Science.gov

Sample records for ac-drive applications volume

  1. Evaluation of semiconductor devices for Electric and Hybrid Vehicle (EHV) ac-drive applications, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, F. C.; Chen, D. Y.; Jovanovic, M.; Hopkins, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    The results of evaluation of power semiconductor devices for electric hybrid vehicle ac drive applications are summarized. Three types of power devices are evaluated in the effort: high power bipolar or Darlington transistors, power MOSFETs, and asymmetric silicon control rectifiers (ASCR). The Bipolar transistors, including discrete device and Darlington devices, range from 100 A to 400 A and from 400 V to 900 V. These devices are currently used as key switching elements inverters for ac motor drive applications. Power MOSFETs, on the other hand, are much smaller in current rating. For the 400 V device, the current rating is limited to 25 A. For the main drive of an electric vehicle, device paralleling is normally needed to achieve practical power level. For other electric vehicle (EV) related applications such as battery charger circuit, however, MOSFET is advantageous to other devices because of drive circuit simplicity and high frequency capability. Asymmetrical SCR is basically a SCR device and needs commutation circuit for turn off. However, the device poses several advantages, i.e., low conduction drop and low cost.

  2. Design single-motor AC drive for energy savings in centrifugal applications

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    This article is an evaluation of a single- motor with AC drive that saves energy with increased efficiency and reliability in a wide variety of pump, fan, compressor, and other centrifugal applications. Drives deliver adjustable speed for adjustable flow and will satisfy a number of particular objectives. A principal benefit of the drive is its efficiency. The drives also offer regenerative capability without modification, built-in memory for first-fault indication, and easy troubleshooting with comprehensive self-diagnostics. The drive controls flow in centrifugal applications by adjusting the pumps or fan speed. This provides energy savings over conventional flow control systems. Slip devices, also used to produce variable speed in centrifugal equipment, vary the ''slip'' between the constant-speed motor shaft and the pump or fan shaft. The speed which is not transmitted is dissipated as heat within the slip device itself. The drives are available from stock (100-250 hp) for immediate energy savings on both new and retrofit spplications, with a number of standard features: a remote operator control station provides start-stop and speed selection; acceleration/deceleration are separately adjustable over a range of 2.5 to 35 seconds with 5- to 70-second range available using simple jumper selection; and a coast-to-rest is also available using simple jumper selection. The drive can be operated automatically from an ungrounded 4-20 mA process control signal.

  3. Evaluation of semiconductor devices for Electric and Hybrid Vehicle (EHV) ac-drive applications, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, F. C.; Chen, D. Y.; Jovanic, M.; Hopkins, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    Test data of switching times characterization of bipolar transistors, of field effect transistor's switching times on-resistance and characterization, comparative data of field effect transistors, and test data of field effect transistor's parallel operation characterization are given. Data is given in the form of graphs.

  4. Development of a computer algorithm for the analysis of variable-frequency AC drives: Case studies included

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kankam, M. David; Benjamin, Owen

    1991-01-01

    The development of computer software for performance prediction and analysis of voltage-fed, variable-frequency AC drives for space power applications is discussed. The AC drives discussed include the pulse width modulated inverter (PWMI), a six-step inverter and the pulse density modulated inverter (PDMI), each individually connected to a wound-rotor induction motor. Various d-q transformation models of the induction motor are incorporated for user-selection of the most applicable model for the intended purpose. Simulation results of selected AC drives correlate satisfactorily with published results. Future additions to the algorithm are indicated. These improvements should enhance the applicability of the computer program to the design and analysis of space power systems.

  5. Comparison of AC drives for electric vehicles -- A report on experts` opinion survey

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.

    1994-08-01

    It is recognized that wide applications of electric vehicles (EVs) will bring tremendous social, economical and ecological benefits. With the growing interests in electric vehicles, much effort is demanded for the development of efficient, reliable and economical AC drives` for EV propulsion purpose. Both induction motor (IM) drives and permanent magnet brushless DC motor (BDCM) drives have been applied to EVs. Switched reluctance motor (SRM) drives have been proposed as an alternative for EV propulsion. In order to assess the suitability of IM, BDCM and SRM drives for EV applications and to provide a technical support for the development and selection of future EV propulsion systems, the existing EV AC propulsion drives were compared, and a survey of experts` opinions was conducted. Comparison of the three AC drives was made on a relative and a quantitative basis using the survey questionnaires. According to the majority of the experts, induction motor drives are best suited for EV propulsion purpose, due to their low cost, high reliability, high speed, established converter and manufacturing technology, low torque ripple/noise and absence of position sensors. BDCM drives feature compactness, low weight and high efficiency and therefore provide an alternative for EV propulsion. The experts regard insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs) as the most suited power semiconductor devices for AC drive converters at the present stage. 7 refs.

  6. Power Electronic Transformer based Three-Phase PWM AC Drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Kaushik

    A Transformer is used to provide galvanic isolation and to connect systems at different voltage levels. It is one of the largest and most expensive component in most of the high voltage and high power systems. Its size is inversely proportional to the operating frequency. The central idea behind a power electronic transformer (PET) also known as solid state transformer is to reduce the size of the transformer by increasing the frequency. Power electronic converters are used to change the frequency of operation. Steady reduction in the cost of the semiconductor switches and the advent of advanced magnetic materials with very low loss density and high saturation flux density implies economic viability and feasibility of a design with high power density. Application of PET is in generation of power from renewable energy sources, especially wind and solar. Other important application include grid tied inverters, UPS e.t.c. In this thesis non-resonant, single stage, bi-directional PET is considered. The main objective of this converter is to generate adjustable speed and magnitude pulse width modulated (PWM) ac waveforms from an ac or dc grid with a high frequency ac link. The windings of a high frequency transformer contains leakage inductance. Any switching transition of the power electronic converter connecting the inductive load and the transformer requires commutation of leakage energy. Commutation by passive means results in power loss, decrease in the frequency of operation, distortion in the output voltage waveform, reduction in reliability and power density. In this work a source based partially loss-less commutation of leakage energy has been proposed. This technique also results in partial soft-switching. A series of converters with novel PWM strategies have been proposed to minimize the frequency of leakage inductance commutation. These PETs achieve most of the important features of modern PWM ac drives including 1) Input power factor correction, 2) Common

  7. Shapiro steps for skyrmion motion on a washboard potential with longitudinal and transverse ac drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichhardt, C.; Reichhardt, C. J. Olson

    2015-12-01

    We numerically study the behavior of two-dimensional skyrmions in the presence of a quasi-one-dimensional sinusoidal substrate under the influence of externally applied dc and ac drives. In the overdamped limit, when both dc and ac drives are aligned in the longitudinal direction parallel to the direction of the substrate modulation, the velocity-force curves exhibit classic Shapiro step features when the frequency of the ac drive matches the washboard frequency that is dynamically generated by the motion of the skyrmions over the substrate, similar to previous observations in superconducting vortex systems. In the case of skyrmions, the additional contribution to the skyrmion motion from a nondissipative Magnus force shifts the location of the locking steps to higher dc drives, and we find that the skyrmions move at an angle with respect to the direction of the dc drive. For a longitudinal dc drive and a perpendicular or transverse ac drive, the overdamped system exhibits no Shapiro steps; however, when a finite Magnus force is present, we find pronounced transverse Shapiro steps along with complex two-dimensional periodic orbits of the skyrmions in the phase-locked regimes. Both the longitudinal and transverse ac drives produce locking steps whose widths oscillate with increasing ac drive amplitude. We examine the role of collective skyrmion interactions and find that additional fractional locking steps occur for both longitudinal and transverse ac drives. At higher skyrmion densities, the system undergoes a series of dynamical order-disorder transitions, with the skyrmions forming a moving solid on the phase locking steps and a fluctuating dynamical liquid in regimes between the steps.

  8. ac driving amplitude dependent systematic error in scanning Kelvin probe microscope measurements: Detection and correction

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yan; Shannon, Mark A.

    2006-04-15

    The dependence of the contact potential difference (CPD) reading on the ac driving amplitude in scanning Kelvin probe microscope (SKPM) hinders researchers from quantifying true material properties. We show theoretically and demonstrate experimentally that an ac driving amplitude dependence in the SKPM measurement can come from a systematic error, and it is common for all tip sample systems as long as there is a nonzero tracking error in the feedback control loop of the instrument. We further propose a methodology to detect and to correct the ac driving amplitude dependent systematic error in SKPM measurements. The true contact potential difference can be found by applying a linear regression to the measured CPD versus one over ac driving amplitude data. Two scenarios are studied: (a) when the surface being scanned by SKPM is not semiconducting and there is an ac driving amplitude dependent systematic error; (b) when a semiconductor surface is probed and asymmetric band bending occurs when the systematic error is present. Experiments are conducted using a commercial SKPM and CPD measurement results of two systems: platinum-iridium/gap/gold and platinum-iridium/gap/thermal oxide/silicon are discussed.

  9. Shape of the Hanle curve in spin-transport structures in the presence of an ac drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roundy, R. C.; Prestgard, M. C.; Tiwari, A.; Raikh, M. E.

    2014-11-01

    Resistance between two ferromagnetic electrodes coupled to a normal channel depends on their relative magnetizations. The spin-dependent component, R , of the resistance changes with magnetic field, B , normal to the directions of magnetizations. In the field of spin transport, this change, R (B ) , originating from the Larmour spin precession, is called the Hanle curve. We demonstrate that the shape of the Hanle curve evolves upon application of an ac drive and study this evolution theoretically as a function of the amplitude, B1, and frequency, ω , of the drive. If the distance between the electrodes, L , is smaller than the spin-diffusion length, λs, the prime effect of a weak circular-polarized drive is the shift of the center of the curve to the value of B for which the Larmour frequency, ωL, is ˜B12/ω . Magnetic resonance at ωL˜ω manifests itself in the derivative, d/R d B . For large L ≫λs the ac drive affects the Hanle curve if the drive amplitude exceeds the spin-relaxation rate, τs-1, i.e., at B1τs≳1 . The prime effect of the drive is the elimination of a minimum in R (B ) . A linearly polarized drive has a fundamentally different effect on the Hanle curve, affecting not its shape but rather its width.

  10. Instabilities across the isotropic conductivity point in a nematic phenyl benzoate under AC driving.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pramoda; Patil, Shivaram N; Hiremath, Uma S; Krishnamurthy, K S

    2007-08-01

    We characterize the sequence of bifurcations generated by ac fields in a nematic layer held between unidirectionally rubbed ITO electrodes. The material, which possesses a negative dielectric anisotropy epsilona and an inversion temperature for electrical conductivity anisotropy sigmaa, exhibits a monostable tilted alignment near TIN, the isotropic-nematic point. On cooling, an anchoring transition to the homeotropic configuration occurs close to the underlying smectic phase. The field experiments are performed for (i) negative sigmaa and homeotropic alignment, and (ii) weakly positive sigmaa and nearly homeotropic alignment. Under ac driving, the Freedericksz transition is followed by bifurcation into various patterned states. Among them are the striped states that seem to belong to the dielectric regime and localized hybrid instabilities. Very significantly, the patterned instabilities are not excited by dc fields, indicating their possible gradient flexoelectric origin. The Carr-Helfrich mechanism-based theories that take account of flexoelectric terms can explain the observed electroconvective effects only in part. PMID:17616118

  11. High performance control of a three-level IGBT inverter fed AC drive

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.

    1995-12-31

    Three-level PWM inverters have been increasingly employed in industry and traction applications where high power and efficiency energy conversions are required. This paper presents a high performance control of a cage induction motor drive fed by a 100 Hp three-level IGBT inverter operating at a low switching frequency. A practical math model of the drive control system is established to aid in the control design to improve the system stability, dynamic performance and robustness over a wide speed range. The modeling and the simulation in Matlab/Simulink facilitate the self-tuning of the regulators in the multi-loop systems. The field oriented control and three-level space-vector modulation together with the drive protection and diagnostics are implemented in software based on a DSP TMS320C31. Experimental results based on the IGBT inverter prototype are given to verify the design and performance. Test results in motor common-mode voltage reduction and inverter neutral-point potential control re also briefly presented.

  12. Nonlinear dynamics, rectification, and phase locking for particles on symmetrical two-dimensional periodic substrates with dc and circular ac drives.

    PubMed

    Reichhardt, C; Olson Reichhardt, C J; Hastings, M B

    2004-05-01

    We investigate the dynamical motion of particles on a two-dimensional symmetric periodic substrate in the presence of both a dc drive along a symmetry direction of the periodic substrate and an additional circular ac drive. For large enough ac drives, the particle orbit encircles one or more potential maxima of the periodic substrate. In this case, when an additional increasing dc drive is applied in the longitudinal direction, the longitudinal velocity increases in a series of discrete steps that are integer multiples of a omega/(2 pi), where a is the lattice constant of the substrate. Fractional steps can also occur. These integer and fractional steps correspond to distinct stable dynamical orbits. A number of these phases also show a rectification in the positive or negative transverse direction where a nonzero transverse velocity occurs in the absence of a dc transverse drive. We map out the phase diagrams of the regions of rectification as a function of ac amplitude, and find a series of tongues. Most of the features, including the steps in the longitudinal velocity and the transverse rectification, can be captured with a simple toy model and by arguments from nonlinear maps. We have also investigated the effects of thermal disorder and incommensuration on the rectification phenomena, and find that for increasing disorder, the rectification regions are gradually smeared and the longitudinal velocity steps are no longer flat but show a linearly increasing velocity. PMID:15244891

  13. Electrical Capacitance Volume Tomography: Design and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Marashdeh, Qussai; Fan, Liang-Shih; Warsito, Warsito

    2010-01-01

    This article reports recent advances and progress in the field of electrical capacitance volume tomography (ECVT). ECVT, developed from the two-dimensional electrical capacitance tomography (ECT), is a promising non-intrusive imaging technology that can provide real-time three-dimensional images of the sensing domain. Images are reconstructed from capacitance measurements acquired by electrodes placed on the outside boundary of the testing vessel. In this article, a review of progress on capacitance sensor design and applications to multi-phase flows is presented. The sensor shape, electrode configuration, and the number of electrodes that comprise three key elements of three-dimensional capacitance sensors are illustrated. The article also highlights applications of ECVT sensors on vessels of various sizes from 1 to 60 inches with complex geometries. Case studies are used to show the capability and validity of ECVT. The studies provide qualitative and quantitative real-time three-dimensional information of the measuring domain under study. Advantages of ECVT render it a favorable tool to be utilized for industrial applications and fundamental multi-phase flow research. PMID:22294905

  14. Applications of Tethers in Space, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cron, A. C. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Topics discussed include tethered satellites, tether deployment, satellite systems, science applications, electrodynamic interactions, transportation applications, artificial gravity, constellations, and technology and testing.

  15. Unified Technical Concepts. Application Modules Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    Unified Technical Concepts (UTC) is a modular system for teaching applied physics in two-year postsecondary technician programs. This UTC laboratory textbook, the second of two volumes, consists of 45 learning modules dealing with basic concepts of physics. Addressed in the individual chapters of the guide are the following topics: force…

  16. Applications of Tethers in Space: Workshop Proceedings, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baracat, W. A. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    The complete documentation of the workshop including all addresses, panel reports, charts, and summaries are presented. This volume presents all the reports on the fundamentals of applications of tethers in space. These applications include electrodynamic interactions, transportation, gravity utilization, constellations, technology and test, and science applications.

  17. Applications of Tethers in Space: workshop proceedings, volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Baracat, W.A.

    1986-06-01

    The complete documentation of the workshop including all addresses, panel reports, charts, and summaries are presented. This volume presents all the reports on the fundamentals of applications of tethers in space. These applications include electrodynamic interactions, transportation, gravity utilization, constellations, technology and test, and science applications.

  18. Computer technology -- 1996: Applications and methodology. PVP-Volume 326

    SciTech Connect

    Hulbert, G.M.; Hsu, K.H.; Lee, T.W.; Nicholas, T.

    1996-12-01

    The primary objective of the Computer Technology Committee of the ASME Pressure Vessels and Piping Division is to promote interest and technical exchange in the field of computer technology, related to the design and analysis of pressure vessels and piping. The topics included in this volume are: analysis of bolted joints; nonlinear analysis, applications and methodology; finite element analysis and applications; and behavior of materials. Separate abstracts were prepared for 23 of the papers in this volume.

  19. HEUS-RS applications study, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The final report of a High Energy Upper Stage Restartable Solid (HEUS-RS) Applications Study is presented. The material deals with launch program cost comparisons associated with meeting NASA mission model requirements with several different launch vehicle approaches.

  20. Applications of Tethers in Space, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cron, A. C. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    The tethered satellite system is described including tether fundamentals. Applications of very long tethers in space to a broad spectrum of future space missions are explored. Topics covered include: science, transportation, constellations, artificial gravity, technology and test, and electrodynamic interactions. Recommendations to NASA are included.

  1. Advanced Energetics for Aeronautical Applications. Volume II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, David S.

    2005-01-01

    NASA has identified water vapor emission into the upper atmosphere from commercial transport aircraft, particularly as it relates to the formation of persistent contrails, as a potential environmental problem. Since 1999, MSE has been working with NASA-LaRC to investigate the concept of a transport-size emissionless aircraft fueled with liquid hydrogen combined with other possible breakthrough technologies. The goal of the project is to significantly advance air transportation in the next decade and beyond. The power and propulsion (P/P) system currently being studied would be based on hydrogen fuel cells (HFCs) powering electric motors, which drive fans for propulsion. The liquid water reaction product is retained onboard the aircraft until a flight mission is completed. As of now, NASA-LaRC and MSE have identified P/P system components that, according to the high-level analysis conducted to date, are light enough to make the emissionless aircraft concept feasible. Calculated maximum aircraft ranges (within a maximum weight constraint) and other performance predictions are included in this report. This report also includes current information on advanced energy-related technologies, which are still being researched, as well as breakthrough physics concepts that may be applicable for advanced energetics and aerospace propulsion in the future.

  2. Vinegar: Application volumes and adjuvants for weed control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vinegar has been identified as a potential organic herbicide, yet more information is needed to determine influence of application volume and use of additives (adjuvants) on weed control. Vinegar is a solution containing water and acetic acid, an organic acid produced through the natural fermentatio...

  3. Organic weed control with vinegar: Application volumes and adjuvants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Preliminary results have indicated that vinegar has potential as an organic herbicide, but further research is needed to increase our understanding of the relationship between acetic acid concentrations, application volumes, adjuvants, weed species, and weed maturity on effectiveness of vinegar to c...

  4. Quality of Life. Volume II: Application to Persons with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schalock, Robert L., Ed.; Siperstein, Gary N., Ed.

    This volume summarizes current policies and programmatic practices that are influencing the quality of life of persons with mental retardation and developmental disabilities. Part 1, "Service Delivery Application," contains: "Using Person-Centered Planning To Address Personal Quality of Life" (John Butterworth and others); "The Aftermath of…

  5. A proposed application programming interface for a physical volume repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Merritt; Williams, Joel; Wrenn, Richard

    1996-01-01

    The IEEE Storage System Standards Working Group (SSSWG) has developed the Reference Model for Open Storage Systems Interconnection, Mass Storage System Reference Model Version 5. This document, provides the framework for a series of standards for application and user interfaces to open storage systems. More recently, the SSSWG has been developing Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) for the individual components defined by the model. The API for the Physical Volume Repository is the most fully developed, but work is being done on APIs for the Physical Volume Library and for the Mover also. The SSSWG meets every other month, and meetings are open to all interested parties. The Physical Volume Repository (PVR) is responsible for managing the storage of removable media cartridges and for mounting and dismounting these cartridges onto drives. This document describes a model which defines a Physical Volume Repository, and gives a brief summary of the Application Programming Interface (API) which the IEEE Storage Systems Standards Working Group (SSSWG) is proposing as the standard interface for the PVR.

  6. The application of volume-outcome contouring in data warehousing.

    PubMed

    Studnicki, James; Berndt, Donald J; Luther, Stephen L; Fisher, John W

    2004-01-01

    Despite a compelling body of published research on the nature of provider volume and clinical outcomes, healthcare executives and policymakers have not managed to develop and implement systems that are useful in directing patients to higher volume providers via selective referral or avoidance. A specialized data warehouse application, utilizing hospital discharge data linked to physician biographical information, allows detailed analysis of physician and hospital volume and the resulting pattern (contour) of related outcomes such as mortality, complications, and medical errors. The approach utilizes a historical repository of hospital discharge data in which the outcomes of interest, important patient characteristics and risk factors used in severity-adjusting of the outcomes are derived from the coding structure of the data. PMID:15537134

  7. An experimental result of estimating an application volume by machine learning techniques.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Tatsuhito; Koshino, Makoto; Kimura, Haruhiko

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we improved the usability of smartphones by automating a user's operations. We developed an intelligent system using machine learning techniques that periodically detects a user's context on a smartphone. We selected the Android operating system because it has the largest market share and highest flexibility of its development environment. In this paper, we describe an application that automatically adjusts application volume. Adjusting the volume can be easily forgotten because users need to push the volume buttons to alter the volume depending on the given situation. Therefore, we developed an application that automatically adjusts the volume based on learned user settings. Application volume can be set differently from ringtone volume on Android devices, and these volume settings are associated with each specific application including games. Our application records a user's location, the volume setting, the foreground application name and other such attributes as learning data, thereby estimating whether the volume should be adjusted using machine learning techniques via Weka. PMID:25713755

  8. Transonic Symposium: Theory, Application, and Experiment, volume 1, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foughner, Jerome T., Jr. (Compiler)

    1989-01-01

    In order to assess the state of the art in transonic flow disciplines and to glimpse at future directions, NASA-Langley held a Transonic Symposium. Emphasis was placed on steady, three dimensional external, transonic flow and its simulation, both numerically and experimentally. The symposium included technical sessions on wind tunnel and flight experiments; computational fluid dynamic applications; inviscid methods and grid generation; viscous methods and boundary layer stability; and wind tunnel techniques and wall interference. This, being volume 1, is unclassified.

  9. Sensors Applications, Volume 6, Sensors in Aerospace Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeser, Hans Peter; von Schoenermark, Maria; Young, Erick T.

    2005-08-01

    This volume gives a detailed overview of the sensor systems employed in aerospace technology, such as sensors for different spectral ranges from the UV to NIR, temperature measuring, radio- and microwave detection and satellite positioning systems. Furthermore, atmospheric measurements for meteorological and deep space exploration purposes as well as land surveys and geological applications are treated in detail. The book series Sensors Applications covers the application of up-to-date sensor principles in key areas, such as process monitoring, building control, household appliances, health care, automobile, aerospace, or environmental technology. Microelectronics have become indispensable in measurement and control technology, meeting the increasing demand for sophisticated sensor systems. The series covers the growing need for comprehensive information on the wide variety of available systems and their purposes, potentials, applications and limitations.

  10. Application of Control Volume Analysis to Cerebrospinal Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Timothy; Cohen, Benjamin; Anor, Tomer; Madsen, Joseph

    2011-11-01

    Hydrocephalus is among the most common birth defects and may not be prevented nor cured. Afflicted individuals face serious issues, which at present are too complicated and not well enough understood to treat via systematic therapies. This talk outlines the framework and application of a control volume methodology to clinical Phase Contrast MRI data. Specifically, integral control volume analysis utilizes a fundamental, fluid dynamics methodology to quantify intracranial dynamics within a precise, direct, and physically meaningful framework. A chronically shunted, hydrocephalic patient in need of a revision procedure was used as an in vivo case study. Magnetic resonance velocity measurements within the patient's aqueduct were obtained in four biomedical state and were analyzed using the methods presented in this dissertation. Pressure force estimates were obtained, showing distinct differences in amplitude, phase, and waveform shape for different intracranial states within the same individual. Thoughts on the physiological and diagnostic research and development implications/opportunities will be presented.

  11. TeleInViVo: a collaborative volume visualization application.

    PubMed

    Coleman, J; Savchenko, A; Goettsch, A; Wang, K; Bono, P; Littlefield, R; Macedonia, C

    1997-01-01

    Converging technologies in the areas of networks, volume visualization algorithms, and computer performance have made possible the development of a new tool for collaboration, which extends the reach of health professionals, and other consumers of volumetric data around the world. TeleInViVo(tm) is a three-dimensional (3D) collaborative volume visualization tool for medical applications. It extends the capabilities of InViVo(tm), a fast volume visualization tool developed at the Fraunhofer IGD, Darmstadt, Germany [1-3], with efficient and intuitive network collaboration features for remote consultation and new modes of interaction. The software runs on both UNIX and Windows NT platforms. TeleInViVo provides a high degree of interactivity for the medical professional when interacting with the patient data, facilitates explanation and communication between field personnel and medical experts located far from the field, and permits viewing of the data in a multitude of ways designed to support rapid and accurate diagnosis. Current efforts involve architectural enhancements to support multiuser, distributed telemedical scenarios. The application includes the following features: Volume and subvolume data transmission at user specified resolution, Synchronization cues, Integration of Immersion Probe(tm), a 6 degree-of-freedom input device, for ergonomic 3D data exploration, Tools for measuring distances, Tools for planning instrument path, Arbitrary cutting planes in real time, Interactive segmentation tools, Virtual video recorder and playback (cine loops), 3D stereo mode. TeleInViVo is an essential part of the MUSTPAC-1 portable 3D ultrasound system developed by Battelle Pacific Northwest Labs, Richland, WA. PMID:10168908

  12. Remote volume rendering pipeline for mHealth applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutenko, Ievgeniia; Petkov, Kaloian; Papadopoulos, Charilaos; Zhao, Xin; Park, Ji Hwan; Kaufman, Arie; Cha, Ronald

    2014-03-01

    We introduce a novel remote volume rendering pipeline for medical visualization targeted for mHealth (mobile health) applications. The necessity of such a pipeline stems from the large size of the medical imaging data produced by current CT and MRI scanners with respect to the complexity of the volumetric rendering algorithms. For example, the resolution of typical CT Angiography (CTA) data easily reaches 512^3 voxels and can exceed 6 gigabytes in size by spanning over the time domain while capturing a beating heart. This explosion in data size makes data transfers to mobile devices challenging, and even when the transfer problem is resolved the rendering performance of the device still remains a bottleneck. To deal with this issue, we propose a thin-client architecture, where the entirety of the data resides on a remote server where the image is rendered and then streamed to the client mobile device. We utilize the display and interaction capabilities of the mobile device, while performing interactive volume rendering on a server capable of handling large datasets. Specifically, upon user interaction the volume is rendered on the server and encoded into an H.264 video stream. H.264 is ubiquitously hardware accelerated, resulting in faster compression and lower power requirements. The choice of low-latency CPU- and GPU-based encoders is particularly important in enabling the interactive nature of our system. We demonstrate a prototype of our framework using various medical datasets on commodity tablet devices.

  13. Ground Operations Aerospace Language (GOAL). Volume 5: Application Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The Ground Operations Aerospace Language (GOAL) was designed to be used by test oriented personnel to write procedures which would be executed in a test environment. A series of discussions between NASA LV-CAP personnel and IBM resulted in some peripheral tasks which would aid in evaluating the applicability of the language in this environment, and provide enhancement for future applications. The results of these tasks are contained within this volume. The GOAL vocabulary provides a high degree of readability and retainability. To achieve these benefits, however, the procedure writer utilizes words and phrases of considerable length. Brief form study was undertaken to determine a means of relieving this burden. The study resulted in a version of GOAL which enables the writer to develop a dialect suitable to his needs and satisfy the syntax equations. The output of the compiler would continue to provide readability by printing out the standard GOAL language. This task is described.

  14. Sensors Applications, Volume 3, Sensors in Medicine and Health Care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öberg, P. Åke; Togawa, Tatsuo; Spelman, Francis A.

    2004-08-01

    Taken as a whole, this series covers all major fields of application for commercial sensors, as well as their manufacturing techniques and major types. As such the series does not treat bulk sensors, but rather places strong emphasis on microsensors, microsystems and integrated electronic sensor packages. Each of the individual volumes is tailored to the needs and queries of readers from the relevant branch of industry. A review of applications for point-of-care diagnostics, their integration into portable systems and the comfortable, easy-to-use sensors that allow patients to monitor themselves at home. The book covers such advanced topics as minimal invasive surgery, implantable sensors and prostheses, as well as biocompatible sensing.

  15. Injection molded high precision freeform optics for high volume applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Lars; Risse, Stefan; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2012-03-01

    Injection molding offers a cost-efficient method for manufacturing high precision plastic optics for high-volume applications. Optical surfaces such as flats, spheres and also aspheres are meanwhile state-of-the-art in the field of plastic optics. The demand for surfaces without symmetric properties, commonly referred to as freeform surfaces, continues to rise. Currently, new mathematical approaches are under consideration which allow for new complex optical designs. Such novel optical designs strongly encourage development of new manufacturing methods. Specifically, new surface descriptions without an axis of symmetry, new ultra precision machining methods and non-symmetrical shrinkage compensation strategies have to be developed to produce freeform optical surfaces with high precision for high-volume applications. This paper will illustrate a deterministic and efficient way for the manufacturing of ultra precision injection molding tool inserts with submicron precision and show the manufacturing of replicated freeform surfaces with micrometer range shape accuracy at diameters up to 40 mm with a surface roughness of approximately 2 nm.

  16. Sensors Applications, Volume 5, Sensors in Household Appliances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschulena, Guido; Lahrmann, Andreas

    2003-11-01

    A competent and comprehensive survey of current and future sensors applied in electronic household devices. Engineers and scientists will find here reports of an increase in product safety, efficiency and consumer comfort, coupled with a decrease in power consumption and water/wastewater. The book also looks at the customer appeal of advanced "intelligent" appliances, showing the heightened need for comprehensive information on their potentials and limitations. Taken as a whole, this series covers all major fields of application for commercial sensors, as well as their manufacturing techniques and major types. As such the series does not treat bulk sensors, but rather places strong emphasis on microsensors, microsystems and integrated electronic sensor packages. Each of the individual volumes is tailored to the needs and queries of readers from the relevant branch of industry.

  17. Application of automated topography focus corrections for volume manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltshire, Timothy J.; Liegl, Bernhard R.; Hwang, Emily M.; Lucksinger, Mark R.

    2010-03-01

    This work describes the implementation and performance of AGILE focus corrections for advanced photo lithography in volume production as well as advanced development in IBM's 300mm facility. In particular, a logic hierarchy that manages the air gage sub-system corrections to optimize tool productivity while sampling with sufficient frequency to ensure focus accuracy for stable production processes is described. The information reviewed includes: General AGILE implementation approaches; Sample focus correction contours for critical 45nm, 32nm, and 22nm applications; An outline of the IBM Advanced Process Control (APC) logic and system(s) that manage the focus correction sets; Long term, historical focus correction data for stable 45nm processes as well as development stage 32nm processes; Practical issues encountered and possible enhancements to the methodology.

  18. Emerging technologies in medical applications of minimum volume vitrification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Catalano, Paolo N; Gurkan, Umut Atakan; Khimji, Imran; Demirci, Utkan

    2011-08-01

    Cell/tissue biopreservation has broad public health and socio-economic impact affecting millions of lives. Cryopreservation technologies provide an efficient way to preserve cells and tissues targeting the clinic for applications including reproductive medicine and organ transplantation. Among these technologies, vitrification has displayed significant improvement in post-thaw cell viability and function by eliminating harmful effects of ice crystal formation compared to the traditional slow freezing methods. However, high cryoprotectant agent concentrations are required, which induces toxicity and osmotic stress to cells and tissues. It has been shown that vitrification using small sample volumes (i.e., <1 µl) significantly increases cooling rates and hence reduces the required cryoprotectant agent levels. Recently, emerging nano- and micro-scale technologies have shown potential to manipulate picoliter to nanoliter sample sizes. Therefore, the synergistic integration of nanoscale technologies with cryogenics has the potential to improve biopreservation methods. PMID:21955080

  19. Emerging technologies in medical applications of minimum volume vitrification

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Catalano, Paolo N; Gurkan, Umut Atakan; Khimji, Imran; Demirci, Utkan

    2011-01-01

    Cell/tissue biopreservation has broad public health and socio-economic impact affecting millions of lives. Cryopreservation technologies provide an efficient way to preserve cells and tissues targeting the clinic for applications including reproductive medicine and organ transplantation. Among these technologies, vitrification has displayed significant improvement in post-thaw cell viability and function by eliminating harmful effects of ice crystal formation compared to the traditional slow freezing methods. However, high cryoprotectant agent concentrations are required, which induces toxicity and osmotic stress to cells and tissues. It has been shown that vitrification using small sample volumes (i.e., <1 μl) significantly increases cooling rates and hence reduces the required cryoprotectant agent levels. Recently, emerging nano- and micro-scale technologies have shown potential to manipulate picoliter to nanoliter sample sizes. Therefore, the synergistic integration of nanoscale technologies with cryogenics has the potential to improve biopreservation methods. PMID:21955080

  20. Solar concentrator technology development for space based applications, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pintz, A.; Castle, C. H.; Reimer, R. R.

    1992-01-01

    Thermoelectric conversion using a radio-isotope heat source has been used where outer planetary space craft are too far away for absorbing significant solar energy. Solar dynamic power (SDP) conversion is one technology that offers advantages for applications within the inner planet region. Since SDP conversion efficiency can be 2 to 3 times higher than photovoltaic, the collecting surfaces are much reduced in area and therefore lighter. This becomes an advantage in allocating more weight to launched payloads. A second advantage results for low earth orbit applications. The reduced area results in lower drag forces on the spacecraft and requires less reboost propellant to maintain orbit. A third advantage occurs because of the sun-to-shade cycling while in earth orbit. Photovoltaic systems require batteries to store energy for use when in the shade, and battery life for periods of 10 to 15 years is not presently achievable. For these reasons the Solar Dynamics and Thermal Systems Branch at NASA LeRC has funded work in developing SDP systems. The generic SDP system uses a large parabolic solar concentrator to focus solar energy onto a power conversion device. The concentrators are large areas and must therefore be efficient and have low specific weights. Yet these surfaces must be precise and capable of being stowed in a launch vehicle and then deployed and sometimes unfurled in space. There are significant technical challenges in engineering such structures, and considerable investigation has been made to date. This is the second of two volumes reporting on the research done by the Advanced Manufacturing Center at Cleveland State University to assist NASA LeRC in evaluating this technology. This volume includes the appendices of selected data sets, drawings, and procedures. The objective of the grant was to restore the solar concentrator development technology of the 1960s while improving it with advances that have occurred since then. This report summarizes the

  1. Turbine design and application volumes 1, 2, and 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, Arthur J. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    NASA has an interest in turbines related primarily to aeronautics and space applications. Airbreathing turbine engines provide jet and turboshaft propulsion, as well as auxiliary power for aircraft. Propellant-driven turbines provide rocket propulsion and auxiliary power for spacecraft. Closed-cycle turbine engines using inert gases, organic fluids, and metal fluids have been studied for providing long-duration electric power for spacecraft. Other applications of interest for turbine engines include land-vehicle (cars, trucks, buses, trains, etc.) propulsion power and ground-based electrical power. In view of the turbine-system interest and efforts at Lewis Research Center, a course entitled 'Turbine Design and Application' was presented during 1968-69 as part of the In-house Graduate Study Program. The course was somewhat revised and again presented in 1972-73. Various aspects of turbine technology were covered including thermodynamic and fluid-dynamic concepts, fundamental turbine concepts, velocity diagrams, losses, blade aerodynamic design, blade cooling, mechanical design, operation, and performance. The notes written and used for the course have been revised and edited for publication. Such a publication can serve as a foundation for an introductory turbine course, a means for self-study, or a reference for selected topics. Any consistent set of units will satisfy the equations presented. Two commonly used consistent sets of units and constant values are given after the symbol definitions. These are the SI units and the U.S. customary units. A single set of equations covers both sets of units by including all constants required for the U.S. customary units and defining as unity those not required for the SI units. Three volumes are compiled into one.

  2. Solar concentrator technology development for space based applications, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pintz, A.; Castle, C. H.; Reimer, R. R.

    1992-01-01

    Thermoelectric conversion using a radio-isotope heat source has been used where outer planetary space craft are too far away for absorbing significant solar energy. Solar dynamic power (SDP) conversion is one technology that offers advantages for applications within the inner planet region. Since SDP conversion efficiency can be 2 to 3 times higher than photovoltaic, the collecting surfaces are much reduced in area and therefore lighter. This becomes an advantage in allocating more weight to launched payloads. A second advantage results for low earth orbit applications. The reduced area results in lower drag forces on the spacecraft and requires less reboost propellant to maintain orbit. A third advantage occurs because of the sun-to-shade cycling while in earth orbit. Photovoltaic systems require batteries to store energy for use when in the shade, and battery life for periods of 10 to 15 years is not presently achievable. For these reasons the Solar Dynamics and Thermal Systems Branch at NASA LeRC has funded work in developing SDP systems. The generic SDP system uses a large parabolic solar concentrator to focus solar energy onto a power conversion device. The concentrators are large areas and must therefore be efficient and have low specific weights. Yet these surfaces must be precise and capable of being stowed in a launch vehicle and then deployed and sometimes unfurled in space. There are significant technical challenges in engineering such structures, and considerable investigation has been made to date. This is the first of two volumes reporting on the research done by the Advanced Manufacturing Center at Cleveland State University to assist NASA LeRC in evaluating this technology. The objective of the grant was to restore the solar concentrator development technology of the 1960s while improving it with advances that have occurred since then. This report summarizes the work done from January 1989 through December 1991.

  3. EPA RREL'S MOBILE VOLUME REDUCTION UNIT -- APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The volume reduction unit (VRU) is a pilot-scale, mobile soil washing system designed to remove organic contaminants from the soil through particle size separation and solubilization. The VRU removes contaminants by suspending them in a wash solution and by reducing the volume of...

  4. Microcomputer Applications for Health Care Professionals. Volume II. Curriculum Improvement Project. Region II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Lucy

    This volume is one of three in a self-paced computer literacy course that gives allied health students a firm base of knowledge concerning computer usage in the hospital environment. It also develops skill in several applications software packages. Volume II contains materials for three one-hour courses on word processing applications, spreadsheet…

  5. Real-time volume rendering of MRCP: clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Neri, E; Boraschi, P; Caramella, D; Braccini, G; Gigoni, R; Cosottini, M; Lodovigi, S; Bartolozzi, C

    2000-02-01

    MR-cholangiopancreatography (Signa Contour 0.5T; GE/Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI) data sets of 156 patients, obtained with a 2D T2-weighted FSE sequence, in the coronal plane, were volume rendered (Advantage Windows 3.1; GEMS) independently by two radiologists, that were asked to define the range of signal intensities in which the signal of the pancreaticobiliary system was included and to rank the quality of native images and volume renderings. Patients had biliary stones (n = 47), inflammatory ampullary stenoses (n = 18), pancreatic tumors (n = 12), surgical bilio-enteric anastomoses (n = 19), ampullary carcinomas (n = 2), pancreatic duct stone (n = 1), cholangiocarcinoma (n = 3) and normal pancreaticobiliary tree (n = 54). Good quality volume renderings of the bile ducts were obtained for at least a maximum diameter of 1.5 mm. The quality rank agreement between volume rendering and native images was excellent (k = 0.94). The correlation between the observers for the setting the signal intensity range was excellent and statistically significant (P < 0.001). The correlation between the observers for the time of volume rendering was not statistically significant. Biliary stones could be displayed in 32/47 (68%) cases. The pancreatic duct stones was displayed as well. Inflammatory ampullary stenoses were detected in all cases (100%). In case of pancreatic tumors, cholangiocarcinomas and ampullary carcinomas volume rendering allowed to identify the site of stenosis. In surgical bilio-enteric anastomoses volume rendering was helpful to display the residual biliary tract, the site of anastomosis and the enteric tract. Volume rendering could be a reliable and efficient tool for the study of the anatomy and pathological changes of the pancreaticobiliary tract. PMID:10697224

  6. IMAGE information monitoring and applied graphics software environment. Volume 4. Applications description

    SciTech Connect

    Hallam, J.W.; Ng, K.B.; Upham, G.L.

    1986-09-01

    The EPRI Information Monitoring and Applied Graphics Environment (IMAGE) system is designed for 'fast proto-typing' of advanced concepts for computer-aided plant operations tools. It is a flexible software system which can be used for rapidly creating, dynamically driving and evaluating advanced operator aid displays. The software is written to be both host computer and graphic device independent. This four volume report includes an Executive Overview of the IMAGE package (Volume 1), followed by Software Description (Volume II), User's Guide (Volume III), and Description of Example Applications (Volume IV).

  7. Students' and Teachers' Application of Surface Area to Volume Relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Amy R.; Jones, M. Gail

    2013-02-01

    The National Science Education Standards emphasize teaching unifying concepts and processes such as basic functions of living organisms, the living environment, and scale (NRC 2011). Scale includes understanding that different characteristics, properties, or relationships within a system might change as its dimensions are increased or decreased (NRC 2011). One such relationship involves surface area to volume which is a pervasive concept that can be found throughout different sciences. This concept is important for students to not only understand the association of the two, but to also be able to apply this relationship in science contexts. The purpose of this study is to investigate the factors that influence the understanding surface area to volume relationships. This study examined middle school students', high school students', and science teachers' logical thinking skills (including proportional reasoning), visual-spatial skills, and understandings of surface area to volume relationships. Regression results indicated that participants' reasoning abilities and components of visual-spatial skills could be possible predictors for one's ability to understand surface area to volume relationships. Implications for teaching scale concepts such as surface area to volume relationships in the science classroom are discussed.

  8. Anterior chamber volume. Its measurement and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Coakes, R L; Lloyd-Jones, D; Hitchings, R A

    1979-04-01

    Measurement of anterior chamber volume is discussed and attention drawn to a new, convenient slit-image method, which was used to study anterior chamber depth and volume before and after prophylactic peripheral iridectomy in the fellow eyes of patients presenting with unilateral acute angle-closure glaucoma. There was no significant change in depth after iridectomy but the mean anterior chamber volume increased significantly (P less than 0.01), by nearly 3 per cent. This increase was due to elimination of peripheral iris bombé which was not present in two control groups of normal eyes, one matched for anterior chamber depth and the other for age and refraction. Peripheral iris bombé may be a quantifiable factor predisposing to the development of acute angle-closure glaucoma. PMID:297385

  9. Volume rendering: application in static field conformal radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourland, J. Daniel; Camp, Jon J.; Robb, Richard A.

    1992-09-01

    Lesions in the head which are large or irregularly shaped present challenges for radiosurgical treatment by linear accelerator or other radiosurgery modalities. To treat these lesions we are developing static field, conformal stereotactic radiosurgery. In this procedure seven to eleven megavoltage x-ray beams are aimed at the target volume. Each beam is designed from the beam's-eye view, and has its own unique geometry: gantry angle, table angle, and shape which conforms to the projected cross-section of the target. A difficulty with this and other 3- D treatment plans is the visualization of the treatment geometry and proposed treatment plan. Is the target volume geometrically covered by the arrangement of beams, and is the dose distribution adequate? To answer these questions we have been investigating the use of ANALYZETM volume rendering to display the target anatomy and the resultant dose distribution.

  10. Volume imaging with diffuse light: method, device, and clinical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampel, Uwe; Schleicher, Eckhard; Freyer, Richard

    2000-11-01

    Diffuse optical imaging and tomography is of some interest in the diagnosis of testicular pathologies. For a clinical evaluation of 3D optical tomography a special laser scanning device as well as dedicated tomography algorithms have been developed. With the device we are able to obtain continuous- wave tomographic scans from an object under investigation using different laser wavelengths. Tomographic image reconstruction is based on the solution of the linearized inverse problem of optical absorption imaging for a three- dimensional volume. Priority is given to a spatial resolution adapted volume discretization and an efficient matrix solution algorithm based on singular value decomposition.

  11. Cooperative Instructional Application of Writing Research. Final Report. Volume Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronnell, Bruce; And Others

    The second of three volumes on the relationship between writing research and instruction, this report first describes a 1982 conference on writing policies and problems sponsored by the Educational Research and Development division of the Southwest Regional Laboratory (SWRL) and the California State University, Long Beach. The second section…

  12. Fly ash construction manual for road and site applications: Volume 2, Contractor's guide: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Glogowski, P.E.; Kelly, J.M.; Curry, M.A.

    1988-10-01

    This two-volume manual presents information for the specification writer or contractor planning to use coal fly ash in the following applications: Fills, Embankments, and Backfills; Subgrade Stabilization; Pavement Base Course; Slurry Backfill; Soil Amendment. This document, Volume 2, ''Contractor's Guide,'' contains information directed toward contractors that describes equipment selection criteria and proper construction techniques. Sample specifications are included as appendices to each volume. 29 refs., 23 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Data catalog series for space science and applications flight missions. Volume 6: Master index volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, Richard; Ross, Patricia A.; King, Joseph H.

    1989-01-01

    The main purpose of the data catalog series is to provide descriptive references to data generated by space science flight missions. The data sets described include all of the actual holdings of the Space Science Data Center (NSSDC), all data sets for which direct contact information is available, and some data collections held and serviced by foreign investigators, NASA, and other U.S. government agencies. This volume contains the Master Index. The following spacecraft are included: Mariner, Pioneer, Pioneer Venus, Venera, Viking, Voyager, and Helios. Separate indexes to the planetary and interplanetary missions are also provided.

  14. Applications of texture mapping to volume and flow visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.; Crawfis, R.; Becker, B.

    1995-05-01

    The authors describe six visualization methods which take advantage of hardware polygon scan conversion, texture mapping, and compositing, to give interactive viewing of 3D scalar fields, and motion for 3D flows. For volume rendering, these are splatting of an optimized 3D reconstruction filter, and tetrahedral cell projection using a texture map to provide the exponential per pixel necessary for accurate opacity calculation. For flows, these are the above tetrahedral projection method for rendering the ``flow volume`` dyed after passing through a dye releasing polygon, ``splatting`` of cycled anisotropic textures to provide flow direction and motion visualization, splatting motion blurred particles to indicate flow velocity, and advecting a texture directly to show the flow motion. All these techniques are tailored to take advantage of existing graphics pipelines to produce interactive visualization tools.

  15. DTM-based surface and volume approximation. Geophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmár, János; Papp, Gábor; Szabó, Tamás

    1995-03-01

    Based on earlier investigations, two new methods for local surface interpolation developed by us were applied to derive regular grids, that is Digital Terrain Models (DTM) from the digitized contour lines of two surfaces. These surfaces represent two main structural boundaries of the Earth's crust, the pre-Tertiary basement and the Mohorovičić discontinuity in the Pannonian Basin, Hungary. The grids were used to model the volume of sediments and mantle material above the basement and below the Moho respectively in order to build up an initial version of a 3-D model of the crust in Hungary for regional gravity field modeling. The grid representation provides an evident and elementary way for modeling a body by right rectangular prisms of Δx × Δy × z, where Δx and Δy are distances between grid knots in the X and Y directions respectively, and z represents a grid value at a grid knot. However, because of the nature of forward gravity modeling, the elementary prisms might be drawn together in a simple volume density distribution (e.g. homogeneous layer) and in such a way that the computation time can be reduced significantly. Therefore, a recursive algorithm for volume approximation by right rectangular prisms of a body determined by its DTM also was developed and applied in the determination of the 3-D crustal model in the Pannonian Basin.

  16. Space shuttle orbiter heat pipe applications. Volume 1: Synopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alario, J. P.; Prager, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was made to formulate and evaluate heat pipe applications for the space shuttle orbiter. Of the twenty-seven specific applications which were identified, a joint evaluation resulted in the selection of five of the most promising ones for prototype development. The formulation process is described, along with the applications which evolved. The bulk of the discussion deals with the top five applications: (1) heat pipe augmented cold rail; (2) avionics heat pipe circuit; (3) heat pipe/phase change material modular sink; (4) air-to-heat-pipe heat exchanger; and (5) heat pipe radiator for compartment temperature control. The philosophy, physical design details, and performance data are presented for each concept along with a comparison to the baseline design where applicable. A sixth application, heat pipe space radiator for waste heat rejection, was also recommended for prototype development.

  17. Applications of aerospace technology to petroleum exploration. Volume 2: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, L. D.

    1976-01-01

    Participants in the investigation of problem areas in oil exploration are listed and the data acquisition methods used to determine categories to be studied are described. Specific aerospace techniques applicable to the tasks identified are explained and their costs evaluated.

  18. Penetration of minoxidil from ethanol/propylene glycol solutions: effect of application volume and occlusion.

    PubMed

    Tata, S; Flynn, G L; Weiner, N D

    1995-06-01

    We have previously established that the relative concentrations of propylene glycol and ethanol as a binary solvent system have a significant effect on the skin penetration of 2% solutions of minoxidil at 50 microL/cm2. The present work extends these studies and investigates the penetration of minoxidil from the different vehicle combinations as functions of application volume and occlusion. Decreasing the application volume has a variable effect which depends on vehicle composition. Penetration of minoxidil from 100% ethanol solutions decreased linearly with application volume. Generally, irrespective of the volume applied, the penetration of minoxidil increased with increasing ethanol fraction with a maximum penetration at 90% ethanol. Penetration from all the formulations was enhanced upon occluding the skin, with greatest increase evident in solutions with higher volatile fraction. Penetration of minoxidil in vivo showed trends similar to those seen in vitro. PMID:7562405

  19. Law School Admissions, 1985 to 1995: Assessing the Effect of Application Volume. LSAC Research Report Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longley, Charles

    This study examined the volume of applications filed for full-time admission to American Bar Association (ABA) approved law schools between 1985 and 1995. There were found to be two periods of application flow, one of increase (1985 to 1992) and one of decrease (1992 to 1995). Using descriptive statistics, the study finds institutional rates of…

  20. Update: Applications of Research in Music Education Yearbook. Volume 24

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowman & Littlefield Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Readers of the online journal "Update: Applications of Research in Music Education" who prefer a printed copy of articles most relevant to their work will find them in the new 2005-2006 "Update Yearbook." Now available to everyone interested in the latest music education trends, the Yearbook contains in print the entire online issues for…

  1. Thermal Storage Applications Workshop. Volume 1: Plenary Session Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The importance of the development of inexpensive and efficient thermal and thermochemical energy storage technology to the solar power program is discussed in a summary of workship discussions held to exchange information and plan for future systems. Topics covered include storage in central power applications such as the 10 MW-e demonstration pilot receiver to be constructed in Barstow, California; storage for small dispersed systems, and problems associated with the development of storage systems for solar power plants interfacing with utility systems.

  2. High Reliability, High Mix, Ultralow Volume Surface Mount Technology for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barela, P.; Bonner, K.; Cornford, S.; Wen, A.

    1995-01-01

    For the past two years, JPL has been working to introduce surface mount technology (SMT) for high reliability space applications. The thrust has centered around four research and development projects, the aim of which is to facilitate the use of SMT for designing, producing, inspecting, and quantifying surface mount printed wiring assemblies for ultralow volume, long life space applications. This paper explores the current approach being pursued at JPL and some of the problems peculiar to applying SMT to spacecraft applications.

  3. Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks for High Volume Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Upadhyay, Piyush; Pilli, Siva Prasad; Carlson, Blair; Carsley, John; Hartfield-Wunsch, Susan; Eisenmenger, Mark

    2014-02-04

    A Design of Experiment based approach is used to systematically investigate relationships between 8 different welding factors (4 related to tool geometry, 4 related to weld process control) and resulting weld properties including strength, elongation and formability in 1.2mm-2mm thick friction stir welding of AA5182-O for TWB application. The factors that result in most significant effects are elucidated. The interactions between several key factors like plunge depth, tool tilt, pin feature and pin length on the overall weld quality is discussed. Appropriate levels of factors that lead to excellent weld properties are also identified.

  4. 3D ultrasound volume stitching using phase symmetry and harris corner detection for orthopaedic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalvi, Rupin; Hacihaliloglu, Ilker; Abugharbieh, Rafeef

    2010-03-01

    Stitching of volumes obtained from three dimensional (3D) ultrasound (US) scanners improves visualization of anatomy in many clinical applications. Fast but accurate volume registration remains the key challenge in this area.We propose a volume stitching method based on efficient registration of 3D US volumes obtained from a tracked US probe. Since the volumes, after adjusting for probe motion, are coarsely registered, we obtain salient correspondence points in the central slices of these volumes. This is done by first removing artifacts in the US slices using intensity invariant local phase image processing and then applying the Harris Corner detection algorithm. Fast sub-volume registration on a small neighborhood around the points then gives fast, accurate 3D registration parameters. The method has been tested on 3D US scans of phantom and real human radius and pelvis bones and a phantom human fetus. The method has also been compared to volumetric registration, as well as feature based registration using 3D-SIFT. Quantitative results show average post-registration error of 0.33mm which is comparable to volumetric registration accuracy (0.31mm) and much better than 3D-SIFT based registration which failed to register the volumes. The proposed method was also much faster than volumetric registration (~4.5 seconds versus 83 seconds).

  5. Reconstruction of 3-Dimensional Histology Volume and its Application to Study Mouse Mammary Glands

    PubMed Central

    Shojaii, Rushin; Bacopulos, Stephanie; Yang, Wenyi; Karavardanyan, Tigran; Spyropoulos, Demetri; Raouf, Afshin; Martel, Anne; Seth, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Histology volume reconstruction facilitates the study of 3D shape and volume change of an organ at the level of macrostructures made up of cells. It can also be used to investigate and validate novel techniques and algorithms in volumetric medical imaging and therapies. Creating 3D high-resolution atlases of different organs1,2,3 is another application of histology volume reconstruction. This provides a resource for investigating tissue structures and the spatial relationship between various cellular features. We present an image registration approach for histology volume reconstruction, which uses a set of optical blockface images. The reconstructed histology volume represents a reliable shape of the processed specimen with no propagated post-processing registration error. The Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) stained sections of two mouse mammary glands were registered to their corresponding blockface images using boundary points extracted from the edges of the specimen in histology and blockface images. The accuracy of the registration was visually evaluated. The alignment of the macrostructures of the mammary glands was also visually assessed at high resolution. This study delineates the different steps of this image registration pipeline, ranging from excision of the mammary gland through to 3D histology volume reconstruction. While 2D histology images reveal the structural differences between pairs of sections, 3D histology volume provides the ability to visualize the differences in shape and volume of the mammary glands. PMID:25145969

  6. Manipulating biological agents and cells in micro-scale volumes for applications in medicine

    PubMed Central

    Tasoglu, Savas; Gurkan, Umut Atakan; Wang, ShuQi

    2013-01-01

    Recent technological advances provide new tools to manipulate cells and biological agents in micro/nano-liter volumes. With precise control over small volumes, the cell microenvironment and other biological agents can be bioengineered; interactions between cells and external stimuli can be monitored; and the fundamental mechanisms such as cancer metastasis and stem cell differentiation can be elucidated. Technological advances based on the principles of electrical, magnetic, chemical, optical, acoustic, and mechanical forces lead to novel applications in point-of-care diagnostics, regenerative medicine, in vitro drug testing, cryopreservation, and cell isolation/purification. In this review, we first focus on the underlying mechanisms of emerging examples for cell manipulation in small volumes targeting applications such as tissue engineering. Then, we illustrate how these mechanisms impact the aforementioned biomedical applications, discuss the associated challenges, and provide perspectives for further development. PMID:23575660

  7. Space processing applications payload equipment study. Volume 3: Programmatics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammel, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    The programmatic aspects of the space processing applications program and the methods of accommodating SPA payloads aboard the Shuttle/Spacelab host vehicle are discussed. An examination of the NASA traffic model shows that there exists a potential for 178 SPA payloads from the overall total of 727 flights specified. This could represent up to one quarter of the total shuttle flights during the 12-year-long period covered by the traffic model. The SPA payload will range from austere for shared flight opportunities to dedicated where space processing will encompass the total flight payload allocations. The major modes of use to SPA will include dedicated Spacelab missions, shared Spacelab missions and shared automated payloads attached to the pallet with the necessary control and display equipment in the host vehicle. Several layout drawings and artist's renderings have been completed to illustrate the various potential configurations available to accommodate the SPA payload equipment.

  8. Thermal Storage Applications Workshop. Volume 2: Contributed Papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The solar thermal and the thermal and thermochemical energy storage programs are described as well as the technology requirements for both external (electrical) and internal (thermal, chemical) modes for energy storage in solar power plants. Specific technical issues addressed include thermal storage criteria for solar power plants interfacing with utility systems; optimal dispatch of storage for solar plants in a conventional electric grid; thermal storage/temperature tradeoffs for solar total energy systems; the value of energy storage for direct-replacement solar thermal power plants; systems analysis of storage in specific solar thermal power applications; the value of seasonal storage of solar energy; criteria for selection of the thermal storage system for a 10 MW(2) solar power plant; and the need for specific requirements by storage system development teams.

  9. High Volume Fraction Carbon Nanotube Composites for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siochi, E. J.; Kim, J.-W.; Sauti, G.; Cano, R. J.; Wincheski, R. A.; Ratcliffe, J. G.; Czabaj, M.

