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Sample records for academia sinica institute

  1. Electromagnetic separation of stable isotopes at the Institute of Atomic Energy, Academia Sinica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming-da, Hua; Gong-pan, Li; Shi-jun, Su; Nai-feng, Mao; Hung-yung, Lu

    1981-07-01

    For almost 20 years the Institute of Atomic Energy, Academia Sinica has been separating stable isotopes of the elements by electromagnetic separators and supplying these materials to research work in many fields of our country. In this article we shall attempt to outline the growth of the effort and describe the present situation.

  2. Neutron therapy facility at the Institute of High Energy Physics, Academia Sinica

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y.C.

    1983-12-01

    The 10 MeV proton linac which was designed as preinjector for the Beijing 50 GeV Proton Synchrotron (BPS) was completed by the end of 1982. Because of the economic readjustment in the People's Republic of China the BPS project was cancelled. Then, the Institute of High Energy Physics decided to increase the energy of the linac from 10 MeV to 35.5 MeV. This increase will take place using the primary five megawatts RF system of the 10 MeV linac. This 35.5 MeV proton linac will be used for research in radiomedicine and radiobiology in general and in particular for research in fast neutron therapy and radiopharmaceutical production. This project has been approved by the Academia Sinica.

  3. Research on imaging, sensing, and characterization of cells at Research Center for Applied Sciences (RCAS), Academia Sinica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hui-Chen; Chang, Chun-Fang; Chen, Bi-Chang; Cheng, Ji-Yen; Chu, Chih-Wei; Han, Hsieh-Cheng; Hatanaka, Koji; Hsieh, Tung-Han; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Lin, Jung-Hsin; Tung, Yi-Chung; Wei, Pei-Kuen; Yang, Fu-Liang; Tsai, Din Ping

    2015-12-01

    Development of imaging, sensing, and characterization of cells at Research Center for Applied Sciences (RCAS) of Academia Sinica in Taiwan is progressing rapidly. The research on advanced lattice light sheet microscopy for temporal visualization of cells in three dimensions at sub-cellular resolution shows novel imaging results. Label-free observation on filopodial dynamics provides a convenient assay on cancer cell motility. The newly-developed software enables us to track the movement of two types of particles through different channels and reconstruct the co-localized tracks. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) for detecting urinary microRNA for diagnosis of acute kidney injury demonstrates excellent sensitivity. A fully automated and integrated portable reader was constructed as a home-based surveillance system for post-operation hepatocellular carcinoma. New microfluidic cell culture devices for fast and accurate characterizations prove various diagnosis capabilities.

  4. CPTAC Establishes Formal Relationships with Two Academic Institutions in Taiwan - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) has entered into memorandum of understandings (MOUs) with Chang Gung University and Academia Sinica, in Taipei, Taiwan.

  5. Greening academia: developing sustainable waste management at Higher Education Institutions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, N; Williams, I D; Kemp, S; Smith, N F

    2011-07-01

    Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) are often the size of small municipalities. Worldwide, the higher education (HE) sector has expanded phenomenally; for example, since the 1960s, the United Kingdom (UK) HE system has expanded sixfold to >2.4 million students. As a consequence, the overall production of waste at HEIs throughout the world is very large and presents significant challenges as the associated legislative, economic and environmental pressures can be difficult to control and manage. This paper critically reviews why sustainable waste management has become a key issue for the worldwide HE sector to address and describes some of the benefits, barriers, practical and logistical problems. As a practical illustration of some of the issues and problems, the four-phase waste management strategy developed over 15 years by one of the largest universities in Southern England--the University of Southampton (UoS)--is outlined as a case study. The UoS is committed to protecting the environment by developing practices that are safe, sustainable and environmentally friendly and has developed a practical, staged approach to manage waste in an increasingly sustainable fashion. At each stage, the approach taken to the development of infrastructure (I), service provision (S) and behavior change (B) is explained, taking into account the Political, Economic, Social, Technological, Legal and Environmental (PESTLE) factors. Signposts to lessons learned, good practice and useful resources that other institutions--both nationally and internationally--can access are provided. As a result of the strategy developed at the UoS, from 2004 to 2008 waste costs fell by around £125k and a recycling rate of 72% was achieved. The holistic approach taken--recognizing the PESTLE factors and the importance of a concerted ISB approach--provides a realistic, successful and practical example for other institutions wishing to effectively and sustainably manage their waste.

  6. Greening academia: Developing sustainable waste management at Higher Education Institutions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, N.; Williams, I.D.; Kemp, S.; Smith, N.F.

    2011-07-15

    Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) are often the size of small municipalities. Worldwide, the higher education (HE) sector has expanded phenomenally; for example, since the 1960s, the United Kingdom (UK) HE system has expanded sixfold to >2.4 million students. As a consequence, the overall production of waste at HEIs throughout the world is very large and presents significant challenges as the associated legislative, economic and environmental pressures can be difficult to control and manage. This paper critically reviews why sustainable waste management has become a key issue for the worldwide HE sector to address and describes some of the benefits, barriers, practical and logistical problems. As a practical illustration of some of the issues and problems, the four-phase waste management strategy developed over 15 years by one of the largest universities in Southern England - the University of Southampton (UoS) - is outlined as a case study. The UoS is committed to protecting the environment by developing practices that are safe, sustainable and environmentally friendly and has developed a practical, staged approach to manage waste in an increasingly sustainable fashion. At each stage, the approach taken to the development of infrastructure (I), service provision (S) and behavior change (B) is explained, taking into account the Political, Economic, Social, Technological, Legal and Environmental (PESTLE) factors. Signposts to lessons learned, good practice and useful resources that other institutions - both nationally and internationally - can access are provided. As a result of the strategy developed at the UoS, from 2004 to 2008 waste costs fell by around Pounds 125k and a recycling rate of 72% was achieved. The holistic approach taken - recognizing the PESTLE factors and the importance of a concerted ISB approach - provides a realistic, successful and practical example for other institutions wishing to effectively and sustainably manage their waste.

  7. Annals of Shanghai Observatory, Academia Sinica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Cheng; Jiang, Dong-Rong; Li, Zhi-Fang; Wan, Ning-Shan; Wang, Lan-Juan; Wang, Jia-Ji; Jiang, Xiao-Yuan; Zhu, Neng-Hong; Xu, Hua-Guan; Li, Zhi-Fang; Yan, Hao-Jian; Jin, Wen-Jing; Zheng, Da-Wei; Liang, Shi-Guang; Huang, Cheng; Fu, Cheng-Qi; Zhai, Zao-Cheng; Tan, De-Tong

    1996-01-01

    This is a report of scientific researches at Shanghai Observatory. Topics presented include achievements in the fields of astro-geodynamics, astrophysics, time and frequency, and development of astronomical instrumentation.

  8. German Academia Heading for Sustainability? Reflections on Policy and Practice in Teaching, Research and Institutional Innovations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adomssent, Maik; Michelsen, Gerd

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses how far (and by what practical means) the growing global trend for universities to commit to sustainable development has spread across German academia. Following this introduction, part 2 will outline the political framework of the sustainability discourse in German higher education. Part 3 will emphasise the integration of…

  9. Defining a Successful Leadership Pathway: Women in Academia and the Role of Institutional Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Sheila A.

    2014-01-01

    Studies in the literature have demonstrated underrepresentation of women in higher education leadership. Nonetheless, women leaders have achieved success when they received strong institutional support. However, even with supportive institutional policies like family leave, there was a need for mapping a more defined career pathway for aspiring…

  10. Acta Genetica Sinica (Selected Articles),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-04

    0879-8SF/ /3 N IT 0󈧬 112. MIRCK L~~Nj~ %. *- - - - - - - - -I.. * .. - II , I FTD-ID(RS)T-0879-85 oM FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIVISION ACTA GENETICA SINICA...34 ’ ° ° ° !4 :A.. it.i FTD- ID(RS)T-0879-85 HUMAN TRANSLATION FTD-ID(RS)T-0879-85 4 April 1986 MICROFICHE NR: FTD-86-C-001691 ACTA GENETICA SINICA...merged into this translation were extracted from the best quality copy available. •i 12 (2): 93-101, 1985 Yichuan Xuebao (Acta Genetica Sinica) Genetic

  11. The clinical development of paclitaxel: a successful collaboration of academia, industry and the National Cancer Institute.

    PubMed

    Donehower, R C

    1996-01-01

    The successful development of paclitaxel as an important new antineoplastic agent with the potential to have an impact on a number of human cancers was possible as a result of significant contributions from individuals and groups with diverse areas of interest and expertise. The advancement of paclitaxel through the preclinical and clinical evaluation which ultimately led to its approval, as well as surmounting the regulatory hurdles which were faced required the close collaboration of individual investigators at academic institutions, the pharmaceutical industry (Bristol-Myers Squibb) and the National Cancer Institute. The latter stages of this developmental effort can be viewed as a prime example of the potential of the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) mechanism to bring novel therapies to patients with serious illnesses in a timely fashion. It is also tangible evidence of the vision and perseverance of a number of members of the Division of Cancer Treatment (DCT) under the direction of Dr. Bruce Chabner, in whose honor this symposium is given.

  12. [The thirty years of Acta Genetica Sinica].

    PubMed

    Li, Shao-Wu; Zhou, Su; Xue, Yong-Biao; Zhu, Li-Huang

    2003-04-01

    Acta Genetica Sinica (AGS) is sponsored by the Genetics Society of China and the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology of Chinese Academy of Sciences, and is published by Science Press. The journal is a leading national academic periodical and one of the Chinese key periodicals of natural sciences. Currently, AGS is being indexed by several well-known domestic and international indexing systems, such as the American Chemical Digest (CA), BIOSIS database, Biological Digest (BA), Medical Index and Russian Digest (P [symbol: see text]). Papers in the areas of genetics, developmental biology, cell molecular biology and evolution are regularly published by AGS.

  13. Restoring balance to industry-academia relationships in an era of institutional financial conflicts of interest: promoting research while maintaining trust.

    PubMed

    Johns, Michael M E; Barnes, Mark; Florencio, Patrik S

    2003-02-12

    Economic partnerships between industry and academia accelerate medical innovation and enhance patient access to medical advances, but such partnerships have sometimes eroded public trust in the research enterprise. There is particular risk for conflict of interest when economic partnerships extend beyond a university's corporate interests to involve institutional decision makers. Institutions and institutional decision makers should fully disclose industry-related financial interests and relationships. Without legitimate justification for such interests, individuals should divest themselves from these interests or recuse themselves from responsibility for research oversight. Management of institutional partnerships also might entail the physical separation of certain facilities, the placement of restrictions on information shared between investment and research staffs, and provision of oversight by independent review panels made up of persons who have expertise in intellectual property, finance, and research, but who are not financially or otherwise dependent on the institution. Through these means, it is possible to restore balance to industry-academia relationships, thereby promoting progress while maintaining public trust in research.

  14. Antioxidative oligostilbenes from Caragana sinica.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qinghao; Han, Xiang Hua; Hong, Seong Su; Lee, Chul; Choe, Sanggil; Lee, Dongho; Kim, Youngsoo; Hong, Jin Tae; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Hwang, Bang Yeon

    2012-01-15

    Two new oligostilbenes, caragasinins A (5) and B (10), and eight known compounds, kobophenol A (1), (+)-α-viniferin (2), (+)-ampelopsin F (3), pallidol (4), (+)-isoampelopsin F (6), miyabenol C (7), carasinaurone (8) and caraphenol B (9) were isolated from the ethylacetate-soluble extract of the roots of Caragana sinica. The structures of the isolates were determined on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis including 1D, 2D NMR and HRESI-MS. These compounds were assessed for antioxidant activities. Caragasinin A (5), caraphenol B (9), and caragasinin B (10) showed moderate DPPH scavenging activity and lipid peroxidation inhibitory activities with IC(50) values ranging from 34.7±1.0 to 89.1±2.3μM.

  15. Class-Based, Gendered and Racialized Institutions of Higher Education: Everyday Life of Academia from the View of Chicana Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero, Mary

    1997-01-01

    Focuses on the daily practices within institutions that shape the professional roles of Chicana scholars and teachers to fulfill specific class, gender, racial, and ethnic expectations held by the dominant majority in higher education. Analysis shows that Chicanas are treated as affirmative action hires and token roles, a view that adversely…

  16. Two new oligostilbenes from Caragana sinica.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Guang; Ma, Da-You; Hu, Chang-Qi

    2004-12-01

    A new resveratrol dimer, carasiphenol A (1), and a new resveratrol trimer, carasiphenol B (2), have been isolated from the aerial parts of Caragana sinica. Their structures have been elucidated from spectroscopic evidence, especially HMBC and NOE experiments. The relative configuration of the known dimer pallidol (6) was confirmed by X-ray diffraction.

  17. Acta Aeronautica et Astronautica Sinica.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-29

    SPECIMENS 68 WITH SINGLE EDGE NOTCH Liu Ligeng, Chen Xianxi and Cai Qigong (Central Iron and Steel Research Institute) ON THE DESIGN OF TRANSONIC TURBINE...et al, Mechanism of Overload Effect on Fatigue Crack Propagation in Aluminum Alloy. Eng. Fract. Mech. 1978 No. 2. (13) Chen Hu, Cai Qigong et al...this paper. 67b J-INTEGRAL EXPERIMENTAL CALIBRATION OF SHEET SPECIMENS WITH SINGLE EDGE NOTCH Lui Ligeng, Chen Xianxi and Cai Qigong (Central Iron and

  18. Gender Inequality in Academia: Evidences from Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogbogu, Christiana O.

    2011-01-01

    Universities and other institutions of higher education in Nigeria see themselves as liberal and open-minded. They support social movements that encourage principles of democracy and social justice, yet their mode of governance is male dominated and patriarchal. This study, therefore, identified the causes of gender inequality in academia and the…

  19. Acta Aeronautica et Astronautica Sinica (Selected Articles),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-29

    method was developed in our country using the technique with generating lines and center lines and has been applied in various aricraft design. However...public release; Distribution unlimited. - , . 16 06 *11 Zo ! 4F , FTD- ID(RS)T-1265-85 HUMAN TRANSLATION FTD-ID(RS)T-1265-85 29 May 1986 MICROFICHE...4 4 . ,, .ii Development in Vortex Motion Research /1 Liu Mouji and Su Wenhan (Beijing Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics) Abstract This paper

  20. Acta Aeronautica et Astronautica Sinica (Selected Articles),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    enthalpy drops can be increased in a single-stage type turbine by con- trolling vortices at the exhaust of the gas turbine . The number or stages is...are used in experiments and their configurations are relatively simple . Based on the existing data. the general rules of wing-tip mounted winglet...in a NH-2 low-speed wind tunnel at Nanjing Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. The wind speed of experiments was 40 m/s. The main wing model

  1. Taiwan Earthquake Damage Index Sin Mei Nga* and Masataka Andob a* Department of Geology, Chinese Culture University, No. 55, Hwa-Kang Road, Yang-Ming-Shan, Taipei 11114, Taiwan b Institute of Earth Sciences, Academia Sinica, 128, Sec2, Academia Road, Nangang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan * Corresponding author. Tel.: +886 (02) 28 61 05 11 ext.26133 fax: +886 (02) 28 61 49 59 E-mail: wsw2@ulive.pccu.edu.tw or sin_mei_josephine_ng@hotmail.com

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, S.

    2012-12-01

    Taking advantage of a previous study and twelve-year, free-field strong motion data in Taiwan, a preliminary, five-level earthquake damage index is newly proposed: I-No (no damage), II-Very Light, III-Light, IV-Moderate, and V-Heavy. For index I, PGA and PGV are, respectively, <62.5 gal and <11 cm/s. Likewise, for index II, PGA is ≧62.5 and ≦187.5 gal; but, PGV is ≧11 and ≦35 cm/s. Similarly, PGA is ≧187.5 and ≦325 gal; but, PGV is ≧35 and ≦55 cm/s for index III. The corresponding PGA and PGV, for index IV, are ≧325 and ≦450 gal and ≧55 and ≦75 cm/s. Finally, for index V, PGA and PGV are respectively >450 gal and >75 cm/s. Ten damaging seismic events in the past twelve years are redefined using this new earthquake damage index, with the devastating Chi-Chi earthquake and one non-damaging event as reference earthquakes. This newly proposed index depicts seismic hazard of these earthquakes with higher accuracy when compared to the existing intensity scale in Taiwan region. For further analysis, Japan earthquakes are also plotted as references.

  2. Keeping the Devil Away from Miss Jones: Censorship in Academia, 1976-1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, L. B.; And Others

    Information on censorship in academia in the United States is presented, based on censorship cases reported in the "Newsletter on Intellectual Freedom" from 1976 to 1981. Cases occurring in academia accounted for 63 of the more than 800 cases reported. The states and institutions in which the censorship attacks occurred are identified, along with…

  3. The Connection Between Academia and Industry

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ajai; Singh, Shakuntala

    2005-01-01

    The growing commercialization of research with its effect on the ethical conduct of researchers, and the advancement of scientific knowledge with its effect on the welfare or otherwise of patients, are areas of pressing concern today and need a serious, thorough study. Biomedical research, and its forward march, is becoming increasingly dependent on industry-academia proximity, both commercial and geographic. A realization of the commercial value of academic biomedical research coupled with its rapid and efficient utilization by industry is the major propelling force here. A number of well-intentioned writers in the field look to the whole development with optimism. But this partnership is a double-edged sword, for it carries with it the potential of an exciting future as much as the prospect of misappropriation and malevolence. Moreover, such partnerships have sometimes eroded public trust in the research enterprise itself. Connected to the growing clout of industry in institutions is concern about thecommercialization of research and resolving the ‘patient or product’ loyalty. There is ambivalence about industry funding and influence in academia, and a consequent ‘approach-avoidance’ conflict. If academia has to provide the patients and research talent, industry necessarily has to provide the finances and other facilities based on it. This is an invariable and essential agreement between the two parties that they can walk out of only at their own peril. The profound ethical concerns that industry funded research has brought center-stage need a close look, especially as they impact patients, research subjects, public trust, marketability of products, and research and professional credibility. How can the intermediate goal of industry (patient welfare) serve the purpose of the final goal of academia is the basic struggle for conscientious research institutions /associations. And how best the goal of maximizing profits can be best served, albeit suitably

  4. WhatsApp Messaging: Achievements and Success in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nitza, Davidivitch; Roman, Yavich

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant rise in the use of technological means in general and in academic teaching in particular. Many programs have been developed that include computer-assisted teaching, as well as online courses at educational institutions. The current study focuses on WhatsApp messaging and its use in academia. Studies…

  5. Neither the State nor the Grass Roots: Language Maintenance and the Discourse of the Academia Mayor de la Lengua Quechua.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marr, Tim

    1999-01-01

    Describes the Academia Mayor de la Lengua Quechua, a Peruvian institution ostensibly dedicated to maintaining Quechua. Data from writings by and about the Academia and from administrator interviews suggest that the institution shows signs of an ambivalent and potentially conflictive attitude toward the Peruvian state and Quechua speakers, and this…

  6. Social bullying in nursing academia.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Earl; Beitz, Janice; Wieland, Diane; Levine, Ciara

    2013-01-01

    Social bullying has gained attention in the contemporary literature and increasing scrutiny in nursing academia. With a paucity of research on the topic in nursing, the authors asked nursing faculty about the phenomenon of being bullied by faculty colleagues or academic administrators. They discuss their study and its outcomes and implications for academic work lives, recruitment, and retention.

  7. Academia-industry symbiosis in organic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Michaudel, Quentin; Ishihara, Yoshihiro; Baran, Phil S

    2015-03-17

    Collaboration between academia and industry is a growing phenomenon within the chemistry community. These sectors have long held strong ties since academia traditionally trains the future scientists of the corporate world, but the recent drastic decrease of public funding is motivating the academic world to seek more private grants. This concept of industrial "sponsoring" is not new, and in the past, some companies granted substantial amounts of money per annum to various academic institutions in exchange for prime access to all their scientific discoveries and inventions. However, academic and industrial interests were not always aligned, and therefore the investment has become increasingly difficult to justify from industry's point of view. With fluctuating macroeconomic factors, this type of unrestricted grant has become more rare and has been largely replaced by smaller and more focused partnerships. In our view, forging a partnership with industry can be a golden opportunity for both parties and can represent a true symbiosis. This type of project-specific collaboration is engendered by industry's desire to access very specific academic expertise that is required for the development of new technologies at the forefront of science. Since financial pressures do not allow companies to spend the time to acquire this expertise and even less to explore fundamental research, partnering with an academic laboratory whose research is related to the problem gives them a viable alternative. From an academic standpoint, it represents the perfect occasion to apply "pure science" research concepts to solve problems that benefit humanity. Moreover, it offers a unique opportunity for students to face challenges from the "real world" at an early stage of their career. Although not every problem in industry can be solved by research developments in academia, we argue that there is significant scientific overlap between these two seemingly disparate groups, thereby presenting an

  8. Identification and expression pattern of candidate olfactory genes in Chrysoperla sinica by antennal transcriptome analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao-Qun; Zhang, Shuai; Luo, Jun-Yu; Wang, Si-Bao; Wang, Chun-Yi; Lv, Li-Min; Dong, Shuang-Lin; Cui, Jin-Jie

    2015-09-01

    Chrysoperla sinica is one of the most prominent natural enemies of many agricultural pests. Host seeking in insects is strongly mediated by olfaction. Understanding the sophisticated olfactory system of insect antennae is crucial for studying the physiological bases of olfaction and could also help enhance the effectiveness of C. sinica in biological control. Obtaining olfactory genes is a research priority for investigating the olfactory system in this species. However, no olfaction sequence information is available for C. sinica. Consequently, we sequenced female- and male-antennae transcriptome of C. sinica. Many candidate chemosensory genes were identified, including 12 odorant-binding proteins (OBPs), 19 chemosensory proteins (CSPs), 37 odorant receptors (ORs), and 64 ionotropic receptors from C. sinica. The expression patterns of 12 OBPs, 19 CSPs and 37 ORs were determined by RT-PCR, and demonstrated antennae-dominantly expression of most OBP and OR genes. Our finding provided large scale genes for further investigation on the olfactory system of C. sinica at the molecular level.

  9. Composition and stereochemistry of ephedrine alkaloids accumulation in Ephedra sinica Stapf.

    PubMed

    Krizevski, Raz; Bar, Einat; Shalit, Or; Sitrit, Yaron; Ben-Shabat, Shimon; Lewinsohn, Efraim

    2010-06-01

    Ephedra sinica Stapf (Ephedraceae) is a widely used Chinese medicinal plant (Chinese name: Ma Huang). The main active constituents of E. sinica are the unique and taxonomically restricted adrenergic agonists phenylpropylamino alkaloids, also known as ephedrine alkaloids: (1R,2S)-norephedrine (1S,2S)-norpseudoephedrine, (1R,2S)-ephedrine, (1S,2S)-pseudoephedrine, (1R,2S)-N-methylephedrine and (1S,2S)-N-methylpseudoephedrine. GC-MS analysis of freshly picked young E. sinica stems enabled the detection of 1-phenylpropane-1,2-dione and (S)-cathinone, the first two putative committed biosynthetic precursors to the ephedrine alkaloids. These metabolites are only present in young E. sinica stems and not in mature stems or roots. The related Ephedra foemina and Ephedra foliata also lack ephedrine alkaloids and their metabolic precursors in their aerial parts. A marked diversity in the ephedrine alkaloids content and stereochemical composition in 16 different E. sinica accessions growing under the same environmental conditions was revealed, indicating genetic control of these traits. The accessions can be classified into two groups according to the stereochemistry of the products accumulated: a group that displayed only 1R stereoisomers, and a group that displayed both 1S and 1R stereoisomers. (S)-cathinone reductase activities were detected in E. sinica stems capable of reducing (S)-cathinone to (1R,2S)-norephedrine and (1S,2S)-norpseudoephedrine in the presence of NADH. The proportion of the diastereoisomers formed varied according to the accession tested. A (1R,2S)-norephedrine N-methyltransferase capable of converting (1R,2S)-norephedrine to (1R,2S)-ephedrine in the presence of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) was also detected in E. sinica stems. Our studies further support the notion that 1-phenylpropane-1,2-dione and (S)-cathinone are biosynthetic precursors of the ephedrine alkaloids in E. sinica stems and that the activity of (S)-cathinone reductases directs and

  10. Activity of Bacillus thuringiensis against Pryeria sinica(Lepidoptera: Zygaenidae), an invasive pest of Euonymus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pryeria sinica Moore (Lepidoptera: Zygaenidae), an invasive pest of Euonymus, is susceptible in the second instar to the Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner product Thuricide®, and to several strains isolated from other B. thuringiensis products. Third instars are also susceptible, while susceptibility...

