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Sample records for ac permeability measurements

  1. Ac Permeability Measurement for Inter- and Intragrain Critical Current Densities in Oxide Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Teruo; Ni, Baorong

    1989-03-01

    A simple measuring method to discriminate between inter- and intragrain current densities in oxide superconductors under given magnetic fields and temperatures is proposed. This is a measurement of the imaginary part of the ac permeability or susceptibility as a function of the ac field amplitude. In this method, the analysis used to derive the penetration depth of the ac field in Campbell’s method or the waveform analysis method is not necessary. This method is useful when the value of the penetration field into the grains and that into the bulk specimen are remarkably different.

  2. AC resistance measuring instrument

    DOEpatents

    Hof, P.J.

    1983-10-04

    An auto-ranging AC resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an AC excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance. After the auto-ranging and auto-compensation functions are complete, the microprocessor calculates the resistance of the load from the selected range resistance, the excitation signal, and the load voltage signal, and displays of the measured resistance on a digital display of the instrument. 8 figs.

  3. AC Resistance measuring instrument

    DOEpatents

    Hof, Peter J.

    1983-01-01

    An auto-ranging AC resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an AC excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance. After the auto-ranging and auto-compensation functions are complete, the microprocessor calculates the resistance of the load from the selected range resistance, the excitation signal, and the load voltage signal, and displays of the measured resistance on a digital display of the instrument.

  4. Automated ac galvanomagnetic measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szofran, F. R.; Espy, P. N.

    1985-01-01

    An automated, ac galvanomagnetic measurement system is described. Hall or van der Pauw measurements in the temperature range 10-300 K can be made at a preselected magnetic field without operator attendance. Procedures to validate sample installation and correct operation of other system functions, such as magnetic field and thermometry, are included. Advantages of ac measurements are discussed.

  5. ac-resistance-measuring instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Hof, P.J.

    1981-04-22

    An auto-ranging ac resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an ac excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance.

  6. The evaluation of rock permeability with streaming current measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Hu, Hengshan; Guan, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Rock permeability is an important parameter for the formation evaluation. In this paper, a new method with streaming current is proposed to determine the sample permeability based on the electrokinetic effects, and is proved by the experimental measurements. Corresponding to this method, we have designed an experimental setup and a test system, then performed the streaming current (potential) and electro-osmosis pressure experiments with 23 sandstone samples at 0.05 mol l-1 NaCl solution. The streaming current (potential) coefficient and electro-osmosis pressure coefficient are obtained, respectively, with the experimental data at low frequencies with AC lock-in technique. The electrokinetic permeabilities are further calculated with these coefficients. The results are consistent well with the gas permeability measured with Darcy's law, which verifies the current method for estimating rock permeability. Our measurements are also analysed and compared with previous measurements. The results indicate that our method can reflect the essence of electrokinetic effects better and simplify the electrokinetic measurements as well. In addition, we discuss the influences of experimental artefacts (core holder and confining pressure installation) on the electrokinetic data. The results show that the trough phenomenon, appeared in frequency curves of streaming current (potential) coefficients, is induced by the resonance of the core-holder/vibrator system. This is important for the design of electrokinetic setup and the analysis of low-frequency response of the electrokinetic coupling coefficients.

  7. Calibrating NMR measured porosity/permeability relationships using µXRCT measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, H. E.; Smith, M. M.; Hao, Y.; Carroll, S.

    2015-12-01

    Carbonate reservoirs have garnered interest for potential use in carbon capture and storage (CCS) activities. To be suitable for long term carbon dioxide (CO2) storage, they must possess sufficient permeability either through existing connected pore space, or due to reactivity with CO2-acidified fluids. Adequate assessment of the target formation permeability will rely on accurate downhole well-logging tools. Primary among these tools is nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) well-logging. Application of this tool relies on our ability to relate the porosity and pore distributions measured by NMR to permeability. These methods are challenging to apply in carbonate reservoirs with complex mineralogies where pores sizes often span orders of magnitudes. We have assessed the ability of NMR methods to measure permeability using rocks from the Weyburn-Midale CO2 Monitoring and Storage Project Saskatchewan, Canada and the Arbuckle injection zone at the Wellington CO2 storage demonstration site, Kansas. Results of laboratory measured permeability values of these rocks indicate that the standard NMR methods for predicting permeability values can produce values off by orders of magnitude within the same flow units. In this presentation, we present the results of a combined NMR and micro X-ray computed tomography (μXRCT) study of these rock cores to better estimate downhole permeability values of carbonate rocks. The results of the study suggest that the dramatic differences in predicted permeability values derive from large differences in the matrix porosity, pore network tortuosities, and mineralogy of the various rock units. We will present new laboratory measurements, and methodologies aimed at producing a universal NMR calibration procedure for determining permeability in carbonate reservoirs. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. PERMEABILITY OF SALTSTONE MEASUREMENT BY BEAM BENDING

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J; Tommy Edwards, T; Vickie Williams, V

    2008-01-30

    One of the goals of the Saltstone variability study is to identify (and, quantify the impact of) the operational and compositional variables that control or influence the important processing and performance properties of Saltstone mixes. A performance property for Saltstone mixes that is important but not routinely measured is the liquid permeability or saturated hydraulic conductivity of the cured Saltstone mix. The value for the saturated hydraulic conductivity is an input into the Performance Assessment for the SRS Z-Area vaults. Therefore, it is important to have a method available that allows for an accurate and reproducible measurement of permeability quickly and inexpensively. One such method that could potentially meet these requirements for the measurement of saturated hydraulic conductivity is the technique of beam bending, developed by Professor George Scherer at Princeton University. In order to determine the feasibility of this technique for Saltstone mixes, a summer student, David Feliciano, was hired to work at Princeton under the direction of George Scherer. This report details the results of this study which demonstrated the feasibility and applicability of the beam bending method to measurement of permeability of Saltstone samples. This research effort used samples made at Princeton from a Modular Caustic side solvent extraction Unit based simulant (MCU) and premix at a water to premix ratio of 0.60. The saturated hydraulic conductivities for these mixes were measured by the beam bending technique and the values determined were of the order of 1.4 to 3.4 x 10{sup -9} cm/sec. These values of hydraulic conductivity are consistent with independently measured values of this property on similar MCU based mixes by Dixon and Phifer. These values are also consistent with the hydraulic conductivity of a generic Saltstone mix measured by Langton in 1985. The high water to premix ratio used for Saltstone along with the relatively low degree of hydration for

  9. Gas permeability measurements for film envelope materials

    DOEpatents

    Ludtka, G.M.; Kollie, T.G.; Watkin, D.C.; Walton, D.G.

    1998-05-12

    Method and apparatus for measuring the permeability of polymer film materials such as used in super-insulation powder-filled evacuated panels (PEPs) reduce the time required for testing from several years to weeks or months. The method involves substitution of a solid non-outgassing body having a free volume of between 0% and 25% of its total volume for the usual powder in the PEP to control the free volume of the ``body-filled panel.`` Pressure versus time data for the test piece permit extrapolation to obtain long term performance of the candidate materials. 4 figs.

  10. Gas permeability measurements for film envelope materials

    DOEpatents

    Ludtka, Gerard M.; Kollie, Thomas G.; Watkin, David C.; Walton, David G.

    1998-01-01

    Method and apparatus for measuring the permeability of polymer film materials such as used in super-insulation powder-filled evacuated panels (PEPs) reduce the time required for testing from several years to weeks or months. The method involves substitution of a solid non-outgassing body having a free volume of between 0% and 25% of its total volume for the usual powder in the PEP to control the free volume of the "body-filled panel". Pressure versus time data for the test piece permit extrapolation to obtain long term performance of the candidate materials.

  11. Comparative field permeability measurement of permeable pavements using ASTM C1701 and NCAT permeameter methods.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Kayhanian, Masoud; Harvey, John T

    2013-03-30

    Fully permeable pavement is gradually gaining support as an alternative best management practice (BMP) for stormwater runoff management. As the use of these pavements increases, a definitive test method is needed to measure hydraulic performance and to evaluate clogging, both for performance studies and for assessment of permeability for construction quality assurance and maintenance needs assessment. Two of the most commonly used permeability measurement tests for porous asphalt and pervious concrete are the National Center for Asphalt Technology (NCAT) permeameter and ASTM C1701, respectively. This study was undertaken to compare measured values for both methods in the field on a variety of permeable pavements used in current practice. The field measurements were performed using six experimental section designs with different permeable pavement surface types including pervious concrete, porous asphalt and permeable interlocking concrete pavers. Multiple measurements were performed at five locations on each pavement test section. The results showed that: (i) silicone gel is a superior sealing material to prevent water leakage compared with conventional plumbing putty; (ii) both methods (NCAT and ASTM) can effectively be used to measure the permeability of all pavement types and the surface material type will not impact the measurement precision; (iii) the permeability values measured with the ASTM method were 50-90% (75% on average) lower than those measured with the NCAT method; (iv) the larger permeameter cylinder diameter used in the ASTM method improved the reliability and reduced the variability of the measured permeability.

  12. Fluid permeability measurement system and method

    DOEpatents

    Hallman, Jr., Russell Louis; Renner, Michael John

    2008-02-05

    A system for measuring the permeance of a material. The permeability of the material may also be derived. The system provides a liquid or high concentration fluid bath on one side of a material test sample, and a gas flow across the opposing side of the material test sample. The mass flow rate of permeated fluid as a fraction of the combined mass flow rate of gas and permeated fluid is used to calculate the permeance of the material. The material test sample may be a sheet, a tube, or a solid shape. Operational test conditions may be varied, including concentration of the fluid, temperature of the fluid, strain profile of the material test sample, and differential pressure across the material test sample.

  13. Comparison of Steady State Method and Transient Methods for Water Permeability Measurement in Low Permeability Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulin, P. F.; Bretonnier, P.; Gland, N.

    2010-12-01

    Very low permeability geomaterials (order of nanoDarcy (10-21 m2)), such as clays rocks, are studied for many industrial applications such as production from unconventional reserves of oil and gas, CO2 geological storage and deep geological disposal of high-level long-lived nuclear wastes. For these last two applications, clay efficiency as barrier relies mainly on their very low permeability. Laboratory measurement of low permeability to water (below 10-19 m2) remains a technical challenge. Some authors argue that steady state methods are irrelevant due to the time required to stabilize water fluxes in such low permeability media. Most of the authors measuring low permeabilities use a transient technique called pulse decay. This study aims to compare objectively these different types of permeability tests performed on a single clay sample. For the steady state method, a high precision pump was used to impose a pressure gradient and to measure the small resulting water flow rate at steady state. We show that with a suitable set-up, the steady state method enables to measure a very low permeability of 8 10-22 m2 in a period of three days. For a comparable duration, the pulse decay test, most commonly used for such low permeability measurements, provides only an average estimate of the permeability. Permeability measurements by pulse decay require to perform simulations to interpret the pressure relaxation signals. Many uncertainties remain such as the determination of the reservoirs storage factor, micro leakage effect, or the determination of the initial pulse pressure. All these uncertainties have a very significant impact on the determination of sample permeability and specific storage. Opposite to the wide-spread idea that transient techniques are required to measure very low permeability, we show that direct steady state measurement of water permeability with suitable equipments can be much faster and more accurate than measurement by pulse decay, especially in

  14. What about temperature? Measuring permeability at magmatic conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushnir, Alexandra R. L.; Martel, Caroline; Champallier, Rémi; Reuschlé, Thierry

    2015-04-01

    The explosive potential of volcanoes is intimately linked to permeability, which is governed by the connectivity of the porous structure of the magma and surrounding edifice. As magma ascends, volatiles exsolve from the melt and expand, creating a gas phase within the conduit. In the absence of a permeable structure capable of dissipating these gases, the propulsive force of an explosive eruption arises from the gas expansion and the build up of subsurface overpressures. Thus, characterizing the permeability of volcanic rocks under in-situ conditions (high temperature and pressure) allows us to better understand the outgassing potential and explosivity of volcanic systems. Current studies of the permeabilities of volcanic rocks generally measure permeability at room temperature using gas permeameters or model permeability using analytic imaging. Our goal is to perform and assess permeability measurements made at high temperature and high pressure in the interest of approaching the permeability of the samples at magmatic conditions. We measure the permeability of andesitic samples expelled during the 2010 Mt. Merapi eruption. We employ and compare two protocols for measuring permeability at high temperature and under high pressure using argon gas in an internally heated Paterson apparatus with an isolated pore fluid system. We first use the pulse decay method to measure the permeability of our samples, then compare these values to permeability measurements performed under steady state flow. We consider the steady state flow method the more rigorous of the two protocols, as we are more capable of accounting for the temperature gradient within the entire pore fluid system. At temperatures in excess of 700°C and pressures of 100 MPa, permeability values plummet by several orders of magnitude. These values are significantly lower than those commonly reported for room temperature permeameter measurements. The reduction in permeability at high temperature is a

  15. New method of measuring permeability of adhesive resin films

    PubMed Central

    Sword, Rhoda J.; Sword, Jeremy J.; Brackett, William W.; Tay, Franklin R.; Pashley, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Objectives To develop a simple gravimetric method for measuring the permeability of adhesive resin films. Methods Using commercially available permeability cups designed for industrial permeability testing, the loss of mass of water vapour or liquid water from a stainless steel cup sealed with a resin film was measured over 1–2 days. The permeabilities of Parafilm (control), Clearfil SE Bond adhesive, Xeno IV and One-Up Bond F were compared. Results The lowest resin film permeability was obtained with Clearfil SE Bond films. The permeabilities of Xeno IV and One-Up Bond F to liquid water were 2.76 and 3.27-fold higher (p<0.001) than that of Clearfil SE Bond. Liquid water permeability was always 2.8 – 3.8-fold higher (p<0.05) than water vapour transmission rate. Conclusions Quantitative comparisons of the permeability properties of resin films can be made gravimetrically. The large permeability cups that are available commercially may be reduced in size in the future for measuring dentine adhesive films with smaller surface areas that are less liable to contain imperfections. PMID:21469402

  16. A new quasi-steady method to measure gas permeability of weakly permeable porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jannot, Yves; Lasseux, Didier

    2012-01-01

    A new quasi-steady method for the determination of the apparent gas permeability of porous materials is presented in this paper along with the corresponding interpretative physical model derived from the unsteady flow equations. This method is mainly dedicated to the measurement of very low permeability of thin porous media, although thicker but more permeable samples may also be analyzed. The method relies on quasi-steady flow resulting from a (quasi) constant pressure maintained at the inlet face of the sample. Gas flow-rate, as low as 3 × 10-10 m3/s, is determined from the record of pressure increase in a reservoir connected to the outlet face of the sample. An estimate of the characteristic time, tc, to reach quasi-steady flow after imposing a constant pressure at the inlet is derived. It is validated by direct numerical simulations of the complete unsteady flow, clearly defining the required experimental duration for the method to apply. Experimental results obtained on rather permeable and thick rock samples are reported showing an excellent agreement of the measured permeability with that determined independently on the same sample whereas the experimental value of tc is also in very good agreement with the predicted one. The method is further employed on a composite material sheet allowing the identification of an apparent gas permeability of about 10-23 m2.

  17. AC loss measurements of twisted and untwisted BSCCO multifilamentary tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhenan; Amemiya, Naoyuki; Nishioka, Takamasa; Oh, Sang-Soo

    2005-01-01

    AC losses in twisted and untwisted BSCCO multifilamentary superconducting tapes with Ag matrix developed in DAPAS program were measured by an electrical method. Magnetization and transport losses were measured by a pick-up coil and by a voltage taps. Total AC loss during simultaneous application of AC transport current and an AC transverse magnetic field was given by the sum of the magnetization and transport losses measured during this simultaneous application. The magnetization loss without transport current of untwisted and twisted tapes was measured first to evaluate the effect of twisting to decouple filaments. Then, the total AC loss of the twisted tape was measured in transverse magnetic fields with various amplitudes and orientations, while the amplitude of the transport current was fixed. The measured total AC loss in a parallel transverse magnetic field was compared with some theoretical models to study the detailed characteristics of the measured total AC loss of the sample.

  18. Instrumentation for Measurement of Gas Permeability of Polymeric Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T.; Wood, George M.; Brown, Kenneth G.; Burns, Karen S.

    1993-01-01

    A mass spectrometric 'Dynamic Delta' method for the measurement of gas permeability of polymeric membranes has been developed. The method is universally applicable for measurement of the permeability of any gas through polymeric membrane materials. The usual large sample size of more than 100 square centimeters required for other methods is not necessary for this new method which requires a size less than one square centimeter. The new method should fulfill requirements and find applicability for industrial materials such as food packaging, contact lenses and other commercial materials where gas permeability or permselectivity properties are important.

  19. Xenon NMR measurements of permeability and tortuosity in reservoir rocks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruopeng; Pavlin, Tina; Rosen, Matthew Scott; Mair, Ross William; Cory, David G; Walsworth, Ronald Lee

    2005-02-01

    In this work we present measurements of permeability, effective porosity and tortuosity on a variety of rock samples using NMR/MRI of thermal and laser-polarized gas. Permeability and effective porosity are measured simultaneously using MRI to monitor the inflow of laser-polarized xenon into the rock core. Tortuosity is determined from measurements of the time-dependent diffusion coefficient using thermal xenon in sealed samples. The initial results from a limited number of rocks indicate inverse correlations between tortuosity and both effective porosity and permeability. Further studies to widen the number of types of rocks studied may eventually aid in explaining the poorly understood connection between permeability and tortuosity of rock cores.

  20. Measurement of the intestinal permeability in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Terpstra, Matty L; Singh, Ramandeep; Geerlings, Suzanne E; Bemelman, Frederike J

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate methods measuring the intestinal per-meability in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and clarify whether there is an increased intestinal permeability in CKD. METHODS: We reviewed the literature in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis (PRISMA) protocol and performed a systematic literature search through MEDline and EMBASE. All controlled trials and cohort studies using non-invasive methods to assess intestinal permeability in CKD patients were included. Excluded were: Conference abstracts and studies including patients younger than 18 years or animals. From the included studies we summarized the used methods and their advantages and disadvantages. For the comparison of their results we divided the included studies in two categories based on their included patient population, either assessing the intestinal permeability in mild to moderate CKD patients or in end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Results were graphically displayed in two plots, one comparing the intestinal permeability in mild to moderate CKD patients to healthy controls and one comparing the intestinal permeability in ESRD patients to healthy controls. RESULTS: From the 480 identified reports, 15 met our inclusion criteria. Methods that were used to assess the intestinal permeability varied from markers measured in plasma to methods based on calculating the urinary excretion of an orally administered test substance. None of the applied methods has been validated in CKD patients and the influence of decreased renal function on the different methods remains unclear to a certain extent. Methods that seem the least likely to be influenced by decreased renal function are the quantitative PCR (qPCR) for bacterial DNA in blood and D-lactate. Considering the results published by the included studies; the studies including patients with mild to moderate CKD conducted conflicting results. Some studies did report an increase in intestinal

  1. Saturated permeability measurements on pumice and welded-tuffaceous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Reda, D.C.; Hadley, G.R.

    1985-12-31

    An experimental apparatus was designed and built to allow water-saturated permeabilities as low as 10{sup -18} m{sup 2} to be measured on cores of diameter 5 cm and length 10 cm under steady-state flow conditions. This same apparatus can also be utilized in a transient (pressure-decay) mode in order to measure permeabilities several orders of magnitude lower than the steady-state limit. Tests were conducted on samples of pumice, fractured welded tuff, and welded tuff, representing a permeability range of seven orders of magnitude. Based on present measurements and calculations, the following results were obtained: Liquid-saturated permeability of the pumice core from Mount St. Helens was 2.76 x 10{sup -12} m{sup 2}; the corresponding Ergun constant was 4.43 x 10{sup 11} kg/m{sup 4}. The ultimate compressive strength of this material was found to be greater than 1.8 MPa, but less than 3.6 MPa; liquid-saturated permeability of the unfractured welded-tuff core was 5.6 x 10{sup -19} m{sup 2}; liquid-saturated permeability for the fractured welded-tuff core was found to decay to 2 x 10{sup -18} m{sup 2} after long-time-scale exposures to continuous-flow and applied-load conditions, independent of the initial fracture state (open vs closed); with an initially closed (naturally existing) fracture, core permeability decreased by a factor of about 2 over a 200-h test period; with an initially open fracture, core permeability decreased by a factor of about 4 under the influence of a comparable load-time history to that experienced in the natural-fracture test; final core permeability was found to be reduced by an order of magnitude from its initial level during a total 700-h test period; and the final effective hydraulic fracture aperture was calculated to be 10{sup -6} m for both tests on the fractured welded-tuff core; the final effective fracture permeability was calculated to be 10{sup -13} m{sup 2}, five orders of magnitude greater than the matrix-material prmeability

  2. Apparatus for providing directional permeability measurements in subterranean earth formations

    DOEpatents

    Shuck, Lowell Z.

    1977-01-01

    Directional permeability measurements are provided in a subterranean earth formation by injecting a high-pressure gas from a wellbore into the earth formation in various azimuthal directions with the direction having the largest pressure drop being indicative of the maximum permeability direction. These measurements are provided by employing an inflatable boot containing a plurality of conduits in registry with a like plurality of apertures penetrating the housing at circumferentially spaced-apart locations. These conduits are, in turn, coupled through a valved manifold to a source of pressurized gas so that the high-pressure gas may be selectively directed through any conduit into the earth formation defining the bore with the resulting difference in the pressure drop through the various conduits providing the permeability measurements.

  3. LOW GRADIENT PERMEABILITY MEASUREMENTS IN A TRIAXIAL SYSTEM.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, H.W.; Nichols, R.W.; Rice, T.L.

    1985-01-01

    Permeability measurements were conducted with the flow-pump method on sand, sandy silt and silty clay specimens in a conventional triaxial system by introducing and withdrawing water at known constant flow rates into the base of a specimen with a flow-pump, and by monitoring the head difference induced across the length of the specimen with a sensitive differential pressure transducer. The results show that the previously reported advantages of the flow-pump method, compared with conventional constant head and falling head methods, were realized for permeability measurements in conventional triaxial equipment.

  4. Estimation of bone permeability using accurate microstructural measurements.

    PubMed

    Beno, Thoma; Yoon, Young-June; Cowin, Stephen C; Fritton, Susannah P

    2006-01-01

    While interstitial fluid flow is necessary for the viability of osteocytes, it is also believed to play a role in bone's mechanosensory system by shearing bone cell membranes or causing cytoskeleton deformation and thus activating biochemical responses that lead to the process of bone adaptation. However, the fluid flow properties that regulate bone's adaptive response are poorly understood. In this paper, we present an analytical approach to determine the degree of anisotropy of the permeability of the lacunar-canalicular porosity in bone. First, we estimate the total number of canaliculi emanating from each osteocyte lacuna based on published measurements from parallel-fibered shaft bones of several species (chick, rabbit, bovine, horse, dog, and human). Next, we determine the local three-dimensional permeability of the lacunar-canalicular porosity for these species using recent microstructural measurements and adapting a previously developed model. Results demonstrated that the number of canaliculi per osteocyte lacuna ranged from 41 for human to 115 for horse. Permeability coefficients were found to be different in three local principal directions, indicating local orthotropic symmetry of bone permeability in parallel-fibered cortical bone for all species examined. For the range of parameters investigated, the local lacunar-canalicular permeability varied more than three orders of magnitude, with the osteocyte lacunar shape and size along with the 3-D canalicular distribution determining the degree of anisotropy of the local permeability. This two-step theoretical approach to determine the degree of anisotropy of the permeability of the lacunar-canalicular porosity will be useful for accurate quantification of interstitial fluid movement in bone.

  5. Direct Optofluidic Measurement of the Lipid Permeability of Fluoroquinolones

    PubMed Central

    Cama, Jehangir; Schaich, Michael; Al Nahas, Kareem; Hernández-Ainsa, Silvia; Pagliara, Stefano; Keyser, Ulrich F.

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying drug permeability across lipid membranes is crucial for drug development. In addition, reduced membrane permeability is a leading cause of antibiotic resistance in bacteria, and hence there is a need for new technologies that can quantify antibiotic transport across biological membranes. We recently developed an optofluidic assay that directly determines the permeability coefficient of autofluorescent drug molecules across lipid membranes. Using ultraviolet fluorescence microscopy, we directly track drug accumulation in giant lipid vesicles as they traverse a microfluidic device while exposed to the drug. Importantly, our measurement does not require the knowledge of the octanol partition coefficient of the drug – we directly determine the permeability coefficient for the specific drug-lipid system. In this work, we report measurements on a range of fluoroquinolone antibiotics and find that their pH dependent lipid permeability can span over two orders of magnitude. We describe various technical improvements for our assay, and provide a new graphical user interface for data analysis to make the technology easier to use for the wider community. PMID:27604156

  6. In Vitro Intrinsic Permeability: A Transporter-Independent Measure of Caco-2 Cell Permeability in Drug Design and Development.

    PubMed

    Fredlund, Linda; Winiwarter, Susanne; Hilgendorf, Constanze

    2017-04-04

    In vitro permeability data have a central place in absorption risk assessments in drug discovery and development. For compounds where active efflux impacts permeability in vitro, the inherent passive membrane permeability ("intrinsic permeability") gives a concentration-independent measure of the compound's permeability. This work describes the validation of an in vitro intrinsic permeability assay and application of the data in a predictive in silico model. Apparent intrinsic permeability (Papp) across Caco-2 cell monolayers is determined in the presence of an optimized cocktail of chemical inhibitors toward the three major efflux transporters ABCB1, ABCC2, and ABCG2. The intrinsic Papp value gives an estimate of passive permeability, which is independent of transporter expression levels and not limited by solubility or cell toxicity. An in silico model has been established to predict the Caco-2 intrinsic permeability and shown to consistently identify highly permeable compounds. The new intrinsic permeability assay is useful for early absorption estimates and suitable for absorption risk assessment in DMPK and pharmaceutical development.

  7. Measurements of turbulent flow overlying impermeable and permeable walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taehoon; Blois, Gianluca; Best, James; Christensen, Kenneth

    2016-11-01

    There exist an array of natural and industrial flow systems wherein the flow is bounded by a surface that is both permeable and rough (e.g. river beds, bed reactors). In such scenarios, the wall boundary condition is complex as it involves both slip and penetration which together significantly modify the statistical and structural modifications the overlying flow owing to momentum exchange across the wall. The current investigation explores the individual roles of topography and permeability in such flows by systematically decoupling one from the other with a number of wall models having the same porous structure (i.e. cubically arranged spheres; two and five layers, respectively, to highlight the effect of turbulence penetration depth) but with different surface topography (smooth versus cubically arranged hemispheres). High resolution particle-image velocimetry measurements were conducted in the streamwise-wall-normal (x - y) plane and refractive-index matching was employed to optically access the flow within the permeable wall. First- and second-order velocity statistics are used to assess the flow modifications associated with the different wall models and thus ascertain the individual impacts of permeability and topography. NSF.

  8. Permeability of Candidate Stirling Heater Head Materials Measured

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, Marc R.; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center are evaluating high-temperature materials for Stirling heater heads for second- and third-generation Stirling radioisotope power systems that would help to increase the system efficiency to 30 to 35 percent and the system specific power to 8 to 10+ W/kg. Ceramic materials could make it possible for the convertor hot-end temperature to be increased to 1050 to 1200 C, in comparison to the current 650 C with an Inconel 718 heater head. A hermetically sealed Stirling heater head must retain a constant internal pressure of nearly 400-psi helium (He) throughout its useful life (120,000 hr) at the design operating temperature. Therefore, He permeability was measured for eight potential materials and compared with the permeability of the current heater head material, Inconel 718. The eight materials included silicon nitride (Si3N4), silicon dioxide (SiO2), both sintered and chemical vapor deposited (CVD) silicon carbide (SiC), alumina (Al2O3), two types of melt-infiltrated (MI) SiC/SiC composites, and a carbon/SiC composite (C/SiC). Glenn submitted samples of each material to Porous Materials, Inc., Ithaca, New York, for permeability analysis. At room temperature and 30-psi He, four materials--Si3N4, Al2O3, SiO2, and sintered SiC--demonstrated lower permeability than Inconel 718. The CVD SiC and all the composite materials were significantly more permeable to He than the baseline material.

  9. Test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material

    DOEpatents

    Reese, Matthew; Dameron, Arrelaine; Kempe, Michael

    2014-03-04

    A test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material. An exemplary device comprises a test card having a thin-film conductor-pattern formed thereon and an edge seal which seals the test card to the barrier material. Another exemplary embodiment is an electrical calcium test device comprising: a test card an impermeable spacer, an edge seal which seals the test card to the spacer and an edge seal which seals the spacer to the barrier material.

  10. Epidermal Permeability Barrier (EPB) measurement in mammalian skin

    PubMed Central

    Indra, Arup Kumar; Leid, Mark

    2012-01-01

    A defective skin epidermal permeability barrier (EPB) is responsible for a high mortality rate in premature infants, and is an important risk factor in inflammatory skin diseases such as eczema. We report here fast and accurate methods for measurement of EPB in animal models or in human patients using simple techniques that monitor diffusion of dyes (X-Gal or Lucifer Yellow) through the upper epidermis and measure transepidermal water loss (TEWL) resulting from a defective skin barrier. Accurate diagnosis and early detection of EPB defects in human patients are critical for effective treatment of certain classes of inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:21874444

  11. New sensitive fluorometric method for measurement of vascular permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, K.; Nakagawa, H.; Tsurufuji, S.

    1984-06-01

    A sensitive fluorometric method has been developed for the measurement of vascular permeability in carrageenin air-pouch inflammation in rats. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled bovine serum albumin (F-BSA) was used as a tracer. This fluorometric method is as simple and reliable as the method using radioiodine-labeled human serum albumin and has the advantages of low cost, no health hazard, and the fact that F-BSA can be stored over a long period. This fluorometric method is probably applicable to other inflammation models such as pleurisy and peritonitis in which inflammatory exudate can be collected.

  12. Electron Temperature Measurement by Floating Probe Method Using AC Voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoshi, Nodomi; Shuichi, Sato; Mikio, Ohuchi

    2016-11-01

    This study presents a novel floating probe method to measure electron temperatures using a hollow cathode-type discharge tube. The proposed method detects a shift in the floating potential when an AC voltage is applied to a probe through an intermediary blocking capacitor. The shift in the floating potential is described as a function of the electron temperature and the applied AC voltage. The floating probe method is simpler than the Langmuir probe method because it does not require the measurement of volt-ampere characteristics. As the input AC voltage increases, the electron temperature converges. The electron temperature measured using the floating probe method with an applied sinusoidal voltage shows a value close to the first (tail) electron temperature in the range of the floating potential.

  13. Characterization of Permeable Zones by the Measurement of Borehole Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Tung-Lin; Chuang, Po-Yu; Lee, Tsai-Ping; Chia, Yeeping

    2015-04-01

    Subsurface temperature distribution has become an important issue in hydrogeologic studies. The major heat transfer mechanisms in porous medium are conduction and convection. Temperature profile in geological formations with different thermal conductivity would be controlled primarily by heat conduction. The temperature change related to water flows is caused by heat convection. Consequently, temperature profiles are affected by a variety of factors, such as surface temperature change, well diameter, groundwater level change, and water flows inside the borehole. In this study, we use temperature probe as a well logging device to investigate the borehole conditions. There is the depth correction for the time lag problem resulting from the equilibration time of the sensors during the logging process. Then the field measurement was conducted in a 60-m deep well in a gravelly aquifer to characterize the temperature profile of screened zone. In the shallow depth, the change of temperature is primarily influenced by seasonal variation and daily fluctuation. Below the depth of 30-m, the change of temperature was subject to geothermal gradient. However, the slope of temperature profiles changed at approximately 42-m deep, the top of well screen, and it indicated the effects of heat convection in the aquifer. In addition, the measured temperature in the borehole may not represent the actual temperature of aquifer. The measured temperature in the screened section changed continuously in response to pumping, but stabilized an hour data when 2 to 3 times of the borehole water volume is extracted. This phenomenon is related to the temperature mixing with the upper borehole water and aquifer permeability. On the other hand, if the aquifer permeability is high enough, it may influence the temperature profile in borehole through the high flow velocity. The test results indicated that, in order to obtain the actual temperature or chemical constituents, we have to pump 2 to 3 times

  14. The Permeability of Plant Cell Walls as Measured by Gel Filtration Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepeer, Mark; Taylor, Iain E. P.

    1981-08-01

    The permeability of plant cell walls to macromolecules may limit the ability of enzymes to alter the biochemical and physical properties of the wall. Proteins of molecular weight up to 60,000 can permeate a substantial portion of the cell wall. Measurements of wall permeability in which cells are exposed to hypertonic solutions of macromolecules may seriously underestimate wall permeability.

  15. Theoretical analysis on ac susceptibility measurements of superconductor tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Du-Xing; Sun, Yue-Ming; Li, Shuo; Fang, Jin

    2017-02-01

    Perpendicular ac susceptibility χ ={χ\\prime}-j{χ\\prime \\prime} of a superconducting long tape defined by magnetic moment and determined inductively by magnetic flux is calculated using Brandt’s technique from a power-law dependence of electric field on sheet current density. The requirements of χ measurements to the experimental setup and procedure are discussed based on the calculation results.

  16. System and method for measuring permeability of materials

    DOEpatents

    Hallman, Jr., Russell Louis; Renner, Michael John

    2013-07-09

    Systems and methods are provided for measuring the permeance of a material. The permeability of the material may also be derived. Systems typically provide a liquid or high concentration fluid bath on one side of a material test sample, and a gas flow across the opposing side of the material test sample. The mass flow rate of permeated fluid as a fraction of the combined mass flow rate of gas and permeated fluid is used to calculate the permeance of the material. The material test sample may be a sheet, a tube, or a solid shape. Operational test conditions may be varied, including concentration of the fluid, temperature of the fluid, strain profile of the material test sample, and differential pressure across the material test sample.

  17. Measurement of the 225Ac half-life.

    PubMed

    Pommé, S; Marouli, M; Suliman, G; Dikmen, H; Van Ammel, R; Jobbágy, V; Dirican, A; Stroh, H; Paepen, J; Bruchertseifer, F; Apostolidis, C; Morgenstern, A

    2012-11-01

    The (225)Ac half-life was determined by measuring the activity of (225)Ac sources as a function of time, using various detection techniques: α-particle counting with a planar silicon detector at a defined small solid angle and in a nearly-2π geometry, 4πα+β counting with a windowless CsI sandwich spectrometer and with a pressurised proportional counter, gamma-ray spectrometry with a HPGe detector and with a NaI(Tl) well detector. Depending on the technique, the decay was followed for 59-141 d, which is about 6-14 times the (225)Ac half-life. The six measurement results were in good mutual agreement and their mean value is T(1/2)((225)Ac)=9.920 (3)d. This half-life value is more precise and better documented than the currently recommended value of 10.0 d, based on two old measurements lacking uncertainty evaluations.

  18. Evaluation of damage-induced permeability using a three-dimensional Adaptive Continuum/Discontinuum Code (AC/DC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabian, Dedecker; Peter, Cundall; Daniel, Billaux; Torsten, Groeger

    Digging a shaft or drift inside a rock mass is a common practice in civil engineering when a transportation way, such as a motorway, railway tunnel or storage shaft is to be built. In most cases, the consequences of the disturbance on the medium must be known in order to estimate the behaviour of the disturbed rock mass. Indeed, excavating part of the rock causes a new distribution of the stress field around the excavation that can lead to micro-cracking and even to the failure of some rock volume in the vicinity of the shaft. Consequently, the formed micro-cracks modify the mechanical and hydraulic properties of the rock. In this paper, we present an original method for the evaluation of damage-induced permeability. ITASCA has developed and used discontinuum models to study rock damage by building particle assemblies and checking the breakage of bonds under stress. However, such models are limited in size by the very large number of particles needed to model even a comparatively small volume of rock. In fact, a large part of most models never experiences large strains and does not require the accurate description of large-strain/damage/post-peak behaviour afforded by a discontinuum model. Thus, a large model frequently can be separated into a strongly strained “core” area to be represented by a Discontinuum and a peripheral area for which continuum zones would be adequate. Based on this observation, Itasca has developed a coupled, three-dimensional, continuum/discontinuum modelling approach. The new approach, termed Adaptive Continuum/Discontinuum Code (AC/DC), is based on the use of a periodic discontinuum “base brick” for which more or less simplified continuum equivalents are derived. Depending on the level of deformation in each part of the model, the AC/DC code can dynamically select the appropriate brick type to be used. In this paper, we apply the new approach to an excavation performed in the Bure site, at which the French nuclear waste agency

  19. Measurements of AC Losses and Current Distribution in Superconducting Cables

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Doan A; Ashworth, Stephen P; Duckworth, Robert C; Carter, Bill; Fleshler, Steven

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents our new experimental facility and techniques to measure ac loss and current distribution between the layers for High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) cables. The facility is powered with a 45 kVA three-phase power supply which can provide three-phase currents up to 5 kA per phase via high current transformers. The system is suitable for measurements at any frequency between 20 and 500 Hz to better understand the ac loss mechanisms in HTS cables. In this paper, we will report techniques and results for ac loss measurements carried out on several HTS cables with and without an HTS shielding layer. For cables without a shielding layer, care must be taken to control the effect of the magnetic fields from return currents on loss measurements. The waveform of the axial magnetic field was also measured by a small pick-up coil placed inside a two-layer cable. The temporal current distribution between the layers can be calculated from the waveform of the axial field.

  20. AC-coupled front-end for biopotential measurements.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Enrique Mario; Pallàs-Areny, Ramon; Mayosky, Miguel Angel

    2003-03-01

    AC coupling is essential in biopotential measurements. Electrode offset potentials can be several orders of magnitude larger than the amplitudes of the biological signals of interest, thus limiting the admissible gain of a dc-coupled front end to prevent amplifier saturation. A high-gain input stage needs ac input coupling. This can be achieved by series capacitors, but in order to provide a bias path, grounded resistors are usually included, which degrade the common mode rejection ratio (CMRR). This paper proposes a novel balanced input ac-coupling network that provides a bias path without any connection to ground, thus resulting in a high CMRR. The circuit being passive, it does not limit the differential dc input voltage. Furthermore, differential signals are ac coupled, whereas common-mode voltages are dc coupled, thus allowing the closed-loop control of the dc common mode voltage by means of a driven-right-leg circuit. This makes the circuit compatible with common-mode dc shifting strategies intended for single-supply biopotential amplifiers. The proposed circuit allows the implementation of high-gain biopotential amplifiers with a reduced number of parts, thus resulting in low power consumption. An electrocardiogram amplifier built according to the proposed design achieves a CMRR of 123 dB at 50 Hz.

  1. Hepatocyte membrane water permeability measured by silicone layer filtering centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Gradilone, Sergio A; Ochoa, J Elena; García, Fabiana; Larocca, M Cecilia; Pellegrino, José M; Marinelli, Raúl A

    2002-03-01

    We previously found that hepatocytes are able to control their osmotic membrane water permeability (P(f)) by regulating the number of surface aquaporin water channels. Hepatocyte P(f) has been assessed by phase-contrast microscopy and cell image analysis, an established but relatively laborious procedure. We report here an alternative method to assess hepatocyte P(f) based on a single silicone layer filtering centrifugation system. Isolated rat hepatocytes were incubated in hypotonic or isotonic buffers containing (3)H(2)O as a tracer and, then, were filtered by rapid centrifugation through a silicone layer down to a lysis layer. Osmotically driven radioactivity (i.e., (3)H(2)O) within hepatocytes was calculated as the difference between the dpm in lysis media measured under hypotonic and isotonic conditions. The P(f) calculated from the initial slope of the radioactivity-versus-time curve was 18 microm/s at 4 degrees C. Hepatocytes treated with dibutyryl cyclic AMP, to increase P(f) through the plasma membrane insertion of aquaporins, showed an increased P(f) value of 37 microm/s. The aquaporin blocker dimethyl sulfoxide selectively prevented the agonist-induced hepatocyte P(f). These data are in good agreement with the corresponding values determined by quantitative phase-contrast microscopy; thus, the method developed allows the rapid and reliable measurement of hepatocyte P(f).

  2. Measured losses in superconductor magnets for 60-Hertz ac operation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamlet, I. L.; Kilgore, R. A.

    1971-01-01

    Results of an experimental study of electrical losses in superconductor magnets. Preliminary 60-Hz ac loss data are presented for coils constructed of Nb3Sn ribbon, Nb-Ti cable, and multifilament Nb-Ti. Losses have been measured for different size coils up to approximately 20 cm in diameter. Of the conductor types tested, Nb3Sn ribbon has the lowest losses for ac operation. In Nb3Sn-ribbon coils of different sizes, the loss per unit length of conductor is shown to decrease with a decrease in the rate of change of current and to increase, in general, with increase in coil size. An important aspect of the study is the high degree of repeatability of the data.

  3. Modification in Cay Concrete Properties During Fluid Flow Permeability Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, F.; Ekolu, S. O.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, two methods consisting of triaxial water permeability and water penetration were used to evaluate the changes occurring in the pores of clay concretes during the tests. Triaxial permeability is generally used for concrete with higher permeability while concretes with very low permeability are suited for the penetration method. Clay concrete specimens of 0 to 40% clay content were used in the study. The concrete mixes had water-to-cement ratios (w/c) of 0.70, 0.75, 0.80, 0.85, and the cementitious content 380 and 450 kg/m3. Results show that concrete gains moisture during wetting at a much faster rate than loses it during subsequent drying. This could be explained by the contribution of suction pressure created upon drying. When water penetration pressure is applied, more water is driven into pore space that could be responsible for changing the network of the voids. Pore structure during drying may certainly be different in size and shape than its form during wetting, leading to a consequent effect on the permeability of the clay concretes. The modification could be one reason why the moisture gain percentage in clay concretes was higher than in normal concretes.

  4. Spectral-induced polarization measurements on sieved sands and the relationship to permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Sheen; Ingham, Malcolm; Gouws, Gideon

    2016-06-01

    Laboratory measurements of the permeability and spectral-induced polarization (SIP) response of samples consisting of unconsolidated sands typical of those found in New Zealand aquifers have been made. After correction of measured formation factors to allow for the fact that some were measured at only one fluid conductivity, predictions of permeability from the grain size (d) of the samples are found to agree well with measured values of permeability. The Cole-Cole time constant (derived from the SIP measurements) is found, as expected, to depend upon d2, but can be affected by the inclusion of smaller grains in the sample. Measurements made on samples comprising of mixtures of grain sizes show that inclusion in a sample of even 10% of smaller grains can significantly reduce both the Cole-Cole time constant (τCC) and the permeability, and support theoretical derivation of how the permeability of a mixture of grain sizes varies with the content of the mixture. Proposed relationships for using τCC as a predictor for permeability are tested and found to be crucially dependent on the assumed relationship between the dynamic pore radius and grain size. The inclusion of a multiplicative constant to take account of numerical approximations results in good predictions for the permeability of the samples in this study. It seems unlikely, however, that there is a single global expression for predicting permeability from SIP data for all samples.

  5. A Large Block Experiment for Measurement of the Effective Permeability of Indiana Limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvadurai, P. A.; Selvadurai, A. P.

    2009-12-01

    The measurement of permeability of large specimens of a rock specimen is bound to provide a clearer picture of the distribution of permeability of predominantly sedimentary rocks. Such distributions can be the basis for evaluating the effective permeability of the rock specimen in the presence of permeability inhomogeneity. This paper discusses the development of a patch permeability test that can be used to measure the near surface permeability characteristics of a large cuboidal block of Indiana Limestone measuring 508 mm. The test is used to generate the near surface permeability of six faces of the cuboid and these estimates are used to generate, via a kriging procedure, the interior permeability distributions of permeability. These permeability distributions are used to examine the validity of theoretical estimates that have been developed in the literature to determine the effective permeability of the material. The classical Wiener (1912) bounds, the estimates provided by Matheron (1967) and Journel et al. (1993) are developed using the experimentally derived data. The procedure is also validated by conducting computational experiments involving one-dimensional flow along three orthogonal directions. References: Wiener, O. (1912) Die Theorie des Mischkörpers für das Feld des stationaären Strömung. Erste Abhandlung die Mittelswertesätsze für Kraft, Polarisation und Energie. Abh. Math.-Physischen Klasse Königl. Säcsh Gesell. Wissen, 32: 509-604. Matheron, G. (1967) Eléments pour une Théorie des Milieux Poroeux, Masson, Paris. Journel, A.G, Deutsch, C.V. and Desbrats, A.J. (1986) Power averaging for block effective permeability, SPE 15128, Society of Petroleum Engineers.

  6. An improved method for predicting permeability by combining electrical measurements and mercury injection capillary pressure data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chong; Cheng, Yuan; Zhang, Chaomo

    2017-02-01

    The applicability of the representative elemental volume (REV) model is analyzed on the basis of the capillary pressure curves, resistivity, porosity and permeability, taken from the experimental measurement data of 83 sandstone core samples from three different blocks mined in China. The results show that the permeability error (the ratio of core permeability to the permeability calculated by the REV model) can be controlled from 0.5 to 2 when the core permeability is more than 3 mD. On the whole, the permeability error is more than 2, and the calculated permeability is lower than the core permeability when the core permeability is less than 3 mD. The reason for the poor calculation accuracy of the REV model in low permeability sandstone is analyzed, and the research suggests that the ∫dS v/(P c)2 in the REV model characterizes the pore-throat radius of the rock. In reality, the permeability is influenced by the throat radius rather than the pore radius. When the core permeability is large enough, there is no obvious difference between the pore radius and the throat radius. So, the error between the core permeability and the permeability calculated by the REV model is small. However, when the core permeability is small, the difference between the pore radius and the throat radius is apparent, and, in general, the pore radius is larger than the throat radius. In these conditions, the pore radius plays a leading role in ∫dS v/(P c)2, thus making the error between the core permeability and the permeability calculated by the REV model apparent. Based on the above, we have derived an improved REV model by introducing the pore-throat radius ratio on the basis of Poiseuille’s law and Darcy’s law. Using the same experimental data, we make a comparison analysis between the improved model, the REV model and the Swanson model. The results show that compared with the REV model and the Swanson model, the accuracy of the calculated permeability of the improved model is

  7. Scale Dependence of Soil Permeability to Air: Measurement Method and Field Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Garbesi, K.; Sextro, R.G.; Robinson, Arthur L.; Wooley, J.D.; Owens, J.A.; Nazaroff, W.W.

    1995-11-01

    This work investigates the dependence soil air-permeability on sampling scale in near-surface unsaturated soils. A new dual-probe dynamic pressure technique was developed to measure permeability in situ over different length scales and different spatial orientations in the soil. Soils at three sites were studied using the new technique. Each soil was found to have higher horizontal than vertical permeability. Significant scale dependence of permeability was also observed at each site. Permeability increased by a factor of 20 as sampling scale increased from 0.1 to 2 m in a sand soil vegetated with dry grass, and by a factor of 15 as sampling scale increased from 0.1 to 3.5 m in a sandy loam with mature Coast Live Oak trees (Quercus agrifolia). The results indicate that standard methods of permeability assessment can grossly underestimate advective transport of gas-phase contaminants through soils.

  8. Scale Dependence of Soil Permeability to Air: Measurement Method and Field Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbesi, Karina; Sextro, Richard G.; Robinson, Allen L.; Wooley, John D.; Owens, Jonathan A.; Nazaroff, William W.

    1996-03-01

    This work investigates the dependence of soil permeability to air on sampling scale in near-surface unsaturated soils. A new dual-probe dynamic pressure technique was developed to measure permeability in situ over different length scales and different spatial orientations in the soil. Soils at three sites were studied using the new technique. Each soil was found to have higher horizontal than vertical permeability. Significant scale dependence of permeability was also observed at each site. Permeability increased by a factor of 20 as sampling scale increased from 0.1 to 2 m in a sand soil vegetated with dry grass, and by a factor of 15 as sampling scale increased from 0.1 to 3.5 m in a sandy loam with mature Coast Live Oak trees (Quercus agrifolia). The results indicate that standard methods of permeability assessment can grossly underestimate advective transport of gas phase contaminants through soils.

  9. Measuring Clogging with Pressure Transducers in Permeable Pavement Strips

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two issues that have a negative affect on the long term hydrologic performance of permeable pavement systems are surface clogging and clogging at the interface with the underlying soil. Surface clogging limits infiltration capacity and results in bypass if runoff rate exceeds in...

  10. Demonstrations of Magnetic Phenomena: Measuring the Air Permeability Using Tablets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lara, V. O. M.; Amaral, D. F.; Faria, D.; Vieira, L. P.

    2014-01-01

    We use a tablet to experimentally determine the dependencies of the magnetic field (B) on the electrical current and the axial distance from a coil (z). Our data shows good precision on the inverse cubic dependence of the magnetic field on the axial distance, B?z[superscript -3]. We obtain the value of air permeability µ[subscript air] with good…

  11. Measurement of AC electrical characteristics of SSC superconducting dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Smedley, K M; Shafer, R E

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to measure the AC electrical characteristics of SSC superconducting dipole magnets over the frequency range of 0.1 Hz to 10 kHz. A magnet equivalent circuit representing the magnet DC inductance, eddy current losses, coil-to-ground and turn-to-turn capacitance, was synthesized from the experimental data. This magnet equivalent circuit can be used to predict the current ripple distribution along the superconducting magnet string and can provide dynamic information for the design of the collider current regulation loop.

  12. Measuring the vertical permeability of horizontally- stratified sedimentary rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Novakowski, K.S.; Lapcevic, P.A. ); Reichart, T.M. )

    1993-03-01

    The vertical permeability of horizontally stratified rocks is usually assumed to be significantly less than the permeability of horizontal structural features such as bedding plane partings and sheeting structure. Consequently it is also assumed that this type of media provides suitable vertical barriers to the migration of both aqueous and non-aqueous phase groundwater contaminants. To investigate this assumption, a site adjacent to an inactive dolostone quarry was instrumented using nine boreholes drilled to a depth of approximately 25 m in a 30 x 30 m area. The area is immediately underlain by flat-lying thick-bedded dolostones of Middle-Silurian age. Six of the boreholes were drilled at angle of 45[degree] to intersect two vertical fracture sets oriented at 020[degree] and 110[degree] which were identified by mapping the fractures in the quarry. Detailed hydraulic tests (constant-head method) were conducted in each of the boreholes using a packer spacing of 0.5 m to determine the hydraulic properties of the individual horizontal and vertical fractures and fracture zones. In addition, four pumping tests were conducted in which a fracture zone in one of the vertical boreholes was shut-in and pumped and the hydraulic response was monitored in the observation boreholes using pressure transducer installed in 15 intervals isolated with multiple-packer strings. The results of the constant-head tests show that although the groundwater flow system in the dolostone is dominated by 3--4 horizontal fracture zones, the average permeability of the vertical fractures is only one order of magnitude less than the average permeability of the horizontal fractures. However, this aspect of the flow system is not detected using pumping tests, the results of which suggest that the average permeability is 3--4 orders of magnitude less in the vertical direction.

  13. Permeability of Two Parachute Fabrics - Measurements, Modeling, and Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, Juan R.; O'Farrell, Clara; Hennings, Elsa; Runnells, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Two parachute fabrics, described by Parachute Industry Specifications PIA-C-7020D Type I and PIA-C-44378D Type I, were tested to obtain their permeabilities in air (i.e., flow-through volume of air per area per time) over the range of differential pressures from 0.146 psf (7 Pa) to 25 psf (1197 Pa). Both fabrics met their specification permeabilities at the standard differential pressure of 0.5 inch of water (2.60 psf, 124 Pa). The permeability results were transformed into an effective porosity for use in calculations related to parachutes. Models were created that related the effective porosity to the unit Reynolds number for each of the fabrics. As an application example, these models were used to calculate the total porosities for two geometrically-equivalent subscale Disk-Gap-Band (DGB) parachutes fabricated from each of the two fabrics, and tested at the same operating conditions in a wind tunnel. Using the calculated total porosities and the results of the wind tunnel tests, the drag coefficient of a geometrically-equivalent full-scale DGB operating on Mars was estimated.

  14. Reservoir condition special core analyses and relative permeability measurements on Almond formation and Fontainebleu sandstone rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Maloney, D.

    1993-11-01

    This report describes the results from special core analyses and relative permeability measurements conducted on Almond formation and Fontainebleu sandstone plugs. Almond formation plug tests were performed to evaluate multiphase, steady-state,reservoir-condition relative permeability measurement techniques and to examine the effect of temperature on relative permeability characteristics. Some conclusions from this project are as follows: An increase in temperature appeared to cause an increase in brine relative permeability results for an Almond formation plug compared to room temperature results. The plug was tested using steady-state oil/brine methods. The oil was a low-viscosity, isoparaffinic refined oil. Fontainebleu sandstone rock and fluid flow characteristics were measured and are reported. Most of the relative permeability versus saturation results could be represented by one of two trends -- either a k{sub rx} versus S{sub x} or k{sub rx} versus Sy trend where x and y are fluid phases (gas, oil, or brine). An oil/surfactant-brine steady-state relative permeability test was performed to examine changes in oil/brine relative permeability characteristics from changes in fluid IFTS. It appeared that, while low interfacial tension increased the aqueous phase relative permeability, it had no effect on the oil relative permeability. The BOAST simulator was modified for coreflood simulation. The simulator was useful for examining effects of variations in relative permeability and capillary pressure functions. Coreflood production monitoring and separator interface level measurement techniques were developed using X-ray absorption, weight methods, and RF admittance technologies. The three types of separators should be useful for routine and specialized core analysis applications.

  15. A permeability and compliance contrast measured hydrogeologically on the San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Lian; Brodsky, Emily E.; Erskine, Jon; Fulton, Patrick M.; Carter, Reed

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogeologic properties of fault zones are critical to faulting processes; however, they are not well understood and difficult to measure in situ, particularly in low-permeability fractured bedrock formations. Analysis of continuous water level response to Earth tides in monitoring wells provides a method to measure the in situ hydrogeologic properties. We utilize four monitoring wells within the San Andreas Fault zone near Logan Quarry to study the fault zone hydrogeologic architecture by measuring the water level tidal response. The specific storage and permeability inferred from the tidal response suggest that there is a difference in properties at different distances from the fault. The sites closer to the fault have higher specific storage and higher permeability than farther from the fault. This difference of properties might be related to the fault zone fracture distribution decreasing away from the fault. Although permeability channels near faults have been documented before, the difference in specific storage near the fault is a new observation. The inferred compliance contrast is consistent with prior estimates of elastic moduli in the near-fault environment, but the direct measurements are new. The combination of measured permeability and storage yields a diffusivity of about 10-2 m2/s at all the sites both near and far from the fault as a result of the competing effects of permeability and specific storage. This uniform diffusivity structure suggests that the permeability contrast might not efficiently trap fluids during the interseismic period.

  16. Comparison of three techniques to measure unsaturated-zone air permeability at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Mira Stone; Tillman, Fred D.; Choi, Jee-Won; Smith, James A.

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare three techniques to measure the air permeability of the unsaturated zone at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ and to examine the effects of moisture content and soil heterogeneity on air permeability. Air permeability was measured in three ways: laboratory experiments on intact soil cores, field-scale air pump tests and calibration of air permeability to air pressures measured in the field under natural air pressure conditions using a numerical airflow model. The results obtained from these three methods were compared and found to be similar. Laboratory experiments performed on intact cores measured air permeability values on the order of 10 -14 to 10 -9 m 2. Low-permeability cores were found between land surface and a depth of 0.6 m. The soil core data were divided into two layers with composite vertical permeability values of 1.3×10 -13 m 2 from land surface to a 0.6-m depth and 3.8×10 -10 m 2 for the lower layer. Analyses of the field-scale pump tests were performed for two scenarios: one in which the entire unsaturated zone was open to the atmosphere and one assuming a cap of low permeability extending 0.6 m below land surface. The vertical air permeability values obtained for the open scenario ranged from 1.2×10 -9 to 1.5×10 -9 m 2, and ranged from 3.6×10 -9 to 6.8×10 -9 m 2 in the lower layer, assuming an upper cap permeability of 6.0×10 -14 m 2. The results from the open scenario are much higher than expected and the possible reasons for this ambiguity are discussed. The results from the capped scenario matched closely with those from the other methods and indicated that it is important to have background information on the study site to correctly analyze the pump test data. The optimized fit of the natural subsurface air pressure was achieved with an intrinsic permeability value of 3.3×10 -14 m 2. When the data were refitted to the model assuming two distinct layers of the unsaturated zone, the optimized fit was achieved

  17. Measurement and Modeling of Sorption-Induced Strain and Permeability Changes in Coal

    SciTech Connect

    Eric P. Robertson

    2005-10-01

    Strain caused by the adsorption of gases was measured in samples of subbituminous coal from the Powder River basin of Wyoming, U.S.A., and high-volatile bituminous coal from the Uinta-Piceance basin of Utah, U.S.A. using a newly developed strain measurement apparatus. The apparatus can be used to measure strain on multiple small coal samples based on the optical detection of the longitudinal strain. The swelling and shrinkage (strain) in the coal samples resulting from the adsorption of carbon dioxide, nitrogen, methane, helium, and a mixture of gases was measured. Sorption-induced strain processes were shown to be reversible and easily modeled with a Langmuir-type equation. Extended Langmuir theory was applied to satisfactorily model strain caused by the adsorption of gas mixtures using the pure gas Langmuir strain constants. The amount of time required to obtain accurate strain data was greatly reduced compared to other strain measurement methods. Sorption-induced changes in permeability were also measured as a function of pres-sure. Cleat compressibility was found to be variable, not constant. Calculated variable cleat-compressibility constants were found to correlate well with previously published data for other coals. During permeability tests, sorption-induced matrix shrinkage was clearly demonstrated by higher permeability values at lower pore pressures while holding overburden pressure constant. Measured permeability data were modeled using three dif-ferent permeability models from the open literature that take into account sorption-induced matrix strain. All three models poorly matched the measured permeability data because they overestimated the impact of measured sorption-induced strain on permeabil-ity. However, by applying an experimentally derived expression to the measured strain data that accounts for the confining overburden pressure, pore pressure, coal type, and gas type, the permeability models were significantly improved.

  18. Evaluation of Various Pulse-Decay Laboratory Permeability Measurement Techniques for Highly Stressed Coals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ruimin; Harpalani, Satya; Pandey, Rohit

    2017-02-01

    The transient technique for laboratory permeability measurement, proposed by Brace et al. (J Geophys Res 73:2225-2236, 1968) and widely used for conventional gas reservoir rocks, is the preferred method when testing low-permeability rocks in the laboratory. However, Brace et al.'s solution leads to considerable errors since it does not take into account compressive storage and sorption effect when applied to sorptive rocks, such as, coals and shales. To verify the applicability of this solution when used to characterize fluid flow behavior of coal, an in-depth investigation of permeability evolution for flow of helium and methane depletion was conducted for San Juan coals using the pressure pulse-decay method under best replicated in situ conditions. Three permeability solutions, Brace et al.'s (1968), Dicker and Smits's (International meeting on petroleum engineering, Society of Petroleum Engineers, 1988) and Cui et al.'s (Geofluids 9:208-223, 2009), were utilized to establish the permeability trends. Both helium and methane permeability results exhibited very small difference between the Brace et al.'s solution and Dicker and Smits's solution, indicating that the effect of compressive storage is negligible. However, methane permeability enhancement at low pressures due to coal matrix shrinkage resulting from gas desorption can be significant and this was observed in pressure response plots and the estimated permeability values using Cui et al.'s solution only. Therefore, it is recommended that Cui et al.'s solution be employed to correctly include the sorption effect when testing coal permeability using the transient technique. A series of experiments were also carried out to establish the stress-dependent permeability trend under constant effective stress condition, and then quantify the sole contribution of the sorption effect on permeability variation. By comparison with the laboratory data obtained under in situ stress/strain condition, it was verified that

  19. Measurement of the gas permeability of autoclaved aerated concrete in conjunction with its physical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Waegner, F.; Moertel, H.; Schober, G.

    1995-12-01

    The technique for determining the gas permeability of autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC) which was developed here allows one to identify differences in the evolution of the porous structure caused by various manufacturing conditions. A comparison of permeability and compressive strength in relation to density illustrates a contradictor tendency on the part of these two physical properties, i.e. as the raw density increases, compressive strength and permeability decline. Small cracks arising during the rising process result in decreased compressive strength in the direction of rising and an increased gas permeability perpendicular to that direction. This anisotropy in AAC can be more precisely illustrated by measuring the gas permeability than by determining the compressive strength, especially with lower classes of density.

  20. Absorption and Attenuation Coefficients Using the WET Labs ac-s in the Mid-Atlantic Bight: Field Measurements and Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohi, Nobuaki; Makinen, Carla P.; Mitchell, Richard; Moisan, Tiffany A.

    2008-01-01

    Ocean color algorithms are based on the parameterization of apparent optical properties as a function of inherent optical properties. WET Labs underwater absorption and attenuation meters (ac-9 and ac-s) measure both the spectral beam attenuation [c (lambda)] and absorption coefficient [a (lambda)]. The ac-s reports in a continuous range of 390-750 nm with a band pass of 4 nm, totaling approximately 83 distinct wavelengths, while the ac-9 reports at 9 wavelengths. We performed the ac-s field measurements at nine stations in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from water calibrations to data analysis. Onboard the ship, the ac-s was calibrated daily using Milli Q-water. Corrections for the in situ temperature and salinity effects on optical properties of water were applied. Corrections for incomplete recovery of the scattered light in the ac-s absorption tube were performed. The fine scale of spectral and vertical distributions of c (lambda) and a (lambda) were described from the ac-s. The significant relationships between a (674) and that of spectrophotometric analysis and chlorophyll a concentration of discrete water samples were observed.

  1. Permeability measurement of soft magnetic films at high frequency and multilayering effect

    SciTech Connect

    Senda, M.

    1993-03-01

    This paper reports a new method for the measurement of permeability at high frequencies (1 MHz to 1 GHz). An inductance line with a magnetic/conductive/magnetic layer structure was used to estimate the permeability. The inductance line made it possible to measure frequency characteristics of the permeability up to the GHz range because of a low stray capacitance and high resonance frequency. The magnetic film pattern was designed so as to eliminate demagnetizing field effects, and the permeability was estimated based on analysis of the magnetic circuit. Using this method, NiFe/SiO[sub 2] and (Fe/SiO[sub 2])/SiO[sub 2] multilayer films were confirmed to show superior frequency characteristics by a factor of 20 over those of NiFe single-layer film. Also, ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) was observed in these multilayer films at 650 and 750 MHz.

  2. Simultaneous measurement of rock permeability and effective porosity using laser-polarized noble gas NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R.; Mair, R. W.; Rosen, M. S.; Cory, D. G.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2004-08-01

    We report simultaneous measurements of the permeability and effective porosity of oil-reservoir rock cores using one-dimensional NMR imaging of the penetrating flow of laser-polarized xenon gas. The permeability result agrees well with industry standard techniques, whereas effective porosity is not easily determined by other methods. This NMR technique may have applications to the characterization of fluid flow in a wide variety of porous and granular media.

  3. Permeable structures at Ceboruco lava dome, Mexico: the challenge of upscaling laboratory measurements to field constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamur, Anthony; Lavallee, Yan; De Angelis, Silvio

    2015-04-01

    Lava domes are, in their lifespan, variably permeable volcanic structures. During magma ascent, construction of a permeable network is facilitated by the coalescence of vesicles and fractures, which regulates magma outgassing and control whether eruption proceeds effusively or explosively. Here, we present a combined laboratory and field study of dome rock permeability, focusing on a ca. 19th century lava dome at Ceboruco, Mexico. The lava dome has a perfectly rounded shape with a diameter of ~80 metres and a height of ~35 metres. The dome consists of blocks ranging in size between centimetres and 5 metres, which reveal a range of porous structures: the rocks are commonly dense, but porosity occasionally reach 38%; some blocks are entirely massive, whilst others display tensile and shear fractures. Microscopic analysis reveals and equally intricate fracture networks. Permeability measurements are currently being performed on 4 rocks (with different porosities) in a hydrostatic pressure vessel at confining pressures of 6, 10, 15, 20, 30 and 40 MPa and averaged pore pressure of 5 MPa (with differential of 1 MPa). For each sample, the uniaxial compressive strength will be determined and permeability will be measured on samples, which have undergone fracture damage due to loading at different fractions of the uniaxial compressive strength (e.g., 80%, 90% and 100%). The laboratory study will be complemented by an electrical resistivity survey of the dome structure (to be undertaken this coming February-March 2015). We will optically measure the density of fractures (i.e., spacing), and width. The resistivity study will be performed at different scales (1-200 metres) to assess the extent of fractures in individual blocks as well as through the entire dome and its underlying root. Mesoscale permeability measurements will be attempted by introducing salinated water into cracks on metre-size blocks whilst performing 3D electrical resistivity tomography. We aim to discuss

  4. Measurement of Interfacial Area Production and Permeability within Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H.

    2010-01-01

    An understanding of the pore-level interactions that affect multi-phase flow in porous media is important in many subsurface engineering applications, including enhanced oil recovery, remediation of dense non-aqueous liquid contaminated sites, and geologic CO2 sequestration. Standard models of two-phase flow in porous media have been shown to have several shortcomings, which might partially be overcome using a recently developed model based on thermodynamic principles that includes interfacial area as an additional parameter. A few static experimental studies have been previously performed, which allowed the determination of static parameters of the model, but no information exists concerning the interfacial area dynamic parameters. A new experimental porous flow cell that was constructed using stereolithography for two-phase gas-liquid flow studies was used in conjunction with an in-house analysis code to provide information on dynamic evolution of both fluid phases and gas-liquid interfaces. In this paper, we give a brief introduction to the new generalized model of two-phase flow model and describe how the stereolithography flow cell experimental setup was used to obtain the dynamic parameters for the interfacial area numerical model. In particular, the methods used to determine the interfacial area permeability and production terms are shown.

