Science.gov

Sample records for academia private industry

  1. Industrial plasmas in academia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollenstein, Ch; Howling, AA; Guittienne, Ph; Furno, I.

    2015-01-01

    The present review, written at the occasion of the 2014 EPS Innovation award, will give a short overview of the research and development of industrial plasmas within the last 30 years and will also provide a first glimpse into future developments of this important topic of plasma physics and plasma chemistry. In the present contribution, some of the industrial plasmas studied at the CRPP/EPFL at Lausanne are highlighted and their influence on modern plasma physics and also discharge physics is discussed. One of the most important problems is the treatment of large surfaces, such as that used in solar cells, but also in more daily applications, such as the packaging industry. In this contribution, the advantages and disadvantages of some of the most prominent plasmas such as capacitively- and inductively-coupled plasmas are discussed. Electromagnetic problems due to the related radio frequency and its consequences on the plasma reactor performance, and also dust formation due to chemical reactions in plasma, are highlighted. Arcing and parasitic discharges occurring in plasma reactors can lead to plasma reactor damages. Some specific problems, such as the gas supply of a large area reactor, are discussed in more detail. Other topics of interest have been dc discharges such as those used in plasma spraying where thermal plasmas are applied for advanced material processing. Modern plasma diagnostics make it possible to investigate sparks in electrical discharge machining, which surprisingly show properties of weakly-coupled plasmas. Nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge plasmas have been applied to more speculative topics such as applications in aerodynamics and will surely be important in the future for ignition and combustion. Most of the commonly-used plasma sources have been shown to be limited in their performance. Therefore new, more effective plasma sources are urgently required. With the recent development of novel resonant network antennas for new

  2. Academia-industry symbiosis in organic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Michaudel, Quentin; Ishihara, Yoshihiro; Baran, Phil S

    2015-03-17

    Collaboration between academia and industry is a growing phenomenon within the chemistry community. These sectors have long held strong ties since academia traditionally trains the future scientists of the corporate world, but the recent drastic decrease of public funding is motivating the academic world to seek more private grants. This concept of industrial "sponsoring" is not new, and in the past, some companies granted substantial amounts of money per annum to various academic institutions in exchange for prime access to all their scientific discoveries and inventions. However, academic and industrial interests were not always aligned, and therefore the investment has become increasingly difficult to justify from industry's point of view. With fluctuating macroeconomic factors, this type of unrestricted grant has become more rare and has been largely replaced by smaller and more focused partnerships. In our view, forging a partnership with industry can be a golden opportunity for both parties and can represent a true symbiosis. This type of project-specific collaboration is engendered by industry's desire to access very specific academic expertise that is required for the development of new technologies at the forefront of science. Since financial pressures do not allow companies to spend the time to acquire this expertise and even less to explore fundamental research, partnering with an academic laboratory whose research is related to the problem gives them a viable alternative. From an academic standpoint, it represents the perfect occasion to apply "pure science" research concepts to solve problems that benefit humanity. Moreover, it offers a unique opportunity for students to face challenges from the "real world" at an early stage of their career. Although not every problem in industry can be solved by research developments in academia, we argue that there is significant scientific overlap between these two seemingly disparate groups, thereby presenting an

  3. Academia-industry symbiosis in organic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Michaudel, Quentin; Ishihara, Yoshihiro; Baran, Phil S

    2015-03-17

    Collaboration between academia and industry is a growing phenomenon within the chemistry community. These sectors have long held strong ties since academia traditionally trains the future scientists of the corporate world, but the recent drastic decrease of public funding is motivating the academic world to seek more private grants. This concept of industrial "sponsoring" is not new, and in the past, some companies granted substantial amounts of money per annum to various academic institutions in exchange for prime access to all their scientific discoveries and inventions. However, academic and industrial interests were not always aligned, and therefore the investment has become increasingly difficult to justify from industry's point of view. With fluctuating macroeconomic factors, this type of unrestricted grant has become more rare and has been largely replaced by smaller and more focused partnerships. In our view, forging a partnership with industry can be a golden opportunity for both parties and can represent a true symbiosis. This type of project-specific collaboration is engendered by industry's desire to access very specific academic expertise that is required for the development of new technologies at the forefront of science. Since financial pressures do not allow companies to spend the time to acquire this expertise and even less to explore fundamental research, partnering with an academic laboratory whose research is related to the problem gives them a viable alternative. From an academic standpoint, it represents the perfect occasion to apply "pure science" research concepts to solve problems that benefit humanity. Moreover, it offers a unique opportunity for students to face challenges from the "real world" at an early stage of their career. Although not every problem in industry can be solved by research developments in academia, we argue that there is significant scientific overlap between these two seemingly disparate groups, thereby presenting an

  4. Strengthening the relationship between industry and academia

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, K.J.; Medford, M.O. )

    1991-11-01

    Both industry and academia recognize that there are potential benefits in developing a partnership. Interaction between industry and academia is necessary if students are to be given the skills that are most critical to industry. These more appropriately educated students will then be able to make a greater and more immediate contribution once in the work force. This interaction can continue throughout the employee's career by providing opportunities for lifelong learning through training - both technical training to prevent obsolescence and training to broaden or add to employee skills (e.g., management or quality training). Local universities and colleges in the Tennessee River Valley provide help with curriculum development and provide expertise and the latest information and techniques that are lacking within the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for training and broadening employees. Two examples are provided of current programs designed to address industrial demands for education.

  5. Industry-funded dermatologic research within academia in the United States: fiscal and ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Blank, I H

    1992-03-01

    Private-sector funding of biomedical research within academia may come from industry, foundations, the dermatologists themselves, and the public at large. Industry-funding is of benefit to both academia and industry. Industry may fund clinical and basic research and product testing. Industry is more willing to fund product testing and clinical research than basic research. Funds for dermatologic research may be obtained from manufacturers of drugs, medical devices, cosmetics, soaps, and detergents. Questions of academic freedom arise when research is funded by industry. The results of academic research are in the public domain; the results of intramural industry research are often proprietary, i.e., "trade secrets." When there is industry funding within academia, any restraints on publication should be held to a minimum and be temporary. Publication should occur in a timely fashion, although recognizing the need for delayed publication if the results concern patentable material. When there is a consultantship, pre-arranged terms of agreement may restrict communication. Patents usually are held by the investigator's institution. The funding company may be granted world-wide, royalty-bearing licenses. Conflicts of interest may arise during any research endeavor; this warrants close attention when the research is industry funded. Stock ownership, speaker fees, blind contracts, etc., should be avoided. In any communication, funding agreements should be stated. Indirect costs are a "necessary evil." There are non-research expenditures associated with all research projects for which the institution is justified in requesting compensation. Indirect costs must have definite connections to a project. As industrial funding of research within academia increases, various facets of the academia-industry relationship are receiving increasing attention. Several aspects of conflicts of interest and indirect costs must yet be resolved. When faced openly and directly, all of these

  6. Navigating the Career Transition from Industry to Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Michael John; Wood, Leigh; Solomonides, Ian; Dixon, Peter; Goos, Merrilyn

    2013-01-01

    Transitions from "industry" to "academia" represent a unique type of career change. Although such transitions are becoming increasingly common in Australian universities and beyond, there is no coherent framework for making sense of the multiple and intersecting factors involved in these inter-domain movements. This form of…

  7. Differences Between Physics in Industry and Academia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, David E.

    1982-01-01

    Compares and contrasts industrial and university physics departments, focusing on the group dynamics and work environment of a corporate physics (General Motors). A major difference between these departments lies in the motivation for and evaluation of research, not in the selection of research topics. (Author/JN)

  8. Life as an acoustician in industry, academia, and government service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastings, Mardi C.

    2001-05-01

    Acoustics is a science that has very broad applications, which affect all different areas of our lives. During the last 20 years, I have combined family with a career as an acoustics engineer in industry, a tenured faculty member at a university and, most recently, a program manager in a government agency. In these positions I have worked in several areas of acoustics, including noise control, structural acoustics, building acoustics, sound quality, physical acoustics, acoustic materials, underwater acoustics, biomedical ultrasound, physiological acoustics, and bioacoustics. Although the fundamental science of sound is the foundation of all these areas, communication of ideas, problems, and solutions varies greatly from industry to academia to government. Thus knowing the science and how to use it are not enough, as communication skills and the ability to adapt them to changing environments are essential for a successful career. In addition to describing life as an acoustician in industry, academia, and government service, I will present several examples of how even though the acoustic fundamentals are the same, how they are communicated could become a disaster or save the day.

  9. Preparing the nurse scientist for academia and industry.

    PubMed

    Lewallen, Lynne P; Kohlenberg, Eileen

    2011-01-01

    The number of doctoral programs in nursing has been increasing. However, these programs tend to focus on preparing nurse scientists to conduct research, and many spend little time preparing doctoral students for the educator, clinical researcher, or administrator role. Leaders of doctoral programs have identified the need to prepare doctoral students in the functional roles they will assume upon graduation, in addition to the researcher role. This article describes a two-course (six-credit) sequence of courses within a research-focused PhD in Nursing program that provides didactic and experiential knowledge about the role of the nurse scientist in academia and industry settings. Students are highly satisfied with the courses, and report that the experiences have provided them with important knowledge and skills as they assume the scientist role.

  10. RETRAINING BY PRIVATE INDUSTRY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HOOS, IDA R.

    SEVERAL SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA COMPANIES WERE EXAMINED FOR SPECIFIC PROGRAMS FOR DISPLACED EMPLOYEES. ARMOUR AND COMPANY SOUGHT TO GUIDE DISPLACED EMPLOYEES TO CLASSES OR COURSES OF ACTION OUTSIDE ITS OWN SPHERE OF OPERATION. LOCKHEED HAS PROVIDED UNUSUALLY WELL FOR UPGRADING AND RETRAINING, MAINLY BECAUSE OF INDUSTRY FLUCTUATIONS AND RAPID…

  11. National colloquium: developing national standards for industry, government, and academia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schou, Corey D.; Maconachy, W. V.; Murray, William; Wilson, Mark A.

    1999-01-01

    The National Colloquium for Information Systems Security Education (the Colloquium) was established in 1997 to serve as a living body to bring government, industry, and academia together to meet the challenges of information security. All aspects of our lives and all aspects of our social, economic and political system are becoming increasingly dependent on our information and communications infrastructure. The security and assurance of our information and communications infrastructure should be a national priority. To address this, our nation needs an information-literate work force that is aware of its vulnerability, as well as a cadre of information professionals that are knowledgeable of the recognized 'best practices available in information security and information assurance, as called for in Presidential Decision Directive 63, May 22, 1998. It is the task of American higher education to provide that information- literate work force and to prepare information professions. To meet this priority, higher education must be informed of the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to be taught in the general curricula and in the information curricula of its colleges and universities. Industry and government must under their role in supporting higher education, not simply expecting higher education to be responsive and informed about information security and assurance.

  12. Academia-Industry-Government Linkages in Tanzania: Trends, Challenges and Prospects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mpehongwa, Gasper

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzed trends, challenges and prospects of academia-industry-government linkages in Tanzania. Using case study design, and documentary review to gather the required data, the study sought to answer three research questions: (1) what are the trends of academia-industry-government linkages in Tanzania?, (2) what are the challenges…

  13. Tapping private industry.

    PubMed

    Weerakoon, B

    1986-12-01

    Many firms throughout Japan and around the world have come to realize that family planning is good for employee morale and company profits. Japanese and Indian efforts prove that family planning programs not only bring welfare benefits to workers, but commercial advantages to businesses. Because workers' family welfare is closely linked to labor welfare and productivity, the trade union movement has started to become active in promoting family planning activities. Factory-based family planning programs have often cut pregnancy rates in half. Godrej Enterprises of India started promoting family planning in 1957; it provides a model of how family planning has been incorporated into a comprehensive employee welfare system in a factory complex on the outskirts of Bombay, where about 1/2 the workers live in high-rise apartments in the company township of Pirojsha Nagar. Similar programs are presented in India, Thailand, Indonesia, Jamaica, Guatemala, Colombia, Korea, and Turkey. Limiting family size enriches workers' lives and improves the quality of the workforce. The International Labor Organization, through its Workers' Education Program on Population, has played an important role in stimulating industrial sector interest in family planning throughout the world.

  14. Better infrastructure: industry-academia partnerships--a marriage of convenience?

    PubMed

    Abraham, Edward

    2009-01-01

    The successful design and completion of clinical trials often requires participation of both industry and academia. Although there may be differing priorities for academic and industry participants, both bring important insights and resources to the clinical trial effort. Although industry generally is primarily responsible for preclinical development and funding of the study and academia for patient recruitment and participation in the data safety monitoring board and clinical coordinating center, there are also a number of important areas, including protocol design, data analysis, and manuscript preparation where both academia and industry can supply important insights. Inherent tensions may exist in the academic-industry relationship, including important issues relating to conflict of interest for both academic and industry participants. Nevertheless, the academic-industry partnership, if appropriately organized, can perform in a synergistic fashion, allowing exploration of novel therapies, elucidation of important mechanisms, and greater understanding of critical illness through using combined approaches that generate insights unable to be provided by either partner alone.

  15. Intellectual Property Rights -- How to Manage the Struggle between Academia and Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabek, Rose Ann

    2000-03-01

    The struggle between Academia and Industry is really one of myths and misperception. Industry is viewed as greedy, difficult to deal with and arrogant. Academia on the other hand is viewed by industry as having unrealistic expectations about the value of the technology and its contribution to product success. Industry wants to own all IP and Academia has come to believe that they will make the next invention that will bring the billion dollars a year royalty income to the school (and the inventors). We will discuss how to measure the contributions of both parties, how to measure the risks and benefits to each party, and offer some suggestions on ways to compromise the IP rights to create a win-win situation for both parties.

  16. [Industry-Academia Collaboration in the Clinical Laboratory Field: Chairmen's Introductory Remarks].

    PubMed

    Inaba, Tohru; Ikemoto, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Industry-academia collaboration has become essential in contemporary medicine. Therefore, many institutes including university corporations have promoted the establishment of an endowed chair and/or performed collaborative research. This symposium was held to overview the present status of industry-academia collaboration in the clinical laboratory field. As a representative of the industry, Mr. Taniguchi (Sysmex) presented the development process of M2BP Glycosylation Isomer, a new marker for liver fibrosis. Mr. Saitoh (Horiba) introduced the achievements of joint collaborative research with Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, especially the practical realization of an automated hematology analyzer capable of simultaneously measuring C-reactive protein. Mr. Setoyama (LSI Medience) presented on the characteristic collaboration between academia and commercial laboratories such as Tsukuba Medical Laboratory of Education and Research (TMER). On the other hand, as a representative of academia, Associate Prof. Imai (Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine) summarized the necessity of clinical laboratories spread regenerative medicine. Finally, Prof. Koshiba (Hyogo College of Medicine) presented on the industry-academia collaboration in routine laboratory work in his institute. PMID:27192804

  17. The role of academia and industry in nurturing women in physics in Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyamwandha, Cecilia A.; Kasina, Angeline; Muthui, Zipporah W.; Awuor, Emily; Baki, Paul

    2015-12-01

    The authors look at some of the primary initiatives taken by the government, academia, and industry to nurture the goals and dreams of Kenyan women physicists. They discuss key transformative lines of progress as evidenced by statistics, and the enabling environments and platforms upon which these were made possible.

  18. Networking Industry and Academia: Evidence from FUSION Projects in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Simon; Onofrei, George

    2009-01-01

    Graduate development programmes such as FUSION continue to be seen by policy makers, higher education institutions and small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) as primary means of strengthening higher education-business links and in turn improving the match between graduate output and the needs of industry. This paper provides evidence from case…

  19. Career Development in the Workplace: Academia and Industry Join Hands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haag-Mutter, Priscilla

    Sinclair Community College (SCC) in Dayton, Ohio has designed a career development workshop for both hourly and salaried employees of Monarch Marking, Inc., to help the local industry to encourage its motivated employees to set and start working toward new career goals within the company. From 12 to 15 employees take part in each 16-hour,…

  20. Multifunctional metal-organic frameworks: from academia to industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Silva, Patrícia; Vilela, Sérgio M F; Tomé, João P C; Almeida Paz, Filipe A

    2015-10-01

    After three decades of intense and fundamental research on metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), is there anything left to say or to explain? The synthesis and properties of MOFs have already been comprehensively described elsewhere. It is time, however, to prove the nature of their true usability: technological applications based on these extended materials require development and implementation as a natural consequence of the up-to-known intensive research focused on their design and preparation. The current large number of reviews on MOFs emphasizes practical strategies to develop novel networks with varied crystal size, shape and topology, being mainly devoted to academic concerns. The present survey intends to push the boundaries and summarise the state-of-the-art on the preparation of promising (multi)functional MOFs in worldwide laboratories and their use as materials for industrial implementation. This review starts, on the one hand, to describe several tools and striking examples of remarkable and recent (multi)functional MOFs exhibiting outstanding properties (e.g., in gas adsorption and separation, selective sorption of harmful compounds, heterogeneous catalysis, luminescent and corrosion protectants). On the other hand, and in a second part, it intends to use these examples of MOFs to incite scientists to move towards the transference of knowledge from the laboratories to the industry. Within this context, we exhaustively review the many efforts of several worldwide commercial companies to bring functional MOFs towards the daily use, analysing the various patents and applications reported to date. Overall, this review goes from the very basic concepts of functional MOF engineering and preparation ending up in their industrial production on a large scale and direct applications in society.

  1. Morally Successful Collaboration between Academia and Industry — A Case of a Project Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartiainen, Tero

    Academia-industry collaboration is common in the IT-field, and it includes training programs, research centre activities, and industry advisory boards (Watson and Huber 2000). For the industry, co-operation provides possibilities to acquire human resources and, for the academia, co-operation ensures that research and teaching activities are relevant. Regardless of its popularity little is known about moral issues relating to this phenomenon. This study intends to fill the gap in knowledge by determining the nature of moral conflicts perceived by clients, students, and instructors of a collaborative project course, and by formulating a framework to successfully getting grips with these conflicts. This article is a summary of the research the detailed description of which is found in Vartiainen (2005).

  2. Changing paradigms in animal agriculture: the role of academia and industry in technology transfer.

    PubMed

    Braund, D G

    1995-10-01

    Challenges abound for academia, industry, and animal agriculture. Universities, especially land-grant universities, are losing their credibility with the public on whom they depend for support. Industries have gone and continue to go through wrenching restructuring, driven by the realities of the marketplace. On the farm and in the classrooms, laboratories, and field research stations of land-grant universities, agriculturalists face a major challenge-society's growing resistance to science and technology. Technology, especially biotechnology, has become suspect in the minds of many people. Solutions to these and other challenges for effective technology transfer in the future will not depend on a single institution, company, or program. Perhaps the most challenging issue is simply how to unite groups and individuals who have been accustomed to having their own separate programs. In the future, "business as usual"; won't work. Academia and industry are being held to new and higher standards of accountability by their clientele (customers). Academia and industry will need to join forces to increase U.S. agriculture's competitiveness in a global environment that demands that the lag time between discovery and adoption of appropriate technology be shortened. PMID:8617689

  3. A Win-Win-Win Proposition -- Academia and Industry Working Together for Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogswell, J.

    2011-12-01

    Both Academia and Industry have a vested interest in building a pipeline of students who are attracted to geoscience as a discipline; who invest in a solid academic geoscience foundation and who move on to fulfilling professional careers. Global society needs geoscientists to find the energy that drives our economic well-being, responsibly and safely; and to solve today's complex environmental concerns. The US Oil and Gas Industry directly employed around 17,300 geologists in 2008(1). As with the rest of the geoscience community, our industry is dealing with a bi-modal age distribution in our workforce, with many eligible to retire in the next five years. Academia and Industry have an urgent, collective, challenge to attract the best and brightest students to study geoscience and to bring promising graduates onboard and up to speed as quickly as possible ExxonMobil accomplishes this rapid acclimation to our industry by focusing on high quality on-boarding, mentoring, and training, as well as diversity in early career assignments. We have implemented a one week on-boarding workshop for our new hires that provides them with comprehensive industry as well as Corporate cultural and infrastructure information. We ensure that our new hires have dedicated mentors who are passionate about petroleum geology, passionate about the petroleum business, and passionate about teaching the next generation of "oil finders." Our new hires attend several "flagship" schools in their first 5 years, which are designed to provide the technical expertise needed in today's petroleum business. Finally, our global operations allow us to provide a rich diversity of early assignments, which enables our early career geoscientists to develop an appreciation of the breadth of our business. There is no sub-discipline of geoscience that is more or less successful transitioning into our business from Academia. The key, which we rely on Academia to provide, is a strong grounding in the fundamentals of

  4. Innovation and industry-academia interactions: where conflicts arise and measures to avoid them.

    PubMed

    Vagelos, P Roy

    2007-03-01

    Every phase of the development of biopharmaceuticals and medical devices has the potential for conflict of interest, but adherence to established rules and practices throughout product development can eliminate the possibility of conflicts. Adherence to good practices should continue through the postmarketing period, with swift reporting and vigorous investigation of any safety concerns. Although some academic medical centers are restricting interactions between their faculty and industry to prevent possible conflicts in physician education about new products, industry and academia should look for new ways to come together in mutually agreed forums that focus on educating clinicians about new products in an efficient, transparent way.

  5. Innovation and industry-academia interactions: where conflicts arise and measures to avoid them.

    PubMed

    Vagelos, P Roy

    2007-03-01

    Every phase of the development of biopharmaceuticals and medical devices has the potential for conflict of interest, but adherence to established rules and practices throughout product development can eliminate the possibility of conflicts. Adherence to good practices should continue through the postmarketing period, with swift reporting and vigorous investigation of any safety concerns. Although some academic medical centers are restricting interactions between their faculty and industry to prevent possible conflicts in physician education about new products, industry and academia should look for new ways to come together in mutually agreed forums that focus on educating clinicians about new products in an efficient, transparent way. PMID:17469468

  6. Natural products and drug discovery: a survey of stakeholders in industry and academia

    PubMed Central

    Amirkia, Vafa; Heinrich, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Context: In recent decades, natural products have undisputedly played a leading role in the development of novel medicines. Yet, trends in the pharmaceutical industry at the level of research investments indicate that natural product research is neither prioritized nor perceived as fruitful in drug discovery programmes as compared with incremental structural modifications and large volume HTS screening of synthetics. Aim: We seek to understand this phenomenon through insights from highly experienced natural product experts in industry and academia. Method: We conducted a survey including a series of qualitative and quantitative questions related to current insights and prospective developments in natural product drug development. The survey was completed by a cross-section of 52 respondents in industry and academia. Results: One recurrent theme is the dissonance between the perceived high potential of NP as drug leads among individuals and the survey participants' assessment of the overall industry and/or company level strategies and their success. The study's industry and academic respondents did not perceive current discovery efforts as more effective as compared with previous decades, yet industry contacts perceived higher hit rates in HTS efforts as compared with academic respondents. Surprisingly, many industry contacts were highly critical to prevalent company and industry-wide drug discovery strategies indicating a high level of dissatisfaction within the industry. Conclusions: These findings support the notion that there is an increasing gap in perception between the effectiveness of well established, commercially widespread drug discovery strategies between those working in industry and academic experts. This research seeks to shed light on this gap and aid in furthering natural product discovery endeavors through an analysis of current bottlenecks in industry drug discovery programmes. PMID:26578954

  7. Training Multidisciplinary Scholars in Science Policy for Careers in Academia, Private Sector, and Public Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenney, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Regardless of a graduate student's ultimate career ambitions, it is becoming increasingly important to either develop skills to successfully transition into non-academic careers or to be able to understand the societal benefits of basic and applied research programs. In this talk I will provide my prospective -- from working in academia, the Federal government, and as an independent consultant -- about the training that we need for graduate students to navigate the jungle gym of career opportunities available (or not available) after they graduate. In particular, I will speak to the need for science policy training, in which scientific and coordination skills are put to use to help support societal decisions. I will assert that, to effectively train graduate students, it is necessary to provide experiences in multidisciplinary, policy-relevant scholarship to build marketable skills critical for a student's professional development.

  8. Digital Image Processing in Private Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Connie

    1986-01-01

    Examines various types of private industry optical disk installations in terms of business requirements for digital image systems in five areas: records management; transaction processing; engineering/manufacturing; information distribution; and office automation. Approaches for implementing image systems are addressed as well as key success…

  9. Collaborations among academia, government, and industry in the diagnostics space: barriers and some ideas for solutions.

    PubMed

    Evans, Greg; Austin, Finley

    2010-12-22

    The development and commercialization of diagnostic assays is distinct from that of therapeutic drugs in many important respects; for example, there are more variable regulatory requirements and reduced outside investments for diagnostics. The diagnostics industry has a pro-collaborative stance, because there is considerable mutual benefit in working in partnership with university or government researchers. However, there are substantial barriers to industry-academic collaborations. A Clinical and Translational Science Awards Industry Forum titled "Promoting Efficient and Effective Collaborations Among Academia, Government, and Industry" was held in February 2010, and a session at this forum was organized to list some of the most important barriers to diagnostics development and to discuss some possible solutions.

  10. Achieving professional success in US government, academia, and industry: an EMGS commentary.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Miriam C; Schwartz, Jeffrey L; Aardema, Marilyn J

    2014-08-01

    One of the goals of the EMGS is to help members achieve professional success in the fields they have trained in. Today, there is greater competition for jobs in genetic toxicology, genomics, and basic research than ever before. In addition, job security and the ability to advance in one's career is challenging, regardless of whether one works in a regulatory, academic, or industry environment. At the EMGS Annual Meeting in Monterey, CA (September, 2013), the Women in EMGS Special Interest Group held a workshop to discuss strategies for achieving professional success. Presentations were given by three speakers, each representing a different employment environment: Government (Miriam C. Poirier), Academia (Jeffrey L. Schwartz), and Industry (Marilyn J. Aardema). Although some differences in factors or traits affecting success in the three employment sectors were noted by each of the speakers, common factors considered important for advancement included networking, seeking out mentors, and developing exceptional communication skills. PMID:24788591

  11. Achieving professional success in US government, academia, and industry: an EMGS commentary.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Miriam C; Schwartz, Jeffrey L; Aardema, Marilyn J

    2014-08-01

    One of the goals of the EMGS is to help members achieve professional success in the fields they have trained in. Today, there is greater competition for jobs in genetic toxicology, genomics, and basic research than ever before. In addition, job security and the ability to advance in one's career is challenging, regardless of whether one works in a regulatory, academic, or industry environment. At the EMGS Annual Meeting in Monterey, CA (September, 2013), the Women in EMGS Special Interest Group held a workshop to discuss strategies for achieving professional success. Presentations were given by three speakers, each representing a different employment environment: Government (Miriam C. Poirier), Academia (Jeffrey L. Schwartz), and Industry (Marilyn J. Aardema). Although some differences in factors or traits affecting success in the three employment sectors were noted by each of the speakers, common factors considered important for advancement included networking, seeking out mentors, and developing exceptional communication skills.

  12. 20 CFR 628.410 - Private Industry Council.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Private Industry Council. 628.410 Section 628... TITLE II OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Local Service Delivery System § 628.410 Private Industry... the Governor shall certify the private industry council (PIC) pursuant to section 102 of the Act....

  13. 20 CFR 628.410 - Private Industry Council.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Private Industry Council. 628.410 Section 628... TITLE II OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Local Service Delivery System § 628.410 Private Industry... the Governor shall certify the private industry council (PIC) pursuant to section 102 of the Act....

  14. First optical education center in Japan established by cooperation between academia and industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatagai, Toyohiko

    2014-07-01

    At the present of the 21st century, optical technology became what must be in our life. If there is no optical technology, we cannot use optical equipments such as the camera, microscopes, DVD, LEDs and laser diodes (LDs). Optics is also the leading part in the most advanced scientific field. It is clear that the organization which does education and research is required in such a very important area. Unfortunately, there was no such organization in Japan. The education and research of light have been individually done in various faculties of universities, various research institutes, and many companies. However, our country is now placed in severer surroundings, such as the globalization of our living, the accelerated competition in research and development. This is one of the reasons why Utsunomiya University has established Center for Optical Research and Education (CORE) in 2007. To contribute to optical technology and further development of optical industry, "Center for Optical Research and Education (CORE), Utsunomiya University" promotes education and research in the field of the optical science and technology cooperatively with industry, academia and the government. Currently, 6 full professors, 21 cooperative professors, 2 visiting professors and 7 post-doctoral researchers and about 40 students are joined with CORE. Many research projects with industries, the local government of Tochigi as well as Japanese government. Optical Innovation Center has established in CORE by supporting of Japan Science and Technology Agency in 2011 to develop advanced optical technologies for local companies.

  15. Views from academia and industry on skills needed for the modern research environment.

    PubMed

    Talgar, Cigdem P; Goodey, Nina M

    2015-01-01

    Reports from employers of higher education graduates indicate the existence of a considerable gap between the skills required by employers and those possessed by recent graduates. As a first step toward closing this gap, this study aims to determine its origin. Interviews with nine research-active biochemistry professionals were used to identify the most important skills for biochemistry students to succeed in research positions postgraduation. The results of these interviews were used to develop a survey, which was then administered to a larger group of biochemistry faculty and industry professionals. The output of the survey was a list of 52 skills valued by biochemistry professionals and rated by perceived importance. Importantly, the survey results also afford a comparative look at the prioritization of skills by two key populations: the academic faculty training students and the industry professionals hiring them. While there are many areas of agreement between these two populations, the survey also reveals areas were priorities diverge. The discrepancies found here suggest that the skills gap manifest at the point of employment may stem directly from differences in prioritization between the academic and industrial environments. This article aims to provide insight into the needs and requirements of the modern biochemical research environment, and invites debate concerning the preparation students receive in academia. Moreover, the results presented herein point to a need for further exploration of the possible misalignment of these two critical environments for young scientists.

  16. The changing environment of graduate and postdoctoral training in drug metabolism: viewpoints from academia, industry, and government.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Jeffrey C; Dean, Dennis C; Preusch, Peter C; Correia, Maria Almira

    2003-04-01

    This article is an invited report of a symposium sponsored by the Drug Metabolism Division of the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics held at Experimental Biology 2002 in New Orleans. The impetus for the symposium was a perceived shortage in the supply of graduate students qualified for drug metabolism research positions in industry, academia, and government. For industry, recent hiring stems largely from the expansion of drug metabolism departments in an effort to keep pace with the demands of drug discovery and new technologies. In turn, regulatory scientists are needed to review and verify the results of the increased number and volume of studies required for drug development and approval. Thus the initial source of training, academia, has been forced to recognize these external hiring pressures while trying to attract and retain the faculty, postdoctoral scientists, and students necessary for active teaching and research programs. The trend of the expansion of the interdisciplinary nature of traditional drug metabolism to include emerging technologies such as pharmacogenetics, transporters, and proteomics and the implications for future needs in training and funding were acknowledged. There was also consensus on the value of partnerships between academia and industry for increasing student interest and providing training in disciplines directly applicable to industrial drug metabolism research. Factors affecting the sources of these trainees, such as federal funding, the number of trainees per institution, and recent issues with immigration restrictions that have limited the flow of scientists were also discussed.

  17. Supporting business continuity during a highly pathogenic avian influenza outbreak: a collaboration of industry, academia, and government.

    PubMed

    Hennessey, Morgan; Lee, Brendan; Goldsmith, Timothy; Halvorson, Dave; Hueston, William; McElroy, Kristina; Waters, Katherine

    2010-03-01

    Since 2006, a collaborative group of egg industry, state, federal, and academia representatives have worked to enhance preparedness in highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) planning. The collaborative group has created a draft egg product movement protocol, which calls for realistic, science-based contingency plans, biosecurity assessments, commodity risk assessments, and real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR testing to support the continuity of egg operations while also preventing and eradicating an HPAI outbreak. The work done by this group serves as an example of how industry, government, and academia can work together to achieve better preparedness in the event of an animal health emergency. In addition, in the event of an HPAI outbreak in domestic poultry, U.S. consumers will be assured that their egg products come from healthy chickens.

  18. 5 CFR 532.311 - Survey of specialized private industry related to a dominant industry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Survey of specialized private industry related to a dominant industry. 532.311 Section 532.311 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL... Positions § 532.311 Survey of specialized private industry related to a dominant industry. If it...

  19. 5 CFR 532.311 - Survey of specialized private industry related to a dominant industry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Survey of specialized private industry related to a dominant industry. 532.311 Section 532.311 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL... Positions § 532.311 Survey of specialized private industry related to a dominant industry. If it...

  20. 5 CFR 532.311 - Survey of specialized private industry related to a dominant industry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Survey of specialized private industry related to a dominant industry. 532.311 Section 532.311 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL... Positions § 532.311 Survey of specialized private industry related to a dominant industry. If it...

  1. 5 CFR 532.311 - Survey of specialized private industry related to a dominant industry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Survey of specialized private industry related to a dominant industry. 532.311 Section 532.311 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL... Positions § 532.311 Survey of specialized private industry related to a dominant industry. If it...

  2. 5 CFR 532.311 - Survey of specialized private industry related to a dominant industry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Survey of specialized private industry related to a dominant industry. 532.311 Section 532.311 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL... Positions § 532.311 Survey of specialized private industry related to a dominant industry. If it...

  3. Academia vs Industry: vanishing boundaries between global earthquake seismology and exploration seismics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Hilst, R. D.

    2011-12-01

    Global seismology and exploration seismics have long lived in parallel universes, with little cross-fertilization of methodologies and with interaction between the associated communities often limited to company recruitment of students. Fortunately, this traditional separation of technology and people has begun to disappear. This is driven not only by continuing demands for human and financial resources (for companies and academia, respectively) but increasingly also by overlapping intellectual interest. First, 'waves are waves' (that is, the fundamental physics - and math to describe/handle it - is scale invariant) and many artificial boundaries are being removed by use of better wave theory, faster computers, and new data acquisition paradigms. For example, the development of dense sensor arrays (in USA, Europe, Asia - mostly China and Japan) is increasing the attraction (and need) of industry-style interrogation of massive data sets. Examples include large scale seismic exploration of Earth's deep interior with inverse scattering of teleseismic wavefields (e.g., Van der Hilst et al., Science, 2007). On the other hand, reservoir exploration and production benefits from expertise in earthquake seismology, both for better characterization of reservoirs and their overburden and for (induced) micro-earthquake analysis. Passive source methods (including but not restricted to ambient noise tomography) are providing new, economic opportunities for velocity analysis and monitoring, and studies of (micro)seismicity (e.g., source location, parameters, and moment tensor) allow in situ stress determination, tomographic velocity analysis with natural sources in the reservoir, and 4D monitoring (e.g., for hydrocarbon production, carbon sequestration, enhanced geothermal systems, and unconventional gas production). Second, the gap between the frequency ranges traditionally considered by both communities is being bridged by better theory, new sensor technology, and through

  4. Options on Roles, Organization, and Programs of the Private Industry Council. Private Industry Council Training Series: 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Alliance of Business, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This handbook, developed by the National Alliance of Business, is designed as a tool for Private Industry Councils (PICs) in promoting permanent partnerships between public and private interests in training and employing the disadvantaged. Basic information on roles, organizational issues, and program activities of the PIC are considered in four…

  5. Alcohol medications development: advantages and caveats of government/academia collaborating with the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Litten, Raye Z; Ryan, Megan; Falk, Daniel; Fertig, Joanne

    2014-05-01

    The process of developing pharmacological treatments for alcohol use disorder is notoriously complex and challenging. The path to market is long, costly, and inefficient. One way of expediting and reducing the drug development process is through collaborations-building partnerships among government, academia, pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, healthcare organizations and advocacy groups, and the patients (end consumers) themselves. By forging collaborations, particularly with pharmaceutical companies, the alcohol treatment field stands to reap benefits in generating new medications for use in mainstream treatment settings. At the same time, there are certain caveats that should be considered, particularly by academic researchers, before entering into such partnerships. This commentary examines the advantages and caveats of government and academia collaborations with pharmaceutical companies.

  6. State of R&D in photonics-related fields in Japan's industry and academia: leading the green digital economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsuno, Kimio

    2010-06-01

    Photonics product statistics in Japan provided by OITDA is shown and analyzed from the aspect of three basic issues those the Japanese R & D state is facing. They are (1) off-shoring due to the deep integration in east Asia, (2) industry-academia collaboration and (3) global warming issue. The challengeable photonics R&D will come by aiming the volume zone market to get rid of the Galapagos problem and by opening innovation through the international collaboration. The connecting of the photonics products to the broadband systems are prospective to lead the "Green Digital Economy.

  7. The Private Police Industry: Its Nature and Extent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kakalik, James S.; Wildhorn, Sorrel

    This report is the second in a series of five describing a 16-month study of the nature and extent of the private police industry in the United States, its problems, its present regulation, and how the law impinges on it. In this report, the nature, size, growth, and operation of the industry and its personnel are described, including the results…

  8. Walking between academia and industry to find successful solutions to biomedical challenges: an interview with Geoffrey Smith.

    PubMed

    Smith, Geoffrey; Cagan, Ross

    2015-10-01

    Geoffrey W. Smith is currently the Managing Director of Mars Ventures. He actually started his studies with a Bachelor of Arts degree and a Doctorate in Law but then, in part by chance and in part by following in his family footsteps, he stepped into the healthcare and biotech field. Since then, he has successfully contributed to the birth of a number of healthcare companies and has also held academic positions at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and at The Rockefeller University in New York, teaching about the interface between science and business. During 2014 he served as Senior Editor on Disease Models & Mechanisms, bringing to the editorial team his valuable experience in drug development and discovery. In this interview, Geoff talks to Ross Cagan, Editor-in-Chief of Disease Models & Mechanisms, about how he developed his incredibly varied career, sharing his views about industry, academia and science publishing, and discussing how academia and industry can fruitfully meet to advance bioscience, train the scientists and stakeholders of the future, and drive the successful discovery of new therapeutics to treat human disease. PMID:26438691

  9. Walking between academia and industry to find successful solutions to biomedical challenges: an interview with Geoffrey Smith

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Geoffrey W. Smith is currently the Managing Director of Mars Ventures. He actually started his studies with a Bachelor of Arts degree and a Doctorate in Law but then, in part by chance and in part by following in his family footsteps, he stepped into the healthcare and biotech field. Since then, he has successfully contributed to the birth of a number of healthcare companies and has also held academic positions at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and at The Rockefeller University in New York, teaching about the interface between science and business. During 2014 he served as Senior Editor on Disease Models & Mechanisms, bringing to the editorial team his valuable experience in drug development and discovery. In this interview, Geoff talks to Ross Cagan, Editor-in-Chief of Disease Models & Mechanisms, about how he developed his incredibly varied career, sharing his views about industry, academia and science publishing, and discussing how academia and industry can fruitfully meet to advance bioscience, train the scientists and stakeholders of the future, and drive the successful discovery of new therapeutics to treat human disease. PMID:26438691

  10. Walking between academia and industry to find successful solutions to biomedical challenges: an interview with Geoffrey Smith.

    PubMed

    Smith, Geoffrey; Cagan, Ross

    2015-10-01

    Geoffrey W. Smith is currently the Managing Director of Mars Ventures. He actually started his studies with a Bachelor of Arts degree and a Doctorate in Law but then, in part by chance and in part by following in his family footsteps, he stepped into the healthcare and biotech field. Since then, he has successfully contributed to the birth of a number of healthcare companies and has also held academic positions at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and at The Rockefeller University in New York, teaching about the interface between science and business. During 2014 he served as Senior Editor on Disease Models & Mechanisms, bringing to the editorial team his valuable experience in drug development and discovery. In this interview, Geoff talks to Ross Cagan, Editor-in-Chief of Disease Models & Mechanisms, about how he developed his incredibly varied career, sharing his views about industry, academia and science publishing, and discussing how academia and industry can fruitfully meet to advance bioscience, train the scientists and stakeholders of the future, and drive the successful discovery of new therapeutics to treat human disease.