    2016-01-01

    Reported mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) at the nanoscale suggest their potential to enable significantly lighter structures of interest for space applications. However, their utility depends on the retention of these properties in bulk material formats that permit practical fabrication of large structures. This presentation summarizes recent progress made to produce carbon nanotube composites with specific tensile properties that begin to rival those of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites. CNT content in these nanocomposites was greater than 70% by weight. Tested nanocomposite specimens were fabricated from kilometers or tens of square meters of CNT, depending on the starting material format. Processing methods to yield these results, and characterization and testing to evaluate the performance of these composites will be discussed. The final objective is the demonstration of a CNT composite overwrapped pressure vessel to be flight tested in the Fall of 2016.

  10. High Volume Fraction Carbon Nanotube Composites for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siochi, Emilie J.; Kim, Jae-Woo; Sauti, Godfrey; Cano, Roberto J.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Czabaj, Michael; Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.

    2015-01-01

    Reported nanoscale mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) suggest that their use may enable the fabrication of significantly lighter structures for use in space applications. To be useful in the fabrication of large structures, however, their attractive nanoscale properties must be retained as they are scaled up to bulk materials and converted into practically useful forms. Advances in CNT production have significantly increased the quantities available for use in manufacturing processes, but challenges remain with the retention of nanoscale properties in larger assemblies of CNTs. This work summarizes recent progress in producing carbon nanotube composites with tensile properties approaching those of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites. These advances were achieved in nanocomposites with CNT content of 70% by weight. The processing methods explored to yield these CNT composite properties will be discussed, as will the characterization and test methods that were developed to provide insight into the factors that contribute to the enhanced tensile properties. Technology maturation was guided by parallel advancements in computational modeling tools that aided in the interpretation of experimental data.

  11. Composite materials. Volume 3 - Engineering applications of composites. Volume 4 - Metallic matrix composites. Volume 8 - Structural design and analysis, Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noton, B. R. (Editor); Kreider, K. G.; Chamis, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    This volume discusses a vaety of applications of both low- and high-cost composite materials in a number of selected engineering fields. The text stresses the use of fiber-reinforced composites, along with interesting material systems used in the electrical and nuclear industries. As to technology transfer, a similarity is noted between many of the reasons responsible for the utilization of composites and those problems requiring urgent solution, such as mechanized fabrication processes and design for production. Features topics include road transportation, rail transportation, civil aircraft, space vehicles, builing industry, chemical plants, and appliances and equipment. The laminate orientation code devised by Air Force materials laboratory is included. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  12. Uncooled amorphous silicon IRFPA for high performance and high volume applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochic, D.; Durand, A.; Tissot, J. L.; Crastes, A.; Vilain, M.; Legras, O.; Tinnes, S.; Minassian, C.; Robert, P.

    2009-09-01

    For more than 10 years now, uncooled sensors have given new opportunities in the IR field of applications by being able to be produce in large volume. Compared to cooled technology, uncooled detectors offer many interesting advantages: high reliability, lower cost ... whereas the performance is high enough for a lot of applications. Thermography, building inspection, enhanced driver vision and military (thermal weapon sight, low altitude UAV sensor) are applications which can be provided with affordable IR focal plane arrays... As uncooled IR sensors are mainly dedicated to these high volume applications, any uncooled IRFPA technology has to be able to provide high performance sensors but also to be producible in large volume at a minimum cost. The high level of accumulated expertise by ULIS and CEA/LETI on uncooled microbolometers made from amorphous silicon layer enables ULIS to develop a full range of IRFPA formats from 160x120 to 1024x768 pixels with 25μm and 17μm pixel-pitch, designed for high end and high volume applications. The detector ROIC designs rely on a simple architecture (detector configuration addressed by a serial link for user defined amplifier gain, windowing capability...) which enables easier systems upgrade and therefore a reduced system development non recurrent cost. The packaging technique depends on the application environment and the production volume in order to fit with the market expectation. Starting from metallic and ceramics package, very advanced new technique is under development in order to reduce uncooled IRFPA production cost. NETD in the range of 30mK (f/1, 300K, 60Hz) as well as operability higher than 99.99%, are routinely achieved with amorphous silicon technology.

  13. SU-E-T-611: Effective Treatment Volume of the Small Size IORT Applicators

    SciTech Connect

    Krechetov, A.S.; Goer, D.A.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose Mobile electron linear accelerators are gaining more attention recently, providing a lower cost and simpler way to perform intraoperative treatment. However, the simplicity of the treatment process does not eliminate the need for proper attention to the technical aspects of the treatment. One of the potential pitfalls is incorrect selection of the appropriate applicator size to adequately cover the tumor bed to the prescription dose. When treating tumor beds in the pelvis, the largest applicator that fits into the pelvis is usually selected as there is concern about microscopic extension of the disease along the sidewalls of the pelvis. But when treating early stage breast tumors, there is a natural tendency to select an applicator as small as possible so as not to jeopardize cosmesis. Methods This investigation questions how much of the typical breast treatment volume gets adequate exposure and what is the correct strategy in selecting the proper applicator size. Actual data from isodose scans were analyzed. Results We found that typical treatment dose prescriptions can cover as much as 80% and as little as 20% of the nominal treatment volume depending on the applicator size and energy of the beam and whether the dose is prescribed to the 80 or 90% isodose level. Treatment volume is defined as a cylinder with diameter equal to applicator and height equal to the corresponding D80 or D90 depth. Conclusion If mobile linear accelerators are used, there can be significant amount of “cold volume” depending on the applicator size and this should be taken into account when selecting the applicator that is needed. Using too small of an applicator could result in significant under-dosing to the tissue at risk. Long-term clinical data demonstrates that selecting an adequate field size results in good ontological control as well as excellent cosmesis. Intraop Medical Corp was providing facilities and equipment for this research.

  14. Bivariate analysis of flood peaks and volumes using copulas. An application to the Danube River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaioannou, George; Bacigal, Tomas; Jeneiova, Katarina; Kohnová, Silvia; Szolgay, Jan; Loukas, Athanasios

    2014-05-01

    A multivariate analysis on flood variables such as flood peaks, volumes and durations, is essential for hydrotechnical projects design. A lot of authors have suggested the use of bivariate distributions for the frequency analysis of flood peaks and volumes due to the supposition that the marginal probability distribution type is the same for these variables. The application of Copulas, which are becoming gradually widespread, can overcome this constraint. The selection of the appropriate copula type/families is not extensively treated in the literature and it remains a challenge in copula analysis. In this study a bivariate copula analysis with the use of different copula families is carried out on the basis of flood peak and the corresponding volumes along a river. This bivariate analysis of flood peaks and volumes is based on streamflow daily data of a time-series more than 100 years from several gauged stations of the Danube River. The methodology applied using annual maximum flood peaks (AMF) with the independent annual maximum volumes of fixed durations at 5, 10, 15,20,25,30 and 60 days. The discharge-volume pairs correlation are examined using Kendall's tau correlation analysis. The copulas families that selected for the bivariate modeling of the extracted pairs discharge and volumes are the Archimedean, Extreme-value and other copula families. The evaluation of the copulas performance achieved with the use of scatterplots of the observed and bootstrapped simulated pairs and formal tests of goodness of fit. Suitability of copulas was statistically compared. Archimedean (e.g. Frank and Clayton) copulas revealed to be more capable for bivariate modeling of floods than the other examined copula families at the Danube River. Results showed in general that copulas are effective tools for bivariate modeling of the two study random variables.

  15. Photopolymer-Based Volume Holographic Optical Elements: Design and Possible Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, G.; Ferrara, M. A.; Borbone, F.; Roviello, A.; Striano, V.; Coppola, G.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, Volume Holographic Optical Elements (V-HOEs), such as holographic gratings and spherical lenses, are designed and fabricated by using a prototype of photopolymer. The recording process of V-HOEs and their appropriate characterization are described. Moreover, V-HOEs possible applications as solar concentrator are investigated and results are discussed. Finally, a system that allows passive solar tracking is proposed and preliminary results are reported.

  16. Higher-Order, Space-Time Adaptive Finite Volume Methods: Algorithms, Analysis and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Minion, Michael

    2014-04-29

    The four main goals outlined in the proposal for this project were: 1. Investigate the use of higher-order (in space and time) finite-volume methods for fluid flow problems. 2. Explore the embedding of iterative temporal methods within traditional block-structured AMR algorithms. 3. Develop parallel in time methods for ODEs and PDEs. 4. Work collaboratively with the Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering (CCSE) at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab towards incorporating new algorithms within existing DOE application codes.

  17. Computing n-dimensional volumes of complexes: Application to constructive entropy bounds

    SciTech Connect

    Beiu, V.; Makaruk, H.E.

    1997-11-01

    The constructive bounds on the needed number-of-bits (entropy) for solving a dichotomy (i.e., classification of a given data-set into two distinct classes) can be represented by the quotient of two multidimensional solid volumes. Exact methods for the calculation of the volume of the solids lead to a tighter lower bound on the needed number-of-bits--than the ones previously known. Establishing such bounds is very important for engineering applications, as they can improve certain constructive neural learning algorithms, while also reducing the area of future VLSI implementations of neural networks. The paper will present an effective method for the exact calculation of the volume of any n-dimensional complex. The method uses a divide-and-conquer approach by: (i) partitioning (i.e., slicing) a complex into simplices; and (ii) computing the volumes of these simplices. The slicing of any complex into a sum of simplices always exists, but it is not unique. This non-uniqueness gives us the freedom to choose that specific partitioning which is convenient for a particular case. It will be shown that this optimal choice is related to the symmetries of the complex, and can significantly reduce the computations involved.

  18. Draft Title 40 CFR 191 compliance certification application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 4: Appendix BIR Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-31

    This report consists of the waste stream profile for the WIPP transuranic waste baseline inventory at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The following assumptions/modifications were made by the WTWBIR team in developing the LL waste stream profiles: since only current volumes were provided by LL, the final form volumes were assumed to be the same as the current volumes; the WTWBIR team had to assign identification numbers (IDs) to those LL waste streams not given an identifier by the site, the assigned identification numbers are consistent with the site reported numbers; LL Final Waste Form Groups were modified to be consistent with the nomenclature used in the WTWBID, these changes included word and spelling changes, the assigned Final Waste Form Groups are consistent with the information provided by LL; the volumes for the year 1993 were changed from an annual rate of generation (m{sup 3}/year) to a cumulative value (m{sup 3}).

  19. Electrical power free, low dead volume, pressure-driven pumping for microfluidic applications

    PubMed Central

    Moscovici, Mario; Chien, Wei-Yin; Abdelgawad, Mohamed; Sun, Yu

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a simple-to-construct, low dead volume pump capable of generating a wide range of positive and negative pressures for microfluidic applications. The pump generates pressure or vacuum by changing the volume of air confined inside a syringe and is able to generate pressures between −95 and +300 kPa with a resolution as high as 1 Pa. Different from syringe pumps and electrokinetic pumping, which are capable of controlling flow rates only, our pump can be used to generate constant flow rates or constant pressures, which are required for certain applications such as the aspiration of biological cells for biophysical characterization. Compared to syringe pumps, the new pump has almost zero dead volume and does not exhibit pulsatile flows. Additionally, the system does not require electrical power and is cost effective (∼$100). To demonstrate the capabilities of the pump, we used it to aspirate osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1 cells) and to determine Young’s modulus of the cells, to generate a concentration gradient, and to produce variable-sized droplets in microchannels using hydrodynamic focusing. PMID:21057609

  20. High field volume coil with unbalance current distribution for MRI applications of rodents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrufo, O. R.; Hernández, J.; Rodríguez, A. O.

    2010-12-01

    The development of transceiver volume coils for high field MRI is still a very dynamic field of investigation and development Temnikov has been recently proposed a new volume coil design, similar to the to the gradiometer coil. It is also claimed that it is possible to individually tune it with a single chip capacitor. This motivated the development of a coil prototype based on this idea for whole-body MRI of rodents at 7 Tesla. Electromagnetic simulations of the RF field generated by this coil design were previously performed to study its properties. Electromagnetic simulations were also conducted for a standard birdcage coil with similar dimensions for fare comparison. In all numerical simulations, an unbalanced currents distribution was assumed by applying half the current intensity to designated legs. This coil design operated in the transceiver mode and was linear-driven. The coil size was manufactured to accommodate small rodents. Numerical simulations showed a field uniformity improvement of our coil over the standard birdcage coil. A popular birdcage coil was also constructed to compare their performances. Phantom and rat images were acquired for both volume coils to prove the viability of this coil design for high field MRI applications and standard spin echo pulse sequences Thus, these preliminary results make this coil design a good candidate for MRI and MRS applications of high magnetic fields.

  1. Characterization of volume holographic optical elements recorded in Bayfol HX photopolymer for solar photovoltaic applications.

    PubMed

    Marín-Sáez, Julia; Atencia, Jesús; Chemisana, Daniel; Collados, María-Victoria

    2016-03-21

    Volume Holographic Optical Elements (HOEs) present interesting characteristics for photovoltaic applications as they can select spectrum for concentrating the target bandwidth and avoiding non-desired wavelengths, which can cause the decrease of the performance on the cell, for instance by overheating it. Volume HOEs have been recorded on Bayfol HX photopolymer to test the suitability of this material for solar concentrating photovoltaic systems. The HOEs were recorded at 532 nm and provided a dynamic range, reaching close to 100% efficiency at 800 nm. The diffracted spectrum had a FWHM of 230 nm when illuminating at Bragg angle. These characteristics prove HOEs recorded on Bayfol HX photopolymer are suitable for concentrating solar light onto photovoltaic cells sensitive to that wavelength range. PMID:27136889

  2. Principles and applications of imaging radar. Manual of remote sensing: Third edition, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, F.M.; Lewis, A.J.

    1998-12-31

    This second volume in the Third Edition of the Manual of Remote Sensing offers a current and comprehensive survey of the theory, methods, and applications of imaging radar for geoscientists, engineers and application scientists interested in the advantages of radar remote sensing. Produced under the auspices of the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, it brings together contributions from experts around the world to discuss the basic principles of imaging radars and trace the research activity--past, present, and future--across the many sciences where radar remote sensing may be applied. This book offers an invaluable snapshot of radar remote sensing technology, including radargrammetry, radar polarimetry and interferometry and its uses. It combines technical and procedural coverage of systems, data interpretation, and other fundamentals with generous coverage of practical applications in agriculture; forestry; soil moisture monitoring; geology; geomorphology and hydrology; oceanography; land use, land cover mapping and archeology.

  3. Horizontal oil well applications and oil recovery assessment. Volume 2: Applications overview, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Deskins, W.G.; McDonald, W.J.; Knoll, R.G.; Springer, S.J.

    1995-03-01

    Horizontal technology has been applied in over 110 formations in the USA. Volume 1 of this study addresses the overall success of horizontal technology, especially in less-publicized formations, i.e., other than the Austin Chalk, Bakken, and Niobrara. Operators in the USA and Canada were surveyed on a formation-by-formation basis by means of a questionnaire. Response data were received describing horizontal well projects in 58 formations in the USA and 88 in Canada. Operators` responses were analyzed for trends in technical and economic success based on lithology (clastics and carbonates) and resource type (light oil, heavy oil, and gas). The potential impact of horizontal technology on reserves was also estimated. A forecast of horizontal drilling activity over the next decade was developed.

  4. Applications of the Mossbauer effect: Applications in other fields. Volume 5

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, Y.M.; Lyubutin, I.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book explores the many areas in which the Mossbauer effect has had a great impact. Collected in several volumes, these findings show how nuclear gamma resonance has resolved many questions in the physical and chemical sciences, metallurgy, geology, biology, medicine, and engineering - ranging in intricacy from the measurements of nuclear parameters to the study of the basic structural properties of materials. Topics considered include molecular orbital approach to interpretation of Mossbauer quadrupole splitting in model bisimidazole-ironporphyrins; the study of low-temperature reduction of methemoglobin of insects; electron relaxation and EFG orientation in crocidolite; coherent excitation of Mossbauer nuclei by synchrotron radiation; suppression of conversion electron yield in the Bragg scattering of Mossbauer rays; and properties of the oriented transformer tin.

  5. Three-dimensional region-based adaptive image processing techniques for volume visualization applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Deus Lopes, Roseli; Zuffo, Marcelo K.; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M.

    1996-04-01

    Recent advances in three-dimensional (3D) imaging techniques have expanded the scope of applications of volume visualization to many areas such as medical imaging, scientific visualization, robotic vision, and virtual reality. Advanced image filtering, enhancement, and analysis techniques are being developed in parallel in the field of digital image processing. Although the fields cited have many aspects in common, it appears that many of the latest developments in image processing are not being applied to the fullest extent possible in visualization. It is common to encounter the use of rather simple and elementary image pre- processing operations being used in visualization and 3D imaging applications. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of selected topics from recent developments in adaptive image processing and demonstrate or suggest their applications in volume visualization. The techniques include adaptive noise removal; improvement of contrast and visibility of objects; space-variant deblurring and restoration; segmentation-based lossless coding for data compression; and perception-based measures for analysis, enhancement, and rendering. The techniques share the common base of identification of adaptive regions by region growing, which lends them a perceptual basis related to the human visual system. Preliminary results obtained with some of the techniques implemented so far are used to illustrate the concepts involved, and to indicate potential performance capabilities of the methods.

  6. High internal free volume compositions for low-k dielectric and other applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swager, Timothy M. (Inventor); Bouffard, Jean (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides materials, devices, and methods involving new heterocyclic, shape-persistent monomeric units with internal free volume. In some cases, materials the present invention may comprise monomers, oligomers, or polymers that incorporate a heterocyclic, shape-persistent iptycene. The present invention may provide materials having low dielectric constants and improved stability at high operating temperatures due to the electron-poor character of materials. In addition, compositions of the invention may be easily synthesized and readily modified to suit a particular application.

  7. Using n-Dimensional Volumes for Mathematical Applications in Spectral Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemann, Amanda K.

    The ability to detect an object or activity -- such as a military vehicle, construction area, campsite, or vehicle tracks -- is highly important to both military and civilian applications. Sensors that process multi and hyperspectral images provide a medium for performing such tasks. Hyperspectral imaging is a technique for collecting and processing imagery at a large number of visible and non-visible wavelengths. Different materials exhibit different trends in their spectra, which can be used to analyze the image. For an image collected at n different wavelengths, the spectrum of each pixel can be mathematically represented as an n-element vector. The algorithm established in this work, the Simplex Volume Estimation algorithm (SVE), focuses specifically on change detection and large area search. In hyperspectral image analysis, a set of pixels constitutes a data cloud, with each pixel corresponding to a vector endpoint in Euclidean space. The SVE algorithm takes a geometrical approach to image analysis based on the linear mixture model, which describes each pixel in an image collected at n spectral bands as a linear combination of n+1 pure-material component spectra (known as endmembers). Iterative endmember identification is used to construct a volume function, where the Gram matrix is used to calculate the hypervolume of the data at each iteration as the endmembers are considered in Euclidean spaces of increasing dimensionality. Linear algebraic theory substantiates that the volume function accurately characterizes the inherent dimensionality of a set of data, and supports that the volume function provides a tool for identifying the subspace in which the magnitude of the spread of the data is the greatest. A metric is extracted from the volume function, and is used to quantify the relative complexity within a single image or the change in complexity across multiple images. The SVE algorithm was applied to hyperspectral images for the tasks of change detection

  8. Photovoltaic applications definition and photovoltaic system definition study in the agricultural sector. Volume 2: Technical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengel, R. W.; Nadolski, T. P.; Sparks, D. C.; Young, S. K.; Yingst, A.

    1980-05-01

    This volume describes the technical results of the study of potential photovoltaic (P/V) applications in US agriculture. The results presented address all technical aspects of the program and include a summary of agricultural energy consumption. The objectives of the technical effort reported were to: (1) identify and characterize agricultural energy demands that can effectively use P/V power systems; (2) develop effective P/V system designs for the four most promising applications; (3) determine performance and cost estimates for the designs; and (4) recommend systems for early test and demonstration and critical issues requiring further systems studies. The farms chosen for conceptual design include; (1) poultry layer farm, (2) hog production farm, (3) beef feedlot, and (4) year round vegetable farm.

  9. Development, Verification and Validation of Parallel, Scalable Volume of Fluid CFD Program for Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Jeff; Yang, H. Q.

    2014-01-01

    There are many instances involving liquid/gas interfaces and their dynamics in the design of liquid engine powered rockets such as the Space Launch System (SLS). Some examples of these applications are: Propellant tank draining and slosh, subcritical condition injector analysis for gas generators, preburners and thrust chambers, water deluge mitigation for launch induced environments and even solid rocket motor liquid slag dynamics. Commercially available CFD programs simulating gas/liquid interfaces using the Volume of Fluid approach are currently limited in their parallel scalability. In 2010 for instance, an internal NASA/MSFC review of three commercial tools revealed that parallel scalability was seriously compromised at 8 cpus and no additional speedup was possible after 32 cpus. Other non-interface CFD applications at the time were demonstrating useful parallel scalability up to 4,096 processors or more. Based on this review, NASA/MSFC initiated an effort to implement a Volume of Fluid implementation within the unstructured mesh, pressure-based algorithm CFD program, Loci-STREAM. After verification was achieved by comparing results to the commercial CFD program CFD-Ace+, and validation by direct comparison with data, Loci-STREAM-VoF is now the production CFD tool for propellant slosh force and slosh damping rate simulations at NASA/MSFC. On these applications, good parallel scalability has been demonstrated for problems sizes of tens of millions of cells and thousands of cpu cores. Ongoing efforts are focused on the application of Loci-STREAM-VoF to predict the transient flow patterns of water on the SLS Mobile Launch Platform in order to support the phasing of water for launch environment mitigation so that vehicle determinantal effects are not realized.

  10. Multispectral scanner data applications evaluation. Volume 2: Sensor system study. [thematic mapper for earth resources application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The optimization of a thematic mapper for earth resources application is discussed in terms of cost versus performance. Performance tradeoffs and the cost impact are analyzed. The instrument design and radiometric performance are also described. The feasibility of a radiative cooler design for a scanning spectral radiometer is evaluated along with the charge coupled multiplex operation. Criteria for balancing the cost and complexity of data acquisition instruments against the requirements of the user, and a pushbroom scanner version of the thematic mapper are presented.

  11. In-Swath Spray Deposition Characteristics of a Low Drift Nozzle for Low Volume Aerial Application - Preliminary Results.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CP flat-fan nozzles with selectable tips were evaluated for droplet spectra and coverage using water sensitive papers placed in the spray swath. This study used low application volumes (1, 2, and 3 GPA) at a certain spray application height as measured precisely by laser mounted in the aircraft. No...

  12. Proceedings of the fourth international conference on remote sensing for marine and coastal environments. Technology and applications: Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    The conference proceedings contain papers which focus on the application of remote sensing technology and geographic information systems to solve problems in marine and coastal environments. Thirty-one papers were selected for the database from Volume 2 of the proceedings. The topics included in the proceedings are: natural resource management, coastal hazards, oceanographic applications, mapping and charting, data access, coastal ocean color, radar satellites/coastal radars, underwater remote sensing, and new sensors and systems. Subtopics of papers in Volume 2 include: optics and models; air-sea interactions and sea ice; sensors and information systems; hyperspectral sensors and applications; charting and mapping; and color imagery.

  13. Proceedings of the fourth international conference on remote sensing for marine and coastal environments. Technology and applications: Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    The conference proceedings contain papers which focus on the application of remote sensing technology and geographic information systems to solve problems in marine and coastal environments. Sixty-nine papers were selected for the database from Volume 1 of the proceedings. The topics included in the proceedings are: natural resource management, coastal hazards, oceanographic applications, mapping and charting, data access, coastal ocean color, radar satellites/coastal radars, underwater remote sensing, and new sensors and systems. Subtopics of papers in Volume 1 include: oil spills and marine pollution; Florida ecosystems; air-sea interaction and sea ice; living resources; optics and models; hyperspectral sensors and applications; and charting and mapping.

  14. Application of Hydrogel in Reconstruction Surgery: Hydrogel/Fat Graft Complex Filler for Volume Reconstruction in Critical Sized Muscle Defects.

    PubMed

    Lui, Y F; Ip, W Y

    2016-01-01

    Autogenic fat graft usually suffers from degeneration and volume shrinkage in volume reconstruction applications. How to maintain graft viability and graft volume is an essential consideration in reconstruction therapies. In this presented investigation, a new fat graft transplantation method was developed aiming to improve long term graft viability and volume reconstruction effect by incorporation of hydrogel. The harvested fat graft is dissociated into small fragments and incorporated into a collagen based hydrogel to form a hydrogel/fat graft complex for volume reconstruction purpose. In vitro results indicate that the collagen based hydrogel can significantly improve the survivability of cells inside isolated graft. In a 6-month investigation on artificial created defect model, this hydrogel/fat graft complex filler has demonstrated the ability of promoting fat pad formation inside the targeted defect area. The newly generated fat pad can cover the whole defect and restore its original dimension in 6-month time point. Compared to simple fat transplantation, this hydrogel/fat graft complex system provides much improvement on long term volume restoration effect against degeneration and volume shrinkage. One notable effect is that there is continuous proliferation of adipose tissue throughout the 6-month period. In summary, the hydrogel/fat graft system presented in this investigation demonstrated a better and more significant effect on volume reconstruction in large sized volume defect than simple fat transplantation. PMID:27446947

  15. Application of Hydrogel in Reconstruction Surgery: Hydrogel/Fat Graft Complex Filler for Volume Reconstruction in Critical Sized Muscle Defects

    PubMed Central

    Ip, W. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Autogenic fat graft usually suffers from degeneration and volume shrinkage in volume reconstruction applications. How to maintain graft viability and graft volume is an essential consideration in reconstruction therapies. In this presented investigation, a new fat graft transplantation method was developed aiming to improve long term graft viability and volume reconstruction effect by incorporation of hydrogel. The harvested fat graft is dissociated into small fragments and incorporated into a collagen based hydrogel to form a hydrogel/fat graft complex for volume reconstruction purpose. In vitro results indicate that the collagen based hydrogel can significantly improve the survivability of cells inside isolated graft. In a 6-month investigation on artificial created defect model, this hydrogel/fat graft complex filler has demonstrated the ability of promoting fat pad formation inside the targeted defect area. The newly generated fat pad can cover the whole defect and restore its original dimension in 6-month time point. Compared to simple fat transplantation, this hydrogel/fat graft complex system provides much improvement on long term volume restoration effect against degeneration and volume shrinkage. One notable effect is that there is continuous proliferation of adipose tissue throughout the 6-month period. In summary, the hydrogel/fat graft system presented in this investigation demonstrated a better and more significant effect on volume reconstruction in large sized volume defect than simple fat transplantation. PMID:27446947

  16. Application of a photogrammetric kinematic model for prediction of lung volumes in adolescents: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There are several ways to measure the respiratory system, among them inductance plethysmography and three-dimensional kinematic analysis, methods of high cost and difficult transportability. The objective of this study was to correlate respiratory volumes obtained by spirometry standard equipment with a biomechanical model photogrammetric analysis of adolescents. Methods We evaluated 50 subjects of both genders, aged between 14 and 17 years old, excluding those with respiratory obstruction or restriction. Stickers with markers, there was a five-point mapping for anatomical modeling and photogrammetry, with each evaluated in supine position, was sought to test the Forced Vital Capacity (FVC). The test was filmed and repeated three times. Images of the films were extracted for the moment of maximum exhalation and inhalation of proof with better breathing. With the use of a commercial software, defined the respiratory volumes to the thorax and abdomen. Results The photogrammetric analysis has found values strongly correlated with the spirometric measurements of FVC (0.812), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 – 0.708), Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF – 0.762) in addition to post test performed Inspiration (IP- 0.816). There was a higher ventilatory mobility for boys than girls for Lower Chest and Lower and Upper Abdomen. It was possible to reach a regression R2 = 0.866 for proof of FVC and R2 = 0.776 for IP with the use of photogrammetry, presenting a standard error of 0.353 and 0.451, respectively. Conclusions Photogrammetry can be used to study thoracoabdominal movements by applying analytical two-dimensional and three-dimensional images acquired using a video camera being, applicable and reproducible. PMID:24571595

  17. Formation of superpower volume discharges and their application for modification of surface of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, Victor F.; Shulepov, M. A.

    2008-05-01

    The results of experimental investigations of a volume avalanche discharge initiated by an e-beam (VADIEB) and surface layer of Cu and AlBe foils modifications at the plasma action of VADIEB are given. The volume discharge in the air of atmosphere pressure formed in the gap with the cathode having small curvature radius and with high voltage pulses of nanosecond duration and positive and negative polarity. A supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) with formation conditions in gases under atmospheric pressure have been investigated. It is proved that the surface layer is cleared of carbon at foil treatment, and atoms of oxygen penetrate into a foil. It is show that the cleaning depth depends on polarity of voltage pulses. At positive polarity of a copper foil electrode the cleaning is observed at the depth over 50 nm, and atoms of oxygen penetrate at the depth up to 25 nm. Plasma of the superpower volume discharge of nanosecond duration with a specific excitation power of hundreds of MW/cm3, and SAEB, and the discharge plasma radiation of various spectral ranges (including UV, VUV and X-ray) has the influence on the anode. The supershort avalanche electronic beam is generated only at negative polarity of a voltage pulse on an electrode with a small radius of curvature. SAEB influence on modifications of the copper foil surface is registered. VADIEB is easily realized in various gases and at various pressures, and, at gas pressure decrease the density of the beam current in helium can achieve 2 kA/cm2. It allows predicting an opportunity of VADIEB application for metal surface modifications in various technological processes, and for surface dielectric modifications at the certain design of the anode.

  18. Wavelets in the solution of the volume integral equation: Application to eddy current modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.; Moulder, J.C.; Basart, J.P.

    1997-05-01

    There is growing interest in the applications of wavelets as basis functions in solutions of integral equations, especially in the area of electromagnetic field problems. In this article we apply a wavelet expansion to the solution of the three-dimensional eddy current modeling problem based on the volume integral method. Although this method shows promise for eddy current modeling of three-dimensional flaws, it is restricted by the computing power required to solve a large linear system. In this article we show that applying a wavelet basis to the volume integral method can dramatically reduce the size of the linear system to be solved. In our approach, the unknown total field is expressed as a twofold summation of shifted and dilated forms of a properly chosen basis function that is often referred to as the mother wavelet. The wavelet expansion can adaptively fit itself to the total field distribution by distributing the localized functions near the flaw boundary, where the field change is large, and the more spatially diffused functions over the interior of the flaw where the total field tends to be smooth. The approach is thus best suited to modeling large three-dimensional flaws where the large number of elements used in the volume integral method requires extremely large memory space and computational capacity. The feasibility of the wavelet method is discussed in the context of the physical nature of eddy-current modeling problems. Numerical examples using both Haar wavelets and Daubechies compactly supported wavelets with periodic extension are given. The results of the wavelet method are also compared with experimental results from a cylindrical flat-bottom hole in an aluminum plate. These numerical examples and comparisons indicate that the wavelet method can greatly reduce the numerical complexity of the problem with negligible loss in accuracy. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Multiplexed Volume Bragg Gratings in Narrowand Broad-band Spectral Systems: Analysis and Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingersoll, Gregory B.

    Volume Bragg gratings (VBGs) are important holographic optical elements in many spectral systems. Using multiple volume gratings, whether multiplexed or arranged sequentially, provides advantages to many types of systems in overall efficiency, dispersion performance, flexibility of design, etc. However, the use of multiple gratings---particularly when the gratings are multiplexed in a single holographic optical element (HOE)---is subject to inter-grating coupling effects that ultimately limit system performance. Analyzing these coupling effects requires a more complex mathematical model than the straightforward analysis of a single volume grating. We present a matrix-based algorithm for determining diffraction efficiencies of significant coupled waves in these multiplexed grating holographic optical elements (HOEs). Several carefully constructed experiments with spectrally multiplexed gratings in dichromated gelatin verify our conclusions. Applications of this theory to broad- and narrow-band systems are explored in detailed simulations. Broadband systems include spectrum splitters for diverse-bandgap photovoltaic (PV) cells. Volume Bragg gratings can serve as effective spectrum splitters, but the inherent dispersion of a VBG can be detrimental given a broad-spectrum input. The performance of a holographic spectrum splitter element can be improved by utilizing multiple volume gratings, each operating in a slightly different spectral band. However, care must be taken to avoid inter-grating coupling effects that limit ultimate performance. We explore broadband multi-grating holographic optical elements (HOEs) in sandwiched arrangements where individual single-grating HOEs are placed in series, and in multiplexed arrangements where multiple gratings are recorded in a single HOE. Particle swarm optimization (PSO) is used to tailor these systems to the solar spectrum taking into account both efficiency and dispersion. Both multiplexed and sandwiched two-grating systems

  20. Application of Local Discretization Methods in the NASA Finite-Volume General Circulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Kao-San; Lin, Shian-Jiann; Rood, Richard B.

    2002-01-01

    We present the basic ideas of the dynamics system of the finite-volume General Circulation Model developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for climate simulations and other applications in meteorology. The dynamics of this model is designed with emphases on conservative and monotonic transport, where the property of Lagrangian conservation is used to maintain the physical consistency of the computational fluid for long-term simulations. As the model benefits from the noise-free solutions of monotonic finite-volume transport schemes, the property of Lagrangian conservation also partly compensates the accuracy of transport for the diffusion effects due to the treatment of monotonicity. By faithfully maintaining the fundamental laws of physics during the computation, this model is able to achieve sufficient accuracy for the global consistency of climate processes. Because the computing algorithms are based on local memory, this model has the advantage of efficiency in parallel computation with distributed memory. Further research is yet desirable to reduce the diffusion effects of monotonic transport for better accuracy, and to mitigate the limitation due to fast-moving gravity waves for better efficiency.

  1. Small Sample Properties of an Adaptive Filter with Application to Low Volume Statistical Process Control

    SciTech Connect

    CROWDER, STEPHEN V.

    1999-09-01

    In many manufacturing environments such as the nuclear weapons complex, emphasis has shifted from the regular production and delivery of large orders to infrequent small orders. However, the challenge to maintain the same high quality and reliability standards while building much smaller lot sizes remains. To meet this challenge, specific areas need more attention, including fast and on-target process start-up, low volume statistical process control, process characterization with small experiments, and estimating reliability given few actual performance tests of the product. In this paper we address the issue of low volume statistical process control. We investigate an adaptive filtering approach to process monitoring with a relatively short time series of autocorrelated data. The emphasis is on estimation and minimization of mean squared error rather than the traditional hypothesis testing and run length analyses associated with process control charting. We develop an adaptive filtering technique that assumes initial process parameters are unknown, and updates the parameters as more data become available. Using simulation techniques, we study the data requirements (the length of a time series of autocorrelated data) necessary to adequately estimate process parameters. We show that far fewer data values are needed than is typically recommended for process control applications. We also demonstrate the techniques with a case study from the nuclear weapons manufacturing complex.

  2. Small sample properties of an adaptive filter with application to low volume statistical process control

    SciTech Connect

    Crowder, S.V.; Eshleman, L.

    1998-08-01

    In many manufacturing environments such as the nuclear weapons complex, emphasis has shifted from the regular production and delivery of large orders to infrequent small orders. However, the challenge to maintain the same high quality and reliability standards white building much smaller lot sizes remains. To meet this challenge, specific areas need more attention, including fast and on-target process start-up, low volume statistical process control, process characterization with small experiments, and estimating reliability given few actual performance tests of the product. In this paper the authors address the issue of low volume statistical process control. They investigate an adaptive filtering approach to process monitoring with a relatively short time series of autocorrelated data. The emphasis is on estimation and minimization of mean squared error rather than the traditional hypothesis testing and run length analyses associated with process control charting. The authors develop an adaptive filtering technique that assumes initial process parameters are unknown, and updates the parameters as more data become available. Using simulation techniques, they study the data requirements (the length of a time series of autocorrelated data) necessary to adequately estimate process parameters. They show that far fewer data values are needed than is typically recommended for process control applications. And they demonstrate the techniques with a case study from the nuclear weapons manufacturing complex.

  3. Seismic hazard analysis application of methodology, results, and sensitivity studies. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    Bernreuter, D. L

    1981-08-08

    As part of the Site Specific Spectra Project, this report seeks to identify the sources of and minimize uncertainty in estimates of seismic hazards in the Eastern United States. Findings are being used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to develop a synthesis among various methods that can be used in evaluating seismic hazard at the various plants in the Eastern United States. In this volume, one of a five-volume series, we discuss the application of the probabilistic approach using expert opinion. The seismic hazard is developed at nine sites in the Central and Northeastern United States, and both individual experts' and synthesis results are obtained. We also discuss and evaluate the ground motion models used to develop the seismic hazard at the various sites, analyzing extensive sensitivity studies to determine the important parameters and the significance of uncertainty in them. Comparisons are made between probabilistic and real spectral for a number of Eastern earthquakes. The uncertainty in the real spectra is examined as a function of the key earthquake source parameters. In our opinion, the single most important conclusion of this study is that the use of expert opinion to supplement the sparse data available on Eastern United States earthquakes is a viable approach for determining estimted seismic hazard in this region of the country. 29 refs., 15 tabs.

  4. Environmental fate model for ultra-low-volume insecticide applications used for adult mosquito management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schleier, Jerome J., III; Peterson, Robert K.D.; Irvine, Kathryn M.; Marshall, Lucy M.; Weaver, David K.; Preftakes, Collin J.

    2012-01-01

    One of the more effective ways of managing high densities of adult mosquitoes that vector human and animal pathogens is ultra-low-volume (ULV) aerosol applications of insecticides. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency uses models that are not validated for ULV insecticide applications and exposure assumptions to perform their human and ecological risk assessments. Currently, there is no validated model that can accurately predict deposition of insecticides applied using ULV technology for adult mosquito management. In addition, little is known about the deposition and drift of small droplets like those used under conditions encountered during ULV applications. The objective of this study was to perform field studies to measure environmental concentrations of insecticides and to develop a validated model to predict the deposition of ULV insecticides. The final regression model was selected by minimizing the Bayesian Information Criterion and its prediction performance was evaluated using k-fold cross validation. Density of the formulation and the density and CMD interaction coefficients were the largest in the model. The results showed that as density of the formulation decreases, deposition increases. The interaction of density and CMD showed that higher density formulations and larger droplets resulted in greater deposition. These results are supported by the aerosol physics literature. A k-fold cross validation demonstrated that the mean square error of the selected regression model is not biased, and the mean square error and mean square prediction error indicated good predictive ability.

  5. DAO's Finite-volume/Physical-space Data Assimilation System: Stratospheric Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    daSilva, Arlindo; Lin, S.-J.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In this talk we describe the next-generation data assimilation system being developed at NASA's Data Assimilation Office (DAO), with emphasis on the applications to stratospheric forecasts and stratospheric constituent transport. This data assimilation system includes the General Circulation Model jointly developed by the DAO and the Climate and Global Dynamics Division (CGDD) at NCAR. This model is based on the finite-volume dynamical core) developed at DAO with physical parameterizations from the NCAR Climate Community Model. The Physical-space Statistical Analysis System (PSAS) is used to combine a first guess from the NASA-NCAR GCM with observational data to provide an updated estimate of the state of the atmosphere. Case studies for the (northern) Winter of 2000 will be discussed.

  6. Solar concentrator technology development for space based applications, volume 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pintz, A.; Castle, C.H.; Reimer, R.R.

    1992-12-01

    Thermoelectric conversion using a radio-isotope heat source has been used where outer planetary space craft are too far away for absorbing significant solar energy. Solar dynamic power (SDP) conversion is one technology that offers advantages for applications within the inner planet region. Since SDP conversion efficiency can be 2 to 3 times higher than photovoltaic, the collecting surfaces are much reduced in area and therefore lighter. This becomes an advantage in allocating more weight to launched payloads. A second advantage results for low earth orbit applications. The reduced area results in lower drag forces on the spacecraft and requires less reboost propellant to maintain orbit. A third advantage occurs because of the sun-to-shade cycling while in earth orbit. Photovoltaic systems require batteries to store energy for use when in the shade, and battery life for periods of 10 to 15 years is not presently achievable. For these reasons the Solar Dynamics and Thermal Systems Branch at NASA LeRC has funded work in developing SDP systems. The generic SDP system uses a large parabolic solar concentrator to focus solar energy onto a power conversion device. The concentrators are large areas and must therefore be efficient and have low specific weights. Yet these surfaces must be precise and capable of being stowed in a launch vehicle and then deployed and sometimes unfurled in space. There are significant technical challenges in engineering such structures, and considerable investigation has been made to date. This is the second of two volumes reporting on the research done by the Advanced Manufacturing Center at Cleveland State University to assist NASA LeRC in evaluating this technology. This volume includes the appendices of selected data sets, drawings, and procedures. The objective of the grant was to restore the solar concentrator development technology of the 1960s while improving it with advances that have occurred since then.

  7. Retention and efficacy of ultra-low volume pesticide applications on Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huichun; Dorr, Gary J; Hewitt, Andrew J

    2015-11-01

    To combat mosquitoes and the public health hazards they present, spraying chemical adulticides is an efficient and timely control method for immediate reduction of adult populations. With the growing consciousness of environmental and public health concerns, effective mosquito control means not only maximizing the effectiveness (in terms of mosquito mortality rates) of the pesticide application, but also minimizing the unintended effects (health hazard and environmental pollution). A series of experiments was carried out to assess the efficacy and deposition of ultra-low volume (ULV) sprays on adult mosquitoes which included the influence of chemical type, spray volume, spray concentration, droplet size, and deposit location (where the droplets land on the mosquito). A modified Potter Tower was used to apply an extremely fine spray (volume median diameter ∼20 μm) on caged adult mosquitoes (Culex quinquefasciatus). Reslin (50 g/L bioresmethrin) was diluted in either water or D-C-Tron plus spray oil (782 g/L paraffinic petroleum oil), Twilight (89 g/L phenothrin) was diluted in D-C-Tron, and the mosquito mortality was assessed 24 h after spraying. A fluorescent tracer was added to the spray mixture to determine the amount of spray on mosquitoes. A fluorescent microscope was also used to view the deposit of droplets on mosquitoes. It was found that droplet retention and mortality were reduced with the larger droplet sizes. Large water-based droplets tend to bounce off adult mosquitoes. There is a tendency for droplets approximately 20 μm in size to be retained on the fine hairs on the mosquito. The largest spray deposit was found on the adult mosquito wings and the lowest deposit on the head. Mortality was higher for formulations diluted with oil compared to those diluted with water. ULV applications with ultra-fine sprays (VMD 20 μm) and oil-based products resulted in maximum target efficacy under laboratory conditions, at minimum cost, and with the minimum

  8. Ultralow volume application of Bacillus thuringiensis ssp. israelensis for the control of mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Lee, H L; Gregorio, E R; Khadri, M S; Seleena, P

    1996-12-01

    Evaluation of the effectiveness of Bacillus thuringiensis ssp. israelensis (B.t.i.) against mosquito larvae dispersed by ultralow volume (ULV) spraying was conducted in simulated field trials. Effectiveness was measured using 3 different indicators: larval mortality, colony-forming unit enumeration, and droplet analysis. B.t.i. was dispersed with a ULV generator using 2 different flow rates: 0.3 and 0.5 liter/min on 2 different days. Based on the results of this study, it can be concluded that an output of 0.3 liter/min is effective for controlling Aedes aegypti. although a dosage of 0.5 liter/min can be used when high residual activity is desired. For Culex quinquefasciatus control, both dosages were effective but with low residual activity. For Anopheles maculatus control, only a discharge rate of 0.5 liter/min was effective with low residual activity. B.t.i. application at both dosages penetrated tires well, indicating that B.t.i. ULV application is an effective method for controlling container-inhabiting mosquitoes. Good coverage of target area and penetration were attributed to satisfactory droplet profiles. PMID:9046471

  9. Stenosis map for volume visualization of constricted tubular structures: Application to coronary artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jihye; Kim, Yeo Koon; Chun, Eun Ju; Shin, Yeong-Gil; Lee, Jeongjin; Kim, Bohyoung

    2016-02-01

    Although direct volume rendering (DVR) has become a commodity, effective rendering of interesting features is still a challenge. In one of active DVR application fields, the medicine, radiologists have used DVR for the diagnosis of lesions or diseases that should be visualized distinguishably from other surrounding anatomical structures. One of most frequent and important radiologic tasks is the detection of lesions, usually constrictions, in complex tubular structures. In this paper, we propose a 3D spatial field for the effective visualization of constricted tubular structures, called as a stenosis map which stores the degree of constriction at each voxel. Constrictions within tubular structures are quantified by using newly proposed measures (i.e. line similarity measure and constriction measure) based on the localized structure analysis, and classified with a proposed transfer function mapping the degree of constriction to color and opacity. We show the application results of our method to the visualization of coronary artery stenoses. We present performance evaluations using twenty eight clinical datasets, demonstrating high accuracy and efficacy of our proposed method. The ability of our method to saliently visualize the constrictions within tubular structures and interactively adjust the visual appearance of the constrictions proves to deliver a substantial aid in radiologic practice. PMID:26608866

  10. Application Level Protocol Development for Library and Information Science Applications. Volume 1: Service Definition. Volume 2: Protocol Specification. Report No. TG.1.5; TG.50.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aagaard, James S.; And Others

    This two-volume document specifies a protocol that was developed using the Reference Model for Open Systems Interconnection (OSI), which provides a framework for communications within a heterogeneous network environment. The protocol implements the features necessary for bibliographic searching, record maintenance, and mail transfer between…

  11. Accurate Automatic Delineation of Heterogeneous Functional Volumes in Positron Emission Tomography for Oncology Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hatt, Mathieu; Cheze le Rest, Catherine; Descourt, Patrice; Dekker, Andre; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Oellers, Michel; Lambin, Philippe; Pradier, Olivier; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: Accurate contouring of positron emission tomography (PET) functional volumes is now considered crucial in image-guided radiotherapy and other oncology applications because the use of functional imaging allows for biological target definition. In addition, the definition of variable uptake regions within the tumor itself may facilitate dose painting for dosimetry optimization. Methods and Materials: Current state-of-the-art algorithms for functional volume segmentation use adaptive thresholding. We developed an approach called fuzzy locally adaptive Bayesian (FLAB), validated on homogeneous objects, and then improved it by allowing the use of up to three tumor classes for the delineation of inhomogeneous tumors (3-FLAB). Simulated and real tumors with histology data containing homogeneous and heterogeneous activity distributions were used to assess the algorithm's accuracy. Results: The new 3-FLAB algorithm is able to extract the overall tumor from the background tissues and delineate variable uptake regions within the tumors, with higher accuracy and robustness compared with adaptive threshold (T{sub bckg}) and fuzzy C-means (FCM). 3-FLAB performed with a mean classification error of less than 9% +- 8% on the simulated tumors, whereas binary-only implementation led to errors of 15% +- 11%. T{sub bckg} and FCM led to mean errors of 20% +- 12% and 17% +- 14%, respectively. 3-FLAB also led to more robust estimation of the maximum diameters of tumors with histology measurements, with <6% standard deviation, whereas binary FLAB, T{sub bckg} and FCM lead to 10%, 12%, and 13%, respectively. Conclusion: These encouraging results warrant further investigation in future studies that will investigate the impact of 3-FLAB in radiotherapy treatment planning, diagnosis, and therapy response evaluation.

  12. Personnel neutron dose assessment upgrade: Volume 2, Field neutron spectrometer for health physics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Reece, W.D.; Miller, S.D.; Endres, G.W.R.; Durham, J.S.; Scherpelz, R.I.; Tomeraasen, P.L.; Stroud, C.M.; Faust, L.G.; Vallario, E.J.

    1988-07-01

    Both the (ICRP) and the (NCPR) have recommended an increase in neutron quality factors and the adoption of effective dose equivalent methods. The series of reports entitled Personnel Neutron Dose Assessment Upgrade (PNL-6620) addresses these changes. Volume 1 in this series of reports (Personnel Neutron Dosimetry Assessment) provided guidance on the characteristics, use, and calibration of personnel neutron dosimeters in order to meet the new recommendations. This report, Volume 2: Field Neutron Spectrometer for Health Physics Applications describes the development of a portable field spectrometer which can be set up for use in a few minutes by a single person. The field spectrometer described herein represents a significant advance in improving the accuracy of neutron dose assessment. It permits an immediate analysis of the energy spectral distribution associated with the radiation from which neutron quality factor can be determined. It is now possible to depart from the use of maximum Q by determining and realistically applying a lower Q based on spectral data. The field spectrometer is made up of two modules: a detector module with built-in electronics and an analysis module with a IBM PC/reg sign/-compatible computer to control the data acquisition and analysis of data in the field. The unit is simple enough to allow the operator to perform spectral measurements with minimal training. The instrument is intended for use in steady-state radiation fields with neutrons energies covering the fission spectrum range. The prototype field spectrometer has been field tested in plutonium processing facilities, and has been proven to operate satisfactorily. The prototype field spectrometer uses a /sup 3/He proportional counter to measure the neutron energy spectrum between 50 keV and 5 MeV and a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) to measure absorbed neutron dose.

  13. Applications of on-product diffraction-based focus metrology in logic high volume manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noyes, Ben F.; Mokaberi, Babak; Bolton, David; Li, Chen; Palande, Ashwin; Park, Kevin; Noot, Marc; Kea, Marc

    2016-03-01

    The integration of on-product diffraction-based focus (DBF) capability into the majority of immersion lithography layers in leading edge logic manufacturing has enabled new applications targeted towards improving cycle time and yield. A CD-based detection method is the process of record (POR) for excursion detection. The drawback of this method is increased cycle time and limited sampling due to CD-SEM metrology capacity constraints. The DBFbased method allows the addition of focus metrology samples to the existing overlay measurements on the integrated metrology (IM) system. The result enables the addition of measured focus to the SPC system, allowing a faster excursion detection method. For focus targeting, the current method involves using a dedicated focus-exposure matrix (FEM) on all scanners, resulting in lengthy analysis times and uncertainty in the best focus. The DBF method allows the measurement to occur on the IM system, on a regular production wafer, and at the same time as the exposure. This results in a cycle time gain as well as a less subjective determination of best focus. A third application aims to use the novel onproduct focus metrology data in order to apply per-exposure focus corrections to the scanner. These corrections are particularly effective at the edge of the wafer, where systematic layer-dependent effects can be removed using DBFbased scanner feedback. This paper will discuss the development of a methodology to accomplish each of these applications in a high-volume production environment. The new focus metrology method, sampling schemes, feedback mechanisms and analysis methods lead to improved focus control, as well as earlier detection of failures.

  14. Relationship between LIBS Ablation and Pit Volume for Geologic Samples: Applications for in situ Absolute Geochronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devismes, D.; Cohen, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    In planetary sciences, in situ absolute geochronology is a scientific and engineering challenge. Currently, the age of the Martian surface can only be determined by crater density counting. However this method has significant uncertainties and needs to be calibrated with absolute ages. We are developing an instrument to acquire in situ absolute geochronology based on the K-Ar method. The protocol is based on the laser ablation of a rock by hundreds of laser pulses. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) gives the potassium content of the ablated material and a mass spectrometer (quadrupole or ion trap) measures the quantity of 40Ar released. In order to accurately measure the quantity of released 40Ar in cases where Ar is an atmospheric constituent (e.g., Mars), the sample is first put into a chamber under high vacuum. The 40Arquantity, the concentration of K and the estimation of the ablated mass are the parameters needed to give the age of the rocks. The main uncertainties with this method are directly linked to the measures of the mass (typically some µg) and of the concentration of K by LIBS (up to 10%). Because the ablated mass is small compared to the mass of the sample, and because material is redeposited onto the sample after ablation, it is not possible to directly measure the ablated mass. Our current protocol measures the ablated volume and estimates the sample density to calculate ablated mass. The precision and accuracy of this method may be improved by using knowledge of the sample's geologic properties to predict its response to laser ablation, i.e., understanding whether natural samples have a predictable relationship between laser energy deposited and resultant ablation volume. In contrast to most previous studies of laser ablation, theoretical equations are not highly applicable. The reasons are numerous, but the most important are: a) geologic rocks are complex, polymineralic materials; b) the conditions of ablation are unusual (for example

  15. Volume average technique for turbulent flow simulation and its application to room airflow prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xianmin

    Fluid motion turbulence is one of the most important transport phenomena occurring in engineering applications. Although turbulent flow is governed by a set of conservation equations for momentum, mass, and energy, a Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the flow by solving these equations to include the finest scale motions is impossible due to the extremely large computer resources required. On the other hand, the Reynolds Averaged Modelling (RAM) method has many limitations which hinder its applications to turbulent flows of practical significance. Room airflow featuring co- existence of laminar and turbulence regimes is a typical example of a flow which is difficult to handle with the RAM method. A promising way to avoid the difficulty of the DNS method and the limitation of the RAM method is to use the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) method. In the present thesis, the drawbacks of previously developed techniques for the LES method, particularly those associated with the SGS modelling, are identified. Then a new so called Volume Average Technique (VAT) for turbulent flow simulation is proposed. The main features of the VAT are as follows: (1) The volume averaging approach instead of the more common filtering approach is employed to define solvable scale fields, so that coarse- graining in the LES and space discretization of the numerical scheme are achieved in a single procedure. (2) All components of the SGS Reynolds stress and SGS turbulent heat flux are modelled dynamically using the newly proposed Functional Scale Similarity (FSS) SGS model. The model is superior to many previously developed SGS models in that it can be applied to highly inhomogeneous and/or anisotropic, weak or multi-regime turbulent flows using a relatively coarse grid. (3) The so called SGS turbulent diffusion is identified and modelled as a separate mechanism to that of the SGS turbulent flux represented by the SGS Reynolds stress and SGS turbulent heat flux. The SGS turbulent diffusion is

  16. ESTABLISHMENT OF DESIGN CRITERIA FOR OPTIMUM BURNERS FOR APPLICATION TO HEAVY FUEL FIRED PACKAGE BOILERS. VOLUME 1. LABORATORY SCALE TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a research program to develop low-NOx heavy oil burners for application to industrial package boilers. Volume I documents Phase 1 of the program, bench scale studies which defined optimum conditions for two-stage combustion. The information led to a co...

  17. ESTABLISHMENT OF DESIGN CRITERIA FOR OPTIMUM BURNERS FOR APPLICATION TO HEAVY FUEL FIRED PACKAGE BOILERS. VOLUME 2. PILOT SCALE TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a research program to develop low-NOx heavy oil burners for application to industrial package boilers. Volume I documents Phase 1 of the program, bench scale studies which defined optimum conditions for two-stage combustion. The information led to a co...

  18. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 1, Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    This volume includes the following chapters: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant RCRA A permit application; facility description; waste analysis plan; groundwater monitoring; procedures to prevent hazards; RCRA contingency plan; personnel training; corrective action for solid waste management units; and other Federal laws.

  19. Full characterization of small volume NbN HEB mixers for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baselmans, J.; Kooi, J.; Baryshev, A.; Yang, Z. Q.; Hajenius, M.; Gao, J. R.; Klapwijk, T. M.; Voronov, B.; Gol'tsman, G.

    2005-05-01

    NbN phonon cooled HEB's are one of the most promising bolometer mixer technologies for (near) future (space) applications. Their performance is usually quantified by measuring the receiver noise temperature at a given IF frequency, usually around 1 - 2 GHz. However, for any real applications it is vital that one fully knows all the relevant properties of the mixer, including LO power, stability, direct detection, gain bandwidth and noise bandwidth, not only the noise temperature at low IF frequencies. To this aim we have measured all these parameters at the optimal operating point of one single, small volume quasioptical NbN HEB mixer. We find a minimum noise temperature of 900 K at 1.46 THz. We observe a direct detection effect indicated by a change in bias current when changing from a 300 K hot load to a 77 K cold load. Due to this effect we overestimate the noise temperature by about 22% using a 300 K hot load and a 77 K cold load. The LO power needed to reach the optimal operating point is 80 nW at the receiver lens front, 59 nW inside the NbN bridge. However, using the isothermal technique we find a power absorbed in the NbN bridge of 25 nW, a difference of about a factor 2. We obtain a gain bandwidth of 2.3 GHz and a noise bandwidth of 4 GHz. The system Allan time is about 1 sec. in a 50 MHz spectral bandwidth and a deviation from white noise integration (governed by the radiometer equation) occurs at 0.2 sec., which implies a maximum integration time of a few seconds in a 1 MHz bandwidth spectrometer.

  20. Solar concentrator technology development for space based applications, volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pintz, A.; Castle, C.H.; Reimer, R.R.