  5. Transient pressure-pulse decay permeability measurements in the Barnett shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhandari, A. R.; Reece, J.; Cronin, M. B.; Flemings, P. B.; Polito, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    We conducted transient pressure-pulse decay permeability measurements on core plugs of the Barnett shale using a hydrostatic pressure cell. Core plugs, 3.8 cm in diameter and less than 2.5 cm in length, were prepared from a core obtained at a depth of approximately 2330 m from the Mitchel Energy 2 T. P. Sims well in the Mississippian Barnett Formation (Loucks and Ruppel, 2007). We performed permeability measurements of the core plugs using argon at varying confining pressures in two different directions (perpendicular and parallel to bedding planes). We calculate gas permeability from changes in pressure with time using the analytical solution of the pressure diffusion equation with appropriate boundary conditions for our test setup (Dicker and Smits, 1988). Based on our limited results, we interpret 2 × 10-18 m2 for vertical permeability and 156 × 10-18 m2 for horizontal permeability. We demonstrate an extreme stress dependence of the horizontal flow permeability where permeability decreases from 156 × 10-18 m2 to 2.5 × 10-18 m2 as the confining stress is increased from 3.5 to 35 MPa. These permeability measurements are at the high side of other pulsed permeability measurements in the Barnett shale (Bustin et al. 2008; Vermylen, 2011). Permeabilities calculated from mercury injection capillary pressure curves, using theoretically derived permeability-capillary pressure models based on parallel tubes assumption, are orders of magnitude less than our transient pressure-pulse decay permeability measurements (for example, 3.7×10-21 m2 (this study), 10-21 -10-20 m2 (Sigal, 2007), 10-20 -10-17 m2 (Prince et al., 2010)). We interpret that the high measured permeabilities are due to microfractures in the sample. At this point, we do not know if the microfractures are due to sampling disturbance (stress-relief induced) or represent an in-situ fracture network. Our study illustrates the importance of characterization of microfractures at the core scale to understand

  6. [In situ measurement of the permeability of concrete by FTIR-MIR].

    PubMed

    Lin, Jun-ren; Lin, Zhong-yu; Du, Rong-gui; Lin, Chang-jian

    2011-05-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy with multiple internal reflection mode (FTIR-MIR) has been applied for the first time to measure the permeability of concrete. The effect of water-cement ratio and curing time on the microstructure and permeability of concrete was studied. Also, the penetration process of H2O and SO4(2-) through the concrete specimens was investigated. The results indicated that the movement of H2O through unsaturated concrete was mainly caused by capillary suction and the movement of SO4(2-) through unsaturated concrete should take into account diffusion, advection caused by a capillary suction flow and the reaction between SO4(2-) and the cement hydration products. The permeability of concrete was determined by its microstructure. With the decrease in water-cement ratio and the increase in curing time, the porosity and the connectivity of pores in concrete decreased, which resulted in the decrease of concrete permeability.

  7. Special core analyses and relative permeability measurement on Almond formation reservoir rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Maloney, D.; Doggett, K.; Brinkmeyer, A.

    1993-02-01

    This report describes the results from special core analyses and relative permeability measurements conducted on samples of rock from the Almond Formation in Greater Green River Basin of southwestern Wyoming. The core was from Arch Unit Well 121 of Patrick Draw field. Samples were taken from the 4,950 to 4,965 ft depth interval. Thin section evaluation, X-ray diffraction, routine permeability and porosity, capillary pressure and wettability tests were performed to characterize the samples. Fluid flow capacity characteristics were measured during two-phase unsteady- and steady-state and three-phase steady-state relative permeability tests. Test results are presented in tables and graphs. Relative permeability results are compared with those of a 260-mD, fired Berea sandstone sample which was previously subjected to similar tests. Brine relative permeabilities were similar for the two samples, whereas oil and gas relative permeabilities for the Almond formation rock were higher at equivalent saturation conditions compared to Berea results. Most of the tests described in this report were conducted at 74[degrees]F laboratory temperature. Additional tests are planned at 150[degrees]F temperature. Equipment and procedural modifications to perform the elevated temperature tests are described.

  8. Special core analyses and relative permeability measurement on Almond formation reservoir rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Maloney, D.; Doggett, K.; Brinkmeyer, A.

    1993-02-01

    This report describes the results from special core analyses and relative permeability measurements conducted on samples of rock from the Almond Formation in Greater Green River Basin of southwestern Wyoming. The core was from Arch Unit Well 121 of Patrick Draw field. Samples were taken from the 4,950 to 4,965 ft depth interval. Thin section evaluation, X-ray diffraction, routine permeability and porosity, capillary pressure and wettability tests were performed to characterize the samples. Fluid flow capacity characteristics were measured during two-phase unsteady- and steady-state and three-phase steady-state relative permeability tests. Test results are presented in tables and graphs. Relative permeability results are compared with those of a 260-mD, fired Berea sandstone sample which was previously subjected to similar tests. Brine relative permeabilities were similar for the two samples, whereas oil and gas relative permeabilities for the Almond formation rock were higher at equivalent saturation conditions compared to Berea results. Most of the tests described in this report were conducted at 74{degrees}F laboratory temperature. Additional tests are planned at 150{degrees}F temperature. Equipment and procedural modifications to perform the elevated temperature tests are described.

  9. A new test method for measuring the water vapour permeability of fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianhua; Qian, Xiaoming

    2007-09-01

    The water vapour permeability of textile fabrics is a critical determinant of wearer comfort. Existing test methods are either time consuming or require large amounts of material. A new test apparatus was developed for characterizing the water vapour permeability of fabrics. An aluminium cylinder covered with waterproof and vapour permeable PTFE laminate is used for generating water vapour source on one side of the sample. A dry nitrogen sweep gas stream is used to carry water vapour away. The calculation of the rate of water vapour transmission across the fabric is based on the measurement of the relative humidity of the outgoing nitrogen stream. This new measuring apparatus offers a short test time and calls for a small sample size. The comparison measurements show that the test results correlated well with those obtained from ISO 11092 and ASTM E96. Therefore, this test method provides a new technique to accurately and precisely characterize the water vapour transport properties of fabrics.

  10. An improved technique for computing permeability from NMR measurements in mudstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, Hugh; Dugan, Brandon

    2011-08-01

    We develop a technique for extending nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) permeability estimation to clay-rich sediments. Our technique builds on the Schlumberger-Doll Research (SDR) equation by using porosity, grain size, specific surface, and magnetic susceptibility data to yield more accurate permeability estimation in mudstones with large pore surface areas and complex mineralogies. Based on measurements of natural sediments as well as resedimented laboratory mixtures of silica, bentonite, and kaolinite powders, we find that our method predicts permeability values that match measured values over four orders of magnitude and among lithologies that vary widely in grain size, mineralogy, and surface area. Our results show that the relationship between NMR data and permeability is a function of mineralogy and grain geometry, and that permeability predictions in clay-rich sediments can be improved with insights regarding the nature of the pore system made by the Kozeny theory. This technique extends the utility of NMR measurements beyond typical reservoir-quality rocks to a wide range of lithologies.

  11. Comparison of three techniques to measure unsaturated-zone air permeability at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ.

    PubMed

    Olson, M S; Tillman, F D; Choi, J W; Smith, J A

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare three techniques to measure the air permeability of the unsaturated zone at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ and to examine the effects of moisture content and soil heterogeneity on air permeability. Air permeability was measured in three ways: laboratory experiments on intact soil cores, field-scale air pump tests and calibration of air permeability to air pressures measured in the field under natural air pressure conditions using a numerical airflow model. The results obtained from these three methods were compared and found to be similar. Laboratory experiments performed on intact cores measured air permeability values on the order of 10(-14) to 10(-9) m2. Low-permeability cores were found between land surface and a depth of 0.6 m. The soil core data were divided into two layers with composite vertical permeability values of 1.3 x 10(-13) m2 from land surface to a 0.6-m depth and 3.8 x 10(-10) m2 for the lower layer. Analyses of the field-scale pump tests were performed for two scenarios: one in which the entire unsaturated zone was open to the atmosphere and one assuming a cap of low permeability extending 0.6 m below land surface. The vertical air permeability values obtained for the open scenario ranged from 1.2 x 10(-9) to 1.5 x 10(-9) m2, and ranged from 3.6 x 10(-9) to 6.8 x 10(-9) m2 in the lower layer, assuming an upper cap permeability of 6.0 x 10(-14) m2. The results from the open scenario are much higher than expected and the possible reasons for this ambiguity are discussed. The results from the capped scenario matched closely with those from the other methods and indicated that it is important to have background information on the study site to correctly analyze the pump test data. The optimized fit of the natural subsurface air pressure was achieved with an intrinsic permeability value of 3.3 x 10(-14) m2. When the data were refitted to the model assuming two distinct layers of the unsaturated zone, the optimized fit

  12. Device and method for the measurement of gas permeability through membranes

    DOEpatents

    Agarwal, Pradeep K.; Ackerman, John; Borgialli, Ron; Hamann, Jerry; Muknahalliptna, Suresh

    2006-08-08

    A device for the measuring membrane permeability in electrical/electrochemical/photo-electrochemical fields is provided. The device is a permeation cell and a tube mounted within the cell. An electrode is mounted at one end of the tube. A membrane is mounted within the cell wherein a corona is discharged from the electrode in a general direction toward the membrane thereby generating heated hydrogen atoms adjacent the membrane. A method for measuring the effects of temperature and pressure on membrane permeability and selectivity is also provided.

  13. An Approach to Measurment of Permeability/Permittivity Tensor of Ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    The magnetic field acting on the ferrofluids causes microstructural conversions that result in a change of their permeability. For this physical phenomenon is referred to as field induced magnetism (FIMA). An experimental method is described for ferrofluids in this state to examine their permeability tensor. Also an analogous phenomenon is described also when there is a change of the ferrofluids permittivity. We call it field induced dielectric anisotropy (FIDA). The contribution describes the method of measuring of the permittivity tensor. It can be expected that the FIMA and FIDA of ferrofluids will find interesting applications in designing of various sensors, in measurement technology, in mechatronic and in other areas of practice.

  14. In-situ measurement of permeability of a porous interface using the ultrasonic slow wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lin

    2011-12-01

    Porous materials are an important class of materials. They occur in natural substances such as oil or water bearing rocks, marine sediment, biological tissues (e.g. bones), granular materials and man made materials such as separation membranes, thermal insulators, ceramics and fuel cells. Porous materials have been used in many areas of applied science and engineering. Understanding of porous media plays an important role in areas such as experimental acoustics, geo-mechanics, geophysics, biophysics, material science. Among the number of parameters describing porous materials, the permeability is often the reason the porous structure is of interest. Permeability is a measurement of the ability of a porous material to transmit fluid. At an interface, permeability describes the flow of fluid into or out of a porous media Ultrasound has been widely used for flaw detection and material characterization. Studies show that there are three waves that exist in porous materials: the longitudinal and shear wave that exist in other solid materials and the slow longitudinal wave that only exists in porous materials. This slow longitudinal wave can only be generated and propagated above a critical frequency. Measuring the critical frequency provides information about the intrinsic permeability of a porous interface. This thesis presents a new technique developed for an in-situ permeability measurement using measurement of slow wave. In this work, an exact solution for the critical wave number for the slow wave has been developed and showed suitable for measuring the permeability of porous materials. A computer model of the reflection coefficient at the interface of fluid/porous media has been developed for the acoustic measurement. Ultrasonic experiments confirmed the sensitivity of this technique to changes in permeability and fluid viscosity. A flow cell test has been performed to show one potential industrial application of this technique by showing open pore and closed pore

  15. Characterization of fracture permeability with high-resolution vertical flow measurements during borehole pumping.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Frederick L.; Hess, A.E.; Cheng, C.H.; Hardin, E.

    1987-01-01

    The distribution of fracture permeability in granitic rocks was investigated by measuring the distribution of vertical flow in boreholes during periods of steady pumping. Pumping tests were conducted at two sites chosen to provide examples of moderately fractured rocks near Mirror Lake, New Hampshire and intensely fractured rocks near Oracle, Arizona. A sensitive heat-pulse flowmeter was used for accurate measurements of vertical flow as low as 0.2 liter per minute. Results indicate zones of fracture permeability in crystalline rocks are composed of irregular conduits that cannot be approximated by planar fractures of uniform aperture, and that the orientation of permeability zones may be unrelated to the orientation of individual fractures within those zones.-Authors

  16. Microscale Diffusion Measurements and Simulation of a Scaffold with a Permeable Strut

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Youl; Lee, Byung Ryong; Lee, Jongwan; Kim, Seongjun; Kim, Jung Kyung; Jeong, Young Hun; Jin, Songwan

    2013-01-01

    Electrospun nanofibrous structures provide good performance to scaffolds in tissue engineering. We measured the local diffusion coefficients of 3-kDa FITC-dextran in line patterns of electrospun nanofibrous structures fabricated by the direct-write electrospinning (DWES) technique using the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) method. No significant differences were detected between DWES line patterns fabricated with polymer supplied at flow rates of 0.1 and 0.5 mL/h. The oxygen diffusion coefficients of samples were estimated to be ~92%–94% of the oxygen diffusion coefficient in water based on the measured diffusion coefficient of 3-kDa FITC-dextran. We also simulated cell growth and distribution within spatially patterned scaffolds with struts consisting of either oxygen-permeable or non-permeable material. The permeable strut scaffolds exhibited enhanced cell growth. Saturated depths at which cells could grow to confluence were 15% deeper for the permeable strut scaffolds than for the non-permeable strut scaffold. PMID:24152434

  17. In-situ permeability measurements with direct push techniques: Phase II topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, W.; Mason, N.; Chipman, V.; Kisiel, K.; Stockton, J.

    1999-03-01

    This effort designed, fabricated, and field tested the engineering prototype of the Cone Permeameter{trademark} system. The integrated system includes the instrumented penetrometer probe, air and water pumps, flowrate controls, flow sensors, and a laptop-controlled data system. All of the equipment is portable and can be transported as luggage on airlines. The data system acquired and displays the process measurements (pressures, flows, and downhole temperature) in real time and calculates the resulting permeability. The measurement probe is a 2 inch diameter CPT rod section, incorporating a screened injection zone near the lower end of the rod and multiple sensitive absolute pressure sensors embedded in the probe at varying distances from the injection zone. Laboratory tests in a large test cell demonstrated the system's ability to measure nominally 1 Darcy permeability soil (30 to 40 Darcy material had been successfully measured in the Phase 1 effort). These tests also provided a shakedown of the system and identified minor instrument problems, which were resolved. Supplemental numerical modeling was conducted to evaluate the effects of layered permeability (heterogeneity) and anisotropy on the measurement system's performance. The general results of the analysis were that the Cone Permeameter could measure accurately, in heterogeneous media, the volume represented by the sample port radii if the outer pressure ports were used. Anisotropic permeability, while readily analyzed numerically, is more complicated to resolve with the simple analytical approach of the 1-D model, and will need further work to quantify. This phase culminated in field demonstrations at the DOE Savannah River Site. Saturated hydraulic conductivity measurements were completed at the D-Area Coal Pile Runoff Basin, and air permeability measurements were conducted at the M Area Integrated Demonstration Site and the 321 M area. The saturated hydraulic conductivity measurements were the most

  18. Design of Low Temperature AC Susceptibility Measurement Scheme for Molecular Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenblit, Simcha; Moon, Byoung; Lee, Yoonseok; Sultan, Reza

    2006-03-01

    AC susceptibility is one of the most important physical properties in many materials such as magnetic materials and superconductors. Although there are many commercial AC susceptibility measurement systems which cover a broad range of temperatures, it is still a daunting task to extend their measurement range into the low millikelvins. We are currently developing a low temperature AC susceptometer for the mK range. As a part of this effort, we have developed a versatile low-cost computer controlled coil-winder to make various types of coils. We have designed primary and secondary coils and wound them using the machine, and performed characterization of the AC susceptometer. In this presentation, I will explain the basics of magnetic susceptibility, its measurement, design considerations for building an AC magnetic susceptometer, and discuss the details of an actual apparatus designed and realized by the authors.

  19. Microwave Permittivity and Permeability Measurement on Lunar Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin; Steinfeld, David; Begley, Shelley B.; Winterhalter, Daniel; Allen, Carlton

    2011-01-01

    There has been interest in finding ways to process the lunar regolith since the early analyses of lunar samples returned from the Apollo moon missions. This fact has led to proposals for using microwaves to perform in-situ processing of the lunar soil to support future colonization of the moon. More recently, there has been speculation that the excellent microwave absorption of lunar soil came from the nanophase iron content in the regolith. The motivation for the present study was to begin obtaining a more fundamental understanding of the dielectric and magnetic properties of the regolith at microwave frequencies. A major objective of this study was to obtain information that would help answer the question about whether nanophase iron plays a major role in heating lunar soils. These new measurements over a wide frequency range can also determine the magnitude of the dielectric and magnetic absorption and if there are any resonant features that could be used to enhance processing of the regolith in the future. In addition, these microwave measurements would be useful in confirming that new simulants being developed, particularly those containing nanophase iron, would have the correct composition to simulate the lunar regolith. The results of this study suggest that nanophase iron does not play a major role in heating lunar regolith.

  20. Stationary and Dynamic Permeability and Coupling Coefficient Measurements in Sintered Glass Bead Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueven, I.; Steeb, H.; Luding, S.

    2014-12-01

    Electrokinetic waves describe the coupling between seismic and electromagnetic waves that exist in porous media. The coupling between them arise from an electrochemical boundary layer between grain and fluid interface of saturated porous media. Acoustical waves cause a disturbance of the electrical fluid charge within the double layer, which therefore creates an electric streaming current (seismoelectric effect). Inversely, electromagnetic waves can generate mechanical signals (electroseismic effect). Electrokinetic conversion potentially combines high seismic resolution with good electromagnetic hydrocarbon sensitivity. The (stationary and frequency-dependent) streaming potential coefficient is a key property, which gives rise to the coupling between electromagnetic and acoustical waves. It depends strongly on the fluid conductivity, porosity, tortuosity, permeability, pore throat and zeta potential of porous media. We examine experimentally both, the stationary and dynamic permeabilities and coupling coefficients of sintered glass bead systems. For this purpose a multi-purpose measuring cell was developed which allows us to carry out - besides common ultrasound experiments - also to perform stationary and frequency-dependent permeability and coupling coefficient measurements. For the experiments sintered mono- and slightly polydisperse glass bead samples with different glass bead diameters between 0.4 and 8mm and porosities ranging between 21 and 39% were used. The stationary and dynamic permeability and streaming potential measurements are supported by μCT scans which enable us a deeper insight into the porous medium. Based on the μCT scans of the produced sintered glass bead samples essential influence parameters, like tortuosity, porosity, effective particle diameters and pore throats in different regions of the entire scanned region have been analyzed in detail to understand the laboratory experiments, cf. Illustration 1. In addition lattice Boltzmann

  1. Permeability measurement and scan imaging to assess clogging of pervious concrete pavements in parking lots.

    PubMed

    Kayhanian, Masoud; Anderson, Dane; Harvey, John T; Jones, David; Muhunthan, Balasingam

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes a study that used permeability measurement along with physical and hydrological characteristics of 20 pervious concrete pavements in parking lots throughout California. The permeability was measured at five locations: the main entrance, an area with no traffic, and three separate measurements within a parking space at each parking lot. Hydrological and physical site characteristics such as traffic flow, erosion, vegetation cover, sediments accumulation, maintenance practice, presence of cracking, rainfall, and temperature data were also collected for each parking lot. These data were used to perform detailed statistical analysis to determine factors influencing changes in permeability and hence assessing possible cause of clogging. In addition, seven representative core samples were obtained from four different parking lots with permeability ranging from very low to very high. Porosity profiles produced from CT scanning were used to assess the possible nature and extent of clogging. Results showed that there is a large variation in permeability within each parking lot and between different parking lots. In general, the age of the parking lot is the predominant factor influencing the permeability. Statistical analysis revealed that fine sediment (particles less than 38 μm) mass is also an important influencing factor. Other influencing factors with lower significance included number of days with a temperature greater than 30°C and the amount of vegetation next to the parking lot. The combined scanned image analysis and porosity profile of the cores showed that most clogging occurs near the surface of the pavement. While lower porosity generally appeared to be limited to the upper 25 mm, in some core samples evidence of lower porosity was found up to 100mm below the surface.

  2. Measuring permeability, Young's modulus, and stress relaxation by the beam-bending technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vichit-Vadakan, Wilasa

    Recent interest in the permeability of cement paste, mortars, and concrete lies in the need to gain further understanding of mechanisms affecting the durability of these materials. Conventional techniques for measuring permeability are cumbersome and often take days to complete just one measurement. This thesis proposes a new technique for measuring the permeability. The advantage of this technique is that the results are obtained in a few minutes to a few hours; moreover, there is no problem with leaks or need for high pressures. The method is particularly well suited for examining the changes in permeability and viscoelastic properties of young cement paste samples. When a saturated rod of a porous material is instantaneously deflected under three-point bending, two types of relaxation processes occur simultaneously: hydrodynamic relaxation, caused by the flow of liquid in the porous body to restore ambient pressure, and viscoelastic relaxation of the solid network. By measuring the decrease in the force required to sustain a constant deflection, it is possible to obtain the permeability and Young's modulus from the hydrodynamic relaxation function, in addition to the stress relaxation function of the sample. The exact viscoelastic solution is developed and the total relaxation is shown to be very closely approximated as the product of the hydrodynamic and stress relaxation functions. The analytical results are verified on porous VycorRTM glass saturated in various solvents, including normal alcohols, water, and glycerol. The results show excellent agreement with the theory. Consistent with observations of previous workers, the permeability is found to be influenced by the size of the solvent molecule; by assuming that the pore surfaces are covered with a monolayer of immobile solvent, the observed variation can be explained. The evolution of the permeability, Young's modulus, and stress relaxation function are reported for Type III Portland cement paste with

  3. Laboratory measurement of permeability upscaling: Results for the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Tidwell, V.C.; Wilson, J.L.

    1997-12-31

    Parameterization of predictive models is often complicated by the inability to make measurements at the same scale at which one wishes to perform the analysis. This disparity in scales necessitates the use of some averaging or upscaling model to compute the desired effective media properties. In efforts to better model permeability upscaling, laboratory experiments have been conducted on a series of rock samples with different genetic origins. These experiments involve the collection of exhaustive permeability data sets at different sample supports (i.e., sample volumes) using a specially designed minipermeameter test system. Here the authors present a synopsis of such a data set collected from a block of volcanic tuff.

  4. Prediction of permeability of cement-admixed soft clay using resistivity and time-domain IP measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latt, Khin M. M.; Giao, P. H.

    2017-02-01

    Permeability is one of the most important petrophysical parameters, which unfortunately is quite difficult to be tested and estimated, particularly for the fine-grained soils and mixed soils. Prediction of permeability based on geophysical measurements is currently one of the most challenging issues in petrophysics. There have been recently reported some empirical relationships between permeability, resistivity and spectral induced polarization (SIP) parameters for a porous medium. However, the disadvantage of this approach is the very scarcity of SIP data as most of practical measurements are time-domain IP. In this study, a detailed overview of permeability prediction models using resistivity and spectral IP data was made. More than that, an innovative approach using resistivity and time-domain IP measurements to predict permeability of cement-admixed Bangkok clay was proposed and successfully applied for tested samples based on measurements of resistivity and time-domain IP data. A good amount of geotechnical and geophysical tests was conducted to investigate the time-dependent development of strength, porosity, and permeability of cement-mixed Bangkok soft clay samples during a 28-day curing process. The permeability predicted by resistivity and chargeability model matched well with permeability measured by consolidation testing. In addition, a series of correlations between unconfined compressive strength, porosity and permeability as measured by geotechnical testing and resistivity and chargeability as measured by geophysical testing were found.

  5. Development of Helium-Mass-Spectrometry-Permeameter for the Measurement of Permeability of Near-Impermeable Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Moo Y.; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2016-12-01

    A helium leakage detection system was modified to measure gas permeability on extracted cores of nearly impermeable rock. The Helium-Mass-Spectrometry-Permeameter (HMSP) is duplicating the classic Darcy's experiment with a constant pressure differential and steady-state flow through a sample using helium gas. Under triaxial stress condition, the newly developed HMSP can measure hydraulic permeability of rocks and geomaterials down to the nanoDarcy scale (10-21 m2). The extension of measuring the lower end of the permeability scale may help answer important questions regarding the permeability of rock at great depth where fractures may close completely under high lithostatic stress.

  6. Reanalysis of in situ permeability measurements in the Barbados décollement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bekins, B.A.; Matmon, D.; Screaton, E.J.; Brown, K.M.

    2011-01-01

    A cased and sealed borehole in the Northern Barbados accretionary complex was the site of the first attempts to measure permeability in situ along a plate boundary décollement. Three separate efforts at Hole 949C yielded permeability estimates for the décollement spanning four orders of magnitude. An analysis of problems encountered during installation of the casing and seals provides insights into how the borehole conditions may have led to the wide range of results. During the installation, sediments from the surrounding formation repeatedly intruded into the borehole and casing. Stress analysis shows that the weak sediments were deforming plastically and the radial and tangential stresses around the borehole were significantly lower than lithostatic. This perturbed stress state may explain why the test pressure records showed indications of hydrofracture at pressures below lithostatic, and permeabilities rose rapidly as the estimated effective stress dropped below 0.8 MPa. Even after the borehole was sealed, the plastic deformation of the formation and relatively large gap of the wire wrapped screen allowed sediment to flow into the casing. Force equilibrium calculations predict sediment would have filled the borehole to 10 cm above the top of the screen by the time slug tests were conducted 1.5 years after the borehole was sealed. Reanalysis of the slug test results with these conditions yields several orders of magnitude higher permeability estimates than the original analysis which assumed an open casing. Overall the results based on only the tests with no sign of hydrofracture yield a permeability range of 10−14–10−15 m2 and a rate of increase in permeability with decreasing effective stress consistent with laboratory tests on samples from the décollement zone.

  7. Calorimetric method of ac loss measurement in a rotating magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Ghoshal, P K; Coombs, T A; Campbell, A M

    2010-07-01

    A method is described for calorimetric ac-loss measurements of high-T(c) superconductors (HTS) at 80 K. It is based on a technique used at 4.2 K for conventional superconducting wires that allows an easy loss measurement in parallel or perpendicular external field orientation. This paper focuses on ac loss measurement setup and calibration in a rotating magnetic field. This experimental setup is to demonstrate measuring loss using a temperature rise method under the influence of a rotating magnetic field. The slight temperature increase of the sample in an ac-field is used as a measure of losses. The aim is to simulate the loss in rotating machines using HTS. This is a unique technique to measure total ac loss in HTS at power frequencies. The sample is mounted on to a cold finger extended from a liquid nitrogen heat exchanger (HEX). The thermal insulation between the HEX and sample is provided by a material of low thermal conductivity, and low eddy current heating sample holder in vacuum vessel. A temperature sensor and noninductive heater have been incorporated in the sample holder allowing a rapid sample change. The main part of the data is obtained in the calorimetric measurement is used for calibration. The focus is on the accuracy and calibrations required to predict the actual ac losses in HTS. This setup has the advantage of being able to measure the total ac loss under the influence of a continuous moving field as experienced by any rotating machines.

  8. Calorimetric method of ac loss measurement in a rotating magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Ghoshal, P. K.; Coombs, T. A.; Campbell, A. M.

    2010-07-15

    A method is described for calorimetric ac-loss measurements of high-T{sub c} superconductors (HTS) at 80 K. It is based on a technique used at 4.2 K for conventional superconducting wires that allows an easy loss measurement in parallel or perpendicular external field orientation. This paper focuses on ac loss measurement setup and calibration in a rotating magnetic field. This experimental setup is to demonstrate measuring loss using a temperature rise method under the influence of a rotating magnetic field. The slight temperature increase of the sample in an ac-field is used as a measure of losses. The aim is to simulate the loss in rotating machines using HTS. This is a unique technique to measure total ac loss in HTS at power frequencies. The sample is mounted on to a cold finger extended from a liquid nitrogen heat exchanger (HEX). The thermal insulation between the HEX and sample is provided by a material of low thermal conductivity, and low eddy current heating sample holder in vacuum vessel. A temperature sensor and noninductive heater have been incorporated in the sample holder allowing a rapid sample change. The main part of the data is obtained in the calorimetric measurement is used for calibration. The focus is on the accuracy and calibrations required to predict the actual ac losses in HTS. This setup has the advantage of being able to measure the total ac loss under the influence of a continuous moving field as experienced by any rotating machines.

  9. Calorimetric method of ac loss measurement in a rotating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoshal, P. K.; Coombs, T. A.; Campbell, A. M.

    2010-07-01

    A method is described for calorimetric ac-loss measurements of high-Tc superconductors (HTS) at 80 K. It is based on a technique used at 4.2 K for conventional superconducting wires that allows an easy loss measurement in parallel or perpendicular external field orientation. This paper focuses on ac loss measurement setup and calibration in a rotating magnetic field. This experimental setup is to demonstrate measuring loss using a temperature rise method under the influence of a rotating magnetic field. The slight temperature increase of the sample in an ac-field is used as a measure of losses. The aim is to simulate the loss in rotating machines using HTS. This is a unique technique to measure total ac loss in HTS at power frequencies. The sample is mounted on to a cold finger extended from a liquid nitrogen heat exchanger (HEX). The thermal insulation between the HEX and sample is provided by a material of low thermal conductivity, and low eddy current heating sample holder in vacuum vessel. A temperature sensor and noninductive heater have been incorporated in the sample holder allowing a rapid sample change. The main part of the data is obtained in the calorimetric measurement is used for calibration. The focus is on the accuracy and calibrations required to predict the actual ac losses in HTS. This setup has the advantage of being able to measure the total ac loss under the influence of a continuous moving field as experienced by any rotating machines.

  10. In-situ permeability measurements with the Cone Permeameter{trademark} measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-30

    The permeability of soil to fluid flow defines the magnitude of soil gas and groundwater flow under imposed pressure gradients. Pressure gradients exist due to natural effects such as hydraulic gradients (in the case of groundwater) and barometrically imposed gradients (in the case of soil gas). Unnatural gradients are imposed by soil vapor extraction air sparging, active venting, pump-and-treat, and other remediation processes requiring the active movement of fluids through the soil. The design of these processes requires knowledge of the flow characteristics of the soil. The most variable of the soil's flow characteristics is its permeability, which can vary by several orders of magnitude in a given geologic and hydrologic setting. Knowledge of soil gas permeability is needed to design soil vapor extraction systems and predict the general movement of gas in soil. Saturated hydraulic conductivity, or the soil's permeability to liquid flow, is required to predict movement of groundwater in saturated soils. The variability of permeability is illustrated by the range of values for different media in a table. It is not uncommon for permeabilities to vary by several orders of magnitude at a given site.

  11. Osmotic water permeability of plasma and vacuolar membranes in protoplasts I: high osmotic water permeability in radish (Raphanus sativus) root cells as measured by a new method.

    PubMed

    Murai-Hatano, Mari; Kuwagata, Tsuneo

    2007-03-01

    Intra- and transcellular water movements in plants are regulated by the water permeability of the plasma membrane (PM) and vacuolar membrane (VM) in plant cells. In the present study, we investigated the osmotic water permeability of both PM (P ( f1)) and VM (P ( f2)), as well as the bulk osmotic water permeability of a protoplast (P ( f(bulk))) isolated from radish (Raphanus sativus) roots. The values of P ( f(bulk)) and P ( f2) were determined from the swelling/shrinking rate of protoplasts and isolated vacuoles under hypo- or hypertonic conditions. In order to minimize the effect of unstirred layer, we monitored dropping or rising protoplasts (vacuoles) in sorbitol solutions as they swelled or shrunk. P ( f1) was calculated from P ( f(bulk)) and P ( f2) by using the 'three-compartment model', which describes the theoretical relationship between P ( f1), P ( f2) and P ( f(bulk)) (Kuwagata and Murai-Hatano in J Plant Res, 2007). The time-dependent changes in the volume of protoplasts and isolated vacuoles fitted well to the theoretical curves, and solute permeation of PM and VM was able to be neglected for measuring the osmotic water permeability. High osmotic water permeability of more than 500 mum s(-1), indicating high activity of aquaporins (water channels), was observed in both PM and VM in radish root cells. This method has the advantage that P ( f1) and P ( f2) can be measured accurately in individual higher plant cells.

  12. In situ measurements of rock salt permeability changes due to nearby excavation

    SciTech Connect

    Stormont, J.C. ); Howard, C.L. ); Daemen, J.J.K. . Mackay School of Mines)

    1991-07-01

    The Small-Scale Mine-By was an in situ experiment to measure changes in brine and gas permeability of rock salt as a result of nearby excavation. A series of small-volume pressurized brine- and gas-filled test intervals were established 8 m beneath the floor of Room L1 in the WIPP underground. The test intervals were isolated in the bottom of the 4.8-cm diameter monitoring boreholes with inflatable rubber packers, and are initially pressurized to about 2 MPa. Both brine- and gas-filled test intervals were located 1.25, 1.5, 2, 3, and 4 r from the center of a planned large-diameter hole, where r is the radius of the large-diameter hole. Prior to the drilling of the large-diameter borehole, the responses of both the brine- and gas-filled test intervals were consistent with the formation modeled as a very low permeability, low porosity porous medium with a significant pore (brine) pressure and no measurable gas permeability. The drilling of the mine-by borehole created a zone of dilated, partially saturated rock out to about 1.5 r. The formation pressure increases from near zero at 1.5 r to the pre-excavation value at 4 r. Injection tests reveal a gradient of brine permeabilities from 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}18} m{sup 2} at 1.25 r to about the pre-excavation value (10{sup {minus}21} m{sup 2}) by 3 r. Gas-injection tests reveal measurable gas permeability is limited to within 1.5 r. 17 refs., 24 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. A falling-pressure method for measuring air permeability of asphalt in laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hailong; Jiao, Jiu Jimmy; Luk, Mario

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a simple analytical solution for estimating air permeability using the test data obtained by a falling-pressure method in laboratory. The perimeter of the column-shaped sample is fixed in a steel cylinder with the upper sample surface open to the atmosphere. The lower surface of the sample and the cylinder form an air chamber. A water manometer is connected to the air chamber to measure the air pressure inside after the chamber is pressurized. The data of pressure versus time in the air chamber are recorded and analyzed. An approximate analytical solution is derived to describe the pressure-time relationship in the air chamber. The air permeability can be easily estimated using the approximate analytical solution based on the linear least-squares fitting to the recorded pressure-time test data. This method is used to estimate the falling-pressure test data of 15 asphalt samples. The agreement between the test data and the analytical prediction is satisfactory for all the samples. To investigate the error caused by the approximate analytical solution, the air permeabilities are also estimated based on fully numerical solutions. The permeability values obtained from analytical and numerical solutions are very close. The maximum relative error is less than 6% for samples with more than five pressure-time records. A quantitative condition is given under which the analytical solution applies with negligible estimation error. Compared with the common, steady-state method for measuring air permeability, the falling-pressure method has its advantages such as simplicity and economy. The steady-state method has to measure the air flux through the sample, while the falling-pressure method does not.

  14. Correlation of AC Loss Data from Magnetic Susceptibility Measurements with YBCO Film Quality (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    excimer laser operating at the KrF, 248 nm , wavelength. Substrates included LaAlO3 ( 100 ) and SrTiO3 ( 100 ) single crystal substrates as well as buffered...AFRL-RZ-WP-TP-2012-0100 CORRELATION OF AC LOSS DATA FROM MAGNETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY MEASUREMENTS WITH YBCO FILM QUALITY (POSTPRINT) Paul N...CORRELATION OF AC LOSS DATA FROM MAGNETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY MEASUREMENTS WITH YBCO FILM QUALITY (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-house 5b. GRANT

  15. AC loss measurements in HTS coil assemblies with hybrid coil structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhenan; Long, Nicholas J.; Staines, Mike; Badcock, Rodney A.; Bumby, Chris W.; Buckley, Robert G.; Amemiya, Naoyuki

    2016-09-01

    Both AC loss and wire cost in coil windings are critical factors for high temperature superconductor (HTS) AC machinery applications. We present AC loss measurement results in three HTS coil assemblies at 77 K and 65 K which have a hybrid coil structure comprising one central winding (CW) and two end windings (EWs) wound with ReBCO and BSCCO wires with different self-field I c values at 77 K. All AC loss results in the coil assemblies are hysteretic and the normalized AC losses in the coil assemblies at different temperatures can be scaled with the I c value of the coil assemblies. The normalised results show that AC loss in a coil assembly with BSCCO CW can be reduced by using EWs wound with high I c ReBCO wires, whilst further AC loss reduction can be achieved by replacing the BSCCO CW with ReBCO CW. The results imply that a flexible hybrid coil structure is possible which considers both AC loss and wire cost in coil assemblies.

  16. Integration of porosity, connectivity and permeability measurements to determine syn-eruptive degassing processes during a sub-plinian basaltic eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Simone; Gurioli, Lucia; Colombier, Matthieu; Le Pennec, Jean-Luc; Roche, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    samples, however, show that the vesicles in each clast are fully connected to each other, while the permeability of the clasts varies by two orders (10-11-10-13m2). Textural analysis of the different vesicle networks will give better insights into the cause of this discrepancy. These interesting results indicate the importance of both connectivity and permeability measurements and textural analysis for the evaluation of the presence of a vesicle network and the potential for degassing prior to fragmentation. References: Polacci, M., Baker, D.R., La Rue, A., Mancini, L., Allard, P., 2012. Degassing behaviour of vesiculated basaltic magmas: an example from Ambrym volcano, Vanuatu Arc. J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res., 233-234, 55-64. Rust, A.C., Cashman, K.V., 2004. Permeability of vesicular silicic magma: inertial and hysteresis effects. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 228, 93-107. Saar, M.O., Manga, M., 1999. Permeability-porosity relationship in vesicular basalts. Geophs. Res. Lett., 26, 111-114. Takeuchi, S., Nakashima, S., Tomiya, A., 2008. Permeability measurements of natural and experimental volcanic materials with a simple permeameter: Toward an understanding of magmatic degassing processes. J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res., 177, 329-339.

  17. Cancellation of the boundary and edge effects by choice of lens thickness during oxygen permeability measurement of contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Weissman, B A; Fatt, I

    1989-05-01

    Edge and boundary effect correction factors have been proposed to modify the oxygen transmissibility and permeability values obtained by polarographic measurement of contact lenses. These two correction factors are opposite in sign: the boundary effect causes oxygen transmissibility and permeability to be underestimated; the edge effect causes the reverse. Two methods are used to define lens thickness values where the two effects should be quantitatively equal and therefore cancel for both rigid gas permeable and hydrogel contact lenses.

  18. Permeability of Icelandic deep geothermal reservoirs: insight from HP and HT measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nono, Franck; Gibert, Benoit; Loggia, Didier; Parat, Fleurice; Azais, Pierre; Cichy, Sarah

    2016-04-01

    Although the Icelandic geothermal system has been intensively investigated over the years, targeting increasingly deeper reservoirs (e.g. under supercritical conditions) requires a good knowledge of the behaviour of physical properties of the host rock types at high temperatures and pressures. In particular permeability, which is the key parameter controlling the dynamics of such unconventional reservoir, is poorly known under these conditions. Up to this date, there is only very limited data available on this topic, especially for magmatic rocks, which is attributed to the difficulty to access these extreme conditions in the presence of pore fluids. Three types of rocks, representative of the lithology are investigated: dolerite, basalt and hyaloclastite. These rocks experienced a high degree of alteration with actinolite, epidote +/- chlorite and talc, representing high temperature conditions (>350°C). We used an internally heated pressure vessel (the Paterson Press) to perform permeability measurements at high temperature and pressure. The effective pressure varied up to 120 MPa while the temperature varied up to 800°C. Inert Argon gas was used as the pore fluid to avoid fluid/rocks interaction. Due to the wide range in permeability, we combined different methods of measurements (steady-state, harmonic, pulse and numerical methods) in order to maintain the accuracy of the permeability measurements. We observed a significant decrease of permeability with effective pressure for the micro-fissural samples (dolerites) when compared to the generally inter-granular hyaloclastites. The decrease is about 1 to 2 orders of magnitude for the dolerites, ranging from about 1 μDarcy to 0.01 μDarcy, while the effective pressure increases from 10 to 120 MPa, respectively. We related this rapid decrease of permeability to the closure of micro-cracks at low effective pressures. This effect has hysteresis as it is not reversible when the effective pressure is re-decreased. On

  19. Application of fluorescent tracer agent technology to point-of-care gastrointestinal permeability measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorshow, Richard B.; Shieh, Jeng-Jong; Rogers, Thomas E.; Hall-Moore, Carla; Shaikh, Nurmohammad; Talcott, Michael; Tarr, Phillip I.

    2016-03-01

    Gut dysfunction, often accompanied by increased mucosal permeability to gut contents, frequently accompanies a variety of human intestinal inflammatory conditions. These disorders include inflammatory bowel diseases (e.g., Crohn's Disease) and environmental enteropathy and enteric dysfunction, a condition strongly associated with childhood malnutrition and stunting in resource poor areas of the world. The most widely used diagnostic assay for gastrointestinal permeability is the lactulose to mannitol ratio (L:M) measurement. These sugars are administered orally, differentially absorbed by the gut, and then cleared from the body by glomerular filtration in the kidney. The amount of each sugar excreted in the urine is measured. The larger sugar, lactulose, is minimally absorbed through a healthy gut. The smaller sugar, mannitol, in contrast, is readily absorbed through both a healthy and injured gut. Thus a higher ratio of lactulose to mannitol reflects increased intestinal permeability. However, several issues prevent widespread use of the L:M ratio in clinical practice. Urine needs to be collected over time intervals of several hours, the specimen then needs to be transported to an analytical laboratory, and sophisticated equipment is required to measure the concentration of each sugar in the urine. In this presentation we show that fluorescent tracer agents with molecular weights similar to those of the sugars, selected from our portfolio of biocompatible renally cleared fluorophores, mimic the L:M ratio test for gut permeability. This fluorescent tracer agent detection technology can be used to overcome the limitations of the L:M assay, and is amenable to point-of-care clinical use.

  20. Linear optics measurements and corrections using an AC dipole in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Bai, M.; Yang, L.

    2010-05-23

    We report recent experimental results on linear optics measurements and corrections using ac dipole. In RHIC 2009 run, the concept of the SVD correction algorithm is tested at injection energy for both identifying the artificial gradient errors and correcting it using the trim quadrupoles. The measured phase beatings were reduced by 30% and 40% respectively for two dedicated experiments. In RHIC 2010 run, ac dipole is used to measure {beta}* and chromatic {beta} function. For the 0.65m {beta}* lattice, we observed a factor of 3 discrepancy between model and measured chromatic {beta} function in the yellow ring.

  1. The Wechsler ACS Social Perception Subtest: A Preliminary Comparison with Other Measures of Social Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kandalaft, Michelle R.; Didehbani, Nyaz; Cullum, C. Munro; Krawczyk, Daniel C.; Allen, Tandra T.; Tamminga, Carol A.; Chapman, Sandra B.

    2012-01-01

    Relative to other cognitive areas, there are few clinical measures currently available to assess social perception. A new standardized measure, the Wechsler Advanced Clinical Solutions (ACS) Social Perception subtest, addresses some limitations of existing measures; however, little is known about this new test. The first goal of this investigation…

  2. Laboratory measurement of directional permeability trends. Project 61031 special core analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, W.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes a procedure that is suitable for measuring the maximum and minimum permeabilities of porous sediments. This procedure has been tested only on sediments characterized by a two-dimensional anisotropy. The underlying theory that led to the development of this procedure is analyzed herein. The data that confirm the theory and illustrate the application of the methodology are given as well. This procedure is a model of simplicity. In ordinary methodologies, measurement errors are unavoidable - a consequence of the fact that uncompensated end effects are introduced because it is so convenient to employ arbitrary sample shapes (such as right-cylindrical core shapes). In the IGT method, however, such end-effect zones are eliminated because the test samples are given a shape that is purposely designed to eliminate them. The conclusion drawn is that this procedure is suitable for studying the directional properties of sediments of Western tight sands. For example, preliminary data indicate that the maximum-to-minimum permeability ratios range from 1 to 2 for single-phase (gas) flow under ambient laboratory conditions. Moreover, it is implied that the ratios may be considerably higher for cases in which the specific gas permeability is reduced, for example, because of the presence of connate water and/or because of the effect of overburden stress.

  3. Measuring permeability and stress relaxation of young cement paste by beam bending

    SciTech Connect

    Vichit-Vadakan, W.; Scherer, George W

    2003-12-01

    When a saturated rod of a porous material is deflected in three-point bending, two types of time-dependent relaxation processes occur simultaneously: hydrodynamic relaxation, caused by the flow of liquid in the porous body, and viscoelastic (VE) relaxation of the solid network. By measuring the decrease in the force required to sustain a constant deflection, it is possible to obtain the permeability from the hydrodynamic relaxation function, in addition to the VE stress relaxation function of the sample. We report the early-age evolution of permeability, elastic modulus, and stress relaxation function for Type III Portland cement paste with water-cement (w/c) ratios of 0.45, 0.50, and 0.55. The stress relaxation function is shown to preserve its shape during aging; that function is numerically transformed into the creep function.

  4. Human/Nonhuman Primate AC-PC Ratio - Considerations for Translational Brain Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Fiandaca, Massimo S.; Salegio, Ernesto Aguilar; Yin, Dali; Richardson, R. Mark; Valles, Francisco E.; Larson, Paul S.; Starr, Philip A.; Lonser, Russell R.; Bankiewicz, Krystof S.

    2011-01-01

    This comparative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analysis evaluated the ratio of AC-PC (anterior commissure to posterior commissure) distance measures in selected groups of humans and nonhuman primates (NHPs). An understanding of the basis of this ratio between primate species may allow more accurate translation of NHP stereotactic targeting measurements to upcoming human trials. MRI datasets of adult humans [n=21], and juvenile and adult NHPs (Macaca fascicularis [n=40], and Macaca mulatta [n=32]), were evaluated in a mid-sagittal plane to obtain the AC-PC distance measure for each examined subject. Two trained evaluators, blinded to each other’s results, carried out three separate measurements of the AC-PC length for each subject. Each observer carried out measurements of the entire dataset [n=93] before repeating the measurements two additional times. Previous dataset measures were not available for review at the time of subsequent measures. Inter- and intra-observer variabilities were not statistically significant. Minimal intraspecies variation was found in the AC-PC measurement of our human and NHP groups. We found significant interspecies differences, however, more between humans and NHPs, and less between the NHP groups. Regression analysis confirms the strong linear relationship of AC-PC distance based primarily on species in our study groups. Human/NHP AC-PC ratios varied between 2.1 to 2.3 based on the compared NHP species groups. We conclude that the scale differences in brain measurements between NHPs and humans described in this study allows improved translation of stereotactic targeting coordinates in future human clinical trials, which may lead to improved efficacy and safety. PMID:21185868

  5. Measurements of AC Loss In Second-Generation HTS Tapes in a DC Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osofsky, M. S.; Soulen, R. J.; Gubser, D. U.; Datta, T.

    2008-03-01

    The successful application of superconductivity to motors and other power system components depends on the characterization and subsequent minimization of the ac loss in the superconductor used for fabrication of the component. The superconductive component, excited by an ac power source, may be exposed to large dc magnetic fields and/or ac fields. To further complicate the situation, the transport properties of the tapes are strongly dependent on the angle between the applied field and the YBCO c-axis (normal to the tape surface). We report on measurements of the transport ac loss of a YBaCuO tape at 65 K, at several frequencies, in applied dc fields of 1-3 T with the field parallel and perpendicular to the tape normal.

  6. Method and apparatus for measuring the gas permeability of a solid sample

    DOEpatents

    Carstens, D.H.W.

    1984-01-27

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus and method for measuring the permeability of a gas in a sample. The gas is allowed to reach a steady flow rate through the sample. A measurable amount of the gas is collected during a given time period and then delivered to a sensitive quadrupole. The quadrupole signal, adjusted for background, is proportional to the amount of gas collected during the time period. The quadrupole can be calibrated with a standard helium leak. The gas can be deuterium and the sample can be polyvinyl alcohol.

  7. Measurement of injectivity indexes in geothermal wells with two permeable zones

    SciTech Connect

    Acuna, Jorge A.

    1994-01-20

    Injectivity tests in wells with two permeable zones and internal flow is analyzed in order to include the usually severe thermal transient effects. A theoretical analysis is performed and a method devised to obtain information from the thermal transient, provided that temperature is measured simultaneously with pressure. The technique is illustrated with two real tests performed at Miravalles, Costa Rica. It allows to estimate total injectivity index as well as the injectivity index of each one of the two zones separately. Correct position of measuring tools and nature of spontaneous internal flow is also discussed.

  8. AC Inductive Measurement of Intergrain and Intragrain Currents in High-Tc Oxide Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Baorong; Munakata, Toshiyuki; Matsushita, Teruo; Iwakuma, Masataka; Funaki, Kazuo; Takeo, Masakatsu; Yamafuji, Kaoru

    1988-09-01

    Bulk intergrain current and closed intragrain current in sintered Y-Ba-Cu-O superconductors were measured at 77 K by using an ac inductive method. These currents can be separated because of the large difference in penetrating rates of the magnetic flux into specimens with respect to the ac field amplitude. The obtained intergrain current density agreed approximately with critical current density measured resistively. The closed intragrain current density amounted to 4.3× 108 A/m2 at B{=}0.5 T and decreased gradually with increasing magnetic field. The present results show that the ac inductive measurement is one of the available nondestructive methods to characterize sintered oxide specimens.

  9. High microvascular endothelial water permeability in mouse lung measured by a pleural surface fluorescence method.

    PubMed Central

    Carter, E P; Olveczky, B P; Matthay, M A; Verkman, A S

    1998-01-01

    Transport of water between the capillary and airspace compartments in lung encounters serial barriers: the alveolar epithelium, interstitium, and capillary endothelium. We previously reported a pleural surface fluorescence method to measure net capillary-to-airspace water transport. To measure the osmotic water permeability across the microvascular endothelial barrier in intact lung, the airspace was filled with a water-immiscible fluorocarbon. The capillaries were perfused via the pulmonary artery with solutions of specified osmolalites containing a high-molecular-weight fluorescent dextran. An increase in perfusate osmolality produced a prompt decrease in surface fluorescence due to dye dilution in the capillaries, followed by a slower return to initial fluorescence as capillary and lung interstitial osmolality equilibrate. A mathematical model was developed to determine the osmotic water permeability coefficient (Pf) of lung microvessels from the time course of pleural surface fluorescence. As predicted, the magnitude of the prompt change in surface fluorescence increased with decreased pulmonary artery perfusion rate and increased osmotic gradient size. With raffinose used to induce the osmotic gradient, Pf was 0.03 cm/s at 23 degrees C and was reduced 54% by 0.5 mM HgCl2. Temperature dependence measurements gave an Arrhenius activation energy (Ea) of 5.4 kcal/mol (12-37 degrees C). The apparent Pf induced by the smaller osmolytes mannitol and glycine was 0.021 and 0.011 cm/s (23 degrees C). Immunoblot analysis showed approximately 1.4 x 10(12) aquaporin-1 water channels/cm2 of capillary surface, which accounted quantitatively for the high Pf. These results establish a novel method for measuring osmotically driven water permeability across microvessels in intact lung. The high Pf, low Ea, and mercurial inhibition indicate the involvement of molecular water channels in water transport across the lung endothelium. PMID:9545071

  10. Comparison between traditional laboratory tests, permeability measurements and CT-based fluid flow modelling for cultural heritage applications.

    PubMed

    De Boever, Wesley; Bultreys, Tom; Derluyn, Hannelore; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Cnudde, Veerle

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we examine the possibility to use on-site permeability measurements for cultural heritage applications as an alternative for traditional laboratory tests such as determination of the capillary absorption coefficient. These on-site measurements, performed with a portable air permeameter, were correlated with the pore network properties of eight sandstones and one granular limestone that are discussed in this paper. The network properties of the 9 materials tested in this study were obtained from micro-computed tomography (μCT) and compared to measurements and calculations of permeability and the capillary absorption rate of the stones under investigation, in order to find the correlation between pore network characteristics and fluid management characteristics of these sandstones. Results show a good correlation between capillary absorption, permeability and network properties, opening the possibility of using on-site permeability measurements as a standard method in cultural heritage applications.

  11. Evaluation of methods for measuring relative permeability of anhydride from the Salado Formation: Sensitivity analysis and data reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, R.L.; Kalbus, J.S.; Howarth, S.M.

    1997-05-01

    This report documents, demonstrates, evaluates, and provides theoretical justification for methods used to convert experimental data into relative permeability relationships. The report facilities accurate determination of relative permeabilities of anhydride rock samples from the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Relative permeability characteristic curves are necessary for WIPP Performance Assessment (PA) predictions of the potential for flow of waste-generated gas from the repository and brine flow into repository. This report follows Christiansen and Howarth (1995), a comprehensive literature review of methods for measuring relative permeability. It focuses on unsteady-state experiments and describes five methods for obtaining relative permeability relationships from unsteady-state experiments. Unsteady-state experimental methods were recommended for relative permeability measurements of low-permeability anhydrite rock samples form the Salado Formation because these tests produce accurate relative permeability information and take significantly less time to complete than steady-state tests. Five methods for obtaining relative permeability relationships from unsteady-state experiments are described: the Welge method, the Johnson-Bossler-Naumann method, the Jones-Roszelle method, the Ramakrishnan-Cappiello method, and the Hagoort method. A summary, an example of the calculations, and a theoretical justification are provided for each of the five methods. Displacements in porous media are numerically simulated for the calculation examples. The simulated product data were processed using the methods, and the relative permeabilities obtained were compared with those input to the numerical model. A variety of operating conditions were simulated to show sensitivity of production behavior to rock-fluid properties.

  12. Experimental Measurements of Permeability Evolution During Brittle Deformation of Crystalline Rocks and Implications for Fluid Flow in Fault Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, T.; Faulkner, D.

    2004-12-01

    Detailed experimental studies of the development of permeability of crustal rock during deformation are essential in helping to understand fault mechanics and constrain larger scale models that predict bulk fluid flow within the crust. The strength, permeability and pore fluid volume evolution of initially intact crystalline rock (Westerly granite and Cerro Cristales granodiorite) under increasing differential load leading to macroscopic failure has been measured in a triaxial deformation apparatus. Experiments were run under pore water pressures of 50 MPa and varying effective pressures from 10 to 50 MPa. Permeability is seen to increase by up to and over two orders of magnitude prior to macroscopic failure, from 3.5 x 10-21 to 9 x 10-19 m2 with the greatest increase seen at lowest effective pressures. Post-failure permeability is shown to be over 3 orders of magnitude higher than initial intact permeabilities, as high as 4 x 10-18 m2, and approaches lower the limit of measurements of in situ bulk crustal permeabilities. Increasing amplitude cyclic loading tests show permeability-stress hysteresis, with high permeabilities maintained as differential stress is reduced. The largest permeability increases are seen between 90-99% of the failure stress. Under hydrothermal conditions without further loading, it is suggested that much of this permeability can be recovered, and pre-macroscopic failure fracture damage may heal relatively faster than post-failure macroscopic fractures. Pre-failure permeabilities are nearly seven to nine orders of magnitude lower than that predicted by some high pressure diffusive models suggesting that microfracture matrix flow cannot dominate, and agrees with inferences that bulk fluid flow and dilatancy must be dominated by larger scale structures, such as macrofractures. It is suggested that the permeability of a highly stressed fault tip process zone in low-permeability crystalline rocks could increase by more than 2 orders of magnitude

  13. Experimental Measurements of Permeability Evolution During Brittle Deformation of Crystalline Rocks and Implications for Fluid Flow in Fault Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, T.; Faulkner, D.

    2007-12-01

    Detailed experimental studies of the development of permeability of crustal rock during deformation are essential in helping to understand fault mechanics and constrain larger scale models that predict bulk fluid flow within the crust. The strength, permeability and pore fluid volume evolution of initially intact crystalline rock (Westerly granite and Cerro Cristales granodiorite) under increasing differential load leading to macroscopic failure has been measured in a triaxial deformation apparatus. Experiments were run under pore water pressures of 50 MPa and varying effective pressures from 10 to 50 MPa. Permeability is seen to increase by up to and over two orders of magnitude prior to macroscopic failure, from 3.5 x 10-21 to 9 x 10-19 m2 with the greatest increase seen at lowest effective pressures. Post-failure permeability is shown to be over 3 orders of magnitude higher than initial intact permeabilities, as high as 4 x 10-18 m2, and approaches lower the limit of measurements of in situ bulk crustal permeabilities. Increasing amplitude cyclic loading tests show permeability-stress hysteresis, with high permeabilities maintained as differential stress is reduced. The largest permeability increases are seen between 90-99% of the failure stress. Under hydrothermal conditions without further loading, it is suggested that much of this permeability can be recovered, and pre-macroscopic failure fracture damage may heal relatively faster than post-failure macroscopic fractures. Pre-failure permeabilities are nearly seven to nine orders of magnitude lower than that predicted by some high pressure diffusive models suggesting that microfracture matrix flow cannot dominate, and agrees with inferences that bulk fluid flow and dilatancy must be dominated by larger scale structures, such as macrofractures. It is suggested that the permeability of a highly stressed fault tip process zone in low-permeability crystalline rocks could increase by more than 2 orders of magnitude

  14. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopic measurements of FCCP-induced change in membrane permeability of MDCK cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lingzhi; Li, Xianchan; Lin, Yuqing; Yang, Lifen; Yu, Ping; Mao, Lanqun

    2012-05-07

    This study demonstrates a new electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) method for measurements of the changes in membrane permeability during the process of cell anoxia. Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells were employed as the model cells and were cultured onto gelatin-modified glassy carbon (GC) electrodes. EIS measurements were conducted at the MDCK/gelatin-modified GC electrodes with Fe(CN)(6)(3-/4-) as the redox probe. The anoxia of the cells grown onto electrode surface was induced by the addition of carbonycyanide p-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (FCCP) into the cell culture, in which the MDCK/gelatin-modified GC electrodes were immersed for different times. The EIS results show that the presence of FCCP in the cell culture clearly decreases the charge-transfer resistance of the Fe(CN)(6)(3-/4-) redox probe at the MDCK/gelatin-modified GC electrodes, and the charge-transfer resistance decreases with increasing time employed for immersing the MDCK/gelatin-modified GC electrodes into the cell culture containing FCCP. These results demonstrate that the EIS method could be used to monitor the changes in the cell membrane permeability during the FCCP-induced cell anoxia. To simulate the EIS system, a rational equivalent circuit was proposed and the values of ohmic resistance of the electrolyte, charge-transfer resistance and constant phase elements for both the gelatin and the cell layers are given with the fitting error in an acceptable value. This study actually offers a new and simple approach to measuring the dynamic process of cell death induced by anoxia through monitoring the changes in the cell membrane permeability.

  15. Development of Low-Frequency AC Voltage Measurement System Using Single-Junction Thermal Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amagai, Yasutaka; Nakamura, Yasuhiro

    Accurate measurement of low-frequency AC voltage using a digital multimeter at frequencies of 4-200Hz is a challenge in the mechanical engineering industry. At the National Metrology Institute of Japan, we developed a low-frequency AC voltage measurement system for calibrating digital multimeters operating at frequencies down to 1 Hz. The system uses a single-junction thermal converter and employs a theoretical model and a three-parameter sine wave fitting algorithm based on the least-square (LS) method. We calibrated the AC voltage down to 1Hz using our measurement system and reduced the measurement time compared with that using thin-film thermal converters. Our measurement results are verified by comparison with those of a digital sampling method using a high-resolution analog-to-digital converter; our data are in agreement to within a few parts in 105. Our proposed method enables us to measure AC voltage with an uncertainty of 25 μV/V (k = 1) at frequencies down to 4 Hz and a voltage of 10 V.

  16. Permeability of laboratory-formed methane-hydrate-bearing sand: Measurements and observations using x-ray computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Kneafsey, T. J.; Seol, Y.; Gupta, A.; Tomutsa, L.

    2010-09-15

    Methane hydrate was formed in two moist sands and a sand/silt mixture under a confining stress in an X-ray-transparent pressure vessel. Three initial water saturations were used to form three different methane-hydrate saturations in each medium. X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to observe location-specific density changes caused by hydrate formation and flowing water. Gas-permeability measurements in each test for the dry, moist, frozen, and hydrate-bearing states are presented. As expected, the effective permeabilities (intrinsic permeability of the medium multiplied by the relative permeability) of the moist sands decreased with increasing moisture content. In a series of tests on a single sample, the effective permeability typically decreased as the pore space became more filled, in the order of dry, moist, frozen, and hydrate-bearing. In each test, water was flowed through the hydrate-bearing medium and we observed the location-specific changes in water saturation using CT scanning. We compared our data to a number of models, and our relative permeability data compare most favorably with models in which hydrate occupies the pore bodies rather than the pore throats. Inverse modeling (using the data collected from the tests) will be performed to extend the relative permeability measurements.

  17. Fiber - Optic Devices as Temperature Sensors for Temperature Measurements in AC Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rablau, Corneliu; Lafrance, Joseph; Sala, Anca

    2007-10-01

    We report on the investigation of several fiber-optic devices as potential sensors for temperature measurements in AC magnetic fields. Common temperature sensors, such as thermocouples, thermistors or diodes, will create random and/or systematic errors when placed in a magnetic field. A DC magnetic field is susceptible to create a systematic offset to the measurement, while in an AC magnetic field of variable frequency random errors which cannot be corrected for can also be introduced. Fiber-Bragg-gratings and thin film filters have an inherent temperature dependence. Detrimental for their primary applications, the same dependence allows one to use such devices as temperature sensors. In an AC magnetic field, they present the advantage of being immune to electromagnetic interference. Moreover, for fiber-Bragg-gratings, the shape factor and small mass of the bare-fiber device make it convenient for temperature measurements on small samples. We studied several thin-film filters and fiber-Bragg-gratings and compared their temperature measurement capabilities in AC magnetic fields of 0 to 150 Gauss, 0 to 20 KHz to the results provided by off-the-shelf thermocouples and thermistor-based temperature measurement systems.

  18. Measurement and simulation of subsurface tracer migration to tile drains in low permeability, macroporous soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Joshua M.; Callaghan, Michael V.; Cey, Edwin E.; Bentley, Larry R.

    2015-06-01

    Multiyear monitoring and simulation of a conservative tracer was used in this study to investigate preferential flow and macropore-matrix interactions in low permeability, macroporous soil. 2,6-Difluorobenzoic acid (DFBA) tracer was applied to a 20 × 20 m drip irrigated test plot situated over two tile drains. Tracer movement over the 2009 and 2010 field seasons was monitored using tile drain effluent, suction lysimeters, monitoring wells, and soil cores. Despite similar volumes of water application to the plot in each season, 10 times more water and 14 times more DFBA were captured by the drains in 2010 due to wetter regional hydrologic conditions. The importance of preferential flow along macropores was shown by rapid DFBA breakthrough to the tile (<47 h), and DFBA detections in sand units below the tile drains. Preferential flow resulted in less than 8% of the DFBA mass being captured by the tiles over both years. With much of the DFBA mass (75%) retained in the upper 0.25 m of the soil at the end of 2009, numerical simulations were used to quantify the migration of this in situ tracer during the subsequent 2010 field season. Dual permeability and dual porosity models produced similar matches to measured tile drain flows and concentrations, but solute leaching was captured more effectively by the dual permeability formulation. The simulations highlighted limitations in current descriptions for small-scale mass transfer between matrix and macropore domains, which do not consider time-dependent transfer coefficients or nonuniform distributions of solute mass within soil matrix blocks.

  19. Study of the magnetite to maghemite transition using microwave permittivity and permeability measurements.

    PubMed

    Cuenca, Jerome Alexander; Bugler, Keith; Taylor, Stuart; Morgan, David; Williams, Paul; Bauer, Johann; Porch, Adrian

    2016-03-16

    The microwave cavity perturbation (MCP) technique is used to identify the transition from magnetite (Fe3O4) to the meta-stable form of maghemite (γ-Fe2O3). In this study Fe3O4 was annealed at temperatures from 60 to 300 °C to vary the oxidation. Subsequent to annealing, the complex permittivity and magnetic permeability of the iron oxide powders were measured. The transition to γ-Fe2O3 was corroborated with x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). XRD, XPS and VSM implied that the starting powder was consistent with Fe3O4 and the powders annealed at more than 200 °C were transitioning to γ-Fe2O3. The MCP measurements gave large differences in both complex permittivity and magnetic permeability of the two phases in the frequency range of 2.5-10.2 GHz. Magnetic permeability decreased with annealing temperature, though magnetic losses showed frequency dependent behaviour. Complex permittivity measurements showed a large decrease in both dielectric constant and losses at all measurement frequencies, as well as a prominent loss peak centred around the phase transition temperatures. We interpret the loss peak as being a consequence of field effects due to an intermediate multi-phase mixture. Additionally, almost no frequency dependence was observed. The reduction in complex permittivity implies that the Feoct(2+) cations in the lattice provide a significant contribution to polarization at microwave frequencies and the effects of Feoct(3+) are nominal in comparison.. The change in loss can be explained as a combination of the differences in the effective conductivity of the two phases (i.e. Fe3O4 exhibits electron-hopping conduction whereas the presence of vacancies in γ-Fe2O3 nullifies this). This shows that the non-invasive MCP measurements serve as a highly sensitive and versatile method for looking at this phase transition in iron and potentially the effects of oxidation states on the polarization

  20. Measurement of VOC permeability of polymer bags and VOC solubility in polyethylene drum liner

    SciTech Connect

    Liekhus, K.J.; Peterson, E.S.

    1995-03-01

    A test program conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) investigated the use of a transport model to estimate the volatile organic compound (VOC) concentration in the void volume of a waste drum. Unsteady-state VOC transport model equations account for VOC permeation of polymer bags, VOC diffusion across openings in layers of confinement, and VOC solubility in a polyethylene drum liner. In support of this program, the VOC permeability of polymer bags and VOC equilibrium concentration in a polyethylene drum liner were measured for nine VOCs. The VOCs used in experiments were dichloromethane, carbon tetrachloride, cyclohexane, toluene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, methanol, 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane (Freon-113), trichloroethylene, and p-xylene. The experimental results of these measurements as well as a method of estimating both parameters in the absence of experimental data are described in this report.

  1. Parameters measurement of rigid gas permeable contact lens based on optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Dexi; Shen, Meixiao; Li, Yiyu

    2012-10-01

    Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) was developed in order to measure the geometric parameters of rigid gas permeable (RGP) contact lens. With custom designed OCT system, an ultra-high axial resolution of 3.3 μm in lens was achieved. The OCT image was corrected to eliminate the optical distortion and actual surfaces of lens were shown in contour map. Central thickness, lens diameter, base curve and front surface curvature at optical zone were calculated from the contour map. The results match well with the real values measured by conventional instruments. Our research indicates that OCT can be used to test the RGP lens in a simple and exact way.

  2. A method for determining transverse permeability of tight reservoir cores by radial pressure pulse decay measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zehao; Dong, Mingzhe; Zhang, Shaojie; Gong, Houjian; Li, Yajun; Long, Feifei

    2016-10-01

    A transverse pressure pulse decay (TPPD) method is presented to measure transverse permeability of tight reservoir cores in a cell with finite volume. Given appropriate assumptions, a mathematical model based on the specially designed experiment is formulated, and its general solution is proposed. Early-time and late-time techniques are further presented for convenient postprocessing applications of experimental data. Meanwhile, sensitivity analysis of TPPD method is given. It is found that a good TPPD experimental principle can be obtained by adjusting test gas, experimental pressure, dimension of core sample, and volume ratio (λ). The volume ratio error (λerror) analysis reveals the following: (1) a larger λerror results in increased transverse permeability error (kerror); (2) the volume ratio (λ) is better not very close to 0.754; (3) when λ is equal to or greater than 1, the kerror resulting from λerror is monotonic decreasing as the volume ratio increases. In practice, λ is usually equal to or greater than 1 due to the very small pore volume of a tight core. But this does not mean that the volume ratio should be as large as possible. The reason for this is that a pressure transducer with higher resolution is needed to record pressure change. That means experimental apparatus is much more costly. And such a TPPD experiment requires a much longer time to attain the late-time straight line behavior. The best choice is to find an optimal balance point among experimental cost, time, and accuracy.