  11. How academia and the pharmaceutical industry can work together: the president's lecture, annual meeting of the American Thoracic Society, San Francisco, California.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, Michael

    2013-02-01

    There is a long history of productive collaboration between biomedical scientists in academia and in the pharmaceutical industry. The primary beneficiary of this collaboration has been the public. Since the middle of the last century, marked advances in the treatment and prevention of disease have been driven by the translational research interactions across these two domains. But now, at a time when collaboration between academia and industry should be accelerating based on past success, new technology, and ever-increasing need, numerous obstacles to effective collaboration have appeared. In this analysis, based on experience in both academia and industry, the author provides perspective on current obstacles to academic-industrial collaboration, followed by recommendations on how effective collaboration can be renewed and enhanced.

  12. How academia and the pharmaceutical industry can work together: the president's lecture, annual meeting of the American Thoracic Society, San Francisco, California.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, Michael

    2013-02-01

    There is a long history of productive collaboration between biomedical scientists in academia and in the pharmaceutical industry. The primary beneficiary of this collaboration has been the public. Since the middle of the last century, marked advances in the treatment and prevention of disease have been driven by the translational research interactions across these two domains. But now, at a time when collaboration between academia and industry should be accelerating based on past success, new technology, and ever-increasing need, numerous obstacles to effective collaboration have appeared. In this analysis, based on experience in both academia and industry, the author provides perspective on current obstacles to academic-industrial collaboration, followed by recommendations on how effective collaboration can be renewed and enhanced. PMID:23509330

  13. A Case Study of an Academia-Industry Partnership to Meet the Education and Training Needs in a Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics (STEM) Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Joseph Carl

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this case study is to provide a description of the characteristics of an academia-industry partnership that works together with industry to meet the education and training needs in a Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) field. After the launch of Sputnik in 1957, U.S. pursued efforts to compete in STEM fields on…

  14. 20 CFR 628.410 - Private Industry Council.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Council. (a) Certification of the PIC. (1) The chief elected official(s) of the SDA shall establish and the Governor shall certify the private industry council (PIC) pursuant to section 102 of the Act. (2) The Governor shall review the certification of the PIC biennially, one year prior to the...

  15. A biomedical adventurers' guide to navigating between careers in academia and industry.

    PubMed

    Superti-Furga, Giulio

    2009-12-01

    An explosion of scientific and technological advances has broadened the field of biomedicine. Traditional boundaries between the public and private research sectors are now blurred by multidisciplinary projects and the necessity for new and more efficient models of the translational process. This allows the adventurous scientist to boldly and consciously sample selected skills during periods of secondment in different institutions and organizations, and to assemble a personal and unique blend of competences to help them manage their career.

  16. Job Creation through Economic Development: The Role of Private Industry Councils. Private Industry Council Guide Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Alliance of Business, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Designed specifically for private industry councils (PICs), this guide introduces the subject of economic development and job creation and highlights the impact PICs can make through carefully chosen involvement in local economic development efforts. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to economic development: What it is; how it is related to…

  17. 5 CFR 532.309 - Determining adequacy of specialized private industry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... private industry. 532.309 Section 532.309 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL... Determining adequacy of specialized private industry. (a) Specialized private industry comparable to an appropriated fund dominant industry is adequate when: (1) The survey area is one of the 25 largest...

  18. 5 CFR 532.309 - Determining adequacy of specialized private industry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... private industry. 532.309 Section 532.309 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL... Determining adequacy of specialized private industry. (a) Specialized private industry comparable to an appropriated fund dominant industry is adequate when: (1) The survey area is one of the 25 largest...

  19. 5 CFR 532.309 - Determining adequacy of specialized private industry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... private industry. 532.309 Section 532.309 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL... Determining adequacy of specialized private industry. (a) Specialized private industry comparable to an appropriated fund dominant industry is adequate when: (1) The survey area is one of the 25 largest...

  20. 5 CFR 532.309 - Determining adequacy of specialized private industry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... private industry. 532.309 Section 532.309 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL... Determining adequacy of specialized private industry. (a) Specialized private industry comparable to an appropriated fund dominant industry is adequate when: (1) The survey area is one of the 25 largest...

  1. 5 CFR 532.309 - Determining adequacy of specialized private industry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... private industry. 532.309 Section 532.309 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL... Determining adequacy of specialized private industry. (a) Specialized private industry comparable to an appropriated fund dominant industry is adequate when: (1) The survey area is one of the 25 largest...

  2. Research on the Industry-Academia-Research Cooperation Mechanism of Local University and College--Take Changchun University of Science and Technology as an Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Qiong; Li, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Local university and college take as their own responsibilities to serve local economy and promote social development. For them, the cooperation mechanism "Industry-Academia-Research" is not only inevitable to keep up with the development of the times and education, but also necessary to adapt themselves to market demands. It is also the…

  3. NSF-NSDL GREEN Project: A Digital Library Partnership of Academia, Government, and Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartolo, Laura M.; Tewary, Vinod K.; Shreve, Gregory M.; Powell, Adam C., IV; Zeng, Marcia L.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the GREEN digital library, part of the NSF (National Science Foundation) NSDL (National Science Digital Library), as a collaboration of materials developed with government agencies, universities, and industry to build a collection of digital resources in the area of Green's functions, used for modeling mechanical and thermal responses of…

  4. Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology in the New Millennium: A Workshop for Academia, Industry, and Government

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deveaugh-Geiss, Joseph; March, John; Shapiro, Mark; Andreason, Paul J.; Emslie, Graham; Ford, Lisa M.; Greenhill, Laurence; Murphy, Dianne; Prentice, Ernest; Roberts, Rosemary; Silva, Susan; Swanson, James M.; van Zwieten-Boot, Barbara; Vitiello, Benedetto; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Mangum, Barry

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To give academic researchers, government officials, and industry scientists an opportunity to assess the state of pediatric psychopharmacology and identify challenges facing professionals in the field. Method: Increased federal spending and the introduction of pediatric exclusivity led to large increases in pediatric psychopharmacology…

  5. Capitalizing Knowledge: New Intersections of Industry and Academia. SUNY Series, Frontiers in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etzkowitz, Henry, Ed.; Webster, Andrew, Ed.; Healey, Peter, Ed.

    This collection of 10 papers provides a comparative analysis of the role of academic-industry relations in innovative educational systems in Eastern Europe, Ibero-America (Latin America, Spain, and Portugal), Russia, and Scotland, as well as in the United States. It arose from a series of conferences, beginning with a 1991 NATO workshop on…

  6. Eco-Driven Chemical Research in the Boundary between Academia and Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sjöström, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines and discusses the views on science and society held among PhD students working in two different industrially and environmentally driven research programmes in the broad area of green chemistry. It is based on thirteen in-depth interviews. The analysis shows three main ways of handling the situation as "post-academic"…

  7. Resolving complex research data management issues in biomedical laboratories: Qualitative study of an industry-academia collaboration.

    PubMed

    Myneni, Sahiti; Patel, Vimla L; Bova, G Steven; Wang, Jian; Ackerman, Christopher F; Berlinicke, Cynthia A; Chen, Steve H; Lindvall, Mikael; Zack, Donald J

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes a distributed collaborative effort between industry and academia to systematize data management in an academic biomedical laboratory. Heterogeneous and voluminous nature of research data created in biomedical laboratories make information management difficult and research unproductive. One such collaborative effort was evaluated over a period of four years using data collection methods including ethnographic observations, semi-structured interviews, web-based surveys, progress reports, conference call summaries, and face-to-face group discussions. Data were analyzed using qualitative methods of data analysis to (1) characterize specific problems faced by biomedical researchers with traditional information management practices, (2) identify intervention areas to introduce a new research information management system called Labmatrix, and finally to (3) evaluate and delineate important general collaboration (intervention) characteristics that can optimize outcomes of an implementation process in biomedical laboratories. Results emphasize the importance of end user perseverance, human-centric interoperability evaluation, and demonstration of return on investment of effort and time of laboratory members and industry personnel for success of implementation process. In addition, there is an intrinsic learning component associated with the implementation process of an information management system. Technology transfer experience in a complex environment such as the biomedical laboratory can be eased with use of information systems that support human and cognitive interoperability. Such informatics features can also contribute to successful collaboration and hopefully to scientific productivity.

  8. Summary of the first network-centric sensing community workshop, 'netted sensors: a government, industry, and academia dialogue'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tromp, Laurens D.; Jacyna, Garry M.; Allen, David P.

    2006-05-01

    The MITRE Corporation recently hosted the first Netted Sensors Community Workshop in McLean, Virginia, on 24 October - 26 October 2005. The Workshop was sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) Director of Defense Research and Engineering (DDR&E), and the National Science Foundation (NSF). The goal was to establish and sustain an annual Netted Sensors workshop that brings together Government, Industry and Academia to accelerate the development and transition of appropriate Netted Sensor technologies to solve real world problems. The workshop provided a forum focused on the application of netted sensing research and development (R&D) activities to solve existing and future Department of Defense (DoD), Intelligence Community (IC), Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and Environmental sensing problems. The Netted Sensors workshop brought together the Science and Technology (S&T) community, Industry, and Government / Military organizations to (1) share, discuss and disseminate new R&D results, (2) highlight new commercial products and technologies, and (3) identify and discuss nationally important sensing problems suitable for Netted Sensing solutions. This paper provides a summary of the presentations that were made at the workshop as well as recommendations for future workshops.

  9. Resolving complex research data management issues in biomedical laboratories: Qualitative study of an industry-academia collaboration.

    PubMed

    Myneni, Sahiti; Patel, Vimla L; Bova, G Steven; Wang, Jian; Ackerman, Christopher F; Berlinicke, Cynthia A; Chen, Steve H; Lindvall, Mikael; Zack, Donald J

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes a distributed collaborative effort between industry and academia to systematize data management in an academic biomedical laboratory. Heterogeneous and voluminous nature of research data created in biomedical laboratories make information management difficult and research unproductive. One such collaborative effort was evaluated over a period of four years using data collection methods including ethnographic observations, semi-structured interviews, web-based surveys, progress reports, conference call summaries, and face-to-face group discussions. Data were analyzed using qualitative methods of data analysis to (1) characterize specific problems faced by biomedical researchers with traditional information management practices, (2) identify intervention areas to introduce a new research information management system called Labmatrix, and finally to (3) evaluate and delineate important general collaboration (intervention) characteristics that can optimize outcomes of an implementation process in biomedical laboratories. Results emphasize the importance of end user perseverance, human-centric interoperability evaluation, and demonstration of return on investment of effort and time of laboratory members and industry personnel for success of implementation process. In addition, there is an intrinsic learning component associated with the implementation process of an information management system. Technology transfer experience in a complex environment such as the biomedical laboratory can be eased with use of information systems that support human and cognitive interoperability. Such informatics features can also contribute to successful collaboration and hopefully to scientific productivity. PMID:26652980

  10. Private Industry Councils Partner to Meet the Challenge of Change in Workforce Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Robert

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the shift in function of PICs (Private Industry Councils) from overseeing training programs for unemployed workers to developing the skills of the entire work force in local communities. Analyzes the relationship between community colleges and Private Industry Councils. (JDI)

  11. Patient Engagement Practices in Clinical Research among Patient Groups, Industry, and Academia in the United States: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sophia K.; Selig, Wendy; Harker, Matthew; Roberts, Jamie N.; Hesterlee, Sharon; Leventhal, David; Klein, Richard; Patrick-Lake, Bray; Abernethy, Amy P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Patient-centered clinical trial design and execution is becoming increasingly important. No best practice guidelines exist despite a key stakeholder declaration to create more effective engagement models. This study aims to gain a better understanding of attitudes and practices for engaging patient groups so that actionable recommendations may be developed. Methods Individuals from industry, academic institutions, and patient groups were identified through Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative and Drug Information Association rosters and mailing lists. Objectives, practices, and perceived barriers related to engaging patient groups in the planning, conduct, and interpretation of clinical trials were reported in an online survey. Descriptive and inferential statistical analysis of survey data followed a literature review to inform survey questions. Results Survey respondents (n = 179) valued the importance of involving patient groups in research; however, patient group respondents valued their contributions to research protocol development, funding acquisition, and interpretation of study results more highly than those contributions were valued by industry and academic respondents (all p < .001). Patient group respondents placed higher value in open communications, clear expectations, and detailed contract execution than did non–patient group respondents (all p < .05). Industry and academic respondents more often cited internal bureaucratic processes and reluctance to share information as engagement barriers than did patient group respondents (all p < .01). Patient groups reported that a lack of transparency and understanding of the benefits of collaboration on the part of industry and academia were greater barriers than did non–patient group respondents (all p< .01). Conclusions Despite reported similarities among approaches to engagement by the three stakeholder groups, key differences exist in perceived barriers and benefits to partnering with

  12. Software Past, Present, and Future: Views from Government, Industry and Academia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holcomb, Lee; Page, Jerry; Evangelist, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Views from the NASA CIO NASA Software Engineering Workshop on software development from the past, present, and future are presented. The topics include: 1) Software Past; 2) Software Present; 3) NASA's Largest Software Challenges; 4) 8330 Software Projects in Industry Standish Groups 1994 Report; 5) Software Future; 6) Capability Maturity Model (CMM): Software Engineering Institute (SEI) levels; 7) System Engineering Quality Also Part of the Problem; 8) University Environment Trends Will Increase the Problem in Software Engineering; and 9) NASA Software Engineering Goals.

  13. Innovation in Neurosurgery: Intellectual Property Strategy and Academia/Industrial Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Yuichi

    2016-09-15

    Neurosurgery has tremendous possibilities for development of innovative medical devices. However, most of the neurosurgical devices used in Japan are imported products. Promotion and development of domestic medical devices is highly encouraged and it is one of the pillars of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's growth strategy of Japanese economy. Innovative "Made in Japan" medical devices can be developed by interdisciplinary collaboration between industries and academic institutions. Proper orientation of medical and engineering education, social and administrative awareness of the need of facilitating the medical devices creative process with corresponding regulatory changes, and appropriate medical and technological infrastructure establishment are needed for stimulating medical device innovation.

  14. Innovation in Neurosurgery: Intellectual Property Strategy and Academia/Industrial Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Yuichi

    2016-09-15

    Neurosurgery has tremendous possibilities for development of innovative medical devices. However, most of the neurosurgical devices used in Japan are imported products. Promotion and development of domestic medical devices is highly encouraged and it is one of the pillars of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's growth strategy of Japanese economy. Innovative "Made in Japan" medical devices can be developed by interdisciplinary collaboration between industries and academic institutions. Proper orientation of medical and engineering education, social and administrative awareness of the need of facilitating the medical devices creative process with corresponding regulatory changes, and appropriate medical and technological infrastructure establishment are needed for stimulating medical device innovation. PMID:27298262

  15. Innovation in Neurosurgery: Intellectual Property Strategy and Academia/Industrial Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    MURAYAMA, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Neurosurgery has tremendous possibilities for development of innovative medical devices. However, most of the neurosurgical devices used in Japan are imported products. Promotion and development of domestic medical devices is highly encouraged and it is one of the pillars of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s growth strategy of Japanese economy. Innovative “Made in Japan” medical devices can be developed by interdisciplinary collaboration between industries and academic institutions. Proper orientation of medical and engineering education, social and administrative awareness of the need of facilitating the medical devices creative process with corresponding regulatory changes, and appropriate medical and technological infrastructure establishment are needed for stimulating medical device innovation. PMID:27298262

  16. Industrial Doctoral Students as Brokers between Industry and Academia: Factors Affecting Their Trajectories, Learning at the Boundaries and Identity Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallgren, Lillemor; Dahlgren, Lars Owe

    2007-01-01

    The authors look at the learning context for 23 industrial doctoral students and assess the prerequisites for the development of their identity as researchers. The students are located in three different industrial research schools--Management, Medical Bioinformatics and Building and Indoor Climate. The purpose of the study is to describe the…

  17. Between Industry and Academia: A Physicist's Experiences at The Aerospace Corporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camparo, James

    2005-03-01

    The Aerospace Corporation is a nonprofit company whose purposes are exclusively scientific: to provide research, development, and advisory services for space programs that serve the national interest, primarily the Air Force's Space and Missile Systems Center and the National Reconnaissance Office. The corporation's laboratory has a staff of about 150 scientists who conduct research in fields ranging from Space Sciences to Material Sciences and from Analytical Chemistry to Atomic Physics. As a consequence, Aerospace stands midway between an industrial research laboratory, focused on product development, and academic/national laboratories focused on basic science. Drawing from Dr. Camparo's personal experiences, the presentation will discuss advantages and disadvantages of a career at Aerospace, including the role of publishing in peer-reviewed journals and the impact of work on family life. Additionally, the presentation will consider the balance between basic physics, applied physics, and engineering in the work at Aerospace. Since joining Aerospace in 1981, Dr. Camparo has worked as an atomic physicist specializing in the area of atomic clocks, and has had the opportunity to experiment and publish on a broad range of research topics including: the stochastic-field/atom interaction, radiation effects on semiconductor materials, and stellar scintillation.

  18. [Industry, Academia and Government Partnership through the Global Health Innovative Technology Fund (GHIT)].

    PubMed

    Hinoshita, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    In developing countries, many people are unable to access basic healthcare services, resulting in many avoidable deaths and/or disabilities. The United Nations adopted the Millennium Development Goals in order to resolve this problem, and Japan has been contributing greatly to the achievement of these goals. In this context, in 2013 the Government of Japan proposed its Strategy on Global Health Diplomacy, and since then has been promoting Universal Health Coverage. Since the beginning of the 21st century, the particular importance of addressing neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) has been stressed by the international community. Nevertheless, of the 1 billion people world-wide who are currently living with NTDs, about three-fourths of these are living in poverty, and of these, nearly 65% are unable to acquire or access drugs for the prevention and treatment of these diseases. Under these circumstances, Japan decided to support the Global Health Innovative Technology (GHIT) Fund in order to support the research and development of drugs for people in developing countries, as well as the manufacture, supply and administration of these drugs. Over the last two years, the GHIT Fund has been supporting the research and development of five new candidate drugs for three NTDs (Chagas disease, leishmaniasis and malaria). Japan also hopes to stimulate domestic pharmaceutical industries in developing countries, as well as to increase international cooperation through various activities such the utilization of our capacity to research and develop new drugs. PMID:26831799

  19. Hurdles in tissue engineering/regenerative medicine product commercialization: a survey of North American academia and industry.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Peter C; Bertram, Timothy A; Tawil, Bill; Hellman, Kiki B

    2011-01-01

    The Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine International Society-North America (TERMIS-NA) Industry Committee was formed in February 2009 to address the common roadblocks (i.e., hurdles) in the commercialization of tissue engineering/regenerative medicine products for its members. A semiquantitative online opinion survey instrument that delineated potentially sensitive hurdles to commercialization in each of the TERMIS constituency groups that generally participate in the stream of technology commercialization (academia, startup companies, development-stage companies, and established companies) was developed. The survey was opened to each of the 863 members of TERMIS-NA for a period of 5 weeks from October to November 2009. By its conclusion, 215 members (25%) had responded. Their proportionate numbers were closely representative of TERMIS-NA constituencies. The resulting data delineate what each group considers to be its most difficult and also its easiest hurdles in taking a technology to full product development. In addition, each group ranked its perception of the difficult and easy hurdles for all other groups, enabling an assessment of the degree of understanding between groups. The data depict not only critical hurdles in the path to commercialization at each stage in product development but also a variable understanding of perceptions of hurdles between groups. This assessment has provided the Industry Committee with activity foci needed to assist individual groups in the technology-commercialization stream. Moreover, the analysis suggests that enhanced communication between groups engaged in commercialization will be critical to the successful development of products in the tissue engineering/regenerative medicine sector.

  20. Collaborative research between academia and industry using a large clinical trial database: a case study in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    of large clinical trial databases for the combined purpose of furthering clinical research and improving patient care. Fruitful collaboration between industry and academia was fostered while the donepezil data repository was used to advance clinical and scientific knowledge. The Expert Working Group approach warrants consideration as a blueprint for conducting similar research ventures in the future. PMID:22029822

  1. NIMH Initiatives to Facilitate Collaborations between Industry, Academia and Government for the Discovery and Clinical Testing of Novel Models and Drugs for Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Linda S.; Winsky, Lois; Goodman, Wayne; Oliveri, Mary Ellen; Stover, Ellen

    2008-01-01

    There is an urgent need to transform basic research discoveries into tools for treatment and prevention of mental illnesses. This article presents an overview of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) programs and resources to address the challenges and opportunities in psychiatric drug development starting at the point of discovery through the early phases of translational research. We summarize NIMH and selected National Institutes of Health (NIH) efforts to stimulate translation of basic and clinical neuroscience findings into novel targets, models, compounds, and strategies for the development of innovative therapeutics for psychiatric disorders. Examples of collaborations and partnerships between NIMH/NIH, academia, and industry are highlighted. PMID:18800066

  2. Restoring balance to industry-academia relationships in an era of institutional financial conflicts of interest: promoting research while maintaining trust.

    PubMed

    Johns, Michael M E; Barnes, Mark; Florencio, Patrik S

    2003-02-12

    Economic partnerships between industry and academia accelerate medical innovation and enhance patient access to medical advances, but such partnerships have sometimes eroded public trust in the research enterprise. There is particular risk for conflict of interest when economic partnerships extend beyond a university's corporate interests to involve institutional decision makers. Institutions and institutional decision makers should fully disclose industry-related financial interests and relationships. Without legitimate justification for such interests, individuals should divest themselves from these interests or recuse themselves from responsibility for research oversight. Management of institutional partnerships also might entail the physical separation of certain facilities, the placement of restrictions on information shared between investment and research staffs, and provision of oversight by independent review panels made up of persons who have expertise in intellectual property, finance, and research, but who are not financially or otherwise dependent on the institution. Through these means, it is possible to restore balance to industry-academia relationships, thereby promoting progress while maintaining public trust in research. PMID:12585953

  3. Old ways, new means: tobacco industry funding of academic and private sector scientists since the Master Settlement Agreement

    PubMed Central

    Schick, Suzaynn F; Glantz, Stanton A

    2007-01-01

    When, as a condition of the Master Settlement Agreement (MSA) in 1998, US tobacco companies disbanded the Council for Tobacco Research and the Center for Indoor Air Research, they lost a vital connection to scientists in academia and the private sector. The aim of this paper was to investigate two new research projects funded by US tobacco companies by analysis of internal tobacco industry documents now available at the University of California San Francisco (San Francisco, California, USA) Legacy tobacco documents library, other websites and the open scientific literature. Since the MSA, individual US tobacco companies have replaced their industry‐wide collaborative granting organisations with new, individual research programmes. Philip Morris has funded a directed research project through the non‐profit Life Sciences Research Office, and British American Tobacco and its US subsidiary Brown and Williamson have funded the non‐profit Institute for Science and Health. Both of these organisations have downplayed or concealed their true level of involvement with the tobacco industry. Both organisations have key members with significant and long‐standing financial relationships with the tobacco industry. Regulatory officials and policy makers need to be aware that the studies these groups publish may not be as independent as they seem. PMID:17565125

  4. The Private Tutoring Industry in Taiwan: Government Policies and Their Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhan, Shengli

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies show that attending private tutoring has become a necessity to many primary and secondary students in East Asia. Educational policies and their effective implementation are crucial to guarantee the healthy development of the private tutoring industry and thus protect the rights of students and their families. Under the framework…

  5. 76 FR 66932 - The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Announces the Initiation of a Public Private Industry...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... Initiation of a Public Private Industry Partnership on Translation of Nanotechnology in Cancer (TONIC) To Promote Translational Research and Development Opportunities of Nanotechnology-Based Cancer Solutions AGENCY: National Cancer Institute (NCI), Office of Cancer Nanotechnology Research (OCNR),...

  6. GPCR structure, function, drug discovery and crystallography: report from Academia-Industry International Conference (UK Royal Society) Chicheley Hall, 1-2 September 2014.

    PubMed

    Heifetz, Alexander; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Seifert, Roland; Tate, Christopher G; Sexton, Patrick M; Gurevich, Vsevolod V; Fourmy, Daniel; Cherezov, Vadim; Marshall, Fiona H; Storer, R Ian; Moraes, Isabel; Tikhonova, Irina G; Tautermann, Christofer S; Hunt, Peter; Ceska, Tom; Hodgson, Simon; Bodkin, Mike J; Singh, Shweta; Law, Richard J; Biggin, Philip C

    2015-08-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the targets of over half of all prescribed drugs today. The UniProt database has records for about 800 proteins classified as GPCRs, but drugs have only been developed against 50 of these. Thus, there is huge potential in terms of the number of targets for new therapies to be designed. Several breakthroughs in GPCRs biased pharmacology, structural biology, modelling and scoring have resulted in a resurgence of interest in GPCRs as drug targets. Therefore, an international conference, sponsored by the Royal Society, with world-renowned researchers from industry and academia was recently held to discuss recent progress and highlight key areas of future research needed to accelerate GPCR drug discovery. Several key points emerged. Firstly, structures for all three major classes of GPCRs have now been solved and there is increasing coverage across the GPCR phylogenetic tree. This is likely to be substantially enhanced with data from x-ray free electron sources as they move beyond proof of concept. Secondly, the concept of biased signalling or functional selectivity is likely to be prevalent in many GPCRs, and this presents exciting new opportunities for selectivity and the control of side effects, especially when combined with increasing data regarding allosteric modulation. Thirdly, there will almost certainly be some GPCRs that will remain difficult targets because they exhibit complex ligand dependencies and have many metastable states rendering them difficult to resolve by crystallographic methods. Subtle effects within the packing of the transmembrane helices are likely to mask and contribute to this aspect, which may play a role in species dependent behaviour. This is particularly important because it has ramifications for how we interpret pre-clinical data. In summary, collaborative efforts between industry and academia have delivered significant progress in terms of structure and understanding of GPCRs and will be

  7. Minorities and Women in Private Industry. 1978 Report. Vol I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Washington, DC.

    This document is the first of two volumes of tables summarizing the data obtained from the Employer Information Reports (EEO-1) for 1978. Figures were obtained from a total of 39,000 employers with 36 million employees. These figures cover about half of all private, non-farm workers, as compared to U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics' annual average…

  8. Private health insurance: New measures of a complex and changing industry

    PubMed Central

    Arnett, Ross H.; Trapnell, Gordon R.

    1984-01-01

    Private health insurance benefit payments are an integral component of estimates of national health expenditures. Recent analyses indicate that the insurance industry has undergone significant changes since the mid-1970's. As a result of these study findings and corresponding changes to estimating techniques, private health insurance estimates have been revised upward. This has had a major impact on national health expenditure estimates. This article describes the changes that have occurred in the industry, discusses some of the implications of those changes, presents a new methodology to measure private health insurance and the resulting estimate levels, and then examines concepts that underpin these estimates. PMID:10310950

  9. Effective Partnership between Public Education and Private Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sue Griffith; Beatty, David

    From the perspectives of both school and industry, this paper outlines the past, present, and future of a partnership between Ivy Tech State College (Columbus, Indiana) and Cummins Engine Company and other local industries formed to provide the southern Indiana area with a highly skilled workforce. First, David Beatty traces on-the-job training at…

  10. Stress and Violence in the Workplace and on Campus: A Growing Problem for Business, Industry and Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Matthew L.; Hughey, Aaron W.; Burke, Monica G.

    2012-01-01

    Levels of stress and violence at work have been increasing globally for the past few decades. Whether the setting is business and industry or a college campus, this disturbing trend affects a growing number of people, including those who do not work directly in these environments. In this paper the authors describe the relationship between stress…

  11. Agreements between Industry and Academia on Publication Rights: A Retrospective Study of Protocols and Publications of Randomized Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Kasenda, Benjamin; von Elm, Erik; You, John J.; Tomonaga, Yuki; Saccilotto, Ramon; Amstutz, Alain; Bengough, Theresa; Meerpohl, Joerg J.; Stegert, Mihaela; Olu, Kelechi K.; Tikkinen, Kari A. O.; Neumann, Ignacio; Carrasco-Labra, Alonso; Faulhaber, Markus; Mulla, Sohail M.; Mertz, Dominik; Akl, Elie A.; Bassler, Dirk; Busse, Jason W.; Nordmann, Alain; Gloy, Viktoria; Ebrahim, Shanil; Schandelmaier, Stefan; Sun, Xin; Vandvik, Per O.; Johnston, Bradley C.; Walter, Martin A.; Burnand, Bernard; Hemkens, Lars G.; Bucher, Heiner C.; Guyatt, Gordon H.; Briel, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about publication agreements between industry and academic investigators in trial protocols and the consistency of these agreements with corresponding statements in publications. We aimed to investigate (i) the existence and types of publication agreements in trial protocols, (ii) the completeness and consistency of the reporting of these agreements in subsequent publications, and (iii) the frequency of co-authorship by industry employees. Methods and Findings We used a retrospective cohort of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) based on archived protocols approved by six research ethics committees between 13 January 2000 and 25 November 2003. Only RCTs with industry involvement were eligible. We investigated the documentation of publication agreements in RCT protocols and statements in corresponding journal publications. Of 647 eligible RCT protocols, 456 (70.5%) mentioned an agreement regarding publication of results. Of these 456, 393 (86.2%) documented an industry partner’s right to disapprove or at least review proposed manuscripts; 39 (8.6%) agreements were without constraints of publication. The remaining 24 (5.3%) protocols referred to separate agreement documents not accessible to us. Of those 432 protocols with an accessible publication agreement, 268 (62.0%) trials were published. Most agreements documented in the protocol were not reported in the subsequent publication (197/268 [73.5%]). Of 71 agreements reported in publications, 52 (73.2%) were concordant with those documented in the protocol. In 14 of 37 (37.8%) publications in which statements suggested unrestricted publication rights, at least one co-author was an industry employee. In 25 protocol-publication pairs, author statements in publications suggested no constraints, but 18 corresponding protocols documented restricting agreements. Conclusions Publication agreements constraining academic authors’ independence are common. Journal articles seldom report on

  12. Scalable technology for the extraction of pharmaceutics: outcomes from a 3 year collaborative industry/academia research programme.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Ian; Thickitt, Chris; Douillet, Nathalie; Freebairn, Keith; Johns, David; Mountain, Clive; Wood, Philip; Edwards, Neil; Rooke, David; Harris, Guy; Keay, David; Mathews, Ben; Brown, Roland; Garrard, Ian; Hewitson, Peter; Ignatova, Svetlana

    2013-03-22

    This paper reports on some of the key outcomes of a 3 year £1.5m Technology Strategy Board (TSB) funded research programme to develop a small footprint, versatile, counter-current chromatography purification technology and methodology which can be operated at a range of scales in both batch and continuous modes and that can be inserted into existing process plant and systems. Our consortium, integrates technology providers (Dynamic Extractions) and the scientific development team (Brunel) with end user needs (GSK & Pfizer), addressing major production challenges aimed at providing flexible, low capital platform technology driving substantial cost efficiency in both drug development and drug manufacturing processes. The aims of the Technology Strategy Board's high value manufacturing programme are described and how the academic/industry community were challenged to instigate step changes in the manufacturing of high value pharmaceuticals. This paper focusses on one of the themes of the TSB research programme, "Generate a Comprehensive Applications Portfolio". It outlines 15 applications from this portfolio that can be published in the public domain and gives four detailed case studies illustrating the range of application of the technology on the separation of (1) isomers, (2) polar compounds, (3) crude mixtures and (4) on the removal of impurities. Two of these case studies that were scaled up demonstrate between 10 and 20% lower solvent usage and were projected to have significant cost savings compared to conventional solid phase silica gel chromatography at procss scale demonstrating that the latest high performance countercurrent chromatography technology is a competitive platform technolgy for the pharmaceutical industry.

  13. Analysis of Market Opportunities for Chinese Private Express Delivery Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Changbing; Bai, Lijun; Tong, Xiaoqing

    China's express delivery market has become the arena in which each express enterprise struggles to chase due to the huge potential demand and high profitable prospects. So certain qualitative and quantitative forecast for the future changes of China's express delivery market will help enterprises understand various types of market conditions and social changes in demand and adjust business activities to enhance their competitiveness timely. The development of China's express delivery industry is first introduced in this chapter. Then the theoretical basis of the regression model is overviewed. We also predict the demand trends of China's express delivery market by using Pearson correlation analysis and regression analysis from qualitative and quantitative aspects, respectively. Finally, we draw some conclusions and recommendations for China's express delivery industry.

  14. Adapting industry-style business model to academia in a system of Performance-based Incentive Compensation.

    PubMed

    Reece, E Albert; Nugent, Olan; Wheeler, Richard P; Smith, Charles W; Hough, Aubrey J; Winter, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Performance-Based Incentive Compensation (PBIC) plans currently prevail throughout industry and have repeatedly demonstrated effectiveness as powerful motivational tools for attracting and retaining top talent, enhancing key indicators, increasing employee productivity, and, ultimately, enhancing mission-based parameters. The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) College of Medicine introduced its PBIC plan to further the transition of the college to a high-performing academic and clinical enterprise. A forward-thinking compensation plan was progressively implemented during a three-year period. After the introduction of an aggressive five-year vision plan in 2002, the college introduced a PBIC plan designed to ensure the retention and recruitment of high-quality faculty through the use of uncapped salaries that reflect each faculty member's clinical, research, and education duties. The PBIC plan was introduced with broad, schoolwide principles adaptable to each department and purposely flexible to allow for tailor-made algorithms to fit the specific approaches required by individual departments. As of July 2006, the college had begun to reap a variety of short-term benefits from Phase I of its PBIC program, including increases in revenue and faculty salaries, and increased faculty morale and satisfaction.Successful implementation of a PBIC plan depends on a host of factors, including the development of a process for evaluating performance that is considered fair and reliable to the entire faculty. The college has become more efficient and effective by adopting such a program, which has helped it to increase overall productivity. The PBIC program continues to challenge our faculty members to attain their highest potential while rewarding them accordingly. PMID:18162757

  15. Strange bedfellows: bridging the worlds of academia, public health and the sex industry to improve sexual health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Knerr, Wendy; Philpott, Anne

    2011-01-01

    The public health response to sexually transmitted infections, particularly HIV, has been and continues to be overwhelmingly focused on risk, disease and negative outcomes of sex, while avoiding discussion of positive motivations for sex (e.g. pleasure, desire, love). Recent advocacy efforts have challenged this approach and organisations have promoted the eroticisation of safer sex, especially in the context of HIV prevention.This paper is a case study of one of these organizations - The Pleasure Project. It gives a brief background on the public-health approach to sex and sexual health, and recommends an alternative approach which incorporates constructs of pleasure and desire into sexual health interventions. The Pleasure Project's aims and unorthodox communications strategies are described, as are the response to and impact of its work, lessons learned and ongoing challenges to its approach.The Pleasure Project combines evidence (rigorous and experimental as well as qualitative and anecdotal) with experiential knowledge from the sex industry and safer-sex promotion to communicate messages about eroticising safer sex to influence researchers, public health practitioners and policymakers, mainstream media and the porn world. There are significant barriers to this work, because it challenges common and entrenched norms and values related to sex and pleasure and their role in the public health sphere. Other barriers include: the limited range of existing rigorous intervention trials which incorporate pleasure constructs; the lack of effective indicators to measure pleasure constructs; limited funding and resources; discomfort among public health practitioners, researchers and donors with concepts of pleasure and sex; and rejection of erotic media as a potential tool for prevention.Despite the backdrop of sex-negative public health practice, there is anecdotal evidence that safer sex, including condom use, can be eroticised and made pleasurable, based on qualitative

  16. Strange bedfellows: bridging the worlds of academia, public health and the sex industry to improve sexual health outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The public health response to sexually transmitted infections, particularly HIV, has been and continues to be overwhelmingly focused on risk, disease and negative outcomes of sex, while avoiding discussion of positive motivations for sex (e.g. pleasure, desire, love). Recent advocacy efforts have challenged this approach and organisations have promoted the eroticisation of safer sex, especially in the context of HIV prevention. This paper is a case study of one of these organizations – The Pleasure Project. It gives a brief background on the public-health approach to sex and sexual health, and recommends an alternative approach which incorporates constructs of pleasure and desire into sexual health interventions. The Pleasure Project’s aims and unorthodox communications strategies are described, as are the response to and impact of its work, lessons learned and ongoing challenges to its approach. The Pleasure Project combines evidence (rigorous and experimental as well as qualitative and anecdotal) with experiential knowledge from the sex industry and safer-sex promotion to communicate messages about eroticising safer sex to influence researchers, public health practitioners and policymakers, mainstream media and the porn world. There are significant barriers to this work, because it challenges common and entrenched norms and values related to sex and pleasure and their role in the public health sphere. Other barriers include: the limited range of existing rigorous intervention trials which incorporate pleasure constructs; the lack of effective indicators to measure pleasure constructs; limited funding and resources; discomfort among public health practitioners, researchers and donors with concepts of pleasure and sex; and rejection of erotic media as a potential tool for prevention. Despite the backdrop of sex-negative public health practice, there is anecdotal evidence that safer sex, including condom use, can be eroticised and made pleasurable, based on

  17. Strange bedfellows: bridging the worlds of academia, public health and the sex industry to improve sexual health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Knerr, Wendy; Philpott, Anne

    2011-06-16

    The public health response to sexually transmitted infections, particularly HIV, has been and continues to be overwhelmingly focused on risk, disease and negative outcomes of sex, while avoiding discussion of positive motivations for sex (e.g. pleasure, desire, love). Recent advocacy efforts have challenged this approach and organisations have promoted the eroticisation of safer sex, especially in the context of HIV prevention.This paper is a case study of one of these organizations - The Pleasure Project. It gives a brief background on the public-health approach to sex and sexual health, and recommends an alternative approach which incorporates constructs of pleasure and desire into sexual health interventions. The Pleasure Project's aims and unorthodox communications strategies are described, as are the response to and impact of its work, lessons learned and ongoing challenges to its approach.The Pleasure Project combines evidence (rigorous and experimental as well as qualitative and anecdotal) with experiential knowledge from the sex industry and safer-sex promotion to communicate messages about eroticising safer sex to influence researchers, public health practitioners and policymakers, mainstream media and the porn world. There are significant barriers to this work, because it challenges common and entrenched norms and values related to sex and pleasure and their role in the public health sphere. Other barriers include: the limited range of existing rigorous intervention trials which incorporate pleasure constructs; the lack of effective indicators to measure pleasure constructs; limited funding and resources; discomfort among public health practitioners, researchers and donors with concepts of pleasure and sex; and rejection of erotic media as a potential tool for prevention.Despite the backdrop of sex-negative public health practice, there is anecdotal evidence that safer sex, including condom use, can be eroticised and made pleasurable, based on qualitative

  18. Employment Generating Services Handbook: Practical Models for Expanding Job Opportunities. Private Industry Council Training Series: 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Alliance of Business, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This handbook, developed by the National Alliance of Business, is designed as a tool for Private Industry Councils (PICs) in providing a framework for planning a program of Employment Generating Services (EGS) for disadvantaged workers. Based on the experiences of many PICs, a six-step EGS-program-planning process that includes assessing needs,…

  19. ARC, State, Private Industry Join to Provide Computer Technician Training in North Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanton, Bill

    1982-01-01

    Describes an innovative training program in minicomputer technology at Dalton Junior College (Georgia) funded by the state department of education, private industry and the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC). Points out reasons for the program's success: shortage of skilled people and the prospect of quick entry into the workworld. (LC)

  20. 7 CFR 701.157 - Private non-industrial forest land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... a 2005 hurricane. To be eligible, a non-industrial private forest landowner must have suffered a... landowner in a designated disaster county due to a 2005 hurricane or related condition. The 35 percent loss shall be determined based on the value of the land before and after the hurricane event. (b) During...