  11. Government and Academia: The Uneasy Bond. A Round Table Held on April 13, 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Enterprise Inst. for Public Policy Research, Washington, DC.

    An edited transcript of a televised American Enterprise Institute Public Policy Forum examines the dangers and benefits of the relationship between government and academia. The following questions about the government's increasing role in higher education are discussed by the panel: Can state and federal governments assist colleges and…

  12. Industry-funded dermatologic research within academia in the United States: fiscal and ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Blank, I H

    1992-03-01

    Private-sector funding of biomedical research within academia may come from industry, foundations, the dermatologists themselves, and the public at large. Industry-funding is of benefit to both academia and industry. Industry may fund clinical and basic research and product testing. Industry is more willing to fund product testing and clinical research than basic research. Funds for dermatologic research may be obtained from manufacturers of drugs, medical devices, cosmetics, soaps, and detergents. Questions of academic freedom arise when research is funded by industry. The results of academic research are in the public domain; the results of intramural industry research are often proprietary, i.e., "trade secrets." When there is industry funding within academia, any restraints on publication should be held to a minimum and be temporary. Publication should occur in a timely fashion, although recognizing the need for delayed publication if the results concern patentable material. When there is a consultantship, pre-arranged terms of agreement may restrict communication. Patents usually are held by the investigator's institution. The funding company may be granted world-wide, royalty-bearing licenses. Conflicts of interest may arise during any research endeavor; this warrants close attention when the research is industry funded. Stock ownership, speaker fees, blind contracts, etc., should be avoided. In any communication, funding agreements should be stated. Indirect costs are a "necessary evil." There are non-research expenditures associated with all research projects for which the institution is justified in requesting compensation. Indirect costs must have definite connections to a project. As industrial funding of research within academia increases, various facets of the academia-industry relationship are receiving increasing attention. Several aspects of conflicts of interest and indirect costs must yet be resolved. When faced openly and directly, all of these

  13. Electronic Publishing in Academia: An Economic Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getz, Malcolm

    The challenge to academia is to invest in services that will turn the abundance of electronic data into sound, useful, compelling information products. The process of filtering, labeling, refining, and packaging, that is, the process of editing and publishing, takes resources and will be shaped by the electronic world in significant ways. This…

  14. Making a Case for Technology in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodds, Kathrin; Callender, Donell; Henry, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Interested in connecting users with the latest resources aimed at advancing intellectual inquiry and discovery, researchers from Texas Tech University Libraries decided to embark on a study to explore the practicality of the latest technology, the iPad, within the varying functions of academia. Using an online survey and focus groups, the…

  15. Gender Equality in Academia: A Critical Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winchester, Hilary P. M.; Browning, Lynette

    2015-01-01

    Gender equality in academia has been monitored in Australia for the past three decades so it is timely to reflect on what progress has been made, what works, and what challenges remain. When data were first published on the gender composition of staff in Australian universities in the mid-1980s women comprised 20 per cent of academic staff and…

  16. Determinants of Organisational Climate for Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMurray, Adela; Scott, Don

    2013-01-01

    Being aware of the factors that develop a positive organisational climate is especially important in universities, where the academic members of staff are, in large measure, self-motivated. To identify the determinants of organisational climate for university academia, the validity and reliability of the first-order constructs of autonomy,…

  17. Caragasinin C: a new oligostilbene from the roots of Caragana sinica.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Wonsik; Ahn, Eun-Kyung; Oh, Joa Sub; Hong, Seong Su

    2017-03-28

    A new oligostilbene, caragasinin C (1), and seven known compounds, betulinic acid (2), 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (3), (‒)-medicarpin (4), wistin (5), (2E,4S)-4-hydroxy-2-nonenoic acid (6), pallidol (7), and (+)-α-viniferin (8), were isolated from the roots of Caragana sinica. The structure of caragasinin C was established on the basis of spectroscopic techniques, including HRESIMS, 1D and 2D-NMR.

  18. Sexual harassment in academia: legal and administrative challenges.

    PubMed

    Dowell, M

    1992-01-01

    Guidelines and institutional policies regarding sexual harassment in academia have a relatively short and controversial background. Deference to Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) guidelines in employment sexual harassment incidents guides much of the thinking in contemporary courts. Title IX of the Educational Amendments and the Civil Rights Restoration Act of 1987 are but two of the legal redresses available to students with harassment grievance complaints. Lack of definition of the term as well as research studies in nursing complicate the issue of sexual harassment. The potential impact of harassment on nursing students both in the classroom and in the practice area is significant. Nursing administrators and educators must be proactive in writing and implementing policies regarding sexual harassment.

  19. Biotechnology and new companies arising from academia.

    PubMed

    Vallance, P

    2001-11-24

    20 years ago, an academic biomedical scientist or clinician who set up a company would probably have been perceived by colleagues as "on the make" and rather unacademic-"not one of us", in other words. Nowadays, academics who have started companies are commonplace, and in some universities the businessman-academic is becoming the norm, although still far more common in the USA than in Europe. At best, the opportunity to capitalise on a discovery has the potential to motivate research workers, provide greater funding for research, and ultimately create wealth. At worst, the spawning of a company from within academia has the potential to use public employees, space, and equipment for personal gain, and divert academics from the pursuit of profound scientific questions into more immediate product-driven research or even marketing dressed up as research. Here, I discuss some of the issues surrounding biotechnology and spin-off companies originating in academia.

  20. Beneficial effect of dietary Ephedra sinica on obesity and glucose intolerance in high-fat diet-fed mice

    PubMed Central

    SONG, MOON-KOO; UM, JAE-YOUNG; JANG, HYEUNG-JIN; LEE, BYUNG-CHEOL

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a major contributor to both glucose intolerance and metabolic syndrome. In this study, we investigated the anti-obesity and anti-hyperglycemic effects of Ephedra sinica on high-fat diet-fed mice. Male ICR mice were divided into four groups; the normal group, the obese and diabetic control group treated with a high-fat diet, the positive control group treated with a high-fat diet containing acarbose, and the experimental group treated with a high-fat diet containing Ephedra sinica. The effects of Ephedra sinica on obesity and glucose intolerance were measured by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), plasma biochemistry, body and epididymal fat weight; the expression of adiponectin, peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor α (PPAR-α), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and leptin was also determined. Ephedra sinica reduced weight gain and epididymal fat accumulation, improved glucose intolerance on the OGTT, decreased triglycerides and increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol compared to the controls. Moreover, it reduced weight gain and fasting glucose levels and improved HDL-cholesterol levels more than acarbose. Gene expression analysis revealed that Ephedra sinica upregulated the expression of adiponectin and PPAR-α, and downregulated the expression of TNF-α. From these results, we suggest that Ephedra sinica may reduce obesity and hyperglycemia by increasing PPAR-α and adiponectin and reducing TNF-α, and that it may have the potential to be used clinically as an ingredient in food or drugs effective in obesity-related glucose intolerance treatments. PMID:22969956

  1. Job sharing for women pharmacists in academia.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Kelly C; Finks, Shannon W

    2009-11-12

    The pharmacist shortage, increasing numbers of female pharmacy graduates, more pharmacy schools requiring faculty members, and a lower percentage of female faculty in academia are reasons to develop unique arrangements for female academic pharmacists who wish to work part-time. Job sharing is an example of a flexible alternative work arrangement that can be successful for academic pharmacists who wish to continue in a part-time capacity. Such partnerships have worked for other professionals but have not been widely adopted in pharmacy academia. Job sharing can benefit the employer through retention of experienced employees who collectively offer a wider range of skills than a single employee. Benefits to the employee include balanced work and family lives with the ability to maintain their knowledge and skills by remaining in the workforce. We discuss the additional benefits of job-sharing as well as our experience in a non-tenure track job-sharing position at the University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy.

  2. Anti-hepatoma activities of ethyl acetate extract from Ampelopsis sinica root.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Zhi; Huang, Bi-Sheng; Cao, Yan; Chen, Ke-Li; Li, Juan

    2017-03-13

    Ampelopsis sinica root (ASR) is a known hepatoprotective folk traditional Chinese medicine. The anti‑hepatoma activity of ethyl acetate extract from A. sinica root (ASRE) in vitro and in vivo and its possible mechanism were explored. This study was designed to investigate cytotoxicity by MTT assay, induction of apoptosis via Hoechst 33258 staining, scanning electron microscopy and bivariate flow cytometric analysis (Annexin V-FITC/PI), inflammation and apoptosis related genes expression by RT-PCR and p53 protein expression by immunofluorescence assay in HepG2 cells. Then, the antitumor activity in vivo was detected by hepatoma H22 xenograft tumor in mice. The results showed that ASRE had powerful anti‑hepatoma activity in vitro without obvious toxicity on normal cells and could induce HepG2 cell apoptosis. The mechanism may be associated with downregulation of inflammatory cytokines including cyclooxygenase-2, 5-lipoxygenase and FLAP, increase of the ratio of bax/bcl-2, activation caspase-3 and inhibition of survivin, and increased expression of p53 protein. Furthermore, the HPLC assay showed the main compounds of ASRE were gallic acid, catechin and gallic acid ethyl ester. In animal experiments, ASR ethanol extract decreased the tumor weights of hepatoma H22 tumor-bearing mice. Therefore, ASR may be a potential therapeutic agent in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  3. Sustainable Health Development Becoming Agenda for Public Health Academia

    PubMed Central

    TAKIAN, Amirhossein; AKBARI-SARI, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) aim to transform our world, and each goal has specific targets to be achieved by 2030. For the goals to be achieved, everyone needs to do their part: governments, academia, the private sector and all people. This paper summarizes the main evidence-based recommendations made by excellent academics and scholars who discussed their experiences and views during the conference to respond to the challenges of sustainable health development. Methods: To contribute to exploring to the academia’s role in reaching SDGs, the 1st International Conference on Sustainable Health Development was held at Tehran University of Medical Sciences, on 24–25 April 2016, in Tehran, Iran. Results: In line with Goal 3 of SDGs: “ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages”, the conference discussed various aspects of Universal Health Coverage (UHC), as well as Global Action Plans for prevention and control of Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs), and explained the special role of academic public health institutes in education, research and service provision in the two above-mentioned areas. Conclusion: To fulfill the requirements of SDGs, modern approaches to funding, education, teaching, research priority setting and advocacy, which in turn need novel strategies in collaboration and constructive partnerships among academic public health institutes from low, middle and high-income countries, are essential. PMID:28028502

  4. The euonymus leaf-notcher, Pryeria sinica Moore (Lepidoptera: Zygaenidae) - alive and well in Fairfax County, Virginia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pryeria sinica Moore, a species native to the eastern Palearctic, was first detected in North America in 2001, where the conspicuous, gregariously-feeding larvae were noticed on ornamental Euonymous (Celastraceae) in a residential area of Fairfax County, Virginia. Although the species was moderatel...

  5. Identification of the glycerol kinase gene and its role in diapause embryo restart and early embryo development of Artemia sinica.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng; Yao, Feng; Chu, Bing; Li, Xuejie; Liu, Yan; Wu, Yang; Mei, Yanli; Wang, Peisheng; Hou, Lin; Zou, Xiangyang

    2014-03-01

    Glycerol kinase (GK) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in glycerol utilization by transferring a phosphate from ATP to glycerol, yielding glycerol 3-phosphate, which is an important intermediate for both energy metabolism and glycerolipid production. Artemia sinica has an unusual diapause process under stress conditions of high salinity, low temperature and lack of food. In the process, diapause embryos of A. sinica (brine shrimp) accumulate high concentrations of glycerol as a cryoprotectant to prevent low temperature damage to embryos. Upon embryo restart, glycerol is converted into glucose and other carbohydrates. Therefore, GK plays an important role in the diapause embryo restart process. However, the role of GK in diapause termination of embryo development in A. sinica remains unknown. In the present study, a 2096 bp full-length cDNA of gk from A. sinica (As-gk) was obtained, encoding putative 551 amino acids, 60.6 kDa protein. As a crucial enzyme in glycerol uptake and metabolism, GK has been conserved structurally and functionally during evolution. The expression pattern of As-gk was investigated by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting. Expression locations of As-gk were analyzed using in situ hybridization. As-gk was widely distributed in the early embryo and several main parts of Artemia after differentiation. The expression of As-GK was also induced by stresses such as cold exposure and high salinity. This initial research into the expression pattern and stress response of GK in Artemia provides a sound basis for further understanding of the function and regulation of genes in early embryonic development in A. sinica and the stress response.

  6. Career Development of Women in Academia: Traversing the Leaky Pipeline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasser, Courtney E.; Shaffer, Katharine S.

    2014-01-01

    Women's experiences in academia are laden with a fundamental set of issues pertaining to gender inequalities. A model reflecting women's career development and experiences around their academic pipeline (or career in academia) is presented. This model further conveys a new perspective on the experiences of women academicians before, during and…

  7. Helping science and drug development to succeed through pharma-academia partnerships: Yale Healthcare Conference 2013.

    PubMed

    Yang, Daniel X; Kim, Yunsoo A

    2013-09-01

    The theme of the 2013 Yale Healthcare Conference was "Partnerships in Healthcare: Cultivating Collaborative Solutions." The April conference brought together leaders across several sectors of health care, including academic research, pharmaceuticals, information technology, policy, and life sciences investing. In particular, the breakout session titled "Taking R&D Back to School: The Rise of Pharma-Academia Alliances" centered on the partnerships between academic institutions and pharmaceutical companies. Attendees of the session included members of the pharmaceutical industry, academic researchers, and physicians, as well as graduate and professional students. The discussion was led by Dr. Thomas Lynch of Yale University. Several topics emerged from the discussion, including resources for scientific discovery and the management of competing interests in collaborations between academia and the pharmaceutical industry.

  8. [Studies on chemical constituents from the root of Coriaria nepalensis wall (Coriaria sinica Maxim)].

    PubMed

    Wei, H; Zeng, F; Lu, M; Tang, R

    1998-09-01

    The root of Coriaria nepalensis Wall (Coriaria sinica Maxim) is a Chinese herbal medicine and has been used to treat numbness, toothache due to wind and heat, phlegm-retention syndrome, traumatic injury and acute conjunctivitis. Nine compounds were isolated from the root of Coriaria nepalensis Wall and they were identified as braylin (I), norbraylin (II), dihydrocoriamyrtin (III), coriamyrtin (IV), tutin (V), coriatin (VI), apotutin (VII), hydroxycoriatin (VIII) and gallic acid (IX) on the basis of their physicochemical properties and IR, UV, MS, 1HNMR, 13CNMR data. I, II were isolated from the title plant for the first time; III was obtained from plant origin for the first time, and VII, VIII were new compounds.

  9. Physiological characteristics of the anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacterium 'Candidatus Brocadia sinica'.

    PubMed

    Oshiki, Mamoru; Shimokawa, Masaki; Fujii, Naoki; Satoh, Hisashi; Okabe, Satoshi

    2011-06-01

    The present study investigated the phylogenetic affiliation and physiological characteristics of bacteria responsible for anaerobic ammonium oxidization (anammox); these bacteria were enriched in an anammox reactor with a nitrogen removal rate of 26.0 kg N m(-3) day(-1). The anammox bacteria were identified as representing 'Candidatus Brocadia sinica' on the basis of phylogenetic analysis of rRNA operon sequences. Physiological characteristics examined were growth rate, kinetics of ammonium oxidation and nitrite reduction, temperature, pH and inhibition of anammox. The maximum specific growth rate (μ(max)) was 0.0041 h(-1), corresponding to a doubling time of 7 days. The half-saturation constants (K(s)) for ammonium and nitrite of 'Ca. B. sinica' were 28±4 and 86±4 µM, respectively, higher than those of 'Candidatus Brocadia anammoxidans' and 'Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis'. The temperature and pH ranges of anammox activity were 25-45 °C and pH 6.5-8.8, respectively. Anammox activity was inhibited in the presence of nitrite (50 % inhibition at 16 mM), ethanol (91 % at 1 mM) and methanol (86 % at 1 mM). Anammox activities were 80 and 70 % of baseline in the presence of 20 mM phosphorus and 3 % salinity, respectively. The yield of biomass and dissolved organic carbon production in the culture supernatant were 0.062 and 0.005 mol C (mol NH (+)(-4))(-1), respectively. This study compared physiological differences between three anammox bacterial enrichment cultures to provide a better understanding of anammox niche specificity in natural and man-made ecosystems.

  10. Simple, rapid and effective preservation and reactivation of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacterium "Candidatus Brocadia sinica".

    PubMed

    Ali, Muhammad; Oshiki, Mamoru; Okabe, Satoshi

    2014-06-15

    It is still the biggest challenge to secure enough seeding biomass for rapid start-up of full-scale (anaerobic ammonium oxidation) anammox processes due to slow growth. Preservation of active anammox biomass could be one of the solutions. In this study, biomass of anammox bacterium, "Candidatus Brocadia sinica", immersed in various nutrient media were preserved at -80 °C, 4 °C and room temperature. After 45, 90 and 150 days of preservation, specific anammox activity (SAA) of the preserved anammox biomass was determined by measuring (29)N2 production rate and transcription levels of hzsA gene encoding hydrazine synthase alpha subunit. Storage in nutrient medium containing 3 mM of molybdate at room temperature with periodical (every 45 days) supply of NH4(+) and NO2(-) was proved to be the most effective storage technique for "Ca. Brocadia sinica" biomass. Using this preservation condition, 96, 92 and 65% of the initial SAA was sustained after 45, 90 and 150 days of storage, respectively. Transcription levels of hzsA gene in biomass correlated with the SAA (R(2) = 0.83), indicating it can be used as a genetic marker to evaluate the anammox activity of preserved biomass. Furthermore, the 90-day-stored biomass was successfully reactivated by immobilizing in polyvinyl alcohol (6%, w/v) and sodium alginate (2%, w/v) gel and then inoculated to up-flow column reactors. Total nitrogen removal rates rapidly increased to 7 kg-N m(-3) d(-1) within 35 days of operation. Based on these results, the room temperature preservation with molybdate addition is simple, cost-effective and feasible at a practical scale, which will accelerate the practical use of anammox process for wastewater treatment.

  11. Impact of Information Technology in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranjan, Jayanthi

    2008-01-01

    Purpose--The purpose of this paper is to study the provisions of information technology IT for development of academic resources and examines the effect of IT in academic institutions for sharing information. Design/methodology/approach--The paper examines the role of IT in sharing information in academic institutions and explores the IT…

  12. The potential role of As-sumo-1 in the embryonic diapause process and early embryo development of Artemia sinica.

    PubMed

    Chu, Bing; Yao, Feng; Cheng, Cheng; Wu, Yang; Mei, Yanli; Li, Xuejie; Liu, Yan; Wang, Peisheng; Hou, Lin; Zou, Xiangyang

    2014-01-01

    During embryonic development of Artemia sinica, environmental stresses induce the embryo diapause phenomenon, required to resist apoptosis and regulate cell cycle activity. The small ubiquitin-related modifier-1 (SUMO), a reversible post-translational protein modifier, plays an important role in embryo development. SUMO regulates multiple cellular processes, including development and other biological processes. The molecular mechanism of diapause, diapause termination and the role of As-sumo-1 in this processes and in early embryo development of Artemia sinica still remains unknown. In this study, the complete cDNA sequences of the sumo-1 homolog, sumo ligase homolog, caspase-1 homolog and cyclin B homolog from Artemia sinica were cloned. The mRNA expression patterns of As-sumo-1, sumo ligase, caspase-1, cyclin B and the location of As-sumo-1 were investigated. SUMO-1, p53, Mdm2, Caspase-1, Cyclin B and Cyclin E proteins were analyzed during different developmental stages of the embryo of A. sinica. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) was used to verify the function of sumo-1 in A. sinica. The full-length cDNA of As-sumo-1 was 476 bp, encoding a 92 amino acid protein. The As-caspases-1 cDNA was 966 bp, encoding a 245 amino-acid protein. The As-sumo ligase cDNA was 1556 bp encoding, a 343 amino acid protein, and the cyclin B cDNA was 739 bp, encoding a 133 amino acid protein. The expressions of As-sumo-1, As-caspase-1 and As-cyclin B were highest at the 10 h stage of embryonic development, and As-sumo ligase showed its highest expression at 0 h. The expression of As-SUMO-1 showed no tissue or organ specificity. Western blotting showed high expression of As-SUMO-1, p53, Mdm2, Caspase-1, Cyclin B and Cyclin E at the 10 h stage. The siRNA caused abnormal development of the embryo, with increased malformation and mortality. As-SUMO-1 is a crucial regulation and modification protein resumption of embryonic diapause and early embryo development of A. sinica.

  13. Proteomic analysis of acute responses to copper sulfate stress in larvae of the brine shrimp, Artemia sinica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qian; Wu, Changgong; Dong, Bo; Li, Fuhua; Liu, Fengqi; Xiang, Jianhai

    2010-03-01

    Proteomics was used to reveal the differential protein expression profiles of acute responses to copper sulfate exposure in larvae of Artemia sinica. Fourteen differentially displayed protein spots were detected and seven of them were identified. Three spots were up-expressed and identified: actin, heat shock protein 70, and chaperone subunit 1; three down-regulated proteins were identified: arginine kinase, elongation factor-2, and glycine-rich protein; and a newly expressed protein was identified as peroxiredoxin. The study indicates the involvement of all the differentially expressed proteins in the early responses of protein expression, and in the survival of A. sinica in the presence of copper and other heavy metals; the findings improve understanding of the organism’s adaptive responses and resistance.

  14. Leading by Example: The Case for IT Security in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Mary Ann

    2005-01-01

    Leadership in IT security is needed. Security matters: the ethics, the economics, and the social implications. There is much the academic community can do to help ensure cybersecurity. This document discusses steps academia can take to help ensure cybersecurity.

  15. Collaboration of academia and industry for high field science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Y.

    2014-05-01

    Close collaboration between academia and industry is essential for opening frontiers of both science and industry. High performance photon detectors developed at industry are playing vital roles in science such as astronomy and high energy physics. Alternatively many advanced industrial and medical products came out of research in basic science. For advancement of high field science, closer collaboration between academia and industry is necessary to develop next generation high power lasers, which will also meet the needs in industry, medicine and energy.

  16. Identification, expression pattern and functional characterization of As-kip2 in diapause embryo restarting process of Artemia sinica.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengchen; Yao, Feng; Qin, Tong; Hou, Lin; Zou, Xiangyang

    2017-04-15

    Proper control of the cellular processes requires a variety of regulatory proteins that are involved in the cell cycle, proliferation and apoptosis. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CKI) negatively regulates transcription and arrests the cell cycle in G1 phase. KIP2 is a member of CKI family, which could inhibit proliferation by tight-binding with several cyclin-CDK complexes. During the embryonic development of the brine shrimp, Artemia sinica, KIP2 plays a key role in the cell cycle regulation, but the specific mechanisms remain unknown. Herein, the 1023bp full-length cDNA of kip2 from A. sinica was cloned. The mRNA expression patterns of As-kip2, As-carp-1 in different development stages and pattern of As-kip2 under environmental stresses were investigated. In situ hybridization of As-kip2 mRNA and immunofluorescence of As-CARP-1 protein showed no tissue or organ specificity. Furthermore, western blotting showed the expressions levels of As-KIP2, As-E2F1, As-p53, As-cyclin E, As-SODD protein, and pattern of As-KIP2 under environmental stresses. Our research revealed that As-KIP2 plays crucial role in the restarting process of diapause embryo in Artemia sinica.

