, 30, and 60 degrees of flexion and extension. While moving all three fingers together, the PGR at 60 degrees flexion was significantly higher than that at 0, 30, or 60 degrees extension. While moving the middle finger alone, the PGR at 60 and 30 degrees flexion was significantly higher than the PGR at 60 degrees extension. The PGR moving the middle finger FDS alone was significantly greater than that for all three digits moving together in 0, 30, and 60 degrees flexion. Differential finger motion with wrist flexion elevated the tendon <span class="hlt">gliding</span> resistance in the carpal tunnel, which may be relevant in considering the possible role of wrist position and activity in the etiology of CTS.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=149980','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=149980"><span>Actin Filament Polymerization Regulates <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Motility by Apicomplexan ParasitesV⃞</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wetzel, D.M.; Håkansson, S.; Hu, K.; Roos, D.; Sibley, L.D.</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Host cell entry by Toxoplasma gondii depends critically on actin filaments in the parasite, yet paradoxically, its actin is almost exclusively monomeric. In contrast to the absence of stable filaments in conventional samples, rapid-freeze electron microscopy revealed that actin filaments were formed beneath the plasma membrane of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> parasites. To investigate the role of actin filaments in motility, we treated parasites with the filament-stabilizing drug jasplakinolide (JAS) and monitored the distribution of actin in live and fixed cells using yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-actin. JAS treatment caused YFP-actin to redistribute to the apical and posterior ends, where filaments formed a spiral pattern subtending the plasma membrane. Although previous studies have suggested that JAS induces rigor, videomicroscopy demonstrated that JAS treatment increased the rate of parasite <span class="hlt">gliding</span> by approximately threefold, indicating that filaments are rate limiting for motility. However, JAS also frequently reversed the normal direction of motility, disrupting forward migration and cell entry. Consistent with this alteration, subcortical filaments in JAS-treated parasites occurred in tangled plaques as opposed to the straight, roughly parallel orientation observed in control cells. These studies reveal that precisely controlled polymerization of actin filaments imparts the correct timing, duration, and directionality of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility in the Apicomplexa. PMID:12589042</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3370611','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3370611"><span>P65 Truncation Impacts P30 Dynamics during Mycoplasma pneumoniae <span class="hlt">Gliding</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hasselbring, Benjamin M.; Sheppard, Edward S.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The cell wall-less prokaryote Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a major cause of community-acquired bronchitis and pneumonia in humans. Colonization is mediated largely by a differentiated terminal organelle, which is also the leading end in <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility. Cytadherence-associated proteins P30 and P65 appear to traffic concurrently to the distal end of developing terminal organelles. Here, truncation of P65 due to transposon insertion in the corresponding gene resulted in lower <span class="hlt">gliding</span> velocity, reduced cytadherence, and decreased steady-state levels of several terminal organelle proteins, including P30. Utilizing fluorescent protein fusions, we followed terminal organelle development over time. New P30 foci appeared at nascent terminal organelles in P65 mutants, as in the wild type. However, with forward cell motility, P30 in the P65 mutants appeared to drag toward the trailing cell pole, where it was released, yielding a fluorescent trail to which truncated P65 colocalized. In contrast, P30 was only rarely observed at the trailing end of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> wild-type cells. Complementation with the recombinant wild-type P65 allele by transposon delivery restored P65 levels and stabilized P30 localization to the terminal organelle. PMID:22544269</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28632065','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28632065"><span>Muscle activation sequencing of leg muscles during linear <span class="hlt">glide</span> shot putting.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Howard, Róisín M; Conway, Richard; Harrison, Andrew J</p> <p>2017-11-01</p> <p>In the shot put, the athlete's muscles are responsible for generating the impulses to move the athlete and project the shot into the air. Information on phasic muscle activity is lacking for the <span class="hlt">glide</span> shot put event and therefore important technical information for coaches is not currently available. This study provides an electromyography (EMG) analysis of the muscle activity of the legs during shot put. Fifteen right-handed Irish national level shot putters performed six maximum effort throws using the <span class="hlt">glide</span> shot put technique. EMG records of eight bilateral lower limb muscles (rectus femoris, biceps femoris, medial- and lateral-gastrocnemius) were obtained during trials. Analysis using smooth EMG linear envelopes revealed patterns of muscle activity across the phases of the throw and compare men and women performers. The results showed that the preferred leg rectus femoris, the preferred leg biceps femoris and the non-preferred leg biceps femoris play important roles in the <span class="hlt">glide</span> technique, with the total duration of high volumes of activity between 34 and 53% of the throw cycle. A comprehensive understanding of movement and muscle activation patterns for coaches could be helpful to facilitate optimal technique throughout each of the key phases of the event.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18543503','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18543503"><span>[Lo-Pro Adult Color <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope: experience in 350 cases].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cuchillo Sastriques, J V; Rodríguez Robles, M A; Gómez-Pajares, A; Rodríguez Argente, G</p> <p>2008-04-01</p> <p>The aim of this study was to describe our experience in managing the new adult color model of the Lo-Pro <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope in a diverse group of patients. Prospective, descriptive study of 350 ASA 1-5 patients who underwent oral or nasal tracheal intubation with the Lo-Pro Adult Color <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope. Patients whose maximum mouth opening was inadequate were excluded. We recorded the following data: demographic variables, predictors of difficult direct laryngoscopy, Cormack-Lehane grade, presence of morbid obesity, adjusting maneuvers required, intubations in awake patients, intubations with a selective double lumen tube, rescues of failed intubations, oropharyngeal lesions, postoperative sore throat, and failed intubation. Cormack-Lehane grade was 1 in 80.6% of the cases, 2 in 16.9%, and 3 in 2.6%. There were no Cormack-Lehane 4 patients. Rotation of the tube was necessary when entering the glottis in 38%. There were no significant differences in the incidence of oropharyngeal lesions between oral and nasal intubations. There were no abandoned attempts. The rate of successful tracheal intubation is high with the new Lo-Pro Adult Color <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope when it is used by trained staff, even in patients with difficult airways. It is also a useful device for intubating awake patients.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004ASAJ..115.2398C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004ASAJ..115.2398C"><span>Prosodic effects on <span class="hlt">glide</span>-vowel sequences in three Romance languages</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chitoran, Ioana</p> <p>2004-05-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Glide</span>-vowel sequences occur in many Romance languages. In some they can vary in production, ranging from diphthongal pronunciation [ja,je] to hiatus [ia,ie]. According to native speakers' impressionistic perceptions, Spanish and Romanian both exhibit this variation, but to different degrees. Spanish favors <span class="hlt">glide</span>-vowel sequences, while Romanian favors hiatus, occasionally resulting in different pronunciations of the same items: Spanish (b[j]ela, ind[j]ana), Romanian (b[i]ela, ind[i]ana). The third language, French, has <span class="hlt">glide</span>-vowel sequences consistently (b[j]elle). This study tests the effect of position in the word on the acoustic duration of the sequences. Shorter duration indicates diphthong production [jV], while longer duration, hiatus [iV]. Eleven speakers (4 Spanish, 4 Romanian, 3 French), were recorded. Spanish and Romanian showed a word position effect. Word-initial sequences were significantly longer than word-medial ones (p<0.001), consistent with native speakers more frequent description of hiatus word-initially than medially. The effect was not found in French (p>0.05). In the Spanish and Romanian sentences, V in the sequence bears pitch accent, but not in French. It is therefore possible that duration is sensitive not to the presence/absence of the word boundary, but to its position relative to pitch accent. The results suggest that the word position effect is crucially enhanced by pitch accent on V.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001ASAJ..115.2398C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001ASAJ..115.2398C"><span>Prosodic effects on <span class="hlt">glide</span>-vowel sequences in three Romance languages</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chitoran, Ioana</p> <p>2001-05-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Glide</span>-vowel sequences occur in many Romance languages. In some they can vary in production, ranging from diphthongal pronunciation [ja,je] to hiatus [ia,ie]. According to native speakers' impressionistic perceptions, Spanish and Romanian both exhibit this variation, but to different degrees. Spanish favors <span class="hlt">glide</span>-vowel sequences, while Romanian favors hiatus, occasionally resulting in different pronunciations of the same items: Spanish (b[j]ela, ind[j]ana), Romanian (b[i]ela, ind[i]ana). The third language, French, has <span class="hlt">glide</span>-vowel sequences consistently (b[j]elle). This study tests the effect of position in the word on the acoustic duration of the sequences. Shorter duration indicates diphthong production [jV], while longer duration, hiatus [iV]. Eleven speakers (4 Spanish, 4 Romanian, 3 French), were recorded. Spanish and Romanian showed a word position effect. Word-initial sequences were significantly longer than word-medial ones (p<0.001), consistent with native speakers more frequent description of hiatus word-initially than medially. The effect was not found in French (p>0.05). In the Spanish and Romanian sentences, V in the sequence bears pitch accent, but not in French. It is therefore possible that duration is sensitive not to the presence/absence of the word boundary, but to its position relative to pitch accent. The results suggest that the word position effect is crucially enhanced by pitch accent on V.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22352799','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22352799"><span>Measurement of forces applied during Macintosh direct laryngoscopy compared with <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope® videolaryngoscopy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Russell, T; Khan, S; Elman, J; Katznelson, R; Cooper, R M</p> <p>2012-06-01</p> <p>Laryngoscopy can induce stress responses that may be harmful in susceptible patients. We directly measured the force applied to the base of the tongue as a surrogate for the stress response. Force measurements were obtained using three FlexiForce Sensors(®) (Tekscan Inc, Boston, MA, USA) attached along the concave surface of each laryngoscope blade. Twenty-four 24 adult patients of ASA physical status 1-2 were studied. After induction of anaesthesia and neuromuscular blockade, laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation was performed using either a Macintosh or a <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope(®) (Verathon, Bothell, WA, USA) laryngoscope. Complete data were available for 23 patients. Compared with the Macintosh, we observed lower median (IQR [range]) peak force (9 (5-13 [3-25]) N vs 20 (14-28 [4-41]) N; p = 0.0001), average force (5 (3-7 [2-19]) N vs 11 (6-16 [1-24]) N; p = 0.0003) and impulse force (98 (42-151 [26-444]) Ns vs 150 (93-207 [17-509]) Ns; p = 0.017) with the <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope. Our study shows that the peak lifting force on the base of the tongue during laryngoscopy is less with the <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope videolaryngoscope compared with the Macintosh laryngoscope.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/922016','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/922016"><span>Tevatron <span class="hlt">AC</span> dipole system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Miyamoto, R.; Kopp, S.E.; Jansson, A.; Syphers, M.J.; /Fermilab</p> <p>2007-06-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">AC</span> dipole is an oscillating dipole magnet which can induce large amplitude oscillations without the emittance growth and decoherence. These properties make it a good tool to measure optics of a hadron synchrotron. The vertical <span class="hlt">AC</span> dipole for the Tevatron is powered by an inexpensive high power audio amplifier since its operating frequency is approximately 20 kHz. The magnet is incorporated into a parallel resonant system to maximize the current. The use of a vertical pinger magnet which has been installed in the Tevatron made the cost relatively inexpensive. Recently, the initial system was upgraded with a more powerful amplifier and oscillation amplitudes up to 2-3{sigma} were achieved with the 980 GeV proton beam. This paper discusses details of the Tevatron <span class="hlt">AC</span> dipole system and also shows its test results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19890028018&hterms=ac+voltage&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dac%2Bvoltage','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19890028018&hterms=ac+voltage&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dac%2Bvoltage"><span><span class="hlt">ac</span> bidirectional motor controller</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Schreiner, K.</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>Test data are presented and the design of a high-efficiency motor/generator controller at NASA-Lewis for use with the Space Station power system testbed is described. The bidirectional motor driver is a 20 kHz to variable frequency three-phase <span class="hlt">ac</span> converter that operates from the high-frequency <span class="hlt">ac</span> bus being designed for the Space Station. A zero-voltage-switching pulse-density-modulation technique is used in the converter to shape the low-frequency output waveform.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_19 --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="381"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19890028018&hterms=ac+ac+converter&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dac%2Bac%2Bconverter','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19890028018&hterms=ac+ac+converter&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dac%2Bac%2Bconverter"><span><span class="hlt">ac</span> bidirectional motor controller</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Schreiner, K.</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>Test data are presented and the design of a high-efficiency motor/generator controller at NASA-Lewis for use with the Space Station power system testbed is described. The bidirectional motor driver is a 20 kHz to variable frequency three-phase <span class="hlt">ac</span> converter that operates from the high-frequency <span class="hlt">ac</span> bus being designed for the Space Station. A zero-voltage-switching pulse-density-modulation technique is used in the converter to shape the low-frequency output waveform.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006hst..prop11041S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006hst..prop11041S"><span><span class="hlt">ACS</span> CCDs daily monitor</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sirianni, Marco</p> <p>2006-07-01</p> <p>This program consists of a set of basic tests to monitor, the read noise, thedevelopment of hot pixels and test for any source of noise in <span class="hlt">ACS</span> CCDdetectors. The files, biases and dark will be used to create referencefiles for science calibration. This programme will be for the entire lifetime of <span class="hlt">ACS</span>.For cycle 15 the program will cover 18 months 12.1.06->05.31.08and it has been divied into three different proposal each covering six months.The three poroposal are 11041-11042-11043.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1169720','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1169720"><span><span class="hlt">AC</span>/RF Superconductivity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ciovati, Gianluigi</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>This contribution provides a brief introduction to <span class="hlt">AC</span>/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992nrc..rept.....J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992nrc..rept.....J"><span><span class="hlt">AC</span>/DC converter</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jain, Praveen K.</p> <p>1992-08-01</p> <p>In a system such as a 20 kHz space station primary electrical power distribution system, power conversion from <span class="hlt">AC</span> to DC is required. Some of the basic requirements for this conversion are high efficiency, light weight and small volume, regulated output voltage, close to unity input power factor, distortionless input current, soft-starting, low electromagnetic interference, and high reliability. An <span class="hlt">AC</span>-to-DC converter is disclosed which satisfies the main design objectives of such converters for use in space. The converter of the invention comprises an input transformer, a resonant network, a current controller, a diode rectifier, and an output filter. The input transformer is for connection to a single phase, high frequency, sinusoidal waveform <span class="hlt">AC</span> voltage source and provides a matching voltage isolating from the <span class="hlt">AC</span> source. The resonant network converts this voltage to a sinusoidal, high frequency bidirectional current output, which is received by the current controller to provide the desired output current. The diode rectifier is connected in parallel with the current controller to convert the bidirectional current into a unidirectional current output. The output filter is connected to the rectifier to provide an essentially ripple-free, substantially constant voltage DC output.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4984554','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4984554"><span>Structural Study of MPN387, an Essential Protein for <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Motility of a Human-Pathogenic Bacterium, Mycoplasma pneumoniae</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kawakita, Yoshito; Kinoshita, Miki; Furukawa, Yukio; Tulum, Isil; Tahara, Yuhei O.; Katayama, Eisaku</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>ABSTRACT Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a human pathogen that <span class="hlt">glides</span> on host cell surfaces with repeated catch and release of sialylated oligosaccharides. At a pole, this organism forms a protrusion called the attachment organelle, which is composed of surface structures, including P1 adhesin and the internal core structure. The core structure can be divided into three parts, the terminal button, paired plates, and bowl complex, aligned in that order from the front end of the protrusion. To elucidate the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> mechanism, we focused on MPN387, a component protein of the bowl complex which is essential for <span class="hlt">gliding</span> but dispensable for cytadherence. The predicted amino acid sequence showed that the protein features a coiled-coil region spanning residue 72 to residue 290 of the total of 358 amino acids in the protein. Recombinant MPN387 proteins were isolated with and without an enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) fusion tag and analyzed by gel filtration chromatography, circular dichroism spectroscopy, analytical ultracentrifugation, partial proteolysis, and rotary-shadowing electron microscopy. The results showed that MPN387 is a dumbbell-shaped homodimer that is about 42.7 nm in length and 9.1 nm in diameter and includes a 24.5-nm-long central parallel coiled-coil part. The molecular image was superimposed onto the electron micrograph based on the localizing position mapped by fluorescent protein tagging. A proposed role of this protein in the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> mechanism is discussed. IMPORTANCE Human mycoplasma pneumonia is caused by a pathogenic bacterium, Mycoplasma pneumoniae. This tiny, 2-μm-long bacterium is suggested to infect humans by <span class="hlt">gliding</span> on the surface of the trachea through binding to sialylated oligosaccharides. The mechanism underlying mycoplasma “<span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility” is not related to any other well-studied motility systems, such as bacterial flagella and eukaryotic motor proteins. Here, we isolated and analyzed the structure of a key protein which is</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27325681','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27325681"><span>Structural Study of MPN387, an Essential Protein for <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Motility of a Human-Pathogenic Bacterium, Mycoplasma pneumoniae.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kawakita, Yoshito; Kinoshita, Miki; Furukawa, Yukio; Tulum, Isil; Tahara, Yuhei O; Katayama, Eisaku; Namba, Keiichi; Miyata, Makoto</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a human pathogen that <span class="hlt">glides</span> on host cell surfaces with repeated catch and release of sialylated oligosaccharides. At a pole, this organism forms a protrusion called the attachment organelle, which is composed of surface structures, including P1 adhesin and the internal core structure. The core structure can be divided into three parts, the terminal button, paired plates, and bowl complex, aligned in that order from the front end of the protrusion. To elucidate the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> mechanism, we focused on MPN387, a component protein of the bowl complex which is essential for <span class="hlt">gliding</span> but dispensable for cytadherence. The predicted amino acid sequence showed that the protein features a coiled-coil region spanning residue 72 to residue 290 of the total of 358 amino acids in the protein. Recombinant MPN387 proteins were isolated with and without an enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) fusion tag and analyzed by gel filtration chromatography, circular dichroism spectroscopy, analytical ultracentrifugation, partial proteolysis, and rotary-shadowing electron microscopy. The results showed that MPN387 is a dumbbell-shaped homodimer that is about 42.7 nm in length and 9.1 nm in diameter and includes a 24.5-nm-long central parallel coiled-coil part. The molecular image was superimposed onto the electron micrograph based on the localizing position mapped by fluorescent protein tagging. A proposed role of this protein in the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> mechanism is discussed. Human mycoplasma pneumonia is caused by a pathogenic bacterium, Mycoplasma pneumoniae This tiny, 2-μm-long bacterium is suggested to infect humans by <span class="hlt">gliding</span> on the surface of the trachea through binding to sialylated oligosaccharides. The mechanism underlying mycoplasma "<span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility" is not related to any other well-studied motility systems, such as bacterial flagella and eukaryotic motor proteins. Here, we isolated and analyzed the structure of a key protein which is directly involved in the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4436805','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4436805"><span>Perception of visual apparent motion is modulated by a gap within concurrent auditory <span class="hlt">glides</span>, even when it is illusory</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wang, Qingcui; Guo, Lu; Bao, Ming; Chen, Lihan</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Auditory and visual events often happen concurrently, and how they group together can have a strong effect on what is perceived. We investigated whether/how intra- or cross-modal temporal grouping influenced the perceptual decision of otherwise ambiguous visual apparent motion. To achieve this, we juxtaposed auditory gap transfer illusion with visual Ternus display. The Ternus display involves a multi-element stimulus that can induce either of two different percepts of apparent motion: ‘element motion’ (EM) or ‘group motion’ (GM). In “EM,” the endmost disk is seen as moving back and forth while the middle disk at the central position remains stationary; while in “GM,” both disks appear to move laterally as a whole. The gap transfer illusion refers to the illusory subjective transfer of a short gap (around 100 ms) from the long <span class="hlt">glide</span> to the short continuous <span class="hlt">glide</span> when the two <span class="hlt">glides</span> intercede at the temporal middle point. In our experiments, observers were required to make a perceptual discrimination of Ternus motion in the presence of concurrent auditory <span class="hlt">glides</span> (with or without a gap inside). Results showed that a gap within a short <span class="hlt">glide</span> imposed a remarkable effect on separating visual events, and led to a dominant perception of GM as well. The auditory configuration with gap transfer illusion triggered the same auditory capture effect. Further investigations showed that visual interval which coincided with the gap interval (50–230 ms) in the long <span class="hlt">glide</span> was perceived to be shorter than that within both the short <span class="hlt">glide</span> and the ‘gap-transfer’ auditory configurations in the same physical intervals (gaps). The results indicated that auditory temporal perceptual grouping takes priority over the cross-modal interaction in determining the final readout of the visual perception, and the mechanism of selective attention on auditory events also plays a role. PMID:26042055</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22570079','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22570079"><span>WE-AB-BRB-02: Development of a <span class="hlt">Micro-Sized</span> Dosimeter for Real-Time Dose Monitoring and Small Field Dosimetry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Volotskova, O; Jenkins, C; Fahimian, B; Xing, L</p> <p>2015-06-15</p> <p>Purpose: To investigate a miniature optical dosimeter for real-time, high-resolution dosimetry, and explore its potential applications for in vivo measurements and small field dosimetry. Methods: A <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> hemispherical (400 µm radius) scintillating detector was constructed from lanthanide activated phosphors doped with Europium (GOS:Eu) and encapsulated in a 17 gauge plastic catheter. A photon counting PMT and CCD-chip spectrometer were used to detect signals emitted from the detector. A single band-passing spectral approach (630nm) was implemented to discriminate the micro-phosphor optical signal from background signals (Cerenkov radiation) in the optical fiber. To test real-time monitoring capabilities, a 3D-printed phantom was used to detect an 192Ir HDR brachytherapy source at locations ranging from 1 to 4 cm radially and 12 cm along the travel axis of the HDR wire. To test the application of the <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> detector for small field dosimetry, the linearity of detector was characterized through irradiation of 6MV photon beam at dose-rates ranging from 100 to 600 MU, and the effect of field size was characterized through detections of beams ranging from 30×30 to 1×1 cm2 size. Results: With a 1 second integration time for the spectrometer, the recorded measurements indicated that the <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> detector allowed accurate detection of source position at distances of up to 6 cm along the axis of travel in water. EB measurements showed that the detected signal was linearly correlated with dose rate (R{sup 2} = 0.99). The crossbeam profile was determined with a step size of ∼500 µm. Conclusion: Miniaturization of optical dosimeters is shown to be possible through the construction of lanthanide activated doped phosphors detectors. The small size of the detector makes it amenable to a variety of applications, including real-time dose delivery verification during HDR brachytherapy and EB beam calibrations in small fields.