  1. 7 CFR 701.157 - Private non-industrial forest land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... a 2005 hurricane. To be eligible, a non-industrial private forest landowner must have suffered a... landowner in a designated disaster county due to a 2005 hurricane or related condition. The 35 percent loss shall be determined based on the value of the land before and after the hurricane event. (b) During...

  2. 7 CFR 701.157 - Private non-industrial forest land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... a 2005 hurricane. To be eligible, a non-industrial private forest landowner must have suffered a... landowner in a designated disaster county due to a 2005 hurricane or related condition. The 35 percent loss shall be determined based on the value of the land before and after the hurricane event. (b) During...

  3. 7 CFR 701.157 - Private non-industrial forest land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... a 2005 hurricane. To be eligible, a non-industrial private forest landowner must have suffered a... landowner in a designated disaster county due to a 2005 hurricane or related condition. The 35 percent loss shall be determined based on the value of the land before and after the hurricane event. (b) During...

  4. Basic Skills for Job Performance: Private Industry Councils and Workplace Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Alliance of Business, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This guide is designed to provide private industry councils (PICs) with information on developing workplace literacy or job-related basic skills programs. Chapter 1 contains an overview of the nation's literacy problem and how it affects business and is designed to provide PIC members with background information to use when discussing the problem…

  5. Private Industry Council Roles and Options: Making the Job Training Partnership Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Alliance of Business, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This handbook provides basic information on the roles, organizational issues, and program activities that will influence the effectiveness of private industry councils (PICs) set up under the Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA) of 1982. Intended to guide PICs on the issues involved, it should be useful to members and staff of existing PICs and…

  6. Planning, Management and Evaluation: Realizing PIC Potential. Private Industry Council Guide. Working Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Alliance of Business, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This Planning, Management, and Evaluation (PME) guide was developed by the National Alliance of Business as part of its program of management assistance for Private Industry Councils (PICs). The guide is a tool which PICs can use to improve their capability to plan, manage, and evaluate the programs which they administer, and to establish locally…

  7. Practical Guidance for Strengthening Private Industry Councils. Research and Evaluation Report Series 91-C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CSR, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This document is divided into three volumes. Volume I describes what exemplary Private Industry Councils (PICS) do, Volume II explains why they are effective, and Volume III tells how to implement exemplary practice. Volume I contains case studies of 10 exemplary PICs organized by 7 topics areas (history and structure, policies and program…

  8. Private Industry Councils: Examining Their Mission under the Job Training Partnership Act. Special Report Number 35.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Commission for Employment Policy (DOL), Washington, DC.

    A number of findings and recommendations regarding the mission of Private Industry Councils (PICs) under the Job Training Partnership ACT (JTPA) were developed based on information collected in several ways: a focus group of PICs, roundtable discussions held nationwide with staff from nearly 100 PICs in 45 states, and canvasses of more than 200…

  9. Private Schooling Industry in North East India: A Trend Analysis of Nagaland State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Biswambhara; Suresh, P. Srinivasa; Rio, K.

    2006-01-01

    The present study is an attempt to examine the intricacies of the growth of Private School industry in the North-Eastern Indian State of Nagaland. The study was carried out in Kohima, the capital city of Nagaland State. Data were obtained from field studies as well as from published reports of the Government. The main objective of the study was to…

  10. A tainted trade? Moral ambivalence and legitimation work in the private security industry.

    PubMed

    Thumala, Angélica; Goold, Benjamin; Loader, Ian

    2011-06-01

    The private security industry is often represented - and typically represents itself - as an expanding business, confident of its place in the world and sure of its ability to meet a rising demand for security. But closer inspection of the ways in which industry players talk about its past, present and future suggests that this self-promotion is accompanied by unease about the industry's condition and legitimacy. In this paper, we analyse the self-understandings of those who sell security - as revealed in interviews conducted with key industry players and in a range of trade materials - in order to highlight and dissect the constitutive elements of this ambivalence. This analysis begins by describing the reputational problems that are currently thought to beset the industry and the underlying fears about its status and worth that these difficulties disclose. We then examine how security players seek to legitimate the industry using various narratives of professionalization. Four such narratives are identified - regulation, education, association and borrowing - each of which seeks to justify private security and enhance the industry's social worth. What is striking about these legitimation claims is that they tend not to justify the selling of security in market terms. In conclusion we ask why this is the case and argue that market justifications are 'closed-off' by a moral ambivalence that attaches to an industry trading in products which cannot guarantee to deliver the condition that its consumers crave.

  11. Private management and public finance in the Italian water industry: A marriage of convenience?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massarutto, Antonio; Paccagnan, Vania; Linares, Elisabetta

    2008-12-01

    In many countries, reforms of water and sanitation utilities have favored private sector participation. The drivers of this trend are the need to improve efficiency, professional capabilities of service operations, and willingness to relieve public budgets of the heavy burden of investment. Scant attention has been devoted to the great impact this strategy can have on water bills because of the higher cost of capital that is implicit, given the economic risk that the private sector is required to accept. Since it is a capital-intensive industry with a long economic life of its assets, the water industry is particularly vulnerable to the cost of capital. This creates the case for publicly-supported financial schemes in order to keep this cost as low as possible and guarantee long-run viability as well as affordability. The Italian water industry is an excellent case study to investigate the importance of this situation: in the last 15 years, a far-reaching reform has been introduced with the aim of substituting a financing model, based entirely on public spending, with one delegating financial responsibilities to operators through full-cost recovery. Our simulations show that delegating all responsibilities and risks to the private sector can lead to unsustainable price increases once replacement of existing assets are required. The solution is not to give up full-cost recovery, but rather to search for risk allocation patterns that are more coherent with the risk profile of the water industry and help keeping the cost of capital low.

  12. An analysis of private, public, and nonprofit industrial pollution prevention initiatives

    SciTech Connect

    Bresnan, J.F. . School of Forestry and Environmental Studies)

    1994-03-01

    The private, public, and nonprofit sectors are all beginning to embrace pollution prevention as the preferred strategy for industrial environmental management. Pollution prevention refers to elimination of pollution before it is created and represents a change from the traditional approach of treating or disposing of pollution after it is generated. This paper describes pollution prevention, the factors that have led to its popularity across the different sectors, the benefits that can be realized through pollution prevention, the impediments to its implementation, and the characteristics of successful pollution prevention programs. The paper then focuses on pollution prevention initiatives that private, public, and nonprofit sector organizations have introduced, in an attempt to assess the present situation and possible future trends in the industrial implementation of pollution prevention.

  13. Public funding and private investment for R&D: a survey in China’s pharmaceutical industry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In recent years, China has experienced tremendous growth in its pharmaceutical industry. Both the Chinese government and private investors are motivated to invest into pharmaceutical research and development (R&D). However, studies regarding the different behaviors of public and private investment in pharmaceutical R&D are scarce. Therefore, this paper aims to investigate the current situation of public funding and private investment into Chinese pharmaceutical R&D. Methods The primary data used in the research were obtained from the China High-tech Industry Statistics Yearbook (2002–2012) and China Statistical Yearbook of Science and Technology (2002–2012). We analyzed public funding and private investment in five aspects: total investment in the industry, funding sources of the whole industry, differences between provinces, difference in subsectors, and private equity/venture capital investment. Results The vast majority of R&D investment was from private sources. There is a significantly positive correlation between public funding and private investment in different provinces of China. However, public funding was likely to be invested into less developed provinces with abundant natural herbal resources. Compared with the chemical medicine subsector, traditional Chinese medicine and biopharmaceutical subsectors obtained more public funding. Further, the effect of the government was focused on private equity and venture capital investment although private fund is the mainstream of this type of investment. Conclusions Public funding and private investment play different but complementary roles in pharmaceutical R&D in China. While being less than private investment, public funding shows its significance in R&D investment. With rapid growth of the industry, the pharmaceutical R&D investment in China is expected to increase steadily from both public and private sources. PMID:24925505

  14. Australia's private health insurance industry: structure, competition, regulation and role in a less than 'ideal world'.

    PubMed

    Shamsullah, Ardel

    2011-02-01

    Australia's private health insurance funds have been prominent participants in the nation's health system for 60 years. Yet there is relatively little public awareness of the distinctive origins of the health funds, the uncharacteristic organisational nature of these commercial enterprises and the peculiarly regulated nature of their industry. The conventional corporate responsibility to shareholders was, until recently, completely irrelevant, and remains marginal to the sector. However, their purported answerability to contributors, styled as 'members', was always doubtful for most health funds. After a long period of remarkable stability in the sector, despite significant shifts in health funding policy, recent years have brought notable changes, with mergers, acquisitions and exits from the industry. The research is based on the detailed study of the private health funds, covering their history, organisational character and industry structure. It argues that the funds have always been divorced from the disciplines of the competitive market and generally have operated complacently within a system of comprehensive regulation and generous subsidy. The prospect of the private health funds enjoying an expanded role under a form of 'social insurance', as suggested by the National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission, is not supported. PMID:21367326

  15. Australia's private health insurance industry: structure, competition, regulation and role in a less than 'ideal world'.

    PubMed

    Shamsullah, Ardel

    2011-02-01

    Australia's private health insurance funds have been prominent participants in the nation's health system for 60 years. Yet there is relatively little public awareness of the distinctive origins of the health funds, the uncharacteristic organisational nature of these commercial enterprises and the peculiarly regulated nature of their industry. The conventional corporate responsibility to shareholders was, until recently, completely irrelevant, and remains marginal to the sector. However, their purported answerability to contributors, styled as 'members', was always doubtful for most health funds. After a long period of remarkable stability in the sector, despite significant shifts in health funding policy, recent years have brought notable changes, with mergers, acquisitions and exits from the industry. The research is based on the detailed study of the private health funds, covering their history, organisational character and industry structure. It argues that the funds have always been divorced from the disciplines of the competitive market and generally have operated complacently within a system of comprehensive regulation and generous subsidy. The prospect of the private health funds enjoying an expanded role under a form of 'social insurance', as suggested by the National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission, is not supported.

  16. Convergence commoditization: A survival guide for corner grocery store owners (and the private power industry)

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, R.

    1998-10-01

    The Pacificorp acquisition of The Energy Company, last year, which is itself a fuel and power marketing amalgam, served to emphasize to the private power industry an ascending ladder of realities: the PURPA-based IPP industry is history (Old News); linkage of power marketers and fuel suppliers is a logical development (Accepted Wisdom); and Convergence of energy supply techniques will be the foundation of the new consolidated energy industry (Rapidly Accepted Wisdom). To cling to this newest rung of the ladder, private power industry members face a classic quandary: finding an appropriate response to the deregulation genie whose escape from the regulatory bottle it has so long promoted. The challenges are clear enough: prevent unfair exercise of competitive advantage by the new convergence mega-companies; facilitate merchant project financing in the new world of shorter term energy arrangements; reestablish a useful, functional role in the foreshortened energy food chain. In short: figure out what to sell from the corner grocery once the supermarket comes to town.

  17. Public-private partnerships: the evolving role of industry funding in nutrition research.

    PubMed

    Zachwieja, Jeffrey; Hentges, Eric; Hill, James O; Black, Richard; Vassileva, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The global burdens of morbidity and mortality associated with obesity-related chronic diseases are crippling public health and are predicted to exponentially increase over the next 3 decades. Meanwhile, the resources necessary to conduct research that may offer solutions to the obesity epidemic continue to decline and funding has become increasingly difficult to secure. Alternative models for funding nutrition and health research are necessary to make considerable and timely progress to improve public health. Key stakeholders include, but are not limited to, government agencies, foundations, private industry, and nongovernmental organizations.

  18. Industrial Hygiene Laboratory accreditation: The JSC experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fadner, Dawn E.

    1993-01-01

    The American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA) is a society of professionals dedicated to the health and safety of workers and community. With more than 10,000 members, the AIHA is the largest international association serving occupational and environmental health professionals practicing industrial hygiene in private industry, academia, government, labor, and independent organizations. In 1973, AIHA developed a National Industrial Hygiene Laboratory Accreditation Program. The purposes of this program are shown.

  19. The Privatization of Industrial Policy: Public Responses to the Rise of Photonic Technology in the United States.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternberg, Ernest

    1990-01-01

    Photonics arose in the 1980s as a revolutionary technological development encompassing lasers, fiber optics, sensing devices, imaging systems, and optical applications in computing. It achieved worldwide commercial significance, affecting the productive activities of numerous industries. Despite considerable domestic investment, US industrial performance in the technology deteriorated in comparison to that of other nations, particularly Japan. This study examines the US public policy response to photonics. Photonics exemplifies a technological paradigm with integral properties: it comprises a body of knowledge and skill, systems of technical devices, and sets of technological interrelationships among industrial sectors. This study argues that private firms in themselves respond inefficiently to such technological interdependencies. Firms would operate more efficiently in the presence of industrial policies that recognize the integral properties of technology and plan for massive technological changes in the economy. Amid a widespread rejection of industrial policy as faulty economics, the US response to photonics occurred not through explicit policy but through a privatization of policy making. This privatization relegated technology policy making to private and unaccountable realms. Privatization took three forms. First, through disaggregation, government dispersed assets to interested parties through pork-barrel appropriations, business participation in agency operations, and review committees representing eventual beneficiaries. Second, through collaboration, committees of university faculty and corporate affiliates made technology policy decisions. Third, through sheltering, technological research was conducted under the military establishment. Privatization made for debilitating policy. Operating in the absence of vision, strategy, or plan, it failed to respond to the integral characteristics of photonics understood as a technological paradigm. US industrial

  20. Sickness absence in the private sector of Greece: comparing shipyard industry and national insurance data.

    PubMed

    Alexopoulos, Evangelos C; Merekoulias, Georgios; Tanagra, Dimitra; Konstantinou, Eleni C; Mikelatou, Efi; Jelastopulu, Eleni

    2012-04-01

    Approximately 3% of employees are absent from work due to illness daily in Europe, while in some countries sickness absence exceeds 20 days per year. Based on a limited body of reliable studies, Greek employees in the private sector seem to be absent far less frequently (<5 days/year) compared to most of the industrialized world. The aim of this study was to estimate the levels of sickness absence in the private sector in Greece, using shipyard and national insurance data. Detailed data on absenteeism of employees in a large shipyard company during the period 1999-2006 were utilized. National data on compensated days due to sickness absence concerning all employees (around 2 million) insured by the Social Insurance Institute (IKA, the largest insurance scheme in Greece) were retrieved from the Institute's annual statistical reports for the period 1987-2006. Sick-leave days per employee and sick-leave rate (%) were calculated, among other indicators. In the shipyard cohort, the employment time loss due to sick leave was 1%. The mean number of sick-leave days per employee in shipyards ranged between 4.6 and 8.7 and sick-leave rate (sickness absenteeism rate) varied among 2% and 3.7%. The corresponding indicators for IKA were estimated between 5 and 6.3 sick-leave days per insured employee (median 5.8), and 2.14-2.72% (median 2.49%), respectively. Short sick-leave spells (<4 days) may account at least for the 25% of the total number of sick-leave days, currently not recorded in national statistics. The level of sickness absence in the private sector in Greece was found to be higher than the suggested by previous reports and international comparative studies, but still remains one of the lowest in the industrialized world. In the 20-years national data, the results also showed a 7-year wave in sickness absence indexes (a decrease during the period 1991-1997 and an increase in 1998-2004) combined with a small yet significant decline as a general trend. These

  1. Sickness Absence in the Private Sector of Greece: Comparing Shipyard Industry and National Insurance Data

    PubMed Central

    Alexopoulos, Evangelos C.; Merekoulias, Georgios; Tanagra, Dimitra; Konstantinou, Eleni C.; Mikelatou, Efi; Jelastopulu, Eleni

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 3% of employees are absent from work due to illness daily in Europe, while in some countries sickness absence exceeds 20 days per year. Based on a limited body of reliable studies, Greek employees in the private sector seem to be absent far less frequently (<5 days/year) compared to most of the industrialized world. The aim of this study was to estimate the levels of sickness absence in the private sector in Greece, using shipyard and national insurance data. Detailed data on absenteeism of employees in a large shipyard company during the period 1999–2006 were utilized. National data on compensated days due to sickness absence concerning all employees (around 2 million) insured by the Social Insurance Institute (IKA, the largest insurance scheme in Greece) were retrieved from the Institute’s annual statistical reports for the period 1987–2006. Sick-leave days per employee and sick-leave rate (%) were calculated, among other indicators. In the shipyard cohort, the employment time loss due to sick leave was 1%. The mean number of sick-leave days per employee in shipyards ranged between 4.6 and 8.7 and sick-leave rate (sickness absenteeism rate) varied among 2% and 3.7%. The corresponding indicators for IKA were estimated between 5 and 6.3 sick-leave days per insured employee (median 5.8), and 2.14–2.72% (median 2.49%), respectively. Short sick-leave spells (<4 days) may account at least for the 25% of the total number of sick-leave days, currently not recorded in national statistics. The level of sickness absence in the private sector in Greece was found to be higher than the suggested by previous reports and international comparative studies, but still remains one of the lowest in the industrialized world. In the 20-years national data, the results also showed a 7-year wave in sickness absence indexes (a decrease during the period 1991–1997 and an increase in 1998–2004) combined with a small yet significant decline as a general trend. These

  2. Sickness absence in the private sector of Greece: comparing shipyard industry and national insurance data.

    PubMed

    Alexopoulos, Evangelos C; Merekoulias, Georgios; Tanagra, Dimitra; Konstantinou, Eleni C; Mikelatou, Efi; Jelastopulu, Eleni

    2012-04-01

    Approximately 3% of employees are absent from work due to illness daily in Europe, while in some countries sickness absence exceeds 20 days per year. Based on a limited body of reliable studies, Greek employees in the private sector seem to be absent far less frequently (<5 days/year) compared to most of the industrialized world. The aim of this study was to estimate the levels of sickness absence in the private sector in Greece, using shipyard and national insurance data. Detailed data on absenteeism of employees in a large shipyard company during the period 1999-2006 were utilized. National data on compensated days due to sickness absence concerning all employees (around 2 million) insured by the Social Insurance Institute (IKA, the largest insurance scheme in Greece) were retrieved from the Institute's annual statistical reports for the period 1987-2006. Sick-leave days per employee and sick-leave rate (%) were calculated, among other indicators. In the shipyard cohort, the employment time loss due to sick leave was 1%. The mean number of sick-leave days per employee in shipyards ranged between 4.6 and 8.7 and sick-leave rate (sickness absenteeism rate) varied among 2% and 3.7%. The corresponding indicators for IKA were estimated between 5 and 6.3 sick-leave days per insured employee (median 5.8), and 2.14-2.72% (median 2.49%), respectively. Short sick-leave spells (<4 days) may account at least for the 25% of the total number of sick-leave days, currently not recorded in national statistics. The level of sickness absence in the private sector in Greece was found to be higher than the suggested by previous reports and international comparative studies, but still remains one of the lowest in the industrialized world. In the 20-years national data, the results also showed a 7-year wave in sickness absence indexes (a decrease during the period 1991-1997 and an increase in 1998-2004) combined with a small yet significant decline as a general trend. These

  3. Drug discovery in academia.

    PubMed

    Shamas-Din, Aisha; Schimmer, Aaron D

    2015-08-01

    Participation of academic centers in aspects of drug discovery and development beyond target identification and clinical trials is rapidly increasing. Yet many academic drug discovery projects continue to stall at the level of chemical probes, and they infrequently progress to drugs suitable for clinical trials. This gap poses a major hurdle for academic groups engaged in drug discovery. A number of approaches have been pursued to overcome this gap, including stopping at the production of high-quality chemical probes, establishing the resources in-house to advance select projects toward clinical trials, partnering with not-for-profit groups to bring the necessary resources and expertise to develop probes into drugs, and drug repurposing, whereby known drugs are advanced into clinical trials for new indications. In this review, we consider the role of academia in anticancer drug discovery and development, as well as the strategies used by academic groups to overcome barriers in this process.

  4. The Global Education Industry: Lessons from Private Education in Developing Countries. IEA Studies in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tooley, James

    This book focuses on the impact of private education in developing countries, such as Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, India, Indonesia, Peru, Romania, Russia, South Africa, and Zimbabwe. The private education sector is large and innovative in the countries studied and not the domain of the wealthy. Contrary to popular opinion, private education in…

  5. Market Professionals in the Private Tutoring Industry: Balancing Profitability with the Humanistic Face of Schooling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aurini, Janice

    Based on interviews with private-tutoring-business entrepreneurs, this paper provides a qualitative analysis of some organizational and ideological transformations in the teacher profession with the advent of market professionals within the private-education sector. No longer simply a means to generate additional income, the private-tutoring…

  6. Summer Academic Skills Enhancement Program 1991. Private Industry Council of Franklin County Job Training Partnership Act. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, William S.

    The Summer Academic Skills Enhancement Program was funded by the Private Industry Council (PIC) of Franklin County (Ohio) through the Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA) to provide JTPA clients with the reading comprehension and language mechanics skills required for employment in entry-level positions. The program was coordinated by the…

  7. Basic Skills and Employment and Training Programs: A Monograph for Local Elected Officials and Private Industry Council Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strumpf, Lori

    This monograph provides advice for local officials and Private Industry Council (PIC) members about youth employment and unemployment problems and strategies for solving them. The first part of the monograph sketches the problem of unemployment and its roots in a changing economy, youths' lack of basic skills, and the mismatch between the needs of…

  8. Youth Programs and the Job Training Partnership Act. Developing Competency Standards: A Guide for Private Industry Council Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strumpf, Lori

    This guide is intended to assist Private Industry Council (PIC) members in developing competency standards for youth programs receiving Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA) funds. Discussed first are the benefits of competency standards to PICs and service delivery areas (SDAs). The various components of program standards (types of skills, skill…

  9. Evaluation and Development of E-Learning Tools and Methods in Digital Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing for Non Experts from Academia and Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gülch, E.; Al-Ghorani, N.; Quedenfeldt, B.; Braun, J.

    2012-07-01

    There does already exist a wide variety of tutorials and on-line courses on Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing very often used in academia. Many of them are still rather static and tedious or target high-knowledge learners. E-learning is, however, increasingly applied by many organizations and companies for life-long learning (like e.g. the EduServ courses of EuroSDR), but also for training of resellers and in order to save the expenses and time of travelling. A new issue of this project when taking into account the ethnic mentality in some countries like Saudi Arabia where it is impossible to mix the females and males at any institution type or for instance to teach ladies by a male teacher face to face, many academic workshops have been done separately twice by foreign organizations to adapt this situation. This paper will focus on these issues and present experiences gathered from a Master Thesis on "E-learning in Digital Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing for Non Experts using Moodle" at HFT Stuttgart in co-operation with a software vendor and a reseller and experiences from a current European Tempus IV project GIDEC (Geographic information technology for sustainable development in Eastern neighouring countries). The aim of this research is to provide an overview on available methods and tools and classify and judge their feasibility for the above mentioned scenarios. A more detailed description is given on the development of e-learning applications for Digital Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing using the open source package Moodle as platform. A first item covers the experiences from setting up and handling of Moodle for non-experts. The major emphasis is then on developing and analyzing some few case studies for lectures, exercises, and software training in the fields of Digital Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing. Feedback from students and company staff will be evaluated and incorporated in an improved design and sample implementation. A further focus is on free

  10. Making industrial energy efficiency mainstream and profitable: Where public benefit and private interests intersect

    SciTech Connect

    McKane, Aimee T.; Tutterow, Vestal; Cockrill, Chris

    2001-05-31

    In 1996, the US Department of Energy s Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) Motor Challenge program began a unique collaboration with industry called the Allied Partner program. Partnerships were sought with equipment suppliers and manufacturers, utilities, consultants, and state agencies that had extensive existing relationships with industrial customers. Partners were neither paid nor charged a fee for participation. The assumption was that these relationships could serve as the foundation for conveying a motor system efficiency message to many more industrial facilities than could be reached through a typical government-to-end-user program model. A substantial effort was made to engage industrial suppliers in delivering program information as part of their customer interactions. A recent independent evaluation of the Motor Challenge program attributes $16.9 million or nearly 67 percent of the total annual program energy savings to the efforts of Allied Partners in the first three years of operation.In 1997, the Compressed Air Challenge(R) (CAC) was developed as an outgrowth of the partnership concept. In this model, OIT is one of 15 sponsors who collaborated to create a national program of compressed air system training. The CAC has gone a step further by setting up a development and deployment model based on shared interests and shared costs among public, private, and not-for-profit organizations that serve industrial customers. Since the first CAC training session in 1999, approximately 3800 people have been trained by CAC qualified instructors--both end users and suppliers. More impressively, the entire compressed air market has begun to shift from a component-based to a system-based approach, largely as the result of collaboration. The typical leverage for OIT participation in a CAC training session is 10:1. During the past year, OIT has reorganized to integrate all of its near-term industrial offerings such as the Motor, Compressed Air, and Steam

  11. Eco-Driven Chemical Research in the Boundary Between Academia and Industry. PhD Students' Views on Science and Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöström, Jesper

    2013-10-01

    This paper examines and discusses the views on science and society held among PhD students working in two different industrially and environmentally driven research programmes in the broad area of green chemistry. It is based on thirteen in-depth interviews. The analysis shows three main ways of handling the situation as "post-academic" PhD student: (1) the student sees the PhD work mainly as a job and does not reflect about his/her research or the research funding, (2) the student is satisfied with the post-academic situation, accepts the established innovation policy discourse and is sceptical to traditional academic research, and (3) the student sees collaborative research programmes as a way to get funding, which can be used for secretly done basic research. Most PhD students either emphasise usefulness—in line with the dominating research policy discourse—or they adopt the positivistic view of science as objective and independent of the surrounding society. However, there are only a few signs of "double problematisation", that is a critical view where both disciplinary-oriented and industry-dependent research are problematised.

  12. Defense Programs benchmarking in Chicago, April 1994: Identifying best practices in the pollution prevention programs of selected private industries

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    The Office of Defense Programs (DP) was the first US Department of Energy (DOE) Cognizant Secretarial Office (CSO) to attempt to benchmark private industries for best-in-class practices in the field of pollution prevention. Defense Programs` intent in this effort is to identify and bring to DOE field offices strategic and technological tools that have helped private companies minimize waste and prevent pollution. Defense Programs` premier benchmarking study focused on business practices and process improvements used to implement exceptional pollution prevention programs in four privately owned companies. The current interest in implementing partnerships information exchange, and technology transfer with the private sector prompted DP to continue to seek best practices in the area of pollution prevention through a second benchmarking endeavor in May 1994. This report presents the results of that effort. The decision was made to select host facilities that own processes similar to those at DOE plants and laboratories, that have programs that have been recognized on a local or national level, that have an interest in partnering with the Department on an information-sharing basis, and that are located in proximity to each other. The DP benchmarking team assessed the pollution prevention programs of five companies in the Chicago area--GE Plastics, Navistar, Northrop Corporation, Sundstrand and Caterpillar. At all facilities visited, Ozone Depleting Compounds (ODCs), hazardous wastes, releases under the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA), waste water and non-hazardous wastes are being eliminated, replaced, reduced, recycled and reused whenever practicable.

  13. The Impacts of Military, Industrial, and Private Support on Modern Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwit, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the period following WW I, governmental support for astronomy grew enormously after WWII and during the Cold War. In spite of reservations expressed by leading astronomers like Harlow Shapley at Harvard and Otto Struve at Yerkes, tools provided by the military took astronomy into directions neither Shapley nor Struve could possibly have imagined — radio, X-ray, gamma-ray and infrared astronomy. It was a great ride that lasted half a century. Had it been up to Shapley and Struve, they would have opted for a return to where pre-war optical astronomy had left off — themes over which they could exert personal control.The problem today, however, as I will show, is that the directions the military supported, while still fruitful, may be keeping us from vigorously pursuing new problems astrophysics needs to consider, the nature of dark energy and dark matter, or the pursuit of intelligent life elsewhere in the universe, none of which appear of interest to the military or industry. Topics of this kind could be supported by the very rich, like Yerkes and Hooker in the past, the Keck Foundation and Paul Allen more recently, or by less affluent but highly skilled volunteers. Support by the wealthy has occasionally been questioned, as in a front page article by William Broad in the International New York Times on March 17, 2014, in which he worried that the ultrarich would likely be idiosyncratic and know too little. Whether this fear is justified can be debated. However, failing this kind of philanthropic support, astronomy might opt for aid through the recently developed "economy of the commons,' pioneered by Elinor Ostrom, which tends to succeed by world-wide support on smaller scales coordinated largely through the internet. This movement is sometimes referred to as crowd sourcing. It tends to attract thoughtful, like-minded individuals from across the globe who wish to contribute their skills and have the required talents.I will review both the great

  14. Privatization, industry integration and international politics: The case of energy and the role of business leadership in South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mireur, Yannick

    2000-10-01

    This thesis analyzes how matters traditionally decided by states because deemed strategic such as cross-border physical energy integration, are now the product of corporate strategy. As a direct result of state divestiture implemented in the scope of a changing model of political economy, corporate bodies have taken on an increasingly important role in the achievement of regional integration. The privatization and ownership transfer of a strategic industry, namely energy, has indeed positioned the private sector at the forefront of regional economic affairs. The study also points out the political impact of private sector-driven projects of infrastructure, particularly between two countries that have been separated by strong antagonism in the recent past, the launching of regional energy integration by private companies has provided the substance that was lacking to governments, even though these were willing to operate a rapprochement. The parameters of foreign policy decisions have been modified and rapprochement has been accelerated as a result of initiatives from the private sector. The thesis thus explores the links between the adoption of a neo-liberal political economy that includes the privatization of the energy sector, regional energy integration, and foreign relations. It analyzes how the transformation of transnational economic ties usually derived from decisions of state can now be the product of private business deals. It emphasizes the role of corporate executives in carrying out projects and shaping a new economic reality that governments have proved to be unable or unwilling to create in the past. Its focus is the Chile-Argentina energy integration process and rapprochement in the nineties. The spread of neo-liberalism in the Southern Cone has taken place in a time of waning alternative discourse on development strategy in the international public arena and of acute sense of development imperative in the so-called emerging economies. The thesis

  15. Job Patterns for Minorities & Women in Private Industry, 1981. Equal Employment Opportunity Report. Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Washington, DC.

    As part of its mandate under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission requires periodic reports from public and private employers, unions, and labor organizations, indicating the makeup of their workforce by sex and by race/ethnic categories. This volume contains two tables summarizing data obtained as…

  16. Recruitment and Selection in Business and Industry: Learning from the Private Sector Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Maria D.; Munoz, Marco A.

    Recruitment and selection practices in the private sector were examined through a literature review to identify strategies that human resource (HR) departments can use in designing new employee recruitment and selection processes or improving existing processes. The following were among the findings: (1) new employees recruited by using informal…

  17. Industry-academia collaborations for biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Asadullah, Khusru; Busch, Andreas; Gottwald, Matthias; Reinke, Petra; Landeck, Lilla

    2015-12-01

    Several types of collaboration are being pursued to identify, validate and apply new biomarkers. Here, we highlight examples of such initiatives and discuss the challenges, approaches to address these challenges and key factors for success.

  18. Diversity in academia: some reflections.

    PubMed

    Steele, R L

    1995-01-01

    How close does academia come to mirroring America? Like other societal institutions, higher education has overcome obstacles to cultural diversity with varying degrees of success. Changes in faculty composition and development of more inclusive curricula have been slow taking place in some instances, but there is reason to be optimistic. This paper discusses the historical context of racism and prejudice in American society and how institutions of higher education compare with current trends in overcoming obstacles affecting parity.

  19. Government Incentives to Private Industry to Locate in Urban Poverty Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabb, William K.

    1969-01-01

    This report investigates the possible use of government subsidies for firms locating in urban poverty areas as a means of improving employment opportunities for the urban disadvantaged. Arguments in favor of incentives, emphasizing the need to avoid wasting manpower and to protect developing industries while inducing further industrialization, are…

  20. Energy Technology Solutions: Public-Private Partnerships Transforming Industry - December 2010

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2010-12-01

    AMO's research and development partnerships with industry have resulted in more than 220 technologies and other solutions that can be purchased today. This document includes a description of each solution, its benefits, and vendor contact information. The document also identifies emerging technologies and other resources to help industry save energy.

  1. Pragmatic privatization

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.

    1995-10-01

    Chile was probably the first country in the world to privatize under a decentralized and competitive framework a former state-owned power sector. Power sector privatization was conducted with pragmatism, particularly in terms of the speed with which the changes occurred. In fact, the earliest privatization did not occur until 1980 and the process was not completed until early 1990. The privatized Chilean electric industry has performed fairly well in terms of the investments carried out not only in the power sector, but also in other economic activities and in foreign countries. The diversification of ownership and the competitive framework have been an incentive to reach efficiency and a guaranty for the stability of the rules of the game in the long run.

  2. Interactions of the public and private sectors in drug development: boundaries to protect scientific values while preserving innovation.

    PubMed

    Cassell, Gail H

    2007-03-01

    Industry, academia, and government have developed highly interwoven relationships in the pursuit of biomedical research. Establishing and maintaining boundaries among the public and private sectors at both the institutional level and the individual level is critical to protect core scientific values, preserve innovation, and allow product development to thrive. This article reviews principles that guide the interactions of these Biomdifferent sectors, sharing principles in place at Eli Lilly and Company as an example.

  3. Pharma and Academia: What We Have Here Is a Failure to Communicate.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, Morris J

    2016-09-13

    In recent years, there has been substantial interest in the potential value of collaboration between academia and the pharmaceutical industry. In this Crosstalk, I discuss obstacles to these relationships being optimally productive. PMID:27626193

  4. Pharma and Academia: What We Have Here Is a Failure to Communicate.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, Morris J

    2016-09-13

    In recent years, there has been substantial interest in the potential value of collaboration between academia and the pharmaceutical industry. In this Crosstalk, I discuss obstacles to these relationships being optimally productive.

  5. Private forest landowner willingness, community impacts and concerns, and the development of a wood-based biofuels industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Eric C.

    The technical/economic aspects of using wood-based biomass as an alternative source of fuel have been well represented in current academic literature. However, currently very few studies have examined the concerns of private forest landowners (PFLs) and communities toward increased harvesting rates to support a wood-based biofuels industry. Further, few studies have tried to study or to determine what factors might impact such willingness. The absence of studies that focus on understanding PFLs and community concerns as well as PFLs willingness to participate in harvesting biofuels for energy is in part traceable to two basic, but untested, assumptions regarding communities and forest landowners: (1) PFLs are able and willing to participate in the production of raw materials with few obstacles; and (2) they will make the transition because of the opportunity to increase profits. While the technical/economic aspects are clearly important, little attention has been paid to those social and cultural factors that may impact the viability of such activity. To address this issue, the present study focused on three questions. (1) What are the opportunities and concerns of PFLs, communities, residents, and existing wood-based industries regarding the development of a wood-based biofuel industry? (2) Will PFLs be willing to harvest raw materials for a wood-based biofuel industry? (2a) What sociocultural and sociodemographic dimensions influence PFLs' willingness to harvest raw materials for a wood-based biofuel industry? Data was collected using a mixed methods approach including using secondary data, key informant interviews and a phone survey of both the general public and PFLs in the Eastern forest region.

  6. 7 CFR 701.57 - Private non-industrial forest land.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... because of losses in calendar year 2005 caused by a 2005 hurricane. To be eligible, a non-industrial... hurricane or related condition. The 35 percent loss shall be determined based on the value of the land before and after the hurricane event. (b) During the 5-year period beginning on the date of the loss,...

  7. A research experiment on facilitation and formation of joint research and development programs between government, industry, and universities: Overview, preliminary findings, and observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariq, Syed Z.

    1992-01-01

    Presented is an overview of an experiment to explore the free-market approach to public-private collaboration through the development and implementation of a joint venture mechanism to enable formation of R&D projects between government, industry and academia. Some preliminary results related to time-to-commercialization and economic competitiveness are discussed.

  8. Wages and Hours of Work of Nonsupervisory Employees in All Private Nonfarm Industries by Coverage Status Under the Fair Labor Standards Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Employment Standards Administration (DOL), Washington, DC.

    At the request of the Employment Standards Administration, the Bureau of Labor Statistics conducted a nationwide survey of private nonfarm industries, designed to provide comprehensive frequency distributions of nonsupervisory employees by average straight-time hourly earnings and weekly hours of work by coverage status under the Fair Labor…

  9. New PIC/Postsecondary Alliances. How Postsecondary Institutions and Private Industry Councils Are Working Together to Boost Economic Development and Put People Back to Work. Six Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. for Work and Learning, Washington, DC.

    Case studies are provided of the six sites involved in a demonstration project to encourage partnerships between postsecondary educational institutions and Private Industry Councils (PICs). These programs represent instances of collaborations between colleges/universities and the Job Training Partnership Act to help the unemployed find work and…

  10. PICs, TECs and LECs: Lessons to Be Learnt from the Differences between the USA Private Industry Councils and Britain's Training and Enterprise Councils.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    Comparison of Britain's Training and Enterprise Councils/Local Enterprise Companies with the United States' Private Industry Councils (PICs) shows common problems: inadequate financing, labor market fragmentation, staff turnover, and lack of national strategy. PICs have a clearer mission and greater success in developing partnerships with local…

  11. New PIC/Postsecondary Partnerships: How Postsecondary Institutions and Private Industry Councils Are Working Together to Boost Economic Development and Put People Back to Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Shirley

    A project sought ways in which colleges and universities can work more closely with the federally funded Job Training Partnership Act to help the unemployed find work and to encourage business startups and expansion. Partnerships between postsecondary educational institutions and Private Industry Councils (PICs) at six sites were encouraged during…

  12. A Primer on Privatization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menell, Seth J.; Phelps, Richard P.

    This paper provides a detailed examination of "contracting," a type of privatization, and is intended to clarify the issues surrounding decisions to privatize public services. Privatization introduces competition among market participants as a means of generating revenue, spurring development of an industry, and/or improving the quality of…

  13. Transfer from research/academia to clinical/regulated.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Ferdousi; Williams, Anthony

    2016-10-01

    We focus here on how the interface in academia has adapted in their approach to assessing the PDs of biological agents to better understand mechanisms at an early stage. This understanding enables drugs to be modified early and to be reassessed before progressing to late stage trials. We discuss how these efforts are now being bolstered by a network of consortia involving industry, academia and regulatory bodies, to bring together resources, knowledge and a harmonization in bioanalytical techniques. We highlight how the regulatory guidance still lags behind the rapid advancement in biologicals and associated analytical techniques, especially in immunotherapies and immunological bioassays. Despite this, new collaborative groups are working together to deliver robust and accurate results essential for identifying the most promising drugs to progress from early phase academic research to late phase industry based trials. We show how the relationship between academia and not-for-profit organizations with large pharma and emerging biotech companies has shifted toward a more collaborative effort in bringing new therapies to the forefront. PMID:27628669

  14. Addressing water resources risk in England and Wales: Long term infrastructure planning in a private, regulated industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Sean

    2015-04-01

    Water resources planning is a complex and challenging discipline in which decision makers must deal with conflicting objectives, contested socio-economic values and vast uncertainties, including long term hydrological variability. The task is arguably more demanding in England and Wales, where private water companies must adhere to a rigid set of regulatory planning guidelines in order to justify new infrastructural investments. These guidelines prescribe a "capacity expansion" approach to planning: ensure that a deterministic measure of supply, known as "Deployable Output," meets projected demand over a 25-year planning horizon. Deployable Output is derived using a method akin to yield analysis and is commensurate with the maximum rate of supply that a water resources system can sustain without incurring failure under a simulation of historical recorded hydrological conditions. This study examines whether Deployable Output analysis is fit to serve an industry in which: water companies are seeking to invest in cross-company water transfer schemes to deal with loss of water availability brought about by European environmental legislation and an increase in demand driven by population growth; water companies are expected address potential climate change impacts through their planning activities; and regulators wish to benchmark water resource system performance across the separate companies. Of particular interest, then, is the adequacy of Deployable Output analysis as a means to measuring current and future water shortage risk and comparing across supply systems. Data from the UK National River Flow Archive are used to develop a series of hypothetical reservoir systems in two hydrologically contrasting regions -- northwest England/north Wales and Southeast England. The systems are varied by adjusting the draft ratio (ratio of target annual demand to mean annual inflow), the inflow diversity (covariance of streamflow sequences supplying the system), the strength of

  15. Electronic Publishing in Academia: An Economic Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getz, Malcolm

    The challenge to academia is to invest in services that will turn the abundance of electronic data into sound, useful, compelling information products. The process of filtering, labeling, refining, and packaging, that is, the process of editing and publishing, takes resources and will be shaped by the electronic world in significant ways. This…

  16. Gender Equality in Academia: A Critical Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winchester, Hilary P. M.; Browning, Lynette

    2015-01-01

    Gender equality in academia has been monitored in Australia for the past three decades so it is timely to reflect on what progress has been made, what works, and what challenges remain. When data were first published on the gender composition of staff in Australian universities in the mid-1980s women comprised 20 per cent of academic staff and…

  17. Using Microcomputers to Increase Productivity in Academia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, Garry D.