  3. Experimental determination of the viscous flow permeability of porous materials by measuring reflected low frequency acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berbiche, A.; Sadouki, M.; Fellah, Z. E. A.; Ogam, E.; Fellah, M.; Mitri, F. G.; Depollier, C.

    2016-01-01

    An acoustic reflectivity method is proposed for measuring the permeability or flow resistivity of air-saturated porous materials. In this method, a simplified expression of the reflection coefficient is derived in the Darcy's regime (low frequency range), which does not depend on frequency and porosity. Numerical simulations show that the reflection coefficient of a porous material can be approximated by its simplified expression obtained from its Taylor development to the first order. This approximation is good especially for resistive materials (of low permeability) and for the lower frequencies. The permeability is reconstructed by solving the inverse problem using waves reflected by plastic foam samples, at different frequency bandwidths in the Darcy regime. The proposed method has the advantage of being simple compared to the conventional methods that use experimental reflected data, and is complementary to the transmissivity method, which is more adapted to low resistive materials (high permeability).

  4. Measurements of soil permeability and pressure fields in EPA's soil-gas chamber. Report for May-August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, R.B.; Snoddy, R.; Brubaker, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    The paper discusses the measurement of soil permeability and pressure fields using EPA's soil-gas chamber, designed to study the production and transport of radon and other potential indoor air pollutants originating in soils. The chamber is instrumented to measure distributions of radon and pressure fields and also moisture distributions and their resulting influence on soil permeability. An analytic solution for advective flow in the soil-gas chamber is presented which includes the effects of moisture-dependent spatial variations of the permeability. Measurements of the pressure field are compared with model calculations. Relatively good agreement between the measurements and calculations is obtained, except near the water level where boundary conditions are not rigorously satisfied.

  5. High-resolution saturated hydraulic conductivity logging of borehole cores using air permeability measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogiers, B.; Winters, P.; Huysmans, M.; Beerten, K.; Mallants, D.; Gedeon, M.; Batelaan, O.; Dassargues, A.

    2014-09-01

    Saturated hydraulic conductivity ( K s) is one of the most important parameters determining groundwater flow and contaminant transport in both unsaturated and saturated porous media. The hand-held air permeameter technique was investigated for high-resolution hydraulic conductivity determination on borehole cores using a spatial resolution of ˜0.05 m. The suitability of such air permeameter measurements on friable to poorly indurated sediments was tested to improve the spatial prediction of classical laboratory-based K s measurements obtained at a much lower spatial resolution (˜2 m). In total, 368 K s measurements were made on ˜350 m of borehole cores originating from the Campine basin, northern Belgium, while ˜5,230 air permeability measurements were performed on the same cores, resulting in a K s range of seven orders of magnitude. Cross-validation demonstrated that, using air permeameter data as the secondary variable for laboratory based K s measurements, the performance increased from R 2 = 0.35 for ordinary kriging (laboratory K s only) to R 2 = 0.61 for co-kriging. The separate treatment of horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivity revealed considerable anisotropy in certain lithostratigraphical units, while others were clearly isotropic at the sample scale. Air permeameter measurements on borehole cores provide a cost-effective way to improve spatial predictions of traditional laboratory based K s.

  6. Effective method to measure back emfs and their harmonics of permanent magnet ac motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Q.; Bi, C.; Lin, S.

    2006-04-01

    As the HDD spindle motors become smaller and smaller, the back electromotive forces (emfs) measurement faces the new challenges due to their low inertias and small sizes. This article proposes a novel method to measure the back emfs and their harmonic components of PM ac motors only through a freewheeling procedure. To eliminate the influence of the freewheeling deceleration, the phase flux linkages are employed to obtain the back emf amplitudes and phases of the fundamental and harmonic components by using finite Fourier series analysis. The proposed method makes the freewheeling measurement of the back emfs and their harmonics accurate and fast. It is especially useful for the low inertia PM ac motors, such as spindle motors for small form factor HDDs.

  7. Structure and permeabilities of partially desaturated compact clays from microtomographic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazdniakou, A.; Thovert, J.; Matray, J.; Dymitrowska, M.; Adler, P. M.

    2009-12-01

    Clay studies have been recently stimulated by the fact that clay massifs may be used as host rocks for final disposal of nuclear wastes, especially because of their very weak permeability. However experimental determination of this property, as well as of relative permeabilities and capillary pressure curves for water and gas (hydrogen), is a very challenging issue. Instead of doing macroscopic experiments, we solve Navier-Stokes equations of motion directly inside a realistic poral network and by fitting Darcy equation to the results we extract the absolute and relative (two phase flow) permeability. We use high resolution X-ray microtomography (0.7 micron) data of Opalinus samples acquired in the scope of the Ventilation Experiment of Mont Terri Project. Porosity above 0.7µm is mainly composed of micrometric cracks mainly parallel to the bedding; the volumetric density of these cracks depends on their distance to the wall (1.11% to 5.3%). The major characteristics of the micro cracks were determined with the concepts and tools used for fractures: the average aperture, the roughness, the auto and inter correlation functions of the solid surface, the contact surface are measured for each crack and their percolating character. These properties will be summarized. Single phase flow was calculated in the percolating cracks by solving the Stokes equations of motion with no slip at the solid interface. An immiscible lattice Boltzmann code was used for this purpose; the fluid evolution was described by two standard multi-relaxation time algorithms in three dimensions and 19 velocities (D3Q19); moreover, some relations between the parameters of the collision matrices were fixed according to the two relaxation times (TRT) model. The code was supplemented by overall boundary conditions (BC) since the basic configuration is spatially periodic. Two types of BC were studied. In the first one, a large parallepipedic reservoir was put at the outlet of the crack in order to make

  8. A comparison of standard methods for measuring water vapour permeability of fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, Elizabeth A.; Kwon, Myoungsook; Shim, Huensup

    2003-08-01

    It is difficult for outdoor apparel manufacturers to interpret the technical information provided by fabric suppliers concerning fabric 'breathability' properties because different methods and test conditions are used. In addition, fabrics with hydrophilic components change their properties under different humidity conditions. The purpose of this study was to measure the water vapour permeability and evaporative resistance of 26 different waterproof, windproof and breathable shell fabrics using five standard test methods. The water vapour transmission rate (WVTR) was measured using the ASTM E 96 upright and inverted cup tests with water, the JIS L 1099 desiccant inverted cup test and the new ASTM F 2298 standard using the dynamic moisture permeation cell (DMPC). The evaporative resistance was measured using the ISO 11092 sweating hot plate test. The WVTRs were consistently highest when measured with the desiccant inverted cup, followed by the inverted cup, DMPC and upright cup. The upright cup was significantly correlated with the DMPC (0.97), and the desiccant inverted cup was correlated to the sweating hot plate (-0.91).

  9. AC Magnetic Properties of Large Volume of Water — Susceptibility Measurement in Unshielded Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukada, Keiji; Kiwa, Toshihiko; Masuda, Yuuki

    2006-10-01

    To investigate the effect of low-frequency magnetic-field exposure of a human body, the low-frequency AC magnetic property of a large volume of water was measured by low-frequency magnetic field exposure (from 50 Hz to 1.2 kHz). The results indicate that the AC magnetic property of water is due to diamagnetism in the low-frequency range. The phase between the main magnetic field and the generated magnetic field remained constant at about 180°. Results were not affected by conductivity or pH. Moreover, the magnetic-field strength from water showed a susceptibility frequency dependence proportional to the frequency above approximately 400 Hz. Because of the incremental effects of susceptibility, the magnetic field from water was measured using a conventional magnetic sensor (magnetic resistive; MR) in an unshielded environment.

  10. Measurement of AC Losses in a Racetrack Superconducting Coil Made from YBCO Coated Conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, Eugen; Abrahamsen, Asger B.; Kováč, Ján; Wichmann, Mike; Træholt, Chresten

    We present the results of transport measurements of AC losses in a racetrack shaped superconducting coil made from coated conductor tape. The outer dimensions of the coil are approximately 24 cm × 12 cm and it has 57 turns. The coil is impregnated with epoxy resin and fiberglass tape is used to insulate the individual turns and to improve the mechanical properties of the epoxy when exposed to thermal cycling. The coil is manufactured as a part of the field winding of a small synchronous generator; therefore stainless steel frames are installed on the inner and outer side of the winding to reinforce it. The AC loss is measured versus the transport current Ia with the coil immersed in liquid nitrogen. Measurements at frequencies 21 Hz, 36 Hz and 72 Hz are compared. The AC losses follow Ia2 dependence at low current amplitudes and Ia3 at high amplitudes. After cutting the inner steel frame the low amplitude losses are decreased, their frequency dependence is reduced but their dependence on the current remains unchanged.

  11. Classification of soils based on double ring measured permeability in Zarrineh-Roud Delta, western Azarbayejan, Iran.

    PubMed

    Alipour, S

    2007-08-01

    A physical method of soil classification based on soil permeability as a preliminary quick way prior to slow and expensive chemical conventional method was conducted in regional scale using 40 test stations. Double ring method used for permeability measurements in the area. The results clearly differentiated development of various soil types and quality in the area under investigation. The results clearly indicate the physical method of double ring measurement permeability is able to identify various soil types in regional scale and the later chemical methods could be used in local scale for detailed classification. NaCl content of soils was reflected by the amount of infiltration rate. Permeability ranged as high, medium and low, corresponded with loamy sand, loamy and clay soils respectively. Permeability in the vicinity of the higher water flows was high due to leaching of NaCl in the soil. NaCl is considered to be the main factor of impermeability reduction in the area associated with clay and soil textures.

  12. Two-dimensional PIV measurements for studying the effect of bed permeability on incipient motion of synthetic sediment particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Heng; Zuniga Zamalloa, Carlo C.; San Juan Blanco, Jorge E.; Landry, Blake J.; Garcia, Marcelo H.

    2015-11-01

    The experimental study of incipient motion, the regime where particles resting on a granular bed enter a process of sediment transport, can be approached using a single-particle pivoting model. Such pivoting model states that the fundamental mechanism of the incipient motion depends, among other factors, on the local fluid flow, bed-flow interface topology, the geometry, and specific density of the sediment particle; yet it does not specify the effect of the bed permeability. In this work the effect that bed permeability has on the incipient motion of a sediment particle is explored by conducting systematic Particle Image Velocimetry measurements of the flow around cylindrical and spherical particles at incipient motion conditions in a water flume. The permeable bed condition for the flume is achieved by placing a synthetic bed at the bottom which consists of cubically packed, uniformly sized spheres. The impermeable condition is obtained by placing at the bottom of the flume a sheet with rows of hemispheres glued to it, the hemispheres being of the same diameter as the ones in the permeable case. The mean velocity profiles are reported to illustrate the influence of the permeable or impermeable beds. The measured velocity data is also compared with the current pivoting model.

  13. Ac-loss measurement of a DyBCO-Roebel assembled coated conductor cable (RACC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuller, S.; Goldacker, W.; Kling, A.; Krempasky, L.; Schmidt, C.

    2007-10-01

    Low ac-loss HTS cables for transport currents well above 1 kA are required for application in transformers and generators and are taken into consideration for future generations of fusion reactor coils. Coated conductors (CC) are suitable candidates for high field application at an operation temperature around 50-77 K, which is a crucial precondition for economical cooling costs. We prepared a short length of a Roebel bar cable made of industrial DyBCO coated conductor (Theva Company, Germany). Meander shaped tapes of 4 mm width with a twist pitch of 122 mm were cut from 10 mm wide CC tapes using a specially designed tool. Eleven of these strands were assembled to a cable. The electrical and mechanical connection of the tapes was achieved using a silver powder filled conductive epoxy resin. Ac-losses of a short sample in an external ac field were measured as a function of frequency and field amplitude in transverse and parallel field orientations. In addition, the coupling current time constant of the sample was directly measured.

  14. Direct Detection of Pure ac Spin Current by X-Ray Pump-Probe Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Shelford, L. R.; Shafer, P.; Tan, A.; Deng, J. X.; Keatley, P. S.; Hwang, C.; Arenholz, E.; van der Laan, G.; Hicken, R. J.; Qiu, Z. Q.

    2016-08-01

    Despite recent progress in spin-current research, the detection of spin current has mostly remained indirect. By synchronizing a microwave waveform with synchrotron x-ray pulses, we use the ferromagnetic resonance of the Py (Ni81Fe19 ) layer in a Py /Cu /Cu75Mn25/Cu /Co multilayer to pump a pure ac spin current into the Cu75Mn25 and Co layers, and then directly probe the spin current within the Cu75Mn25 layer and the spin dynamics of the Co layer by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. This element-resolved pump-probe measurement unambiguously identifies the ac spin current in the Cu75Mn25 layer.

  15. The in situ permeable flow sensor: A device for measuring groundwater flow velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, S.; Barker, G.T.; Nichols, R.L.

    1994-03-01

    A new technology called the In Situ Permeable Flow Sensor has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories. These sensors use a thermal perturbation technique to directly measure the direction and magnitude of the full three dimensional groundwater flow velocity vector in unconsolidated, saturated, porous media. The velocity measured is an average value characteristic of an approximately 1 cubic meter volume of the subsurface. During a test at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina, two flow sensors were deployed in a confined aquifer in close proximity to a well which was screened over the entire vertical extent of the aquifer and the well was pumped at four different pumping rates. In this situation horizontal flow which is radially directed toward the pumping well is expected. The flow sensors measured horizontal flow which was directed toward the pumping well, within the uncertainty in the measurements. The observed magnitude of the horizontal component of the flow velocity increased linearly with pumping rate, as predicted by theoretical considerations. The measured horizontal component of the flow velocity differed from the predicted flow velocity, which was calculated with the assumptions that the hydraulic properties of the aquifer were radially homogeneous and isotropic, by less than a factor of two. Drawdown data obtained from other wells near the pumping well during the pump test indicate that the hydraulic properties of the aquifer are probably not radially homogeneous but the effect of the inhomogeneity on the flow velocity field around the pumping well was not modeled because the degree and distribution of the inhomogeneity are unknown. Grain size analysis of core samples from wells in the area were used to estimate the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity.

  16. Broadband Interferometer for Measuring Transmitted Wavefronts of Optical Bandpass Filters for HST (ACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boucarut, R. A.; Leviton, D. B.

    1998-01-01

    The transmitted wavefronts of optical filters for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) are characterized using the Wildly and Openly Modified Broadband Achromatic Twyman Green (WOMBAT) Interferometer developed in the NASA/GSFC Optics Branch's Diffraction Grating Evaluation Facility (DGEF). Because only four of thirty-three of ACS's optical bandpass filters transmit the 633 nm light of most commercial interferometers, a broadband interferometer is required to verify specified transmitted wavefront of ACS filters. WOMBAT's design is a hybrid of the BAT interferometer developed by JPL used for HST Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC-2) filters and a WYKO 400 phase shifting interferometer. It includes a broadband light source, monochromator, off-axis, parabolic collimating and camera mirrors, an aluminum-coated fused silica beam splitter, flat retroreflecting mirrors for the test and reference arms, and a LTV-sensitive CCD camera. An outboarded, piezo-electric phase shifter holds the flat mirror in the interferometer's reference arm. The interferometer is calibrated through interaction between the WYKO system's software and WONMAT hardware for the test wavelength of light entering the beam splitter. Phase-shifted interferograms of the filter mounted in the test arm are analyzed using WYKO's Vision' software. Filters as large as 90 mm in diameter have been measured over a wavelength range from 200 to 1100 nm with a sensitivity of lambda/200 rms at lambda = 633 nm. Results of transmitted wavefront measurements are shown for ACS fixed band pass and spatially-variable bandpass filters for a variety of wavelengths.

  17. In situ measurements of advective solute transport in permeable shelf sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimers, Clare E.; Stecher, Hilmar A.; Taghon, Gary L.; Fuller, Charlotte M.; Huettel, Markus; Rusch, Antje; Ryckelynck, Natacha; Wild, Christian

    2004-01-01

    Solute transport rates within the uppermost 2 cm of a rippled continental shelf sand deposit, with a mean grain size of 400-500 μm and permeabilities of 2.0-2.4×10 -11 m 2, have been measured in situ by detecting the breakthrough of a pulse of iodide after its injection into the bottom water. These tracer experiments were conducted on the USA Middle Atlantic Bight shelf at a water depth of ˜13 m using a small tethered tripod that carried a close-up video camera, acoustic current meter, motorized 1.5 liter "syringe", and a microprofiling system for positioning and operating a solid-state voltammetric microelectrode. When triggered on shipboard, the syringe delivered a 0.21 M solution of potassium iodide and red dye through five nozzles positioned around and above the buried tip of the voltammetric sensor for 0.65-5 min. Bottom turbulence rapidly mixed and dispersed the tracer, which then was carried into the bed by interfacial water flows associated with ripple topography. The advective downward transport to the sensor tip was timed by a sequence of repetitive voltammetric scans. The distance-averaged vertical velocity, expressed as the depth of the sensor tip in the sand divided by the time to iodide breakthrough, was found to vary from 6 to 53 cm h -1 and generally to decrease with sediment depth. Because of episodic pumping and dispersion associated with the greatest 5% of wave heights and current speeds recorded, some concentration vs. time responses showed evidence of uneven solute migration. For reasons of mass balance, the advective flow field in the surface layers of permeable beds includes regions of water intrusion, horizontal pore-water flow and upwelling which also may explain some of the observed uneven migration. Pore-water advection was also evident in oxygen profiles measured before and after tracer injection with the voltammetric sensor. These profiles showed irregular distributions and oxygen penetration depths of 4-4.5 cm. Sand cores from the

  18. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF GEOMETRICAL SHAPE FACTORS FOR SHORT CYLINDRICAL PROBES USED TO MEASURE SOIL PERMEABILITY TO AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeability of soil has become recognized as an important parameter in determining the rate of transport and entry of radon from the soil into indoor environments. This parameter is usually measured in the field by inserting a cylindrical tube with a short porous section into th...

  19. Recent Advances in AC-DC Transfer Measurements Using Thin-Film Thermal Converters

    SciTech Connect

    WUNSCH,THOMAS F.; KINARD,JOSEPH R.; MANGINELL,RONALD P.; LIPE,THOMAS E.; SOLOMON JR.,OTIS M.; JUNGLING,KENNETH C.

    2000-12-08

    New standards for ac current and voltage measurements, thin-film multifunction thermal converters (MJTCS), have been fabricated using thin-film and micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Improved sensitivity and accuracy over single-junction thermoelements and targeted performance will allow new measurement approaches in traditionally troublesome areas such as the low frequency and high current regimes. A review is presented of new microfabrication techniques and packaging methods that have resulted from a collaborative effort at Sandia National Laboratories and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (MHZ).

  20. Instantaneous velocity measurement of AC electroosmotic flows by laser induced fluorescence photobleaching anemometer with high temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei; Yang, Fang; Qiao, Rui; Wang, Guiren; Rui Qiao Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the instantaneous response of flows to applied AC electric fields may help understand some unsolved issues in induced-charge electrokinetics and enhance performance of microfluidic devices. Since currently available velocimeters have difficulty in measuring velocity fluctuations with frequency higher than 1 kHz, most experimental studies so far focus only on the average velocity measurement in AC electrokinetic flows. Here, we present measurements of AC electroosmotic flow (AC-EOF) response time in microchannels by a novel velocimeter with submicrometer spatial resolution and microsecond temporal resolution, i.e. laser-induced fluorescence photobleaching anemometer (LIFPA). Several parameters affecting the AC-EOF response time to the applied electric signal were investigated, i.e. channel length, transverse position and solution conductivity. The experimental results show that the EOF response time under a pulsed electric field decreases with the reduction of the microchannel length, distance between the detection position to the wall and the conductivity of the solution. This work could provide a new powerful tool to measure AC electrokinetics and enhance our understanding of AC electrokinetic flows.

  1. Measurement of Transient Permeability of Sp2/0 Myeloma Cells: Flow Cytometric Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novickij, Vitalij; Girkontaitė, Irutė; Grainys, Audrius; Zinkevičienė, Auksė; Lastauskienė, Eglė; Švedienė, Jurgita; Paškevičius, Algimantas; Markovskaja, Svetlana; Novickij, Jurij

    2016-12-01

    Electroporation is an electric field induced phenomenon occurring when the permeability of the cell membrane is increased due to the excess of critical transmembrane potential. Fluorescent dye assays are frequently used for evaluation of the permeabilization rate, however, the protocols vary, which negatively affects the repeatability of the results. In this work we have designed experiments to investigate the protocols and threshold concentrations of the Propidium Iodide (PI) and YO-PRO-1 (YP) fluorescent dyes for evaluation of mammalian cell permeabilization induced by electroporation. The Sp2/0 mouse myeloma cells were used and the bursts of 100 μs × 8 electrical pulses of 0.8-2 kV/cm were applied. It has been shown that the dye concentration has an influence on the detectable permeabilization, and the concentrations below 30 μM for PI and 1 μM for YP should be avoided for measurement of electropermeabilization efficacy due to unreliable fluorescence signals. Further, based on the experimental data, the permeabilization curve for the Sp2/0 myeloma cells in the 0.8-2 kV/cm range has been presented.

  2. Permeability of Clay Concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, F.; Ekolu, S. O.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the effect of clay addition on water permeability and air permeability of concretes. Clay concrete mixes consisted of 0 to 40% clay content incorporated as cement replacement. Flow methods using triaxial cells and air permeameters were used for measuring the injected water and air flows under pressure. It was found that the higher the clay content in the mixture, the greater the permeability. At higher water-cement ratios (w/c), the paste matrix is less dense and easily allows water to ingress into concrete. But at high clay contents of 30 to 40% clay, the variation in permeability was significantly diminished among different concrete mixtures. It was confirmed that air permeability results were higher than the corresponding water permeability values when all permeability coefficients were converted to intrinsic permeability values.

  3. Optical transmission versus ac magnetization measurements for monitoring colloidal Ni nanorod rotational dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratz, M.; Tschöpe, A.

    2017-01-01

    Ni nanorods with an average length < 250 nm and diameter < 30 nm were synthesized using the AAO template method. The magnetization and optical transmission of nanorod colloidal dispersions in alternating magnetic fields were measured and analyzed with the objective of comparing the intrinsic Brownian relaxation times obtained with the two methods. The different physical origin of the measured signal, related to different moments of the orientation distribution function, and the non-linear effects expected for the large magnetic moments of the Ni nanorods at common field amplitudes required a comprehensive modelling. The time-dependent magnetization and optical transmission in ac magnetic fields was derived by numerical solution of the Fokker-Planck equation. The simulated time-dependent magnetization and optical transmission at a given frequency and field amplitude were analyzed analogous to experimental data to determine characteristic relaxation frequencies. Empirical relationships were derived which enabled extraction of the intrinsic Brownian relaxation time from the characteristic frequencies measured in the non-linear regime. Despite large differences in the characteristic frequencies obtained from magnetization and optical transmission measurements, the retrieved intrinsic Brownian relaxation times were found to agree well. The potential of ac magnetic field-dependent optical transmission for biosensing applications was demonstrated by monitoring the adsorption of the protein gelatine on the nanorod labels.

  4. Electrical resistivity and AC-calorimetric measurements of PrRu 4P 12 under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, A.; Holmes, A. T.; Kagayama, T.; Shimizu, K.; Sekine, C.; Shirotani, I.; Kikuchi, D.; Sugawara, H.; Sato, H.

    2008-04-01

    We have studied the effect of pressure in the filled skutterudite PrRu 4P 12, which shows a metal-insulator (MI) transition at TMI=63 K, via simultaneous measurements of electrical resistivity ( ρ) and AC-calorimetry ( CAC). Schottky-like anomalies in CAC disappear under pressure, suggesting a change of the ground state. The resistivity below TMI is strongly suppressed with increasing pressure, in contrast to the weak pressure dependence of TMI. Above 10 GPa, ρ(T) shows metallic behavior with small anomalies at TMI. We discuss the likely change of ground state in PrRu 4P 12 with pressure from triplet to singlet.

  5. Measuring sea ice permeability as a function of the attenuation and phase velocity shift of an acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudier, E. J.; Bahoura, M.

    2012-12-01

    Sea ice is a two-phase porous medium consisting of a solid matrix of pure ice and a salty liquid phase. At spring when ice permeability increases, it has been observed that pressure gradients induced at the ice-water interface upstream and downstream of pressure ridge keels can cause sea water and brine to be forced through the ice water boundary. It suggests that salt and heat fluxes through the bottom ice layers may be a major factor controlling the decay of an ice sheet. Knowing how water flows through the ice matrix is fundamental to a modeling of ocean-ice heat exchanges integrating the advective import/export of latent heat that result from melting/freezing within the ice. Permeability is the measurement of the ease with which fluids flow through a porous medium, however one of the most tricky to measure without altering the porosity of the sampled medium. To further complicate the challenge, horizontal and vertical permeability of the ice, referred as ice anisotropy, is significant. Acoustic wave propagation through porous media have been theorized to relate the acoustic velocity and attenuation to the physical properties of the tested material. It is a non-invasive technique, and as such could provide more reliable measurements of sea ice permeability than anything presently used. Simulations combining the Biot's and squirt flow mechanisms are performed to investigate the effect of permeability on the attenuation and phase velocity as a function of frequency. We first present the attenuation dispersion curves for an isotropic sea ice, then low-frequency and high-frequency limits are determined. Optimal frequency range and resolution requirements are evaluated for testing.

  6. Multi-parameter measurement of the permeability transition pore opening in isolated mouse heart mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Marcu, Raluca; Neeley, Chris K; Karamanlidis, Georgios; Hawkins, Brian J

    2012-09-07

    The mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mtPTP) is a non specific channel that forms in the inner mitochondrial membrane to transport solutes with a molecular mass smaller than 1.5 kDa. Although the definitive molecular identity of the pore is still under debate, proteins such as cyclophilin D, VDAC and ANT contribute to mtPTP formation. While the involvement of mtPTP opening in cell death is well established(1), accumulating evidence indicates that the mtPTP serves a physiologic role during mitochondrial Ca(2+) homeostasis(2), bioenergetics and redox signaling( 3). mtPTP opening is triggered by matrix Ca(2+) but its activity can be modulated by several other factors such as oxidative stress, adenine nucleotide depletion, high concentrations of Pi, mitochondrial membrane depolarization or uncoupling, and long chain fatty acids(4). In vitro, mtPTP opening can be achieved by increasing Ca(2+) concentration inside the mitochondrial matrix through exogenous additions of Ca(2+) (calcium retention capacity). When Ca(2+) levels inside mitochondria reach a certain threshold, the mtPTP opens and facilitates Ca(2+) release, dissipation of the proton motive force, membrane potential collapse and an increase in mitochondrial matrix volume (swelling) that ultimately leads to the rupture of the outer mitochondrial membrane and irreversible loss of organelle function. Here we describe a fluorometric assay that allows for a comprehensive characterization of mtPTP opening in isolated mouse heart mitochondria. The assay involves the simultaneous measurement of 3 mitochondrial parameters that are altered when mtPTP opening occurs: mitochondrial Ca(2+) handling (uptake and release, as measured by Ca(2+) concentration in the assay medium), mitochondrial membrane potential, and mitochondrial volume. The dyes employed for Ca(2+) measurement in the assay medium and mitochondrial membrane potential are Fura FF, a membrane impermeant, ratiometric indicator which undergoes a shift in

  7. Simultaneous optical measurement of osmotic and diffusional water permeability in cells and liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, R.G.; Verkman, A.S.

    1989-01-24

    A quantitative description of transmembrane water transport requires specification of osmotic (Pf) and diffusional (Pd) water permeability coefficients. Methodology has been developed to measure Pf and Pd simultaneously on the basis of the sensitivity and rapid response of the fluorophore aminonaphthalenetrisulfonic acid (ANTS) to solution H2O/D2O content. Cells loaded with ANTS in an H2O buffer were subjected to an inward osmotic gradient with a D2O buffer in a stopped-flow apparatus. The time courses of cell volume (giving Pf) and H2O/D2O content (giving Pd) were recorded with dual photomultiplier detection of scattered light intensity and ANTS fluorescence, respectively. The method was validated by using sealed red cell ghosts and artificial liposomes reconstituted with the pore-forming agent gramicidin D. At 25 degrees C, red cell ghost Pf was 0.021 cm/s with Pd 0.005 cm/s (H2O/D2O exchange time 7.9 ms). Pf and Pd were inhibited by 90% and 45% upon addition of 0.5 mM HgCl2. The activation energy for Pd increased from 5.1 kcal/mol to 10 kcal/mol with addition of HgCl2 (18-35 degrees C). In 90% phosphatidylcholine (PC)/10% cholesterol liposomes prepared by bath sonication and exclusion chromatography, Pf and Pd were 5.1 X 10(-4) and 6.3 X 10(-4) cm/s, respectively (23 degrees C). Addition of gramicidin D (0.1 micrograms/mg of PC) resulted in a further increment in Pf and Pd of 7 X 10(-4) and 3 X 10(-4) cm/s, respectively. These results validate the new methodology and demonstrate its utility for rapid determination of Pf/Pd in biological membranes and in liposomes reconstituted with water channels.

  8. Gas diffusivity and permeability through the firn column at Summit, Greenland: measurements and comparison to microstructural properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, A. C.; Albert, M. R.

    2014-02-01

    The physical structure of polar firn plays a key role in the mechanisms by which glaciers and ice sheets preserve a natural archive of past atmospheric composition. This study presents the first measurements of gas diffusivity and permeability along with microstructural information measured from the near-surface firn through the firn column to pore close-off. Both fine- and coarse-grained firn from Summit, Greenland are included in this study to investigate the variability in firn caused by seasonal and storm-event layering. Our measurements reveal that the porosity of firn (derived from density) is insufficient to describe the full profiles of diffusivity and permeability, particularly at porosity values above 0.5. Thus, even a model that could perfectly predict the density profile would be insufficient for application to issues involving gas transport. The measured diffusivity profile presented here is compared to two diffusivity profiles modeled from firn air measurements from Summit. Because of differences in scale and in firn processes between the true field situation, firn modeling, and laboratory measurements, the results follow a similar overall pattern but do not align; our results constitute a lower bound on diffusive transport. In comparing our measurements of both diffusivity and permeability to previous parameterizations from numerical 3-D lattice-Boltzmann modeling, it is evident that the previous relationships to porosity are likely site-specific. We present parameterizations relating diffusivity and permeability to porosity as a possible tool, though use of direct measurements would be far more accurate when feasible. The relationships between gas transport properties and microstructural properties are characterized and compared to existing relationships for general porous media, specifically the Katz-Thompson (KT), Kozeny-Carman (KC), and Archie's law approximations. While those approximations can capture the general trend of gas transport

  9. Control of dense collagen gel scaffolds for tissue engineering through measurement and modelling of hydraulic permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serpooshan, Vahid

    Among various natural biopolymers, type I collagen gels have demonstrated the highest potential as biomimetic scaffolds for tissue engineering (TE). However, the successful application of collagen gels requires a greater understanding of the relationship between their microstructure and physical-mechanical properties. Therefore, a precise method to modulate collagen gel microstructure in order to attain optimal scaffold properties for diverse biomedical applications is necessary. This dissertation describes a new approach to produce collagen gels with defined microstructures, quantified by hydraulic permeability ( k), in order to optimize scaffold properties for TE applications. It was hypothesized that the measurement of k can be used to study the role of microstructure in collagen gel properties, as well as cell function and cell-scaffold interactions. Applying increasing levels of plastic compression (PC) to the highly hydrated collagen gels resulted in an increase in collagen fibrillar density, reduced Happel model derived k values, increased gel stiffness, promoted MSC metabolic activity, osteogenic differentiation, and mineral deposition, while cell-induced gel contraction diminished. Thus, collagen gels with lower k and higher stiffness values exhibited greater potential for bone tissue engineering. Correlating between collagen gel microstructure, k, and fibroblast function within collagen gels indicated that increasing the level of PC yielded a reduction in pore size and an increase in fibril bundle diameter. Decrease in k values resulted in a decrease in gel contraction and an increase in cell metabolic activity. An increase in cell density accelerated contraction. Therefore, fibroblast function within collagen gels can be optimised by a balance between the microstructure, k, and cell seeding density. Developing a micromechanical model to measure experimental k of collagen gels during confined compression revealed the formation of a dense collagen lamella

  10. Redesign of an AC Magnetic Susceptometer for Measurements in Smaller Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, Andres; Fukuda, Ryan; Sunny, Smitha; Ho, Pei-Chun

    2013-03-01

    A new AC magnetic susceptometer was created for the purpose of measuring the magnetic properties of smaller samples, such as nanoparticles that are currently being synthesized in our lab. The susceptometer consists of a primary coil, a secondary coil, and a sample holder. The primary coil is the outer component of the susceptometer, which provides a magnetic field when current is applied due to Ampere's Law. Inside of the primary coil lies the secondary coil, which has two oppositely wound solenoids; they are oppositely wound to reduce background signal. The sample holder lies inside of the secondary coil with the sample. All of these go inside of a beryllium copper casing for protection. We tested the susceptometer by looking for the ferromagnetic phase transition of an 11 mg Gd sample. A ~ 100 μ A AC current was applied to the primary coil, which created a magnetic field that polarized the magnetic moments in the sample. This induced a voltage on the secondary coil, which is proportional to the magnetic susceptibility. We measured the temperature dependency of the induced voltage from 10 K to 300 K. The results showed a sharp increase in the induced voltage around 293K, which agrees with the known ferromagnetic transition of Gd. Research at CSU-Fresno is supported by NSF DMR-1104544. Felipe Vargas is also supported by Undergraduate Research Grant and Faculty-Sponsored Student Research Award at CSU Fresno.

  11. Literature review and recommendation of methods for measuring relative permeability of anhydrite from the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, R.L.; Howarth, S.M.

    1995-08-01

    This report documents a literature review of methods for measuring relative permeability as applied to low permeability anhydrite rock samples from the Salado Formation. About one hundred papers were reviewed, and four methods were identified as promising techniques for measuring the relative permeability of the Salado anhydrite: (1) the unsteady-state high-rate method, (2) the unsteady-state stationary-liquid method, (3) the unsteady-state centrifuge method, and (4) the unsteady-state low-rate method. Except for the centrifuge method, all have been used for low permeability rocks. The unsteady-state high-rate method is preferred for measuring relative permeability of Salado anhydrite, and the unsteady-state stationary-liquid method could be well suited for measuring gas relative permeability of Salado anhydrite. The unsteady-state low-rate method, which combines capillary pressure effects with relative permeability concepts may also prove effective. Likewise, the unsteady-state centrifuge method may be an efficient means for measuring brine relative permeability for Salado anhydrite, especially at high gas saturations.

  12. Spectral response of atmospheric electric field measurements near AC high voltage power lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, H. G.; Matthews, J. C.; Wright, M. D.; Shallcross, D. E.

    2015-10-01

    To understand the influence of corona ion emission on the atmospheric electrical field, measurements were made near to two AC high voltage power lines. A JCI 131 field-mill recorded the atmospheric electric field over one year. Meteorological measurements were also taken. The data series is divided in four zones (dependent on wind direction): whole zones, Z0; zone 1, Z1; zone 2, Z2; zone 3, Z3. Z3 is the least affected by corona ion emission and for that reason it is used as a reference against Z1 and Z2, which are strongly influenced by this phenomena. Analysis was undertaken for all weather days and dry days only. The Lomb-Scargle strategy developed for unevenly spaced time-series is used to calculate the spectral response of the aforementioned zones. Only frequencies above 1 minute are considered.

  13. Spectral Measurements from the Optical Emission of the A.C. Plasma Anemometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matlis, Eric; Marshall, Curtis; Corke, Thomas; Gogineni, Sivaram

    2015-11-01

    The optical emission properties of a new class of AC-driven flow sensors based on a glow discharge (plasma) is presented. These results extend the utility of the plasma sensor that has recently been developed for measurements in high-enthalpy flows. The plasma sensor utilizes a high frequency (1MHz) AC discharge between two electrodes as the main sensing element. The voltage drop across the discharge correlates to changes in the external flow which can be calibrated for mass-flux (ρU) or pressure depending on the design of the electrodes and orientation relative to the free-stream flow direction. Recent experiments examine the potential for spectral analysis of the optical emission of the discharge to provide additional insight to the flow field. These experiments compare the optical emission of the plasma to emission from breakdown due to an ND:YAG laser. The oxygen 777.3 nm band in particular is a focus of interest as a marker for the determination of gas density.

  14. Resistivity and AC calorimetry measurements on CeNiGe2 under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, A. T.; Muramatsu, T.; Miyake, A.; Kaczorowski, D.; Bukowski, Z.; Kagayama, T.; Shimizu, K.

    2007-03-01

    We present resistivity and AC calorimetry measurements of single crystalline CeNiGe2 under high pressure and low temperature in a diamond anvil cell. CeNiGe2 is a highly anisotropic, antiferromagnetic Kondo system at ambient pressure, located close to the boundary with non-magnetic systems. It has two ordering temperatures, T=3.9 K and T=3.2 K, which are suppressed under pressure. Between 0.7 and 1.4 GPa only a single transition was identified, with TN reaching 1.9 K by 1.4 GPa. At 1.9 GPa two transitions could again be seen by AC calorimetry at 2.0 and 1.3 K, accompanied by a qualitative change in the behaviour of the resistivity. The Sommerfeld coefficient showed a maximum of 755 mJ mol-1 K-2 at 1.4 GPa, up from 448 mJ mol-1 K-2 at close to ambient pressure. The residual resistivity was found to decrease sharply above 1.4 GPa after an initial increase with pressure.

  15. The optical measurement of 1,2-propanediol for the determination of lung capillary permeability surface area

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, R.L. Jr.; Staton, D.J.; Harris, T.R. )

    1989-06-01

    A technique has been developed which allows for the optical measurement of the concentration-time relationship for a diffusion-limited material in indicator dilution studies. The material, 1-2 propanediol, is used as a probe of the permeability of capillaries in the lung. Comparisons between standard radioisotope measurements and the optical measurements are provided and show excellent agreement. The optical method represents an improvement over the standard radioisotope method in that it provides the same data at lower cost, lower risk, and without the delay required by the radiographic methods.

  16. Simple uniaxial pressure device for ac-susceptibility measurements suitable for closed cycle refrigerator system.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, S; Manivannan, N; Murugeswari, A

    2007-06-01

    A simple design of the uniaxial pressure device for the measurement of ac-susceptibility at low temperatures using closed cycle refrigerator system is presented for the first time. This device consists of disc micrometer, spring holder attachment, uniaxial pressure cell, and the ac-susceptibility coil wound on stycast bobbin. It can work under pressure till 0.5 GPa and at the temperature range of 30-300 K. The performance of the system at ambient pressure is tested and calibrated with standard paramagnetic salts [Gd(2)O(3), Er(2)O(3), and Fe(NH(4)SO(4))(2)6H(2)O], Fe(3)O(4), Gd metal, Dy metal, superconductor (YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7)), manganite (La(1.85)Ba(0.15)MnO(3)), and spin glass material (Pr(0.8)Sr(0.2)MnO(3)). The performance of the uniaxial pressure device is demonstrated by investigating the uniaxial pressure dependence of La(1.85)Ba(0.15)MnO(3) single crystal with P||c axis. The Curie temperature (T(c)) decreases as a function of pressure with P||c axis (dT(c)dP(||c axis)=-11.65 KGPa) up to 46 MPa. The design is simple, is user friendly, and does not require pressure calibration. Measurement can even be made on thin and small size oriented crystals. The failure of the coil is remote under uniaxial pressure. The present setup can be used as a multipurpose uniaxial pressure device for the measurement of Hall effect and thermoelectric power with a small modification in the pressure cell.

  17. Simple uniaxial pressure device for ac-susceptibility measurements suitable for closed cycle refrigerator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arumugam, S.; Manivannan, N.; Murugeswari, A.

    2007-06-01

    A simple design of the uniaxial pressure device for the measurement of ac-susceptibility at low temperatures using closed cycle refrigerator system is presented for the first time. This device consists of disc micrometer, spring holder attachment, uniaxial pressure cell, and the ac-susceptibility coil wound on stycast bobbin. It can work under pressure till 0.5GPa and at the temperature range of 30-300K. The performance of the system at ambient pressure is tested and calibrated with standard paramagnetic salts [Gd2O3, Er2O3, and Fe(NH4SO4)26H2O], Fe3O4, Gd metal, Dy metal, superconductor (YBa2Cu3O7), manganite (La1.85Ba0.15MnO3), and spin glass material (Pr0.8Sr0.2MnO3). The performance of the uniaxial pressure device is demonstrated by investigating the uniaxial pressure dependence of La1.85Ba0.15MnO3 single crystal with P ‖c axis. The Curie temperature (Tc) decreases as a function of pressure with P ‖c axis (dTc/dP‖caxis=-11.65K/GPa) up to 46MPa. The design is simple, is user friendly, and does not require pressure calibration. Measurement can even be made on thin and small size oriented crystals. The failure of the coil is remote under uniaxial pressure. The present setup can be used as a multipurpose uniaxial pressure device for the measurement of Hall effect and thermoelectric power with a small modification in the pressure cell.

  18. DC and AC Electric Field Measurements by Spin-Plane Double Probes Onboard MMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindqvist, P. A.; Marklund, G. T.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Ergun, R. E.; Goodrich, K.; Torbert, R. B.; Argall, M. R.; Nakamura, R.

    2015-12-01

    The four spacecraft of the NASA Magnetospheric Multiscale mission (MMS) were launched on 12 March 2015 into a 1.2 x 12 Re equatorial orbit to study energy conversion processes in Earth's magnetosphere. After a 5-month commissioning period the first scientific phase starts on 1 September as the orbit enters the dusk magnetopause region. The Spin-plane Double Probe electric field instrument (SDP), part of the electric and magnetic fields instrument suite FIELDS, measures the electric field in the range 0.3 - 500 mV/m with a continuous time resolution up to 8192 samples/s. The instrument features adjustable bias currents and guard voltages to optimize the measurement performance. SDP also measures the spacecraft potential, which can be controlled by the Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) ion emitter, and under certain conditions can be used to determine plasma density. We present observations of DC and AC electric fields in different plasma regions covered by MMS since launch including the night side flow braking region, reconnection regions at the dusk and dayside magnetopause, and in the magnetosheath. We compare the electric field measurements by SDP to other, independent determinations of the electric field, in particular by the Electron Drift Instrument (EDI), in order to assess the accuracy of the electric field measurement under different plasma conditions. We also study the influence of the currents emitted by ASPOC and EDI on the SDP measurements.

  19. In vivo two-photon imaging measuring the blood-brain barrier permeability during early postnatal brain development in rodent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lingyan; Rodríguez-Contreras, Adrián.

    2016-03-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a unique structure between the cerebral blood circulation and the delicate neural environment that is important in regulating the movement of molecules and ions involved in brain development and function. However, little is known about the physiological permeability of molecules and ions across the BBB during brain development. In this study we applied an innovative approach to examine the development of BBB properties quantitatively. Two-photon microscopy was employed to measure BBB permeability in real time in vivo. Vascular growth and specific interactions between astrocyte end feet and microvessels were studied by using a combination of IB4 histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, confocal microscopy and 3D analysis.

  20. Fluorescein Isothiocyanate (FITC)-Dextran Extravasation as a Measure of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Reka; Northrop, Nicole; Yamamoto, Bryan

    2017-04-10

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is formed in part by vascular endothelial cells that constitute the capillaries and microvessels of the brain. The function of this barrier is to maintain homeostasis within the brain microenvironment and buffer the brain from changes in the periphery. A dysfunction of the BBB would permit circulating molecules and pathogens typically restricted to the periphery to enter the brain and interfere with normal brain function. As increased permeability of the BBB is associated with several neuropathologies, it is important to have a reliable and sensitive method that determines BBB permeability and the degree of BBB disruption. A detailed protocol is presented for assessing the integrity of the BBB by transcardial perfusion of a 10,000 Da FITC-labeled dextran molecule and its visualization to determine the degree of extravasation from brain microvessels. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  1. Measuring static thermal permeability and inertial factor of rigid porous materials (L).

    PubMed

    Sadouki, M; Fellah, M; Fellah, Z E A; Ogam, E; Sebaa, N; Mitri, F G; Depollier, C

    2011-11-01

    An acoustic method based on sound transmission is proposed for deducing the static thermal permeability and the inertial factor of porous materials having a rigid frame at low frequencies. The static thermal permeability of porous material is a geometrical parameter equal to the inverse trapping constant of the solid frame [Lafarge et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102, 1995 (1997)] and is an important characteristic of the porous material. The inertial factor [Norris., J. Wave Mat. Interact. 1, 365 (1986)] describes the fluid structure interactions in the low frequency range (1-3 kHz). The proposed method is based on a temporal model of the direct and inverse scattering problems for the propagation of transient audible frequency waves in a homogeneous isotropic slab of porous material having a rigid frame. The static thermal permeability and the inertial factor are determined from the solution of the inverse problem. The minimization between experiment and theory is made in the time domain. Tests are performed using industrial plastic foams. Experimental and theoretical data are in good agreement. Furthermore, the prospects are discussed. This method has the advantage of being simple, rapid, and efficient.

  2. Application of in vitro BBB model to measure permeability of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanada, S.; Fujoka, K.; Inoue, Y.; Kanaya, F.; Manome, Y.; Yamamoto, K.

    2013-04-01

    In both pharmaceutical and toxicological fields, one of major issues has been the possibility of nanoparticle uptake to central nerve system. For the safe use of nanoparticles, it is integral to evaluate the permeability of nanoparticles through BBB. In our collaborative research group reported that a few nanoparticles accumulated in brain in animal experiment, as an in vitro model, we applied commercially available cell-based BBB model for establishing evaluation method, which is quick, quantitative and equivalent to in vivo assay. We assayed 30-1500 nm silica and surface charge dependent Qdots. Our results showed the size-dependency and the surface modification dependency. We compared our assay to several animal experiments. There are both equivalence and discrepancy with animal experiments. Our BBB model can be useful tools for evaluating size-dependent permeability, but not for surface modification-dependent permeability. Our BBB assay is non-serum assay and we have not adequately reflected the serum-related interaction between nanoparticles and cell surfaces. To clear up the discrepancy of our BBB model, serum-based assay and low-concentration detection will be needed.

  3. Multiple-pressure-tapped core holder combined with X-ray computed tomography scanning for gas-water permeability measurements of methane-hydrate-bearing sediments.

    PubMed

    Konno, Yoshihiro; Jin, Yusuke; Uchiumi, Takashi; Nagao, Jiro

    2013-06-01

    We present a novel setup for measuring the effective gas-water permeability of methane-hydrate-bearing sediments. We developed a core holder with multiple pressure taps for measuring the pressure gradient of the gas and water phases. The gas-water flooding process was simultaneously detected using an X-ray computed tomography scanner. We successfully measured the effective gas-water permeability of an artificial sandy core with methane hydrate during the gas-water flooding test.

  4. An AC phase measuring interferometer for measuring dn/dT of fused silica and calcium fluoride at 193 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Shagam, R.N.

    1998-09-01

    A novel method for the measurement of the change in index of refraction vs. temperature (dn/dT) of fused silica and calcium fluoride at the 193 nm wavelength has been developed in support of thermal modeling efforts for the development of 193 nm-based photolithographic exposure tools. The method, based upon grating lateral shear interferometry, uses a transmissive linear grating to divide a 193 nm laser beam into several beam paths by diffraction which propagate through separate identical material samples. One diffracted order passing through one sample overlaps the undiffracted beam from a second sample and forms interference fringes dependent upon the optical path difference between the two samples. Optical phase delay due to an index change from heating one of the samples causes the interference fringes to change sinusoidally with phase. The interferometer also makes use of AC phase measurement techniques through lateral translation of the grating. Results for several samples of fused silica and calcium fluoride are demonstrated.

  5. Developing Test Apparatus and Measurements of AC Loss of High Temperature Superconductors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    superconducting wires can be very effectively reduced in proportion of the number of filaments. The oxygen annealing eliminates the residual coupling losses by...made out of YBCO superconducting wires were studied, confirming the simulation method used to calculate and predict AC loss and hysteretic effects of... oxygen annealing were tested in order to determine their effect on AC loss reduction. Results showed that the AC loss in multifilament

  6. A Comparative Study on Pre-Standardization of Total AC Loss Measurements for Oxide-Superconducting Tapes in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funaki, Kazuo; Tanaka, Yasuzo; Osamura, Kozo

    2006-06-01

    We have been considering about standard methods to estimate total AC loss in oxide-superconducting tapes under practical electromagnetic conditions in future power devices. We adopt 4 candidates of the standard methods to measure the AC loss in superconducting wires exposed to AC transverse magnetic field and alternating transport current. We also introduce two pickup coil methods for comparative references of external magnetic field loss. The specimen is a Bi-2223 Ag-alloy-sheathed multifilamentary tape without twisting. 60-100 mm short pieces of specimen were cut from a terminal of a 50 m long specimen for 4 in 6 methods. A double-layer non-inductive coiled specimen was also prepared from the long specimen for the other 2 methods. The scattering in AC loss property among the short specimens prepared is less than 1% in the perpendicular field with the amplitude from 0.01 to 0.1 T at 10 Hz. The scattering in repeated measurements of the loss during 3 heat cycles is within 2-3%, which almost corresponds to that of the critical current in the long specimen. We processed the results measured by each method for the external field loss and total AC loss, summarized dispersion among the observed results of all methods and discussed about the candidates of the standard methods.

  7. Calcium permeability of transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) 4 channels measured by TRPC4-GCaMP6s

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Juyeon; Myeong, Jongyun; Yang, Dongki

    2017-01-01

    Conflicting evidence has been obtained regarding whether transient receptor potential cation channels (TRPC) are store-operated channels (SOCs) or receptor-operated channels (ROCs). Moreover, the Ca/Na permeability ratio differs depending on whether the current-voltage (I-V) curve has a doubly rectifying shape or inward rectifying shape. To investigate the calcium permeability of TRPC4 channels, we attached GCaMP6s to TRPC4 and simultaneously measured the current and calcium signals. A TRPC4 specific activator, (–)-englerin A, induced both current and calcium fluorescence with the similar time course. Muscarinic receptor stimulator, carbachol, also induced both current and calcium fluorescence with the similar time course. By forming heteromers with TRPC4, TRPC1 significantly reduced the inward current with outward rectifying I-V curve, which also caused the decrease of calcium fluorescence intensity. These results suggest that GCaMP6s attached to TRPC4 can detect slight calcium changes near TRPC4 channels. Consequently, TRPC4-GCaMP6s can be a useful tool for testing the calcium permeability of TRPC4 channels. PMID:28066150

  8. Quantitative Thermal Microscopy Measurement with Thermal Probe Driven by dc+ac Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodzenta, Jerzy; Juszczyk, Justyna; Kaźmierczak-Bałata, Anna; Firek, Piotr; Fleming, Austin; Chirtoc, Mihai

    2016-07-01

    Quantitative thermal measurements with spatial resolution allowing the examination of objects of submicron dimensions are still a challenging task. The quantity of methods providing spatial resolution better than 100 nm is very limited. One of them is scanning thermal microscopy (SThM). This method is a variant of atomic force microscopy which uses a probe equipped with a temperature sensor near the apex. Depending on the sensor current, either the temperature or the thermal conductivity distribution at the sample surface can be measured. However, like all microscopy methods, the SThM gives only qualitative information. Quantitative measuring methods using SThM equipment are still under development. In this paper, a method based on simultaneous registration of the static and the dynamic electrical resistances of the probe driven by the sum of dc and ac currents, and examples of its applications are described. Special attention is paid to the investigation of thin films deposited on thick substrates. The influence of substrate thermal properties on the measured signal and its dependence on thin film thermal conductivity and film thickness are analyzed. It is shown that in the case where layer thicknesses are comparable or smaller than the probe-sample contact diameter, a correction procedure is required to obtain actual thermal conductivity of the layer. Experimental results obtained for thin SiO2 and BaTiO_{3 }layers with thicknesses in the range from 11 nm to 100 nm are correctly confirmed with this approach.

  9. Borehole measurement of the hydraulic properties of low-permeability rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novakowski, Kentner S.; Bickerton, Gregory S.

    1997-11-01

    Hydraulic tests conducted in low-permeability media are subject to numerous influences and processes, many of which manifest in a nonunique fashion. To explore the accuracy and meaning of the interpretation of hydraulic tests conducted under such conditions, two semianalytical models are developed in which variable well bore storage, variable temperature, and test method are considered. The formation is assumed to be of uniform permeability and uniform storativity in both models. To investigate uncertainty in the use of these models, a comparison is conducted to similar models that account for nonuniform formation properties such as finite skin, double porosity, and fractional flow. Using the models for a finite skin and double porosity as baseline cases, results show that the interpretation of slug tests are normally nonunique when tests are conducted in material of low permeability. Provided that a lower bound is defined for storativity, the uncertainty in a given interpretation conducted with the model for a uniform medium can be established by comparison with a fit to the data obtained using the model incorporating finite skin. It was also found that the degree of uncertainty can be diminished by conducting the test using an open hole period followed by a shut-in period (similar to a drill stem test). Determination of the degree of uncertainty was found to be case specific and must be defined by using at least a comparison between the model for uniform media and that for finite skin. To illustrate the use of the slug test model and determine the degree of uncertainty that will accrue with the use of that model, a field example, potentially influenced by variable well bore storage, is presented and interpreted.

  10. Measurements of Gas-Water Relative Permeability for Methane-Hydrate-Bearing Sediments using X-ray Computed-Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Y.; Jin, Y.; Nagao, J.

    2012-04-01

    Oceanic gas hydrate deposits at high saturations have been found within sandy sediments in areas such as the Eastern Nankai Trough and the Gulf of Mexico. The recent discovery of these deposits has stimulated research and development programs exploring the use of gas hydrates as energy resources. Depressurization is thought to be a promising method for gas recovery from gas hydrates deposits; however, considerable water production is expected when this method is applied for oceanic gas hydrate deposits. The prediction of water production is a critical problem for successful gas production from these deposits. The gas-water relative permeability of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments is a key parameter to predict gas-water-ratio (GWR) during gas production. However, the experimental measurement of gas-water relative permeability for gas-hydrate-bearing sediments is a challenging problem due to a phase change (gas hydrate formation/dissociation) during gas-water flooding test. We used X-ray computed tomography (CT) and a newly-developed core holder to measure gas-water relative permeability for gas-hydrate-bearing sediments. X-ray CT was used to image a displacement front and quantify density changes during water flooding test in methane-hydrate-bearing cores. We obtained CT images every two minutes during a water flooding test for a gas-saturated methane-hydrate-bearing core. The movement of displacement front was captured from these CT images. Quantitative analysis of density change was also done to analyze the change of gas/water saturations. We developed a multi-sensor-tap core holder to minimize capillary end effect on the pressure measurements. To be able to obtain CT images by X-ray, the core holder was made of aluminum alloy. We successfully measured pressure differences of the intermediate section of the core during water flooding test. The change of pressure differences during water flooding test showed strong correlation with the movement of displacement front

  11. A short-circuited coplanar waveguide to measure the permeability of magnetic thin films: Comparison with short-circuited microstrip line.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jinwu; Feng, Hongmei; Zhu, Zengtai; Liu, Qingfang; Wang, Jianbo

    2015-11-01

    A short-circuited coplanar waveguide jig was proposed due to its simple structure and potential applications, which was successfully used to measure the permeability spectra of magnetic thin film. The result obtained from the coplanar waveguide (CPW) jig exhibits typical ferromagnetic resonance spectra, which can be well fitted by a trade-off equation because the measured permeability spectra have a bit of asymmetry because of the special intensity distribution of the microwave magnetic field in the CPW. In order to confirm the availability of the shorted CPW jig, a previous short-circuited microstrip line jig was used to measure the permeability spectra of the same sample. The dynamic permeability results obtained by using different jigs are commendably consistent, and the accurate and valid results are also confirmed by using the vector network analyzer ferromagnetic resonance method.

  12. Direct Measurement of Intracellular Compound Concentration by RapidFire Mass Spectrometry Offers Insights into Cell Permeability.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Laurie J; Allen, Morven; Artursson, Per; Hann, Michael M; Leavens, Bill J; Mateus, André; Readshaw, Simon; Valko, Klara; Wayne, Gareth J; West, Andy

    2016-02-01

    One of the key challenges facing early stage drug discovery is understanding the commonly observed difference between the activity of compounds in biochemical assays and cellular assays. Traditionally, indirect or estimated cell permeability measurements such as estimations from logP or artificial membrane permeability are used to explain the differences. The missing link is a direct measurement of intracellular compound concentration in whole cells. This can, in some circumstances, be estimated from the cellular activity, but this may also be problematic if cellular activity is weak or absent. Advances in sensitivity and throughput of analytical techniques have enabled us to develop a high-throughput assay for the measurement of intracellular compound concentration for routine use to support lead optimization. The assay uses a RapidFire-MS based readout of compound concentration in HeLa cells following incubation of cells with test compound. The initial assay validation was performed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, and the assay was subsequently transferred to RapidFire tandem mass spectrometry. Further miniaturization and optimization were performed to streamline the process, increase sample throughput, and reduce cycle time. This optimization has delivered a semi-automated platform with the potential of production scale compound profiling up to 100 compounds per day.

  13. Crustal permeability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gleeson, Tom; Ingebritsen, Steven E.

    2016-01-01

    Permeability is the primary control on fluid flow in the Earth’s crust and is key to a surprisingly wide range of geological processes, because it controls the advection of heat and solutes and the generation of anomalous pore pressures.  The practical importance of permeability – and the potential for large, dynamic changes in permeability – is highlighted by ongoing issues associated with hydraulic fracturing for hydrocarbon production (“fracking”), enhanced geothermal systems, and geologic carbon sequestration.  Although there are thousands of research papers on crustal permeability, this is the first book-length treatment.  This book bridges the historical dichotomy between the hydrogeologic perspective of permeability as a static material property and the perspective of other Earth scientists who have long recognized permeability as a dynamic parameter that changes in response to tectonism, fluid production, and geochemical reactions. 

  14. Compaction and gas loss in welded pyroclastic deposits as revealed by porosity, permeability, and electrical conductivity measurements of the Shevlin Park Tuff

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Heather M.; Cashman, Katharine V.

    2014-01-01

    Pyroclastic flows produced by large volcanic eruptions commonly densify after emplacement. Processes of gas escape, compaction, and welding in pyroclastic-flow deposits are controlled by the physical and thermal properties of constituent material. Through measurements of matrix porosity, permeability, and electrical conductivity, we provide a framework for understanding the evolution of pore structure during these processes. Using data from the Shevlin Park Tuff in central Oregon, United States, and from the literature, we find that over a porosity range of 0%–70%, matrix permeability varies by almost 10 orders of magnitude (from 10–20 to 10–11 m2), with over three orders of magnitude variation at any given porosity. Part of the variation at a given porosity is due to permeability anisotropy, where oriented core samples indicate higher permeabilities parallel to foliation (horizontally) than perpendicular to foliation (vertically). This suggests that pore space is flattened during compaction, creating anisotropic crack-like networks, a geometry that is supported by electrical conductivity measurements. We find that the power law equation: k1 = 1.3 × 10–21 × ϕ5.2 provides the best approximation of dominant horizontal gas loss, where k1 = permeability, and ϕ = porosity. Application of Kozeny-Carman fluid-flow approximations suggests that permeability in the Shevlin Park Tuff is controlled by crack- or disk-like pore apertures with minimum widths of 0.3 and 7.5 μm. We find that matrix permeability limits compaction over short times, but deformation is then controlled by competition among cooling, compaction, water resorption, and permeable gas escape. These competing processes control the potential for development of overpressure (and secondary explosions) and the degree of welding in the deposit, processes that are applicable to viscous densification of volcanic deposits in general. Further, the general relationships among porosity, permeability, and

  15. High-Resolution ac Measurements of the Hall Effect in Organic Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Yi, H. T.; Podzorov, V.

    2016-03-01

    We describe a high resolving power technique for Hall-effect measurements, efficient in determining Hall mobility and carrier density in organic field-effect transistors and other low-mobility systems. We utilize a small low-frequency ac magnetic field (Brms<0.25 T ) and a phase-sensitive (lock-in) detection of Hall voltage, with the necessary corrections for Faraday induction. This method significantly enhances the signal-to-noise ratio and eliminates the necessity of using high magnetic fields in Hall-effect studies. With the help of this method, we are able to obtain the Hall mobility and carrier density in organic transistors with a mobility as low as μ ˜0.3 cm2 V-1 s-1 by using a compact desktop apparatus and low magnetic fields. We find a good agreement between Hall-effect and electric-field-effect measurements, indicating that, contrary to the common belief, certain organic semiconductors with mobilities below 1 cm2 V-1 s-1 can still exhibit a fully developed, band-semiconductor-like Hall effect, with the Hall mobility and carrier density matching those obtained in longitudinal transistor measurements. This suggests that, even when μ <1 cm2 V-1 s-1 , charges in organic semiconductors can still behave as delocalized coherent carriers. This technique paves the way to ubiquitous Hall-effect studies in a wide range of low-mobility materials and devices, where it is typically very difficult to resolve the Hall effect even in very high dc magnetic fields.

  16. Simultaneous measurements of somatosensory evoked AC and near-DC MEG signals.

    PubMed

    Körber, Rainer; Curio, Gabriel; Hartwig, Stefan; Hilschenz, Ingo; Höfner, Nora; Scheer, Hans-Jürgen; Trahms, Lutz; Voigt, Jens; Burghoff, Martin

    2011-04-01

    Magnetoencephalography measurements of somatosensory evoked brain activity taken inside an extremely magnetically shielded room are reported. The massive low frequency shielding in combination with a high sampling rate enabled the simultaneous observation of AC and near-DC effects. Neuronal activation was achieved by repetitive electrostimulation of the right median nerve above motor threshold using repetition rates from 3 Hz to 12 Hz. Stimulation sequences lasted for 10 s and were interspersed with periods of rest of equal length. The recorded magnetic fields, inferred for the N20m and a sustained near-DC component, revealed mainly dipolar patterns with mutually rotated orientations with angles of rotation of 30° and 75°. At the start of the stimulation we observed a fast rise within 100 ms in the evoked magnetic near-DC fields for which a maximum equivalent current dipole strength of 65 nAm was obtained. The sustained fields decayed by a factor of ∼4 to a lower DC-level B(γ) with a time constant τ of order of seconds. For 12 Hz repetition rate B(γ) was decreased. We suggest that the sustained neuronal activity evoked by repetitive electrostimulation could provide a suitable scheme to realize the direct detection of DC effects of neuronal currents via low field magnetic resonance.

  17. Measurement of the direct C P -violating parameter AC P in the decay D+→K-π+π+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.; D0 Collaboration

    2014-12-01

    We measure the direct C P -violating parameter AC P for the decay of the charged charm meson, D+→K-π+π+ (and charge conjugate), using the full 10.4 fb-1 sample of p p ¯ collisions at √{s }=1.96 TeV collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We extract the raw reconstructed charge asymmetry by fitting the invariant mass distributions for the sum and difference of charge-specific samples. This quantity is then corrected for detector-related asymmetries using data-driven methods and for possible physics asymmetries (from B →D processes) using input from Monte Carlo simulation. We measure AC P=[-0.16 ±0.15 (stat)±0.09 (syst)]% , which is consistent with zero, as expected from the standard model prediction of C P conservation, and is the most precise measurement of this quantity to date.

  18. Studies on the activation energy from the ac conductivity measurements of rubber ferrite composites containing manganese zinc ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, Mohd.; Alimuddin; Kumar, Shalendra; Shirsath, Sagar E.; Mohammed, E. M.; Chung, Hanshik; Kumar, Ravi

    2012-11-01

    Manganese zinc ferrites (MZF) have resistivities between 0.01 and 10 Ω m. Making composite materials of ferrites with either natural rubber or plastics will modify the electrical properties of ferrites. The moldability and flexibility of these composites find wide use in industrial and other scientific applications. Mixed ferrites belonging to the series Mn(1-x)ZnxFe2O4 were synthesized for different ‘x’ values in steps of 0.2, and incorporated in natural rubber matrix (RFC). From the dielectric measurements of the ceramic manganese zinc ferrite and rubber ferrite composites, ac conductivity and activation energy were evaluated. A program was developed with the aid of the LabVIEW package to automate the measurements. The ac conductivity of RFC was then correlated with that of the magnetic filler and matrix by a mixture equation which helps to tailor properties of these composites.

  19. Permeability and pressure measurements in Lesser Antilles submarine slides: Evidence for pressure-driven slow-slip failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornbach, Matthew J.; Manga, Michael; Genecov, Michael; Valdez, Robert; Miller, Peter; Saffer, Demian; Adelstein, Esther; Lafuerza, Sara; Adachi, Tatsuya; Breitkreuz, Christoph; Jutzeler, Martin; Le Friant, Anne; Ishizuka, Osamu; Morgan, Sally; Slagle, Angela; Talling, Peter J.; Fraass, Andrew; Watt, Sebastian F. L.; Stroncik, Nicole A.; Aljahdali, Mohammed; Boudon, Georges; Fujinawa, Akihiko; Hatfield, Robert; Kataoka, Kyoko; Maeno, Fukashi; Martinez-Colon, Michael; McCanta, Molly; Palmer, Martin; Stinton, Adam; Subramanyam, K. S. V.; Tamura, Yoshihiko; Villemant, Benoît; Wall-Palmer, Deborah; Wang, Fei

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies hypothesize that some submarine slides fail via pressure-driven slow-slip deformation. To test this hypothesis, this study derives pore pressures in failed and adjacent unfailed deep marine sediments by integrating rock physics models, physical property measurements on recovered sediment core, and wireline logs. Two drill sites (U1394 and U1399) drilled through interpreted slide debris; a third (U1395) drilled into normal marine sediment. Near-hydrostatic fluid pressure exists in sediments at site U1395. In contrast, results at both sites U1394 and U1399 indicate elevated pore fluid pressures in some sediment. We suggest that high pore pressure at the base of a submarine slide deposit at site U1394 results from slide shearing. High pore pressure exists throughout much of site U1399, and Mohr circle analysis suggests that only slight changes in the stress regime will trigger motion. Consolidation tests and permeability measurements indicate moderately low (~10-16-10-17 m2) permeability and overconsolidation in fine-grained slide debris, implying that these sediments act as seals. Three mechanisms, in isolation or in combination, may produce the observed elevated pore fluid pressures at site U1399: (1) rapid sedimentation, (2) lateral fluid flow, and (3) shearing that causes sediments to contract, increasing pore pressure. Our preferred hypothesis is this third mechanism because it explains both elevated fluid pressure and sediment overconsolidation without requiring high sedimentation rates. Our combined analysis of subsurface pore pressures, drilling data, and regional seismic images indicates that slope failure offshore Martinique is perhaps an ongoing, creep-like process where small stress changes trigger motion.