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27555188','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27555188"><span>A comparison between the <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope® classic and <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope® direct video laryngoscopes and direct laryngoscopy for nasotracheal intubation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Heuer, Jan Florian; Heitmann, Sören; Crozier, Thomas A; Bleckmann, Annalen; Quintel, Michael; Russo, Sebastian G</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>Prospective, randomized, clinical trial. University hospital operation room. 104 patients scheduled for elective dental or maxillofacial surgery were randomized to two groups: <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope® classic (GSc) and <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope® direct (GSd). We compared the video laryngoscopes GSc and GSd with each other and with direct laryngoscopy (DL) for nasotracheal intubation with regard to visualization of the glottis, intubation success rate, and required time for and ease of intubation. The aim of the study was to determine whether the use of the video monitor alone reduced the difficulty of nasotracheal intubation, and also to investigate whether the GSc, with its blade designed for difficult airways, had an additional advantage over the video-assisted Macintosh blade (GSd). In both groups the investigators first performed laryngoscopy using the GSd blade, first with the monitor concealed and then with it visible. In the GSd group the tube was then inserted into the trachea with the video monitor screen visible. In the GSc group, the GSd blade was exchanged for the GSc blade, which was then used when inserting the tube with the screen visible. The success rates and the times required for the video-assisted nasotracheal intubation did not differ significantly between the groups. A better view was obtained more often in the GSc group. In both groups there was a significant difference between direct laryngoscopy and the video-assisted intubation technique. Overall, using the video monitor improved the C-L scores by one grade in 52% and by two grades in 11% of the patients. Video laryngoscopes increase the ease of nasotracheal intubation. The GSc blade might provide a better view of the laryngeal structures in case of a difficult airway than the GSd blade. Video laryngoscopy per se gives a better view of the glottis than direct laryngoscopy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27105815','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27105815"><span>Tumor Bioimaging: Morphology-Tailoring of a Red AIEgen from <span class="hlt">Microsized</span> Rods to Nanospheres for Tumor-Targeted Bioimaging (Adv. Mater. 16/2016).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Li, Yongsheng; Shao, Andong; Wang, Yao; Mei, Ju; Niu, Dechao; Gu, Jinlou; Shi, Ping; Zhu, Weihong; Tian, He; Shi, Jianlin</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Y. Li, W. Zhu, and co-workers develop a convenient and versatile "make-up" strategy to modulate the <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> rods of a near-infrared-emissive AIEgen probe integrated into nanospheres via a self-assembly encapsulation process, as presented on page 3187. The obtained nanospheres outperform microrods in terms of brightness, photostability, biocompatibility, tumor-accumulation, and targeting ability, making them perfect bioprobes for tumor-targeted bioimaging. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22066450','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22066450"><span>Characteristic of copper matrix simultaneously reinforced with nano- and <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Rajkovic, Viseslava Bozic, Dusan; Devecerski, Aleksandar; Jovanovic, Milan T.</p> <p>2012-05-15</p> <p>The effect of the simultaneous presence of nano- and <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles on the microstructure and properties of copper matrix was the object of this study. The mixture of inert gas-atomized prealloyed copper powder (with 1 wt.% Al) and 0.6 wt.% commercial Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder (serving as <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> particles) was used as the starting materials. Strengthening of the copper matrix was performed by treating the powders in the air for up to 20 h in the planetary ball mill. During milling of the prealloyed powder, finely dispersed nano-sized Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles were formed in situ by internal oxidation. The approximate size of these particles was between 30 and 60 nm. The highest values of microhardness were reached in compacts processed from 10 h-milled powders. The microhardness of compact obtained from 10 h-milled powder was 3 times higher than the microhardness of compact processed from as-received and non-milled prealloyed powder. At the maximum microhardness the grain size reaches the smallest value as a result of the synergetic effect of nano- and <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles. Recrystallization, which occurred during prolonged milling, was the main factor influencing the decrease in microhardness. The increase in electrical conductivity of compacts after 15 h of milling is the result of the decrease in microhardness and activated recrystallization processes. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Copper matrix was reinforced with nano- and <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The twofold role of coarse Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles in matrix strengthening exists. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer During shorter milling time these particles contribute to increase of microhardness. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At longer milling time decrease in microhardness is related to recrystallization.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhPl...23h3502R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhPl...23h3502R"><span>Characterization of atmospheric pressure H2O/O2 <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc plasma for the production of OH and O radicals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Roy, N. C.; Hafez, M. G.; Talukder, M. R.</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>Atmospheric pressure H 2 O / O 2 <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc plasma is generated by a 88 Hz , 6 kV <span class="hlt">AC</span> power supply. The properties of the produced plasma are investigated by optical emission spectroscopy. The relative intensity, rotational, vibrational, excitation temperatures and electron density are studied as a function of applied voltage, electrode spacing, and oxygen flow rate. The rotational and vibrational temperatures are determined simulating the OH ( A 2 Σ + ( v ″ = 0 ) → X 2 Π ( v ' = 0 ) ) bands with the aid of LIFBASE simulation software. The excitation temperature is obtained from the CuI transition taking non-thermal equilibrium condition into account employing intensity ratio method. The electron density is approximated from the H α Stark broadening using the Voigt profile fitting method. It is observed that the rotational and vibrational temperatures decrease with increasing electrode spacing and O 2 flow rate, but increase with the applied voltage. The excitation temperature is found to increase with increasing applied voltage and O 2 flow rate, but decrease with electrode spacing. The electron density increases with increasing applied voltage while it seems to be in a downward trend with increasing electrode spacing and O 2 flow rate.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3590876','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3590876"><span>How Informative are the Vertical Buoyancy and the Prone <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Tests to Assess Young Swimmers’ Hydrostatic and Hydrodynamic Profiles?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Barbosa, Tiago M.; Costa, Mário J.; Morais, Jorge E; Moreira, Marc; Silva, António J.; Marinho, Daniel A.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The aim of this research was to develop a path-flow analysis model to highlight the relationships between buoyancy and prone <span class="hlt">gliding</span> tests and some selected anthropometrical and biomechanical variables. Thirty-eight young male swimmers (12.97 ± 1.05 years old) with several competitive levels were evaluated. It were assessed the body mass, height, fat mass, body surface area, vertical buoyancy, prone <span class="hlt">gliding</span> after wall push-off, stroke length, stroke frequency and velocity after a maximal 25 [m] swim. The confirmatory model included the body mass, height, fat mass, prone <span class="hlt">gliding</span> test, stroke length, stroke frequency and velocity. All theoretical paths were verified except for the vertical buoyancy test that did not present any relationship with anthropometrical and biomechanical variables nor with the prone <span class="hlt">gliding</span> test. The good-of-fit from the confirmatory path-flow model, assessed with the standardized root mean square residuals (SRMR), is considered as being close to the cut-off value, but even so not suitable of the theory (SRMR = 0.11). As a conclusion, vertical buoyancy and prone <span class="hlt">gliding</span> tests are not the best techniques to assess the swimmer’s hydrostatic and hydrodynamic profile, respectively. PMID:23486528</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23486528','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23486528"><span>How Informative are the Vertical Buoyancy and the Prone <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Tests to Assess Young Swimmers' Hydrostatic and Hydrodynamic Profiles?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Barbosa, Tiago M; Costa, Mário J; Morais, Jorge E; Moreira, Marc; Silva, António J; Marinho, Daniel A</p> <p>2012-05-01</p> <p>The aim of this research was to develop a path-flow analysis model to highlight the relationships between buoyancy and prone <span class="hlt">gliding</span> tests and some selected anthropometrical and biomechanical variables. Thirty-eight young male swimmers (12.97 ± 1.05 years old) with several competitive levels were evaluated. It were assessed the body mass, height, fat mass, body surface area, vertical buoyancy, prone <span class="hlt">gliding</span> after wall push-off, stroke length, stroke frequency and velocity after a maximal 25 [m] swim. The confirmatory model included the body mass, height, fat mass, prone <span class="hlt">gliding</span> test, stroke length, stroke frequency and velocity. All theoretical paths were verified except for the vertical buoyancy test that did not present any relationship with anthropometrical and biomechanical variables nor with the prone <span class="hlt">gliding</span> test. The good-of-fit from the confirmatory path-flow model, assessed with the standardized root mean square residuals (SRMR), is considered as being close to the cut-off value, but even so not suitable of the theory (SRMR = 0.11). As a conclusion, vertical buoyancy and prone <span class="hlt">gliding</span> tests are not the best techniques to assess the swimmer's hydrostatic and hydrodynamic profile, respectively.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26342141','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26342141"><span>Body posture during simulated tracheal intubation: <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope(®) videolaryngoscopy vs Macintosh direct laryngoscopy for novices and experts.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Grundgeiger, T; Roewer, N; Grundgeiger, J; Hurtienne, J; Happel, O</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>Tracheal intubation requires the anaesthetist to adopt an awkward body posture. To investigate how posture may be improved, we compared the effects of laryngoscopy technique (<span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope(®) vs Macintosh blade) and experience (novices vs experts) on body posture angles and the Rapid Entire Body Assessment postural analysis score. Novices (25 medical students) and experts (26 anaesthetists) were video-recorded performing intubation in a manikin using both devices. The <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope resulted in smaller deflections for all analysed posture angles (all p values < 0.001) except the wrist compared with the Macintosh blade. Novices showed more trunk (p < 0.001) and neck (p = 0.002) flexion than experts. Using the <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope resulted in a lower Rapid Entire Body Assessment score compared with using the Macintosh blade (p < 0.001), indicating that the <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope resulted in body posture less likely to induce musculoskeletal injuries. From an ergonomic point of view, the <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope should be the preferred technique for laryngoscopy. © 2015 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/15005907','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/15005907"><span>The Effects of One-Dimensional <span class="hlt">Glide</span> on the Reaction Kinetics of Interstitial Clusters</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Heinisch, Howard L.; Singh, B. N.; Golubov, S. I.</p> <p>2000-12-01</p> <p>Collision cascades in metals produce small interstitial clusters and perfect dislocation loops that <span class="hlt">glide</span> in thermally activated one-dimensional (1D) random walks. These <span class="hlt">gliding</span> defects can change their Burgers vectors by thermal activation or by interactions with other defects. Their migration is therefore "mixed 1D/3D migration" along a 3D path consisting of 1D segments. The defect reaction kinetics under mixed 1D/3D diffusion are different from pure 1D diffusion and pure 3D diffusion, both of which can be formulated within analytical rate theory models of microstructure evolution under irradiation. Atomic-scale kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) defect migration simulations are used to investigate the effects of mixed 1D/3D migration on defect reaction kinetics as a guide for implementing mixed 1D/3D migration into the analytical rate theory. The functional dependence of the sink strength on the sixe and concentration of sinks under mixed 1D/3D migration is shown to lie between that for pure 1D and pure 3D migration and varies with L, the average distance between direction changes of the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> defects. It is shown that the sink strength in simulations for spherical sinks of radius R under mixed 1D/3D migration for values of L greater than R can be approximated by an expression that varies directly as R2. For small L, the form of the transition from mixed 1D/3D to pure 3D diffusion as L decreases is demonstrated in the simulations, the results of which can be used in the future development of an analytical expression describing this transition region.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28551421','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28551421"><span>Interaction of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motion of bacteria with rheological properties of the slime.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Asghar, Z; Ali, N; Sajid, M</p> <p>2017-08-01</p> <p>Bacteria which do not have organelles of motility, such as flagella, adopt <span class="hlt">gliding</span> as a mode of locomotion. In <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility bacterium moves under its own power by secreting a layer of slime on the substrate. The exact mechanism by which a glider achieves motility is yet in controversy but there are evidences which support the wave-like undulation on the surface of the organism, as a possible mechanism of motility. Based on this observation, a model of undulating sheet over a layer of slime is examined as a possible model of the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motion of a bacterium. Three different non-Newtonian constitutive equations namely, finite extendable nonlinear elastic-peterline (FENE-P), Simplified Phan-Thien-Tanner (SPTT) and Rabinowitsch equations are used to capture the rheological properties of the slime. It is found that the governing equation describing the fluid mechanics of the model under lubrication approximation is same for all the considered three constitutive equations. In fact, it involves a single non-Newtonian parameter which assumes different values for each of the considered constitutive relations. This differential equation is solved using both perturbation and semi-analytic procedure. The perturbation solution is exploited to get an estimate of the speed of the glider for different values of the non-Newtonian parameter. The solution obtained via semi-analytic procedure is used to investigate the important features of the flow field in the layer of the slime beneath the glider when the glider is held fixed. The expression of forces generated by the organism and power required for propulsion are also derived based on the perturbation analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26903204','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26903204"><span>Bacterial <span class="hlt">gliding</span> fluid dynamics on a layer of non-Newtonian slime: Perturbation and numerical study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ali, N; Asghar, Z; Anwar Bég, O; Sajid, M</p> <p>2016-05-21</p> <p><span class="hlt">Gliding</span> bacteria are an assorted group of rod-shaped prokaryotes that adhere to and <span class="hlt">glide</span> on certain layers of ooze slime attached to a substratum. Due to the absence of organelles of motility, such as flagella, the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motion is caused by the waves moving down the outer surface of these rod-shaped cells. In the present study we employ an undulating surface model to investigate the motility of bacteria on a layer of non-Newtonian slime. The rheological behavior of the slime is characterized by an appropriate constitutive equation, namely the Carreau model. Employing the balances of mass and momentum conservation, the hydrodynamic undulating surface model is transformed into a fourth-order nonlinear differential equation in terms of a stream function under the long wavelength assumption. A perturbation approach is adopted to obtain closed form expressions for stream function, pressure rise per wavelength, forces generated by the organism and power required for propulsion. A numerical technique based on an implicit finite difference scheme is also employed to investigate various features of the model for large values of the rheological parameters of the slime. Verification of the numerical solutions is achieved with a variational finite element method (FEM). The computations demonstrate that the speed of the glider decreases as the rheology of the slime changes from shear-thinning (pseudo-plastic) to shear-thickening (dilatant). Moreover, the viscoelastic nature of the slime tends to increase the swimming speed for the shear-thinning case. The fluid flow in the pumping (generated where the organism is not free to move but instead generates a net fluid flow beneath it) is also investigated in detail. The study is relevant to marine anti-bacterial fouling and medical hygiene biophysics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25984473','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25984473"><span>Effect of repetitive pecking at working length for <span class="hlt">glide</span> path preparation using G-file.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ha, Jung-Hong; Jeon, Hyo-Jin; Abed, Rashid El; Chang, Seok-Woo; Kim, Sung-Kyo; Kim, Hyeon-Cheol</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Glide</span> path preparation is recommended to reduce torsional failure of nickel-titanium (NiTi) rotary instruments and to prevent root canal transportation. This study evaluated whether the repetitive insertions of G-files to the working length maintain the apical size as well as provide sufficient lumen as a <span class="hlt">glide</span> path for subsequent instrumentation. The G-file system (Micro-Mega) composed of G1 and G2 files for <span class="hlt">glide</span> path preparation was used with the J-shaped, simulated resin canals. After inserting a G1 file twice, a G2 file was inserted to the working length 1, 4, 7, or 10 times for four each experimental group, respectively (n = 10). Then the canals were cleaned by copious irrigation, and lubricated with a separating gel medium. Canal replicas were made using silicone impression material, and the diameter of the replicas was measured at working length (D0) and 1 mm level (D1) under a scanning electron microscope. Data was analysed by one-way ANOVA and post-hoc tests (p = 0.05). The diameter at D0 level did not show any significant difference between the 1, 2, 4, and 10 times of repetitive pecking insertions of G2 files at working length. However, 10 times of pecking motion with G2 file resulted in significantly larger canal diameter at D1 (p < 0.05). Under the limitations of this study, the repetitive insertion of a G2 file up to 10 times at working length created an adequate lumen for subsequent apical shaping with other rotary files bigger than International Organization for Standardization (ISO) size 20, without apical transportation at D0 level.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4432254','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4432254"><span>Effect of repetitive pecking at working length for <span class="hlt">glide</span> path preparation using G-file</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ha, Jung-Hong; Jeon, Hyo-Jin; Abed, Rashid El; Chang, Seok-Woo; Kim, Sung-Kyo</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Objectives <span class="hlt">Glide</span> path preparation is recommended to reduce torsional failure of nickel-titanium (NiTi) rotary instruments and to prevent root canal transportation. This study evaluated whether the repetitive insertions of G-files to the working length maintain the apical size as well as provide sufficient lumen as a <span class="hlt">glide</span> path for subsequent instrumentation. Materials and Methods The G-file system (Micro-Mega) composed of G1 and G2 files for <span class="hlt">glide</span> path preparation was used with the J-shaped, simulated resin canals. After inserting a G1 file twice, a G2 file was inserted to the working length 1, 4, 7, or 10 times for four each experimental group, respectively (n = 10). Then the canals were cleaned by copious irrigation, and lubricated with a separating gel medium. Canal replicas were made using silicone impression material, and the diameter of the replicas was measured at working length (D0) and 1 mm level (D1) under a scanning electron microscope. Data was analysed by one-way ANOVA and post-hoc tests (p = 0.05). Results The diameter at D0 level did not show any significant difference between the 1, 2, 4, and 10 times of repetitive pecking insertions of G2 files at working length. However, 10 times of pecking motion with G2 file resulted in significantly larger canal diameter at D1 (p < 0.05). Conclusions Under the limitations of this study, the repetitive insertion of a G2 file up to 10 times at working length created an adequate lumen for subsequent apical shaping with other rotary files bigger than International Organization for Standardization (ISO) size 20, without apical transportation at D0 level. PMID:25984473</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_20 --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="401"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/962342','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/962342"><span>Rapid diffusion of magic-size islands by combined <span class="hlt">glide</span> and vacancy mechanisms</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Perez, D; Voter, A F; Uche, O U; Hamilton, J C</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Using molecular dynamics, nudged elastic band, and embedded atom methods, we show that certain 2D Ag islands undergo extremely rapid one-dimensional diffusion on Cu(001) surfaces. Indeed, below 300K, hopping rates for 'magic-size' islands are orders of magnitude faster than hopping rates for single Ag adatoms. This rapid diffusion requires both the c(10 x 2) hexagonally-packed superstructure typical of Ag on Cu(001) and appropriate 'magic-sizes' for the islands. The novel highly-cooperative diffusion mechanism presented here couples vacancy diffusion with simultaneous core <span class="hlt">glide</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SPIE.9795E..1HX','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SPIE.9795E..1HX"><span>Research on motion model for the hypersonic boost-<span class="hlt">glide</span> aircraft</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Xu, Shenda; Wu, Jing; Wang, Xueying</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>A motion model for the hypersonic boost-<span class="hlt">glide</span> aircraft(HBG) was proposed in this paper, which also analyzed the precision of model through simulation. Firstly the trajectory of HBG was analyzed, and a scheme which divide the trajectory into two parts then build the motion model on each part. Secondly a restrained model of boosting stage and a restrained model of J2 perturbation were established, and set up the observe model. Finally the analysis of simulation results show the feasible and high-accuracy of the model, and raise a expectation for intensive research.