  17. APC/CCDC20 and APC/C play pivotal roles in the process of embryonic development in Artemia sinica

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mengchen; Yao, Feng; Luan, Hong; Zhao, Wei; Jing, Ting; Zhang, Shuang; Hou, Lin; Zou, Xiangyang

    2016-01-01

    Anaphase Promoting Complex or Cyclosome (APC/C) is a representative E3 ubiquitin ligase, triggering the transition of metaphase to anaphase by regulating degradation and ensures the exit from mitosis. Cell division cycle 20 (CDC20) and Cell division cycle 20 related protein 1 (CDH1), as co-activators of APC/C, play significant roles in the spindle assembly checkpoint, guiding ubiquitin-mediated degradation, together with CDC23. During the embryonic development of the brine shrimp, Artemia sinica, CDC20, CDH1 and CDC23 participate in cell cycle regulation, but the specific mechanisms of their activities remain unknown. Herein, the full-length cDNAs of cdc20 and cdc23 from A. sinica were cloned. Real-time PCR analyzed the expression levels of As-cdc20 and As-cdc23. The locations of CDH1, CDC20 and CDC23 showed no tissue or organ specificity. Furthermore, western blotting showed that the levels of As-CDC20, securin, cyclin B, CDK1, CDH1, CDC14B, CDC23 and geminin proteins conformed to their complicated degradation relationships during different embryo stages. Our research revealed that As-CDC20, As-CDH1 and APC mediate the mitotic progression, downstream proteins degradation and cellular differentiation in the process of embryonic development in A. sinica. PMID:27991546

  18. Making Science Whole Again: The Role of Academia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubchenco, J.

    2006-12-01

    Science in the 21st Century has become increasingly fragmented, not in the usual sense of disciplinary divisions, but with increased specialization in the discovery, teaching, public communication and application aspects of new knowledge. As in the infamous `telephone game', messages passed along through multiple parties, risk distortion. More insidiously, without active and effective checks and balances along the way, information can be and is being deliberately distorted, completely altered, or used selectively. Science, of course, is not the only basis for decision-making; values, politics, economics and other factors should also be considered. Nonetheless, a key role of science is to inform decision-making (not to drive it exclusively). The importance of citizens and leaders having access to accurate scientific information and knowledge is so essential to human well-being that new mechanisms must be found to ensure the integrity of scientific information. Among the multiple changes that are needed to achieve this goal, many of which will be explored in this session, one pertains specifically to the academic scientific community. That change entails growing and supporting stellar scientists who participate directly in discovery AND public communication of knowledge. More scientists whose primary jobs are research and teaching could and should also be actively involved in sharing new knowledge with non-scientists. The public expects this to happen but academia gives it lip service at best. Having more scientists who can communicate scientific knowledge that is understandable, relevant, useable, current and credible to non-technical audiences is a key (though far from the only) factor in protecting the integrity of science. The Aldo Leopold Leadership Program now based at Stanford University's Woods Institute for the Environment is a program that trains tenured, academic environmental scientists to communicate effectively with politicians, business people, the

  19. Gender Inequity in Academia: An Empirical Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpert, Dona

    1989-01-01

    Compared equity in number and salary between women and men at different ranks within a sample of doctoral-level institutions of higher education (N=109). Found that at current rate of increase it will take women 90 years to be equally represented and that gap in salaries has increased since 1975. (ABL)

  20. Academic Inbreeding in the Portuguese Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tavares, Orlanda; Cardoso, Sónia; Carvalho, Teresa; Sousa, Sofia Branco; Santiago, Rui

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses the inbreeding phenomena in Portuguese public universities. Inbreeding is defined as the recruitment of academics by the same institution that awarded their PhDs. Focusing on 1,217 PhD-holding Portuguese academics, belonging to four public universities and to six disciplinary areas, inbreeding is analysed in order to understand…

  1. A pure polysaccharide from Ephedra sinica treating on arthritis and inhibiting cytokines expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiuhong; Shu, Zunpeng; Xing, Na; Xu, Bingqing; Wang, Changfu; Sun, Guibo; Sun, Xiaobo; Kuang, Haixue

    2016-05-01

    In our previous study, we found that the acidic polysaccharides of Ephedra sinica had immunosuppressive effect to treat rheumatoid arthritis and the pure polysaccharide ESP-B4 was the main composition of the acidic polysaccharides. At present, the exact molecular mechanism of ESP-B4 on treating arthritis is unclear. We are thus evaluating the properties of ESP-B4 on LPS-induced THP-1 pro-monocytic cells and adjuvant-induced arthritis in Wistar rats via TLR4. In vitro, ESP-B4 decreased the production of cytokines induced by LPS. In addition, ESP-B4 reduced the LPS-stimulated nuclear translocation of p65 subunit of NF-κB. Pretreatment with ESP-B4 significantly down-regulated the phosphorylation of MAPKs induced by LPS. Furthermore, in vivo, after 12 days of disease induced by adjuvant, rats were treated with ESP-B4 for 16 days. ESP-B4 significantly improved all parameters of inflammation. ESP-B4 reduced the release of inflammatory factors and cytokines by inhibiting the TLR4 signaling pathway to treat rheumatoid arthritis.

  2. Metabolites and the pharmacokinetics of kobophenol A from Caragana sinica in rats.

    PubMed

    Liang, Gao Lin; Bi, Jing Bo; Huang, Hong Qing; Zhang, Su; Hu, Chang-Qi

    2005-10-03

    This research aims to study the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of phytoestrogen kobophenol A (1), the main active compound of Caragana sinica (Buc'hoz) Rehd. (Fabaceae), in rats. Metabolites of 1 in rats' feces were isolated and purified by multi-chromatograph techniques; three new metabolites of 1, named koboquinone A (M1), koboquinone B (M2) and koboquinone C (M3), were isolated, purified from rats' feces after they being orally administered with 1. Structure identification of the metabolites was fulfilled by spectroscopic analysis. M1 and M2 are structurally different to those natural occurring stilbene tetramers, which also have para-quinone structure. M1 also showed the activity of stimulating the proliferation of cultured osteoblasts. The pharmacokinetics of 1 in rats could be described by a two-compartmental model (P<0.05). The half-life was 0.68 h for i.v. administration and 5.78 h for oral administration. The oral bioavailability of 1 was calculated to be 2.0%; rats tissue distribution experiments show that 1 was prominently concentrated in livers. Both of the low oral bioavailability and the rapid reduction of 1 in blood indicated a suitable formulation is needed while it is developed as a new drug.

  3. Stilbene derivatives as human 5-HT(6) receptor antagonists from the root of Caragana sinica.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Hyuk; Kim, Soon-Hee; Kim, Hyoung Ja; Jin, Changbae; Chung, Kwang Chul; Rhim, Hyewhon

    2010-01-01

    The 5-HT₆ receptor (5-HT₆R) is a member of the class of recently discovered 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors. Due to the lack of selective 5-HT₆R ligands, the cellular signaling mechanisms of the 5-HT₆R are poorly understood. We previously developed a cell-based high-throughput screening (HTS) method for the 5-HT₆R and screened synthetic chemical compounds. In the present study, we expanded our screening into natural products to find novel 5-HT₆R ligands. We found that the ethyl acetate fraction from the root of Caragana sinica (537-18BE) produced the most potent antagonistic activity. After further isolation of 537-18BE, we found that three stilbene derivatives, (+)-α-viniferin, miyabenol C and pallidol, are active constituents of 537-18BE inhibiting the 5-HT₆R. Among them, (+)-α-viniferin showed the most potent inhibition, and miyabenol C also produced a considerable inhibition. When examined effects on other neurotransmitters for selectivity, 537-18BE and three stilbene derivatives did not produce any notable effects on 5-HT₄, 5-HT₇, or muscarinic acetylcholine M1 (M(1)) receptors. Furthermore, 5-HT₆R antagonistic effects of (+)-α-viniferin, miyabenol C and pallidol were confirmed on extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) which exerts effects in downstream pathways of 5-HT₆R activation.

  4. Structural characterization of lignins isolated from Caragana sinica using FT-IR and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ling-Ping; Shi, Zheng-Jun; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run-Cang; Mohanty, Amar K

    2011-09-01

    In order to efficiently explore and use woody biomass, six lignin fractions were isolated from dewaxed Caragana sinica via successive extraction with organic solvents and alkaline solutions. The lignin structures were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and 1D and 2D Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). FT-IR spectra revealed that the "core" of the lignin structure did not significantly change during the treatment under the conditions given. The results of 1H and 13C NMR demonstrated that the lignin fraction L2, isolated with 70% ethanol containing 1% NaOH, was mainly composed of beta-O-4 ether bonds together with G and S units and trace p-hydroxyphenyl unit. Based on the 2D HSQC NMR spectrum, the ethanol organosolv lignin fraction L1, extracted with 70% ethanol, presents a predominance of beta-O-4' aryl ether linkages (61% of total side chains), and a low abundance of condensed carbon-carbon linked structures (such as beta-beta', beta-1', and beta-5') and a lower S/G ratio. Furthermore, a small percentage (ca. 9%) of the linkage side chain was found to be acylated at the gamma-carbon.

  5. Stabilization of Ephedrine Alkaloid Content in Ephedra sinica by Selective Breeding and Stolon Propagation.

    PubMed

    Hiyama, Hajime; Ozawa, Aya; Kumazawa, Hiroaki; Takeda, Osami

    2017-01-01

    The Ephedra herb, which has been used in Kampo medicines, originates from terrestrial stems of Ephedra species. It is important to establish cultivation methods and cultivars to secure a stable supply of the Ephedra herb that would meet the quality standards for the ephedrine alkaloids content. In this study, we first grew Ephedra sinica plants derived from seeds in the field for 5 years. Then, for selective breeding of cultivars that could meet the quality standards for the ephedrine alkaloids content, we measured the content of total alkaloids (TAs), ephedrine (Eph), and pseudoephedrine (PEph) in individual plants derived from seedlings and grown for 4 years in the field. The range of the TA content in each individual plant was narrower than that among individual plants grown in the field. Therefore, individual plants were selected according to their TA content, Eph/PEph ratio, and stolon-formation capability. The selected individuals were propagated using stolons, and their TA content was studied for 2 years. In the second year, the TA content in terrestrial stems derived from stolons of the selected individuals was as high as that of their parents. Therefore, it was confirmed that the selected individuals that were propagated using stolons could produce TA reproducibly. This study suggested that selective breeding using stolon propagation is effective for stabilizing Ephedra herb TA content.

  6. The impact of knowledge sharing through social media among academia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazali, Saadiah; Sulaiman, Nor Intan Saniah; Zabidi, Nerda Zura; Omar, Mohd Faizal; Alias, Rose Alinda

    2016-10-01

    The world of research require researcher, academia and lecturers to share knowledge among them. With the invention of social media, knowledge sharing process has been more effective and easy. Previously, there were numerous researches done to investigate the effect of social media utilization for public used. There were also study that aimed to study social media effects in educatioanal sector but those study were centered around student's perspective. Less consideration is given towards academia's perspective. Therefore, this study is directed to explore other niche area on knowledge sharing environment where it will focused on the effects of social media on knowledge sharing among academia. Initially, literature review analysis was done to discover the potential factors that encourage academia to engage in social media. Ability to facilitate communication, idea generation and group establishment are the most cited reasons. Not only that, this paper will highlight the significance of performing this study. In conclusion, there is no doubt that social media do enhance and upgrading the knowledge sharing process thus assisting academia in their scholarly work.

  7. Measuring successful knowledge sharing among academia through social media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazali, Saadiah; Sulaiman, Nor Intan Saniah; Zabidi, Nerda Zura; Omar, Mohd Faizal; Alias, Rose Alinda

    2015-12-01

    This paper aims to study the influence of social media on knowledge sharing among academia. Previously, many researches have been done to explore the importance emergence of social media for public use, but there are still limited studies on how this technological advancement affects the academia. For this study, Facebook is chosen as one of the online social networking tools as the medium of knowledge sharing. To begin with, this study is started with the identification of factors that encourage the academia to share their knowledge through social media. These factors are then categorized based on Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). After this knowledge has successfully shared, the level of successful knowledge sharing through Facebook is modeled using Fuzzy Logic. Fuzzy inputs for this study are the number of like, comment and share. Findings from this study indeed showed that there are many reasons encouraging academia to utilize social media for their work. Besides, this paper contributes new knowledge to fuzzy logic application as it is the first known research in measuring Facebook engagement for knowledge sharing purposes. In conclusion although there exist some barriers and limitations with the use of social media, academia are showing a positive shift in the application of these tools for work.

  8. Identification, expression pattern, cellular location and potential role of the caveolin-1 gene from Artemia sinica.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuejie; Yao, Feng; Zhang, Wei; Cheng, Cheng; Chu, Bing; Liu, Yan; Mei, Yanli; Wu, Yang; Zou, Xiangyang; Hou, Lin

    2014-05-01

    Caveolins are integral membrane proteins that serve as scaffolds to recruit numerous signaling molecules. Caveolins play an important role in membrane trafficking, signal transduction, substrate transport and endocytosis in differentiated cells. In this study, a caveolin-1 gene from Artemia sinica (As-cav-1) was successfully cloned for the first time. The full-length cDNA of As-cav-1 comprises 974 bp, with a 675 bp open reading frame (ORF) that encodes a polypeptide of 224 amino acids with a caveolin scaffolding domain (CSD) and two transmembrane domains. Multiple sequence alignment revealed that the putative As-CAV-1 protein sequence was relatively conserved across species, especially in the CSD domain. Real-time PCR revealed high levels of the As-cav-1 transcript at 0h of embryo development. Furthermore, As-cav-1 transcripts were highly upregulated under high salinity (200‰) and low temperature stresses (15°C). To further characterize As-cav-1, recombinant pET30a-cav-1 protein was expressed using a prokaryotic expression system. The recombinant protein comprised 290 amino acids with a theoretical molecular weight of 32kDa, and a predicted isoelectric point of 5.6. Western blotting of the expression levels of As-CAV-1 during different embryo development stages revealed that As-CAV-1 levels decreased gradually during development stages from 0 h to 40 h, and increased at 3d. Furthermore, western blotting showed that As-CAV-1 was upregulated to its highest expression level by low temperature stress (15°C) and high salinity. Confocal laser microscopy analysis, using antibodies generated against the recombinant As-CAV-1 protein, showed that As-CAV-1 was mostly located in the cell membrane. Our results suggested that As-cav-1 plays a vital role in protecting embryos from high salt damage and low temperature stress, especially during post-diapause embryonic development.

  9. Borrelia sinica sp. nov., a lyme disease-related Borrelia species isolated in China.

    PubMed

    Masuzawa, T; Takada, N; Kudeken, M; Fukui, T; Yano, Y; Ishiguro, F; Kawamura, Y; Imai, Y; Ezaki, T

    2001-09-01

    A survey was performed for Lyme disease borrelia in the southern part of China, in Zhejiang, Sichuan and Anhui provinces, along the Yangtze River valley, in May of 1997 and 1998. Twenty isolates from Ixodes granulatus, Ixodes ovatus, Apodemus agrarius and Niviventer confucianus were obtained. These isolates were characterized by RFLP of the 5S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer, sequence analysis of the intergenic spacer, 16S rDNA and flagellin gene, DNA-DNA hybridization analysis, SDS-PAGE and Western blotting with mAbs. Six isolates from A. agrarius, five from I. granulatus collected in Zhejiang province and one from N. confucianus in Sichuan province were highly similar to strains 10MT and 5MT isolated in Korea and classified as Borrelia valaisiana. Four isolates from A. agrarius and I. granulatus collected in Zhejiang province generated unique RFLP patterns and phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rDNA and flagellin gene sequences suggested that the isolates should be classified as B. valaisiana. Furthermore, three isolates (CMN1a, CNM2, CMN3T) from N. confucianus captured in Sichuan province and one (CWO1) from I. ovatus in Anhui province showed lower 165 rDNA sequence similarity (less than 99.0%) to sequences of previously described Lyme disease-related Borrelia species. DNA-DNA hybridization results revealed that strains CMN3T and CMN1a were clearly distinct from all other known Lyme disease Borrelia species. Electron microscope observation showed the spirochaetes to be morphologically similar to those of Borrelia, but the cells contained only four periplasmic flagella inserted at each end of the spirochaetes. Based on these results, a new Borrelia species, Borrelia sinica sp. nov., is proposed. Strain CMN3T is the type strain of this new species.

  10. SMEs and their co-operation with academia.

    PubMed

    Antoine, Jean Michel; Strömqvist, Mats

    2005-01-01

    Co-operation between SMEs and Academia can be a win-win situation when each partner understands the constraints of the other. SMEs are often leaders in innovation; therefore more ready to share interest in research. They are flexible and dynamic. They need a short feed-back to sustain their co-operation. Academia is often more long-term oriented and more question- than answer-oriented. A code of conduct can ease the relationship because it can anticipate the potential problems.

  11. Simultaneous determination of the contents of three stilbene oligomers in Caragana sinica collected in different seasons using an improved HPLC method.

    PubMed

    Shu, Na; Zhou, Hong; Hu, Changqi

    2006-04-01

    The objectives of this research were to determine simultaneously the contents of two stilbene tetramers, carasinol B (1) and kobophenol A (2), and one stilbene trimer, (+)-alpha-viniferin (3), in the roots, tubers, and leaves of Caragana sinica in various seasons. A HPLC method has been developed for efficiently quantifying the three analytes in the plant. Using this method, different samples of Caragana sinica were evaluated. The results showed that the contents of 1, 2, and 3 in the roots were much higher than those in the tubers, and the contents of stilbene tetramers were maximal in winter while the contents of the stilbene trimer were maximal in summer. Compounds 1, 2, and 3 could not be detected in the flowers of Caragana sinica in our detection ranges.

  12. Incivility in nursing: the connection between academia and clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Luparell, Susan

    2011-04-01

    Incivility and bullying in nursing are complex problems that have garnered much attention in recent years. Emerging evidence suggests that incivility in the workplace has significant implications for nurses, patients, and health care organizations. Because today's students are tomorrow's colleagues, conversations regarding how to address incivility and bullying should include specific aspects of nursing academia and the preparation of new nurses.

  13. Mexican American Social Workers' Perceptions of Doctoral Education and Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tijerina, Mary; Deepak, Anne C.

    2014-01-01

    An increase in Latinos in the social work academy is critical due to current underrepresentation in social work education programs and rapid Latino population growth in the United States. In this qualitative study, perceptions of Mexican American master's of social work-level practitioners regarding social work doctoral education and academia were…

  14. Bridging the Gap in Knowledge Transfer between Academia and Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gera, Rajat

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The paper intends to identify the causes or gaps in transfer of managerial knowledge between academia and practitioners and to develop a framework that overcomes the gaps through knowledge management, information technology and human resource practices. The paper aims to suggest a strategic approach based on the knowledge transfer cycle.…

  15. Environmental Engineering Education: Academia and an Evolving Profession.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, James W.

    1980-01-01

    Summarized are some of the concepts, historical precedents, and pertinent data which explain the existing structure of environmental engineering education in the U.S. Identified are the main issues which must be considered in planning the future directions of academia in educating the environmental engineer. (Author/SMB)

  16. Translating the Academy: Learning the Racialized Languages of Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monzó, Lilia D.; SooHoo, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    This article presents narratives of 2 women faculty of color, 1 early career Latina and the other tenured Asian American woman, regarding their ontological and epistemological struggles in academia, as well as the hope, impetus, and strategies for change that they constructed together. Drawing on a critical pedagogy perspective, mentoring is…

  17. Tenure Denied: Cases of Sex Discrimination in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyer, Susan K., Ed.

    2004-01-01

    This report focuses on women who took their fight for tenure to the courts. Drawing on 19 cases supported by the American Association of University Women Legal Advocacy Fund since 1981, we document the challenge of fighting sex discrimination in academia. In the process, we illustrate the overt and subtle forms of sex discrimination that continue…

  18. The Lived Experience of Novice Nursing Faculty in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooley, Shirley S.

    2013-01-01

    To relieve the nursing faculty shortage, notable numbers of master's prepared clinical nurse experts are entering the ranks of nursing faculty to teach the prelicensure nursing student. The transition from clinical practice to the academia raises concern about the adequacy of preparation for the complex specialization role of nurse educator. In…

  19. "Good Girls": Emphasised Femininity as Cloning Culture in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattsson, Tina

    2015-01-01

    Gender inequality in academia might be understood as an effect of the belief of a contradiction between woman and science, which make it difficult for women to appropriate the right to author and authorise acts of knowing and thinking in science. In relation to this concern, the aim of this article is to explore how a group of successful women…

  20. Navigating the Career Transition from Industry to Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Michael John; Wood, Leigh; Solomonides, Ian; Dixon, Peter; Goos, Merrilyn

    2013-01-01

    Transitions from "industry" to "academia" represent a unique type of career change. Although such transitions are becoming increasingly common in Australian universities and beyond, there is no coherent framework for making sense of the multiple and intersecting factors involved in these inter-domain movements. This form of…

  1. Beyond and between academia and business: How Austrian biotechnology researchers describe high-tech startup companies as spaces of knowledge production.

    PubMed

    Fochler, Maximilian

    2016-04-01

    Research and innovation policy has invested considerable effort in creating new institutional spaces at the interface of academia and business. High-tech startups founded by academic entrepreneurs have been central to these policy imaginaries. These companies offer researchers new possibilities beyond and between academia and larger industry. However, the field of science and technology studies has thus far shown only limited interest in understanding these companies as spaces of knowledge production. This article analyses how researchers working in small and medium-sized biotechnology companies in Vienna, Austria, describe the cultural characteristics of knowledge production in this particular institutional space. It traces how they relate these characteristics to other institutional spaces they have experienced in their research biographies, such as in academia or larger corporations. It shows that the reasons why researchers decide to work in biotechnology companies and how they organize their work are deeply influenced by their perception of deficiencies in the conditions for epistemic work in contemporary academia and, to a lesser degree, in industry.

  2. Detrimental effect of CO2-driven seawater acidification on a crustacean brine shrimp, Artemia sinica.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chao-qun; Jeswin, Joseph; Shen, Kai-li; Lablche, Meghan; Wang, Ke-jian; Liu, Hai-peng

    2015-03-01

    The effects of the decline in ocean pH, termed as ocean acidification due to the elevated carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, on calcifying organisms such as marine crustacean are unclear. To understand the possible effects of ocean acidification on the physiological responses of a marine model crustacean brine shrimp, Artemia sinica, three groups of the cysts or animals were raised at different pH levels (8.2 as control; 7.8 and 7.6 as acidification stress according to the predictions for the end of this century and next century accordingly) for 24 h or two weeks, respectively, followed by examination of their hatching success, morphological appearance such as deformity and microstructure of animal body, growth (i.e. body length), survival rate, expression of selected genes (involved in development, immunity and cellular activity etc), and biological activity of several key enzymes (participated in antioxidant responses and physiological reactions etc). Our results clearly demonstrated that the cysts hatching rate, growth at late stage of acidification stress, and animal survival rate of brine shrimp were all reduced due to lower pH level (7.6 & 7.8) on comparison to the control group (pH 8.2), but no obvious change in deformity or microstructure of brine shrimp was present under these acidification stress by microscopy observation and section analysis. In addition, the animals subjected to a lower pH level of seawater underwent changes on their gene expressions, including Spätzle, MyD88, Notch, Gram-negative bacteria binding protein, prophenoloxidase, Apoptosis inhibitor 5, Trachealess, Caveolin-1 and Cyclin K. Meanwhile, several key enzyme activities, including superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidase, alkaline phosphatase and acid phosphatase, were also affected by acidified seawater stress. Taken together, our findings supports the idea that CO2-driven seawater acidification indeed has a detrimental effect, in case of hatching success, growth and survival, on

  3. Repaving the Road to Biomedical Innovation Through Academia

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Andrew R.

    2013-01-01

    Biomedical innovation requires investigators to build on existing knowledge and achieve insights that are transformative. Innovation starts with incisive scientific discoveries, which are often made in academic research laboratories. Today, the financial model for supporting biomedical research in universities is threatened, and one victim is innovation. New models for public funding that support high-risk research in academia will spur innovation and ultimately advance clinical medicine. PMID:21715676

  4. Iranian academia: evolution after revolution and plagiarism as a disorder.

    PubMed

    Ghazinoory, Sepehr; Ghazinoori, Soroush; Azadegan-Mehr, Mandana

    2011-06-01

    Recently, a few of scientific journals raise serious questions about scientific ethics and moral judgment of some of the Iranian government's senior executives in their papers. Plagiarism, under any circumstances is not justified, and we do not intend to justify it in this note. However, we find it useful in understanding why otherwise respected, responsible individuals may engage in plagiarism by terse review of the history Iranian academia.