  20. Incorporating residential AC load control into ancillary service markets: Measurement and settlement

    SciTech Connect

    Bode, Josh L.; Sullivan, Michael J.; Berghman, Dries; Eto, Joseph H.

    2013-05-01

    Many pre-existing air conditioner load control programs can provide valuable operational flexibility but have not been incorporated into electricity ancillary service markets or grid operations. Multiple demonstrations have shown that residential air conditioner (AC) response can deliver resources quickly and can provide contingency reserves. A key policy hurdle to be overcome before AC load control can be fully incorporated into markets is how to balance the accuracy, cost, and complexity of methods available for the settlement of load curtailment. Overcoming this hurdle requires a means for assessing the accuracy of shorter-term AC load control demand reduction estimation approaches in an unbiased manner. This paper applies such a method to compare the accuracy of approaches varying in cost and complexity ? including regression analysis, load matching and control group approaches ? using feeder data, household data and AC end-use data. We recommend a practical approach for settlement, relying on an annually updated set of tables, with pre-calculated reduction estimates. These tables allow users to look up the demand reduction per device based on daily maximum temperature, geographic region and hour of day, simplifying settlement and providing a solution to the policy problem presented in this paper.

  1. Improved accuracy of measurements of complex permittivity and permeability using transmission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemelin, V.; Valles, N.

    2014-12-01

    Strong damping of Higher-Order-Modes (HOMs) excited by the beam in accelerating cavities is a necessary condition for achievement of high currents and low emittances in storage rings, electron-positron colliders, and high average power Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs). Characterization of the electromagnetic properties of lossy ceramics and ferrites used in HOM loads is therefore an essential part of constructing these accelerators. Here we show how to improve these measurements beyond the state of the art. In the past, significant discrepancies have been typical between measured properties for different batches of the same material. Here we show that these can be explained not only by technological deviations in the material production but also by errors in the dimensions of the measured samples. We identify the main source of errors and show how to improve the accuracy of measuring the electromagnetic parameters of absorbing materials.

  2. Improved method for measuring water imbibition rates on low-permeability porous media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Humphrey, M.D.; Istok, J.D.; Flint, L.E.; Flint, A.L.

    1996-01-01

    Existing methods for measuring water imbibition rates are inadequate when imbibition rates are small (e.g., clay soils and many igneous rocks). We developed an improved laboratory method for performing imbibition measurements on soil or rock cores with a wide range of hydraulic properties. Core specimens are suspended from an electronic strain gauge (load cell) in a closed chamber while maintaining the lower end of the core in contact with a free water surface in a constant water level reservoir. The upper end of the core is open to the atmosphere. During imbibition, mass increase of the core is recorded continuously by a datalogger that converts the load cell voltage signal into mass units using a calibration curve. Computer automation allows imbibition rate measurement on as many as eight cores simultaneously and independently. Performance of each component of the imbibition apparatus was evaluated using a set of rock cores (2.5 cm in diameter and 2-5 cm in length) from a single lithostratigraphic unit composed of non-to-moderately welded ash-flow tuff (a glass-rich pyroclastic rock partially fused by heat and pressure) with porosities ranging from 0.094 to 0.533 m3 m-3. Reproducibility of sample handling and testing procedures was demonstrated using replicate measurements. Precision and accuracy of load cell measurements were assessed using mass balance calculations and indicated agreement within a few tenths of a percent of total mass. Computed values of sorptivity, S, ranged from 8.83 x 10-6 to 4.55 x 10-4 m s-0.5. The developed method should prove useful for measuring imbibition rates on a wide range of porous materials.

  3. AC losses in high pressure synthesized MgB2 bulk rings measured by a transformer method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerovich, V.; Sokolovsky, V.; Prikhna, T.; Gawalek, W.; Habisreuther, T.

    2013-03-01

    Recently developed manufacturing technologies use high pressure and various doping additions to prepare bulk MgB2-based materials with a high critical current density measured by the magnetization method. We use a contactless transformer method, which is based on studying the superconductor response to an induced transport current, to measure AC losses in bulk MgB2 rings synthesized under high pressure. The obtained dependence of the losses on the primary current (applied magnetic field) is fitted by a power law with an exponent of ˜2.1 instead of the cubic dependence predicted by Bean’s model and power law electric field-current density (E-J) characteristics with a large exponent. An unusually strong dependence of the AC losses on the frequency is also observed. It is shown that the E-J characteristic of bulk MgB2 is well fitted by the dependence used in the extended critical state model based on account of the viscous vortex motion in the flux flow regime. Numerical simulation using this E-J characteristic gives current and frequency AC loss dependences that agree well with the experimental results.

  4. Measurement of blood-brain barrier permeability with t1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in brain tumors: a comparative study with two different algorithms.

    PubMed

    Bergamino, Maurizio; Saitta, Laura; Barletta, Laura; Bonzano, Laura; Mancardi, Giovanni Luigi; Castellan, Lucio; Ravetti, Jean Louis; Roccatagliata, Luca

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of measuring different permeability parameters with T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to investigate the blood brain-barrier permeability associated with different brain tumors. The Patlak algorithm and the extended Tofts-Kety model were used to this aim. Twenty-five adult patients with tumors of different histological grades were enrolled in this study. MRI examinations were performed at 1.5 T. Multiflip angle, fast low-angle shot, and axial 3D T1-weighted images were acquired to calculate T1 maps, followed by a DCE acquisition. A region of interest was placed within the tumor of each patient to calculate the mean value of different permeability parameters. Differences in permeability measurements were found between different tumor grades, with higher histological grades characterized by higher permeability values. A significant difference in transfer constant (K (trans)) values was found between the two methods on high-grade tumors; however, both techniques revealed a significant correlation between the histological grade of tumors and their K (trans) values. Our results suggest that DCE acquisition is feasible in patients with brain tumors and that K (trans) maps can be easily obtained by these two algorithms, even if the theoretical model adopted could affect the final results.

  5. Permeability of porour rhyolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, K.; Rust, A.; Wright, H.; Roberge, J.

    2003-04-01

    The development of permeability in bubble-bearing magmas determines the efficiency of volatile escape during their ascent through volcanic conduits, which, in turn, controls their explosive potential. As permeability requires bubble connectivity, relationships between permeability and porosity in silicic magmas must be controlled by the formation, growth, deformation and coalescence of their constituent bubbles. Although permeability data on porous volcanic pyroclasts are limited, the database can be greatly extended by including data for ceramic and metallic foams1. Several studies indicate that a single number does not adequately describe the permeability of a foam because inertial effects, which predominate at high flow rates, cause deviations from Darcy's law. These studies suggest that permeability is best modeled using the Forschheimer equation to determine both the Darcy permeability (k1) and the non-Darcian (k2) permeability. Importantly, at the high porosities of ceramic foams (75-95%), both k1 and k2 are strongly dependent on pore size and geometry, suggesting that measurement of these parameters provides important information on foam structure. We determined both the connected porosity (by He-pycnometry) and the permeability (k1 and k2) of rhyolitic samples having a wide range in porosity (22-85%) and vesicle textures. In general, these data support previous observations of a power law relationship between connected porosity and Darcy permeability2. In detail, variations in k1 increase at higher porosities. Similarly, k2 generally increases in both mean and standard deviation with increasing porosity. Measurements made on three mutually perpendicular cores from individual pumice clasts suggest that some of the variability can be explained by anisotropy in the vesicle structure. By comparison with ceramic foams, we suggest that the remaining variability results from differences either in average vesicle size or, more likely, in the size of apertures

  6. New measurement of exotic decay of 225Ac by 14C emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglielmetti, A.; Bonetti, R.; Ardisson, G.; Barci, V.; Giles, T.; Hussonnois, M.; Le Du, J. F.; Le Naour, C.; Mikheev, V. L.; Pasinetti, A. L.; Ravn, H. L.; Tretyakova, S. P.; Trubert, D.

    The branching ratio of 225Ac decay by emission of 14C was remeasured under improved experimental conditions by using a radioactive source produced at the ISOLDE mass-separator at CERN and a nuclear track detector technique. The result, B = λ14C/λα = (4.5+/-1.4)10-12, is consistent with the anomalously high value obtained in the 1993 experiment, thus confirming the importance of nuclear-structure effects in this exotic decay.

  7. Cell Treatment for Stroke in Type Two Diabetic Rats Improves Vascular Permeability Measured by MRI.

    PubMed

    Ding, Guangliang; Chen, Jieli; Chopp, Michael; Li, Lian; Yan, Tao; Li, Qingjiang; Cui, Chengcheng; Davarani, Siamak P N; Jiang, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of stroke with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) significantly enhances brain remodeling and improves neurological function in non-diabetic stroke rats. Diabetes is a major risk factor for stroke and induces neurovascular changes which may impact stroke therapy. Thus, it is necessary to test our hypothesis that the treatment of stroke with BMSC has therapeutic efficacy in the most common form of diabetes, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). T2DM was induced in adult male Wistar rats by administration of a high fat diet in combination with a single intraperitoneal injection (35mg/kg) of streptozotocin. These rats were then subjected to 2h of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). T2DM rats received BMSC (5x106, n = 8) or an equal volume of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (n = 8) via tail-vein injection at 3 days after MCAo. MRI was performed one day and then weekly for 5 weeks post MCAo for all rats. Compared with vehicle treated control T2DM rats, BMSC treatment of stroke in T2DM rats significantly (p<0.05) decreased blood-brain barrier disruption starting at 1 week post stroke measured using contrast enhanced T1-weighted imaging with gadopentetate, and reduced cerebral hemorrhagic spots starting at 3 weeks post stroke measured using susceptibility weighted imaging, although BMSC treatment did not reduce the ischemic lesion volumes as demarcated by T2 maps. These MRI measurements were consistent with histological data. Thus, BMSC treatment of stroke in T2DM rats initiated at 3 days after stroke significantly reduced ischemic vascular damage, although BMSC treatment did not change infarction volume in T2DM rats, measured by MRI.

  8. RCRA corrective measures using a permeable reactive iron wall US Coast Guard Support Center, Elizabeth City, North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Schmithors, W.L.; Vardy, J.A.

    1997-12-31

    A chromic acid release was discovered at a former electroplating shop at the U.S. Coast Guard Support Center in Elizabeth City, North Carolina. Initial investigative activities indicated that chromic acid had migrated into the subsurface soils and groundwater. In addition, trichloroethylene (TCE) was also discovered in groundwater during subsequent investigations of the hexavalent chromium (Cr VI) plume. Corrective measures were required under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The in-situ remediation method, proposed under RCRA Interim Measures to passively treat the groundwater contaminants, uses reactive zero-valent iron to reductively dechlorinate the chlorinated compounds and to mineralize the hexavalent chromium. A 47 meter by 0.6 meter subsurface permeable iron wall was installed downgradient of the source area to a depth of 7 meters using a direct trenching machine. The iron filings were placed in the ground as the soils were excavated from the subsurface. This is the first time that direct trenching was used to install reactive zero-valent iron filings. Over 250 metric tons of iron filings were used as the reactive material in the barrier wall. Installation of the iron filings took one full day. Extensive negotiations with regulatory agencies were required to use this technology under the current facility Hazardous Waste Management Permit. All waste soils generated during the excavation activities were contained and treated on site. Once contaminant concentrations were reduced the waste soils were used as fill material.

  9. Calorimetric AC loss measurement of MgB2 superconducting tape in an alternating transport current and direct magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See, K. W.; Xu, X.; Horvat, J.; Cook, C. D.; Dou, S. X.

    2012-11-01

    Applications of MgB2 superconductors in electrical engineering have been widely reported, and various studies have been made to define their alternating current (AC) losses. However, studies on the transport losses with an applied transverse DC magnetic field have not been conducted, even though this is one of the favored conditions in applications of practical MgB2 tapes. Methods and techniques used to characterize and measure these losses have so far been grouped into ‘electrical’ and ‘calorimetric’ approaches with external conditions set to resemble the application conditions. In this paper, we present a new approach to mounting the sample and employ the calorimetric method to accurately determine the losses in the concurrent application of AC transport current and DC magnetic fields that are likely to be experienced in practical devices such as generators and motors. This technique provides great simplification compared to the pickup coil and lock-in amplifier methods and is applied to a long length (˜10 cm) superconducting tape. The AC loss data at 20 and 30 K will be presented in an applied transport current of 50 Hz under external DC magnetic fields. The results are found to be higher than the theoretical predictions because of the metallic fraction of the tape that contributes quite significantly to the total losses. The data, however, will allow minimization of losses in practical MgB2 coils and will be used in the verification of numerical coil models.

  10. Cellular pH measurements in Emiliania huxleyi reveal pronounced membrane proton permeability.

    PubMed

    Suffrian, K; Schulz, K G; Gutowska, M A; Riebesell, U; Bleich, M

    2011-05-01

    • To understand the influence of changing surface ocean pH and carbonate chemistry on the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi, it is necessary to characterize mechanisms involved in pH homeostasis and ion transport. • Here, we measured effects of changes in seawater carbonate chemistry on the fluorescence emission ratio of BCECF (2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein) as a measure of intracellular pH (pH(i)). Out of equilibrium solutions were used to differentiate between membrane permeation pathways for H(+), CO(2) and HCO(3)(-). • Changes in fluorescence ratio were calibrated in single cells, resulting in a ratio change of 0.78 per pH(i) unit. pH(i) acutely followed the pH of seawater (pH(e)) in a linear fashion between pH(e) values of 6.5 and 9 with a slope of 0.44 per pH(e) unit. pH(i) was nearly insensitive to changes in seawater CO(2) at constant pH(e) and HCO(3)(-). An increase in extracellular HCO(3)(-) resulted in a slight intracellular acidification. In the presence of DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid), a broad-spectrum inhibitor of anion exchangers, E. huxleyi acidified irreversibly. DIDS slightly reduced the effect of pH(e) on pH(i). • The data for the first time show the occurrence of a proton permeation pathway in E. huxleyi plasma membrane. pH(i) homeostasis involves a DIDS-sensitive mechanism.

  11. Developing passive MEMS DC/AC current sensor applicable to two-wire appliances with high measurement accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong F.; Li, Xiaodong; Xian, Weikang; Liu, Huan; Liu, Xin

    2016-10-01

    A passive MEMS DC/AC current sensor with high measurement accuracy, accomplished by the methodology combining both the "stress-equilibrium" solution and the "position-free" solution, was proposed for measuring electricity consumption of household equipment and Information and Communication Technology devices. For the "stress-equilibrium" solution, slots between two adjacent piezoelectric plates are implemented to minimize the distribution difference of the uneven stress close to the fixed end. The measurement error caused by the uneven stress distribution is decreased from 9% to 4% for ten-piezoelectric-plates and from 8% to 0.5% for three-piezoelectric-plates, respectively. For the "position-free" consideration, an array comprised of four piezoelectric cantilevers is proposed to eliminate the positional error resulted by the uneven magnetic field distribution generated by the test object of electric currents. And the solution is proofed to be an effective method to eliminate the positional error by theoretical and simulation analysis. In light of the above preliminary results, the passive MEMS DC/AC current sensor is believed to be useful to achieve high measurement accuracy via integrating the "stress-equilibrium" and the "position-free" designs. The newly proposed current sensor with high measurement accuracy is applicable to two-wire appliance cord without using any cord separator like that used in Hall-effect based sensor.

  12. Use of rubidium, manganese, and zinc as tracers to measure intestinal permeability by PIXE analysis: basal study in an experimental enteritis model.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Keitaro; Suzuki, Yasuo; Imaseki, Hitoshi; Joshima, Hisamasa; Tamanoi, Itsuro; Saito, Yasushi

    2004-04-01

    Intestinal permeability has been suggested to be closely linked with the etiology or activity of Crohn's disease. However, current methods for measurement of intestinal permeability are too laborious for routine examination, as they require urine collection and/or use of radioisotopes. The present study was performed to develop a more convenient and safer method for assessing intestinal permeability using blood samples rather than urine. Rats with indomethacin-induced enteritis were orally administered Rb, Mn, and Zn as tracers. Intestinal permeability was determined by assaying the levels of Rb, Mn, and Zn in blood samples by particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE). The distributions of Rb, Mn, and Zn in the small intestine after administration were analyzed by micro-PIXE. The conventional PIXE analysis showed that the levels of Rb and Zn in the blood in the enteritis group were correlated with the grade of enteritis. The micro-PIXE analysis showed that Rb, Mn, and Zn were translocated into the wall of the proximal small intestine 5 min after administration, and this effect was more conspicuous in the enteritis group than in controls. Analysis of blood or small intestine tissue samples using the PIXE allows determination of both intestinal permeability and the route of permeation.

  13. Investigation of parameter estimation and impact of injection rate on relative permeability measurements for supercritical CO2 and water by unsteady-state method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiratsuka, Y.; Yamamoto, H.

    2014-12-01

    CCS (Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage) is a promising option for mitigating climate changes. To predict the behavior of injected CO2 in a deep reservoir, relative permeability of supercritical CO2 and water of the reservoir rock is one of the most fundamental and influential properties. For determining the relative permeability, we employed the unsteady state method, in which the relative permeability is determined based on history matching of transient monitoring data with a multi-phase flow model. The unsteady-state method is relatively simple and short, but obviously its accuracy strongly depends on the flow model assumed in the history matching. In this study, we conducted relative permeability measurements of supercritical CO2-water system for Berea sandstone with the unsteady-state method under a reservoir condition at a 1km depth (P= 9.5MPa, T = 44˚C). Automatic history matching was performed with an inversion simulator iTOUGH2/ECO2N for multi-phase flow system of supercritical CO2, NaCl, and water. A sensitivity analysis of relative permeability parameters for CO2 and water was carried out to better understand the uniqueness and the uncertainty of the optimum solution estimated by the history matching. Among the parameters of the Corey-type curve employed in this study, while the end-point permeability could be optimized in a limited range, the other parameters were correlated and their combinations were not unique. However it was found that any combination of these parameters results in nearly identical shapes of the curve in the range of CO2 saturation in this study (0 to 60%). The optimally estimated curve from the unsteady-method was well comparable with those from the steady-state method acquired in the previous studies. Our experiment also focuses on the impact of injection rate on the estimates of relative permeability, as it is known that the injection rate could have a significant effect on fluid distribution such as viscous fingering with

  14. MRI blood-brain barrier permeability measurements to predict hemorrhagic transformation in a rat model of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Angelika; Bredno, Jörg; Wendland, Michael F; Derugin, Nikita; Hom, Jason; Schuster, Tibor; Zimmer, Claus; Su, Hua; Ohara, Peter T; Young, William L; Wintermark, Max

    2012-12-01

    Permeability imaging might add valuable information in the risk assessment of hemorrhagic transformation. This study evaluates the predictive value of blood-brain barrier permeability (BBBP) measurements extracted from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for hemorrhagic transformation in ischemic stroke. Spontaneously hypertensive and Wistar rats with 2 h filament occlusion of the right MCA underwent MRI during occlusion, at 4 and 24 h post reperfusion. BBBP was imaged by DCE imaging and quantified by Patlak analysis. Cresyl-violet staining was used to characterize hemorrhage in sacrificed rats at 24 h, immediately following the last imaging study. BBBP changes were evaluated at baseline, 4 and 24 h after reperfusion. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to determine the most accurate BBBP threshold to predict hemorrhagic transformation. In animals showing macroscopic hemorrhage at 24 h, 95th BBBP percentile values ipsilateral were 0.323 [0.260, 0.387], 0.685 [0.385, 0.985], and 0.412 [0.210, 0.613] ml/min·100 g (marginal mean [95%CI]) during occlusion, at 4 and 24 h post reperfusion, respectively. The BBBP values on the infarcted and contralateral side were significantly different at 4 (p = 0.034) and 24 h post reperfusion (p = 0.031). The predictive value of BBBP in terms of macroscopic hemorrhage was highest 4 h after reperfusion (ROC area under the curve = 84 %) with a high negative predictive value (98.3 %) and limited positive predictive value (14.9 %) for a threshold of 0.35 ml/min·100g. Altered BBBP is a necessary but not sufficient condition to cause hemorrhagic transformation in rats with an infarct. Further research is needed to identify those additional risk factors that are required for hemorrhagic transformation to develop in the setting of ischemic stroke.

  15. Novel multijunction thermal converter in planar technique for AC current, voltage, power and optical radiation measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klonz, M.; Weimann, T.

    1990-05-01

    A new planar thin film design of multijunction thermocouples on a silicon chip containing a window with a SiO2-membrane for low heat conductance underneath of the thermocouples is described. It is used as the sensor for the temperature difference in a multijunction thermal converter for ac-dc transfer of electrical quantities like voltage, current and power via Joule heat in a thin film resistor. By coating the heater with an optically absorbing layer it is used as a highly sensitive radiometer transferring absorbed energy to Joule heat in the resistor. The design can easily be optimized for all different frequency applications. It offers the possibility of the mass production of transfer standards at highest level of accuracy.

  16. Electrical Effect in Silver-Point Realization Due to Cell Structure and Bias Voltage Based on Resistance Measurement Using AC and DC Bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widiatmo, J. V.; Harada, K.; Yamazawa, K.; Tamba, J.; Arai, M.

    2015-08-01

    Electrical effects related to insulating leakage represent one of the major factors contributing to uncertainties in measurements using high-temperature standard platinum resistance thermometers (HTSPRTs), especially during the realization of the silver freezing point (). This work is focused on the evaluation of the differences in resistance measurements observed when using AC resistance bridges and DC resistance bridges, hereafter, termed the AC-DC differences, as the result of various electrical effects. The magnitude of the AC-DC difference in several silver-point cells is demonstrated with several HTSPRTs. The effect of the cell structure on the AC-DC difference is evaluated by exchanging some components, part by part, within a silver-point cell. Then, the effect of the bias voltage applied to the heat pipe within the silver-point furnace is evaluated. Through the analysis of the experimental results and comparison with the reports in the literature, the importance of evaluating the AC-DC difference as a means to characterize the underlying electrical effects is discussed, considering that applying a negative bias condition to the furnace with respect to the high-temperature SPRT can minimize the AC-DC difference. Concluding recommendations are proposed on the components used in silver-point cells and the application of a bias voltage to the measurement circuit to minimize the effects of the electrical leakage.

  17. Seismic waves increase permeability.

    PubMed

    Elkhoury, Jean E; Brodsky, Emily E; Agnew, Duncan C

    2006-06-29

    Earthquakes have been observed to affect hydrological systems in a variety of ways--water well levels can change dramatically, streams can become fuller and spring discharges can increase at the time of earthquakes. Distant earthquakes may even increase the permeability in faults. Most of these hydrological observations can be explained by some form of permeability increase. Here we use the response of water well levels to solid Earth tides to measure permeability over a 20-year period. At the time of each of seven earthquakes in Southern California, we observe transient changes of up to 24 degrees in the phase of the water level response to the dilatational volumetric strain of the semidiurnal tidal components of wells at the Piñon Flat Observatory in Southern California. After the earthquakes, the phase gradually returns to the background value at a rate of less than 0.1 degrees per day. We use a model of axisymmetric flow driven by an imposed head oscillation through a single, laterally extensive, confined, homogeneous and isotropic aquifer to relate the phase response to aquifer properties. We interpret the changes in phase response as due to changes in permeability. At the time of the earthquakes, the permeability at the site increases by a factor as high as three. The permeability increase depends roughly linearly on the amplitude of seismic-wave peak ground velocity in the range of 0.21-2.1 cm s(-1). Such permeability increases are of interest to hydrologists and oil reservoir engineers as they affect fluid flow and might determine long-term evolution of hydrological and oil-bearing systems. They may also be interesting to seismologists, as the resulting pore pressure changes can affect earthquakes by changing normal stresses on faults.

  18. The Phonological Permeability Hypothesis: Measuring Regressive L3 Influence to Test L1 and L2 Phonological Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabrelli Amaro, Jennifer Lauren

    2013-01-01

    The Phonological Permeability Hypothesis (PPH, Cabrelli Amaro & Rothman, 2010) attempts to reconcile evidence suggesting some L2 learners, however rare, attain native-like L2 phonological systems with the observation that most do not. Considering existing L2 phonology research, it is not clear that phonological differences between early and…

  19. An Experimental Study of CO2 Exsolution and Relative Permeability Measurements during CO2 Saturated Water Depressurization Relevant to Carbon Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, L.; Krevor, S. C.; Falta, R. W.; Benson, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    Saline aquifers and depleted oil and gas fields have been considered as preferred geological sequestration options for carbon dioxide to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Given the high solubility of CO2 in water, over time, the fraction of CO2 in the subsurface may be dominated by dissolved CO2. CO2 laden brine may permeate cap rocks and carry dissolved CO2 to shallower depths, if there is an upward pressure gradient from the reservoir to the overlying groundwater aquifers. This kind of non-hydrostatic pressure gradients can be caused by gas injection in deeper formations, or groundwater depletion. Such upward flows will depressurize the brine and the dissolved CO2 will come out of solution as pressure drops. We present the results of an experimental investigation into the effects of CO2 exsolution on multiphase flow properties in a CO2-water system with various reservoir rocks and a risk assessment of CO2 leakage due to exsolution in carbon sequestration. The relative permeability of exsolved CO2 and water was measured in a core-flooding apparatus during depressurization with X-ray computed tomography. Very low relative permeabilities of CO2 and water are measured in the exsolution experiments, compared to the relative permeabilities derived from steady-state drainage measurements in the same cores, even when the CO2 saturation is as high as 40%. The large relative permeability reduction in both the CO2 and water phases is hypothesized to result from the presence of a disconnected exsolution gas phase in this flow system. After the CO2 was exsolved, a CO2-saturated water flooding experiment demonstrated the durability and the stability of the low water mobility in the presence of the exsolution gas phase, while the water mobility returned to normal after all of the exsolved CO2 dissolved by a fresh water. A large pressure drop across the core, which is 4~5 times higher than the pressure drop predicted by the drainage relative permeability, was maintained over 120

  20. Quantifying Evaporation in a Permeable Pavement System

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies quantifying evaporation from permeable pavement systems are limited to a few laboratory studies and one field application. This research quantifies evaporation for a larger-scale field application by measuring the water balance from lined permeable pavement sections. Th...

  1. Optical, electrical and ac conductivity measurements of nonlinear optical Dimethylaminomethylphthalimide doped with cadmium chloride single crystal for nano applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramani, K.; Joseph, P. S.; Shankar, G.

    2013-07-01

    Single crystals of Dimethylaminomethylphthalimide cadmium chloride (DAMPCC) were grown by a slow evaporation technique. The unit cell parameters and crystal structure were measured by the powder X-ray diffraction analysis. The modes of vibrations of different molecular groups present in the DAMPCC crystal have been identified by FTIR spectral analysis. The UV-vis-NIR spectral analysis is used to study the optical behaviors like absorption and transmission properties of the crystal. The diffuse reflectance spectrum in absorption studies is calculated. The optical band gap of the DAMPCC crystal is calculated to be cut off wavelength 360 nm at photon energy 4.772 eV. The optical conductivity, electrical conductivity and ac conductivity are also calculated. Finally the nonlinear optics (NLO) property of DAMPCC crystal was confirmed by second harmonic generation (SHG) test using the Nd:YAG laser of fundamental wavelength 1064 nm.

  2. Evaluation of the electrode performance for PAFC by using acid absorption, acceleration and ac-impedance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chang-Soo; Song, Rak-Hyun; Choi, Byung-Woo

    1996-12-31

    In PAFC, the degradation on cathode electrode caused by carbon corrosion, platinum dissolution and growth is especially severe. An acceleration test is a good technique for evaluating the degradation of electrode performance, because it does not need long time. Coleman et al used thermal cycling and on-off cycling as an acceleration test. Song et al showed that hydrogen shortage decreased the electrode performance more rapidly than that of air shortage in gas shortage test. Honji et al reported that the rate of coarsening of Pt particle is rapid in open circuit potential and this is one of major causes on the performance degradation of electrode. The cathode performance has been studied by using acid absorption, acceleration and ac-impedance measurements as functions of the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) contents and sintering temperatures of the electrode.

  3. Microfabricated AC impedance sensor

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter; Ackler, Harold D.; Becker, Frederick; Boser, Bernhard E.; Eldredge, Adam B.; Fuller, Christopher K.; Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Hamilton, Julie K.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Wang, Xiao-Bo

    2002-01-01

    A microfabricated instrument for detecting and identifying cells and other particles based on alternating current (AC) impedance measurements. The microfabricated AC impedance sensor includes two critical elements: 1) a microfluidic chip, preferably of glass substrates, having at least one microchannel therein and with electrodes patterned on both substrates, and 2) electrical circuits that connect to the electrodes on the microfluidic chip and detect signals associated with particles traveling down the microchannels. These circuits enable multiple AC impedance measurements of individual particles at high throughput rates with sufficient resolution to identify different particle and cell types as appropriate for environmental detection and clinical diagnostic applications.

  4. Size- and composition-dependent radio frequency magnetic permeability of iron oxide nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hongseok; Liu, Xiyu; Paik, Taejong; Palanisamy, Duraivelan; Kim, Jungkwun; Vogel, William D; Viescas, Arthur J; Chen, Jun; Papaefthymiou, Georgia C; Kikkawa, James M; Allen, Mark G; Murray, Christopher B

    2014-12-23

    We investigate the size- and composition-dependent ac magnetic permeability of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals for radio frequency (RF) applications. The nanocrystals are obtained through high-temperature decomposition synthesis, and their stoichiometry is determined by Mössbauer spectroscopy. Two sets of oxides are studied: (a) as-synthesized magnetite-rich and (b) aged maghemite nanocrystals. All nanocrystalline samples are confirmed to be in the superparamagnetic state at room temperature by SQUID magnetometry. Through the one-turn inductor method, the ac magnetic properties of the nanocrystalline oxides are characterized. In magnetite-rich iron oxide nanocrystals, size-dependent magnetic permeability is not observed, while maghemite iron oxide nanocrystals show clear size dependence. The inductance, resistance, and quality factor of hand-wound inductors with a superparamagnetic composite core are measured. The superparamagnetic nanocrystals are successfully embedded into hand-wound inductors to function as inductor cores.

  5. Size- and Composition-Dependent Radio Frequency Magnetic Permeability of Iron Oxide Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, H; Liu, XY; Paik, T; Palanisamy, D; Kim, J; Vogel, WD; Viescas, AJ; Chen, J; Papaefthymiou, GC; Kikkawa, JM; Allen, MG; Murray, CB

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the size- and composition-dependent ac magnetic permeability of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals for radio frequency (RF) applications. The nanocrystals are obtained through high-temperature decomposition synthesis, and their stoichiometry is determined by Mossbauer spectroscopy. Two sets of oxides are studied: (a) as-synthesized magnetite-rich and (b) aged maghemite nanocrystals. All nanocrystalline samples are confirmed to be in the superparamagnetic state at room temperature by SQUID magnetometry. Through the one-turn inductor method, the ac magnetic properties of the nanocrystalline oxides are characterized. In magnetite-rich iron oxide nanocrystals, size-dependent magnetic permeability is not observed, while maghemite iron oxide nanocrystals show clear size dependence. The inductance, resistance, and quality factor of hand-wound inductors with a superparamagnetic composite core are measured. The superparamagnetic nanocrystals are successfully embedded into hand-wound inductors to function as inductor cores.

  6. AC heat capacities of κ-(BEDT-TTF)2Cu2(CN)3 measured by microchip calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraoka, Y.; Yamashita, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Nakazawa, Y.

    2011-09-01

    Thermodynamic measurements of an organic spin liquid compound of κ-(BEDT-TTF)2Cu2(CN)3 where BEDT-TTF is bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene were performed by the ac calorimetry technique using a microchip device of TCG3880. This technique is effective to measure relative temperature and magnetic-field dependences of heat capacity for tiny single crystal samples less than 1μg. Broad hump structures in Cp vs T which are known as so-called 6 K anomaly were observed in κ-(BEDT-TTF)2Cu2(CN)3 and its deuterated compound. The hump temperatures are evaluated as 5.7 K in both compounds. This result demonstrates that the TCG3880 is useful for performing thermodynamic investigations of such kind of organic charge transfer complexes with much reduced sample quantity than the conventional techniques and that the existence of hump structure is intrinsic for κ-(BEDT-TTF)2Cu2(CN)3. The in-plane angular dependence of the magnetic field of 7 T applied parallel to the two dimensional layer is also studied and absence of in-plane anisotropy of the hump structure is discussed in both pristine and deuterated compounds.

  7. Nitrogen Transformations in Three Types of Permeable Pavement

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2009, USEPA constructed a 0.4-ha (1-ac) parking lot at the Edison Environmental Center in Edison, NJ, that incorporated three different permeable pavement types - permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP), pervious concrete (PC), and porous asphalt (PA). The driving lanes...

  8. Estimation of Density of Localized States in Amorphous Se80Te20 and Se80Te10M10 (M = Cd, In, Sb) Alloys Using AC Conductivity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandel, N.; Mehta, N.; Kumar, A.

    2015-08-01

    The ac conductivity of amorphous Se80Te20 (a-Se80Te20) and amorphous Se80Te10M10 (a-Se80Te10M10) alloys has been measured as a function of temperature and frequency in a low-temperature regime. An analysis of the experimental data confirms that ac conductivity is reasonably well interpreted by the Austin-Mott model. The density of localized states was determined in the low-temperature region from 201 K to 280 K. Possible explanations of "metal-induced effects" on the conduction mechanism of a-Se80Te20 alloy are discussed.

  9. A single-shot spatial chirp method for measuring initial AC conductivity evolution of femtosecond laser pulse excited warm dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.; Hering, P.; Brown, S. B.; Curry, C.; Tsui, Y. Y.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-09-19

    To study the rapid evolution of AC conductivity from ultrafast laser excited warm dense matter (WDM), a spatial chirp single-shot method is developed utilizing a crossing angle pump-probe configuration. The pump beam is shaped individually in two spatial dimensions so that it can provide both sufficient laser intensity to excite the material to warm dense matter state and a uniform time window of up to 1 ps with sub-100 fs FWHM temporal resolution. Here, temporal evolution of AC conductivity in laser excited warm dense gold was also measured.

  10. A single-shot spatial chirp method for measuring initial AC conductivity evolution of femtosecond laser pulse excited warm dense matter.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Hering, P; Brown, S B; Curry, C; Tsui, Y Y; Glenzer, S H

    2016-11-01

    To study the rapid evolution of AC conductivity from ultrafast laser excited warm dense matter (WDM), a spatial chirp single-shot method is developed utilizing a crossing angle pump-probe configuration. The pump beam is shaped individually in two spatial dimensions so that it can provide both sufficient laser intensity to excite the material to warm dense matter state and a uniform time window of up to 1 ps with sub-100 fs FWHM temporal resolution. Temporal evolution of AC conductivity in laser excited warm dense gold was also measured.

  11. Stainless Steel Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Buchenauer, Dean A.; Karnesky, Richard A.

    2015-09-01

    An understanding of the behavior of hydrogen isotopes in materials is critical to predicting tritium transport in structural metals (at high pressure), estimating tritium losses during production (fission environment), and predicting in-vessel inventory for future fusion devices (plasma driven permeation). Current models often assume equilibrium diffusivity and solubility for a class of materials (e.g. stainless steels or aluminum alloys), neglecting trapping effects or, at best, considering a single population of trapping sites. Permeation and trapping studies of the particular castings and forgings enable greater confidence and reduced margins in the models. For FY15, we have continued our investigation of the role of ferrite in permeation for steels of interest to GTS, through measurements of the duplex steel 2507. We also initiated an investigation of the permeability in work hardened materials, to follow up on earlier observations of unusual permeability in a particular region of 304L forgings. Samples were prepared and characterized for ferrite content and coated with palladium to prevent oxidation. Issues with the poor reproducibility of measurements at low permeability were overcome, although the techniques in use are tedious. Funding through TPBAR and GTS were secured for a research grade quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and replacement turbo pumps, which should improve the fidelity and throughput of measurements in FY16.

  12. A simple AC calorimeter for specific heat measurement of liquids confined in porous materials: A study of hydrated Vycor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetti, Marco; Zanotti, Jean-Marc

    2016-09-01

    Nanometric confinement of fluids in porous media is a classical way to stabilize metastable states. Calorimetric studies give insight on the behavior of confined liquids compared to bulk liquids. We have developed and built a simple quasi-adiabatic AC calorimeter for heat capacity measurement of confined liquids in porous media in a temperature range between 150 K and 360 K. Taking the fully hydrated porous medium as a reference, we address the thermal behavior of water as a monolayer on the surface of a porous silica glass (Vycor). For temperature ranging between 160 K and 325 K, this interfacial water shows a surprisingly large heat capacity. We describe the interfacial Hbond network in the framework of a mean field percolation model, to show that at 160 K interfacial water experiences a transformation from low density amorphous ice to a heterogeneous system where transient low and high density water patches coexist. The fraction of each species is controlled by the temperature. We identify the large entropy of the interfacial water molecules as the cause of this behaviour.

  13. Comparison of Northern Ireland radon maps based on indoor radon measurements and geology with maps derived by predictive modelling of airborne radiometric and ground permeability data.

    PubMed

    Appleton, J D; Miles, J C H; Young, M

    2011-03-15

    Publicly available information about radon potential in Northern Ireland is currently based on indoor radon results averaged over 1-km grid squares, an approach that does not take into account the geological origin of the radon. This study describes a spatially more accurate estimate of the radon potential of Northern Ireland using an integrated radon potential mapping method based on indoor radon measurements and geology that was originally developed for mapping radon potential in England and Wales. A refinement of this method was also investigated using linear regression analysis of a selection of relevant airborne and soil geochemical parameters from the Tellus Project. The most significant independent variables were found to be eU, a parameter derived from airborne gamma spectrometry measurements of radon decay products in the top layer of soil and exposed bedrock, and the permeability of the ground. The radon potential map generated from the Tellus data agrees in many respects with the map based on indoor radon data and geology but there are several areas where radon potential predicted from the airborne radiometric and permeability data is substantially lower. This under-prediction could be caused by the radon concentration being lower in the top 30 cm of the soil than at greater depth, because of the loss of radon from the surface rocks and soils to air.

  14. Measurements of variability in biofilm thickness in porous media and implications for the predictions of permeability and dispersivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, S.; Sleep, B. E.

    2012-12-01

    The effects of biofilm growth on the flow and transport in porous media were investigated in an anaerobic two-dimensional coarse sand-filled cell. The cell was inoculated with a mixed microbial culture fed methanol. Biomass concentrations attached to the sand and suspended in the water in the cell were determined by protein analysis. The biofilm thickness on individual sand grains was investigated with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The biofilm thickness for individual sand grains had a range of mean values from 59 to 316 microns in this study. To investigate the implications of the variability of biofilm thicknesses, four models were used to calculate reductions in porous media permeability as a function of biofilm thickness. Taylor's model (Taylor et al., 1990) predicted a reduction by a factor ranging from 14 to 5000 from minimum to maximum mean biofilm thickness. Vandevivere's Model (Vandevivere et al.,1995) predicted a reduction in permeability by a factor ranging from 769 to 3846 from minimum to maximum mean biofilm thickness. Seki's model (Seki and Miyazaki, 2001) could not be applied in this study. Clement's model (Clement et al., 1996) predicted a reduction ranging from 1 to 1.14 over the range of biomass levels observed in the cell. To investigate the implications of the variability of biofilm thicknesses for dispersivity, Taylor and Jaffe's models (1990) were used to calculate increase in porous media dispersivity as a function of biofilm thickness. The model predicted an increase in dispersivity by a factor ranging from 20 to 1883 by a simplified dispersivity model and a factor ranging from 4 to 85 by a dispersivity model based on a cut-and-random-rejoin type model of pore geometry from minimum to maximum mean biofilm thickness. Acknowledgements Funding for this research from US Dupont Company, and also from NSFC40872155, 40725010 and 41030746 is gratefully acknowledged. References: Clement, T.P., Hooker, B.S. and Skeen, R.S., 1996

  15. Fine-scale in situ measurement of riverbed nitrate production and consumption in an armored permeable riverbed.

    PubMed

    Lansdown, Katrina; Heppell, Catherine M; Dossena, Matteo; Ullah, Sami; Heathwaite, A Louise; Binley, Andrew; Zhang, Hao; Trimmer, Mark

    2014-04-15

    Alteration of the global nitrogen cycle by man has increased nitrogen loading in waterways considerably, often with harmful consequences for aquatic ecosystems. Dynamic redox conditions within riverbeds support a variety of nitrogen transformations, some of which can attenuate this burden. In reality, however, assessing the importance of processes besides perhaps denitrification is difficult, due to a sparseness of data, especially in situ, where sediment structure and hydrologic pathways are intact. Here we show in situ within a permeable riverbed, through injections of (15)N-labeled substrates, that nitrate can be either consumed through denitrification or produced through nitrification, at a previously unresolved fine (centimeter) scale. Nitrification and denitrification occupy different niches in the riverbed, with denitrification occurring across a broad chemical gradient while nitrification is restricted to more oxic sediments. The narrow niche width for nitrification is in effect a break point, with the switch from activity "on" to activity "off" regulated by interactions between subsurface chemistry and hydrology. Although maxima for denitrification and nitrification occur at opposing ends of a chemical gradient, high potentials for both nitrate production and consumption can overlap when groundwater upwelling is strong.

  16. Sizing nanomaterials in bio-fluids by cFRAP enables protein aggregation measurements and diagnosis of bio-barrier permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Ranhua; Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn E.; Broos, Katleen; Brans, Toon; van Wonterghem, Elien; Libert, Claude; Demeester, Jo; de Smedt, Stefaan C.; Braeckmans, Kevin

    2016-09-01

    Sizing nanomaterials in complex biological fluids, such as blood, remains a great challenge in spite of its importance for a wide range of biomedical applications. In drug delivery, for instance, it is essential that aggregation of protein-based drugs is avoided as it may alter their efficacy or elicit immune responses. Similarly it is of interest to determine which size of molecules can pass through biological barriers in vivo to diagnose pathologies, such as sepsis. Here, we report on continuous fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (cFRAP) as a analytical method enabling size distribution measurements of nanomaterials (1-100 nm) in undiluted biological fluids. We demonstrate that cFRAP allows to measure protein aggregation in human serum and to determine the permeability of intestinal and vascular barriers in vivo. cFRAP is a new analytical technique that paves the way towards exciting new applications that benefit from nanomaterial sizing in bio-fluids.

  17. Sizing nanomaterials in bio-fluids by cFRAP enables protein aggregation measurements and diagnosis of bio-barrier permeability

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Ranhua; Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn E.; Broos, Katleen; Brans, Toon; Van Wonterghem, Elien; Libert, Claude; Demeester, Jo; De Smedt, Stefaan C.; Braeckmans, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Sizing nanomaterials in complex biological fluids, such as blood, remains a great challenge in spite of its importance for a wide range of biomedical applications. In drug delivery, for instance, it is essential that aggregation of protein-based drugs is avoided as it may alter their efficacy or elicit immune responses. Similarly it is of interest to determine which size of molecules can pass through biological barriers in vivo to diagnose pathologies, such as sepsis. Here, we report on continuous fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (cFRAP) as a analytical method enabling size distribution measurements of nanomaterials (1–100 nm) in undiluted biological fluids. We demonstrate that cFRAP allows to measure protein aggregation in human serum and to determine the permeability of intestinal and vascular barriers in vivo. cFRAP is a new analytical technique that paves the way towards exciting new applications that benefit from nanomaterial sizing in bio-fluids. PMID:27653841

  18. Permeability of cork to gases.

    PubMed

    Faria, David P; Fonseca, Ana L; Pereira, Helen; Teodoro, Orlando M N D

    2011-04-27

    The permeability of gases through uncompressed cork was investigated. More than 100 samples were assessed from different plank qualities to provide a picture of the permeability distribution. A novel technique based on a mass spectrometer leak detector was used to directly measure the helium flow through the central area of small disks 10 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick. The permeability for nitrogen, oxygen, and other gases was measured by the pressure rise technique. Boiled and nonboiled cork samples from different sections were evaluated. An asymmetric frequency distribution ranging 3 orders of magnitude (roughly from 1 to 1000 μmol/(cm·atm·day)) for selected samples without macroscopic defects was found, having a peak below 100 μmol/(cm·atm·day). Correlation was found between density and permeability: higher density samples tend to show lower permeability. However, boiled cork showed a mean lower permeability despite having a lower density. The transport mechanism of gases through cork was also examined. Calculations suggest that gases permeate uncompressed cork mainly through small channels between cells under a molecular flow regime. The diameter of such channels was estimated to be in the range of 100 nm, in agreement with the plasmodesmata size in the cork cell walls.

  19. Experimental measurements of permeability evolution during triaxial compression of initially intact crystalline rocks and implications for fluid flow in fault zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, T. M.; Faulkner, D. R.

    2008-11-01

    Detailed experimental studies of the development of permeability of crustal rock during deformation are essential in helping to understand fault mechanics and constrain larger-scale models that predict bulk fluid flow within the crust. Permeability is particularly enhanced in the damage zone of faults, where microfracture damage accumulates under stress less than that required for macroscopic failure. Experiments performed in the prefailure region can provide data directly applicable to these zones of microfracture damage surrounding faults. The strength, permeability, and pore fluid volume evolution of initially intact crystalline rocks (Cerro Cristales granodiorite and Westerly granite) under increasing differential load leading to macroscopic failure has been determined at water pore pressures of 50 MPa and varying effective pressures from 10 to 50 MPa. Permeability is seen to increase by up to, and over, 2 orders of magnitude prior to macroscopic failure, with the greatest increase seen at lowest effective pressures. Postfailure permeability is shown to be over 3 orders of magnitude higher than initial intact permeabilities and approaches the lower limit of predicted in situ bulk crustal permeabilities. Increasing amplitude cyclic loading tests show permeability-stress hysteresis, with high permeabilities maintained as differential stress is reduced and the greatest permeability increases are seen between 90 and 99% of the failure stress. Prefailure permeabilities are nearly 7 to 9 orders of magnitude lower than that predicted by some high-pressure diffusive models suggesting that if these models are correct, microfracture matrix flow cannot dominate, and that bulk fluid flow must be dominated by larger-scale structures such as macrofractures. We present a model, based on our data, in which the permeability of a highly stressed fault tip process zone in low-permeability crystalline rocks increases by more than 2 orders of magnitude. Stress reduction related to

  20. Examination of Humidity Effects on Measured Thickness and Interfacial Phenomena of Exfoliated Graphene on SiO2 via AC-AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinkins, Katherine; Camacho, Jorge; Farina, Lee; Wu, Yan

    2015-03-01

    Tapping (AC) mode Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is commonly used to determine the thickness of graphene samples. However, AFM measurements have been shown to be sensitive to environmental conditions such as adsorbed water, in turn dependent on relative humidity (RH). In the present study, AC-AFM is used to measure the thickness and loss tangent of exfoliated graphene on silicon dioxide (SiO2) as RH is increased from 10% to 80%. We show that the measured thickness of graphene is dependent on RH. Loss tangent is an AFM imaging technique that interprets the phase information as a relationship between the stored and dissipated energy in the tip-sample interaction. This study demonstrates the loss tangent of the graphene and oxide regions are both affected by humidity, with generally higher loss tangent for graphene than SiO2. As RH increases, we observe the loss tangent of both materials approaches the same value. We hypothesize that there is a layer of water trapped between the graphene and SiO2 substrate to explain this observation. Using this interpretation, the loss tangent images also indicate movement and change in this trapped water layer as RH increases, which impacts the measured thickness of graphene using AC-AFM.

  1. Positron emission tomographic measurement of cerebral blood flow and permeability-surface area product of water using (/sup 15/O)water and (/sup 11/C)butanol

    SciTech Connect

    Herscovitch, P.; Raichle, M.E.; Kilbourn, M.R.; Welch, M.J.

    1987-10-01

    We have previously adapted Kety's tissue autoradiographic method for measuring regional CBF in laboratory animals to the measurement of CBF in humans with positron emission tomography (PET) and H/sub 2/(/sup 15/)O. Because this model assumes diffusion equilibrium between tissue and venous blood, the use of a diffusion-limited tracer, such as H/sub 2/(/sup 15/)O, may lead to an underestimation of CBF. We therefore validated the use of (/sup 11/C)butanol as an alternative freely diffusible tracer for PET. We then used it in humans to determine the underestimation of CBF that occurs with H/sub 2/(/sup 15/)O, and thereby were able to calculate the extraction Ew and permeability-surface area product PSw of H/sub 2/(/sup 15/)O. Measurements of the permeability of rhesus monkey brain to (/sup 11/C)butanol, obtained by means of an intracarotid injection, external detection technique, demonstrated that this tracer is freely diffusible up to a CBF of at least 170 ml/min-100 g. CBF measured in baboons with the PET autoradiographic method and (/sup 11/C)butanol was then compared with CBF measured in the same animals with a standard residue detection method. An excellent correspondence was obtained between both of these measurements. Finally, paired PET measurements of CBF were made with both H/sub 2/(/sup 15/)O and (/sup 11/C)butanol in 17 normal human subjects. Average global CBF was significantly greater when measured with (/sup 11/C)butanol (53.1 ml/min-100 g) than with H/sub 2/(/sup 15/)O (44.4 ml/min-100 g). Average global Ew was 0.84 and global PSw was 104 ml/min-100 g. Regional measurements showed a linear relationship between local PSw and CBF, while Ew was relatively uniform throughout the brain. Simulations were used to determine the potential error associated with the use of an incorrect value for the brain-blood partition coefficient for (/sup 11/C)butanol and to calculate the effect of tissue heterogeneity and errors in flow measurement on the calculation of PSw.

  2. Permeability of normal versus carious dentin.

    PubMed

    Pashley, E L; Talman, R; Horner, J A; Pashley, D H

    1991-10-01

    Although a number of reports have been published demonstrating that carious dentin is less permeable than normal dentin, these reports have been qualitative rather than quantitative. The purpose of this in vitro study was to apply a quantitative technique to the study of the permeability of carious human teeth before and after excavation, before and after removal of the smear layer and before and after preparation of a control cavity of similar size and depth in normal dentin subjected to the same measurements, for comparative purposes. Dentin permeability was measured as a hydraulic conductance. The permeability values measured at each step in the protocol were expressed as a percent of the maximum permeability of both cavities, permitting each tooth the serve as its own control. Carious lesions exhibited a slight degree of permeability (2.3 +/- 0.6% of controls) which remained unchanged after excavation of the lesions. Removal of the smear layer in the excavated carious lesions increased the permeability significantly to 6.9 +/- 3.2%. Preparation of a control cavity of the same area and depth increased the permeability slightly. Removal of its smear layer increased the permeability of the dentin 91%. These results confirm previous qualitative studies that carious dentin, even after excavation and removal of the smear layer has a very low permeability.

  3. Anisotropic hydraulic permeability in compressed articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Reynaud, Boris; Quinn, Thomas M

    2006-01-01

    The extent to which articular cartilage hydraulic permeability is anisotropic is largely unknown, despite its importance for understanding mechanisms of joint lubrication, load bearing, transport phenomena, and mechanotransduction. We developed and applied new techniques for the direct measurement of hydraulic permeability within statically compressed adult bovine cartilage explant disks, dissected such that disk axes were perpendicular to the articular surface. Applied pressure gradients were kept small to minimize flow-induced matrix compaction, and fluid outflows were measured by observation of a meniscus in a glass capillary under a microscope. Explant disk geometry under radially unconfined axial compression was measured by direct microscopic observation. Pressure, flow, and geometry data were input to a finite element model where hydraulic permeabilities in the disk axial and radial directions were determined. At less than 10% static compression, near free-swelling conditions, hydraulic permeability was nearly isotropic, with values corresponding to those of previous studies. With increasing static compression, hydraulic permeability decreased, but the radially directed permeability decreased more dramatically than the axially directed permeability such that strong anisotropy (a 10-fold difference between axial and radial directions) in the hydraulic permeability tensor was evident for static compression of 20-40%. Results correspond well with predictions of a previous microstructurally-based model for effects of tissue mechanical deformations on glycosaminoglycan architecture and cartilage hydraulic permeability. Findings inform understanding of structure-function relationships in cartilage matrix, and suggest several biomechanical roles for compression-induced anisotropic hydraulic permeability in articular cartilage.

  4. Engineered Trehalose Permeable to Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Abazari, Alireza; Meimetis, Labros G; Budin, Ghyslain; Bale, Shyam Sundhar; Weissleder, Ralph; Toner, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Trehalose is a naturally occurring disaccharide which is associated with extraordinary stress-tolerance capacity in certain species of unicellular and multicellular organisms. In mammalian cells, presence of intra- and extracellular trehalose has been shown to confer improved tolerance against freezing and desiccation. Since mammalian cells do not synthesize nor import trehalose, the development of novel methods for efficient intracellular delivery of trehalose has been an ongoing investigation. Herein, we studied the membrane permeability of engineered lipophilic derivatives of trehalose. Trehalose conjugated with 6 acetyl groups (trehalose hexaacetate or 6-O-Ac-Tre) demonstrated superior permeability in rat hepatocytes compared with regular trehalose, trehalose diacetate (2-O-Ac-Tre) and trehalose tetraacetate (4-O-Ac-Tre). Once in the cell, intracellular esterases hydrolyzed the 6-O-Ac-Tre molecules, releasing free trehalose into the cytoplasm. The total concentration of intracellular trehalose (plus acetylated variants) reached as high as 10 fold the extracellular concentration of 6-O-Ac-Tre, attaining concentrations suitable for applications in biopreservation. To describe this accumulation phenomenon, a diffusion-reaction model was proposed and the permeability and reaction kinetics of 6-O-Ac-Tre were determined by fitting to experimental data. Further studies suggested that the impact of the loading and the presence of intracellular trehalose on cellular viability and function were negligible. Engineering of trehalose chemical structure rather than manipulating the cell, is an innocuous, cell-friendly method for trehalose delivery, with demonstrated potential for trehalose loading in different types of cells and cell lines, and can facilitate the wide-spread application of trehalose as an intracellular protective agent in biopreservation studies.

  5. Measurement of absolute cell volume, osmotic membrane water permeability, and refractive index of transmembrane water and solute flux by digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, Daniel; Kühn, Jonas; Jourdain, Pascal; Depeursinge, Christian; Magistretti, Pierre J.; Marquet, Pierre

    2013-03-01

    A dual-wavelength digital holographic microscope to measure absolute volume of living cells is proposed. The optical setup allows us to reconstruct two quantitative phase contrast images at two different wavelengths from a single hologram acquisition. When adding the absorbing dye fast green FCF as a dispersive agent to the extracellular medium, cellular thickness can be univocally determined in the full field of view. In addition to the absolute cell volume, the method can be applied to derive important biophysical parameters of living cells including osmotic membrane water permeability coefficient and the integral intracellular refractive index (RI). Further, the RI of transmembrane flux can be determined giving an indication about the nature of transported solutes. The proposed method is applied to cultured human embryonic kidney cells, Chinese hamster ovary cells, human red blood cells, mouse cortical astrocytes, and neurons.

  6. Permeability evolution of shale during spontaneous imbibition

    DOE PAGES

    Chakraborty, N.; Karpyn, Z. T.; Liu, S.; ...

    2017-01-05

    Shales have small pore and throat sizes ranging from nano to micron scales, low porosity and limited permeability. The poor permeability and complex pore connectivity of shales pose technical challenges to (a) understanding flow and transport mechanisms in such systems and, (b) in predicting permeability changes under dynamic saturation conditions. This paper presents quantitative experimental evidence of the migration of water through a generic shale core plug using micro CT imaging. In addition, in-situ measurements of gas permeability were performed during counter-current spontaneous imbibition of water in nano-darcy permeability Marcellus and Haynesville core plugs. It was seen that water blocksmore » severely reduced the effective permeability of the core plugs, leading to losses of up to 99.5% of the initial permeability in experiments lasting 30 days. There was also evidence of clay swelling which further hindered gas flow. When results from this study were compared with similar counter-current gas permeability experiments reported in the literature, the initial (base) permeability of the rock was found to be a key factor in determining the time evolution of effective gas permeability during spontaneous imbibition. With time, a recovery of effective permeability was seen in the higher permeability rocks, while becoming progressively detrimental and irreversible in tighter rocks. Finally, these results suggest that matrix permeability of ultra-tight rocks is susceptible to water damage following hydraulic fracturing stimulation and, while shut-in/soaking time helps clearing-up fractures from resident fluid, its effect on the adjacent matrix permeability could be detrimental.« less

  7. Mutual-induction measurement of the AC penetration depth in HTSC's theory of calibration function for flat samples under axial symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klupsch, Th.; Zeisberger, M.

    1995-02-01

    A contribution to find optimum mutual-induction arrangements for investigating the linear AC response properties of the pinned vortices in the mixed state of HTSC is given. In particular, the complex calibration function (mutual-induction coefficient L12 as a function of the complex AC penetration depth λ) is analyzed, strictly axial symmetry and flat sample geometries provided (finite disk and its limiting case of infinite platelet) assuming the radius of at least one induction coil is smaller than the sample radius. Because the sample is positioned transverse to the AC induction B, the mutual inductance becomes, in general, strongly modified by distortions of B around the sample, which results in a strong dependence of L12(λ) upon certain geometry parameters and an enhanced sensitivity to λ for selected |λ| intervals. The analysis is based upon powerful analytic approximation formulae for elementary arrangements derived in a separate paper. Also, formulae to estimate the errors from irregular (eccentric) sample shapes, from the field enhancement near the disk edges as well as from treating the finite-disk problem in the limit of an infinite platelet are given. Except for ultrathin films with thickness much smaller than |λ|, arrangements with both the coils at the same sample side and with the loop radii sufficiently smaller than the disk radius are favored for measurements of small λ with |D/λ| ≳ 1 ( D is the sample thickness), which also includes the possibility of a λ measurement in the bulk limit | D/λ| → ∞.

  8. EPA Permeable Surface Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA recognizes permeable surfaces as an effective post-construction infiltration-based Best Management Practice to mitigate the adverse effects of stormwater runoff. The professional user community conceptually embraces permeable surfaces as a tool for making runoff more closely...

  9. Performance measurements and operational characteristics of the Storage Tek ACS 4400 tape library with the Cray Y-MP EL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, Gary; Ranade, Sanjay

    1993-01-01

    With over 5000 units sold, the Storage Tek Automated Cartridge System (ACS) 4400 tape library is currently the most popular large automated tape library. Based on 3480/90 tape technology, the library is used as the migration device ('nearline' storage) in high-performance mass storage systems. In its maximum configuration, one ACS 4400 tape library houses sixteen 3480/3490 tape drives and is capable of holding approximately 6000 cartridge tapes. The maximum storage capacity of one library using 3480 tapes is 1.2 TB and the advertised aggregate I/O rate is about 24 MB/s. This paper reports on an extensive set of tests designed to accurately assess the performance capabilities and operational characteristics of one STK ACS 4400 tape library holding approximately 5200 cartridge tapes and configured with eight 3480 tape drives. A Cray Y-MP EL2-256 was configured as its host machine. More than 40,000 tape jobs were run in a variety of conditions to gather data in the areas of channel speed characteristics, robotics motion, time taped mounts, and timed tape reads and writes.

  10. Measurement of submilliwatt, picosecond terahertz emission from a femtosecond-laser-pumped solid-state dc to ac radiation converter based on a ZnSe crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Yugami, Noboru; Ohata, Nobuo; Yaegashi, Kenta; Kawanago, Hiroshi

    2006-11-15

    We measured the terahertz pulse emission from a femtosecond-laser-pumped solid-state dc to ac radiation converter using a 150 fs Ti:sapphire laser pulse for dense plasma diagnostics. The laser-produced ionization front was directly modulated from a periodic electrostatic field to pulsed emission. The central frequency of the emission was measured to be 0.13 THz having a bandwidth of 0.1 THz and a peak power of 0.2 mW. This emission source is suitable for use in various novel diagnostic techniques, such as dense plasma diagnostics.

  11. Relative permeability through fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Diomampo, Gracel, P.

    2001-08-01

    The mechanism of two-phase flow through fractures is of importance in understanding many geologic processes. Currently, two-phase flow through fractures is still poorly understood. In this study, nitrogen-water experiments were done on both smooth and rough parallel plates to determine the governing flow mechanism for fractures and the appropriate methodology for data analysis. The experiments were done using a glass plate to allow visualization of flow. Digital video recording allowed instantaneous measurement of pressure, flow rate and saturation. Saturation was computed using image analysis techniques. The experiments showed that gas and liquid phases flow through fractures in nonuniform separate channels. The localized channels change with time as each phase path undergoes continues breaking and reforming due to invasion of the other phase. The stability of the phase paths is dependent on liquid and gas flow rate ratio. This mechanism holds true for over a range of saturation for both smooth and rough fractures. In imbibition for rough-walled fractures, another mechanism similar to wave-like flow in pipes was also observed. The data from the experiments were analyzed using Darcy's law and using the concept of friction factor and equivalent Reynold's number for two-phase flow. For both smooth- and rough-walled fractures a clear relationship between relative permeability and saturation was seen. The calculated relative permeability curves follow Corey-type behavior and can be modeled using Honarpour expressions. The sum of the relative permeabilities is not equal one, indicating phase interference. The equivalent homogeneous single-phase approach did not give satisfactory representation of flow through fractures. The graphs of experimentally derived friction factor with the modified Reynolds number do not reveal a distinctive linear relationship.

  12. Tevatron AC dipole system

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.; Kopp, S.E.; Jansson, A.; Syphers, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The AC dipole is an oscillating dipole magnet which can induce large amplitude oscillations without the emittance growth and decoherence. These properties make it a good tool to measure optics of a hadron synchrotron. The vertical AC dipole for the Tevatron is powered by an inexpensive high power audio amplifier since its operating frequency is approximately 20 kHz. The magnet is incorporated into a parallel resonant system to maximize the current. The use of a vertical pinger magnet which has been installed in the Tevatron made the cost relatively inexpensive. Recently, the initial system was upgraded with a more powerful amplifier and oscillation amplitudes up to 2-3{sigma} were achieved with the 980 GeV proton beam. This paper discusses details of the Tevatron AC dipole system and also shows its test results.

  13. Tilted Magnetic Levitation Enables Measurement of the Complete Range of Densities of Materials with Low Magnetic Permeability.

    PubMed

    Nemiroski, Alex; Soh, Siowling; Kwok, Sen Wai; Yu, Hai-Dong; Whitesides, George M

    2016-02-03

    Magnetic levitation (MagLev) of diamagnetic or weakly paramagnetic materials suspended in a paramagnetic solution in a magnetic field gradient provides a simple method to measure the density of small samples of solids or liquids. One major limitation of this method, thus far, has been an inability to measure or manipulate materials outside of a narrow range of densities (0.8 g/cm(3) < ρ < 2.3 g/cm(3)) that are close in density to the suspending, aqueous medium. This paper explores a simple method-"tilted MagLev"-to increase the range of densities that can be levitated magnetically. Tilting the MagLev device relative to the gravitational vector enables the magnetic force to be decreased (relative to the magnetic force) along the axis of measurement. This approach enables many practical measurements over the entire range of densities observed in matter at ambient conditions-from air bubbles (ρ ≈ 0) to osmium and iridium (ρ ≈ 23 g/cm(3)). The ability to levitate, simultaneously, objects with a broad range of different densities provides an operationally simple method that may find application to forensic science (e.g., for identifying the composition of miscellaneous objects or powders), industrial manufacturing (e.g., for quality control of parts), or resource-limited settings (e.g., for identifying and separating small particles of metals and alloys).

  14. A paired comparison between human skin and hairless guinea pig skin in vitro permeability and lag time measurements for 6 industrial chemicals.

    PubMed

    Frasch, H Frederick; Barbero, Ana M

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to measure and compare permeability coefficients (k(p)) and lag times (tau) in human skin and hairless guinea pig (HGP) skin. Paired experiments employed heat-separated epidermal membranes from human and HGP sources mounted on static in vitro diffusion cells. Infinite-dose, saturated aqueous solutions of 6 industrial chemicals were used as donors: aniline, benzene, 1,2- dichloroethane, diethyl phthalate, naphthalene, and tetrachloroethylene. No significant differences were found between human and HGP skin for either k(p) or tau for any of these chemicals (p >or= .24). HGP vs. human k(p) measurements, and HGP vs. human tau measurements, were highly correlated. For k(p), the slope of the linear correlation was close to unity (1.080 +/- 0.182) and the intercept close to 0 (0.015 +/- 0. 029 cm/h), with a correlation coefficient (r(2)) = 0.898. For tau, the slope was also close to unity (0.818 +/- 0.030) and the intercept close to 0 (-0.014 +/- 0.023 h), with r(2) = 0.994. These results suggest that HGP skin may serve as an excellent surrogate for human skin in in vitro dermal penetration studies.

  15. Film Permeability Determination Using Static Permeability Cells

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The permeability of tarps to soil fumigant pesticides varies depending on the active ingredient chemical: dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), methyl bromide, chloropicrin, or other. The diffusion rate can be represented by the mass transfer coefficient (MTC).

  16. Pyrotechnic deflagration velocity and permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Begeal, D R; Stanton, P L

    1982-01-01

    Particle size, porosity, and permeability of the reactive material have long been considered to be important factors in propellant burning rates and the deflagration-to-detonation transition in explosives. It is reasonable to assume that these same parameters will also affect the deflagration velocity of pyrotechnics. This report describes an experimental program that addresses the permeability of porous solids (particulate beds), in terms of particle size and porosity, and the relationship between permeability and the behavior of pyrotechnics and explosives. The experimental techniques used to acquire permeability data and to characterize the pyrotechnic burning are discussed. Preliminary data have been obtained on the burning characteristics of titanium hydride/potassium perchlorate (THKP) and boron/calcium chromate (BCCR). With THKP, the velocity of a pressure wave (from hot product gases) in the unburned region shows unsteady behavior which is related to the initial porosity or permeability. Simultaneous measurements with pressure gauges and ion gauges reveal that the pressure wave precedes the burn front. Steady burning of BCCR was observed with pressure gauge diagnostics and with a microwave interferometry technique.