    1984-01-01

    The expanded use of microcomputers, including word processing, to improve productivity of geological educators and students is discussed. Topic areas examined include: computer development and academic use; word processing with microcomputers; instructional uses and other applications; impacts on academia; and acquisition. (BC)

  18. Continuous Improvement Framework: Implications for Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temponi, Cecilia

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the main elements of continuous improvement (CI) in higher education and the concerns of academia's stakeholders in the implementation of such an approach. Suggests guidelines for the development of a culture more receptive to the implementation and maintenance of a CI approach in higher education. Design/methodology/approach:…

  19. Determinants of Organisational Climate for Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMurray, Adela; Scott, Don

    2013-01-01

    Being aware of the factors that develop a positive organisational climate is especially important in universities, where the academic members of staff are, in large measure, self-motivated. To identify the determinants of organisational climate for university academia, the validity and reliability of the first-order constructs of autonomy,…

  20. Gender Inequality in Academia: Evidences from Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogbogu, Christiana O.

    2011-01-01

    Universities and other institutions of higher education in Nigeria see themselves as liberal and open-minded. They support social movements that encourage principles of democracy and social justice, yet their mode of governance is male dominated and patriarchal. This study, therefore, identified the causes of gender inequality in academia and the…

  1. Burke and Academia: Revenge of the Specialists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambkin, David J.

    Kenneth Burke was a college dropout who did not enjoy notable success until quite late in life. His major interest was the development of a meta-theory of language, which he called "rhetoric." Denied the resources and material rewards of academia, Burke was both scapegoated and redeemed by the academic community. Furthermore, the scapegoaters and…

  2. Making a Case for Technology in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodds, Kathrin; Callender, Donell; Henry, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Interested in connecting users with the latest resources aimed at advancing intellectual inquiry and discovery, researchers from Texas Tech University Libraries decided to embark on a study to explore the practicality of the latest technology, the iPad, within the varying functions of academia. Using an online survey and focus groups, the…

  3. Technology Transfer: A Case Study of Programs and Practices at NASA, DOD, DOC, and Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blood, John R.

    2009-01-01

    Technology transfer is vital to humanity. It spurs innovation, promotes commerce, and provides technology-based goods and services. Technology transfer is also highly complex and interdependent in nature. This interdependence is exemplified principally by the various technology transfer interactions between government, industry, and academia. …

  4. Accelerating technology transfer from federal laboratories to the private sector by industrial R and D collaborations - A new business model

    SciTech Connect

    LOMBANA,CESAR A.; ROMIG JR.,ALTON D.; LINTON,JONATHAN D.; MARTINEZ,J. LEONARD

    2000-04-13

    Many important products and technologies were developed in federal laboratories and were driven initially by national needs and for federal applications. For example, the clean room technology that enhanced the growth of the semiconductor industry was developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) decades ago. Similarly, advances in micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS)--an important set of process technologies vital for product miniaturization--are occurring at SNL. Each of the more than 500 federal laboratories in the US, are sources of R and D that contributes to America's economic vitality, productivity growth and, technological innovation. However, only a fraction of the science and technology available at the federal laboratories is being utilized by industry. Also, federal laboratories have not been applying all the business development processes necessary to work effectively with industry in technology commercialization. This paper addresses important factors that federal laboratories, federal agencies, and industry must address to translate these under utilized technologies into profitable products in the industrial sector.

  5. Public/private sector cooperation to promote industrial energy efficiency: Allied partners and the US Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    McKane, Aimee; Cockrill, Chris; Tutterow, Vestal; Radspieler, Anthony

    2003-05-18

    Since 1996, the US Department of Energy's Office of Industrial Technologies (USDOE) has been involved in a unique voluntary collaboration with industry called the Allied Partner program. Initially developed under the Motor Challenge program, the partnership concept continues as a central element of USDOE's BestPractices, which in 2001 integrated all of USDOE's near-term industrial program offerings including those in motors, compressed air, pump, fan, process heating and steam systems. Partnerships are sought with end use industrial companies as well as equipment suppliers and manufacturers, utilities, consultants, and state agencies that have extensive existing relationships with industrial customers. Partners are neither paid nor charged a fee for participation. Since the inception of Allied Partners, the assumption has been that these relationships could serve as the foundation for conveying a system energy-efficiency message to many more industrial facilities than could be reached through a typical government-to-end-user program model. An independent evaluation of the Motor Challenge program, reported at the last EEMODS conference, attributed US $16.9 million or nearly 67 percent of the total annual program energy savings to the efforts of Allied Partners in the first three years of operation. A recent evaluation of the Compressed Air Challenger, which grew out of the former Motor Challenger program, attribute additional energy savings from compressed air training alone at US $12.1 million per year. Since the reorganization under BestPractices, the Allied Partner program has been reshaped to extend the impact of all BestPractices program activities. This new model is more ambitious than the former Motor Challenge program concerning the level of collaborative activities negotiated with Allied Partners. This paper describes in detail two new types of program initiatives involving Allied Partners: Qualified Specialist Training and Energy Events. The Qualified

  6. Privatizing Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerrard, Jane; Bolt, Nancy; Strege, Karen

    2012-01-01

    This timely special report from ALA Editions provides a succinct but comprehensive overview of the "privatization" of public libraries. It provides a history of the trend of local and state governments privatizing public services and assets, and then examines the history of public library privatization right up to the California legislation…

  7. Extension in Tough Times--Addressing Failures in Public and Private Extension, Lessons from the Tasmanian Wool Industry, Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Warren; Coutts, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports research on the impact of introducing a range of extension approaches into the wool-growing regions of Tasmania Australia to meet an emerging knowledge and skills gap in the sector. The wool-growing industry of the state has experienced minimal government extension support for over 15 years. There is a failure in both private…

  8. Public private partnerships: a marriage of necessity.

    PubMed

    Rao, Mahendra

    2013-02-01

    Harnessing the unprecedented flexibility that iPSC technology and gene editing offer academic and industry-based researchers requires developing an interactive model of collaboration. Such a model will have to leverage the basic research expertise in academia with the pharmaceutical industry's knowledge in manufacturing and high throughput technology to be successful.

  9. Cost of lost work and bed days for us workers in private industry--national health interview survey, 2003.

    PubMed

    Yassin, Abdiaziz S

    2007-07-01

    Data from the 2003 National Health Interview Survey (n = 12,943) of US workers aged 18 to 64 years were used to estimate the annual cost of lost work (ACLW) and lost productivity (ACLP) due to bed days. The average lost workdays (LWDs) was estimated to be 8.39 for US workers compared with 5.62 bed days (BDs). The prevalence of high LWDs (>or=30 days) was 2.9% for US workers compared with 1.3% for BDs (>or=30 days). Regression analyses showed that female workers had higher adjusted mean LWDs and BDs than did male workers. Workers in the mining industry had the highest mean of 26.71 LWDs compared with 5.58 LWDs for workers in the wholesale industry. The total ACLW and ACLP was estimated to be $62.8 billion ($US 2003; 95% CI = $57.53-$67.52 billion).

  10. Job sharing for women pharmacists in academia.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Kelly C; Finks, Shannon W

    2009-11-12

    The pharmacist shortage, increasing numbers of female pharmacy graduates, more pharmacy schools requiring faculty members, and a lower percentage of female faculty in academia are reasons to develop unique arrangements for female academic pharmacists who wish to work part-time. Job sharing is an example of a flexible alternative work arrangement that can be successful for academic pharmacists who wish to continue in a part-time capacity. Such partnerships have worked for other professionals but have not been widely adopted in pharmacy academia. Job sharing can benefit the employer through retention of experienced employees who collectively offer a wider range of skills than a single employee. Benefits to the employee include balanced work and family lives with the ability to maintain their knowledge and skills by remaining in the workforce. We discuss the additional benefits of job-sharing as well as our experience in a non-tenure track job-sharing position at the University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy. PMID:19960092

  11. [Optimizing French scientific and economic performance: the Cifre system of public-private partnership in doctoral research and Servier's contribution].

    PubMed

    Canet, Emmanuel; Grassy, Gérard

    2006-01-01

    The European Union has set itself the daunting target of becoming the world's most competitive and dynamic knowledge-based economy by 2010. Any hope of success against the United States and the Asian tiger economies lies in the quality of scientific and technological research. In France, postgraduate training has long labored under a deep academia/industry divide. Although the universities have introduced supervised 3 year doctoral courses along the lines of the English-speaking countries, they still produce too many postdocs with little experience or understanding of, and little taste for, the private sector. This ignores career realities: the public sector can offer employment to only half the postdocs it produces. The rest must fall back on positions in the private sector, in some cases with a sense of failure, ill suiting them to drive the intellectual economy forwards compared to their international competitors. To combat the divide and emphasize the quality of the research training available within industry, the public/private National Association for Technical Research (ANRT), acting on behalf of the Ministry of Research, created the Industrial Research Training Agreement (Cifre) scheme in 1981. Higher education laboratories and private companies combine to offer doctoral students the opportunity to undertake their 3 year course in a mixed public/private environment (the exact ratio is not defined but in the case of the Servier Research Group, an early and active participant in the scheme, at least one third of the course is spent in the private sector). The doctoral thesis is thereby transformed into a meaningful career qualification. Funded by the Ministry, with maintenance grants to the students and compensatory payments to the companies, the Cifre scheme, which is currently being expanded, has produced 12,000 postdocs personally and intellectually equipped for careers transiting seamlessly between the public and private sectors, to the enrichment of each.

  12. Programming Language Use in US Academia and Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben Arfa Rabai, Latifa; Cohen, Barry; Mili, Ali

    2015-01-01

    In the same way that natural languages influence and shape the way we think, programming languages have a profound impact on the way a programmer analyzes a problem and formulates its solution in the form of a program. To the extent that a first programming course is likely to determine the student's approach to program design, program analysis,…

  13. Privatizing Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, M.T.

    1995-07-01

    The sun is setting on Australia`s long tradition of state involvement in business. As part of efforts begun in the late-1980`s to stem the tide of debt rising within Australian federal and state treasuries, government-owned entities are being corporatized and privatized, and private companies are sponsoring a large share of the country`s new infrastructure projects.

  14. The Law and Private Police.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kakalik, James S.; Wildhorn, Sorrel

    This report is one of a series of five describing a 16-month study of the nature and extent of the private police industry in the United States, its problems, its present regulation, and how the law impinges on it. A general discussion of the sources of legal limitations upon private police activities and personnel and sources of legal powers is…

  15. Career Development of Women in Academia: Traversing the Leaky Pipeline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasser, Courtney E.; Shaffer, Katharine S.

    2014-01-01

    Women's experiences in academia are laden with a fundamental set of issues pertaining to gender inequalities. A model reflecting women's career development and experiences around their academic pipeline (or career in academia) is presented. This model further conveys a new perspective on the experiences of women academicians before, during and…

  16. Firm Seeks More Patent Money for Academia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinson, Steve

    1982-01-01

    Research Corporation is aiding universities in locating new sources of income by finding patentable inventions, acting as broker between companies wanting to fund research and investigators with parallel interests, seeking capital for professors whose ideas have commercial possibilities, and finding private donors of scientific equipment.…

  17. Private Trade and Technical Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    David, Christopher

    1983-01-01

    Among the advantages of private trade and technical schools is their market orientation, a sensitivity to employers' current needs. Teachers recruited from industry, accelerated pace, flexible scheduling, and emphasis on job placement are other benefits found in proprietary schools. (SK)

  18. Latin American privatization

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.; Hennagir, T.; Hernandez, L.A. Jr. )

    1994-01-01

    Fundamental change is reshaping the Latin America power sector as governments explore new and improved privatization schemes. Latin American power markets are second in size only to those found in Asia. As the region grows and capacity needs increase, governments are turning to private power as a way to meet new demands for electric energy. Following the privatization model initiated by Chile, an increasing number of Latin American countries are following suit with an array of private power schemes for their state-owned utilities. The move means great opportunities for developers willing to enter this growing market. The recently established Scudder Latin American Trust for Independent Power is a prime example of new equity players becoming involved in this region. In Chile, the privatization process started more than 12 years ago. Currently, the power sector has been fully restructured to concentrate price and quality regulation on transmission and distribution, leaving generation and sales to a marketplace largely in the hands of the private sector. Furthermore, the Chilean government controls only about 15 percent of the installed generation in the country, so there is free-flow in this segment of the industry or a free market modality.

  19. Commentary: Will academia embrace comparative effectiveness research?

    PubMed

    Lauer, Michael S

    2011-06-01

    In recent medical history, a number of therapies that were widely adopted based on observational data or pathophysiological constructs turned out to be useless or even harmful when tested in randomized comparative effectiveness trials. These therapies not only harmed patients but also did a disservice to the practical education of medical students, residents, and fellows. These trainees effectively learned that it is acceptable to implement practices even in the absence of high-quality evidence, and so they may not have learned how to analyze the quality of evidence. In this issue of Academic Medicine, seven groups address critical aspects of the intersection between comparative effectiveness research (CER) and academic medicine. Their topics include the need at academic health centers for cultural shifts, for addressing conflicts of interest, for exploiting academic talent and electronic information resources, for interacting well with policy makers, for incorporating economic evaluations, for incorporating tests of educational methods, for developing multidisciplinary models, and for integrating CER into "predictive health." This commentary argues that academia must embrace CER by insisting on the highest levels of evidence, by viewing all clinical interactions as opportunities for scientific advancement, by setting an example for policy makers and colleagues working in nonacademic settings, and by engaging all physicians in the clinical research enterprise. PMID:21613887

  20. Building Alliances with Private Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMauro, Karen

    2001-01-01

    Describes how Clarion and Edinboro universities bundled their university-related telecommunications services with residence hall services and sought a vendor consortia to install and manage those services. In return for long-term contracts granting the right to sell services, the two consortia invested money to install data networks in the…

  1. Leading by Example: The Case for IT Security in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Mary Ann

    2005-01-01

    Leadership in IT security is needed. Security matters: the ethics, the economics, and the social implications. There is much the academic community can do to help ensure cybersecurity. This document discusses steps academia can take to help ensure cybersecurity.

  2. Operating private hospitals in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Barcie, Joseph S

    2015-01-01

    Mexico is one of the richest countries in Latin America and over the last several decades there have been many changes in the healthcare delivery systems, from universal healthcare coverage for all Mexicans to the fast paced expansion of private healthcare. Like many countries, Mexico has both private and public health systems and hospital administrators are facing challenges on multiple fronts in addition to facing exciting new opportunities. In this article you will get a bird's eye view of this ever changing panorama. How the new growing middle class consumerism has impacted physicians, health insurance and private healthcare industry. PMID:26521381

  3. Measuring successful knowledge sharing among academia through social media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazali, Saadiah; Sulaiman, Nor Intan Saniah; Zabidi, Nerda Zura; Omar, Mohd Faizal; Alias, Rose Alinda

    2015-12-01

    This paper aims to study the influence of social media on knowledge sharing among academia. Previously, many researches have been done to explore the importance emergence of social media for public use, but there are still limited studies on how this technological advancement affects the academia. For this study, Facebook is chosen as one of the online social networking tools as the medium of knowledge sharing. To begin with, this study is started with the identification of factors that encourage the academia to share their knowledge through social media. These factors are then categorized based on Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). After this knowledge has successfully shared, the level of successful knowledge sharing through Facebook is modeled using Fuzzy Logic. Fuzzy inputs for this study are the number of like, comment and share. Findings from this study indeed showed that there are many reasons encouraging academia to utilize social media for their work. Besides, this paper contributes new knowledge to fuzzy logic application as it is the first known research in measuring Facebook engagement for knowledge sharing purposes. In conclusion although there exist some barriers and limitations with the use of social media, academia are showing a positive shift in the application of these tools for work.

  4. Industry, Philanthropy, and Universities: The Roles and Influences of the Private Sector in Higher Education. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.12.06

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vest, Charles M.

    2006-01-01

    Charles Vest gave the third of three Clark Kerr Lectures on the Role of Higher Education in Society on September 13, 2005 on the Berkeley campus. In public as well as private universities, resources provided by philanthropic individuals and foundations and by corporate research sponsors increasingly support the margin of university excellence, and…

  5. Peru privatizes

    SciTech Connect

    Suttil, K.R.

    1993-02-01

    Peru has been undergoing a revolution since the election of Alberto Fujimori as president in 1990. A revolution that is reversing many of the policies of the past 25 years and one which aims to bring Peru back into the mainstream of the world economy. All the enterprises nationalized in the heady days of the early 1970s are set up for privatization. The most important are the three mining companies: Hierro-Peru, Centromin, and Mineroo-Peru. It will not be easy to attract foreign investment after such a long period of political and economic instability but the rewards are there for the intrepid.

  6. Academia–Industry Symbiosis in Organic Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus Collaboration between academia and industry is a growing phenomenon within the chemistry community. These sectors have long held strong ties since academia traditionally trains the future scientists of the corporate world, but the recent drastic decrease of public funding is motivating the academic world to seek more private grants. This concept of industrial “sponsoring” is not new, and in the past, some companies granted substantial amounts of money per annum to various academic institutions in exchange for prime access to all their scientific discoveries and inventions. However, academic and industrial interests were not always aligned, and therefore the investment has become increasingly difficult to justify from industry’s point of view. With fluctuating macroeconomic factors, this type of unrestricted grant has become more rare and has been largely replaced by smaller and more focused partnerships. In our view, forging a partnership with industry can be a golden opportunity for both parties and can represent a true symbiosis. This type of project-specific collaboration is engendered by industry’s desire to access very specific academic expertise that is required for the development of new technologies at the forefront of science. Since financial pressures do not allow companies to spend the time to acquire this expertise and even less to explore fundamental research, partnering with an academic laboratory whose research is related to the problem gives them a viable alternative. From an academic standpoint, it represents the perfect occasion to apply “pure science” research concepts to solve problems that benefit humanity. Moreover, it offers a unique opportunity for students to face challenges from the “real world” at an early stage of their career. Although not every problem in industry can be solved by research developments in academia, we argue that there is significant scientific overlap between these two seemingly disparate

  7. Drug Discovery in Academia- the third way?

    PubMed Central

    Frearson, Julie; Wyatt, Paul

    2010-01-01

    As the pharmaceutical industry continues to re-strategise and focus on low-risk, relatively short term gains for the sake of survival, we need to re-invigorate the early stages of drug discovery and rebalance efforts towards novel modes of action therapeutics and neglected genetic and tropical diseases. Academic drug discovery is one model which offers the promise of new approaches and an alternative organisational culture for drug discovery as it attempts to apply academic innovation and thought processes to the challenge of discovering drugs to address real unmet need. PMID:20922062

  8. SMEs and their co-operation with academia.

    PubMed

    Antoine, Jean Michel; Strömqvist, Mats

    2005-01-01

    Co-operation between SMEs and Academia can be a win-win situation when each partner understands the constraints of the other. SMEs are often leaders in innovation; therefore more ready to share interest in research. They are flexible and dynamic. They need a short feed-back to sustain their co-operation. Academia is often more long-term oriented and more question- than answer-oriented. A code of conduct can ease the relationship because it can anticipate the potential problems.

  9. Public health service administration and academia. A joint venture.

    PubMed

    Campbell, B F; King, J B

    1992-12-01

    Joint ventures between service and academia are designed to enhance the quality of client services, enrich faculty teaching experiences and skills, and strengthen communication channels. The joint venture described in this article is an example of how public health nursing services and academia can be united through faculty participation in administration. Included in the discussion are the impetus for the project, the contract negotiations, the positive outcomes and disadvantages of the venture, and questions that should be raised when a similar venture is considered.

  10. Design Principles for Fragment Libraries: Maximizing the Value of Learnings from Pharma Fragment-Based Drug Discovery (FBDD) Programs for Use in Academia.

    PubMed

    Keserű, György M; Erlanson, Daniel A; Ferenczy, György G; Hann, Michael M; Murray, Christopher W; Pickett, Stephen D

    2016-09-22

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) is well suited for discovering both drug leads and chemical probes of protein function; it can cover broad swaths of chemical space and allows the use of creative chemistry. FBDD is widely implemented for lead discovery in industry but is sometimes used less systematically in academia. Design principles and implementation approaches for fragment libraries are continually evolving, and the lack of up-to-date guidance may prevent more effective application of FBDD in academia. This Perspective explores many of the theoretical, practical, and strategic considerations that occur within FBDD programs, including the optimal size, complexity, physicochemical profile, and shape profile of fragments in FBDD libraries, as well as compound storage, evaluation, and screening technologies. This compilation of industry experience in FBDD will hopefully be useful for those pursuing FBDD in academia.

  11. Privatization and the globalization of energy markets

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This report reviews recent global efforts to privatize energy resources and outlines the opportunities and challenges privatization has presented to U.S. and foreign multinational energy companies. The group of energy companies studied in this report includes the major U.S. petroleum companies and many foreign companies. The foreign companies reviewed include state-run energy enterprises, recently privatized energy enterprises, and foreign multinationals that have been privately held. The privatization of non-petroleum energy industries, such as electricity generation and transmission, natural gas transmission, and coal mining, are also discussed. Overseas investments made by electric companies, natural gas companies, and coal companies are included. The report is organized into six chapters: (1) economics of privatization; (2) petroleum privatization efforts among non-U.S. Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development nations; (3) petroleum privatization efforts in Latin America; (4) privatization in socialist and former socialist regimes; (5) privatization efforts in global electric power generation, transmission, and distribution industries; and (6) privatization and globalization of world coal.

  12. Bolivian petroleum privatization taking shape

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-07

    Bolivia is boldly embracing a free market philosophy that extends to liberalization of the country`s petroleum sector. Although petroleum industry privatization is being considered by several South American countries, only Argentina has so far completely opened its oil sector and fully privatized its state oil company. The Bolivian government`s own version of privatization, capitalization, is a groundbreaking attempt to attract massive investment from the private sector without leaving the government open to accusations of stripping the country`s assets for short term electoral gain. The paper discusses the government`s strategy to sell the state owned company either as a single unit or to split it into upstream and downstream units. Questions still to be resolved, international interest in the move, bolivian potential, and the gas supply infrastructure are also discussed.

  13. Tenure Denied: Cases of Sex Discrimination in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyer, Susan K., Ed.

    2004-01-01

    This report focuses on women who took their fight for tenure to the courts. Drawing on 19 cases supported by the American Association of University Women Legal Advocacy Fund since 1981, we document the challenge of fighting sex discrimination in academia. In the process, we illustrate the overt and subtle forms of sex discrimination that continue…

  14. "Good Girls": Emphasised Femininity as Cloning Culture in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattsson, Tina

    2015-01-01

    Gender inequality in academia might be understood as an effect of the belief of a contradiction between woman and science, which make it difficult for women to appropriate the right to author and authorise acts of knowing and thinking in science. In relation to this concern, the aim of this article is to explore how a group of successful women…

  15. The Lived Experience of Novice Nursing Faculty in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooley, Shirley S.

    2013-01-01

    To relieve the nursing faculty shortage, notable numbers of master's prepared clinical nurse experts are entering the ranks of nursing faculty to teach the prelicensure nursing student. The transition from clinical practice to the academia raises concern about the adequacy of preparation for the complex specialization role of nurse educator. In…

  16. Translating the Academy: Learning the Racialized Languages of Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monzó, Lilia D.; SooHoo, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    This article presents narratives of 2 women faculty of color, 1 early career Latina and the other tenured Asian American woman, regarding their ontological and epistemological struggles in academia, as well as the hope, impetus, and strategies for change that they constructed together. Drawing on a critical pedagogy perspective, mentoring is…

  17. Getting Started in Academia: A Guide for Educational Psychologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, Christine B.; Barnes, Benita J.

    2008-01-01

    We identify the major tasks facing pre-tenure faculty members and outline advice, based on a review of the literature and our experiences, for succeeding in academia. The challenges encountered by new faculty include learning the culture of the new academic institution, understanding the processes and policies for academic performance review,…

  18. Bridging the Gap in Knowledge Transfer between Academia and Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gera, Rajat

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The paper intends to identify the causes or gaps in transfer of managerial knowledge between academia and practitioners and to develop a framework that overcomes the gaps through knowledge management, information technology and human resource practices. The paper aims to suggest a strategic approach based on the knowledge transfer cycle.…

  19. Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

    2007-12-01

    This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of

  20. Strange Bedfellows? Reaffirming Rehabilitation and Prison Privatization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Kevin A.

    2010-01-01

    Private prisons are here to stay irrespective of empirical findings for or against their existence in the corrections industry. It is necessary, therefore, to step back and consider them on a broader level to assess how they can benefit current penological practice. It will be argued that prison privatization creates an opportunity to reassess the…

  1. Do Changes in the Chemical Industry Imply Changes in Curriculum?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cussler, E. L.

    1999-01-01

    Speculates about the future responsiveness of chemical engineering curricula to changes in the chemical industry. Focuses on changes in the chemical industry, the status of academia, and possible curricular changes. (DDR)

  2. Privatization and Public Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Myron

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the ramifications of privatization (the withdrawal of government as the creator and provider of services) for public education. Includes discussion of vouchers and of privatization of instructional services through the contracting of instructional services from private organizations. (MD)

  3. Principles for building public-private partnerships to benefit food safety, nutrition, and health research.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Sylvia; Alexander, Nick; Kretser, Alison; Steele, Robert; Kretsch, Molly; Applebaum, Rhona; Clydesdale, Fergus; Cummins, Deborah; Hentges, Eric; Navia, Juan; Jarvis, Ashley; Falci, Ken

    2013-10-01

    The present article articulates principles for effective public-private partnerships (PPPs) in scientific research. Recognizing that PPPs represent one approach for creating research collaborations and that there are other methods outside the scope of this article, PPPs can be useful in leveraging diverse expertise among government, academic, and industry researchers to address public health needs and questions concerned with nutrition, health, food science, and food and ingredient safety. A three-step process was used to identify the principles proposed herein: step 1) review of existing PPP guidelines, both in the peer-reviewed literature and at 16 disparate non-industry organizations; step 2) analysis of relevant successful or promising PPPs; and step 3) formal background interviews of 27 experienced, senior-level individuals from academia, government, industry, foundations, and non-governmental organizations. This process resulted in the articulation of 12 potential principles for establishing and managing successful research PPPs. The review of existing guidelines showed that guidelines for research partnerships currently reside largely within institutions rather than in the peer-reviewed literature. This article aims to introduce these principles into the literature to serve as a framework for dialogue and for future PPPs.

  4. Principles for building public-private partnerships to benefit food safety, nutrition, and health research

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Sylvia; Alexander, Nick; Kretser, Alison; Steele, Robert; Kretsch, Molly; Applebaum, Rhona; Clydesdale, Fergus; Cummins, Deborah; Hentges, Eric; Navia, Juan; Jarvis, Ashley; Falci, Ken

    2013-01-01

    The present article articulates principles for effective public-private partnerships (PPPs) in scientific research. Recognizing that PPPs represent one approach for creating research collaborations and that there are other methods outside the scope of this article, PPPs can be useful in leveraging diverse expertise among government, academic, and industry researchers to address public health needs and questions concerned with nutrition, health, food science, and food and ingredient safety. A three-step process was used to identify the principles proposed herein: step 1) review of existing PPP guidelines, both in the peer-reviewed literature and at 16 disparate non-industry organizations; step 2) analysis of relevant successful or promising PPPs; and step 3) formal background interviews of 27 experienced, senior-level individuals from academia, government, industry, foundations, and non-governmental organizations. This process resulted in the articulation of 12 potential principles for establishing and managing successful research PPPs. The review of existing guidelines showed that guidelines for research partnerships currently reside largely within institutions rather than in the peer-reviewed literature. This article aims to introduce these principles into the literature to serve as a framework for dialogue and for future PPPs. PMID:24117791

  5. Industrial Physics Careers: A Large Company Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zollner, Stefan

    2009-03-01

    Statistical data from the American Institute of Physics and the National Science Foundation show that only about a third of physics graduates get permanent jobs in academia. A few work in government labs and hospitals. The majority of physics Ph.D.s, however, find employment in the private sector (industry). This trend has been increasing, i.e., recent Ph.D.s are even more likely to start careers in industry. Industrial physicists work in small, medium or large companies in a broad range of fields, including aerospace, semiconductors, automotive, energy, information technology, contract research, medical, chemical, optics, etc. They are also represented in fields outside of physics, such as finance. Even the ``inventor'' of the Powerball lottery game is a Ph.D. physicist. In my talk, I will describe pathways to success for an industrial physicist, from the perspective of employment in three different large corporations. Based on the NIST Baldridge criteria of Performance Excellence, I will discuss how to achieve and measure organizational success through focus on products and customers. Individual performance is linked to the goals of the organization. Performance has two components: Goals and behaviors. Both are key to success as an individual contributor or manager.[4pt] References: [0pt] http://www.aip.org/statistics/trends/emptrends.html [0pt] http://www.aps.org/about/governance/committees/commemb/index.cfm [0pt] http://www.quality.nist.gov/

  6. Iranian academia: evolution after revolution and plagiarism as a disorder.

    PubMed

    Ghazinoory, Sepehr; Ghazinoori, Soroush; Azadegan-Mehr, Mandana

    2011-06-01

    Recently, a few of scientific journals raise serious questions about scientific ethics and moral judgment of some of the Iranian government's senior executives in their papers. Plagiarism, under any circumstances is not justified, and we do not intend to justify it in this note. However, we find it useful in understanding why otherwise respected, responsible individuals may engage in plagiarism by terse review of the history Iranian academia.

  7. Repaving the road to biomedical innovation through academia.

    PubMed

    Marks, Andrew R

    2011-06-29

    Biomedical innovation requires investigators to build on existing knowledge and achieve insights that are transformative. Innovation starts with incisive scientific discoveries, which are often made in academic research laboratories. Today, the financial model for supporting biomedical research in universities is threatened, and one victim is innovation. New models for public funding that support high-risk research in academia will spur innovation and ultimately advance clinical medicine.

  8. Repaving the Road to Biomedical Innovation Through Academia

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Andrew R.

    2013-01-01

    Biomedical innovation requires investigators to build on existing knowledge and achieve insights that are transformative. Innovation starts with incisive scientific discoveries, which are often made in academic research laboratories. Today, the financial model for supporting biomedical research in universities is threatened, and one victim is innovation. New models for public funding that support high-risk research in academia will spur innovation and ultimately advance clinical medicine. PMID:21715676

  9. Exploring Industry Perceptions of the Development and Sustainability of Academia-Industry Advanced Technological Education Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kile, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    The increasing demands on community colleges to broaden access and provide for the community's economic welfare, while maintaining its traditional educational role, have served as a powerful impetus for institutional change. Concurrently, institutions have been forced to explore non-traditional avenues to counteract resource scarcity.…

  10. Inmate Recidivism as a Measure of Private Prison Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spivak, Andrew L.; Sharp, Susan F.

    2008-01-01

    The growth of the private corrections industry has elicited interest in the comparative performance of state and private prisons. One way to measure the service quality of private prisons is to examine inmates' postrelease performance. Current empirical evidence is limited to four studies, all conducted in Florida. This analysis replicates and…

  11. Privatization and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dash, Neena

    2009-01-01

    This paper highlights emerging trends, programmes and policies in privatization of education in Western countries. These trends are educational vouchers, choice of private schools, private school liberalization, private contracting of specific services, tuition tax credits and deductions for parents ,subsidies and assistance grants to private…

  12. Beyond and between academia and business: How Austrian biotechnology researchers describe high-tech startup companies as spaces of knowledge production.

    PubMed

    Fochler, Maximilian

    2016-04-01

    Research and innovation policy has invested considerable effort in creating new institutional spaces at the interface of academia and business. High-tech startups founded by academic entrepreneurs have been central to these policy imaginaries. These companies offer researchers new possibilities beyond and between academia and larger industry. However, the field of science and technology studies has thus far shown only limited interest in understanding these companies as spaces of knowledge production. This article analyses how researchers working in small and medium-sized biotechnology companies in Vienna, Austria, describe the cultural characteristics of knowledge production in this particular institutional space. It traces how they relate these characteristics to other institutional spaces they have experienced in their research biographies, such as in academia or larger corporations. It shows that the reasons why researchers decide to work in biotechnology companies and how they organize their work are deeply influenced by their perception of deficiencies in the conditions for epistemic work in contemporary academia and, to a lesser degree, in industry. PMID:27263239

  13. Beyond and between academia and business: How Austrian biotechnology researchers describe high-tech startup companies as spaces of knowledge production.

    PubMed

    Fochler, Maximilian

    2016-04-01

    Research and innovation policy has invested considerable effort in creating new institutional spaces at the interface of academia and business. High-tech startups founded by academic entrepreneurs have been central to these policy imaginaries. These companies offer researchers new possibilities beyond and between academia and larger industry. However, the field of science and technology studies has thus far shown only limited interest in understanding these companies as spaces of knowledge production. This article analyses how researchers working in small and medium-sized biotechnology companies in Vienna, Austria, describe the cultural characteristics of knowledge production in this particular institutional space. It traces how they relate these characteristics to other institutional spaces they have experienced in their research biographies, such as in academia or larger corporations. It shows that the reasons why researchers decide to work in biotechnology companies and how they organize their work are deeply influenced by their perception of deficiencies in the conditions for epistemic work in contemporary academia and, to a lesser degree, in industry.

  14. Eurosdr - the Pan-European Network for Mapping Agencies and Academia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streilein, A.; Remondino, F.; Pfeifer, N.; Trollvik, J. A.; Stoter, J.; Crompvoets, J.; Potůčková, M.

    2016-06-01

    EuroSDR (http://www.eurosdr.net/) is a non-profit organisation that provides a pan-European network that brings together mapping / cadastre agencies and academia for the purpose of applied research, and securing timely, research-based knowledge that allows the agencies to play their role as content providers and government competence centres for geographic information and spatial data infrastructures. EuroSDR is the recognised provider of research-based knowledge to a Europe where citizens can readily benefit from geographic information. Its mission is to develop and improve methods, systems and standards for the acquisition, processing, production, maintenance, management, visualization, and dissemination of geographic reference data in support of applications and service delivery. EuroSDR delivers advanced research-based knowledge. Its value is generated by facilitating interaction between research organisations and the public and private sector with the aim of exchanging ideas and knowledge about relevant research topics; by facilitating and contributing to research projects; and by transferring knowledge and research results to real world applications. The paper gives an overview about EuroSDR research principles, research alliances, objectives and action plans of each of the technical commissions.

  15. Private Police in the United States: Findings and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kakalik, James S.; Wildhorn, Sorrel

    This report is the first in a series of five describing a 16-month study of the nature and extent of the private police industry in the United States, its problems, its present regulation, and how the law impinges on it. Intended for use by the private police industry and by the governmental agencies that regulate it, as well as by the general…

  16. The Coordination of Job Training. Strategies for the Delivery of Services between Vocational Education Agencies and Private Industry Councils/SDAs. The 1993 Biennial Report as Required by Carl D. Perkins Vocational & Applied Technology Education Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-392).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Council on Vocational Education, Sacramento.

    Coordination of job training delivery strategies by vocational education (VE) agencies and private industry councils/service delivery areas (PICs/SDAs) throughout California in 1993 was reviewed. Among the review's main findings were the following: more than 9 of 10 SDAs have VE representatives on PICs; community colleges are the VE…

  17. The Private Language Argument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Gordon

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the private language argument (PLA)--the argument against the possibility of a private language. Raises questions about the PLA, suggesting there are a number of problems that PLA interpretation generates and fails to resolve. (Author/JL)

  18. Negotiating Three Worlds: Academia, Nursing Science, and Tribal Communities

    PubMed Central

    Holkup, Patricia A.; Rodehorst, T. Kim; Wilhelm, Susan L.; Kuntz, Sandra W.; Weinert, Clarann; Stepans, Mary Beth Flanders; Salois, Emily Matt; Bull, Jacqueline Left Hand; Hill, Wade G.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this article is to use a cross-cultural model to guide the exploration of common issues and the dynamic interrelationships surrounding entrée to tribal communities as experienced by four nursing research teams. Method Members of four research teams discuss the primary lessons learned about successful strategies and challenges encountered during their projects' early stages. Results Understanding the cultural values of relationship and reciprocity is critical to the success of research projects conducted in Native American communities. Discussion Conducting cross-cultural research involves complex negotiations among members of three entities: academia, nursing science, and tribal communities. The lessons learned in these four research projects may be instructive to investigators who have the opportunity to conduct research with tribal communities. PMID:18948449

  19. New Space Industries for the Next Millennium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smitherman, D. V., Jr. (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    New Space Industries For the Next Millennium is a final report of the findings from the New Space Industries Workshop held in Washington, DC, in February 1998. The primary purpose of this workshop was to identify what must be done to develop new markets, and to generate plans, milestones and new organizational relationships designed to facilitate the goal of space development. This document provides a summary report on the results of that workshop and is not intended as a statement of NASA or government policy. Previous studies had shown great potential for the development of new markets in space (e.g., travel and entertainment, space solar power, satellite and space transfer services, research and development in space, space manufacturing, and space resources), and a great need for coordination and formation of infrastructures (e.g., space transportation, space business parks, and space utilities), to facilitate the growth of new space businesses. The New Space Industries Workshop brought together government, academia, and industry participants from several previous studies and other professionals interested in the development of space for commercial purposes. Their participation provided input into the role of government and industry in space development as well as the technology needs that will enable space development. The opening of the frontier of space, not just to government missions but to private individuals and commercial business, is a challenge of overarching importance. It is our hope that the workshop and this final report continue in earnest the process of identifying and overcoming the barriers to large-scale public access and development of space in the early years of the next century.

  20. Tensions in private health insurance regulation.

    PubMed

    Willcox, Sharon

    2003-02-01

    This article provides an analysis of the regulatory framework of Australian private health insurance linked to four major implicit regulatory objectives: promoting access to health insurance for consumers; promoting financial solvency and industry viability of registered health benefits organisations; promoting competition between registered health benefits organisations; and promoting accountability to consumers. Through an analysis of regulatory changes, case law and policy documents on the performance of the health insurance industry, it is argued that existing health insurance regulation exhibits inevitable tensions due to shifting and often conflicting government objectives about the role of private health insurance.

  1. Analysis of the private market for LANDSAT products and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The private sector was examined and evaluated to develop base line strategies and mechanisms for its increased utilization of LANDSAT (and future satellite) technologies as both consumer and producer of products and services. Methodologies used to assess the digital analysis service and national mapping industries are described. Private sector users in business and industry are identified and the potential U.S. industry role in the foreign LANDSAT market is considered.