    1992-12-01

    Thermoelectric conversion using a radio-isotope heat source has been used where outer planetary space craft are too far away for absorbing significant solar energy. Solar dynamic power (SDP) conversion is one technology that offers advantages for applications within the inner planet region. Since SDP conversion efficiency can be 2 to 3 times higher than photovoltaic, the collecting surfaces are much reduced in area and therefore lighter. This becomes an advantage in allocating more weight to launched payloads. A second advantage results for low earth orbit applications. The reduced area results in lower drag forces on the spacecraft and requires less reboost propellant to maintain orbit. A third advantage occurs because of the sun-to-shade cycling while in earth orbit. Photovoltaic systems require batteries to store energy for use when in the shade, and battery life for periods of 10 to 15 years is not presently achievable. For these reasons the Solar Dynamics and Thermal Systems Branch at NASA LeRC has funded work in developing SDP systems. The generic SDP system uses a large parabolic solar concentrator to focus solar energy onto a power conversion device. The concentrators are large areas and must therefore be efficient and have low specific weights. Yet these surfaces must be precise and capable of being stowed in a launch vehicle and then deployed and sometimes unfurled in space. There are significant technical challenges in engineering such structures, and considerable investigation has been made to date. This is the first of two volumes reporting on the research done by the Advanced Manufacturing Center at Cleveland State University to assist NASA LeRC in evaluating this technology. The objective of the grant was to restore the solar concentrator development technology of the 1960s while improving it with advances that have occurred since then.

  1. The application of waterworks sludge ash to stabilize the volume of cement paste.

    PubMed

    Luo, H L; Kuo, W T; Lin, D F

    2008-01-01

    In order to extend the recycling of waterworks sludge to engineering applications, this paper addresses the influence of nano-SiO2 on incinerated waterworks sludge ash (IWSA) cement paste attacked by sulfate. Tests were performed such as length measurement for volume change, compressive strength, weight loss, and micro-structural testing using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results indicate that when a portion of the cement in the paste was replaced by IWSA, the IWSA diluted the cementitious material C3A, and filled the capillary pores in the hardened paste. Moreover, since IWSA has potential pozzolanic activity, it can chemically react with Ca(OH)2 crystals in the paste and can consequently improve the resistance of the paste to sulfate attack. Test results also show that due to the fully developed pozzolanic effect of IWSA, the major reaction products of sulfate attack, gypsum and ettringite, were clearly reduced. Hence, the expansion rate in length decreased with the increase of IWSA replacement. Furthermore, the addition of nano-SiO2 to IWSA cement paste can also reduce the length expansion rate. PMID:18235178

  2. Application of adaptive and neural network computational techniques to Traffic Volume and Classification Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Mead, W.C.; Fisher, H.N.; Jones, R.D.; Bisset, K.R.; Lee, L.A.

    1993-09-01

    We are developing a Traffic Volume and Classification Monitoring (TVCM) system based on adaptive and neural network computational techniques. The value of neutral networks in this application lies in their ability to learn from data and to form a mapping of arbitrary topology. The piezoelectric strip and magnetic loop sensors typically used for TVCM provide signals that are complicated and variable, and that correspond in indirect ways with the desired FWHA 13-class classification system. Further, the wide variety of vehicle configurations adds to the complexity of the classification task. Our goal is to provide a TVCM system featuring high accuracy, adaptability to wide sensor and envirorunental variations, and continuous fault detection. We have instrumented an experimental TVCM site, developed PC-based on-line data acquisition software, collected a large database of vehicles` signals together with accurate ground truth determination, and analyzed the data off-line with a neural net classification system that can distinguish between class 2 (automobiles) and class 3 (utility vehicles) with better than 90% accuracy. The neural network used, called the Connectionist Hyperprism Classification (CHC) network, features simple basis functions; rapid, linear training algorithms for basis function amplitudes and widths; and basis function elimination that enhances network speed and accuracy. Work is in progress to extend the system to other classes, to quantify the system`s adaptability, and to develop automatic fault detection techniques.

  3. Developing technologies for high volume land application uses of pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) ash

    SciTech Connect

    Beeghly, J.H.; Dick, W.A.; Wolfe, W.E.

    1995-12-31

    Dry alkaline flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products, including Tidd PFBC bed and cyclone ash are being evaluated for beneficial uses via land application for agriculture, mine spoil reclamation, soil stabilization, and road embankment construction in a 5 year, $4.4 million research program based in Ohio. The beneficial use for agriculture and mine reclamation as a soil amendment material is primarily due to its high acid neutralizing capacity and gypsum content. Concentrations of leachate RCRA heavy metals approached primary drinking water quality standards and are well within the criteria for classification as non-toxic fly ash according to Ohio EPA policy. Characterization tests of compressive strength, permeability, and compressibility indicate the by-products are practical materials for use in high volume engineered fills or embankments, base courses, and for soil reinforcement. Large field demonstrations of technical, economic, and environmental feasibility have been completed using Tidd PFBC ash: (1) to reclaim abandoned coal mineland spoil, (2) as an agricultural lime substitute, (3) in stabilized base construction for a cattle feedlot, and (4) for reconstruction of two state highway embankments. An important factor to understand the behavior of this Tidd PFBC residue is that dolomite was the sorbent.

  4. Lung Volume Reduction After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy of Lung Tumors: Potential Application to Emphysema

    SciTech Connect

    Binkley, Michael S.; Shrager, Joseph B.; Leung, Ann N.; Popat, Rita; Trakul, Nicholas; Atwood, Todd F.; Chaudhuri, Aadel; Maxim, Peter G.; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W.

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) improves dyspnea and other outcomes in selected patients with severe emphysema, but many have excessive surgical risk for LVRS. We analyzed the dose-volume relationship for lobar volume reduction after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) of lung tumors, hypothesizing that SABR could achieve therapeutic volume reduction if applied in emphysema. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified patients treated from 2007 to 2011 who had SABR for 1 lung tumor, pre-SABR pulmonary function testing, and ≥6 months computed tomographic (CT) imaging follow-up. We contoured the treated lobe and untreated adjacent lobe(s) on CT before and after SABR and calculated their volume changes relative to the contoured total (bilateral) lung volume (TLV). We correlated lobar volume reduction with the volume receiving high biologically effective doses (BED, α/β = 3). Results: 27 patients met the inclusion criteria, with a median CT follow-up time of 14 months. There was no grade ≥3 toxicity. The median volume reduction of the treated lobe was 4.4% of TLV (range, −0.4%-10.8%); the median expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe was 2.6% of TLV (range, −3.9%-11.6%). The volume reduction of the treated lobe was positively correlated with the volume receiving BED ≥60 Gy (r{sup 2}=0.45, P=.0001). This persisted in subgroups determined by high versus low pre-SABR forced expiratory volume in 1 second, treated lobe CT emphysema score, number of fractions, follow-up CT time, central versus peripheral location, and upper versus lower lobe location, with no significant differences in effect size between subgroups. Volume expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe(s) was positively correlated with volume reduction of the treated lobe (r{sup 2}=0.47, P<.0001). Conclusions: We identified a dose-volume response for treated lobe volume reduction and adjacent lobe compensatory expansion after lung tumor SABR, consistent across

  5. Application of a dry-gas meter for measuring air sample volumes in an ambient air monitoring network

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, Brad G.

    2009-05-24

    Ambient air monitoring for non-research applications (e.g. compliance) occurs at locations throughout the world. Often, the air sampling systems employed for these purposes employee simple yet robust equipment capable of handling the rigors of demanding sampling schedules. At the Hanford Site (near Richland, Washington) concentrations of radionuclides in ambient air are monitored continuously at 44 locations. In 2004, mechanical dry-gas meters were incorporated into the Hanford Site ambient air sample collection system to allow the direct measurement of sample volumes. These meters replaced a portable airflow measurement system that required two manual flow measurements and a sample duration measurement to determine sample volume. A six-month evaluation of the dry-gas meters compared sample volumes calculated using the original flow rate method to the direct sample volume measurement (new method). The results of the evaluation indicate that use of the dry-gas meters result in accurate sample volume measurements and provide greater confidence in the measured sample volumes. In several years of in-network use, the meters have proven to be reliable and have resulted in an improved sampling system.

  6. Energy-state formulation of lumped volume dynamic equations with application to a simplified free piston Stirling engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniele, C. J.; Lorenzo, C. F.

    1979-01-01

    Lumped volume dynamic equations are derived using an energy state formulation. This technique requires that kinetic and potential energy state functions be written for the physical system being investigated. To account for losses in the system, a Rayleigh dissipation function is formed. Using these functions, a Lagrangian is formed and using Lagrange's equation, the equations of motion for the system are derived. The results of the application of this technique to a lumped volume are used to derive a model for the free piston Stirling engine. The model was simplified and programmed on an analog computer. Results are given comparing the model response with experimental data.

  7. Energy-state formulation of lumped volume dynamic equations with application to a simplified free piston Stirling engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniele, C. J.; Lorenzo, C. F.

    1979-01-01

    Lumped volume dynamic equations are derived using an energy-state formulation. This technique requires that kinetic and potential energy state functions be written for the physical system being investigated. To account for losses in the system, a Rayleigh dissipation function is also formed. Using these functions, a Lagrangian is formed and using Lagrange's equation, the equations of motion for the system are derived. The results of the application of this technique to a lumped volume are used to derive a model for the free-piston Stirling engine. The model was simplified and programmed on an analog computer. Results are given comparing the model response with experimental data.

  8. Hydration and blood volume effects on human thermoregulation in the heat: Space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawka, Michael N.; Gonzalez, Richard R.; Pandolf, Kent B.

    1994-01-01

    Astronauts exposed to prolonged weightlessness will experience deconditioning, dehydration, and hypovolemia which all adversely affect thermoregulation. These thermoregulatory problems can be minimized by several countermeasures that manipulate body water and vascular volumes. USARIEM scientists have extensively studied dehydration effects and several possible countermeasures including hyperhydration, plasma and erythrocyte volume expansion. This paper reviews USARIEM research into these areas.

  9. Bystander Exposure to Ultra-Low-Volume Insecticide Applications Used for Adult Mosquito Management

    PubMed Central

    Preftakes, Collin J.; Schleier, Jerome J.; Peterson, Robert K. D.

    2011-01-01

    A popular and effective management option for adult mosquitoes is the use of insecticides applied by ultra-low-volume (ULV) equipment. However, there is a paucity of data on human dermal exposure to insecticides applied by this method. The objective of the current study was to estimate dermal exposures to the insecticide active ingredient permethrin using water- (Aqua-Reslin®) and oil-based (Permanone® 30-30) formulations with passive dosimetry. No significant differences in deposition of permethrin were observed between years, distance from the spray source, front or back of the body, or the placement of the patches on the body. However, exposure to Aqua-Reslin was significantly greater than Permanone 30-30 and average concentrations deposited on the body were 4.2 and 2.1 ng/cm2, respectively. The greater deposition of Aqua-Reslin is most likely due to the higher density of the water-based formulation which causes it to settle out faster than the lighter oil-based formulation of Permanone 30-30. The estimated average absorbed dermal exposure for permethrin from Aqua-Reslin and Permanone 30-30 was 0.00009 and 0.00005 mg/kg body weight, respectively. We also found that ground deposition of ULV insecticides can be used as a surrogate for estimating dermal exposure. The estimated exposures support the findings of previous risk assessments that exposure to ULV applications used for mosquito management are below regulatory levels of concern. PMID:21776222

  10. Comparison of different methods of cell lysis and protein measurements in Clostridium perfringens: application to the cell volume determination.

    PubMed

    Guerlava, P; Izac, V; Tholozan, J L

    1998-03-01

    Four cell lysis methods (NaOH-SDS solubilization, French press treatment, sonication, mutanolysin treatment) and three methods of protein assays (Lowry, Bradford, Pierce) were studied for their applicability to determination of cell volume in Clostridium perfringens NCTC 8798 cell suspensions. Protein contents were higher after a mechanical disruption of the cells than with the other techniques of lysis. The lowest concentrations of protein were obtained with the Bradford procedure. With each of the three protein assay methods, Clostridium perfringens NCTC 8798 protein cell contents were 45% to 58% of protein. Other factors possibly involved in variations of the intracellular volume measurements were examined. A control of the level of protein concentration in the test sample and the type of silicone oil used for the centrifugation were of prime importance during sample preparation. Under our conditions, an intracellular volume of 4 microl/(mg of protein) was routinely found for Clostridium perfringens NCTC 8798. PMID:9516540

  11. Price-volume multifractal analysis and its application in Chinese stock markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ying; Zhuang, Xin-tian; Liu, Zhi-ying

    2012-06-01

    An empirical research on Chinese stock markets is conducted using statistical tools. First, the multifractality of stock price return series, ri(ri=ln(Pt+1)-ln(Pt)) and trading volume variation series, vi(vi=ln(Vt+1)-ln(Vt)) is confirmed using multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis. Furthermore, a multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis between stock price return and trading volume variation in Chinese stock markets is also conducted. It is shown that the cross relationship between them is also found to be multifractal. Second, the cross-correlation between stock price Pi and trading volume Vi is empirically studied using cross-correlation function and detrended cross-correlation analysis. It is found that both Shanghai stock market and Shenzhen stock market show pronounced long-range cross-correlations between stock price and trading volume. Third, a composite index R based on price and trading volume is introduced. Compared with stock price return series ri and trading volume variation series vi, R variation series not only remain the characteristics of original series but also demonstrate the relative correlation between stock price and trading volume. Finally, we analyze the multifractal characteristics of R variation series before and after three financial events in China (namely, Price Limits, Reform of Non-tradable Shares and financial crisis in 2008) in the whole period of sample to study the changes of stock market fluctuation and financial risk. It is found that the empirical results verified the validity of R.

  12. Feasibility of consistently estimating timber volume through landsat-based remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroyo, Renaldo Josue Salazar

    The Mississippi Institute for Forest Inventory (MIFI) is the only cost-effective large-scale forest inventory system in the United States with sufficient precision for producing reliable volume/weight/biomass estimates for small working circle areas (procurement areas). When forest industry is recruited to Mississippi, proposed working circles may overlap existing boundaries of bordering states leaving a gap of inventory information, and a remote sensing-based system for augmenting missing ground inventory data is desirable. The feasibility of obtaining acceptable cubic foot volume estimates from a Landsat-derived volume estimation model (Wilkinson 2011) was assessed by: 1) an initial study to temporally validate Landsat-derived cubic foot volume outside bark to a pulpwood top estimates in comparison with MIFI ground truth inventory plot estimates at two separate time periods, and 2) re-developing a regression model based on remotely sensed imagery in combination with available MIFI plot data. Initial results failed to confirm the relationships shown in past research between radiance values and volume estimation. The complete lack of influence of radiance values in the model led to a re-assessment of volume estimation schemes. Data outlier trimming manipulation was discovered to lead to false relationships with radiance values reported in past research. Two revised volume estimation models using age, average stand height, and trees per-acre and age and height alone as independent variables were found sufficient to explain variation of volume across the image. These results were used to develop a procedure for other remote sensing technologies that could produce data with sufficient precision for volume estimation where inventory data are sparse or non-existent.

  13. Method of interactive specification of interested regions via a volume-rendered image with application to virtualized endoscope system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kensaku; Higuchi, Yoshitake; Suenaga, Yasuhito; Toriwaki, Jun-ichiro; Hasegawa, Jun-ichi; Katada, Kazuhiro

    2000-04-01

    This paper proposes a method to specify interested regions including points, lines, surfaces and mass regions through a volume rendered image,directly and interactively, and its application to virtual endoscopy system. Measurement function is one of the most important functions in the virtual endoscopy. We should specify a target region on the virtual endoscopic image for measurements. It is hard to specify target regions on the organ wall in a volume rendered image, since the organ is not explicitly segmented from an input image when observed using the volume rendering. The proposed method enables the user to specify interested regions directly by analyzing change of accumulated opacity along a casting ray. When the user specify a point on a volume rendered image, we cast a ray that passes through a specified point of an image plane from a viewpoint. We considered the position that has the highest accumulated opacity as the three-dimensional position of the specified point. Line and surface regions are obtained by iterating the point specification method. A mass region is obtained by finding the interval on the ray where the opacity is greater than zero. We have implemented those specifying methods to our virtual endoscopy system. The result showed that we could specify points, lines, surfaces and mass regions on volume rendered images.

  14. A simple method for the production of large volume 3D macroporous hydrogels for advanced biotechnological, medical and environmental applications

    PubMed Central

    Savina, Irina N.; Ingavle, Ganesh C.; Cundy, Andrew B.; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V.

    2016-01-01

    The development of bulk, three-dimensional (3D), macroporous polymers with high permeability, large surface area and large volume is highly desirable for a range of applications in the biomedical, biotechnological and environmental areas. The experimental techniques currently used are limited to the production of small size and volume cryogel material. In this work we propose a novel, versatile, simple and reproducible method for the synthesis of large volume porous polymer hydrogels by cryogelation. By controlling the freezing process of the reagent/polymer solution, large-scale 3D macroporous gels with wide interconnected pores (up to 200 μm in diameter) and large accessible surface area have been synthesized. For the first time, macroporous gels (of up to 400 ml bulk volume) with controlled porous structure were manufactured, with potential for scale up to much larger gel dimensions. This method can be used for production of novel 3D multi-component macroporous composite materials with a uniform distribution of embedded particles. The proposed method provides better control of freezing conditions and thus overcomes existing drawbacks limiting production of large gel-based devices and matrices. The proposed method could serve as a new design concept for functional 3D macroporous gels and composites preparation for biomedical, biotechnological and environmental applications. PMID:26883390

  15. A simple method for the production of large volume 3D macroporous hydrogels for advanced biotechnological, medical and environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savina, Irina N.; Ingavle, Ganesh C.; Cundy, Andrew B.; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V.

    2016-02-01

    The development of bulk, three-dimensional (3D), macroporous polymers with high permeability, large surface area and large volume is highly desirable for a range of applications in the biomedical, biotechnological and environmental areas. The experimental techniques currently used are limited to the production of small size and volume cryogel material. In this work we propose a novel, versatile, simple and reproducible method for the synthesis of large volume porous polymer hydrogels by cryogelation. By controlling the freezing process of the reagent/polymer solution, large-scale 3D macroporous gels with wide interconnected pores (up to 200 μm in diameter) and large accessible surface area have been synthesized. For the first time, macroporous gels (of up to 400 ml bulk volume) with controlled porous structure were manufactured, with potential for scale up to much larger gel dimensions. This method can be used for production of novel 3D multi-component macroporous composite materials with a uniform distribution of embedded particles. The proposed method provides better control of freezing conditions and thus overcomes existing drawbacks limiting production of large gel-based devices and matrices. The proposed method could serve as a new design concept for functional 3D macroporous gels and composites preparation for biomedical, biotechnological and environmental applications.

  16. Multi-Segment Hemodynamic and Volume Assessment With Impedance Plethysmography: Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Yu-Tsuan E.; Montgomery, Leslie D.; Webbon, Bruce W. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Definition of multi-segmental circulatory and volume changes in the human body provides an understanding of the physiologic responses to various aerospace conditions. We have developed instrumentation and testing procedures at NASA Ames Research Center that may be useful in biomedical research and clinical diagnosis. Specialized two, four, and six channel impedance systems will be described that have been used to measure calf, thigh, thoracic, arm, and cerebral hemodynamic and volume changes during various experimental investigations.

  17. An AC drive system for a battery driven moped

    SciTech Connect

    Nandi, S.; Saha, S.; Sharon, M.; Sundersingh, V.P.

    1995-12-31

    A petrol driven moped is converted to an electric one by replacing the petrol engine by a three phase 1.5 HR, AC squirrel cage induction motor drive system. The motor voltage rating selected is 200 V to keep the DC boost voltage level to a reasonable value.f the power source used is a high energy density, 24 V, 110 Ah, Ni-Zn battery. A modified indirect current controlled step-up chopper as well as a standard push-pull DC-DC boost converter is studied for the boost scheme. A simple three phase quasi-square wave inverter is designed along with suitable protection for driving the motor. Successful trial test of the system has been conducted at the laboratory.

  18. New Technique of AC drive in Tokamak using Permanent Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteucci, Jackson; Zolfaghari, Ali

    2013-10-01

    This study investigates a new technique of capturing the rotational energy of alternating permanent magnets in order to inductively drive an alternating current in tokamak devices. The use of rotational motion bypasses many of the pitfalls seen in typical inductive and non-inductive current drives. Three specific designs are presented and assessed in the following criteria: the profile of the current generated, the RMS loop voltage generated as compared to the RMS power required to maintain it, the system's feasibility from an engineering perspective. All of the analysis has been done under ideal E&M conditions using the Maxwell 3D program. Preliminary results indicate that it is possible to produce an over 99% purely toroidal current with a RMS d Φ/dt of over 150 Tm2/s, driven by 20 MW or less of rotational power. The proposed mechanism demonstrates several key advantages including an efficient mechanical drive system, the generation of pure toroidal currents, and the potential for a quasi-steady state fusion reactor. The following quantities are presented for various driving frequencies and magnet strengths: plasma current generated, loop voltage, torque and power required. This project has been supported by DOE Funding under the SULI program.

  19. Efficiency optimal control for AC drives with PWM inverters

    SciTech Connect

    Zach, F.C.; Ertl, H.

    1985-07-01

    For electrical drives using pulsewidth modulation (PWM) inverters and ac motors, methods for efficiency optimal control (EOC) have been developed. They are based on the most complete motor models, including such features as rotor skin effect. Furthermore, new solutions for selected harmonic elimination (SHE) are given. These new solutions come close to EOC. Also, it has been found that EOC solutions (although basically load-dependent as opposed to SHE) do not vary much with the motor used or the motor model applied. Even using a simple R-L series circuit as motor model does not change the solutions much. It is found that using the solutions gained from such a simple model is not more than two points off the real optimum based on a very complete motor model. (For this definition, the absolute harmonic loss minimum is given as zero points, the overall maximum as 100 points with a linear scale in between.) Therefore, one can use one EOC solution for all motors with sufficient accuracy, or, as second best solution, the new form of SHE. Therefore, the EOC solution can be judged load-independent. The implementation by microprocessor-based systems is as easy for other PWM methods. EOC for three and five switching angles per quarter period is discussed, as well as the new solutions for SHE for up to nine angles.

  20. Proceedings of a Workshop on Applications of Tethers in Space, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The panel conclusions for each of the following panels (science applications; electrodynamic interactions; transportation applications; artificial gravity; constellations; and technology and test) are given.

  1. Proceedings of a Workshop on Applications of Tethers in Space, Volume 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1983-12-01

    The panel conclusions for each of the following panels (science applications; electrodynamic interactions; transportation applications; artificial gravity; constellations; and technology and test) are given.

  2. Volume fraction dependent magnetic behaviour of ferrofluids for rotating seal applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schinteie, G.; Palade, P.; Vekas, L.; Iacob, N.; Bartha, C.; Kuncser, V.

    2013-10-01

    Ferrofluid samples consisting of magnetite nanoparticles (NPs) coated with oleic acid and dispersed in a non-polar organic solvent have been synthesized by chemical routes. Different volume fractions, φ, of magnetic NPs were considered. The overall structural characterization of NPs has been performed by x-ray diffractometry, with lattice parameters and average coherence lengths evaluated via Rietveld refinements. The magnetic properties of different samples have been analysed by SQUID magnetometry and temperature-dependent Mössbauer spectroscopy and finally explained by adequate magnetic relaxation mechanisms. Zero field cooling-field cooling protocols provided useful information about specific volume fraction dependent magnetic relaxation and de-freezing processes, the lack of the Verwey transition and stronger dipolar interactions at higher volume fractions. Anisotropy energies as obtained by both temperature dependent Mössbauer spectroscopy and magnetometry data are compared and a new procedure for a quantitative characterization of the dipolar interactions is proposed.

  3. Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain. Volume 4: License Application Plan and Costs

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    Volume 4 provides the DOE plan and cost estimate for the remaining work necessary to proceed from completing this VA to submitting an LA to NRC. This work includes preparing an EIS and evaluating the suitability of the site. Both items are necessary components of the documentation required to support a decision in 2001 by the Secretary of Energy on whether or not to recommend that the President approve the site for development as a repository. If the President recommends the site to Congress and the site designation becomes effective, then DOE will submit the LA to NRC in 2002 for authorization to construct the repository. The work described in Volume 4 constitutes the last step in the characterization of the Yucca Mountain site and the design and evaluation of the performance of a repository system in the geologic setting of this site. The plans in this volume for the next 4 years' work are based on the results of the previous 15 years' work, as reported in Volumes 1, 2, and 3 of this VA. Volume 1 summarizes what DOE has learned to date about the Yucca Mountain site. Volume 2 describes the current, reference repository design, several design options that might enhance the performance of the reference design, and several alternative designs that represent substantial departures from the reference design. Volume 2 also summarizes the results of tests of candidate materials for waste packages and for support of the tunnels into which waste would be emplaced. Volume 3 provides the results of the latest performance assessments undertaken to evaluate the performance of the design in the geologic setting of Yucca Mountain. The results described in Volumes 1, 2, and 3 provide the basis for identifying and prioritizing the work described in this volume. DOE believes that the planned work, together with the results of previous work, will be sufficient to support a site suitability evaluation for site recommendation and, if the site is recommended and designated, a

  4. DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF A WATER SUPPLY FINANCIAL REPORTING SYSTEM. VOLUME 1

    EPA Science Inventory

    This two-volume report describes the development of a computerized financial reporting system (FRS) for the Kenton County, Kentucky, Water District No. 1 (KCWD). The system was designed and implemented after a computer based cost analysis system (CAS) had proved to be advantageou...

  5. DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF A WATER SUPPLY FINANCIAL REPORTING SYSTEM. VOLUME 2

    EPA Science Inventory

    This two-volume report describes the development of a computerized financial reporting system (FRS) for the Kenton County, Kentucky, Water District No. 1 (KCWD). The system was designed and implemented after a computer based cost analysis system (CAS) had proved to be advantageou...

  6. Educational Technology Project, Volume Four, An Application of Educational Technology (Set 3). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eiss, Albert F.; And Others

    This volume is one of four sets of materials produced for training science supervisors in educational technology. Participants design an inservice institute useful to their future work, analyze and revise a hypothetical plan for an inservice institute, and review and revise their own plans. Guidelines for institutes are provided. Supervisors are…

  7. PROCEEDINGS: 1985 JOINT SYMPOSIUM ON STATIONARY COMBUSTION NOX CONTROL. VOLUME 1. UTILITY BOILER APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The two-volume proceedings document the more than 60 papers, describing recent advances in NOx control technology, that were presented at the 1985 Joint Symposium on Stationary Combustion NOx Control, May 6-9, 1985, in Boston, MA. The papers covered the following topics: the stat...

  8. Licensing an assured isolation facility for low-level radioactive waste. Volume 2: Recommendations on the content and review of an application

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, D.J.; Bauser, M.A.; Baird, R.D.

    1998-07-01

    This report provides a detailed set of proposed criteria and guidance for the preparation of a license application for an assured isolation facility (AIF). The report is intended to provide a detailed planning basis upon which a prospective applicant may begin pre-licensing discussions with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and initiate development of a license application. The report may also be useful to the NRC or to state regulatory agencies that may be asked to review such an application. Volume 1 of this report provides background information, and describes the licensing approach and methodology. Volume 2 identifies specific information that is recommended for inclusion in a license application.

  9. Proceedings of a Workshop on the Applications of Tethers in Space, Volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1983-12-01

    Project overview; tether deployment; satellite system description; tether fundamentals; science applications; electrodynamic interactions; transportation; artificial gravity; and constellations; were described.

  10. Proceedings of a Workshop on the Applications of Tethers in Space, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Project overview; tether deployment; satellite system description; tether fundamentals; science applications; electrodynamic interactions; transportation; artificial gravity; and constellations; were described.

  11. Finite-volume application of high-order ENO schemes to two-dimensional boundary-value problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casper, Jay

    1991-01-01

    Finite-volume applications of high-order accurate ENO schemes to two-dimensional boundary-value problems are studied. These schemes achieve high-order spatial accuracy, in smooth regions, by a piecewise polynomial approximation of the solution from cell averages. In addition, this spatial operation involves an adaptive stencil algorithm in order to avoid the oscillatory behavior that is associated with interpolation across steep gradients. High-order TVD Runge-Kutta methods are employed for time integration, thus making these schemes best suited for unsteady problems. Fifth- and sixth-order accurate applications are validated through a grid refinement study involving the solutions of scalar hyperbolic equations. A previously proposed extension for the Euler equations of gas dynamics is tested, including its application to solutions of boundary-value problems involving solid walls and curvilinear coordinates.

  12. Aperture size to therapeutic volume relation for a multielement ultrasound system: determination of applicator adequacy for superficial hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Moros, E G; Myerson, R J; Straube, W L

    1993-01-01

    Three-dimensional acoustic and thermal models were developed to simulate superficial hyperthermia treatments using a new multielement planar ultrasonic system. Typical power density and steady-state temperature distributions are presented. A parametric study was performed to determine the relationship between therapeutic volume (volume at and above 42 degrees C) and aperture size (number of active elements). The parameters investigated were: maximum allowable temperature, skin surface temperature, blood perfusion (thermal diffusion length), acoustic absorption, and frequency. Results showed that this device produces well distributed sound beams with lateral dimensions comparable to the aperture size. These simulated results were in agreement with experimental measurements. The simulated temperature distributions were uniform at each depth across the applicator's aperture. The main heating characteristics found were: (1) the therapeutic volume was directly proportional to the aperture size; (2) the lateral dimensions of the therapeutic volume were independent of the parameters studied and remained practically constant with depth for several centimeters, with a very rapid increase near the skin surface and a very rapid fall off at depth; and (3) therapeutic penetration was strongly dependent on maximum allowable temperature, frequency, and acoustic absorption; and weakly dependent on blood perfusion and skin surface temperature. These heating characteristics are new in commercial systems for superficial hyperthermia. Despite the well-distributed beams, it was found that in order to produce adequate hyperthermia with this device the lateral dimensions of tumors must be smaller than the applicator's active aperture and that thermal depth coverage must be monitored during treatments. Guidelines for aperture selection and thermometry strategies are discussed. PMID:8289722

  13. Application of Control Volume Method Using the Voronoi Tessellation in Numerical Modelling of Solidification Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domański, Zbigniew; Ciesielski, Mariusz; Mochnacki, Bohdan

    2010-03-01

    The paper presents the method to analyse the thermal processes occurring in the cast composite solidification. The cast is formed by a bundle of parallel fibres randomly immersed in a host metal matrix. The heat is transferred from the metal matrix and absorbed by the fibres. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the volumetric fraction of the fibres for which the solidification of the metal matrix occurs only due to the presence of fibres playing a role of internal chills. Our method is to compute Voronoi diagrams with Voronoi regions representing the geometric location of the fibres in the metal matrix and to use these regions as control volumes within a variant of the Control Volume Method.

  14. Application of the control volume mixed finite element method to a triangular discretization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naff, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    A two-dimensional control volume mixed finite element method is applied to the elliptic equation. Discretization of the computational domain is based in triangular elements. Shape functions and test functions are formulated on the basis of an equilateral reference triangle with unit edges. A pressure support based on the linear interpolation of elemental edge pressures is used in this formulation. Comparisons are made between results from the standard mixed finite element method and this control volume mixed finite element method. Published 2011. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. ?? 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  15. Field evaluation of ultra-low volume applications with a mixture of d-allethrin and d-phenothrin for control of Anopheles albimanus in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Shono, Y; Jean-Francois, V; Saint Jean, Y; Itoh, T

    1991-09-01

    Ultra-low volume applications of d-allethrin and d-phenothrin could possibly reduce populations of Anopheles albimanus when used in conjunction with residual spraying of fenitrothion. The experiments were carried out in Les Cayes, Haiti. PMID:1791463

  16. PROCEEDINGS: EIGHTH SYMPOSIUM ON THE TRANSFER AND UTILIZATION OF PARTICULATE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY - VOLUME 2. BAGHOUSES AND PARTICULATE CONTROL FOR NEW APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The two-volume proceedings describe the latest research and development efforts to improve particulate control devices, while treating traditional concerns of operational cost and compliance. Overall, particulate control remains a key issue in the cost and applicability of furnac...

  17. PROCEEDINGS: EIGHTH SYMPOSIUM ON THE TRANSFER AND UTILIZATION OF PARTICULATE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY: VOLUME 2. BAGHOUSES AND PARTICULATE CONTROL FOR NEW APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The two-volume proceedings describe the latest research and development efforts to improve particulate control devices, while treating traditional concerns of operational cost and compliance. (overall, particulate control remains a key issue in the cost and applicability of furna...

  18. Volume and Mass Estimation of Three-Phase High Power Transformers for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimnach, Greg L.

    2004-01-01

    Spacecraft historically have had sub-1kW(sub e), electrical requirements for GN&C, science, and communications: Galileo at 600W(sub e), and Cassini at 900W(sub e), for example. Because most missions have had the same order of magnitude power requirements, the Power Distribution Systems (PDS) use existing, space-qualified technology and are DC. As science payload and mission duration requirements increase, however, the required electrical power increases. Subsequently, this requires a change from a passive energy conversion (solar arrays and batteries) to dynamic (alternator, solar dynamic, etc.), because dynamic conversion has higher thermal and conversion efficiencies, has higher power densities, and scales more readily to higher power levels. Furthermore, increased power requirements and physical distribution lengths are best served with high-voltage, multi-phase AC to maintain distribution efficiency and minimize voltage drops. The generated AC-voltage must be stepped-up (or down) to interface with various subsystems or electrical hardware. Part of the trade-space design for AC distribution systems is volume and mass estimation of high-power transformers. The volume and mass are functions of the power rating, operating frequency, the ambient and allowable temperature rise, the types and amount of heat transfer available, the core material and shape, the required flux density in a core, the maximum current density, etc. McLyman has tabulated the performance of a number of transformers cores and derived a "cookbook" methodology to determine the volume of transformers, whereas Schawrze had derived an empirical method to estimate the mass of single-phase transformers. Based on the work of McLyman and Schwarze, it is the intent herein to derive an empirical solution to the volume and mass estimation of three-phase, laminated EI-core power transformers, having radiated and conducted heat transfer mechanisms available. Estimation of the mounting hardware, connectors

  19. A finite volume method solution for the bidomain equations and their application to modelling cardiac ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Peter R

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an implementation of the finite volume method with the aim of studying subendocardial ischaemia during the ST segment. In this implementation, based on hexahedral finite volumes, each quadrilateral sub-face is split into two triangles to improve the accuracy of the numerical integration in complex geometries and when fibre rotation is included. The numerical method is validated against previously published solutions obtained from slab and cylindrical models of the left ventricle with subendocardial ischaemia and no fibre rotation. Epicardial potential distributions are then obtained for a half-ellipsoid model of the left ventricle. In this case it is shown that for isotropic cardiac tissue the degree of subendocardial ischaemia does not affect the epicardial potential distribution, which is consistent with previous findings from analytical studies in simpler geometries. The paper also considers the behaviour of various preconditioners for solving numerically the resulting system of algebraic equations resulting from the implementation of the finite volume method. It is observed that each geometry considered has its own optimal preconditioner. PMID:19639486

  20. Photovoltaic system criteria documents. Volume 6: Criteria for auditing photovoltaic system applications and experiments. Revision A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, John C.; Billitti, Joseph W.; Tallon, John M.

    1980-01-01

    The criteria is defined for auditing photovoltaic system applications and experiments. The purpose of the audit is twofold: to see if the application is meeting its stated objectives and to measure the application's progress in terms of the National Photovoltaic Program's goals of performance, cost, reliability, safety, and socio-environmental acceptance. The information obtained from an audit will be used to assess the status of an application and to provide the Department of Energy with recommendations on the future conduct of the application. Those aspects are covered of a site audit necessary to produce a systematic method for the gathering of qualitative and quantitative data to measure the success of an application. A sequence of audit events and guidelines for obtaining the required information is presented.

  1. Photovoltaic system criteria documents. Volume 4: Review criteria for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, John C.; Billitti, Joseph W.; Tallon, John M.

    1979-01-01

    Guidelines are provided for the organization, preparation and conduct of program reviews for photovoltaic applications. These criteria apply to all photovoltaic applications. They include, but are not limited to, the following: (1) Conceptual design review; (2) Preliminary design review; (3) Critical design review; and (4) Operational readiness review. Contract goal's and objectives are met through program monitoring for cost, schedule, and performance for both managerial and technical elements for all PV applications activities.

  2. The Environment for Application Software Integration and Execution (EASIE) version 1.0. Volume 1: Executive overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowell, Lawrence F.; Davis, John S.

    1989-01-01

    The Environment for Application Software Integration and Execution (EASIE) provides a methodology and a set of software utility programs to ease the task of coordinating engineering design and analysis codes. EASIE was designed to meet the needs of conceptual design engineers that face the task of integrating many stand-alone engineering analysis programs. Using EASIE, programs are integrated through a relational database management system. Volume 1, Executive Overview, gives an overview of the functions provided by EASIE and describes their use. Three operational design systems based upon the EASIE software are briefly described.

  3. Experiences with the application of the ADIC automatic differentiation tool for to the CSCMDO 3-D volume grid generation code

    SciTech Connect

    Bischof, C.H.; Mauer, A.; Jones, W.T.

    1995-12-31

    Automatic differentiation (AD) is a methodology for developing reliable sensitivity-enhanced versions of arbitrary computer programs with little human effort. It can vastly accelerate the use of advanced simulation codes in multidisciplinary design optimization, since the time for generating and verifying derivative codes is greatly reduced. In this paper, we report on the application of the recently developed ADIC automatic differentiation tool for ANSI C programs to the CSCMDO multiblock three-dimensional volume grid generator. The ADIC-generated code can easily be interfaced with Fortran derivative codes generated with the ADIFOR AD tool FORTRAN 77 programs, thus providing efficient sensitivity-enhancement techniques for multilanguage, multidiscipline problems.

  4. Real-time bladder volume monitoring by the application of a new implantable bladder volume sensor for a small animal model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Sup; Kim, Su Jin; Sohn, Dong Wan; Choi, Bumkyoo; Lee, Moon Kyu; Lee, Seung Joon; Kim, Sae Woong

    2011-04-01

    Although real-time monitoring of bladder volume together with intravesical pressure can provide more information for understanding the functional changes of the urinary bladder, it still entails difficulties in the accurate prediction of real-time bladder volume in urodynamic studies with small animal models. We studied a new implantable bladder volume monitoring device with eight rats. During cystometry, microelectrodes prepared by the microelectromechanical systems process were placed symmetrically on both lateral walls of the bladder, and the expanded bladder volume was calculated. Immunohistological study was done after 1 week and after 4 weeks to evaluate the biocompatibility of the microelectrode. From the point that infused saline volume into the bladder was higher than 0.6 mL, estimated bladder volume was statistically correlated with the volume of saline injected (p<0.01). Additionally, the microelectromechanical system microelectrodes used in this study showed reliable biocompatibility. Therefore, the device can be used to evaluate changes in bladder volume in studies with small animals, and it may help to provide more information about functional changes in the bladder in laboratory studies. Furthermore, owing to its biocompatibility, the device could be chronically implanted in conscious ambulating animals, thus allowing a novel longitudinal study to be performed for a specific purpose. PMID:21463835

  5. Manned maneuvering unit mission definition study. Volume 2: Appendices to the MMU applications analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Information used in identifying representative Manned Maneuvering Unit (MMU) from the many Automated and Sortie Payloads and orbiter subsystems is presented. Representative missions were selected to represent typical MMU applications across all payloads and orbiter subsystems. Data analysis sheets are provided with other applicable information. Calculations used in defining MMU general performance and control requirements to satisfy eleven space missions are included.

  6. Proceedings of the National Conference on Energy Resource Management. Volume 2: Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brumfield, J. O. (Editor); Schiffman, Y. M. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Subject areas related to the integration of remotely sensed data with geographic information systems for application in energy resource management are covered. The current trends and advances in the application of these systems to a number of energy concerns are addressed.

  7. Conference record of the 1995 IEEE Industry Applications Society, thirtieth IAS annual meeting. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This is the conference record of the 1995 IEEE Industry Applications Conference, Thirtieth IAS annual meeting. The topics of the papers included efficiency and power control of drives, sensorless permanent magnet motor drives, advanced drive concepts, sensorless control, permanent magnet motor drives, reluctance motor drives, induction motor drives, drive applications, and magnetics and energy conversion.

  8. Application of the QSDC procedure to the formulation of space shuttle design criteria. Volume 2: Applications guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouton, I.; Martin, G. L.

    1972-01-01

    Criteria to determine the probability of aircraft structural failure were established according to the Quantitative Structural Design Criteria by Statistical Methods, the QSDC Procedure. This criteria method was applied to the design of the space shuttle during this contract. An Applications Guide was developed to demonstrate the utilization of the QSDC Procedure, with examples of the application to a hypothetical space shuttle illustrating the application to specific design problems. Discussions of the basic parameters of the QSDC Procedure: the Limit and Omega Conditions, and the strength scatter, have been included. Available data pertinent to the estimation of the strength scatter have also been included.

  9. Design and Evaluation of an Intelligent Remote Tidal Volume Variability Monitoring System in E-Health Applications.

    PubMed

    Fekr, Atena Roshan; Radecka, Katarzyna; Zilic, Zeljko

    2015-09-01

    A reliable long-term monitoring and diagnosis of breath disorders at an early stage provides an improvement of medical act, life expectancy, and quality of life while decreasing the costs of treatment and medical services. Therefore, a real-time unobtrusive monitoring of respiration patterns, as well as breath parameters, is a critical need in medical applications. In this paper, we propose an intelligent system for patient home care, capable of measuring respiration rate and tidal volume variability via a wearable sensing technology. The proposed system is designed particularly for the goal of diagnosis and treatment in patients with pathological breathing, e.g., respiratory complications after surgery or sleep disorders. The complete system was comprised of wearable calibrated accelerometer sensor, Bluetooth low energy, and cloud database. The experiments are conducted with eight subjects and the overall error in respiration rate calculation is obtained 0.29%±0.33% considering SPR-BTA spirometer as the reference. We also introduce a method for tidal volume variability estimation while validated using Pearson correlation. Furthermore, since it is essential to detect the critical events resulted from sudden rise or fall in per breath tidal volume of the patients, we provide a technique to automatically find the accurate threshold values based on each individual breath characteristics. Therefore, the system is able to detect the major changes, precisely by more than 98%, and provide immediate feedback such as sound alarm for round-the-clock respiration monitoring. PMID:26087508

  10. Tri-color composite volume H-PDLC grating and its application to 3D color autostereoscopic display.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kangni; Zheng, Jihong; Gao, Hui; Lu, Feiyue; Sun, Lijia; Yin, Stuart; Zhuang, Songlin

    2015-11-30

    A tri-color composite volume holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal (H-PDLC) grating and its application to 3-dimensional (3D) color autostereoscopic display are reported in this paper. The composite volume H-PDLC grating consists of three different period volume H-PDLC sub-gratings. The longer period diffracts red light, the medium period diffracts the green light, and the shorter period diffracts the blue light. To record three different period gratings simultaneously, two photoinitiators are employed. The first initiator consists of methylene blue and p-toluenesulfonic acid and the second initiator is composed of Rose Bengal and N-phenyglycine. In this case, the holographic recording medium is sensitive to entire visible wavelengths, including red, green, and blue so that the tri-color composite grating can be written simultaneously by harnessing three different color laser beams. In the experiment, the red beam comes from a He-Ne laser with an output wavelength of 632.8 nm, the green beam comes from a Verdi solid state laser with an output wavelength of 532 nm, and the blue beam comes from a He-Cd laser with an output wavelength of 441.6 nm. The experimental results show that diffraction efficiencies corresponding to red, green, and blue colors are 57%, 75% and 33%, respectively. Although this diffraction efficiency is not perfect, it is high enough to demonstrate the effect of 3D color autostereoscopic display. PMID:26698768

  11. Automated cerebellar segmentation: Validation and application to detect smaller volumes in children prenatally exposed to alcohol☆

    PubMed Central

    Cardenas, Valerie A.; Price, Mathew; Infante, M. Alejandra; Moore, Eileen M.; Mattson, Sarah N.; Riley, Edward P.; Fein, George

    2014-01-01

    Objective To validate an automated cerebellar segmentation method based on active shape and appearance modeling and then segment the cerebellum on images acquired from adolescents with histories of prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) and non-exposed controls (NC). Methods Automated segmentations of the total cerebellum, right and left cerebellar hemispheres, and three vermal lobes (anterior, lobules I–V; superior posterior, lobules VI–VII; inferior posterior, lobules VIII–X) were compared to expert manual labelings on 20 subjects, studied twice, that were not used for model training. The method was also used to segment the cerebellum on 11 PAE and 9 NC adolescents. Results The test–retest intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) of the automated method were greater than 0.94 for all cerebellar volume and mid-sagittal vermal area measures, comparable or better than the test–retest ICCs for manual measurement (all ICCs > 0.92). The ICCs computed on all four cerebellar measurements (manual and automated measures on the repeat scans) to compare comparability were above 0.97 for non-vermis parcels, and above 0.89 for vermis parcels. When applied to patients, the automated method detected smaller cerebellar volumes and mid-sagittal areas in the PAE group compared to controls (p < 0.05 for all regions except the superior posterior lobe, consistent with prior studies). Discussion These results demonstrate excellent reliability and validity of automated cerebellar volume and mid-sagittal area measurements, compared to manual measurements. These data also illustrate that this new technology for automatically delineating the cerebellum leads to conclusions regarding the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on the cerebellum consistent with prior studies that used labor intensive manual delineation, even with a very small sample. PMID:25061566

  12. Application of radar for automotive collision avoidance. Volume 2: Development plan and progress reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenberg, Christopher L. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this project was research and development of an automobile collision avoidance radar system. Items within the scope of the one-year effort were to: (1) review previous authors' work in this field; (2) select a suitable radar approach; (3) develop a system design; (4) perform basic analyses and observations pertinent to radar design, performance, and effects; (5) fabricate and collect radar data from a data collection radar; (6) analyze and derive conclusions from the radar data; and (7) make recommendations about the likelihood of success of the investigated radar techniques. The final technical report presenting all conclusions is contained in Volume 1.

  13. [Application possibilities and initial experience with digital volume tomography in hand and wrist imaging].

    PubMed

    Goerke, Sebastian M; Neubauer, J; Zajonc, H; Thiele, J R; Kotter, E; Langer, M; Stark, G B; Lampert, F M

    2015-02-01

    During the last decade, DVT (digital volume tomography) imaging has become a widely used standard technique in head and neck imaging. Lower radiation exposure compared to conventional computed tomography (MDCT) has been described. Recently, DVT has been developed as an extremity scanner and as such represents a new imaging technique for hand surgery. We here describe the first 24 months experience with this new imaging modality in hand and wrist imaging by presenting representative cases and by describing the technical background. Furthermore, the method's advantages and disadvantages are discussed with reference to the given literature. PMID:25706176

  14. Integrated Power/Attitude Control System (IPACS) study. Volume 1: Feasibility studies. [application of flywheels for power storage and generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notti, J. E.; Cormack, A., III; Schmill, W. C.

    1974-01-01

    An Integrated Power/Attitude Control System (IPACS) concept consisting of an array of spinning flywheels, with or without gimbals, capable of performing the dual function of power storage and generation, as well as attitude control has been investigated. This system provides attitude control through momentum storage, and replaces the storage batteries onboard the spacecraft. The results of the investigation are presented in two volumes. The trade-off studies performed to establish the feasibility, cost effectiveness, required level of development, and boundaries of application of IPACS to a wide variety of spacecraft are discussed. The conceptual designs for a free-flying research application module (RAM), and for a tracking and data relay satellite (TDRS) are presented. Results from dynamic analyses and simulations of the IPACS conceptual designs are included.

  15. Development and application of an automated, low-volume chromatography system for resin and condition screening.

    PubMed

    Teeters, Mark; Bezila, Daniel; Alred, Patricia; Velayudhan, Ajoy

    2008-10-01

    A small-volume chromatography system was developed for rapid resin and parameter screening and applied to the purification of a therapeutic monoclonal antibody from a key product-related impurity. Accounting for constraints in peripheral volume, gradient formation, column integrity, and fraction collection in microtiter plates, the resulting system employed 2-mL columns and was successfully integrated with plate-based methods for rapid sample analysis (e. g., use of automated liquid handlers, plate readers, and HPLC). Several cation-exchange chromatography resins were screened using automated programs and tailored gradients for the combination of a particular resin and a given antibody feedstock produced during Phase 1 development. Results from the tailored gradient runs were used to select a resin, and to arrive at efficient stepwise elution schedules for the chosen resin. By maintaining a constant residence time, final operating parameters were successfully scaled to representative bed heights and column diameters up to 2.6 cm (106 mL). This approach significantly improved throughput while reducing development time and material consumption. PMID:18543245

  16. First-trimester assessment of the fetal palate: a novel application of the Volume NT algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sepulveda, Waldo; Cafici, Daniel; Bartholomew, Julie; Wong, Amy E; Martinez-Ten, Pilar

    2012-09-01

    We describe a new technique that can facilitate the first-trimester examination of the fetal palate using the Volume NT algorithm (Samsung Medison, Seoul, Korea), a program that automatically detects the exact midsagittal plane of the head and is primarily designed for semiautomatic measurement of the nuchal translucency thickness. Three-dimensional (3D) data sets from the fetal face were captured with Volume NT and subsequently reformatted with the Oblique View software to obtain orthogonal views of the primary and secondary palate in coronal and axial planes, respectively. By testing this method in selected 3D data sets obtained retrospectively (n = 12) and prospectively (n = 28), we were able to extract clinically acceptable views of the fetal palate in all cases. This preliminary report shows that with this new 3D automation development, early evaluation of the fetal palate is feasible and reproducible and could be easily incorporated into the first-trimester sonographic protocol once its ability to detect abnormal cases is demonstrated. PMID:22922625

  17. Diffusion on a Curved Surface Coupled to Diffusion in the Volume: Application to Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Igor L.; Gao, Fei; Choi, Yung-Sze; Resasco, Diana; Schaff, James C.; Slepchenko, Boris M.

    2007-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for solving a diffusion equation on a curved surface coupled to diffusion in the volume, a problem often arising in cell biology. It applies to pixilated surfaces obtained from experimental images and performs at low computational cost. In the method, the Laplace-Beltrami operator is approximated locally by the Laplacian on the tangential plane and then a finite volume discretization scheme based on a Voronoi decomposition is applied. Convergence studies show that mass conservation built in the discretization scheme and cancellation of sampling error ensure convergence of the solution in space with an order between 1 and 2. The method is applied to a cell-biological problem where a signaling molecule, G-protein Rac, cycles between the cytoplasm and cell membrane thus coupling its diffusion in the membrane to that in the cell interior. Simulations on realistic cell geometry are performed to validate, and determine the accuracy of, a recently proposed simplified quantitative analysis of fluorescence loss in photobleaching. The method is implemented within the Virtual Cell computational framework freely accessible at www.vcell.org. PMID:18836520

  18. Development of a multicomponent force and moment balance for water tunnel applications, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, Carlos J.; Malcolm, Gerald N.; Kramer, Brian R.; Smith, Brooke C.; Ayers, Bert F.

    1994-01-01

    The principal objective of this research effort was to develop a multicomponent strain gauge balance to measure forces and moments on models tested in flow visualization water tunnels. An internal balance was designed that allows measuring normal and side forces, and pitching, yawing and rolling moments (no axial force). The five-components to applied loads, low interactions between the sections and no hysteresis. Static experiments (which are discussed in this Volume) were conducted in the Eidetics water tunnel with delta wings and a model of the F/A-18. Experiments with the F/A-18 model included a thorough baseline study and investigations of the effect of control surface deflections and of several Forebody Vortex Control (FVC) techniques. Results were compared to wind tunnel data and, in general, the agreement is very satisfactory. The results of the static tests provide confidence that loads can be measured accurately in the water tunnel with a relatively simple multicomponent internal balance. Dynamic experiments were also performed using the balance, and the results are discussed in detail in Volume 2 of this report.

  19. Optimization of multi-grating volume holographic spectrum splitters for photovoltaic applications.

    PubMed

    Ingersoll, G B; Leger, J R

    2016-07-10

    Recent research has shown that using multiple diverse-bandgap photovoltaic (PV) cells in conjunction with a spectrum splitting optical system can significantly improve PV power generation efficiency. Although volume Bragg gratings (VBGs) can serve as effective spectrum splitters, the inherent dispersion of a VBG can be detrimental given a broad-spectrum input. The performance of a single holographic spectrum splitter element can be improved by utilizing multiple single volume gratings, each operating in a slightly different spectral band. However, care must be taken to avoid inter-grating coupling effects that limit the ultimate performance. This work explores broadband two-grating holographic optical elements (HOEs) in multiplexed (single element) and sandwiched-grating arrangements. Particle swarm optimization is used to tailor these systems to the solar spectrum, taking into account both efficiency and dispersion. Both multiplexed and sandwiched two-grating systems exhibit performance improvements over single-grating solutions, especially when reduced dispersion is required. Under a ±2° constraint on output angular spread from wavelength dispersion, sandwiched-, multiplexed-, and single-grating systems exhibit power conversion efficiencies of 82.1%, 80.9%, and 77.5%, respectively, compared to an ideal bandpass spectrum splitter. Dispersion performance can be further improved by employing more than two VBGs in the spectrum splitter, but efficiency is compromised by additional cross-coupling effects. Multiplexed-grating systems are especially susceptible to these effects, but have the advantage of utilizing only a single HOE. PMID:27409317

  20. Development of a multicomponent force and moment balance for water tunnel applications, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, Carlos J.; Malcolm, Gerald N.; Kramer, Brian R.; Smith, Brooke C.; Ayers, Bert F.

    1994-01-01

    The principal objective of this research effort was to develop a multicomponent strain gauge balance to measure forces and moments on models tested in flow visualization water tunnels. Static experiments (which are discussed in Volume 1 of this report) were conducted, and the results showed good agreement with wind tunnel data on similar configurations. Dynamic experiments, which are the main topic of this Volume, were also performed using the balance. Delta wing models and two F/A-18 models were utilized in a variety of dynamic tests. This investigation showed that, as expected, the values of the inertial tares are very small due to the low rotating rates required in a low-speed water tunnel and can, therefore, be ignored. Oscillations in pitch, yaw and roll showed hysteresis loops that compared favorably to data from dynamic wind tunnel experiments. Pitch-up and hold maneuvers revealed the long persistence, or time-lags, of some of the force components in response to the motion. Rotary-balance experiments were also successfully performed. The good results obtained in these dynamic experiments bring a whole new dimension to water tunnel testing and emphasize the importance of having the capability to perform simultaneous flow visualization and force/moment measurements during dynamic situations.

  1. Development of a multicomponent force and moment balance for water tunnel applications, volume 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, Carlos J.; Malcolm, Gerald N.; Kramer, Brian R.; Smith, Brooke C.; Ayers, Bert F.

    1994-12-01

    The principal objective of this research effort was to develop a multicomponent strain gauge balance to measure forces and moments on models tested in flow visualization water tunnels. Static experiments (which are discussed in Volume 1 of this report) were conducted, and the results showed good agreement with wind tunnel data on similar configurations. Dynamic experiments, which are the main topic of this Volume, were also performed using the balance. Delta wing models and two F/A-18 models were utilized in a variety of dynamic tests. This investigation showed that, as expected, the values of the inertial tares are very small due to the low rotating rates required in a low-speed water tunnel and can, therefore, be ignored. Oscillations in pitch, yaw and roll showed hysteresis loops that compared favorably to data from dynamic wind tunnel experiments. Pitch-up and hold maneuvers revealed the long persistence, or time-lags, of some of the force components in response to the motion. Rotary-balance experiments were also successfully performed. The good results obtained in these dynamic experiments bring a whole new dimension to water tunnel testing and emphasize the importance of having the capability to perform simultaneous flow visualization and force/moment measurements during dynamic situations.

  2. Development of a multicomponent force and moment balance for water tunnel applications, volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, Carlos J.; Malcolm, Gerald N.; Kramer, Brian R.; Smith, Brooke C.; Ayers, Bert F.

    1994-12-01

    The principal objective of this research effort was to develop a multicomponent strain gauge balance to measure forces and moments on models tested in flow visualization water tunnels. An internal balance was designed that allows measuring normal and side forces, and pitching, yawing and rolling moments (no axial force). The five-components to applied loads, low interactions between the sections and no hysteresis. Static experiments (which are discussed in this Volume) were conducted in the Eidetics water tunnel with delta wings and a model of the F/A-18. Experiments with the F/A-18 model included a thorough baseline study and investigations of the effect of control surface deflections and of several Forebody Vortex Control (FVC) techniques. Results were compared to wind tunnel data and, in general, the agreement is very satisfactory. The results of the static tests provide confidence that loads can be measured accurately in the water tunnel with a relatively simple multicomponent internal balance. Dynamic experiments were also performed using the balance, and the results are discussed in detail in Volume 2 of this report.

  3. Application of Remote Sensing to the Chesapeake Bay Region. Volume 2: Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, W. T. (Editor); Freas, G. W., Jr. (Editor); Hickman, G. D. (Editor); Pemberton, D. A. (Editor); Wilkerson, T. D. (Editor); Adler, I. (Editor); Laurie, V. J. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    A conference was held on the application of remote sensing to the Chesapeake Bay region. Copies of the papers, resource contributions, panel discussions, and reports of the working groups are presented.