  5. The changing environment of graduate and postdoctoral training in drug metabolism: viewpoints from academia, industry, and government.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Jeffrey C; Dean, Dennis C; Preusch, Peter C; Correia, Maria Almira

    2003-04-01

    This article is an invited report of a symposium sponsored by the Drug Metabolism Division of the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics held at Experimental Biology 2002 in New Orleans. The impetus for the symposium was a perceived shortage in the supply of graduate students qualified for drug metabolism research positions in industry, academia, and government. For industry, recent hiring stems largely from the expansion of drug metabolism departments in an effort to keep pace with the demands of drug discovery and new technologies. In turn, regulatory scientists are needed to review and verify the results of the increased number and volume of studies required for drug development and approval. Thus the initial source of training, academia, has been forced to recognize these external hiring pressures while trying to attract and retain the faculty, postdoctoral scientists, and students necessary for active teaching and research programs. The trend of the expansion of the interdisciplinary nature of traditional drug metabolism to include emerging technologies such as pharmacogenetics, transporters, and proteomics and the implications for future needs in training and funding were acknowledged. There was also consensus on the value of partnerships between academia and industry for increasing student interest and providing training in disciplines directly applicable to industrial drug metabolism research. Factors affecting the sources of these trainees, such as federal funding, the number of trainees per institution, and recent issues with immigration restrictions that have limited the flow of scientists were also discussed.

  6. Transfer from research/academia to clinical/regulated.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Ferdousi; Williams, Anthony

    2016-10-01

    We focus here on how the interface in academia has adapted in their approach to assessing the PDs of biological agents to better understand mechanisms at an early stage. This understanding enables drugs to be modified early and to be reassessed before progressing to late stage trials. We discuss how these efforts are now being bolstered by a network of consortia involving industry, academia and regulatory bodies, to bring together resources, knowledge and a harmonization in bioanalytical techniques. We highlight how the regulatory guidance still lags behind the rapid advancement in biologicals and associated analytical techniques, especially in immunotherapies and immunological bioassays. Despite this, new collaborative groups are working together to deliver robust and accurate results essential for identifying the most promising drugs to progress from early phase academic research to late phase industry based trials. We show how the relationship between academia and not-for-profit organizations with large pharma and emerging biotech companies has shifted toward a more collaborative effort in bringing new therapies to the forefront.

  7. Bibliography of Chinese Materials on Tai Linguistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boltz, William G.

    This bibliography is an effort to establish a convenient listing of works in Chinese which deal with any of the various aspects of Tai linguistics. There are 50 entries including cross-references. Some of the sources covered are: Academia Sinica, Bulletin of the Institute of History and Philology, Institute of History and Philology, Yu-yen…

  8. Life as an acoustician in industry, academia, and government service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastings, Mardi C.

    2004-05-01

    Acoustics is a science that has very broad applications, which affect all different areas of our lives. During the last 20 years, I have combined family with a career as an acoustics engineer in industry, a tenured faculty member at a university and, most recently, a program manager in a government agency. In these positions I have worked in several areas of acoustics, including noise control, structural acoustics, building acoustics, sound quality, physical acoustics, acoustic materials, underwater acoustics, biomedical ultrasound, physiological acoustics, and bioacoustics. Although the fundamental science of sound is the foundation of all these areas, communication of ideas, problems, and solutions varies greatly from industry to academia to government. Thus knowing the science and how to use it are not enough, as communication skills and the ability to adapt them to changing environments are essential for a successful career. In addition to describing life as an acoustician in industry, academia, and government service, I will present several examples of how even though the acoustic fundamentals are the same, how they are communicated could become a disaster or save the day.

  9. Cloning and expression of retinoblastoma-binding protein 4 gene in embryo diapause termination and in response to salinity stress from brine shrimp Artemia sinica.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolu; Yao, Feng; Liang, Xiaoyu; Zhu, Xiaolin; Zheng, Ren; Jia, Baolin; Hou, Lin; Zou, Xiangyang

    2016-10-15

    Retinoblastoma binding protein 4 (RBBP4) is a nuclear protein with four WD-repeat sequences and thus belongs to a highly conserved subfamily of proteins with such domains. This retinoblastoma-binding protein plays an important role in nucleosome assembly and histone modification, which influences gene transcription and regulates cell cycle and proliferation. Artemia sinica (brine shrimp) undergoes an unusual diapause process under stress conditions of high salinity and low temperature. However, the role of RBBP4 in diapause termination of embryo development in A. sinica remains unknown. Here, the full-length cDNA of the As-rbbp4 gene was obtained from A. sinica and found to contain 1411 nucleotides, including a 1281 bp open reading frame (ORF), 63 bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR) and a 67-bp 3'-UTR, which encodes a 427 amino acid (48 kDa) protein. Bioinformatic analysis indicated As-RBBP4 to be mainly located in the nucleus, with a theoretical isoelectric point of 4.79. Protein sequence domain analysis showed that As-RBBP4 is a conserved protein, especially in the WD40 domain. No specificity in expression of this gene was observed in tissues or organs by in situ hybridization. Real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot analyses of As-RBBP4 gene and protein expression, respectively, showed notably high levels at 10 h and a subsequent downward trend. Obvious trends in upregulation of As-RBBP4 were observed under conditions of low temperature and high salinity stress. As-E2F1 and As-CyclinE also presented similar trends as that of As-RBBP4 in Western blots. Analysis of the RBBP4 expression in early embryonic development of A. sinica indicated that this protein plays an important role in diapause termination and cell cycle regulation.

  10. Identification, expression pattern and functional characterization of As-MyD88 in bacteria challenge and during different developmental stages of Artemia sinica.

    PubMed

    Qin, Tong; Zhao, Xinxin; Luan, Hong; Ba, Huazhong; Yang, Lei; Li, Zhenegmin; Hou, Lin; Zou, Xiangyang

    2015-05-01

    Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MYD88), a key adapter protein in Toll-like receptor signaling, affects the immune response and the formation of the dorsal-ventral axis. Here, the 1555bp full-length cDNA of MyD88 from Artemia sinica (As-MyD88) was obtained. Molecular characterization revealed that the sequence includes an 1182bp open reading frame encoding a predicted protein of 393 amino acids. The predicted protein contains a death domain in the N-terminus, and box1 and 2 motifs of the TIR domain in the C-terminus. Real-time quantitative PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were used to determine the expression level, protein production and location of As-MYD88 during embryonic development and bacterial challenge. The highest expression level during embryonic development was at the 0h and 5h stages of A. sinica. As-MYD88 was remarkably upregulated after bacterial challenge. Our results suggested that As-MYD88 plays a vital role in response to bacterial challenge, and during post-diapause embryonic development of A. sinica.

  11. Differential protein expression using proteomics from a crustacean brine shrimp (Artemia sinica) under CO2-driven seawater acidification.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xue-Jiao; Zheng, Chao-Qun; Wang, Yu-Wei; Meng, Chuang; Xie, Xiao-Lu; Liu, Hai-Peng

    2016-11-01

    Gradually increasing atmospheric CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) has caused an imbalance in carbonate chemistry and resulted in decreased seawater pH in marine ecosystems, termed seawater acidification. Anthropogenic seawater acidification is postulated to affect the physiology of many marine calcifying organisms. To understand the possible effects of seawater acidification on the proteomic responses of a marine crustacean brine shrimp (Artemia sinica) three groups of cysts were hatched and further raised in seawater at different pH levels (8.2 as control and 7.8 and 7.6 as acidification stress levels according to the predicted levels at the end of this century and next century, respectively) for 1, 7 and 14 days followed by examination of the protein expression changes via two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Searches of protein databases revealed that 67 differential protein spots were altered due to lower pH level (7.6 and 7.8) stress in comparison to control groups (pH 8.2) by mass spectrometry. Generally, these differentially expressed proteins included the following: 1) metabolic process-related proteins involved in glycolysis and glucogenesis, nucleotide/amino acid/fatty acid metabolism, protein biosynthesis, DNA replication and apoptosis; 2) stress response-related proteins, such as peroxiredoxin, thioredoxin peroxidase, 70-kDa heat shock protein, Na/K ATPase, and ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase; 3) immune defence-related proteins, such as prophenoloxidase and ferritin; 4) cytoskeletal-related proteins, such as myosin light chain, TCP1 subunit 2, tropomyosin and tubulin alpha chain; and 5) signal transduction-related proteins, such as phospholipase C-like protein, 14-3-3 zeta, translationally controlled tumour protein and RNA binding motif protein. Taken together, these data support the idea that CO2-driven seawater acidification may affect protein expression in the crustacean A. sinica and possibly also in other species that feed on brine shrimp in the

  12. NIMH Initiatives to Facilitate Collaborations between Industry, Academia and Government for the Discovery and Clinical Testing of Novel Models and Drugs for Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Linda S.; Winsky, Lois; Goodman, Wayne; Oliveri, Mary Ellen; Stover, Ellen

    2008-01-01

    There is an urgent need to transform basic research discoveries into tools for treatment and prevention of mental illnesses. This article presents an overview of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) programs and resources to address the challenges and opportunities in psychiatric drug development starting at the point of discovery through the early phases of translational research. We summarize NIMH and selected National Institutes of Health (NIH) efforts to stimulate translation of basic and clinical neuroscience findings into novel targets, models, compounds, and strategies for the development of innovative therapeutics for psychiatric disorders. Examples of collaborations and partnerships between NIMH/NIH, academia, and industry are highlighted. PMID:18800066

  13. The eICU research institute - a collaboration between industry, health-care providers, and academia.

    PubMed

    McShea, Michael; Holl, Randy; Badawi, Omar; Riker, Richard R; Silfen, Eric

    2010-01-01

    As the volume of data that is electronically available promliferates, the health-care industry is identifying better ways to use this data for patient care. Ideally, these data are collected in real time, can support point-of-care clinical decisions, and, by providing instantaneous quality metrics, can create the opportunities to improve clinical practice as the patient is being cared for. The business-world technology supporting these activities is referred to as business intelligence, which offers competitive advantage, increased quality, and operational efficiencies. The health-care industry is plagued by many challenges that have made it a latecomer to business intelligence and data-mining technology, including delayed adoption of electronic medical records, poor integration between information systems, a lack of uniform technical standards, poor interoperability between complex devices, and the mandate to rigorously protect patient privacy. Efforts at developing a health care equivalent of business intelligence (which we will refer to as clinical intelligence) remains in its infancy. Until basic technology infrastructure and mature clinical applications are developed and implemented throughout the health-care system, data aggregation and interpretation cannot effectively progress. The need for this approach in health care is undisputed. As regional and national health information networks emerge, we need to develop cost-effective systems that reduce time and effort spent documenting health-care data while increasing the application of knowledge derived from that data.

  14. Drug development: how academia, industry and authorities interact.

    PubMed

    Garattini, Silvio; Perico, Norberto

    2014-10-01

    Unfortunately, abundant examples could be given of pitfalls in the current drug development paradigm-including in the design, conduct and evaluation of phase III clinical trials. This article discusses issues of particular relevance to clinical trials in nephrology, including the inappropriate use of placebo, publication of reports that emphasize potential treatment benefits over adverse reactions, the sometimes dubious impartiality of independent guidelines, and inadequate recruitment of elderly patients. This Perspectives article aims to highlight and summarize the flaws in the current drug development process, while suggesting a way forward that equally satisfies the requirements of academia, patients and the pharmaceutical industry. We suggest improvements to the drug development process and related legislation that intend to balance public needs with commercial aims and ensure effective drug evaluation by regulatory authorities.

  15. Accelerating technology transfer: new relationships for academia, industry and government.

    PubMed

    Satava, R M

    1998-01-01

    The budget deficit, reduction in Defense spending and the lack of return in the "peace dividend" has resulted in reduced federal funding for research. A number of programs have attempted to remedy the problem, with the use of collaborative funding as one of the major solutions. However, within the medical research community, there continues to be a very long technology transfer cycle. By mimicking the processes of non-medical high technology research and employing a number of these innovative solutions to medical research could afford the pathway to success. A template of how this could be accomplished through cooperative efforts of academia, industry and government is presented by using examples of success and failure in the past.

  16. Arboreal adaptations of body fat in wild toque macaques (Macaca sinica) and the evolution of adiposity in primates.

    PubMed

    Dittus, Wolfgang P J

    2013-11-01

    There is a paucity of information on body composition and fat patterning in wild nonhuman primates. Dissected adipose tissue from wild toque macaques (Macaca sinica) (WTM), feeding on a natural diet, accounted for 2.1% of body weight. This was far less than fatness reported for nonhuman primates raised in captivity or for contemporary humans. In WTM, fatness increased with age and diet richness, but did not differ by sex. In WTM (none of which were obese) intra-abdominal fat filled first, and "excess" fat was stored peripherally in a ratio of about 6:1. Intermuscular fat was minimal (0.1%). The superficial paunch held <15% of subcutaneous fat weight in contrast to its much larger proportions in obese humans and captive monkeys where most added fat accumulates subcutaneously. With increasing total adiposity, accumulating fat shifted in its distribution among eight different main internal and peripheral deposit areas-consistent with maintaining body balance and a low center of gravity. The available data suggest that, in arboreal primates, adaptations for agile locomotion and terminal branch feeding set constraints on the quantity and distribution of fat. The absence of a higher percentage of body fat in females and neonates (as are typical of humans) suggests that arboreal adaptations preclude the development of fat-dependent, large-brained infants and the adipose-rich mothers needed to sustain them. The lifestyle and body composition of wild primates represent a more appropriate model for early human foragers than well-fed captive monkeys do.

  17. The IT Advantage Assessment Model: Applying an Expanded Value Chain Model to Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Walter L.; Stylianou, Antonis C.

    2004-01-01

    Academia faces an uncertain future as the 21st century unfolds. New demands, discerning students, increased competition from non-traditional competitors are just a few of the forces demanding a response. The use of information technology (IT) in academia has not kept pace with its use in industry. What has been lacking is a model for the strategic…

  18. Academia-Industry-Government Linkages in Tanzania: Trends, Challenges and Prospects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mpehongwa, Gasper

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzed trends, challenges and prospects of academia-industry-government linkages in Tanzania. Using case study design, and documentary review to gather the required data, the study sought to answer three research questions: (1) what are the trends of academia-industry-government linkages in Tanzania?, (2) what are the challenges…

  19. A Study on the Role of Web Technology in Enhancing Research Pursuance among University Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussain, Irshad; Durrani, Muhammad Ismail

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of web technologies in promoting research pursuance among university teachers, examine the use of web technologies by university teachers in conducting research and identify the problems of university academia in using web technologies for research. The study was delimited to academia of social…

  20. A Case of Mimetic Isomorphism: A Short-Cut to Increasing Loyalty to Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orkodashvili, Mariam

    2008-01-01

    The paper discusses the process of shortening career path to leadership positions in academia that could serve as an example of mimetic isomorphism, where university tries to apply business-like quick result-oriented strategies. This strategy incentivizes young faculty to stay in universities and keep loyalty to academia. This process could also…

  1. Latinas/os Succeeding in Academia: The Effect of Mentors and Multiethnic Coursework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavazos, Alyssa G.

    2016-01-01

    Academia often devalues diverse identities, cultures, and languages through emphasis placed on academic values. To ascertain how established and new Latina/o academics achieved success in academia, the author conducted interviews with ten Latina/o academics; they noted mentoring and multiethnic coursework as influential in their success as…

  2. Pursuit of personalized anticancer therapy: leveraging collaboration between academia and the biotech/pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Buck, Elizabeth; Mulvihill, Mark; Iwata, Kenneth K

    2010-01-01

    Over the past 2 decades, our increased understanding of tumor biology has resulted in the delivery of a new generation of molecularly targeted cancer drugs with greater efficacy and less toxicity. This understanding has also provided pharmaceutical and academic institutions with a greater appreciation for the complexities and challenges associated with discovering and developing molecularly targeted drugs. To deal with the complexities of tumor biology and the associated technologies needed to develop molecularly targeted drugs, there has been increased cooperation and collaboration between academic and pharmaceutical-industry researchers in a broader number of aspects of the drug discovery and development continuum, including structural biology and translational research. This collaborative effort has played a role in molecularly targeted drugs such as cetuximab, trastuzumab, imatinib, and new promising drug candidates such as OSI-906. Cooperative efforts by industry and academia have also provided important insights to optimize the use of such agents in the clinic. This review aims to emphasize the need for academic/industrial collaborations for success and efficiency through the drug discovery and development continuum, and will highlight several examples of collaborations between academic and industrial scientists that facilitated the development of molecularly targeted antitumor agents into the clinic.

  3. First optical education center in Japan established by cooperation between academia and industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatagai, Toyohiko

    2014-07-01

    At the present of the 21st century, optical technology became what must be in our life. If there is no optical technology, we cannot use optical equipments such as the camera, microscopes, DVD, LEDs and laser diodes (LDs). Optics is also the leading part in the most advanced scientific field. It is clear that the organization which does education and research is required in such a very important area. Unfortunately, there was no such organization in Japan. The education and research of light have been individually done in various faculties of universities, various research institutes, and many companies. However, our country is now placed in severer surroundings, such as the globalization of our living, the accelerated competition in research and development. This is one of the reasons why Utsunomiya University has established Center for Optical Research and Education (CORE) in 2007. To contribute to optical technology and further development of optical industry, "Center for Optical Research and Education (CORE), Utsunomiya University" promotes education and research in the field of the optical science and technology cooperatively with industry, academia and the government. Currently, 6 full professors, 21 cooperative professors, 2 visiting professors and 7 post-doctoral researchers and about 40 students are joined with CORE. Many research projects with industries, the local government of Tochigi as well as Japanese government. Optical Innovation Center has established in CORE by supporting of Japan Science and Technology Agency in 2011 to develop advanced optical technologies for local companies.

  4. Clinical Pharmacology Research Internships at the Interface between Academia and Industry: Students' Perceptions and Scientific Output.

    PubMed

    Goulooze, Sebastiaan C; Franson, Kari L; Cohen, Adam F; Rissmann, Robert

    2017-01-08

    The Centre for Human Drug Research (CHDR) is a non-profit clinical research institute at the interface between academia and the pharmaceutical industry. CHDR hosts a research internship programme for undergraduate (bio)medical students. The aim of this study was (i) to investigate the student perceptions of the undergraduate research internship and (ii) to quantify the scientific output related to these internships. We surveyed former interns at the CHDR from the year 2007 to 2014 and quantified their scientific output with a PubMed search. There was a response rate to the survey of 61%, with a good overall rating of the internships. Many students considered their internship at CHDR to be (much) more broad (55%) and with a (much) stricter planning (48%), compared to previous internships at academic research groups. In turn, there were many aspects reported to be similar to academic research internships such as focus on research methodology and 'outcome-drivenness'. Twenty-four per cent of the internships resulted in a co-authorship on papers published in peer-reviewed journals with an average impact factor of 3.3. In conclusion, with appropriate management and supervision, effective research electives are possible in the more commercial environment of a clinical research organization.

  5. The End of Academia?: From "Cogito Ergo Sum" to "Consumo Ergo Sum" Germany and Malaysia in Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Kim-Hui,; Har, Wai-Mun

    2008-01-01

    The lack of academic and thinking culture is getting more worried and becomes a major challenge to our academia society this 21st century. Few directions that move academia from "cogito ergo sum" to "consumo ergo sum" are actually leading us to "the end of academia". Those directions are: (1) the death of dialectic;…

  6. Transcriptome Profiling of Khat (Catha edulis) and Ephedra sinica Reveals Gene Candidates Potentially Involved in Amphetamine-Type Alkaloid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Groves, Ryan A.; Hagel, Jillian M.; Zhang, Ye; Kilpatrick, Korey; Levy, Asaf; Marsolais, Frédéric; Lewinsohn, Efraim; Sensen, Christoph W.; Facchini, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Amphetamine analogues are produced by plants in the genus Ephedra and by khat (Catha edulis), and include the widely used decongestants and appetite suppressants (1S,2S)-pseudoephedrine and (1R,2S)-ephedrine. The production of these metabolites, which derive from L-phenylalanine, involves a multi-step pathway partially mapped out at the biochemical level using knowledge of benzoic acid metabolism established in other plants, and direct evidence using khat and Ephedra species as model systems. Despite the commercial importance of amphetamine-type alkaloids, only a single step in their biosynthesis has been elucidated at the molecular level. We have employed Illumina next-generation sequencing technology, paired with Trinity and Velvet-Oases assembly platforms, to establish data-mining frameworks for Ephedra sinica and khat plants. Sequence libraries representing a combined 200,000 unigenes were subjected to an annotation pipeline involving direct searches against public databases. Annotations included the assignment of Gene Ontology (GO) terms used to allocate unigenes to functional categories. As part of our functional genomics program aimed at novel gene discovery, the databases were mined for enzyme candidates putatively involved in alkaloid biosynthesis. Queries used for mining included enzymes with established roles in benzoic acid metabolism, as well as enzymes catalyzing reactions similar to those predicted for amphetamine alkaloid metabolism. Gene candidates were evaluated based on phylogenetic relationships, FPKM-based expression data, and mechanistic considerations. Establishment of expansive sequence resources is a critical step toward pathway characterization, a goal with both academic and industrial implications. PMID:25806807

  7. Methods Used by Colleges and Schools of Pharmacy to Prepare Student Pharmacists for Careers in Academia

    PubMed Central

    Dy-Boarman, Eliza A.; Clifford, Kalin M.; Summa, Maria A.; Willson, Megan N.; Boyle, Jaclyn A.; Peeters, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To identify the methods used by US colleges and schools of pharmacy to prepare student pharmacists for academic careers. Method. An 18-item survey instrument was developed and distributed to US colleges and schools of pharmacy. Representatives were asked about faculty responsibilities, experiences in academia currently offered to student pharmacists, and representatives’ perception of their student pharmacists’ preparedness for careers in academia, including barriers in current programming. Results. Representatives from 96 colleges/schools responded. The vast majority (96%) provided academia-focused advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs), 40% provided didactic coursework in academia, 28% offered a longitudinal research track, and 42% offered academia-focused independent studies. Teaching methods and creating learning objectives were the most common pedagogical content, while assessment activities were diverse. Time was the most prevalent barrier to providing training for academic careers; however, degree of student pharmacist interest, faculty inexperience, and lack of leadership support were also commonly reported. Conclusions: Colleges and schools of pharmacy vary in the extent to which they prepare student pharmacists for careers in academia. Advanced pharmacy practice experiences were the most common method of training offered. Standardization of training for academia may better promote this career path to student pharmacists. PMID:28289296

  8. From Marginalisation to Integration: Arab-Palestinians in Israeli Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hager, Tamar; Jabareen, Yousef

    2016-01-01

    The Arab-Palestinian minority in Israel, one-fifth of the country's population, has been underrepresented in Israeli institutions of higher education since the establishment of the state. This article focuses on the authors' shared aim of promoting diversity and multiculturalism in institutions of higher education in Israel. It first introduces…

  9. Temporal distance and discrimination: an audit study in academia.

    PubMed

    Milkman, Katherine L; Akinola, Modupe; Chugh, Dolly

    2012-07-01

    Through a field experiment set in academia (with a sample of 6,548 professors), we found that decisions about distant-future events were more likely to generate discrimination against women and minorities (relative to Caucasian males) than were decisions about near-future events. In our study, faculty members received e-mails from fictional prospective doctoral students seeking to schedule a meeting either that day or in 1 week; students' names signaled their race (Caucasian, African American, Hispanic, Indian, or Chinese) and gender. When the requests were to meet in 1 week, Caucasian males were granted access to faculty members 26% more often than were women and minorities; also, compared with women and minorities, Caucasian males received more and faster responses. However, these patterns were essentially eliminated when prospective students requested a meeting that same day. Our identification of a temporal discrimination effect is consistent with the predictions of construal-level theory and implies that subtle contextual shifts can alter patterns of race- and gender-based discrimination.

  10. The dilemma of inclusivity in the globalization of academia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castano Rodriguez, Carolina

    2015-12-01

    This paper extends the conversation started by Mariona Espinet, Mercè Izquierdo, Clara Garcia-Pujol; Ludovic Morge and Isabel Martins and Susana de Souza regarding the diverse issues faced by the internationalisation of science education journals. I use my own experience as an early career researcher coming from an underrepresented culture and language within academia to expand on these issues. I focus on the issues which I have experienced the most: the disconnection between university research and school practice and the struggles with the unspoken power structures. As I delve into my experience, I argue that we are failing to ask the right questions to create a science education community that is inclusive of diverse views and multicultural perspectives. We need to rethink how we can avoid colonisation of school teachers, as Isabel and Susana describe, but also the colonisation of those academics and teachers who are from non-English speaking cultures. I urge us to carry more debates such as the one initiated by these three authors, exposing and debating about the different power structures within science education so that we can progress in empowering all those voices that have been silenced.