  17. High membrane permeability for melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haijie; Dickson, Eamonn J.; Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Koh, Duk-Su

    2016-01-01

    The pineal gland, an endocrine organ in the brain, synthesizes and secretes the circulating night hormone melatonin throughout the night. The literature states that this hormone is secreted by simple diffusion across the pinealocyte plasma membrane, but a direct quantitative measurement of membrane permeability has not been made. Experiments were designed to compare the cell membrane permeability to three indoleamines: melatonin and its precursors N-acetylserotonin (NAS) and serotonin (5-HT). The three experimental approaches were (1) to measure the concentration of effluxing indoleamines amperometrically in the bath while cells were being dialyzed internally by a patch pipette, (2) to measure the rise of intracellular indoleamine fluorescence as the compound was perfused in the bath, and (3) to measure the rate of quenching of intracellular fura-2 dye fluorescence as indoleamines were perfused in the bath. These measures showed that permeabilities of melatonin and NAS are high (both are uncharged molecules), whereas that for 5-HT (mostly charged) is much lower. Comparisons were made with predictions of solubility-diffusion theory and compounds of known permeability, and a diffusion model was made to simulate all of the measurements. In short, extracellular melatonin equilibrates with the cytoplasm in 3.5 s, has a membrane permeability of ∼1.7 µm/s, and could not be retained in secretory vesicles. Thus, it and NAS will be “secreted” from pineal cells by membrane diffusion. Circumstances are suggested when 5-HT and possibly catecholamines may also appear in the extracellular space passively by membrane diffusion. PMID:26712850

  18. Studying the Variation in Gas Permeability of Porous Building Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, L.; Savidge, C. R.; Hu, L.; Rizzo, D. M.; Hayden, N. J.; Dewoolkar, M.

    2009-12-01

    Understanding permeability of building materials is important for problems involving studies of contaminant transport. Examples include contamination from fire, acid rain, and chemical and biological weapons. Our research investigates the gas permeability of porous building substrates such as concretes, limestones, sandstones, and bricks. Each sample was cored to produce 70 mm (2.75”) diameter cores approximately 75-130 mm (3-5”) tall. The surface gas permeability was measured on the top surface of these specimens using the AutoScan II device manufactured by New England Research, Inc. The measurements were taken along a 3 mm grid producing a map of surface gas permeability. An example map is shown in Figure 1. The macroscopic measurements were performed along the entire cored specimen. A second set of measurements were made on a 5 mm thick slice cut from the top of each specimen to examine whether these measurements compare better with the surface measurements. The macroscopic gas permeability was measured for all specimens using ASTM D 4525. The results are summarized in Table 1. In general, the surface and macroscopic gas permeability measurements (Table 1) compare reasonably well (within one order of magnitude). The permeability of the 5 mm slices is not significantly different from the entire core for the specimens tested. Figure 1. Results of surface permeability mappingof Ohio Sandstone using the AutoScan II device. a) Map of gas permeability b) Range of gas permeability c) Density function of permeability. Table 1. Gas permeability values (mD)

  19. Hydrostatic Pressure Study on 3-K Phase Superconductivity in Sr2RuO4-Ru Eutectic Crystals by AC Magnetic Susceptibility Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaguchi, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Hiromichi; Sakaue, Akira

    2012-12-01

    We have investigated the effect of hydrostatic pressure on 3-K phase superconductivity in Sr2RuO4-Ru eutectic crystals by means of AC magnetic susceptibility measurements. We have found that the application of hydrostatic pressure suppresses the superconducting transition temperature Tc of the 3-K phase with a pressure coefficient of dTc/dP ≈ -0.2 K/GPa, similar to the case of the 1.5-K phase. We have also observed that the effect of hydrostatic pressure on the 3-K phase seems to be elastic whilst that of uniaxial pressure is plastic.

  20. Permeability enhancement by shock cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Luke; Heap, Michael; Reuschlé, Thierry; Baud, Patrick; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2015-04-01

    The permeability of an efficient reservoir, e.g. a geothermal reservoir, should be sufficient to permit the circulation of fluids. Generally speaking, permeability decreases over the life cycle of the geothermal system. As a result, is usually necessary to artificially maintain and enhance the natural permeability of these systems. One of the methods of enhancement -- studied here -- is thermal stimulation (injecting cold water at low pressure). This goal of this method is to encourage new thermal cracks within the reservoir host rocks, thereby increasing reservoir permeability. To investigate the development of thermal microcracking in the laboratory we selected two granites: a fine-grained (Garibaldi Grey granite, grain size = 0.5 mm) and a course-grained granite (Lanhelin granite, grain size = 2 mm). Both granites have an initial porosity of about 1%. Our samples were heated to a range of temperatures (100-1000 °C) and were either cooled slowly (1 °C/min) or shock cooled (100 °C/s). A systematic microstructural (2D crack area density, using standard stereological techniques, and 3D BET specific surface area measurements) and rock physical property (porosity, P-wave velocity, uniaxial compressive strength, and permeability) analysis was undertaken to understand the influence of slow and shock cooling on our reservoir granites. Microstructurally, we observe that the 2D crack surface area per unit volume and the specific surface area increase as a result of thermal stressing, and, for the same maximum temperature, crack surface area is higher in the shock cooled samples. This observation is echoed by our rock physical property measurements: we see greater changes for the shock cooled samples. We can conclude that shock cooling is an extremely efficient method of generating thermal microcracks and modifying rock physical properties. Our study highlights that thermal treatments are likely to be an efficient method for the "matrix" permeability enhancement of

  1. Simultaneous optical and mr imaging of tissue within implanted window chamber: System development and application in measuring vascular permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayegan Salek, Mir Farrokh

    Simultaneous optical imaging and MRI of a dorsal skin-fold window chamber mouse model is investigated as a novel methodology to study the tumor microenvironment. Simultaneous imaging with two modalities allows for cross-validation of results, integration of the capabilities of the two modalities in one study and mitigation of invasive factors, such as surgery and anesthesia, in an in-vivo experiment. To make this investigation possible, three optical imaging systems were developed that operated inside the MRI scanner. One of the developed systems was applied to estimate vascular kinetic parameters of tumors in a dorsal skin-fold window chamber mouse model with simultaneous optical and MRI imaging. The target of imaging was a molecular agent that was dual labeled with both optical and MRI contrast agents. The labeling of the molecular agent, characteristics of the developed optical systems, the methodologies of measuring vascular kinetic parameters using optical imaging and MRI data, and the obtained results are described and illustrated.

  2. Characterisation and monitoring of the Excavation Disturbed Zone (EDZ) in fractured gneisses of the Roselend underground laboratory: permeability measurements, transport property changes and related radon bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassermann, Jérôme; Sabroux, Jean-Christophe; Richon, Patrick; Pontreau, Sébastien; Guillon, Sophie; Pili, Eric

    2010-05-01

    The Roselend tunnel was drilled in the fifties by blasting in the micashists, granites and gneisses of the Méraillet massif (French Alps). It is situated on the shore of the Roselend reservoir Lake near its dam. Several tectonic shear fractures related to the Alpine orogeny intersect the dead end tunnel (with length of 128 m and section about 2 m), indeed the fracture density varies from 0.45 to 1 fracture per meter along the tunnel (Dezayes and Villemin 2002). Some fractures are partially or totally filled with secondary minerals. The flow rates of percolating water through the fractured medium are seasonal dependent. Large fractures drain a large fluid volume unlike small ones that drain limited fluid volume (Patriarche et al. 2007). The Roselend underground laboratory allows the study of the geochemical and geophysical responses of a fractured rock mass to periodic sollicitations due to water level variations of the nearby Roselend reservoir Lake. The tunnel was instrumented in the nineties to understand the relationship between radon (Rn-222) concentration and water level variations of the Roselend reservoir Lake (Trique et al. 1999). In order to characterize the geometry and the extent of the EDZ, core drilling and permeability measurements through pneumatic testing are performed along the Roselend tunnel. Drilled core analysis consists of direct observations at a macroscopic scale of fractures (density of fractures from EDZ) and also at a microscopic scale via thin sections. Method of pressure build-up in wells (Jakubick and Franz 1993, Bossart et al. 2002) is used to determine permeability profile along each borehole and hence to precise the extent and geometry of the EDZ. A strong correlation is observed between permeability profiles and the density of fractures estimated from core analysis. The extent of the EDZ appears to be about one tunnel radius i.e. one meter around the tunnel corridor. Another experiment consisting of continuous differential

  3. Permeability and Strength Measurements on Sintered, Porous, Hollow Turbine Blades Made by the American Electro Metal Corporation under Office of Naval Research Contract N-ONR-295 (01)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Hadley T.; Livingood, N.B.

    1954-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made to determine the permeability and strength characteristics of a number of sintered, porous, hollow turbine rotor blades and to determine the effectiveness of the blade fabrication method on permeability control. The test blades were fabricated by the American Electro Metal Corporation under a contract with the Office of Naval Research, Department of the Navy, and were submitted to the NACA for testing. Of the 22 test blades submitted, ten were sintered but not coined, five were sintered and coined, and seven were sintered and not coined but contained perforated reinforcements integral with the blade shells. Representative samples of each group of blades were tested. Large variations in permeability in both chordwise and spanwise directions were found. Local deviations as large as 155 to -85 percent from prescribed values were found in chordwise permeability. Only one blade, an uncoined one, had a chordwise permeability variations which reasonably approached that specified. Even for this blade, local deviations exceeded 10 percent. Spanwise permeability, specified to be held constant, varied as much as 50 percent from root to tip for both an uncoined and a coined blade. Previous NACA analyses have shown that in order to maintain proper control of blade wall temperatures, permeability variations must not exceed plus or minus 10 percent. Satisfactory control of permeability in either the chordwise or the spanwise direction was not achieved in the blades tested. Spin tests made at room temperature for six blades revealed the highest material rupture strength to be 8926 pounds per square inch. This value is about one third the strength required for rotor blades in present-day turbojet engines. The lowest value of blade strength was 1436 pounds per square inch.

  4. A Fast Network Flow Model is used in conjunction with Measurements of Filter Permeability to calculate the Performance of Hot Gas Filters

    SciTech Connect

    VanOsdol, J.G.; Chiang, T-K.

    2002-09-19

    Two different technologies that are being considered for generating electric power on a large scale by burning coal are Pressurized Fluid Bed Combustion (PFBC) systems and Integrated Gasification and Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. Particulate emission regulations that have been proposed for future systems may require that these systems be fitted with large scale Hot Gas Clean-Up (HGCU) filtration systems that would remove the fine particulate matter from the hot gas streams that are generated by PFBC and IGCC systems. These hot gas filtration systems are geometrically and aerodynamically complex. They typically are constructed with large arrays of ceramic candle filter elements (CFE). The successful design of these systems require an accurate assessment of the rate at which mechanical energy of the gas flow is dissipated as it passes through the filter containment vessel and the individual candle filter elements that make up the system. Because the filtration medium is typically made of a porous ceramic material having open pore sizes that are much smaller than the dimensions of the containment vessel, the filtration medium is usually considered to be a permeable medium that follows Darcy's law. The permeability constant that is measured in the lab is considered to be a function of the filtration medium only and is usually assumed to apply equally to all the filters in the vessel as if the flow were divided evenly among all the filter elements. In general, the flow of gas through each individual CFE will depend not only on the geometrical characteristics of the filtration medium, but also on the local mean flows in the filter containment vessel that a particular filter element sees. The flow inside the CFE core, through the system manifolds, and inside the containment vessel itself will be coupled to the flow in the filter medium by various Reynolds number effects. For any given filter containment vessel, since the mean flows are different in different locations

  5. Ultradeformable lipid vesicles can penetrate the skin and other semi-permeable barriers unfragmented. Evidence from double label CLSM experiments and direct size measurements.

    PubMed

    Cevc, Gregor; Schätzlein, Andreas; Richardsen, Holger

    2002-08-19

    The stability of various aggregates in the form of lipid bilayer vesicles was tested by three different methods before and after crossing different semi-permeable barriers. First, polymer membranes with pores significantly smaller than the average aggregate diameter were used as the skin barrier model; dynamic light scattering was employed to monitor vesicle size changes after barrier passage for several lipid mixtures with different bilayer elasticities. This revealed that vesicles must adapt their size and/or shape, dependent on bilayer stability and elasto-mechanics, to overcome an otherwise confining pore. For the mixed lipid aggregates with highly flexible bilayers (Transfersomes), the change is transient and only involves vesicle shape and volume adaptation. The constancy of ultradeformable vesicle size before and after pores penetration proves this. This is remarkable in light of the very strong aggregate deformation during an enforced barrier passage. Simple phosphatidylcholine vesicles, with less flexible bilayers, lack such capability and stability. Conventional liposomes are therefore fractured during transport through a semi-permeable barrier; as reported by other researchers, liposomes are fragmented to the size of a narrow pore if sufficient pressure is applied across the barrier; otherwise, liposomes clog the pores. The precise outcome depends on trans-barrier flux and/or on relative vesicle vs. pore size. Lipid vesicles applied on the skin behave accordingly. Mixed lipid vesicles penetrate the skin if they are sufficiently deformable. If this is the case, they cross inter-cellular constrictions in the organ without significant composition or size modification. To prove this, we labelled vesicles with two different fluorescent markers and applied the suspension on intact murine skin without occlusion. The confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) of the skin then revealed a practically indistinguishable distribution of both labels in the stratum

  6. High Resolution ground penetrating radar (GPR) measurements at the laboratory scale to model porosity and permeability in the Miami Limestone in South Florida.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mount, G. J.; Comas, X.

    2015-12-01

    Subsurface water flow within the Biscayne aquifer is controlled by the heterogeneous distribution of porosity and permeability in the karst Miami Limestone and the presence of numerous dissolution and mega-porous features. The dissolution features and other high porosity areas can create preferential flow paths and direct recharge to the aquifer, which may not be accurately conceptualized in groundwater flow models. As hydrologic conditions are undergoing restoration in the Everglades, understanding the distribution of these high porosity areas within the subsurface would create a better understanding of subsurface flow. This research utilizes ground penetrating radar to estimate the spatial variability of porosity and dielectric permittivity of the Miami Limestone at centimeter scale resolution at the laboratory scale. High frequency GPR antennas were used to measure changes in electromagnetic wave velocity through limestone samples under varying volumetric water contents. The Complex Refractive Index Model (CRIM) was then applied in order to estimate porosity and dielectric permittivity of the solid phase of the limestone. Porosity estimates ranged from 45.2-66.0% from the CRIM model and correspond well with estimates of porosity from analytical and digital image techniques. Dielectric permittivity values of the limestone solid phase ranged from 7.0 and 13.0, which are similar to values in the literature. This research demonstrates the ability of GPR to identify the cm scale spatial variability of aquifer properties that influence subsurface water flow which could have implications for groundwater flow models in the Biscayne and potentially other shallow karst aquifers.

  7. Saturated High Permeability Magnetic Shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenkel, Christian

    2016-05-01

    High permeability magnetic shields can be used in space to mitigate the effect of magnetic sources by several orders of magnitude. Nevertheless, the presence of significant amounts of ferromagnetic material on-board a spacecraft carries, by itself, a certain risk in terms of meeting magnetic cleanliness requirements. One possibility is that the shield is accidentally magnetised irreversibly, either by a strong external field, or mechanical shock. A second possibility is that the shield will acquire an induced moment in the presence of external fields (DC or AC), and could potentially amplify them.Here, we propose the use of high permeability shields which are driven into their fully saturated state - by the source that is being shielded. This approach limits the shielding effect to perhaps one or two orders of magnitude, but is expected to mitigate the above risks substantially. We present extensive numerical simulations describing the design principle behind optimised, fully saturated shields, as well as some results to substantiate the above claims.

  8. Electrical characterization of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin films peeled off from Mo-coated soda-lime glass substrate by AC Hall measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umehara, Takeshi; Iinuma, Shohei; Sadono, Adiyudha; Kurokawa, Yasuyoshi; Yamada, Akira

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a new evaluation method for electrical properties of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) grown on a Mo-coated soda-lime glass (SLG). The method consists of the peel-off process and the AC Hall measurement, which enables us to evaluate CIGS films grown on the Mo electrode. It was found, from the measurement, that the hole concentration of CIGS grown on a Mo-coated SLG was approximately two orders of magnitude higher than that on a SLG, suggesting the Na-doping effect. Furthermore, the hole mobility of 0.47 cm2/(V·s) was simultaneously measured, even though the film was deposited on the Mo electrode.

  9. A technique for estimating one-dimensional diffusion coefficients in low-permeability sedimentary rock using X-ray radiography: comparison with through-diffusion measurements.

    PubMed

    Cavé, Lisa; Al, Tom; Xiang, Yan; Vilks, Peter

    2009-01-07

    The measurement of diffusive properties of low-permeability rocks is of interest to the nuclear power industry, which is considering the option of deep geologic repositories for management of radioactive waste. We present a simple, non-destructive, constant source in-diffusion method for estimating one-dimensional pore diffusion coefficients (D(p)) in geologic materials based on X-ray radiography. Changes in X-ray absorption coefficient (Deltamicro) are used to quantify changes in relative concentration (C/C(0)) of an X-ray attenuating iodide tracer as the tracer solution diffuses through the rock pores. Estimated values of D(p) are then obtained by fitting an analytical solution to the measured concentration profiles over time. Measurements on samples before and after saturation with iodide can also be used to determine iodide-accessible porosity (phi(I)). To evaluate the radiography method, results were compared with traditional steady-state through-diffusion measurements on two rock types: shale and limestone. Values of D(p) of (4.8+/-2.5)x10(-11) m(2).s(-1) (mean+/-standard deviation) were measured for samples of Queenston Formation shale and (2.6+/-1.0)x10(-11) m(2).s(-1) for samples of Cobourg Formation limestone using the radiography method. The range of results for each rock type agree well with D(p) values of (4.6+/-2.0)x10(-11) m(2).s(-1) for shale and (3.5+/-1.8)x10(-11) m(2).s(-1) for limestone, calculated from through-diffusion experiments on adjacent rock samples. Low porosity (0.01 to 0.03) and heterogeneous distribution of porosity in the Cobourg Formation may be responsible for the slightly poorer agreement between radiography and through-diffusion results for limestones. Mean values of phi(I) for shales (0.060) and limestones (0.028) were close to mean porosity measurements made on bulk samples by the independent water loss technique (0.062 and 0.020 for shales and limestones, respectively). Radiography measurements offer the advantage of time

  10. AC-Susceptibility and Ultrasonic Attenuation Measurements of Vortex Dynamics in the Vicinity of the Peak Effect in V-Ti Alloys - Multicriticality Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrov, I. K.

    2005-03-01

    In-situ SANS and ac-susceptibility measurements have provided evidence for a first-order Bragg glass transition into a disordered vortex state in a Nb single crystal. This transition manifests itself in the peak effect (PE) in the critical current density, widely believed to be associated with the sudden softening of the vortex lattice. Subsequent studies mapping the full phase diagram in the same sample have suggested the existence of four distinct phase boundaries meeting at a single multicritical point (MCP). The natures of the transition lines combined with simple thermodynamic requirements suggest that the MCP is a bicritical point. This would rule out either the bulk transition line Tc2(T) or the surface superconducting transition Hc3(T) as being related to the MCP. Mutual inductance magnetic ac-susceptibility and ultrasonic attenuation measurements in V-21at.%Ti have unequivocally established the presence of a PE in this alloy. The H-T phase diagram for this sample will be presented and vortex dynamics in the vicinity of the PE will be discussed. We are indebted to Prof. Shapira of Tufts University for providing us with the sample. This work was supported by the NSF under Grant No. DMR-0406626.

  11. ac Stark shift measurements of the clock transition in cold Cs atoms: Scalar and tensor light shifts of the D2 transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanzo, G. A.; Micalizio, S.; Godone, A.; Camparo, J. C.; Levi, F.

    2016-06-01

    The ac Stark shift, or light shift, is a physical phenomenon that plays a fundamental role in many applications ranging from basic atomic physics to applied quantum electronics. Here, we discuss experiments testing light-shift theory in a cold-atom cesium fountain clock for the Cs D2 transition (i.e., 6 2S1 /2→6 2P3 /2 at 852 nm). Cold-atom fountains represent a nearly ideal system for the study of light shifts: (1) The atoms can be perturbed by a field of arbitrary character (e.g., coherent field or nonclassical field); (2) there are no trapping fields to complicate data interpretation; (3) the probed atoms are essentially motionless in their center-of-mass reference frame, T ˜ 1 μK; and (4) the atoms are in an essentially collisionless environment. Moreover, in the present work the resolution of the Cs excited-state hyperfine splittings implies that the D2 ac Stark shift contains a nonzero tensor polarizability contribution, which does not appear in vapor phase experiments due to Doppler broadening. Here, we test the linearity of the ac Stark shift with field intensity, and measure the light shift as a function of field frequency, generating a "light-shift curve." We have improved on the previous best test of theory by a factor of 2, and after subtracting the theoretical scalar light shift from the experimental light-shift curves, we have isolated and tested the tensor light shift for an alkali D2 transition.

  12. Changes in rock salt permeability due to nearby excavation

    SciTech Connect

    Stormont, J C; Howard, C L

    1991-07-01

    Changes in brine and gas permeability of rock salt as a result of nearby excavation (mine-by) have been measured from the underground workings of the WIPP facility. Prior to the mine-by, the formation responds as a porous medium with a very low brine permeability, a significant pore (brine) pressure and no measurable gas permeability. The mine-by excavation creates a dilated, partially saturated zone in the immediate vicinity of the excavation with an increased permeability to brine and a measurable permeability to gas. The changes in hydrologic properties are discussed in the context of pore structure changes.

  13. Using earth-tide induced water pressure changes to measure in situ permeability: A comparison with long-term pumping tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allègre, Vincent; Brodsky, Emily E.; Xue, Lian; Nale, Stephanie M.; Parker, Beth L.; Cherry, John A.

    2016-04-01

    Good constraints on hydrogeological properties are an important first step in any quantitative model of groundwater flow. Field estimation of permeability is difficult as it varies over orders of magnitude in natural systems and is scale-dependent. Here we directly compare permeabilities inferred from tidal responses with conventional large-scale, long-term pumping tests at the same site. Tidally induced water pressure changes recorded in wells are used to infer permeability at ten locations in a densely fractured sandstone unit. Each location is either an open-hole well or a port in a multilevel monitoring well. Tidal response is compared at each location to the results of two conventional, long-term and large scale pumping tests performed at the same site. We obtained consistent values between the methods for a range of site-specific permeabilities varying from ˜10-15 m2 to 10-13 m2 for both open wells with large open intervals and multilevel monitoring well. We conclude that the tidal analysis is able to capture passive and accurate estimates of permeability.

  14. Measuring permeability with a whole cell-based biosensor as an alternate assay for angiogenesis: comparison with common in vitro assays.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Gargi; Mehta, Ishan; Cornette, Abagail L; Anderson, Kimberly W

    2008-02-28

    Angiogenesis plays cardinal role in normal developmental processes as well as in numerous pathologies. Multiple cytokines are released and act simultaneously to activate endothelial cells in vivo. The present study investigated the relative ability of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in modulating cell monolayer permeability, migration, proliferation and tube formation individually and in combination. While the common methods for assaying angiogenesis were conducted for studying cell migration, proliferation and differentiation, endothelial cell monolayer permeability studies were carried out using a whole cell-based biosensor. The biosensor, consisting of a confluent monolayer of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) on a potassium ion-selective electrode, takes advantage of cell monolayer permeability dysfunction to detect the presence of small quantities of cytokines. When a confluent monolayer of cells was formed on the membrane surface, the response of the electrode toward the marker ion, potassium, was inhibited. The response obtained after exposing this sensor to different cytokines for 1 and 3h, can be attributed to the modulation of monolayer permeability by these cytokines. The present study demonstrated that at the concentrations experimented with, the relative change in permeability assay in the presence of cytokines compared to the control was much higher than that observed in other assays, thereby bolstering the potential of the biosensor to act as a quick screening tool for angiogenesis.

  15. Permeability of Dentine

    PubMed Central

    Ghazali, Farid Bin Che

    2003-01-01

    This is an update on the present integrated knowledge regarding dentine permeability that assumed a role in dentine sensitivity and contribute clinically to the effective bonding properties of restorative dental materials. This paper will attempt to refer to in vivo and in vitro studies of dentine permeability and the various interrelated factors governing it. PMID:23365497

  16. AC photovoltaic module magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, C.; Chang, G.J.; Reyes, A.B.; Whitaker, C.M.

    1997-12-31

    Implementation of alternating current (AC) photovoltaic (PV) modules, particularly for distributed applications such as PV rooftops and facades, may be slowed by public concern about electric and magnetic fields (EMF). This paper documents magnetic field measurements on an AC PV module, complementing EMF research on direct-current PV modules conducted by PG and E in 1993. Although not comprehensive, the PV EMF data indicate that 60 Hz magnetic fields (the EMF type of greatest public concern) from PV modules are comparable to, or significantly less than, those from household appliances. Given the present EMF research knowledge, AC PV module EMF may not merit considerable concern.

  17. A cluster-glass magnetic state in R5Pd2 (R = Ho, Tb) compounds evidenced by AC-susceptibility and neutron scattering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubkin, A. F.; Sherstobitova, E. A.; Terentyev, P. B.; Hoser, A.; Baranov, N. V.

    2013-06-01

    AC- and DC-susceptibility, high-field magnetization and neutron diffraction measurements have been performed in order to study the magnetic state of R5Pd2 (R = Ho, Tb) compounds. The results show that both compounds undergo cluster-glass freezing upon cooling below Tf. According to the neutron diffraction a long-range magnetic order is absent down to 2 K and magnetic clusters with short-range incommensurate antiferromagnetic correlations exist not only below Tf but also in a wide temperature range above the freezing temperature (at least up to 2Tf). A complex cluster-glass magnetic state existing in Ho5Pd2 and Tb5Pd2 down to low temperatures results in rather complicated magnetization behavior in DC and AC magnetic fields. Such an unusual magnetic state in compounds with a high rare-earth concentration may be associated with the layered type of their crystal structure and with substantial atomic disorder, which results in frustrations in the magnetic subsystem.

  18. Permeability After Impact Testing of Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A.T.; Munafo, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Since composite laminates are beginning to be identified for use in reusable launch vehicle propulsion systems, an understanding of their permeance is needed. A foreign object impact event can cause a localized area of permeability (leakage) in a polymer matrix composite and it is the aim of this study to assess a method of quantifying permeability-after-impact results. A simple test apparatus is presented and variables that could affect the measured values of permeability-after-impact were assessed. Once it was determined that valid numbers were being measured, a fiber/resin system was impacted at various impact levels and the resulting permeability measured, first with a leak check solution (qualitative) then using the new apparatus (quantitative). The results showed that as the impact level increased, so did the measured leakage. As the pressure to the specimen was increased, the leak rate was seen to increase in a non-linear fashion for almost all of the specimens tested.

  19. Permeability After Impact Testing of Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    2003-01-01

    Since composite laminates are beginning to be identified for use in reusable launch vehicle propulsion systems, an understanding of their permeance is needed. A foreign object impact event can cause a localized area of permeability (leakage) in a polymer matrix composite and it is the aim of this study to assess a method of quantifying permeability-after-impact results. A simple test apparatus is presented and variables that could affect the measured values of permeability-after-impact were assessed. Once it was determined that valid numbers were being measured, a fiber/resin system was impacted at various impact levels and the resulting permeability measured, first with a leak check solution (qualitative) then using the new apparatus (quantitative). The results showed that as the impact level increased, so did the measured leakage. As the pressure to the specimen was increased, the leak rate was seen to increase in a non-linear fashion for almost all of the specimens tested.

  20. Influence of fiber packing structure on permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, Zhong; Berdichevsky, Alexander L.

    1993-01-01

    The study on the permeability of an aligned fiber bundle is the key building block in modeling the permeability of advanced woven and braided preforms. Available results on the permeability of fiber bundles in the literature show that a substantial difference exists between numerical and analytical calculations on idealized fiber packing structures, such as square and hexagonal packing, and experimental measurements on practical fiber bundles. The present study focuses on the variation of the permeability of a fiber bundle under practical process conditions. Fiber bundles are considered as containing openings and fiber clusters within the bundle. Numerical simulations on the influence of various openings on the permeability were conducted. Idealized packing structures are used, but with introduced openings distributed in different patterns. Both longitudinal and transverse flow are considered. The results show that openings within the fiber bundle have substantial effect on the permeability. In the longitudinal flow case, the openings become the dominant flow path. In the transverse flow case, the fiber clusters reduce the gap sizes among fibers. Therefore the permeability is greatly influenced by these openings and clusters, respectively. In addition to the porosity or fiber volume fraction, which is commonly used in the permeability expression, another fiber bundle status parameter, the ultimate fiber volume fraction, is introduced to capture the disturbance within a fiber bundle.

  1. A Pilot Study Measuring the Distribution and Permeability of a Vaginal HIV Microbicide Gel Vehicle Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography/Computed Tomography, and a Radiolabeled Small Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Jill L.; Friend, David R.; Coleman, Jenell S.; Hendrix, Craig W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Vaginal microbicide gels containing tenofovir have proven effective in HIV prevention, offering the advantage of reduced systemic toxicity. We studied the vaginal distribution and effect on mucosal permeability of a gel vehicle. Six premenopausal women were enrolled. In Phase 1, a spreading gel containing 99mtechnetium-DTPA (99mTc) radiolabel and gadolinium contrast for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was dosed intravaginally. MRI was obtained at 0.5, 4, and 24 h, and single photon emission computed tomography with conventional computed tomography (SPECT/CT) at 1.5, 5, and 25 h postdosing. Pads and tissues were measured for activity to determine gel loss. In Phase 2, nonoxynol-9 (N-9), containing 99mTc-DTPA, was dosed as a permeability control; permeability was measured in blood and urine for both phases. SPECT/CT showed the distribution of spreading gel throughout the vagina with the highest concentration of radiosignal in the fornices and ectocervix; signal intensity diminished over 25 h. MRI showed the greatest signal accumulation in the fornices, most notably 1–4 h postdosing. The median (interquartile range) isotope signal loss from the vagina through 6 h was 29.1% (15.8–39.9%). Mucosal permeability to 99mTc-DTPA following spreading gel was negligible, in contrast to N-9, with detectable radiosignal in plasma, peaking at 8 h (5–12). Following spreading gel dosing, 0.004% (0.001–2.04%) of the radiosignal accumulated in urine over 12 h compared to 8.31% (7.07–11.01%) with N-9, (p=0.043). Spreading gel distributed variably throughout the vagina, persisting for 24 h, with signal concentrating in the fornices and ectocervix. The spreading gel had no significant effect on vaginal mucosal permeability. PMID:26077739

  2. Intestinal permeability, leaky gut, and intestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Hollander, D

    1999-10-01

    A major task of the intestine is to form a defensive barrier to prevent absorption of damaging substances from the external environment. This protective function of the intestinal mucosa is called permeability. Clinicians can use inert, nonmetabolized sugars such as mannitol, rhamnose, or lactulose to measure the permeability barrier or the degree of leakiness of the intestinal mucosa. Ample evidence indicates that permeability is increased in most patients with Crohn's disease and in 10% to 20% of their clinically healthy relatives. The abnormal leakiness of the mucosa in Crohn's patients and their relatives can be greatly amplified by aspirin preadministration. Permeability measurements in Crohn's patients reflect the activity, extent, and distribution of the disease and may allow us to predict the likelihood of recurrence after surgery or medically induced remission. Permeability is also increased in celiac disease and by trauma, burns, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The major determinant of the rate of intestinal permeability is the opening or closure of the tight junctions between enterocytes in the paracellular space. As we broaden our understanding of the mechanisms and agents that control the degree of leakiness of the tight junctions, we will be increasingly able to use permeability measurements to study the etiology and pathogenesis of various disorders and to design or monitor therapies for their management.

  3. Vortex dynamics and irreversibility line in optimally doped SmFeAsO0.8F0.2 from ac susceptibility and magnetization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prando, G.; Carretta, P.; de Renzi, R.; Sanna, S.; Palenzona, A.; Putti, M.; Tropeano, M.

    2011-05-01

    Ac susceptibility and static magnetization measurements were performed in the optimally doped SmFeAsO0.8F0.2 superconductor. The field-temperature phase diagram of the superconducting state was drawn, and, in particular, the features of the flux lines were derived. The dependence of the intragrain depinning energy on the magnetic field intensity was derived in the thermally activated flux-creep framework, enlightening a typical 1/H dependence in the high-field regime. The intragrain critical current density was extrapolated in the zero-temperature and zero-magnetic-field limit, showing a remarkably high value Jc0(0)~2×107 A/cm2, which demonstrates that this material is rather interesting for potential future technological applications.

  4. AC magnetic measurement of LiFeAs at pressures up to 5.2 GPa: The relation between T c and the structural parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Yamaguchi, Nobuhiro; Mito, Masaki; Deguchi, Hiroyuki; Baker, Peter. J.; Blundell, Stephen. J.; Pitcher, Michael. J.; Parker, Dinah. R.; Clarke, Simon. J.

    2013-08-01

    The pressure effects on the 111-type Fe-based superconductor LiFeAs were investigated through AC susceptibility measurements and X-ray diffraction experiments, and revealed a correlation between the superconducting transition temperature ( T c ) and the As-Fe-As bond angle ( α) rather than the height of As from the Fe layers ( h As). As the pressure was increased, T c of 17 K at P = 0 GPa decreased down to 10 K at P = 5.2 GPa. According to a previous report from an X-ray diffraction experiment, α changes from 101.5° at 0 GPa to 97.8° at 17 GPa. The obtained change in T c is consistent with Lee et al.'s plot of T c as a function of α, and from this result, we conclude that T c will fall to zero at around α = 98°.

  5. Cell volume kinetics of adherent epithelial cells measured by laser scanning reflection microscopy: determination of water permeability changes of renal principal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Maric, K; Wiesner, B; Lorenz, D; Klussmann, E; Betz, T; Rosenthal, W

    2001-01-01

    The water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2), a key component of the antidiuretic machinery in the kidney, is rapidly regulated by the antidiuretic hormone vasopressin. The hormone exerts its action by inducing a translocation of AQP2 from intracellular vesicles to the cell membrane. This step requires the elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP. We describe here a new method, laser scanning reflection microscopy (LSRM), suitable for determining cellular osmotic water permeability coefficient changes in primary cultured inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) cells. The recording of vertical-reflection-mode x-z-scan section areas of unstained, living IMCD cells proved useful and valid for the investigation of osmotic water permeability changes. The time-dependent increases of reflection-mode x-z-scan section areas of swelling cells were fitted to a single-exponential equation. The analysis of the time constants of these processes indicates a twofold increase in osmotic water permeability of IMCD cells after treatment of the cells both with forskolin, a cyclic AMP-elevating agent, and with Clostridium difficile toxin B, an inhibitor of Rho proteins that leads to depolymerization of F-actin-containing stress fibers. This indicates that both agents lead to the functional insertion of AQP2 into the cell membrane. Thus, we have established a new functional assay for the study of the regulation of the water permeability at the cellular level. PMID:11259291

  6. Maintenance measures for preservation and recovery of permeable pavement surface infiltration rate--The effects of street sweeping, vacuum cleaning, high pressure washing, and milling.

    PubMed

    Winston, Ryan J; Al-Rubaei, Ahmed M; Blecken, Godecke T; Viklander, Maria; Hunt, William F

    2016-03-15

    The surface infiltration rates (SIR) of permeable pavements decline with time as sediment and debris clog pore spaces. Effective maintenance techniques are needed to ensure the hydraulic functionality and water quality benefits of this stormwater control. Eight different small-scale and full-scale maintenance techniques aimed at recovering pavement permeability were evaluated at ten different permeable pavement sites in the USA and Sweden. Maintenance techniques included manual removal of the upper 2 cm of fill material, mechanical street sweeping, regenerative-air street sweeping, vacuum street sweeping, hand-held vacuuming, high pressure washing, and milling of porous asphalt. The removal of the upper 2 cm of clogging material did not significantly improve the SIR of concrete grid paves (CGP) and permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP) due to the inclusion of fines in the joint and bedding stone during construction, suggesting routine maintenance cannot overcome improper construction. For porous asphalt maintenance, industrial hand-held vacuum cleaning, pressure washing, and milling were increasingly successful at recovering the SIR. Milling to a depth of 2.5 cm nearly restored the SIR for a 21-year old porous asphalt pavement to like-new conditions. For PICP, street sweepers employing suction were shown to be preferable to mechanical sweepers; additionally, maintenance efforts may become more intensive over time to maintain a threshold SIR, as maintenance was not 100% effective at removing clogging material.

  7. Transient and steady-state relative permeabilities from two-phase flow experiments in planar pore networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsakiroglou, C. D.; Avraam, D. G.; Payatakes, A. C.

    2007-09-01

    The water krw and oil kro relative permeability curves of a glass-etched planar pore network are estimated with history matching from transient displacement experiments performed at varying values of the capillary number, Ca, for two fluid systems: one of intermediate and one of strong wettability. The transient k,k are compared to corresponding ones measured with the steady-state method on the same porous medium [Avraam DG, Payatakes AC. Flow regimes and relative permeabilities during steady-state two-phase flow in porous media. J Fluid Mech 1995;293:207-36; Avraam DG, Payatakes AC. Generalized relative permeability coefficients during steady-state two-phase flow in porous media and correlation with the flow mechanisms. Transport Porous Med 1995;20:135-68; Avraam DG, Payatakes AC. Flow mechanisms, relative permeabilities, and coupling effects in steady-state two-phase flow through porous media. The case of strong wettability. Ind Eng Chem Res 1999;38:778-86.], and potential differences from them are interpreted in the light of the differences between the transient growth pattern, and the steady-state two-phase flow regime. For intermediate wettability, the transient kro and krw exceed the corresponding steady-state functions at low Ca values and have the tendency to become smaller than the steady-state ones at high Ca values. For strong wettability, the transient kro and krw are increasing functions of Ca, the transient kro is higher than the steady-state one, whereas the transient krw decreases substantially and becomes lower than the steady-state one at low Ca values. The dynamic capillary pressure estimated from transient experiments is a decreasing function of Ca in agreement with previous theoretical and experimental studies.

  8. Exploring the scale-dependent permeability of fractured andesite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Michael J.; Kennedy, Ben M.

    2016-08-01

    Extension fractures in volcanic systems exist on all scales, from microscopic fractures to large fissures. They play a fundamental role in the movement of fluids and distribution of pore pressure, and therefore exert considerable influence over volcanic eruption recurrence. We present here laboratory permeability measurements for porous (porosity = 0.03-0.6) andesites before (i.e., intact) and after failure in tension (i.e., the samples host a throughgoing tensile fracture). The permeability of the intact andesites increases with increasing porosity, from 2 ×10-17 to 5 ×10-11 m2. Following fracture formation, the permeability of the samples (the equivalent permeability) falls within a narrow range, 2- 6 ×10-11 m2, regardless of their initial porosity. However, laboratory measurements on fractured samples likely overestimate the equivalent permeability due to the inherent scale-dependence of permeability. To explore this scale-dependence, we first determined the permeability of the tensile fractures using a two-dimensional model that considers flow in parallel layers. Our calculations highlight that tensile fractures in low-porosity samples are more permeable (as high as 3.5 ×10-9 m2) than those in high-porosity samples (as low as 4.1 ×10-10 m2), a difference that can be explained by an increase in fracture tortuosity with porosity. We then use our fracture permeability data to model the equivalent permeability of fractured rock (with different host rock permeabilities, from 10-17 to 10-11 m2) with increasing lengthscale. We highlight that our modelling approach can be used to estimate the equivalent permeability of numerous scenarios at andesitic stratovolcanoes in which the fracture density and width and host rock porosity or permeability are known. The model shows that the equivalent permeability of fractured andesite depends heavily on the initial host rock permeability and the scale of interest. At a given lengthscale, the equivalent permeability of

  9. Permeability of edible coatings.

    PubMed

    Mishra, B; Khatkar, B S; Garg, M K; Wilson, L A

    2010-01-01

    The permeabilities of water vapour, O2 and CO2 were determined for 18 coating formulations. Water vapour transmission rate ranged from 98.8 g/m(2).day (6% beeswax) to 758.0 g/m(2).day (1.5% carboxymethyl cellulose with glycerol). O2 permeability at 14 ± 1°C and 55 ± 5% RH ranged from 1.50 to 7.95 cm(3)cm cm(-2)s(-1)Pa(-1), with CO2 permeability 2 to 6 times as high. Permeability to noncondensable gases (O2 and CO2) was higher for hydrophobic (peanut oil followed by beeswax) coatings as compared to hydrophilic (whey protein concentrate and carboxymethyl cellulose).

  10. Experimental Volcanology: Fragmentation and Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spieler, O.

    2005-12-01

    An increasing number of scientists design new experiments to analyse processes that control the dynamics of explosive eruptions. There research is mostly coupled to numerical models and aims toward its controlling parameters. The fragmentation process, its threshold and the speed of the fragmentation wave as well as the energy consumed by the fragmentation are some hot spots of the experimental volcanology. Analysing the fragmentation behaviour of volcaniclastics as close to the natural system as possible, we found a number of physical constrains. Identifying the porosity as determining factor of the threshold, we realised that neither threshold nor the speed of the fragmentation process are solely controlled by the rock density. The later results of the shock tube type apparatus lead to the analysis of the specific surface area and permeability as direct links to textural features. Permeability analysis performed in a modified shock tube type apparatus, show two clear, distinct trends for dome rock and pyroclastic samples. The specific surface determined by Argon sorbtion (BET) as well as textural features of pumices from Campi Flegrei, Montserrat and Krakatoa (1883) give in contrary evidence of a more complex story. Large spherical, or ellipsoidal bubbles around fractured crystals prove that the high permeability of the pumice has partially developed after the fixing of the bubble size distribution. This puts up the question, if permeability measurements on pyroclastic samples reveal relevant numbers! The surface tension controlled 'self sealing' behaviour of surfaces from foaming obsidian hinders in situ measurements. Close textural investigations will have to clarify how the 'post process' samples deviate from the syneruptive conduit filling.

  11. Anisotropy of permeability in faulted porous sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, N. J. C.; Healy, D.; Taylor, C. W.

    2014-06-01

    Studies of fault rock permeabilities advance the understanding of fluid migration patterns around faults and contribute to predictions of fault stability. In this study a new model is proposed combining brittle deformation structures formed during faulting, with fluid flow through pores. It assesses the impact of faulting on the permeability anisotropy of porous sandstone, hypothesising that the formation of fault related micro-scale deformation structures will alter the host rock porosity organisation and create new permeability pathways. Core plugs and thin sections were sampled around a normal fault and oriented with respect to the fault plane. Anisotropy of permeability was determined in three orientations to the fault plane at ambient and confining pressures. Results show that permeabilities measured parallel to fault dip were up to 10 times higher than along fault strike permeability. Analysis of corresponding thin sections shows elongate pores oriented at a low angle to the maximum principal palaeo-stress (σ1) and parallel to fault dip, indicating that permeability anisotropy is produced by grain scale deformation mechanisms associated with faulting. Using a soil mechanics 'void cell model' this study shows how elongate pores could be produced in faulted porous sandstone by compaction and reorganisation of grains through shearing and cataclasis.

  12. Specific absorption rate dependence on temperature in magnetic field hyperthermia measured by dynamic hysteresis losses (ac magnetometry).

    PubMed

    Garaio, Eneko; Sandre, Olivier; Collantes, Juan-Mari; Garcia, Jose Angel; Mornet, Stéphane; Plazaola, Fernando

    2015-01-09

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are intensively studied for their potential use for magnetic hyperthermia, a treatment that has passed a phase II clinical trial against severe brain cancer (glioblastoma) at the end of 2011. Their heating power, characterized by the 'specific absorption rate (SAR)', is often considered temperature independent in the literature, mainly because of the difficulties that arise from the measurement methodology. Using a dynamic magnetometer presented in a recent paper, we measure here the thermal dependence of SAR for superparamagnetic iron oxide (maghemite) NPs of four different size-ranges corresponding to mean diameters around 12 nm, 14 nm, 15 nm and 16 nm. The article reports a parametrical study extending from 10 to 60 °C in temperature, from 75 to 1031 kHz in frequency, and from 2 to 24 kA m(-1) in magnetic field strength. It was observed that SAR values of smaller NPs decrease with temperature whereas for the larger sample (16 nm) SAR values increase with temperature. The measured variation of SAR with temperature is frequency dependent. This behaviour is fully explained within the scope of linear response theory based on Néel and Brown relaxation processes, using independent magnetic measurements of the specific magnetization and the magnetic anisotropy constant. A good quantitative agreement between experimental values and theoretical values is confirmed in a tri-dimensional space that uses as coordinates the field strength, the frequency and the temperature.

  13. Specific absorption rate dependence on temperature in magnetic field hyperthermia measured by dynamic hysteresis losses (ac magnetometry)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaio, Eneko; Sandre, Olivier; Collantes, Juan-Mari; Garcia, Jose Angel; Mornet, Stéphane; Plazaola, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are intensively studied for their potential use for magnetic hyperthermia, a treatment that has passed a phase II clinical trial against severe brain cancer (glioblastoma) at the end of 2011. Their heating power, characterized by the ‘specific absorption rate (SAR)’, is often considered temperature independent in the literature, mainly because of the difficulties that arise from the measurement methodology. Using a dynamic magnetometer presented in a recent paper, we measure here the thermal dependence of SAR for superparamagnetic iron oxide (maghemite) NPs of four different size-ranges corresponding to mean diameters around 12 nm, 14 nm, 15 nm and 16 nm. The article reports a parametrical study extending from 10 to 60 {}^\\circ C in temperature, from 75 to 1031 kHz in frequency, and from 2 to 24 kA m-1 in magnetic field strength. It was observed that SAR values of smaller NPs decrease with temperature whereas for the larger sample (16 nm) SAR values increase with temperature. The measured variation of SAR with temperature is frequency dependent. This behaviour is fully explained within the scope of linear response theory based on Néel and Brown relaxation processes, using independent magnetic measurements of the specific magnetization and the magnetic anisotropy constant. A good quantitative agreement between experimental values and theoretical values is confirmed in a tri-dimensional space that uses as coordinates the field strength, the frequency and the temperature.

  14. Permeability-porosity relationships of subduction zone sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gamage, K.; Screaton, E.; Bekins, B.; Aiello, I.

    2011-01-01

    Permeability-porosity relationships for sediments from the northern Barbados, Costa Rica, Nankai, and Peru subduction zones were examined based on sediment type, grain size distribution, and general mechanical and chemical compaction history. Greater correlation was observed between permeability and porosity in siliciclastic sediments, diatom oozes, and nannofossil chalks than in nannofossil oozes. For siliciclastic sediments, grouping of sediments by percentage of clay-sized material yields relationships that are generally consistent with results from other marine settings and suggests decreasing permeability as percentage of clay-sized material increases. Correction of measured porosities for smectite content improved the correlation of permeability-porosity relationships for siliciclastic sediments and diatom oozes. The relationship between permeability and porosity for diatom oozes is very similar to the relationship in siliciclastic sediments, and permeabilities of both sediment types are related to the amount of clay-size particles. In contrast, nannofossil oozes have higher permeability values by 1.5 orders of magnitude than siliciclastic sediments of the same porosity and show poor correlation between permeability and porosity. More indurated calcareous sediments, nannofossil chalks, overlap siliciclastic permeabilities at the lower end of their measured permeability range, suggesting similar consolidation patterns at depth. Thus, the lack of correlation between permeability and porosity for nannofossil oozes is likely related to variations in mechanical and chemical compaction at shallow depths. This study provides the foundation for a much-needed global database with fundamental properties that relate to permeability in marine settings. Further progress in delineating controls on permeability requires additional carefully documented permeability measurements on well-characterized samples. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  15. Steam-water relative permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Ambusso, W.; Satik, C.; Home, R.N.

    1997-12-31

    A set of relative permeability relations for simultaneous flow of steam and water in porous media have been measured in steady state experiments conducted under the conditions that eliminate most errors associated with saturation and pressure measurements. These relations show that the relative permeabilities for steam-water flow in porous media vary approximately linearly with saturation. This departure from the nitrogen/water behavior indicates that there are fundamental differences between steam/water and nitrogen/water flows. The saturations in these experiments were measured by using a high resolution X-ray computer tomography (CT) scanner. In addition the pressure gradients were obtained from the measurements of liquid phase pressure over the portions with flat saturation profiles. These two aspects constitute a major improvement in the experimental method compared to those used in the past. Comparison of the saturation profiles measured by the X-ray CT scanner during the experiments shows a good agreement with those predicted by numerical simulations. To obtain results that are applicable to general flow of steam and water in porous media similar experiments will be conducted at higher temperature and with porous rocks of different wetting characteristics and porosity distribution.

  16. Vascular permeability, vascular hyperpermeability and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Janice A.; Benjamin, Laura; Zeng, Huiyan; Dvorak, Ann M.

    2008-01-01

    The vascular system has the critical function of supplying tissues with nutrients and clearing waste products. To accomplish these goals, the vasculature must be sufficiently permeable to allow the free, bidirectional passage of small molecules and gases and, to a lesser extent, of plasma proteins. Physiologists and many vascular biologists differ as to the definition of vascular permeability and the proper methodology for its measurement. We review these conflicting views, finding that both provide useful but complementary information. Vascular permeability by any measure is dramatically increased in acute and chronic inflammation, cancer, and wound healing. This hyperpermeability is mediated by acute or chronic exposure to vascular permeabilizing agents, particularly vascular permeability factor/vascular endothelial growth factor (VPF/VEGF, VEGF-A). We demonstrate that three distinctly different types of vascular permeability can be distinguished, based on the different types of microvessels involved, the composition of the extravasate, and the anatomic pathways by which molecules of different size cross-vascular endothelium. These are the basal vascular permeability (BVP) of normal tissues, the acute vascular hyperpermeability (AVH) that occurs in response to a single, brief exposure to VEGF-A or other vascular permeabilizing agents, and the chronic vascular hyperpermeability (CVH) that characterizes pathological angiogenesis. Finally, we list the numerous (at least 25) gene products that different authors have found to affect vascular permeability in variously engineered mice and classify them with respect to their participation, as far as possible, in BVP, AVH and CVH. Further work will be required to elucidate the signaling pathways by which each of these molecules, and others likely to be discovered, mediate the different types of vascular permeability. PMID:18293091

  17. NONLINEAR DIAGNOSTICS USING AC DIPOLES.

    SciTech Connect

    PEGGS,S.

    1999-03-29

    There are three goals in the accurate nonlinear diagnosis of a storage ring. First, the beam must be moved to amplitudes many times the natural beam size. Second, strong and long lasting signals must be generated. Third, the measurement technique should be non-destructive. Conventionally, a single turn kick moves the beam to large amplitudes, and turn-by-turn data are recorded from multiple beam position monitors (BPMs) [1-6]. Unfortunately, tune spread across the beam causes the center of charge beam signal to ''decohere'' on a time scale often less than 100 turns. Filamentation also permanently destroys the beam emittance (in a hadron ring). Thus, the ''strong single turn kick'' technique successfully achieves only one out of the three goals. AC dipole techniques can achieve all three. Adiabatically excited AC dipoles slowly move the beam out to large amplitudes. The coherent signals then recorded last arbitrarily long. The beam maintains its original emittance if the AC dipoles are also turned off adiabatically, ready for further use. The AGS already uses an RF dipole to accelerate polarized proton beams through depolarizing resonances with minimal polarization loss [7]. Similar AC dipoles will be installed in the horizontal and vertical planes of both rings in RHIC [8]. The RHIC AC dipoles will also be used as spin flippers, and to measure linear optical functions [9].

  18. Simulating perforation permeability damage and cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J P; Lomov, I N; Glenn, L A

    2000-12-15

    Completion of cased and cemented wells by shaped charge perforation causes its own damage to the formation, potentially reducing well productivity. In practice it is found that underbalance conditions clean up the damaged zone to some extent, however, the mechanisms of these processes are poorly understood. Most hydrocodes typically used to simulate rock response to shaped charge penetration do not provide permeability estimates. Furthermore, the time scales for formation clean up are potentially much longer than the period of jet penetration. We have developed a simple, yet accurate model for the evolution of porosity and permeability which can easily be incorporated into existing hydrocodes using information from the history of each cell. In addition, we have developed a code that efficiently simulates fines migration during the post-shot surge period using initial conditions taken directly from hydrocode simulations of jet penetration. Results from a one-dimensional model simulation are in excellent agreement with measured permeability distributions. We also present two-dimensional numerical results which qualitatively reproduce experimentally obtained permeability maps for different values of underbalance. Although initial results have been promising, further comparison with experiment is essential to tune the coupling between the hydrocode and fines migration simulator. Currently the permeability model is most appropriate for high permeability sandstones (such as Berea), but with little effort, the model can be extended to other rock types, given sufficient experimental data.

  19. Fracture-permeability behavior of shale

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, J. William; Lei, Zhou; Rougier, Esteban; Mori, Hiroko; Viswanathan, Hari

    2015-05-08

    The fracture-permeability behavior of Utica shale, an important play for shale gas and oil, was investigated using a triaxial coreflood device and X-ray tomography in combination with finite-discrete element modeling (FDEM). Fractures generated in both compression and in a direct-shear configuration allowed permeability to be measured across the faces of cylindrical core. Shale with bedding planes perpendicular to direct-shear loading developed complex fracture networks and peak permeability of 30 mD that fell to 5 mD under hydrostatic conditions. Shale with bedding planes parallel to shear loading developed simple fractures with peak permeability as high as 900 mD. In addition to the large anisotropy in fracture permeability, the amount of deformation required to initiate fractures was greater for perpendicular layering (about 1% versus 0.4%), and in both cases activation of existing fractures are more likely sources of permeability in shale gas plays or damaged caprock in CO₂ sequestration because of the significant deformation required to form new fracture networks. FDEM numerical simulations were able to replicate the main features of the fracturing processes while showing the importance of fluid penetration into fractures as well as layering in determining fracture patterns.

  20. Fracture-permeability behavior of shale

    DOE PAGES

    Carey, J. William; Lei, Zhou; Rougier, Esteban; ...

    2015-05-08

    The fracture-permeability behavior of Utica shale, an important play for shale gas and oil, was investigated using a triaxial coreflood device and X-ray tomography in combination with finite-discrete element modeling (FDEM). Fractures generated in both compression and in a direct-shear configuration allowed permeability to be measured across the faces of cylindrical core. Shale with bedding planes perpendicular to direct-shear loading developed complex fracture networks and peak permeability of 30 mD that fell to 5 mD under hydrostatic conditions. Shale with bedding planes parallel to shear loading developed simple fractures with peak permeability as high as 900 mD. In addition tomore » the large anisotropy in fracture permeability, the amount of deformation required to initiate fractures was greater for perpendicular layering (about 1% versus 0.4%), and in both cases activation of existing fractures are more likely sources of permeability in shale gas plays or damaged caprock in CO₂ sequestration because of the significant deformation required to form new fracture networks. FDEM numerical simulations were able to replicate the main features of the fracturing processes while showing the importance of fluid penetration into fractures as well as layering in determining fracture patterns.« less

  1. Permeability of stemming materials for prompt gas sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Beiriger, J.; Trimmer, D.

    1982-01-01

    The permeability and porosity of a suite of man-made granular aggregates and stemming materials currently in use at NTS was measured in 1-D loading as a function of stress. In all cases, the gas permeability was measured at 22 MPa after cycling up and down from 100 to 1200 MPa. Depending on stress and material, permeability decreased up to three orders of magnitude, porosity up to 63% and the sample compacted by as much as 35%. Steel ball bearings were found to retain the highest permeability of all the materials tested. The enhancement of prompt gas sampling through alternate stemming material in the column above the nuclear device is discussed.

  2. Flexibility of hard gas permeable contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, R W

    1988-11-01

    Gas permeable (GP) lenses can flex on some eyes producing unpredictable clinical results. A method of measuring the flexibility of hard GP materials has been developed and shown to be repeatable. Materials in the form of flats rather than lenses were used. Differences between materials were found and in general a linear relation was shown to exist between maximum flexing and quoted oxygen permeability (r = 0.78, p less than 0.05). It is recommended that flexibility be measured and reported in the data presented with all new GP polymers. The term "hard" rather than "rigid" in describing GP lenses is suggested.

  3. EPA Permeable Surface Research - Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA recognizes permeable surfaces as an effective post-construction infiltration-based Best Management Practice to mitigate the adverse effects of stormwater runoff. The professional user community conceptually embraces permeable surfaces as a tool for making runoff more closely...

  4. Liquid-permeable electrode

    DOEpatents

    Folser, George R.

    1980-01-01

    Electrodes for use in an electrolytic cell, which are liquid-permeable and have low electrical resistance and high internal surface area are provided of a rigid, porous, carbonaceous matrix having activated carbon uniformly embedded throughout. The activated carbon may be catalyzed with platinum for improved electron transfer between electrode and electrolyte. Activated carbon is mixed with a powdered thermosetting phenolic resin and compacted to the desired shape in a heated mold to melt the resin and form the green electrode. The compact is then heated to a pyrolyzing temperature to carbonize and volatilize the resin, forming a rigid, porous structure. The permeable structure and high internal surface area are useful in electrolytic cells where it is necessary to continuously remove the products of the electrochemical reaction.

  5. Structural determinants of glomerular permeability.

    PubMed

    Deen, W M; Lazzara, M J; Myers, B D

    2001-10-01

    Recent progress in relating the functional properties of the glomerular capillary wall to its unique structure is reviewed. The fenestrated endothelium, glomerular basement membrane (GBM), and epithelial filtration slits form a series arrangement in which the flow diverges as it enters the GBM from the fenestrae and converges again at the filtration slits. A hydrodynamic model that combines morphometric findings with water flow data in isolated GBM has predicted overall hydraulic permeabilities that are consistent with measurements in vivo. The resistance of the GBM to water flow, which accounts for roughly half that of the capillary wall, is strongly dependent on the extent to which the GBM surfaces are blocked by cells. The spatial frequency of filtration slits is predicted to be a very important determinant of the overall hydraulic permeability, in keeping with observations in several glomerular diseases in humans. Whereas the hydraulic resistances of the cell layers and GBM are additive, the overall sieving coefficient for a macromolecule (its concentration in Bowman's space divided by that in plasma) is the product of the sieving coefficients for the individual layers. Models for macromolecule filtration reveal that the individual sieving coefficients are influenced by one another and by the filtrate velocity, requiring great care in extrapolating in vitro observations to the living animal. The size selectivity of the glomerular capillary has been shown to be determined largely by the cellular layers, rather than the GBM. Controversial findings concerning glomerular charge selectivity are reviewed, and it is concluded that there is good evidence for a role of charge in restricting the transmural movement of albumin. Also discussed is an effect of albumin that has received little attention, namely, its tendency to increase the sieving coefficients of test macromolecules via steric interactions. Among the unresolved issues are the specific contributions of the

  6. Digital ac monitor

    DOEpatents

    Hart, George W.; Kern, Jr., Edward C.

    1987-06-09

    An apparatus and method is provided for monitoring a plurality of analog ac circuits by sampling the voltage and current waveform in each circuit at predetermined intervals, converting the analog current and voltage samples to digital format, storing the digitized current and voltage samples and using the stored digitized current and voltage samples to calculate a variety of electrical parameters; some of which are derived from the stored samples. The non-derived quantities are repeatedly calculated and stored over many separate cycles then averaged. The derived quantities are then calculated at the end of an averaging period. This produces a more accurate reading, especially when averaging over a period in which the power varies over a wide dynamic range. Frequency is measured by timing three cycles of the voltage waveform using the upward zero crossover point as a starting point for a digital timer.

  7. Digital ac monitor

    DOEpatents

    Hart, G.W.; Kern, E.C. Jr.

    1987-06-09

    An apparatus and method is provided for monitoring a plurality of analog ac circuits by sampling the voltage and current waveform in each circuit at predetermined intervals, converting the analog current and voltage samples to digital format, storing the digitized current and voltage samples and using the stored digitized current and voltage samples to calculate a variety of electrical parameters; some of which are derived from the stored samples. The non-derived quantities are repeatedly calculated and stored over many separate cycles then averaged. The derived quantities are then calculated at the end of an averaging period. This produces a more accurate reading, especially when averaging over a period in which the power varies over a wide dynamic range. Frequency is measured by timing three cycles of the voltage waveform using the upward zero crossover point as a starting point for a digital timer. 24 figs.

  8. Permeability reduction in granite under hydrothermal conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrow, C.A.; Moore, Diane E.; Lockner, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    The formation of impermeable fault seals between earthquake events is a feature of many models of earthquake generation, suggesting that earthquake recurrence may depend in part on the rate of permeability reduction of fault zone materials under hydrothermal conditions. In this study, permeability measurements were conducted on intact, fractured, and gouge-bearing Westerly granite at an effective pressure of 50 MPa and at temperatures from 150?? to 500??C, simulating conditions in the earthquake-generating portions of fault zones. Pore fluids were cycled back and forth under a 2 MPa pressure differential for periods of up to 40 days. Permeability of the granite decreased with time t, following the exponential relation k = c(10-rt). For intact samples run between 250?? and 500??C the time constant for permeability decrease r was proportional to temperature and ranged between 0.001 and 0.1 days-1 (i.e., between 0.4 and 40 decades year-1 loss of permeability). Values of r for the lower-temperature experiments differed little from the 250??C runs. In contrast, prefractured samples showed higher rates of permeability decrease at a given temperature. The surfaces of the fractured samples showed evidence of dissolution and mineral growth that increased in abundance with both temperature and time. The experimentally grown mineral assemblages varied with temperature and were consistent with a rock-dominated hydrothermal system. As such mineral deposits progressively seal the fractured samples, their rates of permeability decrease approach the rates for intact rocks at the same temperature. These results place constraints on models of precipitation sealing and suggest that fault rocks may seal at a rate consistent with earthquake recurrence intervals of typical fault zones.

  9. ACS: ALMA Common Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiozzi, Gianluca; Šekoranja, Matej

    2013-02-01

    ALMA Common Software (ACS) provides a software infrastructure common to all ALMA partners and consists of a documented collection of common patterns and components which implement those patterns. The heart of ACS is based on a distributed Component-Container model, with ACS Components implemented as CORBA objects in any of the supported programming languages. ACS provides common CORBA-based services such as logging, error and alarm management, configuration database and lifecycle management. Although designed for ALMA, ACS can and is being used in other control systems and distributed software projects, since it implements proven design patterns using state of the art, reliable technology. It also allows, through the use of well-known standard constructs and components, that other team members whom are not authors of ACS easily understand the architecture of software modules, making maintenance affordable even on a very large project.

  10. Dentin permeability: effects of endodontic procedures on root slabs.

    PubMed

    Fogel, H M; Pashley, D H

    1990-09-01

    The permeability of human radicular dentin was measured as a hydraulic conductance before and after treatment with K files and before and after subsequent treatment of the endodontic smear layer with NaOCl, 50% citric acid, or 3% monopotassium-monohydrogen oxalate. Filing reduced dentin permeability 25 to 49%, respectively, depending upon whether outer or inner root dentin was filed. The permeability of these smear layers was unaffected by 5% NaOCl but increased many times after treatment with 50% citric acid for 2 min. Oxalate treatment lowered root dentin permeability to levels below that produced by creation of smear layers due to the production of a crystalline precipitate.

  11. Wetting phase permeability in a partially saturated horizontal fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholl, M.J.; Glass, R.J.

    1993-12-31

    A major obstacle to understanding of unsaturated fracture flow is the paucity of physical data on both fracture aperture structure and the effects of phase structure on permeability. An experimental procedure is developed for collecting detailed data on aperture and phase structure from a transparent analog fracture. Stable phase structures of varying complexity are creating within the horizontal analog fracture. Wetting phase permeability is measured under steady-state conditions. A process based model for wetting phase relative permeability is explored. Average distribution of the wetting phase is shown to provide insufficient information for modeling relative permeability; descriptive models must account for spatial structure of the phases.

  12. Ex vivo permeability experiments in excised rat intestinal tissue and in vitro solubility measurements in aspirated human intestinal fluids support age-dependent oral drug absorption.

    PubMed

    Annaert, Pieter; Brouwers, Joachim; Bijnens, Ann; Lammert, Frank; Tack, Jan; Augustijns, Patrick

    2010-01-31

    The possible influence of advanced age on intestinal drug absorption was investigated by determining the effects of aging on (i) solubility of model drugs in human intestinal fluids (HIF) obtained from two age groups (18-25 years; 62-72 years); and (ii) transepithelial permeation of model drugs across intestinal tissue excised from young, adult and old rats. Average equilibrium solubility values for 10 poorly soluble compounds in HIF aspirated from both age groups showed high interindividual variability, but did not reveal significant differences. Characterization of the HIF from both age groups demonstrated comparable pH profiles, while concentrations of individual bile salts showed pronounced variability between individuals, however without statistical differences between age groups. Transepithelial permeation of the transcellular probe metoprolol was significantly increased in old rats (38 weeks) compared to the younger age groups, while the modulatory role of P-glycoprotein in transepithelial talinolol transport was observed in adult and old rats but not in young rats. In conclusion, age-dependent permeability of intestinal tissue (rather than age-dependent luminal drug solubility) may contribute to altered intestinal drug absorption in older patients compared to young adults.

  13. SINGLE-INTERVAL GAS PERMEABILITY ESTIMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Single-interval, steady-steady-state gas permeability testing requires estimation of pressure at a screened interval which in turn requires measurement of friction factors as a function of mass flow rate. Friction factors can be obtained by injecting air through a length of pipe...

  14. Unsaturated and Saturated Permeabilities of Fiber Reinforcement: Critics and Suggestions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chung Hae; Krawczak, Patricia

    2015-04-01

    In general, permeability measurement results show a strong scattering according to the measurement method, the type of test fluid and the fluid injection condition, even though permeability is regarded as a unique property of porous medium. In particular, the discrepancy between the unsaturated and saturated permeabilities for the same fabric has been widely reported. In the literature, relative permeability has been adopted to model the unsaturated flow. This approach has some limits in the modeling of double-scale porosity medium. We address this issue of permeability measurement by rigorously examining the mass conservation condition. Finally, we identify that the pressure gradient is non-linear with positive curvature in the unsaturated flow and a misinterpretation of pressure gradient is the main reason for the difference between the saturated and unsaturated permeabilities of the same fiber reinforcement. We propose to use a fixed value of permeability and to modify the mass conservation equation if there are air voids which are entrapped inside the fiber tow. Finally, we also suggest some guidelines and future perspectives to obtain more consistent permeability measurement results.

  15. Barometric pressure transient testing applications at the Nevada Test Site: formation permeability analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, J.M.