  4. Intersatellite Link (ISL) application to commercial communications satellites. Volume 2: Technical final report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, S. Lee

    1987-01-01

    Intersatellite Link (ISL) applications can improve and expand communication satellite services in a number of ways. As the demand for orbital slots within prime regions of the geostationary arc increases, attention is being focused on ISLs as a method to utilize this resource more efficiently and circumvent saturation. Various GEO-to-GEO applications were determined that provide potential benefits over existing communication systems. A set of criteria was developed to assess the potential applications. Intersatellite link models, network system architectures, and payload configurations were developed. For each of the chosen ISL applications, ISL versus non-ISL satellite systems architectures were derived. Both microwave and optical ISL implementation approaches were evaluated for payload sizing and cost analysis. The technological availability for ISL implementations was assessed. Critical subsystems technology areas were identified, and an estamate of the schedule and cost to advance the technology to the requiered state of readiness was made.

  5. Manned maneuvering unit mission definition study. Volume 1: MMU applications analysis and performance requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Applications of Manned Maneuvering Units (MMU'S) to the space shuttle program are identified and described. The applications analyses included studies of the shuttle orbiter, orbiter subsystems, and both Sortie and Automated Payloads. Based on practicable MMU applications, general performance and control requirements for shuttle supporting maneuvering units are defined and compared to units evaluated on Skylab. The results of the MMU applications analyses and the general MMU performance and control requirements are presented. To describe a versatile utility-type maneuvering unit, conceptual designs of MMU support subsystems and ancillary equipment were prepared. Concepts for attaching and securing the MMU crewman to various vehicles, structure configurations, and rescue systems were developed. Concepts for ancillary provisions are reported.

  6. Preliminary energy sector assessments of Jamacica. Volume III: renewable energy. Part III: biogas applications

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The study considers the feasibility of biogas generation and applications. Biogas is a high grade fuel produced by anaerobic digestion of organic matter such as farm crops or animal manure and is useful for cooking and other purposes.

  7. Photovoltaic system criteria documents. Volume 3: Environmental issues and evaluation criteria for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, John C.; Billitti, Joseph W.; Tallon, John M.

    1979-01-01

    The environmental issues and evaluation criteria relating to the suitability of sites proposed for photovoltaic (PV) system deployment are identified. The important issues are defined, briefly discussed and then developed into evaluation criteria. System designers are provided with information on the environmental sensitivity of PV systems in realistic applications, background material which indicates the applicability of the siting issues identified, and evaluation criteria are defined to facilitate the selection of sites that maximize PV system operation.

  8. Reference earth orbital research and applications investigations (blue book). Volume 5: Communications/navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The design and development of a communications/navigation facility for operation aboard space stations and space shuttles are discussed. The objectives of the facility are as follows: (1) to develop and demonstrate satellite and spacecraft technology applicable to space communications, navigation, and traffic control, (2) to optimize the use of the electromagnetic spectrum for communications and navigation satellite systems, and (3) to provide fundamental understanding of the space communications and navigation sciences to permit application of this discipline to government and industry.

  9. An overview of artificial intelligence and robotics. Volume 1: Artificial intelligence. Part B: Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gevarter, W. B.

    1983-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) is an emerging technology that has recently attracted considerable attention. Many applications are now under development. This report, Part B of a three part report on AI, presents overviews of the key application areas: Expert Systems, Computer Vision, Natural Language Processing, Speech Interfaces, and Problem Solving and Planning. The basic approaches to such systems, the state-of-the-art, existing systems and future trends and expectations are covered.

  10. Data catalog series for space science and applications flight missions. Volume 4B: Descriptions of data sets from meteorological and terrestrial applications spacecraft and investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Carolyn; Stonesifer, G. Richard

    1989-01-01

    The main purpose of the data catalog series is to provide descriptive references to data generated by space science flight missions. The data sets described include all of the actual holdings of the Space Science Data Center (NSSDC), all data sets for which direct contact information is available, and some data collections held and serviced by foreign investigators, NASA and other U.S. government agencies. This volume contains narrative descriptions of data sets from meteorological and terrestrial applications spacecraft and investigations. The following spacecraft series are included: Mariner, Pioneer, Pioneer Venus, Venera, Viking, Voyager, and Helios. Separate indexes to the planetary and interplanetary missions are also provided.

  11. Data catalog series for space science and applications flight missions. Volume 4A: Descriptions of meteorological and terrestrial applications spacecraft and investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, C. Y. (Editor); Sheu, Y. T. P. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) provides data from and information about space science and applications flight investigations in support of additional studies beyond those performed as the principal part of any flight mission. The Earth-orbiting spacecraft for investigations of the earth and its atmosphere is discussed. Geodetic tracking data are included in this category. The principal subject areas presented are meteorology and earth resources survey, and the spacecraft selection is made according to those subjects. All experiments on board the spacecraft are described. No attempt is made to reference investigations that are related to the above disciplines, but that are described in other volumes of this series.

  12. Application of a finite volume based method of lines to turbulent forced convection in circular tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Campo, A.; Tebeest, K.; Lacoa, U.; Morales, J.C.

    1996-10-01

    A semianalytic analysis of in-tube turbulent forced convection is performed whose special computational feature is the combination of the method of lines, the finite volume technique, and a radial coordinate transformation. First, a numerical solution of the momentum equation was obtained by a simple Runge-Kutta integration scheme. Second, the energy equation was reformulated into a system of ordinary differential equations of first order. Each equation in the system controls the temperature along a line in a mesh consisting of concentric lines. Reliable analytic solutions for the temperature distribution of fluids in the region of thermal development can be determined for combinations of Reynolds and Prandtl numbers. Predicted results for the distributions of mean bulk temperature and local Nusselt numbers for air, water, and oils compare satisfactorily with the available experimental data.

  13. Analysis of the effects of viscosity, volume, and temperature in photopolymer material for holographic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jinxin; Gleeson, Michael R.; Sheridan, John T.

    2013-05-01

    In recent work carried out, we introduced the developments made to the Non-local Photo-polymerization Driven Diffusion model, and illustrate some of the useful trends, which the model predicts and then analyse their implications on photopolymer improvement. The model was improved in its physicality through the inclusion of viscosity effects (changes in fractional free volume), multiple components and their photo-kinetic and photo-physical behaviour, and free space vacuoles. In this paper, we further explore this model to provide a more rigorous and informed basis for predicting the behaviours of photopolymer materials in both photo-chemical and photo-physical sides. Such improvements include a) the analysis of the effects of viscosity on the refractive index modulation, b) the effects of the introduction of free space holes, e.g. the volumetric changes, and c) an examination of the effects of local temperatures and various concentration ratios to optimise material performance.

  14. Capillary plasma jet: A low volume plasma source for life science applications

    SciTech Connect

    Topala, I. E-mail: tmnagat@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp; Nagatsu, M. E-mail: tmnagat@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp

    2015-02-02

    In this letter, we present results from multispectroscopic analysis of protein films, after exposure to a peculiar plasma source, i.e., the capillary plasma jet. This plasma source is able to generate very small pulsed plasma volumes, in kilohertz range, with characteristic dimensions smaller than 1 mm. This leads to specific microscale generation and transport of all plasma species. Plasma diagnosis was realized using general electrical and optical methods. Depending on power level and exposure duration, this miniature plasma jet can induce controllable modifications to soft matter targets. Detailed discussions on protein film oxidation and chemical etching are supported by results from absorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and microscopy techniques. Further exploitation of principles presented here may consolidate research interests involving plasmas in biotechnologies and plasma medicine, especially in patterning technologies, modified biomolecule arrays, and local chemical functionalization.

  15. Assessment of research needs for advanced heterogeneous catalysts for energy applications. Final report: Volume 2, Topic reports

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, G.A.

    1994-04-01

    This report assesses the direction, technical content, and priority of research needs judged to provide the best chance of yielding new and improved heterogeneous catalysts for energy-related applications over the period of 5-20 years. It addresses issues of energy conservation, alternate fuels and feedstocks, and the economics and applications that could alleviate pollution from energy processes. Recommended goals are defined in 3 research thrusts: catalytic science, environmental protection by catalysis, and industrial catalytic applications. This study was conducted by an 11-member panel of experts from industry and academia, including one each from Japan and Europe. This volume first presents an in-depth overview of the role of catalysis in future energy technology in chapter 1; then current catalytic research is critically reviewed and research recommended in 8 topic chapters: catalyst preparation (design and synthesis), catalyst characterization (structure/function), catalyst performance testing, reaction kinetics/reactor design, catalysis for industrial chemicals, catalysis for electrical applications (clean fuels, pollution remediation), catalysis for control of exhaust emissions, and catalysts for liquid transportation fuels from petroleum, coal, residual oil, and biomass.

  16. The Environment for Application Software Integration and Execution (EASIE), version 1.0. Volume 3: Program execution guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwing, James L.; Criste, Russell E.; Schwing, James L.; Criste, Russell E.

    1988-01-01

    The Environment for Application Software Integration and Execution, EASIE, provides a methodology and a set of software utility programs to ease the task of coordinating engineering design and analysis codes. EASIE was designed to meet the needs of conceptual design engineers that face the task of integrating the results of many stand-alone engineering analysis programs. EASIE provides access to these programs via a quick, uniform, user-friendly interface. In addition, EASIE provides utilities which aid in the execution of the following tasks: selection of application programs, modification and review of program data, automatic definition and coordination of data files during program execution and a logging of steps executed throughout a design study. Volume 3, the Program Execution Guide, describes the executive capabilities provided by EASIE and defines the command language and menus available under Version 1.0. EASIE provides users with two basic modes of operation. One is the Application-Derived Executive (ADE) which provides users with sufficient guidance to quickly review data, select menu action items, and execute application programs. The second is the Complete Control Executive (CCE), which provides a full executive interface allowing users in-depth control of the design process.

  17. Proceedings of 1994 IEEE industry applications society: Annual meeting. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The following topics were dealt with: electric generators; induction motors; permanent magnet motors; synchronous motors; reluctance motors; DC motors; sensors and actuators; industrial drives; electric vehicle drives; sensorless control; field oriented control; power control; power converters; utility interface; power electronics; thermal issues; gate drives; charged particles and corona systems; electrostatics in polymer processing and web handling; electrostatic spraying and coating; biological applications and hazards; electrostatic precipitators; plasma chemical processing; computational electrostatics; electrohydrodynamics; control system applications; intelligent control; fuzzy logic and neural networks; robot simulators and controllers; industrial process control and heating; real-time systems, I/O bus and control software; applied automation; motion control technology; lighting; metals application; mine electrical systems; rubber and plastics; power system design, analysis and reliability; power quality. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  18. Photovoltaic system criteria documents. Volume 2: Quality assurance criteria for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, John C.; Billitti, Joseph W.; Tallon, John M.

    1979-01-01

    Quality assurance criteria are described for manufacturers and installers of solar photovoltaic tests and applications. Quality oriented activities are outlined to be pursued by the contractor/subcontractor to assure the physical and operational quality of equipment produced is included. In the broad sense, guidelines are provided for establishing a QA organization if none exists. Mainly, criteria is provided to be considered in any PV quality assurance plan selected as appropriate by the responsible Field Center. A framework is established for a systematic approach to ensure that photovoltaic tests and applications are constructed in a timely and cost effective manner.

  19. Space processing applications payload equipment study. Volume 2A: Experiment requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. G.; Anderson, W. T., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis of the space processing applications payload equipment was conducted. The primary objective was to perform a review and an update of the space processing activity research equipment requirements and specifications that were derived in the first study. The analysis is based on the six major experimental classes of: (1) biological applications, (2) chemical processes in fluids, (3) crystal growth, (4) glass technology, (5) metallurgical processes, and (6) physical processes in fluids. Tables of data are prepared to show the functional requirements for the areas of investigation.

  20. Reference earth orbital research and applications investigations (blue book). Volume 7: Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The candidate experiment program for manned space stations with specific application to technology disciplines is presented. The five functional program elements are devoted to the development of new technology for application to future generation spacecraft and experiments. The functional program elements are as follows: (1) monitor and trace movement of external contaminants to determine methods for controlling contamination, (2) analysis of fundamentals of fluid systems management, (3) extravehicular activity, (4) advanced spacecraft systems tests, and (5) development of teleoperator system for use with space activities.

  1. EFFECTS OF GROUND ULV (ULTRA-LOW VOLUME) APPLICATIONS OF FENTHION ON ESTUARINE BIOTA. 3. RESPONSE OF CAGED PINK SHRIMP AND GRASS SHRIMP

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuarine grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) and pink shrimp (Penaeus duorarum) were deployed in floating cages to determine if fenthion, in an actual-use application in the field, affected shrimp survival. After four ultra-low-volume ground applications (equivalent to llg/ha or 0...

  2. Draft Title 40 CFR 191 compliance certification application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-31

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a research and development facility for the demonstration of the permanent isolation of transuranic radioactive wastes in a geologic formation. The facility was constructed in southeastern New Mexico in a manner intended to meet criteria established by the scientific and regulatory community for the safe, long-term disposal of transuranic wastes. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing an application to demonstrate compliance with the requirements outlined in Title 40, Part 191 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) for the permanent disposal of transuranic wastes. As mandated by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Land Withdrawal Act of 1992, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must evaluate this compliance application and provide a determination regarding compliance with the requirements within one year of receiving a complete application. Because the WIPP is a very complex program, the DOE has planned to submit the application as a draft in two parts. This strategy will allow for the DOE and the EPA to begin technical discussions on critical WIPP issues before the one-year compliance determination period begins. This report is the first of these two draft submittals.

  3. SAI (SYSTEMS APPLICATIONS, INCORPORATED) AIRSHED MODEL OPERATIONS MANUALS. VOLUME 2. SYSTEMS MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the Systems Applications, Inc. (SAI) Airshed Model System from a programmer's point of view. Included are discussions of all subroutines and how they fit together, run-time core allocation techniques, internal methods of segment handling using secondary stor...

  4. Study of airborne science experiment management concepts for application to space shuttle. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulholland, D. R.; Reller, J. O., Jr.; Neel, C. B.; Haughney, L. C.

    1973-01-01

    The management concepts and operating procedures are documented as they apply to the planning of shuttle spacelab operations. Areas discussed include: airborne missions; formulation of missions; management procedures; experimenter involvement; experiment development and performance; data handling; safety procedures; and applications to shuttle spacelab planning. Characteristics of the airborne science experience are listed, and references and figures are included.

  5. Best Visual Presentation--Observations from the Award Committee. IR Applications. Volume 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bers, Trudy

    2005-01-01

    In 2003, the Association for Institutional Research (AIR) initiated the Best Visual Presentation (BVP) award to acknowledge the contributions made through new ways of professional communication, in addition to those made through more traditional scholarly formats. The purpose of this "IR Applications" is to provide observations from the BVP Award…

  6. LAND APPLICATION OF WASTEWATER AND STATE WATER LAW: STATE ANALYSES. VOLUME II

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research project was undertaken with the overall objective of analyzing state water rights law in order to determine its possible impact on systems of land application of wastewater. It was determined that most states do not have regulations specifically controlling land app...

  7. LAND APPLICATION OF WASTEWATER AND STATE WATER LAW: AN OVERVIEW (VOLUME I)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research project was undertaken with the overall objective of analyzing state water rights law in order to determine its possible impact on systems of land application of wastewater. It was determined that most states do not have regulations specifically controlling land app...

  8. Application of Shuttle EVA Systems to Payloads. Volume 2: Payload EVA Task Completion Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Candidate payload tasks for EVA application were identified and selected, based on an analysis of four representative space shuttle payloads, and typical EVA scenarios with supporting crew timelines and procedures were developed. The EVA preparations and post EVA operations, as well as the timelines emphasizing concurrent payload support functions, were also summarized.

  9. [Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B permit application: Volume 6, Revision 3: Engineering Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This report is part of revision 3 to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act part B permit application for the WIPP facility. Engineering drawings and details are included on the following: fire protection sprinkler system and fire water collection system; fault analysis and protective device coordination; primary power distribution, area electrical diagrams; paving details; fencing plan; railroad access plan; and access road plans.

  10. [Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B permit application: Volume 6, Revision 3: Engineering Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    This report is part of revision 3 to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act part B permit application for the WIPP facility. Engineering drawings and details are included on the following: fire protection sprinkler system and fire water collection system; fault analysis and protective device coordination; primary power distribution, area electrical diagrams; paving details; fencing plan; railroad access plan; and access road plans.

  11. Fifth Annual Workshop on Space Operations Applications and Research (SOAR 1991), volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishen, Kumar (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Papers given at the Space Operations and Applications Symposium, host by the NASA Johnson Space Center on July 9-11, 1991 are given. The technical areas covered included intelligent systems, automation and robotics, human factors and life sciences, and environmental interactions.

  12. Assessment of solar options for small power systems applications. Volume III. Analysis of concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Laity, W.W.; Aase, D.T.; Apley, W.J.; Bird, S.P.; Drost, M.K.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Williams, T.A.

    1980-09-01

    A comparative analysis of solar thermal conversion concepts that are potentially suitable for development as small electric power systems (1 to 10 MWe) is given. Seven generic types of collectors, together with associated subsystems for electric power generation, were considered. The collectors can be classified into three categories: (1) two-axis tracking (with compound-curvature reflecting surfaces; (2) one-axis tracking (with single-curvature reflecting suraces; and (3) nontracking (with low-concentration reflecting surfaces). All seven collectors were analyzed in conceptual system configurations with Rankine-cycle engines. In addition, two of the collectors (the Point Focus Central Receiver and the Point Focus Distributed Receiver) were analyzed with Brayton-cycle engines, and the latter of the two also was analyzed with Stirling-cycle engines. This volume describes the systems analyses performed on all the alternative configurations of the seven generic collector concepts and the results obtained. The SOLSTEP computer code used to determine each configuration's system cost and performance is briefly described. The collector and receiver performance calculations used are also presented. The capital investment and related costs that were obtained from the systems studies are presented, and the levelized energy costs are given as a function of capacity factor obtained from the systems studies. Included also are the values of the other attributes used in the concepts' final ranking. The comments, conclusions, and recommendations developed by the PNL study team during the concept characterization and systems analysis tasks of the study are presented. (WHK)

  13. Large-volume methacrylate monolith for plasmid purification. Process engineering approach to synthesis and application.

    PubMed

    Danquah, Michael K; Forde, Gareth M

    2008-04-25

    The extent of exothermicity associated with the construction of large-volume methacrylate monolithic columns has somewhat obstructed the realisation of large-scale rapid biomolecule purification especially for plasmid-based products which have proven to herald future trends in biotechnology. A novel synthesis technique via a heat expulsion mechanism was employed to prepare a 40 mL methacrylate monolith with a homogeneous radial pore structure along its thickness. Radial temperature gradient was recorded to be only 1.8 degrees C. Maximum radial temperature recorded at the centre of the monolith was 62.3 degrees C, which was only 2.3 degrees C higher than the actual polymerisation temperature. Pore characterisation of the monolithic polymer showed unimodal pore size distributions at different radial positions with an identical modal pore size of 400 nm. Chromatographic characterisation of the polymer after functionalisation with amino groups displayed a persistent dynamic binding capacity of 15.5 mg of plasmid DNA/mL. The maximum pressure drop recorded was only 0.12 MPa at a flow rate of 10 mL/min. The polymer demonstrated rapid separation ability by fractionating Escherichia coli DH5alpha-pUC19 clarified lysate in only 3 min after loading. The plasmid sample collected after the fast purification process was tested to be a homogeneous supercoiled plasmid with DNA electrophoresis and restriction analysis. PMID:18329651

  14. Space Applications of Automation, Robotics and Machine Intelligence Systems (ARAMIS). Volume 1: Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Minsky, M. L.; Smith, D. B. S.

    1982-01-01

    Potential applications of automation, robotics, and machine intelligence systems (ARAMIS) to space activities, and to their related ground support functions are explored. The specific tasks which will be required by future space projects are identified. ARAMIS options which are candidates for those space project tasks and the relative merits of these options are defined and evaluated. Promising applications of ARAMIS and specific areas for further research are identified. The ARAMIS options defined and researched by the study group span the range from fully human to fully machine, including a number of intermediate options (e.g., humans assisted by computers, and various levels of teleoperation). By including this spectrum, the study searches for the optimum mix of humans and machines for space project tasks.

  15. Application handbook for a Standardized Control Module (SCM) for DC-DC converters, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, F. C.; Mahmoud, M. F.; Yu, Y.

    1980-01-01

    The standardized control module (SCM) was developed for application in the buck, boost and buck/boost DC-DC converters. The SCM used multiple feedback loops to provide improved input line and output load regulation, stable feedback control system, good dynamic transient response and adaptive compensation of the control loop for changes in open loop gain and output filter time constraints. The necessary modeling and analysis tools to aid the design engineer in the application of the SCM to DC-DC Converters were developed. The SCM functional block diagram and the different analysis techniques were examined. The average time domain analysis technique was chosen as the basic analytical tool. The power stage transfer functions were developed for the buck, boost and buck/boost converters. The analog signal and digital signal processor transfer functions were developed for the three DC-DC Converter types using the constant on time, constant off time and constant frequency control laws.

  16. Evaluation of the Trajectory Operations Applications Software Task (TOAST). Volume 2: Interview transcripts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Sharon; Martin, Andrea; Bavinger, Bill

    1990-01-01

    The Trajectory Operations Applications Software Task (TOAST) is a software development project whose purpose is to provide trajectory operation pre-mission and real-time support for the Space Shuttle. The purpose of the evaluation was to evaluate TOAST as an Application Manager - to assess current and planned capabilities, compare capabilities to commercially-available off the shelf (COTS) software, and analyze requirements of MCC and Flight Analysis Design System (FADS) for TOAST implementation. As a major part of the data gathering for the evaluation, interviews were conducted with NASA and contractor personnel. Real-time and flight design users, orbit navigation users, the TOAST developers, and management were interviewed. Code reviews and demonstrations were also held. Each of these interviews was videotaped and transcribed as appropriate. Transcripts were edited and are presented chronologically.

  17. Solar thermal power systems point-focusing thermal and electric applications projects. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marriott, A.

    1980-01-01

    The activities of the Point-Focusing Thermal and Electric Applications (PETEA) project for the fiscal year 1979 are summarized. The main thrust of the PFTEA Project, the small community solar thermal power experiment, was completed. Concept definition studies included a small central receiver approach, a point-focusing distributed receiver system with central power generation, and a point-focusing distributed receiver concept with distributed power generation. The first experiment in the Isolated Application Series was initiated. Planning for the third engineering experiment series, which addresses the industrial market sector, was also initiated. In addition to the experiment-related activities, several contracts to industry were let and studies were conducted to explore the market potential for point-focusing distributed receiver (PFDR) systems. System analysis studies were completed that looked at PFDR technology relative to other small power system technology candidates for the utility market sector.

  18. 64 kW concentrator Photovoltaics Application Test Center. Volume. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jardine, D.M.; Jones, D.W.

    1980-06-01

    Kaman Sciences Corporation has designed a 64 kW Concentrating Photovoltaic Applications Test Center (APTEC). The APTEC employs a combined concentrating photovoltaic array in a total energy system application for load sharing the electric and thermal demands of a large computer center with the interfaced electric and natural gas utility. The photovoltaic array is composed of two-axis tracking heliostats of Fresnel lens concentrating, silicon solar cell modules. The modules are cooled with a fluid which transfers heat to a ground coupled heat sink/storage unit for subsequent use in meeting the computer center's thermal load demand. The combined photovoltaic power system shares basic components - a power conditioning unit, batteries and thermal conditioning equipment - with the electric and natural gas utility service, improving the computer center's operating availability time and displacing a portion of the fossil fuel required to power the computer center with solar energy. The detailed system design is reported.

  19. Noninvasive Evaluation of Bladder Wall Mechanical Properties as a Function of Filling Volume: Potential Application in Bladder Compliance Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Mynderse, Lance; Husmann, Douglas; Urban, Matthew; Alizad, Azra

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We propose a novel method to monitor bladder wall mechanical properties as a function of filling volume, with the potential application to bladder compliance assessment. The proposed ultrasound bladder vibrometry (UBV) method uses ultrasound to excite and track Lamb waves on the bladder wall from which its mechanical properties are derived by fitting measurements to an analytical model. Of particular interest is the shear modulus of bladder wall at different volumes, which we hypothesize, is similar to measuring the compliance characteristics of the bladder. Materials and Methods Three experimental models were used: 1) an ex vivo porcine model where normal and aberrant (stiffened by formalin) bladders underwent evaluation by UBV; 2) an in vivo study to evaluate the performance of UBV on patients with clinically documented compliant and noncompliant bladders undergoing UDS; and 3) a noninvasive UBV protocol to assess bladder compliance using oral hydration and fractionated voiding on three healthy volunteers. Results The ex vivo studies showed a high correlation between the UBV parameters and direct pressure measurement (R2 = 0.84–0.99). A similar correlation was observed for 2 patients with compliant and noncompliant bladders (R2 = 0.89–0.99) undergoing UDS detrusor pressure-volume measurements. The results of UBV on healthy volunteers, performed without catheterization, were comparable to a compliant bladder patient. Conclusion The utility of UBV as a method to monitor changes in bladder wall mechanical properties is validated by the high correlation with pressure measurements in ex vivo and in vivo patient studies. High correlation UBV and UDS in vivo studies demonstrated the potential of UBV as a bladder compliance assessment tool. Results of studies on healthy volunteers with normal bladders demonstrated that UBV could be performed noninvasively. Further studies on a larger cohort are needed to fully validate the use of UBV as a clinical tool for

  20. Space processing applications payload equipment study. Volume 2C: Data acquisition and process control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayton, M.; Smith, A. G.

    1974-01-01

    The services provided by the Spacelab Information Management System are discussed. The majority of the services are provided by the common-support subsystems in the Support Module furnished by the Spacelab manufacturer. The information processing requirements for the space processing applications (SPA) are identified. The requirements and capabilities for electric power, display and control panels, recording and telemetry, intercom, and closed circuit television are analyzed.

  1. Reference earth orbital research and applications investigations (blue book). Volume 4: Earth observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The earth observations capability of the space station and space shuttle program definition is discussed. The stress in the functional program element has been to update the sensor specifications and to shift some of the emphasis from sensors to experiments to be done aboard the facility. The earth observations facility will include provisions for data acquisition, sensor control and display, data analysis, and maintenance and repair. The facility is research and development in nature with a potential for operational applications.

  2. Space applications of Automation, Robotics and Machine Intelligence Systems (ARAMIS). Volume 2: Space projects overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Minsky, M. L.; Smith, D. B. S.

    1982-01-01

    Applications of automation, robotics, and machine intelligence systems (ARAMIS) to space activities, and their related ground support functions are studied so that informed decisions can be made on which aspects of ARAMIS to develop. The space project breakdowns, which are used to identify tasks ('functional elements'), are described. The study method concentrates on the production of a matrix relating space project tasks to pieces of ARAMIS.

  3. A thermal scale modeling study for Apollo and Apollo applications, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    The development and demonstration of practical thermal scale modeling techniques applicable to systems involving radiation, conduction, and convection with emphasis on cabin atmosphere/cabin wall thermal interface are discussed. The Apollo spacecraft environment is used as the model. Four possible scaling techniques were considered: (1) modified material preservation, (2) temperature preservation, (3) scaling compromises, and Nusselt number preservation. A thermal mathematical model was developed for use with the Nusselt number preservation technique.

  4. Impact Factors for Microinvasion in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Possible Application to the Definition of Clinical Tumor Volume

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Minhua; Ji Yuan; Zeng Zhaochong; Tang Zhaoyou; Fan Jia; Zhou Jian; Zeng Mengsu; Bi Aihong; Tan Yunshan

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the degree of invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) microscopically that will provide a potential application for gross tumor volume to clinical tumor volume (GTV-to-CTV) expansion. Methods and Materials: From January 2002 to January 2006, 149 HCC patients were selected from those who had undergone surgical resection. Pathology slides and clinical data of all patients were reviewed, including platelet counts, serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels, degree of liver cirrhosis, tumor size, capsular status, portal vein invasion, TNM stage, and histologic tumor grade. The distance between the tumor margin (or fibrous capsule) and the invasive lesions was measured by senior pathologists. Results: Of these 149 patients, 79 (53.0%) patients presented with tumor microinvasion between 0.5 and 4 mm. This degree of microinvasion was inversely correlated with lower platelet counts and positively correlated with higher AFP levels, larger tumor sizes, portal vein invasion, and advanced TNM stage. Microinvasion distances less than or equal to 2 mm were found in 96.1% of patients (74/77) with tumor dimensions less than or equal to 5 cm and in 94.5% of patients (85/90) with AFP levels less than 400 mug/l. Conclusions: Based on our study findings, GTV-to-CTV expansions of 4 mm for HCC are required to conceal the gross tumor and any microscopic disease with 100% accuracy. Tumor size and AFP levels are the simplest indicators for determining the GTV-to-CTV distance for HCC.

  5. High-volume use of self-cementing spray dry absorber material for structural applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Charles E.

    Spray dry absorber (SDA) material, or spray dryer ash, is a byproduct of energy generation by coal combustion and sulfur emissions controls. Like any resource, it ought to be used to its fullest potential offsetting as many of the negative environmental impacts of coal combustion as possible throughout its lifecycle. Its cementitious and pozzolanic properties suggest it be used to augment or replace another energy and emissions intensive product: Portland cement. There is excellent potential for spray dryer ash to be used beneficially in structural applications, which will offset CO2 emissions due to Portland cement production, divert landfill waste by further utilizing a plentiful coal combustion by-product, and create more durable and sustainable structures. The research into beneficial use applications for SDA material is relatively undeveloped and the material is highly underutilized. This dissertation explored a specific self-cementing spray dryer ash for use as a binder in structural materials. Strength and stiffness properties of hydrated spray dryer ash mortars were improved by chemical activation with Portland cement and reinforcement with polymer fibers from automobile tire recycling. Portland cement at additions of five percent of the cementitious material was found to function effectively as an activating agent for spray dryer ash and had a significant impact on the hardened properties. The recycled polymer fibers improved the ductility and toughness of the material in all cases and increased the compressive strength of weak matrix materials like the pure hydrated ash. The resulting hardened materials exhibited useful properties that were sufficient to suggest that they be used in structural applications such as concrete, masonry block, or as a hydraulic cement binder. While the long-term performance characteristics remain to be investigated, from an embodied-energy and carbon emissions standpoint the material investigated here is far superior to

  6. Intersatellite Link (ISL) application to commercial communications satellites. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, S. Lee

    1987-01-01

    Based on a comprehensive evaluation of the fundamental Intersatellite Link (ISL) systems characteristics, potential applications of ISLs to domestic, regional, and global commercial satellite communications were identified, and their cost-effectiveness and other systems benefits quantified wherever possible. Implementation scenarios for the cost-effective communications satellite systems employing ISLs were developed for the first launch in 1993 to 1994 and widespread use of ISLs in the early 2000's. Critical technology requirements for both the microwave (60 GHz) and optical (0.85 micron) ISL implementations were identified, and their technology development programs, including schedule and cost estimates, were derived.

  7. Seventh Annual Workshop on Space Operations Applications and Research (SOAR 1993), volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishen, Kumar (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    This document contains papers presented at the Space Operations, Applications and Research Symposium (SOAR) Symposium hosted by NASA/Johnson Space Center (JSC) and cosponsored by NASA/JSC and U.S. Air Force Materiel Command. SOAR included NASA and USAF programmatic overviews, plenary session, panel discussions, panel sessions, and exhibits. It invited technical papers in support of U.S. Army, U.S. Navy, Department of Energy, NASA, and USAF programs in the following areas: robotics and telepresence, automation and intelligent systems, human factors, life support, and space maintenance and servicing. SOAR was concerned with Government-sponsored research and development relevant to aerospace operations.

  8. Space processing applications payload equipment study. Volume 2D: SPA supplemental power and heat rejection kit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammel, R. L. (Editor); Smith, A. G. (Editor)

    1974-01-01

    The design and application of a supplementary power and heat rejection kit for the Spacelab are discussed. Two subsystems of electric power and thermal control were analyzed to define the requirements for the power and heat rejection kit (PHRK). Twelve exemplary experiments were defined and power timelines were developed. From these timeline, the experiment requirements for sustained power, peak power, and energy were determined. The electrical power subsystem of the PHRK will consist of two fuel cells, oxygen and hydrogen reactant tank assemblies, water storage tanks, plumbing, cabling, and inverters to convert the nominal 28 volt dc fuel cell output to ac power.

  9. Liquid rocket booster study. Volume 2, book 5, appendix 9: LRB alternate applications and evolutionary growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The analyses performed in assessing the merit of the Liquid Rocket Booster concept for use in alternate applications such as for Shuttle C, for Standalone Expendable Launch Vehicles, and possibly for use with the Air Force's Advanced Launch System are presented. A comparison is also presented of the three LRB candidate designs, namely: (1) the LO2/LH2 pump fed, (2) the LO2/RP-1 pump fed, and (3) the LO2/RP-1 pressure fed propellant systems in terms of evolution along with design and cost factors, and other qualitative considerations. A further description is also presented of the recommended LRB standalone, core-to-orbit launch vehicle concept.

  10. Water recovery and solid waste processing for aerospace and domestic applications. Volume 1: Final report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    A comprehensive study of advanced water recovery and solid waste processing techniques employed in both aerospace and domestic or commercial applications is reported. A systems approach was used to synthesize a prototype system design of an advanced water treatment/waste processing system. Household water use characteristics were studied and modified through the use of low water use devices and a limited amount of water reuse. This modified household system was then used as a baseline system for development of several water treatment waste processing systems employing advanced techniques. A hybrid of these systems was next developed and a preliminary design was generated to define system and hardware functions.

  11. Conceptual design study of concentrator enhanced solar arrays for space applications Volume 2: Technical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Concentrator concepts which utilize Kapton mirror material were evaluated and selected for solar array use due to their zero mass. All concepts considered employed thin silicon solar cells. Design requirements for the concentrator were: the cell temperature was not to exceed 150 C; the concentrators were to produce illumination of the array within 15% of being perfectly uniform; the concentrators were to operate while misaligned as much as 5 degrees with the solar axis. Concentrator designs along with mirror structure and configurations are discussed and comparisons are made for optimal space applications.

  12. Phase 3 study of selected tether applications in space. Volume 2: Study results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Engineering designs were developed relative to a tethered launch assist from the Shuttle for payloads up to 10,000 kg mass and the tethering of a 15,000 kg science platform from the space station. These designs are used for a cost benefit analysis which assesses the feasibility of using such systems as a practical alternative to what would otherwise be accomplished by conventional means. The term conventional as related to both these applications is intended to apply to the use of some form(s) of chemical propulsion system.

  13. Sixth Annual Workshop on Space Operations Applications and Research (SOAR 1992), volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishen, Kumar (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This document contains papers presented at the Space Operations, Applications, and Research Symposium (SOAR) hosted by the U.S. Air Force (USAF) on 4-6 Aug. 1992. The symposium was cosponsored by the Air Force Material Command and by NASA/JSC. Key technical areas covered during the symposium were robotics and telepresence, automation and intelligent systems, human factors, life sciences, and space maintenance and servicing. The SOAR differed from most other conferences in that it was concerned with Government-sponsored research and development relevant to aerospace operations. Symposium proceedings include papers covering various disciplines presented by experts from NASA, the USAF, universities, and industry.

  14. Thirteenth Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion and Launch Vehicle Technology. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. W. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    This conference publication includes various abstracts and presentations given at the 13th Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion and Launch Vehicle Technology held at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center April 25-27 1995. The purpose of the workshop was to discuss experimental and computational fluid dynamic activities in rocket propulsion and launch vehicles. The workshop was an open meeting for government, industry, and academia. A broad number of topics were discussed including computational fluid dynamic methodology, liquid and solid rocket propulsion, turbomachinery, combustion, heat transfer, and grid generation.

  15. Thermal power systems, small power systems application project. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marriott, A. T.

    1979-01-01

    Current small power system technology as applied to power plants up to 10 MWe in size was assessed. Markets for small power systems were characterized and cost goals were established. Candidate power plant system design concepts were selected for evaluation and preliminary performance and cost assessments were made. Economic studies were conducted and breakeven capital costs were determined for leading contenders among the candidate systems. An application study was made of the potential use of small power systems in providing part of the demand for pumping power by the extensive aqueduct system of California, estimated to be 1000 MWe by 1985. Criteria and methodologies were developed for application to the ranking of candidate power plant system design concepts. Experimental power plants concepts of 1 MWe rating were studied leading toward the definition of a power plant configuration for subsequent detail design, construction, testing and evaluation as Engineering Experiment No. 1 (EE No. 1). Site selection criteria and ground rules for the solicitation of EE No. 1 site participation proposals by DOE were developed.

  16. Study of selected tether applications in space, phase 3, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The results of a Phase 3 study of two Selected Tether Applications in Space (STAIS); deorbit of a Shuttle and launch of an Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), both from the space station using a tether were examined. The study objectives were to: perform a preliminary engineering design, define operational scenarios, develop a common cost model, perform cost benefits analyses, and develop a Work Breakdown Structure (WBS). Key features of the performance analysis were to identify the net increases in effective Shuttle cargo capability if tethers are used to assist in the deorbit of Shuttles and the launching of the OTVs from the space station and to define deployer system designs required to accomplish these tasks. Deployer concepts were designed and discussed. Operational scenarios, including timelines, for both tethered and nontethered Shuttle and OTV operations at the space station were evaluated. A summary discussion of the Selected Tether Applications Cost Model (STACOM) and the results of the cost benefits analysis are presented. Several critical technologies needed to implement tether assisted deployment of payloads are also discussed. Conclusions and recommendations are presented.

  17. Deposition from Ultra-Low Volume Application of Public Health Insecticides in a Hot Desert Environment.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Michael L; Hoel, David F; Farooq, Muhammad; Walker, Todd W

    2015-06-01

    Three insecticides commonly used for mosquito and sand fly control were applied 30 min to 3 h after sunset during June and July 2010, at Camp Buehring, Kuwait, to determine the relative quantity of pesticides to height and distance traveled in a hot desert environment. A BVA dilution oil was used for the control. Oil-based adulticides were sprayed using a truck-mounted Curtis DynaFog Maxi-Pro 4 ultra-low volume (ULV) sprayer. Malathion (Fyfanon ULV, 96% active ingredient [AI]), resmethrin (Scourge 4+12, 4% AI), pyrethrins (ULD BP-300, 3% AI), and BVA Spray 13 (100% refined petroleum distillate) were mixed with Uvitex optical brightener fluorescent dye and applied at 2 speeds on evenings when wind speed was less than 16.1 km/h (10 mph). Collection targets using biodegradable cotton ribbons (1 m×2.5 cm) were later read with a fluorometer to quantify the amount of insecticide deposited on targets set at heights of 15.2, 76.2, and 152.4 cm (6, 30, and 60 in.) and distances of 1.5, 6.1, 15.2, 30.5, 61.0, and 91.4 m (5, 20, 50, 100, 200, and 300 ft). Mean insecticide deposition across all distances was 31% on 76.2-cm targets and 49% on 152.4-cm targets, while 15.2-cm targets typically collected <20% of test spray. Mean ground temperatures were typically within 5°C of air temperatures at 152.4 cm and within 1 to 5°C of air at 15.2 cm or 76.2 cm. Collectively, mean insecticide deposition was 80% at or above 76.2 cm for all insecticides. This finding may explain in part why control of low-flying phlebotomine sand flies with ULV insecticides has been met with less than optimal success by US military forces deployed in the Middle East. PMID:26181691

  18. NSSDC Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies for Space and Earth Science Applications, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobler, Ben (Editor); Hariharan, P. C. (Editor); Blasso, L. G. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This report contains copies of nearly all of the technical papers and viewgraphs presented at the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies for Space and Earth Science Applications. This conference served as a broad forum for the discussion of a number of important issues in the field of mass storage systems. Topics include magnetic disk and tape technologies, optical disk and tape, software storage and file management systems, and experiences with the use of a large, distributed storage system. The technical presentations describe, among other things, integrated mass storage systems that are expected to be available commercially. Also included is a series of presentations from Federal Government organizations and research institutions covering their mass storage requirements for the 1990s.

  19. Study of power management technology for orbital multi-100KWe applications. Volume 3: Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mildice, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    Mid to late 1980's power management technology needs to support development of a general purpose space platform, capable of suplying 100 to 250 KWe to a variety of users in low Earth orbit are examined. A typical, shuttle assembled and supplied space platform is illustred, along with a group of payloads which might reasonably be expected to use such a facility. Examination of platform and user power needs yields a set of power requirements used to evaluate power management options for life cycle cost effectivness. The most cost effective ac/dc and dc systems are evaluated, specifically to develop system details which lead to technology goals, including: array and transmission voltages, best frequency for ac power transmission, and advantages and disadvantages of ac and dc systems for this application. System and component requirements are compared with the state-of-the-art to identify areas where technological development is required.

  20. NSSDC Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies for Space and Earth Science Applications, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobler, Ben (Editor); Hariharan, P. C. (Editor); Blasso, L. G. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This report contains copies of nearly all of the technical papers and viewgraphs presented at the NSSDC Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies for Space and Earth Science Application. This conference served as a broad forum for the discussion of a number of important issues in the field of mass storage systems. Topics include the following: magnetic disk and tape technologies; optical disk and tape; software storage and file management systems; and experiences with the use of a large, distributed storage system. The technical presentations describe, among other things, integrated mass storage systems that are expected to be available commercially. Also included is a series of presentations from Federal Government organizations and research institutions covering their mass storage requirements for the 1990's.

  1. A study of application of remote sensing to river forecasting. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A project is described whose goal was to define, implement and evaluate a pilot demonstration test to show the practicability of applying remotely sensed data to operational river forecasting in gaged or previously ungaged watersheds. A secondary objective was to provide NASA with documentation describing the computer programs that comprise the streamflow forecasting simulation model used. A computer-based simulation model was adapted to a streamflow forecasting application and implemented in an IBM System/360 Model 44 computer, operating in a dedicated mode, with operator interactive control through a Model 2250 keyboard/graphic CRT terminal. The test site whose hydrologic behavior was simulated is a small basin (365 square kilometers) designated Town Creek near Geraldine, Alabama.

  2. LANDSAT follow-on: A report by the applications survey groups. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billingsley, F. C.; Helton, M. R.; Obrien, V. M.

    1976-01-01

    Attempts at operational usage of the LANDSAT imagery by non NASA users are studied with particular emphasis on profitable use of the imagery, as contrasted with investigations concerned with research and development of a technology. An evaluation is given of the functional capabilities of the LANDSAT follow-on and ground systems designs in terms of user requirements and desiderata for data measurements, products, and parameters. Applications survey groups (ASGs) were formed for mineral and petroleum exploration, inland water resources, land inventory, and agriculture. The members were drawn from all segments of the user community: Federal agencies, state and local governments or agencies (or from associations of such constituencies), industry and universities. They were selected so that in aggregate they would be able to adequately assess the state-of-the-art in their technical areas and represent this in the ASG deliberations.

  3. Sixth Annual Workshop on Space Operations Applications and Research (SOAR 1992), volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Krishen, K.

    1993-02-01

    This document contains papers presented at the Space Operations, Applications, and Research Symposium (SOAR) hosted by the U.S. Air Force (USAF) on 4-6 Aug. 1992. The symposium was cosponsored by the Air Force Material Command and by NASA/JSC. Key technical areas covered during the symposium were robotics and telepresence, automation and intelligent systems, human factors, life sciences, and space maintenance and servicing. The SOAR differed from most other conferences in that it was concerned with Government-sponsored research and development relevant to aerospace operations. Symposium proceedings include papers covering various disciplines presented by experts from NASA, the USAF, universities, and industry. Separate abstracts have been prepared for articles from this report.

  4. Seventh Annual Workshop on Space Operations Applications and Research (SOAR 1993), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishen, Kumar (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    This document contains papers presented at the Space Operations, Applications and Research Symposium (SOAR) Symposium hosted by NASA/Johnson Space Center (JSC) on August 3-5, 1993, and held at JSC Gilruth Recreation Center. SOAR included NASA and USAF programmatic overview, plenary session, panel discussions, panel sessions, and exhibits. It invited technical papers in support of U.S. Army, U.S. Navy, Department of Energy, NASA, and USAF programs in the following areas: robotics and telepresence, automation and intelligent systems, human factors, life support, and space maintenance and servicing. SOAR was concerned with Government-sponsored research and development relevant to aerospace operations. More than 100 technical papers, 17 exhibits, a plenary session, several panel discussions, and several keynote speeches were included in SOAR '93.

  5. End-systolic Pressure–Volume Relation, Ejection Fraction, and Heart Failure: Theoretical Aspect and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Shoucri, Rachad M

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical formalism describing the nonlinear end-systolic pressure–volume relation (ESPVR) is used to derive new indexes that can be used to assess the performance of the heart left ventricle by using the areas under the ESPVR (units of energy), the ordinates of the ESPVR (units of pressure), or from slopes of the curvilinear ESPVR. New relations between the ejection fraction (EF) and the parameters describing the ESPVR give some insight into the problem of heart failure (HF) with normal or preserved ejection fraction. Relations between percentage occurrence of HF and indexes derived from the ESPVR are also discussed. When ratios of pressures are used, calculation can be done in a noninvasive way with the possibility of interesting applications in routine clinical work. Applications to five groups of clinical data are given and discussed (normal group, aortic stenosis, aortic valvular regurgitation, mitral valvular regurgitation, miscellaneous cardiomyopathies). No one index allows a perfect segregation between all clinical groups, it is shown that appropriate use of two indexes (bivariate analysis) can lead to better separation of different clinical groups. PMID:26244035

  6. The Environment for Application Software Integration and Execution (EASIE), version 1.0. Volume 2: Program integration guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Kennie H.; Randall, Donald P.; Stallcup, Scott S.; Rowell, Lawrence F.

    1988-01-01

    The Environment for Application Software Integration and Execution, EASIE, provides a methodology and a set of software utility programs to ease the task of coordinating engineering design and analysis codes. EASIE was designed to meet the needs of conceptual design engineers that face the task of integrating many stand-alone engineering analysis programs. Using EASIE, programs are integrated through a relational data base management system. In volume 2, the use of a SYSTEM LIBRARY PROCESSOR is used to construct a DATA DICTIONARY describing all relations defined in the data base, and a TEMPLATE LIBRARY. A TEMPLATE is a description of all subsets of relations (including conditional selection criteria and sorting specifications) to be accessed as input or output for a given application. Together, these form the SYSTEM LIBRARY which is used to automatically produce the data base schema, FORTRAN subroutines to retrieve/store data from/to the data base, and instructions to a generic REVIEWER program providing review/modification of data for a given template. Automation of these functions eliminates much of the tedious, error prone work required by the usual approach to data base integration.

  7. Finite-volume application of high order ENO schemes to multi-dimensional boundary-value problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casper, Jay; Dorrepaal, J. Mark

    1990-01-01

    The finite volume approach in developing multi-dimensional, high-order accurate essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) schemes is considered. In particular, a two dimensional extension is proposed for the Euler equation of gas dynamics. This requires a spatial reconstruction operator that attains formal high order of accuracy in two dimensions by taking account of cross gradients. Given a set of cell averages in two spatial variables, polynomial interpolation of a two dimensional primitive function is employed in order to extract high-order pointwise values on cell interfaces. These points are appropriately chosen so that correspondingly high-order flux integrals are obtained through each interface by quadrature, at each point having calculated a flux contribution in an upwind fashion. The solution-in-the-small of Riemann's initial value problem (IVP) that is required for this pointwise flux computation is achieved using Roe's approximate Riemann solver. Issues to be considered in this two dimensional extension include the implementation of boundary conditions and application to general curvilinear coordinates. Results of numerical experiments are presented for qualitative and quantitative examination. These results contain the first successful application of ENO schemes to boundary value problems with solid walls.

  8. Deposition of pyrethrins and piperonyl butoxide following aerial ultra-low volume applications in the Coachella Valley, California.

    PubMed

    Lothrop, H D; Huang, H Z; Lothrop, B B; Gee, S; Gomsi, D E; Reisen, W K

    2007-06-01

    Data on adulticide deposition were collected during studies optimizing aerial ultra-low volume applications and droplet size in the desert environment of the Coachella Valley, Riverside County, California. Pyrenone 25-5 and BVA Spray 13 oil were applied by a single-engine, fixed wing aircraft equipped with 2 Micronair AU5000 atomizers. Data recorded by a portable weather station documented that weather conditions were suitable for application. Adulticide residue was collected using 24-cm-diameter filter papers positioned along 2-3 transects, with 3 positive controls held outside of the treated zone. The trace amounts of 2 major insecticidal components (pyrethrin I and II) and the synergist piperonyl butoxide (PBO) were detected from samples near the center of the spray zone by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC); pyrethrin deposition was highest at the center, 156 microg/m2, and it was not detectable 60 m beyond the center of the transect, whereas PBO deposition was 5,000 microg/m2 at the center but was not detectable beyond 150 m. Droplet diameters on spinning Teflon slides were larger than expected for the rated output of the atomizers. For these single swath trials, the lack of swath overlap due to drift resulted in low mortality in sentinel mosquitoes. Detection of residues was limited to the centroid of droplet densities on spinning glass slides and with mortality among sentinel mosquitoes, indicating HPLC may be useful in detecting postspray residues. PMID:17847856

  9. Innovative coke oven gas cleaning system for retrofit applications. Volume 1, Public design report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-24

    This Public Design Report provides, in a single document, available nonproprietary design -information for the ``Innovative Coke Oven Gas Cleaning System for Retrofit Applications`` Demonstration Project at Bethlehem Steel Corporation`s Sparrows Point, Maryland coke oven by-product facilities. This project demonstrates, for the first time in the United States, the feasibility of integrating four commercially available technologies (processes) for cleaning coke oven gas. The four technologies are: Secondary Gas Cooling, Hydrogen Sulfide and Ammonia Removal, Hydrogen Sulfide and Ammonia Recovery, and Ammonia Destruction and Sulfur Recovery. In addition to the design aspects, the history of the project and the role of the US Department of,Energy are briefly discussed. Actual plant capital and projected operating costs are also presented. An overview of the integration (retrofit) of the processes into the existing plant is presented and is followed by detailed non-proprietary descriptions of the four technologies and their overall effect on reducing the emissions of ammonia, sulfur, and other pollutants from coke oven gas. Narrative process descriptions, simplified process flow diagrams, input/output stream data, operating conditions, catalyst and chemical requirements, and utility requirements are given for each unit. Plant startup provisions, environmental considerations and control monitoring, and safety considerations are also addressed for each process.

  10. Integrated lake-watershed acidification study. Volume 1: model principles and application procedures. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.W.; Gherini, S.A.; Hudson, R.J.M.; Dean, J.D.

    1983-09-01

    The ILWAS model has been developed to simulate the biogeochemical processes occurring along the pathways which precipitation follows as it passes through the forest canopy, soil horizons, streams, bogs, and lakes. The model accepts as input precipitation quantity, precipitation quality, ambient air quality and basin properties. It calculates the volumetric flow rates and the concentrations of cations (H/sup +/, Ca/sup 2 +/, Mg/sup 2 +/, K/sup +/, Na/sup +/, and NH/sub 4//sup +/), anions (SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, NO/sub 3//sup -/, Cl/sup -/, and F/sup -/), monomeric aluminum, total inorganic carbon, and an organic acid analog throughout the lake-watershed system. The model segments heterogeneous lake-watershed systems into cascades of homogeneous compartments. Precipitation is routed through the compartments using hydraulic formulations and the principle of continuity. Alkalinity is used as a master variable; major alkalinity producing and consuming reactions are simulated. Slow reactions are presented by rate expressions; fast reactions by multiphase equilibria. Modeled processes are all formulated in terms of deterministic equations. Application of the model involves eight steps: (1) system segmentation, (2) preparation of data on lake-watershed characteristics, (3) selection of model coefficients, (4) preparation of wet and dry deposition data, (5) model calibration, (6) sensitivity analysis, (7) hypotheses testing, and (8) evaluation of management scenarios. 89 references, 36 figures, 8 tables.

  11. Application of radar for automotive collision avoidance. Volume 1: Technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenberg, C. L. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this project was research and development of an automobile collision avoidance radar system. The major finding was that the application of radar to the automobile collision avoidance problem deserves continued research even though the specific approach investigated in this effort did not perform adequately in its angle measurement capability. Additional findings were that: (1) preliminary performance requirements of a candidate radar system are not unreasonable; (2) the number and severity of traffic accidents could be reduced by using a collision avoidance radar system which observes a fairly wide (at least + or - 10 deg) field of view ahead of the vehicle; (3) the health radiation hazards of a probable radar design are not significant even when a large number of radar-equipped vehicles are considered; (4) effects of inclement weather on radar operation can be accommodated in most cases; (5) the phase monopulse radar technique as implemented demonstrated inferior angle measurement performance which warrants the recommendation of investigating alternative radar techniques; and (6) extended target and multipath effects, which presumably distort the amplitude and phase distribution across the antenna aperture, are responsible for the observed inadequate phase monopulse radar performance.

  12. Study of power management technology for orbital multi-100KWe applications. Volume 2: Study results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mildice, J. W.

    1980-07-01

    The preliminary requirements and technology advances required for cost effective space power management systems for multi-100 kilowatt requirements were identified. System requirements were defined by establishing a baseline space platform in the 250 KE KWe range and examining typical user loads and interfaces. The most critical design parameters identified for detailed analysis include: increased distribution voltages and space plasma losses, the choice between ac and dc distribution systems, shuttle servicing effects on reliability, life cycle costs, and frequency impacts to power management system and payload systems for AC transmission. The first choice for a power management system for this kind of application and size range is a hybrid ac/dc combination with the following major features: modular design and construction-sized minimum weight/life cycle cost; high voltage transmission (100 Vac RMS); medium voltage array or = 440 Vdc); resonant inversion; transformer rotary joint; high frequency power transmission line or = 20 KHz); energy storage on array side or rotary joint; fully redundant; and 10 year life with minimal replacement and repair.

  13. Applications of advanced V/STOL aircraft concepts to civil utility missions, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The suitability of advanced V/STOL aircraft to civil utility applications was assessed for offshore oil support, forest fire support, transport, and humanitarian missions. The aircraft concepts considered were a lift fan aircraft, a tilt rotor aircraft, and an advanced helicopter. All the aircraft had a design payload of 2,268 kg. (5,000 lb.) with the maximum range varying from 2,224 km. (1,800 nm) for the lift fan STOL to 1,482 km (800 nm) for the advanced helicopter. The analysis of these missions considered such factors as aircraft performance, annual utilization, initial cost, and operating cost. It is concluded that all the advanced V/STOL aircraft concepts generally performed these missions better than contemporary aircraft. The lift fan aircraft and the tilt rotor aircraft were found to be effective for the offshore oil and the forest fire support missions. The lift fan aircraft in the VTOL mode was also found to be very attractive for the executive transport mission where the passenger time value was $30/hr. or more.

  14. PUREX Storage Tunnels dangerous waste permit application. Revision 1, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    The PUREX Storage Tunnels are a mixed waste storage unit consisting of two underground railroad tunnels: Tunnel Number 1 designated 218-E-14 and Tunnel Number 2 designated 218-E-15. The two tunnels are connected by rail to the PUREX Plant and combine to provide storage space for 48 railroad cars (railcars). The PUREX Storage Tunnels provide a long-term storage location for equipment removed from the PUREX Plant. Transfers into the PUREX Storage Tunnels are made on an as-needed basis. Radioactively contaminated equipment is loaded on railcars and remotely transferred by rail into the PUREX Storage Tunnels. Railcars act as both a transport means and a storage platform for equipment placed into the tunnels. This report consists of part A and part B. Part A reports on amounts and locations of the mixed water. Part B permit application consists of the following: Facility Description and General Provisions; Waste Characteristics; Process Information; Groundwater Monitoring; Procedures to Prevent Hazards; Contingency Plan; Personnel Training; Exposure Information Report.

  15. Study of power management technology for orbital multi-100KWe applications. Volume 2: Study results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mildice, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    The preliminary requirements and technology advances required for cost effective space power management systems for multi-100 kilowatt requirements were identified. System requirements were defined by establishing a baseline space platform in the 250 KE KWe range and examining typical user loads and interfaces. The most critical design parameters identified for detailed analysis include: increased distribution voltages and space plasma losses, the choice between ac and dc distribution systems, shuttle servicing effects on reliability, life cycle costs, and frequency impacts to power management system and payload systems for AC transmission. The first choice for a power management system for this kind of application and size range is a hybrid ac/dc combination with the following major features: modular design and construction-sized minimum weight/life cycle cost; high voltage transmission (100 Vac RMS); medium voltage array or = 440 Vdc); resonant inversion; transformer rotary joint; high frequency power transmission line or = 20 KHz); energy storage on array side or rotary joint; fully redundant; and 10 year life with minimal replacement and repair.