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ApPhL.101d1602F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ApPhL.101d1602F"><span>Surface modification by nonthermal plasma induced by using magnetic-field-assisted <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc discharge</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Feng, Zongbao; Saeki, Noboru; Kuroki, Tomoyuki; Tahara, Mitsuru; Okubo, Masaaki</p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>The authors report on the introduction of a magnetic field to <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc discharge (GD) in order to enhance surface modification by nonthermal plasma at atmospheric-pressure. The GD is induced between two wire electrodes by using a pulse high-voltage power supply with peak-to-peak voltage of 5 kV. When a magnetic field of 0.25 T is applied, the GD enlarged and a 19-cm-long stretch of plasma is excited. The surface treatment of polyethylene terephthalate and polytetrafluoroethylene films is performed. The adhesion improved by up to ˜30 times due to the enhanced chemical activity in the films.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998EPJAP...4..171B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998EPJAP...4..171B"><span>Plasma treatment of aqueous solutes: Some chemical properties of a <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc in humid air</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Benstaali, B.; Moussa, D.; Addou, A.; Brisset, J.-L.</p> <p>1998-11-01</p> <p>The chemical properties of the gaseous species generated in a humid air <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc discharge are investigated. Aqueous solutions are used as the targets exposed to the plasma, and this allows to evidence strong acid and oxidizing effects on various solutes by means of spectrometric or potentiometric methods. The influence of some working parameters such as the input gas flow, the distance from the electrodes to the target or the electrode gap is examined on the chemical transform and simple experimental laws are derived. A general feature is observed for oxidation and suggests the occurrence of an auto-catalytic step in the relevant kinetic mechanism.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvB..93s5138K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvB..93s5138K"><span>Emergent spinless Weyl semimetals between the topological crystalline insulator and normal insulator phases with <span class="hlt">glide</span> symmetry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kim, Heejae; Murakami, Shuichi</p> <p>2016-05-01</p> <p>We construct a theory describing phase transitions between the spinless topological crystalline insulator phase with <span class="hlt">glide</span> symmetry and a normal insulator phase. We show that a spinless Weyl semimetal phase should intervene between these two phases. Here, because all the bands are free from degeneracy in general, a gap closing between a single conduction band and a single valence band at phase transition generally gives rise to a pair creation of Weyl nodes; hence the Weyl semimetal phase naturally appears. We show the relationship between the change of the Z2 topological number when the system goes through the Weyl semimetal phase, and the trajectory of the Weyl nodes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/958742','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/958742"><span>Dislocation <span class="hlt">glide</span> in the presence of either solute atoms or glissile loops.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Bacon, David J; Osetskiy, Yury N; Rong, Zhouwen; Tapasa, Kanit</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Atomic-scale computer simulation is used to investigate obstacle effects on the dynamics of <span class="hlt">glide</span> of an edge dislocation in two situations. In one, a dislocation in {alpha}-iron encounters copper atoms in solution and it is found that the effect on dislocation velocity under constant stress below the static Peierls stress is strong. In the other, drag of glissile interstitial loops with the same Burgers vector as the dislocation is considered for iron and copper. The drag coefficient of a loop is determined for the first time, and is shown to be related to the diffusivity of clusters of interstitials via a model of dislocation drag of discrete pinning points.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GeoRL..4311173T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GeoRL..4311173T"><span>Estimate of Rayleigh-to-Love wave ratio in the secondary <span class="hlt">microseism</span> by a small array at Piñon Flat observatory, California</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tanimoto, Toshiro; Lin, Chin-Jen; Hadziioannou, Céline; Igel, Heiner; Vernon, Frank</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>Using closely located seismographs at Piñon Flat (PFO), California, for 1 year long record (2015), we estimated the Rayleigh-to-Love wave energy ratio in the secondary <span class="hlt">microseism</span> (0.1-0.35 Hz) in four seasons. Rayleigh wave energy was estimated from a vertical component seismograph. Love wave energy was estimated from rotation seismograms that were derived from a small array at PFO. Derived ratios are 2-2.5, meaning that there is 2-2.5 times more Rayleigh wave energy than Love wave energy at PFO. In our previous study at Wettzell, Germany, this ratio was 0.9-1.0, indicating comparable energy between Rayleigh waves and Love waves. This difference suggests that the Rayleigh-to-Love wave ratios in the secondary <span class="hlt">microseism</span> may differ greatly from region to region. It also implies that an assumption of the diffuse wavefield is not likely to be valid for this low frequency range as the equipartition of energy should make this ratio much closer.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23204460','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23204460"><span>Use of a mariner-based transposon mutagenesis system to isolate Clostridium perfringens mutants deficient in <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Liu, Hualan; Bouillaut, Laurent; Sonenshein, Abraham L; Melville, Stephen B</p> <p>2013-02-01</p> <p>Clostridium perfringens is an anaerobic Gram-positive pathogen that causes many human and animal diseases, including food poisoning and gas gangrene. C. perfringens lacks flagella but possesses type IV pili (TFP). We have previously shown that C. perfringens can <span class="hlt">glide</span> across an agar surface in long filaments composed of individual bacteria attached end to end and that two TFP-associated proteins, PilT and PilC, are needed for this. To discover additional gene products that play a role in <span class="hlt">gliding</span>, we developed a plasmid-based mariner transposon mutagenesis system that works effectively in C. perfringens. More than 10,000 clones were screened for mutants that lacked the ability to move away from the edge of a colony. Twenty-four mutants (0.24%) were identified that fit the criteria. The genes containing insertions that affected <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility fell into nine different categories. One gene, CPE0278, which encodes a homolog of the SagA cell wall-dependent endopeptidase, acquired distinct transposon insertions in two independent mutants. sagA mutants were unable to form filaments due to a complete lack of end-to-end connections essential for <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility. Complementation of the sagA mutants with a wild-type copy of the gene restored <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility. We constructed an in-frame deletion mutation in the sagA gene and found that this mutant had a phenotype similar to those of the transposon mutants. We hypothesize that the sagA mutant strains are unable to form the molecular complexes which are needed to keep the cells in an end-to-end orientation, leading to separation of daughter cells and the inability to carry out <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20550669','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20550669"><span>A rolling-<span class="hlt">gliding</span> wear simulator for the investigation of tribological material pairings for application in total knee arthroplasty.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Richter, Berna I; Ostermeier, Sven; Turger, Anke; Denkena, Berend; Hurschler, Christof</p> <p>2010-06-15</p> <p>Material wear testing is an important technique in the development and evaluation of materials for use in implant for total knee arthroplasty. Since a knee joint induces a complex rolling-<span class="hlt">gliding</span> movement, standardised material wear testing devices such as Pin-on-Disc or Ring-on-Disc testers are suitable to only a limited extent because they generate pure <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motion only. A rolling-<span class="hlt">gliding</span> wear simulator was thus designed, constructed and implemented, which simulates and reproduces the rolling-<span class="hlt">gliding</span> movement and loading of the knee joint on specimens of simplified geometry. The technical concept was to run a base-plate, representing the tibia plateau, against a pivoted cylindrical counter-body, representing one femur condyle under an axial load. A rolling movement occurs as a result of the friction and pure <span class="hlt">gliding</span> is induced by limiting the rotation of the cylindrical counter-body. The set up also enables simplified specimens handling and removal for gravimetrical wear measurements. Long-term wear tests and gravimetrical wear measurements were carried out on the well known material pairings: cobalt chrome-polyethylene, ceramic-polyethylene and ceramic-ceramic, over three million motion cycles to allow material comparisons to be made. The observed differences in wear rates between cobalt-chrome on polyethylene and ceramic on polyethylene pairings were similar to the differences of published data for existing material-pairings. Test results on ceramic-ceramic pairings of different frontal-plane geometry and surface roughness displayed low wear rates and no fracture failures. The presented set up is able to simulate the rolling-<span class="hlt">gliding</span> movement of the knee joint, is easy to use, and requires a minimum of user intervention or monitoring. It is suitable for long-term testing, and therefore a useful tool for the investigation of new and promising materials which are of interest for application in knee joint replacement implants.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3782077','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3782077"><span>The Effect of Surface Modification on <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Ability of Decellularized Flexor Tendon in a Canine Model In Vitro</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ozasa, Yasuhiro; Amadio, Peter C.; Thoreson, Andrew R.; An, Kai-Nan; Zhao, Chunfeng</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Purpose To investigate the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> ability and mechanical properties of decellularized intrasynovial tendons without and with surface modification designed to reduce <span class="hlt">gliding</span> resistance. Methods Thirty-three canine flexor digitorum profundus tendons were randomly assigned to one of 3 groups: untreated fresh tendons, to serve as a control; tendons decellularized with trypsin and Triton X-100; and tendons decellularized as in group 2 with surface modification using carbodiimide-derivatized hyaluronic acid and gelatin (cd- HA-gelatin). Tendons were subjected to cyclic friction testing for 1000 cycles with subsequent tensile stiffness testing. The surface roughness after 1000 cycles was qualitatively evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. Results The <span class="hlt">gliding</span> resistance of the decellularized group was significantly higher than that of both the control and cd-HA-gelatin tendons (0.20N, 0.09N and 0.11N after the first cycle, 0.41N, 0.09N and 0.14N after 1000 cycles, respectively).<span class="hlt">Gliding</span> resistance between the control and cd-HA-gelatin groups was not significantly different. The Young modulus was not significantly different between the 3 groups. The surfaces of the control and cd-HA-gelatin treated tendons appeared smooth after 1000 cycles, while those of the decellularized tendons appeared rougher under scanning electron microscopy observation. Conclusions Decellularization with trypsin and Triton X-100 did not change tendon stiffness. However, this treatment, while effective in removing cells, adversely altered the tendon surface, both in appearance and <span class="hlt">gliding</span> resistance. Surface modification with cd- HA-gelatin improved the tendon surface smoothness and significantly decreased the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> resistance. Clinical Relevance The combination of decellularization and surface modification may improve the function of tendon allografts when used clinically. PMID:23849733</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25282377','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25282377"><span>Energy consumption of ProTaper Next X1 after <span class="hlt">glide</span> path with PathFiles and ProGlider.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Berutti, Elio; Alovisi, Mario; Pastorelli, Michele Angelo; Chiandussi, Giorgio; Scotti, Nicola; Pasqualini, Damiano</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Instrument failure caused by excessive torsional stress can be controlled by creating a manual or mechanical <span class="hlt">glide</span> path. The ProGlider single-file system (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) was recently introduced to perform a mechanical <span class="hlt">glide</span> path. This study was designed to compare the effect of a <span class="hlt">glide</span> path performed with PathFiles (Dentsply Maillefer) and ProGlider on torque, time, and pecking motion required for ProTaper Next X1 (Dentsply Maillefer) to reach the full working length in simulated root canals. Forty Endo Training Blocks (Dentsply Maillefer) were used. Twenty were prepared with a mechanical <span class="hlt">glide</span> path using PathFiles 1 and 2 (the PathFile group), and 20 were prepared with a mechanical <span class="hlt">glide</span> path using a ProGlider single file (the ProGlider group). All samples were shaped with ProTaper Next X1 driven by an endodontic motor connected to a digital wattmeter. The required torque for root canal instrumentation was analyzed by evaluating the electrical power consumption of the endodontic engine. Electric power consumption (mW/h), elapsed time (seconds), and number of pecking motions required to reach the full working length with ProTaper Next X1 were calculated. Differences among groups were analyzed with the parametric Student t test for independent data (P < .05). Elapsed time and electric power consumption were significantly different between groups (P = .0001 for both). ProGlider appears to perform more efficiently than PathFiles in decreasing electric power consumption of ProTaper Next X1 to reach the full working length. This study confirmed the ability of ProGlider to reduce stress in ProTaper Next X1 during shaping through a <span class="hlt">glide</span> path and preliminary middle and coronal preflaring. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23849733','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23849733"><span>The effect of surface modification on <span class="hlt">gliding</span> ability of decellularized flexor tendon in a canine model in vitro.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ozasa, Yasuhiro; Amadio, Peter C; Thoreson, Andrew R; An, Kai-Nan; Zhao, Chunfeng</p> <p>2013-09-01</p> <p>To investigate the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> ability and mechanical properties of decellularized intrasynovial tendons with and without surface modification designed to reduce <span class="hlt">gliding</span> resistance. We randomly assigned 33 canine flexor digitorum profundus tendons to 1 of 3 groups: untreated fresh tendons, to serve as a control; tendons decellularized with trypsin and Triton X-100; and tendons decellularized as in group 2 with surface modification using carbodiimide-derivatized hyaluronic acid and gelatin (cd-HA-gelatin). Tendons were subjected to cyclic friction testing for 1,000 cycles with subsequent tensile stiffness testing. We qualitatively evaluated the surface roughness after 1,000 cycles using scanning electron microscopy. The <span class="hlt">gliding</span> resistance of the decellularized group was significantly higher than that of both the control and cd-HA-gelatin tendons (0.20, 0.09, and 0.11 N after the first cycle; and 0.41, 0.09, and 0.14 N after 1,000 cycles, respectively). <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> resistance between the control and cd-HA-gelatin groups was not significantly different. The Young modulus was not significantly different between groups. The surfaces of the control and cd-HA-gelatin-treated tendons appeared smooth after 1,000 cycles, whereas those of the decellularized tendons appeared roughened under scanning electron microscopy observation. Decellularization with trypsin and Triton X-100 did not change tendon stiffness. However, although this treatment was effective in removing cells, it adversely altered the tendon surface in both appearance and <span class="hlt">gliding</span> resistance. Surface modification with cd-HA-gelatin improved the tendon surface smoothness and significantly decreased the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> resistance. The combination of decellularization and surface modification may improve the function of tendon allografts when used clinically. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2893536','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2893536"><span>A rolling-<span class="hlt">gliding</span> wear simulator for the investigation of tribological material pairings for application in total knee arthroplasty</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Background Material wear testing is an important technique in the development and evaluation of materials for use in implant for total knee arthroplasty. Since a knee joint induces a complex rolling-<span class="hlt">gliding</span> movement, standardised material wear testing devices such as Pin-on-Disc or Ring-on-Disc testers are suitable to only a limited extent because they generate pure <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motion only. Methods A rolling-<span class="hlt">gliding</span> wear simulator was thus designed, constructed and implemented, which simulates and reproduces the rolling-<span class="hlt">gliding</span> movement and loading of the knee joint on specimens of simplified geometry. The technical concept was to run a base-plate, representing the tibia plateau, against a pivoted cylindrical counter-body, representing one femur condyle under an axial load. A rolling movement occurs as a result of the friction and pure <span class="hlt">gliding</span> is induced by limiting the rotation of the cylindrical counter-body. The set up also enables simplified specimens handling and removal for gravimetrical wear measurements. Long-term wear tests and gravimetrical wear measurements were carried out on the well known material pairings: cobalt chrome-polyethylene, ceramic-polyethylene and ceramic-ceramic, over three million motion cycles to allow material comparisons to be made. Results The observed differences in wear rates between cobalt-chrome on polyethylene and ceramic on polyethylene pairings were similar to the differences of published data for existing material-pairings. Test results on ceramic-ceramic pairings of different frontal-plane geometry and surface roughness displayed low wear rates and no fracture failures. Conclusions The presented set up is able to simulate the rolling-<span class="hlt">gliding</span> movement of the knee joint, is easy to use, and requires a minimum of user intervention or monitoring. It is suitable for long-term testing, and therefore a useful tool for the investigation of new and promising materials which are of interest for application in knee joint replacement</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/984284','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/984284"><span>The Effects of One-Dimensional <span class="hlt">Glide</span> On the Reaction Kinetics of Interstitial Clusters</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Heinisch, Howard L.; Singh, B. N.; Golubov, S. I.</p> <p>2000-09-01</p> <p>Collision cascades in metals produce small interstitial clusters and perfect dislocation loops that <span class="hlt">glide</span> in thermally activated, one-dimensional (1D) random walks. These <span class="hlt">gliding</span> defects can change their Burgers vectors by thermal activation or by interactions with other defects. Their migration is therefore ?mixed 1D/3D migration? along a 3D path consisting of 1D segments. The defect reaction kinetics under mixed 1D/3D diffusion are different from both pure 1D diffusion and pure 3D diffusion, both of which can be formulated within analytical rate theory models of microstructure evolution under irradiation. Atomic-scale Kinetic Monte Carlo defect migration simulations are used to investigate the effects of mixed 1D/3D migration on defect reaction kinetics as a guide for implementing mixed 1D/3D migration into the theory. The dependence of sink strength on the size and concentration of sinks under mixed 1D/3D migration lies between those for pure 1D and pure 3D migration and varies with the average distance between direction changes, L. The sink strength for sinks of size R under mixed 1D/3D migration can be approximated by an expression that varies directly as R2 for values of L greater than the sink size. The transition from mixed 1D/3D to pure 3D diffusion as L decreases is demonstrated in the simulations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20884290','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20884290"><span>The novel marine <span class="hlt">gliding</span> zooflagellate genus Mantamonas (Mantamonadida ord. n.: Apusozoa).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Glücksman, Edvard; Snell, Elizabeth A; Berney, Cédric; Chao, Ema E; Bass, David; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas</p> <p>2011-04-01</p> <p>Mantamonasis a novel genus of marine <span class="hlt">gliding</span> zooflagellates probably related to apusomonad and planomonad Apusozoa. Using phase and differential interference contrast microscopy we describe the type species Mantamonas plasticasp. n. from coastal sediment in Cumbria, England. Cells are ∼5μm long, ∼5μm wide, asymmetric, flattened, biciliate, and somewhat plastic. The posterior cilium, on which they <span class="hlt">glide</span> smoothly over the substratum, is long and highly acronematic. The much thinner, shorter, and almost immobile anterior cilium points forward to the cell's left. These morphological and behavioural traits suggest thatMantamonasis a member of the protozoan phylum Apusozoa. Analyses of 18S and 28S rRNA gene sequences of Mantamonas plasticaand a second genetically very different marine species from coastal sediment in Tanzania show Mantamonasas a robustly monophyletic clade, that is very divergent from all other eukaryotes. 18S rRNA trees mostly placeMantamonaswithin unikonts (opisthokonts, Apusozoa, and Amoebozoa) but its precise position varies with phylogenetic algorithm and/or taxon and nucleotide position sampling; it may group equally weakly as sister to Planomonadida, Apusomonadida or Breviata. On 28S rRNA and joint 18/28S rRNA phylogenies (including 11 other newly obtained apusozoan/amoebozoan 28S rRNA sequences) it consistently strongly groups with Apusomonadida (Apusozoa).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AIPC.1685c0004K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AIPC.1685c0004K"><span>Pitch <span class="hlt">glide</span> effect induced by a nonlinear string-barrier interaction</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kartofelev, Dmitri; Stulov, Anatoli; Välimäki, Vesa</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>Interactions of a vibrating string with its supports and other spatially distributed barriers play a significant role in the physics of many stringed musical instruments. It is well known that the tone of the string vibrations is determined by the string supports, and that the boundary conditions of the string termination may cause a short-lasting initial fundamental frequency shifting. Generally, this phenomenon is associated with the nonlinear modulation of the stiff string tension. The aim of this paper is to study the initial frequency <span class="hlt">glide</span> phenomenon that is induced only by the string-barrier interaction, apart from other possible physical causes, and without the interfering effects of dissipation and dispersion. From a numerical simulation perspective, this highly nonlinear problem may present various difficulties, not the least of which is the risk of numerical instability. We propose a numerically stable and a purely kinematic model of the string-barrier interaction, which is based on the travelling wave solution of the ideal string vibration. The model is capable of reproducing the motion of the vibrating string exhibiting the initial fundamental frequency <span class="hlt">glide</span>, which is caused solely by the complex nonlinear interaction of the string with its termination. The results presented in this paper can expand our knowledge and understanding of the timbre evolution and the physical principles of sound generation of numerous stringed instruments, such as lutes called the tambura, sitar and biwa.