  11. Intentional introduction of Artemia sinica (Anostraca) in the high-altitude Tibetan lake Dangxiong Co: the new population and consequences for the environment and for humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Qinxian; Anufriieva, Elena; Liu, Xifang; Kong, Fanjing; Shadrin, Nickolai

    2015-11-01

    The imbalance between supply and demand of Artemia cysts in China and around the world is increasing now. Salt lakes in Tibet may contribute to the solution of the problem. In Northern Tibet there are 26 saline lakes whose salinity and temperature may support Artemia survival at an altitude of 4 000-5 100 m. We found Artemia in 15 of these lakes. The saline lakes with Artemia populations mainly belong to the shallow basin lakes, and the majority of these lakes are small in area. The total area of lakes without Artemia is more than 1 000 km2. Lake Dangxiong Co (Co means lake in Tibet) was chosen for the intentional introduction of Artemia sinica. In 2004, 850 g of A. sinica cysts, originating from Qinghai, were introduced in the lake. Surveys in 2006-2014 showed that the average abundance of Artemia adults in the lake gradually increased from 20 ind./m3 in 2006 to 1950 ind./m3 in 2013. We assume that two subpopulations of A. sinica, separated by depth, may exist in the lake. The new Artemia population caused an increase in the number of species of phytoplankton and heterotrophic protozoa with a decrease of their total abundance. Water transparency also increased. Dominance in phytoplankton passed from cyanobacteria to diatoms. Changes occurred not only in the lake ecosystem; the number of water birds using the lakes also dramatically increased. Preliminary calculations showed that is it possible to harvest at least about 150 t cysts per year from the lake as well as 3.2 thousand tons of frozen or 350 t of dried biomass of adult Artemia.

  12. Journal of the Chinese Silicate Society (Selected Articles).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    Diameter Sapphire Crystals in Tubular and Rod Shapes;, by Zhang Shouqing, Tang Lianan, Wang Wen, and Le Xiuhong ................................ 1...Jingwen....... ......................................... 21 ’< .. .L7- THE EFG GROWTH AND APPLICATION OF SMALL DIAMETER SAPPHIRE CRYSTALS • LIN TUBULAR AND...ROD SHAPES Zhang Shouqing, Tang Lianan, Wang Wen, Le Xiuhong (Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Academia Sinica) Small diameter sapphire crystals in

  13. Pharma and Academia: What We Have Here Is a Failure to Communicate.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, Morris J

    2016-09-13

    In recent years, there has been substantial interest in the potential value of collaboration between academia and the pharmaceutical industry. In this Crosstalk, I discuss obstacles to these relationships being optimally productive.

  14. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression analysis of the protein arginine N-methyltransferase 1 gene (As-PRMT1) from Artemia sinica.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xue; Yao, Feng; Li, Xuejie; Jia, Baolin; Zhong, Guangying; Zhang, Jianfeng; Zou, Xiangyang; Hou, Lin

    2015-07-01

    Protein arginine N-methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) is an important epigenetic regulation factor in eukaryotic genomes. PRMT1 is involved in histone arginine loci methylation modification, changes in eukaryotic genomes' chromatin structure, and gene expression regulation. In the present paper, the full-length 1201-bp cDNA sequence of the PRMT1 homolog of Artemia sinica (As-PRMT1) was cloned for the first time. The putative As-PRMT1 protein comprises 346 amino acids with a SAM domain and a PRMT5 domain. Multiple sequence alignments revealed that the putative sequence of As-PRMT1 protein was relatively conserved across species, especially in the SAM domain. As-PRMT1 is widely expressed during embryo development of A. sinica. This is followed by a dramatic upregulation after diapause termination and then downregulation from the nauplius stage. Furthermore, As-PRMT1 transcripts are highly upregulated under conditions of high salinity and low temperature stress. These findings suggested that As-PRMT1 is a stress-related factor that might promote or inhibit the expression of certain genes, play a critical role in embryonic development and in resistance to low temperature and high salinity stress.

  15. Molecular characterization and expression of As-nurp1 gene from Artemia sinica during development and in response to salinity and temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiuying; Zhang, Qiaozhi; Han, Lulu; Yuan, Zhe; Tan, Jian; Du, Bin; Zou, Xiangyang; Hou, Lin

    2012-06-01

    Nuclear protein 1 (NURP1) is a stress-related protein and closely related to diapause in the development of Artemia. In the present paper, the full-length 568-bp cDNA sequence of the nurp1 homolog of Artemia sinica (As-nurp1) was isolated by RACE technology for the first time. The putative As-nurp1 protein consists of 66 amino acids with a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) motif and a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS). Multiple sequence alignments revealed that the putative As-nurp1 protein sequence was relatively conserved across species, especially in the bHLH domain. The expression of As-nurp1 is widely distributed during A. sinica development. This is followed by a dramatic downregulation after diapause and is newly upregulated from the larval nauplius stage. Furthermore, As-nurp1 transcripts are highly upregulated under conditions of high salinity and low temperature. These findings suggest that As-nurp1 is stress-related and may act as a protective factor in embryonic development.

  16. Constructing Fear in Academia: Neoliberal Practices at a Public College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Dana-Ain

    2011-01-01

    Neoliberal values and ideology, which have broadly undermined social justice ideals, have been inserted into a range of public spheres both in the U.S.A. and internationally. Public higher education institutions have increasingly acquiesced to neoliberal strategies, which restrict access to public services, commodify the public sphere and…

  17. What Academia Can Gain from Building a Data Warehouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wierschem, David; McMillen, Jeremy; McBroom, Randy

    2003-01-01

    Describes how, when used effectively, data warehouses can be a significant component of strategic decision making on campus. Discusses what a data warehouse is and what its informational contents may include, environmental drivers and obstacles, and strategies to justify developing a data warehouse for an academic institution. (EV)

  18. Family-Friendly Policies and Gender Bias in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Audrey L.; Tikka, Paivi M.

    2008-01-01

    Several recent reports on the status of women in US academic institutions have recommended more generous family policies to encourage and retain more women among academic staffs. Many of the policies suggested are modelled on those that have been in effect in Nordic countries for decades. The status of women among Finnish and Swedish academic…

  19. Networking Industry and Academia: Evidence from FUSION Projects in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Simon; Onofrei, George

    2009-01-01

    Graduate development programmes such as FUSION continue to be seen by policy makers, higher education institutions and small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) as primary means of strengthening higher education-business links and in turn improving the match between graduate output and the needs of industry. This paper provides evidence from case…

  20. Academia's Garbage: Campus/Community Solid Waste Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyles, Marcia

    The nation's overall efforts in solid waste management are noted, and suggestions and examples are presented concerning activities that can be undertaken by institutions of higher education to assist their communities to achieve safer and cleaner environments. The federal regulatory agency, The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), is concerned…

  1. Regulation of Academia in Israel: Legislation, Policy, and Market Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Erez; Davidovitch, Nitza

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development of Israel's system of higher education in recent years has led to a sharp rise in the number of students, the establishment of new institutions certified to award degrees, and legislation and policy changes. The evolving circumstances are explored in the current article, which follows the sources, causes, and justifications…

  2. Acta Aerodynamica Sinica,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-03

    r &t ar + rx Re -1 ar r ((vur) + 3t) O a~ p ~~ (u 4) r aX 2 -T...radius of curvature of the surface and R is the gas constant. For the dust (a,u , r ) +t--(,ur. (a,u,/h) ’) P + V , , + a uv, F,±L - &I +a"v - ’ R "h - IC...h,~h Here, r is the dust particle concentration. The mutual interaction force is F..Ua_____ T, Tm where Tm=4d2 p Re , Re=av(Up-U)2+(Vp-v)2 d P P

  3. Molecular analysis and its expression of a pou homeobox protein gene during development and in response to salinity stress from brine shrimp, Artemia sinica.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Qing; Hou, Lin; Yi, Nan; Zhang, Riu-Feng; Zou, Xiang-Yang

    2012-01-01

    Brine shrimps of the genus Artemia are aquatic species of economic importance because of their important significance to aquaculture and are used as a model species in physiology and developmental biology. Research on Artemia POU homeobox gene function will enhance our understanding of the physiological and developmental processes of POU homeobox gene in animals. Herein, a full-length cDNA encoding an Artemia POU homeobox protein gene 1 (APH-1) from Artemia sinica (designated as As-APH-1) was cloned and characterized by a reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA end (RACE) method. The As-APH-1 gene encoded a protein of 388 amino acid polypeptide with a calculated molecular mass of 42.85kDa and an isoelectric point of 6.90 and the protein belongs to the POU III family. Multiple sequence alignments revealed that A. sinica As-APH-1 protein sequence shared a conserved POU homeobox domain with other species. The early and persistent expression of As-APH-1 in the naupliar stages by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and whole-mount embryonic immunohistochemistry suggest that As-APH-1 functions very early in the salt gland and may be required continuously in this organ. Later in development, expression of As-APH-1 begins to dramatically decrease and disappear in salt gland of the sub-adult Artemia. In addition, we also discovered that As-APH-1 increased obviously as the salinity increased, indicating that As-APH-1 might be used as a good indicator of salinity stress. In summary, we are the first to identify the As-APH-1 gene and to determine its gene expression patterns in early embryogenesis stages and in different salinity stress in brine shrimp, A. sinica. The result of expression of As-APH-1 affected by salinity changes will provide us further understanding of the underlying mechanisms of osmoregulation in Artemia early embryonic development.

  4. The Imperative of Academia in the Globalization of Plastic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Harry S; Bentz, Michael L; Baus, Gustavo Herdocia; Palacios, Jorge; Dibbell, David G; Noon, John; Poore, Samuel O; King, Timothy W; Mount, Delora L

    2015-06-01

    Although vertical health care delivery models certainly will remain a vital component in the provision of surgery in low-and-middle-income countries, it is clear now that the sustainability of global surgery will depend on more than just surgeons operating. Instead, what is needed is a comprehensive approach, that is, a horizontal integration that develops sustainable human resources, physical infrastructure, administrative oversight, and financing mechanisms in the developing world. We propose that such a strategy for development would necessarily involve an active role by academic institutions of high-income countries.

  5. Open Access Meets Discoverability: Citations to Articles Posted to Academia.edu.

    PubMed

    Niyazov, Yuri; Vogel, Carl; Price, Richard; Lund, Ben; Judd, David; Akil, Adnan; Mortonson, Michael; Schwartzman, Josh; Shron, Max

    2016-01-01

    Using matching and regression analyses, we measure the difference in citations between articles posted to Academia.edu and other articles from similar journals, controlling for field, impact factor, and other variables. Based on a sample size of 31,216 papers, we find that a paper in a median impact factor journal uploaded to Academia.edu receives 16% more citations after one year than a similar article not available online, 51% more citations after three years, and 69% after five years. We also found that articles also posted to Academia.edu had 58% more citations than articles only posted to other online venues, such as personal and departmental home pages, after five years.

  6. Open Access Meets Discoverability: Citations to Articles Posted to Academia.edu

    PubMed Central

    Niyazov, Yuri; Vogel, Carl; Price, Richard; Lund, Ben; Judd, David; Akil, Adnan; Mortonson, Michael; Schwartzman, Josh; Shron, Max

    2016-01-01

    Using matching and regression analyses, we measure the difference in citations between articles posted to Academia.edu and other articles from similar journals, controlling for field, impact factor, and other variables. Based on a sample size of 31,216 papers, we find that a paper in a median impact factor journal uploaded to Academia.edu receives 16% more citations after one year than a similar article not available online, 51% more citations after three years, and 69% after five years. We also found that articles also posted to Academia.edu had 58% more citations than articles only posted to other online venues, such as personal and departmental home pages, after five years. PMID:26886730

  7. Better infrastructure: industry-academia partnerships--a marriage of convenience?

    PubMed

    Abraham, Edward

    2009-01-01

    The successful design and completion of clinical trials often requires participation of both industry and academia. Although there may be differing priorities for academic and industry participants, both bring important insights and resources to the clinical trial effort. Although industry generally is primarily responsible for preclinical development and funding of the study and academia for patient recruitment and participation in the data safety monitoring board and clinical coordinating center, there are also a number of important areas, including protocol design, data analysis, and manuscript preparation where both academia and industry can supply important insights. Inherent tensions may exist in the academic-industry relationship, including important issues relating to conflict of interest for both academic and industry participants. Nevertheless, the academic-industry partnership, if appropriately organized, can perform in a synergistic fashion, allowing exploration of novel therapies, elucidation of important mechanisms, and greater understanding of critical illness through using combined approaches that generate insights unable to be provided by either partner alone.

  8. Developing an academia-based public health observatory: the new global public health observatory with emphasis on urban health at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Salgado, Carlos

    2015-11-01

    Health observatories may differ according to their mission, institutional setting, topical emphasis or geographic coverage. This paper discusses the development of a new urban-focused health observatory, and its operational research and training infrastructure under the academic umbrella of the Department of Epidemiology and the Institute of Urban Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (BSPH) in Baltimore, USA. Recognizing the higher education mission of the BSPH, the development of a new professional training in public health was an important first step for the development of this observatory. This new academia-based observatory is an innovative public health research and training platform offering faculty, investigators, professional epidemiology students and research partners a physical and methodological infrastructure for their operational research and training activities with both a local urban focus and a global reach. The concept of a public health observatory and its role in addressing social health inequalities in local urban settings is discussed.

  9. You're hired! Negotiating your first biomedical engineering position: academia vs. private sector.

    PubMed

    Linte, Cristian A

    2008-01-01

    This session is intended to prepare current bio-engineering students and post-doctoral fellows and getting them in the right shape to apply, negotiate and succeed in getting their first job in industry or academia. Tips on putting together the appropriate CV, preparing your portfolio and getting ready for the interview will be covered by the invited speakers. Academia-oriented trainees will also get a better feel on the academic requirements, what items should be highlighted in the CV, what makes a well-rounded junior faculty and what the expectations are of junior/assistant professors.

  10. Who Gets Promoted? Gender Differences in Science and Engineering Academia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Kristen

    Using a nationally representative sample of doctoral academic scientists and engineers, this study examines gender differences in the likelihood of having tenure and senior faculty ranks after controlling for academic age, field, doctoral origins, employing educational institution, productivity, postdoctoral positions, work activities, and family characteristics. Logistic regressions show that many of these controls are significant; that biology and employment at comprehensive universities have a gender-specific advantage for women; and that postdoctoral positions, teaching instead of doing administrative work, and having children have a gender-specific disadvantage. Although the statistical methods employed here do not reveal the exact nature of how gender inequities in science and engineering careers arise, the author suggests that they exist.

  11. Collaboration with academia in the development of post ovulatory methods.

    PubMed

    Thaler, G

    1999-12-01

    The 0.75-mg levonorgestrel-containing 'morning after' contraceptive tablet Postinor was developed by Gedeon Richter Ltd., Hungary. The product was first launched in 1979 and registered later in approximately 40 countries. In 1994, the World Health Organization offered the company participation in a multinational clinical trial to prove the superiority of the product over existing (Yuzpe-type) emergency contraceptive products. Based on these data the company was able to redesign the 'morning after' type Postinor into an 'emergency' pill, Postinor-2. During further clinical trials a close working relationship was formed between the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at the Albert Szent-Györgyi Medical University in Szeged, Hungary, and Gedeon Richter. The advantages and challenges of cooperation between public- and private-sector institutions are analyzed in the paper.

  12. The G4R GMES Academy - linking research, academia, service providers and local authorities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeil, Peter; Tramutoli, Valerio

    2013-04-01

    The GMES Academy intends to enhance the role of the academic and R&D communities in the evolution of EO & GI services. The GMES4Regions G4R initiative, aiming to strengthen the link between GMES (Global Monitoring for Environment and Security) and European regions, inaugurated the GMES Academy at the University Mozarteum of Salzburg (Austria) on 13th - 14th September 2012. This academy has been created with the objective of fostering a dialogue among the private sector, Local and Regional Administration (LRA) and the academic and research community, in order to improve the development of Earth Observation (EO) and Geographic Information (GI) services. On this occasion, Z_GIS, the Interfaculty Department of Geoinformatics of Salzburg University, hosted the round table "Fostering Downstream Services for the Regions - contributions from Research & Academia," during which the participants had the opportunity to discuss with representatives of the European Commission (EC) and the European Space Agency (ESA) the future role of the academic community in this domain. Stakeholders from the academic and R&D world adopted the 'Salzburg Declaration on GMES related Research', calling for strengthening connections between research activities and educational programmes to improve GMES services. The Declaration calls mainly for: • fostering education and training on GMES • ensuring cooperation among the academic and research community through the GMES Academy • maintaining a political commitment towards the implementation of such academic initiatives. The GMES Academy is established as a platform with six components: GATEWAY - the directory of Universities and Research Centres BRIDGE - an inventory of research briefs documenting the latest offerings from research to effective applications FACILITATOR - a portal to seek or propose internships or contract research across Europe and addressing outreach and advocacy: LINK - Access to the repository of on-going GMES related

  13. Technology Transfer: A Case Study of Programs and Practices at NASA, DOD, DOC, and Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blood, John R.

    2009-01-01

    Technology transfer is vital to humanity. It spurs innovation, promotes commerce, and provides technology-based goods and services. Technology transfer is also highly complex and interdependent in nature. This interdependence is exemplified principally by the various technology transfer interactions between government, industry, and academia. …

  14. The Efficacy of Social Media Technologies in Academia: A Pedagogical Bliss or Digital Fad?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kivunja, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Efficacy of a teaching strategy technically refers to the ability of that strategy to produce a desired or intended learning outcomes. To date, there is little information on the efficacy of social media technologies in academia and it is likely to be some time before their effectiveness is proven. It is therefore legitimate to ask the question,…

  15. Gender and Prestige in Swedish Academia: Exploring Senior Management in Universities and University Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Helen

    2017-01-01

    This article highlights the multifaceted character of the Swedish higher education sector and investigates senior academic management positions from a gender perspective using theories about an academic prestige economy and academic capitalism. The focus is on an aspect often overseen in research on Swedish academia: the distinction between…

  16. Refugees, Migrants, Visitors and Internally Displaced Persons: Investigating Acculturation in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Nicholas; Martin, Rose; Knox, Sarah; Mabingo, Alfdaniels

    2016-01-01

    What is the boundary of the academic space, and who can belong within it? The migration of skilled practitioners into Academia from other workplaces brings with it the opportunity to expand the understandings and functions of higher education. Similar to processes of geographic/political migration, the acculturation resulting from this…

  17. Deal-Making and Rule-Breaking: Behind the Facade of Equity in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjeldal, Sue-Ellen; Rindfleish, Jennifer; Sheridan, Alison

    2005-01-01

    A glass ceiling for women still exists in academia after two decades of equal employment opportunity (EEO) legislation in Australia. There are complex factors that when combined make gender inequity in the higher education sector highly resistant to change. Using personal histories as a reflexive device, the paper makes explicit the embedded male…

  18. Barriers to Women Leaders in Academia: Tales from Science and Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe-Walsh, Liza; Turnbull, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    There is growing concern regarding the lack of women in senior positions in science and technology (ST) in United Kingdom (UK) universities. Previous research has enhanced our understanding of the challenges women in academia face to progress their careers. In contrast, relatively little is known as to why so few women reach leadership positions…

  19. Poverty PhDs: Funds of Knowledge, Poverty, and Professional Identity in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutri, Ramona Maile; Manning, Jill Michelle; Chun, Marc

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to the common deficit approach, this self-study explores the relationship between the funds of knowledge possessed by people of poverty and their development of professional identity in academia. All three authors have moved beyond conditions of financial poverty, but all find that the mental conditions of poverty persist. We conclude…

  20. A Closer Look at Being a Woman in Turkish Academia: A Descriptive Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birlik, Nurten; Arikan, Arda

    2009-01-01

    In this descriptive study, women's professional lives with a focus on what it means to be a woman in Turkish academia and on whether being a woman differs from being a man in an academic context was put under scrutiny. For this purpose, a questionnaire was conducted among 41 women academics currently working at the Faculties of Education in…

  1. Productivity in Academia: An Assessment of Causal Linkages between Output and Outcome Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wamala, Robert; Ssembatya, Vincent A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate causal linkages between output and outcome indicators of productivity in academia. Design/methodology/approach: The duration of teaching service and the number of graduate students supervised to completion were adopted as output indicators of productivity. Equivalent outcome indicators were the…

  2. A Critical Analysis of Anti-Discrimination Law and Microaggressions in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukes, Robin; Bangs, Joann

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a critical analysis of microaggressions and anti-discrimination law in academia. There are many challenges for faculty claiming discrimination under current civil rights laws. Examples of microaggressions that fall outside of anti-discrimination law will be provided. Traditional legal analysis of discrimination will not end…

  3. Students Perception of the Role of Parents in Academia and Continued Examination Malpractice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ofoegbu, Felicia I.

    2009-01-01

    The formal school system is bedeviled with many problems some of which have defied satisfactory solutions. One major problem plaguing the Nigerian education system is large scale examination malpractice. The aim of the study is to find out the role of parents in academia in perpetrating and perpetuating examination malpractice. The population of…

  4. Political Attitudes in the Classroom: Is Academia the Last Bastion of Liberalism?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    La Falce, David; Gomez, SimonPeter

    2007-01-01

    Academia is under attack from those who believe that college professors are uniformly leftist politically, which creates an environment of bias against conservative students and professors. Advocates have proposed an "Academic Bill of Rights" that may lead to policies to achieve intellectual diversity in faculty hiring and tenure decisions.…

  5. Language and La Academia, If English Works, Por Que Se Emplea Espanol?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonz, Jon G.

    1978-01-01

    The dynamics of Mexican American nationalism reflected in the publications of the Academia de la Nueva Raza and in a 1971 work by Ricardo Sanchez are examined in this article. The connection between language and ideology is discussed in the context of Chicano nationalist writing. (GC)

  6. The role of academia and industry in nurturing women in physics in Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyamwandha, Cecilia A.; Kasina, Angeline; Muthui, Zipporah W.; Awuor, Emily; Baki, Paul

    2015-12-01

    The authors look at some of the primary initiatives taken by the government, academia, and industry to nurture the goals and dreams of Kenyan women physicists. They discuss key transformative lines of progress as evidenced by statistics, and the enabling environments and platforms upon which these were made possible.

  7. The Diffusion of the Learning Pyramid Myths in Academia: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Letrud, Kåre; Hernes, Sigbjørn

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the diffusion and present day status of a family of unsubstantiated learning-retention myths, some of which are referred to as "the learning pyramid". We demonstrate through an extensive search in academic journals and field-specific encyclopaedias that these myths are indeed widely publicised in academia and that…

  8. Leadership, Diversity and Succession Planning in Academia. Research & Occasional Papers Series: CSHE 8.10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Although academia is becoming more like business in many respects--not all of them positive--it has not borrowed one of the best attributes of business culture: its tradition of developing leadership through succession planning. As a result, much talent is underutilized. This includes, most prominently, that of women and minorities, who tend not…

  9. Reflections on the No-Uterus Rule: Pregnancy, Academia, and Feminist Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shope, Janet Hinson

    2005-01-01

    This essay relays the author's own pregnancy story to illustrate how academia traditionally reinforces the mind/body dualism by adhering to the no-uterus rule: a gender blind, antibody approach that treats persons as if they do not occupy a body in time and space. Her experience reveals the problems disembodied approaches to knowledge pose for…

  10. NOAA & Academia Partnership Building Conference. Highlights (3rd, Washington, DC, November 14-15, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (DOC), Silver Spring, MD.