  16. Application of matched asymptotic expansions to lunar and interplanetary trajectories. Volume 1: Technical discussion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancaster, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    Previously published asymptotic solutions for lunar and interplanetary trajectories have been modified and combined to formulate a general analytical solution to the problem on N-bodies. The earlier first-order solutions, derived by the method of matched asymptotic expansions, have been extended to second order for the purpose of obtaining increased accuracy. The derivation of the second-order solution is summarized by showing the essential steps, some in functional form. The general asymptotic solution has been used as a basis for formulating a number of analytical two-point boundary value solutions. These include earth-to-moon, one- and two-impulse moon-to-earth, and interplanetary solutions. The results show that the accuracies of the asymptotic solutions range from an order of magnitude better than conic approximations to that of numerical integration itself. Also, since no iterations are required, the asymptotic boundary value solutions are obtained in a fraction of the time required for comparable numerically integrated solutions. The subject of minimizing the second-order error is discussed, and recommendations made for further work directed toward achieving a uniform accuracy in all applications.

  17. An analysis for high speed propeller-nacelle aerodynamic performance prediction. Volume 1: Theory and application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egolf, T. Alan; Anderson, Olof L.; Edwards, David E.; Landgrebe, Anton J.

    1988-01-01

    A computer program, the Propeller Nacelle Aerodynamic Performance Prediction Analysis (PANPER), was developed for the prediction and analysis of the performance and airflow of propeller-nacelle configurations operating over a forward speed range inclusive of high speed flight typical of recent propfan designs. A propeller lifting line, wake program was combined with a compressible, viscous center body interaction program, originally developed for diffusers, to compute the propeller-nacelle flow field, blade loading distribution, propeller performance, and the nacelle forebody pressure and viscous drag distributions. The computer analysis is applicable to single and coaxial counterrotating propellers. The blade geometries can include spanwise variations in sweep, droop, taper, thickness, and airfoil section type. In the coaxial mode of operation the analysis can treat both equal and unequal blade number and rotational speeds on the propeller disks. The nacelle portion of the analysis can treat both free air and tunnel wall configurations including wall bleed. The analysis was applied to many different sets of flight conditions using selected aerodynamic modeling options. The influence of different propeller nacelle-tunnel wall configurations was studied. Comparisons with available test data for both single and coaxial propeller configurations are presented along with a discussion of the results.

  18. Evaluation of ultra low volume and thermal fog pesticide applications against Old World Phlebotomine sand fly vectors of Leishmania in Kenya

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One component of the Department of Defense (DoD) pest management system is ultra-low volume (ULV) and/or thermal fog aerosol pesticide application. Despite widespread implementations of this and other components of the system, such as use of repellents and permethrin, US military operations in hot-a...

  19. 2D wavelet-analysis-based calibration technique for flat-panel imaging detectors: application in cone beam volume CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiangyang; Ning, Ruola; Yu, Rongfeng; Conover, David L.

    1999-05-01

    The application of the newly developed flat panel x-ray imaging detector in cone beam volume CT has attracted increasing interest recently. Due to an imperfect solid state array manufacturing process, however, defective elements, gain non-uniformity and offset image unavoidably exist in all kinds of flat panel x-ray imaging detectors, which will cause severe streak and ring artifacts in a cone beam reconstruction image and severely degrade image quality. A calibration technique, in which the artifacts resulting from the defective elements, gain non-uniformity and offset image can be reduced significantly, is presented in this paper. The detection of defective elements is distinctively based upon two-dimensional (2D) wavelet analysis. Because of its inherent localizability in recognizing singularities or discontinuities, wavelet analysis possesses the capability of detecting defective elements over a rather large x-ray exposure range, e.g., 20% to approximately 60% of the dynamic range of the detector used. Three-dimensional (3D) images of a low-contrast CT phantom have been reconstructed from projection images acquired by a flat panel x-ray imaging detector with and without calibration process applied. The artifacts caused individually by defective elements, gain non-uniformity and offset image have been separated and investigated in detail, and the correlation with each other have also been exposed explicitly. The investigation is enforced by quantitative analysis of the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and the image uniformity of the cone beam reconstruction image. It has been demonstrated that the ring and streak artifacts resulting from the imperfect performance of a flat panel x-ray imaging detector can be reduced dramatically, and then the image qualities of a cone beam reconstruction image, such as contrast resolution and image uniformity are improved significantly. Furthermore, with little modification, the calibration technique presented here is also applicable

  20. Evaluation of the National School Lunch Program Application/Verification Pilot Projects: Volume II: Data Collection, Study Methods and Supplementary Tables on Certification Impacts. Nutrition Assistance Program Report Series. Report No. CN-04-AV2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burghardt, John; Gleason, Philip; Sinclair, Michael; Cohen, Rhoda; Hulsey, Lara; Milliner-Waddell, Julita

    2004-01-01

    This is Volume II of the report on the evaluation of the NSLP Application Verification Pilot Projects. It supplements Volume I, which presents the evaluation findings. Volume II has two objectives: (1) to provide a detailed description of the methods used to conduct the study; and (2) to present tabulations that supplement and extend the analyses…

  1. Mars Global Digital Dune Database (MGD3): North polar region (MC-1) distribution, applications, and volume estimates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayward, R.K.

    2011-01-01

    The Mars Global Digital Dune Database (MGD3) now extends from 90??N to 65??S. The recently released north polar portion (MC-1) of MGD3 adds ~844 000km2 of moderate- to large-size dark dunes to the previously released equatorial portion (MC-2 to MC-29) of the database. The database, available in GIS- and tabular-format in USGS Open-File Reports, makes it possible to examine global dune distribution patterns and to compare dunes with other global data sets (e.g. atmospheric models). MGD3 can also be used by researchers to identify areas suitable for more focused studies. The utility of MGD3 is demonstrated through three example applications. First, the uneven geographic distribution of the dunes is discussed and described. Second, dune-derived wind direction and its role as ground truth for atmospheric models is reviewed. Comparisons between dune-derived winds and global and mesoscale atmospheric models suggest that local topography may have an important influence on dune-forming winds. Third, the methods used here to estimate north polar dune volume are presented and these methods and estimates (1130km3 to 3250km3) are compared with those of previous researchers (1158km3 to 15 000km3). In the near future, MGD3 will be extended to include the south polar region. ?? 2011 by John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.

  2. Developing technologies for high-volume land application uses of pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) ash

    SciTech Connect

    Beeghly, J.H.; Dick, W.A.; Wolfe, W.

    1995-04-01

    Dry alkaline flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products, including Tidd PFBC bed and cyclone ash are being evaluated for beneficial uses via land application for agriculture, mine spoil reclamation, soil stabilization, and road embankment construction in a 5 year, $4.4 million research program based in Ohio. The beneficial use for agriculture and mine reclamation as a soil amendment material is primarily due to its high acid neutralizing capacity and gypsum content. Concentrations of leachate RCRA heavy metals approached primary drinking water quality standards and are well within the criteria for classification as non-toxic fly ash according to Ohio EPA policy. Characterization tests of compressive strength, permeability, and compressibility indicate the by-products are practical materials for use in high volume engineered fills or embankments, base courses, and for soil reinforcement. Large field demonstrations of technical, economic, and environmental feasibility have been completed using Tidd PFBC ash (1) to reclaim abandoned coal mineland spoil, (2) as an agricultural lime substitute, (3) in stabilized base construction for a cattle feedlot, and (4) for reconstruction of two state highway embankments. An important factor to understand the behavior of this Tidd PFBC residue is that dolomite was the sorbent.

  3. High volume molecular genetic identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms using Genetic Bit Analysis Application to human genetic diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce-Jacino, M.T.; Reynolds, J.; Nikiforov, T.

    1994-09-01

    The most common type of genetic disease-associated mutation is the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Because most genetic diseases can be caused by multiple SNPs in the same gene, effective routine diagnosis of complex genetic diseases is dependent on a simple and reliable method of interrogating SNP sites. Molecular Tool`s solid phase assay capable of direct genotyping (single base sequencing) of SNP sites, Genetic Bit Analysis (GBA), involves hybridization-capture of a single-stranded PCR product to a sequence-specific, microtiter plate-bound oligonucleotide primer. The captured PCR product then acts as template for single-base extension of the capture primer across the polymorphic site, enabling direct determination of the base composition of the polymorphism through a simple colormetric assay. Genotyping in a high volume, semi-automated, processing system with a current capacity of 100 SNP interrogations per technician per day enables the screening of candidate mutations rapidly and cost-effectively, critically important to comprehensive genetic diagnosis. Using this gel-free technology, we have developed prototype diagnostic tests for CFTR and ApoE polymorphisms which enable direct sequencing of the polymorphic base at each site of interest. Routine clinical diagnosis of genetically complex diseases such as cystic fibrosis is dependent on this combination of robust biochemistry and simple format. Additionally, the ability to transfer the format and biochemistry to any disease gene of interest enables the broad application of this technology to clinical diagnostics, especially for genetically complex diseases.

  4. Advances in Chemical Physics, Volume 130, 2-Volume Set, Geometric Structures of Phase Space in Multi-Dimensional Chaos: Applications to Chemical Reaction Dynamics in Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Stuart A.; Toda, Mikito; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki; Konishi, Tetsuro; Berry, R. Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Edited by Nobel Prize winner Ilya Prigogine and renowned authority Stuart A. Rice, the Advances in Chemical Physics series provides a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations in every area of the discipline. In a format that encourages the expression of individual points of view, experts in the field present comprehensive analyses of subjects of interest. Advances in Chemical Physics remains the premier venue for presentations of new findings in its field. Volume 130 consists of three parts including: Part I: Phase Space Geometry of Multi-dimensional Dynamical Systems and Reaction Processes Part II Complex Dynamical Behavior in Clusters and Proteins, and Data Mining to Extract Information on Dynamics Part III New directions in Multi-Dimensional Chaos and Evolutionary Reactions

  5. Technical issues associated with in situ vitrification of the INEL Subsurface Disposal Area. Volume 3, Application of technical issues to the TRU-contaminated pits and trenches

    SciTech Connect

    Stoots, C.M.; Bates, S.O.; Callow, R.A.; Campbell, K.A.; Farnsworth, R.K.; Krisman, G.K.; McKellar, M.G.; Nickelson, D.F.; Slater, C.E.

    1992-07-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) has been identified as an alternative technology for remediation of the acid pit and transuranic pits and trenches (TRU-PTs) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). However, a number of technical issues must be resolved before ISV can be considered applicable to these waste sites. To assist in the ISV technology evaluation, an ISV Steering Committee was formed to identify, prioritize, and develop closure roadmaps for technical issues lated with ISV application at the SDA. The activities of the ISV Steering Committee are summarized in a three-volume report. Volume I identifies the systematic approach used to identify and prioritize the ISV technical issues and briefly discusses the methodology that will be employed to resolve these issues. Volumes 2 and 3 discuss each technical issue in greater detail and suggest specific closure roadmaps to be used in resolving technical issues associated with ISV at the SDA Acid Pit and TRU-PTS, respectively. The three-volume report is a working document that will be updated as necessary to reflect current evaluation strategy for the ISV technology. This is Volume 3.

  6. Influence of liquid-volume and airflow rates on spray application quality and homogeneity in super-intensive olive tree canopies.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Fuentes, Antonio; Rodríguez-Lizana, Antonio; Gil, Emilio; Agüera-Vega, J; Gil-Ribes, Jesús A

    2015-12-15

    Olive is a key crop in Europe, especially in countries around the Mediterranean Basin. Optimising the parameters of a spray is essential for sustainable pesticide use, especially in high-input systems, such as the super-intensive hedgerow system. Parameters may be optimised by adjusting the applied volume and airflow rate of sprays, in addition to the liquid to air proportion and the relationship between air velocity and airflow rate. Two spray experiments using a commercial airblast sprayer were conducted in a super-intensive orchard to study how varying the liquid volume rate (testing volumes of 182, 619, and 1603 l ha(-1)) and volumetric airflow rate (with flow rates of 11.93, 8.90, and 6.15 m(3) s(-1)) influences the coverage parameters and the amount and distribution of deposits in different zones of the canopy.. Our results showed that an increase in the application volume raised the mean deposit and percentage coverage, but decreased the application efficiency, spray penetration, and deposit homogeneity. Furthermore, we found that the volumetric airflow rate had a lower influence on the studied parameters than the liquid volume; however, an increase in the airflow rate improved the application efficiency and homogeneity to a certain threshold, after which the spray quality decreased. This decrease was observed in the high-flow treatment. Our results demonstrate that intermediate liquid volume rates and volumetric airflow rates are required for the optimal spraying of pesticides on super-intensive olive crops, and would reduce current pollution levels. PMID:26282759

  7. Permanent lesion of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve after low-volume ethanol 96%application on the lumbar sympathetic chain.

    PubMed

    Pennekamp, Werner; Krumova, Elena K; Feigl, Georg Pd; Frombach, Elke; Nicolas, Volkmar; Schwarzer, Andreas; Maier, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Lumbar sympathetic blocks and chemical sympathectomies are used for the pain treatment of peripheral arterial occlusive disease or sympathetically maintained pain syndrome after nerve injury or complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). A 30-year-old patient was referred to the pain department with all the clinical signs and symptoms of a CRPS of the right foot one and a half years after being surgically treated for rupture of the achilles tendon. An inpatient admission was necessary due to insufficient pain reduction upon the current treatment, strong allodynia in the medial distal right lower leg and decreased load-bearing capacity of the right foot. A computed tomography (CT)-guided lumbar sympathetic block at the right L3 (Bupivacaine 0.5%, 4 mL) led to a skin temperature increase from 21° C before block to > 34° C for about 5 hours after the intervention. The patient experienced significant pain relief, indicating sympathetically maintained pain. Thus, we performed a CT-guided lumbar sympathetic neurolysis at the same level (ethanol 96%, 2 mL) 5 days later, achieving again a significant skin temperature increase of the right foot and a slight reduction of his pain intensity from numeric rating scale (NRS) 7 prior to the intervention to NRS 4 after 8 hours (NRS, 0 = no pain, 10 = strongest pain imaginable). Eight months later a repeated inpatient admission was necessary due to considerable pain relapse and decreased load-bearing capacity of his right foot. A CT-guided lumbar sympathetic neurolysis was repeated at the L4 level on the right side and was successful, inducing a significant skin temperature increase. Despite a temporary irritation of the genitofemoral nerve 8 hours after the intervention, a delayed irritation of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve occurred. This was a long-lasting lesion of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve following a CT-guided chemical sympathectomy with a low-volume ethanol 96% application - a complication which has not been

  8. Application of ultradisperse magnetic adsorbents for removal of small concentrations of pollutants from large volumes of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechitailo, Galina S.; Kuznetsov, Anatoli; Kuznetsov, Oleg

    2016-07-01

    with the adsorbed toluidine blue were removed from the solution by magnetic separation. The sorbent was proven to have high sorption capacity and rapid adsorption kinetics for toluidine blue. These experiments demonstrated the validity of the method, where a small concentration of a pollutant was successfully collected from a large volume of water. By varying the ratio of the sorbent/pollutant, it is possible to optimize the sorbent use and the time required to adsorb all pollutant present in the treated water. A variety of magnetically controlled sorbents can be designed and used in this method, from broad-spectrum adsorbing sorbents to sorbents specifically targeting a particular pollutant. These sorbents can be used either individually or as mixtures of sorbents with different properties, depending on the desired purification goals. Simplicity and scalability of this method allow a variety of ecological applications, as well as industrial ones, from process water purification to wastewater treatment.

  9. Energy use and conservation in the commercial sector: Volume 2, An application of the NBECS (Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey) commercial conditional demand model to a test case utility, San Diego Gas and Electric Company: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Parti, M.; Sebald, A.V.; Farber, M.

    1988-02-01

    This report describes an investigation into the application of an enhanced conditional demand analysis (CDA) technique to the estimation and forecasting of commercial sector energy demand. The report consists of two volumes. This volume, the second, describes the application of the technique to a particular utility service area. 5 refs., 4 figs., 27 tabs.

  10. An Industrial Perspective of CAM/ROB Fuzzy Integrated Postprocessing Implementation for Redundant Robotic Workcells Applicability for Big Volume Prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés, J.; Gracia, L.; Tornero, J.; García, J. A.; González, F.

    2009-11-01

    The implementation of a postprocessor for the NX™ platform (Siemens Corp.) is described in this paper. It is focused on a milling redundant robotic milling workcell consisting of one KUKA KR 15/2 manipulator (6 rotary joints, KRC2 controller) mounted on a linear axis and synchronized with a rotary table (i.e., two additional joints). For carrying out a milling task, a choice among a set of possible configurations is required, taking into account the ability to avoid singular configurations by using both additional joints. Usually, experience and knowledge of the workman allow an efficient control in these cases, but being it a tedious job. Similarly to this expert knowledge, a stand-alone fuzzy controller has been programmed with Matlab's Fuzzy Logic Toolbox (The MathWorks, Inc.). Two C++ programs complement the translation of the toolpath tracking (expressed in the Cartesian space) from the NX™-CAM module into KRL (KUKA Robot Language). In order to avoid singularities or joint limits, the location of the robot and the workpiece during the execution of the task is fit after an inverse kinematics position analysis and a fuzzy inference (i.e., fuzzy criterion in the Joint Space). Additionally, the applicability of robot arms for the manufacture of big volume prototypes with this technique is proven by means of one case studied. It consists of a big orographic model to simulate floodways, return flows and retention storage of a reservoir in the Mijares river (Puebla de Arenoso, Spain). This article deals with the problem for a constant tool orientation milling process and sets the technological basis for future research at five axis milling operations.

  11. Higher-order conservative interpolation between control-volume meshes: Application to advection and multiphase flow problems with dynamic mesh adaptivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, A.; Pavlidis, D.; Percival, J. R.; Salinas, P.; Xie, Z.; Fang, F.; Pain, C. C.; Muggeridge, A. H.; Jackson, M. D.

    2016-09-01

    A general, higher-order, conservative and bounded interpolation for the dynamic and adaptive meshing of control-volume fields dual to continuous and discontinuous finite element representations is presented. Existing techniques such as node-wise interpolation are not conservative and do not readily generalise to discontinuous fields, whilst conservative methods such as Grandy interpolation are often too diffusive. The new method uses control-volume Galerkin projection to interpolate between control-volume fields. Bounded solutions are ensured by using a post-interpolation diffusive correction. Example applications of the method to interface capturing during advection and also to the modelling of multiphase porous media flow are presented to demonstrate the generality and robustness of the approach.

  12. Relationship Between LIBS Ablation and Pit Volume for Geologic Samples: Applications for the In Situ Absolute Geochronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devismes, Damien; Cohen, Barbara; Miller, J.-S.; Gillot, P.-Y.; Lefevre, J.-C.; Boukari, C.

    2014-01-01

    These first results demonstrate that LIBS spectra can be an interesting tool to estimate the ablated volume. When the ablated volume is bigger than 9.10(exp 6) cubic micrometers, this method has less than 10% of uncertainties. Far enough to be directly implemented in the KArLE experiment protocol. Nevertheless, depending on the samples and their mean grain size, the difficulty to have homogeneous spectra will increase with the ablated volume. Several K-Ar dating studies based on this approach will be implemented. After that, the results will be shown and discussed.

  13. Technical issues associated with in situ vitrification of the INEL Subsurface Disposal Area. Volume 2, Application of technical issues to the Acid Pit

    SciTech Connect

    Stoots, C.M.; Bates, S.O.; Callow, R.A.; Campbell, K.A.; Farnsworth, R.K.; Gratson, G.K.; McKellar, M.G.; Nickelson, D.F.; Slater, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) has been identified as an alternative technology for remediation of the Acid Pit and Transuranic Pits and Trenches (TRU-PTs) that are present at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). However, a number of technical issues exist that must be resolved before ISV can be considered applicable to these waste sites. To assist in the ISV technology evaluation, an ISV Steering Committee was formed to identify, prioritize, and develop closure roadmaps for technical issues associated with ISV application at the INEL SDA. The activities of the ISV Steering Committee are summarized in three volumes of this report. Volume 1 identifies the systematic approach used to identify and prioritize the ISV technical issues, and briefly discusses the methodology that will be employed to resolve these issues. This document Volume 2 and Volume 3 discusses each technical issue in greater detail and suggest specific closure roadmaps to be used in resolving technical issues associated with ISV at the SDA Acid Pit and TRU-PTs, respectively.

  14. VIPRE (Versatile Internals and Component Program for Reactors; EPRI)-01: A thermal-hydraulic code for reactor cores: Volume 4, Applications: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cuta, J.M.; Stewart, C.W.; Koontz, A.S.; Montgomery, S.D.

    1987-04-01

    VIPRE (Versatile Internals and Component Program for Reactors; EPRI) has been developed for nuclear power utility thermal-hydraulic analysis applications. It is designed to help evaluate nuclear reactor core safety limits including minimum departure from nucleate boiling ratio (MDNBR), critical power ratio (CPR), fuel and clad temperatures, and coolant state in normal operation and assumed accident conditions. This volume (Volume 4: Applications) contains extensive comparisons of VIPRE calculations to experimental data. There are also sensitivity studies and evaluations of code numerical and computational performance. In addition, calculations performed by member utilities using VIPRE for comparisons with transient CHF data, and FSAR plant analyses are presented. Comparisons are also presented of plant thermal-hydraulic calculations with VIPRE and other COBRA codes. These calculations demonstrate the suitability of VIPRE for PWR core thermal-hydraulic analysis.

  15. Application of 3D Scanned Imaging Methodology for Volume, Surface Area, and Envelope Density Evaluation of Densified Biomass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measurement of surface area, volume, and density is an essential for quantifying, evaluating, and designing the biomass densification, storage, and transport operations. Acquiring accurate and repeated measurements of these parameters for hygroscopic densified biomass are not straightforward and on...

  16. Cell volume measured by total internal reflection microfluorimetry: application to water and solute transport in cells transfected with water channel homologs.

    PubMed Central

    Farinas, J; Simanek, V; Verkman, A S

    1995-01-01

    Total internal reflection (TIR) microfluorimetry was established as a method to measure continuously the volume of adherent cells and applied to measure membrane permeabilities in cells transfected with water channel homologs. Cytosol was labeled with the membrane-impermeant fluorophore calcein. Fluorescence was excited by the TIR evanescent field in a thin section of cytosol (approximately 150 nm) adjacent to the cell-substrate interface. Because cytosolic fluorophore number per cell remains constant, the TIR fluorescence signal should be inversely related to cell volume. For small volume changes in Sf-9 and LLC-PK1 cells, relative TIR fluorescence was nearly equal to inverse relative cell volume; deviations from the ideal were modeled theoretically. To measure plasma membrane osmotic water permeability, Pf, the time course of osmotically induced cell volume change was inferred from the TIR fluorescence signal. LLC-PK1 cells expressing the CHIP28 water channel had an HgCl2-sensitive, threefold increase in Pf compared to nontransfected cells (Pf = 0.0043 cm/s at 10 degrees C). Solute permeability was measured from the TIR fluorescence time course in response to solute gradients. Glycerol permeability in Sf-9 cells expressing the water channel homolog GLIP was (1.3 +/- 0.2) x 10(-5) cm/s (22 degrees C), greater than that of (0.36 +/- 0.04) x 10(-5) cm/s (n = 4, p < 0.05) for control cells, indicating functional expression of GLIP. Water and urea permeabilities were similar in GLIP-expressing and control cells. The TIR method should be applicable to the study of water and solute permeabilities and cell volume regulation in cells of arbitrary shape and size. Images FIGURE 4 PMID:7540430

  17. Experimental applications for the MARK-1 and MARK-1A pulsed ionizing radiation detection systems. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Harker, Y.D.; Lawrence, R.S.; Yoon, W.Y.; Lones, J.L.

    1993-12-01

    This report is the third volume in a three volume set describing the MARK series of pulsed ionizing radiation detection systems. This volume describes the MARK-1A detection system, compares it with the MARK-1 system, and describes the experimental testing of the detection systems. Volume 1 of this set presents the technical specifications for the MARK-1 detection system. Volume 2 is an operations manual specifically for the MARK-1 system, but it generally applies to the MARK-1A system as well. These detection systems operate remotely and detect photon radiation from a single or a multiple pulsed source. They contain multiple detector (eight in the MARK-1 and ten in the MARK-1A) for determination of does and incident photon effective energy. The multiple detector arrangement, having different detector sizes and shield thicknesses, provides the capability of determining the effective photon energy of the radiation spectrum. Dose measurements using these units are consistent with TLD measurements. The detection range is from 3 nanorads to 90 microrads per source burst; the response is linear over that range. Three units were built and are ready for field deployment.

  18. Fast software-based volume rendering using multimedia instructions on PC platforms and its application to virtual endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kensaku; Suenaga, Yasuhito; Toriwaki, Jun-ichiro

    2003-05-01

    This paper describes a software-based fast volume rendering (VolR) method on a PC platform by using multimedia instructions, such as SIMD instructions, which are currently available in PCs' CPUs. This method achieves fast rendering speed through highly optimizing software rather than an improved rendering algorithm. In volume rendering using a ray casting method, the system requires fast execution of the following processes: (a) interpolation of voxel or color values at sample points, (b) computation of normal vectors (gray-level gradient vectors), (c) calculation of shaded values obtained by dot-products of normal vectors and light source direction vectors, (d) memory access to a huge area, and (e) efficient ray skipping at translucent regions. The proposed software implements these fundamental processes in volume rending by using special instruction sets for multimedia processing. The proposed software can generate virtual endoscopic images of a 3-D volume of 512x512x489 voxel size by volume rendering with perspective projection, specular reflection, and on-the-fly normal vector computation on a conventional PC without any special hardware at thirteen frames per second. Semi-translucent display is also possible.

  19. Applicability of ultrasonic testing for the determination of volume fraction of particulates in alumina-reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, C.K.; Fang, R.L.; Weng, W.P.; Chuang, T.H.

    1999-10-01

    An ultrasonic testing technique was employed to determine the volume fraction of alumina particulate reinforcement in 6061 aluminum matrix composites. this study was performed on various composites with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nominal volume fractions of 10, 15, and 20%. For comparison, other techniques were employed as well, including the Archimedes method, metallographic image analysis, X-ray diffraction, and acid dissolution. Observations indicated that ultrasonic testing and acid dissolution methods are more reliable than the other techniques, while ultrasonic testing is faster than the acid dissolution method.

  20. Application of taxonomy theory, Volume 1: Computing a Hopf bifurcation-related segment of the feasibility boundary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zaborszky, J.; Venkatasubramanian, V.

    1995-10-01

    Taxonomy Theory is the first precise comprehensive theory for large power system dynamics modeled in any detail. The motivation for this project is to show that it can be used, practically, for analyzing a disturbance that actually occurred on a large system, which affected a sizable portion of the Midwest with supercritical Hopf type oscillations. This event is well documented and studied. The report first summarizes Taxonomy Theory with an engineering flavor. Then various computational approaches are sighted and analyzed for desirability to use with Taxonomy Theory. Then working equations are developed for computing a segment of the feasibility boundary that bounds the region of (operating) parameters throughout which the operating point can be moved without losing stability. Then experimental software incorporating large EPRI software packages PSAPAC is developed. After a summary of the events during the subject disturbance, numerous large scale computations, up to 7600 buses, are reported. These results are reduced into graphical and tabular forms, which then are analyzed and discussed. The report is divided into two volumes. This volume illustrates the use of the Taxonomy Theory for computing the feasibility boundary and presents evidence that the event indeed led to a Hopf type oscillation on the system. Furthermore it proves that the Feasibility Theory can indeed be used for practical computation work with very large systems. Volume 2, a separate volume, will show that the disturbance has led to a supercritical (that is stable oscillation) Hopf bifurcation.

  1. EFFECTS OF GROUND ULV (ULTRA-LOW VOLUME) APPLICATIONS OF FENTHION ON ESTUARINE BIOTA. 2. ANALYTICAL METHODS AND RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods of analyses were validated for quantitating fenthion residues in samples from two salt marsh sites subjected to ground ultra-low volume sprays. Concentrations of these residues were followed from the water's surface, through the water column and onto the sediment. For all...

  2. New municipal solid waste processing technology reduces volume and provides beneficial reuse applications for soil improvement and dust control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A garbage-processing technology has been developed that shreds, sterilizes, and separates inorganic and organic components of municipal solid waste. The technology not only greatly reduces waste volume, but the non-composted byproduct of this process, Fluff®, has the potential to be utilized as a s...

  3. Spatial and temporal single-cell volume estimation by a fluorescence imaging technique with application to astrocytes in primary culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatibi, Siamak; Allansson, Louise; Gustavsson, Tomas; Blomstrand, Fredrik; Hansson, Elisabeth; Olsson, Torsten

    1999-05-01

    Cell volume changes are often associated with important physiological and pathological processes in the cell. These changes may be the means by which the cell interacts with its surrounding. Astroglial cells change their volume and shape under several circumstances that affect the central nervous system. Following an incidence of brain damage, such as a stroke or a traumatic brain injury, one of the first events seen is swelling of the astroglial cells. In order to study this and other similar phenomena, it is desirable to develop technical instrumentation and analysis methods capable of detecting and characterizing dynamic cell shape changes in a quantitative and robust way. We have developed a technique to monitor and to quantify the spatial and temporal volume changes in a single cell in primary culture. The technique is based on two- and three-dimensional fluorescence imaging. The temporal information is obtained from a sequence of microscope images, which are analyzed in real time. The spatial data is collected in a sequence of images from the microscope, which is automatically focused up and down through the specimen. The analysis of spatial data is performed off-line and consists of photobleaching compensation, focus restoration, filtering, segmentation and spatial volume estimation.

  4. Estimation of the Cultured Cells’ Volume and Surface Area: Application of Stereological Methods on Vero Cells Infected by Rubella Virus

    PubMed Central

    Noorafshan, Ali; Motamedifar, Mohammad; Karbalay-Doust, Saied

    2016-01-01

    Background: Morphological changes of the cells infected with rubella virus cannot be observed easily. Estimation of the size of the cultured cells can be a valuable parameter in this condition. This study was conducted to find answers to the following questions: How much time after infection with rubella virus, the volume and surface area of the Vero cells and their nuclei get started to change?How is it possible to apply stereological methods to estimate the volume and surface area of the cultured cells using the invariator, nucleator, and surfactor techniques? Methods: The cultured Vero cells were infected with rubella virus. The cells of the control and experimental groups were harvested at 2, 4, 8, 24, and 48 hours following the incubation period. The cells were processed and embedded in paraffin. Invariator, nucleator, and surfactor were applied to estimate the size of the Vero cells and their nuclei. Results: The cell volume was decreased by 15-24%, 48 hours after the infection in comparison to the non-infected cells. Besides, the cell surface area was decreased by 13%, 48 hours after the infection. However, no changes were detected in the nuclei. The values of the standard deviation and coefficient of variation of the cells, estimated by invariator, were lower compared to those measured by the nucleator or surfactor. Conclusion: In this study, the volume and surface area of the Vero cells were reduced by rubella virus 48 hours after infection. Invariator is a more precise method compared to nucleator or surfactor. PMID:26722143

  5. NASA Historical Data Book. Volume 6; NASA Space Applications, Aeronautics and Space Research and Technology, Tracking and Data Acquisition/Support Operations, Commercial Programs and

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumerman, Judy A.

    2000-01-01

    This sixth volume of the NASA Historical Data Book is a continuation of those earlier efforts. This fundamental reference tool presents information, much of it statistical, documenting the development of several critical areas of NASA responsibility for the period between 1979 and 1988. This volume includes detailed information on the space applications effort, the development and operation of aeronautics and space research and technology programs, tracking and data acquisition/space operations, commercial programs, facilities and installations, personnel, and finances and procurement during this era. Special thanks are owed to the student research assistants who gathered and input much of the tabular material-a particularly tedious undertaking. There are numerous people at NASA associated with historical study, technical information, and the mechanics of publishing who helped in myriad ways in the preparation of this historical data book.

  6. BEDVH--A method for evaluating biologically effective dose volume histograms: Application to eye plaque brachytherapy implants

    SciTech Connect

    Gagne, Nolan L.; Leonard, Kara L.; Huber, Kathryn E.; Mignano, John E.; Duker, Jay S.; Laver, Nora V.; Rivard, Mark J.

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: A method is introduced to examine the influence of implant duration T, radionuclide, and radiobiological parameters on the biologically effective dose (BED) throughout the entire volume of regions of interest for episcleral brachytherapy using available radionuclides. This method is employed to evaluate a particular eye plaque brachytherapy implant in a radiobiological context. Methods: A reference eye geometry and 16 mm COMS eye plaque loaded with {sup 103}Pd, {sup 125}I, or {sup 131}Cs sources were examined with dose distributions accounting for plaque heterogeneities. For a standardized 7 day implant, doses to 90% of the tumor volume ( {sub TUMOR}D{sub 90}) and 10% of the organ at risk volumes ( {sub OAR}D{sub 10}) were calculated. The BED equation from Dale and Jones and published {alpha}/{beta} and {mu} parameters were incorporated with dose volume histograms (DVHs) for various T values such as T = 7 days (i.e., {sub TUMOR} {sup 7}BED{sub 10} and {sub OAR} {sup 7}BED{sub 10}). By calculating BED throughout the volumes, biologically effective dose volume histograms (BEDVHs) were developed for tumor and OARs. Influence of T, radionuclide choice, and radiobiological parameters on {sub TUMOR}BEDVH and {sub OAR}BEDVH were examined. The nominal dose was scaled for shorter implants to achieve biological equivalence. Results: {sub TUMOR}D{sub 90} values were 102, 112, and 110 Gy for {sup 103}Pd, {sup 125}I, and {sup 131}Cs, respectively. Corresponding {sub TUMOR} {sup 7}BED{sub 10} values were 124, 140, and 138 Gy, respectively. As T decreased from 7 to 0.01 days, the isobiologically effective prescription dose decreased by a factor of three. As expected, {sub TUMOR} {sup 7}BEDVH did not significantly change as a function of radionuclide half-life but varied by 10% due to radionuclide dose distribution. Variations in reported radiobiological parameters caused {sub TUMOR} {sup 7}BED{sub 10} to deviate by up to 46%. Over the range of {sub OAR

  7. Determining the representative volume element size for three-dimensional microstructural material characterization. Part 2: Application to experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, William M.; Chiu, Wilson K. S.

    2015-05-01

    Improved microstructural imaging and characterization methods have recently opened the door for quantitative evaluation of microstructures of such functional materials as solid oxide fuel cell and battery electrodes and composite gas separation membranes. Accurate quantitative characterization of these structures relies on the concept of a representative volume element (RVE) to provide a sufficiently large sample to be statistically representative of the material. In Part 1 of this work, several models were described to determine the RVE size for several common microstructural properties: volume fraction, particle size, and network contiguity. In this work, extensive synchrotron X-ray nanotomography imaging of a multiphase composite gas separation membrane is used to provide an experimental comparison to the model predictions. Results suggest that the models provide a reasonable estimate of RVE size, and can serve as a starting point for researchers planning imaging and characterization experiments.

  8. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 6, Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    This volume contains Appendix D2, engineering design basis reports. Contents include: Design considerations for the waste hoist of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP); A site-specific study of wind and tornado probabilities at the WIPP Site in southeast New Mexico; Seismic evaluation report of underground facilities; and calculations for analysis of wind loads and tornado loads for WHB, seismic calculations, calculations for VOC-10 monitoring system, and for shaft at station A.

  9. GASP cloud- and particle-encounter statistics and their application to LFC aircraft studies. Volume 2: Appendixes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasperson, W. H.; Nastron, G. D.; Davis, R. E.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    Summary studies are presented for the entire cloud observation archive from the NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP). Studies are also presented for GASP particle-concentration data gathered concurrently with the cloud observations. Cloud encounters are shown on about 15 percent of the data samples overall, but the probability of cloud encounter is shown to vary significantly with altitude, latitude, and distance from the tropopause. Several meteorological circulation features are apparent in the latitudinal distribution of cloud cover, and the cloud-encounter statistics are shown to be consistent with the classical mid-latitude cyclone model. Observations of clouds spaced more closely than 90 minutes are shown to be statistically dependent. The statistics for cloud and particle encounter are utilized to estimate the frequency of cloud encounter on long-range airline routes, and to assess the probability and extent of laminaar flow loss due to cloud or particle encounter by aircraft utilizing laminar flow control (LFC). It is shown that the probability of extended cloud encounter is too low, of itself, to make LFC impractical. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the narrative, analysis, and conclusions. Volume II contains five supporting appendixes.

  10. Application of Hollow Fiber Forward Osmosis Membranes for Produced and Process Water Volume Reduction: An Osmotic Concentration Process.

    PubMed

    Minier-Matar, Joel; Santos, Ana; Hussain, Altaf; Janson, Arnold; Wang, Rong; Fane, Anthony G; Adham, Samer

    2016-06-01

    Produced and process water (PPW) from oil and gas operations, specifically in Qatar, are disposed of by deep well injection in onshore facilities. Disposing large volumes of PPW may affect deep well formation sustainability highlighting the need for effective PPW management. Forward osmosis (FO) was applied as an "osmotic concentration" process to reduce PPW injection volumes by 50% using brines and seawater as draw solutions (DS). The energy intensive step of restoring the salinity of the DS was eliminated; the diluted DS would be simply discharged to the ocean. Both hollow fiber and flat sheet FO membranes were tested and the former exhibited better flux and rejection; they are the focus of this study. Optimization experiments, conducted using Box-Behnken statistical design, confirmed that temperature and DS concentration had a substantial effect on performance. To validate the concept, a long-term experiment, under optimized conditions, was conducted with PPW as feed and brine from thermal desalination plant as DS which yielded an average flux of 24 L/m(2)h. The results confirmed that low-energy osmotic concentration FO has the potential for full-scale implementation to reduce PPW injection volumes. Pilot testing opportunities are being evaluated to demonstrate the effectiveness of this technology under field conditions. PMID:27161935

  11. An unstructured-grid finite-volume surface wave model (FVCOM-SWAVE): Implementation, validations and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Jianhua; Chen, Changsheng; Beardsley, Robert C.; Perrie, Will; Cowles, Geoffrey W.; Lai, Zhigang

    The structured-grid surface wave model SWAN (Simulating Waves Nearshore) has been converted into an unstructured-grid finite-volume version (hereafter referred to as FVCOM-SWAVE) for use in coastal ocean regions with complex irregular geometry. The implementation is made using the Flux-Corrected Transport (FCT) algorithm in frequency space, the implicit Crank-Nicolson method in directional space and options of explicit or implicit second-order upwind finite-volume schemes in geographic space. FVCOM-SWAVE is validated using four idealized benchmark test problems with emphasis on numerical dispersion, wave-current interactions, wave propagation over a varying-bathymetry shallow water region, and the basic wave grow curves. Results demonstrate that in the rectangular geometric domain, the second-order finite-volume method used in FVCOM-SWAVE has the same accuracy as the third-order finite-difference method used in SWAN. FVCOM-SWAVE was then applied to simulate wind-induced surface waves on the US northeast shelf with a central focus in the Gulf of Maine and New England Shelf. Through improved geometric fitting of the complex irregular coastline, FVCOM-SWAVE was able to robustly capture the spatial and temporal variation of surface waves in both deep and shallow regions along the US northeast coast.

  12. Proceedings of the Eleventh International Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment, volume 2. [application and processing of remotely sensed data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Application and processing of remotely sensed data are discussed. Areas of application include: pollution monitoring, water quality, land use, marine resources, ocean surface properties, and agriculture. Image processing and scene analysis are described along with automated photointerpretation and classification techniques. Data from infrared and multispectral band scanners onboard LANDSAT satellites are emphasized.

  13. Validation of Student and Parent Reported Data on the Basic Grant Application Form. Final Report. Volume VI, Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applied Management Sciences, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    Objectives and findings of the Basic Grant Validation Study, which investigated the validity of information provided by applicants to the Basic Educational Opportunity Grant (BEOG) program, are described. Implications of the findings for financial aid application validation are also discussed. Seven separate studies were conducted in order to:…

  14. Multiphase flow modelling using non orthogonal collocated finite volumes : application to fluid catalytical cracking and large scale geophysical flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R. M.; Nicolas, A. N.

    2003-04-01

    A modeling approach of gas solid flow, taking into account different physical phenomena such as gas turbulence and inter-particle interactions is presented. Moment transport equations are derived for the second order fluctuating velocity tensor which allow to involve practical closures based on single phase turbulence modeling on one hand and kinetic theory of granular media on the other hand. The model is applied to fluid catalytic cracking processes and explosive volcanism. In the industry as well as in the geophysical community, multiphase flows are modeled using a finite volume approach and a multicorrector algorithm in time in order to determine implicitly the pressures, velocities and volume fractions for each phase. Pressures, and velocities are generally determined at mid-half mesh step from each other following the staggered grid approach. This ensures stability and prevents oscillations in pressure. It allows to treat almost all the Reynolds number ranges for all speeds and viscosities. The disadvantages appear when we want to treat more complex geometries or if a generalized curvilinear formulation of the conservation equations is considered. Too many interpolations have to be done and accuracy is then lost. In order to overcome these problems, we use here a similar algorithm in time and a Rhie and Chow interpolation (1983) of the collocated variables and essentially the velocities at the interface. The Rhie and Chow interpolation of the velocities at the finite volume interfaces allows to have no oscillations of the pressure without checkerboard effects and to stabilize all the algorithm. In a first predictor step, fluxes at the interfaces of the finite volumes are then computed using 2nd and 3rd order shock capturing schemes of MUSCL/TVD or Van Leer type, and the orthogonal stress components are treated implicitly while cross viscous/diffusion terms are treated explicitly. Pentadiagonal linear systems are solved in each geometrical direction (the so

  15. High-resolution neutron protein crystallography with radically small crystal volumes: application of perdeuteration to human aldose reductase.

    PubMed

    Hazemann, I; Dauvergne, M T; Blakeley, M P; Meilleur, F; Haertlein, M; Van Dorsselaer, A; Mitschler, A; Myles, D A A; Podjarny, A

    2005-10-01

    Neutron diffraction data have been collected to 2.2 Angstrom resolution from a small (0.15 mm(3)) crystal of perdeuterated human aldose reductase (h-AR; MW = 36 kDa) in order to help to determine the protonation state of the enzyme. h-AR belongs to the aldo-keto reductase family and is implicated in diabetic complications. Its ternary complexes (h-AR-coenzyme NADPH-selected inhibitor) provide a good model to study both the enzymatic mechanism and inhibition. Here, the successful production of fully deuterated human aldose reductase [h-AR(D)], subsequent crystallization of the ternary complex h-AR(D)-NADPH-IDD594 and neutron Laue data collection at the LADI instrument at ILL using a crystal volume of just 0.15 mm(3) are reported. Neutron data were recorded to 2 Angstrom resolution, with subsequent data analysis using data to 2.2 Angstrom. This is the first fully deuterated enzyme of this size (36 kDa) to be solved by neutron diffraction and represents a milestone in the field, as the crystal volume is at least one order of magnitude smaller than those usually required for other high-resolution neutron structures determined to date. This illustrates the significant increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of data collected from perdeuterated crystals and demonstrates that good-quality neutron data can now be collected from more typical protein crystal volumes. Indeed, the signal-to-noise ratio is then dominated by other sources of instrument background, the nature of which is under investigation. This is important for the design of future instruments, which should take maximum advantage of the reduction in the intrinsic diffraction pattern background from fully deuterated samples. PMID:16204895

  16. Are you bleeding? Validation of a machine-learning algorithm for determination of blood volume status: application to remote triage.

    PubMed

    Rickards, Caroline A; Vyas, Nisarg; Ryan, Kathy L; Ward, Kevin R; Andre, David; Hurst, Gennifer M; Barrera, Chelsea R; Convertino, Victor A

    2014-03-01

    Due to limited remote triage monitoring capabilities, combat medics cannot currently distinguish bleeding soldiers from those engaged in combat unless they have physical access to them. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that low-level physiological signals can be used to develop a machine-learning algorithm for tracking changes in central blood volume that will subsequently distinguish central hypovolemia from physical activity. Twenty-four subjects underwent central hypovolemia via lower body negative pressure (LBNP), and a supine-cycle exercise protocol. Exercise workloads were determined by matching heart rate responses from each LBNP level. Heart rate and stroke volume (SV) were measured via Finometer. ECG, heat flux, skin temperature, galvanic skin response, and two-axis acceleration were obtained from an armband (SenseWear Pro2) and used to develop a machine-learning algorithm to predict changes in SV as an index of central blood volume under both conditions. The algorithm SV was retrospectively compared against Finometer SV. A model was developed to determine whether unknown data points could be correctly classified into these two conditions using leave-one-out cross-validation. Algorithm vs. Finometer SV values were strongly correlated for LBNP in individual subjects (mean r = 0.92; range 0.75-0.98), but only moderately correlated for exercise (mean r = 0.50; range -0.23-0.87). From the first level of LBNP/exercise, the machine-learning algorithm was able to distinguish between LBNP and exercise with high accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity (all ≥90%). In conclusion, a machine-learning algorithm developed from low-level physiological signals could reliably distinguish central hypovolemia from exercise, indicating that this device could provide battlefield remote triage capabilities. PMID:24408992

  17. High-resolution neutron protein crystallography with radically small crystal volumes: Application of perdeuteration to human aldose reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Hazemann, I.; Dauvergne, M. T.; Blakeley, M. P.; Meilleur, Flora; Haertlein, M.; Van Dorsselaer, A.; Mitschler, A.; Myles, Dean A A; Podjarny, A.

    2005-08-01

    Neutron diffraction data have been collected to 2.2 {angstrom} resolution from a small (0.15 mm{sup 3}) crystal of perdeuterated human aldose reductase (h-AR; MW = 36 kDa) in order to help to determine the protonation state of the enzyme. h-AR belongs to the aldo-keto reductase family and is implicated in diabetic complications. Its ternary complexes (h-AR-coenzyme NADPH-selected inhibitor) provide a good model to study both the enzymatic mechanism and inhibition. Here, the successful production of fully deuterated human aldose reductase [h-AR(D)], subsequent crystallization of the ternary complex h-AR(D)-NADPH-IDD594 and neutron Laue data collection at the LADI instrument at ILL using a crystal volume of just 0.15 mm{sup 3} are reported. Neutron data were recorded to 2 {angstrom} resolution, with subsequent data analysis using data to 2.2 {angstrom}. This is the first fully deuterated enzyme of this size (36 kDa) to be solved by neutron diffraction and represents a milestone in the field, as the crystal volume is at least one order of magnitude smaller than those usually required for other high-resolution neutron structures determined to date. This illustrates the significant increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of data collected from perdeuterated crystals and demonstrates that good-quality neutron data can now be collected from more typical protein crystal volumes. Indeed, the signal-to-noise ratio is then dominated by other sources of instrument background, the nature of which is under investigation. This is important for the design of future instruments, which should take maximum advantage of the reduction in the intrinsic diffraction pattern background from fully deuterated samples.

  18. A prospective study of the effects of ultralow volume (ULV) aerial application of malathion on epidemic Plasmodium falciparum malaria. III. Ecologic aspects.

    PubMed

    McLean, R G; Spillane, J T; Miles, J W

    1975-03-01

    The effects of aerial ultralow volume (ULV) malathion on selected species of nontarget animals in Haiti are reported. Mortality of certain groups of insects such as bees, flies, beetles, and butterflies was observed immediately following spray application. Minor fish mortality occurred only in shallow water exposed to direct spray. The brain acetylcholine esterase levels of living fish, tree lizards, birds and bats collected from treated areas were not significantly reduced. No ill or dead animals, besides the few fish, were seen even when maximum exposure occurred. Only minor changes in the feeding behavior of some insectivorous birds were observed. The relative bird density decreased substantially for only one species during the study, and other factors besides treatment were considered to be the reasons for the decline. Aerial applications of ULV malathion at dosages sufficient to dramatically reduce anopheline populations did not significantly affect nontarget vertebrates in this tropical environment. PMID:1091169

  19. Application of the cruciform specimen geometry to obtain transverse interface-property data in a high-fiber-volume-fraction SiC/Titanium alloy composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehlert, C. J.; Majumdar, B. S.; Miracle, D. B.

    2001-12-01

    A combined experimental and computational methodology was used to determine the relevant strength and residual-stress parameters in a manufactured, high-fiber-volume-fraction multiply metal matrix composite (MMC). The method was similar to that previously demonstrated on single-fiber composites, which had an extremely low fiber volume fraction. Variabilities in residual stresses and debond strengths in high-fiber-volume-fraction multiply composites, as well as current demands on the micromechanics-based computational prediction and validation of complex composite systems, necessitated the establishment of the test methodology described here. The model material chosen for this investigation was a plasma-processed six-ply, unidirectional Sigma-1240/Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo (wt pct) MMC containing 32 vol pct continuous fibers. Room-temperature transverse tensile experiments were conducted on cruciform specimens. In addition, rectangular specimens were also evaluated in order to verify their applicability in obtaining valid interfacial property data. Debonding events, evaluated at different positions within a given specimen geometry, were captured by stress-strain curves and metallographic examination. Analytical and finite-element stress analyses were conducted to estimate the geometrical stress-concentration factors associated with the cruciform geometry. Residual stresses were estimated using etching and computational procedures. For the cruciform specimens, the experimental fiber-matrix debond strength was determined to be 22 MPa. Separation occurred within the carbon-rich interfacial layer, consistent with some previous observations on similar systems. Thus, the cruciform test methodology described here can be successfully used for transverse interfacial-property evaluation of high-fiber-volume-fraction composites. For the rectangular specimens, the strain gages at different positions along the specimen width confirmed that the interface crack had initiated from the

  20. Application of a volume holographic grating in a CaF2 crystal for measuring linear displacements with nanoscale accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcheulin, A. S.; Angervaks, A. E.; Kupchikov, A. K.; Verkhovskii, E. B.; Ryskin, A. I.

    2014-12-01

    A holographic method for measuring linear displacements based on the use of a highly stable volume scale hologram recorded in an additively colored calcium fluoride crystal with photochromic color centers is proposed and experimentally approved. The essence of this method lies in measuring and analyzing harmonic signals formed during linear displacement of crystal with a volume hologram in an external interference field. A physical model of the formation of harmonic signals in photodetectors when measuring displacements is considered, and a mathematical method for calculating linear displacements by plotting a Lissajous figure is substantiated. A laboratory breadboard of a device for measuring linear displacements in a range of 10 mm, limited by the aperture of crystal with a recorded 8.7-mm-thick hologram, is designed. When using a scale hologram with a period of 2.18 μm and a 632.8-nm He-Ne laser for reading this hologram, the error in measuring displacements by this method is 9 nm at a resolution of 3 nm.

  1. New critical exponents in a fully parabolic quasilinear Keller-Segel system and applications to volume filling models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieślak, Tomasz; Stinner, Christian

    2015-03-01

    We carry on our studies related to the fully parabolic quasilinear Keller-Segel system started in [6] and continued in [7]. In the above mentioned papers we proved finite-time blowup of some radially symmetric solutions to the quasilinear Keller-Segel system if the nonlinear chemosensitivity is strong enough and an adequate relation between nonlinear diffusion and chemosensitivity holds. On the other hand we proved that once chemosensitivity is weak enough solutions exist globally in time. The present paper is devoted to looking for critical exponents distinguishing between those two behaviors. Moreover, we apply our results to the so-called volume filling models with a power-type jump probability function. The most important consequence of our investigations of the latter is a critical mass phenomenon found in dimension 2. Namely we find a value m* such that when the solution to the two-dimensional volume filling Keller-Segel system starts with mass smaller than m*, then it is bounded, while for some initial data with mass exceeding m* solutions are unbounded, though being defined for any time t > 0.

  2. Continuation of the compendium of applications technology satellite and communications technology satellite user experiments 1967-1977, volume 2. [bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engler, N. A.; Nash, J. F.; Strange, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    Approximately 453 reports, papers, and articles catalogued into an information retrieval system, covering communications experiments and demonstrations conducted, utilizing the Communications Technology Satellite and the Applications Technology Satellites 1, 3, 5, and 6 are listed.

  3. The Application of a Representative Volume Element (RVE) Model for the Prediction of Rice Husk Particulate-Filled Polymer Composite Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochanard, Pandhita

    Polymer composite is one of the most widely used materials with application in multiple industries. However, its versatility and subsequent rise in consumption have prompted an increase in research on alternative materials to address the associated environmental concerns. The forefront of this investigation is on the potential use of biocomposite materials as a more sustainable replacement to the traditional polymer composite. Consequently, the ability to apply a theoretical model capable of replicating the microstructures of particulate-filled composite would make a very powerful analytical tool for material design. To address these requirements, this thesis applies a representative volume element (RVE) model for the investigation on the potential use of rice husk particulate-filled polymer composite as alternative material in non-critical application. In this work, rice husk powder (RHP) was used with epoxy for the fabrication of biocomposite samples with 0%, 10% and 30% RHP volume percentage. It was observed that a 10% increase in RHP did not affect the composite elastic property, but led to 15% and 20% decrease in yield stress and tensile strength, respectively. Further increase in RHP to 30% volume percentage also led to 8%, 21% and 28% reduction in Young's modulus, yield stress and tensile strength, respectively. Additionally, the material's responses to uniaxial loading predicted by the RVE model were found to be in reasonable agreement with the analytical and experimental results. No coupling agent was used in this study. The results of this present study suggested that rice husk powder could be used to reduce the composite raw material costs by replacing the more expensive polymer content with agricultural waste products without significant compromise to the composite's mechanical properties.

  4. Novel Application of Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy and 3D Volume Rendering toward Improving the Resolution of the Fossil Record of Charcoal

    PubMed Central

    Belcher, Claire M.; Punyasena, Surangi W.; Sivaguru, Mayandi

    2013-01-01

    Variations in the abundance of fossil charcoals between rocks and sediments are assumed to reflect changes in fire activity in Earth’s past. These variations in fire activity are often considered to be in response to environmental, ecological or climatic changes. The role that fire plays in feedbacks to such changes is becoming increasingly important to understand and highlights the need to create robust estimates of variations in fossil charcoal abundance. The majority of charcoal based fire reconstructions quantify the abundance of charcoal particles and do not consider the changes in the morphology of the individual particles that may have occurred due to fragmentation as part of their transport history. We have developed a novel application of confocal laser scanning microscopy coupled to image processing that enables the 3-dimensional reconstruction of individual charcoal particles. This method is able to measure the volume of both microfossil and mesofossil charcoal particles and allows the abundance of charcoal in a sample to be expressed as total volume of charcoal. The method further measures particle surface area and shape allowing both relationships between different size and shape metrics to be analysed and full consideration of variations in particle size and size sorting between different samples to be studied. We believe application of this new imaging approach could allow significant improvement in our ability to estimate variations in past fire activity using fossil charcoals. PMID:23977267

  5. Environmental Report 1996, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Harrach, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    This is Volume 2 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) annual Environmental Report 1996, prepared for the US Department of Energy. Volume 2 supports Volume 1 summary data and is essentially a detailed data report that provides individual data points, where applicable. Volume 2 includes information on monitoring of air, air effluents, sewerable water, surface water, ground water, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuff, environmental radiation, and quality assurance.

  6. Application of the QSDC procedure to the formulation of space shuttle design criteria. Volume 1: Study effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouton, I.; Martin, G. L.

    1972-01-01

    Criteria to determine the probability of aircraft structural failure were statistically established according to the Quantitative Structural Design Criteria by Statistical Methods, the QSDC procedure. Since an Application Guide is needed to use the QSDC procedure, most of the study was directed to the development of this guide. Most of the considerations followed in the development of the Applications Guide and the Guide itself are reported.

  7. Northeast Artificial Intelligence Consortium (NAIC). Volume 8. Artificial intelligence applications to speech recognition. Final report, Sep 84-Dec 89

    SciTech Connect

    Rhody, H.; Biles, J.

    1990-12-01

    The Northeast Artificial Intelligence Consortium (NAIC) was created by the Air Force Systems Command, Rome Air Development Center, and the Office of Scientific Research. Its purpose was to conduct pertinent research in artificial intelligence and to perform activities ancillary to this research. This report describes progress during the existence of the NAIC of the technical research tasks undertaken at the member universities. The topics covered in general are: versatile expert system for equipment maintenance, distributed AI for communications system control, automatic photointerpretation, time-oriented problem solving, speech understanding systems, knowledge based maintenance, hardware architectures for very large systems, knowledge based reasoning and planning, and a knowledge acquisition, assistance, and explanation system. The specific topic for this volume is the design and implementation of a knowledge-based system to read speech spectrograms.

  8. Horizontal oil well applications and oil recovery assessment. Volume 1: Success of horizontal well technology, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Deskins, W.G.; McDonald, W.J.; Knoll, R.G.; Springer, S.J.