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27414063','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27414063"><span>Velocity Fluctuations in Kinesin-1 <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Motility Assays Originate in Motor Attachment Geometry Variations.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Palacci, Henri; Idan, Ofer; Armstrong, Megan J; Agarwal, Ashutosh; Nitta, Takahiro; Hess, Henry</p> <p>2016-08-09</p> <p>Motor proteins such as myosin and kinesin play a major role in cellular cargo transport, muscle contraction, cell division, and engineered nanodevices. Quantifying the collective behavior of coupled motors is critical to our understanding of these systems. An excellent model system is the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility assay, where hundreds of surface-adhered motors propel one cytoskeletal filament such as an actin filament or a microtubule. The filament motion can be observed using fluorescence microscopy, revealing fluctuations in <span class="hlt">gliding</span> velocity. These velocity fluctuations have been previously quantified by a motional diffusion coefficient, which Sekimoto and Tawada explained as arising from the addition and removal of motors from the linear array of motors propelling the filament as it advances, assuming that different motors are not equally efficient in their force generation. A computational model of kinesin head diffusion and binding to the microtubule allowed us to quantify the heterogeneity of motor efficiency arising from the combination of anharmonic tail stiffness and varying attachment geometries assuming random motor locations on the surface and an absence of coordination between motors. Knowledge of the heterogeneity allows the calculation of the proportionality constant between the motional diffusion coefficient and the motor density. The calculated value (0.3) is within a standard error of our measurements of the motional diffusion coefficient on surfaces with varying motor densities calibrated by landing rate experiments. This allowed us to quantify the loss in efficiency of coupled molecular motors arising from heterogeneity in the attachment geometry.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012APS..GECDT3005G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012APS..GECDT3005G"><span>CO2 Dissociation by Low Current <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Discharge in the Reverse Vortex Flow</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gutsol, Alexander</p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>If performed with high energy efficiency, plasma-chemical dissociation of carbon dioxide can be a way of converting and storing energy when there is an excess of electric energy, for example generated by solar elements of wind turbines. CO2 dissociation with efficiency of up to 90% was reported earlier for low pressure microwave discharge in supersonic flow. A new plasma-chemical system uses a low current <span class="hlt">gliding</span> discharge in the reverse vortex flow of plasma gas. The system is a development of the <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Arc in Tornado reactor. The system was used to study dissociation of CO2 in wide ranges of the following experimental parameters: reactor pressure (15-150 kPa), discharge current (50-500 mA), gas flow rate (3-30 liters per minute), and electrode gap length (1-10 cm). Additionally, the effect of thermal energy recuperation on CO2 dissociation efficiency was tested. Plasma chemical efficiency of CO2 dissociation is very low (about 3%) in a short discharge at low pressures (about 15 kPa) when it is defined by electronic excitation. The highest efficiency (above 40%) was reached at pressures 50-70 kPa in a long discharge with thermal energy recuperation. It means that the process is controlled by thermal dissociation with subsequent effective quenching. Plasma chemical efficiency was determined from the data of chromatographic analysis and oscilloscope electric power integration, and also was checked calorimetrically by the thermal balance of the system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19966289','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19966289"><span>A protein secretion system linked to bacteroidete <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility and pathogenesis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sato, Keiko; Naito, Mariko; Yukitake, Hideharu; Hirakawa, Hideki; Shoji, Mikio; McBride, Mark J; Rhodes, Ryan G; Nakayama, Koji</p> <p>2010-01-05</p> <p>Porphyromonas gingivalis secretes strong proteases called gingipains that are implicated in periodontal pathogenesis. Protein secretion systems common to other Gram-negative bacteria are lacking in P. gingivalis, but several proteins, including PorT, have been linked to gingipain secretion. Comparative genome analysis and genetic experiments revealed 11 additional proteins involved in gingipain secretion. Six of these (PorK, PorL, PorM, PorN, PorW, and Sov) were similar in sequence to Flavobacterium johnsoniae <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility proteins, and two others (PorX and PorY) were putative two-component system regulatory proteins. Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that porK, porL, porM, porN, porP, porT, and sov were down-regulated in P. gingivalis porX and porY mutants. Disruption of the F. johnsoniae porT ortholog resulted in defects in motility, chitinase secretion, and translocation of a <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility protein, SprB adhesin, to the cell surface, providing a link between a unique protein translocation system and a motility apparatus in members of the Bacteroidetes phylum.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2806738','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2806738"><span>A protein secretion system linked to bacteroidete <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility and pathogenesis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Sato, Keiko; Naito, Mariko; Yukitake, Hideharu; Hirakawa, Hideki; Shoji, Mikio; McBride, Mark J.; Rhodes, Ryan G.; Nakayama, Koji</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Porphyromonas gingivalis secretes strong proteases called gingipains that are implicated in periodontal pathogenesis. Protein secretion systems common to other Gram-negative bacteria are lacking in P. gingivalis, but several proteins, including PorT, have been linked to gingipain secretion. Comparative genome analysis and genetic experiments revealed 11 additional proteins involved in gingipain secretion. Six of these (PorK, PorL, PorM, PorN, PorW, and Sov) were similar in sequence to Flavobacterium johnsoniae <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility proteins, and two others (PorX and PorY) were putative two-component system regulatory proteins. Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that porK, porL, porM, porN, porP, porT, and sov were down-regulated in P. gingivalis porX and porY mutants. Disruption of the F. johnsoniae porT ortholog resulted in defects in motility, chitinase secretion, and translocation of a <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility protein, SprB adhesin, to the cell surface, providing a link between a unique protein translocation system and a motility apparatus in members of the Bacteroidetes phylum. PMID:19966289</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040058111','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040058111"><span>Energy Management of Manned Boost-<span class="hlt">Glide</span> Vehicles: A Historical Perspective</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Day, Richard E.</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>As flight progressed from propellers to jets to rockets, the propulsive energy grew exponentially. With the development of rocket-only boosted vehicles, energy management of these boost-gliders became a distinct requirement for the unpowered return to base, alternate landing site, or water-parachute landing, starting with the X-series rocket aircraft and terminating with the present-day Shuttle. The problem presented here consists of: speed (kinetic energy) - altitude (potential energy) - steep <span class="hlt">glide</span> angles created by low lift-to-drag ratios (L/D) - distance to landing site - and the bothersome effects of the atmospheric characteristics varying with altitude. The primary discussion regards post-boost, stabilized <span class="hlt">glides</span>; however, the effects of centrifugal and geopotential acceleration are discussed as well. The aircraft and spacecraft discussed here are the X-1, X-2, X-15, and the Shuttle; and to a lesser, comparative extent, Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, and lifting bodies. The footprints, landfalls, and methods developed for energy management are also described. The essential tools required for energy management - simulator planning, instrumentation, radar, telemetry, extended land or water range, Mission Control Center (with specialist controllers), and emergency alternate landing sites - were first established through development of early concepts and were then validated by research flight tests.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23661772','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23661772"><span>Heart rate and estimated energy expenditure of flapping and <span class="hlt">gliding</span> in black-browed albatrosses.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sakamoto, Kentaro Q; Takahashi, Akinori; Iwata, Takashi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Yamamoto, Maki; Trathan, Philip N</p> <p>2013-08-15</p> <p>Albatrosses are known to expend only a small amount of energy during flight. The low energy cost of albatross flight has been attributed to energy-efficient <span class="hlt">gliding</span> (soaring) with sporadic flapping, although little is known about how much time and energy albatrosses expend in flapping versus <span class="hlt">gliding</span> during cruising flight. Here, we examined the heart rates (used as an instantaneous index of energy expenditure) and flapping activities of free-ranging black-browed albatrosses (Thalassarche melanophrys) to estimate the energy cost of flapping as well as time spent in flapping activities. The heart rate of albatrosses during flight (144 beats min(-1)) was similar to that while sitting on the water (150 beats min(-1)). In contrast, heart rate was much higher during takeoff and landing (ca. 200 beats min(-1)). Heart rate during cruising flight was linearly correlated with the number of wing flaps per minute, suggesting an extra energy burden of flapping. Albatrosses spend only 4.6±1.4% of their time flapping during cruising flight, which was significantly lower than during and shortly after takeoff (9.8±3.5%). Flapping activity, which amounted to just 4.6% of the time in flight, accounted for 13.3% of the total energy expenditure during cruising flight. These results support the idea that albatrosses achieve energy-efficient flight by reducing the time spent in flapping activity, which is associated with high energy expenditure.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1510166B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1510166B"><span>Latest Sea-Operations in the Macaronesian region with Unmanned Autonomous Marine <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Vehicles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Barrera, Carlos; Lorenzo, Alvaro; Viera, Josue; Morales, Tania; Vega, Daura; Rueda, Maria Jose; Llinas, Octavio</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>Current advances on key marine technology fields provide nowadays a broad range of autonomous unmanned platforms addressed for an efficient and cost-effective ocean observation, with a suitable level of success in terms of endurance, reliability and useful gathered information. In this context, a multidisciplinary family of unmanned autonomous vehicles addressed to monitor both coastal and open-ocean areas plays a relevant role. During the last month, some of the newest unmanned <span class="hlt">gliding</span> vehicle technologies have been tested within the context of the Oceanic Platform of the Canary Islands (PLOCAN) in varied operational scenarios aiming different technical and scientific purposes, all of them joined in direct partnership with the company provider and other R&D institutions in some cases. Among others, representative examples in this way are the missions under the name Challenger One, Vulcano and SB02 through surface and underwater <span class="hlt">gliding</span> vehicles, performed mostly in the surrounding subtropical waters of the ESTOC site observatory in the Canary Islands archipelago. The main gathered operational and scientific results from these missions are presented in this work as a sign of new ocean observing technologies within the framework of the Macaronesian Marine and Maritime Observation Strategy (R3M) and linked with the current European rules programs and projects in this field. Keywords: autonomous vehicle, gliders, R3M, ocean observatory, monitoring, marine robotics, ESTOC,</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22089313','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22089313"><span>In-situ transmission electron microscopy of partial-dislocation <span class="hlt">glide</span> in 4H-SiC under electron radiation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ohno, Yutaka; Yonenaga, Ichiro; Miyao, Kotaro; Maeda, Koji; Tsuchida, Hidekazu</p> <p>2012-07-23</p> <p>Electron-radiation-enhanced <span class="hlt">glide</span> of 30 Degree-Sign -Si(g) partial dislocations bringing about an expansion/shrinkage of Shockley-type stacking faults in 4H-SiC was observed in-situ by transmission electron microscopy. Geometrical kinks on 30 Degree-Sign -Si(g) partials did not migrate in the dark, indicating that the kink migration is enhanced by electron irradiation. The direction of the enhanced <span class="hlt">glide</span> was reversible depending on the irradiation intensity, which can be interpreted in terms of a sign reversal of the driving force originating in the effective stacking fault energy variable with the irradiation intensity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23814992','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23814992"><span>[A child with Klippel-Feil syndrome in whom <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope was effective for tracheal intubation].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Arai, Takero; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Saito, Tomoyuki; Ogata, Tokiko; Chiba, Ayako; Sato, Hiromi; Enomoto, Sumie; Shimazaki, Mutsuhisa; Okuda, Yasuhisa</p> <p>2013-06-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope videolaryngoscope (<span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope, herein-after referred to as "GS", Verathon Medical, Bothell, WA, USA), with a high-resolution camera positioned on a blade, enables operators to confirm the position of the larynx and a tube through clear view, thereby conducting intubation safely in a patient whose neck is difficult to be bent back. As the blade is slim, GS is indicated for use in children whose oral cavity is narrow. We herein report safe and smooth intubation with GS in a child with Klippel-Feil syndrome in whom difficult intubation was predicted.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70169880','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70169880"><span>Examining spring wet slab and <span class="hlt">glide</span> avalanche occurrence along the Going-to-the-Sun Road corridor, Glacier National Park, Montana, USA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Peitzsch, Erich H.; Hendrikx, Jordy; Fagre, Daniel B.; Reardon, Blase</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The results suggest that the role of air temperature and snowpack settlement appear to be the most important variables in wet slab and <span class="hlt">glide</span> avalanche occurrence. When applied to the 2011 season, the results of the CART model are encouraging and they enhance our understanding of some of the required meteorological and snowpack conditions for wet slab and <span class="hlt">glide</span> avalanche occurrence.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19720000564','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19720000564"><span>Analysis of <span class="hlt">microsize</span> particulates</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Blanchard, M. B.; Farlow, N. H.; Ferry, G. V.</p> <p>1972-01-01</p> <p>Unique methods for analyzing individual particles ranging in size from 0.01 to 1000 micrometers have been developed for investigation of nature of cosmic dust. Methods are applicable to particulate aerosols and contaminants characteristically encountered in studies of air pollution and in experiments designed to abate pollution.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/174468','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/174468"><span>[Acrocephalosyndactyly (<span class="hlt">ACS</span>) (author's transl)].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fajardo Carmona, A V; Pascual Castroviejo, I</p> <p>1975-01-01</p> <p>13 cases of <span class="hlt">ACS</span> are presented: seven of them were identified as Apert's syndrome; two as Chotzen's syndrome; three as Carpenter's syndrome, and one as Pfeiffer's syndrome. These disorders have no known ethiology. However, it is necessary to look for diabetic antecedents and dermatogliphus alterations, both in the patient and the parents. An attempt to give an explanation of their hereditary penetrance is made. Frequency of associated abnormalities, mental retardation, therapeutics, prognosis, and recent encouraging results of plastic surgery of the face are reviewed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://arc.lib.montana.edu/snow-science/item/460','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://arc.lib.montana.edu/snow-science/item/460"><span>Characterizing wet slab and <span class="hlt">glide</span> slab avalanche occurrence along the Going-to-the-Sun Road, Glacier National Park, Montana, USA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Peitzsch, Erich H.; Hendrikx, Jordy; Fagre, Daniel B.; Reardon, Blase</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Wet slab and <span class="hlt">glide</span> slab snow avalanches are dangerous and yet can be particularly difficult to predict. Both wet slab and <span class="hlt">glide</span> slab avalanches are thought to depend upon free water moving through the snowpack but are driven by different processes. In Glacier National Park, Montana, both types of avalanches can occur in the same year and affect the Going-to-the-Sun Road (GTSR). Both wet slab and <span class="hlt">glide</span> slab avalanches along the GTSR from 2003-2010 are investigated. Meteorological data from two high-elevation weather stations and one SNOTEL site are used in conjunction with an avalanche database and snowpit profiles. These data were used to characterize years when only <span class="hlt">glide</span> slab avalanches occurred and those years when both <span class="hlt">glide</span> slab and wet slab avalanches occurred. Results of 168 <span class="hlt">glide</span> slab and 57 wet slab avalanches along the GTSR suggest both types of avalanche occurrence depend on sustained warming periods with intense solar radiation (or rain on snow) to produce free water in the snowpack. Differences in temperature and net radiation metrics between wet slab and <span class="hlt">glide</span> slab avalanches emerge as one moves from one day to seven days prior to avalanche occurrence. On average, a more rapid warming precedes wet slab avalanche occurrence. <span class="hlt">Glide</span> slab and wet slab avalanches require a similar amount of net radiation. Wet slab avalanches do not occur every year, while <span class="hlt">glide</span> slab avalanches occur annually. These results aim to enhance understanding of the required meteorological conditions for wet slab and <span class="hlt">glide</span> slab avalanches and aid in improved wet snow avalanche forecasting.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1327892','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1327892"><span><span class="hlt">AC</span> Optimal Power Flow</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p></p> <p>2016-10-04</p> <p>In this work, we have implemented and developed the simulation software to implement the mathematical model of an <span class="hlt">AC</span> Optimal Power Flow (OPF) problem. The objective function is to minimize the total cost of generation subject to constraints of node power balance (both real and reactive) and line power flow limits (MW, MVAr, and MVA). We have currently implemented the polar coordinate version of the problem. In the present work, we have used the optimization solver, Knitro (proprietary and not included in this software) to solve the problem and we have kept option for both the native numerical derivative evaluation (working satisfactorily now) as well as for analytical formulas corresponding to the derivatives being provided to Knitro (currently, in the debugging stage). Since the <span class="hlt">AC</span> OPF is a highly non-convex optimization problem, we have also kept the option for a multistart solution. All of these can be decided by the user during run-time in an interactive manner. The software has been developed in C++ programming language, running with GCC compiler on a Linux machine. We have tested for satisfactory results against Matpower for the IEEE 14 bus system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7243584','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7243584"><span><span class="hlt">AC</span> resistance measuring instrument</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Hof, P.J.</p> <p>1983-10-04</p> <p>An auto-ranging <span class="hlt">AC</span> resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an <span class="hlt">AC</span> excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance. After the auto-ranging and auto-compensation functions are complete, the microprocessor calculates the resistance of the load from the selected range resistance, the excitation signal, and the load voltage signal, and displays of the measured resistance on a digital display of the instrument. 8 figs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/864722','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/864722"><span><span class="hlt">AC</span> Resistance measuring instrument</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Hof, Peter J.</p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p>An auto-ranging <span class="hlt">AC</span> resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an <span class="hlt">AC</span> excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance. After the auto-ranging and auto-compensation functions are complete, the microprocessor calculates the resistance of the load from the selected range resistance, the excitation signal, and the load voltage signal, and displays of the measured resistance on a digital display of the instrument.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5593727','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5593727"><span>Identification of /sup 233/<span class="hlt">Ac</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Chu, Y.Y.; Zhou, M.L.</p> <p>1983-09-01</p> <p>We report in this paper identification of the new isotope /sup 233/<span class="hlt">Ac</span>. Uranium targets were irradiated with 28 GeV protons; after rapid retrieval of the target and separation of actinium from thorium, /sup 233/<span class="hlt">Ac</span> was allowed to decay into the known /sup 233/Th daughter. Exhaustive chemical purification was employed to permit the identification of /sup 233/Th via its characteristic ..gamma.. radiations. The half-life derived for /sup 233/<span class="hlt">Ac</span> from several experiments is 2.3 +- 0.3 min. The production cross section for /sup 233/<span class="hlt">Ac</span> is 100 ..mu..b.