  2. A Study on the Role of Web Technology in Enhancing Research Pursuance among University Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussain, Irshad; Durrani, Muhammad Ismail

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of web technologies in promoting research pursuance among university teachers, examine the use of web technologies by university teachers in conducting research and identify the problems of university academia in using web technologies for research. The study was delimited to academia of social…

  3. Latinas/os Succeeding in Academia: The Effect of Mentors and Multiethnic Coursework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavazos, Alyssa G.

    2016-01-01

    Academia often devalues diverse identities, cultures, and languages through emphasis placed on academic values. To ascertain how established and new Latina/o academics achieved success in academia, the author conducted interviews with ten Latina/o academics; they noted mentoring and multiethnic coursework as influential in their success as…

  4. A Case of Mimetic Isomorphism: A Short-Cut to Increasing Loyalty to Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orkodashvili, Mariam

    2008-01-01

    The paper discusses the process of shortening career path to leadership positions in academia that could serve as an example of mimetic isomorphism, where university tries to apply business-like quick result-oriented strategies. This strategy incentivizes young faculty to stay in universities and keep loyalty to academia. This process could also…

  5. Keeping the Devil Away from Miss Jones: Censorship in Academia, 1976-1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, L. B.; And Others

    Information on censorship in academia in the United States is presented, based on censorship cases reported in the "Newsletter on Intellectual Freedom" from 1976 to 1981. Cases occurring in academia accounted for 63 of the more than 800 cases reported. The states and institutions in which the censorship attacks occurred are identified, along with…

  6. Shaping NASA's Earth Science Enterprise Workforce Development Initiative to Address Industry Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosage, David; Meeson, Blanche W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    It has been well recognized that the commercial remote sensing industry will expand in new directions, resulting in new applications, thus requiring a larger, more skilled workforce to fill the new positions. In preparation for this change, NASA has initiated a Remote Sensing Professional Development Program to address the workforce needs of this emerging industry by partnering with the private sector, academia, relevant professional societies, and other R&D organizations. Workforce needs will in part include understanding current industry concerns, personnel competencies, current and future skills, growth rates, geographical distributions, certifications, and sources of pre-service and in-service personnel. Dave Rosage of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and a panel of MAPPS members will lead a discussion to help NASA specifically address private firms' near and long-term personnel needs to be included in NASA's Remote Sensing Professional Development Program. In addition, Dave Rosage will present perspectives on how remote sensing technologies are evolving, new NASA instruments being developed, and what future workforce skills are expected to support these new developments.

  7. Drug Information Residency Rotation with Pharmaceutical Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Richard L.

    1986-01-01

    Program objectives of a drug information rotation at the Upjohn Company include improving communication between the pharmaceutical industry and hospital pharmacy/academia, exposing the resident to the challenges the industry encounters, improving proficiency in drug information practice, and providing insight into the working relationships of…

  8. Temporal distance and discrimination: an audit study in academia.

    PubMed

    Milkman, Katherine L; Akinola, Modupe; Chugh, Dolly

    2012-07-01

    Through a field experiment set in academia (with a sample of 6,548 professors), we found that decisions about distant-future events were more likely to generate discrimination against women and minorities (relative to Caucasian males) than were decisions about near-future events. In our study, faculty members received e-mails from fictional prospective doctoral students seeking to schedule a meeting either that day or in 1 week; students' names signaled their race (Caucasian, African American, Hispanic, Indian, or Chinese) and gender. When the requests were to meet in 1 week, Caucasian males were granted access to faculty members 26% more often than were women and minorities; also, compared with women and minorities, Caucasian males received more and faster responses. However, these patterns were essentially eliminated when prospective students requested a meeting that same day. Our identification of a temporal discrimination effect is consistent with the predictions of construal-level theory and implies that subtle contextual shifts can alter patterns of race- and gender-based discrimination.

  9. The dilemma of inclusivity in the globalization of academia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castano Rodriguez, Carolina

    2015-12-01

    This paper extends the conversation started by Mariona Espinet, Mercè Izquierdo, Clara Garcia-Pujol; Ludovic Morge and Isabel Martins and Susana de Souza regarding the diverse issues faced by the internationalisation of science education journals. I use my own experience as an early career researcher coming from an underrepresented culture and language within academia to expand on these issues. I focus on the issues which I have experienced the most: the disconnection between university research and school practice and the struggles with the unspoken power structures. As I delve into my experience, I argue that we are failing to ask the right questions to create a science education community that is inclusive of diverse views and multicultural perspectives. We need to rethink how we can avoid colonisation of school teachers, as Isabel and Susana describe, but also the colonisation of those academics and teachers who are from non-English speaking cultures. I urge us to carry more debates such as the one initiated by these three authors, exposing and debating about the different power structures within science education so that we can progress in empowering all those voices that have been silenced.

  10. The Limits of Privatization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starr, Paul

    Transferring public services and public assets to private ownership is not an entirely new idea. Governments at all levels in the United States have for years contracted out many services. However, under the recently coined label "privatization," such policies now come recommended as a more comprehensive approach to the problems of modern…

  11. Laboring through Privatization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bushweller, Kevin

    1994-01-01

    Hiring private contractors to manage school support services, such as food, maintenance, and busing, is a growing trend. Companies such as Marriott Corp., ServiceMaster, ARA Services, and Laidlaw Transit report that school business is steadily increasing. Unions staunchly oppose privatization. This article balances advantages and disadvantages,…

  12. Public Values, Private Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devins, Neal E.

    Controversy surrounding private education involves questions of compulsory education's role in inculcating values, how much alike public and private schools should be, and the duty of educational institutions to conform to constitutional norms. This book examines government regulation and resistance, legislative and judicial approaches, and issues…

  13. Procrustes and Private Schooling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Beverley

    1983-01-01

    R. J. Royce (Journal of Philosophy of Education; v16 p105-13) argues that private school education may be better or worse than state schooling and, because of this inequality, it must be abolished. Royce's arguments are analyzed to determine if abolishing private schooling would create a fairer society. (SR)

  14. Information: Public or Private?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jean

    1984-01-01

    Examines policies concerning government-generated information and trend toward privatization of information, i.e., contracting out of government information functions to private sector. The impact these policies may have on public's access to government documents and reports and implications for information professionals are analyzed. A 42-item…

  15. Private Speech in Ballet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Dale

    2006-01-01

    Authoritarian teaching practices in ballet inhibit the use of private speech. This paper highlights the critical importance of private speech in the cognitive development of young ballet students, within what is largely a non-verbal art form. It draws upon research by Russian psychologist Lev Vygotsky and contemporary socioculturalists, to…

  16. Cyber Security Testing and Training Programs for Industrial Control Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Noyes

    2012-03-01

    Service providers rely on industrial control systems (ICS) to manage the flow of water at dams, open breakers on power grids, control ventilation and cooling in nuclear power plants, and more. In today's interconnected environment, this can present a serious cyber security challenge. To combat this growing challenge, government, private industry, and academia are working together to reduce cyber risks. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a key contributor to the Department of Energy National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Control Systems Security Program (CSSP), both of which focus on improving the overall security posture of ICS in the national critical infrastructure. In support of the NSTB, INL hosts a dedicated SCADA testing facility which consists of multiple control systems supplied by leading national and international manufacturers. Within the test bed, INL researchers systematically examine control system components and work to identify vulnerabilities. In support of the CSSP, INL develops and conducts training courses which are designed to increase awareness and defensive capabilities for IT/Control System professionals. These trainings vary from web-based cyber security trainings for control systems engineers to more advanced hands-on training that culminates with a Red Team/ Blue Team exercise that is conducted within an actual control systems environment. INL also provides staffing and operational support to the DHS Industrial Control Systems Cyber Emergency Response Team (ICS-CERT) Security Operations Center which responds to and analyzes control systems cyber incidents across the 18 US critical infrastructure sectors.

  17. Dialogue on private events

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, David C.; Eshleman, John; Brandon, Paul; Layng, T. V. Joe; McDonough, Christopher; Michael, Jack; Schoneberger, Ted; Stemmer, Nathan; Weitzman, Ray; Normand, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    In the fall of 2003, the authors corresponded on the topic of private events on the listserv of the Verbal Behavior Special Interest Group. Extracts from that correspondence raised questions about the role of response amplitude in determining units of analysis, whether private events can be investigated directly, and whether covert behavior differs from other behavior except in amplitude. Most participants took a cautious stance, noting not only conceptual pitfalls and empirical difficulties in the study of private events, but doubting the value of interpretive exercises about them. Others argued that despite such obstacles, in domains where experimental analyses cannot be done, interpretation of private events in the light of laboratory principles is the best that science can offer. One participant suggested that the notion that private events can be behavioral in nature be abandoned entirely; as an alternative, the phenomena should be reinterpreted only as physiological events. PMID:22477293

  18. The End of Academia?: From "Cogito Ergo Sum" to "Consumo Ergo Sum" Germany and Malaysia in Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Kim-Hui,; Har, Wai-Mun

    2008-01-01

    The lack of academic and thinking culture is getting more worried and becomes a major challenge to our academia society this 21st century. Few directions that move academia from "cogito ergo sum" to "consumo ergo sum" are actually leading us to "the end of academia". Those directions are: (1) the death of dialectic;…

  19. Profile of the chemicals industry in California: Californiaindustries of the future program

    SciTech Connect

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst

    2004-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) established the Industries of the Future (IOF) program to increase energy efficiency, reduce waste production and to improve competitiveness, currently focusing on nine sectors. The IOF is a partnership strategy involving industry, the research community and the government, working together to identify technology needs, promote industrial partnerships and implement joint measures with all partners involved. The State Industries of the Future (SIOF) program delivers the accomplishments of the national Industries of the Future strategy to the local level, to expand the technology opportunities to a larger number of partners and reach smaller businesses and manufacturers that were not initially involved in the IOF effort. The state programs bring together industry, academia, and state agencies to address the important issues confronting industry in the state. These public-private coalitions facilitate industry solutions locally and enhance economic development. California has started a State Industries of the Future effort, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy. The California Energy Commission (CEC) is leading the SIOF program in California, as part of many other programs to improve the energy efficiency and performance of industries in California. The California State IOF program aims to build a network of participants from industry, academia and government in four selected industrial sectors as a basis for the development of a strategic partnership for industrial energy efficient technology in the state. In California the IOF effort focuses petroleum refining, chemical processing, food processing and electronics. As part of this effort, the SIOF program will develop roadmaps for technology development for the selected sectors. On the basis of the roadmap, the program will develop successful projects with co-funding from state and federal government, and promote industry

  20. "A deep fragrance of academia": the Australian Tobacco Research Foundation

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, S; Carter, S; Peters, M

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: (1) To review the history of the tobacco industry supported Australian Tobacco Research Foundation (ATRF)(1970–1994) for evidence of the industry's use of the Foundation to further its objectives that "more research was needed" on smoking and health and to promulgate the view that nicotine was not addictive. (2) To review efforts by public health advocates to discredit the ATRF as a public relations tool used by the Australian industry. Methods: Systematic search of previously internal industry documents released through the US Master Settlement Agreement. Results: The ATRF was headed by prestigious Australian medical scientists, with at least one considered by the industry to be "industry positive". An international ATRF symposium on nicotine was vetted by the industry and heavily attended by industry approved scientists. Following sustained criticism from the health and medical community about the industry's creation of the ATRF to further its objectives, the ATRF's scientific committee was provoked to publicly declare in 1988 that smoking was a causative agent in disease. This criticism led to growing ATRF boycotts by scientists and substandard applications, causing the industry to see the ATRF as being poor value-for-money and eventually abandoning it. Conclusions: The raison d'etre for the ATRF's establishment was to allow the Australian industry to point to its continuing commitment to independent medical research, with the implied corollary that tobacco control measures were premature in the face of insufficient evidence about tobacco's harms. Sustained criticism of tobacco industry funded research schemes can undermine their credibility among the scientific community. PMID:14645947

  1. Evaluation and Private Philanthropy: View from a Corporation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roser, Hal

    The role of evaluation in the profit and loss sector of American economy differs from its role in the nonprofit sector. Since corporate industry and private foundations contribute approximately 4.5 billion dollars to help finance the ninety-billion dollar private nonprofit sector, sound planning and evaluation activities are essential to maintain…

  2. Private Tutoring through the Internet: Globalization and "Offshoring"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ventura, Alexandre; Jang, Sunhwa

    2010-01-01

    The private tutoring industry has come forward as the third great sector of education. The common sense representation about private tutoring is changing. The growing search for supplementary educational support services and the technological innovation have created a new paradigm. This paper focuses on one of the most interesting faces of this…

  3. Making Science Whole Again: The Role of Academia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubchenco, J.

    2006-12-01

    Science in the 21st Century has become increasingly fragmented, not in the usual sense of disciplinary divisions, but with increased specialization in the discovery, teaching, public communication and application aspects of new knowledge. As in the infamous `telephone game', messages passed along through multiple parties, risk distortion. More insidiously, without active and effective checks and balances along the way, information can be and is being deliberately distorted, completely altered, or used selectively. Science, of course, is not the only basis for decision-making; values, politics, economics and other factors should also be considered. Nonetheless, a key role of science is to inform decision-making (not to drive it exclusively). The importance of citizens and leaders having access to accurate scientific information and knowledge is so essential to human well-being that new mechanisms must be found to ensure the integrity of scientific information. Among the multiple changes that are needed to achieve this goal, many of which will be explored in this session, one pertains specifically to the academic scientific community. That change entails growing and supporting stellar scientists who participate directly in discovery AND public communication of knowledge. More scientists whose primary jobs are research and teaching could and should also be actively involved in sharing new knowledge with non-scientists. The public expects this to happen but academia gives it lip service at best. Having more scientists who can communicate scientific knowledge that is understandable, relevant, useable, current and credible to non-technical audiences is a key (though far from the only) factor in protecting the integrity of science. The Aldo Leopold Leadership Program now based at Stanford University's Woods Institute for the Environment is a program that trains tenured, academic environmental scientists to communicate effectively with politicians, business people, the

  4. Private Housing or Alternative Financing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruno, Nick

    1999-01-01

    Explores the history of privatizing university housing and some current financing options, including use of developer and private foundations. Examples of successful alternative financing methods are highlighted. (GR)

  5. Privatization in Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Cartselos, T.

    1994-02-01

    Three factors have slowed the pace of power sector privatization, particularly in Europe: Capital shortages, political interests, scarce human capital resources. Balancing these factors are powerful drivers for privatization. These include the financial distress many European governments are facing, which limit their ability to continue subsidies and protection of unproductive state enterprises. Increasingly sophisticated customers are also demanding better products and services at lower prices. Privatization progress in Europe will probably move slowly and unevenly. Power generation will likely be the first beneficiary of any reform because it is not a natural monopoly. Transmission and distribution will remain regulated, despite discussion within the European Union regarding open or third-party access. What is likely to speed up the pace of privatization in some countries is a power crisis along the lines of what occurred in the Philippines. Greece, Italy and Portugal and perhaps the most likely prospects for such a scenario.

  6. Views from Academia and Industry on Skills Needed for the Modern Research Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talgar, Cigdem P.; Goodey, Nina M.

    2015-01-01

    Reports from employers of higher education graduates indicate the existence of a considerable gap between the skills required by employers and those possessed by recent graduates. As a first step toward closing this gap, this study aims to determine its origin. Interviews with nine research-active biochemistry professionals were used to identify…

  7. The GET Immersion Experience: A New Model for Leveraging the Synergies between Industry and Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saltz, Jeff; Serva, Mark A.; Heckman, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a new and innovative open co-op program for MIS/IS students. The program, Global Enterprise Technology Immersion Experience (GET IE), has a global enterprise focus that is integrated with hands-on experiential work-based learning to provide a context in which students are stimulated to utilize their classroom knowledge. The…

  8. Greening up Auto Part Manufacturing: A Collaboration between Academia and Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kneas, Kristi A.; Armstrong, Drew L.; Brank, Alice R.; Johnson, Amanda L.; Kissinger, Chelsea A.; Mabe, Adam R.; Sezer, Ozge; Fontinell, Mike

    2009-01-01

    Historically, manufacture of automotive electronic components and screen-printing of automotive instrument clusters at DENSO Manufacturing Tennessee, Inc. required washing of equipment such as screens, stencils, and jigs with sizable quantities of volatile organic compounds and hazardous air pollutants. Collaborative efforts between the Maryville…

  9. EPA SCIENCE FORUM - EPA'S TOXICOGENOMICS PARTNERSHIPS ACROSS GOVERNMENT, ACADEMIA AND INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past decade genomics, proteomics and metabonomics technologies have transformed the science of toxicology, and concurrent advances in computing and informatics have provided management and analysis solutions for this onslaught of toxicogenomic data. EPA has been actively...

  10. Collaboration with academia in the development of post ovulatory methods.

    PubMed

    Thaler, G

    1999-12-01

    The 0.75-mg levonorgestrel-containing 'morning after' contraceptive tablet Postinor was developed by Gedeon Richter Ltd., Hungary. The product was first launched in 1979 and registered later in approximately 40 countries. In 1994, the World Health Organization offered the company participation in a multinational clinical trial to prove the superiority of the product over existing (Yuzpe-type) emergency contraceptive products. Based on these data the company was able to redesign the 'morning after' type Postinor into an 'emergency' pill, Postinor-2. During further clinical trials a close working relationship was formed between the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at the Albert Szent-Györgyi Medical University in Szeged, Hungary, and Gedeon Richter. The advantages and challenges of cooperation between public- and private-sector institutions are analyzed in the paper.

  11. Industrial applications of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Stark, W J; Stoessel, P R; Wohlleben, W; Hafner, A

    2015-08-21

    Research efforts in the past two decades have resulted in thousands of potential application areas for nanoparticles - which materials have become industrially relevant? Where are sustainable applications of nanoparticles replacing traditional processing and materials? This tutorial review starts with a brief analysis on what makes nanoparticles attractive to chemical product design. The article highlights established industrial applications of nanoparticles and then moves to rapidly emerging applications in the chemical industry and discusses future research directions. Contributions from large companies, academia and high-tech start-ups are used to elucidate where academic nanoparticle research has revolutionized industry practice. A nanomaterial-focused analysis discusses new trends, such as particles with an identity, and the influence of modern instrument advances in the development of novel industrial products.

  12. The G4R GMES Academy - linking research, academia, service providers and local authorities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeil, Peter; Tramutoli, Valerio

    2013-04-01

    The GMES Academy intends to enhance the role of the academic and R&D communities in the evolution of EO & GI services. The GMES4Regions G4R initiative, aiming to strengthen the link between GMES (Global Monitoring for Environment and Security) and European regions, inaugurated the GMES Academy at the University Mozarteum of Salzburg (Austria) on 13th - 14th September 2012. This academy has been created with the objective of fostering a dialogue among the private sector, Local and Regional Administration (LRA) and the academic and research community, in order to improve the development of Earth Observation (EO) and Geographic Information (GI) services. On this occasion, Z_GIS, the Interfaculty Department of Geoinformatics of Salzburg University, hosted the round table "Fostering Downstream Services for the Regions - contributions from Research & Academia," during which the participants had the opportunity to discuss with representatives of the European Commission (EC) and the European Space Agency (ESA) the future role of the academic community in this domain. Stakeholders from the academic and R&D world adopted the 'Salzburg Declaration on GMES related Research', calling for strengthening connections between research activities and educational programmes to improve GMES services. The Declaration calls mainly for: • fostering education and training on GMES • ensuring cooperation among the academic and research community through the GMES Academy • maintaining a political commitment towards the implementation of such academic initiatives. The GMES Academy is established as a platform with six components: GATEWAY - the directory of Universities and Research Centres BRIDGE - an inventory of research briefs documenting the latest offerings from research to effective applications FACILITATOR - a portal to seek or propose internships or contract research across Europe and addressing outreach and advocacy: LINK - Access to the repository of on-going GMES related

  13. Women Using Physics: Alternate Career Paths, The Private Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tams, Jessica

    2006-12-01

    For those who have spent their careers inside the safe walls of academia, the word is a little scary. Can I compete? Will I fit in? What do I need to know? Am I prepared? Will I succeed? While many would say: Yes! You are ready to excel! This isn’t actually the case. The private sector comes with many unanticipated shocks to many of us, especially women. This isn’t a group project. This session will discuss entering a quickly growing and competitive technical field and what one can do to prepare for continued success. Preparing and Entering the Private Sector * Women with technical skills are a desired part of the private workforcein general women posses stronger people skills, are more reliable and often more well rounded than their male counterparts. Key factors we will discuss to landing that first job: · Expand your knowledge base with current applications of technology · Preparing a solid employment pitch to highlight strengths: Overcoming stereotypes · Don’t show them your bad side: Why some student projects may hurt you · The private sector attitude toward performance and entry level expectations Excelling in the Private Sector * Now that we have landed a job * for better or worse we are now all about making money and exerting control. What to keep in mind while working in the private sector: · The formative first years: focus on your weaknesses and practice, practice, practice · Men & Women in the workplace: what women subconsciously do to hurt their careers · Politics: Working in a team environment · Polish & Detail & Reliabilit

  14. Supercomputing in American Academia: The University of Illinois Example.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Jarrett S.

    1991-01-01

    The University of Illinois' National Center for Supercomputing Applications, a cooperative effort of the National Science Foundation, University of Illinois, the state, and industry, offers training and support services in the use of technologically advanced computing for scientific research. The computers simulate physical phenomena that are…

  15. Salazar on private power

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.

    1995-02-01

    The Philipines power market, considered one of the more mature markets in Asia, continues to expand with economic growth. Independent power producers will find opportunities in the next few years as new additions are required. Currently, the government is encouraging private investment and is awaiting feedback from financiers as it considers eliminating its government guarantee. In a recent interview, the Honorable Mariano S. Salazar, secretary of energy, with the Philippines` Department of Energy, discussed the regulatory structure, encouragement of private power and his country`s capital needs.

  16. Slouching toward Privatization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickeson, Robert C.; Figuli, David J.

    2007-01-01

    The past two decades have seen a significant shift in the financial model of American higher education, laying groundwork for a transformation that could reshape people's understanding of the academy. The shift--toward increasing degrees of privatization--is unmistakable and has affected every American college and university to varying extents.…

  17. The Private Sector Beckons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsey, Krista

    1998-01-01

    Whether from frustration, ambition, or financial necessity, administrators are inclined to say "yes" when private companies come calling. Sometimes superintendents initiate contacts themselves and begin new careers as well-credentialed salespeople or behind-the-scenes think tanks. At the Edison Project, former superintendents work in curriculum…

  18. Privatization and Educational Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Myron

    This book describes how and why educational choice movements will affect public education. It uses a public-choice approach to argue that both the supporters and opponents of private and school choice have failed to address several critical issues. Following an introductory chapter, chapter 2 is devoted to the rationale for contracting out…

  19. Public Roles, Private Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Lydia

    2008-01-01

    The role of a presidential spouse is very complex. Indeed, expectations vary among college governing boards and campus constituencies of what a presidential spouse's responsibilities should be. In this article, the author discusses the role of presidential spouses and how they balance their public roles with their private life.

  20. Industrial Combustion Technology Roadmap: A Technology Roadmap by and for the Industrial Combustion Community (2002)

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2002-10-01

    The Industrial Technology Program (ITP) convened industry workshops in 2001 to update the 1999 roadmap. The revised plan, in which the combustion industry lays out the R&D initiatives to meet its performance targets for the next 20 years, is presented in the Industrial Combustion Technology Roadmap. This roadmap showcases a comprehensive R&D plan for the industry and specifies the coordination and alignment of key groups, such as industry, academia, and the federal government, to meet the future energy and environmental goals of the industry.

  1. Current Regulation of Private Police: Regulatory Agency Experience and Views.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kakalik, James S.; Wildhorn, Sorrel

    This report is the third in a series of five describing a 16-month study of the nature and extent of the private police industry in the United States, its problems, present regulation, and the laws impinging on it. Licensing and regulation of the industry in every state and several cities are described in this volume. Extensive tables present the…

  2. Open Access Meets Discoverability: Citations to Articles Posted to Academia.edu

    PubMed Central

    Niyazov, Yuri; Vogel, Carl; Price, Richard; Lund, Ben; Judd, David; Akil, Adnan; Mortonson, Michael; Schwartzman, Josh; Shron, Max

    2016-01-01

    Using matching and regression analyses, we measure the difference in citations between articles posted to Academia.edu and other articles from similar journals, controlling for field, impact factor, and other variables. Based on a sample size of 31,216 papers, we find that a paper in a median impact factor journal uploaded to Academia.edu receives 16% more citations after one year than a similar article not available online, 51% more citations after three years, and 69% after five years. We also found that articles also posted to Academia.edu had 58% more citations than articles only posted to other online venues, such as personal and departmental home pages, after five years. PMID:26886730

  3. Gender and letters of recommendation for academia: agentic and communal differences.

    PubMed

    Madera, Juan M; Hebl, Michelle R; Martin, Randi C

    2009-11-01

    In 2 studies that draw from the social role theory of sex differences (A. H. Eagly, W. Wood, & A. B. Diekman, 2000), the authors investigated differences in agentic and communal characteristics in letters of recommendation for men and women for academic positions and whether such differences influenced selection decisions in academia. The results supported the hypotheses, indicating (a) that women were described as more communal and less agentic than men (Study 1) and (b) that communal characteristics have a negative relationship with hiring decisions in academia that are based on letters of recommendation (Study 2). Such results are particularly important because letters of recommendation continue to be heavily weighted and commonly used selection tools (R. D. Arvey & T. E. Campion, 1982; R. M. Guion, 1998), particularly in academia (E. P. Sheehan, T. M. McDevitt, & H. C. Ross, 1998). PMID:19916666

  4. Open Access Meets Discoverability: Citations to Articles Posted to Academia.edu.

    PubMed

    Niyazov, Yuri; Vogel, Carl; Price, Richard; Lund, Ben; Judd, David; Akil, Adnan; Mortonson, Michael; Schwartzman, Josh; Shron, Max

    2016-01-01

    Using matching and regression analyses, we measure the difference in citations between articles posted to Academia.edu and other articles from similar journals, controlling for field, impact factor, and other variables. Based on a sample size of 31,216 papers, we find that a paper in a median impact factor journal uploaded to Academia.edu receives 16% more citations after one year than a similar article not available online, 51% more citations after three years, and 69% after five years. We also found that articles also posted to Academia.edu had 58% more citations than articles only posted to other online venues, such as personal and departmental home pages, after five years. PMID:26886730

  5. Private cord blood banking: current use and clinical future.

    PubMed

    Hollands, Peter; McCauley, Catherina

    2009-09-01

    International private umbilical cord blood banking has expanded rapidly in recent years since the first cord blood transplant which was 20 years ago. Private companies offer parents the opportunity to store umbilical cord blood for the possible future use by their child or other family members. The private cord blood industry has been criticised by a number of professional bodies including the EU Ethics Committee, the Royal College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, the Royal College of Midwives and the US College of Paediatrics. This review presents the arguments from the opponents of private cord blood banking, and then makes the case for private cord banking based on the latest scientific and clinical evidence. PMID:19603288

  6. Private Colleges: Strategies for Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Joyce; Finch, Harold L.

    1975-01-01

    By responding to the specialized needs of their clientele, private institutions have provided a personalized, value-oriented education to a degree not possible in the public sector. Notwithstanding the accomplishments of private institutions, demographic studies of postsecondary education indicate declines in private enrollments, a trend that is…

  7. Stimuli, Reinforcers, and Private Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevin, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Radical behaviorism considers private events to be a part of ongoing observable behavior and to share the properties of public events. Although private events cannot be measured directly, their roles in overt action can be inferred from mathematical models that relate private responses to external stimuli and reinforcers according to the same…

  8. The Privatization of Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Judith A.

    2011-01-01

    This study, The Privatization of Special Education, addresses a shift in the provision of special education and related services to students with disabilities in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Students with disabilities are being publicly placed in private day and residential schools at public expense. In Virginia, 125 private schools are licensed…

  9. Private Sector Initiative Between the U.S. and Japan

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-30

    OAK-A258 Private Sector Initiative Between the U.S. and Japan. This report for calendar years 1993 through September 1998 describes efforts performed under the Private Sector Initiatives contract. The report also describes those efforts that have continued with private funding after being initiated under this contract. The development of a pyrochemical process, called TRUMP-S, for partitioning actinides from PUREX waste, is described in this report. This effort is funded by the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), KHI, the United States Department of Energy, and Boeing.

  10. Performance of fully private and concessionary water and sewerage companies: a metafrontier approach.

    PubMed

    Molinos-Senante, María; Sala-Garrido, Ramon

    2016-06-01

    As many countries have privatized their water industries, there is increasing interest in comparing the efficiency of public and private water and sewerage companies (WaSCs). However, previous studies have not considered that privatization can be carried out following two main approaches: fully private WaSCs, which involve the sale of utilities to the private sector, and concessionary WaSCs, in which only the operation of the services is privatized. This paper investigates, for the first time, the impact of both privatization approaches on the efficiency of WaSCs. In doing so, data envelopment analysis (DEA) was applied. However, unlike traditional models, the metafrontier concept was used in this research as it cannot be assumed that fully private and concessionary WaSCs share the same production frontier. The empirical application focused on the Chilean water industry as it was privatized from 1998 to 2004 following the two approaches described. The results suggest that the performance of fully private WaSCs is better than that of concessionary WaSCs. The conclusions of this study will be of great interest to water authorities worldwide facing the challenge of water industry privatization.

  11. Performance of fully private and concessionary water and sewerage companies: a metafrontier approach.

    PubMed

    Molinos-Senante, María; Sala-Garrido, Ramon

    2016-06-01

    As many countries have privatized their water industries, there is increasing interest in comparing the efficiency of public and private water and sewerage companies (WaSCs). However, previous studies have not considered that privatization can be carried out following two main approaches: fully private WaSCs, which involve the sale of utilities to the private sector, and concessionary WaSCs, in which only the operation of the services is privatized. This paper investigates, for the first time, the impact of both privatization approaches on the efficiency of WaSCs. In doing so, data envelopment analysis (DEA) was applied. However, unlike traditional models, the metafrontier concept was used in this research as it cannot be assumed that fully private and concessionary WaSCs share the same production frontier. The empirical application focused on the Chilean water industry as it was privatized from 1998 to 2004 following the two approaches described. The results suggest that the performance of fully private WaSCs is better than that of concessionary WaSCs. The conclusions of this study will be of great interest to water authorities worldwide facing the challenge of water industry privatization. PMID:26931665

  12. Barriers to Women Leaders in Academia: Tales from Science and Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe-Walsh, Liza; Turnbull, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    There is growing concern regarding the lack of women in senior positions in science and technology (ST) in United Kingdom (UK) universities. Previous research has enhanced our understanding of the challenges women in academia face to progress their careers. In contrast, relatively little is known as to why so few women reach leadership positions…

  13. Reflections on the No-Uterus Rule: Pregnancy, Academia, and Feminist Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shope, Janet Hinson

    2005-01-01

    This essay relays the author's own pregnancy story to illustrate how academia traditionally reinforces the mind/body dualism by adhering to the no-uterus rule: a gender blind, antibody approach that treats persons as if they do not occupy a body in time and space. Her experience reveals the problems disembodied approaches to knowledge pose for…

  14. Leadership, Diversity and Succession Planning in Academia. Research & Occasional Papers Series: CSHE 8.10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Although academia is becoming more like business in many respects--not all of them positive--it has not borrowed one of the best attributes of business culture: its tradition of developing leadership through succession planning. As a result, much talent is underutilized. This includes, most prominently, that of women and minorities, who tend not…

  15. Leaks in the pipeline: separating demographic inertia from ongoing gender differences in academia.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Allison K; Stanton, Daniel E

    2012-09-22

    Identification of the causes underlying the under-representation of women and minorities in academia is a source of ongoing concern and controversy. This is a critical issue in ensuring the openness and diversity of academia; yet differences in personal experiences and interpretations have mired it in controversy. We construct a simple model of the academic career that can be used to identify general trends, and separate the demographic effects of historical differences from ongoing biological or cultural gender differences. We apply the model to data on academics collected by the National Science Foundation (USA) over the past three decades, across all of science and engineering, and within six disciplines (agricultural and biological sciences, engineering, mathematics and computer sciences, physical sciences, psychology, and social sciences). We show that the hiring and retention of women in academia have been affected by both demographic inertia and gender differences, but that the relative influence of gender differences appears to be dwindling for most disciplines and career transitions. Our model enables us to identify the two key non-structural bottlenecks restricting female participation in academia: choice of undergraduate major and application to faculty positions. These transitions are those in greatest need of detailed study and policy development. PMID:22719028

  16. NOAA & Academia Partnership Building Conference. Highlights (3rd, Washington, DC, November 14-15, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (DOC), Silver Spring, MD.

    In November 2001 the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) hosted the third NOAA and Academia Partnership to evaluate, maintain, and expand on efforts to optimize NOAA-university cooperation. Close partnership between the NOAA and U.S. universities has produced many benefits for the U.S. economy and the environment. Based on the…

  17. Productivity in Academia: An Assessment of Causal Linkages between Output and Outcome Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wamala, Robert; Ssembatya, Vincent A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate causal linkages between output and outcome indicators of productivity in academia. Design/methodology/approach: The duration of teaching service and the number of graduate students supervised to completion were adopted as output indicators of productivity. Equivalent outcome indicators were the…

  18. Students Perception of the Role of Parents in Academia and Continued Examination Malpractice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ofoegbu, Felicia I.

    2009-01-01

    The formal school system is bedeviled with many problems some of which have defied satisfactory solutions. One major problem plaguing the Nigerian education system is large scale examination malpractice. The aim of the study is to find out the role of parents in academia in perpetrating and perpetuating examination malpractice. The population of…

  19. A Critical Analysis of Anti-Discrimination Law and Microaggressions in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukes, Robin; Bangs, Joann

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a critical analysis of microaggressions and anti-discrimination law in academia. There are many challenges for faculty claiming discrimination under current civil rights laws. Examples of microaggressions that fall outside of anti-discrimination law will be provided. Traditional legal analysis of discrimination will not end…

  20. The Three-Ring Circus of Academia: How to Become the Ringmaster

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toews, Michelle L.; Yazedjian, Ani

    2007-01-01

    The three-ring circus of academia is made up of research, teaching, and service. It is also characterized by continuous action that must be facilitated by the academic ringmaster. Academic life is more difficult than most anticipate because the responsibilities are time-consuming, diverse, and conflicting. Therefore, this article focuses on…

  1. Political Attitudes in the Classroom: Is Academia the Last Bastion of Liberalism?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    La Falce, David; Gomez, SimonPeter

    2007-01-01

    Academia is under attack from those who believe that college professors are uniformly leftist politically, which creates an environment of bias against conservative students and professors. Advocates have proposed an "Academic Bill of Rights" that may lead to policies to achieve intellectual diversity in faculty hiring and tenure decisions.…

  2. Poverty PhDs: Funds of Knowledge, Poverty, and Professional Identity in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutri, Ramona Maile; Manning, Jill Michelle; Chun, Marc

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to the common deficit approach, this self-study explores the relationship between the funds of knowledge possessed by people of poverty and their development of professional identity in academia. All three authors have moved beyond conditions of financial poverty, but all find that the mental conditions of poverty persist. We conclude…

  3. Language and La Academia, If English Works, Por Que Se Emplea Espanol?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonz, Jon G.

    1978-01-01

    The dynamics of Mexican American nationalism reflected in the publications of the Academia de la Nueva Raza and in a 1971 work by Ricardo Sanchez are examined in this article. The connection between language and ideology is discussed in the context of Chicano nationalist writing. (GC)

  4. Deal-Making and Rule-Breaking: Behind the Facade of Equity in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjeldal, Sue-Ellen; Rindfleish, Jennifer; Sheridan, Alison

    2005-01-01

    A glass ceiling for women still exists in academia after two decades of equal employment opportunity (EEO) legislation in Australia. There are complex factors that when combined make gender inequity in the higher education sector highly resistant to change. Using personal histories as a reflexive device, the paper makes explicit the embedded male…

  5. German Academia Heading for Sustainability? Reflections on Policy and Practice in Teaching, Research and Institutional Innovations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adomssent, Maik; Michelsen, Gerd

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses how far (and by what practical means) the growing global trend for universities to commit to sustainable development has spread across German academia. Following this introduction, part 2 will outline the political framework of the sustainability discourse in German higher education. Part 3 will emphasise the integration of…

  6. Refugees, Migrants, Visitors and Internally Displaced Persons: Investigating Acculturation in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Nicholas; Martin, Rose; Knox, Sarah; Mabingo, Alfdaniels

    2016-01-01

    What is the boundary of the academic space, and who can belong within it? The migration of skilled practitioners into Academia from other workplaces brings with it the opportunity to expand the understandings and functions of higher education. Similar to processes of geographic/political migration, the acculturation resulting from this…

  7. Government and Academia: The Uneasy Bond. A Round Table Held on April 13, 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Enterprise Inst. for Public Policy Research, Washington, DC.

    An edited transcript of a televised American Enterprise Institute Public Policy Forum examines the dangers and benefits of the relationship between government and academia. The following questions about the government's increasing role in higher education are discussed by the panel: Can state and federal governments assist colleges and…

  8. Development and Validation of a Measure of Intention to Stay in Academia for Physician Assistant Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Karen

    2012-01-01

    This study attempted development and validation of a measure of "intention to stay in academia" for physician assistant (PA) faculty in order to determine if the construct could be measured in way that had both quantitative and qualitative meaning. Adopting both the methodologic framework of the Rasch model and the theoretical framework…

  9. The Efficacy of Social Media Technologies in Academia: A Pedagogical Bliss or Digital Fad?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kivunja, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Efficacy of a teaching strategy technically refers to the ability of that strategy to produce a desired or intended learning outcomes. To date, there is little information on the efficacy of social media technologies in academia and it is likely to be some time before their effectiveness is proven. It is therefore legitimate to ask the question,…

  10. The Diffusion of the Learning Pyramid Myths in Academia: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Letrud, Kåre; Hernes, Sigbjørn

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the diffusion and present day status of a family of unsubstantiated learning-retention myths, some of which are referred to as "the learning pyramid". We demonstrate through an extensive search in academic journals and field-specific encyclopaedias that these myths are indeed widely publicised in academia and that…

  11. How Artists Working in Academia View Artistic Practice as Research: Implications for Tertiary Music Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blom, Diana; Bennett, Dawn; Wright, David

    2011-01-01

    Artistic research output struggles for recognition as "legitimate" research within the highly-competitive and often traditional university sector. Often recognition requires the underpinning processes and thinking to be documented in a traditional written format. This article discusses the views of eight arts practitioners working in academia by…

  12. High-throughput screening in academia: the Harvard experience.

    PubMed

    Stein, Ross L

    2003-12-01

    To identify small-molecule modulators of biologic systems, academic scientists are beginning to use high-throughput screening (HTS) approaches that have traditionally been used only in industry. The HTS laboratories that are being established in universities, while differing in details of staffing, equipment, and size, have all been created to attain 1 or more of 3 principal goals: drug discovery, chemical genetics, or training. This article will examine the role that these activities play in 4 HTS laboratories that have been created within the academic community of Harvard Medical School and its affiliated institutions. First, the 3 activities will be defined with special attention paid to describing the impact they are having on how academic biologic science is conducted today. Next, the histories and operations of the 4 Harvard laboratories are reviewed. In the course of these summaries, emphasis is placed on understanding the motivational role that the 3 activities initially played in the creation of the 4 Harvard facilities and the roles that the activities continue to play in their day-to-day operations. Finally, several concerns are identified that must be attended to for the successful establishment and operation of an academic biologic science that has yet to be fully determined. HTS has the ability to provide the tools to test previously untestable hypotheses and can thereby allow the discovery of the unanticipated and the truly novel.