    In November 2001 the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) hosted the third NOAA and Academia Partnership to evaluate, maintain, and expand on efforts to optimize NOAA-university cooperation. Close partnership between the NOAA and U.S. universities has produced many benefits for the U.S. economy and the environment. Based on the…

  11. Academic Dynasties: Decentralization and Familism in the Italian Academia. NBER Working Paper No. 17572

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durante, Ruben; Labartino, Giovanna; Perotti, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Decentralization can lead to "good" or "bad" outcomes depending on the socio-cultural norms of the targeted communities. We investigate this issue by looking at the evolution of familism and nepotism in the Italian academia before and after the 1998 reform, which decentralized the recruitment of professors from the national to…

  12. New psychoactive substances legislation in Ireland - Perspectives from academia.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Pierce V; Power, John D

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of 'legal highs' or 'new psychoactive substances' (NPS) on the Irish market is reflective of their appearance in many countries, with some notable exceptions. The official response to the situation is examined here by looking at Irish controlled drugs legislation and drug enforcement policies as enacted in recent years and their effects on academic research on NPS. The philosophy and practice of outright bans of scheduled substances has not been effective in delivering the stated aims of illicit drug control, namely harm reduction. With these legislative changes, we have witnessed the removal of the 'legitimate' sale and open marketing of a number of NPS to the general public in commercial retail premises. However, as legislation was enacted, suppliers and vendors rapidly changed the contents of their legal high products from now controlled to non-controlled substances. We have found that it is administratively challenging to perform scientific research on controlled substances at academic institutions. It is desirable to gather analytical, pharmacological, and toxicological data on these substances as they emerge on the market but due to the restrictive nature of licensing requirements, once a substance or generic class of substances is controlled, this becomes more difficult. The facts that any quantity of substance, no matter how small, is controlled, the nomenclature used to describe compounds is not consistent within the enacted legislation and the use of catch-all classes of compounds with the intention of controlling many similar molecular structures, all create problematic issues for academic researchers.

  13. Institution Closures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Mary F., Ed.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue focuses on the need to accelerate the closing of institutions for people with mental retardation. Articles are by both current and former residents of institutions and by professionals, and include: "The Realities of Institutions" (Tia Nelis); "I Cry Out So That I Won't Go Insane" (Mary F. Hayden); "Trends in…

  14. Information Technology Diffusion in Academic Teaching: An Institutional Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveh, Gali; Tubin, Dorit; Pliskin, Nava

    Even though diffusion of information and communication technology (ICT) in academic teaching has been fast, the expected benefits in pedagogy and structure have yet to materialize. Rogers' diffusion theory, which focuses on adoption and rejection of innovation, can explain the proliferation of ICT usage in academia, but the lack of ICT-based pedagogical and structural changes are beyond the scope of diffusion theory. The objective of this paper is to broaden the theoretical base for explaining the state of ICT in academia via the alternative conceptual lens of institutional theory, which focuses on the relationship between the organization and its environment. With the institutional theory perspective in mind, we suggest that further pedagogical and structural changes in academic courses should not be expected as a result of ICT implementation in academic teaching.

  15. New Challenges for Women Seeking an Academic Career: The Hiring Process in Portuguese Higher Education Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvalho, Teresa; Santiago, Rui

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the potential impact of changes in recruitment and hiring processes in Portuguese higher education institutions--under the New Public Management framework--on the representation of women in academia. Based on official data from the Portuguese Ministry of Science, Technology and Higher Education, two major…

  16. Off-Campus Employee Perceptions of Organizational Culture at a Higher Education Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malley, Krista H.

    2009-01-01

    Off-campus locations affiliated with established, traditional higher education institutions have grown over the last 30 years (Rohfeld, 1990). The expansion of traditional academia's reach beyond the range of the normal student population has presented many diverse logistical challenges. One of these challenges is the transmittal of organizational…

  17. Latina Faculty in the Labyrinth: Constructing and Contesting Legitimacy in Hispanic Serving Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales, Leslie D.; Murakami, Elizabeth; Nunez, Anne-Marie

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on the presence and experiences of Latina academics in the U.S., especially those who serve in Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs). Following the theme of this special issue related to Women of Color Faculty's "Testimonios" and "Laberintos," the authors add to the notion of academia as a labyrinth…

  18. Communities of practice in nursing academia: a growing need to practice what we teach.

    PubMed

    Risling, Tracie; Ferguson, Linda

    2013-08-22

    Although the community of practice (CoP) concept has been heavily utilized in business literature since its inception in the 1990s, it has not been significantly featured in nursing research. With student-centered approaches increasingly infusing nursing classrooms, including opportunities for collaborative learning and the development of student learning communities, it may be time to ask: Do we practice what we teach? Nursing academia faces challenges related to recruitment and retention, scholarly productivity and engagement of new faculty, and increasing demands for collaborative research. Challenges, some would argue, that could be addressed through CoPs; a sentiment reflected in the recent expansion of nursing CoP literature. What is the current state of the application of this concept in nursing academia and what barriers present in the promotion and development of CoPs in the academy? This article addresses these questions and provides guidance for those in search of community.

  19. New record of Apoholosticha sinica (Ciliophora, Urostylida) from the UK: morphology, 18S rRNA gene phylogeny and notes on morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaozhong; Fan, Yangbo; Warren, Alan

    2015-08-01

    The benthic urostylid ciliate Apoholosticha sinicaFan et al., 2014 was isolated from a salt marsh at Blakeney, UK, and reinvestigated using light microscopy and small-subunit rRNA gene sequencing. Morphologically, it corresponds well with the original description. Several stages of divisional morphogenesis and physiological reorganization were also observed from which the following could be deduced: (i) the oral apparatus is completely newly built in the proter; (ii) frontal-ventral-transverse cirral anlage II does not produce a buccal cirrus; (iii) each of the posteriormost three or four anlagen contributes one transverse cirrus at its posterior end; (iv) a row of frontoterminal cirri originates from the rearmost frontal-ventral-transverse cirral anlage; (v) the last midventral row is formed from the penultimate frontal-ventral-transverse cirral anlage. Based on new data, two diagnostic features were added to the genus definition: (i) the midventral complex is composed of midventral pairs and midventral row and (ii) pretransverse ventral cirri are absent. Based on a combination of morphological and morphogenetic data, the genus Apoholosticha is assigned to the recently erected subfamily Nothoholostichinae Paiva et al., 2014, which is consistent with sequence comparison and phylogenetic analyses based on SSU rRNA gene data. It is also concluded that this benthic species, previously reported only from China, is not an endemic form.

  20. [The false positive reaction of the Triage panel drug-of-abuse by herbal drugs ma-huang (Ephedra sinica (Ephedraceae))].

    PubMed

    Nishiguchi, M; Kinoshita, H; Higasa, K; Taniguchi, T; Ouchi, H; Minami, T; Marukawa, S; Yoshinaga, K; Yamauchi, J; Aoki, S; Hishida, S

    2001-11-01

    We investigated false-positive reactions obtained from a drug screening test using a Triage panel. We detected 2 cases giving false-positive reaction for AMP (amphetamine, methamphetamine) during the screening of 187 normal subjects. Subsequent follow up testing by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), showed both to be false-positive reactions. As both cases have a history of ingesting the herbal drug, Ma-huang (Ephedra sinica (Ephedraceae)), containing ephedrine, we examined the relationship between false-positive reactions on Triage and Ma-huang. All urine samples collected from 7 healthy volunteers following administration of Ma-huang indicated AMP positive on Triage. Also a high ratio of AMP positives was observed in the patients who were administered Ma-huang-containing drugs at the hospital. However, none of them were identified as true-positives by HPLC or gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. The extract of Ma-huang contained in herbal drugs, which otherwise contain neither amphetamine nor its derivatives, gives (AMP) positive indications on Triage. We speculate that unidentified components of Ma-huang cause the false-positive reactions. We suggest that follow-up tests by GC/MS or HPLC are needed wherever a positive result is obtained from a screening test by Triage. Furthermore, it will be established to continue collecting information on prescribed and non-prescribed drugs.

  1. Collaborative Computer Graphics Product Development between Academia and Government: A Dynamic Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowler, Deborah R.; Kostis, Helen-Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Collaborations and partnerships between academia and government agencies are common, especially when it comes to research and development in the fields of science, engineering and technology. However, collaboration between a government agency and an art school is rather atypical. This paper presents the Collaborative Student Project, which aims to explore the following challenge: The ideation, development and realization of education and public outreach products for NASAs upcoming ICESat-2 mission in collaboration with art students.

  2. The role of modern biology and medicine in drug development in academia and industry.

    PubMed

    Blake, Charles A; Barker, Kenneth L; Sobel, Burton E

    2006-12-01

    This symposium addresses careers in drug development in industry; the performance of translational research by academia, industry, and both; and numerous factors pertinent to alliances essential to drug discovery and development. Drug development is a complex process that regularly involves effective collaborations between academic and physician scientists and industry. There are specific occupational factors affecting recruitment of scientists and physicians in drug development programs in industry; ideal backgrounds for successful applicants for positions in industry in drug development; ethical and regulatory considerations particularly germane to the performance of scientists and physicians in drug development programs in industry and at universities; and particular gratifications available to scientists in industry working on drug development. Both similarities and differences characterize the performance of translational research in industry compared with academia. In industry, logistic, operational, and scientific oversight is complex, especially because it often involves relationships with clinical enterprises outside of the corporation. The process is long and arduous from formulation of a good idea in discovery to acceptance of a novel drug in the marketplace. Collaborations and partnerships by industry often involving academia and confrontation of multiple issues are pivotal.

  3. A Win-Win-Win Proposition -- Academia and Industry Working Together for Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogswell, J.

    2011-12-01

    Both Academia and Industry have a vested interest in building a pipeline of students who are attracted to geoscience as a discipline; who invest in a solid academic geoscience foundation and who move on to fulfilling professional careers. Global society needs geoscientists to find the energy that drives our economic well-being, responsibly and safely; and to solve today's complex environmental concerns. The US Oil and Gas Industry directly employed around 17,300 geologists in 2008(1). As with the rest of the geoscience community, our industry is dealing with a bi-modal age distribution in our workforce, with many eligible to retire in the next five years. Academia and Industry have an urgent, collective, challenge to attract the best and brightest students to study geoscience and to bring promising graduates onboard and up to speed as quickly as possible ExxonMobil accomplishes this rapid acclimation to our industry by focusing on high quality on-boarding, mentoring, and training, as well as diversity in early career assignments. We have implemented a one week on-boarding workshop for our new hires that provides them with comprehensive industry as well as Corporate cultural and infrastructure information. We ensure that our new hires have dedicated mentors who are passionate about petroleum geology, passionate about the petroleum business, and passionate about teaching the next generation of "oil finders." Our new hires attend several "flagship" schools in their first 5 years, which are designed to provide the technical expertise needed in today's petroleum business. Finally, our global operations allow us to provide a rich diversity of early assignments, which enables our early career geoscientists to develop an appreciation of the breadth of our business. There is no sub-discipline of geoscience that is more or less successful transitioning into our business from Academia. The key, which we rely on Academia to provide, is a strong grounding in the fundamentals of

  4. Patient Engagement Practices in Clinical Research among Patient Groups, Industry, and Academia in the United States: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sophia K.; Selig, Wendy; Harker, Matthew; Roberts, Jamie N.; Hesterlee, Sharon; Leventhal, David; Klein, Richard; Patrick-Lake, Bray; Abernethy, Amy P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Patient-centered clinical trial design and execution is becoming increasingly important. No best practice guidelines exist despite a key stakeholder declaration to create more effective engagement models. This study aims to gain a better understanding of attitudes and practices for engaging patient groups so that actionable recommendations may be developed. Methods Individuals from industry, academic institutions, and patient groups were identified through Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative and Drug Information Association rosters and mailing lists. Objectives, practices, and perceived barriers related to engaging patient groups in the planning, conduct, and interpretation of clinical trials were reported in an online survey. Descriptive and inferential statistical analysis of survey data followed a literature review to inform survey questions. Results Survey respondents (n = 179) valued the importance of involving patient groups in research; however, patient group respondents valued their contributions to research protocol development, funding acquisition, and interpretation of study results more highly than those contributions were valued by industry and academic respondents (all p < .001). Patient group respondents placed higher value in open communications, clear expectations, and detailed contract execution than did non–patient group respondents (all p < .05). Industry and academic respondents more often cited internal bureaucratic processes and reluctance to share information as engagement barriers than did patient group respondents (all p < .01). Patient groups reported that a lack of transparency and understanding of the benefits of collaboration on the part of industry and academia were greater barriers than did non–patient group respondents (all p< .01). Conclusions Despite reported similarities among approaches to engagement by the three stakeholder groups, key differences exist in perceived barriers and benefits to partnering with

  5. Institutional issues affecting the integration and use of remotely sensed data and geographic information systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lauer, D.T.; Estes, J.E.; Jensen, J.R.; Greenlee, D.D.

    1991-01-01

    The developers as well as the users of remotely sensed data and geographic information system (GIS) techniques are associated with nearly all types of institutions in government, industry, and academia. Individuals in these various institutions often find the barriers to accepting remote sensing and GIS are not necessarily technical in nature, but can be attributed to the institutions themselves. Several major institutional issues that affect the technologies of remote sensing and GIS are data availability, data marketing and costs, equipment availability and costs, standards and practices, education and training, and organizational infrastructures. Not only are problems associated with these issues identified, but needs and opportunities also are discussed. -from Authors

  6. Anti-arthritic effects of Ephedra sinica STAPF herb-acupuncture: inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation and adjuvant-induced polyarthritis.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Mi-Jung; Lee, Han-Chang; Kim, Gun-Ho; Lee, Hye-Jung; Shim, Insop; Oh, Seung-Kyu; Kang, Sung-Keel; Hahm, Dae-Hyun

    2006-01-01

    Anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic effects of water distillates of Ephedra sinica STAPF (ES), in herb-acupuncture, on the inflammatory responses of arthritis was investigated using phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)/lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced human macrophage and adjuvant-induced arthritic rat. The luciferase reporter vectors driven by the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and cyclooxygenase-2 promoters were transiently transfected into U937 cells, which were then differentiated and stimulated by PMA and LPS, respectively, to develop an in vitro anti-inflammation assay system. The luciferase activities, observed in the activated U937 cells, were significantly inhibited by ES herb-acupuncture, compared to those of PD98509 and berberine. To evaluate ES herb-acupuncture as a novel anti-arthritic therapy, a polyarthritic rat model was developed using heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and 50 mul of ES distillate was subcutaneously injected into the ST36 acupoint on each knee joint. While the articular indexes of arthritic rats were evidently decreased by ES herb-acupuncture, their body weights did not regain their initial levels. This may be due to the accelerating effects of ES on weight-loss and fat consumption. The mRNA expressions of TNF-alpha and interleukin (IL)-6 genes, which were closely stimulated in the arthritic rat joints, were found to be restored to the normal levels through the ES treatment. In the case of IL-1beta, the recovery was not significant but substantial. The anti-arthritic effect of ES herb-acupuncture was not found in the ES-treated/non-acupoint group. In conclusion, the ES herb-acupuncture into the ST36 acupoint was found to be effective in alleviating the inflammatory response and thus arthritic symptoms in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats.

  7. Validating skinfold thickness as a proxy to estimate total body fat in wild toque macaques (Macaca sinica) using the mass of dissected adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Dittus, Wolfgang P J; Gunathilake, K A Sunil

    2015-06-01

    Skinfold thickness (SFT) has been used often in non-human primates and humans as a proxy to estimate fatness (% body fat). We intended to validate the relation between SFT (in recently deceased specimens) and the mass of adipose tissue as determined from dissection of fresh carcasses of wild toque macaques (Macaca sinica). In adult male and female toque macaques body composition is normally 2% adipose tissue. Calipers for measuring SFT were suitable for measuring only some subcutaneous deposits of adipose tissue but were not suitable for measuring large fat deposits within the body cavity or minor intermuscular ones. The anatomical distribution of 13 different adipose deposits, in different body regions (subcutaneous, intra-abdominal and intermuscular) and their proportional size differences, were consistent in this species (as in other primates), though varying in total mass among individuals. These consistent allometric relationships were fundamental for estimating fatness of different body regions based on SFT. The best fit statistically significant correlations and regressions with the known masses of dissectible adipose tissue were evident between the SFT means of the seven sites measured, as well as with a single point on the abdomen anterior to the umbilicus. SFT related to total fat mass and intra-abdominal fat mass in curvilinear regressions and to subcutaneous fat mass in a linear relationship. To adjust for differences in body size among individuals, and to circumvent intangible variations in total body mass allocated, for example to the gastro-intestinal contents, dissected fat mass was estimated per unit body size (length of crown-rump)(3). SFT had greater coefficients of correlation and regressions with this Fat Mass Index (g/dm(3)) than with Percent Body Fat.

  8. Innovation and industry-academia interactions: where conflicts arise and measures to avoid them.

    PubMed

    Vagelos, P Roy

    2007-03-01

    Every phase of the development of biopharmaceuticals and medical devices has the potential for conflict of interest, but adherence to established rules and practices throughout product development can eliminate the possibility of conflicts. Adherence to good practices should continue through the postmarketing period, with swift reporting and vigorous investigation of any safety concerns. Although some academic medical centers are restricting interactions between their faculty and industry to prevent possible conflicts in physician education about new products, industry and academia should look for new ways to come together in mutually agreed forums that focus on educating clinicians about new products in an efficient, transparent way.

  9. "I Don't Belong Here": Chicanas/Latinas at a Hispanic Serving Institution Creating Community through "Muxerista" Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ek, Lucila D.; Quijada Cerecer, Patricia D.; Alanis, Iliana; Rodriguez, Mariela A.

    2010-01-01

    In order to create more diverse communities and greater social justice in academia, a group of Chicana/Latina junior faculty at a Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI) established a research collaborative, Research for the Educational Advancement of Latin@s (REAL). Using a co-operative inquiry and dialogical epistemology, we document how REAL is an…

  10. Institutional Censorship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, John Gordon; Bowers, H. Paxton

    1970-01-01

    The difficulty an individual who has been denied access to library material faces in obtaining a remedy in the courts dictates that the library profession go on record against all forms of institutional censorship or unreasonable restrictions on use of library materials. (Author/JS)

  11. Institutional betrayal.

    PubMed

    Smith, Carly Parnitzke; Freyd, Jennifer J

    2014-09-01

    A college freshman reports a sexual assault and is met with harassment and insensitive investigative practices leading to her suicide. Former grade school students, now grown, come forward to report childhood abuse perpetrated by clergy, coaches, and teachers--first in trickles and then in waves, exposing multiple perpetrators with decades of unfettered access to victims. Members of the armed services elect to stay quiet about sexual harassment and assault during their military service or risk their careers by speaking up. A Jewish academic struggles to find a name for the systematic destruction of his people in Nazi Germany during the Holocaust. These seemingly disparate experiences have in common trusted and powerful institutions (schools, churches, military, government) acting in ways that visit harm upon those dependent on them for safety and well-being. This is institutional betrayal. The purpose of this article is to describe psychological research that examines the role of institutions in traumatic experiences and psychological distress following these experiences. We demonstrate the ways in which institutional betrayal has been left unseen by both the individuals being betrayed as well as the field of psychology and introduce means by which to identify and address this betrayal.

  12. Institution Morphisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goguen, Joseph; Rosu, Grigore; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Institutions formalize the intuitive notion of logical system, including both syntax and semantics. A surprising number of different notions of morphisim have been suggested for forming categories with institutions as objects, and a surprising variety of names have been proposed for them. One goal of this paper is to suggest a terminology that is both uniform and informative to replace the current rather chaotic nomenclature. Another goal is to investigate the properties and interrelations of these notions. Following brief expositions of indexed categories, twisted relations, and Kan extensions, we demonstrate and then exploit the duality between institution morphisms in the original sense of Goguen and Burstall, and the 'plain maps' of Meseguer, obtaining simple uniform proofs of completeness and cocompleteness for both resulting categories; because of this duality, we prefer the name 'comorphism' over 'plain map.' We next consider 'theoroidal' morphisms and comorphisims, which generalize signatures to theories, finding that the 'maps' of Meseguer are theoroidal comorphisms, while theoroidal morphisms are a new concept. We then introduce 'forward' and 'semi-natural' morphisms, and appendices discuss institutions for hidden algebra, universal algebra, partial equational logic, and a variant of order sorted algebra supporting partiality.

  13. The Institute for Security Technology Studies (ISTS): overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotz, David F.

    2004-09-01

    The Institute for Security Technology Studies (ISTS) was founded at Dartmouth College in 2000 as a national center of security research and development. The Institute conducts interdisciplinary research and development projects addressing the challenges of cyber and homeland security, to protect the integrity of the Internet, computer networks, and other interdependent information infrastructures. ISTS also develops technology for providing the information and tools necessary to assist communities and first responders with the evolving, complex security landscape. ISTS is a member of and administers the Institute for Information Infrastructure Protection (I3P), a consortium of 24 leading academic institutions, non-profits and federal laboratories that brings industry, academia and government together to articulate and focus on problems that need to be solved to help ensure the nation's information infrastructure is safe, secure, and robust.

  14. Advancing institutional anomie theory: a microlevel examination connecting culture, institutions, and deviance.

    PubMed

    Muftić, Lisa R

    2006-12-01

    Institutional anomie theory (IAT) contends that crime can be explained by an examination of American society, particularly the exaggerated emphasis on economic success inherent in American culture, which has created a "cheating orientation" that permeates structural institutions, including academia. Consistent with its macrosocial perspective, previous tests of IAT have examined IAT variables at the structural level only. The current study tests the robustness of IAT by operationalizing IAT variables at the individual level and looking at a minor form of deviance, student cheating. The author also examines the role statistical modeling has in testing the theory at the microlevel. Undergraduates, 122 American born and 48 international, were surveyed about their cheating behaviors and adherence to economic goal orientations. Results related to the hypothesis that American students, relative to foreign-born students, will have an increased adherence to economic goal orientations that increase cheating behaviors are presented, as are suggestions for future studies.

  15. RECOPE: How to succeed in bringing ideas from academia to market without compromising ingenuity.

    PubMed

    Gaymalov, Zagit; Kabanov, Alexander

    2016-10-29

    Translation of biomedical technology originated in academia to the market is hindered by lack of consideration of market needs and commercialization pathways that leads academic research away from the market, leaving the public without long-awaited cures. Here we describe Reverse Conceptual Product Engineering (RECOPE), an approach applied in academic setting early in the course of the research project to facilitate biomedical research translation from bench to bedside. By using expertise of diverse set of biomedical professionals and trainees to solve a problem, RECOPE helps to make research goals more relevant to the society needs and translatable in a long-term perspective. Through the use of RECOPE one can critically reassess research design and translational potential and identify new market opportunities. RECOPE also provides for considerable educational opportunities to pre- and post-doctoral trainees. Adoption of RECOPE as a basic to for research design education will have a noticeable impact on academic research.

  16. Academia, advocacy, and industry: a collaborative method for clinical research advancement.

    PubMed

    Vanzo, Rena J; Lortz, Amanda; Calhoun, Amy R U L; Carey, John C

    2014-07-01

    Professionals who work in academia, advocacy, and industry often carry out mutually exclusive activities related to research and clinical care. However, there are several examples of collaboration among such professionals that ultimately allows for improved scientific and clinical understanding. This commentary recounts our particular experience (a collaboration between geneticists at the Universities of Minnesota and Utah, the 4p- Support Group, and Lineagen, Inc) and reviews other similar projects. We formally propose this collaborative method as a conduit for future clinical research programs. Specifically, we encourage academicians, directors of family/advocacy/support groups, and members of industry to establish partnerships and document their experiences. The medical community as a whole will benefit from such partnerships and, specifically, families will teach us lessons that could never be learned in a laboratory or textbook.

  17. Achieving professional success in US government, academia, and industry: an EMGS commentary.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Miriam C; Schwartz, Jeffrey L; Aardema, Marilyn J

    2014-08-01

    One of the goals of the EMGS is to help members achieve professional success in the fields they have trained in. Today, there is greater competition for jobs in genetic toxicology, genomics, and basic research than ever before. In addition, job security and the ability to advance in one's career is challenging, regardless of whether one works in a regulatory, academic, or industry environment. At the EMGS Annual Meeting in Monterey, CA (September, 2013), the Women in EMGS Special Interest Group held a workshop to discuss strategies for achieving professional success. Presentations were given by three speakers, each representing a different employment environment: Government (Miriam C. Poirier), Academia (Jeffrey L. Schwartz), and Industry (Marilyn J. Aardema). Although some differences in factors or traits affecting success in the three employment sectors were noted by each of the speakers, common factors considered important for advancement included networking, seeking out mentors, and developing exceptional communication skills.