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.6073F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.6073F"><span>The effect of vegetation cover on the formation of <span class="hlt">glide</span>-snow avalanches</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Feistl, Thomas; Bebi, Peter; Bartelt, Perry</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Glide</span> snow avalanches release on steep, smooth slopes and can be prevented either by protection forests or by artificial defense structures. To minimize the risk for people and infrastructure, guidelines have been formulated concerning structure, height and distance between avalanche prevention bridges. These guidelines assure the major functions of the defense structures: first to prevent the release of avalanches and second to withstand the static and dynamic forces of the moving snow cover. The major functions of protection forests are generally similar and therefore guidelines on the maximum tolerable size of forest gaps exist in Switzerland. These guidelines are based on a static relationship between the pressure of the snow cover and the resistance of the defense structure and on empirical observations (forest). Whereas ground friction is only qualitatively taken into account, we assume it to play a crucial role in <span class="hlt">glide</span> snow avalanche formation. To prove this assumption we collected data on the predominant vegetation cover of 67 release areas in the region of Davos, Switzerland. Our observations reveal a strong relationship between vegetation cover type, slope angle and slab length. We were able to quantify the Coulomb friction parameter μ by applying a physical model that accounts for the dynamic forces of the moving snow on the stauchwall, the fixed snow cover below the release area. The stauchwall resists the dynamic forces of the snow cover, until a critical strain rate is reached and then fails in brittle compression. This failure strongly depends on the friction between snow cover and soil. A typical value of μ for grassy slopes is 0.2. Snow characteristics like density are implemented in the model as constants. We compared the model results with the guidelines for defense structures and forest gap sizes and found accordance for certain friction parameter values. Forest gaps of 40 meter length and a 35° slope angle require friction values of 0</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..1215526P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..1215526P"><span><span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Box method applied to trace element distribution of a geochemical data set</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Paz González, Antonio; Vidal Vázquez, Eva; Rosario García Moreno, M.; Paz Ferreiro, Jorge; Saa Requejo, Antonio; María Tarquis, Ana</p> <p>2010-05-01</p> <p>The application of fractal theory to process geochemical prospecting data can provide useful information for evaluating mineralization potential. A geochemical survey was carried out in the west area of Coruña province (NW Spain). Major elements and trace elements were determined by standard analytical techniques. It is well known that there are specific elements or arrays of elements, which are associated with specific types of mineralization. Arsenic has been used to evaluate the metallogenetic importance of the studied zone. Moreover, as can be considered as a pathfinder of Au, as these two elements are genetically associated. The main objective of this study was to use multifractal analysis to characterize the distribution of three trace elements, namely Au, As, and Sb. Concerning the local geology, the study area comprises predominantly acid rocks, mainly alkaline and calcalkaline granites, gneiss and migmatites. The most significant structural feature of this zone is the presence of a mylonitic band, with an approximate NE-SW orientation. The data set used in this study comprises 323 samples collected, with standard geochemical criteria, preferentially in the B horizon of the soil. Occasionally where this horizon was not present, samples were collected from the C horizon. Samples were taken in a rectilinear grid. The sampling lines were perpendicular to the NE-SW tectonic structures. Frequency distributions of the studied elements departed from normal. Coefficients of variation ranked as follows: Sb < As < Au. Significant correlation coefficients between Au, Sb, and As were found, even if these were low. The so-called ‘<span class="hlt">gliding</span> box' algorithm (GB) proposed originally for lacunarity analysis has been extended to multifractal modelling and provides an alternative to the ‘box-counting' method for implementing multifractal analysis. The partitioning method applied in GB algorithm constructs samples by <span class="hlt">gliding</span> a box of certain size (a) over the grid map in all</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26374117','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26374117"><span>Two Essential Light Chains Regulate the MyoA Lever Arm To Promote Toxoplasma <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Motility.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Williams, Melanie J; Alonso, Hernan; Enciso, Marta; Egarter, Saskia; Sheiner, Lilach; Meissner, Markus; Striepen, Boris; Smith, Brian J; Tonkin, Christopher J</p> <p>2015-09-15</p> <p>Key to the virulence of apicomplexan parasites is their ability to move through tissue and to invade and egress from host cells. Apicomplexan motility requires the activity of the glideosome, a multicomponent molecular motor composed of a type XIV myosin, MyoA. Here we identify a novel glideosome component, essential light chain 2 (ELC2), and functionally characterize the two essential light chains (ELC1 and ELC2) of MyoA in Toxoplasma. We show that these proteins are functionally redundant but are important for invasion, egress, and motility. Molecular simulations of the MyoA lever arm identify a role for Ca(2+) in promoting intermolecular contacts between the ELCs and the adjacent MLC1 light chain to stabilize this domain. Using point mutations predicted to ablate either the interaction with Ca(2+) or the interface between the two light chains, we demonstrate their contribution to the quality, displacement, and speed of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> Toxoplasma parasites. Our work therefore delineates the importance of the MyoA lever arm and highlights a mechanism by which this domain could be stabilized in order to promote invasion, egress, and <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility in apicomplexan parasites. Tissue dissemination and host cell invasion by apicomplexan parasites such as Toxoplasma are pivotal to their pathogenesis. Central to these processes is <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility, which is driven by an actomyosin motor, the MyoA glideosome. Others have demonstrated the importance of the MyoA glideosome for parasite motility and virulence in mice. Disruption of its function may therefore have therapeutic potential, and yet a deeper mechanistic understanding of how it works is required. Ca(2+)-dependent and -independent phosphorylation and the direct binding of Ca(2+) to the essential light chain have been implicated in the regulation of MyoA activity. Here we identify a second essential light chain of MyoA and demonstrate the importance of both to Toxoplasma motility. We also investigate the role of Ca(2+) and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19850008560','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19850008560"><span>A cockpit-display concept for executing a multiple <span class="hlt">glide</span>-slope approach for wake-vortex avoidance</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Abbott, T. S.</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>A piloted simulation study was undertaken to determine the feasibility of utilizing a forward-looking display to provide information that would enable aircraft to rredue their in-trail separation interval, and hence increase airport capacity, through the application of multiple <span class="hlt">glide</span>-path approach techniques. The primary objective of this study was to determine whether information could be satisfactorily provided on a head-up display (HUD) format to permit the pilot to conduct a multiple <span class="hlt">glide</span>-slope approach while maintaining a prespecified in-trail separation interval. The tests were conducted in a motion-base cockpit simulator configured as a current-generation transport aircraft and included dynamic effects of the vortices generated by the lead aircraft. The information provided on the HUD included typical aircraft guidance information and the current and past positions of the lead aircraft. Additionally, the displayed information provided self-separation cues that allowed the pilot to maintain separation on the lead aircraft. Performance data and pilot subjective ratings and comments were obtained during the tests. The results of this study indicate that multiple <span class="hlt">glide</span>-slope approaches, procedurally designed for vortex avoidance, are possible while maintaining pilot work load and performance within operationally acceptable limits. In general, it would seem that multiple <span class="hlt">glide</span>-slope approaches are possible even under reduced in-trail separation conditions if the pilot is provided with adequate situational information.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25487764','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25487764"><span>[Effectiveness of the <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope video laryngoscope in a case of unexpected difficult airway due to lingual tonsil hypertrophy].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cruz, P; Alarcón, L; Del Castillo, T; Cabrerizo, P; Díaz, S</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>Lingual tonsil hypertrophy can cause varying degrees of airway obstruction and is considered a risk factor for difficult mask ventilation and tracheal intubation. We report a case of unexpected difficult airway in a patient with unknown lingual tonsil hypertrophy that was solved with the use of the <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope video laryngoscope.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=317676','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=317676"><span>Flavobacterium columnare type IX secretion system mutations result in defects in <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility and loss of virulence</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/find-a-publication/">USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The <span class="hlt">gliding</span> bacterium Flavobacterium columnare causes columnaris disease in wild and aquaculture-reared freshwater fish. The mechanisms responsible for columnaris disease are not known. The related bacterium Flavobacterium johnsoniae uses a type IX secretion system (T9SS) to secrete enzymes, adhesin...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23123913','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23123913"><span>Role of binding in Mycoplasma mobile and Mycoplasma pneumoniae <span class="hlt">gliding</span> analyzed through inhibition by synthesized sialylated compounds.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kasai, Taishi; Nakane, Daisuke; Ishida, Hideharu; Ando, Hiromune; Kiso, Makoto; Miyata, Makoto</p> <p>2013-02-01</p> <p>Mycoplasmas, which have been shown to be the causative pathogens in recent human pneumonia epidemics, bind to solid surfaces and <span class="hlt">glide</span> in the direction of the membrane protrusion at a pole. During <span class="hlt">gliding</span>, the legs of the mycoplasma catch, pull, and release sialylated oligosaccharides fixed on a solid surface. Sialylated oligosaccharides are major structures on animal cell surfaces and are sometimes targeted by pathogens, such as influenza virus. In the present study, we analyzed the inhibitory effects of 16 chemically synthesized sialylated compounds on the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> and binding of Mycoplasma mobile and Mycoplasma pneumoniae and concluded the following. (i) The recognition of sialylated oligosaccharide by mycoplasma legs proceeds in a "lock-and-key" fashion, with the binding affinity dependent on structural differences among the sialylated compounds examined. (ii) The binding of the leg and the sialylated oligosaccharide is cooperative, with Hill constants ranging from 2 to 3. (iii) Mycoplasma legs may generate a drag force after a stroke, because the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> speed decreased and pivoting motion occurred more frequently when the number of working legs was reduced by the addition of free sialylated compounds.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19449853','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19449853"><span>Carborane clusters in computational drug design: a comparative docking evaluation using AutoDock, FlexX, <span class="hlt">Glide</span>, and Surflex.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tiwari, Rohit; Mahasenan, Kiran; Pavlovicz, Ryan; Li, Chenglong; Tjarks, Werner</p> <p>2009-06-01</p> <p>Compounds containing boron atoms play increasingly important roles in the therapy and diagnosis of various diseases, particularly cancer. However, computational drug design of boron-containing therapeutics and diagnostics is hampered by the fact that many software packages used for this purpose lack parameters for all or part of the various types of boron atoms. In the present paper, we describe simple and efficient strategies to overcome this problem, which are based on the replacement of boron atom types with carbon atom types. The developed methods were validated by docking closo- and nido-carboranyl antifolates into the active site of a human dihydrofolate reductase (hDHFR) using AutoDock, <span class="hlt">Glide</span>, FlexX, and Surflex and comparing the obtained docking poses with the poses of their counterparts in the original hDHFR-carboranyl antifolate crystal structures. Under optimized conditions, AutoDock and <span class="hlt">Glide</span> were equally good in docking of the closo-carboranyl antifolates followed by Surflex and FlexX, whereas Autodock, <span class="hlt">Glide</span>, and Surflex proved to be comparably efficient in the docking of nido-carboranyl antifolates followed by FlexX. Differences in geometries and partial atom charges in the structures of the carboranyl antifolates resulting from different data sources and/or optimization methods did not impact the docking performances of AutoDock or <span class="hlt">Glide</span> significantly. Binding energies predicted by all four programs were in accordance with experimental data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11817881','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11817881"><span>Suture techniques with high breaking strength and low <span class="hlt">gliding</span> resistance: experiments in the dog flexor digitorum profundus tendon.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Momose, T; Amadio, P C; Zhao, C; Zobitz, M E; Couvreur, P J; An, K N</p> <p>2001-12-01</p> <p>We studied the breaking strength and <span class="hlt">gliding</span> resistance between the pulley and flexor tendon for various suture techniques. Canine flexor digitorum profundus tendons were transected and sutured using one of eight repair techniques: modified Kessler (MK); Tsuge (Tsuge); two variations of a double modified Kessler (DK1, DK2); combined modified Kessler-modified Tsuge (MKT); augmented Becker (Becker); Cruciate (Cruciate); and modified double Tsuge (DT). The force to produce a 1.5 mm gap, ultimate failure load, resistance to gap formation, and <span class="hlt">gliding</span> resistance were measured. The force to produce a 1.5 mm gap and the ultimate breaking force were higher with the DK1, DK2, MKT, Becker, Cruciate, and DT repairs than they were with the MK and Tsuge repair, while the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> resistance of the Becker was higher than that of the MK, DK1, DK2, MKT. Cruciate, and UT repairs. In addition to confirming that repair strength increases as the number of strands crossing the repair increases, we also found that these stronger repairs need not produce higher <span class="hlt">gliding</span> resistance than less robust repairs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=speech+AND+perception&pg=6&id=EJ965909','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=speech+AND+perception&pg=6&id=EJ965909"><span>Differential Recognition of Pitch Patterns in Discrete and <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Stimuli in Congenital Amusia: Evidence from Mandarin Speakers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Liu, Fang; Xu, Yi; Patel, Aniruddh D.; Francart, Tom; Jiang, Cunmei</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>This study examined whether "melodic contour deafness" (insensitivity to the direction of pitch movement) in congenital amusia is associated with specific types of pitch patterns (discrete versus <span class="hlt">gliding</span> pitches) or stimulus types (speech syllables versus complex tones). Thresholds for identification of pitch direction were obtained using discrete…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24921925','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24921925"><span>Potential role of Flavobacterial <span class="hlt">gliding</span>-motility and type IX secretion system complex in root colonization and plant defense.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kolton, Max; Frenkel, Omer; Elad, Yigal; Cytryn, Eddie</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p>Members of the Flavobacterium genus are often highly abundant in the rhizosphere. Nevertheless, the physiological characteristics associated with their enhanced rhizosphere competence are currently an enigma. Flavobacteria possess a unique <span class="hlt">gliding</span>-motility complex that is tightly associated with a recently characterized Bacteroidetes-specific type IX protein secretion system, which distinguishes them from the rest of the rhizosphere microbiome. We hypothesize that proper functionality of this complex may confer a competitive advantage in the rhizosphere. To test this hypothesis, we constructed mutant and complement root-associated flavobacterial variants with dysfunctional secretion and <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility, and tested them in a series of in planta experiments. These mutants demonstrated significantly lower rhizosphere persistence (approximately 10-fold), plant root colonization (approximately fivefold), and seed adhesion capacity (approximately sevenfold) than the wild-type strains. Furthermore, the biocontrol capacity of the mutant strain toward foliar-applied Clavibacter michiganensis was significantly impaired relative to the wild-type strain, suggesting a role of the <span class="hlt">gliding</span> and secretion complex in plant protection. Collectively, these results provide an initial link between the high abundance of flavobacteria in the rhizosphere and their unique physiology, indicating that the flavobacterial <span class="hlt">gliding</span>-motility and secretion complex may play a central role in root colonization and plant defense.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012NJPh...14a3010D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012NJPh...14a3010D"><span>The application of a non-thermal plasma generated by gas-liquid <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc discharge in sterilization</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Du, Chang Ming; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Lu; Xia Li, Hong; Liu, Hui; Xiong, Ya</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Gliding</span> arc discharge has been investigated in recent years as an innovative physicochemical technique for contaminated water treatment at atmospheric pressure and ambient temperature. In this study we tested a gas-liquid <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc discharge reactor, the bacterial suspension of which was treated circularly. When the bacterial suspension was passed through the electrodes and circulated at defined flow rates, almost 100% of the bacteria were killed in less than 3.0 min. Experimental results showed that it is possible to achieve an abatement of 7.0 decimal logarithm units within only 30 s. Circulation flow rates and types of feeding gas caused a certain impact on bacteria inactivation, but the influences are not obvious. So, under the promise of sterilization effect, industrial applications can select their appropriate operating conditions. All inactivation curves presented the same three-phase profile showing an apparent sterilization effect. Analysis of the scanning electron microscope images of bacterial cells supports the speculation that the gas-liquid <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc discharge plasma is acting under various mechanisms driven essentially by oxidation and the effect of electric field. These results enhance the possibility of applying gas-liquid <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc discharge decontamination systems to disinfect bacterial-contaminated water. Furthermore, correlational research indicates the potential applications of this technology in rapid sterilization of medical devices, spacecraft and food.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22165365','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22165365"><span>A comparison of the forces applied to a manikin during laryngoscopy with the <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope and Macintosh laryngoscopes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Russell, T; Lee, C; Firat, M; Cooper, R M</p> <p>2011-11-01</p> <p>The force applied during laryngoscopy can cause local tissue trauma and can induce cardiovascular responses and cervical spine movement in susceptible patients. Previous studies have identified numerous operator and patient factors that influence the amount of force applied during intubation. There are few studies evaluating the effect of different laryngoscope blades and no study involving video laryngoscopes. In this study we measured the forces using two laryngoscopic techniques. Three FlexiForce Sensors (A201-25, Tekscan, Boston, MA, USA) were attached to the concave blade surface of a Macintosh and a <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope laryngoscope. Experienced anaesthetists performed Macintosh and <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope intubations on the Laerdal Airway Management Trainer manikin. Compared to Macintosh intubations, the <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope intubations had equal or superior views of the glottis with 55%, 58% and 66% lower median peak, average and impulse forces applied to the tongue base. The distal sensor registered the most force in both devices and the force distribution pattern was similar between the devices. The findings suggest that the <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope requires less force for similar or better laryngoscopic views, at least in a manikin model.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7255125','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7255125"><span>Digital <span class="hlt">ac</span> monitor</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Hart, G.W.; Kern, E.C. Jr.</p> <p>1987-06-09</p> <p>An apparatus and method is provided for monitoring a plurality of analog <span class="hlt">ac</span> circuits by sampling the voltage and current waveform in each circuit at predetermined intervals, converting the analog current and voltage samples to digital format, storing the digitized current and voltage samples and using the stored digitized current and voltage samples to calculate a variety of electrical parameters; some of which are derived from the stored samples. The non-derived quantities are repeatedly calculated and stored over many separate cycles then averaged. The derived quantities are then calculated at the end of an averaging period. This produces a more accurate reading, especially when averaging over a period in which the power varies over a wide dynamic range. Frequency is measured by timing three cycles of the voltage waveform using the upward zero crossover point as a starting point for a digital timer. 24 figs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/866275','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/866275"><span>Digital <span class="hlt">ac</span> monitor</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Hart, George W.; Kern, Jr., Edward C.</p> <p>1987-06-09</p> <p>An apparatus and method is provided for monitoring a plurality of analog <span class="hlt">ac</span> circuits by sampling the voltage and current waveform in each circuit at predetermined intervals, converting the analog current and voltage samples to digital format, storing the digitized current and voltage samples and using the stored digitized current and voltage samples to calculate a variety of electrical parameters; some of which are derived from the stored samples. The non-derived quantities are repeatedly calculated and stored over many separate cycles then averaged. The derived quantities are then calculated at the end of an averaging period. This produces a more accurate reading, especially when averaging over a period in which the power varies over a wide dynamic range. Frequency is measured by timing three cycles of the voltage waveform using the upward zero crossover point as a starting point for a digital timer.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005IJMPB..19..511J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005IJMPB..19..511J"><span>Cooling Floor <span class="hlt">AC</span> Systems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jun, Lu; Hao, Ding; Hong, Zhang; Ce, Gao Dian</p> <p></p> <p>The present HVAC equipments for the residential buildings in the Hot-summer-and-Cold-winter climate region are still at a high energy consuming level. So that the high efficiency HVAC system is an urgently need for achieving the preset government energy saving goal. With its advantage of highly sanitary, highly comfortable and uniform of temperature field, the hot-water resource floor radiation heating system has been widely accepted. This paper has put forward a new way in air-conditioning, which combines the fresh-air supply unit and such floor radiation system for the dehumidification and cooling in summer or heating in winter. By analyze its advantages and limitations, we found that this so called Cooling/ Heating Floor <span class="hlt">AC</span> System can improve the IAQ of residential building while keep high efficiency quality. We also recommend a methodology for the HVAC system designing, which will ensure the reduction of energy cost of users.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4619082','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4619082"><span>Crawling and <span class="hlt">Gliding</span>: A Computational Model for Shape-Driven Cell Migration</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Niculescu, Ioana; Textor, Johannes; de Boer, Rob J.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Cell migration is a complex process involving many intracellular and extracellular factors, with different cell types adopting sometimes strikingly different morphologies. Modeling realistically behaving cells in tissues is computationally challenging because it implies dealing with multiple levels of complexity. We extend the Cellular Potts Model with an actin-inspired feedback mechanism that allows small stochastic cell rufflings to expand to cell protrusions. This simple phenomenological model produces realistically crawling and deforming amoeboid cells, and <span class="hlt">gliding</span> half-moon shaped keratocyte-like cells. Both cell types can migrate randomly or follow directional cues. They can squeeze in between other cells in densely populated environments or migrate collectively. The model is computationally light, which allows the study of large, dense and heterogeneous tissues containing cells with realistic shapes and migratory properties. PMID:26488304</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28179410','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28179410"><span><span class="hlt">Gliding</span> lizards use the position of the sun to enhance social display.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Klomp, Danielle A; Stuart-Fox, Devi; Das, Indraneil; Ord, Terry J</p> <p>2017-02-01</p> <p>Effective communication requires animal signals to be readily detected by receivers in the environments in which they are typically given. Certain light conditions enhance the visibility of colour signals and these conditions can vary depending on the orientation of the sun and the position of the signaller. We tested whether Draco sumatranus <span class="hlt">gliding</span> lizards modified their position relative to the sun to enhance the conspicuousness of their throat-fan (dewlap) during social display to conspecifics. The dewlap was translucent, and we found that lizards were significantly more likely to orient themselves perpendicular to the sun when displaying. This increases the dewlap's radiance, and likely, its conspicuousness, by increasing the amount of light transmitted through the ornament. This is a rare example of a behavioural adaptation for enhancing the visibility of an ornament to distant receivers. © 2017 The Author(s).