  13. Space industrialization: A national perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reis, V. H.

    1984-01-01

    Space industrialization (or commercialization) has the potential to be a major player in America's space program. If this potential is to be realized, however, industrialization efforts must be considered within the context of the other major portions of the space program: shuttle, space station, and civil remote sensing. Further, development efforts must be based upon a sound scientific and technical understanding of the products and processes, and there must be a trained cadre of dedicated individuals willing to devote time and effort to this effort. There remain considerable risks and uncertainties. Given all this, the best path to follow would seem to be a long term, balanced commitment, emphasizing government, industry, and academia partnerships. Several points are addressed: (1) the place of space industrialization in the overall national space program; (2) the meaning of space industrialization with respect to the historic, national aims of space; and (3) specifically what is being industrialized.

  14. Mobile Virtual Private Networking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulkkis, Göran; Grahn, Kaj; Mårtens, Mathias; Mattsson, Jonny

    Mobile Virtual Private Networking (VPN) solutions based on the Internet Security Protocol (IPSec), Transport Layer Security/Secure Socket Layer (SSL/TLS), Secure Shell (SSH), 3G/GPRS cellular networks, Mobile IP, and the presently experimental Host Identity Protocol (HIP) are described, compared and evaluated. Mobile VPN solutions based on HIP are recommended for future networking because of superior processing efficiency and network capacity demand features. Mobile VPN implementation issues associated with the IP protocol versions IPv4 and IPv6 are also evaluated. Mobile VPN implementation experiences are presented and discussed.

  15. Smoking restrictions in private workplaces in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Koh, Y H; Voo, Y O; Yong, L S

    1994-06-01

    This survey aims to determine the number and profile of private workplaces in Singapore which have a smoking restriction policy. The response rate was 43%. Of the companies which responded, 59% had some form of smoking restriction. Private companies are more likely to have a smoking restriction policy: (a) where smoking poses inherent fire risks, such as those dealing with inflammable chemicals or gases; (b) where smoking poses inherent detrimental effects to the quality of the products, such as those dealing with precision electronic microcomponents, where a smoke-free and dust-free environment is essential; (c) are larger companies; and (d) have strong management support in initiating and enforcing smoking restriction. Future programmes should give more emphasis to the service industries such as construction, insurance, banking and finance, and smaller companies (with fewer than 100 employees). They should involve the management who play an important role in implementing smoking restriction at their workplace. PMID:7997897

  16. If private equity sized up your business.

    PubMed

    Pozen, Robert C

    2007-11-01

    As the dust settles on the recent frenzy of private equity deals (including transactions topping $20 billion), what lessons can companies glean? Directors and executives of public companies may now be slightly less fearful of imminent takeover, yet the pressure remains: They face shareholders who wonder why they aren't getting private-equity-level returns. Rather than dismiss the value private equity has created as manipulated or aberrant, public company leaders should recognize the disciplined management that often underlies it. Pozen, a longtime leader in the financial services industry, finds that in the aftermath of buyouts, companies undergo five major thrusts of reform. These translate into five key questions that directors should pose to senior management: Have we left too much cash on our balance sheet instead of raising our cash dividends or buying back shares? Do we have the optimal capital structure, with the lowest weighted after-tax cost of total capital, including debt and equity? Do we have an operating plan that will significantly increase shareholder value, with specific metrics to monitor performance? Are the compensation rewards for our top executives tied closely enough to increases in shareholder value, with real penalties for nonperformance? Finally, does our board have enough industry experts who have made the time commitments and been given the financial incentives necessary to maximize shareholder value? The era of private equity is far from over - the top funds have become very large and are likely to play an influential role in future market cycles. Boards that ask these questions, and act on them, won't just beat the takeover artists to the punch. They will build stronger businesses.

  17. Wastewater privatization: A beneficial alternative

    SciTech Connect

    Wakeman, R.F.; Drewry, W.A.

    1999-07-01

    Municipalities with wastewater operations face increasing requirements to maximize efficiency, implement capital improvements, and ensure environmental compliance. Privatization is a relatively unused alternative offering benefits in the areas of cost-effective operations, flexible financing, technology access, and compliance assurance. Recent executive direction and tax code changes have opened new doors for mutually beneficial public-private partnerships. Wastewater privatization has historically consisted of short-term contract agreements for treatment operations, but looming infrastructure recapitalization and development requirements have catalyzed an exploration of non-traditional alternatives that include private sector financing, development, and operation of entire wastewater systems, The purpose of this paper is to show why privatization must be considered, evaluate the different levels available, and generate an analytical aid for communities taking their first look at privatization opportunities.

  18. Projects with Industry: A Public/Private Partnership That Works. Report from the Study Group. Institute on Rehabilitation Issues (10th, St. Louis, Missouri, May 31-June 2, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville. Arkansas Rehabilitation Research and Training Center.

    This manual is intended to serve as a resource document as well as a training guide for rehabilitation personnel to use in developing and implementing Projects with Industry (PWI) programs. Covered in a historical profile of PWI are the changing work environment, the evolution and definition of PWI, the impact of PWI on rehabilitation, and various…

  19. Private Stimuli, Covert Responses, and Private Events: Conceptual Remarks

    PubMed Central

    Tourinho, Emmanuel Zagury

    2006-01-01

    In this article, I discuss the concepts of private stimuli, covert responses, and private events, emphasizing three aspects: the conditions under which private stimuli may acquire discriminative functions to verbal responses, the conditions of unobservability of covert responses, and the complexity of events or phenomena described as private. I argue that the role of private stimuli in the control of self-descriptive verbal responses is dependent on a relation (correlation or equivalence relation) with public stimuli, and that responses vary along a continuum of observability. These remarks on private stimuli and covert responses are introductory to an examination of the varying complexity of phenomena described as private. I argue that private events is a verbal response emitted under the control of phenomena of different degrees of complexity, and I interpret these phenomena, based on the principle of selection by consequences. I introduce the notion of inclusiveness to suggest that some phenomena related to privacy are less or more complex as they include relations of a phylogenetic, ontogenetic, and cultural origin. PMID:22478451

  20. Differentially private distributed logistic regression using private and public data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Privacy protecting is an important issue in medical informatics and differential privacy is a state-of-the-art framework for data privacy research. Differential privacy offers provable privacy against attackers who have auxiliary information, and can be applied to data mining models (for example, logistic regression). However, differentially private methods sometimes introduce too much noise and make outputs less useful. Given available public data in medical research (e.g. from patients who sign open-consent agreements), we can design algorithms that use both public and private data sets to decrease the amount of noise that is introduced. Methodology In this paper, we modify the update step in Newton-Raphson method to propose a differentially private distributed logistic regression model based on both public and private data. Experiments and results We try our algorithm on three different data sets, and show its advantage over: (1) a logistic regression model based solely on public data, and (2) a differentially private distributed logistic regression model based on private data under various scenarios. Conclusion Logistic regression models built with our new algorithm based on both private and public datasets demonstrate better utility than models that trained on private or public datasets alone without sacrificing the rigorous privacy guarantee. PMID:25079786

  1. An industry perspective on the use of seasonal forecasts and weather information for evaluating sensitivities in traded commodity supply chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domeisen, Daniela; Slavov, Georgi

    2015-04-01

    Weather information on seasonal timescales is crucial to various end users, from the level of subsistence farming to the government level. Also the financial industry is ever more aware of and interested in the benefits that early and correctly interpreted forecast information provides. Straight forward and often cited applications include the estimation of rainfall and temperature anomalies for drought - prone agricultural areas producing traded commodities, as well as some of the rather direct impacts of weather on energy production. Governments, weather services, as well as both academia and private companies are working on tailoring climate and weather information to a growing number of customers. However, also other large markets, such as coal, iron ore, and gas, are crucially dependent on seasonal weather information and forecasts, while the needs are again very dependent on the direction of the predicted signal. So far, relatively few providers in climate services address these industries. All of these commodities show a strong seasonal and weather dependence, and an unusual winter or summer can crucially impact their demand and supply. To name a few impacts, gas is crucially driven by heating demand, iron ore excavation is dependent on the available water resources, and coal mining is dependent on winter temperatures and rainfall. This contribution will illustrate and provide an inside view of the type of climate and weather information needed for the various large commodity industries.

  2. Industrialization of Biology.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Douglas C; Ellington, Andrew D

    2015-10-16

    The advancement of synthetic biology over the past decade has contributed substantially to the growing bioeconomy. A recent report by the National Academies highlighted several areas of advancement that will be needed for further expansion of industrial biotechnology, including new focuses on design, feedstocks, processing, organism development, and tools for testing and measurement; more particularly, a focus on expanded chassis and end-to-end design in an effort to move beyond the use of E. coli and S. cerivisiea to organisms better suited to fermentation and production; second, continued efforts in systems biology and high-throughput screening with a focus on more rapid techniques that will provide the needed information for moving to larger scale; and finally, work to accelerate the building of a holacratic community with collaboration and engagement between the relevant government agencies, industry, academia, and the public.

  3. Economic Public Private Partnerships for Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Thomas C.; Kistler, Walter P.; Citron, Bob

    2008-01-01

    Space transportation has evolved to entrepreneurs offering affordable transportation services to LEO. Society expects space tourism to produce low costs quickly, but entrepreneurs need the larger commercial transportation markets to raise the private money to build the orbital vehicles. Early heavy cargo is the logistics model of remote bases on Earth and is likely to be similar for off planet remote bases. Public Private Partnerships (PPP), (Norment, 2006) and other alliances with governments offer new transportation markets and combines private funding with government markets to accelerate the movement of mankind into space, (Kistler, 2004a). Entrepreneurs bring change like a multitude of innovation, changes to the traditional aerospace industry status quo, commercial market forces and the lowering of the cost of transportation to orbit. Within PPPs, government stretches space budgets, increases vehicle innovation without cost and gains cost advantages of larger markets. Examples of PPPs show some opportunity for change in space commerce is possible, (Stainback, 2000 and Spekman, 2000). Some of the items entrepreneurs bring include innovation in hardware, a maturing of the normal market forces such as the pressures from buyers and sellers rather than those from government planners or from regulation. Launch costs are high, society wants orbital hotels and current/future markets are not emerging because of high transportation costs. The paper proposes a new approach with examples, because mankind has taken a long time to transition from expendable launch vehicles to newer more affordable launch innovation and may require the introduction of new innovative approaches.

  4. Dual-use technologies for the mining, processing, and energy industries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barney B.; Kimel, Kris

    1994-01-01

    Over the years, NASA has utilized several approaches towards transferring space technologies into the private sectors. Some of these approaches have been successful, others have had mixed results. The conventional approach usually involves identifying advanced NASA technologies and then searching for applications. Some approaches involve joint sponsorship, but mostly focus on technologies for space. The greatest success has occurred when market forces are used to determine technology initiatives. This paper describes an unconventional approach that was structured to drive out customer requirements for advanced technologies where NASA is also a customer on par with others. The approach used herein is best described as entrepreneurial deal-making. This approach is new and is working very well so far, but it is still too early, and the process is too immature, for quantitative evaluation of success. However, it is appropriate to share these experiences at this time in order to obtain feedback and improve our chances for success. In the needs identification stage, NASA is one of many users (customers), and in the subsequent development stage, NASA is one of many suppliers along with industry, academia, and other government organizations. This specific characteristic of the approach was a primary goal that was incorporated from inception. It was the viewpoint of the instigators (the authors) that if the activity was customer focused, it would: (1) have a higher probability for success since it will be driven by those who will reap the benefits; (2) be able to advocate and promote action if necessary, since it would be founded outside the federal government; (3) not be self-perpetuating; that is, if no common need could be found that had a reasonable return on investment, it would self-destruct; and (4) have increased stability from a broader base of support and not be dependent on NASA being the principal funding source. To date, the workshop activities have identified

  5. Private Loans: Facts and Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute for College Access & Success, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Private loans are one of the riskiest ways to finance a college education. Like credit cards, they typically have variable interest rates. Both variable and fixed rates are higher for those who can least afford them--as high as 13% in June 2014. Private loans are not eligible for the important deferment, income-based repayment, or loan forgiveness…

  6. Michigan School Privatization Survey 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohman, James M.; Freeland, William L. E.

    2008-01-01

    Privatization of school support services is a time-tested means for lowering educational costs. The three major services that school districts in Michigan contract out for are food, custodial and transportation. The Mackinac Center for Public Policy's survey of privatization is the longest running and most comprehensive source of school support…

  7. Research Opportunities in Private Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Donald A.

    Private education as an area of study offers many opportunities to educational researchers. Four types of research that would include private education are discussed and examples of research possibilities under each type are offered. The first type involves fundamental educational processes. Suggested are studies of the effects of various levels…

  8. Private Schools in American Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nehrt, Roy C.

    The vital, sometimes controversial contribution of private schools to American education is documented by data gathered from 1976 to 1979. Although the totals reported are estimates because many values had to be statistically imputed, many patterns emerge. The proportion of private schools to all schools has varied only slightly since 1932.…

  9. Signed Soliloquy: Visible Private Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmermann, Kathrin; Brugger, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Talking to oneself can be silent (inner speech) or vocalized for others to hear (private speech, or soliloquy). We investigated these two types of self-communication in 28 deaf signers and 28 hearing adults. With a questionnaire specifically developed for this study, we established the visible analog of vocalized private speech in deaf signers.…

  10. Michigan School Privatization Survey 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohman, James M.; Anderson, Dustin D.

    2010-01-01

    Privatization of support services has been a method that Michigan school districts have used for several years to lower costs. More than ever before, Michigan school districts are privatizing the three main support services they offer--food, custodial and transportation. The annual survey finds that 48.8 percent of Michigan school districts are…

  11. Private Faith and Public Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trigg, Roger

    2008-01-01

    Must faith be privatized? Taken at face value, this could seem a curious question, since no one is in a position to "sell off" any religion to private interests, in the way that, for example, British Rail was dismembered. Yet the question is an important one in a contemporary society, characterized as it is by a significant divergence of views…

  12. Personal and Other Services. Industry Training Monograph No. 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumbrell, Tom

    Australia's personal and other services industry is the sixth smallest of the 17 industry divisions in numbers employed. The industry, a collection of quite diverse businesses and services in the public and private sectors, has three subdivisions: personal services, other services, and private households employing staff. The employment level has…

  13. Public/Private Partnerships: A Trojan Horse for Higher Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baines, Lawrence; Chiarelott, Leigh

    2010-01-01

    Partnering with private industry is presented as a sensible solution to some faculties at institutions of higher education during the current economic downturn. The authors discuss the historic context for increased efficiencies and provide descriptions of how two institutions responded to the prospect of "collaborating" with a corporation. In one…

  14. Private-Equity Juggernaut Rolls through Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenstyk, Goldie

    2007-01-01

    The deluge of money that private-equity investors have been pouring into buyouts of companies in all sectors of the economy is having a growing impact on higher education. Until recently, outside investors were primarily interested in the for-profit college industry, acquiring family-owned colleges and chains of colleges. Now several of those…

  15. The Franchising of Private Tutoring: A View from Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Scott; Aurini, Janice

    2006-01-01

    Private tutoring is a growing industry that is being transformed by an evolution from "shadow education" provision into "learning center" franchises. Traditional shadow educators closely follow the school curriculum, offering short-term homework help and test preparation. Learning centers develop their own curricular and assessment tools, offer…

  16. Malaysian Private Education Quality: Application of SERVQUAL Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaz, Anthony; Mansori, Shaheen

    2013-01-01

    Intense competition among existing private education providers and the Malaysian government's relaxation of regulations for allowing international universities to open off shore campuses in Malaysia, have forced companies in the education industry to develop strategies which can help them to make their existing students satisfied and keep them…

  17. Ethics and Industrial Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Daniel

    The development of nanotechnology seems inevitable, for it alone would be able to solve or circumvent the huge difficulties to be faced by industrial and post-industrial societies, in both their private and their public aspects, and including the ageing population and its expectations with regard to health, the evolution of the climate, pollution, the management of food resources and raw materials, access to drinking water, control of energy production and consumption, equitable and sustainable development, etc.

  18. Language Industries Atlas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hearn, P. M., Ed.; Button, D. F., Ed.

    This atlas describes the activities of public and private organizations that create the infrastructure within which languages are able to develop and interact in the European Community (EC). It contains over 1,000 descriptions of activities that play a role in shaping the language industries, from a user or provider perspective. The atlas is…

  19. Private Sector Initiative Program. Documentation and Assessment of CETA Title VII Implementation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Thomas J.

    The development and performance, through 1981, of Private Industry Councils (PICs) in 16 study sites are described and assessed in this report. (PICs were set up under Title VII of the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) to serve as a hub for attracting increased private sector involvement in employment and training activities for the…

  20. The Changing Relationship between the Private and Public Sectors: Privatisation and Rural Britain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Philip; Cloke, Paul

    1989-01-01

    Explores the theoretical and ideological background of privatization within the context of New Right politics. Examines the economic and social impacts on rural Britain of Thatcher government policies: "user pays" policies, private contracting of formerly public services, denationalization of utilities and industries, and deregulation. Contains 61…

  1. How Leadership Styles in Academia Align to Achieve Success within the Tanzanian Catholic Universities System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vumilia, Philbert L.

    2015-01-01

    Public and private universities in Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, and elsewhere in Africa have been experiencing all-time high expansion since the late 1990s. This rush to expand both public and private universities has seriously impacted both the physical infrastructure as well as the effective leadership that new universities require. At the same…

  2. Private Information and Insurance Rejections

    PubMed Central

    Hendren, Nathaniel

    2013-01-01

    Across a wide set of non-group insurance markets, applicants are rejected based on observable, often high-risk, characteristics. This paper argues that private information, held by the potential applicant pool, explains rejections. I formulate this argument by developing and testing a model in which agents may have private information about their risk. I first derive a new no-trade result that theoretically explains how private information could cause rejections. I then develop a new empirical methodology to test whether this no-trade condition can explain rejections. The methodology uses subjective probability elicitations as noisy measures of agents beliefs. I apply this approach to three non-group markets: long-term care, disability, and life insurance. Consistent with the predictions of the theory, in all three settings I find significant amounts of private information held by those who would be rejected; I find generally more private information for those who would be rejected relative to those who can purchase insurance; and I show it is enough private information to explain a complete absence of trade for those who would be rejected. The results suggest private information prevents the existence of large segments of these three major insurance markets. PMID:24187381

  3. Private Information and Insurance Rejections.

    PubMed

    Hendren, Nathaniel

    2013-09-01

    Across a wide set of non-group insurance markets, applicants are rejected based on observable, often high-risk, characteristics. This paper argues that private information, held by the potential applicant pool, explains rejections. I formulate this argument by developing and testing a model in which agents may have private information about their risk. I first derive a new no-trade result that theoretically explains how private information could cause rejections. I then develop a new empirical methodology to test whether this no-trade condition can explain rejections. The methodology uses subjective probability elicitations as noisy measures of agents beliefs. I apply this approach to three non-group markets: long-term care, disability, and life insurance. Consistent with the predictions of the theory, in all three settings I find significant amounts of private information held by those who would be rejected; I find generally more private information for those who would be rejected relative to those who can purchase insurance; and I show it is enough private information to explain a complete absence of trade for those who would be rejected. The results suggest private information prevents the existence of large segments of these three major insurance markets.

  4. 75 FR 49932 - Private Transfer Fee Covenants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... AGENCY Private Transfer Fee Covenants AGENCY: Federal Housing Finance Agency. ACTION: Notice of proposed... Guidance, ``Guidance on Private Transfer Fee Covenants,'' to the Federal National Mortgage Association... mortgages on properties encumbered by private transfer fee covenants. Such covenants appear adverse...

  5. Collaborative Service Learning: A Winning Proposition for Industry and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crutsinger, Christy A.; Pookulangara, Sanjukta; Tran, Gina; Duncan, Kim

    2004-01-01

    Collaboration between industry and academia creates a win-win situation for individuals and communities. Through innovative partnering, students apply knowledge to real-world situations, institutions increase program visibility, and businesses receive innovative solutions to complex problems. This article provides a roadmap for implementing a…

  6. Relativistic quantum private database queries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Si-Jia; Yang, Yu-Guang; Zhang, Ming-Ou

    2015-04-01

    Recently, Jakobi et al. (Phys Rev A 83, 022301, 2011) suggested the first practical private database query protocol (J-protocol) based on the Scarani et al. (Phys Rev Lett 92, 057901, 2004) quantum key distribution protocol. Unfortunately, the J-protocol is just a cheat-sensitive private database query protocol. In this paper, we present an idealized relativistic quantum private database query protocol based on Minkowski causality and the properties of quantum information. Also, we prove that the protocol is secure in terms of the user security and the database security.

  7. Private expenditure and the role of private health insurance in Greece: status quo and future trends.

    PubMed

    Siskou, Olga; Kaitelidou, Daphne; Economou, Charalampos; Kostagiolas, Peter; Liaropoulos, Lycourgos

    2009-10-01

    The health care system in Greece is financed in almost equal proportions by public and private sources. Private expenditure, consists mostly of out-of-pocket and under-the-table payments. Such payments strongly suggest dissatisfaction with the public system, due to under financing during the last 25 years. This gap has been filled rapidly by the private sector. From this point of view, one might suggest that the flourishing development of private provision may lead in turn to a corresponding growth in private health insurance (PHI). This paper aims to examine the role of PHI in Greece, to identify the factors influencing its development, and to make some suggestions about future policies and trends. In the decade of 1985-1995 PHI show increasing activity, reflecting the intention of some citizens to seek health insurance solutions in the form of supplementary cover in order to ensure faster access, better quality of services, and increased consumer choice. The benefits include programs covering hospital expenses, cash benefits, outpatient care expenses, disability income insurance, as well as limited managed care programs. However, despite recent interest, PHI coverage remains low in Greece compared to other EU countries. Economic, social and cultural factors such as low average household income, high unemployment, obligatory and full coverage by social insurance, lead to reluctance to pay for second-tier insurance. Instead, there is a preference to pay a doctor or hospital directly even in the form of under-the-table payments (which are remarkably high in Greece), when the need arises. There are also factors endogenous to the PHI industry, related to market policies, low organisational capacity, cream skimming, and the absence of insurance products meeting consumer requirements, which explain the relatively low state of development of PHI in Greece. PMID:19593628

  8. Private expenditure and the role of private health insurance in Greece: status quo and future trends.

    PubMed

    Siskou, Olga; Kaitelidou, Daphne; Economou, Charalampos; Kostagiolas, Peter; Liaropoulos, Lycourgos

    2009-10-01

    The health care system in Greece is financed in almost equal proportions by public and private sources. Private expenditure, consists mostly of out-of-pocket and under-the-table payments. Such payments strongly suggest dissatisfaction with the public system, due to under financing during the last 25 years. This gap has been filled rapidly by the private sector. From this point of view, one might suggest that the flourishing development of private provision may lead in turn to a corresponding growth in private health insurance (PHI). This paper aims to examine the role of PHI in Greece, to identify the factors influencing its development, and to make some suggestions about future policies and trends. In the decade of 1985-1995 PHI show increasing activity, reflecting the intention of some citizens to seek health insurance solutions in the form of supplementary cover in order to ensure faster access, better quality of services, and increased consumer choice. The benefits include programs covering hospital expenses, cash benefits, outpatient care expenses, disability income insurance, as well as limited managed care programs. However, despite recent interest, PHI coverage remains low in Greece compared to other EU countries. Economic, social and cultural factors such as low average household income, high unemployment, obligatory and full coverage by social insurance, lead to reluctance to pay for second-tier insurance. Instead, there is a preference to pay a doctor or hospital directly even in the form of under-the-table payments (which are remarkably high in Greece), when the need arises. There are also factors endogenous to the PHI industry, related to market policies, low organisational capacity, cream skimming, and the absence of insurance products meeting consumer requirements, which explain the relatively low state of development of PHI in Greece.

  9. [Public and private: insurance companies and medical care in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Tamez, S; Bodek, C; Eibenschutz, C

    1995-01-01

    During the late 70's and early 80's in Mexico, as in the rest of Latin-America, sanitary policies were directed to support the growth of the private sector of health care at the expense of the public sector. This work analyzes the evolution of the health insurance market as a part of the privatization process of health care. The analysis based on economic data, provides the political profile behind the privatization process as well as the changes in the relations between the State and the health sector. The central hypothesis is that the State promotes and supports the growth of the private market of medical care via a series of legal, fiscal and market procedures. It also discusses the State roll in the legal changes related to the national insurance activity. A comparative analysis is made about the evolution of the insurance industry in Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Mexico during the period 1986-1992, with a particular enfasis in the last country. One of the principal results is that the Premium/GNP and Premium/per capita, display a general growth in the 4 countries. This growth is faster for Mexico for each one) because the privatization process occurred only during the most recent years. For the 1984-1991 period in Mexico the direct premium as percentage of the GNP raised from 0.86% to 1.32%. If one focussed only in the insurance for health and accidents branches the rice goes form 8.84% in 1984 to 19.08% in 1991. This indicates that the insurance industry is one of the main targets of the privatization process of the health care system in Mexico. This is also shown by the State support to fast expansion of the big medical industrial complex of the country. Considering this situation in the continuity of the neoliberal model of Mexico, this will profound the inequity and inequality. PMID:12973592

  10. [Public and private: insurance companies and medical care in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Tamez, S; Bodek, C; Eibenschutz, C

    1995-01-01

    During the late 70's and early 80's in Mexico, as in the rest of Latin-America, sanitary policies were directed to support the growth of the private sector of health care at the expense of the public sector. This work analyzes the evolution of the health insurance market as a part of the privatization process of health care. The analysis based on economic data, provides the political profile behind the privatization process as well as the changes in the relations between the State and the health sector. The central hypothesis is that the State promotes and supports the growth of the private market of medical care via a series of legal, fiscal and market procedures. It also discusses the State roll in the legal changes related to the national insurance activity. A comparative analysis is made about the evolution of the insurance industry in Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Mexico during the period 1986-1992, with a particular enfasis in the last country. One of the principal results is that the Premium/GNP and Premium/per capita, display a general growth in the 4 countries. This growth is faster for Mexico for each one) because the privatization process occurred only during the most recent years. For the 1984-1991 period in Mexico the direct premium as percentage of the GNP raised from 0.86% to 1.32%. If one focussed only in the insurance for health and accidents branches the rice goes form 8.84% in 1984 to 19.08% in 1991. This indicates that the insurance industry is one of the main targets of the privatization process of the health care system in Mexico. This is also shown by the State support to fast expansion of the big medical industrial complex of the country. Considering this situation in the continuity of the neoliberal model of Mexico, this will profound the inequity and inequality.

  11. State Regulation of Private Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lines, Patricia M.

    1982-01-01

    Examines state laws and the actions of various courts on home instruction and unauthorized educational programs. Suggests reforming the regulation of private education through legislative action that requires periodic testing as an alternative to compulsory school attendance. (Author/MLF)

  12. What Future for Private Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cath Sch J, 1970

    1970-01-01

    After examining a small private school (Norwood Academy, Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia) a group of leading educators give their answers to questions about its future and the future of such schools in general. (Editor)

  13. REPORT ON WORKSHOP ON SUSTAINABILITY AND INDUSTRY: ENERGY, MATERIAL CONSUMPTION, AND HUMAN BEHAVIOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the Workshop was to begin a process by which the leaders of the Council for Chemical Research, industry, academia, and government focus on sustainability and devote substantial resources to advancing issues that will improve the sustainability of industry and socie...

  14. Progressive MS Alliance Industry Forum: Maximizing Collective Impact To Enable Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Zaratin, P; Comi, G; Coetzee, T; Ramsey, K; Smith, K; Thompson, A; Panzara, M

    2016-10-01

    The Progressive MS Alliance Industry Forum describes a new approach to address barriers to developing treatments for progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). This innovative model promises to facilitate robust collaboration between industry, academia, and patient organizations and accelerate research towards the overarching goal of developing safe and effective treatments for progressive MS.

  15. Lessons from the other side: what can we learn from the private sector?

    PubMed

    Clarke, D

    1999-01-01

    Business has reacted in an impressive manner to increasing globalisation, short-term stock market pressure for performance, emerging industries and new technologies. While the private sector has become increasingly competitive, the public sector has not adopted this commercial rigour. Funding pressures on health services will continue, as will increasing consumer and staff demands and the blurring of public and private health care provision. As a result, there are lessons and techniques the public and private health sectors should learn from each other. I have drawn the issues that follow from my experience in the steel and food industries.

  16. Proceedings: Water and Wastewater Privatization: Proceedings from an EPRI-Sponsored Workshop on Municipal Water and Wastewater Privatization, October 17-18, 1996, San Francisco, California

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The global water and wastewater industries are undergoing significant changes. Historically, water and wastewater systems have developed along different lines in the various nation states. The difference has usually been on the degree of public versus private sector involvement. The objective of these proceedings was to produce a better understanding of the heightened worldwide competition within the water and wastewater industries. Twenty-two presentations represented a cross-section of investor owned and public water and wastewater professionals, as well as engineering, financial, legal and regulatory experts, providing a balanced perspective on the role privatization is playing and is expected to play in these industries.

  17. Research on private cloud computing based on analysis on typical opensource platform: a case study with Eucalyptus and Wavemaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaoyuan; Yuan, Jian; Chen, Shi

    2013-03-01

    Cloud computing is one of the most popular topics in the IT industry and is recently being adopted by many companies. It has four development models, as: public cloud, community cloud, hybrid cloud and private cloud. Except others, private cloud can be implemented in a private network, and delivers some benefits of cloud computing without pitfalls. This paper makes a comparison of typical open source platforms through which we can implement a private cloud. After this comparison, we choose Eucalyptus and Wavemaker to do a case study on the private cloud. We also do some performance estimation of cloud platform services and development of prototype software as cloud services.

  18. Research Activities at the Institute of Astronomy & Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, S.

    2003-12-01

    The Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica (ASIAA) is an institute of Academia Sinica, the national research organization in Taiwan. The institute has a staff of approximately 100, and has operations in both Taipei and Hawaii. Present research at the ASIAA includes the Solar System, Stellar Evolution, Star Formation, Interstellar Chemistry, Galactic Dynamics, Active Galaxies, and Cosmology. We are partners in the SubMillimeter Array (SMA) project on Mauna Kea, and are developing an Array for Microwave Background Anisotropy (AMiBA) in Mauna Loa. ASIAA also participates in the CFHT Wide Field Infrared Camera development in exchange for observing time on the telescope. A 3-telescope system is being built in Lulin Mountain in Taiwan to conduct an occultation survey in search for small Kuiper Belt objects. An increasing level of theoretical and computational astrophysics is being pursued through the establishment of Theoretical Institute for Advanced Research in Astrophysics (TIARA) in collaboration with TsingHua University. In this paper, we will report on some of the current research activities at ASIAA as well as plans for the future.

  19. [Johann Laurentius Bausch and Philipp Jacob Sachs of Lewenhaimb. Foundation of the Academia Naturae

    PubMed

    Müller, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    The biographical notes of the two municipal physicians of Schweinfurt, Leonhard Bausch (1574 to 1636) and Johann Laurentius Bausch (1605-1665) and another three physicians (Johann Michael Fehr, Georg Balthasar Wohlfarth and Georg Balthasar Metzger) who founded the Academia Naturae Curiosorum together with the younger Bausch in 1652, show that this founding was initiated by a surprisingly homogenous group, sharing the same social, educational and professional background as well as ancestral and acquired experiences. They all had been influenced by the immigration fate of their families, the rapid rise to the politically or academically educated elite in the imperial city of Schweinfurt, worn out by war and plagues. They all had studied at universities in protestant territories of the Holy Roman Empire, finishing with an educational journey (peregrinatio academica), usually to Italy. Experience of the flourishing university life beyond the frontiers of the Holy Roman Empire laid waste by the "Teutsche Krieg", the great variety of academies in Italy, the narrowness of contemporary medicine and the inability of the individual to explore the immense variety of nature: all this leads to the founding of the Academia Naturae Curiosorum and it is the point of reference of the founding documents of 1651/1652, which were first printed in 1662 (Salve Academicum). What is innovative about this is not the establishment of an academy but the desired aim and the way of achieving this. The tenor of these documents--to medically explore the variety of the divine "res naturals" in a cooperative and regulated way for the benefit of medicine and mankind and to publish the results in monographes (utilitas by curiositas)--was condensed by the later Leopoldina to the still used motto "to explore nature for the benefit of mankind". Due to Breslau's municipal physician Philipp Jacob Sachs von Lewenhaimb (1627 - 1672) the publishing activities of the academy came into being. But before the

  20. An Analysis of Private School Closings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandey, Lakshmi; Sjoquist, David L.; Walker, Mary Beth

    2009-01-01

    We add to the small literature on private school supply by exploring exits of K-12 private schools. We find that the closure of private schools is not an infrequent event and use national survey data from the National Center for Education Statistics to study closures of private schools. We assume that the probability of an exit is a function of…

  1. The "Decline" of Private Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Daniel C.

    2013-01-01

    No topic in private higher education study has attracted as great attention globally as has growth. This is appropriate as private growth has soared to nearly a third of the world's total higher education enrolment. But while private growth continues to be the dominant trend, important declines in private shares have emerged. These must be…

  2. How To Pick a Perfect Private School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unger, Harlow G.

    This book offers consumer information for parents who are considering enrolling their child in a private school. Beginning with a descriptive overview of private schools, the guide discusses advantages of private schools, how to finance a private school education, and how to determine a child's educational needs. The book offers criteria for…

  3. Lessons from the private sector on performance-based management

    SciTech Connect

    Stoeckle, K.E.; Kolster, W.G.; Shangraw, R.F.

    1996-03-01

    Implementation of the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 (GPRA) has provided a unique challenge for Federal Agencies, such as the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Waste Management (OWM). While performance measurement, as required by GPRA, is new to Federal Agencies, private industry has applied it at all organizational levels to better manage their operations for some time. There has been significant discussion about how the private sector uses performance measures, but there have been very few empirical studies systematically examining their use. To gather information on comparable private industry practices, waste management industry firms were surveyed through questionnaires and follow-on interviews. Questionnaires were sent to 75 waste management firms throughout the United States and Canada. Twenty-four percent of the firms responded to the questionnaire and participated in the follow-on interviews. The questionnaires were typically completed by vice-presidents or senior financial officers. Information collected from the questionnaire and follow-on interviews provided valuable insight into industry practices in the area of performance measurement. This paper discusses the study results and how they can be incorporated in the DOE OWM performance measures and influence the character of the ``critical few`` metrics used by senior DOE managers.

  4. 15 CFR 1160.3 - Assistance to industrial technology partnerships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... INNOVATION Promotion of Private Sector Industrial Technology Partnerships § 1160.3 Assistance to industrial.... Accordingly, the Department shall identify sources of information for them on innovation services and... products and services; financing; techniques and incentives for innovation; organizations...

  5. Redefining private insurance in a changing market structure.

    PubMed

    Chollet, D J

    1996-01-01

    This discussion on likely changes and challenges for the health insurance industry over the coming decade assumes that significant national reform of health care financing for the privately insured population will not occur--or, if it does, that it will mirror the insurance market reforms that many states already have undertaken. First, the changes in private insurance coverage during the past several years are considered, with particular attention to the erosion of employer-based coverage and to the rising influence of public insurance programs--especially Medicaid--on the private insurance market. Next is a description of the changing web of state laws and regulations governing private health insurance. At this writing, virtually every state has enacted or is considering reforms of the small group market to limit what many perceive as unfair or destructive insurer practices and to set new ground rules for competition among insurance arrangements. The changing nature of private insurance contracts in the United States is considered next. Evolving from conventional fee-for-service contracts, private insurance is increasingly a complex mixture of capitation, partial capitation, and reinsurance of capitated arrangements. Finally, this chapter discusses three issues of increasing importance in shaping the marketplace for private insurers: (1) the federal preemption of states' regulatory authority over self-insured employer plans; (2) emerging state regulation to restructure competition in the health insurance and health care markets; and (3) the growing interest of both federal and state governments in medical savings accounts to finance health insurance and health care spending.

  6. TWRS privatization process technical baseline

    SciTech Connect

    Orme, R.M.

    1996-09-13

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is planning a two-phased program for the remediation of Hanford tank waste. Phase 1 is a pilot program to demonstrate the procurement of treatment services. The volume of waste treated during the Phase 1 is a small percentage of the tank waste. During Phase 2, DOE intends to procure treatment services for the balance of the waste. The TWRS Privatization Process Technical Baseline (PPTB) provides a summary level flowsheet/mass balance of tank waste treatment operations which is consistent with the tank inventory information, waste feed staging studies, and privatization guidelines currently available. The PPTB will be revised periodically as privatized processing concepts are crystallized.

  7. Concentration in the Greek private hospital sector: a descriptive analysis.

    PubMed

    Boutsioli, Zoe

    2007-07-01

    Over the last 20 years, governments all around the world have attempted to boost the role of market and competition in health care industries in order to increase efficiency and reduce costs. The increased competition and the significant implications on costs and prices of health care services resulted in health care industries being transformed. Large firms are merging and acquiring other firms. If this trend continues, few firms will dominate the health care markets. In this study, I use the simple concentration ratio (CR) for the largest 4, 8 and 20 companies to measure the concentration of Greek private hospitals during the period 1997-2004. Also, the Gini coefficient for inequality is used. For the two different categories of hospitals used (a) general and neuropsychiatric and (b) obstetric/gynaecological it is evident that the top four firms of the first category accounted for 43% of sales in 1997, and 52% in 2004, while the four largest firms of the second category accounted for almost 83% in 1997, and 81% in 2004. Also, the Gini coefficient increases over the 8-year period examined from 0.69 in 1997 to 0.82 in 2004. It explains that the market of the private health care services becomes less equal in the sense that fewer private hospitals and clinics hold more and more of the share of the total sales. From a cross-industry analysis it is clear that the private hospital sector has the highest concentration rate. Finally, it appears that the market structure of the private hospitals in Greece resembles more closely to an oligopoly rather than a monopolistic competition, since very few firms dominate the market.

  8. Evaluation of Private Sector Roles in Space Resource Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamassoure, Elisabeth S.; Blair, Brad R.; Diaz, Javier; Oderman, Mark; Duke, Michael B.; Vaucher, Marc; Manvi, Ramachandra; Easter, Robert W.

    2003-01-01

    An integrated engineering and financial modeling approach has been developed and used to evaluate the potential for private sector investment in space resource development, and to assess possible roles of the public sector in fostering private interest. This paper presents the modeling approach and its results for a transportation service using propellant extracted from lunar regolith. The analysis starts with careful case study definition, including an analysis of the customer base and market requirements, which are the basis for design of a modular, scalable space architecture. The derived non-recurring, recurring and operations costs become inputs for a `standard' financial model, as used in any commercial business plan. This model generates pro forma financial statements, calculates the amount of capitalization required, and generates return on equity calculations using two valuation metrics of direct interest to private investors: market enterprise value and multiples of key financial measures. Use of this model on an architecture to sell transportation services in Earth orbit based on lunar propellants shows how to rapidly test various assumptions and identify interesting architectural options, key areas for investment in exploration and technology, or innovative business approaches that could produce an economically viable industry. The same approach can be used to evaluate any other possible private ventures in space, and conclude on the respective roles of NASA and the private sector in space resource development and solar system exploration.

  9. Analysis of debt leveraging in private power projects

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, E.P. ); Meal, M.; Doerrer, S.; Morse, S. )

    1992-08-01

    As private power (non-utility generation) has grown to become a significant part of the electricity system, increasing concern about its financial implications has arisen. In many cases, the source of this concern has been the substantial reliance of these projects on debt financing. This study examines debt leveraging in private power projects. The policy debate on these issues has typically been conducted at a high level of generality. Critics of the private power industry assert that high debt leveraging confers an unfair competitive advantage by lowering the cost of capital, and that this leveraging is only possible because risks are shifted to the utility. Further, debt leveraging is claimed to be a threat to reliability. On the opposite side, it is argued that debt leveraging imposes costs and obligations not home by utilities, and so there is no financial advantage. The private producers also argue that on balance more risk is shifted away from utilities than to them, and that incentives for reliability are strong. In this study we examine the project finance mechanisms used in private power lending in detail, relying on a sample of actual loan documents. This review and its findings should be relevant to the further evolution of this debate. State regulatory commissions are likely to be interested in it, and Federal legislation to amend the Public Utility Holding Company Act (PUHCA) could require states to consider the implications of debt leveraging in relation to their oversight of utility power purchase programs.