  18. AFSPC Innovation and Science and Technology Outreach to Industry and Academia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, Merri J.; Dills, Anthony N.; Chandler, Faith

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Air Force is taking a strategic approach to ensuring that we are at the cutting edge of science and technology. This includes fostering game-changing approaches and technologies that are balanced with operational needs. The security of the Nation requires a constant pursuit of science, technical agility, and a rapid adoption of innovation. This includes pursuits of game-changing technologies and domains that perhaps we cannot even imagine today. This paper highlights the Air Force Space Command (AFSPC) collaboration and outreach to other government agencies, military and national laboratories, industry, and academia on long term science and technology challenges. In particular we discuss the development of the AFSPC Long Term Science and Technology Challenges that include both space and cyberspace operations within a multi-domain environment and the subsequent Innovation Summits.

  19. The SULSA Assay Development Fund: accelerating translation of new biology from academia to pharma.

    PubMed

    McElroy, Stuart P; Jones, Philip S; Barrault, Denise V

    2017-02-01

    With industry increasingly sourcing preclinical drug discovery projects from academia it is important that new academic discoveries are enabled through translation with HTS-ready assays. However, many scientifically interesting, novel molecular targets lack associated high-quality, robust assays suitable for hit finding and development. To bridge this gap, the Scottish Universities Life Sciences Alliance (SULSA) established a fund to develop assays to meet quality criteria such as those of the European Lead Factory. A diverse project portfolio was quickly assembled, and a review of the learnings and successful outcomes showed this fund as a new highly cost-effective model for leveraging significant follow-on resources, training early-career scientists and establishing a culture of translational drug discovery in the academic community.

  20. Digital innovation through partnership between nature conservation organisations and academia: a qualitative impact assessment.

    PubMed

    Galán-Díaz, Carlos; Edwards, Peter; Nelson, John D; van der Wal, René

    2015-11-01

    Nature conservation organisations increasingly turn to new digital technologies to help deliver conservation objectives. This has led to collaborative forms of working with academia to spearhead digital innovation. Through in-depth interviews with three UK research-council-funded case studies, we show that by working with academics conservation organisations can receive positive and negative impacts, some of which cut across their operations. Positive impacts include new ways of engaging with audiences, improved data workflows, financial benefits, capacity building and the necessary digital infrastructure to help them influence policy. Negative impacts include the time and resources required to learn new skills and sustain new technologies, managing different organisational objectives and shifts in working practices as a result of the new technologies. Most importantly, collaboration with academics was shown to bring the opportunity of a profound change in perspectives on technologies with benefits to the partner organisations and individuals therein.

  1. Training Multidisciplinary Scholars in Science Policy for Careers in Academia, Private Sector, and Public Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenney, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Regardless of a graduate student's ultimate career ambitions, it is becoming increasingly important to either develop skills to successfully transition into non-academic careers or to be able to understand the societal benefits of basic and applied research programs. In this talk I will provide my prospective -- from working in academia, the Federal government, and as an independent consultant -- about the training that we need for graduate students to navigate the jungle gym of career opportunities available (or not available) after they graduate. In particular, I will speak to the need for science policy training, in which scientific and coordination skills are put to use to help support societal decisions. I will assert that, to effectively train graduate students, it is necessary to provide experiences in multidisciplinary, policy-relevant scholarship to build marketable skills critical for a student's professional development.

  2. Center for Semiconductor Materials and Device Modeling: expanding collaborative research opportunities between government, academia, and industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perconti, Philip; Bedair, Sarah S.; Bajaj, Jagmohan; Schuster, Jonathan; Reed, Meredith

    2016-09-01

    To increase Soldier readiness and enhance situational understanding in ever-changing and complex environments, there is a need for rapid development and deployment of Army technologies utilizing sensors, photonics, and electronics. Fundamental aspects of these technologies include the research and development of semiconductor materials and devices which are ubiquitous in numerous applications. Since many Army technologies are considered niche, there is a lack of significant industry investment in the fundamental research and understanding of semiconductor technologies relevant to the Army. To address this issue, the US Army Research Laboratory is establishing a Center for Semiconductor Materials and Device Modeling and seeks to leverage expertise and resources across academia, government and industry. Several key research areas—highlighted and addressed in this paper—have been identified by ARL and external partners and will be pursued in a collaborative fashion by this Center. This paper will also address the mechanisms by which the Center is being established and will operate.

  3. [Introduction of neuroethics: out of clinic, beyond academia in human brain research].

    PubMed

    Fukushi, Tamami; Sakura, Osamu

    2008-11-01

    Higher cognitive function in human brain is one of well-developed fields of neuroscience research in the 21st century. Especially functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and near infrared recording system have brought so many non-clinical researchers whose background is such as cognitive psychology, economics, politics, pedagogy, and so on, to the human brain mapping study. Authors have introduced the ethical issues related to incidental findings during the fMRI recording for non-clinical purpose, which is a typical problem derived from such expanded human brain research under non clinical condition, that is, neuroethics. In the present article we would introduce neuroethical issues in contexts of "out of clinic" and "beyond academia".

  4. Natural products and drug discovery: a survey of stakeholders in industry and academia

    PubMed Central

    Amirkia, Vafa; Heinrich, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Context: In recent decades, natural products have undisputedly played a leading role in the development of novel medicines. Yet, trends in the pharmaceutical industry at the level of research investments indicate that natural product research is neither prioritized nor perceived as fruitful in drug discovery programmes as compared with incremental structural modifications and large volume HTS screening of synthetics. Aim: We seek to understand this phenomenon through insights from highly experienced natural product experts in industry and academia. Method: We conducted a survey including a series of qualitative and quantitative questions related to current insights and prospective developments in natural product drug development. The survey was completed by a cross-section of 52 respondents in industry and academia. Results: One recurrent theme is the dissonance between the perceived high potential of NP as drug leads among individuals and the survey participants' assessment of the overall industry and/or company level strategies and their success. The study's industry and academic respondents did not perceive current discovery efforts as more effective as compared with previous decades, yet industry contacts perceived higher hit rates in HTS efforts as compared with academic respondents. Surprisingly, many industry contacts were highly critical to prevalent company and industry-wide drug discovery strategies indicating a high level of dissatisfaction within the industry. Conclusions: These findings support the notion that there is an increasing gap in perception between the effectiveness of well established, commercially widespread drug discovery strategies between those working in industry and academic experts. This research seeks to shed light on this gap and aid in furthering natural product discovery endeavors through an analysis of current bottlenecks in industry drug discovery programmes. PMID:26578954

  5. Measuring scientific impact beyond academia: An assessment of existing impact metrics and proposed improvements

    PubMed Central

    Liakata, Maria; Clare, Amanda; Duma, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    How does scientific research affect the world around us? Being able to answer this question is of great importance in order to appropriately channel efforts and resources in science. The impact by scientists in academia is currently measured by citation based metrics such as h-index, i-index and citation counts. These academic metrics aim to represent the dissemination of knowledge among scientists rather than the impact of the research on the wider world. In this work we are interested in measuring scientific impact beyond academia, on the economy, society, health and legislation (comprehensive impact). Indeed scientists are asked to demonstrate evidence of such comprehensive impact by authoring case studies in the context of the Research Excellence Framework (REF). We first investigate the extent to which existing citation based metrics can be indicative of comprehensive impact. We have collected all recent REF impact case studies from 2014 and we have linked these to papers in citation networks that we constructed and derived from CiteSeerX, arXiv and PubMed Central using a number of text processing and information retrieval techniques. We have demonstrated that existing citation-based metrics for impact measurement do not correlate well with REF impact results. We also consider metrics of online attention surrounding scientific works, such as those provided by the Altmetric API. We argue that in order to be able to evaluate wider non-academic impact we need to mine information from a much wider set of resources, including social media posts, press releases, news articles and political debates stemming from academic work. We also provide our data as a free and reusable collection for further analysis, including the PubMed citation network and the correspondence between REF case studies, grant applications and the academic literature. PMID:28278243

  6. Measuring scientific impact beyond academia: An assessment of existing impact metrics and proposed improvements.

    PubMed

    Ravenscroft, James; Liakata, Maria; Clare, Amanda; Duma, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    How does scientific research affect the world around us? Being able to answer this question is of great importance in order to appropriately channel efforts and resources in science. The impact by scientists in academia is currently measured by citation based metrics such as h-index, i-index and citation counts. These academic metrics aim to represent the dissemination of knowledge among scientists rather than the impact of the research on the wider world. In this work we are interested in measuring scientific impact beyond academia, on the economy, society, health and legislation (comprehensive impact). Indeed scientists are asked to demonstrate evidence of such comprehensive impact by authoring case studies in the context of the Research Excellence Framework (REF). We first investigate the extent to which existing citation based metrics can be indicative of comprehensive impact. We have collected all recent REF impact case studies from 2014 and we have linked these to papers in citation networks that we constructed and derived from CiteSeerX, arXiv and PubMed Central using a number of text processing and information retrieval techniques. We have demonstrated that existing citation-based metrics for impact measurement do not correlate well with REF impact results. We also consider metrics of online attention surrounding scientific works, such as those provided by the Altmetric API. We argue that in order to be able to evaluate wider non-academic impact we need to mine information from a much wider set of resources, including social media posts, press releases, news articles and political debates stemming from academic work. We also provide our data as a free and reusable collection for further analysis, including the PubMed citation network and the correspondence between REF case studies, grant applications and the academic literature.

  7. Institute news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-11-01

    Joining the team A new member of staff has recently joined the Institute of Physics Education Department (Schools and Colleges) team. (Dr) Steven Chapman will have managerial responsibility for physics education issues in the 11 - 16 age range, particularly on the policy side. He will work closely with Mary Wood, who spends much of her time out and about doing the practical things to support physics education pre-16. Catherine Wilson will be spending more of her time working to support the Post-16 Physics Initiative but retains overall responsibility for the department. Steven graduated in Physics and Astronomy and then went on to do his doctorate at Sussex University. He stayed in the research field for a while, including a period at NPL. Then, having decided to train as a teacher, he taught for the last five years, most recently at a brand new school in Sutton where he was Head of Physics. Physics update Dates for `Physics Update' courses in 2000, intended for practising science teachers, are as follows: 1 - 3 April: Malvern College 9 - 10 June: Stirling University 8 - 10 July: York University 8 - 10 December: Oxford University The deadline for applications for the course to be held on 11 - 13 December 1999 at the School of Physics, Exeter University, is 12 November, so any late enquiries should be sent to Leila Solomon at The Institute of Physics, 76 Portland Place, London W1N 3DH (tel: 020 7470 4821) right away. Name that teacher! Late nominations are still welcome for the Teachers of Physics/Teachers of Primary Science awards for the year 2000. Closing date for nominations is `the last week in November'. Further details can be obtained from Catherine Wilson or Barbara Hill in the Institute's Education Department. Forward and back! The Education Group's one-day meeting on 13 November is accepting bookings until almost the last minute, so don't delay your application! The day is entitled `Post-16 physics: Looking forward, learning from the past' and it aims to

  8. Relational-Cultural Theory as a Framework for Mentoring in Academia: Toward Diversity and Growth-Fostering Collaborative Scholarly Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Consuella; Olshansky, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Mentoring in academia that encourages collaboration and interpersonal relationships is important in helping newer faculty members attain success. Developing such programs is challenging within our prevailing academic context that rewards competition and individually delineated success. We propose that Relational Cultural Theory, a feminist…

  9. The Managerial Turn in Higher Education? On the Interplay of Organizational and Occupational Change in German Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krücken, Georg; Blümel, Albrecht; Kloke, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    The managerial turn in academia is currently broadly discussed. Based on empirical data gathered from a sample that includes all German universities, we can give a broad and fine-grained account of this turn. What we can clearly see is that whole new categories of administrative management positions have been created over the last years.…

  10. Learning in Academia Is More than Academic Learning: Action Research in Academic Practice for and with Medical Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trevitt, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Academic learning traditionally involves research, and the production of journal papers, books, etc. "Learning in academia" refers to academics becoming more skilful in what they do. It is what legal or medical clinicians would refer to as continuing professional education (or development) (CPE/D) which, by analogy, invokes the notion of CPE in…

  11. Conflicting Views on Quality: Interpretations of "A Good University" by Representatives of the State, the Market and Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Udam, Maiki; Heidmets, Mati

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the results of research conducted over the period 2010-2012 in Estonia with the aim of identifying the expectations for the quality of higher education by principal parties in higher education, the state, the market and academia, as well as describing the differences and similarities in their expectations. The findings show…

  12. Acta Mechanica Sinica (Selected Articles).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-15

    Hodgkings have all tried to calculate equation (7.1) with non-steady state method. For reference, see [1, 17, 18]. They call this the dynamic...Pe,,.yu (9*16). Sci,’ua Sinea (1977), 287- 304 .- 19 J ,a.-,eieKKa*. 0. A.. MaTOMaTI4e.K11e u(ipocu ,tIHa,,K)I a3KO Nt aeiolk Nw.KrA.ocT.. l:i0IAr

  13. Acta Aeronautica et Astronautica Sinica,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-28

    displacement of the origin in1] the various directions, and da.. = cdP . Figure l(c) shows13 Jj* the model [7) obtained by modifying the moving hardening...1 -. 𔃼 1sinl[ QQ(, - ,) + ,¢+2i.,.. - -) Q ( ) + 4,++ 24.)J The constant vector v can be determined from x (tf ) = 0. Sx ,+x 2 ,-1 o )+ F(-(X39-)e

  14. Acta Aeronautica et Astronautica Sinica,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-14

    3 400 Fig.2 Gand specimas - 1--plate; 2--washer; 3--screw head; 4-- crack warning transducer The Ko,* at stress concentration point in the structure...628 office 1975 [4] R. E. Peterson, Design Stress Concentrating Coefficient, China Industrial Publication Co. 1965. 66 I- THE CRACK -FREE LIFE...this large scale structural component was carried out using these two spectra. The stress spectrum was obtained by directly measuring at the cracked f

  15. Acta Aeronautica et Astronautica Sinica.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-07

    technology. Recently the design of aircraft structure has already been developed into the stages of safety lifetime and damage tolerance. It is required to...but also influenced by the interior structures and the fatigue damages produced in manufacture and application. Iri i Ino’., although some models...downward wing. Special attention should be paid to the joint design of ,)f nomposite materials. An inadequate joint design will lead to early joint damage

  16. Acta Aeronautica et Astronautica Sinica,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-04

    numerical subsonic solution (Sells, 1968). Example 2 was an experimental wing NACA R14 A51G31 having airfoil NACA 64A010 which is perpendicular to...perpendicular to the 1/4 chord line is NACA 64A010 . X1/4= 45 , =3, n=2 . Choose a mesh of 31xl3xl9. There are 15 sections along the half wing span. Each section...small perturbation velocity potential equation and I--±0.2 were used at the blunt leading-edge. Table 1. Computed cases of NACA RM A51G31 Wing. M. a

  17. Acta Optica Sinica (Selected Articles),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-04

    Selected Articles) C= Approved for public release; LL 4..::.: .... y ,, .,, FTD- ID(RS)T- 1089 -85 O"V%r. - HUMAN TRANSLATION FTD-ID(RS)T- 1089 -85 4 April...OPINION OF THE FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIVISION WPAFB. OHIO FTo- ID(RS)T- 1089 -85 Date 4 April 19 86 GRAPHICS DISCLAIMER All figures, graphics, tables

  18. Lecturers' Job Satisfaction in a Public Tertiary Institution in Singapore: Ambivalent and Non-Ambivalent Relationships between Job Satisfaction and Demographic Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Emily Pakivathy; Phua, Seok Kheng

    2011-01-01

    Increasing lecturer turnover rates and fewer qualified recruits choosing a career in academia threaten the integrity of the tertiary education system in Singapore. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the relationship between lecturers' job satisfaction levels in a public tertiary institution and selected demographic variables. The study…

  19. In-Vitro, Anti-Bacterial Activities of Aqueous Extracts of Acacia catechu (L.F.)Willd, Castanea sativa, Ephedra sinica stapf and shilajita mumiyo Against Gram Positive and Gram Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dashtdar, Mehrab; Dashtdar, Mohammad Reza; Dashtdar, Babak; shirazi, Mohammad khabaz; Khan, Saeed Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Evaluations of the in-vitro anti-bacterial activities of aqueous extracts of Acacia catechu (L.F.)Willd, Castanea sativa, Ephedra sinica stapf and Shilajita mumiyo against gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumonia) and gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) are reasonable since these ethnomedicinal plants have been used in Persian folk medicine for treating skin diseases, venereal diseases, respiratory problems and nervous disorders for ages. Methods: The well diffusion method (KB testing) with a concentration of 250 μg/disc was used for evaluating the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC). Maximum synergistic effects of different combinations of components were also observed. Results: A particular combination of Acacia catechu (L.F.) Willd, Castanea sativa, Ephedra sinica stapf and shilajita mumiyo extracts possesses an outstanding anti-bacterial activity. It's inhibiting effect on microorganisms is significant when compared to the control group (P< 0.05). Staphylococcus aureus was the most sensitive microorganism. The highest antibacterial activity against gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumonia) or gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, Proteus mirabilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) was exerted by formula number 2 (Table1). Conclusion: The results reveal the presence of antibacterial activities of Acacia catechu, Castanea sativa husk, Ephedra sp. and Mumiyo against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Synergistic effects in a combined formula, especially in formula number 2 (ASLANⓇ) can lead to potential sources of new antiseptic agents for treatment of acute or chronic skin ulcers. These results considering the significant antibacterial effect of the present formulation, support ethno-pharmacological uses against diarrheal and venereal diseases and demonstrate use of these plants to treat

  20. Exploring Industry Perceptions of the Development and Sustainability of Academia-Industry Advanced Technological Education Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kile, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    The increasing demands on community colleges to broaden access and provide for the community's economic welfare, while maintaining its traditional educational role, have served as a powerful impetus for institutional change. Concurrently, institutions have been forced to explore non-traditional avenues to counteract resource scarcity.…

  1. The Parlous State of Academia: When Politics, Prestige and Proxies Overtake Higher Education's Teaching Mission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callier, Viviane; Singiser, Richard H.; Vanderford, Nathan L.

    2015-01-01

    Original and significant research benefits the careers of those running universities and brings prestige to their institution. World class teaching, by and large, does not, and this has important consequences for higher education's tripartite mission. Most notably, emphasis on the research mission of major higher education institutions dwarfs that…

  2. Eurosdr - the Pan-European Network for Mapping Agencies and Academia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streilein, A.; Remondino, F.; Pfeifer, N.; Trollvik, J. A.; Stoter, J.; Crompvoets, J.; Potůčková, M.

    2016-06-01

    EuroSDR (http://www.eurosdr.net/) is a non-profit organisation that provides a pan-European network that brings together mapping / cadastre agencies and academia for the purpose of applied research, and securing timely, research-based knowledge that allows the agencies to play their role as content providers and government competence centres for geographic information and spatial data infrastructures. EuroSDR is the recognised provider of research-based knowledge to a Europe where citizens can readily benefit from geographic information. Its mission is to develop and improve methods, systems and standards for the acquisition, processing, production, maintenance, management, visualization, and dissemination of geographic reference data in support of applications and service delivery. EuroSDR delivers advanced research-based knowledge. Its value is generated by facilitating interaction between research organisations and the public and private sector with the aim of exchanging ideas and knowledge about relevant research topics; by facilitating and contributing to research projects; and by transferring knowledge and research results to real world applications. The paper gives an overview about EuroSDR research principles, research alliances, objectives and action plans of each of the technical commissions.

  3. Views from academia and industry on skills needed for the modern research environment.

    PubMed

    Talgar, Cigdem P; Goodey, Nina M

    2015-01-01

    Reports from employers of higher education graduates indicate the existence of a considerable gap between the skills required by employers and those possessed by recent graduates. As a first step toward closing this gap, this study aims to determine its origin. Interviews with nine research-active biochemistry professionals were used to identify the most important skills for biochemistry students to succeed in research positions postgraduation. The results of these interviews were used to develop a survey, which was then administered to a larger group of biochemistry faculty and industry professionals. The output of the survey was a list of 52 skills valued by biochemistry professionals and rated by perceived importance. Importantly, the survey results also afford a comparative look at the prioritization of skills by two key populations: the academic faculty training students and the industry professionals hiring them. While there are many areas of agreement between these two populations, the survey also reveals areas were priorities diverge. The discrepancies found here suggest that the skills gap manifest at the point of employment may stem directly from differences in prioritization between the academic and industrial environments. This article aims to provide insight into the needs and requirements of the modern biochemical research environment, and invites debate concerning the preparation students receive in academia. Moreover, the results presented herein point to a need for further exploration of the possible misalignment of these two critical environments for young scientists.

  4. Faculty to faculty incivility: experiences of novice nurse faculty in academia.

    PubMed

    Peters, Anya Bostian

    2014-01-01

    Academic incivility creates a challenging work environment for nursing faculty. Understanding the concept of faculty-to-faculty incivility may enlighten faculty regarding appropriate interpersonal relationships, assist in alleviating uncivil behavior, and improve the likelihood that faculty will remain in nursing education, potentially easing the current nursing faculty shortage. The primary purpose of this study was to describe novice nurse faculty members' lived experiences of faculty-to-faculty incivility. A second purpose was to describe and understand how incivility influences faculty decision to remain in nursing academia. A hermeneutical phenomenological approach was selected to uncover the lived experience. A purposive sample of eight novice nursing faculty, those with less than 5 years of experience, was obtained via e-mail recruitment from mid-Atlantic college Web sites. Five themes and 7 subthemes emerged. Among the findings were sensing rejection, employing behaviors to cope with uncivil colleagues, sensing others wanted novice faculty to fail, sensing a possessiveness of territory from senior faculty, and struggling with the decision to remain in the faculty position. This study is significant in that understanding of faculty-to-faculty incivility adds insight and an increased sensitivity related to uncivil interactions and may contribute to the design of evidence-based interventions supporting increased collegiality that fosters an environment conducive for the recruitment and retention of faculty.

  5. Creating impact with operations research in health: making room for practice in academia.

    PubMed

    Brandeau, Margaret L

    2016-12-01

    Operations research (OR)-based analyses have the potential to improve decision making for many important, real-world health care problems. However, junior scholars often avoid working on practical applications in health because promotion and tenure processes tend to value theoretical studies more highly than applied studies. This paper discusses the author's experiences in using OR to inform and influence decisions in health and provides a blueprint for junior researchers who wish to find success by taking a similar path. This involves selecting good problems to study, forming productive collaborations with domain experts, developing appropriate models, identifying the most salient results from an analysis, and effectively disseminating findings to decision makers. The paper then suggests how journals, funding agencies, and senior academics can encourage such work by taking a broader and more informed view of the potential role and contributions of OR to solving health care problems. Making room in academia for the application of OR in health follows in the tradition begun by the founders of operations research: to work on important real-world problems where operations research can contribute to better decision making.

  6. Supporting business continuity during a highly pathogenic avian influenza outbreak: a collaboration of industry, academia, and government.

    PubMed

    Hennessey, Morgan; Lee, Brendan; Goldsmith, Timothy; Halvorson, Dave; Hueston, William; McElroy, Kristina; Waters, Katherine

    2010-03-01

    Since 2006, a collaborative group of egg industry, state, federal, and academia representatives have worked to enhance preparedness in highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) planning. The collaborative group has created a draft egg product movement protocol, which calls for realistic, science-based contingency plans, biosecurity assessments, commodity risk assessments, and real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR testing to support the continuity of egg operations while also preventing and eradicating an HPAI outbreak. The work done by this group serves as an example of how industry, government, and academia can work together to achieve better preparedness in the event of an animal health emergency. In addition, in the event of an HPAI outbreak in domestic poultry, U.S. consumers will be assured that their egg products come from healthy chickens.