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28163873','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28163873"><span>Wake analysis of drag components in <span class="hlt">gliding</span> flight of a jackdaw (Corvus monedula) during moult.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>KleinHeerenbrink, Marco; Hedenström, Anders</p> <p>2017-02-06</p> <p>To maintain the quality of the feathers, birds regularly undergo moult. It is widely accepted that moult affects flight performance, but the specific aerodynamic consequences have received relatively little attention. Here we measured the components of aerodynamic drag from the wake behind a <span class="hlt">gliding</span> jackdaw (Corvus monedula) at different stages of its natural wing moult. We found that span efficiency was reduced (lift induced drag increased) and the wing profile drag coefficient was increased. Both effects best correlated with the corresponding reduction in spanwise camber. The negative effects are partially mitigated by adjustments of wing posture to minimize gaps in the wing, and by weight loss to reduce wing loading. By studying the aerodynamic consequences of moult, we can refine our understanding of the emergence of various moulting strategies found among birds.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017EGUGA..19.4428H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017EGUGA..19.4428H"><span>Gravity <span class="hlt">gliding</span> in the Bay of Mecklenburg? - New seismic data at the North German Basin margin</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Huebscher, Christian; Damm, Volkmar; Engels, Martin; Juhlin, Christopher; Krawczyk, Charlotte; Malinowski, Michal; Noack, Vera; Schnabel, Michael; Seidel, Elisabeth</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>Halotectonic pulses in the Bays of Mecklenburg and Kiel including the Glückstadt Graben have been previously explained by reactive and passive diapirism or differential load, e.g., caused by sub-salt faulting. Salt walls that formed above those sub-salt faults further grew during phases of inversion. Consequently, phases of enhanced halotectonics have been mainly related to the Triassic W-E extension, Jurassic North Sea doming, the Alpine orogeny. The location of salt walls was attributed to deep rooted sub-salt faults. Alternative concepts of salt tectonics have been developed for continental slopes. Salt deformation may start already during the precipitation of the salt due to basin floor tilt, which may result from thermo-tectonic subsidence or from the salt load. As the consequence the emerging salt layer creeps towards the basin center causing internal folding and thrusting ("gravity <span class="hlt">gliding</span>"). The resulting thickness variations of the salt are considered to be significant enough that sedimentation in the depressions directly initiate differential load and passive diapirism. Extensional faulting in the basin margin and diapirism in the central basin continues if basin subsidence continues or if basin margin sedimentation causes differential load on the salt rim ("gravity spreading"). In the course of RV MARIA S. MERIAN expedition MSM52 (BalTec) in March 2016 we imaged the tectonic conditions within the Paleozoic to recent sedimentary strata of the southern Baltic Sea between the North German Basin across the Tornquist Fan with yet unparalleled vertical resolution. The equipment consisted of 8 GI-Guns (70 Hz dominant frequency) as a source array and a digital seismic streamer of 2700 m active length. Due to the short initial offset of 37 meters between the seismic source array and the first active streamer section the data image without gap the subsurface geology from the Paleozoic strata or basement up to the seafloor. A SW-NE striking seismic profiles from</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1213318-glide-plane-symmetry-superconducting-gap-structure-iron-based-superconductors','SCIGOV-DOEP'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1213318-glide-plane-symmetry-superconducting-gap-structure-iron-based-superconductors"><span><span class="hlt">Glide</span>-plane symmetry and superconducting gap structure of iron-based superconductors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/pages">DOE PAGES</a></p> <p>Wang, Yan; Berlijn, Tom; Hirschfeld, Peter J.; ...</p> <p>2015-03-10</p> <p>We consider the effect of <span class="hlt">glide</span>-plane symmetry of the Fe-pnictogen/chalcogen layer in Fe-based superconductors on pairing in spin fluctuation models. Recent theories propose that so-called η-pairing states with nonzero total momentum can be realized and possess such exotic properties as odd parity spin singlet symmetry and time-reversal symmetry breaking. Here we show that when there is orbital weight at the Fermi level from orbitals with even and odd mirror reflection symmetry in z, η pairing is inevitable; however, we conclude from explicit calculation that the gap function appearing in observable quantities is identical to that found in earlier pseudocrystal momentummore » calculations with 1 Fe per unit cell.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1213318','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1213318"><span><span class="hlt">Glide</span>-plane symmetry and superconducting gap structure of iron-based superconductors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Wang, Yan; Berlijn, Tom; Hirschfeld, Peter J.; Scalapino, Douglas J.; Maier, Thomas A.</p> <p>2015-03-10</p> <p>We consider the effect of <span class="hlt">glide</span>-plane symmetry of the Fe-pnictogen/chalcogen layer in Fe-based superconductors on pairing in spin fluctuation models. Recent theories propose that so-called η-pairing states with nonzero total momentum can be realized and possess such exotic properties as odd parity spin singlet symmetry and time-reversal symmetry breaking. Here we show that when there is orbital weight at the Fermi level from orbitals with even and odd mirror reflection symmetry in z, η pairing is inevitable; however, we conclude from explicit calculation that the gap function appearing in observable quantities is identical to that found in earlier pseudocrystal momentum calculations with 1 Fe per unit cell.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JCAMD..23..527K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JCAMD..23..527K"><span>Virtual fragment screening: an exploration of various docking and scoring protocols for fragments using <span class="hlt">Glide</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kawatkar, Sameer; Wang, Hongming; Czerminski, Ryszard; Joseph-McCarthy, Diane</p> <p>2009-08-01</p> <p>Fragment-based drug discovery approaches allow for a greater coverage of chemical space and generally produce high efficiency ligands. As such, virtual and experimental fragment screening are increasingly being coupled in an effort to identify new leads for specific therapeutic targets. Fragment docking is employed to create target-focussed subset of compounds for testing along side generic fragment libraries. The utility of the program <span class="hlt">Glide</span> with various scoring schemes for fragment docking is discussed. Fragment docking results for two test cases, prostaglandin D2 synthase and DNA ligase, are presented and compared to experimental screening data. Self-docking, cross-docking, and enrichment studies are performed. For the enrichment runs, experimental data exists indicating that the docking decoys in fact do not inhibit the corresponding enzyme being examined. Results indicate that even for difficult test cases fragment docking can yield enrichments significantly better than random.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20030066152','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20030066152"><span>Automated CFD Database Generation for a 2nd Generation <span class="hlt">Glide</span>-Back-Booster</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Chaderjian, Neal M.; Rogers, Stuart E.; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Pandya, Shishir A.; Ahmad, Jasim U.; Tejmil, Edward</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>A new software tool, AeroDB, is used to compute thousands of Euler and Navier-Stokes solutions for a 2nd generation <span class="hlt">glide</span>-back booster in one week. The solution process exploits a common job-submission grid environment using 13 computers located at 4 different geographical sites. Process automation and web-based access to the database greatly reduces the user workload, removing much of the tedium and tendency for user input errors. The database consists of forces, moments, and solution files obtained by varying the Mach number, angle of attack, and sideslip angle. The forces and moments compare well with experimental data. Stability derivatives are also computed using a monotone cubic spline procedure. Flow visualization and three-dimensional surface plots are used to interpret and characterize the nature of computed flow fields.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1987afm..conf..417C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1987afm..conf..417C"><span>Optimal heading change with minimum energy loss for a hypersonic <span class="hlt">gliding</span> vehicle</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Calise, Anthony J.; Bae, Gyoung H.</p> <p></p> <p>A three state model is presented for analyzing the problem of optimal changes in heading with minimum energy loss for a hypersonic <span class="hlt">gliding</span> vehicle. A further model order reduction to a single state model is examined using singular perturbation theory. The optimal solution for the reduced problem defines an optimal altitude profile dependent on the current energy of the vehicle, and the corresponding optimal lift and bank angle. A separate boundary layer analysis, based on an expansion of the necessary conditions about the reduced solution, is used to account for altitude and flight path angle dynamics and to derive a guidance law in feedback form. The guidance law is evaluated for a hypothetical vehicle.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19870062344&hterms=hypersonic+glide&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dhypersonic%2Bglide','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19870062344&hterms=hypersonic+glide&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dhypersonic%2Bglide"><span>Optimal heading change with minimum energy loss for a hypersonic <span class="hlt">gliding</span> vehicle</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Calise, Anthony J.; Bae, Gyoung H.</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>A three state model is presented for analyzing the problem of optimal changes in heading with minimum energy loss for a hypersonic <span class="hlt">gliding</span> vehicle. A further model order reduction to a single state model is examined using singular perturbation theory. The optimal solution for the reduced problem defines an optimal altitude profile dependent on the current energy of the vehicle, and the corresponding optimal lift and bank angle. A separate boundary layer analysis, based on an expansion of the necessary conditions about the reduced solution, is used to account for altitude and flight path angle dynamics and to derive a guidance law in feedback form. The guidance law is evaluated for a hypothetical vehicle.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE10010E..3GF','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE10010E..3GF"><span>Treatment by <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc of epoxy resin: preliminary analysis of surface modifications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Faubert, F.; Wartel, M.; Pellerin, N.; Pellerin, S.; Cochet, V.; Regnier, E.; Hnatiuc, B.</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>Treatments with atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma are easy to implement and inexpensive. Among them <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc (GlidArc) remains rarely used in surface treatment of polymers. However, it offers economic and flexible way to treat quickly large areas. In addition the choice of carrier gas makes it possible to bring the active species and other radicals allowing different types of grafting and functionalization of the treated surfaces, for example in order to apply for anti-biofouling prevention. This preliminary work includes analysis of the surface of epoxy resins by infrared spectroscopy: the different affected chemical bonds were studied depending on the duration of treatment. The degree of oxidation (the C/O ratio) is obtained by X-ray microanalysis and contact angle analysis have been performed to determinate the wettability properties of the treated surface. A spectroscopic study of the plasma allows to determine the possible active species in the different zones of the discharge.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26488304','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26488304"><span>Crawling and <span class="hlt">Gliding</span>: A Computational Model for Shape-Driven Cell Migration.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Niculescu, Ioana; Textor, Johannes; de Boer, Rob J</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>Cell migration is a complex process involving many intracellular and extracellular factors, with different cell types adopting sometimes strikingly different morphologies. Modeling realistically behaving cells in tissues is computationally challenging because it implies dealing with multiple levels of complexity. We extend the Cellular Potts Model with an actin-inspired feedback mechanism that allows small stochastic cell rufflings to expand to cell protrusions. This simple phenomenological model produces realistically crawling and deforming amoeboid cells, and <span class="hlt">gliding</span> half-moon shaped keratocyte-like cells. Both cell types can migrate randomly or follow directional cues. They can squeeze in between other cells in densely populated environments or migrate collectively. The model is computationally light, which allows the study of large, dense and heterogeneous tissues containing cells with realistic shapes and migratory properties.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22415215','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22415215"><span>Measurements of 3D slip velocities and plasma column lengths of a <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc discharge</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Zhu, Jiajian; Gao, Jinlong; Ehn, Andreas; Aldén, Marcus; Li, Zhongshan E-mail: alpers@ma.tum.de; Moseev, Dmitry; Kusano, Yukihiro; Salewski, Mirko; Alpers, Andreas E-mail: alpers@ma.tum.de; Gritzmann, Peter; Schwenk, Martin</p> <p>2015-01-26</p> <p>A non-thermal <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc discharge was generated at atmospheric pressure in an air flow. The dynamics of the plasma column and tracer particles were recorded using two synchronized high-speed cameras. Whereas the data analysis for such systems has previously been performed in 2D (analyzing the single camera image), we provide here a 3D data analysis that includes 3D reconstructions of the plasma column and 3D particle tracking velocimetry based on discrete tomography methods. The 3D analysis, in particular, the determination of the 3D slip velocity between the plasma column and the gas flow, gives more realistic insight into the convection cooling process. Additionally, with the determination of the 3D slip velocity and the 3D length of the plasma column, we give more accurate estimates for the drag force, the electric field strength, the power per unit length, and the radius of the conducting zone of the plasma column.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1049887','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1049887"><span>Complete genome sequence of the <span class="hlt">gliding</span>, heparinolytic Pedobacter saltans type strain (113T)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Liolios, Konstantinos; Sikorski, Johannes; Lu, Megan; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, N; Pagani, Ioanna; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Kotsyurbenko, Oleg; Rohde, Manfred; Tindall, Brian; Abt, Birte; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Pedobacter saltans Steyn et al. 1998 is one of currently 32 species in the genus Pedobacter within the family Sphingobacteriaceae. The species is of interest for its isolated location in the tree of life. Like other members of the genus P. saltans is heparinolytic. Cells of P. saltans show a peculiar <span class="hlt">gliding</span>, dancing motility and can be distinguished from other Pedobacter strains by their ability to utilize glycerol and the inability to assimilate D-cellobiose. The ge- nome presented here is only the second completed genome sequence of a type strain from a member of the family Sphingobacteriaceae to be published. The 4,635,236 bp long genome with its 3,854 protein-coding and 67 RNA genes consists of one chromosome, and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MS%26E..234a2012Q','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017MS%26E..234a2012Q"><span>Study on BTT Coordinated Turn Autopilot Design for Reentry <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Vehicle</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Qiang, Li; Yongtao, Shui; Yonghai, Wang; Gang, Wang; Xuguo, Qin</p> <p>2017-09-01</p> <p>Two-loop acceleration yaw-autopilot with a PI compensator and the engineering approximation of sideslip angle rate feedback for autopilot inner-loop are put forward accounted for BTT coordinated turn control of reentry <span class="hlt">gliding</span> vehicle. The effect of turning acceleration to body-frame yaw channel is analyzed deeply, two-loop acceleration yaw-autopilot with a PI compensator is advanced to ensure system rapidity and stability based on minimum output by turning acceleration. The convergence essence of sideslip angle rate feedback is presented, furthermore, the engineering implementation composed by yaw angle rate and feedforward compensator is presented. Finally, the simulation results show that the autopilot design can make sideslip angle to be zero fast, improve the performance of coordinated turn. The design has certain robustness and application value.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JPhD...49o4001W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JPhD...49o4001W"><span>Investigation of hydrocarbon oil transformation by <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc discharge: comparison of batch and recirculated configurations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Whitehead, J. Christopher; Prantsidou, Maria</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>The degradation of liquid dodecane was studied in a <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc discharge (GAD) of humid argon or nitrogen. A batch or recirculating configuration was used. The products in the gaseous and liquid phase were analysed by infrared and chromatography and optical emission spectroscopy was used to identify the excited species in the discharge. The best degradation performance comes from the use of humid N2 but a GAD of humid argon produces fewer gas-phase products but more liquid-phase end-products. A wide range of products such as heavier saturated or unsaturated hydrocarbons both aliphatic and aromatic, and oxidation products mainly alcohols, but also aldehydes, ketones and esters are produced in the liquid-phase. The recirculating treatment mode is more effective than the batch mode increasing the reactivity and changing the product selectivities. Overall, the study shows promising results for the organic liquid waste treatment, especially in the recirculating mode.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PSST...24b2002P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PSST...24b2002P"><span>Gravity effects on a <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc in four noble gases: from normal to hypergravity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Potočňáková, L.; Šperka, J.; Zikán, P.; van Loon, J. J. W. A.; Beckers, J.; Kudrle, V.</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">gliding</span> arc in four noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr) has been studied under previously unexplored conditions of varying artificial gravity, from normal 1 g gravity up to 18 g hypergravity. Significant differences, mainly the visual thickness of the plasma channel, its maximum elongation and general sensitivity to hypergravity conditions, were observed between the discharges in individual gases, resulting from their different atomic weights and related quantities, such as heat conductivity or ionisation potential. Generally, an increase of the artificial gravity level leads to a faster plasma channel movement thanks to stronger buoyant force and a decrease of maximum height reached by the channel due to more intense losses of heat and reactive species. In relation to this, an increase in current and a decrease in absorbed power was observed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930091508','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930091508"><span>Lift and Drag Characteristics and <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Performance of an Autogiro as Determined in Flight</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Wheatley, John B</p> <p>1933-01-01</p> <p>This report presents the results of flight test of the Pitcairn "PCA-2" autogiro. Lift and drag coefficients with the propeller stopped have been determined over approximately a 90 degree range of angles of attack. Based on the sum of fixed-wing and swept-disk areas, the maximum lift coefficient is 0.895, the minimum drag coefficient with propeller stopped is 0.015, and the maximum l/d with propeller stopped is 4.8. Lift coefficients were found also with the propeller delivering positive thrust and did not differ consistently from those found with propeller stopped. Curves of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> performance included in this report show a minimum vertical velocity of 15 feet per second at an air speed of 36 miles per hour and a flight-path angle of -17 degrees. In vertical descent the vertical velocity is 35 feet per second.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5268471','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5268471"><span>Numerical Investigation of Swimmer’s <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Stage with 6-DOF Movement</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Li, Tianzeng; Cai, Wenhao; Zhan, Jiemin</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study is to analyze the motion status of swimmers during their <span class="hlt">gliding</span> stage using a numerical simulation method. This simulation strategy is conducted by solving the 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations using the Realizable k-ε turbulence closure equations in combination with the Six Degrees of Freedom (6-DOF) method. The uneven mass distribution of a swimmer and the roughness of the surface of the body are taken into consideration. The hydrodynamic characteristics and movement characteristics of the swimmers at different launch speeds were analyzed. The calculated results suggest that an optimal instant for starting propulsive movement is when the velocity of the swimmer decreases by 1.75 m/s to 2.0 m/s from an initial horizontal velocity of 3.1 m/s to 3.5 m/s. PMID:28125724</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhRvL.111x8102W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhRvL.111x8102W"><span>Bidirectional Bacterial <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Motility Powered by the Collective Transport of Cell Surface Proteins</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wada, Hirofumi; Nakane, Daisuke; Chen, Hsuan-Yi</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility of Flavobacterium johnsoniae is driven by moving surface adhesive proteins. Recently, these motility components were observed to travel along a closed loop on the cell surface. The mechanism by which such moving surface adhesins give rise to cell motion remains unknown. On the basis of the unique motility properties of F. johnsoniae, we present a generic model for bidirectional motion of rigidly coupled adhesins, which are propelled in opposite directions. Using analytical and numerical methods, we demonstrate that, for a sufficiently large adhesin speed, bidirectional motion arises from spontaneous symmetry breaking. The model also predicts that, close to the bifurcation point, a weak asymmetry in the binding dynamics is sufficient to facilitate directed motility, indicating that the direction of motion could be sensitively regulated internally in response to inhomogeneity of the environment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3236043','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3236043"><span>Complete genome sequence of the <span class="hlt">gliding</span>, heparinolytic Pedobacter saltans type strain (113T)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Liolios, Konstantinos; Sikorski, Johannes; Lu, Meagan; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, Natalia; Pagani, Ioanna; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Kotsyurbenko, Oleg; Rohde, Manfred; Tindall, Brian J.; Abt, Birte; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C.; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Pedobacter saltans Steyn et al. 1998 is one of currently 32 species in the genus Pedobacter within the family Sphingobacteriaceae. The species is of interest for its isolated location in the tree of life. Like other members of the genus P. saltans is heparinolytic. Cells of P. saltans show a peculiar <span class="hlt">gliding</span>, dancing motility and can be distinguished from other Pedobacter strains by their ability to utilize glycerol and the inability to assimilate D-cellobiose. The genome presented here is only the second completed genome sequence of a type strain from a member of the family Sphingobacteriaceae to be published. The 4,635,236 bp long genome with its 3,854 protein-coding and 67 RNA genes consists of one chromosome, and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:22180808</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11949665','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11949665"><span>The effect of lateral ankle sprain on dorsiflexion range of motion, posterior talar <span class="hlt">glide</span>, and joint laxity.