  10. Analysis of debt leveraging in private power projects

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, E.P.; Meal, M.; Doerrer, S.; Morse, S.

    1992-08-01

    As private power has grown to become a significant part of the electricity system, increasing concern about its financial implications has arisen. In many cases, the source of this concern has been the substantial reliance of these projects on debt financing. This study examines debt leveraging in private power projects. The policy debate on these issues has typically been conducted at a high level of generality. Critics of the private power industry assert that high debt leveraging confers an unfair competitive advantage by lowering the cost of capital. This leveraging is only possible because risks are shifted to the utility. Further, debt leveraging is claimed to be a threat to reliability. On the opposite side, it is argued that debt leveraging imposes costs and obligations not borne by utilities, and so there is no financial advantage. The private producers also argue that on balance more risk is shifted away from utilities than to them, and that incentives for reliability are strong. In this study we examine the project finance mechanisms used in private power lending in detail, relying on a sample of actual loan documents. This review and its findings should be relevant to the further evolution of this debate. State regulatory commissions are likely to be interested in it, and Federal legislation to amend the Public Utility Holding Company Act (PUHCA) could require states to consider the implications of debt leveraging in relation to their oversight of utility power purchase programs.

  11. Analysis of debt leveraging in private power projects. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, E.P.; Meal, M.; Doerrer, S.; Morse, S.

    1992-08-01

    As private power (non-utility generation) has grown to become a significant part of the electricity system, increasing concern about its financial implications has arisen. In many cases, the source of this concern has been the substantial reliance of these projects on debt financing. This study examines debt leveraging in private power projects. The policy debate on these issues has typically been conducted at a high level of generality. Critics of the private power industry assert that high debt leveraging confers an unfair competitive advantage by lowering the cost of capital, and that this leveraging is only possible because risks are shifted to the utility. Further, debt leveraging is claimed to be a threat to reliability. On the opposite side, it is argued that debt leveraging imposes costs and obligations not home by utilities, and so there is no financial advantage. The private producers also argue that on balance more risk is shifted away from utilities than to them, and that incentives for reliability are strong. In this study we examine the project finance mechanisms used in private power lending in detail, relying on a sample of actual loan documents. This review and its findings should be relevant to the further evolution of this debate. State regulatory commissions are likely to be interested in it, and Federal legislation to amend the Public Utility Holding Company Act (PUHCA) could require states to consider the implications of debt leveraging in relation to their oversight of utility power purchase programs.

  12. Industry/University Cooperative Programs. Proceedings of a Workshop Held in Conjunction with the Annual Meeting of the Council of Graduate Schools in the United States (20th, Las Vegas, Nevada, December 2, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Graduate Schools in the U.S., Washington, DC.

    Proceedings of a 1980 workshop on industry/university cooperative programs are presented. Program presentations and authors include: "On Industry/Academia Relations" (T. Baron); "The MIT Liaison Program" (J. D. Bruce); "An Industrial Perspective of Academic Programs" (R. Fuller); "University/Industry Interactions through 'Centers'" (R. L.…

  13. Black Vocational Technical and Industrial Arts Education: Development and History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Clyde W.

    Since coverage of the history of industrial training of blacks in the United States is lacking, the author has compiled a single volume tracing this history from the plantation era. All phases are described--early schools prior to 1865, private and public industrial institutions of higher education, private institutions of higher education…

  14. Privatization and emergency medical services.

    PubMed

    Reissman, S G

    1997-01-01

    Osborne and Gaebler's Reinventing Government has sparked discussion amongst elected officials, civil servants, the media, and the general public regarding advantages of privatizing government services. Its support stems from an effort to provide services to municipalities while reducing taxpayer expenditure. Many echo the sentiment of former New York Governor Mario Cuomo, who said, "It is not government's obligation to provide services, but to see that they're provided." Even in the area of public safety, privatization has found a "market." In many localities, privatizing Emergency Medical Services (EMS) is a popular and successful method for providing ambulance services. Privately owned ambulance services staff and respond to medical emergencies in a given community as part of the 9-1-1 emergency response system. Regulations for acceptable response times, equipment, and other essential components of EMS systems are specified by contract. This allows the municipality oversight of the service provided, but it does not provide the service directly. As will be discussed, this "contracting-out" model has many benefits. Privatizing EMS services is a decision based not only on cost-savings, but on accountability. A thorough evaluation must be utilized in the selection process. Issues of efficiency, effectiveness, quality, customer service, responsiveness, and equity must be considered by the government, in addition to cost of service. The uncertain future of health care in the United States has led those in EMS to look beyond the field's internal market to explore additional opportunities for expanding and redefining its roles beyond emergency care. It is important, however, to consider how emergency medical care, the original role of EMS, can be best delivered. Responding to emergencies is not just one of the functions involved in this field, it is the principal function from which public perception of EMS is formed, and from which support for entering other markets can

  15. The price of choice: private health insurance in Australia.

    PubMed

    Stoelwinder, Johannes U

    2002-01-01

    Private Health Insurance (PHI) is an integral part of the financing of the Australian health care system. PHI is popular and has strong political support because it is perceived to give choice of access and responsiveness. However, in the past increasing premiums have led to a progressive decline in membership. A package of reforms by the Commonwealth Government in support of the private health insurance has reinvigorated the industry over the last three years. Some strategies for achieving a sustainable PHI industry are described. The key challenge is to control claims cost to maintain affordable premiums. Many techniques to do this compromise choice and challenge the very rationale for purchasing the product. Funds and providers will have to establish a new level of relationship to meet this challenge.

  16. Measuring nepotism through shared last names: the case of Italian Academia.

    PubMed

    Allesina, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Nepotistic practices are detrimental for academia. Here I show how disciplines with a high likelihood of nepotism can be detected using standard statistical techniques based on shared last names among professors. As an example, I analyze the set of all 61,340 Italian academics. I find that nepotism is prominent in Italy, with particular disciplinary sectors being detected as especially problematic. Out of 28 disciplines, 9 - accounting for more than half of Italian professors - display a significant paucity of last names. Moreover, in most disciplines a clear north-south trend emerges, with likelihood of nepotism increasing with latitude. Even accounting for the geographic clustering of last names, I find that for many disciplines the probability of name-sharing is boosted when professors work in the same institution or sub-discipline. Using these techniques policy makers can target cuts and funding in order to promote fair practices.

  17. Digital innovation through partnership between nature conservation organisations and academia: a qualitative impact assessment.

    PubMed

    Galán-Díaz, Carlos; Edwards, Peter; Nelson, John D; van der Wal, René

    2015-11-01

    Nature conservation organisations increasingly turn to new digital technologies to help deliver conservation objectives. This has led to collaborative forms of working with academia to spearhead digital innovation. Through in-depth interviews with three UK research-council-funded case studies, we show that by working with academics conservation organisations can receive positive and negative impacts, some of which cut across their operations. Positive impacts include new ways of engaging with audiences, improved data workflows, financial benefits, capacity building and the necessary digital infrastructure to help them influence policy. Negative impacts include the time and resources required to learn new skills and sustain new technologies, managing different organisational objectives and shifts in working practices as a result of the new technologies. Most importantly, collaboration with academics was shown to bring the opportunity of a profound change in perspectives on technologies with benefits to the partner organisations and individuals therein. PMID:26508342

  18. Digital innovation through partnership between nature conservation organisations and academia: a qualitative impact assessment.

    PubMed

    Galán-Díaz, Carlos; Edwards, Peter; Nelson, John D; van der Wal, René

    2015-11-01

    Nature conservation organisations increasingly turn to new digital technologies to help deliver conservation objectives. This has led to collaborative forms of working with academia to spearhead digital innovation. Through in-depth interviews with three UK research-council-funded case studies, we show that by working with academics conservation organisations can receive positive and negative impacts, some of which cut across their operations. Positive impacts include new ways of engaging with audiences, improved data workflows, financial benefits, capacity building and the necessary digital infrastructure to help them influence policy. Negative impacts include the time and resources required to learn new skills and sustain new technologies, managing different organisational objectives and shifts in working practices as a result of the new technologies. Most importantly, collaboration with academics was shown to bring the opportunity of a profound change in perspectives on technologies with benefits to the partner organisations and individuals therein.

  19. Practicum projects of value: a successful strategic partnership between nurse executives and master's level academia.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Joyce A

    2010-01-01

    The opportunity exists for academia and the nursing executive community to collaboratively create cultures of excellence. One university formed relationships of collaborative synergy with nurse executives to provide practicum experiences of value for both the graduate nursing administration students and the health care facilities. The strategic preceptor partnerships offer graduate students the invaluable opportunity to experience the in-depth, real world perspective of nursing administration resulting in the enrichment of their academic scholarship. A final practicum work project is designed collaboratively with the preceptor and completed by the end of the second practicum semester. The resulting practicum project is an example of a mutually rewarding experience for the graduate nursing administration student and the preceptor. The collaborative synergistic model is a win-win situation for the university and the health care facility.

  20. Finding the Right Prescription: In Stiff Competition with the Private Sector for Pharmacy Faculty, Academia Often Finds Itself on the Losing Side

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Tracie

    2004-01-01

    An aging population, the changing role of pharmacists as health systems rely more heavily on newer, sophisticated drug therapies to cure ills, and a proliferation of corner drug stores is driving a growing demand for pharmacists in this country, a challenge the higher education sector is having a tough time meeting. There are more students…

  1. Financing of Private Outdoor Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    A survey of financial institutions was undertaken by the Bureau of Outdoor Recreation to evaluate the demand and availability of private credit for enterprises that provide outdoor recreation. The survey provided basic information for (1) evaluating legislative proposals for loan guarantee programs, (2) nationwide planning, and (3) assessing the…

  2. Privatization and the Public Good

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    After two centuries of public higher education in the United States, the covenant between public colleges and universities and the public that created and funded them is under strain. In a time of scarce resources and changing policy in many corners of the country and around the globe, privatization has emerged as a possible replacement for the…

  3. Michigan School Privatization Survey 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Daniel J.; LaFaive, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    From April 25 through June 30, 2007, the Mackinac Center for Public Policy conducted its fifth survey of the privatization of bus, food and janitorial services among Michigan's 552 conventional public school districts. All Michigan school districts responded. In 2007, the Mackinac Center also conducted a nationwide survey of state education…

  4. Public Schools: Make Them Private.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Milton

    1997-01-01

    A voucher system enabling parents to choose freely the schools their children attend is the most feasible way to improve education. Vouchers will encourage privatization. That will unleash the drive, imagination, and energy of competitive free enterprise to revolutionize the education process. Government schools will be forced to improve to retain…

  5. Financing a Private School Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    A recent National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS) survey of more than 1,200 individuals who filed financial aid forms underscores the central role financial aid plays in their ability to pursue a private education for their children. This article highlights the survey findings, demonstrating why school leaders need to thoroughly analyze…

  6. View from a Private School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Tom

    1993-01-01

    Counters Jonathan Kozol's concerns about educational vouchers, insisting that $2,500 could buy a quality private school education in Montgomery, Alabama. Critiques other voucher articles in the November 1992 "Educational Leadership" issue by challenging Alex Molnar's common school system concept and Arnold Fege's substitution of societal consensus…

  7. Private Tutoring and Social Cohesion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyneman, Stephen P.

    2011-01-01

    Mastering the public school curriculum is so important to a child's occupational future that in many regions of the world "shadow" education outside of the public system has now become the norm. In one way, this is excellent news because private investment in human capital is a strong contributor to economic and social development. However,…

  8. Public vs. Private (and beyond)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poliniak, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Different types of schools make for different experiences. Pros and cons abound, whether one teaches at a public, private, magnet, or charter school. Although it's certainly true that some individual schools may offer better environments for music education than others, no type of school is categorically the "best." Still, it can be instructive to…

  9. The Privatization of Public Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Richard

    2010-01-01

    For-profit education is not a new focus for public schools in the United States. It has been around for several decades, has stimulated considerable controversy, and has been heralded by some as a panacea for improving learning for the nation's public school students. For-profit schools are run by private, for-profit companies or organizations…

  10. Differentially Private Frequent Subgraph Mining

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shengzhi; Xiong, Li; Cheng, Xiang; Xiao, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Mining frequent subgraphs from a collection of input graphs is an important topic in data mining research. However, if the input graphs contain sensitive information, releasing frequent subgraphs may pose considerable threats to individual's privacy. In this paper, we study the problem of frequent subgraph mining (FGM) under the rigorous differential privacy model. We introduce a novel differentially private FGM algorithm, which is referred to as DFG. In this algorithm, we first privately identify frequent subgraphs from input graphs, and then compute the noisy support of each identified frequent subgraph. In particular, to privately identify frequent subgraphs, we present a frequent subgraph identification approach which can improve the utility of frequent subgraph identifications through candidates pruning. Moreover, to compute the noisy support of each identified frequent subgraph, we devise a lattice-based noisy support derivation approach, where a series of methods has been proposed to improve the accuracy of the noisy supports. Through formal privacy analysis, we prove that our DFG algorithm satisfies ε-differential privacy. Extensive experimental results on real datasets show that the DFG algorithm can privately find frequent subgraphs with high data utility.

  11. Differentially Private Frequent Subgraph Mining

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shengzhi; Xiong, Li; Cheng, Xiang; Xiao, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Mining frequent subgraphs from a collection of input graphs is an important topic in data mining research. However, if the input graphs contain sensitive information, releasing frequent subgraphs may pose considerable threats to individual's privacy. In this paper, we study the problem of frequent subgraph mining (FGM) under the rigorous differential privacy model. We introduce a novel differentially private FGM algorithm, which is referred to as DFG. In this algorithm, we first privately identify frequent subgraphs from input graphs, and then compute the noisy support of each identified frequent subgraph. In particular, to privately identify frequent subgraphs, we present a frequent subgraph identification approach which can improve the utility of frequent subgraph identifications through candidates pruning. Moreover, to compute the noisy support of each identified frequent subgraph, we devise a lattice-based noisy support derivation approach, where a series of methods has been proposed to improve the accuracy of the noisy supports. Through formal privacy analysis, we prove that our DFG algorithm satisfies ε-differential privacy. Extensive experimental results on real datasets show that the DFG algorithm can privately find frequent subgraphs with high data utility. PMID:27616876

  12. 28 CFR 302.1 - Public and private sector comment procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... JUSTICE COMMENTS ON UNICOR BUSINESS OPERATIONS § 302.1 Public and private sector comment procedures. (a... Industries, Inc. (UNICOR) may write to the Chief Operating Officer of UNICOR, or to the Chairman of the Board.... (b) Address correspondence as follows: (1) Chief Operating Officer, Federal Prison Industries,...

  13. The Managerial Turn in Higher Education? On the Interplay of Organizational and Occupational Change in German Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krücken, Georg; Blümel, Albrecht; Kloke, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    The managerial turn in academia is currently broadly discussed. Based on empirical data gathered from a sample that includes all German universities, we can give a broad and fine-grained account of this turn. What we can clearly see is that whole new categories of administrative management positions have been created over the last years.…

  14. Conflicting Views on Quality: Interpretations of "A Good University" by Representatives of the State, the Market and Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Udam, Maiki; Heidmets, Mati

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the results of research conducted over the period 2010-2012 in Estonia with the aim of identifying the expectations for the quality of higher education by principal parties in higher education, the state, the market and academia, as well as describing the differences and similarities in their expectations. The findings show…

  15. Implications of information from LANDSAT-4 for private industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, J. R.; Dykstra, J. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    The broader spectral coverage and higher resolution of LANDSAT-4 Thematic Mapper (TM) data open the door for identification from space of spectral phenomena associated with mineralization and microseepage of hydrocarbon. Digitally enhanced image products generated from TM data allow the mapping of many major and minor structural features that mark or influence emplacement of mineralization and accumulation of hydrocarbons. These improvements in capabilities over multispectral scanner data should accelerate the acceptance and integration of satellite data as a routinely used exploration tool that allows rapid examination of large areas in considerable detail. Imagery of Southern Ontario, Canada as well as of Cement, Oklahoma and Death Valley, California is discussed.

  16. Public-Private Partnerships Benefit Students and Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Tiffani

    2012-01-01

    In today's highly competitive job market, it takes more than just having the right training or degree to get hired. Many companies require previous work experience to even be considered for an interview. For young adults looking to enter the workforce for the first time, or older adults making a career change, this can be a frustrating situation.…

  17. 5 CFR 532.313 - Private sector industries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the physical, engineering, and life sciences (except biotechnology). 56172 Janitorial services. 62191... wholesalers. 42382 Farm and garden machinery and equipment merchant wholesalers. 4413 Automotive parts... product and parts manufacturing. 54131 Architectural services. 54133 Engineering services....

  18. 5 CFR 532.313 - Private sector industries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the physical, engineering, and life sciences (except biotechnology). 56172 Janitorial services. 62191... wholesalers. 42382 Farm and garden machinery and equipment merchant wholesalers. 4413 Automotive parts... product and parts manufacturing. 54131 Architectural services. 54133 Engineering services....

  19. 5 CFR 532.313 - Private sector industries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the physical, engineering, and life sciences (except biotechnology). 56172 Janitorial services. 62191... wholesalers. 42382 Farm and garden machinery and equipment merchant wholesalers. 4413 Automotive parts... product and parts manufacturing. 54131 Architectural services. 54133 Engineering services....

  20. 5 CFR 532.313 - Private sector industries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the physical, engineering, and life sciences (except biotechnology). 56172 Janitorial services. 62191... wholesalers. 42382 Farm and garden machinery and equipment merchant wholesalers. 4413 Automotive parts... product and parts manufacturing. 54131 Architectural services. 54133 Engineering services....

  1. 5 CFR 532.313 - Private sector industries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the physical, engineering, and life sciences (except biotechnology). 56172 Janitorial services. 62191... Automotive parts, accessories, and tire stores. 44421 Outdoor power equipment stores. 484 Truck... product and parts manufacturing. 54131 Architectural services. 54133 Engineering services....

  2. The Switch to Private Pension Plans for Teachers, 1982-2002: A Case of Freedom of Choice or Financial Scandal?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griggs, Clive

    2009-01-01

    In the early 1980s the Conservative Administration introduced legislation to promote private personal pension plans for public sector workers. An army of commission-driven sales staff from the financial services industry sought to persuade teachers and others to abandon their inflation-proof pension schemes for those offered by private companies.…

  3. The New Business Look in Employment and Training Programs. The Private Sector Initiative Program (PSIP). Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Uvaldo

    Intended to inform local communities (especially the business sector) of ways to join government-sponsored employment and training programs with the private employment market, this handbook provides broad guidelines for use in the establishment and operation of the Private Industry Council (PIC). (The PIC is the primary vehicle created by Title…

  4. Solar industrial process heat

    SciTech Connect

    Lumsdaine, E.

    1981-04-01

    The aim of the assessment reported is to candidly examine the contribution that solar industrial process heat (SIPH) is realistically able to make in the near and long-term energy futures of the United States. The performance history of government and privately funded SIPH demonstration programs, 15 of which are briefly summarized, and the present status of SIPH technology are discussed. The technical and performance characteristics of solar industrial process heat plants and equipment are reviewed, as well as evaluating how the operating experience of over a dozen SIPH demonstration projects is influencing institutional acceptance and economoc projections. Implications for domestic energy policy and international implications are briefly discussed. (LEW)

  5. Industrial Enterprise Handbook. The Wisconsin Guide to Local Curriculum Improvement in Industrial Education, K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison. Div. of Instructional Services.

    This handbook is designed to aid industrial educators in developing a private enterprise component in their programs in order to help students learn how business and industry work. It is a guide to implementing The Wisconsin Guide to Local Curriculum Improvement in Industrial Education, K-12. The book contains the following three sections: (1)…

  6. Multitasking in academia: Effective combinations of research, education and public outreach illustrated by a volcanic ash warning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bye, B. L.; Plag, H.

    2011-12-01

    Science permeates our society. Its role and its perceived importance evolves with time. Scientists today are highly specialized, yet society demands they master a variety of skills requiring not only a number of different competencies but also a broad mindset. Scientists are subjected to a meritocracy in terms of having to produce scientific papers. Peer-reviewed scientific publications used to be sufficient to meet the various laws and regulations with respect to dissemination of scientific results. This has dramatically changed; both expressed directly through public voices (such as in the climate change discourses), but also by politicians and policy makers. In some countries research funding now comes with specific requirements concerning public outreach that go way beyond peer-reviewed publications and presentation at scientific conferences. Science policies encourage multidisciplinary cooperation and scientific questions themselves often cannot be answered without knowledge and information from several scientific areas. Scientists increasingly need to communicate knowledge and results in more general terms as well as educating future generations. A huge challenge lies in developing the knowledge, human capacity and mindset that will allow an individual academician to contribute to education, communicate across scientific fields and sectors in multidisciplinary cross sectoral cooperations and also reach out to the general public while succeeding within the scientific meritocracy. We demonstrate how research, education and communication within and outside academia can effectively be combined through a presentation of the International Airways Volcano Watch that encompasses an operational volcanic ash warning system for the aviation industry. This presentation will show the role of science throughout the information flow, from basic science to the pilots' decision-making. Furthermore, it will illustrate how one can connect specific scientific topics to societal

  7. 77 FR 15566 - Private Transfer Fees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-16

    ... any private transfer fee covenants. (75 FR 49932). As described in the proposed guidance, private... (76 FR 6702) inviting comments on a proposal that incorporated a number of changes to the substance...

  8. NASA and Public-Private Partnerships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Gary L.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews ways to build public-private partnerships with NASA, and the many efforts that Ames Research Center is engaged in in building partnerships with private businesses, not profit organizations and universities.

  9. Education and the Private Finance Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griggs, Clive

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the development of Private Finance Initiative schemes in the United Kingdom, and reflects on how profitable opportunities for private financiers and construction companies were created at the expense of the public sector. (Contains 72 notes.)

  10. Private School Universe Survey: 1999-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broughman, Stephen P.; Colaciello, Lenore A.

    2001-01-01

    Presents universe data on private schools, teachers, and students by school size, school level, religious orientation, geographic region, community type, and program emphasis. Data are from the National Center for Education Statistics Private School Survey. (Author/SLD)

  11. 75 FR 39090 - Airport Privatization Pilot Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... procedures to be used in applications for exemption under the Airport Privatization Pilot Program (62 FR... Federal Aviation Administration Airport Privatization Pilot Program AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Gwinnett County Airport Briscoe Field (LZU), Lawrenceville, Georgia. SUMMARY: The Federal...

  12. 75 FR 68018 - Airport Privatization Pilot Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... procedures to be used in applications for exemption under Airport Privatization Pilot Program (62 FR 48693... Federal Aviation Administration Airport Privatization Pilot Program AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Airglades Airport (2IS), Clewiston, Florida. SUMMARY: The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)...

  13. Privatization and the Globalization of Energy Markets

    EIA Publications

    1996-01-01

    Discusses recent efforts at privatization in petroleum, electricity, and coal, as well as the impetus that privatization has provided in fostering the evolution of the multinational and multidimensional energy company.

  14. Natural resource workshop: Public/private partnership for sustainable use of natural resources

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    As part of an effort to shape Federal policy for environmentally sound, sustainable economic development, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy sponsored a workshop in Boise, Idaho on February 1--2, 1995. The Boise Idaho workshop focused on the sustainable use of natural resources, a topic of considerable interest in Idaho. The workshop gave representatives from industry, academia, research, the public, and local and state government an opportunity to provide input to lawmakers and policymakers for establishing a National Environmental Technology Strategy to be issued by Earth Day, 1995.

  15. A model for scholarship in nursing: the case of a private liberal arts college.

    PubMed

    Nelson, M L

    2001-01-01

    Faculty in the Department of Nursing at Augustana College, Sioux Falls, SD, focused their faculty development efforts for the 1997-1998 academic year on the creation of a scholarship model that would be both discipline-specific and relevant to Augustana's private liberal arts college identity. Rooted in Boyer's seminal re-examination of scholarship in academia, the Augustana model defines scholarship in nursing and delineates dimensions of scholarship, as well as the qualities of a scholar and criteria for evaluating scholarly endeavors. This evolving model has proven useful as a framework for faculty self-evaluation and peer review, as a guide for orienting undergraduate and graduate students to their own scholarly development, and as a framework to define criteria for final graduate student projects. The model is presented as an invitation to individual and collective scholarship development for every clinician, educator, theorist, and researcher in nursing.

  16. Mental Health Services at Selected Private Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hoof, Thomas J.; Sherwin, Tierney E.; Baggish, Rosemary C.; Tacy, Peter B.; Meehan, Thomas P.

    2004-01-01

    Private schools educate a significant percentage of US children and adolescents. Private schools, particularly where students reside during the academic year, assume responsibility for the health and well-being of their students. Children and adolescents experience mental health problems at a predictable rate, and private schools need a mechanism…

  17. 22 CFR 216.4 - Private applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Private applicants. 216.4 Section 216.4 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ENVIRONMENTAL PROCEDURES § 216.4 Private applicants. Programs, projects or activities for which financing from A.I.D. is sought by private applicants, such as PVOs...

  18. The Privatization of Education in Argentina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naradowski, Mariono; Andrada, Myrian

    2001-01-01

    Describes historical and current trends in Argentina's private and public primary- and secondary-school enrollment levels and policy reasons behind changes, including deregulation of private schools. Evaluates research analyzing impact of increased private-school enrollment; argues middle- and high-income students are opting out of public schools…

  19. Mathematic Achievement of Canadian Private School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cadigan, Francoise Jane; Wei, Yichun; Clifton, Rodney A.

    2013-01-01

    Very little Canadian research has examined the academic achievement of private school students. Data from The Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2003 were used to examine the achievement of private school students. The study found that private school students outperformed their public school peers. In addition, the…

  20. 45 CFR 84.39 - Private education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Private education. 84.39 Section 84.39 Public... Secondary Education § 84.39 Private education. (a) A recipient that provides private elementary or secondary education may not, on the basis of handicap, exclude a qualified handicapped person if the person can,...

  1. 45 CFR 605.39 - Private education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Private education. 605.39 Section 605.39 Public..., Elementary, and Secondary Education § 605.39 Private education. (a) A recipient that provides private elementary or secondary education may not, on the basis of handicap, exclude a qualified handicapped...

  2. 7 CFR 15b.28 - Private education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Private education. 15b.28 Section 15b.28 Agriculture... Education § 15b.28 Private education. (a) A recipient that provides private elementary or secondary education may not, on the basis of handicap, exclude a qualified handicapped person if the person can,...

  3. 7 CFR 15b.28 - Private education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Private education. 15b.28 Section 15b.28 Agriculture... Education § 15b.28 Private education. (a) A recipient that provides private elementary or secondary education may not, on the basis of handicap, exclude a qualified handicapped person if the person can,...

  4. 38 CFR 18.439 - Private education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Private education. 18.439... Adult Education § 18.439 Private education. (a) A recipient that provides private elementary or secondary education may not on the basis of handicap, exclude a qualified handicapped person if the...

  5. 7 CFR 15b.28 - Private education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Private education. 15b.28 Section 15b.28 Agriculture... Education § 15b.28 Private education. (a) A recipient that provides private elementary or secondary education may not, on the basis of handicap, exclude a qualified handicapped person if the person can,...

  6. 45 CFR 605.39 - Private education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Private education. 605.39 Section 605.39 Public..., Elementary, and Secondary Education § 605.39 Private education. (a) A recipient that provides private elementary or secondary education may not, on the basis of handicap, exclude a qualified handicapped...

  7. 7 CFR 15b.28 - Private education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Private education. 15b.28 Section 15b.28 Agriculture... Education § 15b.28 Private education. (a) A recipient that provides private elementary or secondary education may not, on the basis of handicap, exclude a qualified handicapped person if the person can,...

  8. 38 CFR 18.439 - Private education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Private education. 18.439... Adult Education § 18.439 Private education. (a) A recipient that provides private elementary or secondary education may not on the basis of handicap, exclude a qualified handicapped person if the...

  9. 38 CFR 18.439 - Private education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Private education. 18.439... Adult Education § 18.439 Private education. (a) A recipient that provides private elementary or secondary education may not on the basis of handicap, exclude a qualified handicapped person if the...

  10. 38 CFR 18.439 - Private education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Private education. 18.439... Adult Education § 18.439 Private education. (a) A recipient that provides private elementary or secondary education may not on the basis of handicap, exclude a qualified handicapped person if the...

  11. 45 CFR 84.39 - Private education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Private education. 84.39 Section 84.39 Public... Secondary Education § 84.39 Private education. (a) A recipient that provides private elementary or secondary education may not, on the basis of handicap, exclude a qualified handicapped person if the person can,...

  12. 45 CFR 605.39 - Private education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Private education. 605.39 Section 605.39 Public..., Elementary, and Secondary Education § 605.39 Private education. (a) A recipient that provides private elementary or secondary education may not, on the basis of handicap, exclude a qualified handicapped...

  13. 45 CFR 84.39 - Private education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Private education. 84.39 Section 84.39 Public... Secondary Education § 84.39 Private education. (a) A recipient that provides private elementary or secondary education may not, on the basis of handicap, exclude a qualified handicapped person if the person can,...

  14. 45 CFR 605.39 - Private education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Private education. 605.39 Section 605.39 Public..., Elementary, and Secondary Education § 605.39 Private education. (a) A recipient that provides private elementary or secondary education may not, on the basis of handicap, exclude a qualified handicapped...

  15. 45 CFR 84.39 - Private education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Private education. 84.39 Section 84.39 Public... Secondary Education § 84.39 Private education. (a) A recipient that provides private elementary or secondary education may not, on the basis of handicap, exclude a qualified handicapped person if the person can,...

  16. Private quantum subsystems and quasiorthogonal operator algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levick, Jeremy; Jochym-O'Connor, Tomas; Kribs, David W.; Laflamme, Raymond; Pereira, Rajesh

    2016-03-01

    We generalize a recently discovered example of a private quantum subsystem to find private subsystems for Abelian subgroups of the n-qubit Pauli group, which exist in the absence of private subspaces. In doing so, we also connect these quantum privacy investigations with the theory of quasiorthogonal operator algebras through the use of tools from group theory and operator theory.

  17. Private vs. Public Higher Education Budgeting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beamer, Sarah A.

    2011-01-01

    Private higher education institutions are those entities owned and operated by the private sector, while public institutions are those established, supported, and controlled by a governmental agency, most often a state. Key differences exist between private and public institutions that affect budgeting in critical ways. Such differences include…

  18. Does Privatization Affect Access to Government Information?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caponio, Joseph F.; Geffner, Janet

    This paper begins by pointing out that privatization, or relying on the private sector to provide commercial goods and services for government departments and agencies, is a tool that has been used effectively by the federal government for several decades. It then presents the theoretical basis for privatization, describes a number of methods used…

  19. 43 CFR 4750.1 - Private maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RANGE MANAGEMENT (4000) PROTECTION, MANAGEMENT, AND CONTROL OF WILD FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Private Maintenance § 4750.1 Private maintenance. The authorized officer shall make available for private maintenance all healthy excess wild horses or burros for which an adoption demand...

  20. 43 CFR 4750.1 - Private maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RANGE MANAGEMENT (4000) PROTECTION, MANAGEMENT, AND CONTROL OF WILD FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Private Maintenance § 4750.1 Private maintenance. The authorized officer shall make available for private maintenance all healthy excess wild horses or burros for which an adoption demand...

  1. 43 CFR 4750.1 - Private maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RANGE MANAGEMENT (4000) PROTECTION, MANAGEMENT, AND CONTROL OF WILD FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Private Maintenance § 4750.1 Private maintenance. The authorized officer shall make available for private maintenance all healthy excess wild horses or burros for which an adoption demand...

  2. 43 CFR 4750.1 - Private maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RANGE MANAGEMENT (4000) PROTECTION, MANAGEMENT, AND CONTROL OF WILD FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Private Maintenance § 4750.1 Private maintenance. The authorized officer shall make available for private maintenance all healthy excess wild horses or burros for which an adoption demand...

  3. Private Schooling and the Status Attainment Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Lionel S.; Wanner, Richard A.

    1979-01-01

    Examines effects of a private school education on educational, occupational, and earnings attainments. Using subsamples of respondents who attended private schools only and public schools only, the so-called private school advantage and its function in transmitting background related advantages is analyzed. (Author/DB)

  4. Privatization of Higher Education in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sivalingam, G.

    2007-01-01

    The study will trace the external factors influencing the liberalization, deregulation and privatization of higher education in Malaysia from 1970 to the present and to analyze the effects of liberalization, deregulation and privatization on the modes of privatization and the internal restructuring of institutions of higher learning to increase…

  5. An Alternative Instrument for Private School Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen-Zada, D.

    2009-01-01

    Empirical studies estimating the effect of private school competition on student outcomes commonly use the share of Catholics in the local population as an instrument for private school competition. I show that this is not a valid instrument since it is endogenous to private school competition and suggest using instead the local share of Catholics…

  6. 38 CFR 18.439 - Private education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Private education. 18.439... Adult Education § 18.439 Private education. (a) A recipient that provides private elementary or secondary education may not on the basis of handicap, exclude a qualified handicapped person if the...

  7. 45 CFR 605.39 - Private education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Private education. 605.39 Section 605.39 Public..., Elementary, and Secondary Education § 605.39 Private education. (a) A recipient that provides private elementary or secondary education may not, on the basis of handicap, exclude a qualified handicapped...

  8. 45 CFR 84.39 - Private education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Private education. 84.39 Section 84.39 Public... Secondary Education § 84.39 Private education. (a) A recipient that provides private elementary or secondary education may not, on the basis of handicap, exclude a qualified handicapped person if the person can,...

  9. 7 CFR 15b.28 - Private education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Private education. 15b.28 Section 15b.28 Agriculture... Education § 15b.28 Private education. (a) A recipient that provides private elementary or secondary education may not, on the basis of handicap, exclude a qualified handicapped person if the person can,...

  10. Forensic psychiatry in private practice.

    PubMed

    Modlin, H C; Felthous, A

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents statistical and explanatory analyses of 637 forensic psychiatry cases in a private practice setting during the past 12 years, highlighting the remarkable variety of clinical and legal issues addressed by forensic psychiatrists. Emphasis is on how and why forensic psychiatrists need to be expert diagnosticians and clinicians, and ways in which they may respond to difficult clinical and legal opinions are recommended.

  11. A Proposal for Public and Private Partnership in Extension

    PubMed Central

    Krell, Rayda K.; Fisher, Marc L.; Steffey, Kevin L.

    2016-01-01

    Public funding for Extension in the United States has been decreasing for many years, but farmers’ need for robust information on which to make management decisions has not diminished. The current Extension funding challenges provide motivation to explore a different model for developing and delivering extension. The private sector has partnered with the public sector to fund and conduct agricultural research, but partnering on extension delivery has occurred far less frequently. The fundamental academic strength and established Extension network of the public sector combined with the ability of the private sector to encourage and deliver practical, implementable solutions has the potential to provide measurable benefits to farmers. This paper describes the current Extension climate, presents data from a survey about Extension and industry relationships, presents case studies of successful public- and private-sector extension partnerships, and proposes a framework for evaluating the state of effective partnerships. Synergistic public–private extension efforts could ensure that farmers receive the most current and balanced information available to help with their management decisions. PMID:26949567

  12. United States Private-Sector Physicians and Pharmaceutical Contract Research: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Jill A.; Kalbaugh, Corey A.

    2012-01-01

    Background There have been dramatic increases over the past 20 years in the number of nonacademic, private-sector physicians who serve as principal investigators on US clinical trials sponsored by the pharmaceutical industry. However, there has been little research on the implications of these investigators' role in clinical investigation. Our objective was to study private-sector clinics involved in US pharmaceutical clinical trials to understand the contract research arrangements supporting drug development, and specifically how private-sector physicians engaged in contract research describe their professional identities. Methods and Findings We conducted a qualitative study in 2003–2004 combining observation at 25 private-sector research organizations in the southwestern United States and 63 semi-structured interviews with physicians, research staff, and research participants at those clinics. We used grounded theory to analyze and interpret our data. The 11 private-sector physicians who participated in our study reported becoming principal investigators on industry clinical trials primarily because contract research provides an additional revenue stream. The physicians reported that they saw themselves as trial practitioners and as businesspeople rather than as scientists or researchers. Conclusions Our findings suggest that in addition to having financial motivation to participate in contract research, these US private-sector physicians have a professional identity aligned with an industry-based approach to research ethics. The generalizability of these findings and whether they have changed in the intervening years should be addressed in future studies. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary. PMID:22911055

  13. TWRS privatization phase 1 master site plan

    SciTech Connect

    Parazin, R.J.

    1996-09-30

    The DOE-RL is pursuing a new business strategy of hiring private contractors for treatment of Hanford Site tank wastes. This strategy is called `privatization` and includes design, permitting, construction, operation and deactivation of facilities for tank waste treatment. The TWRS Privatization Infrastructure Project consists of several sub-projects which will provide key services needed to support the privatization mission. This master site plan presently describes all pertinent aspects of the site and identifies all planned provisions for site development, utilities and other site services. It is a baseline document which will be revised as privatization proceeds through design, construction and start-up.

  14. Private equity investments beyond Earth orbits: Can space exploration be the new frontier for private investments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathurin, Jeph; Peter, Nicolas

    2006-07-01

    The year 2004 can be considered an important milestone for space activities. First, on January 14, 2004 President Bush announced a new vision for human and robotic space exploration named "A Renewed Spirit of Discovery". This new space exploration policy called for "a sustained and affordable human and robotic program to explore the solar system and beyond" and seeks also to "promote international and commercial participation in space exploration to further US scientific, security, and economic interests". Secondly, the satellite industry has experienced a trend of private investment fund acquisitions. Five of six major fixed and mobile satellite service providers in the world have been partly or entirely sold to conventional financial investors. These transactions have taken place despite the background noise of overcapacity, stagnant growth and declining operating margins satellite services sector. Over the last 18 months, we have seen a total of approximately US $12B dollars in private equity transactions in the satellite sector. Finally, the Ansari X prize has been won opening the possibility of the personal spaceflight revolution. This paper seeks to provide some insights into the nature, timing and a rationale for these investments in the space sector. Then, an attempt is made to analyze the potential that space exploration might present for traditional financial investors.

  15. Investing private capital in private-public partnerships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadd, Courtney A.

    1996-03-01

    Businesses must invest in technology to sustain and enhance their profitability over the long-term. Two of today's greatest challenges are rapidly emerging new technologies and rapidly changing customer preferences. To meet these challenges, businesses must recoup technology investments over shorter product life cycles and reduce new product development times. The associated risk is extraordinary. Businesses reduce this risk through partnerships, strategic alliances, and joint ventures; however, public sector partners are not routinely included in new technology and product development decisions. This paper discusses general decision criteria for technology investment and how decisions may be enhanced through the use of private-public partnerships.

  16. [Nurturing clinician investigators is the best way to promote innovative drug development from academia].

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Shunichi; Sakushima, Ken; Nishimura, Masaharu

    2012-03-01

    Clinical research in Japan is still lacking in quality and quantity, and that situation is worsening. One important cause of those problems is the dearth of clinician-investigators. A recent change in the system for post-graduate clinical training affected the career paths of medical residents and reduced the number of young doctors who enter graduate school. Even those who are interested in clinical research now have incentives to avoid graduate school. In Japan, 19th-century biological absolutism is still the dominant paradigm in the medical-research community. Science for public health in the 21st century will benefit from a probabilistic paradigm, which can help to restore an appropriate balance between basic sciences and clinical research. Research done by clinician-investigators should be based on clinical questions that arise in medical practice. That research includes investigation of disease and practice, exploration of associations between causes and outcomes, evaluation of diagnostic tests, and studies of the efficacy of treatments and prevention strategies. We emphasize the importance of nurturing clinician-investigators for the development of clinical research in Japan. This may not be the fastest way to promote innovative drug development from academia, but it is certainly the best.