    1984-12-01

    The report evaluates previous investigations of the gas permeability of the rock surrounding emplacement holes at the Nevada Test Site. The discussion sets the framework from which the present uncertainty in gas permeability can be overcome. The usefulness of the barometric pressure testing method has been established. Flow models were used to evaluate barometric pressure transients taken at NTS holes U2fe, U19ac and U20ai. 31 refs., 103 figs., 18 tabs. (ACR)

  16. Proppant effects on maintaining fracture permeability in shale.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingraham, M. D.; Bauer, S. J.; Bolintineanu, D.; Rao, R. R.; Lechman, J. B.; Romero, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    A series of tests have been performed on manually fractured and propped shale. The shale used in this study contained 5-10% porosity, and 10-40% clay. Samples were fractured subparallel to bedding. Quartz sand (0.60-0.85 mm) was used as a proppant; proppant was manually placed on a fracture surface, resulting in a monolayer with random distribution. The specimens were repeatedly subjected to reservoir conditions, 20.7 MPa confining, 6.9 MPa differential stress, and temperature of 75 C. System permeability was measured during testing by flowing DI water through the specimen, flow rates were set to 0.002 ml/min, with the downstream vented to atmosphere. Upstream pressure varied to maintain the flow rate, and was approximately 1.4 MPa in the most recent (lowest permeability) test. Between test periods, specimens were removed from the test system and scanned with x-ray μCT. There is significant decrease in flow with subsequent testing due fracture closure. This is attributed to observations of clay swelling, proppant embedment, proppant fracture and shale wall sloughing. These lead to a decrease in effective fracture aperture. Flow induced particle transport clogs flow paths and impedes flow. Isolated grains tend to crush whereas continuous grains in proppant patches tend fracture with little displacement and tend towards embedment. Corresponding numerical simulations are underway to capture the change in crack flow due to these mechanisms. Images from the CT scans of the proppant filled crack are segmented and meshed. Then flow simulations are performed via the finite element method. Preliminary results are discussed. This work is a precursor to laboratory-scale shale fracture and proppant testing; cores will be hydraulically fractured and propped with appropriate proppant and fluid rheology. Proppant life and permeability reduction will be monitored and specimens will be scanned with μCT. Tests will be used to inform proppant flow models which seek to model

  17. Strain-dependent permeability of volcanic rocks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Jamie; Heap, Michael; Baud, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    We explore permeability evolution during deformation of volcanic materials using a suite of rocks with varying compositions and physical properties (such as porosity ϕ). 40 mm × 20 mm cylindrical samples were made from a range of extrusive rocks, including andesites from Colima, Mexico (ϕ˜0.08; 0.18; 0.21), Kumamoto, Japan (ϕ˜0.13), and Ruapehu, New Zealand (ϕ˜0.15), and basalt from Mt Etna, Italy (ϕ˜0.04). Gas permeability of each sample was measured before and after triaxial deformation using a steady-state benchtop permeameter. To study the strain-dependence of permeability in volcanic rocks, we deformed samples to 2, 3, 4, 6, and 12 % axial strain at a constant strain rate of 10-5 s-1. Further, the influence of failure mode - dilatant or compactant - on permeability was assessed by repeating experiments at different confining pressures. During triaxial deformation, porosity change of the samples was monitored by a servo-controlled pore fluid pump. Below an initial porosity of ˜0.18, and at low confining pressures (≤ 20 MPa), we observe a dilatant failure mode (shear fracture formation). With increasing axial strain, stress is accommodated by fault sliding and the generation of ash-sized gouge between the fracture planes. In higher-porosity samples, or at relatively higher confining pressures (≥ 60 MPa), we observe compactant deformation characterised by a monotonous decrease in porosity with increasing axial strain. The relative permeability k' is given by the change in permeability divided by the initial reference state. When behaviour is dilatant, k' tends to be positive: permeability increases with progressive deformation. However, results suggest that after a threshold amount of strain, k' can decrease. k' always is negative (permeability decreases during deformation) when compaction is the dominant behaviour. Our results show that - in the absence of a sealing or healing process - the efficiency of a fault to transmit fluids is correlated to

  18. Superconductor coil geometry and ac losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, T. V., Jr.; Zapata, R. N.

    1976-01-01

    An empirical relation is presented which allows simple computation of volume-averaged winding fields from central fields for coils of small rectangular cross sections. This relation suggests that, in certain applications, ac-loss minimization can be accomplished by use of low winding densities, provided that hysteresis losses are independent of winding density. The ac-loss measurements on coils wound of twisted multifilamentary composite superconductors show no significant dependence on ac losses on winding density, thus permitting the use of winding density as an independent design parameter in loss minimization.

  19. Liquid helium boil-off measurements of heat leakage from sinter-forged BSCCO current leads under DC and AC conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Y. S.; Niemann, R. C.; Hull, J. R.; Youngdahl, C. A.; Lanagan, M. T.; Nakade, M.; Hara, T.

    1995-06-01

    Liquid helium boil-off experiments are conducted to determine the heat leakage rate of a pair of BSCCO 2223 high-temperature superconductor current leads made by sinter forging. The experiments are carried out in both DC and AC conditions and with and without an intermediate heat intercept. Current ranges are from 0-500 A for DC tests and 0-1,000 A(sub rms) for AC tests. The leads are self-cooled. Results show that magnetic hysteresis (AC) losses for both the BSCCO leads and the low-temperature superconductor current jumper are small for the current range. It is shown that significant reduction in heat leakage rate (liquid helium boil-off rate) is realized by using the BSCCO superconductor leads. At 100 A, the heat leakage rate of the BSCCO/copper binary lead is approximately 29% of that of the conventional copper lead. Further reduction in liquid helium boil-off rate can be achieved by using an intermediate heat intercept. For example, at 500 K, the heat leakage rate of the BSCCO/copper binary lead is only 7% of that of the conventional copper lead when an intermediate heat intercept is used.

  20. Liquid helium boil-off measurements of heat leakage from sinter-forged BSCCO current leads under DC and AC conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Y.S.; Niemann, R.C.; Hull, J.R.; Youngdahl, C.A.; Lanagan, M.T.; Nakade, M.; Hara, T.

    1995-06-01

    Liquid helium boil-off experiments are conducted to determine the heat leakage rate of a pair of BSCCO 2223 high-temperature superconductor current leads made by sinter forging. The experiments are carried out in both DC and AC conditions and with and without an intermediate heat intercept. Current ranges are from 0-500 A for DC tests and 0-1,000 A{sub rms} for AC tests. The leads are self-cooled. Results show that magnetic hysteresis (AC) losses for both the BSCCO leads and the low-temperature superconductor current jumper are small for the current range. It is shown that significant reduction in heat leakage rate (liquid helium boil-off rate) is realized by using the BSCCO superconductor leads. At 100 A, the heat leakage rate of the BSCCO/copper binary lead is approximately 29% of that of the conventional copper lead. Further reduction in liquid helium boil-off rate can be achieved by using an intermediate heat intercept. For example, at 500 K, the heat leakage rate of the BSCCO/copper binary lead is only 7% of that of the conventional copper lead when an intermediate heat intercept is used.

  1. Rocks of low permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The 17th International Congress of the IAH (International Association of Hydrogeologists) will meet in Tucson, Ariz., January 7-10, 1985. The deadline for abstracts is March 1, 1984, and final papers are due October 15, 1984.The topic of the congress will be “Hydrogeology of Rocks of Low Permeability,” and speakers will include W. Back, J. F. Bredehoeft, G. de Marsily, J. E. Gale, P. Fritz, L. W. Gelhar, G. E. Grisak, C. W. Kreitler, M. R. Llamas, T. N. Narasimhan, I. Neretnieks, and E. P. Weeks. The congress will conclude with a panel discussion moderated by S. P. Neuman. Panelists include S. N. Davis, G. de Marsily, R. A. Freeze, P. A. Witherspoon, and I. Neretnieks.

  2. Placental Permeability of Lead

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Stanley J.

    1974-01-01

    The detection of lead in fetal tissues by chemical analysis has long been accepted as prima facie evidence for the permeability of the placenta to this nonessential trace metal. However, only a few investigations, all on lower mammalian species, have contributed any direct experimental data bearing on this physiological process. Recent radioactive tracer and radioautographic studies on rodents have shown that lead crosses the placental membranes rapidly and in significant amounts even at relatively low maternal blood levels. While it is not possible to extrapolate directly the results of these experiments to humans because of differences in placental structure and other factors, the results do serve as a warning of the possible hazard to the human embryo and fetus of even low levels of lead in the maternal system. PMID:4857497

  3. Permeability of alkaline magmas: a study from Campi Flegrei, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polacci, M.; Bouvet de Maissoneuve, C.; Giordano, D.; Piochi, M.; Degruyter, W.; Bachmann, O.; Mancini, L.

    2012-04-01

    Knowledge of permeability is of paramount importance for understanding the evolution of magma degassing during pre-, syn- and post-eruptive volcanic processes. Most permeability estimates existing to date refer to magmas of calc-alkaline compositions. We report here the preliminary results of permeability measurements performed on alkali-trachyte products erupted from the Campanian Ignimbrite (CI) and Monte Nuovo (MTN), two explosive eruptions from Campi Flegrei (CF), an active, hazardous caldera west of Naples, Southern Italy. Darcian (viscous) permeability spans a wide range between 10^-11 and 10^-14 m^2. We observe that the most permeable samples are the scoria clasts from the upper units of MTN; pumice samples from the Breccia Museo facies of CI are instead the least permeable. Non-Darcian (inertial) permeability follows the same trend as Darcian permeability. The first implication of this study is that porosity in alkaline as well as calc-alkaline magmas does not exert a first order control on permeability (e.g. the MTN samples are the most permeable but not the most porous). Second, sample geometry exhibits permeability anisotropy (higher permeability in the direction of vesicle elongation), suggesting stronger degassing in the vertical direction in the conduit. In addition, inertial effects are higher across the sample. As inertial effects are potentially generated by tortuosity (or tortuous vesicle paths), tortuosity is likely higher horizontally than vertically in the conduit. Finally, the measured CF permeability values overlap with those of rhyolitic pumice clasts from the Kos Plateau Tuff (Bouvet de Maisonneuve et al., 2009), together with CI one of the major Quaternary explosive eruptions of the Mediterranean region. This indicates that gas flow is strongly controlled by the geometry of the porous media, which is generated by the bubble dynamics during magma ascent. Therefore, permeability will depend on composition through the rheological properties

  4. Stress dependence of permeability of intact and fractured shale cores.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Noort, Reinier; Yarushina, Viktoriya

    2016-04-01

    Whether a shale acts as a caprock, source rock, or reservoir, understanding fluid flow through shale is of major importance for understanding fluid flow in geological systems. Because of the low permeability of shale, flow is thought to be largely confined to fractures and similar features. In fracking operations, fractures are induced specifically to allow for hydrocarbon exploration. We have constructed an experimental setup to measure core permeabilities, using constant flow or a transient pulse. In this setup, we have measured the permeability of intact and fractured shale core samples, using either water or supercritical CO2 as the transporting fluid. Our measurements show decreasing permeability with increasing confining pressure, mainly due to time-dependent creep. Furthermore, our measurements show that for a simple splitting fracture, time-dependent creep will also eliminate any significant effect of this fracture on permeability. This effect of confinement on fracture permeability can have important implications regarding the effects of fracturing on shale permeability, and hence for operations depending on that.

  5. Permeable Boundaries in Organizational Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazy, James K.; Tivnan, Brian F.; Schwandt, David R.

    The nature of the organizational boundary is investigated in the context of organizational learning. Boundary permeability is defined and hypotheses relating it to performance are tested computationally using data from 5,500 artificial organizations. We find that matching boundary permeability to the environment predicts both agent and organization survival.

  6. Strain-induced permeability increase in volcanic rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Jamie I.; Heap, Michael J.; Baud, Patrick

    2016-11-01

    The extrusion of dense, viscous magma typically occurs along pronounced conduit-parallel faults. To better understand the evolution of fault permeability with increasing strain, we measured the permeability of low-porosity volcanic rock samples (basalt and andesite) that were deformed in the brittle regime to various levels of inelastic strain. We observed a progressive increase in sample permeability with increasing inelastic strain (i.e., with continued sliding on the fault plane). At the maximum imposed inelastic strain (0.11), sample permeability had increased by 3 orders of magnitude or more for all sample sets. Microstructural observations show that narrow shear fractures evolve into more complex fracture systems characterized by thick zones of friction-induced cataclasis (gouge) with increasing inelastic strain. These data suggest that the permeability of conduit-parallel faults hosted in the rock at the conduit-wall rock interface will increase during lava extrusion, thus facilitating outgassing and hindering the transition to explosive behavior.

  7. Patterns of Nonelectrolyte Permeability in Human Red Blood Cell Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Naccache, P.; Sha'afi, R. I.

    1973-01-01

    The permeability of human red cell membrane to 90 different molecules has been measured. These solutes cover a wide spectrum of nonelectrolytes with varying chemical structure, chain length, lipid solubility, chemical reactive group, ability to form hydrogen bonds, and other properties. In general, the present study suggests that the permeability of red cell membrane to a large solute is determined by lipid solubility, its molecular size, and its hydrogen-bonding ability. The permeability coefficient increases with increasing lipid solubility and decreasing ability to form hydrogen bonds, whereas it decreases with increasing molecular size. In the case of small solutes, the predominant diffusion factor is steric hindrance augmented by lipid solubility. It is also found that replacement of a hydroxyl group by a carbonyl group or an ether linkage tends to increase permeability. On the other hand, replacement of a hydroxyl group by an amide group tends to decrease the permeability coefficient. PMID:4804758

  8. Differential permeability of the proximal and distal rabbit small bowel

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Allan; Rubin, Allen W.; Deren, Julius J.

    1972-01-01

    The permeability of the proximal and distal rabbit intestine for two to six carbon polyhydric alcohols was compared. Intestinal segments were mounted in chambers that permitted the measurement of the unidirectional flux across the brush border membrane. For both proximal and distal intestine, the permeability for a series of polyhydric alcohols decreased with increasing size. The proximal intestine was more permeable for four, five, and six carbon polyhydric alcohols than distal intestine. This regional permeability difference can be attributed to variations in the permeability characteristics of the brush border specifically. The uptake of alcohols was nonsaturable and was not inhibited by phlorizine or n-ethylmaleimide. The results are compatible with the concept that the brush border membrane has properties similar to artificial porous membranes and that the equivalent radius of the pores of the proximal intestine exceeds that of the distal gut. PMID:4639025

  9. Correlation of Three Techniques for Determining Soil Permeability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winneberger, John T.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses problems of acquiring adequate results when measuring for soil permeability. Correlates three relatively simple techniques that could be helpful to the inexperienced technician dealing with septic tank practices. An appendix includes procedures for valid percolation tests. (MLB)

  10. Research Update from EPA Permeable Parking Lot in Edison, NJ

    EPA Science Inventory

    Communities are increasingly installing green infrastructure stormwater control measures (SCMs) to reduce pollutant loads associated with stormwater runoff. Permeable pavement is a SCM that has limited research on working-scale, side-by-side performance of different pavement sur...

  11. AC magnetohydrodynamic microfluidic switch

    SciTech Connect

    Lemoff, A V; Lee, A P

    2000-03-02

    A microfluidic switch has been demonstrated using an AC Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pumping mechanism in which the Lorentz force is used to pump an electrolytic solution. By integrating two AC MHD pumps into different arms of a Y-shaped fluidic circuit, flow can be switched between the two arms. This type of switch can be used to produce complex fluidic routing, which may have multiple applications in {micro}TAS.

  12. Update to Permeable Pavement Research at the Edison ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA’s Urban Watershed Management Branch (UWMB) has been monitoring the permeable pavement demonstration site at the Edison Environmental Center, NJ since 2010. This site has three different types of permeable pavements including interlocking concrete permeable pavers, pervious concrete, and porous asphalt. The permeable pavements are limited to parking spaces while adjacent driving lanes are impermeable and drain to the permeable surfaces. The parking lot is instrumented for continuous monitoring with thermistors and water content reflectometers that measure moisture as infiltrate passes through the storage gallery beneath the permeable pavements into the underlying native soil. Each permeable surface of the parking lot has four lined sections that capture infiltrate in tanks for water quality analyses; these tanks are capable of holding volumes up to 4.1 m3, which represents up to 38 mm (1.5 in.) for direct rainfall on the porous pavement and runoff from adjacent driving lanes that drain into the permeable surface.Previous technical releases concerning the demonstration site focused on monitoring techniques, observed chloride and nutrient concentrations, surface hydrology, and infiltration and evaporation rates. This presentation summarizes these past findings and addresses current water quality efforts including pH, solids analysis, total organic carbon, and chemical oxygen demand. Stormwater runoff continues to be a major cause of water pollution in

  13. Investigation of the permeability tensor of electrical steel sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Birkfeld, M.

    1998-09-01

    The permeability tensor is a mathematical model for the description of the electro-magnetic behavior of electrical silicon iron steel sheet under two-dimensional magnetizing conditions. In this paper, an interpretation of the properties of this tensor is given, the investigation of the tensor elements from measurements under two-dimensional magnetizing conditions is described, and some examples of measurements and the corresponding permeability tensor elements are indicated.

  14. Effects of CO2 laser energy on dentin permeability.

    PubMed

    Pashley, E L; Horner, J A; Liu, M; Kim, S; Pashley, D H

    1992-06-01

    The effect of a CO2 laser on the structure and permeability of smear layer-covered human dentin was evaluated in vitro. Three different energy levels were used (11, 113, and 566 J/cm2). The lowest exposure to the laser energy increased dentin permeability, measured as a hydraulic conductance, due to partial measured as a hydraulic conductance, due to partial loss of the superficial smear layer and smear plugs. The intermediate energy level also increased dentin permeability by crater formation, making the dentin thinner. The lack of uniform glazing of the surface of the crater, leaving its surface porous and in communication with the underlying dentinal tubules also contributed to the increase in dentin permeability seen with the intermediate laser energy. The highest laser energy produced complete glazing of the crater surfaces and sealed the dentinal tubules beneath the crater. However, it also completely removed the smear layer in a halo zone about 100-microns wide around each crater which increased the permeability of the pericrater dentin at the same time it decreased the permeability of the dentin within the crater. The combined use of scanning electron microscopy and permeability measurements provides important complementary information that is essential in evaluating the effects of lasers on dentin.

  15. Permeability-porosity relationships in sedimentary rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Philip H.

    1994-01-01

    In many consolidated sandstone and carbonate formations, plots of core data show that the logarithm of permeability (k) is often linearly proportional to porosity (??). The slope, intercept, and degree of scatter of these log(k)-?? trends vary from formation to formation, and these variations are attributed to differences in initial grain size and sorting, diagenetic history, and compaction history. In unconsolidated sands, better sorting systematically increases both permeability and porosity. In sands and sandstones, an increase in gravel and coarse grain size content causes k to increase even while decreasing ??. Diagenetic minerals in the pore space of sandstones, such as cement and some clay types, tend to decrease log(k) proportionately as ?? decreases. Models to predict permeability from porosity and other measurable rock parameters fall into three classes based on either grain, surface area, or pore dimension considerations. (Models that directly incorporate well log measurements but have no particular theoretical underpinnings from a fourth class.) Grain-based models show permeability proportional to the square of grain size times porosity raised to (roughly) the fifth power, with grain sorting as an additional parameter. Surface-area models show permeability proportional to the inverse square of pore surface area times porosity raised to (roughly) the fourth power; measures of surface area include irreducible water saturation and nuclear magnetic resonance. Pore-dimension models show permeability proportional to the square of a pore dimension times porosity raised to a power of (roughly) two and produce curves of constant pore size that transgress the linear data trends on a log(k)-?? plot. The pore dimension is obtained from mercury injection measurements and is interpreted as the pore opening size of some interconnected fraction of the pore system. The linear log(k)-?? data trends cut the curves of constant pore size from the pore-dimension models

  16. Permeable membrane experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, Thomas J.; Cao, Tuan Q.; Kliss, Mark H.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the Permeable Membrane Experiment is to gather flight data on three areas of membrane performance that are influenced by the presence of gravity. These areas are: (1) Liquid/gas phase separation, (2) gas bubble interference with diffusion through porous membranes and (3) wetting characteristics of hydrophilic membrane surfaces. These data are important in understaning the behavior of membrane/liquid/gas interfaces where surface tension forces predominate. The data will be compared with 1-g data already obtained and with predicted micrograviity behavior. The data will be used to develop designs for phase separation and plant nutrient delivery systems and will be available to the life support community for use in developing technologies which employ membranes. A conceptual design has been developed to conduct three membrane experiments, in sequence, aboard a single Complex Autonomous Payload (CAP) carrier to be carried in the Shuttle Orbiter payload bay. One experiment is conducted for each of the three membrane performance areas under study. These experiments are discussed in this paper.

  17. Investigation of magnetic spin glass property in La{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} sample using non-linear AC susceptibility measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Punith V. Manju, M. R. Dayal, Vijaylakshmi

    2014-04-24

    We present a comprehensive study on origin of Spin Glass (SG) property in polycrystalline La{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} perovskite oxide using linear and higher order ac susceptibility (χ) measurements. The third order harmonic susceptibility (χ{sub 3}) vs. temperature (K) with varying magnetic fields from 0.95 to 9.45 Oe and the divergence in their χ{sub 3} (max) allows us to infer the SG behavior occurring in the sample possibly due to co-operative freezing of the spins.

  18. Magnetic ordering in UCoNiSi2 and UCoCuSi2 studied by ac-susceptibility and neutron-diffraction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznietz, Moshe; Pinto, Haim; Melamud, Mordechai

    1994-05-01

    Polycrystalline samples of intermediate solid solutions of the UM2Si2 compounds (M=Co,Ni,Cu), namely UCoNiSi2 and UCoCuSi2, were prepared and were found to have body-centered tetragonal ThCr2Si2-type crystallographic structure. In UCoNiSi2 ac susceptibility indicates a single antiferromagnetic (AF) transition at TN=115±5 K, confirmed by neutron-diffraction observation of the AF-I structure down to 10 K (with uranium moments of 1.6±0.2μB, along the tetragonal c axis). In UCoCuSi2 ac susceptibility indicates ferromagnetic transition at TC=107±5 K, and implies an AF transition at lower temperature, confirmed by the AF-I structure, observed in neutron diffraction below T0=95±5 K down to 10 K (with uranium moments of 1.6±0.1μB, along the c axis). The magnetic properties are discussed in comparison with UM2X2 and U(M,M')2X2 materials (X=Si,Ge).

  19. Microtubule alignment and manipulation using AC electrokinetics.

    PubMed

    Uppalapati, Maruti; Huang, Ying-Ming; Jackson, Thomas N; Hancock, William O

    2008-09-01

    The kinesin-microtubule system plays an important role in intracellular transport and is a model system for integrating biomotor-driven transport into microengineered devices. AC electrokinetics provides a novel tool for manipulating and organizing microtubules in solution, enabling new experimental geometries for investigating and controlling the interactions of microtubules and microtubule motors in vitro. By fabricating microelectrodes on glass substrates and generating AC electric fields across solutions of microtubules in low-ionic-strength buffers, bundles of microtubules are collected and aligned and the electrical properties of microtubules in solution are measured. The AC electric fields result in electro-osmotic flow, electrothermal flow, and dielectrophoresis of microtubules, which can be controlled by varying the solution conductivity, AC frequency, and electrode geometry. By mapping the solution conductivity and AC frequency over which positive dielectrophoresis occurs, the apparent conductivity of taxol-stabilized bovine-brain microtubules in PIPES buffer is measured to be 250 mS m(-1). By maximizing dielectrophoretic forces and minimizing electro-osmotic and electrothermal flow, microtubules are assembled into opposed asters. These experiments demonstrate that AC electrokinetics provides a powerful new tool for kinesin-driven transport applications and for investigating the role of microtubule motors in development and maintenance of the mitotic spindle.

  20. Relative Permeability of Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Mark D. Habana

    2002-06-30

    Contemporary understanding of multiphase flow through fractures is limited. Different studies using synthetic fractures and various fluids have yielded different relative permeability-saturation relations. This study aimed to extend the understanding of multiphase flow by conducting nitrogen-water relative permeability experiments on a naturally-fractured rock from The Geysers geothermal field. The steady-state approach was used. However, steady state was achieved only at the endpoint saturations. Several difficulties were encountered that are attributed to phase interference and changes in fracture aperture and surface roughness, along with fracture propagation/initiation. Absolute permeabilities were determined using nitrogen and water. The permeability values obtained change with the number of load cycles. Determining the absolute permeability of a core is especially important in a fractured rock. The rock may change as asperities are destroyed and fractures propagate or st rain harden as the net stresses vary. Pressure spikes occurred in water a solute permeability experiments. Conceptual models of an elastic fracture network can explain the pressure spike behavior. At the endpoint saturations the water relative permeabilities obtained are much less than the nitrogen gas relative permeabilities. Saturations were determined by weighing and by resistivity calculations. The resistivity-saturation relationship developed for the core gave saturation values that differ by 5% from the value determined by weighing. Further work is required to complete the relative permeability curve. The steady-state experimental approach encountered difficulties due to phase interference and fracture change. Steady state may not be reached until an impractical length of time. Thus, unsteady-state methods should be pursued. In unsteady-state experiments the challenge will be in quantifying rock fracture change in addition to fluid flow changes.

  1. IMPACT OF CAPILLARY AND BOND NUMBERS ON RELATIVE PERMEABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2002-09-30

    Recovery and recovery rate of oil, gas and condensates depend crucially on their relative permeability. Relative permeability in turn depends on the pore structure, wettability and flooding conditions, which can be represented by a set of dimensionless groups including capillary and bond numbers. The effect of flooding conditions on drainage relative permeabilities is not well understood and is the overall goal of this project. This project has three specific objectives: to improve the centrifuge relative permeability method, to measure capillary and bond number effects experimentally, and to develop a pore network model for multiphase flows. A centrifuge has been built that can accommodate high pressure core holders and x-ray saturation monitoring. The centrifuge core holders can operate at a pore pressure of 6.9 MPa (1000 psi) and an overburden pressure of 17 MPa (2500 psi). The effect of capillary number on residual saturation and relative permeability in drainage flow has been measured. A pore network model has been developed to study the effect of capillary numbers and viscosity ratio on drainage relative permeability. Capillary and Reynolds number dependence of gas-condensate flow has been studied during well testing. A method has been developed to estimate relative permeability parameters from gas-condensate well test data.

  2. Thermal treatment of low permeability soils using electrical resistance heating

    SciTech Connect

    Udell, K.S.

    1996-08-01

    The acceleration of recovery rates of second phase liquid contaminants from the subsurface during gas or water pumping operations is realized by increasing the soil and ground water temperature. Electrical heating with AC current is one method of increasing the soil and groundwater temperature and has particular applicability to low permeability soils. Several mechanisms have been identified that account for the enhanced removal of the contaminants during electrical heating. These are vaporization of liquid contaminants with low boiling points, temperature-enhanced evaporation rates of semi-volatile components, and removal of residual contaminants by the boiling of residual water. Field scale studies of electrical heating and fluid extraction show the effectiveness of this technique and its applicability to contaminants found both above and below the water table and within low permeability soils. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  3. The permeability of dentine from bovine incisors in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tagami, J; Tao, L; Pashley, D H; Horner, J A

    1989-01-01

    The permeability of coronal dentine was investigated by measuring the hydraulic conductance of dentine discs. Reductions in dentine thickness from the enamel side of disc resulted in a greater increase in permeability than reductions from the pulpal side. Scanning electron microscopy revealed fewer dentinal tubules with smaller diameters in superficial dentine than in deep dentine. The permeability of coronal incisor bovine dentine is six to eight times less than that of unerupted coronal human third molar dentine but similar to that of human root dentine.

  4. AC losses in a HTS coil carrying DC current in AC external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, J.; Zushi, Y.; Fukushima, M.; Tsukamoto, O.; Suzuki, E.; Hirakawa, M.; Kikukawa, K.

    2003-10-01

    We electrically measured AC losses in a Bi2223/Ag-sheathed pancake coil excited by a DC current in AC external magnetic field. Losses in the coil contain two kinds of loss components that are the magnetization losses and dynamic resistance losses. In the measurement, current leads to supply a current to the coil were specially arranged to suppress electromagnetic coupling between the coil current and the AC external magnetic field. A double pick-up coils method was used to suppress a large inductive voltage component contained in voltage signal for measuring the magnetization losses. It was observed that the magnetization losses were dependent on the coil current and that a peak of a curve of the loss factor vs. amplitude of the AC external magnetic field shifted to lower amplitude of the AC magnetic field as the coil current increased. This result suggests the full penetration magnetic field of the coil tape decreases as the coil current increases. The dynamic resistance losses were measured by measuring a DC voltage appearing between the coil terminals. It was observed that the DC voltage appearing in the coil subject to the AC external magnetic field was much larger than that in the coil subject to DC magnetic field.

  5. Geothermal Permeability Enhancement - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Beall; Mark Walters

    2009-06-30

    The overall objective is to apply known permeability enhancement techniques to reduce the number of wells needed and demonstrate the applicability of the techniques to other undeveloped or under-developed fields. The Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) concept presented in this project enhances energy extraction from reduced permeability zones in the super-heated, vapor-dominated Aidlin Field of the The Geysers geothermal reservoir. Numerous geothermal reservoirs worldwide, over a wide temperature range, contain zones of low permeability which limit the development potential and the efficient recovery of heat from these reservoirs. Low permeability results from poorly connected fractures or the lack of fractures. The Enhanced Geothermal System concept presented here expands these technologies by applying and evaluating them in a systematic, integrated program.

  6. Permeability of soils in Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Hara, Charles G.

    1994-01-01

    The permeability of soils in Mississippi was determined and mapped using a geographic information system (GIS). Soil permeabilities in Mississippi were determined to range in value from nearly 0.0 to values exceeding 5.0 inches per hour. The U.S. Soil Conservation Service's State Soil Geographic Data Base (STATSGO) was used as the primary source of data for the determination of area-weighted soil permeability. STATSGO provides soil layer properties that are spatially referenced to mapped areas. These mapped areas are referred to as polygons in the GIS. The polygons arc boundaries of soils mapped as a group and are given unique Map Unit Identifiers (MUIDs). The data describing the physical characteristics of the soils within each polygon are stored in a tabular data base format and are referred to as attributes. The U.S. Soil Conservation Service developed STATSGO to be primarily used as a guide for regional resource planning, management, and monitoring. STATSGO was designed so that soil information could be extracted from properties tables at the layer level, combined by component, and statistically expanded to cover the entire map unit. The results of this study provide a mapped value for permeability which is representative of the vertical permeability of soils in that area. The resultant permeability map provides a representative vertical soil permeability for a given area sufficient for county, multi- county, and area planning, and will be used as the soil permeability data component in the evaluation of the susceptibility of major aquifers to contami- nation in Mississippi.

  7. An approach for estimating the permeability of agricultural films.

    PubMed

    Papiernik, S K; Yates, S R; Gan, J

    2001-03-15

    Plastic tarps currently used during soil fumigation to control emissions have been shown to be permeable to fumigant vapors, resulting in appreciable losses to the atmosphere. New low-permeability films are being developed to reduce fumigant emissions and increase efficacy. A rapid, reliable, and sensitive method is required to measure the permeability of various films that may be used in new management practices. This manuscript presents an approach for estimating the mass transfer coefficient (h) of fumigant compounds across agricultural films. The h is a measure of the resistance to diffusion which, unlike other measures of permeability, is a property of the film-chemical combination and independent of the concentration gradient across the film. This method uses static sealed cells; fumigant vapor is spiked to one side of the film and the concentrations on both sides of the film are monitored until equilibrium. An analytical model is fitted to the data to obtain h. This model relies on a mass balance approach and includes sorption to and diffusion across the film membrane. The method was tested using two polyethylene films and a very low-permeability film and showed that the method produces a sensitive and reproducible measure of film permeability.

  8. Permeability theory and Palace Athena.

    PubMed

    Stamps, Arthur E

    2013-06-01

    Permeability theory suggests that safety in environments depends on how far and how easily one can perceive or move through environments. Parts of environments that limit perception or retard locomotion elicit impressions of being enclosed, so properties of environments that influence perceived enclosure are important in permeability theory. One prediction of permeability theory is that the more permeable the boundary, the less enclosed the region within that boundary will seem to be. Another prediction is that boundary depth will have little influence on perceived enclosure. These predictions were tested in the venue of Greek temples. 30 participants were tested (14 men, 16 women; M age = 40 yr.), who rated perceived enclosure for 18 stimuli. The stimuli were constructed using a virtual scene from the Tholos in Delphi with the positions of the columns forming the boundaries. The boundaries were designed to have different levels of permeability and depth. Data were analyzed in terms of effect sizes and focused comparisons. Results indicated that perceived enclosure was most strongly influenced by the visual permeability of the boundary, while depth of boundary had a much smaller effect on perceived enclosure.

  9. Porosity, permeability, and their relationship in granite, basalt, and tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    This report discusses the porosity, storage, and permeability of fractured (mainly crystalline) rock types proposed as host rock for nuclear waste repositories. The emphasis is on the inter-relationships of these properties, but a number of reported measurements are included as well. The porosity of rock is shown to consist of fracture porosity and matrix porosity; techniques are described for determining the total interconnected porosity through both laboratory and field measurement. Permeability coefficient, as obtained by experiments ranging from laboratory to crustal scale, is discussed. Finally, the problem of determining the relationship between porosity and permeability is discussed. There is no simple, all encompassing relationship that describes the dependence of permeability upon porosity. However, two particular cases have been successfully analyzed: flow through a single rough fracture, and flow through isotropic porous rock. These two cases are discussed in this report.

  10. ACS CCDs daily monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirianni, Marco

    2006-07-01

    This program consists of a set of basic tests to monitor, the read noise, thedevelopment of hot pixels and test for any source of noise in ACS CCDdetectors. The files, biases and dark will be used to create referencefiles for science calibration. This programme will be for the entire lifetime of ACS.For cycle 15 the program will cover 18 months 12.1.06->05.31.08and it has been divied into three different proposal each covering six months.The three poroposal are 11041-11042-11043.

  11. ac bidirectional motor controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiner, K.

    1988-01-01

    Test data are presented and the design of a high-efficiency motor/generator controller at NASA-Lewis for use with the Space Station power system testbed is described. The bidirectional motor driver is a 20 kHz to variable frequency three-phase ac converter that operates from the high-frequency ac bus being designed for the Space Station. A zero-voltage-switching pulse-density-modulation technique is used in the converter to shape the low-frequency output waveform.

  12. Permeability of cork for water and ethanol.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Ana Luisa; Brazinha, Carla; Pereira, Helena; Crespo, Joao G; Teodoro, Orlando M N D

    2013-10-09

    Transport properties of natural (noncompressed) cork were evaluated for water and ethanol in both vapor and liquid phases. The permeability for these permeants has been measured, as well as the sorption and diffusion coefficients. This paper focuses on the differences between the transport of gases' relevant vapors and their liquids (water and ethanol) through cork. A transport mechanism of vapors and liquids is proposed. Experimental evidence shows that both vapors and liquids permeate not only through the small channels across the cells (plasmodesmata), as in the permeation of gases, but also through the walls of cork cells by sorption and diffusion as in dense membranes. The present study also shows that cork permeability for gases was irreversibly and drastically decreased after cork samples were exposed to ethanol or water in liquid phase.

  13. Regional variability in the permeability of human dentine.

    PubMed

    Pashley, D H; Andringa, H J; Derkson, G D; Derkson, M E; Kalathoor, S R

    1987-01-01

    This was measured qualitatively by using dyes and quantitatively by hydraulic conductance in dentine discs and crown segments in vitro. Both types of preparation demonstrated large regional differences in permeability, with the highest values at the periphery and the lowest in the centre of the disc or crown. As dentine permeability may vary 3-10-fold across a few millimetres, investigators should use as large a surface area as possible to compensate for these regional differences.

  14. Gas permeability and flow characterization of simulated lunar regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toutanji, Houssam; Goff, Christopher M.; Ethridge, Edwin; Stokes, Eric

    2012-04-01

    Recent discoveries of water ice trapped within lunar topsoil (regolith) have placed a new emphasis on the recovery and utilization of water for future space exploration. Upon heating the lunar ice to sublimation, the resulting water vapor could theoretically transmit through the lunar regolith, to be captured on the surface. As the permeability of lunar regolith is essential to this process, this paper seeks to experimentally determine the permeability and flow characteristics of various gas species through simulated lunar regolith (SLR). Two different types of SLR were compacted and placed into the permeability setup to measure the flow-rate of transmitted gas through the sample. Darcy's permeability constant was calculated for each sample and gas combination, and flow characteristics were determined from the results. The results show that Darcy's permeability constant varies with SLR compaction density, and identified no major difference in permeable flow between the several tested gas species. Between the two tested SLR types, JSC-1A was shown to be more permeable than NU-LHT under similar conditions. In addition, a transition zone was identified in the flow when the gas pressure differential across the sample was less than ˜40 kPa.

  15. Groundwater Flow in Low-Permeability Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuzil, C. E.

    1986-08-01

    Certain geologic media are known to have small permeability; subsurface environments composed of these media and lacking well developed secondary permeability have groundwater flow sytems with many distinctive characteristics. Moreover, groundwater flow in these environments appears to influence the evolution of certain hydrologic, geologic, and geochemical systems, may affect the accumulation of pertroleum and ores, and probably has a role in the structural evolution of parts of the crust. Such environments are also important in the context of waste disposal. This review attempts to synthesize the diverse contributions of various disciplines to the problem of flow in low-permeability environments. Problems hindering analysis are enumerated together with suggested approaches to overcoming them. A common thread running through the discussion is the significance of size- and time-scale limitations of the ability to directly observe flow behavior and make measurements of parameters. These limitations have resulted in rather distinct small- and large-scale approaches to the problem. The first part of the review considers experimental investigations of low-permeability flow, including in situ testing; these are generally conducted on temporal and spatial scales which are relatively small compared with those of interest. Results from this work have provided increasingly detailed information about many aspects of the flow but leave certain questions unanswered. Recent advances in laboratory and in situ testing techniques have permitted measurements of permeability and storage properties in progressively "tighter" media and investigation of transient flow under these conditions. However, very large hydraulic gradients are still required for the tests; an observational gap exists for typical in situ gradients. The applicability of Darcy's law in this range is therefore untested, although claims of observed non-Darcian behavior appear flawed. Two important nonhydraulic flow

  16. Effect of Permeability of Tipping Paper on Cigarette Burning Temperature and the Property of Mainstream Smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhen-Yu; Shen, Yan; Huang, Hai-Qun; Xu, Ji-Cang

    2016-05-01

    Cigarette smoke analysis of tipping paper with different permeability was carried out. The infrared thermal imager was used to measure burning temperature of cigarette with different permeability tipping paper. The results indicated that with the increase of tipping paper permeability, Tar, CO and nicotine in cigarette mainstream were significantly linear decreased, puff count was increased. Tipping paper permeability had a great influence on cigarette burning temperature. With the increase of tipping paper permeability, the third puff burning temperature and the average peak temperature values were dropped obviously, but the changes of smoldering temperature were not obvious. In addition, smoldering average temperature was significantly lower than the third puff burning temperature and peak temperature.

  17. Permeability of Campi Flegrei magmas: examples from the Campanian Ignimbrite and Monte Nuovo eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polacci, Margherita; Bouvet de Maisonneuve, Caroline; Giordano, Daniele; Piochi, Monica; Mancini, Lucia; Degruyter, Wim; Bachmann, Olivier

    2014-05-01

    We performed permeability measurements on trachy-phonolitic pyroclastic products from the Campanian Ignimbrite and Monte Nuovo, two explosive eruptions from the active Campi Flegrei caldera, Southern Italy. Viscous (Darcian) permeability spans a wide range between 1.22x10-14 and 9.31x10-11 m2. Inertial (non-Darcian) permeability follows the same trend as viscous permeability: it increases as viscous permeability increases, highlighting the strong direct correlation between these two parameters. We observe that vesicularity does not exert a first order control on permeability: the Monte Nuovo scoria clasts are the most permeable samples but not the most vesicular; pumice clasts from the Campanian Ignimbrite proximal facies, whose vesicularity is comparable with that of Monte Nuovo scoriae, are instead the least permeable. In addition, we find that sample geometry exhibits permeability anisotropy as samples oriented parallel to vesicle elongation are more permeable than those oriented perpendicular. We compare our results with permeability values of volcanic products from effusive and explosive activity, and discuss the role of melt viscosity and crystallinity on magma permeability.

  18. A poroelastic finite element model of the bone-cartilage unit to determine the effects of changes in permeability with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Stender, Michael E; Regueiro, Richard A; Ferguson, Virginia L

    2017-02-01

    The changes experienced in synovial joints with osteoarthritis involve coupled chemical, biological, and mechanical processes. The aim of this study was to investigate the consequences of increasing permeability in articular cartilage (AC), calcified cartilage (CC), subchondral cortical bone (SCB), and subchondral trabecular bone (STB) as observed with osteoarthritis. Two poroelastic finite element models were developed using a depth-dependent anisotropic model of AC with strain-dependent permeability and poroelastic models of calcified tissues (CC, SCB, and STB). The first model simulated a bone-cartilage unit (BCU) in uniaxial unconfined compression, while the second model simulated spherical indentation of the AC surface. Results indicate that the permeability of AC is the primary determinant of the BCU's poromechanical response while the permeability of calcified tissues exerts no appreciable effect on the force-indentation response of the BCU. In spherical indentation simulations with osteoarthritic permeability properties, fluid velocities were larger in magnitude and distributed over a smaller area compared to normal tissues. In vivo, this phenomenon would likely lead to chondrocyte death, tissue remodeling, alterations in joint lubrication, and the progression of osteoarthritis. For osteoarthritic and normal tissue permeability values, fluid flow was predicted to occur across the osteochondral interface. These results help elucidate the consequences of increases in the permeability of the BCU that occur with osteoarthritis. Furthermore, this study may guide future treatments to counteract osteoarthritis.

  19. Proton and hydroxide ion permeability of phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Nozaki, Y; Tanford, C

    1981-01-01

    The apparent permeability of H+ through phospholipid bilayers was determined by measuring H+ efflux from large unilamellar phospholipid vesicles with internal space buffered at pH 4. The value obtained is about 10(-9) cm/sec at room temperature, five orders of magnitude lower than was recently reported for the combined permeability for H+ and OH- [Nichols, J. W. & Deamer, D. W. (1980) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 77, 2038-2042]. The apparent permeability measured in this way is the sum of contributions from the movement of H+ and of uncharged species (HCl or HNO3) in equilibrium with anions in the solution. There is evidence that the uncharged species make the dominant contribution and that the permeability coefficient for H+ per se is no larger than 5 X 10(-12) cm/sec. An attempt to measure OH- permeability by use of vesicles buffered at pH 10 did not give a conclusive result because the vesicle walls appeared to be damaged by exposure to this pH. An apparent permeability coefficient of about 10(-7) cm/sec was estimated for undamaged membranes. PMID:6270672

  20. Internal filtration in dialyzers with different membrane permeabilities.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuichi; Kimura, Kenjiro; Chikaraishi, Tatsuya

    2010-07-01

    Over the last decade, hemodialysis with enhanced internal filtration (IF) has been investigated as an alternative to conventional dialysis. Several factors affect IF, including the geometry and permeability of hollow-fiber dialyzers. Although various studies have been performed, the association between IF and membrane permeability has not been fully examined because of the difficulty in measuring IF. Therefore, in this study, we set up an experimental circuit and attempted to directly measure IF as well as membrane permeability in five dialyzers. In the circuit, we placed two dialyzers of the same type in series, and a special sampling port between them, thereby making it possible to determine IF by measuring the extent to which blood was concentrated between the two dialyzers. We showed that a significant amount of IF occurred in this tandem-dialyzer circuit, ranging from 23.5 to 100 ml/min, which increased linearly with increasing membrane permeability. We also showed that membrane permeability was reduced in the first dialyzer to a greater extent than in the second one after four hours of circulation, suggesting that filtration caused substantial membrane fouling. In this study we practically demonstrated that membrane permeability is highly relevant to the phenomenon of IF.

  1. Long-term bioventing performance in low-permeability soils

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, M.B.; Stanin, F.T.; Downey, D.C.

    1995-12-31

    Short-term and long-term bioventing treatability testing has shown that in situ air injection and extraction is a practical method for sustaining increased oxygen levels and enhancing aerobic biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in low-permeability soils. At several test sites, initial physical parameter analysis of soils and air permeability tests indicated that impacted soils (fine sandy silts and clays) had low air permeabilities. Measurements of depleted soil-gas oxygen levels and increased soil-gas carbon dioxide levels indicated that the natural process of aerobic biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons was oxygen-limited. Initial treatability testing consisted of air permeability tests to measure the permeability of the soils to air and in situ respiration tests to measure the rates at which native microorganisms could biodegrade the contaminants when provided with sufficient oxygen. During the long-term treatment period, active air injection or extraction systems were operated for 1 year or longer. Soil gas was periodically monitored within the treatment zone to evaluate the success of the bioventing systems in increasing soil-gas oxygen levels in the low-permeability soils. Follow-up respiration tests and soil and soil-gas sampling were conducted to evaluate changes in respiration rates and contaminant concentrations with time.

  2. AC/DC converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Praveen K.

    1992-08-01

    In a system such as a 20 kHz space station primary electrical power distribution system, power conversion from AC to DC is required. Some of the basic requirements for this conversion are high efficiency, light weight and small volume, regulated output voltage, close to unity input power factor, distortionless input current, soft-starting, low electromagnetic interference, and high reliability. An AC-to-DC converter is disclosed which satisfies the main design objectives of such converters for use in space. The converter of the invention comprises an input transformer, a resonant network, a current controller, a diode rectifier, and an output filter. The input transformer is for connection to a single phase, high frequency, sinusoidal waveform AC voltage source and provides a matching voltage isolating from the AC source. The resonant network converts this voltage to a sinusoidal, high frequency bidirectional current output, which is received by the current controller to provide the desired output current. The diode rectifier is connected in parallel with the current controller to convert the bidirectional current into a unidirectional current output. The output filter is connected to the rectifier to provide an essentially ripple-free, substantially constant voltage DC output.

  3. AC/RF Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  4. Predicting chemically-induced skin reactions. Part II: QSAR models of skin permeability and the relationships between skin permeability and skin sensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, Vinicius M.; Muratov, Eugene; Fourches, Denis; Strickland, Judy; Kleinstreuer, Nicole; Tropsha, Alexander

    2015-04-15

    Skin permeability is widely considered to be mechanistically implicated in chemically-induced skin sensitization. Although many chemicals have been identified as skin sensitizers, there have been very few reports analyzing the relationships between molecular structure and skin permeability of sensitizers and non-sensitizers. The goals of this study were to: (i) compile, curate, and integrate the largest publicly available dataset of chemicals studied for their skin permeability; (ii) develop and rigorously validate QSAR models to predict skin permeability; and (iii) explore the complex relationships between skin sensitization and skin permeability. Based on the largest publicly available dataset compiled in this study, we found no overall correlation between skin permeability and skin sensitization. In addition, cross-species correlation coefficient between human and rodent permeability data was found to be as low as R{sup 2} = 0.44. Human skin permeability models based on the random forest method have been developed and validated using OECD-compliant QSAR modeling workflow. Their external accuracy was high (Q{sup 2}{sub ext} = 0.73 for 63% of external compounds inside the applicability domain). The extended analysis using both experimentally-measured and QSAR-imputed data still confirmed the absence of any overall concordance between skin permeability and skin sensitization. This observation suggests that chemical modifications that affect skin permeability should not be presumed a priori to modulate the sensitization potential of chemicals. The models reported herein as well as those developed in the companion paper on skin sensitization suggest that it may be possible to rationally design compounds with the desired high skin permeability but low sensitization potential. - Highlights: • It was compiled the largest publicly-available skin permeability dataset. • Predictive QSAR models were developed for skin permeability. • No concordance between skin

  5. Compaction and Permeability Reduction of Castlegate Sandstone under Pore Pressure Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate time-dependent compaction and permeability changes by cycling pore pressure with application to compressed air energy storage (CAES) in a reservoir. Preliminary experiments capture the impacts of hydrostatic stress, pore water pressure, pore pressure cycling, chemical, and time-dependent considerations near a borehole in a CAES reservoir analog. CAES involves creating an air bubble in a reservoir. The high pressure bubble serves as a mechanical battery to store potential energy. When there is excess grid energy, bubble pressure is increased by air compression, and when there is energy needed on the grid, stored air pressure is released through turbines to generate electricity. The analog conditions considered are depth ~1 km, overburden stress ~20 MPa and a pore pressure ~10MPa. Pore pressure is cycled daily or more frequently between ~10 MPa and 6 MPa, consistent with operations of a CAES facility at this depth and may continue for operational lifetime (25 years). The rock can vary from initially fully-to-partially saturated. Pore pressure cycling changes the effective stress.Jacketed, room temperature tap water-saturated samples of Castlegate Sandstone are hydrostatically confined (20 MPa) and subjected to a pore pressure resulting in an effective pressure of ~10 MPa. Pore pressure is cycled between 6 to 10 MPa. Sample displacement measurements yielded determinations of volumetric strain and from water flow measurements permeability was determined. Experiments ran for two to four weeks, with 2 to 3 pore pressure cycles per day. The Castlegate is a fluvial high porosity (>20%) primarily quartz sandstone, loosely calcite cemented, containing a small amount of clay.Pore pressure cycling induces compaction (~.1%) and permeability decreases (~20%). The results imply that time-dependent compactive processes are operative. The load path, of increasing and decreasing pore pressure, may facilitate local loosening and grain readjustments that results in the

  6. Total AC losses in twisted and untwisted multifilamentary Bi-2223 superconducting tapes carrying AC transport current in AC longitudinal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amemiya, Naoyuki; Jin, Feng; Jiang, Zhenan; Shirai, Shunsuke; ten Haken, Bennie; Rabbers, Jan-Jaap; Ayai, Naoki; Hayashi, Kazuhiko

    2003-03-01

    In some electrical apparatuses, superconducting tapes are exposed to the longitudinal magnetic field. In this work, AC losses were measured in twisted and untwisted Bi-2223 tapes carrying AC transport current in the AC longitudinal magnetic field. In twisted tapes, the transport, magnetization and total losses depend on the relative direction of the longitudinal magnetic field to the direction of the transport current, while the field direction does not influence the AC loss characteristics in untwisted tapes. In the Z-twisted tapes, the total AC loss is larger in the longitudinal magnetic field that is anti-parallel to the transport current than in the longitudinal magnetic field of another direction. Numerical analysis shows that this field direction dependence of the total AC loss results from the change in the current distribution. In the longitudinal magnetic field that is anti-parallel to the transport current, the total AC loss in the Z-twisted tape is more than that in the untwisted tape. This dependence on the field direction is reversed in S-twisted tapes. It is to be noted that the twist increases the total AC loss in a longitudinal magnetic field of a certain direction, while it reduces the AC loss in the transverse magnetic field.

  7. Development and validation of a sensitive UPLC-MS/MS method for the quantitation of [(13)C]sucrose in rat plasma, blood, and brain: Its application to the measurement of blood-brain barrier permeability.

    PubMed

    Miah, Mohammad K; Bickel, Ulrich; Mehvar, Reza

    2016-03-15

    Accurate and reproducible measurement of blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity is critical in the assessment of the pathophysiology of the central nervous system disorders and in monitoring therapeutic effects. The widely-used low molecular weight marker [(14)C]sucrose is non-specific in the absence of chromatographic separation. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a sensitive and reproducible LC-MS/MS method for the analysis of stable isotope-modified [(13)C12]sucrose in brain, plasma, and blood to determine BBB permeability to sucrose. After addition of internal standard (IS, [(13)C6]sucrose), the marker and IS were recovered from diluted rat blood, plasma, and brain homogenate by protein precipitation using acetonitrile. The recovery of the marker and IS was almost quantitative (90-106%) for all three matrices. The recovered samples were directly injected into an isocratic UPLC system with a run time of 6 min. Mass spectrometry was conducted using multiple reaction monitoring in negative mode. The method was linear (r(2)≥0.99) in the concentration ranges tested for the diluted blood and plasma (10-1000 ng/mL) and brain homogenate (1-200 ng/mL). The lower limit of quantitation of the assay was 0.5 pg injected on column. The assay was validated (n=5) based on acceptable intra- and inter-run accuracy and precision values. The method was successfully used for the measurement of serial blood and plasma and terminal brain concentrations of [(13)C12]sucrose after a single intravenous dose (10 mg/kg) of the marker to rats. As expected, the apparent brain uptake clearance values of [(13)C12]sucrose were low in healthy rats. The method may be useful for determination of the BBB integrity in animal models.

  8. Endothelial cell permeability to water and antipyrine

    SciTech Connect

    Garrick, R.A.

    1986-03-05

    The endothelium provides a structural barrier between plasma constituents and the tissues. The permeability characteristics of the the endothelial cells regulate the transcellular movement of materials across this barrier while other movement is paracellular. In this study the permeability of the endothelial cells to tritiated water (/sup 3/HHO) and /sup 14/C-labeled antipyrine (AP) was investigated. The cells were isolated non-enzymatically from calf pulmonary artery and were maintained in culture and used between the seventh and fifteenth passage. The cells were removed from the T-flasks with a rubber policeman, titurated with a 22g needle and centrifuged. The cells were mixed with an extracellular marker, drawn into polyethylene tubing and packed by centrifugation for use in the linear diffusion technique. All measurements were made at 37 C. The diffusion coefficients for /sup 3/HHO through the packed cells (D), the intracellular material (D/sub 2/), and the extracellular material (D/sub 1/) were 0.682, 0.932 and 2.45 x 10/sup -5/ cm/sup 2/ s/sup -1/ and for AP were 0.273, 0.355 and 1.13 x 10/sup -5/ cm/sup 2/ s/sup -1/ respectively. The permeability coefficient calculated by the series-parallel pathway model for /sup 3/HHO was higher than that for AP and for both /sup 3/HHO and AP were lower than those calculated for isolated lung cells and erythrocytes.

  9. Platelets can enhance vascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Nathalie; Paré, Alexandre; Farndale, Richard W; Schumacher, H Ralph; Nigrovic, Peter A; Lacroix, Steve; Boilard, Eric

    2012-08-09

    Platelets survey blood vessels, searching for endothelial damage and preventing loss of vascular integrity. However, there are circumstances where vascular permeability increases, suggesting that platelets sometimes fail to fulfill their expected function. Human inflammatory arthritis is associated with tissue edema attributed to enhanced permeability of the synovial microvasculature. Murine studies have suggested that such vascular leak facilitates entry of autoantibodies and may thereby promote joint inflammation. Whereas platelets typically help to promote microvascular integrity, we examined the role of platelets in synovial vascular permeability in murine experimental arthritis. Using an in vivo model of autoimmune arthritis, we confirmed the presence of endothelial gaps in inflamed synovium. Surprisingly, permeability in the inflamed joints was abrogated if the platelets were absent. This effect was mediated by platelet serotonin accumulated via the serotonin transporter and could be antagonized using serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitor antidepressants. As opposed to the conventional role of platelets to microvascular leakage, this demonstration that platelets are capable of amplifying and maintaining permeability adds to the rapidly growing list of unexpected functions for platelets.

  10. Enhancement of scleral macromolecular permeability with prostaglandins.

    PubMed Central

    Weinreb, R N

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: It is proposed that the sclera is a metabolically active and pharmacologically responsive tissue. These studies were undertaken to determine whether prostaglandin exposure can enhance scleral permeability to high-molecular-weight substances. METHODS: Topical prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) was administered to monkeys to determine if this altered the amount of scleral matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Experiments also were performed to determine whether the prostaglandin F (FP) receptor and gene transcripts are expressed in normal human sclera. Permeability of organ-cultured human sclera following prostaglandin exposure then was studied and the amount of MMP released into the medium measured. Finally, the permeability of human sclera to basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) was determined following prostaglandin exposure. RESULTS: Topical prostaglandin administration that reduced scleral collagen also increased scleral MMP-1, MMP-2, and MMP-3 by 63 +/- 35%, 267 +/- 210%, and 729 +/- 500%, respectively. FP receptor protein was localized in scleral fibroblasts, and FP receptor gene transcript was identified in sclera. Exposure to prostaglandin F2 alpha, 17-phenyltrinor, PGF2 alpha, or latanoprost acid increased scleral permeability by up to 124%, 183%, or 213%, respectively. In these cultures, MMP-1, MMP-2, and MMP-3 were increased by up to 37%, 267%, and 96%, respectively. Finally, transscleral absorption of FGF-2 was increased by up to 126% with scleral exposure to latanoprost. CONCLUSIONS: These studies demonstrate that the sclera is metabolically active and pharmacologically responsive to prostaglandins. Further, they demonstrate the feasibility of cotreatment with prostaglandin to enhance transscleral delivery of peptides, such as growth factors and high-molecular-weight substances, to the posterior segment of the eye. PMID:11797317

  11. Ac irreversibility line of bismuth-based high temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Mehdaoui, A.; Beille, J.; Berling, D.; Loegel, B.; Noudem, J.G.; Tournier, R.

    1997-09-01

    We discuss the magnetic properties of lead doped Bi-2223 bulk samples obtained through combined magnetic melt texturing and hot pressing (MMTHP). The ac complex susceptibility measurements are achieved over a broad ac field range (1 Oe{lt}h{sub ac}{lt}100 Oe) and show highly anisotropic properties. The intergranular coupling is improved in the direction perpendicular to the applied stress and magnetic field direction, and an intragranular loss peak is observed for the first time. A comparison is made with other bismuth-based compounds and it is shown that the MMTHP process shifts the ac irreversibility line (ac IL) toward higher fields. It is also shown that all the ac IL{close_quote}s for quasi 2D bismuth-based compounds show a nearly quadratic temperature dependence and deviate therefore strongly from the linear behavior observed in quasi 3D compounds and expected from a critical state model.{copyright} {ital 1997 Materials Research Society.}

  12. Permeability controls in the Santana Tuff, Trans-Pecos Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, R.C.; Sharp, J.M. Jr. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-02-01

    The Santana Tuff is a poorly to densely welded rhyolitic ash-flow tuff that erupted from the Sierra Rica caldera complex in Chihuahua, Mexico, 27.8 m.y. ago. The portion of the Santana Tuff examined in this study crops out over a 125-km[sup 2] area in the Big Bend Ranch State Natural Area in Trans-Pecos Texas. A review of recent literature has revealed the need to incorporate realistic values for permeability due to fracture spacing into groundwater models. Permeability/porosity relationship for fracture skins and unaltered tuff are significant to problems of solute transport. Permeability measurements of tuff samples vary over four orders of magnitude. The most densely welded samples have the lowest permeability. The least densely welded ones have the highest permeability. However, effective permeabilities of the differentially welded layers are quite different if fractures are considered. The spacing of cooling fractures in poorly to densely welded layers of the Santana Tuff also varies considerably. Degree of welding of the different Santana Tuff units has been quantified by length-to-width ratios (flattening) of pumice fragments. Lognormally distributed fracture spacing measurements correlate directly with the degree of welding. Rose diagrams and stereonets indicate that fracture orientations are not always random, as might be inferred from a cooling origin, but may have preferred orientation patterns.

  13. Timescales for permeability reduction and strength recovery in densifying magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, M. J.; Farquharson, J. I.; Wadsworth, F. B.; Kolzenburg, S.; Russell, J. K.

    2015-11-01

    Transitions between effusive and explosive behaviour are routine for many active volcanoes. The permeability of the system, thought to help regulate eruption style, is likely therefore in a state of constant change. Viscous densification of conduit magma during effusive periods, resulting in physical and textural property modifications, may reduce permeability to that preparatory for an explosive eruption. We present here a study designed to estimate timescales of permeability reduction and strength recovery during viscous magma densification by coupling measurements of permeability and strength (using samples from a suite of variably welded, yet compositionally identical, volcanic deposits) with a rheological model for viscous compaction and a micromechanical model, respectively. Bayesian Information Criterion analysis confirms that our porosity-permeability data are best described by two power laws that intersect at a porosity of 0.155 (the ;changepoint; porosity). Above and below this changepoint, the permeability-porosity relationship has a power law exponent of 8.8 and 1.0, respectively. Quantitative pore size analysis and micromechanical modelling highlight that the high exponent above the changepoint is due to the closure of wide (∼200-300 μm) inter-granular flow channels during viscous densification and that, below the changepoint, the fluid pathway is restricted to narrow (∼50 μm) channels. The large number of such narrow channels allows porosity loss without considerable permeability reduction, explaining the switch to a lower exponent. Using these data, our modelling predicts a permeability reduction of four orders of magnitude (for volcanically relevant temperatures and depths) and a strength increase of a factor of six on the order of days to weeks. This discrepancy suggests that, while the viscous densification of conduit magma will inhibit outgassing efficiency over time, the regions of the conduit prone to fracturing, such as the margins, will

  14. Huge ac magnetoresistance of La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 in sub-kilogauss magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahendiran, Ramanathan; Rebello, Alwyn; Naik, Vinayak B.; Barik, Sujit Kumar

    2010-03-01

    We report radio frequency (f = 0.1 5 MHz) magnetotransport of La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 in sub kilogauss magnetic fields (H = 0-1 kG). We measured ac resistance (R) and reactance (X) simultaneously. In zero field, R decreases smoothly around the Curie temperature TC when f = 100 kHz, but it increases abruptly and shows a peak close to TC for f = 0.5-5 MHz. The peak decreases in amplitude, broadens and shifts downward in temperature as the bias field increases. The peak is completely suppressed under Hdc = 1 kOe when f = 0.5 MHz. A huge low-field ac magnetoresistance (δR/R = 40 %) and magnetoinductance (δX/X = 12 %) are found in a field of Hdc = 700 Oe and f = 2 MHz. We suggest that the observed ac magnetoresistance arises from the suppression of ac permeability and enhanced magnetic skin depth under a magnetic field. The dynamical magnetotransport reported here will be interesting from view points of fundamental physics and applications.

  15. Evaluation of modern IGBT-modules for hard-switched AC/DC/AC converters

    SciTech Connect

    Blaabjerg, F.; Pedersen, J.K.; Jaeger, U.

    1995-12-31

    The development of IGBT devices is still producing faster devices with lower losses. The applications become more advanced like a complete hard-switched AC/DC/AC converter with almost clean input current and regenerating capabilities. This paper will first focus on a detailed characterization and comparison of eight different IGBT-modules representing state-of-the-art for both PT and NPT technologies. The voltage level of the devices is 1,200V and 1,600V/1,700V. The characterization is done on an advanced measurement system which is briefly described. The characterization is based on static and dynamic tests for both IGBT and the diodes in the IGBT-modules at a junction temperature at 125 C. The comparison is first done directly based on conduction losses and switching losses, and later the measurements are used in a loss model for a complete AC/DC/AC converter application. In the AC/DC/AC converter the power losses are modelled, and different operating conditions are compared like different voltage levels in the DC-link. It is concluded dependent on operation conditions different devices will be preferable, but the high voltage devices have the highest losses even at a high operating voltage.

  16. Probing permeability and microstructure: Unravelling the role of a low-permeability dome on the explosivity of Merapi (Indonesia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushnir, Alexandra R. L.; Martel, Caroline; Bourdier, Jean-Louis; Heap, Michael J.; Reuschlé, Thierry; Erdmann, Saskia; Komorowski, Jean-Christophe; Cholik, Noer

    2016-04-01

    Low permeability dome rocks may contribute to conduit overpressure development in volcanic systems, indirectly abetting explosive activity. The permeability of dome-forming rocks is primarily controlled by the volume, type (vesicles and/or microcracks), and connectivity of the void space present. Here we investigate the permeability-porosity relationship of dome-forming rocks and pumice clasts from Merapi's 1888 to 2013 eruptions and assess their possible role in eruptive processes, with particular emphasis on the 2010 paroxysmal eruption. Rocks are divided into three simple field classifications common to all eruptions: Type 1 samples have low bulk density and are pumiceous in texture; Type 2 samples, ubiquitous to the 2010 eruption, are dark grey to black in hand sample and vary greatly in vesicularity; and Type 3 samples are weakly vesicular, light grey in hand sample, and are the only samples that contain cristobalite. Type 2 and Type 3 rocks are present in all eruptions and their permeability and porosity data define similar power law relationships, whereas data for Type 1 samples are clearly discontinuous from these trends. A compilation of permeability and porosity data for andesites and basaltic andesites with published values highlights two microstructural transitions that exert control on permeability, confirmed by modified Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) analysis. Permeability is microcrack- and diktytaxitic-controlled at connected porosities, φc, < 10.5 vol.%; vesicle- and microcrack-controlled at 10.5 < φc < 31 vol.%; and likely vesicle-controlled for φc > 31 vol.%. Type 3 basaltic andesites, the least permeable of the measured samples and therefore the most likely to have originated in the uppermost low-permeability dome, are identified as relicts of terminal domes (the last dome extruded prior to quiescence). Cristobalite commonly found in the voids of Type 3 blocks may not contribute significantly to the reduction of the permeability of

  17. The geometric mean concept for interpreting the permeability of heterogeneous geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvadurai, Patrick; Selvadurai, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Naturally occurring geomaterials are heterogeneous and the estimation of the effective permeability characteristics of such geomaterials presents a challenge not only in terms of the experimental procedures that should be used to ensure flow through the porous medium but also in the correct use of the theoretical concepts needed to accurately interpret the data. The general consensus is that the flow path in a test needs to be drastically reduced if steady state tests are considered as a suitable experimental technique. The disadvantage of flow path reduction is that the tested volume may not be altogether representative of the rock, particularly if it displays heterogeneity in the scale of the sample being tested. Also, if the sample is not correctly restrained, the differential pressures needed to initiate steady flow can introduce damage in the sample leading to erroneous estimates of permeability. The alternative approach is to use large enough samples that can capture the spatial heterogeneity but develop testing procedures that can test examine the steady state flow process as a problem in three-dimensional fluid flow that can capture the spatial distribution of permeability. The paper discusses theoretical and computational approaches that have been developed for the estimation of the spatial distribution of permeability in a cuboidal Indiana Limestone sample measuring 450 mm. The "Patch Permeability Test" developed in connection with the research allows the measurements of the surface permeability of the block and through kriging techniques estimate the permeability within the block sample. The research promotes the use of the "Geometric Mean" concept for the description of the effective permeability of the heterogeneous porous medium where the spatial distribution conforms to a lognormal pattern. The effectiveness of the approach is that the techniques can be applied to examine the effective permeability of heterogeneous low permeability materials such as

  18. Turbulent drag reduction by permeable coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Mayoral, Ricardo; Abderrahaman-Elena, Nabil

    2015-11-01

    We present an assessment of permeable coatings as a form of passive drag reduction, proposing a simplified model to quantify the effect of the coating thickness and permeability. To reduce skin friction, the porous layer must be preferentially permeable in the streamwise direction, so that a slip effect is produced. For small permeability, the controlling parameter is the difference between streamwise and spanwise permeability lengths, scaled in viscous units, √{Kx+}-√{Kz+}. In this regime, the reduction in drag is proportional to that difference. However, the proportional performance eventually breaks down for larger permeabilities. A degradation mechanism is investigated, common to other obstructed surfaces in general and permeable substrates in particular, which depends critically on the geometric mean of the streamwise and wall-normal permeabilities, √{Kx+ Ky+}. For a streamwise-to-cross-plane permeability ratio of order Kx+/Ky+ = Kx+/Kz+ 10 -100, the model predicts a maximum drag reduction of order 15-25%.