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Denegar, Craig R; Hertel, Jay; Fonseca, Jose</p> <p>2002-04-01</p> <p>Retrospective study. Assess range of motion, posterior talar <span class="hlt">glide</span>, and residual joint laxity following ankle sprain in a population of athletes who have returned to unrestricted activity. Lateral ankle sprains occur frequently in athletic populations and the reinjury rate may be as high as 80%. In an effort to better understand risk factors for reinjury, the sequelae to injury in a sample of college athletes were assessed. Twelve athletes with a history of lateral ankle sprain within the last 6 months and who had returned to sport participation were tested. Only athletes who reported never injuring the contralateral ankle were included. The injured and uninjured ankles of subjects were compared for measures of joint laxity, ankle dorsiflexion range of motion, and posterior talar <span class="hlt">glide</span>. Friedman's test of rank order was used to analyze the laxity measures and a MANOVA was used to assess the dorsiflexion and posterior talar <span class="hlt">glide</span> measures. Laxity was significantly greater at the talocrural and subtalar joints of the injured ankles. There were no significant differences in any of the ankle dorsiflexion measurements between injured and uninjured ankles, but posterior talar <span class="hlt">glide</span> was significantly reduced in injured ankles as compared to uninjured ankles. In our sample of subjects, residual ligamentous laxity was commonly found following lateral ankle sprain. Dorsiflexion range of motion was restored in the population studied despite evidence of restricted posterior <span class="hlt">glide</span> of the talocrural joint. Although restoration of physiological range of motion was achieved, residual joint dysfunction persisted. Further research is warranted to elucidate the role of altered arthrokinematics after lateral ankle sprain.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850058313&hterms=Van+der+Pauw&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DVan%2Bder%2BPauw','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850058313&hterms=Van+der+Pauw&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DVan%2Bder%2BPauw"><span>Automated <span class="hlt">ac</span> galvanomagnetic measurement system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Szofran, F. R.; Espy, P. N.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>An automated, <span class="hlt">ac</span> galvanomagnetic measurement system is described. Hall or van der Pauw measurements in the temperature range 10-300 K can be made at a preselected magnetic field without operator attendance. Procedures to validate sample installation and correct operation of other system functions, such as magnetic field and thermometry, are included. Advantages of <span class="hlt">ac</span> measurements are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19700000481','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19700000481"><span>Thermionic triode generates <span class="hlt">ac</span> power</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Kniazzeh, A. G. F.; Scharz, F. C.</p> <p>1970-01-01</p> <p>Electrostatic grid controls conduction cycle of thermionic diode to convert low dc output voltages to high <span class="hlt">ac</span> power without undesirable power loss. An <span class="hlt">ac</span> voltage applied to the grid of this new thermionic triode enables it to convert heat directly into high voltage electrical power.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017FML....1050016S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017FML....1050016S"><span><span class="hlt">Micro-sized</span> K2SiF6:Mn4+ red phosphors for light emitting diodes synthesized by a simple method</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Shi, Yurong; Li, Wan; Wen, Yan</p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Micro-sized</span> K2SiF6:Mn4+ red phosphor was prepared by a simple method. Oleic acid (OA) was used as dispersant and reductant. In a fixed condition of the mole ratio of SiO2/KMnO4, the effects of the volume of OA on the morphology and luminescence properties were studied. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to characterize the phase. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and luminescence spectra were carried out to identify the morphology and the luminescence properties, respectively. The results show that the dispersive particles of K2SiF6:Mn4+ red phosphor ˜ 3μm larger was obtained, which is suitable for industrial applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25714401','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25714401"><span>Nano- and <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> rare-earth carbonates and their use as precursors and sacrificial templates for the synthesis of new innovative materials.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kaczmarek, Anna M; Van Hecke, Kristof; Van Deun, Rik</p> <p>2015-04-21</p> <p>This review focuses on rare-earth carbonate materials of nano- and <span class="hlt">micro-size</span>. It discusses in depth the different types of rare-earth carbonate compounds, diverse synthetic approaches and possibilities for chemical tuning of the size, shape and morphology. The interesting luminescence properties of lanthanide doped rare-earth carbonates and their potential applications for example as efficient white light sources and biolabels are reviewed. Additionally the use of these materials as precursors for the synthesis of nano-/micro-sized oxides, and their application as sacrificial templates for morphology-controlled synthesis of other materials such as YVO4, LaF3, NaYF4 and others is overviewed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10407467','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10407467"><span>Phalangeal morphology of the paromomyidae (?primates, plesiadapiformes): the evidence for <span class="hlt">gliding</span> behavior reconsidered.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hamrick, M W; Rosenman, B A; Brush, J A</p> <p>1999-07-01</p> <p>A comparative morphometric analysis of isolated proximal and intermediate phalanges attributed to the paromomyids Ignacius graybullianus and Phenacolemur simonsi was undertaken to test the hypothesis that these fossil phalanges exhibit evidence of a dermopteran-like interdigital patagium. Linear dimensions were collected for the fossil phalanges and a comparative sample of associated proximal and intermediate phalanges representing extant tree squirrels, tree shrews, dermopterans (colugos), <span class="hlt">gliding</span> rodents and marsupials, and prosimian primates. Quantitative data indicate that the proximal and intermediate phalanges of paromomyids are most similar in their overall shape to those of the dermopteran Cynocephalus. The proximal phalanges of paromomyids and colugos possess well-developed flexor sheath ridges and broad, high shafts, whereas the intermediate phalanges of these taxa are most similar to one another in their trochlear morphology. Discriminant analysis indicates that all of the paromomyid intermediate phalanges resemble those from colugo toes more so than those from colugo fingers. Moreover, the relative length and midshaft proportions of both the proximal and intermediate phalanges of paromomyids closely resemble those of several squirrels that lack an interdigital patagium. The following conclusions are drawn from this study: 1) paromomyids share a number of derived phalangeal features with modern dermopterans that may be indicative of a phylogenetic relationship between them, 2) existing intermediate phalanges of paromomyids are inconsistent with the "mitten <span class="hlt">gliding</span>" hypothesis because they do not possess the distinctive length and midshaft proportions characteristic of colugo manual intermediate phalanges, and 3) paromomyids share with colugos and the scaly-tailed squirrel Anomalurus several aspects of phalangeal morphology functionally related to frequent vertical clinging and climbing on large-diameter arboreal supports.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21161340','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21161340"><span>Foliage chemistry influences tree choice and landscape use of a <span class="hlt">gliding</span> marsupial folivore.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Youngentob, Kara N; Wallis, Ian R; Lindenmayer, David B; Wood, Jeff T; Pope, Matthew L; Foley, William J</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The chemical quality of forage may determine landscape use and habitat quality for some herbivorous species. However, studies that investigate the relationship between foliar chemistry and foraging choices in wild vertebrates are rare. Petauroides volans (the greater glider) is unique among Australian marsupial folivores because it <span class="hlt">glides</span>. It also frequently consumes foliage from both major Eucalyptus subgenera, Eucalyptus (common name "monocalypt") and Symphyomyrtus (common name "symphyomyrtle"), which differ markedly in their foliar chemistry. Such differences are thought to be a product of co-evolution that also led to guild-specific plant secondary metabolite (PSM) specialization among other marsupial eucalypt folivores. To explore whether foliar chemistry influences tree use, we analyzed foliage from eucalypt trees in which we observed P. volans during a radio tracking study and from eucalypt trees in which animals were never observed. We used a combination of chemical assays and near infrared spectrophotometry (NIRS) to determine concentrations of nitrogen (N), in vitro available nitrogen (AvailN), and in vitro digestible dry matter (DDM) from foliage sampled from the monocalypt and symphyomyrtle species, and total formylated phloroglucinol compounds (FPCs) and sideroxylonals (a class of FPCs) from the symphyomyrtle species (FPCs do not occur in monocalypts). Tree size and spatially-dependent, intraspecific variations in sideroxylonals and DDM concentrations in the symphyomyrtle foliage and of N, AvailN, and DDM in the monocalypt species were important indicators of tree use and habitat suitability for P. volans. The results i) demonstrate that guild-specific PSMs do not always lead to guild-specific foraging; ii) provide a compelling co-evolutionary case for the development of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> in P. volans; and iii) have implications for the management and conservation of this and other folivorous species.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25989968','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25989968"><span><span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope vs. C-MAC for Awake Upright Laryngoscopy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Drenguis, Andrea Skye; Carlson, Jestin N</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>Combining video laryngoscopy with awake upright intubation may provide an alternative modality of endotracheal intubation (ETI) that avoids pitfalls associated with traditional ETI. We compared laryngoscopic views and time intervals between the <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope (GVL) and C-MAC video laryngoscopes using a face-to-face technique in awake, upright volunteers. We performed a prospective, randomized, crossover study performing awake upright laryngoscopy on healthy volunteers. Under local anesthesia, participants had awake upright laryngoscopy performed by a resident and attending physician, both operating GVL and C-MAC in random order. We recorded times to first view of the glottis and best view of the glottis, percentage of glottic opening (POGO) score, Cormack-Lehane grade, and number of attempts needed to visualize the glottis. We enrolled 26 subjects, 10 male and 16 female (mean age of 31.9 years). GVL had shorter time to first view of the glottis than the CMAC (median 7 s; interquartile range [IQR]: 6.5-18 s vs. 9 s; IQR: 8-13; p = 0.005). However, time to best view of the glottis was similar between devices (GVL 10.25 s; IQR: 8.5-15 s; CMAC 13 s; IQR: 10-16 s; p = 0.238). GVL had higher POGO median scores (61.25; IQR: 45.5-87.5) compared to C-MAC (5; IQR: 2.5-20.5) (p < 0.001) and improved Cormack-Lehane views (median 1.5 views; IQR: 1-2 views) compared to C-MAC (median 2 views; IQR: 2-3 views; p = 0.001). Number of attempts were similar across devices (median 1; IQR, 1-1.5) for both GVL and C-MAC (p = 0.764). <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope provides superior views to C-MAC in awake upright laryngoscopy in healthy volunteers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1489658','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1489658"><span>A Mutation in Flavobacterium psychrophilum tlpB Inhibits <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Motility and Induces Biofilm Formation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Álvarez, B.; Secades, P.; Prieto, M.; McBride, M. J.; Guijarro, J. A.</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>Flavobacterium psychrophilum is a psychrotrophic, fish-pathogenic bacterium belonging to the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides group. Tn4351-induced mutants deficient in <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility, growth on iron-depleted media, and extracellular proteolytic activity were isolated. Some of these mutants were affected in only one of these characteristics, whereas others had defects in two or more. FP523, a mutant deficient in all of these properties, was studied further. FP523 had a Tn4351 insertion in tlpB (thiol oxidoreductase-like protein gene), which encodes a 41.4-kDa protein whose sequence does not exhibit high levels of similar to the sequences of proteins having known functions. TlpB has two domains; the N-terminal domains has five transmembrane regions, whereas the C-terminal domains has the Cys-X-X-Cys motif and other conserved motifs characteristic of thiol:disulfide oxidoreductases. Quantitative analysis of the thiol groups of periplasmic proteins revealed that TlpB is required for reduction of these groups. The tlpB gene is part of the fpt (F. psychrophilum thiol oxidoreductase) operon that contains two other genes, tlpA and tpiA, which encode a thiol:disulfide oxidoreductase and a triosephosphate isomerase, respectively. FP523 exhibited enhanced biofilm formation and decreased virulence and cytotoxicity. Complementation with the tlpB loci restored the wild-type phenotype. <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> motility and biofilm formation appear to be antagonistic properties, which are both affected by TlpB. PMID:16751514</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17693502','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17693502"><span>Proteins P24 and P41 function in the regulation of terminal-organelle development and <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility in Mycoplasma pneumoniae.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hasselbring, Benjamin M; Krause, Duncan C</p> <p>2007-10-01</p> <p>Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a major cause of bronchitis and atypical pneumonia in humans. This cell wall-less bacterium has a complex terminal organelle that functions in cytadherence and <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility. The <span class="hlt">gliding</span> mechanism is unknown but is coordinated with terminal-organelle development during cell division. Disruption of M. pneumoniae open reading frame MPN311 results in loss of protein P41 and downstream gene product P24. P41 localizes to the base of the terminal organelle and is required to anchor the terminal organelle to the cell body, but during cell division, MPN311 insertion mutants also fail to properly regulate nascent terminal-organelle development spatially or <span class="hlt">gliding</span> activity temporally. We measured <span class="hlt">gliding</span> velocity and frequency and used fluorescent protein fusions and time-lapse imaging to assess the roles of P41 and P24 individually in terminal-organelle development and <span class="hlt">gliding</span> function. P41 was necessary for normal <span class="hlt">gliding</span> velocity and proper spatial positioning of new terminal organelles, while P24 was required for <span class="hlt">gliding</span> frequency and new terminal-organelle formation at wild-type rates. However, P41 was essential for P24 function, and in the absence of P41, P24 exhibited a dynamic localization pattern. Finally, protein P28 requires P41 for stability, but analysis of a P28(-) mutant established that the MPN311 mutant phenotype was not a function of loss of P28.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24094209','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24094209"><span>Characterisation of <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> and nano-sized tungsten oxide-epoxy composites for radiation shielding of diagnostic X-rays.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Azman, N Z Noor; Siddiqui, S A; Low, I M</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Characteristics of X-ray transmissions were investigated for epoxy composites filled with 2-10 vol% WO3 loadings using synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at 10-40 keV. The results obtained were used to determine the equivalent X-ray energies for the operating X-ray tube voltages of mammography and radiology machines. The results confirmed the superior attenuation ability of nano-sized WO3-epoxy composites in the energy range of 10-25 keV when compared to their <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> counterparts. However, at higher synchrotron radiation energies (i.e., 30-40 keV), the X-ray transmission characteristics were similar with no apparent size effect for both nano-sized and <span class="hlt">micro-sized</span> WO3-epoxy composites. The equivalent X-ray energies for the operating X-ray tube voltages of the mammography unit (25-49 kV) were in the range of 15-25 keV. Similarly, for a radiology unit operating at 40-60 kV, the equivalent energy range was 25-40 keV, and for operating voltages greater than 60 kV (i.e., 70-100 kV), the equivalent energy was in excess of 40 keV. The mechanical properties of epoxy composites increased initially with an increase in the filler loading but a further increase in the WO3 loading resulted in deterioration of flexural strength, modulus and hardness.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26745514','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26745514"><span>Graphene Oxide-Assisted Synthesis of <span class="hlt">Microsized</span> Ultrathin Single-Crystalline Anatase TiO2 Nanosheets and Their Application in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chen, Biao; Sha, Junwei; Li, Wei; He, Fang; Liu, Enzuo; Shi, Chunsheng; He, Chunnian; Li, Jiajun; Zhao, Naiqin</p> <p>2016-02-03</p> <p>High-quality <span class="hlt">microsized</span> ultrathin single-crystalline anatase TiO2 nanosheets (MS-TiO2) with exposed {001} facets were synthesized by a facile and low-cost two-step process that combines a graphene oxide (GO)-assisted hydrothermal method with calcination. Both GO and HF play an important role in the formation of well dispersed MS-TiO2. As a novel <span class="hlt">microsized</span> (1-4 μm) ultrathin two-dimensional (2D) material, MS-TiO2 possesses much higher lateral size and aspect ratio compared to common 2D nanosized (30-60 nm) ultrathin TiO2 nanosheets (NS-TiO2), resulting in excellent electronic conductivity and superior electron transfer and diffusion properties. Here, we fabricated MS-TiO2 and NS-TiO2, both of which were incorporated with the TiO2 nanoparticles (P25) to constitute the hybrid photoanode of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), and explored the effect of the lateral size (nano- and micro-) of ultrathin TiO2 nanosheets on their electron transfer and diffusion properties. Benefiting from the faster electron transfer rate and short diffusion path of the MS-TiO2, the MS-TiO2/P25 gains the more superior performance compared to pure P25 and NS-TiO2/P25 in the application of DSSCs. Moreover, it is expected that the novel high aspect ratio MS-TiO2 may be applied in diverse fields including photocatalysis, photodetectors, lithium-ion batteries and others concerning the environment and energy.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016E%26PSL.449...39L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016E%26PSL.449...39L"><span>Source locations of teleseismic P, SV, and SH waves observed in <span class="hlt">microseisms</span> recorded by a large aperture seismic array in China</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Liu, Qiaoxia; Koper, Keith D.; Burlacu, Relu; Ni, Sidao; Wang, Fuyun; Zou, Changqiao; Wei, Yunhao; Gal, Martin; Reading, Anya M.</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>Transversely polarized seismic waves are routinely observed in ambient seismic energy across a wide range of periods, however their origin is poorly understood because the corresponding source regions are either undefined or weakly constrained, and nearly all models of <span class="hlt">microseism</span> generation incorporate a vertically oriented single force as the excitation mechanism. To better understand the origin of transversely polarized energy in the ambient seismic wavefield we make the first systematic attempt to locate the source regions of teleseismic SH waves observed in microseismic (2.5-20 s) noise. We focus on body waves instead of surface waves because the source regions can be constrained in both azimuth and distance using conventional array techniques. To locate microseismic sources of SH waves (as well as SV and P waves) we continuously backproject the vertical, radial, and transverse components of the ambient seismic wavefield recorded by a large-aperture array deployed in China during 2013-2014. As expected, persistent P wave sources are observed in the North Atlantic, North Pacific, and Indian Oceans, mainly at periods of 2.5-10 s, in regions with the strong ocean wave interactions needed to produce secondary <span class="hlt">microseisms</span>. SV waves are commonly observed to originate from locations indistinguishable from the P wave sources, but with smaller signal-to-noise ratios. We also observe SH waves with about half or less the signal-to-noise ratio of SV waves. SH source regions are definitively located in deep water portions of the Pacific, away from the sloping continental shelves that are thought to be important for the generation of microseismic Love waves, but nearby regions that routinely generate teleseismic P waves. The excitation mechanism for the observed SH waves may therefore be related to the interaction of P waves with small-wavelength bathymetric features, such as seamounts and basins, through some sort of scattering process.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ254362.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ254362.pdf"><span>Layoff Handling Still Lags <span class="hlt">ACS</span> Standards.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Chemical and Engineering News, 1981</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>Reviews termination procedures of professional chemists and the compliance of these terminations to the American Chemical Society's (<span class="hlt">ACS</span>'s) Professional Employment Guidelines. Provides the <span class="hlt">ACS</span> guidelines. (DS)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/304444','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/304444"><span><span class="hlt">AC</span> photovoltaic module magnetic fields</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Jennings, C.; Chang, G.J.; Reyes, A.B.; Whitaker, C.M.</p> <p>1997-12-31</p> <p>Implementation of alternating current (<span class="hlt">AC</span>) photovoltaic (PV) modules, particularly for distributed applications such as PV rooftops and facades, may be slowed by public concern about electric and magnetic fields (EMF). This paper documents magnetic field measurements on an <span class="hlt">AC</span> PV module, complementing EMF research on direct-current PV modules conducted by PG and E in 1993. Although not comprehensive, the PV EMF data indicate that 60 Hz magnetic fields (the EMF type of greatest public concern) from PV modules are comparable to, or significantly less than, those from household appliances. Given the present EMF research knowledge, <span class="hlt">AC</span> PV module EMF may not merit considerable concern.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/797119','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/797119"><span>RHIC VERTICAL <span class="hlt">AC</span> DIPOLE COMMISSIONING.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>BAI,M.; DELONG,J.; HOFF,L.; PAI,C.; PEGGS,S.; PIACENTINO,J.; OERTER,B.; ODDO,P.; ROSER,T.; SATOGATA,T.; TRBOJEVIC,D.; ZALTSMAN,A.</p> <p>2002-06-02</p> <p>The RHIC vertical <span class="hlt">ac</span> dipole was installed in the summer of 2001. The magnet is located in the interaction region between sector 3 and sector 4 common to both beams. The resonant frequency of the <span class="hlt">ac</span> dipole was first configured to be around half of the beam revolution frequency to act as a spin flipper. At the end of the RHIC 2002 run, the <span class="hlt">ac</span> dipole frequency was reconfigured for linear optics studies. A 0.35 mm driven betatron oscillation was excited with the vertical <span class="hlt">ac</span> dipole and the vertical betatron functions and phase advances at each beam position monitor (BPM) around the RHIC yellow ring were measured using the excited coherence. We also recorded horizontal turn-by-turn beam positions at each BPM location to investigate coupling effects. Analysis algorithms and measurement results are presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28539482','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28539482"><span>Multi-cored vortices support function of slotted wing tips of birds in <span class="hlt">gliding</span> and flapping flight.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>KleinHeerenbrink, Marco; Johansson, L Christoffer; Hedenström, Anders</p> <p>2017-05-01</p> <p>Slotted wing tips of birds are commonly considered an adaptation to improve soaring performance, despite their presence in species that neither soar nor <span class="hlt">glide</span>. We used particle image velocimetry to measure the airflow around the slotted wing tip of a jackdaw (Corvus monedula) as well as in its wake during unrestrained flight in a wind tunnel. The separated primary feathers produce individual wakes, confirming a multi-slotted function, in both <span class="hlt">gliding</span> and flapping flight. The resulting multi-cored wingtip vortex represents a spreading of vorticity, which has previously been suggested as indicative of increased aerodynamic efficiency. Considering benefits of the slotted wing tips that are specific to flapping flight combined with the wide phylogenetic occurrence of this configuration, we propose the hypothesis that slotted wings evolved initially to improve performance in powered flight. © 2017 The Author(s).