  17. [Nurturing clinician investigators is the best way to promote innovative drug development from academia].

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Shunichi; Sakushima, Ken; Nishimura, Masaharu

    2012-03-01

    Clinical research in Japan is still lacking in quality and quantity, and that situation is worsening. One important cause of those problems is the dearth of clinician-investigators. A recent change in the system for post-graduate clinical training affected the career paths of medical residents and reduced the number of young doctors who enter graduate school. Even those who are interested in clinical research now have incentives to avoid graduate school. In Japan, 19th-century biological absolutism is still the dominant paradigm in the medical-research community. Science for public health in the 21st century will benefit from a probabilistic paradigm, which can help to restore an appropriate balance between basic sciences and clinical research. Research done by clinician-investigators should be based on clinical questions that arise in medical practice. That research includes investigation of disease and practice, exploration of associations between causes and outcomes, evaluation of diagnostic tests, and studies of the efficacy of treatments and prevention strategies. We emphasize the importance of nurturing clinician-investigators for the development of clinical research in Japan. This may not be the fastest way to promote innovative drug development from academia, but it is certainly the best. PMID:22402715

  18. Engaging academia to advance the science and practice of environmental public health tracking

    PubMed Central

    Strosnider, Heather; Zhou, Ying; Balluz, Lina; Qualters, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Public health agencies at the federal, state, and local level are responsible for implementing actions and policies that address health problems related to environmental hazards. These actions and policies can be informed by integrating or linking data on health, exposure, hazards, and population. The mission of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Environmental Public Health Tracking Program (Tracking Program) is to provide information from a nationwide network of integrated health, environmental hazard, and exposure data that drives actions to improve the health of communities. The Tracking Program and federal, state, and local partners collect, integrate, analyze, and disseminate data and information to inform environmental public health actions. However, many challenges exist regarding the availability and quality of data, the application of appropriate methods and tools to link data, and the state of the science needed to link and analyze health and environmental data. The Tracking Program has collaborated with academia to address key challenges in these areas. The collaboration has improved our understanding of the uses and limitations of available data and methods, expanded the use of existing data and methods, and increased our knowledge about the connections between health and environment. Valuable working relationships have been forged in this process, and together we have identified opportunities and improvements for future collaborations to further advance the science and practice of environmental public health tracking. PMID:25038624

  19. Engaging academia to advance the science and practice of environmental public health tracking.

    PubMed

    Strosnider, Heather; Zhou, Ying; Balluz, Lina; Qualters, Judith

    2014-10-01

    Public health agencies at the federal, state, and local level are responsible for implementing actions and policies that address health problems related to environmental hazards. These actions and policies can be informed by integrating or linking data on health, exposure, hazards, and population. The mission of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention׳s National Environmental Public Health Tracking Program (Tracking Program) is to provide information from a nationwide network of integrated health, environmental hazard, and exposure data that drives actions to improve the health of communities. The Tracking Program and federal, state, and local partners collect, integrate, analyze, and disseminate data and information to inform environmental public health actions. However, many challenges exist regarding the availability and quality of data, the application of appropriate methods and tools to link data, and the state of the science needed to link and analyze health and environmental data. The Tracking Program has collaborated with academia to address key challenges in these areas. The collaboration has improved our understanding of the uses and limitations of available data and methods, expanded the use of existing data and methods, and increased our knowledge about the connections between health and environment. Valuable working relationships have been forged in this process, and together we have identified opportunities and improvements for future collaborations to further advance the science and practice of environmental public health tracking.

  20. Is contracting a form of privatization?

    PubMed Central

    Perrot, Jean

    2006-01-01

    Contracting is often seen as a form of privatization, with contracts functioning as the tool that makes privatization possible. But contracting is also viewed by some as a means for the private sector to expand in a covert way its presence within the health sector. This article discusses the wider meaning of the term privatization in the health sector and the ways in which it is achieved. Privatization is seen here not simply as an action that leads to a new situation but also as one that leads to a change in behaviour. It is proposed that privatization may be assessed by looking at the ownership, management, and mission or objectives of the entity being privatized. Discussed also is the use of contracting by the state as a tool for state interventionism that is not based on authoritarian regulation. PMID:17143466

  1. Health care privatization in Latin America: comparing divergent privatization approaches in Chile, Colombia, and Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Arturo Vargas; Méndez, Claudio A

    2014-08-01

    The public-private mix in Chile, Colombia, and Mexico was very similar until the early 1980s when Chile undertook health care privatization as part of comprehensive health care reform. Since then, health care privatization policies have diverged in these countries. In this study we characterize health care privatization in Latin America and identify the main factors that promoted and hindered privatization by comparing the experiences of these countries. We argue that policy elites took advantage of specific policy environments and the diffusion of privatization policies to promote health care privatization while political mobilization against privatization, competing policy priorities, weak market and government institutions, and efforts to reach universal health insurance hindered privatization. The privatization approaches of Chile and Colombia were classified as "big-bang," since these countries implemented health care privatization more rapidly and with a wider scope compared with the case of Mexico, which was classified as gradualist, since the privatization path followed by this country adopted a slower pace and became more limited and focalized over time. We conclude that the emphasis on policy-driven privatization diminished in the 1990s and 2000s because of increased public health care financing and a shift in health care reform priorities. Health care privatization in the region, however, continued as a consequence of demand-driven privatization. PMID:24842976

  2. Health care privatization in Latin America: comparing divergent privatization approaches in Chile, Colombia, and Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Arturo Vargas; Méndez, Claudio A

    2014-08-01

    The public-private mix in Chile, Colombia, and Mexico was very similar until the early 1980s when Chile undertook health care privatization as part of comprehensive health care reform. Since then, health care privatization policies have diverged in these countries. In this study we characterize health care privatization in Latin America and identify the main factors that promoted and hindered privatization by comparing the experiences of these countries. We argue that policy elites took advantage of specific policy environments and the diffusion of privatization policies to promote health care privatization while political mobilization against privatization, competing policy priorities, weak market and government institutions, and efforts to reach universal health insurance hindered privatization. The privatization approaches of Chile and Colombia were classified as "big-bang," since these countries implemented health care privatization more rapidly and with a wider scope compared with the case of Mexico, which was classified as gradualist, since the privatization path followed by this country adopted a slower pace and became more limited and focalized over time. We conclude that the emphasis on policy-driven privatization diminished in the 1990s and 2000s because of increased public health care financing and a shift in health care reform priorities. Health care privatization in the region, however, continued as a consequence of demand-driven privatization.

  3. Drug information residency rotation with pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Cramer, R L

    1986-01-01

    A drug information rotation in pharmaceutical industry may be elected as a component of a hospital pharmacy residency program. Program objectives include improving communication between the pharmaceutical industry and hospital pharmacy/academia, exposing the resident to the challenges the pharmaceutical industry encounters, improving proficiency in drug information practice, and providing insight into the working relationships of various departments within the company. During the rotation, the resident serves as a member of the Drug Information Service. Resident activities include participating in interviews with corporate professionals, updating pharmacokinetic profiles, responding to drug information requests and participating in other information projects. This rotation enables the resident to better understand pharmaceutical industry's concerns and relate these concerns to clinical pharmacy practice. PMID:10277398

  4. Collaborative Business Models for Exploration: - The Expansion of Public-Private Partnerships to Enable Exploration and Improve the Quality of Life on Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    In May of 2007, The Space Life Sciences Strategy was published, launching a series of efforts aimed at driving human health and performance innovations that both meet space flight needs and benefit life on Earth. These efforts, led by the Space Life Science Directorate (SLSD) at the NASA Johnson Space Center, led to the development and implementation of the NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC) in October 2010. The NHHPC now has over 100 members including seven NASA centers; other federal agencies; some of the International Space Station partners; industry; academia and non-profits. The NHHPC seeks to share best practices, develop collaborative projects and experiment with open collaboration techniques such as crowdsourcing. Using this approach, the NHHPC collaborative projects are anticipated to be at the earliest possible stage of development utilizing the many possible public-private partnerships in this center. Two workshops have been successfully conducted in 2011 (January and October) with a third workshop planned for the spring of 2012. The challenges of space flight are similar in many respects to providing health care and environmental monitoring in challenging settings on the earth. These challenges to technology development include the need for low power consumption, low weight, in-situ analysis, operator independence (i.e., minimal training), robustness, and limited resupply or maintenance. When similar technology challenges are identified (such as the need to provide and monitor a safe water supply or develop a portable medical diagnostic device for remote use), opportunities arise for public-private partnerships to engage in co-creation of novel approaches for space exploration and health and environmental applications on earth. This approach can enable the use of shared resources to reduce costs, engage other organizations and the public in participatory exploration (solving real-world problems), and provide technologies with multiple uses

  5. University-Industry Partnership: An Important Cornerstone for Puerto Rico's Biotechnology Cluster Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saliceti-Piazza, L.; Buxeda, R.; Rivera, E.; Hormaza, M.; Morell, L.

    2003-01-01

    Successful knowledge-based economic models rely on synergy between government, industry and academia. This paper reviews the efforts to convert the island of Puerto Rico from a manufacturing to a high-tech manufacturing/research and development economy, with information technology and biotechnology as the main development strongholds. The…

  6. The Role of Context in Academic Capitalism: The Industry-Friendly Department Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    This study shows a case of a department heavily involved in industry-academia collaborations and patenting activities while exhibiting high levels of academic norms such as teaching, basic research, academic freedom and free dissemination of knowledge. Based on the findings, the author argues that academic capitalism is a highly contextual…

  7. A NASA/University/Industry Consortium for Research on Aircraft Ice Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumwalt, Glen W.

    1989-01-01

    From 1982 through 1987, an unique consortium was functioning which involved government (NASA), academia (Wichita State Univ.) and twelve industries. The purpose was the development of a better ice protection systems for aircraft. The circumstances which brought about this activity are described, the formation and operation recounted, and the effectiveness of the ventue evaluated.

  8. Academic-Industry Collaboration under Federal Grants and Cooperative Agreements: Financial, Administrative, and Regulatory Compliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferreira, William F.

    2011-01-01

    Federal sponsorship of collaboration between academic institutions and industry is on the rise. Many government programs emphasize cooperation between universities and the commercial sector as a means to merge basic and applied research, promote economic development, and enhance knowledge dissemination. The intersection between academia and…

  9. Students' Perception of Industrial Internship Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renganathan, Sumathi; Karim, Zainal Ambri Bin Abdul; Li, Chong Su

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: An important aspect of an academic curriculum in higher learning institutions for technical disciplines is the industrial internship programme for students. The purpose of this paper is to investigate students' perception of the effectiveness of an industrial internship programme offered by a private technological university in Malaysia.…

  10. Skills Conversion Project, Chapter 12, Leisure Industries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Society of Professional Engineers, Washington, DC.

    The Skills Conversion Project conducted by the National Society of Professional Engineers sought to study the transition mechanisms required to transfer available technical manpower from aerospace and defense industries into other areas of employment in private industry and public service. Fourteen study teams assessed the likelihood of future…

  11. TWRS privatization bibliography. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this bibliography is to present a select set of documents that may be of interest to the Offeror, covering a variety of subject areas related to the TWRS Privatization Project. This bibliography is not, nor is it intended to be, exhaustive or complete. It was prepared with the intent of providing a sampling of representative documents potentially helpful to Offerors. This bibliography is organized by subject area. The subjects covered are: waste characterization; pre-treatment; high-level waste immobilization; low-level waste immobilization; low-level waste melter test program; performance assessment; general; and safety.

  12. Snore related signals processing in a private cloud computing system.

    PubMed

    Qian, Kun; Guo, Jian; Xu, Huijie; Zhu, Zhaomeng; Zhang, Gongxuan

    2014-09-01

    Snore related signals (SRS) have been demonstrated to carry important information about the obstruction site and degree in the upper airway of Obstructive Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome (OSAHS) patients in recent years. To make this acoustic signal analysis method more accurate and robust, big SRS data processing is inevitable. As an emerging concept and technology, cloud computing has motivated numerous researchers and engineers to exploit applications both in academic and industry field, which could have an ability to implement a huge blue print in biomedical engineering. Considering the security and transferring requirement of biomedical data, we designed a system based on private cloud computing to process SRS. Then we set the comparable experiments of processing a 5-hour audio recording of an OSAHS patient by a personal computer, a server and a private cloud computing system to demonstrate the efficiency of the infrastructure we proposed. PMID:25205499

  13. Snore related signals processing in a private cloud computing system.

    PubMed

    Qian, Kun; Guo, Jian; Xu, Huijie; Zhu, Zhaomeng; Zhang, Gongxuan

    2014-09-01

    Snore related signals (SRS) have been demonstrated to carry important information about the obstruction site and degree in the upper airway of Obstructive Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome (OSAHS) patients in recent years. To make this acoustic signal analysis method more accurate and robust, big SRS data processing is inevitable. As an emerging concept and technology, cloud computing has motivated numerous researchers and engineers to exploit applications both in academic and industry field, which could have an ability to implement a huge blue print in biomedical engineering. Considering the security and transferring requirement of biomedical data, we designed a system based on private cloud computing to process SRS. Then we set the comparable experiments of processing a 5-hour audio recording of an OSAHS patient by a personal computer, a server and a private cloud computing system to demonstrate the efficiency of the infrastructure we proposed.

  14. Training's Policies: Public and Private Reinforcement for the American Economy. Final Report. The Impact of Public Policy on Education and Training in the Private Sector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyerson, Martin; Zemsky, Robert

    A study examined the impact of public policy on education and training in the private sector. During the study, the following research activities were completed: a statistical examination of the scope and nature of firm-supplied training, 20 case studies of the training supplied by large firms representing a diverse set of industries across the…

  15. Future Public Policy and Ethical Issues Facing the Agricultural and Microbial Genomics Sectors of the Biotechnology Industry: A Roundtable Discussion

    SciTech Connect

    Diane E. Hoffmann

    2003-09-12

    issues or problems, simply to identify those topics that deserve our attention as a society. Some of the issues may benefit from legislation at the federal or state levels, others may be more appropriately addressed by the private sector. Participants at the roundtable included over a dozen experts in the areas of microbiology, intellectual property, agricultural biotechnology, microbial genomics, bioterrorism, economic development, biotechnology research, and bioethics. These experts came from federal and state government, industry and academia. The participants were asked to come to the roundtable with a written statement of the top three to five public policy/ ethical issues they viewed as most likely to be significant to the industry and to policy makers over the next several years.

  16. Leveraging public private partnerships to innovate under challenging budget times.

    PubMed

    Portilla, Lili M; Rohrbaugh, Mark L

    2014-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH), academic medical centers and industry have a long and productive history in collaborating together. Decreasing R&D budgets in both the private and public sector have made the need for such collaborations paramount to reduce the risk of further declines in the number of innovative drugs reaching the market to address pressing public health needs. Doing more with less has forced both industry and public sector research institutions (PSRIs) to leverage resources and expertise in order to de-risk projects. In addition, it provides an opportunity to envision and implement new approaches to accomplish these goals. We discuss several of these innovative collaborations and partnerships at the NIH that demonstrate how the NIH and industry are working together to strengthen the drug development pipeline. PMID:24283971

  17. Leveraging Public Private Partnerships to Innovate Under Challenging Budget Times

    PubMed Central

    Portilla, Lili M.; Rohrbaugh, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH), academic medical centers and industry have a long and productive history in collaborating together. Decreasing R&D budgets both the private and public sector have made the need for such collaborations paramount [critical?] to reduce the risk of [further?] declines in the number of innovative drugs reaching the market to address pressing public health needs. Doing more with less has forced both industry and public sector research institutions (PSRIs) to leverage resources and expertise in order to de-risk projects. In addition, it provides an opportunity to envision and implement new approaches to accomplish these goals. We discuss several of these innovative collaborations and partnerships at the NIH that demonstrate how the NIH and industry are working together to strenghten the drug development pipeline. PMID:24283971

  18. Examining Workplace Ostracism Experiences in Academia: Understanding How Differences in the Faculty Ranks Influence Inclusive Climates on Campus.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Carla A; Carter-Sowell, Adrienne R; Xu, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    Research on the retention of women in academia has focused on challenges, including a "chilly climate," devaluation, and incivility. The unique consequences of workplace ostracism - being ignored and excluded by others in an organizational setting - require focus on this experience as another interpersonal challenge for women in academia. The purpose of this study is to examine differences in the faculty experiences and outcomes of workplace ostracism, and to determine if these experiences are affected significantly by the gender composition of an employee's specific department. Participants were recruited at two time points to complete campus climate surveys that were distributed to faculty at a large, public, research university. We examined the number of reported ostracism experiences (Study 1) and perceived information sharing (Study 2) among male and female university faculty. The findings indicated that female faculty members perceived more workplace ostracism than male faculty members. Analyses of department gender ratios suggested that the proportion of women in the department did not reduce the amount of workplace ostracism experienced by women. No gender differences were found in perceived information sharing. However, we found that Faculty of Color, both men and women, reported more frequent information exclusion than White faculty. These results have important implications for theoretical and practical understandings of workplace demography and suggest that it is necessary to look at subtle, ambiguous forms of discrimination in order to increase retention of faculty from underrepresented groups in academia.

  19. [An analysis of national projects of scientific research in Japanese acupuncture-moxibustion academia during recent 40 years].

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Kushizaki, Masateru

    2013-02-01

    Adopting bibliometrics research methods to categorize and analyze the acupuncture scientific research findings which has been published by the KAKEN Database of Grants-In-Aid for Scientific Research, and moreover compared results from some of the winning national research projects published by the Internet-based Science Information System of China in 2011. Upon evaluation, it is found that the applied logic of Japanese acupuncture academia is clearer and the fixed position is more accurate. The achivments and academic thought of Japan acup-mox cirde will in some way inspire the acupuncture researchers in China regarding project selection and help them to avoid invalid or duplicate research. Furthermore, it is concluded that Chinese acupuncture academia is focusing on basic research and is showing the spirit for the scientific research as the cradle of acupuncture and moxibustion. In comparison, Japanese acupuncture academia is re nowned for their focus on the subtle interplay of basic and clinical research, as well as attention to detail, serves as a testament to their straightforward, absence of pretense as a country of practical scientific research.

  20. Examining Workplace Ostracism Experiences in Academia: Understanding How Differences in the Faculty Ranks Influence Inclusive Climates on Campus.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Carla A; Carter-Sowell, Adrienne R; Xu, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    Research on the retention of women in academia has focused on challenges, including a "chilly climate," devaluation, and incivility. The unique consequences of workplace ostracism - being ignored and excluded by others in an organizational setting - require focus on this experience as another interpersonal challenge for women in academia. The purpose of this study is to examine differences in the faculty experiences and outcomes of workplace ostracism, and to determine if these experiences are affected significantly by the gender composition of an employee's specific department. Participants were recruited at two time points to complete campus climate surveys that were distributed to faculty at a large, public, research university. We examined the number of reported ostracism experiences (Study 1) and perceived information sharing (Study 2) among male and female university faculty. The findings indicated that female faculty members perceived more workplace ostracism than male faculty members. Analyses of department gender ratios suggested that the proportion of women in the department did not reduce the amount of workplace ostracism experienced by women. No gender differences were found in perceived information sharing. However, we found that Faculty of Color, both men and women, reported more frequent information exclusion than White faculty. These results have important implications for theoretical and practical understandings of workplace demography and suggest that it is necessary to look at subtle, ambiguous forms of discrimination in order to increase retention of faculty from underrepresented groups in academia. PMID:27303322

  1. Examining Workplace Ostracism Experiences in Academia: Understanding How Differences in the Faculty Ranks Influence Inclusive Climates on Campus

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Carla A.; Carter-Sowell, Adrienne R.; Xu, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    Research on the retention of women in academia has focused on challenges, including a “chilly climate,” devaluation, and incivility. The unique consequences of workplace ostracism – being ignored and excluded by others in an organizational setting – require focus on this experience as another interpersonal challenge for women in academia. The purpose of this study is to examine differences in the faculty experiences and outcomes of workplace ostracism, and to determine if these experiences are affected significantly by the gender composition of an employee’s specific department. Participants were recruited at two time points to complete campus climate surveys that were distributed to faculty at a large, public, research university. We examined the number of reported ostracism experiences (Study 1) and perceived information sharing (Study 2) among male and female university faculty. The findings indicated that female faculty members perceived more workplace ostracism than male faculty members. Analyses of department gender ratios suggested that the proportion of women in the department did not reduce the amount of workplace ostracism experienced by women. No gender differences were found in perceived information sharing. However, we found that Faculty of Color, both men and women, reported more frequent information exclusion than White faculty. These results have important implications for theoretical and practical understandings of workplace demography and suggest that it is necessary to look at subtle, ambiguous forms of discrimination in order to increase retention of faculty from underrepresented groups in academia. PMID:27303322

  2. 34 CFR 200.10 - Applicability of a State's academic assessments to private schools and private school students.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... private schools and private school students. 200.10 Section 200.10 Education Regulations of the Offices of... assessments to private schools and private school students. (a) Nothing in § 200.1 or § 200.2 requires a private school, including a private school whose students receive services under subpart A of this...

  3. Food industry: friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Yach, D

    2014-01-01

    Open discourse and tolerance between the food industry and public sector is limited. As a result, the public and private sectors are reluctant to collaborate on pressing nutritional issues. Those in the public sector have never heard what they could do to encourage a food company's transition towards healthier foods and beverages, whereas many in the private sector dismissed policies and actions initiated within the public sector. During my career, I have sought to engage the broadest possible stakeholder groups required to develop evidence-based policies and with the aim of improving public health. My recent experience in industry confirmed my view about the need for scientific exchange regardless of the disagreements about policy. Open discourse and partnering is essential if we are to tackle complex food and health issues and improve the global food system. Private-public engagement can provide faster and more sustainable results than government alone without impacting profits. Moreover, a high-quality product in smaller portions will have higher profit margins than a bargain-sized product of lower quality. The food industry and private sector must come together to implement innovative strategies to address urgent nutritional needs. PMID:24180599

  4. Food industry: friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Yach, D

    2014-01-01

    Open discourse and tolerance between the food industry and public sector is limited. As a result, the public and private sectors are reluctant to collaborate on pressing nutritional issues. Those in the public sector have never heard what they could do to encourage a food company's transition towards healthier foods and beverages, whereas many in the private sector dismissed policies and actions initiated within the public sector. During my career, I have sought to engage the broadest possible stakeholder groups required to develop evidence-based policies and with the aim of improving public health. My recent experience in industry confirmed my view about the need for scientific exchange regardless of the disagreements about policy. Open discourse and partnering is essential if we are to tackle complex food and health issues and improve the global food system. Private-public engagement can provide faster and more sustainable results than government alone without impacting profits. Moreover, a high-quality product in smaller portions will have higher profit margins than a bargain-sized product of lower quality. The food industry and private sector must come together to implement innovative strategies to address urgent nutritional needs.

  5. Setting Up Private Practice in Psychiatry*

    PubMed Central

    De Sousa, Alan; De Sousa, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Setting up a private practice in Mumbai is an onerous task. The present paper looks at the difficulties face by young psychiatrists when starting a private practice in psychiatry. It suggests certain guidelines to be followed to ensure the development of a successful practice. It also suggests methods to gain popularity among patients and society along with the ethics to be followed, knowledge base to be garnered, and the role of using multiple therapies and versatility in private practice. PMID:25838718

  6. Industry Job Hunting for PhDs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silbernagel, Bernard

    2006-03-01

    The industrial environment presents opportunities and challenges that are significantly different from those in academia. The research problems encountered are often complex and the solutions are generally sought by teams of researchers with a variety of skills from different disciplines. An important criterion for a new researcher in industry is that they be able to represent their area of competency on such a team. In most instances, hiring decisions are based on a reasonable compatibility of the candidate's skills and the needs of the research area, but the supposition is that the individual will evolve with time and with changing assignments. Important attributes for the candidate are solid technical strength in their area of expertise, good ``peripheral vision'' of science and technology in proximate and more remote areas, and a willingness to adapt to changes in the direction of the project. In contrast to academia, there are a variety of career paths for the industrial scientist, including a long-term participation in research and development, migration into the more practical aspects of the business (such as problem-solving or technical liaison) or management. Initially, it will probably not be apparent which of these paths is the most desirable and, in fact, a person may be involved with more than one during the course of their career. Each of these paths, or a combination of them, can be extremely satisfying and rewarding.

  7. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    An overview of the industrial diamond industry is provided. More than 90 percent of the industrial diamond consumed in the U.S. and the rest of the world is manufactured diamond. Ireland, Japan, Russia, and the U.S. produce 75 percent of the global industrial diamond output. In 2000, the U.S. was the largest market for industrial diamond. Industrial diamond applications, prices for industrial diamonds, imports and exports of industrial diamonds, the National Defense Stockpile of industrial diamonds, and the outlook for the industrial diamond market are discussed.

  8. Private hospitals in Latin America - An investor's perspective.

    PubMed

    Cleaton-Jones, Ioan P

    2015-01-01

    Private hospitals are expanding in Latin America, but the industry is less developed in this region than in some other emerging markets. Groups of hospitals are emerging in countries such as Brazil, Mexico, Colombia and Peru. However, they haven't reached the size of hospital groups in Malaysia, India and South Africa. They also remain domestically focused, while companies from the aforementioned three emerging markets outside Latin America have expanded to multiple other countries and have listed on stock exchanges to access more capital to finance their expansion. It is very likely that these trends seen in other emerging markets will manifest in Latin America as it continues to develop. PMID:26521378

  9. Application of clustering for customer segmentation in private banking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xuan; Chen, Jin; Hao, Pengpeng; Wang, Yanbo J.

    2015-07-01

    With fierce competition in banking industry, more and more banks have realised that accurate customer segmentation is of fundamental importance, especially for the identification of those high-value customers. In order to solve this problem, we collected real data about private banking customers of a commercial bank in China, conducted empirical analysis by applying K-means clustering technique. When determine the K value, we propose a mechanism that meet both academic requirements and practical needs. Through K-means clustering, we successfully segmented the customers into three categories, and features of each group have been illustrated in details.

  10. Public/private sector partnership for emerging infections.

    PubMed Central

    Bond, E. C.

    2001-01-01

    This paper gives examples of public/private partnerships that support research, support drug development and that advance policy development, suggesting that such partnerships can advance our understanding and control of emerging infections. The investment in emerging infectious diseases from government and from industry is currently much larger than that from philanthropy. Nevertheless philanthropy, even with limited dollars, is able to play a catalytic function and provide risk capitol for innovative partnerships and could in the future play an even larger role if the value of such investment is better defined and argued to recruit additional dollars to this area. PMID:11485645

  11. Private hospitals in Latin America - An investor's perspective.

    PubMed

    Cleaton-Jones, Ioan P

    2015-01-01

    Private hospitals are expanding in Latin America, but the industry is less developed in this region than in some other emerging markets. Groups of hospitals are emerging in countries such as Brazil, Mexico, Colombia and Peru. However, they haven't reached the size of hospital groups in Malaysia, India and South Africa. They also remain domestically focused, while companies from the aforementioned three emerging markets outside Latin America have expanded to multiple other countries and have listed on stock exchanges to access more capital to finance their expansion. It is very likely that these trends seen in other emerging markets will manifest in Latin America as it continues to develop.

  12. Transnational Tobacco Company Influence on Tax Policy During Privatization of a State Monopoly: British American Tobacco and Uzbekistan

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, Anna; Collin, Jeff; Townsend, Joy

    2007-01-01

    Objectives. The International Monetary Fund encourages privatization of state-owned tobacco industries. Privatization tends to lower cigarette prices, which encourages consumption. This could be countered with effective tax policies. We explored how investment by British American Tobacco (BAT) influenced tax policy in Uzbekistan during privatization there. Methods. We obtained internal documents from BAT and analyzed them using a hermeneutic process to create a chronology of events. Results. BAT thoroughly redesigned the tobacco taxation system in Uzbekistan. It secured (1) a reduction of approximately 50% in the excise tax on cigarettes, (2) an excise system to benefit its brands and disadvantage those of its competitors (particularly Philip Morris), and (3) a tax stamp system from which it hoped to be exempted, because this would likely facilitate its established practice of cigarette smuggling and further its competitive advantage.. Conclusions. Privatization can endanger effective tobacco excise policies. The International Monetary Fund should review its approach to privatization and differentiate the privatization of an industry whose product kills from privatization of other industries. PMID:17138915

  13. Live cell imaging: an industrial perspective.

    PubMed

    McCann, Terry

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of live cells using automated fluorescence microscopy systems on an industrial scale is known as high content screening/analysis (HCS/A). Its development has been driven both by the demands of compound screening in the drug discovery industry and by the promise of whole genome functional analyses using siRNA knockouts. This chapter outlines the primary applications of HCS/A within the drug discovery process and in systems cell biology. It discusses specific issues which must be addressed when undertaking HCS/A, such as choice of cells, probes, labels, and assay type. Drawing from information gathered from surveys of key users of HCS/A in industry and academia, it then provides a detailed description of HCS/A user issues and requirements, before concluding with a summary of the imaging instrumentation currently available for live cell HCS/A.

  14. Policy change and private health insurance: did the cheapest policy do the trick?

    PubMed

    Butler, James R G

    2002-01-01

    From the introduction of Australia's national health insurance scheme (Medicare) in 1984 until recently, the proportion of the population covered by private health insurance declined steadily. Following an Industry Commission inquiry into the private health insurance industry in 1997, a number of policy changes were effected in an attempt to reverse this trend. The main policy changes were of two types: "carrots and sticks" financial incentives that provided subsidies for purchasing, or tax penalties for not purchasing, private health insurance; and lifetime community rating, which aimed to revise the community rating regulations governing private health insurance in Australia. This paper argues that the membership uptake that has occurred recently is largely attributable to the introduction of lifetime community rating which goes some way towards addressing the adverse selection associated with the previous community rating regulations. This policy change had virtually no cost to government. However, it was introduced after subsidies for private health insurance were already in place. The chronological sequencing of these policies has resulted in substantial increases in government expenditure on private health insurance subsidies, with such increases not being a cause but rather an effect of increased demand for private health insurance. The paper also considers whether the decline in membership that has occurred since the implementation of lifetime community rating presages the re-emergence of an adverse selection problem in private health insurance. Much of the decline to date may be attributable to failure on the part of some members to honour premium payments when they first fell due. However, the changing age composition of the insured pool since September 2000, resulting in an increasing average age of those insured, suggests the possible reappearance of an adverse selection dynamic. Thus the 'trick' delivered by lifetime community ratings may not be

  15. Policy change and private health insurance: did the cheapest policy do the trick?

    PubMed

    Butler, James R G

    2002-01-01

    From the introduction of Australia's national health insurance scheme (Medicare) in 1984 until recently, the proportion of the population covered by private health insurance declined steadily. Following an Industry Commission inquiry into the private health insurance industry in 1997, a number of policy changes were effected in an attempt to reverse this trend. The main policy changes were of two types: "carrots and sticks" financial incentives that provided subsidies for purchasing, or tax penalties for not purchasing, private health insurance; and lifetime community rating, which aimed to revise the community rating regulations governing private health insurance in Australia. This paper argues that the membership uptake that has occurred recently is largely attributable to the introduction of lifetime community rating which goes some way towards addressing the adverse selection associated with the previous community rating regulations. This policy change had virtually no cost to government. However, it was introduced after subsidies for private health insurance were already in place. The chronological sequencing of these policies has resulted in substantial increases in government expenditure on private health insurance subsidies, with such increases not being a cause but rather an effect of increased demand for private health insurance. The paper also considers whether the decline in membership that has occurred since the implementation of lifetime community rating presages the re-emergence of an adverse selection problem in private health insurance. Much of the decline to date may be attributable to failure on the part of some members to honour premium payments when they first fell due. However, the changing age composition of the insured pool since September 2000, resulting in an increasing average age of those insured, suggests the possible reappearance of an adverse selection dynamic. Thus the 'trick' delivered by lifetime community ratings may not be

  16. The Face of Private Tutoring in Russia: Evidence from Online Marketing by Private Tutors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozar, Olga

    2013-01-01

    Private tutoring is a common and worldwide phenomenon. However, there is a dearth of up-to-date research on private tutoring compared with that on institutional one-to-one teaching, which could be explained by challenges associated with data collection. This article proposes using publicly available online advertisements of private tutors as a…

  17. Private Challenges to Public Dominance: The Resurgence of Private Education in the Pearl River Delta.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mok, Ka-Ho

    1997-01-01

    Examines the policy context in which private education has emerged in post-Mao China. Uses three case studies of private schools/colleges to explore how intellectuals and educators in the Pearl River Delta (Guangdong province) have persevered to assert their academic independence, offer a new agenda for education, and redefine the private-public…

  18. Industrial Alcoholism Programs: The Problem, The Program, The Professional

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Lawrence M.

    1976-01-01

    Alcoholism, as a national health problem, is receiving increasingly more attention from private industry as well as from federal and local government. The author addresses himself to the problem of alcoholism in industry and reviews the historical development of industrial alcoholism programs. He concludes with suggestions for the community…

  19. 47 CFR 90.35 - Industrial/Business Pool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Industrial/Business Pool. 90.35 Section 90.35 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Industrial/Business Radio Pool § 90.35 Industrial/Business Pool. (a) Eligibility. Persons primarily engaged in any...

  20. 47 CFR 90.35 - Industrial/Business Pool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Industrial/Business Pool. 90.35 Section 90.35 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Industrial/Business Radio Pool § 90.35 Industrial/Business Pool. (a) Eligibility. Persons primarily engaged in any...

  1. 47 CFR 90.35 - Industrial/Business Pool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Industrial/Business Pool. 90.35 Section 90.35 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Industrial/Business Radio Pool § 90.35 Industrial/Business Pool. (a) Eligibility. Persons primarily engaged in any...

  2. 47 CFR 90.35 - Industrial/Business Pool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Industrial/Business Pool. 90.35 Section 90.35 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Industrial/Business Radio Pool § 90.35 Industrial/Business Pool. (a) Eligibility. Persons primarily engaged in any...

  3. 47 CFR 90.35 - Industrial/Business Pool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Industrial/Business Pool. 90.35 Section 90.35 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Industrial/Business Radio Pool § 90.35 Industrial/Business Pool. (a) Eligibility. Persons primarily engaged in any...

  4. Private investment in AIDS vaccine development: obstacles and solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Batson, A.; Ainsworth, M.

    2001-01-01

    The development of vaccines for the prevention of AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, and other diseases requires both public and private investment. Private investment, however, has been far lower than might have been hoped, given the massive human toll of these diseases, particularly in the poorest countries. With a view to understanding this situation and exploring potential solutions, the World Bank AIDS Vaccine Task Force commissioned a study on the perspectives of the biotechnology, vaccine, and pharmaceutical industries regarding investment in research and development work on an AIDS vaccine. It was found that different obstacles to the development of an AIDS vaccine arose during the product development cycle. During the earlier phases, before obtaining proof of product, the principal barriers were scientific. The lack of consensus on which approach was likely to be effective increased uncertainty and the risks associated with investing in expensive clinical trials. The later phases, which involved adapting, testing, and scaling up production for different populations, were most influenced by market considerations. In order to raise the levels of private research and development in an AIDS vaccine there will probably have to be a combination of push strategies, which reduce the cost and scientific risk of investment, and pull strategies, which guarantee a market. PMID:11545328

  5. Private School Location and Neighborhood Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    Using data from Illinois, I examine relationships between the number of private schools and characteristics of the public schools and surrounding population. I find positive, statistically significant relationships between number of private schools in 1998 and public school 3rd grade class size, the percent college educated, and the percent over…

  6. Social Transformation and Private Education in China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jing

    Until the early 20th century, virtually all schooling in China was private. However, since 1949, private schools disappeared throughout the country when the Chinese Communist Party took power. They resurfaced after 1978 when the government embarked on economic reform for modernization. As a comprehensive study of the development, context,…

  7. Private Placement Debt Financing for Public Entities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holman, Lance S.

    2010-01-01

    Private placement financing is a debt or capital lease obligation arranged between a municipality or a 501(c) (3) not-for-profit organization and a single sophisticated institutional investor. The investor can be a bank, insurance company, finance company, hedge fund, or high-net worth individual. Private placement financing is similar to…

  8. Privatization in a public leadership mixed duopoly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Fernanda A.; Ferreira, Flávio

    2016-06-01

    We consider domestic and international competitions with one public leader firm and one follower private firm, producing complementary goods and competing on prices. We compare the results obtained in both models. Furthermore, we examine the impacts of privatization on consumer surplus and on social welfare.

  9. 50 CFR 27.92 - Private structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Private structures. 27.92 Section 27.92... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PROHIBITED ACTS Other Disturbing Violations § 27.92 Private structures. No..., pier, dock, fence, wall, pile, anchorage, or other structure or obstruction in any national...

  10. 50 CFR 27.92 - Private structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Private structures. 27.92 Section 27.92... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PROHIBITED ACTS Other Disturbing Violations § 27.92 Private structures. No..., pier, dock, fence, wall, pile, anchorage, or other structure or obstruction in any national...

  11. 50 CFR 27.92 - Private structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Private structures. 27.92 Section 27.92... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PROHIBITED ACTS Other Disturbing Violations § 27.92 Private structures. No..., pier, dock, fence, wall, pile, anchorage, or other structure or obstruction in any national...

  12. 50 CFR 27.92 - Private structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Private structures. 27.92 Section 27.92... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PROHIBITED ACTS Other Disturbing Violations § 27.92 Private structures. No..., pier, dock, fence, wall, pile, anchorage, or other structure or obstruction in any national...

  13. 50 CFR 27.92 - Private structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Private structures. 27.92 Section 27.92... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PROHIBITED ACTS Other Disturbing Violations § 27.92 Private structures. No..., pier, dock, fence, wall, pile, anchorage, or other structure or obstruction in any national...

  14. Private Schools Opt for Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2012-01-01

    The common standards are not just for public schools. With all but four states having adopted them since 2010, districts have little choice but to implement the Common Core State Standards. But many private schools are also making the transition. Many Roman Catholic, Lutheran, and other private schools have adopted at least portions of the…

  15. Private Schools, Choice and The Ethical Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exley, Sonia; Suissa, Judith

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the relationship between the existence of private schools and public attitudes towards questions about educational provision. Data from the 2010 British Social Attitudes survey suggest that parents who choose to send children to private schools may become more entrenched in their support for more extensive forms of…

  16. 34 CFR 104.39 - Private education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Private education. 104.39 Section 104.39 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION... Preschool, Elementary, and Secondary Education § 104.39 Private education. (a) A recipient that...

  17. 34 CFR 104.39 - Private education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Private education. 104.39 Section 104.39 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION... Preschool, Elementary, and Secondary Education § 104.39 Private education. (a) A recipient that...

  18. 34 CFR 104.39 - Private education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Private education. 104.39 Section 104.39 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION... Preschool, Elementary, and Secondary Education § 104.39 Private education. (a) A recipient that...

  19. 34 CFR 104.39 - Private education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Private education. 104.39 Section 104.39 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION... Preschool, Elementary, and Secondary Education § 104.39 Private education. (a) A recipient that...

  20. Private Room as a Test Accommodation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewandowski, Lawrence; Wood, Whitney; Lambert, Tonya

    2015-01-01

    The effects of a private vs. group test setting were examined on a reading comprehension test for a sample of typical college students. Participants took Forms G and H of the Nelson Denny Reading Comprehension Test in both private and group (classroom) settings. Contrary to expectations, performance was slightly better in the group setting.…