  19. Experimental Permeability Measurements on a Strut-Supported Transpiration-Cooled Turbine Blade with Stainless-Steel Shell made by the Federal-Mogul Corporation under Bureau of Aeronautics Contract N0as 51613-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Hadley T.

    1954-01-01

    A turbine blade with a porous stainless-steel shell sintered to a supporting steel strut has been fabricated for tests at the NACA by Federal-Mogul Corporation under contract from the Bureau of Aeronautics, Department of the Navy. The apparent permeability of this blade, on the average, more nearly approaches the values specified by the NAGA than did two strut-supported bronze blades in a previous investigation. Random variations of permeability in the present blade are substantialy greater than those of the bronze blades, but projected improvements in certain phases of the fabrication process are expected to reduce these variations.

  20. Amorphous force transducers in ac applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meydan, T.; Overshott, K. J.

    1982-11-01

    The high stress sensitivity and high yield stress properties of amorphous ribbon materials make them suitable for magnetic sensors and tranducer applications. Recently the authors have shown that ac systems eliminate the offset voltage and drift problems of the previously published dc systems. Further investigations proved that these transducers could be operated with a linear characteristic up to 1000 g in multiwrap toroidal configurations. The cause of the transducing behavior of the materials was proved to be variation of permeability with stress. It was previously suggested that the optimum operating frequency of the ac transducers is dependent on the physical configuration of the core. Further investigations have shown that the optimum operating frequency is linearly dependent on the amplitude of the input signal to the transducer. Double-core systems have been previously described in the literature where one core acts as a dummy core and the force is applied to the active core. The disadvantage of the double-core system is that aging of the active core changes the performance of the transducer by as much as 10%. A new system will be presented which uses an accurate analog memory to reduce the ageing effect to a fraction of one percent.

  1. Aneurysm permeability following coil embolization: packing density and coil distribution

    PubMed Central

    Chueh, Ju-Yu; Vedantham, Srinivasan; Wakhloo, Ajay K; Carniato, Sarena L; Puri, Ajit S; Bzura, Conrad; Coffin, Spencer; Bogdanov, Alexei A; Gounis, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    Background Rates of durable aneurysm occlusion following coil embolization vary widely, and a better understanding of coil mass mechanics is desired. The goal of this study is to evaluate the impact of packing density and coil uniformity on aneurysm permeability. Methods Aneurysm models were coiled using either Guglielmi detachable coils or Target coils. The permeability was assessed by taking the ratio of microspheres passing through the coil mass to those in the working fluid. Aneurysms containing coil masses were sectioned for image analysis to determine surface area fraction and coil uniformity. Results All aneurysms were coiled to a packing density of at least 27%. Packing density, surface area fraction of the dome and neck, and uniformity of the dome were significantly correlated (p<0.05). Hence, multivariate principal components-based partial least squares regression models were used to predict permeability. Similar loading vectors were obtained for packing and uniformity measures. Coil mass permeability was modeled better with the inclusion of packing and uniformity measures of the dome (r2=0.73) than with packing density alone (r2=0.45). The analysis indicates the importance of including a uniformity measure for coil distribution in the dome along with packing measures. Conclusions A densely packed aneurysm with a high degree of coil mass uniformity will reduce permeability. PMID:25031179

  2. Aquifer and Shallow San Andreas Fault Permeabilities Inferred from Poroelastic Modeling of InSAR Measurements of Land Surface Deformation in Coachella Valley, California. Ravi Appana and Martin O. Saar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appana, R.; Saar, M. O.

    2009-12-01

    Coachella Valley, in southern California, is located in a region where the southern San Andreas Fault system, comprising three main faults, cuts through the valley aquifer dividing it into many sub-basins. Satellite interferometry (InSAR) has revealed differential uplift of the land surface across the Banning Strand - San Andreas Fault (BSF) and the Garnet Hill Fault (GHF) in the upper Coachella Valley. This uplift is suggested to be caused by the elastic response of the aquifer to artificial groundwater recharge and the tectonic stresses acting in this region. However, the differential uplift appears to be mainly caused by the semi-permeable faults which partially restrict pore-fluid pressure diffusion and related groundwater flow. Hence, by employing numerical models of coupled groundwater flow and poroelastic deformation of the aquifer sediments, the land surface uplift can be utilized to constrain a large-scale hydrologic model of the region that includes hydraulic representations of the faults and the sub-basins. Such a regional model can aide in developing better groundwater management strategies that aim at uniform restorations of ground surface elevations and groundwater table levels and would better constrain fault permeabilities with implications for research related to earthquake dynamics and estimates of potential slip along segments of the southern San Andreas Fault system. Studies have suggested that these segments have reached the end of the inter-seismic strain accumulation period posing the biggest risk to seismic hazards in California. InSAR data showing regional land surface uplift and well data of water table elevations, collected in this region, are used to constrain the model yielding hydraulic parameters. Specifically, our results suggest that the horizontal permeability, kxWWB, of the White Water sub-basin (WWB) and its permeability anisotropy, aWWB = (kz/kx)WWB, are on the order of 0.20x10-11 m2 ≤ kxWWB ≤ 1.2x10-11 m2 and 0.04 ≤ a

  3. Rigid gas permeable extended wear.

    PubMed

    Maehara, J R; Kastl, P R

    1994-04-01

    We have reviewed the pertinent literature on rigid gas permeable (RGP) extended wear contact lenses, and we discuss the benefits and adverse reactions of this contact lens modality, drawing conclusions from reviewed studies. We suggest parameters for success with these lenses and guidelines for the prevention of adverse reactions.

  4. Influence of Relict Joints on Permeability of Residual Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talib, Z. A.; Kassim, A.; Yunusa, G. H.

    2016-07-01

    Weathering process of granitic material results in the formation of relict joint in lateritic layer of the weathering profile. The number and arrangements of the relict joints affects the permeability of the residual soil which invariably affects water flow and suction distribution in the residual soil. Although the permeability of residual soil without a relict joint can be determined using standard permeability test, it is difficult to be measured when a relict joint is incorporated due to limitation of size and area of the standard equipment. Hence, modified permeability test equipment is introduced in this study. Two arrangement of the relict joint in the equipment were considered. In the first arrangement one relict joint with various spacing were tested while the orientation and spacing of the relict joint were tested using two relict joints in the second arrangement. The results obtained shows that the permeability of the residual soil due to one and two relict joint varies by two orders of magnitude. Therefore, the number and spacing of relict joints modified the permeability of residual soil.

  5. Effective pressure law for permeability of E-bei sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Bernabé, Y.; Xiao, W.-I.; Chen, Z.-Y.; Liu, Z.-Q.

    2009-07-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the effective pressure law for permeability of tight sandstone rocks from the E-bei gas reservoir, China. The permeability k of five core samples was measured while cycling the confining pressure pc and fluid pressure pf. The permeability data were analyzed using the response-surface method, a statistical model-building approach yielding a representation of k in (pc, pf) space that can be used to determine the effective pressure law, i.e., peff = pc - κpf. The results show that the coefficient κ of the effective pressure law for permeability varies with confining pressure and fluid pressure as well as with the loading or unloading cycles (i.e., hysteresis effect). Moreover, κ took very small values in some of the samples, even possibly lower than the value of porosity, in contradiction with a well-accepted theoretical model. We also reanalyzed a previously published permeability data set on fissured crystalline rocks and found again that the κ varies with pc but did not observe κ values lower than 0.4, a value much larger than porosity. Analysis of the dependence of permeability on effective pressure suggests that the occurrence of low κ values may be linked to the high-pressure sensitivity of E-bei sandstones.

  6. AC Losses of Prototype HTS Transmission Cables

    SciTech Connect

    Demko, J.A.; Dresner, L.; Hughey, R.L.; Lue, J.W.; Olsen, S.K.; Sinha, U.; Tolbert, J.C.

    1998-09-13

    Since 1995 Southwire Company and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have jointly designed, built, and tested nine, l-m long, high temperature superconducting (HTS) transmission cable prototypes. This paper summarizes the AC loss measurements of five of the cables not reported elsewhere, and compares the losses with each other and with theory developed by Dresner. Losses were measured with both a calorimetric and an electrical technique. Because of the broad resistive transition of the HTS tapes, the cables can be operated stably beyond their critical currents. The AC losses were measured in this region as well as below critical currents. Dresner's theory takes into account the broad resistive transition of the HTS tapes and calculates the AC losses both below and above the critical current. The two sets of AC 10SS data agree with each other and with the theory quite welL In particular, at low currents of incomplete penetration, the loss data agree with the theoretical prediction of hysteresis loss based on only the outer two Iayers carrying the total current.

  7. MEAUSREMENT OF THE SURFACE PERMEABILITY OF BASEMENT CONCRETES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the development, testing, and use of a portable surface permeameter suitable for field use in measuring the surface permeability of concrete in new houses. he permeameter measures the airflow induced by a pressure difference across a temporary test seal appli...

  8. Effects of confining pressure, pore pressure and temperature on absolute permeability. SUPRI TR-27

    SciTech Connect

    Gobran, B.D.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Brigham, W.E.

    1981-10-01

    This study investigates absolute permeability of consolidated sandstone and unconsolidated sand cores to distilled water as a function of the confining pressure on the core, the pore pressure of the flowing fluid and the temperature of the system. Since permeability measurements are usually made in the laboratory under conditions very different from those in the reservoir, it is important to know the effect of various parameters on the measured value of permeability. All studies on the effect of confining pressure on absolute permeability have found that when the confining pressure is increased, the permeability is reduced. The studies on the effect of temperature have shown much less consistency. This work contradicts the past Stanford studies by finding no effect of temperature on the absolute permeability of unconsolidated sand or sandstones to distilled water. The probable causes of the past errors are discussed. It has been found that inaccurate measurement of temperature at ambient conditions and non-equilibrium of temperature in the core can lead to a fictitious permeability reduction with temperature increase. The results of this study on the effect of confining pressure and pore pressure support the theory that as confining pressure is increased or pore pressure decreased, the permeability is reduced. The effects of confining pressure and pore pressure changes on absolute permeability are given explicitly so that measurements made under one set of confining pressure/pore pressure conditions in the laboratory can be extrapolated to conditions more representative of the reservoir.

  9. Methyl methacrylate permeability of dental and industrial gloves.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sebastian; Padmanabhan, T V

    2009-01-01

    Our study was undertaken to measure the amount and time it took for methyl methacrylate monomer (MMA) to permeate latex, vinyl and industrial neoprene gloves and to compare the results to obtain a rating of the permeability of each of the gloves studied to MMA. The monomer, permeated under static conditions, was measured using a spectrophotometer. Latex and vinyl clinical gloves became permeable to MMA in a very short amount of time. Neoprene industrial gloves remained impervious for 25 minutes. Dentists and dental technicians should be aware of the toxic effects of MMA and understand that clinical gloves do not afford protection from MMA.

  10. Drug permeability prediction using PMF method.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fancui; Xu, Weiren

    2013-03-01

    Drug permeability determines the oral availability of drugs via cellular membranes. Poor permeability makes a drug unsuitable for further development. The permeability may be estimated as the free energy change that the drug should overcome through crossing membrane. In this paper the drug permeability was simulated using molecular dynamics method and the potential energy profile was calculated with potential of mean force (PMF) method. The membrane was simulated using DPPC bilayer and three drugs with different permeability were tested. PMF studies on these three drugs show that doxorubicin (low permeability) should pass higher free energy barrier from water to DPPC bilayer center while ibuprofen (high permeability) has a lower energy barrier. Our calculation indicates that the simulation model we built is suitable to predict drug permeability.

  11. Permeable Pavement Research - Edison, New Jersey

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides the background and summary of results collected at the permeable pavement parking lot monitored at the EPA facility in Edison, NJ. This parking lot is surfaced with permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP), pervious concrete, and porous asphalt. ...

  12. The Effects of Rock Mineralogy on Matrix Permeability in the Utica Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Ismail, M.; Zoback, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    We conducted pulse-decay permeability measurements on four horizontally oriented Utica Shale samples to examine the effects of rock mineralogy on transport mechanisms using both a non-adsorbing gas (Argon) and an adsorbing gas (CO2). The mineralogy of the shale samples varied from clay-rich to calcite-rich. We conducted the experiments at a temperature of 38.5°C, confining pressures ranging from 4.83 to 22.75 MPa, and pore fluid pressures ranging from 1.38 to 8.96 MPa. We measured the permeability at a range of confining pressures and pore pressures in order to independently test the effects of effective stress, confining pressure and pore pressure on permeability. Our results show that shale mineralogy did not have an impact on permeability. The permeability of clay-rich samples varied between 0.26 and 1.10 microdarcy. The permeability of calcite-rich samples varied between 0.18 and 2.05 microdarcy. Additionally, we found that the shale mineralogy affected the stress-dependent permeability. The magnitude of permeability reduction as a function of effective stress was dependent on the overall rock mineralogy. When the effective stress increased from 3.45 MPa to 13.79 MPa, the permeability of the clay-rich and calcite-rich samples decreased by 85% and 48%, respectively. Based on Klinkenberg analysis, we found that the mean effective pore radius for the clay-rich sample decreased from 27 nm at 3.45 MPa effective stress to 15 nm at 13.79 MPa effective stress (44% reduction). The mean effective pore radius for the calcite-rich sample decreased from 49 nm to 38 nm (22% reduction). These findings suggest that variations in rock mineralogy lead to different responses in mechanical deformation as the effective stress increases with depletion. Finally, our CO2 permeability measurements show that the CO2 permeability for the clay-rich sample decreased by 40% compared to Argon permeability. The CO2 permeability for the calcite-rich sample did not shift and was equivalent to

  13. AC losses in multifilamentary Bi(2223) tapes with an interfilamentary resistive carbonate barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckelmann, H.; Quilitz, M.; Oomen, M.; Leghissa, M.; Goldacker, W.

    1998-12-01

    For the most common AC application frequencies, the main component of the AC losses in multifilamentary Bi(2223) tapes are caused by hysteresis- and coupling losses. These losses can be reduced enhancing the matrix resistivity and applying a twist to the filaments. We report on the AC loss properties of 37-filament tapes with AgAu (8 wt.%) matrix, and novel 19-filament tapes with SrCO 3 barriers between the filaments. We performed transport AC loss and magnetic AC loss measurements in parallel and perpendicular magnetic fields. Both kinds of tapes were also prepared with filament twists below a twist pitch of 20 mm. The influence of the different tape modifications on the AC loss behaviour is presented and compared with theoretical models to understand the effect of the resistive matrix. In the case of magnetic AC loss measurements, reduced AC losses due to decoupled filaments were observed for the twisted tapes with a resistive matrix in low parallel fields.

  14. A dry-cooled AC quantum voltmeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, M.; Starkloff, M.; Peiselt, K.; Anders, S.; Knipper, R.; Lee, J.; Behr, R.; Palafox, L.; Böck, A. C.; Schaidhammer, L.; Fleischmann, P. M.; Meyer, H.-G.

    2016-10-01

    The paper describes a dry-cooled AC quantum voltmeter system operated up to kilohertz frequencies and 7 V rms. A 10 V programmable Josephson voltage standard (PJVS) array was installed on a pulse tube cooler (PTC) driven with a 4 kW air-cooled compressor. The operating margins at 70 GHz frequencies were investigated in detail and found to exceed 1 mA Shapiro step width. A key factor for the successful chip operation was the low on-chip power consumption of 65 mW in total. A thermal interface between PJVS chip and PTC cold stage was used to avoid a significant chip overheating. By installing the cryocooled PJVS array into an AC quantum voltmeter setup, several calibration measurements of dc standards and calibrator ac voltages up to 2 kHz frequencies were carried out to demonstrate the full functionality. The results are discussed and compared to systems with standard liquid helium cooling. For dc voltages, a direct comparison measurement between the dry-cooled AC quantum voltmeter and a liquid-helium based 10 V PJVS shows an agreement better than 1 part in 1010.

  15. Novel additives to retard permeable flow

    SciTech Connect

    Golombok, Michael; Crane, Carel; Ineke, Erik; Welling, Marco; Harris, Jon

    2008-09-15

    Low concentrations of surfactant and cosolute in water, can selectively retard permeable flow in high permeability rocks compared to low permeability ones. This represents a way forward for more efficient areal sweep efficiency when water flooding a reservoir during improved oil recovery. (author)

  16. Review of Hydrogen Isotope Permeability Through Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Steward, S. A.

    1983-08-15

    This report is the first part of a comprehensive summary of the literature on hydrogen isotope permeability through materials that do not readily form hydrides. While we mainly focus on pure metals with low permeabilities because of their importance to tritium containment, we also give data on higher-permeability materials such as iron, nickel, steels, and glasses.

  17. Structure/Permeability Relationships Of Polyimide Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, A. K.; Yamamoto, H.; Mi, Y.; Stern, S. A.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes experimental study of permeabilities, by each of five gases, of membranes made of four different polyimides. Conducted to gain understanding of effects of molecular structures of membranes on permeabilities and to assess potential for exploitation of selective permeability in gas-separation processes. Gases used: H2, O2, N2, CO2, and CH4.

  18. System level permeability modeling of porous hydrogen storage materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Kanouff, Michael P.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Voskuilen, Tyler

    2010-01-01

    A permeability model for hydrogen transport in a porous material is successfully applied to both laboratory-scale and vehicle-scale sodium alanate hydrogen storage systems. The use of a Knudsen number dependent relationship for permeability of the material in conjunction with a constant area fraction channeling model is shown to accurately predict hydrogen flow through the reactors. Generally applicable model parameters were obtained by numerically fitting experimental measurements from reactors of different sizes and aspect ratios. The degree of channeling was experimentally determined from the measurements and found to be 2.08% of total cross-sectional area. Use of this constant area channeling model and the Knudsen dependent Young & Todd permeability model allows for accurate prediction of the hydrogen uptake performance of full-scale sodium alanate and similar metal hydride systems.

  19. AC Optimal Power Flow

    SciTech Connect

    2016-10-04

    In this work, we have implemented and developed the simulation software to implement the mathematical model of an AC Optimal Power Flow (OPF) problem. The objective function is to minimize the total cost of generation subject to constraints of node power balance (both real and reactive) and line power flow limits (MW, MVAr, and MVA). We have currently implemented the polar coordinate version of the problem. In the present work, we have used the optimization solver, Knitro (proprietary and not included in this software) to solve the problem and we have kept option for both the native numerical derivative evaluation (working satisfactorily now) as well as for analytical formulas corresponding to the derivatives being provided to Knitro (currently, in the debugging stage). Since the AC OPF is a highly non-convex optimization problem, we have also kept the option for a multistart solution. All of these can be decided by the user during run-time in an interactive manner. The software has been developed in C++ programming language, running with GCC compiler on a Linux machine. We have tested for satisfactory results against Matpower for the IEEE 14 bus system.

  20. Nexal membrane permeability to anions

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    The permeability of the septa of the earthworm in the median axon has been calculated for the anions fluorescein and its halogen derivatives. The values ranged from 5.4 X 10(-5) to 4 X 10(-6) cm/s. Previously, the septa had been shown to contain nexuses. By using freeze-fracture material, the surface area of nexus on the septal membranes was determined to be 4.5%, very similar to the percentage of nexus in the intercalated disk of mammalian myocardium. Plasma membrane permeability to these dyes was also calculated and shown to be much less than that of the septal membranes. In addition, an estimate of cytoplasmic binding for each dye was made, and most dyes showed little or no binding with the exception of aminofluorescein. PMID:702107

  1. THE GRADIENT OF VASCULAR PERMEABILITY

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Frederick; Rous, Peyton

    1931-01-01

    A mounting gradient of permeability exists along the capillaries of frog muscle. In chicken muscle on the other hand none has been demonstrated; but the close-knit vascularization is arranged in duplicate in such manner that the blood runs in opposite directions through the capillaries of nearly adjacent fibres. In a flight muscle of the pigeon there exists in addition to this artifice what appears to be a special collecting system of venous capillaries. In the mammalian diaphragm indications of such a system are also to be found, and a gradient of capillary permeability like that in the other skeletal muscles is probably present. These vascular conditions are briefly considered in terms of function. PMID:19869836

  2. Gas permeability of ice-templated, unidirectional porous ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Seuba, Jordi; Deville, Sylvain; Guizard, Christian; Stevenson, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the gas flow behavior of unidirectional porous ceramics processed by ice-templating. The pore volume ranged between 54% and 72% and pore size between 2.9 μm and 19.1 μm. The maximum permeability (k1=1.39 ×10-11 m2) was measured in samples with the highest total pore volume (72%) and pore size (19.1 μm). However, we demonstrate that it is possible to achieve a similar permeability (k1=1.09 ×10-11 m2) at 54% pore volume by modification of the pore shape. These results were compared with those reported and measured for isotropic porous materials processed by conventional techniques. In unidirectional porous materials tortuosity (τ) is mainly controlled by pore size, unlike in isotropic porous structures where τ is linked to pore volume. Furthermore, we assessed the applicability of Ergun and capillary model in the prediction of permeability and we found that the capillary model accurately describes the gas flow behavior of unidirectional porous materials. Finally, we combined the permeability data obtained here with strength data for these materials to establish links between strength and permeability of ice-templated materials. PMID:27877884

  3. Gas permeability of ice-templated, unidirectional porous ceramics.

    PubMed

    Seuba, Jordi; Deville, Sylvain; Guizard, Christian; Stevenson, Adam J

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the gas flow behavior of unidirectional porous ceramics processed by ice-templating. The pore volume ranged between 54% and 72% and pore size between 2.9 [Formula: see text]m and 19.1 [Formula: see text]m. The maximum permeability ([Formula: see text] [Formula: see text] m[Formula: see text]) was measured in samples with the highest total pore volume (72%) and pore size (19.1 [Formula: see text]m). However, we demonstrate that it is possible to achieve a similar permeability ([Formula: see text] [Formula: see text] m[Formula: see text]) at 54% pore volume by modification of the pore shape. These results were compared with those reported and measured for isotropic porous materials processed by conventional techniques. In unidirectional porous materials tortuosity ([Formula: see text]) is mainly controlled by pore size, unlike in isotropic porous structures where [Formula: see text] is linked to pore volume. Furthermore, we assessed the applicability of Ergun and capillary model in the prediction of permeability and we found that the capillary model accurately describes the gas flow behavior of unidirectional porous materials. Finally, we combined the permeability data obtained here with strength data for these materials to establish links between strength and permeability of ice-templated materials.

  4. Identification of /sup 233/Ac

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Y.Y.; Zhou, M.L.

    1983-09-01

    We report in this paper identification of the new isotope /sup 233/Ac. Uranium targets were irradiated with 28 GeV protons; after rapid retrieval of the target and separation of actinium from thorium, /sup 233/Ac was allowed to decay into the known /sup 233/Th daughter. Exhaustive chemical purification was employed to permit the identification of /sup 233/Th via its characteristic ..gamma.. radiations. The half-life derived for /sup 233/Ac from several experiments is 2.3 +- 0.3 min. The production cross section for /sup 233/Ac is 100 ..mu..b.

  5. Permeability of intertidal sandflats: Impact of temporal variability on sediment metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zetsche, E.; Bulling, M. T.; Witte, U.

    2012-07-01

    The effects of sediment permeability on sediment oxygen consumption (SOC) in an intertidal permeable sandflat were studied over a 1-year period. Our study demonstrates that temporal variation in sediment metabolism was not only driven by temperature, but also changes in sediment permeability and total carbon content over time. High SOC rates in the summer months (seasonal mean 36.5 mmol m-2 d-1) could be attributed to high temperatures affecting metabolic processes, the rapid turnover of labile organic material and the presence of large amounts of microphytobenthos and their exudates in interstitial pore spaces. The resultant clogging of pores lowered sediment permeabilities and led to the observation of increasing SOC rates at decreasing permeabilities. Despite higher permeabilities, oxygen consumption rates in winter (seasonal mean 17.3 mmol m-2 d-1) were less than half those measured in the summer, reflecting the presence of more persistent refractory material and lower temperatures. During the winter, a major storm event reworked the sediment and significantly changed the permeability, affecting SOC rates. As sediment permeability rose by ˜25%, SOC rates were increased by ˜35% in the month after the event compared to the previous month. Our results show that temporal variation, not only in temperature and carbon content, but also in sediment permeability, affects sediment metabolism and that resuspension and storm events are necessary to unclog systems and maintain high remineralisation rates in organically poor permeable sands.

  6. Experimental investigation of turbulent flow over a permeable rough wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T.; Blois, G.; Best, J.; Christensen, K. T.

    2015-12-01

    Permeable walls are encountered in a variety of geophysical flows, including alluvial river beds, canopies and urban environments. Permeable walls possess very different boundary conditions as compared to classic impermeable walls (i.e. the slip condition and penetration of flow into the bed). Permeability allows flow interactions across the wall interface, resulting in notable mass, momentum and energy exchange. Such exchange takes place in the so-called transition layer and often occurs through turbulent flow mechanisms. It is increasingly recognized that turbulence plays a key role in a number of important natural functions, including biogeochemical as well as geomorphological processes. However, the flow physics of the transition layer are still poorly understood due to a lack of quantitative investigation of these permeable systems within which physical and optical access are severely compromised. This is particularly true for state-of-the-art flow measurement techniques such as particle image velocimetry (PIV) that require unaberrated optical access to the measurement locations. To overcome optical limitations, a refractive index matching (RIM) technique was employed herein to gain full optical access to the transition layer. Sodium Iodide aqueous solution (63% by weight and RI ~ 1.496 at 20°C) served as a working fluid, and an acrylic resin (RI ~ 1.499) was chosen for fabricating wall models. Measurements were performed using high-resolution planar PIV in different configurations to characterize the turbulent boundary layer and the transition layer. The wall models comprised uniform spheres packed in a cubic arrangement, and two cases were modeled - impermeable and permeable walls that were both rough. To eliminate the effect of roughness, and thus isolate the effect of permeability, the surface roughness of the two wall models was kept identical. This allowed us to obtain a more meaningful comparison and highlight the impact of wall permeability in natural

  7. Basic concepts of induced AC voltages on pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, E.L.

    1995-07-01

    The phenomena of induced AC on pipelines sharing common rights-of-way with overhead high-voltage electrical transmission power lines is discussed. Basic concepts and techniques for personnel safety and some pipeline protective measures are reviewed.

  8. Correlation of Gas Permeability in a Metal-Organic Framework MIL-101(Cr)-Polysulfone Mixed-Matrix Membrane with Free Volume Measurements by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS).

    PubMed

    Jeazet, Harold B Tanh; Koschine, Tönjes; Staudt, Claudia; Raetzke, Klaus; Janiak, Christoph

    2013-10-25

    Hydrothermally stable particles of the metal-organic framework MIL-101(Cr) were incorporated into a polysulfone (PSF) matrix to produce mixed-matrix or composite membranes with excellent dispersion of MIL-101 particles and good adhesion within the polymer matrix. Pure gas (O2, N2, CO2 and CH4) permeation tests showed a significant increase of gas permeabilities of the mixed-matrix membranes without any loss in selectivity. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) indicated that the increased gas permeability is due to the free volume in the PSF polymer and the added large free volume inside the MIL-101 particles. The trend of the gas transport properties of the composite membranes could be reproduced by a Maxwell model.

  9. Correlation of Gas Permeability in a Metal-Organic Framework MIL-101(Cr)–Polysulfone Mixed-Matrix Membrane with Free Volume Measurements by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS)

    PubMed Central

    Jeazet, Harold B. Tanh; Koschine, Tönjes; Staudt, Claudia; Raetzke, Klaus; Janiak, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Hydrothermally stable particles of the metal-organic framework MIL-101(Cr) were incorporated into a polysulfone (PSF) matrix to produce mixed-matrix or composite membranes with excellent dispersion of MIL-101 particles and good adhesion within the polymer matrix. Pure gas (O2, N2, CO2 and CH4) permeation tests showed a significant increase of gas permeabilities of the mixed-matrix membranes without any loss in selectivity. Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) indicated that the increased gas permeability is due to the free volume in the PSF polymer and the added large free volume inside the MIL-101 particles. The trend of the gas transport properties of the composite membranes could be reproduced by a Maxwell model. PMID:24957061

  10. Experimental investigation on the coupled effect of effective stress and gas slippage on the permeability of shale

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Diansen; Wang, Wei; Chen, Weizhong; Wang, Shugang; Wang, Xiaoqiong

    2017-01-01

    Permeability is one of the most important parameters to evaluate gas production in shale reservoirs. Because shale permeability is extremely low, gas is often used in the laboratory to measure permeability. However, the measured apparent gas permeability is higher than the intrinsic permeability due to the gas slippage effect, which could be even more dominant for materials with nanopores. Increasing gas pressure during tests reduces gas slippage effect, but it also decreases the effective stress which in turn influences the permeability. The coupled effect of gas slippage and effective stress on shale permeability remains unclear. Here we perform laboratory experiments on Longmaxi shale specimens to explore the coupled effect. We use the pressure transient method to measure permeability under different stress and pressure conditions. Our results reveal that the apparent measured permeability is controlled by these two competing effects. With increasing gas pressure, there exists a pressure threshold at which the dominant effect on permeability switches from gas slippage to effective stress. Based on the Klinkenberg model, we propose a new conceptual model that incorporates both competing effects. Combining microstructure analysis, we further discuss the roles of stress, gas pressure and water contents on gas permeability of shale. PMID:28304395

  11. Experimental investigation on the coupled effect of effective stress and gas slippage on the permeability of shale.

    PubMed

    Yang, Diansen; Wang, Wei; Chen, Weizhong; Wang, Shugang; Wang, Xiaoqiong

    2017-03-17

    Permeability is one of the most important parameters to evaluate gas production in shale reservoirs. Because shale permeability is extremely low, gas is often used in the laboratory to measure permeability. However, the measured apparent gas permeability is higher than the intrinsic permeability due to the gas slippage effect, which could be even more dominant for materials with nanopores. Increasing gas pressure during tests reduces gas slippage effect, but it also decreases the effective stress which in turn influences the permeability. The coupled effect of gas slippage and effective stress on shale permeability remains unclear. Here we perform laboratory experiments on Longmaxi shale specimens to explore the coupled effect. We use the pressure transient method to measure permeability under different stress and pressure conditions. Our results reveal that the apparent measured permeability is controlled by these two competing effects. With increasing gas pressure, there exists a pressure threshold at which the dominant effect on permeability switches from gas slippage to effective stress. Based on the Klinkenberg model, we propose a new conceptual model that incorporates both competing effects. Combining microstructure analysis, we further discuss the roles of stress, gas pressure and water contents on gas permeability of shale.

  12. Experimental investigation on the coupled effect of effective stress and gas slippage on the permeability of shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Diansen; Wang, Wei; Chen, Weizhong; Wang, Shugang; Wang, Xiaoqiong

    2017-03-01

    Permeability is one of the most important parameters to evaluate gas production in shale reservoirs. Because shale permeability is extremely low, gas is often used in the laboratory to measure permeability. However, the measured apparent gas permeability is higher than the intrinsic permeability due to the gas slippage effect, which could be even more dominant for materials with nanopores. Increasing gas pressure during tests reduces gas slippage effect, but it also decreases the effective stress which in turn influences the permeability. The coupled effect of gas slippage and effective stress on shale permeability remains unclear. Here we perform laboratory experiments on Longmaxi shale specimens to explore the coupled effect. We use the pressure transient method to measure permeability under different stress and pressure conditions. Our results reveal that the apparent measured permeability is controlled by these two competing effects. With increasing gas pressure, there exists a pressure threshold at which the dominant effect on permeability switches from gas slippage to effective stress. Based on the Klinkenberg model, we propose a new conceptual model that incorporates both competing effects. Combining microstructure analysis, we further discuss the roles of stress, gas pressure and water contents on gas permeability of shale.

  13. Insights into reptile dermal contaminant exposure: Reptile skin permeability to pesticides.

    PubMed

    Weir, Scott M; Talent, Larry G; Anderson, Todd A; Salice, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    There is growing interest in improving ecological risk assessment exposure estimation, specifically by incorporating dermal exposure. At the same time, there is a growing interest in amphibians and reptiles as receptors in ecological risk assessment, despite generally receiving less research than more traditional receptors. Previous research has suggested that dermal exposure may be more important than previously considered for reptiles. We measured reptile skin permeability to four pesticides (thiamethoxam, malathion, tebuthiuron, trifluralin) using ventral skin samples. All four pesticides penetrated the skin but generally had low permeability. There was no apparent relationship between physicochemical properties and permeability coefficients. Malathion had a significantly greater permeability rate at all time points compared to the other pesticides. Tebuthiuron had a greater permeability than thiamethoxam. Reptiles and mammals appear to have similar skin permeability suggesting that dermal exposure estimates for mammals may be representative of reptiles.

  14. Experimental investigation the effect of nanoparticles on the oil-water relative permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amedi, Hamidreza; Ahmadi, Mohammad-Ali

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the effects of the nanosilica particles on the water and oil relative permeability curves at reservoir conditions. Real reservoir crude oil sample was employed as an oil phase in relative permeability measurements. In addition, real carbonate reservoir rock samples were employed as a porous media in core displacement experiments. To determine relative permeability curves, the unsteady-state approach was employed in which Toth et al. method was applied to the recovery data points. By increasing the nanosilica content of the aqueous phase the oil relative permeability increased while the residual oil saturation decreased; however, by increasing the nanosilica concentration in the aqueous solution the water relative permeability decreased. The outcomes of this paper can provide a better understanding regarding chemically enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by nanoparticles. Moreover, relative permeability curves help us in the history matching section of reservoir simulation for any further EOR scenarios.

  15. Spatial variations in ac susceptibility and microstructure for the YBa2Cu3O(7-x) superconductor and their correlation with room-temperature ultrasonic measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Deguire, Mark R.; Dolhert, Leonard E.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    1991-01-01

    The spatial (within-sample) uniformity of superconducting behavior and microstructure in YBa2Cu3O(7-x) specimens over the pore fraction range of 0.10 to 0.25 was examined. The viability of using a room-temperature, nondestructive characterization method (ultrasonic velocity imaging) to predict spatial variability was determined. Spatial variations in superconductor properties were observed for specimens containing 0.10 pore fraction. An ultrasonic velocity image constructed from measurements at 1 mm increments across one such specimen revealed microstructural variation between edge and center locations that correlated with variations in alternating-current shielding and loss behavior. Optical quantitative image analysis on sample cross-sections revealed pore fraction to be the varying microstructural feature.

  16. Ocular Albumin Fluorophotometric Quantitation of Endotoxin-Induced Vascular Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, Scott W.; Rosenbaum, James T.; Guss, Robert B.; Egbert, Peter R.

    1982-01-01

    Bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) is known to alter systemic vascular permeability, but this effect is difficult to monitor and quantitate in vivo. The ocular vessels of the rabbit are particularly sensitive to LPS. Using a slit lamp equipped with a fluorophotometer, we have adapted a method to quantitate endotoxin-induced ocular vascular permeability by measuring the accumulation of fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated albumin into the anterior chamber of the eye. After intravenous administration of Salmonella typhimurim LPS, the anterior chamber fluorescence and blood fluorescence were measured at intervals of 15 min and 1 h, respectively, over 4 h. In controls, maximal fluorescence in the anterior chamber was 3.1 ± 0.8% of blood fluorescence. Doses of LPS as low as 0.25 μg/kg produced an ocular/serum fluorescence ratio of 17.6 ± 4.9. A dose of 2.5 μg of LPS per kg tended to produce a higher ratio (68.0 ± 7.1) than a larger dose of 50 μg/kg (30.5 ± 16.6). Permeability changes began within 30 min after LPS, and the rate of dye accumulation varied over time, with maximal leakage usually occurring 90 min after LPS, but occasionally occurring much later. Repeated doses produced tolerance. By conjugating albumin to rhodamine and utilizing a second filter with the slit lamp to measure accumulation of this dye, we demonstrated the persistence of marked permeability during a period when intraocular fluorescein isothiocyanate and albumin levels were relatively constant. This methodology indicates that extremely low doses of LPS induce ocular permeability changes and that neither the time course nor the dose response of this effect is linear. Ocular fluorophotometry is a sensitive, noninvasive technique to study the dynamics and pharmacology of LPS-induced permeability changes. PMID:6806194

  17. Pore-structure models of hydraulic conductivity for permeable pavement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, X.; Sansalone, J.; Ying, G.; Ranieri, V.

    2011-03-01

    SummaryPermeable pavement functions as a porous infrastructure interface allowing the infiltration and evaporation of rainfall-runoff while functioning as a relatively smooth load-bearing surface for vehicular transport. Hydraulic conductivity ( k) of permeable pavement is an important hydraulic property and is a function of the pore structure. This study examines k for a cementitious permeable pavement (CPP) through a series of pore-structure models. Measurements utilized include hydraulic head as well as total porosity, ( ϕ t), effective porosity ( ϕ e), tortuosity ( L e/ L) and pore size distribution (PSD) indices generated through X-ray tomography (XRT). XRT results indicate that the permeable pavement pore matrix is hetero-disperse, with high tortuosity and ϕ t ≠ ϕ e. Power law models of k- ϕ t and k- ϕ e relationships are developed for a CPP mix design. Results indicate that the Krüger, Fair-Hatch, Hazen, Slichter, Beyer and Terzaghi models based on simple pore-structure indices do not reproduce measured k values. The conventional Kozeny-Carman model (KCM), a more parameterized pore-structure model, did not reproduce measured k values. This study proposes a modified KCM utilizing ϕ e, specific surface area (SSA) pe and weighted tortuosity ( L e/ L) w. Results demonstrate that such permeable pavement pore-structure parameters with the modified KCM can predict k. The k results are combined with continuous simulation modeling using historical rainfall to provide nomographs examining permeable pavement as a low impact development (LID) infrastructure component.

  18. Cooling Floor AC Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Lu; Hao, Ding; Hong, Zhang; Ce, Gao Dian

    The present HVAC equipments for the residential buildings in the Hot-summer-and-Cold-winter climate region are still at a high energy consuming level. So that the high efficiency HVAC system is an urgently need for achieving the preset government energy saving goal. With its advantage of highly sanitary, highly comfortable and uniform of temperature field, the hot-water resource floor radiation heating system has been widely accepted. This paper has put forward a new way in air-conditioning, which combines the fresh-air supply unit and such floor radiation system for the dehumidification and cooling in summer or heating in winter. By analyze its advantages and limitations, we found that this so called Cooling/ Heating Floor AC System can improve the IAQ of residential building while keep high efficiency quality. We also recommend a methodology for the HVAC system designing, which will ensure the reduction of energy cost of users.

  19. Water permeability of spider dragline silk.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Eles, Philip T; Michal, Carl A

    2009-05-11

    The water permeability of spider dragline silk was studied by measuring changes in amide deuteration of D(2)O-soaked silk with solid-state NMR. (13)C-D rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) NMR experiments showed that chemical exchange of amide hydrogen occurs in a large fraction of amino acids, including over 50% of alanine residues, which are known to exist predominantly in beta-sheet crystallites. This suggests that a substantial fraction of the crystalline regions are permeable to water, at least on the time scale of hours, implying that they are more dynamic, and therefore susceptible to chemical exchange with water, than previously thought. Wideline deuterium NMR spectra of dried D(2)O-soaked silk showed a combination of quadrupolar broadened and motionally averaged isotropic components whose intensities change on the time scale of hours. These results are interpreted in terms of chemical exchange between deuterium on the protein backbone, residual water within the silk, and water vapor in the ambient atmosphere. A simple compartmental model fits the results well and yields rate constants for the exchange processes. The model requires the inclusion of a compartment that does not undergo exchange. This compartment, likely related to the crystalline region, is interesting because it is accessible to water in wet silk, but impervious to any remaining free water when the silk is dried.

  20. Permeability of oceanic crustal rock samples from IODP Hole 1256D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, L. A.; Bona, M. L.

    2016-09-01

    Permeability is an important parameter of oceanic crust: it controls hydrothermal circulation and influences the exchange of heat and chemicals between seawater and the crust. Using the most complete section of intact, in situ normal oceanic crust, this paper presents the first permeability measurements of samples from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Hole 1256D in a relatively undisturbed section through lavas, dikes, and into gabbros. At in situ pressures, saturated gabbro from Hole 1256D is about half as permeable as basalt (2.4 × 10-20 m2 and 4.0 × 10-20 m2, respectively). Although fresh basalt samples have higher permeabilities, the basalts at Hole 1256D contain saponite, an alteration mineral which drastically reduces permeability. These measurements represent an opportunity for comparison to models that predict permeability at IODP Hole 1256D. Similar to model predictions, sample permeability generally decreases with depth. However, even after applying the scaling rule, models predict higher permeabilities than exhibited by the samples, suggesting large-scale cracks still control permeability in the 15 My old crust at Hole 1256D.

  1. Evolution of blood-brain-barrier permeability after acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics of BBB permeability after AIS in humans are not well understood. In the present study we measured the evolution of BBB permeability after AIS in humans using MRI. Patients presenting to our institution with a diagnosis of AIS underwent a single dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) sequence to measure BBB permeability during their initial workup. Forty-two patients were included in the final analysis. The patient sample underwent DCE-MRI at a mean time of 23.8hrs after the onset of AIS symptoms (range: 1.3–90.7hrs). At all time-points the BBB permeability within the infarct region of the brain as defined on DWI/ADC was higher compared to the homologous region of the contralateral hemisphere (p<0.005). BBB permeability, expressed as a ratio of infarct permeability to contralateral permeability, was greatest at 6-48hrs after the onset of AIS. Although the data was not acquired longitudinally, these findings suggest that the permeability of the BBB is continually elevated following AIS, which contradicts previous assertions that BBB permeability after AIS follows a biphasic course. Knowledge of BBB dynamics following AIS may provide insight into future treatments for AIS, especially BBB stabilizing agents. PMID:28207745

  2. Adsorption, Permeability, and Effective Stress in the Barnett Shale, Texas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermylen, J. P.; Zoback, M. D.

    2010-12-01

    We have been carrying out adsorption and permeability experiments on Barnett shale core samples. For our adsorption work, we seek to understand how rock properties control gas adsorption and also to investigate the potential for carbon dioxide sequestration and enhanced recovery in gas shale rocks. Adsorption experiments have been conducted on crushed, dried Barnett samples using conventional Boyle’s law methods. Langmuir-like adsorption curves have been measured for nitrogen, methane, and carbon dioxide. At 5 MPa (725 psi), N2 adsorption ranges between 0.3-0.5 cc/g (10-17 scf/ton), CH4 adsorption ranges between 0.7-1.1 cc/g (25-40 scf/ton), and CO2 adsorption ranges between 2.5-3.5 cc/g (90-125 scf/ton). These results are consistent with previous analyses of Barnett shale samples and Appalachian shale samples of similar composition. We observe about 3x adsorption of CO2 over CH4 in the Barnett Shale, however, further research is required to investigate the potential for enhanced production of methane with CO2 in these rocks. Our permeability experiments are focused on building effective stress laws for gas shales and investigating the effects of different gases, both adsorbing and non-adsorbing, on permeability. Permeability experiments have been conducted on intact rock plugs using pulse-permeability and static darcy flow methods. We have measured permeabilities ranging from 1500 to 5 nanodarcies on intact samples, both 10x higher and 10x lower than the widely reported 100 nanodarcy average Barnett Shale intact matrix permeability. On a higher permeability shale sample with a carbonate streak, the effective stress coefficient for permeability was found to be 0.82, indicating a moderate impact of pore pressure on permeability. Work to characterize effective stress laws for the lowest permeability samples is ongoing, as is the effect of adsorbing gases on permeability in the Barnett shale.

  3. Upscaling verticle permeability within a fluvio-aeolian reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, S.D.; Corbett, P.W.M.; Jensen, J.L.

    1997-08-01

    Vertical permeability (k{sub v}) is a crucial factor in many reservoir engineering issues. To date there has been little work undertaken to understand the wide variation of k{sub v} values measured at different scales in the reservoir. This paper presents the results of a study in which we have modelled the results of a downhole well tester using a statistical model and high resolution permeability data. The work has demonstrates and quantifies a wide variation in k{sub v} at smaller, near wellbore scales and has implications for k{sub v} modelling at larger scales.

  4. Antidepressants Alter Cerebrovascular Permeability and Metabolic Rate in Primates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preskorn, Sheldon H.; Raichle, Marcus E.; Hartman, Boyd K.

    1982-07-01

    External detection of the annihilation radiation produced by water labeled with oxygen-15 was used to measure cerebrovascular permeability and cerebral blood flow in six rhesus monkeys. Use of oxygen-15 also permitted assessment of cerebral metabolic rate in two of the monkeys. Amitriptyline produced a dose-dependent, reversible increase in permeability at plasma drug concentrations which are therapeutic for depressed patients. At the same concentrations the drug also produced a 20 to 30 percent reduction in cerebral metabolic rate. At higher doses normal autoregulation of cerebral blood flow was suspended, but responsivity to arterial carbon dioxide was normal.

  5. Determination of hydrogen permeability in commercial and modified superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Peterman, W.

    1983-01-01

    The results of hydrogen permeability measurements on several iron- and cobalt-base alloys as well as on two long-ranged ordered alloys over the range of 705 to 870 C (1300 to 1600 F) are summarized. The test alloys included wrought alloys N-155, IN 800, A-286, 19-9DL, and 19-9DL modifications with aluminum, niobium, and misch metal. In addition, XF-818, CRM-6D, SA-F11, and HS-31 were evaluated. Two wrought long-range ordered alloys, Ni3Al and (Fe,Ni)3(V,Al) were also evaluated. All tests were conducted at 20.7 MPa pressure in either pure and/or 1% CO2-doped H2 for test periods as long as 133 h. Detailed analyses were conducted to determine the relative permeability rankings of these alloys and the effect of doping, exit surface oxidation, specimen design variations, and test duration on permeability coefficient, and permeation activation energies were determined. The two long-range ordered alloys had the lowest permeability coefficients in pure H2 when compared with the eight commercial alloys and their modifications. With CO2 doping, significant decrease in permeability was observed in commercial alloys--no doped tests were conducted with the long-range ordered alloys.

  6. Desformylgramicidin: a model channel with an extremely high water permeability.

    PubMed Central

    Saparov, S M; Antonenko, Y N; Koeppe, R E; Pohl, P

    2000-01-01

    The water conductivity of desformylgramicidin exceeds the permeability of gramicidin A by two orders of magnitude. With respect to its single channel hydraulic permeability coefficient of 1.1.10(-12) cm(3) s(-1), desformylgramicidin may serve as a model for extremely permeable aquaporin water channel proteins (AQP4 and AQPZ). This osmotic permeability exceeds the conductivity that is predicted by the theory of single-file transport. It was derived from the concentration distributions of both pore-impermeable and -permeable cations that were simultaneously measured by double barreled microelectrodes in the immediate vicinity of a planar bilayer. From solvent drag experiments, approximately five water molecules were found to be transported by a single-file process along with one ion through the channel. The single channel proton, potassium, and sodium conductivities were determined to be equal to 17 pS (pH 2.5), 7 and 3 pS, respectively. Under any conditions, the desformyl-channel remains at least 10 times longer in its open state than gramicidin A. PMID:11053127

  7. Similarity & Instability in Flows Over Permeable Layers (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisalberti, M.

    2013-12-01

    Permeable obstructions (such as seagrass meadows) are prevalent in the benthic region of freshwater and coastal environments. Their impact on the near-bed flow, turbulence and vertical transport is profound. Here, I use particle imaging and point velocity measurements in both steady and oscillatory flows to demonstrate three salient features of environmental flows over permeable layers: (1) A framework developed for vegetation canopies has the capacity to predict flow, turbulence and mixing properties over a wide range of permeable layers (from sediment beds to coral reefs to 'urban' canopies to ancient rangeomorph communities). (2) Steady flows are characterized by the development of a Kelvin-Helmholtz-type instability at the interface between the permeable layer and the free flow. These coherent structures dominate vertical mixing at the interface and generate regular oscillations in flow and transport. The height of the permeable layer relative to its drag length scale defines three regimes of obstructed shear flow. (3) Such instability is also observed in oscillatory flow when both the Reynolds and Keulegan-Carpenter numbers exceed threshold values. This is important in the prediction of residence time in ecologically-significant benthic habitats that exist in shallow (and therefore, typically, wave-dominated) coastal regions.

  8. Permeability changes in coal resulting from gas desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, J.R.; Johnson, P.M.

    1992-01-01

    Research continued on the study of coal permeability and gas desorption. This quarter, most of the effort involved identifying problems with the microbalance and then getting it repaired. Measurement of the amount of gas adsorbed with the microbalance involved corrections for the buoyancy change with pressure and several experiments with helium were made to determine this correction.

  9. Effect of periodontal root planing on dentin permeability.

    PubMed

    Fogel, H M; Pashley, D H

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitate the effects of root planing on the permeability of human root dentin in vitro. Unerupted 3rd molars were used. The crowns were removed and longitudinal slices made of the root. The hydraulic conductance of the root dentin was measured before and after root planing, acid etching and potassium oxalate application using a fluid filtration method. The results showed that root planing creates a smear layer that reduces the permeability of the underlying dentin. However, this smear layer is acid labile. Thus, root planing may ultimately cause increased dentin permeability and the associated sequelae of sensitive dentin, bacterial invasion of tubules, reduced periodontal reattachment and pulpal irritation.

  10. Microwave permeability of composites filled with thin Fe films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iakubov, Igor T.; Lagarkov, Andrey N.; Maklakov, Sergey A.; Osipov, Alexey V.; Rozanov, Konstantin N.; Ryzhikov, Ilya A.; Starostenko, Sergey N.

    2006-05-01

    The microwave permeability of regular composites filled with thin ferromagnetic discs with in-plane anisotropy is studied. The samples are made of patterned, multi-layered Fe films stacked together to comprise a bulk composite. The permeability is measured in the frequency range of 0.1-10 GHz, and is discussed in terms of constraints to the microwave performance of such composites. The technology suggested allows a composite sample to be produced with the permeability of 2.8, and low magnetic loss at frequencies below 1 GHz, the volume fraction of Fe is as low as 0.77%. Such composites can be useful in the design of microwave inductors, miniaturized wideband antennas, etc.

  11. Oxygen permeability of several ceramic oxides above 1200 degrees C

    SciTech Connect

    Courtright, E.L.; Prater, J.T.

    1992-01-01

    Oxygen permeability as a function of temperature was measured for several ceramic oxides over the range 1200 to 1700{degrees}C. Of the oxides testbed, alumina, beryllia, yttria, lanthanum halfnate, and calcium zironcate exhibited the lowest permeabilities in order of decreasing resistance to oxygen transport. None of the permeability constants were less than the 10{sup {minus}10} to 10{sup {minus}12} g O{sub 2}/cm {center dot} s needed for a useful protective coating system above 1500{degrees}C. In some of the mixed oxide compounds, cation segregation was observed to occur with the more rapidly diffusing species segregating to the side of highest oxygen potential. Thus, segregation must be considered when selecting mixed oxides for high temperature applications.

  12. Geotechnology for low-permeability gas reservoirs, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.; Harstad, H.; Lorenz, J.; Warpinski, N.; Boneau, T.; Holcomb, D.; Teufel, L.; Young, C.

    1995-06-01

    The permeability, and thus the economics, of tight reservoirs are largely dependent on natural fractures, and on the in situ stresses that both originated fractures and control subsequent fracture permeability. Natural fracture permeability ultimately determines the gas (or oil) producibility from the rock matrix. Therefore, it is desirable to be able to predict, both prior to drilling and during reservoir production, (1) the natural fracture characteristics, (2) the mechanical and transport properties of fractures and the surrounding rock matrix, and (3) the present in situ stress magnitudes and orientations. The combination of activities described in this report extends the earlier work to other Rocky Mountain gas reservoirs. Additionally, it extends the fracture characterizations to attempts of crosswell geophysical fracture detection using shear wave birefringence and to obtaining detailed quantitative models of natural fracture systems for use in improved numerical reservoir simulations. Finally, the project continues collaborative efforts to evaluate and advance cost-effective methods for in situ stress measurements on core.

  13. Water retention and gas relative permeability of two industrial concretes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Wei; Liu Jian; Brue, Flore; Skoczylas, Frederic; Davy, C.A.; Bourbon, Xavier; Talandier, Jean

    2012-07-15

    This experimental study aims at identifying the water retention properties of two industrial concretes to be used for long term underground nuclear waste storage structures. Together with water retention, gas transfer properties are identified at varying water saturation level, i.e. relative gas permeability is assessed directly as a function of water saturation level S{sub w}. The influence of the initial de-sorption path and of the subsequent re-saturation are analysed both in terms of water retention and gas transfer properties. Also, the influence of concrete microstructure upon water retention and relative gas permeability is assessed, using porosity measurements, analysis of the BET theory from water retention properties, and MIP. Finally, a single relative gas permeability curve is proposed for each concrete, based on Van Genuchten-Mualem's statistical model, to be used for continuous modelling approaches of concrete structures, both during drying and imbibition.

  14. Kinetin Increases Water Permeability of Phosphatidylcholine Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Stillwell, William; Hester, Paul

    1983-01-01

    Kinetin is shown to increase substantially the water permeability of liposomes composed of several types of phosphatidylcholines including the natural phospholipids egg lecithin and asolectin and the synthetic phospholipids dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine. Kinetin effects were measured from 16.3 micromolar to 2.4 millimolar at temperatures from 10°C to 50°C and at pH 2.0, 7.0, and 11.0. Temperature studies indicate that kinetin produces a larger increase in water permeability with membranes in the more fluid liquid crystalline state. Kinetin is also shown to enhance [14C]glucose permeability and perhaps promotes membrane aggregation. From these experiments, we conclude that kinetin may produce its initial effect by altering the lipid bilayer portion of membranes. PMID:16662860

  15. Associations among gut permeability, inflammatory markers, and symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alterations in gastrointestinal (GI) permeability and immune measures are present in some patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) but the relationship to symptoms is poorly defined. In adults with IBS, we compared permeability, unstimulated peripheral blood monocyte (PBMC) interleukin-10 (IL-10...

  16. Intestinal Permeability and Glucagon-Like Peptide-2 in Children with Autism: A Controlled Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Marli A.; Sigalet, David L.; Holst, Jens J.; Meddings, Jon B.; Wood, Julie; Sharkey, Keith A.

    2008-01-01

    We measured small intestinal permeability using a lactulose:mannitol sugar permeability test in a group of children with autism, with current or previous gastrointestinal complaints. Secondly, we examined whether children with autism had an abnormal glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) response to feeding. Results were compared with sibling controls…

  17. The Membrane Permeability Outcome study.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, Francesco; Cavalli, Andrea; Manzoni, Celestina; Pontoriero, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Many observational studies have consistently shown that high-flux hemodialysis has positive effects on the survival and morbidity of uremic patients when compared with low-flux hemodialysis. However, the HEMO study, a randomized trial designed to evaluate the effect of membrane permeability on patient survival, showed only an 8% non-statistically significant reduction of mortality, albeit a secondary analysis suggested an advantage for high-flux membranes in certain patient subgroups. The prospective, randomized Membrane Permeability Outcome (MPO) study investigated the impact of membrane permeability on survival in incident hemodialysis patients who had low albumin (≤4 g/dl) and normal albumin ( >4 g/dl) as separate randomization groups. Patients with serum albumin ≤4 g/dl had significantly better survival rates in the high-flux group compared with the low-flux group (p = 0.032). Moreover, a post-hoc secondary analysis showed that high-flux membranes may significantly improve survival in diabetic patients. No difference was found in patients with normal albumin levels. Considering the increasing number of dialysis patients with low serum albumin levels and with diabetes, the relevance of the MPO study led to the publication of a position statement by the European Renal Best Practice Advisory Board. This board strongly recommended that high-flux hemodialysis should be used for high-risk patients and, with a lower degree of evidence, even also for low-risk subjects due to the substantial reduction in β(2)-microglobulin levels observed in the high-flux group.

  18. Large aperture ac interferometer for optical testing.

    PubMed

    Moore, D T; Murray, R; Neves, F B

    1978-12-15

    A 20-cm clear aperture modified Twyman-Green interferometer is described. The system measures phase with an AC technique called phase-lock interferometry while scanning the aperture with a dual galvanometer scanning system. Position information and phase are stored in a minicomputer with disk storage. This information is manipulated with associated software, and the wavefront deformation due to a test component is graphically displayed in perspective and contour on a CRT terminal.

  19. Increased pulmonary and intestinal permeability in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Adenis, A; Colombel, J F; Lecouffe, P; Wallaert, B; Hecquet, B; Marchandise, X; Cortot, A

    1992-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that an increased epithelial permeability may affect sites other than the intestine in patients with Crohn's disease by simultaneously evaluating their pulmonary and intestinal permeability. Pulmonary and intestinal permeability were measured by clearance of inhaled technetium-99m diethylene triamine pentacetate (99mTc-DTPA) and by urinary recovery of chromium-51 ethylene diamine tetracetate respectively in 22 patients with Crohn's disease. The half time clearance of 99mTc-DTPA from lung to blood (t1/2LB) was decreased--that is pulmonary permeability increased--in the whole group of patients with Crohn's disease as compared with 13 controls (median 45.5 minutes (8-160) v 85 minutes (34-130) (p less than 0.003)). When analysed separately only patients with active Crohn's disease (n = 15) had a decreased t1/2 lung to blood v controls (42 minutes (8-160) v 85 minutes (34-130) (p less than 0.0025)). Among patients with active Crohn's disease, six were studied again when their disease was quiescent and their t1/2 lung to blood did not differ significantly. The intestinal permeability was increased in the whole group of Crohn's disease patients as compared with 15 controls (5.25% (1.2-24) v 1.7% (0.65-5.75) (p less than 0.0002)). When analysed separately both patients with active and inactive Crohn's disease had increased intestinal permeability v controls (8.1% (1.6-24) and 3.5% (1.2.9.2) v 1.7% (0.65-5.75)) (p less than 0.0001, p = 0.05 respectively). Six patients with active Crohn's disease were studied again when their disease was quiescent and their intestinal permeability decreased significantly p less than 0.04). Pulmonary permeability was increased in patients with Crohn's disease but was not greatly influenced by Crohn's disease activity as opposed to intestinal permeability. The mechanism of this increase is unknown, but may be related in some patients to the presence of an alveolitis. PMID:1612487

  20. Enhancement of apparent substrate selectivity of proteinase K encapsulated in liposomes through a cholate-induced alteration of the bilayer permeability.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Makoto; Wang, Shaoqing; Fukunaga, Kimitoshi; Treyer, Mike; Walde, Peter; Kuboi, Ryoichi; Nakao, Katsumi

    2004-01-20

    Proteinase K-containing liposomes with highly selective membrane permeability properties were prepared. The selectivity obtained was with respect to the two substrate molecules added to the external aqueous phase of the liposomes: acetyl-L-Ala-Ala-Ala-p-nitroanilide (Ac-AAA-pNA) and succinyl-L-Ala-Ala-Ala-p-nitroanilide (Suc-AAA-pNA). The liposome-forming lipid used was POPC (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) and modulation of the membrane permeability was achieved using the detergent cholate. Proteinase K-containing mixed liposomes (PKCL) were prepared by adding cholate to preformed proteinase K-containing POPC liposomes (PKL) at a defined effective cholate/POPC molar ratio in the liposomal bilayer membrane R(e). Proteinase K was kept inside PKCL with a negligible amount of leakage into the bulk aqueous phase at R(e) < or = 0.30. At higher R(e), leakage of proteinase K was pronounced, even under conditions where POPC/cholate mixed liposomes seemed to be still intact (0.30 < R(e) < or = 0.39). At R(e) < or = 0.30, the reactivity of proteinase K in the PKCL measured with the externally added substrate Ac-AAA-pNA increased with increasing R(e), while the reactivity measured with Suc-AAA-pNA remained low, regardless of the R(e) value. This showed that externally added Ac-AAA-pNA molecules permeated the liposomal membrane more easily than Suc-AAA-pNA by modulating the membrane with cholate. Consequently, Ac-AAA-pNA was hydrolyzed in PKCL with considerably higher apparent substrate selectivity in comparison with the cases of proteinase K in PKL and free proteinase K (without liposomal encapsulation). The results obtained clearly demonstrate that the prepared PKCL can be utilized as a kind of nano-scaled bioreactor system which can take up a particular target substrate with high apparent substrate selectively from the external phase of the liposomes. Inside the liposomes, the target substrate is then converted into the corresponding products.

  1. Theoretical studies of permeability inversion from seismoelectric logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, H.; Guan, W.; Zhao, W.

    2012-04-01

    fluid, f is the frequency. According to this approximate expression, if porosity, tortuosity and pore fluid properties (density and viscosity) have been measured by some methods or estimated by empirical formulas, permeability can be inverted by calculating tan(θEP) and using its corresponding frequency. To test this method, permeabilities of different sandstones are inverted from the synthetic full-waveform data of the seismoelectric logs. A modified inversion process is proposed based on the analysis of the inversion errors, by which the relative errors are controlled below 25% and they are smaller than those of the permeability inversion from the Stoneley wave logs. This study is supported by National Natural Science Foundations of China (41174110), Natural Science Foundation of Heilongjiang Province of China (QC2010025), Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (20102302120024), Postdoctoral Science Foundation of China (2011M500651).

  2. Brain permeability of inhaled corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Arya, Vikram; Issar, Manish; Wang, Yaning; Talton, James D; Hochhaus, Guenther

    2005-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if the permeability of inhaled corticosteroids entering the brain is reduced and if P-glycoprotein (P-gp) transporters are involved. Currently employed inhaled corticosteroids were given intravenously and intratracheally to rats at a dose of 100 microg kg-1. An ex-vivo receptor binding assay was used to monitor over 12 h the glucocorticoid receptor occupancy in the brain and a systemic reference organ (kidney). The involvement of P-gp in the brain permeability of triamcinolone acetonide was assessed in wild-type mice and mdr1a(-/-) knockout mice (mice lacking the gene for expressing P-gp). After both forms of administration, the average brain receptor occupancies were 20-56% of those of the reference organ, with the more lipophilic drugs showing a more pronounced receptor occupation. While the receptor occupancies in the liver of wild-type and mdr1a(-/-) mice were similar after administration of triamcinolone acetonide, brain receptor occupancies in mdr1a(-/-) mice were significantly greater (mdr1a(-/-): 47.6%, 40.2-55.0%, n=14; 2; wild-type: 11.5+/-33.0%, n=14; 3). Penetration into the brain for inhaled corticosteroids (especially those of lower lipophilicity) is reduced. Experiments in mdr1a(-/-) mice confirmed the involvement of P-gp transporters. Further studies are needed to assess whether potential drug interactions at the transporter level are of pharmacological significance.

  3. Influence of Decenylsuccinic Acid on Water Permeability of Plant Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, O. Y.; Stadelmann, Ed. J.; Weiser, C. J.

    1972-01-01

    Decenylsuccinic acid altered permeability to water of epidermal cells of bulb scales of Allium cepa and of the leaf midrib of Rhoeo discolor. Water permeability, as determined by deplasmolysis time measurements, was related to the dose of undissociated decenylsuccinic acid (mm undissociated decenylsuccinic acid × minute). No relationship was found between permeability and total dose of decenylsuccinic acid, or dose of dissociated decenylsuccinic acid, suggesting that the undissociated molecule was the active factor in permeability changes and injury. At doses which did not damage cells (0.0008 to 0.6 [mm of the undissociated molecule × minute]) decenylsuccinic acid decreased water permeability. At higher doses (e.g., 4 to 8 [mm × minute]) injury to cells was common and decenylsuccinic acid increased permeability. Doses above the 10 to 20 (mm × minute) range were generally lethal. The plasmolysis form of uninjured cells was altered and protoplasmic swelling occasionally was observed. The dose-dependent reversal of water permeability changes (decreased to increased permeability) may reflect decenylsuccinic acid-induced changes in membrane structure. Reported effects of decenylsuccinic acid on temperature dependence of permeability and frost resistance were not verified. Images PMID:16658227

  4. The role of geology in the behavior and choice of permeability predictors

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, L.D.; Corbett, P.W.M.; Jensen, J.L.; Lewis, J.J.M.

    1997-03-01

    For effective flow-simulation models, it may be important to estimate permeability accurately over several scales of geological heterogeneity. Critical to the data analysis and permeability prediction are the volume of investigation and sampling interval of each petrophysical tool and how each relates to these geological scales. The authors examine these issues in the context of the As Sarah Field, Sirte Basin, Libya. A geological study of this braided fluvial reservoir has revealed heterogeneity at a series of scales. This geological hierarchy in turn possessed a corresponding hierarchy of permeability variation.The link between the geology and permeability was found to be very important in understanding well logs and core data and subsequent permeability upscaling. They found that the small scale (cm) permeability variability was better predicted using a flushed-zone resistivity, R{sub xo}, tool, rather than a wireline porosity measurement. The perm-resistivity correlation was strongest when the probe permeabilities were averaged to best match the window size of the wireline R{sub xo}. This behavior was explained by the geological variation present at this scale. For the larger scale geological heterogeneity, the production flowmeter highlighted discrepancies between flow data and averaged permeability. This yielded a layered sedimentological model interpretation and a change in averaging for permeability prediction at the bedset scale (ms-10 x ms).

  5. Osmotic flow through fully permeable nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Lee, C; Cottin-Bizonne, C; Biance, A-L; Joseph, P; Bocquet, L; Ybert, C

    2014-06-20

    Osmosis across membranes is intrinsically associated with the concept of semipermeability. Here, however, we demonstrate that osmotic flow can be generated by solute gradients across nonselective, fully permeable nanochannels. Using a fluorescence imaging technique, we are able to measure the water flow rate inside single nanochannels to an unprecedented sensitivity of femtoliters per minute flow rates. Our results indicate the onset of a convective liquid motion under salinity gradients, from the higher to lower electrolyte concentration, which is attributed to diffusio-osmotic transport. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence and quantitative investigation of this subtle interfacially driven transport, which need to be accounted for in nanoscale dynamics. Finally, diffusio-osmotic transport under a neutral polymer gradient is also demonstrated. The experiments highlight the entropic depletion of polymers that occurs at the nanochannel surface, resulting in convective flow in the opposite direction to that seen for electrolytes.

  6. Osmotic Flow through Fully Permeable Nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.; Cottin-Bizonne, C.; Biance, A.-L.; Joseph, P.; Bocquet, L.; Ybert, C.