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19760026146','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19760026146"><span>Orbiter entry trajectory corridors: 32000 pound payload, 67.5 percent center of gravity. [<span class="hlt">glide</span> path data compilation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Treybig, J. H.</p> <p>1975-01-01</p> <p>Thermal and equilibrium <span class="hlt">glide</span> boundaries were used to analyze and/or design shuttle orbiter entry trajectories. Plots are presented of orbiter thermal and equilibrium <span class="hlt">glide</span> boundaries in the drag/mass-relative velocity dynamic pressure-relative velocity, and altitude-relative velocity planes for an orbiter having a 32,000 pound payload and a 67.5% center of gravity location. These boundaries were defined for control points 1 through 4 of the shuttle orbiter for 40 deg-30 deg and 38 deg-28 deg ramped angle of attack entry profiles and 40 deg, 38 deg, 35 deg, 30 deg, 28 deg, and 25 deg constant angle of attack entry profiles each at 20 deg, 15 deg, and 10 deg constant body flap settings.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11887516','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11887516"><span>Efficacy and safety of BrushPicks, a new cleaning aid, compared to the use of <span class="hlt">Glide</span> floss.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yankell, Samuel L; Shi, Xiuren; Emling, Robert C</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>The objective of this double-blind, four-week clinical study was to evaluate the efficacy of BrushPicks, a new cleaning aid, and <span class="hlt">Glide</span> floss on the reduction of plaque area, gingivitis and bleeding on probing, and to monitor safety when these products were used in addition to toothbrushing with an ADA-Accepted toothbrush (Oral-B P35) and an ADA-Accepted fluoride-containing dentifrice (Crest Regular). No special instructions on or supervision of product use was conducted, other than requesting twice-a-day (morning and evening) use of the assigned products. Following a baseline examination, 63 qualifying adult male and female subjects from the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania area were randomized into two groups. Subjects were also told to use their assigned dental aid after each toothbrushing. Examinations for efficacy and safety were repeated after two and four weeks' use of the products. Sixty-two subjects completed all aspects of the study. There were no untoward side effects attributed to product use, reported or observed, at the two- or four-week examination times. At baseline, there were no significant differences in plaque, gingivitis or bleeding on probing mean scores between the BrushPicks and <span class="hlt">Glide</span> floss groups. At the two- and four-week evaluation times, both the BrushPicks and <span class="hlt">Glide</span> floss had numerically lower plaque scores compared to baseline levels. The only statistically significant reduction (p < 0.01) was in the BrushPicks group, comparing the week two mean with the baseline value. Gingivitis (GI) at four weeks was statistically (p < 0.05) lower in the BrushPicks group as compared to the <span class="hlt">Glide</span> floss mean value. When the changes in scores from baseline to two weeks and to four weeks were assessed, the mean GI score for the <span class="hlt">Glide</span> floss group was significantly lower at two weeks (p < 0.01) compared to baseline, and also from two weeks to four weeks (p < 0.001). The change in mean GI score for the <span class="hlt">Glide</span> floss group from baseline to four weeks was also</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20014963','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20014963"><span>Effect of non-<span class="hlt">glide</span> components of the stress tensor on deformation behavior of bcc transition metals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ito, K.; Vitek, V.</p> <p>1999-07-01</p> <p>In this paper the authors demonstrate by atomic computer simulation that the non-Schmid slip behavior in bcc metals is a direct consequence of the non-planar core structure of 1/2<111> screw dislocations and their response to the applied stress tensor. The analysis has been carried out in detail for tantalum using the Finnis-Sinclair type central force many-body potentials. Two distinct non-Schmid effects have been discerned. The first is twinning-antitwinning slip asymmetry on {l{underscore}brace}112{r{underscore}brace} planes. This is an intrinsic property of the bcc structure and depends on the sense of the applied <span class="hlt">glide</span> stress. The second non-Schmid effect is extrinsic and is controlled by the non-<span class="hlt">glide</span> shear stresses perpendicular to the total Burgers vector on {l{underscore}brace}110{r{underscore}brace} planes into which the stress-free core of screw dislocations spread.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22300149','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22300149"><span>Interlayer-<span class="hlt">glide</span>-driven isosymmetric phase transition in compressed In{sub 2}Se{sub 3}</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ke, Feng; Liu, Cailong; Zhang, Junkai; Han, Yonghao; Gao, Chunxiao; Gao, Yang; Ma, Yanzhang; Tan, Dayong; Shu, Jinfu; Yang, Wenge; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Chen, Bin; Chen, Xiao-Jia</p> <p>2014-05-26</p> <p>We report an anomalous phase transition in compressed In{sub 2}Se{sub 3}. The high-pressure studies indicate that In{sub 2}Se{sub 3} transforms to a new isosymmetric R-3m structure at 0.8 GPa whilst the volume collapses by ∼7%. This phase transition involves a pressure-induced interlayer shear <span class="hlt">glide</span> with respect to one another. Consequently, the outer Se atoms of one sheet locate into the interstitial sites of three Se atoms in the neighboring sheets that are weakly connected by van der Waals interaction. Interestingly, this interlayer shear <span class="hlt">glide</span> changes the stacking sequence significantly but leaves crystal symmetry unaffected. This study provides an insight to the mechanisms of the intriguing isosymmetric phase transition.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1348155','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1348155"><span>Reduced dislocation density in Ga<sub>x</sub>In<sub>1–x</sub>P compositionally graded buffer layers through engineered <span class="hlt">glide</span> plane switch</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Schulte, Kevin L.; France, Ryan M.; McMahon, William E.; Norman, Andrew G.; Guthrey, Harvey L.; Geisz, John F.</p> <p>2016-11-17</p> <p>In this work we develop control over dislocation <span class="hlt">glide</span> dynamics in Ga<sub>x</sub>In<sub>1-x</sub>P compositionally graded buffer layers (CGBs) through control of CuPt ordering on the group-III sublattice. The ordered structure is metastable in the bulk, so any glissile dislocation that disrupts the ordered pattern will release stored energy, and experience an increased <span class="hlt">glide</span> force. Here we show how this connection between atomic ordering and dislocation <span class="hlt">glide</span> force can be exploited to control the threading dislocation density (TDD) in Ga<sub>x</sub>In<sub>1-x</sub>P CGBs. When ordered Ga<sub>x</sub>In<sub>1-x</sub>P is graded from the GaAs lattice constant to InP, the order parameter ..eta.. decreases as x decreases, and dislocation <span class="hlt">glide</span> switches from one set of <span class="hlt">glide</span> planes to the other. This <span class="hlt">glide</span> plane switch (GPS) is accompanied by the nucleation of dislocations on the new <span class="hlt">glide</span> plane, which typically leads to increased TDD. We develop control of the GPS position within a Ga<sub>x</sub>In<sub>1-x</sub>P CGB through manipulation of deposition temperature, surfactant concentration, and strain-grading rate. We demonstrate a two-stage Ga<sub>x</sub>In<sub>1-x</sub>P CGB from GaAs to InP with sufficiently low TDD for high performance devices, such as the 4-junction inverted metamorphic multi-junction solar cell, achieved through careful control the GPS position. Here, experimental results are analyzed within the context of a model that considers the force balance on dislocations on the two competing <span class="hlt">glide</span> planes as a function of the degree of ordering.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1348155-reduced-dislocation-density-gaxin1xp-compositionally-graded-buffer-layers-through-engineered-glide-plane-switch','SCIGOV-DOEP'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1348155-reduced-dislocation-density-gaxin1xp-compositionally-graded-buffer-layers-through-engineered-glide-plane-switch"><span>Reduced dislocation density in GaxIn1–xP compositionally graded buffer layers through engineered <span class="hlt">glide</span> plane switch</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/pages">DOE PAGES</a></p> <p>Schulte, Kevin L.; France, Ryan M.; McMahon, William E.; ...</p> <p>2016-11-17</p> <p>In this work we develop control over dislocation <span class="hlt">glide</span> dynamics in GaxIn1-xP compositionally graded buffer layers (CGBs) through control of CuPt ordering on the group-III sublattice. The ordered structure is metastable in the bulk, so any glissile dislocation that disrupts the ordered pattern will release stored energy, and experience an increased <span class="hlt">glide</span> force. Here we show how this connection between atomic ordering and dislocation <span class="hlt">glide</span> force can be exploited to control the threading dislocation density (TDD) in GaxIn1-xP CGBs. When ordered GaxIn1-xP is graded from the GaAs lattice constant to InP, the order parameter ..eta.. decreases as x decreases, andmore » dislocation <span class="hlt">glide</span> switches from one set of <span class="hlt">glide</span> planes to the other. This <span class="hlt">glide</span> plane switch (GPS) is accompanied by the nucleation of dislocations on the new <span class="hlt">glide</span> plane, which typically leads to increased TDD. We develop control of the GPS position within a GaxIn1-xP CGB through manipulation of deposition temperature, surfactant concentration, and strain-grading rate. We demonstrate a two-stage GaxIn1-xP CGB from GaAs to InP with sufficiently low TDD for high performance devices, such as the 4-junction inverted metamorphic multi-junction solar cell, achieved through careful control the GPS position. Here, experimental results are analyzed within the context of a model that considers the force balance on dislocations on the two competing <span class="hlt">glide</span> planes as a function of the degree of ordering.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=25631','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=25631"><span>Time-Lapse Video Microscopy of <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Motility in Toxoplasma gondii Reveals a Novel, Biphasic Mechanism of Cell LocomotionV⃞</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Håkansson, Sebastian; Morisaki, Hiroshi; Heuser, John; Sibley, L. David</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>Toxoplasma gondii is a member of the phylum Apicomplexa, a diverse group of intracellular parasites that share a unique form of <span class="hlt">gliding</span> motility. <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> is substrate dependent and occurs without apparent changes in cell shape and in the absence of traditional locomotory organelles. Here, we demonstrate that <span class="hlt">gliding</span> is characterized by three distinct forms of motility: circular <span class="hlt">gliding</span>, upright twirling, and helical rotation. Circular <span class="hlt">gliding</span> commences while the crescent-shaped parasite lies on its right side, from where it moves in a counterclockwise manner at a rate of ∼1.5 μm/s. Twirling occurs when the parasite rights itself vertically, remaining attached to the substrate by its posterior end and spinning clockwise. Helical <span class="hlt">gliding</span> is similar to twirling except that it occurs while the parasite is positioned horizontally, resulting in forward movement that follows the path of a corkscrew. The parasite begins lying on its left side (where the convex side is defined as dorsal) and initiates a clockwise revolution along the long axis of the crescent-shaped body. Time-lapse video analyses indicated that helical <span class="hlt">gliding</span> is a biphasic process. During the first 180o of the turn, the parasite moves forward one body length at a rate of ∼1–3 μm/s. In the second phase, the parasite flips onto its left side, in the process undergoing little net forward motion. All three forms of motility were disrupted by inhibitors of actin filaments (cytochalasin D) and myosin ATPase (butanedione monoxime), indicating that they rely on an actinomyosin motor in the parasite. <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> motility likely provides the force for active penetration of the host cell and may participate in dissemination within the host and thus is of both fundamental and practical interest. PMID:10564254</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA530917','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/ADA530917"><span>Development of Non-Equilibrium Plasma-Flame Kinetic Mechanism and its Validation Using <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Arc Integrated with Counterflow Burner</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.dtic.mil/">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-02-21</p> <p>FINAL REPORT: FA9550-07-1-0136, Dec. 2006 – Nov. 2009 Development of Non-Equilibrium Plasma-Flame Kinetic Mechanism and its...Non-Equilibrium Plasma-Flame Kinetic 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Mechanism and its Validation Using <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Arc Integrated with FA9550-07-1...DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY STATEMENT 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Kinetic enhancements of NOx, O3, and O2(a1Δg) on ignition and flame propagation</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22495084','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22495084"><span>An adult patient with Klippel-Feil syndrome presenting for repeat operation: a cautionary tale of the <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Serdiuk, Andrew A; Bosek, Voytek</p> <p>2012-05-01</p> <p>The introduction of video laryngoscopes has increased the success of intubating the difficult airway. However, failures have been reported in the literature that are associated with certain patient characteristics. Klippel-Feil Syndrome is a condition that typically presents with decreased cervical spine motion, a characteristic that has been associated with <span class="hlt">Glide</span>Scope failure. After an uneventful first anesthetic, a case of a near impossible-to-intubate occurred in a patient with Klippel-Feil Syndrome.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19980228460','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19980228460"><span>Problems Involved in an Emergency Method of Guiding a <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> Vehicle from High Altitudes to a High Key Position</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Jewel, Joseph W., Jr.; Whitten, James B.</p> <p>1960-01-01</p> <p>An investigation has been conducted to determine the problems involved in an emergency method of guiding a <span class="hlt">gliding</span> vehicle from high altitudes to a high key position (initial position) above a landing field. A jet airplane in a simulated flameout condition, conventional ground-tracking radar, and a scaled wire for guidance programming on the radar plotting board were used in the tests. Starting test altitudes varied from 30,000 feet to 46,500 feet, and starting positions ranged 8.4 to 67 nautical miles from the high key. Specified altitudes of the high key were 12,000, 10,000 or 4,000 feet. Lift-drag ratios of the aircraft of either 17, 16, or 6 were held constant during any given flight; however, for a few flights the lift-drag ratio was varied from 11 to 6. Indicated airspeeds were held constant at either 160 or 250 knots. Results from these tests indicate that a <span class="hlt">gliding</span> vehicle having a lift-drag ratio of 16 and an indicated approach speed of 160 knots can be guided to within 800 feet vertically and 2,400 feet laterally of a high key position. When the lift-drag ratio of the vehicle is reduced to 6 and the indicated approach speed is raised to 250 knots, the radar controller was able to guide the vehicle to within 2,400 feet vertically and au feet laterally of the high key. It was also found that radar stations which give only azimuth-distance information could control the <span class="hlt">glide</span> path of a <span class="hlt">gliding</span> vehicle as well as stations that receive azimuth-distance-altitude information, provided that altitude information is supplied by the pilot.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26472675','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26472675"><span>Apical Transportation, Centering Ability, and Cleaning Effectiveness of Reciprocating Single-file System Associated with Different <span class="hlt">Glide</span> Path Techniques.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>de Carvalho, Guilherme Moreira; Sponchiado Junior, Emílio Carlos; Garrido, Angela Delfina Bittencourt; Lia, Raphael Carlos Comelli; Garcia, Lucas da Fonseca Roberti; Marques, André Augusto Franco</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>The aim of this study was to evaluate the apical transportation, the centering ability, and the cleaning effectiveness of a reciprocating single-file system associated to different <span class="hlt">glide</span> path techniques. The mesial root canals of 52 mandibular molars were randomly distributed into 4 groups (n = 13) according to the different <span class="hlt">glide</span> path techniques used before biomechanical preparation with Reciproc System (RS): KF/RS (sizes 10 and 15 K-files), NGP/RS (no <span class="hlt">glide</span> path, only reciprocating system), PF/RS (sizes 13, 16, and 19 PathFile instruments), and NP (no preparation). Cone-beam computed tomography analysis was performed before and after instrumentation for apical third images acquisition. Apical transportation and its direction were evaluated by using the formula D = (X1 - X2) - (Y1 - Y2), and the centering ability was analyzed by the formula CC = (X1 - X2/Y1 - Y2 or Y1 - Y2/X1 - X2). The samples were submitted to histologic processing and analyzed under a digital microscope for debris quantification. The values were statistically analyzed (Kruskal-Wallis, the Dunn multiple comparisons test, P < .05). All groups had similar apical transportation values, with no significant difference among them (P > .05). Groups had a tendency toward transportation in the mesial direction. No technique had perfect centering ability (=1.0), with no significant difference among them. KF/RS had larger amount of debris, with statistically significant difference in comparison with NGP/RS (P > .05). The different <span class="hlt">glide</span> path techniques promoted minimal apical transportation, and the reciprocating single-file system tested remained relatively centralized within the root canal. Also, the different techniques interfered in the cleaning effectiveness of the reciprocating system. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26315068','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26315068"><span>Longitudinal <span class="hlt">Gliding</span> of the Median Nerve in the Carpal Tunnel: Ultrasound Cadaveric Evaluation of Conventional and Novel Concepts of Nerve Mobilization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Meng, Stefan; Reissig, Lukas F; Beikircher, Reinhard; Tzou, Chieh-Han John; Grisold, Wolfgang; Weninger, Wolfgang J</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>To evaluate median nerve excursion during conventional nerve <span class="hlt">gliding</span> exercises and newly developed exercises, primarily comprising abduction and adduction of the fingers. Descriptive study. Anatomical dissection facility. Random sample of upper extremities of fresh whole-body human cadavers (N=18). Cadavers with neuromuscular diseases in the medical record or anatomic variations were excluded. Conventional and new nerve <span class="hlt">gliding</span> exercises. Distances between markers applied into the nerve and markers in the periosteum were visualized with ultrasound and measured. Comparisons of nerve excursions between different exercises were performed. Conventional exercises led to substantial nerve <span class="hlt">gliding</span> proximal to the carpal tunnel and between the head of the pronator teres (12 and 13.8mm, respectively), but it led to far less in the carpal tunnel (6.6mm). With our novel exercises, we achieved nerve <span class="hlt">gliding</span> in the carpal tunnel of 13.8mm. No substantial marker movement could be detected during lateral flexion of the cervical spine. Although conventional nerve <span class="hlt">gliding</span> exercises only lead to minimal nerve excursions in the carpal tunnel, our novel exercises with the abduction and adduction of the fingers result in substantial longitudinal <span class="hlt">gliding</span> throughout the arm. Clinical trials will have to deliver the clinical evidence. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4321159','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4321159"><span>A Middle Triassic thoracopterid from China highlights the evolutionary origin of overwater <span class="hlt">gliding</span> in early ray-finned fishes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Xu, Guang-Hui; Zhao, Li-Jun; Shen, Chen-Chen</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Gliding</span> adaptations in thoracopterid flying fishes represent a remarkable case of convergent evolution of overwater <span class="hlt">gliding</span> strategy with modern exocoetid flying fishes, but the evolutionary origin of this strategy was poorly known in the thoracopterids because of lack of transitional forms. Until recently, all thoracopterids, from the Late Triassic of Austria and Italy and the Middle Triassic of South China, were highly specialized ‘four-winged’ gliders in having wing-like paired fins and an asymmetrical caudal fin with the lower caudal lobe notably larger than the upper lobe. Here, we show that the new genus Wushaichthys and the previously alleged ‘peltopleurid’ Peripeltopleurus, from the Middle Triassic (Ladinian, 235–242 Ma) of South China and near the Ladinian/Anisian boundary of southern Switzerland and northern Italy, respectively, represent the most primitive and oldest known thoracopterids. Wushaichthys, the most basal thoracopterid, shows certain derived features of this group in the skull. Peripeltopleurus shows a condition intermediate between Wushaichthys and Thoracopterus in having a slightly asymmetrical caudal fin but still lacking wing-like paired fins. Phylogenetic studies suggest that the evolution of overwater <span class="hlt">gliding</span> of thoracopterids was gradual in nature; a four-stage adaption following the ‘cranial specialization–asymmetrical caudal fin–enlarged paired fins–scale reduction’ sequence has been recognized in thoracopterid evolution. Moreover, Wushaichthys and Peripeltopleurus bear hooklets on the anal fin of supposed males, resembling those of modern viviparious teleosts. Early thoracopterids probably had evolved a live-bearing reproductive strategy. PMID:25568155</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_25 --> <center> <div class="footer-extlink text-muted"><small>Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site.</small> </div> </center> <div id="footer-wrapper"> <div class="footer-content"> <div id="footerOSTI" class=""> <div class="row"> <div class="col-md-4 text-center col-md-push-4 footer-content-center"><small><a href="http://www.science.gov/disclaimer.html">Privacy and Security</a></small> <div class="visible-sm visible-xs push_footer"></div> </div> <div class="col-md-4 text-center col-md-pull-4 footer-content-left"> <img src="https://www.osti.gov/images/DOE_SC31.png" alt="U.S. Department of Energy" usemap="#doe" height="31" width="177"><map style="display:none;" name="doe" id="doe"><area shape="rect" coords="1,3,107,30" href="http://www.energy.gov" alt="U.S. Deparment of Energy"><area shape="rect" coords="114,3,165,30" href="http://www.science.energy.gov" alt="Office of Science"></map> <a ref="http://www.osti.gov" style="margin-left: 15px;"><img src="https://www.osti.gov/images/footerimages/ostigov53.png" alt="Office of Scientific and Technical Information" height="31" width="53"></a> <div class="visible-sm visible-xs push_footer"></div> </div> <div class="col-md-4 text-center footer-content-right"> <a href="http://www.science.gov"><img src="https://www.osti.gov/images/footerimages/scigov77.png" alt="science.gov" height="31" width="98"></a> <a href="http://worldwidescience.org"><img src="https://www.osti.gov/images/footerimages/wws82.png" alt="WorldWideScience.org" height="31" width="90"></a> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <p><br></p> </div><!-- container --> <script type="text/javascript"><!-- // var lastDiv = ""; function showDiv(divName) { // hide last div if (lastDiv) { document.getElementById(lastDiv).className = "hiddenDiv"; } //if value of the box is not nothing and an object with that name exists, then change the class if (divName && document.getElementById(divName)) { document.getElementById(divName).className = "visibleDiv"; lastDiv = divName; } } //--> </script> <script> /** * Function that tracks a click on an outbound link in Google Analytics. * This function takes a valid URL string as an argument, and uses that URL string * as the event label. */ var trackOutboundLink = function(url,collectionCode) { try { h = window.open(url); setTimeout(function() { ga('send', 'event', 'topic-page-click-through', collectionCode, url); }, 1000); } catch(err){} }; </script> <!-- Google Analytics --> <script> (function(i,s,o,g,r,a,m){i['GoogleAnalyticsObject']=r;i[r]=i[r]||function(){ (i[r].q=i[r].q||[]).push(arguments)},i[r].l=1*new Date();a=s.createElement(o), m=s.getElementsByTagName(o)[0];a.async=1;a.src=g;m.parentNode.insertBefore(a,m) })(window,document,'script','//www.google-analytics.com/analytics.js','ga'); ga('create', 'UA-1122789-34', 'auto'); ga('send', 'pageview'); </script> <!-- End Google Analytics --> <script> showDiv('page_1') </script> </body> </html>