    1995-03-01

    Horizontal technology has been applied in over 110 formations in the USA. Volume I of this study addresses the overall success of horizontal technology, especially in less-publicized formations, i.e., other than the Austin Chalk, Bakken, and Niobrara. Operators in the USA. and Canada were surveyed on a formation-by-formation basis by means of a questionnaire. Response data were received describing horizontal well projects in 58 formations in the USA. and 88 in Canada. Operators responses were analyzed for trends in technical and economic success based on lithology (clastics and carbonates) and resource type (light oil, heavy oil, and gas). The potential impact of horizontal technology on reserves was also estimated. A forecast of horizontal drilling activity over the next decade was developed.

  9. Application of Molecular Interaction Volume Model for Phase Equilibrium of Sn-Based Binary System in Vacuum Distillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Lingxin; Yang, Bin; Xu, Baoqiang; Li, Yifu

    2014-09-01

    Based on the molecular interaction volume model (MIVM), the activities of components of Sn-Sb, Sb-Bi, Sn-Zn, Sn-Cu, and Sn-Ag alloys were predicted. The predicted values are in good agreement with the experimental data, which indicate that the MIVM is of better stability and reliability due to its good physical basis. A significant advantage of the MIVM lies in its ability to predict the thermodynamic properties of liquid alloys using only two parameters. The phase equilibria of Sn-Sb and Sn-Bi alloys were calculated based on the properties of pure components and the activity coefficients, which indicates that Sn-Sb and Sn-Bi alloys can be separated thoroughly by vacuum distillation. This study extends previous investigations and provides an effective and convenient model on which to base refining simulations for Sn-based alloys.

  10. Low concentration ratio solar array for low Earth orbit multi-100kW application. Volume 2: Drawings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalbandian, S. J.; French, E. P.

    1982-01-01

    A preliminary design effort directed toward a low concentration ratio photovoltaic array system based on 1984 technology and capable of delivering multi-hundred kilowatts (300 kW to 100 kW range) in low Earth orbit. The array system consists of two or more array modules each capable of delivering between 113 kW to 175 kW using silicon solar cells or gallium arsenide solar cells, respectively. The array module deployed area is 1320 square meters and consists of 4356 pyramidal concentrator elements. The module, when stowed in the Space Shuttle's payload bay, has a stowage volume of a cube with 3.24 meters on a side. The concentrator elements are sized for a geometric concentration ratio (GCR) of six with an aperture area of 0.5 meters x 0.5 meters. Drawings for the preliminary design configuration and for the test hardware that was fabricated for design evaluation and test are provided.

  11. Finite Volume schemes on unstructured grids for non-local models: Application to the simulation of heat transport in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Goudon, Thierry; Parisot, Martin

    2012-10-15

    In the so-called Spitzer-Haerm regime, equations of plasma physics reduce to a nonlinear parabolic equation for the electronic temperature. Coming back to the derivation of this limiting equation through hydrodynamic regime arguments, one is led to construct a hierarchy of models where the heat fluxes are defined through a non-local relation which can be reinterpreted as well by introducing coupled diffusion equations. We address the question of designing numerical methods to simulate these equations. The basic requirement for the scheme is to be asymptotically consistent with the Spitzer-Haerm regime. Furthermore, the constraints of physically realistic simulations make the use of unstructured meshes unavoidable. We develop a Finite Volume scheme, based on Vertex-Based discretization, which reaches these objectives. We discuss on numerical grounds the efficiency of the method, and the ability of the generalized models in capturing relevant phenomena missed by the asymptotic problem.

  12. Representative elementary volume assessment of three-dimensional x-ray microtomography images of heterogeneous materials: Application to limestones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenbaum, O.; du Roscoat, S. Rolland

    2014-05-01

    Over the last 15 years, x-ray microtomography has become a useful technique to obtain morphological, structural, and topological information on materials. Moreover, these three-dimensional (3D) images can be used as input data to assess certain properties (e.g., permeability) or to simulate phenomena (e.g., transfer properties). In order to capture all the features of interest, high spatial resolution is required. This involves imaging small samples, raising the question of the representativity of the data sets. In this article, we (i) present a methodology to analyze the microstructural properties of complex porous media from 3D images, (ii) assess statistical representative elementary volumes (REVs) for such materials; and (iii) establish criteria to delimit these REVs. In the context of cultural heritage conservation, a statistical study was done on 30 quarry samples for three sorts of stones. We first present the principles of x-ray microtomography experiments and emphasize the care that must be taken in the 3D image segmentation steps. Results show that statistical REVs exist for these media and are reached for the image sizes studied (1300 × 1300 × 1000 voxels) for two characteristics: porosity and chord length distributions. Furthermore, the estimators used (porosity, autocorrelation function, and chord length distributions) are sufficiently sensitive to quantitatively distinguish these three porous media from each other. Lastly, this study puts forward criteria based on the above-mentioned estimators to evaluate the REVs. These criteria avoid having to repeat the statistical study for each new material studied. This is particularly relevant to quantitatively monitor the modifications in materials (weathering, deformation …) or to determine the smallest 3D volume for simulation in order to reduce computing time.

  13. Effectiveness of Ultra-Low Volume Nighttime Applications of an Adulticide against Diurnal Aedes albopictus, a Critical Vector of Dengue and Chikungunya Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Farajollahi, Ary; Healy, Sean P.; Unlu, Isik; Gaugler, Randy; Fonseca, Dina M.

    2012-01-01

    Aedes albopictus, the Asian tiger mosquito, continues expanding its geographic range and involvement in mosquito-borne diseases such as chikungunya and dengue. Vector control programs rarely attempt to suppress this diurnal species with an ultra-low volume (ULV) adulticide because for maximum efficacy applications are conducted at night. During 2009–2011 we performed experimental nighttime applications of a novel adulticide (DUET®) against field populations of Ae. albopictus within an urban site composed of approximately 1,000 parcels (home and yard) in northeastern USA. Dual applications at mid label rate of the adulticide spaced one or two days apart accomplished significantly higher control (85.0±5.4% average reduction) than single full rate applications (73.0±5.4%). Our results demonstrate that nighttime ULV adulticiding is effective in reducing Ae. albopictus abundance and highlight its potential for use as part of integrated pest management programs and during disease epidemics when reducing human illness is of paramount importance. PMID:23145115

  14. NASTRAN thermal analyzer: Theory and application including a guide to modeling engineering problems, volume 1. [thermal analyzer manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H. P.

    1977-01-01

    The NASTRAN Thermal Analyzer Manual describes the fundamental and theoretical treatment of the finite element method, with emphasis on the derivations of the constituent matrices of different elements and solution algorithms. Necessary information and data relating to the practical applications of engineering modeling are included.

  15. Technology and Education: Issues in Administration, Policy and Applications in K12 Schools. (Advances in Educational Administration, Volume 8)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tettegah, Sharon Y., Ed.; Hunter, Richard C, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    In today's society where most students own MP3 players, engage in constant instant messaging and downloading from the Internet, more than ever school administrators and staff should be aware of issues in administration, policy, and applications. This book provides a comprehensive presentation of current policies and practices of technology in…

  16. Worldwide Intelligent Systems: Approaches to Telecommunications and Network Management. Frontiers in Artificial Intelligence and Applications, Volume 24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liebowitz, Jay, Ed.; Prerau, David S., Ed.

    This is an international collection of 12 papers addressing artificial intelligence (AI) and knowledge technology applications in telecommunications and network management. It covers the latest and emerging AI technologies as applied to the telecommunications field. The papers are: "The Potential for Knowledge Technology in Telecommunications: A…

  17. Design and market study of retrofit photovoltaic system for commercial building and applications. Volume IV. Drawing package

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, G.T.; Hagely, J.R.; Ulmer, R.A.; Ayres, J.G.

    1982-03-01

    Drawing packages including architectural and engineering drawings for the eleven system concepts are provided. Each drawing package includes: an architectural rendering; a site plan; detailed drawings of foundation and support structure; detailed drawings of the electrical wiring and grounding concepts; drawings illustrating thermal energy and control subsystems (where applicable); and a sequence of cartoon-type assembly/installation procedure drawings.

  18. Fracture control methods for space vehicles. Volume 2: Assessment of fracture mechanics technology for space shuttle applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehret, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    The concepts explored in a state of the art review of those engineering fracture mechanics considered most applicable to the space shuttle vehicle include fracture toughness, precritical flaw growth, failure mechanisms, inspection methods (including proof test logic), and crack growth predictive analysis techniques.

  19. Nanostructural Free-Volume Effects in Humidity-Sensitive MgO-Al2O3 Ceramics for Sensor Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klym, H.; Ingram, A.; Shpotyuk, O.; Hadzaman, I.; Hotra, O.; Kostiv, Yu.

    2016-03-01

    Technologically modified spinel MgO-Al2O3 ceramics were prepared from Al2O3 and 4MgCO3·Mg(OH)2·5H2O powders at sintering temperatures of 1200, 1300, and 1400 °C. Free-volume structural effects in MgO-Al2O3 ceramics and their electrophysical properties were studied using combined x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Hg-porosimetry, and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. It is shown that increasing of sintering temperature from 1200 to 1400 °C results in the transformation of pore size distribution in ceramics from tri- to bi-modal including open macro- and meso(micro)pores with sizes from ten to hundreds nm and nanopores with sizes up to a few nm. Microstructure of these ceramics is improved with the increase of sintering temperature, which results in decreased amount of additional phases located near grain boundaries. These phase extractions serve as specific trapping centers for positrons penetrating the ceramics. The positron trapping and ortho-positronium decaying components are considered in the mathematical treatment of the measured spectra. Classic Tao-Eldrup model is used to draw the correlation between the ortho-positronium lifetime and the size of nanopores, which is complementary to porosimetry data. The studied ceramics with optimal nanoporous structure are highly sensitive to humidity changes in the region of 31-96% with minimal hysteresis in adsorption-desorption cycles.

  20. Microdroplet application of mosquitocidal Bacillus thuringiensis using ultra-low-volume generator for the control of mosquitos.

    PubMed

    Seleena, P; Lee, H L; Nazni, W A; Rohani, A; Kadri, M S

    1996-09-01

    In an effort to develop a more effective technique in dispersing a microbial control agent, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), a truck-mounted ultra low volume (ULV) generator (Scorpion) was used to disperse B. thuringiensis israelensis (Bti) and Bti with malathion. Complete larval and adult mortalities for all tested mosquito species within the first 70-80 feet from the ULV generator were achieved. Beyond that distance less than 50% mortality was achieved as insufficient sprayed particles reached the area. A minimum of 10(3) Bti colony forming units per ml is required to cause 100% larval mortality. The sprayed Bti larvicidal toxins were persistent in the test water 7 days post ULV. The effectiveness of B. thuringiensis jegathesan (Btj), a new mosquitocidal Bt serotype was also evaluated. Similar mortality results as Bti were achieved except that the Btj toxins underwent degradation in the test water, since less than 50% less in larval mortality was observed in 7 days post ULV samples. This ULV method has the potential to disperse Bt and malathion effectively for a simultaneous control of mosquito adults and larvae. PMID:9185282

  1. The role of computational fluid dynamics in aeronautical engineering (5). Improvements and applications of implicit TVD finite volume code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shima, Eiji; Yoshida, Kenji; Amano, Kanichi

    1987-11-01

    An automatic grid generator for multiple element airfoils was developed and the existing implicit Total Variation Diminishing (TVD) finite volume code was improved in both accuracy and efficiency, in order to make the Navier-Stokes solver a practical design tool for high lift devices. Utilizing these codes, Navier-Stokes analysis of the single slotted flap was carried out. The automatic grid generator utilizes the elliptic equation solver using the finite difference method combined with the panel method. The flow field is divided into subregions by the dividing stream lines which are calculated by the panel method and the computational grid in each subregion is generated by solving the elliptic equations (Thompson's method). Since the panel method can solve the potential flow around any number of arbitrary shaped bodies, this grid generator can generate a H-type computational grid around such bodies automatically. To obtain a high accuracy on a rapidly stretching grid, the flow solver uses the TVD formulation containing an explicit treatment of nonuniform grid spacing. Converging rate and numerical stability of the flow solver is augmented by the relaxation approach using Symmetric Point Gauss Seidel method in matrix inversion process which is necessary for an implicit scheme.

  2. Uncooled amorphous silicon 160 x 120 IRFPA with 25 μm pixel-pitch for large volume applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilain, M.; Tissot, J. L.; Legras, O.; Yon, J. J.; Minassian, C.; Fièque, B.; Chiappa, J. M.

    2008-03-01

    This paper reviews the specifications and performances of a 160 × 120 uncooled infrared focal plane array made from amorphous silicon microbolometers with a pixel-pitch of 25 μm, integrated into a LCC TEC-less package. This detector has been specifically designed for large volume production, while keeping the main features of high end developments, at detection pixel level, as well as at ROIC level, like detector configuration by serial link in order to minimize the number of electrical inputs, low power, large dynamic range...) The main particular features of this achievement are the miniaturized very low weight package, along with easy TEC-less operation naturally afforded via the readout architecture, which leads to very low consumption levels, making it well adapted to low end hand held or helmet mounted thermal imaging cameras. We present in the last part of this paper the main electro-optical characteristics and TEC-less operation, demonstrating wide thermal dynamic range and low power, thanks to the simple single-level amorphous silicon technology, coupled with advanced ROIC design.

  3. Compact uncooled amorphous silicon 160x120 IRFPA with 25 μm pixel-pitch for large volume applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tissot, J. L.; Legras, O.; Minassian, C.; Robert, P.; Fieque, B.; Tinnes, S.; Dupont, B.; Yon, J. J.; Arnaud, A.

    2007-10-01

    This paper reviews specifications and performances of a 160 x 120 uncooled infrared focal plane array made from amorphous silicon micro bolometer with a pixel-pitch of 25 μm, integrated in a LCC package. This detector has been specifically designed for being produced in large volume. The detector has kept all the innovations developed on the full TV format ROIC (detector configuration by serial link, low power consumption or wide electrical dynamic range... ) and offers an advanced TEC-less focal plane array well adapted to low end thermal imaging cameras. The specific appeal of this unit lies in the miniaturization of the packaging and its extremely light weight.In the last part of the paper, we will look more closely at electro-optical performances of this TEC-less product 160 x 120 as well as the other 25 μm products like the 384 x 288. We will insist on the wide thermal dynamic range and the low consumption achieved thanks to the mastering of the amorphous silicon technology coupled with the innovation in the ROIC design.

  4. A new high-resolution unstructured grid finite volume Arctic Ocean model (AO-FVCOM): An application for tidal studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Changsheng; Gao, Guoping; Qi, Jianhua; Proshutinsky, Andrey; Beardsley, Robert C.; Kowalik, Zygmunt; Lin, Huichan; Cowles, Geoffrey

    2009-08-01

    A spherical coordinate version of the unstructured grid 3-D FVCOM (finite volume coastal ocean model) has been applied to the Arctic Ocean to simulate tides with a horizontal resolution ranging from 1 km in the near-coastal areas to 15 km in the deep ocean. By accurately resolving the irregular coastlines and bathymetry in the Arctic Ocean coastal regions, this model reproduces the diurnal (K1 and O1) and semidiurnal (M2 and S2) tidal wave dynamics and captures the complex tidal structure along the coast, particularly in the narrow straits of the Canadian Archipelago. The simulated tidal parameters (harmonic constituents of sea surface elevation and currents) agree well with the available observational data. High-resolution meshes over the continental shelf and slope capture the detailed spatial structure of topographic trapped shelf waves, which are quite energetic along the Greenland, Siberia, and Spitsbergen continental slope and shelf break areas. Water stratification influences the vertical distribution of tidal currents but not the water transport and thus tidal elevation. The comparison with previous finite difference models suggests that horizontal resolution and geometric fitting are two prerequisites to simulate realistically the tidal energy flux in the Arctic Ocean, particularly in the Canadian Archipelago.

  5. Photovoltaic system criteria documents. Volume 1: Guidelines for evaluating the management and operations planning of photovoltaic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, John C.; Billitti, Joseph W.; Tallon, John M.

    1979-01-01

    Guidelines are provided to the Field Centers for organization, scheduling, project and cost control, and performance in the areas of project management and operations planning for Photovoltaics Test and Applications. These guidelines may be used in organizing a T and A Project Team for system design/test, site construction and operation, and as the basis for evaluating T and A proposals. The attributes are described for project management and operations planning to be used by the Field Centers. Specifically, all project management and operational issues affecting costs, schedules and performance of photovoltaic systems are addressed. Photovoltaic tests and applications include residential, intermediate load center, central station, and stand-alone systems. The sub-categories of system maturity considered are: Initial System Evaluation Experiments (ISEE); System Readiness Experiments (SRE); and Commercial Readiness Demonstration Projects (CRDP).

  6. The Environment for Application Software Integration and Execution (EASIE) version 1.0. Volume 4: System installation and maintenance guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, Donald P.; Jones, Kennie H.; Rowell, Lawrence F.

    1988-01-01

    The Environment for Application Software Integration and Execution (EASIE) provides both a methodology and a set of software utility programs to ease the task of coordinating engineering design and analysis codes. This document provides necessary information for installing the EASIE software on a host computer system. The target host is a DEX VAX running VMS version 4; host dependencies are noted when appropriate. Relevant directories and individual files are identified, and compile/load/execute sequences are specified. In the case of the data management utilities, database management system (DBMS) specific features are described in an effort to assist the maintenance programmer in converting to a new DBMS. The document also describes a sample EASIE program directory structure to guide the program implementer in establishing his/her application dependent environment.

  7. Software design specification. Part 2: Orbital Flight Test (OFT) detailed design specification. Volume 3: Applications. Book 2: System management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The functions performed by the systems management (SM) application software are described along with the design employed to accomplish these functions. The operational sequences (OPS) control segments and the cyclic processes they control are defined. The SM specialist function control (SPEC) segments and the display controlled 'on-demand' processes that are invoked by either an OPS or SPEC control segment as a direct result of an item entry to a display are included. Each processing element in the SM application is described including an input/output table and a structured control flow diagram. The flow through the module and other information pertinent to that process and its interfaces to other processes are included.

  8. Space Applications of Automation, Robotics and Machine Intelligence Systems (ARAMIS). Volume 4: Supplement, Appendix 4.3: Candidate ARAMIS Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Minsky, M. L.; Smith, D. B. S.

    1982-01-01

    Potential applications of automation, robotics, and machine intelligence systems (ARAMIS) to space activities, and to their related ground support functions, in the years 1985-2000, so that NASA may make informed decisions on which aspects of ARAMIS to develop. The study first identifies the specific tasks which will be required by future space projects. It then defines ARAMIS options which are candidates for those space project tasks, and evaluates the relative merits of these options. Finally, the study identifies promising applications of ARAMIS, and recommends specific areas for further research. The ARAMIS options defined and researched by the study group span the range from fully human to fully machine, including a number of intermediate options (e.g., humans assisted by computers, and various levels of teleoperation). By including this spectrum, the study searches for the optimum mix of humans and machines for space project tasks.

  9. Regional applicability and potential of salt-gradient solar ponds in the United States. Volume 2: Detailed report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, E. I. H.

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment of the regional applicability and potential of salt-gradient solar ponds in the United States is provided. The assessment is focused on the general characteristics of twelve defined geographic regions. Natural resources essential to solar ponds are surveyed. Meteorological and hydrogeological conditions affecting pond performance are examined. Potentially favorable pond sites are identified. Regional thermal and electrical energy output from solar ponds is calculated. Selected pond design cases are studied. Five major potential market sectors are evaluated in terms of technical and energy-consumption characteristics, and solar-pond applicability and potential. Relevant pond system data and financial factors are analyzed. Solar-pond energy costs are compared with conventional energy costs. The assessment concludes that, excepting Alaska, ponds are applicable in all regions for at least two market sectors. Total solar pond energy supply potential in the five market sectors examined is estimated to be 8.94 quads/yr by the year 2000, approximately 7.2% of the projected total national energy demand.

  10. Aerial ultra-low-volume application of naled: impact on nontarget imperiled butterfly larvae (Cyclargus thomasi bethunebakeri) and efficacy against adult mosquitoes (Aedes taeniorhynchus).

    PubMed

    Zhong, H; Hribar, L J; Daniels, J C; Feken, M A; Brock, C; Trager, M D

    2010-12-01

    We assessed the exposure and acute toxicity of naled, applied aerially as an ultra-low-volume spray for mosquito control, on late instar larvae of the Miami blue (Cyclargus thomasi bethunebakeri) (Comstock and Huntington 1943) (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae), an imperiled South Florida butterfly. We concurrently evaluated the control efficacy against caged adult female salt-marsh mosquitoes (Aedes taeniorhynchus) (Wiedemann 1821) (Diptera: Culicidae). This 3-yr study was conducted in north Key Largo (Monroe County, FL) beginning in 2006. The field trials incorporated 15 sampling stations: nine in the target spray zone, three in the spray drift zone at varying distances from the target zone, and three in the control zone not subjected to naled spray drift. A total of six field spray trials were completed, three at an altitude of 30.5 m (100 feet), and three at 45.7 m (150 feet). For all trials, the ultra-low-volume application of Trumpet EC insecticide (78% naled) at a rate of 54.8 ml/ha (0.75 fl. oz/acre) was effective in killing caged adult mosquitoes in the target zone. Butterfly larvae survival was significantly reduced in the spray zone compared with drift and control zones. Analysis of insecticide residue data revealed that the mortality of the late instar butterfly larvae was a result of exposure to excess residues of naled. Additional research is needed to determine mitigation strategies that can limit exposure of sensitive butterflies to naled while maintaining mosquito control efficacy. PMID:22182563

  11. Applications systems verification and transfer project. Volume 2: Operational applications of satellite snow-cover observations and data-collection systems in the Arizona test site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumann, H. H.

    1981-01-01

    Ground surveys and aerial observations were used to monitor rapidly changing moisture conditions in the Salt-Verde watershed. Repetitive satellite snow cover observations greatly reduce the necessity for routine aerial snow reconnaissance flights over the mountains. High resolution, multispectral imagery provided by LANDSAT satellite series enabled rapid and accurate mapping of snow-cover distributions for small- to medium-sized subwatersheds; however, the imagery provided only one observation every 9 days of about a third of the watershed. Low resolution imagery acquired by the ITOSa dn SMS/GOES meteorological satellite series provides the daily synoptic observation necessary to monitor the rapid changes in snow-covered area in the entire watershed. Short term runoff volumes can be predicted from daily sequential snow cover observations.

  12. A volume birdcage coil with an adjustable sliding tuner ring for neuroimaging in high field vertical magnets: ex and in vivo applications at 21.1 T

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Chunqi; Masad, Ihssan S.; Rosenberg, Jens T.; Elumalai, Malathy; Brey, William W.; Grant, Samuel C.; Gor’kov, Peter L.

    2012-01-01

    A tunable 900 MHz transmit/receive volume coil was constructed for 1H MR imaging of biological samples in a 21.1 T vertical bore magnet. To accommodate a diverse range of specimen and RF loads at such a high frequency, a sliding-ring adaptation of a low-pass birdcage was implemented through simultaneous alteration of distributed capacitance. To make efficient use of the constrained space inside the vertical bore, a modular probe design was implemented with a bottom-adjustable tuning and matching apparatus. The sliding ring coil displays good homogeneity and sufficient tuning range for different samples of various dimensions representing large span of RF loads. High resolution in vivo and ex vivo images of large rats (up to 350 g), mice and human postmortem tissues were obtained to demonstrate coil functionality and to provide examples of potential applications at 21.1 T. PMID:22750638

  13. Proceedings of the thirteenth national conference on artificial intelligence and the eighth innovative applications of artificial intelligence conference. Volume 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    This report contain papers from the Thirteenth National Conference on Artificial Intelligence and the Eighth Conference on Innovative Applications of Artificial Intelligence collected in two volumes. General areas of research for these papers are: interaction; internet agents; multiagent learning; multiagent problem solving; negotiation and coalition; AI in art and entertainment; constraint satisfaction; data consistency; game-tree search; phase transition; search control; search and learning; stochastic search; temporal reasoning; education; information retrieval and natural language processing; knowledge-based systems; knowledge compilation; knowledge representation; belief and belief revision; description logics and probabilities reasoning; knowledge-base and context; nonmonotonic reasoning; reasoning about action; learning; mobile robots; model-based reasoning; natural language; preception; planning; rule-based reasoning and connectionism; uncertainty; robot competition; student abstracts; and case studies.

  14. A Mathematical Model for Vertical Attitude Takeoff and Landing (VATOL) Aircraft Simulation. Volume 1; Model Description Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortenbaugh, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    A mathematical model of a high performance airplane capable of vertical attitude takeoff and landing (VATOL) was developed. An off line digital simulation program incorporating this model was developed to provide trim conditions and dynamic check runs for the piloted simulation studies and support dynamic analyses of proposed VATOL configuration and flight control concepts. Development details for the various simulation component models and the application of the off line simulation program, Vertical Attitude Take-Off and Landing Simulation (VATLAS), to develop a baseline control system for the Vought SF-121 VATOL airplane concept are described.

  15. 1993 RCRA Part B permit renewal application, Savannah River Site: Volume 10, Consolidated Incineration Facility, Section C, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Molen, G.

    1993-08-01

    This section describes the chemical and physical nature of the RCRA regulated hazardous wastes to be handled, stored, and incinerated at the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) at the Savannah River Site. It is in accordance with requirements of South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations R.61-79.264.13(a) and(b), and 270.14(b)(2). This application is for permit to store and teat these hazardous wastes as required for the operation of CIF. The permit is to cover the storage of hazardous waste in containers and of waste in six hazardous waste storage tanks. Treatment processes include incineration, solidification of ash, and neutralization of scrubber blowdown.

  16. Study of the application of advanced technologies to long range transport aircraft. Volume 2: Advanced technology program recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The benefits of the application of advanced technology to future transport aircraft were investigated. The noise reduction goals established by the CARD (Civil Aviation Research and Development) study for the 1981-1985 time period can be satisfied. Reduced terminal area and airway congestion can result from use of advanced on-board systems and operating procedures. The use of advanced structural design concepts can result in greatly reduced gross weight and improved operating economics. The full potential of these benefits can be realized in a 1985 airplane by implementing a research and development program that is funded to an average level of approximately $55 million per year over a ten year period.

  17. Environmental report 1995. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Harrach, R.J.; Failor, R.A.; Gallegos, G.M.

    1996-09-01

    This is Volume 2 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) annual Environmental Report 1995. This volume is intended to support summary data from Volume 1 and is essentially a detailed data report that provides additional data points, where applicable. Some summary data are also included in Volume 2, and more detailed accounts are given of sample collection and analytical methods. Volume 2 includes information in eight chapters on monitoring of air, air effluent, sewage, surface water, ground water, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuff, and environmental radiation, as well as three chapters on ground water protection, compliance self-monitoring and quality assurance.

  18. An improved approach for flight readiness certification: Methodology for failure risk assessment and application examples. Volume 2: Software documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, N. R.; Ebbeler, D. H.; Newlin, L. E.; Sutharshana, S.; Creager, M.

    1992-01-01

    An improved methodology for quantitatively evaluating failure risk of spaceflight systems to assess flight readiness and identify risk control measures is presented. This methodology, called Probabilistic Failure Assessment (PFA), combines operating experience from tests and flights with engineering analysis to estimate failure risk. The PFA methodology is of particular value when information on which to base an assessment of failure risk, including test experience and knowledge of parameters used in engineering analyses of failure phenomena, is expensive or difficult to acquire. The PFA methodology is a prescribed statistical structure in which engineering analysis models that characterize failure phenomena are used conjointly with uncertainties about analysis parameters and/or modeling accuracy to estimate failure probability distributions for specific failure modes, These distributions can then be modified, by means of statistical procedures of the PFA methodology, to reflect any test or flight experience. Conventional engineering analysis models currently employed for design of failure prediction are used in this methodology. The PFA methodology is described and examples of its application are presented. Conventional approaches to failure risk evaluation for spaceflight systems are discussed, and the rationale for the approach taken in the PFA methodology is presented. The statistical methods, engineering models, and computer software used in fatigue failure mode applications are thoroughly documented.

  19. An improved approach for flight readiness certification: Methodology for failure risk assessment and application examples, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, N. R.; Ebbeler, D. H.; Newlin, L. E.; Sutharshana, S.; Creager, M.

    1992-01-01

    An improved methodology for quantitatively evaluating failure risk of spaceflight systems to assess flight readiness and identify risk control measures is presented. This methodology, called Probabilistic Failure Assessment (PFA), combines operating experience from tests and flights with engineering analysis to estimate failure risk. The PFA methodology is of particular value when information on which to base an assessment of failure risk, including test experience and knowledge of parameters used in engineering analyses of failure phenomena, is expensive or difficult to acquire. The PFA methodology is a prescribed statistical structure in which engineering analysis models that characterize failure phenomena are used conjointly with uncertainties about analysis parameters and/or modeling accuracy to estimate failure probability distributions for specific failure modes. These distributions can then be modified, by means of statistical procedures of the PFA methodology, to reflect any test or flight experience. Conventional engineering analysis models currently employed for design of failure prediction are used in this methodology. The PFA methodology is described and examples of its application are presented. Conventional approaches to failure risk evaluation for spaceflight systems are discussed, and the rationale for the approach taken in the PFA methodology is presented. The statistical methods, engineering models, and computer software used in fatigue failure mode applications are thoroughly documented.

  20. An improved approach for flight readiness certification: Methodology for failure risk assessment and application examples. Volume 2: Software documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, N. R.; Ebbeler, D. H.; Newlin, L. E.; Sutharshana, S.; Creager, M.

    1992-06-01

    An improved methodology for quantitatively evaluating failure risk of spaceflight systems to assess flight readiness and identify risk control measures is presented. This methodology, called Probabilistic Failure Assessment (PFA), combines operating experience from tests and flights with engineering analysis to estimate failure risk. The PFA methodology is of particular value when information on which to base an assessment of failure risk, including test experience and knowledge of parameters used in engineering analyses of failure phenomena, is expensive or difficult to acquire. The PFA methodology is a prescribed statistical structure in which engineering analysis models that characterize failure phenomena are used conjointly with uncertainties about analysis parameters and/or modeling accuracy to estimate failure probability distributions for specific failure modes, These distributions can then be modified, by means of statistical procedures of the PFA methodology, to reflect any test or flight experience. Conventional engineering analysis models currently employed for design of failure prediction are used in this methodology. The PFA methodology is described and examples of its application are presented. Conventional approaches to failure risk evaluation for spaceflight systems are discussed, and the rationale for the approach taken in the PFA methodology is presented. The statistical methods, engineering models, and computer software used in fatigue failure mode applications are thoroughly documented.

  1. An improved approach for flight readiness certification: Methodology for failure risk assessment and application examples, volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, N. R.; Ebbeler, D. H.; Newlin, L. E.; Sutharshana, S.; Creager, M.

    1992-06-01

    An improved methodology for quantitatively evaluating failure risk of spaceflight systems to assess flight readiness and identify risk control measures is presented. This methodology, called Probabilistic Failure Assessment (PFA), combines operating experience from tests and flights with engineering analysis to estimate failure risk. The PFA methodology is of particular value when information on which to base an assessment of failure risk, including test experience and knowledge of parameters used in engineering analyses of failure phenomena, is expensive or difficult to acquire. The PFA methodology is a prescribed statistical structure in which engineering analysis models that characterize failure phenomena are used conjointly with uncertainties about analysis parameters and/or modeling accuracy to estimate failure probability distributions for specific failure modes. These distributions can then be modified, by means of statistical procedures of the PFA methodology, to reflect any test or flight experience. Conventional engineering analysis models currently employed for design of failure prediction are used in this methodology. The PFA methodology is described and examples of its application are presented. Conventional approaches to failure risk evaluation for spaceflight systems are discussed, and the rationale for the approach taken in the PFA methodology is presented. The statistical methods, engineering models, and computer software used in fatigue failure mode applications are thoroughly documented.

  2. Volume production of high quality SiC substrates and epitaxial layers: Defect trends and device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, St. G.; Sanchez, E. K.; Hansen, D. M.; Drachev, R. D.; Chung, G.; Thomas, B.; Zhang, J.; Loboda, M. J.; Dudley, M.; Wang, H.; Wu, F.; Byrappa, S.; Raghothamachar, B.; Choi, G.

    2012-08-01

    We review the progress of silicon carbide (SiC) bulk growth by the sublimation method, highlighting recent advances at Dow Corning, which resulted in the commercial release of 100 mm n-type 4H-SiC wafers with median micropipe densities (MPD) in production wafers <0.1 cm-2 and the demonstration of micropipe free material over a full 100 mm diameter. Investigations by Synchrotron White Beam X-ray Topography (SWBXRT) and molten KOH etch pit analysis of 100 mm wafers demonstrate threading screw dislocation densities <500 cm-2. Additional results indicate the positive impact of maintaining thermo-mechanical stress levels in the growing crystal below the critical resolved shear stress on reducing basal plane dislocation densities to values as low as ˜300-400 cm-2 in 100 mm crystals. We summarize the steps of systematic quality improvements on increasing wafer diameter, utilizing numerical simulations of the SiC growth system as a critical tool to guide this process. For the economical production of SiC epitaxy, a 10×100 mm wafer platform has been established in a warm-wall planetary chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor. The combined improvements in the epitaxy process, pre-epi wafer surface preparation and the underlying substrate quality itself have led to a reduction of the device killer defect density from 8 cm-2 to 1.5 cm-2 on a volume product like 100 mm 4° off-axis 6.5 μm epi-wafers. Dow Corning production epi-wafers routinely show Schottky diode yields above 90% at a die size of 2 mm×2 mm. Additionally, 50-100 μm thick epitaxy on 76 mm 4° off-axis wafers with morphological defect densities of 2-6 cm-2, a surface roughness (RMS) ≤1 nm as measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM), and carrier lifetimes consistently in the range of 2-3 μs has been demonstrated.

  3. Conceptual design of thermal energy storage systems for near term electric utility applications. Volume 1: Screening of concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hausz, W.; Berkowitz, B. J.; Hare, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    Over forty thermal energy storage (TES) concepts gathered from the literature and personal contacts were studied for their suitability for the electric utility application of storing energy off-peak discharge during peak hours. Twelve selections were derived from the concepts for screening; they used as storage media high temperature water (HTW), hot oil, molten salts, and packed beds of solids such as rock. HTW required pressure containment by prestressed cast-iron or concrete vessels, or lined underground cavities. Both steam generation from storage and feedwater heating from storage were studied. Four choices were made for further study during the project. Economic comparison by electric utility standard cost practices, and near-term availability (low technical risk) were principal criteria but suitability for utility use, conservation potential, and environmental hazards were considered.

  4. Rotary-wing aerodynamics. Volume 1: Basic theories of rotor aerodynamics with application to helicopters. [momentum, vortices, and potential theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepniewski, W. Z.

    1979-01-01

    The concept of rotary-wing aircraft in general is defined. The energy effectiveness of helicopters is compared with that of other static thrust generators in hover, as well as with various air and ground vehicles in forward translation. The most important aspects of rotor-blade dynamics and rotor control are reviewed. The simple physicomathematical model of the rotor offered by the momentum theory is introduced and its usefulness and limitations are assessed. The combined blade-element and momentum theory approach, which provides greater accuracy in performance predictions, is described as well as the vortex theory which models a rotor blade by means of a vortex filament or vorticity surface. The application of the velocity and acceleration potential theory to the determination of flow fields around three dimensional, non-rotating bodies as well as to rotor aerodynamic problems is described. Airfoil sections suitable for rotors are also considered.

  5. Study of the application of advanced technologies to long-range transport aircraft. Volume 2: Research and development requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, R. H.; Sturgeon, R. F.; Adams, W. E.; Bradley, E. S.; Cahill, J. F.; Eudaily, R. R.; Hancock, J. P.; Moore, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Investigations were conducted to evaluate the relative benefits attainable through the exploitation of advanced technologies and to identify future research and development efforts required to permit the application of selected technologies to transport aircraft entering commercial operation in 1985. Results show that technology advances, particularly in the areas of composite materials, supercritical aerodynamics, and active control systems, will permit the development of long-range, high-payload commercial transports operating at high-subsonic speeds with direct operating costs lower than those of current aircraft. These advanced transports also achieve lower noise levels and lower engine pollutant emissions than current transports. Research and development efforts, including analytical investigations, laboratory test programs, and flight test programs, are required in essentially all technology areas to achieve the potential technology benefits.

  6. A distribution benefits model for improved information on worldwide crop production. Volume 1: Model structure and application to wheat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, J.

    1976-01-01

    The improved model is suitable for the study of benefits of worldwide information on a variety of crops. Application to the previously studied case of worldwide wheat production shows that about $108 million per year of distribution benefits to the United States would be achieved by a satellite-based wheat information system meeting the goals of LACIE. The model also indicates that improved information alone will not change world stock levels unless production itself is stabilized. The United States benefits mentioned above are associated with the reduction of price fluctuations within the year and the more effective use of international trade to balance supply and demand. Price fluctuations from year to year would be reduced only if production variability were itself reduced.

  7. Technique for integrative energy planning in developing nations with illustrative application to Pakistan. (Volumes I and II)

    SciTech Connect

    Ciliano, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the conceptual definition, development and illustrative application of a new methodology for integrative energy planning in less developed countries (LDCs). The author terms his approach the Integrative Planning Technique (IPT). The IPT provides a direct linkage between sectoral activity levels and targets specified in the overall economic development plan and the energy system physical infrastructure and resource flows upon which they depend. Central concepts within the IPT include (a) the Energy Resource Delivery Network (ERDN), a network representation of the overall energy system from resource extraction through ultimate end-use; and (b) the Resource Coefficient Table (RCT), a computational matrix method which prepares inputs to the ERDN and provides the building block basis for translating policy initiatives relating to new technology penetration, interfuel substitution, and re-directed development targets into corresponding energy requirements associated with policy implementation.

  8. Methods for dependency estimation and system unavailability evaluation based on failure data statistics. Volume 2, Detailed description and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Azarm, M.A.; Hsu, F.; Martinez-Guridi, G.; Vesely, W.E.

    1993-07-01

    This report introduces a new perspective on the basic concept of dependent failures where the definition of dependency is based on clustering in failure times of similar components. This perspective has two significant implications: firstly, it relaxes the conventional assumption that dependent failures must be simultaneous and result from a severe shock; secondly, it allows the analyst to use all the failures in a time continuum to estimate the potential for multiple failures in a window of time (e.g., a test interval), therefore arriving at a more accurate value for system unavailability. In addition, the models developed here provide a method for plant-specific analysis of dependency, reflecting the plant-specific maintenance practices that reduce or increase the contribution of dependent failures to system unavailability. The proposed methodology can be used for screening analysis of failure data to estimate the fraction of dependent failures among the failures. In addition, the proposed method can evaluate the impact of the observed dependency on the system unavailability and plant risk. The formations derived in this report have undergone various levels of validations through computer simulation studies and pilot applications. The pilot applications of these methodologies showed that the contribution of dependent failures of diesel generators in one plant was negligible, while in another plant, it was quite significant. It also showed that in the plant with significant contribution of dependency to Emergency Power System (ESP) unavailability, the contribution changed with time. Similar findings were reported for the Containment Fan Cooler breakers. Drawing such conclusions about system performance would not have been possible with any other reported dependency methodologies.

  9. Numerical simulation of dynamics of brushless dc motors for aerospace and other applications. Volume 1: Model development and applications, part A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demerdash, N. A. O.; Nehl, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    The development, fabrication and evaluation of a prototype electromechanical actuator (EMA) is discussed. Application of the EMA as a motor for control surfaces in aerospace flight is examined. A mathematical model of the EMA is developed for design optimization. Nonlinearities which complicate the mathematical model are discussed. The dynamics of the EMA from the underlying physical principles are determined and a discussion of similating the control logic by means of equivalent boolean expressions is presented.

  10. VOLUME CALCULATION OF RATS' ORGANS AND ITS APPLICATION IN THE VALIDATION OF THE VOLUME RELATION BETWEEN THE ABDOMINAL CAVITY AND THE HERNIAL SAC IN INCISIONAL HERNIAS WITH "LOSS OF ABDOMINAL DOMAIN"

    PubMed Central

    de ARAÚJO, Luz Marina Gonçalves; SERIGIOLLE, Leonardo Carvalho; GOMES, Helbert Minuncio Pereira; RODRIGUES, Daren Athiê Boy; LOPES, Carolina Marques; LEME, Pedro Luiz Squilacci

    2014-01-01

    Background The calculation of the volume ratio between the hernia sac and the abdominal cavity of incisional hernias is based on tomographic sections as well as the mathematical formula of the volume of the ellipsoid, which allows determining whether this is a giant hernia or there is a "loss of domain". As the images used are not exact geometric figures, the study of the volume of two solid organs of Wistar rats was performed to validate these calculations. Aim To correlate two methods for determining the volume of the kidney and spleen of rats, comparing a direct method of observation of the volume with the mathematical calculation of this value. Methods The volume of left kidney, geometrically more regular, and spleen, with its peculiar shape, of ten animals was established in cubic centimeters after complete immersion in water with the aid of a beaker graduated in millimeters. These values ​​were compared with those obtained by calculating the same volume with a specific mathematical formula: V = 4/3 × π × (r1 x r2 x r3). Data were compared and statistically analyzed by Student's t test. RESULTS: Although the average volume obtained was higher through the direct method (1.13 cm3 for the left kidney and 0.71 cm3 for the spleen) than the values ​​calculated with the mathematical formula (0.81 cm3 and 0.54 cm3), there were no statistically significant differences between the values ​​found for the two organs (p>0.05). Conclusion There was adequate correlation between the direct calculation of the volume of the kidney and spleen with the result of mathematical calculation of these values ​​in the animals' studies. PMID:25184766

  11. Guidebook for performance assessment parameters used in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant compliance certification application. Volume 2: Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Howarth, S.M.; Martell, M.A.; Weiner, R.; Lattier, C.

    1998-06-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Compliance Certification Application (CCA) Performance Assessment (PA) Parameter Database and its ties to supporting information evolved over the course of two years. When the CCA was submitted to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in October 1996, information such as identification of parameter value or distribution source was documented using processes established by Sandia National Laboratories WIPP Quality Assurance Procedures. Reviewers later requested additional supporting documentation, links to supporting information, and/or clarification for many parameters. This guidebook is designed to document a pathway through the complex parameter process and help delineate flow paths to supporting information for all WIPP CCA parameters. In addition, this report is an aid for understanding how model parameters used in the WIPP CCA were developed and qualified. To trace the source information for a particular parameter, a dual-route system was established. The first route uses information from the Parameter Records package as it existed when the CCA calculations were run. The second route leads from the EPA Parameter Database to additional supporting information.

  12. Guidebook for performance assessment parameters used in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant compliance certification application. Volume 1: Main report

    SciTech Connect

    Howarth, S.M.; Martell, M.A.; Weiner, R.; Lattier, C.

    1998-06-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Compliance Certification Application (CCA) Performance Assessment (PA) Parameter Database and its ties to supporting information evolved over the course of two years. When the CCA was submitted to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in October 1996, information such as identification of parameter value or distribution source was documented using processes established by Sandia National Laboratories WIPP Quality Assurance Procedures. Reviewers later requested additional supporting documentation, links to supporting information, and/or clarification for many parameters. This guidebook is designed to document a pathway through the complex parameter process and help delineate flow paths to supporting information for all WIPP CCA parameters. In addition, this report is an aid for understanding how model parameters used in the WIPP CCA were developed and qualified. To trace the source information for a particular parameter, a dual-route system was established. The first route uses information from the Parameter Records Package as it existed when the CCA calculations were run. The second route leads from the EPA Parameter Database to additional supporting information.

  13. Small capacity, low cost (Ni-H2) design concept for commercial, military, and higher-volume aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, James R.; Cook, William D.; Smith, Ron

    1991-01-01

    Nickel Hydrogen (Ni/H2) batteries have become the technology of choice for both commercial and defense related satellites in geosynchronous orbits. Their use for low earth orbit (LEO) applications is not as advanced, but seems just as inevitable because of their inherent advantages over nickel cadmium batteries. These include superior energy density, longer cycle life, and better tolerance to over-charge and reversal. Ni/H2 cells have the added advantage in both construction and operation of not presenting the environmental possibility of cadmium pollution. Unfortunately, but necessarily, the design of these cells has been driven to high cost by the sophistication of the satellites and their uses. Now, using most of the same concepts but less costly materials and techniques, a low cost, small cell design was developed. Combined with the concept of the common pressure vessel, this new design promises to be ideal for the small-sat and commercial markets which, increasingly, are calling for large numbers of less expensive satellites.

  14. Space applications of Automation, Robotics and Machine Intelligence Systems (ARAMIS). Volume 4: Application of ARAMIS capabilities to space project functional elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Minsky, M. L.; Smith, D. B. S.

    1982-01-01

    Applications of automation, robotics, and machine intelligence systems (ARAMIS) to space activities and their related ground support functions are studied, so that informed decisions can be made on which aspects of ARAMIS to develop. The specific tasks which will be required by future space project tasks are identified and the relative merits of these options are evaluated. The ARAMIS options defined and researched span the range from fully human to fully machine, including a number of intermediate options (e.g., humans assisted by computers, and various levels of teleoperation). By including this spectrum, the study searches for the optimum mix of humans and machines for space project tasks.

  15. RCRA Part B Permit Application for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory - Volume 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Pamela R. Cunningham

    1992-07-01

    This section of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) Part B permit application describes the waste characteristics Of the transuranic (TRU) mixed wastes at the RWMC waste management units to be permitted: the Intermediate-Level Transuranic Storage Facility (ILTSF) and the Waste Storage Facility (WSF). The ILTSF is used to store radioactive remote-handled (RH) wastes. The WSF will be used to store radioactive contact-handled (CH) wastes. The Transuranic Storage Area (TSA) was established at the RWMC to provide interim storage of TRU waste. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A defines TRU waste as waste contaminated with alpha-emitting transuranium radionuclides with half-lives greater than 20 years in concentrations greater than 100 nanocuries per gram (nCi/g) o f waste material. The TSA serves generators both on and off the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The ILTSF is located at the TSA, and the WSF will be located there also. Most of the wastes managed at the TSA are mixed wastes, which are radioactive wastes regulated under the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) that also contain hazardous materials regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Regulations. These wastes include TRU mixed wastes and some low-level mixed wastes. Accordingly, the TSA is subject to the permitting requirements of RCRA and the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act (IDAPA). Prior to 1982, DOE orders defined TRU wastes as having transuranium radionuclides in concentrations greater than 10 nCi/g, The low-level mixed wastes managed at the TSA are those wastes with 10 to 100 nCi/g of TRU radionuclides that prior to 1982 were considered TRU waste.

  16. Application of the Price-Volume Approach in Cases of Innovative Drugs Where Value-Based Pricing is Inadequate: Description of Real Experiences in Italy.

    PubMed

    Messori, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Several cases of expensive drugs designed for large patient populations (e.g. sofosbuvir) have raised a complex question in terms of drug pricing. Even assuming value-based pricing, the treatment with these drugs of all eligible patients would have an immense budgetary impact, which is unsustainable also for the richest countries. This raises the need to reduce the prices of these agents in comparison with those suggested by the value-based approach and to devise new pricing methods that can achieve this goal. The present study discusses in detail the following two methods: (i) The approach based on setting nation-wide budget thresholds for individual innovative agents in which a fixed proportion of the historical pharmaceutical expenditure represents the maximum budget attributable to an innovative treatment; (ii) The approach based on nation-wide price-volume agreements in which drug prices are progressively reduced as more patients receive the treatment. The first approach has been developed in the USA by the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review and has been applied to PCSK9 inhibitors (alirocumab and evolocumab). The second approach has been designed for the Italian market and has found a systematic application to manage the price of ranibizumab, sofosbuvir, and PCSK9 inhibitors. While, in the past, price-volume agreements have been applied only on an empirical basis (i.e. in the absence of any quantitative theoretical rule), more recently some explicit mathematical models have been described. The performance of these models is now being evaluated on the basis of the real-world experiences conducted in some European countries, especially Italy. PMID:27216427

  17. Low-volume application by mist-blower compared with conventional compression sprayer treatment of houses with residual pyrethroid to control the malaria vector Anopheles albimanus in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, C; Rodriguez, M H; Bown, D N; Arredondo-Jiménez, J I

    1995-04-01

    Village-scale trials were carried out in southern Mexico to compare the efficacy of indoor-spraying of the pyrethroid insecticide lambda-cyhalothrin applied either as low-volume (LV) aqueous emulsion or as wettable-powder (WP) aqueous suspension for residual control of the principal coastal malaria vector Anopheles albimanus. Three indoor spray rounds were conducted at 3-month intervals using back-pack mist-blowers to apply lambda-cyhalothrin 12.5 mg a.i./m2 by LV, whereas the WP was applied by conventional compression sprayer at a mean rate of 26.5 mg a.i./m2. Both treatments caused mosquito mortality indoors and outdoors (collected inside house curtains) as a result of contact with treated surfaces before and after feeding, but had no significant impact on overall population density of An. albimanus resting indoors or assessed by human bait collections. Contact bioassays showed that WP and LV treatments with lambda-cyhalothrin were effective for 12-20 weeks (> 75% mortality) without causing excito-repellency. Compared to the WP treatment (8 houses/man/day), LV treatment (25 houses/man/day) was more than 3 times quicker per house, potentially saving 68% of labour costs. This is offset, however, by the much lower unit price of a compression sprayer (e.g. Hudson 'X-pert' at US$120) than a mist-blower (e.g. 'Super Jolly' at US$350), and higher running costs for LV applications. It was calculated, therefore, that LV becomes more economical than WP after 18.8 treatments/100 houses/10 men at equivalent rates of application, or after 7.6 spray rounds with half-rate LV applications. PMID:7787228

  18. Minimizing the impact of the mosquito adulticide naled on honey bees, Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae): aerial ultra-low-volume application using a high-pressure nozzle system.

    PubMed

    Zhong, He; Latham, Mark; Payne, Steve; Brock, Cate

    2004-02-01

    The impact of the mosquito adulticide naled on honey bees, Apis mellifera L., was evaluated by exposing test beehives to nighttime aerial ultra-low-volume (ULV) applications using a high-pressure nozzle system. The tests were conducted during routine mosquito control missions at Manatee County, Florida, in summer 2000. Two treatment sites were sprayed a total of four times over a 10-wk period. Honey bees, which clustered outside of the hive entrances, were subjected to naled exposure during these mosquito control sprays. The highest average naled ground deposition was 2,688 microg/m2 at the Port Manatee site, which resulted in statistically significant bee mortality (118) compared with the controls. At the Terra Ceia Road site, an intermediate level of naled deposition was found (1,435 microg/m2). For this spray mission, the range of dead bees per hive at Terra Ceia was 2 to 9 before spraying and 5 to 36 after naled application. Means of all other naled ground depositions were < 850 microl/m2. We concluded that substantial bee mortality (> 100 dead bees) resulted when naled residue levels were > 2,000 kg/m2 and honey bees were clustered outside of the hive entrances during mosquito adulticide applications. Compared with the flat-fan nozzle systems currently used by most of Florida's mosquito control programs, the high-pressure nozzle system used in this experiment substantially reduced environmental insecticide contamination and lead to decreased bee mortality. Statistical analysis also showed that average honey yield at the end of the season was not significantly reduced for those hives that were exposed to the insecticide. PMID:14998120

  19. Applications systems verification and transfer project. Volume 7: Cost/benefit analysis for the ASVT on operational applications of satellite snow-cover observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castruccio, P.; Loats, H.; Lloyd, D.; Newman, P.

    1981-01-01

    The results of the OASSO ASVT's were used to estimate the benefits accruing from the added information available from satellite snowcover area measurement. Estimates of the improvement in runoff prediction due to addition of SATSCAM were made by the Colorado ASVT personnel. The improvement estimate is 6-10%. Data were applied to subregions covering the Western States snow area amended by information from the ASVT and other watershed experts to exclude areas which are not impacted by snowmelt runoff. Benefit models were developed for irrigation and hydroenergy uses. The benefit/cost ratio is 72:1. Since only two major benefit contributors were used and since the forecast improvement estimate does not take into account future satellite capabilities these estimates are considered to be conservative. The large magnitude of the benefit/cost ratio supports the utility and applicability of SATSCAM.

  20. Quantum volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, V. A.

    2015-08-01

    Quantum systems in a mechanical embedding, the breathing mode of a small particles, optomechanical system, etc. are far not the full list of examples in which the volume exhibits quantum behavior. Traditional consideration suggests strain in small systems as a result of a collective movement of particles, rather than the dynamics of the volume as an independent variable. The aim of this work is to show that some problem here might be essentially simplified by introducing periodic boundary conditions. At this case, the volume is considered as the independent dynamical variable driven by the internal pressure. For this purpose, the concept of quantum volume based on Schrödinger’s equation in 𝕋3 manifold is proposed. It is used to explore several 1D model systems: An ensemble of free particles under external pressure, quantum manometer and a quantum breathing mode. In particular, the influence of the pressure of free particle on quantum oscillator is determined. It is shown also that correction to the spectrum of the breathing mode due to internal degrees of freedom is determined by the off-diagonal matrix elements of the quantum stress. The new treatment not using the “force” theorem is proposed for the quantum stress tensor. In the general case of flexible quantum 3D dynamics, quantum deformations of different type might be introduced similarly to monopole mode.

  1. Capital Requirements Estimating Model (CREMOD) for electric utilities. Volume I. Methodology description, model, description, and guide to model applications. [For each year up to 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, D E; Gammon, J; Shaw, M L

    1980-01-01

    The Capital Requirements Estimating Model for the Electric Utilities (CREMOD) is a system of programs and data files used to estimate the capital requirements of the electric utility industry for each year between the current one and 1990. CREMOD disaggregates new electric plant capacity levels from the Mid-term Energy Forecasting System (MEFS) Integrating Model solution over time using actual projected commissioning dates. It computes the effect on aggregate capital requirements of dispersal of new plant and capital expenditures over relatively long construction lead times on aggregate capital requirements for each year. Finally, it incorporates the effects of real escalation in the electric utility construction industry on these requirements and computes the necessary transmission and distribution expenditures. This model was used in estimating the capital requirements of the electric utility sector. These results were used in compilation of the aggregate capital requirements for the financing of energy development as published in the 1978 Annual Report to Congress. This volume, Vol. I, explains CREMOD's methodology, functions, and applications.

  2. ANALYSIS OF THE VOLUME OF RED BLOOD CELLS: APPLICATION OF THE EXPECTATION-MAXIMIZATION ALGORITHM TO GROUPED DATA FROM THE DOUBLY-TRUNCATED LOGNORMAL DISTRIBUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In accordance with general principles recommended by the International Committee for Standardization in Haematology (1982, Journal of Clinical Pathology 35, 1320-1322), the authors have developed statistical methods for the analysis of red cell volume distributions. To select an ...

  3. Data catalog series for space science and applications flight missions. Volume 5A: Descriptions of astronomy, astrophysics, and solar physics spacecraft and investigations. Volume 5B: Descriptions of data sets from astronomy, astrophysics, and solar physics spacecraft and investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sang J. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The main purpose of the data catalog series is to provide descriptive references to data generated by space science flight missions. The data sets described include all of the actual holdings of the Space Science Data Center (NSSDC), all data sets for which direct contact information is available, and some data collections held and serviced by foreign investigators, NASA and other U.S. government agencies. This volume contains narrative descriptions of data sets of astronomy, astrophysics, solar physics spacecraft and investigations. The following spacecraft series are included: Mariner, Pioneer, Pioneer Venus, Venera, Viking, Voyager, and Helios. Separate indexes to the planetary and interplanetary missions are also provided.

  4. VOLUMNECT: measuring volumes with Kinect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintino Ferreira, Beatriz; Griné, Miguel; Gameiro, Duarte; Costeira, João. Paulo; Sousa Santos, Beatriz

    2014-03-01

    This article presents a solution to volume measurement object packing using 3D cameras (such as the Microsoft KinectTM). We target application scenarios, such as warehouses or distribution and logistics companies, where it is important to promptly compute package volumes, yet high accuracy is not pivotal. Our application auto- matically detects cuboid objects using the depth camera data and computes their volume and sorting it allowing space optimization. The proposed methodology applies to a point cloud simple computer vision and image processing methods, as connected components, morphological operations and Harris corner detector, producing encouraging results, namely an accuracy in volume measurement of 8mm. Aspects that can be further improved are identified; nevertheless, the current solution is already promising turning out to be cost effective for the envisaged scenarios.