    2014-06-01

    Osmosis across membranes is intrinsically associated with the concept of semipermeability. Here, however, we demonstrate that osmotic flow can be generated by solute gradients across nonselective, fully permeable nanochannels. Using a fluorescence imaging technique, we are able to measure the water flow rate inside single nanochannels to an unprecedented sensitivity of femtoliters per minute flow rates. Our results indicate the onset of a convective liquid motion under salinity gradients, from the higher to lower electrolyte concentration, which is attributed to diffusio-osmotic transport. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence and quantitative investigation of this subtle interfacially driven transport, which need to be accounted for in nanoscale dynamics. Finally, diffusio-osmotic transport under a neutral polymer gradient is also demonstrated. The experiments highlight the entropic depletion of polymers that occurs at the nanochannel surface, resulting in convective flow in the opposite direction to that seen for electrolytes.

  7. Mitochondrial permeability transition pore and calcium handling.

    PubMed

    Wong, Renee; Steenbergen, Charles; Murphy, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Opening of a large conductance channel in the inner mitochondrial membrane, known as the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore, has been shown to be a primary mediator of cell death in the heart subjected to ischemia-reperfusion injury. Inhibitors of the MPT have been shown to reduce cardiac ischemia-reperfusion injury. Furthermore, most cardioprotective strategies appear to reduce ischemic cell death either by reducing the triggers for the opening of the MPT, such as reducing calcium overload or reactive oxygen species, or by more direct inhibition of the MPT. This chapter focuses on key issues in the study of the MPT and provides some methods for measuring MPT opening in isolated mitochondria.

  8. Fast electric dipole transitions in Ra-Ac nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.

    1985-01-01

    Lifetime of levels in /sup 225/Ra, /sup 225/Ac, and /sup 227/Ac have been measured by delayed coincidence techniques and these have been used to determine the E1 gamma-ray transition probabilities. The reduced E1 transition probabilities. The reduced E1 transition probabilities in /sup 225/Ra and /sup 225/Ac are about two orders of magnitude larger than the values in mid-actinide nuclei. On the other hand, the E1 rate in /sup 227/Ac is similar to those measured in heavier actinides. Previous studies suggest the presence of octupole deformation in all the three nuclei. The present investigation indicates that fast E1 transitions occur for nuclei with octupole deformation. However, the studies also show that there is no one-to-one correspondence between E1 rate and octupole deformation. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Layoff Handling Still Lags ACS Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Reviews termination procedures of professional chemists and the compliance of these terminations to the American Chemical Society's (ACS's) Professional Employment Guidelines. Provides the ACS guidelines. (DS)

  10. AC plasma anemometer—characteristics and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Curtis; Matlis, Eric; Corke, Thomas; Gogineni, Sivaram

    2015-08-01

    The characteristics and design of a high-bandwidth flow sensor that uses an AC glow discharge (plasma) as the sensing element is presented. The plasma forms in the air gap between two protruding low profile electrodes attached to a probe body. The output from the anemometer is an amplitude modulated version of the AC voltage input that contains information about the mean and fluctuating velocity components. The anemometer circuitry includes resistance and capacitance elements that simulate a dielectric-barrier to maintain a diffuse plasma, and a constant-current feedback control that maintains operation within the desired glow discharge regime over an extended range of air velocities. Mean velocity calibrations are demonstrated over a range from 0 to 140 m s-1. Over this velocity range, the mean output voltage varied linearly with air velocity, providing a constant static sensitivity. The effect of the electrode gap and input AC carrier frequency on the anemometer static sensitivity and dynamic response are investigated. Experiments are performed to compare measurements obtained with a plasma sensor operating at two AC carrier frequencies against that of a constant-temperature hot-wire. All three sensors were calibrated against the same known velocity reference. An uncertainty based on the standard deviation of the velocity calibration fit was applied to the mean and fluctuating velocity measurements of the three sensors. The motivation is not to replace hot-wires as a general measurement tool, but rather as an alternative to hot-wires in harsh environments or at high Mach numbers where they either have difficulty in surviving or lack the necessary frequency response.

  11. Vortex rings impinging on permeable boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mujal-Colilles, Anna; Dalziel, Stuart B.; Bateman, Allen

    2015-01-01

    Experiments with vortex rings impinging permeable and solid boundaries are presented in order to investigate the influence of permeability. Utilizing Particle Image Velocimetry, we compared the behaviour of a vortex ring impinging four different reticulated foams (with permeability k ˜ 26 - 85 × 10-8 m2) and a solid boundary. Results show how permeability affects the stretching phenomena of the vortex ring and the formation and evolution of the secondary vortex ring with opposite sign. Moreover, permeability also affects the macroscopic no-slip boundary condition found on the solid boundary, turning it into an apparent slip boundary condition for the most permeable boundary. The apparent slip-boundary condition and the flux exchange between the ambient fluid and the foam are jointly responsible for both the modified formation of the secondary vortex and changes on the vortex ring diameter increase.

  12. Clogging in permeable concrete: A review.

    PubMed

    Kia, Alalea; Wong, Hong S; Cheeseman, Christopher R

    2017-05-15

    Permeable concrete (or "pervious concrete" in North America) is used to reduce local flooding in urban areas and is an important sustainable urban drainage system. However, permeable concrete exhibits reduction in permeability due to clogging by particulates, which severely limits service life. This paper reviews the clogging mechanism and current mitigating strategies in order to inform future research needs. The pore structure of permeable concrete and characteristics of flowing particulates influence clogging, which occurs when particles build-up and block connected porosity. Permeable concrete requires regular maintenance by vacuum sweeping and pressure washing, but the effectiveness and viability of these methods is questionable. The potential for clogging is related to the tortuosity of the connected porosity, with greater tortuosity resulting in increased potential for clogging. Research is required to develop permeable concrete that can be poured on-site, which produces a pore structure with significantly reduced tortuosity.

  13. Advanced Glycation End-Product Accumulation Reduces Vitreous Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Lee, On-Tat; Good, Samuel D.; Lamy, Ricardo; Kudisch, Max; Stewart, Jay M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the effect of nonenzymatic cross-linking (glycation) upon the permeability of the vitreous to small- and large-solute diffusion. Methods. Vitreous from freshly excised porcine eyes was treated for 30 minutes with control or 0.01%, 0.1%, or 1% methylglyoxal (MG) solution. The efficacy of the glycation regimen was verified by measuring nonenzymatic cross-link density by fluorescence in the vitreous samples. Resistance to collagenase digestion as well as Nε-(carboxyethyl) lysine (CEL) content were also measured. The permeability coefficient for fluorescein and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-IgG diffusion through 3 mL of the vitreous samples was determined by using a custom permeability tester. Results. Vitreous cross-linking with MG treatment was confirmed by increased fluorescence, increased CEL concentration, and increased resistance to collagenase digestion. Vitreous glycation resulted in a statistically significant decrease in the permeability coefficient for fluorescein diffusion when either 0.1% or 1% MG solution was used (5.36 ± 5.24 × 10−5 cm s−1, P = 0.04; and 4.03 ± 2.1 × 10−5 cm s−1, P = 0.001; respectively, compared with control, 9.77 ± 5.45 × 10−5 cm s−1). The permeability coefficient for diffusion of FITC-IgG between control (9.9 ± 6.37 × 10−5 cm s−1) and treatment groups was statistically significant at all MG concentrations (0.01% MG: 3.95 ± 3.44 × 10−5 cm s−1, P = 0.003; 0.1% MG: 4.27 ± 1.32 × 10−5 cm s−1, P = 0.004; and 0.1% MG: 3.72 ± 2.49 × 10−5 cm s−1, P = 0.001). Conclusions. Advanced glycation end-product (AGE) accumulation reduces vitreous permeability when glycation is performed in ex vivo porcine vitreous. The permeability change was more pronounced for the larger solute, suggesting a lower threshold for AGE-induced permeability changes to impact the movement of proteins through the vitreous when compared with smaller molecules. PMID:26024075

  14. Experimental characterization of in-plane permeability of gas diffusion layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feser, J. P.; Prasad, A. K.; Advani, S. G.

    Recent studies indicate that PEM fuel cell performance may be strongly influenced by in-plane permeability of the gas diffusion layer (GDL). The current study employs a radial flow technique for obtaining in-plane permeability of GDLs, using either gas or liquid as the impregnating fluid. A model has been developed and experimentally verified to account for compressibility effects when permeability measurements are conducted using a gas. Permeability experiments are performed on samples of woven, non-woven, and carbon fiber-based GDL at various levels of compression using air as the impregnating fluid. Woven and non-woven samples are measured to have significantly higher in-plane permeability compared to carbon fiber paper at similar solid volume fractions.

  15. Tritium Permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617

    SciTech Connect

    Philip Winston; Pattrick Calderoni; Paul Humrickhouse

    2012-07-01

    Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) reactor and its high-temperature components requires information regarding the permeation of fission generated tritium and hydrogen product through candidate heat exchanger alloys. Release of fission-generated tritium to the environment and the potential contamination of the helium coolant by permeation of product hydrogen into the coolant system represent safety basis and product contamination issues. Of the three potential candidates for high-temperature components of the NGNP reactor design, only permeability for Incoloy 800H has been well documented. Hydrogen permeability data have been published for Inconel 617, but only in two literature reports and for partial pressures of hydrogen greater than one atmosphere, far higher than anticipated in the NGNP reactor. To support engineering design of the NGNP reactor components, the tritium permeability of Inconel 617 and Incoloy 800H was determined using a measurement system designed and fabricated at Idaho National Laboratory. The tritium permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617, was measured in the temperature range 650 to 950°C and at primary concentrations of 1.5 to 6 parts per million volume tritium in helium. (partial pressures of 10-6 atm)—three orders of magnitude lower partial pressures than used in the hydrogen permeation testing. The measured tritium permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617 deviated substantially from the values measured for hydrogen. This may be due to instrument offset, system absorption, presence of competing quantities of hydrogen, surface oxides, or other phenomena. Due to the challenge of determining the chemical composition of a mixture with such a low hydrogen isotope concentration, no categorical explanation of this offset has been developed.

  16. Tritium Permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617

    SciTech Connect

    Philip Winston; Pattrick Calderoni; Paul Humrickhouse

    2011-09-01

    Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) reactor and its high-temperature components requires information regarding the permeation of fission generated tritium and hydrogen product through candidate heat exchanger alloys. Release of fission-generated tritium to the environment and the potential contamination of the helium coolant by permeation of product hydrogen into the coolant system represent safety basis and product contamination issues. Of the three potential candidates for high-temperature components of the NGNP reactor design, only permeability for Incoloy 800H has been well documented. Hydrogen permeability data have been published for Inconel 617, but only in two literature reports and for partial pressures of hydrogen greater than one atmosphere, far higher than anticipated in the NGNP reactor. To support engineering design of the NGNP reactor components, the tritium permeability of Inconel 617 and Incoloy 800H was determined using a measurement system designed and fabricated at Idaho National Laboratory. The tritium permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617, was measured in the temperature range 650 to 950 C and at primary concentrations of 1.5 to 6 parts per million volume tritium in helium. (partial pressures of 10-6 atm) - three orders of magnitude lower partial pressures than used in the hydrogen permeation testing. The measured tritium permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617 deviated substantially from the values measured for hydrogen. This may be due to instrument offset, system absorption, presence of competing quantities of hydrogen, surface oxides, or other phenomena. Due to the challenge of determining the chemical composition of a mixture with such a low hydrogen isotope concentration, no categorical explanation of this offset has been developed.

  17. HVDC-AC system interaction from AC harmonics. Volume 1. Harmonic impedance calculations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Breuer, G D; Chow, J H; Lindh, C B; Miller, N W; Numrich, F H; Price, W W; Turner, A E; Whitney, R R

    1982-09-01

    Improved methods are needed to characterize ac system harmonic behavior for ac filter design for HVDC systems. The purpose of this General Electric Company RP1138 research is to evaluate the present filter design practice and to investigate methods for calculating system harmonic impedances. An overview of ac filter design for HVDC systems and a survey of literature related to filter design have been performed. Two methods for calculating system harmonic impedances have been investigated. In the measurement method, an instrumentation system for measuring system voltage and current has been assembled. Different schemes of using the measurements to calculate system harmonic impedances have been studied. In the analytical method, a procedure to include various operating conditions has been proposed. Computer programs for both methods have been prepared, and the results of the measurement and analytical methods analyzed. A conclusion of the project is that the measurement and analytical methods both provided reasonable results. There are correlations between the measured and analytical results for most harmonics, although there are discrepancies between the assumptions used in the two methods. A sensitivity approach has been proposed to further correlate the results. From the results of the analysis, it is recommended that both methods should be tested further. For the measurement method, more testing should be done to cover different system operating conditions. In the analytical method, more detailed models for representing system components should be studied. In addition, alternative statistical and sensitivity approaches should be attempted.

  18. Search for {beta}-delayed fission of {sup 228}Ac

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Yanbing; Ding Huajie; Yuan Shuanggui; Yang Weifan; Niu Yanning; Li Yingjun; Xiao Yonghou; Zhang Shengdong; Lu Xiting

    2006-10-15

    Radium was radiochemically separated from natural thorium. Thin {sup 228}Ra{yields}{beta}{sup -228}Ac sources were prepared and exposed to mica fission track detectors, and measured by an HPGe {gamma}-ray detector. The {beta}-delayed fission events of {sup 228}Ac were observed and its {beta}-delayed fission probability was found to be (5{+-}2)x10{sup -12}.

  19. Vascular permeability in cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Mikati, Abdul G; Khanna, Omaditya; Zhang, Lingjiao; Girard, Romuald; Shenkar, Robert; Guo, Xiaodong; Shah, Akash; Larsson, Henrik B W; Tan, Huan; Li, Luying; Wishnoff, Matthew S; Shi, Changbin; Christoforidis, Gregory A; Awad, Issam A

    2015-10-01

    Patients with the familial form of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are haploinsufficient for the CCM1, CCM2, or CCM3 gene. Loss of corresponding CCM proteins increases RhoA kinase-mediated endothelial permeability in vitro, and in mouse brains in vivo. A prospective case-controlled observational study investigated whether the brains of human subjects with familial CCM show vascular hyperpermeability by dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, in comparison with CCM cases without familial disease, and whether lesional or brain vascular permeability correlates with CCM disease activity. Permeability in white matter far (WMF) from lesions was significantly greater in familial than in sporadic cases, but was similar in CCM lesions. Permeability in WMF increased with age in sporadic patients, but not in familial cases. Patients with more aggressive familial CCM disease had greater WMF permeability compared to those with milder disease phenotype, but similar lesion permeability. Subjects receiving statin medications for routine cardiovascular indications had a trend of lower WMF, but not lesion, permeability. This is the first demonstration of brain vascular hyperpermeability in humans with an autosomal dominant disease, as predicted mechanistically. Brain permeability, more than lesion permeability, may serve as a biomarker of CCM disease activity, and help calibrate potential drug therapy.

  20. Vascular permeability in cerebral cavernous malformations

    PubMed Central

    Mikati, Abdul G; Khanna, Omaditya; Zhang, Lingjiao; Girard, Romuald; Shenkar, Robert; Guo, Xiaodong; Shah, Akash; Larsson, Henrik BW; Tan, Huan; Li, Luying; Wishnoff, Matthew S; Shi, Changbin; Christoforidis, Gregory A; Awad, Issam A

    2015-01-01

    Patients with the familial form of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are haploinsufficient for the CCM1, CCM2, or CCM3 gene. Loss of corresponding CCM proteins increases RhoA kinase-mediated endothelial permeability in vitro, and in mouse brains in vivo. A prospective case-controlled observational study investigated whether the brains of human subjects with familial CCM show vascular hyperpermeability by dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, in comparison with CCM cases without familial disease, and whether lesional or brain vascular permeability correlates with CCM disease activity. Permeability in white matter far (WMF) from lesions was significantly greater in familial than in sporadic cases, but was similar in CCM lesions. Permeability in WMF increased with age in sporadic patients, but not in familial cases. Patients with more aggressive familial CCM disease had greater WMF permeability compared to those with milder disease phenotype, but similar lesion permeability. Subjects receiving statin medications for routine cardiovascular indications had a trend of lower WMF, but not lesion, permeability. This is the first demonstration of brain vascular hyperpermeability in humans with an autosomal dominant disease, as predicted mechanistically. Brain permeability, more than lesion permeability, may serve as a biomarker of CCM disease activity, and help calibrate potential drug therapy. PMID:25966944

  1. Effect of endodontic procedures on root dentin permeability.

    PubMed

    Tao, L; Anderson, R W; Pashley, D H

    1991-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitate the sequential effects of endodontic procedures on the permeability of human root dentin in vitro. Forty single-rooted teeth were used. Both the crown and the apical 2 mm of the root were removed. The hydraulic conductance of the root before and after various endodontic procedures was measured using a fluid filtration method. Measurements were also made of dentin thickness, intracanal diameter changes, and changes in intracanal surface area. The results showed that instrumentation by K files alone or in combination with Gates Glidden drills did not alter radicular dentin permeability when the cementum remained intact. After removing the cementum, the creation of a smear layer and smear plugs on the canal surface tended to offset the expected increase in dentin permeability created by increasing the intracanal surface area and decreasing root dentin thickness. EDTA treatment inside the instrumented canal to remove the smear layer did not increase permeability significantly. The use of K files followed by Gates Glidden drills tended to remove more cervical dentin, increased the intracanal surface area, and increased the hydraulic conductance of root dentin more than the use of K files alone.

  2. Iron abundance and magnetic permeability of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkin, C. W.; Daily, W. D.; Dyal, P.

    1974-01-01

    A set of simultaneous data from the Apollo 12 lunar surface magnetometer and the Explorer 35 Ames magnetometer are used to construct a whole-moon hysteresis curve, from which a new value of global lunar permeability is determined to be mu = 1.012 + or - 0.006. The corresponding global induced dipole moment is 2.1 x 10 to the 18th power gauss-cucm for typical inducing fields of .1000 gauss in the lunar environment. From the permeability measurement, lunar free iron abundance is determined to be 2.5 + or - 2.0 wt. %. Total iron abundance is calculated for two assumed compositional models of the lunar interior: a free iron/orthopyroxene lunar composition and a free iron/olivine composition. The overall lunar total iron abundance is determined to be 9.0 + or - 4.7 wt. %. Other lunar models with a small iron core and with a shallow iron-rich layer are discussed in light of the measured global permeability. Effects on permeability and iron content calculations due to a possible lunar ionosphere are also considered.

  3. Perceptions of breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) levels among a sample of bar patrons with BrAC values of 0.08% or higher.

    PubMed

    Martin, Ryan J; Chaney, Beth H; Cremeens-Matthews, Jennifer; Vail-Smith, Karen

    2016-09-01

    Breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) is a commonly used measure of alcohol intoxication. Because of the potential negative consequences of excessive alcohol consumption, it is important to examine how accurately intoxicated individuals can estimate their BrAC values, especially individuals over the legal BrAC driving threshold (i.e., 0.08%). To better understand perceptions of BrAC values among intoxicated individuals, this field study examined actual BrAC values and BrAC range estimates (0.08% and above, 0.02-0.07%, less than 0.02%) among a sample of bar patrons (N = 454) with BrAC levels at 0.08% or higher. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to examine the relationship between actual BrAC values and perceived BrAC levels. We also examined whether the following demographic and drinking variables were associated with underestimating BrAC in this sample: gender, age, race, college student status, plans to get home, and hazardous drinking. Results indicated that the majority (60.4%) of participants underestimated their BrAC (i.e., less than 0.08%) and lower BrAC values correlated with underestimating BrAC ranges (p < .001, 95% CI[0.2, 0.6]). Further, females (p = .001, 95% CI[1.3, 3.3]) and participants under 21 (p = .039, 95% CI = 1.0, 2.6) were significantly more likely to estimate their BrAC to be less than 0.08%, which is concerning given that young (less than 21) intoxicated females are a group at high risk for sexual assault on college campuses. (PsycINFO Database Record

  4. BOLD signal effects of transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) in the alpha range: A concurrent tACS-fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Vosskuhl, Johannes; Huster, René J; Herrmann, Christoph S

    2016-10-15

    Many studies have proven transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) to manipulate brain activity. Until now it is not known, however, how these manipulations in brain activity are represented in brain metabolism or how spatially specific these changes are. Alpha-tACS has been shown to enhance the amplitude of the individual alpha frequency (IAF) and a negative correlation between alpha amplitude and occipital BOLD signal was reported in numerous EEG/fMRI experiments. Thus, alpha-tACS was chosen to test the effects of tACS on the BOLD signal. A reduction thereof was expected during alpha-tACS which shows the spatial extent of tACS effects beyond modeling studies. Three groups of subjects were measured in an MRI scanner, receiving tACS at either their IAF (N=11), 1Hz (control; N=12) or sham (i.e., no stimulation - a second control; N=11) while responding to a visual vigilance task. Stimulation was administered in an interleaved pattern of tACS-on runs and tACS-free baseline periods. The BOLD signal was analyzed in response to tACS-onset during resting state and in response to seldom target stimuli. Alpha-tACS at 1.0mA reduced the task-related BOLD response to visual targets in the occipital cortex as compared to tACS-free baseline periods. The deactivation was strongest in an area where the BOLD signal was shown to correlate negatively with alpha amplitude. A direct effect of tACS on resting state BOLD signal levels could not be shown. Our findings suggest that tACS-related changes in BOLD activity occur only as a modulation of an existing BOLD response.

  5. Changes in airway permeability and responsiveness after exposure to ozone. [Sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, W.M.; Delehunt, J.C.; Yerger, L.; Marchette, B.; Oliver, W. Jr.

    1984-06-01

    The relationship between airway responsiveness and the permeability of histamine through the airways in conscious sheep after exposure to ozone (O/sub 3/ was examined). Airway responsiveness was assessed by measuring the change from baseline in mean pulmonary flow resistance following a controlled 2-min inhalation challenge with 1% histamine, containing 200 ..mu..Ci/ml of (/sup 3/H)histamine. The rate of appearance of the (/sup 3/H)histamine in the plasma during inhalation challenge was used to estimate airway permeability. To perturb the airways, conscious sheep were exposed to either 0.5 or 1.0 ppm O/sub 3/ for 2 hr via an endotracheal tube. Airway responsiveness and airway permeability were measured prior to and 1 day after exposure. In six sheep exposed to 0.5 ppm O/sub 3/, increased airway responsiveness and airway permeability were obseved 1 day after exposure. Four of seven sheep exposed to 1.0 ppm O/sub 3/ had enhanced airway responsiveness and airway permeability, while the remaining three sheep showed corresponding decreases in airway responsiveness and airway permeability. Since the O/sub 3/-induced directional changes in airway responsiveness paralleled the directional changes in airway permeability in both the positive and negative directions, it was concluded that changes in airway responsiveness to inhaled histamine following exposure to O/sub 3/ may be related to concomitant changes in airway permeability to this agent.

  6. THE ACS NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY TREASURY

    SciTech Connect

    Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Rosema, Keith; Gogarten, Stephanie M.; Christensen, Charlotte; Gilbert, Karoline; Hodge, Paul; Seth, Anil C.; Dolphin, Andrew; Holtzman, Jon; Skillman, Evan D.; Weisz, Daniel; Cole, Andrew; Girardi, Leo; Karachentsev, Igor D.; Olsen, Knut; Freeman, Ken; Gallart, Carme; De Jong, Roelof S. E-mail: ben@astro.washington.edu E-mail: stephanie@astro.washington.edu E-mail: fabio@astro.washington.edu E-mail: aseth@cfa.harvard.edu

    2009-07-15

    The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury (ANGST) is a systematic survey to establish a legacy of uniform multi-color photometry of resolved stars for a volume-limited sample of nearby galaxies (D < 4 Mpc). The survey volume encompasses 69 galaxies in diverse environments, including close pairs, small and large groups, filaments, and truly isolated regions. The galaxies include a nearly complete range of morphological types spanning a factor of {approx}10{sup 4} in luminosity and star formation rate. The survey data consist of images taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), supplemented with archival data and new Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) imaging taken after the failure of ACS. Survey images include wide field tilings covering the full radial extent of each galaxy, and single deep pointings in uncrowded regions of the most massive galaxies in the volume. The new wide field imaging in ANGST reaches median 50% completenesses of m {sub F475W} = 28.0 mag, m {sub F606W} = 27.3 mag, and m {sub F814W} = 27.3 mag, several magnitudes below the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB). The deep fields reach magnitudes sufficient to fully resolve the structure in the red clump. The resulting photometric catalogs are publicly accessible and contain over 34 million photometric measurements of >14 million stars. In this paper we present the details of the sample selection, imaging, data reduction, and the resulting photometric catalogs, along with an analysis of the photometric uncertainties (systematic and random), for both ACS and WFPC2 imaging. We also present uniformly derived relative distances measured from the apparent magnitude of the TRGB.

  7. The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Seth, Anil C.; Dolphin, Andrew; Holtzman, Jon; Rosema, Keith; Skillman, Evan D.; Cole, Andrew; Girardi, Léo; Gogarten, Stephanie M.; Karachentsev, Igor D.; Olsen, Knut; Weisz, Daniel; Christensen, Charlotte; Freeman, Ken; Gilbert, Karoline; Gallart, Carme; Harris, Jason; Hodge, Paul; de Jong, Roelof S.; Karachentseva, Valentina; Mateo, Mario; Stetson, Peter B.; Tavarez, Maritza; Zaritsky, Dennis; Governato, Fabio; Quinn, Thomas

    2009-07-01

    The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury (ANGST) is a systematic survey to establish a legacy of uniform multi-color photometry of resolved stars for a volume-limited sample of nearby galaxies (D < 4 Mpc). The survey volume encompasses 69 galaxies in diverse environments, including close pairs, small and large groups, filaments, and truly isolated regions. The galaxies include a nearly complete range of morphological types spanning a factor of ~104 in luminosity and star formation rate. The survey data consist of images taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), supplemented with archival data and new Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) imaging taken after the failure of ACS. Survey images include wide field tilings covering the full radial extent of each galaxy, and single deep pointings in uncrowded regions of the most massive galaxies in the volume. The new wide field imaging in ANGST reaches median 50% completenesses of m F475W = 28.0 mag, m F606W = 27.3 mag, and m F814W = 27.3 mag, several magnitudes below the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB). The deep fields reach magnitudes sufficient to fully resolve the structure in the red clump. The resulting photometric catalogs are publicly accessible and contain over 34 million photometric measurements of >14 million stars. In this paper we present the details of the sample selection, imaging, data reduction, and the resulting photometric catalogs, along with an analysis of the photometric uncertainties (systematic and random), for both ACS and WFPC2 imaging. We also present uniformly derived relative distances measured from the apparent magnitude of the TRGB.

  8. Heterogeneity, permeability patterns, and permeability upscaling: Physical characterization of a block of Massillon sandstone exhibiting nested scales of heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    TIDWELL,VINCENT C.; WILSON,JOHN L.

    2000-04-20

    Over 75,000 permeability measurements were collected from a meter-scale block of Massillon sandstone, characterized by conspicuous cross bedding that forms two distinct nested-scales of heterogeneity. With the aid of a gas minipermeameter, spatially exhaustive fields of permeability data were acquired at each of five different sample supports (i.e. sample volumes) from each block face. These data provide a unique opportunity to physically investigate the relationship between the multi-scale cross-stratified attributes of the sandstone and the corresponding statistical characteristics of the permeability. These data also provide quantitative physical information concerning the permeability upscaling of a complex heterogeneous medium. Here, a portion of the data taken from a single block face cut normal to stratification is analyzed. Results indicate a strong relationship between the calculated summary statistics and the cross-stratified structural features visible evident in the sandstone sample. Specifically, the permeability fields and semivariograms are characterized by two nested scales of heterogeneity, including a large-scale structure defined by the cross-stratified sets (delineated by distinct bounding surfaces) and a small-scale structure defined by the low-angle cross-stratification within each set. The permeability data also provide clear evidence of upscaling. That is, each calculated summary statistic exhibits distinct and consistent trends with increasing sample support. Among these trends are an increasing mean, decreasing variance, and an increasing semivariogram range. Results also clearly indicate that the different scales of heterogeneity upscale differently, with the small-scale structure being preferentially filtered from the data while the large-scale structure is preserved. Finally, the statistical and upscaling characteristics of individual cross-stratified sets were found to be very similar owing to their shared depositional environment

  9. Ac loss calorimeter for three-phase cable

    SciTech Connect

    Daney, D.E.; Boenig, H.J.; Maley, M.P.; McMurry, D.E.; DeBlanc, B.G.

    1996-10-01

    A calorimeter for measuring ac losses in meter-long lengths of HTS superconducting power transmission line cables is described. The calorimeter, which is based on a temperature difference technique, has a precision of 1 mW and measures single, two-phase (coupling), and three-phase losses. The measurements show significant coupling losses between phases.

  10. Tensor Inversion of Intrinsic Permeabilities for Heterogeneous Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    An inverse method has been developed using hybrid formulations and coordinate transform techniques to simultaneously estimate multiple intrinsic permeability tensors (k), flow field, and boundary conditions for a heterogeneous reservoir under non-pumping or pumping conditions [Jiao & Zhang, 2013]. Unlike the objective-function-based approaches, the inverse method does not require forward flow simulations to assess the data-model misfits; thus the knowledge of reservoir boundary conditions is not needed. The method directly incorporates noisy observed data (i.e., fluid heads, Darcy fluxes, or well rates) at the measurement locations, without solving a boundary value problem. Given sufficient measurement data, it yields well-posed systems of equations that can be solved efficiently with coarse inverse grids and nonlinear optimization. When pumping and injection are active, the well rates can be used as measurements and subsurface flux sampling is not needed. Also, local grid refinement at the well locations is not needed for the inversion to succeed. The method is successfully tested for reservoir problems with regular and irregular geometries, different petrofacies patterns, and permeability anisotropy ratios. All problems yield stable solutions under increasing measurement errors. For a given set of the observation data, inversion accuracy is most affected by the permeability anisotropy ratio. Accuracy in estimating k is also affected by the flow pattern: within a given petrofacies, when the Darcy flux component is extremely small, the corresponding directional permeability perpendicular to streamlines becomes less identifiable. Finally, inversion is successful even if the location of the reservoir boundaries is unknown. In this case, the problem domain for inversion is defined by the location of the measurement data. Select problems are presented below in a set of figures and a table (the relevant quantities have a consistent set of units and are thus not labeled

  11. Acute rigid gas permeable contact lens intolerance.

    PubMed

    Jackson, A J; Wolsley, C; Briggs, J L; Frazer, D G

    2001-01-01

    Rigid gas permeable (RGP) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) lens wearers occasionally report episodes of acute intolerance which is experienced upon lens insertion. In this paper, we report two cases of such intolerance in which the probable cause was contact lens inversion. We also present the results of a study in which a custom-built calibrated strain gauge was used to measure the force in Newtons (N), required to invert RGP lenses [oxygen permeability, or Dk, values between 30 and 90 x 10(-11) (cm2/s) (mlO2/ml x mmHg)] and PMMA lenses of different spherical back vertex powers (+/-3.00 D, 9.00 D). Significantly, less force was required to invert minus powered lenses (17.5 +/- 4.8 N) than plus powered lenses (31.7 +/- 7 .4 N), irrespective of the material. PMMA lenses required more force to induce inversion than that required to invert RGP lenses. Lenses with a Dk of 90 required only two thirds of the force (20.0 +/- 5.8 N) required to cause inversion compared to PMMA lenses (32.9 +/- 11.0 N). High powered PMMA lenses were found to be more likely to fracture on inversion than any other lenses tested. The force required to return negatively powered lenses to their original shape, once inverted, was less than 25% of that initially required to induce inversion. Plus powered lenses either reverted to their original form spontaneously, or required less than 3% of the original inversion force to do so. It was concluded that practitioners should consider inversion as a possible reason for otherwise unexplained, acute RGP contact lens intolerance experienced upon lens insertion. The reason why inversion has eluded so many, as a possible cause of intolerance, is likely to be because minimal force is required to return those lenses, which do not crack or fracture, to their original shape.

  12. Four-point potential drop measurements for materials characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowler, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    The technique of measuring the voltage difference (potential drop) between two of the four electrodes of a four-point probe, in order to determine conductivity or surface resistivity of a test piece, is well established in the direct-current (dc) or quasi-dc regime. The technique finds wide usage in the semiconductor industry for the purpose of measuring surface resistivity of semiconductors, and also in the measurement of conductivity of metals, particularly of ferromagnetic metals for which conductivity cannot be easily measured using eddy-current nondestructive evaluation (NDE). In these applications, the conductivity of the test piece is deduced from an analytic formula that depends on the geometry of the probe and test piece. Such a formula requires, as an input, the measured value of the potential drop. Several analytical expressions exist for a variety of test-piece geometries and probe arrangements. Recently, it has been shown that broadband measurements of the potential drop, known as 'alternating current potential drop' (ac PD) measurements, can be used not only to obtain the conductivity of a test piece, but also its linear permeability μ. The beauty of this measurement is that the two parameters are completely decoupled in the quasi-static regime. In fact, μ does not appear in the quasi-static expression for σ. Hence, σ may be obtained from low-frequency ac PD measurements and then μ may be deduced as the frequency increases beyond the quasi-static regime, once σ is known. In this review, both dc and ac solutions that are useful in determining the conductivity of metals and semiconductors, and the permeability of ferromagnetic conductors, are summarized. In particular, flat test pieces with arbitrary thickness are considered. At the next level of complexity, a solution for a half-space coated with a surface layer is given, along with a discussion of the use of the four-point potential drop method for determining thickness of a surface layer, such

  13. Hydraulic Permeability of Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Paul Allen

    2010-01-01

    An ion exchange process using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin is the baseline process for removing cesium from the dissolved salt solution in the high-level waste tanks at the Hanford Site, using large scale columns as part of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The RF resin is also being evaluated for use in the proposed small column ion exchange (SCIX) system, which is an alternative treatment option at Hanford and at the Savannah River Site (SRS). A recirculating test loop with a small ion exchange column was used to measure the effect of oxygen uptake and radiation exposure on the permeability of a packed bed of the RF resin. The lab-scale column was designed to be prototypic of the proposed Hanford columns at the WTP. Although the test equipment was designed to model the Hanford ion exchange columns, the data on changes in the hydraulic permeability of the resin will also be valuable for determining potential pressure drops through the proposed SCIX system. The superficial fluid velocity in the lab-scale test (3.4-5.7 cm/s) was much higher than is planned for the full-scale Hanford columns to generate the maximum pressure drop expected in those columns (9.7 psig). The frictional drag from this high velocity produced forces on the resin in the lab-scale tests that matched the design basis of the full-scale Hanford column. Any changes in the resin caused by the radiation exposure and oxygen uptake were monitored by measuring the pressure drop through the lab-scale column and the physical properties of the resin. Three hydraulic test runs were completed, the first using fresh RF resin at 25 C, the second using irradiated resin at 25 C, and the third using irradiated resin at 45 C. A Hanford AP-101 simulant solution was recirculated through a test column containing 500 mL of Na-form RF resin. Known amounts of oxygen were introduced into the primary recirculation loop by saturating measured volumes of the simulant solution with oxygen and reintroducing

  14. Evolution of AC conductivity of wet illitic clay during drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csáki, Š.; Štubňa, I.; Trnovcová, V.; Ondruška, J.; Vozár, L.; Dobroň, P.

    2017-02-01

    The evolution of the AC electrical conductivity during drying as well as the relationship between sample volume and moisture of green illite samples were investigated. The samples were prepared from illitic clay (80 mass % illite, 4 mass % montmorillonite, 12 mass % quartz and 4 mass % of orthoclase) and distilled water with initial moisture content 36 mass % and were freely dried in air. Conductivity was measured by the volt-ampere method with AC power supply of 5 V in the frequency range from 50 Hz to 10 kHz. The AC conductivity steeply increased with increasing moisture, up to 15 mass %. At higher values of the moisture, the AC conductivity was high and almost constant. The volume of samples increased with increasing moisture when the moisture was higher than 8 mass %. Below this value, the dimensions of samples do not significantly change. The dependence of the relative volume change on moisture is presented in a form of the Bigot’s curve.

  15. Relations between ac-dc components and optical path length in photoplethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chungkeun; Sik Shin, Hang; Lee, Myoungho

    2011-07-01

    Photoplethysmography is used in various areas such as vital sign measurement, vascular characteristics analysis, and autonomic nervous system assessment. Photoplethysmographic signals are composed of ac and dc, but it is difficult to find research about the interaction of photoplethysmographic components. This study suggested a model equation combining two Lambert-Beer equations at the onset and peak points of photoplethysmography to evaluate ac characteristics, and verified the model equation through simulation and experiment. In the suggested equation, ac was dependent on dc and optical path length. In the simulation, dc was inversely proportionate to ac sensitivity (slope), and ac and optical path length were proportionate. When dc increased from 10% to 90%, stabilized ac decreased from 1 to 0.89 +/- 0.21, and when optical path length increased from 10% to 90%, stabilized ac increased from 1 to 1.53 +/- 0.40.

  16. Effect of Dead Algae on Soil Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R.S.

    2003-02-21

    Since existing basins support heavy growths of unicellular green algae which may be killed by temperature variation or by inadvertent pH changes in waste and then deposited on the basin floor, information on the effects of dead algae on soil permeability was needed. This study was designed to show the effects of successive algal kills on the permeability of laboratory soil columns.

  17. A method of determination of permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, S.V.; Trofimov, V.A.

    2007-11-15

    A method is proposed for determining permeability of coals under conditions of steady-state deformation and stationary filtration mode by employing a reference core made of gas-non-sorbing material with a known permeability. The approach has been developed to assess the time of transition to the stable filtration.

  18. Diagnostics of the Fermilab Tevatron using an AC dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Ryoichi

    2008-08-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron is currently the world's highest energy colliding beam facility. Its counter-rotating proton and antiproton beams collide at 2 TeV center-of-mass. Delivery of such intense beam fluxes to experiments has required improved knowledge of the Tevatron's beam optical lattice. An oscillating dipole magnet, referred to as an AC dipole, is one of such a tool to non-destructively assess the optical properties of the synchrotron. We discusses development of an AC dipole system for the Tevatron, a fast-oscillating (f ~ 20 kHz) dipole magnet which can be adiabatically turned on and off to establish sustained coherent oscillations of the beam particles without affecting the transverse emittance. By utilizing an existing magnet and a higher power audio amplifier, the cost of the Tevatron AC dipole system became relatively inexpensive. We discuss corrections which must be applied to the driven oscillation measurements to obtain the proper interpretation of beam optical parameters from AC dipole studies. After successful operations of the Tevatron AC dipole system, AC dipole systems, similar to that in the Tevatron, will be build for the CERN LHC. We present several measurements of linear optical parameters (beta function and phase advance) for the Tevatron, as well as studies of non-linear perturbations from sextupole and octupole elements.

  19. Exenatide: AC 2993, AC002993, AC2993A, exendin 4, LY2148568.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    Exenatide [AC002993, AC2993A, AC 2993, LY2148568, exendin 4], a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonist, is a synthetic exendin 4 compound under development with Amylin Pharmaceuticals for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Both exendin 4 and its analogue, exendin 3, are 39-amino acid peptides isolated from Heloderma horridum lizard venom that have different amino acids at positions 2 and 3, respectively. Exendins are able to stimulate insulin secretion in response to rising blood glucose levels, and modulate gastric emptying to slow the entry of ingested sugars into the bloodstream. Amylin Pharmaceuticals acquired exclusive patent rights for the two exendin compounds (exendin 3 and exendin 4) from the originator, Dr John Eng (Bronx, NY, US). On 20 September 2002, Amylin and Eli Lilly signed a collaborative agreement for the development and commercialisation of exenatide for type 2 diabetes. Under the terms of the agreement, Eli Lilly has paid Amylin a licensing fee of 80 million US dollars and bought Amylin's stock worth 30 million US dollars at 18.69 US dollars a share. After the initial payment, Eli Lilly will pay Amylin up to 85 US dollars million upon reaching certain milestones and also make an additional payment of up to 130 million US dollars upon global commercialisation of exenatide. Both companies will share the US development and commercialisation costs, while Eli Lilly will pick up up to 80% of development costs and all commercialisation costs outside the US. Amylin and Eli Lilly will equally share profit from sales in the US, while Eli Lilly will get 80% of the profit outside the US and Amylin will get the rest. This agreement has also enabled Amylin to train its sales force to co-promote Lilly's human growth hormone Humatrope. Alkermes will receive research and development funding and milestone payments, and also a combination of royalty payments and manufacturing fees based on product sales. Alkermes undertakes the responsibility for the development

  20. Permeability of lipid bilayers to amino acids and phosphate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, A. C.; Deamer, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    Permeability coefficients for amino acid classes, including neutral, polar, hydrophobic, and charged species, were measured and compared with values for other ionic solutes such as phosphate. The rates of efflux of glycine, lysine, phenylalanine, serine and tryptophan were determined after they were passively entrapped in large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) composed of egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC) or dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). The following permeability coefficients were obtained for: glycine, 5.7 x 10(-12) cm s-1 (EPC), 2.0 x 10(-11) cm s-1 (DMPC); serine, 5.5 x 10(-12) cm s-1 (EPC), 1.6 x 10(-11) cm s-1 (DMPC); lysine, 5.1 x 10(-12) cm s-1 (EPC), 1.9 x 10(-11) cm s-1 (DMPC); tryptophan, 4.1 x 10(-10) cm s-1 (EPC); and phenylalanine, 2.5 x 10(-10) cm s-1 (EPC). Decreasing lipid chain length increased permeability slightly, while variations in pH had only minor effects on the permeability coefficients of the amino acids tested. Phosphate permeability was in the range of 10(-12)-10(-13) cm s-1 depending on the pH of the medium. The values for the polar and charged amino acids were surprisingly similar to those previously measured for monovalent cations such as sodium and potassium, which are in the range of 10(-12)-10(-13) cm s-1, depending on conditions and the lipid species used. This observation suggests that the permeation rates for the neutral, polar and charged amino acids are controlled by bilayer fluctuations and transient defects, rather than partition coefficients and Born energy barriers. The results are relevant to the permeation of certain peptides into lipid bilayers during protein translocation and membrane biogenesis.

  1. Long-term stormwater quantity and quality performance of permeable pavement systems.

    PubMed

    Brattebo, Benjamin O; Booth, Derek B

    2003-11-01

    This study examined the long-term effectiveness of permeable pavement as an alternative to traditional impervious asphalt pavement in a parking area. Four commercially available permeable pavement systems were evaluated after 6 years of daily parking usage for structural durability, ability to infiltrate precipitation, and impacts on infiltrate water quality. All four permeable pavement systems showed no major signs of wear. Virtually all rainwater infiltrated through the permeable pavements, with almost no surface runoff. The infiltrated water had significantly lower levels of copper and zinc than the direct surface runoff from the asphalt area. Motor oil was detected in 89% of samples from the asphalt runoff but not in any water sample infiltrated through the permeable pavement. Neither lead nor diesel fuel were detected in any sample. Infiltrate measured 5 years earlier displayed significantly higher concentrations of zinc and significantly lower concentrations of copper and lead.

  2. Estimation of Permeability from NMR Logs Based on Formation Classification Method in Tight Gas Sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Deng-Feng; Liu, Xiao-Peng; Hu, Xiao-Xin; Xu, Rui; Zhu, Ling-Ling

    2015-10-01

    The Schlumberger Doll Research (SDR) model and cross plot of porosity versus permeability cannot be directly used in tight gas sands. In this study, the HFU approach is introduced to classify rocks, and determine the involved parameters in the SDR model. Based on the difference of FZI, 87 core samples, drilled from tight gas sandstones reservoirs of E basin in northwest China and applied for laboratory NMR measurements, were classified into three types, and the involved parameters in the SDR model are calibrated separately. Meanwhile, relationships of porosity versus permeability are also established. The statistical model is used to calculate consecutive FZI from conventional logs. Field examples illustrate that the calibrated SDR models are applicable in permeability estimation; models established from routine core analyzed results are effective in reservoirs with permeability lower than 0.3 mD, while the unified SDR model is only valid in reservoirs with permeability ranges from 0.1 to 0.3 mD.

  3. SAFETY AND EFFICIENCY OF MODULATING PARACELLULAR PERMEABILITY TO ENHANCE AIRWAY EPITHELIAL GENE TRANSFER IN VIVO

    EPA Science Inventory


    ABSTRACT

    We evaluated the safety of agents that enhance gene transfer by modulating paracellular permeability. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and cytokine release were measured in polarized primary human airway epithelial (HAE) cells after luminal application of vehicle, ...

  4. Generating enhanced site topography data to improve permeable pavement performance assessment methods - presentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable pavement surfaces are infiltration based stormwater control measures (SCM) commonly applied in parking lots to decrease impervious area and reduce runoff volume. Many are not optimally designed however, as little attention is given to draining a large enough contributin...

  5. STUDY ON FLOOD CONTROL PROPERTIES OF PERMEABLE PAVEMENT USING SATURATED-UNSATURATED SEEPAGE ANALYSIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Takao; Nishiyama, Satoshi; Ohnishi, Yuzo; Nakashima, Shinichiro; Moriishi, Kazushi; Wada, Minoru

    The rainfall storage and infiltration facility of permeable pavement have been attracted attention as a control measure of flood and an environmental improvement measure in urban areas. However, rainfall infiltration of permeable pavement is unsteady flow and strongly dependent on the behavior of unsaturated zones in the pavement. Moreover, the wet condition of subbase course also has a great influence on the rainfall infiltration of the pavement. That's why previous studies have not made clear the precise the facility of permeable pavement as a flood control. In this paper, experimental studies and simulated analyses were performed to measure the overflow from the pavement under various conditions of rainfall intensities and estimate the rainfall infiltration of the pavement using the measurement data and unsaturated infiltration characteristics of porous asphalt materials. It is clear that this study shows the methods to have a quantitative estimation of the rainfall storage and infiltration facility of permeable pavement.

  6. Assessment of Clogging Dynamics in Permeable Pavement Systems with Time Domain Reflectometers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Infiltration is a primary functional mechanism in green infrastructure stormwater controls. This study used time domain reflectometers (TDRs) to measure spatial infiltration and assess clogging dynamics of permeable pavement systems in Edison, NJ, and Louisville, KY. In 2009, t...

  7. Permeability Testing of Impacted Composite Laminates for Use on Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.

    2001-01-01

    Since composite laminates are beginning to be identified for use in reusable launch vehicle propulsion systems, an understanding of their permeance is needed. A foreign object impact event can cause a localized area of permeability (leakage) in a polymer matrix composite, and it is the aim of this study to assess a method of quantifying permeability-after-impact results. A simple test apparatus is presented, and variables that could affect the measured values of permeability-after-impact were assessed. Once it was determined that valid numbers were being measured, a fiber/resin system was impacted at various impact levels and the resulting permeability measured, first with a leak check solution (qualitative) then using the new apparatus (quantitative). The results showed that as the impact level increased, so did the measured leakage. As the pressure to the specimen was increased, the leak rate was seen to increase in a nonlinear fashion for almost all the specimens tested.

  8. Accelerator Production of 225Ac For Alpha-Immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidner, J. W.; Nortier, F. M.; Bach, H. T.; John, K. D.; Couture, A.; Ullmann, J. L.; Fassbender, M. E.; Goff, G. S.; Taylor, W.; Valdez, F.; Wolfsberg, L. E.; Cisneros, M.; Dry, D.; Gallegos, M.; Gritzo, R.; Bitteker, L. J.; Wender, S.; Baty, R. S.

    2011-06-01

    225Ac has tremendous potential for the treatment of metastatic cancer due to the four alpha-particles emitted during its decay to stable 209Bi. Additionally, it is one of the few alpha-emitters being considered for clinical trials. The anticipated 225Ac demand for these trials is expected to far exceed the annual worldwide supply of approximately 1,000 mCi/yr. Consequently, the DOE Office of Science has funded investigations into accelerator-based production of 225Ac. Existing 232Th(p,x)225Ac cross section data indicate that up to 480 mCi/day of 225Ac could be created by bombarding a thick target of natural thorium with 100 MeV protons at the Los Alamos Isotope Production Facility. To verify these predictions, experiments are underway at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center to measure the 232Th(p,x)225Ac production cross sections for protons in the energy range 40-200 MeV, and at 800 MeV. For 800 MeV protons, preliminary results indicate that the 225Ac production cross section is 12.4±0.6 mb and the 225Ra production cross section is 3.2±0.2 mb. Moreover, preliminary results suggest that the 227Ac production cross section is 16±1 mb. Experiments to measure these same cross sections at proton energies below 200 MeV are planned for the last half of calendar year 2010.

  9. Accelerator Production of {sup 225}Ac For Alpha-Immunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Weidner, J. W.; Nortier, F. M.; Bach, H. T.; John, K. D.; Couture, A.; Ullmann, J. L.; Fassbender, M. E.; Goff, G. S.; Taylor, W.; Valdez, F.; Wolfsberg, L. E.; Cisneros, M.; Dry, D.; Gallegos, M.; Gritzo, R.; Bitteker, L. J.; Wender, S.; Baty, R. S.

    2011-06-01

    {sup 225}Ac has tremendous potential for the treatment of metastatic cancer due to the four alpha-particles emitted during its decay to stable {sup 209}Bi. Additionally, it is one of the few alpha-emitters being considered for clinical trials. The anticipated {sup 225}Ac demand for these trials is expected to far exceed the annual worldwide supply of approximately 1,000 mCi/yr. Consequently, the DOE Office of Science has funded investigations into accelerator-based production of {sup 225}Ac. Existing {sup 232}Th(p,x){sup 225}Ac cross section data indicate that up to 480 mCi/day of {sup 225}Ac could be created by bombarding a thick target of natural thorium with 100 MeV protons at the Los Alamos Isotope Production Facility. To verify these predictions, experiments are underway at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center to measure the {sup 232}Th(p,x){sup 225}Ac production cross sections for protons in the energy range 40-200 MeV, and at 800 MeV. For 800 MeV protons, preliminary results indicate that the {sup 225}Ac production cross section is 12.4{+-}0.6 mb and the {sup 225}Ra production cross section is 3.2{+-}0.2 mb. Moreover, preliminary results suggest that the {sup 227}Ac production cross section is 16{+-}1 mb. Experiments to measure these same cross sections at proton energies below 200 MeV are planned for the last half of calendar year 2010.

  10. Darcy permeability of hagfish slime: an ultra-soft hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Gaurav; Fudge, Douglas; Ewoldt, Randy

    2016-11-01

    When under attack from predators, hagfish produces a large amount of slime. The slime is an exceptional hydrogel, which sets-up in fraction of a second and is known to choke the predators. A small quantity of exudate, released from specialized slime glands, mixes with a large volume of sea water (99.996% w/v) and forms a mucus-like cohesive mass. The exudate has two main constituents: mucins and long intermediate filament based threads. This remarkably dilute material forms into a solid and is hypothesized to have a low hydrodynamic permeability. In this work, we present the first experimental measurements of Darcy permeability of hagfish slime. Our results explain how this ultra-soft hydrogel possesses the so-called 'gill-clogging' ability. We also investigate the roles played by individual components of slime, namely, thread cells and mucins, via a concentration-dependent permeability study. Our results provide vital insights into the roles of individual components and it is evident from our observations that mucins play a vital role in significantly reducing the permeability of the fibrous network formed by threads.

  11. AC losses in perpendicular external magnetic fields in ring bundle barrier multifilamentary BSCCO(2223) tapes with a central resistive barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckelmann, H.; Krelaus, J.; Nast, R.; Goldacker, W.

    2001-06-01

    For the most common AC frequencies, the main components of the AC losses in multifilamentary Bi(2223) tapes are caused by both hysteresis and coupling losses. These losses can be reduced by increasing the matrix resistivity, applying a twist to the filaments and by the use of a conductor design optimised for a practical application. In the ring bundle barrier (RBB) conductor design we have bundles of filaments which are twisted around a central resistive core. The RBB structure was prepared via the powder in tube assemble and react (PITAR) route . In these tapes six bundles of seven filaments are twisted around a resistive layer of a mixture of 50% SrCO 3 and 50% SrZrO 3 in the centre of the tape. A series of tapes with twist lengths down to 3.4 mm was prepared. We present the measured AC losses of these tapes in external perpendicular magnetic fields. By using existing models, a description of the losses in the low Ḃ range was possible, leading to a separation into hysteresis, eddy current and coupling current losses. The frequency dependent loss contribution is dominated by the coupling current losses, from which the coupling current decay time constant, the effective permeability, the matrix resistivity and the critical Ḃc for filament coupling were extracted. In tapes with a twist length below 5 mm the typical loss behaviour for decoupled filaments is observed at frequencies up to 500 Hz. Compared to the untwisted tapes, a loss reduction of up to 70% for low field amplitudes (below 10 mT) was achieved.

  12. Grain-size dynamics beneath mid-ocean ridges: Implications for permeability and melt extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Andrew J.; Katz, Richard F.; Behn, Mark D.

    2015-03-01

    Grain size is an important control on mantle viscosity and permeability, but is difficult or impossible to measure in situ. We construct a two-dimensional, single phase model for the steady state mean grain size beneath a mid-ocean ridge. The mantle rheology is modeled as a composite of diffusion creep, dislocation creep, dislocation accommodated grain boundary sliding, and a plastic stress limiter. The mean grain size is calculated by the paleowattmeter relationship of Austin and Evans (2007). We investigate the sensitivity of our model to global variations in grain growth exponent, potential temperature, spreading-rate, and mantle hydration. We interpret the mean grain-size field in terms of its permeability to melt transport. The permeability structure due to mean grain size may be approximated as a high permeability region beneath a low permeability region. The transition between high and low permeability regions occurs across a boundary that is steeply inclined toward the ridge axis. We hypothesize that such a permeability structure generated from the variability of the mean grain size may focus melt toward the ridge axis, analogous to Sparks and Parmentier (1991)-type focusing. This focusing may, in turn, constrain the region where significant melt fractions are observed by seismic or magnetotelluric surveys. This interpretation of melt focusing via the grain-size permeability structure is consistent with MT observation of the asthenosphere beneath the East Pacific Rise.

  13. The permeability of poly-disperse porous media and effective particle size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markicevic, B. I.; Preston, C.; Osterroth, S.; Iliev, O.; Hurwitz, M.

    2015-11-01

    The interactions between the fluid and solid phases in porous media account for the openness and length of the flow path that the fluid needs to travel within. The same reasoning applies for both mono- and poly-disperse media, and is reflected in the adoption of the same permeability models. The only difference is that an effective particle size diameter has to be used for the poly-disperse samples. A filtration experiment is used to form a particle layer, filter cake, consisting of particles of different sizes. Both inflow and outflow particle size distribution are measured by particle counting method, and from their difference, the particle size distribution in the cake is determined. In a set of experiments, the filtration history is altered by changing (i) filtration medium; (ii) suspension flow rate; and (iii) particle concentration, where in all cases investigated the cake permeability remains constant. In order to predict the permeability of poly-disperse cake from the analytical models, the particle size distribution moments are calculated, and the permeability is found for each moment. Comparing the experimental to the analytical permeability values the effective particle size is found, where the permeability calculated by using the harmonic mean of the particle size distribution reproduces the permeability experimental value best. Finally, in the parametric study, reducing the cake porosity and/or lowering the particle retention shifts effective particle size used in the permeability model toward higher moments of the particle size distribution function.

  14. Grain-size dynamics beneath mid-ocean ridges: Implications for permeability and melt extraction.

    PubMed

    Turner, Andrew J; Katz, Richard F; Behn, Mark D

    2015-03-01

    Grain size is an important control on mantle viscosity and permeability, but is difficult or impossible to measure in situ. We construct a two-dimensional, single phase model for the steady state mean grain size beneath a mid-ocean ridge. The mantle rheology is modeled as a composite of diffusion creep, dislocation creep, dislocation accommodated grain boundary sliding, and a plastic stress limiter. The mean grain size is calculated by the paleowattmeter relationship of Austin and Evans (2007). We investigate the sensitivity of our model to global variations in grain growth exponent, potential temperature, spreading-rate, and mantle hydration. We interpret the mean grain-size field in terms of its permeability to melt transport. The permeability structure due to mean grain size may be approximated as a high permeability region beneath a low permeability region. The transition between high and low permeability regions occurs across a boundary that is steeply inclined toward the ridge axis. We hypothesize that such a permeability structure generated from the variability of the mean grain size may focus melt toward the ridge axis, analogous to Sparks and Parmentier (1991)-type focusing. This focusing may, in turn, constrain the region where significant melt fractions are observed by seismic or magnetotelluric surveys. This interpretation of melt focusing via the grain-size permeability structure is consistent with MT observation of the asthenosphere beneath the East Pacific Rise.

  15. A Permeability Model for Coal and Other Fractured, Sorptive-Elastic Media

    SciTech Connect

    Eric P. Robertson; Richard L. Christiansen

    2006-10-01

    This paper describes the derivation of a new equation that can be used to model the permeability behavior of a fractured, sorptive-elastic media, such as coal, under variable stress conditions commonly used during measurement of permeability data in the laboratory. The model is derived for cubic geometry under biaxial or hydrostatic confining pressures. The model is also designed to handle changes in permeability caused by adsorption and desorption of gases from the matrix blocks. The model equations can be used to calculate permeability changes caused by the production of methane from coal as well as the injection of gases, such as carbon dioxide, for sequestration in coal. Sensitivity analysis of the model found that each of the input variables can have a significant impact on the outcome of the permeability forecast as a function of changing pore pressure; thus, accurate input data are essential. The permeability model can also be used as a tool to determine input parameters for field simulations by curve-fitting laboratory-generated permeability data. The new model is compared to two other widely used coal permeability models using a hypothetical coal with average properties.

  16. Obtaining DC and AC isothermal electrical characteristics for RF MOSFET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, A. K.; Fregonese, S.; Scheer, P.; Celi, D.; Juge, A.; Zimmer, T.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we demonstrate a new and simple approach to obtain isothermal electrical characteristics of metal oxide field effect transistor (MOSFET) from conventional non-isothermal measurements. DC and continuous wave (CW) S-parameter measurements are performed at different chuck temperatures (Tchuck). Knowing the thermal resistance (RTH) of the device the variation of DC and AC characteristic due to self-heating can be de-embedded and all the isothermal DC data and AC data above isothermal frequency can be determined. The method is validated by comparing the results with pulsed DC and pulsed RF measurements and found to be in good agreements.

  17. Relative permeability and the microscopic distribution of wetting and nonwetting phases in the pore space of Berea sandstone

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, E.M.; Cook, N.G.W. |; Witherspoon, P.A.; Myer, L.R.

    1994-04-01

    Experiments to study relative permeabilities of a partially saturated rock have been carried out in Berea sandstone using fluids that can be solidified in place. The effective permeability of the spaces not occupied by the wetting fluid (paraffin wax) or the nonwetting fluid (Wood`s metal), have been measured at various saturations after solidifying each of the phases. The tests were conducted on Berea sandstone samples that had an absolute permeability of about 600 md. The shape of the laboratory-derived relative permeability vs. saturation curves measured with the other phase solidified conforms well with typical curves obtained using conventional experimental methods. The corresponding wetting and nonwetting fluid distributions at different saturations are presented and analyzed in light of the role of the pore structure in the invasion process, and their impact on relative permeability and capillary pressure. Irreducible wetting and nonwetting phase fluid distributions are studied. The effect of clay minerals on permeability is also assessed.

  18. Analysis of Instrumentation Selection and Placement to Monitor the Hydrologic Performance of Permeable Pavement Systems and Bioinfiltration Areas at the Edison Environmental Center in New Jersey

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2009, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency constructed a 0.4-ha (1-ac) parking lot surfaced with three different permeable pavement types (interlocking concrete pavers, porous concrete, and porous asphalt) and six bioinfiltration areas with three different drainage area to...

  19. Non-invasive measurement of micro-area skin impedance in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dachao; Liang, Wenshuai; Liu, Tongkun; Yu, Haixia; Xu, Kexin

    2011-12-01

    Volume measurement of interstitial fluid transdermally extracted is important in continuous glucose monitoring instrument. The volume of transdermally extracted interstitial fluid could be determined by a skin permeability coefficient. If the skin impedance which is the indicator of skin permeability coefficient can be accurately measured, the volume of interstitial fluid can be calculated based on the relationship between the indicator and the skin permeability coefficient. The possibility of using the skin impedance to indicate the skin permeability coefficient is investigated. A correlation model between the skin impedance and the skin permeability coefficient is developed. A novel non-invasive method for in vivo, real-time, and accurate measurement of skin impedance within a micro skin area is brought forward. The proposed measurement method is based on the theory that organisms saliva and interstitial fluid are equipotential. An electrode is put on the surface of a micro skin area and another one is put in the mouth to be fully contacted with saliva of an animal in the experiments. The electrode in mouth is used to replace the implantable subcutaneous electrode for non-invasive measurement of skin impedance in vivo. A biologically compatible AC current with amplitude of 100mv and frequency of 10Hz is applied to stimulate the micro skin area by the two electrodes. And then the voltage and current between the two electrodes are measured to calculate the skin impedance within a micro skin area. The measurement results by electrode in mouth are compared with the results by subcutaneous electrode in animal experiments and they are consistent so the proposed measurement method is verified well. The effect of moisture and pressure for the measurement is also studied in the paper.

  20. The effect of air permeability and water vapor permeability of cleanroom clothing on physiological responses and wear comfort.

    PubMed

    Chen, Te-Hung; Chen, Wan-Ping; Wang, Mao-Jiun J

    2014-01-01

    The function of cleanroom clothing is to protect the product from contamination by people, and to dissipate electrostatic discharge. People in the cleanroom work environment often complain about the discomforts associated with the wearing of cleanroom clothing. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of air permeability and water vapor permeability of cleanroom clothing on the subject's physiological and subjective responses. Five male and five female subjects participated in this study. The experimental goal was to simulate the operator's regular tasks in a semiconductor manufacturing cleanroom. Each subject completed three treatment combinations with three different cleanroom clothing types. A three-factor experiment was designed (significance level p = 0.05). The independent variables included gender, cleanroom clothing, and duration. The dependent measures included heart rate, core temperature, skin temperature, micro-climate relative humidity, micro-climate temperature, and subjective responses. A total of 40 min was involved for each treatment condition. The results indicate that skin temperature, micro-climate temperature and micro-climate relative humidity were lower while wearing cleanroom clothing with high air permeability and high water vapor permeability. The significant gender difference was found in skin temperature. As the task time increased, the micro-climate temperature also increased but the micro-climate relative humidity decreased at first and then increased. In addition, the physiological responses showed significant positive correlations with the subjective perception of clothing comfort. The findings of this study may provide useful information for cleanroom clothing design and selection.

  1. Permeability of human erythrocyte membrane vesicles to alkali cations.

    PubMed

    Sze, H; Solomon, A K

    1979-02-02

    The permeability of inside-out and right-side-out vesicles from erythrocyte membranes to inorganic cations was determined quantitatively. Using 86Rb as a K analog, we have measured the rate constant of 86Rb efflux from vesicles under equilibrium exchange conditions, using a dialysis procedure. The permeability coefficients of the vesicles to Rb are only about an order of magnitude greater than that of whole erythrocytes. Furthermore, we have measured many of the specialized transport systems known to exist in erythrocytes and have shown that glucose, sulfate, ATP-dependent Ca and ATP-dependent Na transport activities are retained by the vesicle membranes. These results suggest that inside-out and right-side-out vesicles can be used effectively to study transport properties of erythrocyte membranes.

  2. Fluid permeability of deformable fracture networks

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.R.; Bruhn, R.L.

    1997-04-01

    The authors consider the problem of defining the fracture permeability tensor for each grid lock in a rock mass from maps of natural fractures. For this purpose they implement a statistical model of cracked rock due to M. Oda [1985], where the permeability tensor is related to the crack geometry via a volume average of the contribution from each crack in the population. In this model tectonic stress is implicitly coupled to fluid flow through an assumed relationship between crack aperture and normal stress across the crack. The authors have included the following enhancements to the basic model: (1) a realistic model of crack closure under stress has been added along with the provision to apply tectonic stresses to the fracture system in any orientation, the application of stress results in fracture closure and consequently a reduction in permeability; (2) the fracture permeability can be superimposed onto an arbitrary anisotropic matrix permeability; (3) the fracture surfaces are allowed to slide under the application of shear stress, causing fractures to dilate and result in a permeability increase. Through an example, the authors demonstrate that significant changes in permeability magnitudes and orientations are possible when tectonic stress is applied to a fracture system.

  3. Permeable Gas Flow Influences Magma Fragmentation Speed.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, D.; Scheu, B.; Spieler, O.; Dingwell, D.

    2008-12-01

    Highly viscous magmas undergo fragmentation in order to produce the pyroclastic deposits that we observe, but the mechanisms involved remain unclear. The overpressure required to initiate fragmentation depends on a number of physical parameters, such as the magma's vesicularity, permeability, tensile strength and textural properties. It is clear that these same parameters control also the speed at which a fragmentation front travels through magma when fragmentation occurs. Recent mathematical models of fragmentation processes consider most of these factors, but permeable gas flow has not yet been included in these models. However, it has been shown that permeable gas flow through a porous rock during a sudden decompression event increases the fragmentation threshold. Fragmentation experiments on natural samples from Bezymianny (Russia), Colima (Mexico), Krakatau (Indonesia) and Augustine (USA) volcanoes confirm these results and suggest in addition that high permeable flow rates may increase the speed of fragmentation. Permeability from the investigated samples ranges from as low as 5 x 10-14 to higher than 9 x 10- 12 m2 and open porosity ranges from 16 % to 48 %. Experiments were performed for each sample series at applied pressures up to 35 MPa. Our results indicate that the rate of increase of fragmentation speed is higher when the permeability is above 10-12 m2. We confirm that it is necessary to include the influence of permeable flow on fragmentation dynamics.

  4. An improved prediction of the human in vivo intestinal permeability and BCS class of drugs using the in vitro permeability ratio obtained for rat intestine using an Ussing chamber system.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Jin, Hyo-Eon; Shim, Won-Sik; Shim, Chang-Koo

    2013-10-01

    The Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) was developed to facilitate estimation of the in vivo pharmacokinetic performance of drugs from human intestinal permeability and solubility. However, the measurement of human in vivo intestinal permeability, unlike that of solubility, is problematic and inefficient. Thus, rat in vitro intestinal permeability results obtained via the Ussing chamber technique are often used instead. However, these data could be unreliable due to difficulty in maintaining the viability of the dissected intestinal membrane in the Ussing chamber. Therefore, a more efficient method to obtain a reliable in vitro permeability is mandatory. Here, we propose a new approach by introducing a novel factor called the permeability ratio (PR). Basically, PR is a rat in vitro intestinal permeability obtained from the Ussing chamber, which is then corrected by the permeability of lucifer yellow, a paracellular permeability marker. To prove the val