  5. Direct Volume Rendering of Curvilinear Volumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaziri, Arsi; Wilhelms, J.; Challinger, J.; Alper, N.; Ramamoorthy, S.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Direct volume rendering can visualize sampled 3D scalar data as a continuous medium, or extract features. However, it is generally slow. Furthermore, most algorithms for direct volume rendering have assumed rectilinear gridded data. This paper discusses methods for using direct volume rendering when the original volume is curvilinear, i.e. is divided into six-sided cells which are not necessarily equilateral hexahedra. One approach is to ray-cast such volumes directly. An alternative approach is to interpolate the sample volumes to a rectilinear grid, and use this regular volume for rendering. Advantages and disadvantages of the two approaches in terms of speed and image quality are explored.

  6. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Volume-controlled buckling of thin elastic shells: application to crusts formed on evaporating partially wetted droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, D. A.

    2006-10-01

    Motivated by observing the buckling of glassy crusts formed on evaporating droplets of polymer and colloid solutions, we numerically model the deformation and buckling of spherical elastic caps controlled by varying the volume between the shell and the substrate. This volume constraint mimics the incompressibility of the unevaporated solvent. Discontinuous buckling is found to occur for sufficiently thin and/or large contact angle shells, and robustly takes the form of a single circular region near the boundary that 'snaps' to an inverted shape, in contrast to the externally pressurized shells case. Scaling theory for shallow shells is shown to approximate well the critical buckling volume, the subsequent enlargement of the inverted region and the contact line force.

  7. A new definition of the representative volume element in numerical homogenization problems and its application to the performance evaluation of analytical homogenization models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussaddy, Hadi

    The Representative Volume Element (RVE) plays a central role in the mechanics of composite materials with respect to predicting their effective properties. Numerical homogenization delivers accurate estimations of composite effective properties when associated with a RVE. In computational homogenization, the RVE refers to an ensemble of random material volumes that yield, by an averaging procedure, the effective properties of the bulk material, within a tolerance. A large diversity of RVE quantitative definitions, providing computational methods to estimate the RVE size, are found in literature. In this study, the ability of the different RVE definitions to yield accurate effective properties is investigated. The assessment is conducted on a specific random microstructure, namely an elastic two-phase three dimensional composite reinforced by randomly oriented fibers. Large scale finite element simulations of material volumes of different sizes are performed on high performance computational servers using parallel computing. The materials volumes are virtually generated and subjected to periodic boundary conditions. It is shown that most popular RVE definitions, based on convergence of the properties when increasing the material volume, yields inaccurate effective properties. A new RVE definition is introduced based on the statistical variations of the properties computed from material volumes. It is shown to produce more accurate estimations of the effective properties. In addition, the new definition produced RVE that are smaller in size than that of other RVE definitions ; also the number of necessary finite element simulations to determine the RVE is substantially reduced. The computed effective properties are compared to that of analytical models. The comparisons are performed for a wide range of fibers aspect ratios (up to 120), properties contrast (up to 300) and volume fractions only up to 20% due to computational limits. The Mori-Tanaka model and the two

  8. Targeting Cydia pomonella (L.)(Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) Adults with Low Volume Applications of Insecticides Alone and in Combination with Sex Pheromone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies examined the effectiveness of adding insecticides to low volume sprays of a microencapsulated (MEC) sex pheromone to manage codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L). The activities of fifteen insecticides against the adult stage were first evaluated with a plastic cup assay. In general, moth longev...

  9. Ambient isobaric heat capacities, C(p,m), for ionic solids and liquids: an application of volume-based thermodynamics (VBT).

    PubMed

    Glasser, Leslie; Jenkins, H Donald Brooke

    2011-09-01

    Thermodynamic properties, such as standard entropy, among others, have been shown to correlate well with formula volume, V(m), thus permitting prediction of these properties on the basis of chemical formula and density alone, with no structural detail required. We have termed these procedures "volume-based thermodynamics" (VBT). We here extend these studies to ambient isobaric heat capacities, C(p,m), of a wide range of materials. We show that heat capacity is strongly linearly correlated with formula volume for large sets of minerals, for ionic solids in general, and for ionic liquids and that the results demonstrate that the Neumann-Kopp rule (additivity of heat capacity contributions per atom) is widely valid for ionic materials, but the smaller heat capacity contribution per unit volume for ionic liquids is noted and discussed. Using these correlations, it is possible to predict values of ambient (298 K) heat capacities quite simply. We also show that the heat capacity contribution of water molecules of crystallization is remarkably constant, at 41.3 ± 4.7 J K(-1) (mol of water)(-1), so that the heat capacities of various hydrates may be reliably estimated from the values of their chemical formula neighbors. This result complements similar observations that we have reported for other thermodynamic differences of hydrates. PMID:21812409

  10. SECOND SYMPOSIUM ON THE TRANSFER AND UTILIZATION OF PARTICULATE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY: VOLUME IV. SPECIAL APPLICATIONS FOR AIR POLLUTION MEASUREMENT AND CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document the approximately 120 presentations at the EPA/IERL-RTP-sponsored symposium, attended by nearly 800 representatives of a wide variety of companies (including 17 utilities). The keynote speech for the 4-day meeting was by EPA's Frank Princiotta. This volum...

  11. [Applications of multi-micro-volume pressure-assisted derivatization reaction device for analysis of polar heterocyclic aromatic amines by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiru; Chen, Fangxiang; Shi, Yamei; Tan, Connieal; Chen, Xi

    2013-01-01

    A multi-micro-volume pressure-assisted derivatization reaction device has been designed and made for the silylation derivatization of polar heterocyclic aromatic amines by N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl )-N-methyl-trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) with 1% catalyst tert-butyldimethylchlorosilane (TBDMCS) at a high temperature. The tert-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives then could be automatically analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Using the pressure-assisted device, the silylation reaction may occur at a temperature higher than the boiling points of the reagents, and several micro-volume samples can be simultaneously pretreated in the same device to shorten the sample-preparation time and to improve the repeatability. The derivatization conditions including the headspace volume of the vial, the evaporative surface area of the reagent, derivatization temperature and time have been discussed for the use of the pressure-assisted device. The experimental results proved that the device is an effective way for the simultaneous derivatization of several micro-volume samples at a high temperature. Compared with a common device, the derivative amounts were obviously increased when using the pressure-assisted device at 90 degrees C. Quantitative derivatization can be achieved even at 150 degrees C while there was no common device could be applied at such a high temperature due to the heavy losses of reagents by evaporation. However, no obviously higher reaction speed has been observed in such a circumstance with a higher temperature and a higher pressure using the pressure-assisted device. PMID:23667982

  12. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act: Part B, Permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 1, Revison 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This report contains information related to the permit application for the WIPP facility. Information is presented on solid waste management; personnel safety; emergency plans; site characterization; applicable regulations; decommissioning; and ground water monitoring requirements.

  13. A method to estimate the fractional fat volume within a ROI of a breast biopsy for WAXS applications: Animal tissue evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Robert Y.; McDonald, Nancy Laamanen, Curtis; LeClair, Robert J.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To develop a method to estimate the mean fractional volume of fat (ν{sup ¯}{sub fat}) within a region of interest (ROI) of a tissue sample for wide-angle x-ray scatter (WAXS) applications. A scatter signal from the ROI was obtained and use of ν{sup ¯}{sub fat} in a WAXS fat subtraction model provided a way to estimate the differential linear scattering coefficient μ{sub s} of the remaining fatless tissue. Methods: The efficacy of the method was tested using animal tissue from a local butcher shop. Formalin fixed samples, 5 mm in diameter 4 mm thick, were prepared. The two main tissue types were fat and meat (fibrous). Pure as well as composite samples consisting of a mixture of the two tissue types were analyzed. For the latter samples, ν{sub fat} for the tissue columns of interest were extracted from corresponding pixels in CCD digital x-ray images using a calibration curve. The means ν{sup ¯}{sub fat} were then calculated for use in a WAXS fat subtraction model. For the WAXS measurements, the samples were interrogated with a 2.7 mm diameter 50 kV beam and the 6° scattered photons were detected with a CdTe detector subtending a solid angle of 7.75 × 10{sup −5} sr. Using the scatter spectrum, an estimate of the incident spectrum, and a scatter model, μ{sub s} was determined for the tissue in the ROI. For the composite samples, a WAXS fat subtraction model was used to estimate the μ{sub s} of the fibrous tissue in the ROI. This signal was compared to μ{sub s} of fibrous tissue obtained using a pure fibrous sample. Results: For chicken and beef composites, ν{sup ¯}{sub fat}=0.33±0.05 and 0.32 ± 0.05, respectively. The subtractions of these fat components from the WAXS composite signals provided estimates of μ{sub s} for chicken and beef fibrous tissue. The differences between the estimates and μ{sub s} of fibrous obtained with a pure sample were calculated as a function of the momentum transfer x. A t-test showed that the mean of the

  14. Validation of Student and Parent Reported Data on the Basic Grant Application Form. Final Report. Volume III, Internal Revenue Service Comparison Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuchak, JoAnn

    Application forms for the Basic Educational Opportunity Grant (BEOG) Program for 1974-1975 were compared to Internal Revenue Service (IRA) tax forms to determine the scope of applicants' misreporting and to identify categories of applicants who tend to misreport. A total of 70,063 tax forms and BEOG records from eligible and ineligible applicants…

  15. Earth Observations Division version of the Laboratory for Applications of Remote Sensing System (EOD-LARSYS) user guide for the IBM 370/148. Volume 2: User reference manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aucoin, P. J.; Stewart, J.; Mckay, M. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    This document presents instructions for analysts who use the EOD-LARSYS as programmed on the Purdue University IBM 370/148 (recently replaced by the IBM 3031) computer. It presents sample applications, control cards, and error messages for all processors in the system and gives detailed descriptions of the mathematical procedures and information needed to execute the system and obtain the desired output. EOD-LARSYS is the JSC version of an integrated batch system for analysis of multispectral scanner imagery data. The data included is designed for use with the as built documentation (volume 3) and the program listings (volume 4). The system is operational from remote terminals at Johnson Space Center under the virtual machine/conversational monitor system environment.

  16. Results Oriented Management in Education. Project R.O.M.E. The Continued Refinement and Development of the Georgia Principal Assessment System and Its Application to a Field-Based Training Program for Public School Principals. Assessment Design--Procedures--Instrumentation--Field Test Results. Final Report: Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellett, Chad D.

    This publication is one of two companion volumes that describe processes, procedures, and products developed as parts of the Georgia Principal Assessment System (GPAS) and present the results of a test application of the GPAS to participants in a field-based training program for public school principals. This volume consists mainly of descriptive…

  17. Volumetric measurement of tank volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Richard T. (Inventor); Vanbuskirk, Paul D. (Inventor); Weber, William F. (Inventor); Froebel, Richard C. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A method is disclosed for determining the volume of compressible gas in a system including incompressible substances in a zero-gravity environment consisting of measuring the change in pressure (delta P) for a known volume change rate (delta V/delta t) in the polytrophic region between isothermal and adiabatic conditions. The measurements are utilized in an idealized formula for determining the change in isothermal pressure (delta P sub iso) for the gas. From the isothermal pressure change (delta iso) the gas volume is obtained. The method is also applicable to determination of gas volume by utilizing work (W) in the compression process. In a passive system, the relationship of specific densities can be obtained.

  18. Design and development of Stirling engines for stationary power generation applications in the 500 to 3000 horsepower range. Volume 2. Program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available,

    1980-09-15

    A plan for implementing the proposed state-of-the-art design described in Volume I has been developed. The main objective of the project is to demonstrate a large coal-fired Stirling engine and thus shorten the lead time to commercialization. The demonstration engine will be based on the concepts developed in the first phase of this program, as detailed in Volume I of this report. Thus the proposed program plan is based on the U-4 engine concept fired by a fluidized bed combustor with a two-stage gravity-assisted heat pipe. The plan is divided into five phases and an ongoing supporting technology program. Phase I, Conceptual Design, has been completed. The remaining phases are: Preliminary Design; Final Design; Fabrication; and Testing and Demonstration. The primary target is to begin testing the large coal-fired engine by the fifth year (1985) after the start of Preliminary Design.

  19. Temporal behavior of peripheral organ distribution volume in mammillary systems. II. Application to background correction in separate glomerular filtration rate estimation in man

    SciTech Connect

    Decostre, P.L.; Salmon, Y. )

    1990-10-01

    An original approach to background subtraction is presented for 99mTc-DTPA separate glomerular filtration rate (SGFR) estimation in man. The method is based on the properties of the peripheral organ distribution volume (PODV) in mammillary systems. These PODV properties allow easy separation of the components of the renogram, i.e., interstitial fluid, plasma and renal activities. The proposed algorithm takes advantage of the linear time dependence of the kidney distribution volume, during the renal uptake phase, to correct for the plasma residual activity, which always remains after classical background correction. Theoretically, the ratio between kidney uptake and SGFR should be identical for both left and right kidneys, even for very asymmetrical kidney functions. This is best verified when the proposed plasma residual activity correction is applied.

  20. Estimation of gonad volume, fecundity, and reproductive stage of shovelnose sturgeon using sonography and endoscopy with application to the endangered pallid sturgeon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bryan, J.L.; Wildhaber, M.L.; Papoulias, D.M.; DeLonay, A.J.; Tillitt, D.E.; Annis, M.L.

    2007-01-01

    Most species of sturgeon are declining in the Mississippi River Basin of North America including pallid (Scaphirhynchus albus F. and R.) and shovelnose sturgeons (S. platorynchus R.). Understanding the reproductive cycle of sturgeon in the Mississippi River Basin is important in evaluating the status and viability of sturgeon populations. We used non-invasive, non-lethal methods for examining internal reproductive organs of shovelnose and pallid sturgeon. We used an ultrasound to measure egg diameter, fecundity, and gonad volume; endoscope was used to visually examine the gonad. We found the ultrasound to accurately measure the gonad volume, but it underestimated egg diameter by 52%. After correcting for the measurement error, the ultrasound accurately measured the gonad volume but it was higher than the true gonad volume for stages I and II. The ultrasound underestimated the fecundity of shovelnose sturgeon by 5%. The ultrasound fecundity was lower than the true fecundity for stage III and during August. Using the endoscope, we viewed seven different egg color categories. Using a model selection procedure, the presence of four egg categories correctly predicted the reproductive stage ± one reproductive stage of shovelnose sturgeon 95% of the time. For pallid sturgeon, the ultrasound overestimated the density of eggs by 49% and the endoscope was able to view eggs in 50% of the pallid sturgeon. Individually, the ultrasound and endoscope can be used to assess certain reproductive characteristics in sturgeon. The use of both methods at the same time can be complementary depending on the parameter measured. These methods can be used to track gonad characteristics, including measuring Gonadosomatic Index in individuals and/or populations through time, which can be very useful when associating gonad characteristics with environmental spawning triggers or with repeated examinations of individual fish throughout the reproductive cycle.

  1. A computational framework for conservative, three-dimensional, unsplit, geometric transport with application to the volume-of-fluid (VOF) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owkes, Mark; Desjardins, Olivier

    2014-08-01

    In this work, a novel computational framework for calculating convection fluxes is developed and employed in the context of the piecewise linear interface calculation (PLIC) volume-of-fluid (VOF) method. The scheme is three-dimensional, unsplit, discretely conservative, and bounded. The scheme leverages the idea of semi-Lagrangian transport to estimate the amount of liquid that is fluxed through each face during a time-step. The present work can be seen as an extension of the two-dimensional EMFPA method of López et al. (2004) [16] to three dimensions and an improvement of the three-dimensional FMFPA-3D method of Hernández et al. (2008) [17] with the addition of discrete conservation. In FMFPA-3D, fluxes of liquid volume fraction are calculated by transporting a cell face back in time with a semi-Lagrangian method that uses cell face edge velocities to produce a flux hexahedron with flat faces. The flux hexahedron may overlap with neighboring fluxes hindering the conservation properties of the method. The proposed method computes the fluxes by transporting the cell face back in time using a semi-Lagrangian step based on the cell face corner velocities, which results in a three-dimensional, generalized flux hexahedron that does not typically have flat faces. However, the flux volumes do not overlap and discrete conservation can be achieved. The complex flux volume is partitioned into a collection of simplices and a simple sign convention allows the calculation of the flux to be reduced to a straightforward and systematic algorithm. The proposed VOF scheme is tested on multiple benchmark cases including Zalesak's disk, two- and three-dimensional deformation tests, and the evolution of a droplet in homogeneous isotropic turbulence.

  2. Eleventh annual Department of Energy low-level waste management conference. Volume 3: Waste characterization, waste reduction and minimization, prototype licensing application

    SciTech Connect

    1989-11-01

    Thirteen papers are presented in volume 3. The seven papers on waste characterization discuss sampling, analysis, and certification techniques for low-level radioactive wastes. Three papers discuss US DOE waste minimization policies and regulations, Y-12 Plant`s reduction of chlorinated solvents, and C-14 removal from spent resins. The last three papers discuss the licensing studies for earth-mounded concrete bunkers for LLW disposal. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  3. A Descriptive Study of the Temporal Patterns of Volume and Contents Change in Human Acute Burn Edema: Application in Evidence-Based Intervention and Research Design.

    PubMed

    Edgar, Dale W; Fear, Mark; Wood, Fiona M

    2016-01-01

    Edema after burn contributes significantly to burn wound depth conversion. In humans after burn injury, there is a lack of detailed understanding of the contents and temporal changes in volume of acute tissue edema. The novel findings of these studies relate to the collection of edema fluid after partial-thickness burn injury. Edema volume peaks on day 1 after burn without formal fluid resuscitation. The studies indicated that the peak was on day 2 for a resuscitated burn. In contrast, animal studies suggest that the peak of edema occurs by or before day 1 after injury. The findings confirm the pitfalls of evidence derived from animal models and assuming direct transference to humans. Postburn edema was demonstrated to be a high-protein fluid (ie, ≥10 g/L) for the duration of the inflammatory period. The presence of high-protein edema presents greater challenges to clinicians developing novel treatment options. The rate of volume change over time tapered to insignificant levels after day 4 following burn. Greater than 98% of the edema contents was fluid. However, the size of particulate matter did not preclude it passing through patent lymphatic collectors. The results indicate a necessity for urgent postburn intervention, which should incorporate the active stimulation of the lymphatic system to improve efficacy of edema removal. PMID:27322367

  4. Monte-Carlo simulations of clinically realistic respiratory gated (18)F-FDG PET: application to lesion detectability and volume measurements.

    PubMed

    Vauclin, S; Michel, C; Buvat, I; Doyeux, K; Edet-Sanson, A; Vera, P; Gardin, I; Hapdey, S

    2015-01-01

    In PET/CT thoracic imaging, respiratory motion reduces image quality. A solution consists in performing respiratory gated PET acquisitions. The aim of this study was to generate clinically realistic Monte-Carlo respiratory PET data, obtained using the 4D-NCAT numerical phantom and the GATE simulation tool, to assess the impact of respiratory motion and respiratory-motion compensation in PET on lesion detection and volume measurement. To obtain reconstructed images as close as possible to those obtained in clinical conditions, a particular attention was paid to apply to the simulated data the same correction and reconstruction processes as those applied to real clinical data. The simulations required 140,000h (CPU) generating 1.5 To of data (98 respiratory gated and 49 ungated scans). Calibration phantom and patient reconstructed images from the simulated data were visually and quantitatively very similar to those obtained in clinical studies. The lesion detectability was higher when the better trade-off between lesion movement limitation (compared to ungated acquisitions) and image statistic preservation is considered (respiratory cycle sampling in 3 frames). We then compared the lesion volumes measured on conventional PET acquisitions versus respiratory gated acquisitions, using an automatic segmentation method and a 40%-threshold approach. A time consuming initial manual exclusion of noisy structures needed with the 40%-threshold was not necessary when the automatic method was used. The lesion detectability along with the accuracy of tumor volume estimates was largely improved with the gated compared to ungated PET images. PMID:25459525

  5. Modern Chemical Technology, Volume 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecsok, Robert L., Ed.; Chapman, Kenneth, Ed.

    This volume contains chapters 26-31 for the American Chemical Society (ACS) "Modern Chemical Technology" (ChemTeC) instructional material intended to prepare chemical technologists. Chapter 26 reviews oxidation and reduction, including applications in titrations with potassium permanganate and iodometry. Coordination compounds are described in the…

  6. LANDSAT-4 Science Characterization Early Results. Volume 4: Applications. [agriculture, soils land use, geology, hydrology, wetlands, water quality, biomass identification, and snow mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, J. L. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The excellent quality of TM data allows researchers to proceed directly with applications analyses, without spending a significant amount of time applying various corrections to the data. The early results derived of TM data are discussed for the following applications: agriculture, land cover/land use, soils, geology, hydrology, wetlands biomass, water quality, and snow.

  7. Validation of Student and Parent Report Data on the Basic Grant Application Form. Final Report. Volume I, Individual Validation Studies: Institution Referral Study, Pre-established Criteria Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Ronald J.

    Errors made on applications to the Basic Educational Opportunity Grant (BEOG) program were studied to determine the scope and nature of misreporting and misuse of the BEOG program. Characteristics of applicants who misreport personal and/or family financial circumstances were identified, and procedures were established to regularly screen and…

  8. High Sensitivity RT-qPCR Assay of Nonlabeled siRNA in Small Blood Volume for Pharmacokinetic Studies: Application to Survivin siRNA.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Bertrand Z; Lu, Ze; Wientjes, Guillaume M; Au, Jessie L-S

    2015-11-01

    RNAi therapeutics provide an opportunity to correct faulty genes, and several RNAi have entered clinical evaluation. The existing quantification methods typically use radioactivity- or fluorescence-labeled RNAi, require large blood volumes, and/or have a limited dynamic detection range. We established a quantitative reverse transcriptase real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) assay to measure RNAi; the model analyte was survivin siRNA (siSurvivin). A second siRNA was used as the internal standard. The three major steps were (a) extraction of the two siRNAs from blood or water, (b) synthesis of their cDNA by poly-A extension, and (c) qPCR of cDNA. Standard curves were established. Utility of the assay was demonstrated in a pharmacokinetic study where all 12 samples for the blood concentration-time profile were obtained from a single mouse given an intravenous dose of 1 nmole siSurvivin (prepared as lipoplex with pegylated cationic liposomes). The RT-qPCR assay was sensitive (lower detection limit of 100 fM) and had a 5 × 107-fold dynamic range and low sample volume requirement (10 μL). The 16-point standard curves constructed using whole blood samples were linear (R (2) > 0.98). The intraday and interday variations for the slopes were ≤6%, although the variations for accuracy and precision at individual concentrations were substantially higher (58-145%). Standard curves prepared with water in place of blood showed similar results (<6% difference), indicating water may be used when blood is not available. The current RT-qPCR assay enabled the measurement of nonlabeled siRNA in small volume of blood samples. PMID:26286676

  9. Note: Measurement method for sound velocity of melts in large volume press and its application to liquid sodium up to 2.0 GPa.

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Liu, Yonggang; Wang, Zhigang; Gong, Chaoying; Guo, Jie; Zhou, Wenge; Xie, Hongsen

    2011-08-01

    Based on large volume press and conventional pulse-echo ultrasonic technique, we have overcome the difficulty in determining the length of liquid specimen under high pressure, and the sound velocity in liquid Na has been measured up to 2 GPa. The P-V data deduced by our sound velocity results through equation of state is in an excellent agreement with previous data directly determined by piezometer method. This new experimental technique is convenient and ready for use, being expected to advance investigation on thermodynamic properties of liquid metals and other melts under high pressure. PMID:21895286

  10. Data catalog series for space science and applications flight missions. Volume 1A: Descriptions of planetary and heliocentric spacecraft and investigations, second edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, Winifred Sawtell (Editor); Vostreys, Robert W. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The main purpose of the data catalog series is to provide descriptive references to data generated by space science flight missions. The data sets described include all of the actual holdings of the Space Science Data Center (NSSDC), all data sets for which direct contact information is available, and some data collections held and serviced by foreign investigators, NASA and other U.S. government agencies. This volume contains narrative descriptions of planetary and heliocentric spacecraft and associated experiments. The following spacecraft series are included: Mariner, Pioneer, Pioneer Venus, Venera, Viking, Voyager, and Helios. Separate indexes to the planetary and interplanetary missions are also included.

  11. Predicting natural-convection-dominated phase change problems by control volume unstructured triangular grid: Applications to the melting of pure metal

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Z.C.; Liou, J.H.

    1998-02-20

    Control volume methods have recently been developed for fluid flow and heat transfer on unstructured meshes. In this study, the authors extend these methods to implement the solution of natural-convection-dominated melting of gallium by a fixed-grid method. A simple, robust, and reliable explicit numerical method (MAC method) is applied for an unstructured triangular grid. This investigation also applies the implicit SIMPLER method for an unstructured triangular grid. Results obtained from the unstructured triangular grid correlate well with the structured mesh computations and experimental data. Also, the feasibility of applying the triangular grid to complex geometric problems is demonstrated by calculating two different triangular domains.

  12. Data catalog series for space science and applications flight flight missions. Volume 2B: Descriptions of data sets from geostationary and high-altitude scientific spacecraft and investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schofield, Norman J. (Editor); Parthasarathy, R. (Editor); Hills, H. Kent (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The main purpose of the data catalog series is to provide descriptive references to data generated by space science flight missions. The data sets described include all of the actual holdings of the Space Science Data Center (NSSDC), all data sets for which direct contact information is available, and some data collections held and serviced by foreign investigators, NASA and other U.S. government agencies. This volume contains narrative descriptions of data sets from geostationary and high altitude scientific spacecraft and investigations. The following spacecraft series are included: Mariner, Pioneer, Pioneer Venus, Venera, Viking, Voyager, and Helios. Separate indexes to the planetary and interplanetary missions are also provided.

  13. Data catalog series for space science and applications flight missions. Volume 3B: Descriptions of data sets from low- and medium-altitude scientific spacecraft and investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, John E. (Editor); Horowitz, Richard (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The main purpose of the data catalog series is to provide descriptive references to data generated by space science flight missions. The data sets described include all of the actual holdings of the Space Science Data Center (NSSDC), all data sets for which direct contact information is available, and some data collections held and serviced by foreign investigators, NASA and other U.S. government agencies. This volume contains narrative descriptions of data sets from low and medium altitude scientific spacecraft and investigations. The following spacecraft series are included: Mariner, Pioneer, Pioneer Venus, Venera, Viking, Voyager, and Helios. Separate indexes to the planetary and interplanetary missions are also provided.

  14. Northeast Artificial Intelligence Consortium annual report. 1988 artificial intelligence applications to speech recognition. Volume 8. Interim report, January-December 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Rhody, H.E.; Ridley, T.R.; Biles, J.A.

    1989-10-01

    This report describes progress that has been made in the fourth year of the existence of the NAIC on the technical research tasks undertaken at the member universities. The topics covered in general are: versatile expert system for equipment maintenance, distributed AI for communications system control, automatic photointerpretation, time-oriented problem solving, speech understanding systems, knowledge base maintenance, hardware architectures for very large systems, knowledge-based reasoning and planning, and a knowledge acquisition, assistance, and explanation system. The specific topic for this volume is the design and implementation of a knowledge-based system to read speech spectrograms.

  15. Incorporating surface indicators of reservoir permeability into reservoir volume calculations: Application to the Colli Albani caldera and the Central Italy Geothermal Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, Guido; De Benedetti, Arnaldo Angelo; Bonamico, Andrea; Ramazzotti, Paolo; Mattei, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    The Quaternary Roman Volcanic Province extends for over 200 km along the Tyrrhenian margin of the Italian peninsula and is composed of several caldera complexes with significant associated geothermal potential. In spite of the massive programs of explorations conducted by the then state-owned ENEL and AGIP companies between the 1970s and 1990s, and the identification of several high enthalpy fields, this resource remains so far unexploited, although it occurs right below the densely populated metropolitan area of Roma capital city. The main reason for this failure is that deep geothermal reservoirs are associated with fractured rocks, the secondary permeability of which has been difficult to predict making the identification of the most productive volumes of the reservoirs and the localisation of productive wells uncertain. As a consequence, almost half of the many exploration deep bore-holes drilled in the area reached a dry target. This work reviews available data and re-assesses the geothermal potential of caldera-related systems in Central Italy, by analysing in detail the case of the Colli Albani caldera system, the closest to Roma capital city. A GIS based approach identifies the most promising reservoir volumes for geothermal exploitation and uses an improved volume method approach for the evaluation of geothermal potential. The approach is based on a three dimensional matrix of georeferenced spatial data; the A axis accounts for the modelling of the depth of the top of the reservoirs based on geophysical and direct data; the B axis accounts for the thermal modelling of the crust (i.e. T with depth) based on measured thermal gradients. Both A and B data are necessary but not sufficient to identify rock volumes actually permeated by geothermal fluids in fractured reservoirs. We discuss the implementation of a C axis that evaluates all surface data indicating permeability in the reservoir and actual geothermal fluid circulation. We consider datasets on: i

  16. Data catalog series for space science and applications flight missions. Volume 1B: Descriptions of data sets from planetary and heliocentric spacecraft and investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, Richard (Compiler); Jackson, John E. (Compiler); Cameron, Winifred S. (Compiler)

    1987-01-01

    The main purpose of the data catalog series is to provide descriptive references to data generated by space science flight missions. The data sets described include all of the actual holdings of the Space Science Data Center (NSSDC), all data sets for which direct contact information is available, and some data collections held and serviced by foreign investigators, NASA and other U.S. government agencies. This volume contains narrative descriptions of planetary and heliocentric spacecraft and associated experiments. The following spacecraft series are included: Mariner, Pioneer, Pioneer Venus, Venera, Viking, Voyager, and Helios. Separate indexes to the planetary and interplanetary missions are also provided.

  17. Liposome technology. Volume I: Preparation of liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Gregoriadis, G.

    1984-01-01

    These three volumes cover liposome technology in pharmacology and medicine. Contributors emphasize methodology used in their own laboratories, and include a brief introduction, coverage of relevant literature, applications and critical evaluations for the methods they describe. Volume I examine methods for the preparation of liposomes and auxiliary techniques.

  18. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 7: Revision 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This permit application (Vol. 7) for the WIPP facility contains appendices related to the following information: Ground water protection; personnel; solid waste management; and memorandums concerning environmental protection standards.

  19. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B Permit Application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Chapter D, Appendix D1 (conclusion): Volume 3, Revision 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    This report, Part B (Vol. 3) of the permit application for the WIPP facility, contains information related to the site characterization of the facility, including geology, design, rock salt evaluations, maps, drawings, and shaft excavations. (CBS)

  20. AAAIC '88 - Aerospace Applications of Artificial Intelligence; Proceedings of the Fourth Annual Conference, Dayton, OH, Oct. 25-27, 1988. Volumes 1 2

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    Topics presented include integrating neural networks and expert systems, neural networks and signal processing, machine learning, cognition and avionics applications, artificial intelligence and man-machine interface issues, real time expert systems, artificial intelligence, and engineering applications. Also considered are advanced problem solving techniques, combinational optimization for scheduling and resource control, data fusion/sensor fusion, back propagation with momentum, shared weights and recurrency, automatic target recognition, cybernetics, optical neural networks.

  1. Vector quantization for volume rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ning, Paul; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1992-01-01

    Volume rendering techniques typically process volumetric data in raw, uncompressed form. As algorithmic and architectural advances improve rendering speeds, however, larger data sets will be evaluated requiring consideration of data storage and transmission issues. In this paper, we analyze the data compression requirements for volume rendering applications and present a solution based on vector quantization. The proposed system compresses volumetric data and then renders images directly from the new data format. Tests on a fluid flow data set demonstrate that good image quality may be achieved at a compression ratio of 17:1 with only a 5 percent cost in additional rendering time.

  2. Diesel organic Rankine bottoming cycle powerplant program: Volume II. Industrial waste heat applications. Final report. [Using Fluorinol-85 as working fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    Several industrial processes and facilities were evaluated as possible sites to demonstrate the application of an Organic Rankine Cycle system (ORCS) using Fluorinol-85 as the working fluid to effect industrial waste-heat recovery. The economic applications for ORCS's using Fluorinol as the working fluid are in situations where the temperature of the waste-heat stream is between 400/sup 0/ and 1000/sup 0/F. A literature review indicated that the greatest potential and economic advantage for an industrial application for the recovery of waste heat by means of an ORCS using Fluorinol as the working fluid is from the exhausts of high-temperature furnaces and boilers for six major industry categories. Together they expend 80% of the US annual energy consumption in the industrial sector. From these categories, four potential applications were selected, specific information about plant characteristics was obtained, and detailed performance predictions were carried out for an ORC waste-heat recovery system operating in these plants. In addition, the performance of the existing demonstration system hardware was predicted for two recommended applications, the petroleum refinery and the steel mill, utilizing only a portion of the available exhaust gas flow. Only nominal modifications would be required to make the existing hardware suitable for a demonstration program for either of these recommended applications.

  3. Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting. Volume 3, Primary system integrity; Aging research, products and applications; Structural and seismic engineering; Seismology and geology: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Monteleone, S.

    1994-04-01

    This three-volume report contains 90 papers out of the 102 that were presented at the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 25-27, 1993. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Germany, Japan, Russia, Switzerland, Taiwan, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. Selected papers were indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  4. Ultra-trace plutonium determination in small volume seawater by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with application to Fukushima seawater samples.

    PubMed

    Bu, Wenting; Zheng, Jian; Guo, Qiuju; Aono, Tatsuo; Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo; Tazoe, Hirofumi; Yamada, Masatoshi

    2014-04-11

    Long-term monitoring of Pu isotopes in seawater is required for assessing Pu contamination in the marine environment from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. In this study, we established an accurate and precise analytical method based on anion-exchange chromatography and SF-ICP-MS. This method was able to determine Pu isotopes in seawater samples with small volumes (20-60L). The U decontamination factor was 3×10(7)-1×10(8), which provided sufficient removal of interfering U from the seawater samples. The estimated limits of detection for (239)Pu and (240)Pu were 0.11fgmL(-1) and 0.08fgmL(-1), respectively, which corresponded to 0.01mBqm(-3) for (239)Pu and 0.03mBqm(-3) for (240)Pu when a 20L volume of seawater was measured. We achieved good precision (2.9%) and accuracy (0.8%) for measurement of the (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratio in the standard Pu solution with a (239)Pu concentration of 11fgmL(-1) and (240)Pu concentration of 2.7fgmL(-1). Seawater reference materials were used for the method validation and both the (239+240)Pu activities and (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios agreed well with the expected values. Surface and bottom seawater samples collected off Fukushima in the western North Pacific since March 2011 were analyzed. Our results suggested that there was no significant variation of the Pu distribution in seawater in the investigated areas compared to the distribution before the accident. PMID:24636561

  5. Robust adaptive transient damping in power systems. Volume 1, System identification and decentralized adaptive control with applications to power systems: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pierre, D.A.; Sadighi, I.; Trudnowski, D.J.; Smith, J.R.; Nehrir, M.H.

    1992-09-01

    This Volume 1 of the final report on RP2665-1 contains two parts. part 1 consists of the following: (1) a literature review of real-time parameter identification algorithms which may be used in self-tuning adaptive control; (2) a description of mathematical discrete-time models that are linear in the parameters and that are useful for self-tuning adaptive control; (3) detailed descriptions of several variations of recursive-least-squares algorithms (RLS algorithms) and a unified representation of some of these algorithms; (4) a new variation of RLS called Corrector Least Squares (CLS); (5) a set of practical issues that need to be addressed in the implementation of RLS-based algorithms; (6) a set of simulation examples that illustrate properties of the identification methods; and (7) appendices With FORTRAN listings of several identification codes. Part 2 of this volume addresses the problem of damping electromechanical oscillations in power systems using advanced control theory. Two control strategies are developed. Controllers are then applied to a power system as power system stabilizer (PSS) units. The primary strategy is a decentralized indirect adaptive control scheme where multiple self-tuning adaptive controllers are coordinated. This adaptive scheme is presented in a general format and the stabilizing properties are demonstrated using examples. Both the adaptive and the conventional strategies are applied to a 17-machine computer-simulated power system. PSS units are applied to four generators in the system. Detailed simulation results are presented that show the feasibility and properties of both control schemes. FORTRAN codes for the control simulations are given in appendices of Part 2, as also are FORTRAN codes for the Prony identification method.

  6. Liquid crystals for optical non-display applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrentovich, Oleg D.

    2012-10-01

    Liquid crystals (LCs) demonstrate a number of unusual physical properties and effects that so far has been explored mainly for LC display (LCD) applications. This presentation discusses aspects of LCs that lead to the new opportunities in non-LCD applications, such as biosensors, micro- and opto-fluidics, switchable metamaterials. A LC is a unique medium for colloidal particles as it responds to the presence of inclusions by altering the orientation of LC molecules and thus the optic axis. The effect can be used in real-time sensing of microbes, as the molecular reorientation is easily detectable by optical means. Symmetry breaking associated with director distortions around inclusions in LCs enables a new mechanism of nonlinear electrophoresis. In the liquid-crystal enabled electrophoresis (LCEEP), the velocity of particle grows with the square of the applied field. The feature allows one to use an AC driving, to create steady flows and to move uncharged particle. The trajectory of particle is not necessarily parallel to the electric field and can be controlled by the director configuration. A gradient electric field can be used to align metallic nanorods into ordered LC-like birefringent structures with spatially varying refractive index; the latter represents a switchable medium for transformation optics.

  7. Investigation of storage system designs and techniques for optimizing energy conservation in integrated utility systems. Volume 2: (Application of energy storage to IUS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The applicability of energy storage devices to any energy system depends on the performance and cost characteristics of the larger basic system. A comparative assessment of energy storage alternatives for application to IUS which addresses the systems aspects of the overall installation is described. Factors considered include: (1) descriptions of the two no-storage IUS baselines utilized as yardsticks for comparison throughout the study; (2) discussions of the assessment criteria and the selection framework employed; (3) a summary of the rationale utilized in selecting water storage as the primary energy storage candidate for near term application to IUS; (4) discussion of the integration aspects of water storage systems; and (5) an assessment of IUS with water storage in alternative climates.

  8. Age estimation from canine volumes.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, Danilo; Gaudio, Daniel; Guercini, Nicola; Cipriani, Filippo; Gibelli, Daniele; Caputi, Sergio; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2015-08-01

    Techniques for estimation of biological age are constantly evolving and are finding daily application in the forensic radiology field in cases concerning the estimation of the chronological age of a corpse in order to reconstruct the biological profile, or of a living subject, for example in cases of immigration of people without identity papers from a civil registry. The deposition of teeth secondary dentine and consequent decrease of pulp chamber in size are well known as aging phenomena, and they have been applied to the forensic context by the development of age estimation procedures, such as Kvaal-Solheim and Cameriere methods. The present study takes into consideration canines pulp chamber volume related to the entire teeth volume, with the aim of proposing new regression formulae for age estimation using 91 cone beam computerized scans and a freeware open-source software, in order to permit affordable reproducibility of volumes calculation. PMID:25698302

  9. Validation of Student and Parent Report Data on the Basic Grant Application Form: Institution Referral Study, Pre-established Criteria Study, Overpayment Recovery. Final Report, Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Ronald J.; And Others

    The types and ranges of errors made on applications to the Basic Educational Opportunity Grant (BEOG) program were studied, along with procedures used in recovering overpayments. The objective was to assess the scope and nature of misreporting and misuse of the BEOG program. A 1975-1976 study reviewed cases referred to the U.S. Office of Education…

  10. A theoretical analysis of the free vibrations of ring- and/or stringer-stiffened elliptical cylinders with arbitrary end conditions. Volume 1: Analytical derivation and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, D. E.; Rao, C. K. P.

    1973-01-01

    The derivation and application of a Rayleigh-Ritz modal vibration analysis are presented for ring and/or stringer stiffened noncircular cylindrical shells with arbitrary end conditions. Comparisons with previous results from experimental and analytical studies showed this method of analysis to be accurate for a variety of end conditions. Results indicate a greater effect of rings on natural frequencies than of stringers.

  11. EFFECTS OF GROUND ULV (ULTRA-LOW VOLUME) APPLICATIONS OF FENTHION ON ESTUARINE BIOTA. 5. RESPONSES OF FIELD AND LABORATORY ESTUARINE BENTHIC COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of fenthion on macrobenthic animals that colonized sand-filled boxes at two salt marsh sites were determined after two field sprayings within 5 days and in the laboratory after intermittent exposures that simulated field conditions. ULV ground applications for adult m...

  12. Characterization of in-swath spray deposition for CP-11TT flat-fan nozzles used in low volume aerial application of crop production and protection materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For aerial application of crop production and protection materials, a complex interaction of controllable and uncontrollable factors is involved. It is difficult to completely characterize spray drift and deposition, but estimates can be made with appropriate sampling protocol and analysis. With c...

  13. Numerical simulation of dynamics of brushless dc motors for aerospace and other applications. Volume 2: User's guide to computer EMA model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demerdash, N. A. O.; Nehl, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    A description and user's guide of the computer program developed to simulate the dynamics of an electromechanical actuator for aerospace applications are presented. The effects of the stator phase currents on the permanent magnets of the rotor are examined. The voltage and current waveforms present in the power conditioner network during the motoring, regenerative braking, and plugging modes of operation are presented and discussed.

  14. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project. ACT/Control/Guidance System study. Volume 2: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The integrated application of active controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport is reported. Supplementary technical data on the following topics are included: (1) 1990's avionics technology assessment; (2) function criticality assessment; (3) flight deck system for total control and functional features list; (4) criticality and reliability assessment of units; (5) crew procedural function task analysis; and (6) recommendations for simulation mechanization.

  15. Multivariate volume rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Crawfis, R.A.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents a new technique for representing multivalued data sets defined on an integer lattice. It extends the state-of-the-art in volume rendering to include nonhomogeneous volume representations. That is, volume rendering of materials with very fine detail (e.g. translucent granite) within a voxel. Multivariate volume rendering is achieved by introducing controlled amounts of noise within the volume representation. Varying the local amount of noise within the volume is used to represent a separate scalar variable. The technique can also be used in image synthesis to create more realistic clouds and fog.

  16. Volcanic sulfur dioxide index and volcanic explosivity index inferred from eruptive volume of volcanoes in Jeju Island, Korea: application to volcanic hazard mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Bokyun; Yun, Sung-Hyo

    2016-04-01

    Jeju Island located in the southwestern part of Korea Peninsula is a volcanic island composed of lavaflows, pyroclasts, and around 450 monogenetic volcanoes. The volcanic activity of the island commenced with phreatomagmatic eruptions under subaqueous condition ca. 1.8-2.0 Ma and lasted until ca. 1,000 year BP. For evaluating volcanic activity of the most recently erupted volcanoes with reported age, volcanic explosivity index (VEI) and volcanic sulfur dioxide index (VSI) of three volcanoes (Ilchulbong tuff cone, Songaksan tuff ring, and Biyangdo scoria cone) are inferred from their eruptive volumes. The quantity of eruptive materials such as tuff, lavaflow, scoria, and so on, is calculated using a model developed in Auckland Volcanic Field which has similar volcanic setting to the island. The eruptive volumes of them are 11,911,534 m3, 24,987,557 m3, and 9,652,025 m3, which correspond to VEI of 3, 3, and 2, respectively. According to the correlation between VEI and VSI, the average quantity of SO2 emission during an eruption with VEI of 3 is 2-8 × 103 kiloton considering that the island was formed under intraplate tectonic setting. Jeju Island was regarded as an extinct volcano, however, several studies have recently reported some volcanic eruption ages within 10,000 year BP owing to the development in age dating technique. Thus, the island is a dormant volcano potentially implying high probability to erupt again in the future. The volcanoes might have explosive eruptions (vulcanian to plinian) with the possibility that SO2 emitted by the eruption reaches stratosphere causing climate change due to backscattering incoming solar radiation, increase in cloud reflectivity, etc. Consequently, recommencement of volcanic eruption in the island is able to result in serious volcanic hazard and this study provides fundamental and important data for volcanic hazard mitigation of East Asia as well as the island. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS: This research was supported by a grant [MPSS

  17. Image plane sweep volume illumination.

    PubMed

    Sundén, Erik; Ynnerman, Anders; Ropinski, Timo

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, many volumetric illumination models have been proposed, which have the potential to simulate advanced lighting effects and thus support improved image comprehension. Although volume ray-casting is widely accepted as the volume rendering technique which achieves the highest image quality, so far no volumetric illumination algorithm has been designed to be directly incorporated into the ray-casting process. In this paper we propose image plane sweep volume illumination (IPSVI), which allows the integration of advanced illumination effects into a GPU-based volume ray-caster by exploiting the plane sweep paradigm. Thus, we are able to reduce the problem complexity and achieve interactive frame rates, while supporting scattering as well as shadowing. Since all illumination computations are performed directly within a single rendering pass, IPSVI does not require any preprocessing nor does it need to store intermediate results within an illumination volume. It therefore has a significantly lower memory footprint than other techniques. This makes IPSVI directly applicable to large data sets. Furthermore, the integration into a GPU-based ray-caster allows for high image quality as well as improved rendering performance by exploiting early ray termination. This paper discusses the theory behind IPSVI, describes its implementation, demonstrates its visual results and provides performance measurements. PMID:22034331

  18. A Simple and Sensitive HPLC Method for Fluorescence Quantitation of Doxorubicin in Micro-volume Plasma: Applications to Pharmacokinetic Studies in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Daeihamed, Marjan; Haeri, Azadeh; Dadashzadeh, Simin

    2015-01-01

    A validated HPLC method was developed to determine the doxorubicin concentration in a small volume of rat plasma (60 µL) with convenient fluorescence detection. Sample preparation includes a simple one-step liquid-liquid extraction using a minimum amount of organic solvent, with extraction recovery more than 95%. The analysis was accomplished using PerfectSil C18 column maintained at 35 °C and a mobile phase consisted of acetonitrile and water (32:68, v/v; pH=2.6). The flow-rate was kept at 1 mL/min and the column effluent was monitored with a fluorescence detector at an excitation and emission wavelength of 470 and 555 nm, respectively. The detection limit was 5 ng/mL. No analytical interference was observed from endogenous components in the rat plasma. This method was feasibly applied to the pharmacokinetic study of 5 mg/Kg of doxorubicin after the intravenous administration to rats. PMID:26185503

  19. Application of the high-resolution finite-volume NASA/NCAR Climate Model for Medium-Range Weather Prediction Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, S. J. L.; Shen, B. W. S.; Putman, W. P.; Chern, J. D. C.

    2003-04-01

    A high-resolution version of the finite-volume climate model (fvGCM) jointly developed by NASA/DAO and NCAR/CGD has been used operationally at NASA/DAO for data assimilation and stratospheric re-analysis. The fvGCM has been regarded as a climate model because the physics packages were originally developed and tuned for low-resolution climate simulations. It was therefore unclear if the fvGCM would do well for medium-range weather predictions. In this study we carried out the so-called transplant experiment in which the forecasts from fvGCM were initialized, not with its own data assimilation system, the fvDAS, but with foreign data from the NCEP's operational system. The forecasts from fvGCM were then compared to that from NCEP's Global Forecasts system (GFS) using the same initial conditions. Despite some initial problems and disadvantages (e.g., initial shocks due to different physics, incompatible land initial conditions, different vertical/horizontal resolution, and different terrain), it is found that the forecasts from fvGCM using NCEP initial conditions are very competitive, particularly for the winter hemisphere.

  20. A novel method to make boron-doped microcrystalline silicon thin films with optimal crystalline volume fraction for thin films solar cell applications.

    PubMed

    Shin, Chonghoon; Park, Jinjoo; Kim, Sangho; Park, Hyeongsik; Jung, Junhee; Bong, Sungjae; Lee, Youn-Jung; Yi, Junsin

    2014-12-01

    Highly conducting boron-doped microcrystalline silicon (p-type μc-Si:H) thin films have been prepared by radio frequency plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition (RF-PECVD). In this work, the effects of hydrogen dilution, doping ratio, plasma power, deposition pressure and substrate temperature on the growth and the properties of boron-doped microcrystalline silicon (p-type μc-Si:H) thin films are investigated. The electrical, chemical and structural properties are improved with increasing crystallite, which depends on the plasma conditions. For various plasma parameters, the crystalline volume fraction (X(c)), dark conductivity (σ(d)), activation energy (E(a)), hydrogen content (C(H)), surface roughness (S(r)), and micro void fraction (R*) were measured, and they were 0-72%, 4.17-10(-4) S/cm-1.1 S/cm, 0.041-0.113 eV, 3.8-11.5 at.%, 3.2 nm-12.2 nm, and 0.47-0.80, respectively. The film with R* of 0.47 and C(H) of about 5 at.% belonged to a region of low disorder, and acted as a good passivation layer. PMID:25971071

  1. Adaptive finite volume methods with well-balanced Riemann solvers for modeling floods in rugged terrain: Application to the Malpasset dam-break flood (France, 1959)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    George, D.L.

    2011-01-01

    The simulation of advancing flood waves over rugged topography, by solving the shallow-water equations with well-balanced high-resolution finite volume methods and block-structured dynamic adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), is described and validated in this paper. The efficiency of block-structured AMR makes large-scale problems tractable, and allows the use of accurate and stable methods developed for solving general hyperbolic problems on quadrilateral grids. Features indicative of flooding in rugged terrain, such as advancing wet-dry fronts and non-stationary steady states due to balanced source terms from variable topography, present unique challenges and require modifications such as special Riemann solvers. A well-balanced Riemann solver for inundation and general (non-stationary) flow over topography is tested in this context. The difficulties of modeling floods in rugged terrain, and the rationale for and efficacy of using AMR and well-balanced methods, are presented. The algorithms are validated by simulating the Malpasset dam-break flood (France, 1959), which has served as a benchmark problem previously. Historical field data, laboratory model data and other numerical simulation results (computed on static fitted meshes) are shown for comparison. The methods are implemented in GEOCLAW, a subset of the open-source CLAWPACK software. All the software is freely available at. Published in 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Sensitive method for the determination of rocilinostat in small volume mouse plasma by LC-MS/MS and its application to a pharmacokinetic study in mice.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Manish; Dixit, Abhishek; Devaraj, V C; Zainuddin, Mohd; Bhamidipati, Ravi Kanth; Hallur, Mahanandeesha S; Dewang, Purushottam; Rajagopal, Sridharan; Rajagopal, Sriram; Mullangi, Ramesh

    2016-07-01

    A highly sensitive, specific and rapid LC-ESI-MS/MS method has been developed and validated for the quantification of rocilinostat in small volume mouse plasma (20 μL) using vorinostat as an internal standard (IS) as per regulatory guidelines. Sample preparation was accomplished through a protein precipitation procedure with acetonitrile. Chromatography was achieved on Prodigy ODS-2 column using a binary gradient using mobile phase A (0.2% formic acid in water) and B (acetonitrile) at a flow rate of 0.38 mL/min. The total chromatographic run time was 4.1 min and the elution of rocilinostat and IS occurred at ~3.2 and 2.9 min, respectively. A linear response function was established in the concentration range of 0.28-1193 ng/mL in mouse plasma. The intra- and inter-day accuracy and precisions were in the ranges of 3.12-8.93 and 6.41-11.6%, respectively. This novel method has been applied to a pharmacokinetic study in mice. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26633099

  3. Low concentration ratio solar array for low Earth orbit multi-100 kW application. Volume 1: Design, analysis and development tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A preliminary design effort directed toward a low concentration ratio photovoltaic array system capable of delivering multihundred kilowatts (300 kW to 1000 kW range) in low earth orbit is described. The array system consists of two or more array modules each capable of delivering between 113 kW to 175 kW using silicon solar cells or gallium arsenide solar cells, respectively. The array module deployed area is 1320 square meters and consists of 4356 pyramidal concentrator elements. The module, when stowed in the Space Shuttle's payload bay, has a stowage volume of a cube with 3.24 meters on a side. The concentrator elements are sized for a geometric concentration ratio (GCR) of six with an aperture area of .25 sq. m. The structural analysis and design trades leading to the baseline design are discussed. It describes the configuration, as well as optical, thermal and electrical performance analyses that support the design and overall performance estimates for the array are described.

  4. Application of the Molecular Interaction Volume Model (MIVM) to Calcium-Based Liquid Alloys of Systems Forming High-Melting Intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Poizeau, S; Sadoway, DR

    2013-06-05

    The thermodynamic properties of multiple liquid alloys with strong negative deviation from ideality were successfully modeled by the molecular interaction volume model (MIVM). The modeled partial Gibbs free energy of calcium in Ca-Ag, Ca-In, Ca-Pb, Ca-Sn, Ca-Tl, and Ca-Zn at 800 degrees C was within 1.5 kJ/mol of the existing experimental data. The partial Gibbs free energy of calcium in Ca-Bi liquid alloys at 600 degrees C was predicted within 1.6 kJ/mol (or 1%) by the MIVM from experimental data at 800 degrees C. For the first time, the MIVM was applied to a ternary system far from ideality, Ca-Sb-Pb. The partial Gibbs free energy of Ca in six Ca-Pb-Sb alloys was determined by emf measurements in a cell configured as Ca(s)vertical bar CaF2(s)vertical bar Ca-Sb-Pb, over the temperature range of 500-830 degrees C. These values were 2% (or 5 kJ/mol) more negative than those predicted by the MIVM using experimental data for the Ca-Pb, Ca-Sb, and Pb-Sb binary alloys. This difference was attributed to the inability of the MIVM to account for interactions between the first nearest neighbors of Ca, Pb and Sb in the ternary Ca-Sb-Pb alloy.

  5. Incorporation of texture-based features in optimal graph-theoretic approach with application to the 3D segmentation of intraretinal surfaces in SD-OCT volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antony, Bhavna J.; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Sonka, Milan; Kwon, Young H.; Garvin, Mona K.

    2012-02-01

    While efficient graph-theoretic approaches exist for the optimal (with respect to a cost function) and simultaneous segmentation of multiple surfaces within volumetric medical images, the appropriate design of cost functions remains an important challenge. Previously proposed methods have used simple cost functions or optimized a combination of the same, but little has been done to design cost functions using learned features from a training set, in a less biased fashion. Here, we present a method to design cost functions for the simultaneous segmentation of multiple surfaces using the graph-theoretic approach. Classified texture features were used to create probability maps, which were incorporated into the graph-search approach. The efficiency of such an approach was tested on 10 optic nerve head centered optical coherence tomography (OCT) volumes obtained from 10 subjects that presented with glaucoma. The mean unsigned border position error was computed with respect to the average of manual tracings from two independent observers and compared to our previously reported results. A significant improvement was noted in the overall means which reduced from 9.25 +/- 4.03μm to 6.73 +/- 2.45μm (p < 0.01) and is also comparable with the inter-observer variability of 8.85 +/- 3.85μm.

  6. Evaluation of a new impedancemeter to independently measure extracellular, intracellular and total body water volumes: application to the measurement of hydration.

    PubMed

    Moreno, M-V; Ribbe-Cornet, E; Rebeyrol, J; Vannicatte, A; Krief, L

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of independent hydric data for the quantification of total body water (V t), extracellular water (V e) and intracellular water (V i), obtained by a multifrequency impedancemeter Z-Métrix(®) (ZM), in standing and lying position, with respect to the Xitron reference. In a second step, the aim was to consider whether it is possible to quantify daily hydration. The average repeatability error of the ZM impedancemeter is less than 0.5 %. For total body water (V t), we note a low R (2) dispersion with an average of 0.9 for men and 0.6 for women. The estimation of extracellular water is equivalent to a maximum error of 3.1 % in standing position for women against 2.97 % for men in the same position. The estimation of the total body water by direct measurement and by summing the volumes of extracellular and intracellular water obtained by the Z-Metrix(®) shows very low dispersions with R (2) = 0.89 and average error from 1.3 % for healthy women in lying position to 3.9 % for healthy women in standing position. Finally, despite the impact of events on the daily measurements, it is viable to track a subject's overall hydration. PMID:26036775

  7. Structure refinement of sub-cubic-mm volume sample at high pressures by pulsed neutron powder diffraction: application to brucite in an opposed anvil cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuchi, Takuo; Tomioka, Naotaka; Purevjav, Narangoo; Abe, Jun; Harjo, Stefanus; Gong, Wu

    2014-04-01

    Neutron powder diffraction measurements of 0.9 mm3 of mixture of deuterated brucite and pressure medium were conducted at pressures to 2.8 GPa, using an opposed anvil cell and a medium-resolution diffractometer at Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex pulsed neutron source. Spurious-free diffraction patterns were successfully obtained and refined to provide all structural parameters including Debye-Waller factors. Tilting of hydroxyl dipoles of brucite toward one of the three nearest-neighbor oxygen anions was confirmed to be substantial at pressure as low as 1.5 GPa. By this application, technical feasibility to analyze such a small sample has been newly established, which would be useful to extend the applications of neutron diffraction at high pressures.

  8. Parts, Materials, and Processes Experience Summary. Volume 1; [Catalog of ALERT and Other Information on Basic Design, Reliability, Quality and Applications Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The ALERT program, a system for communicating common problems with parts, materials, and processes, is condensed and catalogued. Expanded information on selected topics is provided by relating the problem area (failure) to the cause, the investigations and findings, the suggestions for avoidance (inspections, screening tests, proper part applications), and failure analysis procedures. The basic objective of ALERT is the avoidance of the recurrence of parts, materials, and processed problems, thus improving the reliability of equipment produced for and used by the government.

  9. The effectiveness of ultra-low-volume applications of malathion at a rate of 6 US fluid ounces per acre in controlling Aedes aegypti in a large-scale test at Nakhon Sawan, Thailand*

    PubMed Central

    Lofgren, Clifford S.; Ford, Hugh R.; Tonn, Robert J.; Jatanasen, Sujarti

    1970-01-01

    The effectiveness of ultra-low-volume (ULV) applications of technical malathion to control Aedes aegypti was studied in Nakhon Sawan, Thailand, in November 1968. Two treatments of 6 US fl oz/acre (438 ml/ha) were applied 4 days apart by a C-47 aircraft equipped with a fuselage-mounted spraying boom. An area of 7 square miles (18 km2), which included the entire city area, was treated. The landing rate of adult A. aegypti adults was reduced significantly following each malathion application (95% and 99%, respectively), the reduction ranging from 88% to 99% during the 10-day post-treatment observation period. No eggs were deposited in ovitraps 4 days after the first application. Dissections of female mosquitos collected during the post-treatment period showed that only 8% of the females were parous compared with 30% before treatment and 40% in the check area. Night landing rates of other mosquitos were reduced by 82%-97%; housefly populations also decreased markedly. The test results indicate that UVL treatments with malathion applied by aircraft can be used to control A. aegypti during outbreaks of dengue haemorrhagic fever. The fuselage-mounted spraying system used in the tests performed very well. The equipment can be mounted on, and removed from, a C-47 aircraft very quickly, thus making it possible to convert such aircraft used for other purposes into spraying planes at quite short notice. PMID:5309512

  10. Application of Unstructured Grid Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model to Louisiana Coast: Simulation of River Water Plumes into the Hypoxia Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Rabalais, N. N.; Chen, C.; Twilley, R. R.; Lin, H.; Turner, E. R.

    2008-12-01

    We have applied the unstructured grid finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM), developed at the University of Massachusetts, to the entire Gulf of Mexico, with a particular focus on the northern Gulf of Mexico including the Regions of Freshwater Influence. This area covers one of the largest hypoxia zones in coastal oceans where freshwater and nutrient inputs are significant from land drainage. Among the rivers included in the model are the Mississippi River and the Atchafalaya River that run into the continental shelf along the Louisiana coast. The complexity of the LA coastline and bays, low-lying marsh areas are among the challenges for an accurate simulation of transport of water and associated dynamics. The FVCOM is selected to address this complexity. The model is implemented by using irregular triangles with the smallest ones having scales of ~50 m. This allows accurate representation of fluxes through the multiple inlets connecting the shelf and a series of semi-enclosed bays. A total of more than 263,000 triangles are used to cover the domain, with more than 90% concentrated over the Louisiana shelf and coast areas. The astronomical tides, river discharges, and wind are provided as the forcing for the model. The preliminary simulations yielded detailed flow structure including the river plumes that mimics the high resolution images observed from satellites. These plumes respond to wind forcing and river discharges as well as the numerical model parameters related to turbulence and bottom friction. The accuracy of coastlines and bathymetry also has influence to the results. The model results show multiple eddies in the bays, at the inlets, near the river mouth and deltas, and on the shelf. This preliminary study provides a new tool to study the dynamics of hypoxia in the northern Gulf of Mexico.

  11. (BARS) -- Bibliographic Retrieval System Sandia Shock Compression (SSC) database Shock Physics Index (SPHINX) database. Volume 1: UNIX version query guide customized application for INGRES

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, W.; von Laven, G.M.; Parker, T.

    1993-09-01

    The Bibliographic Retrieval System (BARS) is a data base management system specially designed to retrieve bibliographic references. Two databases are available, (i) the Sandia Shock Compression (SSC) database which contains over 5700 references to the literature related to stress waves in solids and their applications, and (ii) the Shock Physics Index (SPHINX) which includes over 8000 further references to stress waves in solids, material properties at intermediate and low rates, ballistic and hypervelocity impact, and explosive or shock fabrication methods. There is some overlap in the information in the two data bases.

  12. High altitude chemically reacting gas particle mixtures. Volume 3: Computer code user's and applications manual. [rocket nozzle and orbital plume flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. D.

    1984-01-01

    A users manual for the RAMP2 computer code is provided. The RAMP2 code can be used to model the dominant phenomena which affect the prediction of liquid and solid rocket nozzle and orbital plume flow fields. The general structure and operation of RAMP2 are discussed. A user input/output guide for the modified TRAN72 computer code and the RAMP2F code is given. The application and use of the BLIMPJ module are considered. Sample problems involving the space shuttle main engine and motor are included.

  13. Uncooled amorphous silicon TEC-less 1/4 VGA IRFPA with 25μm pixel-pitch for high volume applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, A.; Minassian, C.; Tissot, J. L.; Vilain, M.; Robert, P.; Touvignon, A.; Chiappa, J. M.; Pistre, C.

    2009-05-01

    The high level of accumulated expertise by ULIS on uncooled microbolometers TEC-less operation enables ULIS to develop 384 x 288 (1/4 VGA) IRFPA format with 25μm pixel-pitch especially designed for TEC-less application. This detector, while keeping all the performances and all the innovations developed on previous ULIS ROIC (NETD performance, detector configuration by serial link, low power consumption and wide electrical dynamic range ...), can be operated on a wide range of ambient temperature, with constant settings. We present in this paper the electro-optical performances and the TEC-less capability of this device. The thermal behavior is described in detail.

  14. An improved approach for flight readiness certification: Methodology for failure risk assessment and application examples. Volume 3: Structure and listing of programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, N. R.; Ebbeler, D. H.; Newlin, L. E.; Sutharshana, S.; Creager, M.

    1992-01-01

    An improved methodology for quantitatively evaluating failure risk of spaceflight systems to assess flight readiness and identify risk control measures is presented. This methodology, called Probabilistic Failure Assessment (PFA), combines operating experience from tests and flights with engineering analysis to estimate failure risk. The PFA methodology is of particular value when information on which to base an assessment of failure risk, including test experience and knowledge of parameters used in engineering analyses of failure phenomena, is expensive or difficult to acquire. The PFA methodology is a prescribed statistical structure in which engineering analysis models that characterize failure phenomena are used conjointly with uncertainties about analysis parameters and/or modeling accuracy to estimate failure probability distributions for specific failure modes. These distributions can then be modified, by means of statistical procedures of the PFA methodology, to reflect any test or flight experience. Conventional engineering analysis models currently employed for design of failure prediction are used in this methodology. The PFA methodology is described and examples of its application are presented. Conventional approaches to failure risk evaluation for spaceflight systems are discussed, and the rationale for the approach taken in the PFA methodology is presented. The statistical methods, engineering models, and computer software used in fatigue failure mode applications are thoroughly documented.

  15. Evaluation of coated columbium alloy heat shields for space shuttle thermal protection system application. Volume 2, phase 2: Subsize heat shield and small size TPS evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, W. E.

    1973-01-01

    Initially a trade study was conducted of seven heat shield configurations. These were evaluated for structural reliability, fabricability, weight, inspectability, and refurbishability. Two concepts, a tee-stiffened and an open corrugation, were selected as offering the most potential for system success. Fourteen subsize heat shields of a full scale section were fabricated from C-129Y and Cb-752 and silicide coated with R-512E. These subsize panels were subjected to a simulated flight profile representing temperature, local surface pressures, and applied pressure differential loads. All corrugated panels of both alloys sustained 100 cycles without structural or coating failure. All Cb-752/R-512E panels performed well with one panel being successfully repaired after 66 cycles and completing 100 cycles. As a result of this evaluating the Cb-752/R-512E system was selected for hardware application during the subsequent phases. In addition, the tee-stiffened configuration was selected for further development and application in Phase III. This selection was based on an overall assessment of relative weight, cost, and structural performance of the tee-stiffened and open corrugation TPS.

  16. An improved approach for flight readiness certification: Methodology for failure risk assessment and application examples. Volume 3: Structure and listing of programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, N. R.; Ebbeler, D. H.; Newlin, L. E.; Sutharshana, S.; Creager, M.

    1992-06-01

    An improved methodology for quantitatively evaluating failure risk of spaceflight systems to assess flight readiness and identify risk control measures is presented. This methodology, called Probabilistic Failure Assessment (PFA), combines operating experience from tests and flights with engineering analysis to estimate failure risk. The PFA methodology is of particular value when information on which to base an assessment of failure risk, including test experience and knowledge of parameters used in engineering analyses of failure phenomena, is expensive or difficult to acquire. The PFA methodology is a prescribed statistical structure in which engineering analysis models that characterize failure phenomena are used conjointly with uncertainties about analysis parameters and/or modeling accuracy to estimate failure probability distributions for specific failure modes. These distributions can then be modified, by means of statistical procedures of the PFA methodology, to reflect any test or flight experience. Conventional engineering analysis models currently employed for design of failure prediction are used in this methodology. The PFA methodology is described and examples of its application are presented. Conventional approaches to failure risk evaluation for spaceflight systems are discussed, and the rationale for the approach taken in the PFA methodology is presented. The statistical methods, engineering models, and computer software used in fatigue failure mode applications are thoroughly documented.

  17. Development and application of optimal design capability for coal gasification systems - Task 1 (Volume 1, 2 and 3). Topical report, July 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is a process for the post-combustion removal of NO{sub x} from the flue gas of fossil-fuel-fired power plants. SCR is capable of NO{sub x} reduction efficiencies of up to 80 or 90 percent. SCR technology has been applied for treatment of flue gases from a variety of emission sources, including natural gas- and oil-fired gas turbines, process steam boilers in refineries, and coal-fired power plants. SCR applications to coal-fired power plants have occurred in Japan and Germany. Full-scale SCR systems have not been applied to coal-fired power plants in the U.S., although there have been small-scale demonstration projects. SCR has become increasingly widely applied in the U.S. to natural-gas fired gas turbine combined cycle systems. In the remainder of this section, we review the applicability of SCR, as well as the need for post-combustion NO{sub x} control, for several power generation systems.

  18. An improved approach for flight readiness certification: Probabilistic models for flaw propagation and turbine blade failure. Volume 1: Methodology and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, N. R.; Ebbeler, D. H.; Newlin, L. E.; Sutharshana, S.; Creager, M.

    1992-01-01

    An improved methodology for quantitatively evaluating failure risk of spaceflight systems to assess flight readiness and identify risk control measures is presented. This methodology, called Probabilistic Failure Assessment (PFA), combines operating experience from tests and flights with analytical modeling of failure phenomena to estimate failure risk. The PFA methodology is of particular value when information on which to base an assessment of failure risk, including test experience and knowledge of parameters used in analytical modeling, is expensive or difficult to acquire. The PFA methodology is a prescribed statistical structure in which analytical models that characterize failure phenomena are used conjointly with uncertainties about analysis parameters and/or modeling accuracy to estimate failure probability distributions for specific failure modes. These distributions can then be modified, by means of statistical procedures of the PFA methodology, to reflect any test or flight experience. State-of-the-art analytical models currently employed for designs failure prediction, or performance analysis are used in this methodology. The rationale for the statistical approach taken in the PFA methodology is discussed, the PFA methodology is described, and examples of its application to structural failure modes are presented. The engineering models and computer software used in fatigue crack growth and fatigue crack initiation applications are thoroughly documented.

  19. Development of a plume-in-grid model for industrial point and volume sources: application to power plant and refinery sources in the Paris region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Seigneur, C.; Duclaux, O.

    2013-11-01

    Plume-in-grid (PinG) models incorporating a host Eulerian model and a subgrid-scale model (usually a Gaussian plume or puff model) have been used for the simulations of stack emissions (e.g., fossil fuel-fired power plants and cement plants) for gaseous and particulate species such as nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), particulate matter (PM) and mercury (Hg). Here, we describe the extension of a PinG model to study the impact of an oil refinery where volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions can be important. The model is based on a reactive PinG model for ozone (O3), which incorporates a three-dimensional (3-D) Eulerian model and a Gaussian puff model. The model is extended to treat PM, with treatments of aerosol chemistry, particle size distribution, and the formation of secondary aerosols, which are consistent in both the 3-D Eulerian host model and the Gaussian puff model. Furthermore, the PinG model is extended to include the treatment of volume sources to simulate fugitive VOC emissions. The new PinG model is evaluated over Greater Paris during July 2009. Model performance is satisfactory for O3, PM2.5 and most PM2.5 components. Two industrial sources, a coal-fired power plant and an oil refinery, are simulated with the PinG model. The characteristics of the sources (stack height and diameter, exhaust temperature and velocity) govern the surface concentrations of primary pollutants (NOx, SO2 and VOC). O3 concentrations are impacted differently near the power plant than near the refinery, because of the presence of VOC emissions at the latter. The formation of sulfate is influenced by both the dispersion of SO2 and the oxidant concentration; however, the former tends to dominate in the simulations presented here. The impact of PinG modeling on the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) is small and results mostly from the effect of different oxidant concentrations on biogenic SOA formation. The investigation of the criteria for injecting

  20. Development of a plume-in-grid model for industrial point and volume sources: application to power plant and refinery sources in the Paris region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Seigneur, C.; Duclaux, O.

    2014-04-01

    Plume-in-grid (PinG) models incorporating a host Eulerian model and a subgrid-scale model (usually a Gaussian plume or puff model) have been used for the simulations of stack emissions (e.g., fossil fuel-fired power plants and cement plants) for gaseous and particulate species such as nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), particulate matter (PM) and mercury (Hg). Here, we describe the extension of a PinG model to study the impact of an oil refinery where volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions can be important. The model is based on a reactive PinG model for ozone (O3), which incorporates a three-dimensional (3-D) Eulerian model and a Gaussian puff model. The model is extended to treat PM, with treatments of aerosol chemistry, particle size distribution, and the formation of secondary aerosols, which are consistent in both the 3-D Eulerian host model and the Gaussian puff model. Furthermore, the PinG model is extended to include the treatment of volume sources to simulate fugitive VOC emissions. The new PinG model is evaluated over Greater Paris during July 2009. Model performance is satisfactory for O3, PM2.5 and most PM2.5 components. Two industrial sources, a coal-fired power plant and an oil refinery, are simulated with the PinG model. The characteristics of the sources (stack height and diameter, exhaust temperature and velocity) govern the surface concentrations of primary pollutants (NOx, SO2 and VOC). O3 concentrations are impacted differently near the power plant than near the refinery, because of the presence of VOC emissions at the latter. The formation of sulfate is influenced by both the dispersion of SO2 and the oxidant concentration; however, the former tends to dominate in the simulations presented here. The impact of PinG modeling on the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is small and results mostly from the effect of different oxidant concentrations on biogenic SOA formation. The investigation of the criteria for injecting

  1. Extension of a dynamic headspace multi-volatile method to milliliter injection volumes with full sample evaporation: Application to green tea.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Nobuo; Sasamoto, Kikuo; Tsunokawa, Jun; Hoffmann, Andreas; Okanoya, Kazunori; MacNamara, Kevin

    2015-11-20

    An extension of multi-volatile method (MVM) technology using the combination of a standard dynamic headspace (DHS) configuration, and a modified DHS configuration incorporating an additional vacuum module, was developed for milliliter injection volume of aqueous sample with full sample evaporation. A prior step involved investigation of water management by weighing of the water residue in the adsorbent trap. The extended MVM for 1 mL aqueous sample consists of five different DHS method parameter sets including choice of the replaceable adsorbent trap. An initial two DHS sampling sets at 25°C with the standard DHS configuration using a carbon-based adsorbent trap target very volatile solutes with high vapor pressure (>10 kPa) and volatile solutes with moderate vapor pressure (1-10 kPa). Subsequent three DHS sampling sets at 80°C with the modified DHS configuration using a Tenax TA trap target solutes with low vapor pressure (<1 kPa) and/or hydrophilic characteristics. After the five sequential DHS samplings using the same HS vial, the five traps are sequentially desorbed with thermal desorption in reverse order of the DHS sampling and the desorbed compounds are trapped and concentrated in a programmed temperature vaporizing (PTV) inlet and subsequently analyzed in a single GC-MS run. Recoveries of 21 test aroma compounds in 1 mL water for each separate DHS sampling and the combined MVM procedure were evaluated as a function of vapor pressure in the range of 0.000088-120 kPa. The MVM procedure provided high recoveries (>88%) for 17 test aroma compounds and moderate recoveries (44-71%) for 4 test compounds. The method showed good linearity (r(2)>0.9913) and high sensitivity (limit of detection: 0.1-0.5 ng mL(-1)) even with MS scan mode. The improved sensitivity of the method was demonstrated with analysis of a wide variety of aroma compounds in brewed green tea. Compared to the original 100 μL MVM procedure, this extension to 1 mL MVM allowed detection of nearly

  2. Large stationary Stirling engine. Volume 1. conceptual design of Stirling engines for stationary power-generation applications in the 500- to 3000-HP range. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    The Conceptual Design is described of Stirling Engines for Stationary Power Application in the 500 to 3000 hp range which was aimed at state-of-the-art stationary Stirling engines for a 1985 hardware demonstration, and an advanced engine design with identification of the supporting R and D efforts required. The main goals of this effort were to obtain reliable cost data for a stationary Stirling engine capable of meeting future needs for total energy/cogeneration systems and to establish a pragmatic and conservative base design for a first-generation hardware. In order to secure a competitive position for this engine in the marketplace, it was clearly recognized that a coal and waste product fired version had to be given primary consideration since a fuel oil or gas fired version would not be cost competitive with a diesel/gas engine. Therefore, the mating of the Stirling engine with an Atmospheric Fluidized Bed (AFB) was a main target.

  3. Draft Title 40 CFR 191 compliance certification application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 9: Appendices RM, SCR, SER, SUM, WRAC

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-31

    The Rock Mechanics Program is important to the establishment of a radioactive waste repository in salt because rock mechanics deals with the prediction of creep closure and eventual encapsulation of the waste. The intent of this paper is to give the current status of the program. This program consists of three major modeling efforts: continuum creep, fracture, and the disturbed rock zone. These models, together with laboratory material parameters, plastic flow potentials, initial and boundary input data, and other peripheral information forms the predictive technology. The extent to which the predictive technology is validated against in situ test data adds certainty to the method. Application of the technology is through simulations of the test results, design, or performance using numerical codes. In summary, the predictive capabilities are technically sound and reasonable. The current status of the program is that which would be advanced for compliance.

  4. A plan for application system verification tests: The value of improved meteorological information, volume 1. [economic consequences of improved meteorological information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The framework within which the Applications Systems Verification Tests (ASVTs) are performed and the economic consequences of improved meteorological information demonstrated is described. This framework considers the impact of improved information on decision processes, the data needs to demonstrate the economic impact of the improved information, the data availability, the methodology for determining and analyzing the collected data and demonstrating the economic impact of the improved information, and the possible methods of data collection. Three ASVTs are considered and program outlines and plans are developed for performing experiments to demonstrate the economic consequences of improved meteorological information. The ASVTs are concerned with the citrus crop in Florida, the cotton crop in Mississippi and a group of diverse crops in Oregon. The program outlines and plans include schedules, manpower estimates and funding requirements.

  5. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project. ACT/Control/Guidance System study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The active control technology (ACT) control/guidance system task of the integrated application of active controls (IAAC) technology project within the NASA energy efficient transport program was documented. The air traffic environment of navigation and air traffic control systems and procedures were extrapolated. An approach to listing flight functions which will be performed by systems and crew of an ACT configured airplane of the 1990s, and a determination of function criticalities to safety of flight, are the basis of candidate integrated ACT/Control/Guidance System architecture. The system mechanizes five active control functions: pitch augmented stability, angle of attack limiting, lateral/directional augmented stability, gust load alleviation, and maneuver load control. The scope and requirements of a program for simulating the integrated ACT avionics and flight deck system, with pilot in the loop, are defined, system and crew interface elements are simulated, and mechanization is recommended. Relationships between system design and crew roles and procedures are evaluated.

  6. Uncooled amorphous silicon TEC-less 1/4 VGA IRFPA with 25 μm pixel-pitch for high volume applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minassian, Christophe; Tissot, Jean Luc; Vilain, Michel; Legras, Olivier; Tinnes, Sebastien; Fieque, Bruno; Chiappa, Jean Marc; Robert, Patrick

    2008-04-01

    The high level of accumulated expertise by ULIS and CEA/LETI on uncooled microbolometers made from an amorphous silicon layer enables ULIS to develop 384 x 288 (1/4 VGA) IRFPA format with 25 μm pixel-pitch designed for low end application. This detector has kept all the innovations developed on the full TV format ROIC (detector configuration by serial link, low power consumption or wide electrical dynamic range ...). The specific appeal of this unit lies in the miniaturization of the TEC-less (Thermo-Electric Cooler) package and its extremely light weight. The reduction of the pixel-pitch and the innovative package turn this array into a low cost product well adapted for mass production. We will present first the simple TEC-less operating mode which has been developed. The electro-optical characterization versus environmental temperature will be presented.

  7. The volume change during solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rittich, M.

    1985-01-01

    The liquid-solid phase transformation of solidifying metallic melts is accompanied by a volume change Delta-Vm. This volume change produces a gravity-independent microscopic flow near the solidification front. In a ground-based laboratory, solidification processes are also affected by convection due to temperature and concentration gradients. A quantitative evaluation of the effects of these flows on the formation of structure requires reproducible values of Delta-Vm. Alloys with Delta-Vm = 0 would be best suited for such an evaluation, while alloys with a constant value for Delta-Vm are still usable. Another requirement is related to a solidus-liquidus interval which is as small as possible. One-phase alloys, which would be particularly well suited, could not be found. For these reasons, alloys which solidify in two phases, as for example eutectics, have been considered, taking into account the Al-Ge system. Attention is given to the volume change at the melting point, the measurement of this change, the volume change at solidification, and applications to terrestrial technology.

  8. Evaluation of the applicability of nonlinear programming algorithms to a typical commercial process flow-sheeting simulator (Volumes I and II)

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    An efficient methodology for using commercial flowsheeting programs with advanced mathematical programming algorithms was developed for the optimization of operating plants. The methodology was demonstrated and validated using ChemShare Corporation's DESIGN/2000 simulation of the Freeport Chemical Company's plant for sulfuric acid manufacture and three nonlinear programming techniques: successive linear programming, successive quadratic programming, and the generalized reduced-gradient method. The application of this methodology begins with the development of a feasible base-case simulation. Partial derivatives of the economic model and constraint equations are computed using fully converged simulations. This information is used to formulate an optimization problem that can be solved with the NLP algorithms giving improved values of the economic model. A line search is constructed through the point found from the nonlinear programming algorithm to find the best feasible point to repeat the procedure. The procedure is repeated using the ChemShare simulation program and the NLP code until convergence criteria are met. This method was applied to three flowsheeting problems; a plant-scale-contact sulfuric acid process model, a packed-bed-reactor design model, and an adiabatic-flash problem.

  9. Design and development of Stirling engines for stationary power generation applications in the 500 to 3000 horsepower range. Volume 1. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available,

    1980-09-15

    This project was Phase I of a multiphased program for the design and development of Stirling engines for stationary power generation applications in the 500 to 3000 horsepower range. Phase I comprised the conceptual design and associated cost estimates of a stationary Stirling engine capable of being fueled by a variety of heat sources, with emphasis on coal firing, followed by the preparation of a plan for implementing the design, fabrication and testing of a demonstration engine by 1985. The development and evaluation of conceptual designs have been separated into two broad categories: the A designs which represent the present state-of-the-art and which are demonstrable by 1985 with minimum technical risk; and the B designs which involve advanced technology and therefore would require significant research and development prior to demonstration and commercialization, but which may ultimately offer advantages in terms of lower cost, better performance, or higher reliability. The majority of the effort in Phase I was devoted to the A designs.

  10. Application of matched asymptotic expansions to lunar and interplanetary trajectories. Volume 2: Derivations of second-order asymptotic boundary value solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancaster, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    Previously published asymptotic solutions for lunar and interplanetery trajectories have been modified and combined to formulate a general analytical solution to the problem of N-bodies. The earlier first-order solutions, derived by the method of matched asymptotic expansions, have been extended to second order for the purpose of obtaining increased accuracy. The complete derivation of the second-order solution, including the application of a regorous matching principle, is given. It is shown that the outer and inner expansions can be matched in a region of order mu to the alpha power, where 2/5 alpha 1/2, and mu (the moon/earth or planet/sun mass ratio) is much less than one. The second-order asymptotic solution has been used as a basis for formulating a number of analytical two-point boundary value solutions. These include earth-to-moon, one- and two-impulse moon-to-Earth, and interplanetary solutions. Each is presented as an explicit analytical solution which does not require iterative steps to satisfy the boundary conditions. The complete derivation of each solution is shown, as well as instructions for numerical evaluation. For Vol. 1, see N73-27738.

  11. Advanced vehicle systems assessment. Volume 2: Subsystems assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, K.

    1985-01-01

    Volume 2 (Subsystems Assessment) is part of a five-volume report entitled Advanced Vehicle Systems Assessment. Volume 2 presents the projected performance capabilities and cost characteristics of applicable subsystems, considering an additional decade of development. Subsystems of interest include energy storage and conversion devices as well as the necessary powertrain components and vehicle subsystems. Volume 2 also includes updated battery information based on the assessment of an independent battery review board (with the aid of subcontractor reports on advanced battery characteristics).

  12. Volume Visual Attention Maps (VVAM) in ray-casting rendering.

    PubMed

    Beristain, Andoni; Congote, John; Ruiz, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an extension visual attention maps for volume data visualization, where eye fixation points become rays in the 3D space, and the visual attention map becomes a volume. This Volume Visual Attention Map (VVAM) is used to interactively enhance a ray-casting based direct volume rendering (DVR) visualization. The practical application of this idea into the biomedical image visualization field is explored for interactive visualization. PMID:22356956

  13. Design optimization in underground coal systems. Volume VIII. The roof truss: an analysis with applications to mine design. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-28

    The purpose of this research effort was to optimize the application of the roof truss for use in supporting coal mine roofs. Model analysis using two-dimensinal, body-loaded, photoelastic models was supplemented with field data and testing. A detailed literature review was also undertaken. The detailed analysis of photoelastic models of roof trusses was pursued by varying a number of the truss parameters - center-span installation angles and blocking-point configuration. In obtaining reduced deflection, the best support was achieved employing an angle of installation of 90/sup 0/. However, due to roof failute considerations, the recommended angle of installation was 45/sup 0/. Blocking points were shown to have an effect on roof-support capacity as well as truss span, and field tests indicated that the installation of a roof truss actually raised the roof. Also, from field measurements, it was shown that all sections of the arch carried the same load. The use of the roof truss as a major support principle and device in underground coal mines was confined. The installation angle should be 45/sup 0/ in any specified roof span. Blocking is an essential part of the arch installation and should be carefully implemented to insure maximum efficiency of the arch. It was concluded that: the truss installation of 45/sup 0/ produces maximum benefit when the overall stability of the roof is considered; the two-dimensional, body-loaded photoelastic model may be used to analyze underground structures; in underground installations, all components of the roof truss structure sustain the same load; and uplift of the roof may be achieved during installation of the roof truss system.

  14. 49th JANNAF Propulsion Meeting. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggleston, Debra S. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This volume, the first of three volumes, is a collection of 15 unclassified/unlimited-distribution papers which were presented at the 49,h Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) Propulsion Meeting, held 14-16 December 1999 at the Sheraton El Conquistador Resort in Tucson, Arizona. Specific subjects discussed include solid propellants; solid propellant ingredients, hazards, and demilitarization/disposal; composite materials used in propulsion applications; and sensors.

  15. Optimizing Crystal Volume for Neutron Diffraction Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, E. H.

    2003-01-01

    For structural studies with neutron diffraction more intense neutron sources, improved sensitivity detector and larger volume crystals are all means by which the science is being advanced to enable studies on a wider range of samples. We have chosen a simplistic approach using a well understood crystallization method, with minimal amounts of sample and using design of experiment techniques to maximize the crystal volume all for minimum effort. Examples of the application are given.

  16. In situ and on-site bioremediation. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Alleman, B.C.; Leeson, A.

    1997-11-01

    Collected in Volume 2 are articles on the bioremediation of media contaminated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), PCBs and chlorinated aromatics, explosives and nitroaromatics, pesticides and herbicides, and other recalcitrant compounds. The technologies discussed include intrinsic remediation/natural attenuation, fungal technologies, application of surfactants, composting, and landfarming. This volume also contains articles on field methods and process monitoring to support bioremediation applications.

  17. Finite-volume scheme for anisotropic diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Es, Bram; Koren, Barry; de Blank, Hugo J.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we apply a special finite-volume scheme, limited to smooth temperature distributions and Cartesian grids, to test the importance of connectivity of the finite volumes. The area of application is nuclear fusion plasma with field line aligned temperature gradients and extreme anisotropy. We apply the scheme to the anisotropic heat-conduction equation, and compare its results with those of existing finite-volume schemes for anisotropic diffusion. Also, we introduce a general model adaptation of the steady diffusion equation for extremely anisotropic diffusion problems with closed field lines.

  18. Waste minimization handbook, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Boing, L.E.; Coffey, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    This technical guide presents various methods used by industry to minimize low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated during decommissioning and decontamination (D and D) activities. Such activities generate significant amounts of LLW during their operations. Waste minimization refers to any measure, procedure, or technique that reduces the amount of waste generated during a specific operation or project. Preventive waste minimization techniques implemented when a project is initiated can significantly reduce waste. Techniques implemented during decontamination activities reduce the cost of decommissioning. The application of waste minimization techniques is not limited to D and D activities; it is also useful during any phase of a facility`s life cycle. This compendium will be supplemented with a second volume of abstracts of hundreds of papers related to minimizing low-level nuclear waste. This second volume is expected to be released in late 1996.

  19. Finite volume hydromechanical simulation in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordbotten, Jan Martin

    2014-05-01

    Cell-centered finite volume methods are prevailing in numerical simulation of flow in porous media. However, due to the lack of cell-centered finite volume methods for mechanics, coupled flow and deformation is usually treated either by coupled finite-volume-finite element discretizations, or within a finite element setting. The former approach is unfavorable as it introduces two separate grid structures, while the latter approach loses the advantages of finite volume methods for the flow equation. Recently, we proposed a cell-centered finite volume method for elasticity. Herein, we explore the applicability of this novel method to provide a compatible finite volume discretization for coupled hydromechanic flows in porous media. We detail in particular the issue of coupling terms, and show how this is naturally handled. Furthermore, we observe how the cell-centered finite volume framework naturally allows for modeling fractured and fracturing porous media through internal boundary conditions. We support the discussion with a set of numerical examples: the convergence properties of the coupled scheme are first investigated; second, we illustrate the practical applicability of the method both for fractured and heterogeneous media.

  20. Finite volume hydromechanical simulation in porous media

    PubMed Central

    Nordbotten, Jan Martin

    2014-01-01

    Cell-centered finite volume methods are prevailing in numerical simulation of flow in porous media. However, due to the lack of cell-centered finite volume methods for mechanics, coupled flow and deformation is usually treated either by coupled finite-volume-finite element discretizations, or within a finite element setting. The former approach is unfavorable as it introduces two separate grid structures, while the latter approach loses the advantages of finite volume methods for the flow equation. Recently, we proposed a cell-centered finite volume method for elasticity. Herein, we explore the applicability of this novel method to provide a compatible finite volume discretization for coupled hydromechanic flows in porous media. We detail in particular the issue of coupling terms, and show how this is naturally handled. Furthermore, we observe how the cell-centered finite volume framework naturally allows for modeling fractured and fracturing porous media through internal boundary conditions. We support the discussion with a set of numerical examples: the convergence properties of the coupled scheme are first investigated; second, we illustrate the practical applicability of the method both for fractured and heterogeneous media. PMID:25574061

  1. Advanced space system concepts and their orbital support needs (1980 - 2000). Volume 4: Detailed data. Part 2: Program plans and common support needs (a study of the commonality of space vehicle applications to future national needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekey, I.; Mayer, H. L.; Wolfe, M. G.

    1976-01-01

    The methodology of alternate world future scenarios is utilized for selecting a plausible, though not advocated, set of future scenarios each of which results in a program plan appropriate for the respective environment. Each such program plan gives rise to different building block and technology requirements, which are analyzed for common need between the NASA and the DoD for each of the alternate world scenarios. An essentially invariant set of system, building block, and technology development plans is presented at the conclusion, intended to allow protection of most of the options for system concepts regardless of what the actual future world environment turns out to be. Thus, building block and technology needs are derived which support: (1) each specific world scenario; (2) all the world scenarios identified in this study; or (3) generalized scenarios applicable to almost any future environment. The output included in this volume consists of the building blocks, i.e.: transportation vehicles, orbital support vehicles, and orbital support facilities; the technology required to support the program plans; identification of their features which could support the DoD and NASA in common; and a complete discussion of the planning methodology.

  2. Applications of remote sensing, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landgrebe, D. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. ECHO successfully exploits the redundancy of states characteristics of sampled imagery of ground scenes to achieve better classification accuracy, reduce the number of classifications required, and reduce the variability of classification results. The information required to produce ECHO classifications are cell size, cell homogeneity, cell-to-field annexation parameters, input data, and a class conditional marginal density statistics deck.

  3. Applications of remote sensing, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landgrebe, D. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Of the four change detection techniques (post classification comparison, delta data, spectral/temporal, and layered spectral temporal), the post classification comparison was selected for further development. This was based upon test performances of the four change detection method, straightforwardness of the procedures, and the output products desired. A standardized modified, supervised classification procedure for analyzing the Texas coastal zone data was compiled. This procedure was developed in order that all quadrangles in the study are would be classified using similar analysis techniques to allow for meaningful comparisons and evaluations of the classifications.

  4. Turbine Design and Application, Volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    Turbine technology concepts for thermodynamic and fluid dynamics are presented along with velocity diagrams, losses, mechanical design, operation and performance. Designs discussed include: supersonic turbines, radial-inflow turbines, and turbine cooling.

  5. Applications of remote sensing, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landgrebe, D. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The overall spectral response of the strata measured by a mean vector and covariance matrix for each stratum did not show differences among the LACIE phase 3 strata using the machine clustering procedures. This was expected since the large strata gave rise to broad normal distributions with a great deal of overlap. The static stratification of Kansas contains strata which are small in size. The distributions for these strata are not as broad as those based on the LACIE phase 3 partitions, but there is still some confusion since strata from different categories are not spectrally distinct.

  6. IR Activities. IR Applications, Volume 12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Stephen; Gerek, Mary Louise

    2007-01-01

    Institutional research is the sum total of all activities directed at describing the full spectrum of functions (educational, administrative, and support) occurring within a college or university. Institutional research activities examine those functions in their broadest definitions, and embrace data collection and analytical strategies in…

  7. Unsteady flow volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, B.G.; Lane, D.A.; Max, N.L.

    1995-03-01

    Flow volumes are extended for use in unsteady (time-dependent) flows. The resulting unsteady flow volumes are the 3 dimensional analog of streamlines. There are few examples where methods other than particle tracing have been used to visualize time varying flows. Since particle paths can become convoluted in time there are additional considerations to be made when extending any visualization technique to unsteady flows. We will present some solutions to the problems which occur in subdivision, rendering, and system design. We will apply the unsteady flow volumes to a variety of field types including moving multi-zoned curvilinear grids.

  8. Gravimetric gas determinations for volume calibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, P.W.

    1991-01-01

    Gravimetric measurement of gases is one of the methods available for calibrating gas volumes. By inputting a known quantity of gas and measuring the resulting pressure and temperature, the system volume can be calculated using gas law principles. Historically, this method has been less accurate due to the difficulty in the mass determination. This difficulty comes from several sources. Two examples are the large tare weight of the gas container relative to the weight of gas and the external volume of the gas container relative to the standards. The application of a gravimetric gas determination to tank volume calibrations at the Savannah River Site is discussed. Mass determinations on a 25,000 gram gas container were such that a 1500 gram quantity of gas was routinely determined to within {plus minus}0.2 gram at the 99% confidence level. The weighing design and the methods used to address the difficulties of the mass determination are detailed.

  9. Gravimetric gas determinations for volume calibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, P.W.

    1991-12-31

    Gravimetric measurement of gases is one of the methods available for calibrating gas volumes. By inputting a known quantity of gas and measuring the resulting pressure and temperature, the system volume can be calculated using gas law principles. Historically, this method has been less accurate due to the difficulty in the mass determination. This difficulty comes from several sources. Two examples are the large tare weight of the gas container relative to the weight of gas and the external volume of the gas container relative to the standards. The application of a gravimetric gas determination to tank volume calibrations at the Savannah River Site is discussed. Mass determinations on a 25,000 gram gas container were such that a 1500 gram quantity of gas was routinely determined to within {plus_minus}0.2 gram at the 99% confidence level. The weighing design and the methods used to address the difficulties of the mass determination are detailed.

  10. Solar cell array design handbook, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschenbach, H. S.

    1976-01-01

    Twelve chapters discuss the following: historical developments, the environment and its effects, solar cells, solar cell filters and covers, solar cell and other electrical interconnections, blocking and shunt diodes, substrates and deployment mechanisms, material properties, design synthesis and optimization, design analysis, procurement, production and cost aspects, evaluation and test, orbital performance, and illustrative design examples. A comprehensive index permits rapid locating of desired topics. The handbook consists of two volumes: Volume 1 is of an expository nature while Volume 2 contains detailed design data in an appendix-like fashion. Volume 2 includes solar cell performance data, applicable unit conversion factors and physical constants, and mechanical, electrical, thermal optical, magnetic, and outgassing material properties. Extensive references are provided.

  11. Multi-volume visualization for interactive therapy planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Liangshou; Amin, Viren R.; Ryken, Timothy; Long, Tao; Hagge, Mathew J.; Bryden, Mark

    2007-03-01

    During the past decade, various volume visualization techniques have been developed for different purposes, and many of them, such as direct volume rendering, maximum intensity projection and non-photorealistic rendering, have been implemented on consumer graphics hardware for real time visualization. However, effective multi-volume visualization, a way to establish the visual connections between two or more types of data, has not been adequately addressed even though it has wide applications in medical imaging and numerical simulation based on 3D physical model. In this paper, we aim to develop an effective GPU-based system for multi-volume visualization which is able to reveal both the connections and distinctions among multiple volume data. To address the main challenge for multi-volume visualization on how to establish the visual correspondences while maintaining the distinctive information among multiple volumes, a multi-level distinction mechanism is developed including 2D transfer function, mixed rendering modes, and volume clipping. Taking advantage of the fast hardware-supported processing capabilities, the system is implemented based on the GPU programming. Several advanced volume rendering techniques based on segmented volume are also implemented. The resulting visualization is a highly interactive image fusion system with high quality image and three-level volume distinction. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our system with a case study in which the heat effect on brain tumor, represented as a temperature volume resulting from high intensity focused ultrasound beam exposure over time, is visualized in the context of a MRI head volume.

  12. Variable-Volume Container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colling, A. K.; Nallette, T. A.; Sansevero, F.

    1989-01-01

    Container holds bed of beads securely while accommodating sizable changes in volume and allowing gases to flow through bed. Developed for air-purifying system in which carbon dioxide is removed by solid amine beads.

  13. Environmental chemistry: Volume A

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, T.F.

    1999-08-01

    This is an extensive introduction to environmental chemistry for engineering and chemical professionals. The contents of Volume A include a brief review of basic chemistry prior to coverage of litho, atmo, hydro, pedo, and biospheres.

  14. Stereometric body volume measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herron, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The following studies are reported: (1) effects of extended space flight on body form of Skylab astronauts using biostereometrics; (2) comparison of body volume determinations using hydrostatic weighing and biostereometrics; and (3) training of technicians in biostereometric principles and procedures.

  15. Free volume under shear.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Moumita; Vinutha, H A; Sastry, Srikanth; Heussinger, Claus

    2015-10-14

    Using an athermal quasistatic simulation protocol, we study the distribution of free volumes in sheared hard-particle packings close to, but below, the random-close packing threshold. We show that under shear, and independent of volume fraction, the free volumes develop features similar to close-packed systems - particles self-organize in a manner as to mimick the isotropically jammed state. We compare athermally sheared packings with thermalized packings and show that thermalization leads to an erasure of these structural features. The temporal evolution in particular the opening-up and the closing of free-volume patches is associated with the single-particle dynamics, showing a crossover from ballistic to diffusive behavior. PMID:26472384

  16. The GPS Space Service Volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F. H.; Moreau, M. C.; Dahle-Melsaether, M. E.; Petrofski, W. P.; Stanton, B. J.; Thomason, S.; Harris, G. A.; Sena, R. P.; Temple, L. Parker, III

    2006-01-01

    Prior to the advent of artificial satellites, the concept of navigating in space and the desire to understand and validate the laws of planetary and satellite motion dates back centuries. At the initiation of orbital flight in 1957, space navigation was dominated by inertial and groundbased tracking methods, underpinned by the laws of planetary motion. It was early in the 1980s that GPS was first explored as a system useful for refining the position, velocity, and timing (PVT) of other spacecraft equipped with GPS receivers. As a result, an entirely new GPS utility was developed beyond its original purpose of providing PVT services for land, maritime, and air applications. Spacecraft both above and below the GPS constellation now receive the GPS signals, including the signals that spill over the limb of the Earth. The use of radionavigation satellite services for space navigation in High Earth Orbits is in fact a capability unique to GPS. Support to GPS space applications is being studied and planned as an important improvement to GPS. This paper discusses the formalization of PVT services in space as part of an overall GPS improvement effort. It describes the GPS Space Service Volume (SSV) and compares it to the Terrestrial Service Volume (TSV). It also discusses SSV coverage with the current GPS constellation, coverage characteristics as a function of altitude, expected power levels, and coverage figures of merit.

  17. Geomagnetism. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    The latest attempt to summarise the wealth of knowledge now available on geomagnetic phenomena has resulted in this multi-volume treatise, with contributions and reviews from many scientists. The first volume in the series contains a thorough review of all existing information on measuring the Earth's magnetic field, both on land and at sea, and includes a comparative analysis of the techniques available for this purpose.

  18. Direct volume editing.

    PubMed

    Bürger, Kai; Krüger, Jens; Westermann, Rüdiger

    2008-01-01

    In this work we present basic methodology for interactive volume editing on GPUs, and we demonstrate the use of these methods to achieve a number of different effects. We present fast techniques to modify the appearance and structure of volumetric scalar fields given on Cartesian grids. Similar to 2D circular brushes as used in surface painting we present 3D spherical brushes for intuitive coloring of particular structures in such fields. This paint metaphor is extended to allow the user to change the data itself, and the use of this functionality for interactive structure isolation, hole filling, and artefact removal is demonstrated. Building on previous work in the field we introduce high-resolution selection volumes, which can be seen as a resolution-based focus+context metaphor. By utilizing such volumes we present a novel approach to interactive volume editing at sub-voxel accuracy. Finally, we introduce a fast technique to paste textures onto iso-surfaces in a 3D scalar field. Since the texture resolution is independent of the volume resolution, this technique allows structure-aligned textures containing appearance properties or textual information to be used for volume augmentation and annotation. PMID:18988988

  19. TREATABILITY MANUAL. VOLUME V: SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Treatability Manual presents in five volumes an extensive survey of the effectiveness of various water pollution treatment processes when applied to particular industrial effluents. This volume summarizes volumes one through four and outlines their potential utility to Nation...

  20. NASA Propulsion Engineering Research Center, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is the second volume in the 1994 annual report for the NASA Propulsion Engineering Research Center's Sixth Annual Symposium. This conference covered: (1) Combustors and Nozzles; (2) Turbomachinery Aero- and Hydro-dynamics; (3) On-board Propulsion systems; (4) Advanced Propulsion Applications; (5) Vaporization and Combustion; (6) Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics; and (7) Atomization and Sprays.

  1. First CLIPS Conference Proceedings, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The topics of volume 2 of First CLIPS Conference are associated with following applications: quality control; intelligent data bases and networks; Space Station Freedom; Space Shuttle and satellite; user interface; artificial neural systems and fuzzy logic; parallel and distributed processing; enchancements to CLIPS; aerospace; simulation and defense; advisory systems and tutors; and intelligent control.

  2. Practical Nursing, Volume I. Health Occupations Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Helen W.; And Others

    This curriculum guide provides teachers with up-to-date information and skill-related applications needed by the practical nurse. The volume contains three sections and 24 instructional units: Personal Vocational Relationships (6 units), Nutrition (3 units), and Basic Nursing Principles and Applied Skills (15 units covering such topics as…

  3. Volume MLS ray casting.

    PubMed

    Ledergerber, Christian; Guennebaud, Gaël; Meyer, Miriah; Bächer, Moritz; Pfister, Hanspeter

    2008-01-01

    The method of Moving Least Squares (MLS) is a popular framework for reconstructing continuous functions from scattered data due to its rich mathematical properties and well-understood theoretical foundations. This paper applies MLS to volume rendering, providing a unified mathematical framework for ray casting of scalar data stored over regular as well as irregular grids. We use the MLS reconstruction to render smooth isosurfaces and to compute accurate derivatives for high-quality shading effects. We also present a novel, adaptive preintegration scheme to improve the efficiency of the ray casting algorithm by reducing the overall number of function evaluations, and an efficient implementation of our framework exploiting modern graphics hardware. The resulting system enables high-quality volume integration and shaded isosurface rendering for regular and irregular volume data. PMID:18988986

  4. Live ultrasound volume reconstruction using scout scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Amelie; Lasso, Andras; Ungi, Tamas; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound-guided interventions often necessitate scanning of deep-seated anatomical structures that may be hard to visualize. Visualization can be improved using reconstructed 3D ultrasound volumes. High-resolution 3D reconstruction of a large area during clinical interventions is challenging if the region of interest is unknown. We propose a two-stage scanning method allowing the user to perform quick low-resolution scouting followed by high-resolution live volume reconstruction. Scout scanning is accomplished by stacking 2D tracked ultrasound images into a low-resolution volume. Then, within a region of interest defined in the scout scan, live volume reconstruction can be performed by continuous scanning until sufficient image density is achieved. We implemented the workflow as a module of the open-source 3D Slicer application, within the SlicerIGT extension and building on the PLUS toolkit. Scout scanning is performed in a few seconds using 3 mm spacing to allow region of interest definition. Live reconstruction parameters are set to provide good image quality (0.5 mm spacing, hole filling enabled) and feedback is given during live scanning by regularly updated display of the reconstructed volume. Use of scout scanning may allow the physician to identify anatomical structures. Subsequent live volume reconstruction in a region of interest may assist in procedures such as targeting needle interventions or estimating brain shift during surgery.

  5. Assessing volume status.

    PubMed

    Scott, Michael C; Mallemat, Haney

    2014-11-01

    Shock is a physiologic state associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. The clinician has several tools available to evaluate volume status. Each modality has its benefits and limitations but, to date, no one test can indicate with 100% accuracy which patients will be truly volume responsive. Although the search for the Holy Grail of a perfect intravascular monitor continues, we must remember the importance of early, aggressive, and goal-directed interventions for patients in shock. Finally, there is no substitute for the most important intervention-the frequent presence of the physician at the patient's bedside. PMID:25441036

  6. Aperiodic Volume Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerke, Tim D.

    Presented in this thesis is an investigation into aperiodic volume optical devices. The three main topics of research and discussion are the aperiodic volume optical devices that we call computer-generated volume holograms (CGVH), defects within periodic 3D photonic crystals, and non-periodic, but ordered 3D quasicrystals. The first of these devices, CGVHs, are designed and investigated numerically and experimentally. We study the performance of multi-layered amplitude computer-generated volume holograms in terms of efficiency and angular/frequency selectivity. Simulation results show that such aperiodic devices can increase diffraction efficiency relative to periodic amplitude volume holograms while maintaining angular and wavelength selectivity. CGVHs are also designed as voxelated volumes using a new projection optimization algorithm. They are investigated using a volumetric diffraction simulation and a standard 3D beam propagation technique as well as experimentally. Both simulation and experiment verify that the structures function according to their design. These represent the first diffractive structures that have the capacity for generating arbitrary transmission and reflection wave fronts and that provide the ability for multiplexing arbitrary functionality given different illumination conditions. Also investigated and discussed in this thesis are 3D photonic crystals and quasicrystals. We demonstrate that these devices can be fabricated using a femtosecond laser direct writing system that is particularly appropriate for fabrication of such arbitrary 3D structures. We also show that these devices can provide 3D partial bandgaps which could become complete bandgaps if fabricated using high index materials or by coating lower index materials with high index metals. Our fabrication method is particularly suited to the fabrication of engineered defects within the periodic or quasi-periodic systems. We demonstrate the potential for fabricating defects within

  7. Sensors, Volume 1, Fundamentals and General Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandke, Thomas; Ko, Wen H.

    1996-12-01

    'Sensors' is the first self-contained series to deal with the whole area of sensors. It describes general aspects, technical and physical fundamentals, construction, function, applications and developments of the various types of sensors. This volume deals with the fundamentals and common principles of sensors and covers the wide areas of principles, technologies, signal processing, and applications. Contents include: Sensor Fundamentals, e.g. Sensor Parameters, Modeling, Design and Packaging; Basic Sensor Technologies, e.g. Thin and Thick Films, Integrated Magnetic Sensors, Optical Fibres and Intergrated Optics, Ceramics and Oxides; Sensor Interfaces, e.g. Signal Processing, Multisensor Signal Processing, Smart Sensors, Interface Systems; Sensor Applications, e.g. Automotive: On-board Sensors, Traffic Surveillance and Control, Home Appliances, Environmental Monitoring, etc. This volume is an indispensable reference work and text book for both specialits and newcomers, researchers and developers.

  8. Determination of gas volume trapped in a closed fluid system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, W. F.; Jolley, J. E.

    1971-01-01

    Technique involves extracting known volume of fluid and measuring system before and after extraction, volume of entrapped gas is then computed. Formula derived from ideal gas laws is basis of this method. Technique is applicable to thermodynamic cycles and hydraulic systems.

  9. Liposome technology. Volume III: Targeted drug delivery and biological interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gregoriadis, G.

    1984-01-01

    These three volumes cover liposome technology in pharmacology and medicine. Contributors emphasize methodology used in their own laboratories, and include a brief introduction, coverage of relevant literature, applications and critical evaluations for the methods they describe. In Volume III, the growing variety of techniques yielding targeted liposomes and approaches of studying liposomal behavior both in vitro and in vivo are discussed.

  10. Health Occupations Education. Units of Instruction. Teacher's Guide. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East Texas State Univ., Commerce. Occupational Curriculum Lab.

    This manual is the first part of a two-volume teacher's guide to a series of instructional units for use in health occupations education programs in Texas. Covered in the 10 units included in this volume are the following topics: taking and recording vital signs; job applications and interviews; grooming and personal hygiene; health careers;…

  11. GREEK BASIC COURSE, VOLUME I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OBOLENSKY, SERGE; AND OTHERS

    THE GREEK LANGUAGE DESCRIBED IN VOLUME I OF THIS INTRODUCTORY COURSE FOR ADULTS IS THE "KATHOMILUMENI" VARIETY, THAT OF THE STANDARD SPEECH OF EDUCATED GREEKS. (VOLUME III OF THE COURSE INTRODUCES THE MORE FORMAL KATHAREVUSA VARIETY.) EACH VOLUME OF THE COURSE CONTAINS 25 UNITS PLUS FIVE REVIEW SECTIONS. A TYPICAL UNIT IN VOLUME I CONSISTS OF--(1)…

  12. Cerebrospinal fluid volume measurements in hydrocephalic rats.

    PubMed

    Basati, Sukhraaj; Desai, Bhargav; Alaraj, Ali; Charbel, Fady; Linninger, Andreas

    2012-10-01

    Object Experimental data about the evolution of intracranial volume and pressure in cases of hydrocephalus are limited due to the lack of available monitoring techniques. In this study, the authors validate intracranial CSF volume measurements within the lateral ventricle, while simultaneously using impedance sensors and pressure transducers in hydrocephalic animals. Methods A volume sensor was fabricated and connected to a catheter that was used as a shunt to withdraw CSF. In vitro bench-top calibration experiments were created to provide data for the animal experiments and to validate the sensors. To validate the measurement technique in a physiological system, hydrocephalus was induced in weanling rats by kaolin injection into the cisterna magna. At 28 days after induction, the sensor was implanted into the lateral ventricles. After sealing the skull using dental cement, an acute CSF drainage/infusion protocol consisting of 4 sequential phases was performed with a pump. Implant location was confirmed via radiography using intraventricular iohexol contrast administration. Results Controlled CSF shunting in vivo with hydrocephalic rats resulted in precise and accurate sensor measurements (r = 0.98). Shunting resulted in a 17.3% maximum measurement error between measured volume and actual volume as assessed by a Bland-Altman plot. A secondary outcome confirmed that both ventricular volume and intracranial pressure decreased during CSF shunting and increased during infusion. Ventricular enlargement consistent with successful hydrocephalus induction was confirmed using imaging, as well as postmortem. These results indicate that volume monitoring is feasible for clinical cases of hydrocephalus. Conclusions This work marks a departure from traditional shunting systems currently used to treat hydrocephalus. The overall clinical application is to provide alternative monitoring and treatment options for patients. Future work includes development and testing of a chronic

  13. Leadership Abstracts, Volume 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milliron, Mark D., Ed.

    1997-01-01

    The abstracts in this series provide brief discussions of issues related to leadership, administration, professional development, technology, and education in community colleges. Volume 10 for 1997 contains the following 12 abstracts: (1) "On Community College Renewal" (Nathan L. Hodges and Mark D. Milliron); (2) "The Community College Niche in a…

  14. Liter - Metric Volume.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sisk, Diane

    This autoinstructional program, developed as part of a general science course, is offered for students in the middle schools. Mathematics of fractions and decimals is considered to be prerequisite knowledge. The behavioral objectives are directed toward mastery of determining volumes of solid objects using the water displacement method as well as…

  15. Overview of the Volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Emslie, A. G.; Hudson, H. S.

    2011-01-01

    In this introductory chapter, we provide a brief summary of the successes and remaining challenges in understanding the solar flare phenomenon and its attendant implications for particle acceleration mechanisms in astrophysical plasmas. We also provide a brief overview of the contents of the other chapters in this volume, with particular reference to the well-observed flare of 2002 July 23.

  16. Volume measuring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oele, J. S.

    1975-01-01

    Chamber is designed to be airtight; it includes face mask for person to breathe outside air so that he does not disturb chamber environment. Chamber includes piston to vary air volume inside. Also included are two microphone transducers which record pressure information inside chamber.

  17. Navajo Biographies. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Virginia

    The life stories of eight Navajo ("Dine", their term for themselves) leaders are presented in volume one of this collection of biographies. Interspersed with portraits, drawings, and maps, the narrative chronologically covers the time period from 1766 when the Navajos lived on land under the rule of Spain into the twentieth century and dealings…

  18. Strategic Plan. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to present the strategic plan and associated organizational structure that the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) will utilize to achieve the defined mission and objectives provided by NASA. Much of the information regarding the background and establishment of the NSBRI by NASA has been provided in other documentation and will not be repeated in this Strategic Plan. This Strategic Plan is presented in two volumes. Volume I (this volume) begins with an Introduction (Section 2) that provides the Institute's NASA-defined mission and objectives, and the organizational structure adopted to implement these through three Strategic Programs: Countermeasure Research; Education, Training and Outreach; and Cooperative Research and Development. These programs are described in Sections 3 to 5. Each program is presented in a similar way, using four subsections: Goals and Objectives; Current Strategies; Gaps and Modifications; and Resource Requirements. Section 6 provides the administrative infrastructure and total budget required to implement the Strategic Programs and assures that they form a single cohesive plan. This plan will ensure continued success of the Institute for the next five years. Volume II of the Strategic Plan provides an in-depth analysis of the current and future strategic programs of the 12 current NSBRI teams, including their goals, objectives, mutual interactions and schedules.

  19. VOLUME AND SURFACE AREA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FOLEY, JACK L.

    THIS BOOKLET, ONE OF A SERIES, HAS BEEN DEVELOPED FOR THE PROJECT, A PROGRAM FOR MATHEMATICALLY UNDERDEVELOPED PUPILS. A PROJECT TEAM, INCLUDING INSERVICE TEACHERS, IS BEING USED TO WRITE AND DEVELOP THE MATERIALS FOR THIS PROGRAM. THE MATERIALS DEVELOPED IN THIS BOOKLET INCLUDE (1) MEASURING VOLUMES OF RECTANGULAR SOLIDS, RIGHT RECTANGULAR…

  20. Negotiating Salaries, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Service Bureau, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This volume discusses specific strategy and tactics that can be employed in the effort to reach an agreement on salaries at the bargaining table. Although strategies and situations may vary from case to case, this report focuses on those principles and approaches that are essential to any good bargaining procedure. The discussion covers public vs.…