  7. Examining Workplace Ostracism Experiences in Academia: Understanding How Differences in the Faculty Ranks Influence Inclusive Climates on Campus.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Carla A; Carter-Sowell, Adrienne R; Xu, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    Research on the retention of women in academia has focused on challenges, including a "chilly climate," devaluation, and incivility. The unique consequences of workplace ostracism - being ignored and excluded by others in an organizational setting - require focus on this experience as another interpersonal challenge for women in academia. The purpose of this study is to examine differences in the faculty experiences and outcomes of workplace ostracism, and to determine if these experiences are affected significantly by the gender composition of an employee's specific department. Participants were recruited at two time points to complete campus climate surveys that were distributed to faculty at a large, public, research university. We examined the number of reported ostracism experiences (Study 1) and perceived information sharing (Study 2) among male and female university faculty. The findings indicated that female faculty members perceived more workplace ostracism than male faculty members. Analyses of department gender ratios suggested that the proportion of women in the department did not reduce the amount of workplace ostracism experienced by women. No gender differences were found in perceived information sharing. However, we found that Faculty of Color, both men and women, reported more frequent information exclusion than White faculty. These results have important implications for theoretical and practical understandings of workplace demography and suggest that it is necessary to look at subtle, ambiguous forms of discrimination in order to increase retention of faculty from underrepresented groups in academia.

  8. Examining Workplace Ostracism Experiences in Academia: Understanding How Differences in the Faculty Ranks Influence Inclusive Climates on Campus

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Carla A.; Carter-Sowell, Adrienne R.; Xu, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    Research on the retention of women in academia has focused on challenges, including a “chilly climate,” devaluation, and incivility. The unique consequences of workplace ostracism – being ignored and excluded by others in an organizational setting – require focus on this experience as another interpersonal challenge for women in academia. The purpose of this study is to examine differences in the faculty experiences and outcomes of workplace ostracism, and to determine if these experiences are affected significantly by the gender composition of an employee’s specific department. Participants were recruited at two time points to complete campus climate surveys that were distributed to faculty at a large, public, research university. We examined the number of reported ostracism experiences (Study 1) and perceived information sharing (Study 2) among male and female university faculty. The findings indicated that female faculty members perceived more workplace ostracism than male faculty members. Analyses of department gender ratios suggested that the proportion of women in the department did not reduce the amount of workplace ostracism experienced by women. No gender differences were found in perceived information sharing. However, we found that Faculty of Color, both men and women, reported more frequent information exclusion than White faculty. These results have important implications for theoretical and practical understandings of workplace demography and suggest that it is necessary to look at subtle, ambiguous forms of discrimination in order to increase retention of faculty from underrepresented groups in academia. PMID:27303322

  9. Institute Study Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Ann; Steadman, Jackie; Little, Sally; Underwood, Debra; Blackman, Mack; Simonds, Judy

    1997-01-01

    This report documents a study conducted by the MSFC working group on Institutes in 1995 on the structure, organization and business arrangements of Institutes at a time when the agency was considering establishing science institutes. Thirteen institutes, ten science centers associated with the state of Georgia, Stanford Research Institute (SRI), and IIT Research Institute (IITRI), and general data on failed institutes were utilized to form this report. The report covers the working group's findings on institute mission, structure, director, board of directors/advisors, the working environment, research arrangements, intellectual property rights, business management, institute funding, and metrics.

  10. Academia vs Industry: vanishing boundaries between global earthquake seismology and exploration seismics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Hilst, R. D.

    2011-12-01

    Global seismology and exploration seismics have long lived in parallel universes, with little cross-fertilization of methodologies and with interaction between the associated communities often limited to company recruitment of students. Fortunately, this traditional separation of technology and people has begun to disappear. This is driven not only by continuing demands for human and financial resources (for companies and academia, respectively) but increasingly also by overlapping intellectual interest. First, 'waves are waves' (that is, the fundamental physics - and math to describe/handle it - is scale invariant) and many artificial boundaries are being removed by use of better wave theory, faster computers, and new data acquisition paradigms. For example, the development of dense sensor arrays (in USA, Europe, Asia - mostly China and Japan) is increasing the attraction (and need) of industry-style interrogation of massive data sets. Examples include large scale seismic exploration of Earth's deep interior with inverse scattering of teleseismic wavefields (e.g., Van der Hilst et al., Science, 2007). On the other hand, reservoir exploration and production benefits from expertise in earthquake seismology, both for better characterization of reservoirs and their overburden and for (induced) micro-earthquake analysis. Passive source methods (including but not restricted to ambient noise tomography) are providing new, economic opportunities for velocity analysis and monitoring, and studies of (micro)seismicity (e.g., source location, parameters, and moment tensor) allow in situ stress determination, tomographic velocity analysis with natural sources in the reservoir, and 4D monitoring (e.g., for hydrocarbon production, carbon sequestration, enhanced geothermal systems, and unconventional gas production). Second, the gap between the frequency ranges traditionally considered by both communities is being bridged by better theory, new sensor technology, and through

  11. Exploring Gender and Race amongst Female Sociologists Exiting Academia in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabe, Marlize; Rugunanan, Pragna

    2012-01-01

    This article explores issues of gender and race in the academic careers of female sociologists in South Africa by focusing on selected women who left academic departments in higher education institutions. In-depth interviews were conducted with 11 participants who left various Sociology departments at different times. It was found that young black…

  12. Research and Publishing in Academia: A Prerequisite for Assuring Quality in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braimoh, Dele; Alade, Eunice B.

    2005-01-01

    Academic research and publishing, particularly at the higher education level, are activities that do not only complement effective teaching but are also sine-qua-non for the achievement of academic excellence. However, due to myriad of factors, many academics in Tertiary Institutions have a myopic belief that universities are meant, essentially…

  13. Re-Starting the Conversation about Race in Academia: Transcultural Narratives in the Lifeworld

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamez, Francisco N.

    2010-01-01

    For this dissertation, I carried out a participatory hermeneutic research inquiry on the role race plays in the everyday lives of staff and administrators of color who work at various organizational levels within selected post-secondary institutions. This research explored the current narrative identities of staff and administrators of color…

  14. Envisioning Helps Promote Sustainability in Academia: A Case Study at the University of Vermont

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollock, Noah; Horn, Eileen; Costanza, Robert; Sayre, Matt

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Universities are increasingly aspiring to be both models and catalysts of change, leading the world to a more sustainable and desirable future. Yet complex and ineffective governance, traditional disciplinary boundaries, and the lack of a shared vision at academic institutions often hinder progress toward this goal. The purpose of this…

  15. Running Bamboo: A Mentoring Network of Women Intending to Thrive in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agosto, Vonzell; Karanxha, Zorka; Unterreiner, Ann; Cobb-Roberts, Deirdre; Esnard, Talia; Wu, Ke; Beck, Makini

    2016-01-01

    This article is based on the authors' experiences as women academics who engage in informal peer mentoring to persist in the cultural milieus of their respective institutions. The authors draw on poststructural perspectives and the metaphor of the rhizome "running bamboo" to illustrate the connections they forged in a mentoring network…

  16. Joint Venture Arrangement for RN to BSN: A Model of Synergy between Academia and Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bargagliotti, L. Antoinette; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Joint venture among educational and practice institutions is well on its way toward becoming the norm in nursing education and practice. Kaiser Permanente and the University of San Francisco School of Nursing offer a venture that allows registered nurses to pursue a bachelor of science in nursing degree. (JOW)

  17. Management and Accounting in English Higher Education Influenced by Environmental and Academia-Specific Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Alberti-Alhtaybat, Larissa; Al-Htaybat, Khaldoon; Hutaibat, Khaled

    2012-01-01

    This article originates from a longitudinal study of management and accounting practices in the English higher education sector. The processes of strategic management and strategic management accounting in several English higher education institutions were investigated, from planning to assessment, and their meaning to members of staff. The study…

  18. Increasing Efficiency in Academia: The Use of a Weaning Model in Fundraising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maniaci, Vincent M.; Poole, Rob

    2005-01-01

    The authors discuss a method to increase institutional efficiency and financial stability through strategic planning, by gradually reallocating funds raised for annual operations to quasi-endowment over a period of years using a weaning model. The weaning model is offered as a tactic to address issues of financial vulnerability developed in…

  19. Immigrant or Refugee: Perceived Effects of Colonisation of Academia by Market Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawlins, Peter; Hansen, Sally; Jorgensen, Lone

    2011-01-01

    Managers and personnel within tertiary institutions colonised by neo-liberal ministrations and buffeted by the winds of a "change culture" formed within the philosophical shifts of the last century can be considered in terms of "immigrants" or "refugees" within this new territory. The case story of this article is set…

  20. External Labor Markets and the Distribution of Black Scientists and Engineers in Academia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulis, Stephen; Shaw, Heather; Chong, Yinong

    2000-01-01

    Analyzes data from the 1989 Survey of Doctorate Recipients to evaluate racial segmentation of the academic labor market along geographic and disciplinary lines. Finds that black faculty in the sciences and engineering are found disproportionately in southern, historically black institutions; areas with sizable black populations; and, independent…

  1. Scientific integrity resource guide: Efforts by federal agencies, foundations, nonprofit organizations, professional societies, and academia in the United States.

    PubMed

    Kretser, Alison; Murphy, Delia; Dwyer, Johanna

    2017-01-02

    Scientific integrity is at the forefront of the scientific research enterprise. This paper provides an overview of key existing efforts on scientific integrity by federal agencies, foundations, nonprofit organizations, professional societies, and academia from 1989 to April 2016. It serves as a resource for the scientific community on scientific integrity work and helps to identify areas in which more action is needed. Overall, there is tremendous activity in this area and there are clear linkages among the efforts of the five sectors. All the same, scientific integrity needs to remain visible in the scientific community and evolve along with new research paradigms. High priority in instilling these values falls upon all stakeholders.

  2. Social exclusion in academia through biases in methodological quality evaluation: On the situation of women in science and philosophy.

    PubMed

    Leuschner, Anna

    2015-12-01

    Empirical studies show that academia is socially exclusive. I argue that this social exclusion works, at least partly, through the systematic methodological disqualification of contributions from members of underrepresented social groups. As methodological quality criteria are underdetermined their interpretation and weighting can be biased with relation to gender, race, social background, etc. Such biased quality evaluation can take place on a local or global level. The current situation of women in academic philosophy illuminates this. I conclude that only mechanical solutions can effectively change the situation.

  3. State of R&D in photonics-related fields in Japan's industry and academia: leading the green digital economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsuno, Kimio

    2010-06-01

    Photonics product statistics in Japan provided by OITDA is shown and analyzed from the aspect of three basic issues those the Japanese R & D state is facing. They are (1) off-shoring due to the deep integration in east Asia, (2) industry-academia collaboration and (3) global warming issue. The challengeable photonics R&D will come by aiming the volume zone market to get rid of the Galapagos problem and by opening innovation through the international collaboration. The connecting of the photonics products to the broadband systems are prospective to lead the "Green Digital Economy.

  4. Plasma Physics Research at an Undergraduate Institution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padalino, Stephen

    2007-11-01

    Undergraduate research experiences have motivated many physics majors to continue their studies at the graduate level. The Department of Physics and Astronomy at SUNY Geneseo, a primarily undergraduate institution, recognizes this simple reality and is committed to ensuring research opportunities are available to interested majors beginning as early as their freshman year. Every year for more than a decade, as many as two dozen students and 8 faculty members have worked on projects related to high energy density physics and inertial confinement fusion during the summer months and the academic year. By working with their research sponsors, it has been possible to identify an impressive number of projects suitable for an institution such as Geneseo. These projects tend to be hands-on and require teamwork and innovation to be successful. They also take advantage of in-house capabilities such as the 2 MV tandem pelletron accelerator, a scanning electron microscope, a duoplasmatron ion deposition system and a 64 processor computing cluster. The end products of their efforts are utilized at the sponsoring facilities in support of nationally recognized programs. In this talk, I will discuss a number of these projects and point out what made them attractive and appropriate for an institution like Geneseo, the direct and indirect benefits of the research opportunities for the students and faculty, and how the national programs benefited from the cost-effective use of undergraduate research. In addition, I will discuss the importance of exposure for both students and faculty mentors to the larger scientific community through posters presentations at annual meetings such as the DPP and DNP. Finally, I will address the need for even greater research opportunities for undergraduate students in the future and the importance of establishing longer ``educational pipelines'' to satisfy the ever growing need for top-tier scientists and engineers in industry, academia and the

  5. Highland macrolichen flora of Northwestern Yunnan, China.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jae-Seoun; Wang, Li-Song; Oh, Soon-Ok; Kim, Gyoung Hee; Lim, Kwang-Mi; Jung, Jae-Sung; Koh, Young Jin

    2005-06-01

    Fifty-six species in 36 genera of macrolichens are reported from the Zhongdian area, northwest Yunnan, China during the lichenological expedition for highland macrolichen survey in June, 2004. More than 60% of these species have not been reported in South Korea. All of the 182 collected specimens are deposited in the Korean Lichen Research Institute (KoLRI) at Sunchon National University in Korea, and some of them are duplicated in the lichen herbarium, Crytogamic Herbarium, Kunming Institute of Botany, Academia Sinica (KUN-L) in China. This is the first report on the macrolichen flora in the visited areas.

  6. Software Past, Present, and Future: Views from Government, Industry and Academia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holcomb, Lee; Page, Jerry; Evangelist, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Views from the NASA CIO NASA Software Engineering Workshop on software development from the past, present, and future are presented. The topics include: 1) Software Past; 2) Software Present; 3) NASA's Largest Software Challenges; 4) 8330 Software Projects in Industry Standish Groups 1994 Report; 5) Software Future; 6) Capability Maturity Model (CMM): Software Engineering Institute (SEI) levels; 7) System Engineering Quality Also Part of the Problem; 8) University Environment Trends Will Increase the Problem in Software Engineering; and 9) NASA Software Engineering Goals.

  7. A biomedical adventurers' guide to navigating between careers in academia and industry.

    PubMed

    Superti-Furga, Giulio

    2009-12-01

    An explosion of scientific and technological advances has broadened the field of biomedicine. Traditional boundaries between the public and private research sectors are now blurred by multidisciplinary projects and the necessity for new and more efficient models of the translational process. This allows the adventurous scientist to boldly and consciously sample selected skills during periods of secondment in different institutions and organizations, and to assemble a personal and unique blend of competences to help them manage their career.

  8. Communicating Geosciences with Policy-makers: a Grand Challenge for Academia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, W. J.; Walls, M. R.; Boland, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Geoscientists interested in the broader societal impacts of their research can make a meaningful contribution to policy making in our changing world. Nevertheless, policy and public decision making are the least frequently cited Broader Impacts in proposals and funded projects within NSF's Geosciences Directorate. Academic institutions can play a lead role by introducing this societal dimension of our profession to beginning students, and by enabling interdisciplinary research and promoting communication pathways for experienced career geoscientists. Within the academic environment, the public interface of the geosciences can be presented through curriculum content and creative programs. These include undergraduate minors in economics or public policy designed for scientists and engineers, and internships with policy makers. Federal research institutions and other organizations provide valuable policy-relevant experiences for students. Academic institutions have the key freedom of mission to tackle interdisciplinary research challenges at the interface of geoscience and policy. They develop long-standing relationships with research partners, including national laboratories and state geological surveys, whose work may support policy development and analysis at local, state, regional, and national levels. CSM's Payne Institute for Earth Resources awards mini-grants for teams of researchers to develop collaborative research efforts between engineering/science and policy researchers. Current work in the areas of nuclear generation and the costs of climate policy and on policy alternatives for capturing fugitive methane emissions are examples of work at the interface between the geosciences and public policy. With academic engagement, geoscientists can steward their intellectual output when non-scientists translate geoscience information and concepts into action through public policies.

  9. Tank Automotive Research, Development & Engineering Center Advanced Planning Briefing for Academia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-15

    Po rtu ga l Tu rk ey M ex ico Source: International Outcomes of Learning in Mathematics Literacy and Problem Solving: PISA 2003, Results From the U.S...money did the Department of Defense award to Institutions of Higher Education in 2007? Roughly 50% 2 Billion Dollars Unclassified 3 • Society of...Transforming Processes • TARDEC Funding & Manpower • Workforce & Recruiting Agenda Unclassified 4 A Team for 91 Years Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE

  10. Hurricane Public Health Research Center at Louisiana State University a Case of Academia Being Prepared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heerden, I. L.

    2006-12-01

    and chemicals in these standing flood waters would set the stage for massive disease outbreaks and prolonged chemical exposure. Before Katrina, population evacuation behavior had been determined, computer models could be used to predict storm surge flooding, government databases and GIS technology allowed documentation of at-risk areas, probable chemical and sewerage release sites had been mapped, tropical disease experts and social scientists had determined possible public health impacts; that injured and displaced animal pets and wild animals would be a major problem had been identified; and, an interactive GIS database was available for utilization in all aspects of the assessment and remediation post landfall. The value of this project has been many-fold. First, before Katrina it had a positive impact on emergency preparedness in the state of Louisiana. Second, during the hurricane Katrina catastrophe the project offered a major service to the state as the various data sets and research outputs were extensively used throughout the flooding thus reducing deaths, disease, pain, and suffering. Third, the model of academia aiding in disaster science and management is being exported nationally and internationally. Finally, our research results are applicable to other complex disasters such as earthquakes, tornadoes, chemical spills or terrorism.

  11. Beyond Academia – Interrogating Research Impact in the Research Excellence Framework

    PubMed Central

    Smallman, Melanie; Lock, Simon J.; Johnson, Charlotte; Austwick, Martin Zaltz

    2016-01-01

    Big changes to the way in which research funding is allocated to UK universities were brought about in the Research Excellence Framework (REF), overseen by the Higher Education Funding Council, England. Replacing the earlier Research Assessment Exercise, the purpose of the REF was to assess the quality and reach of research in UK universities–and allocate funding accordingly. For the first time, this included an assessment of research ‘impact’, accounting for 20% of the funding allocation. In this article we use a text mining technique to investigate the interpretations of impact put forward via impact case studies in the REF process. We find that institutions have developed a diverse interpretation of impact, ranging from commercial applications to public and cultural engagement activities. These interpretations of impact vary from discipline to discipline and between institutions, with more broad-based institutions depicting a greater variety of impacts. Comparing the interpretations with the score given by REF, we found no evidence of one particular interpretation being more highly rewarded than another. Importantly, we also found a positive correlation between impact score and [overall research] quality score, suggesting that impact is not being achieved at the expense of research excellence. PMID:27997599

  12. Collaborating for a cause--Creating partnerships between IT and academia.

    PubMed

    Cato, Jim; Abbott, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    An international nursing shortage is driving the redesign of nursing education curriculum. Providing nursing students with an opportunity for hands on use of advanced healthcare technology is critical to the development of highly competent nurses who are prepared not only to fully interact in the healthcare domain, but to also participate in its re-engineering via IT. The academic institution with an integrated IT solution in clinical simulation labs can become a place where students can learn the skills, understand the potential, participate in the selection and evaluation of software systems and eventually help to craft IT solutions that benefit both the patient and the practice of nursing and medicine. As the healthcare environment continues to change - pushing curricular redesign, the expectation that educators will increase the integration of IT into coursework and clinical experiences is increasing. The challenge however, is not only to educate the students, but to also educate faculty who often possess limited amounts of IT knowledge. Faculties, like students, have limited time and learning outcomes are enhanced when hands-on and practical educational opportunities are available. This presentation therefore will not only focus on the student; instead, the gestalt of integrated teaching/learning from faculty and student perspectives will be addressed. The challenges, including identifying partnership opportunities, identifying financial resources to support such partnerships, gaining institutional support, determining criteria to evaluate student performance, and strategies for engendering faculty support will be discussed, along with solutions on how they can be overcome. The presentation will also highlight the benefits of the partnership for both the institution and the industry vendor. The institution can benefit from the access to the vendor's software, hardware, and expertise. By using advanced clinical solutions in the classroom and hospital setting

  13. Only an integrated approach across academia, enterprise, governments, and global agencies can tackle the public health impact of climate change.

    PubMed

    Stordalen, Gunhild A; Rocklöv, Joacim; Nilsson, Maria; Byass, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite considerable global attention to the issues of climate change, relatively little priority has been given to the likely effects on human health of current and future changes in the global climate. We identify three major societal determinants that influence the impact of climate change on human health, namely the application of scholarship and knowledge; economic and commercial considerations; and actions of governments and global agencies. Discussion The three major areas are each discussed in terms of the ways in which they facilitate and frustrate attempts to protect human health from the effects of climate change. Academia still pays very little attention to the effects of climate on health in poorer countries. Enterprise is starting to recognise that healthy commerce depends on healthy people, and so climate change presents long-term threats if it compromises health. Governments and international agencies are very active, but often face immovable vested interests in other sectors. Overall, there tends to be too little interaction between the three areas, and this means that potential synergies and co-benefits are not always realised. Conclusion More attention from academia, enterprise, and international agencies needs to be given to the potential threats the climate change presents to human health. However, there needs to also be much closer collaboration between all three areas in order to capitalise on possible synergies that can be achieved between them.

  14. Walking between academia and industry to find successful solutions to biomedical challenges: an interview with Geoffrey Smith.

    PubMed

    Smith, Geoffrey; Cagan, Ross

    2015-10-01

    Geoffrey W. Smith is currently the Managing Director of Mars Ventures. He actually started his studies with a Bachelor of Arts degree and a Doctorate in Law but then, in part by chance and in part by following in his family footsteps, he stepped into the healthcare and biotech field. Since then, he has successfully contributed to the birth of a number of healthcare companies and has also held academic positions at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and at The Rockefeller University in New York, teaching about the interface between science and business. During 2014 he served as Senior Editor on Disease Models & Mechanisms, bringing to the editorial team his valuable experience in drug development and discovery. In this interview, Geoff talks to Ross Cagan, Editor-in-Chief of Disease Models & Mechanisms, about how he developed his incredibly varied career, sharing his views about industry, academia and science publishing, and discussing how academia and industry can fruitfully meet to advance bioscience, train the scientists and stakeholders of the future, and drive the successful discovery of new therapeutics to treat human disease.

  15. Walking between academia and industry to find successful solutions to biomedical challenges: an interview with Geoffrey Smith

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Geoffrey W. Smith is currently the Managing Director of Mars Ventures. He actually started his studies with a Bachelor of Arts degree and a Doctorate in Law but then, in part by chance and in part by following in his family footsteps, he stepped into the healthcare and biotech field. Since then, he has successfully contributed to the birth of a number of healthcare companies and has also held academic positions at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and at The Rockefeller University in New York, teaching about the interface between science and business. During 2014 he served as Senior Editor on Disease Models & Mechanisms, bringing to the editorial team his valuable experience in drug development and discovery. In this interview, Geoff talks to Ross Cagan, Editor-in-Chief of Disease Models & Mechanisms, about how he developed his incredibly varied career, sharing his views about industry, academia and science publishing, and discussing how academia and industry can fruitfully meet to advance bioscience, train the scientists and stakeholders of the future, and drive the successful discovery of new therapeutics to treat human disease. PMID:26438691

  16. Too Many PhD Graduates or Too Few Academic Job Openings: The Basic Reproductive Number R0 in Academia.

    PubMed

    Larson, Richard C; Ghaffarzadegan, Navid; Xue, Yi

    2014-01-01

    The academic job market has become increasingly competitive for PhD graduates. In this note, we ask the basic question of 'Are we producing more PhDs than needed?' We take a systems approach and offer a 'birth rate' perspective: professors graduate PhDs who later become professors themselves, an analogue to how a population grows. We show that the reproduction rate in academia is very high. For example, in engineering, a professor in the US graduates 7.8 new PhDs during his/her whole career on average, and only one of these graduates can replace the professor's position. This implies that in a steady state, only 12.8% of PhD graduates can attain academic positions in the USA. The key insight is that the system in many places is saturated, far beyond capacity to absorb new PhDs in academia at the rates that they are being produced. Based on the analysis, we discuss policy implications.

  17. Promoting interdisciplinary project-based learning to build the skill sets for research and development of medical devices in academia.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Shankar

    2013-01-01

    The worldwide need for rapid expansion and diversification of medical devices and the corresponding requirements in industry pose arduous challenges for educators to train undergraduate biomedical engineering (BME) students. Preparing BME students for working in the research and development (R&D) in medical device industry is not easily accomplished by adopting traditional pedagogical methods. Even with the inclusion of the design and development elements in capstone projects, medical device industry may be still experience a gap in fulfilling their needs in R&D. This paper proposes a new model based on interdisciplinary project-based learning (IDPBL) to address the requirements of building the necessary skill sets in academia for carrying out R&D in medical device industry. The proposed model incorporates IDPBL modules distributed in a stepwise fashion through the four years of a typical BME program. The proposed model involves buy-in and collaboration from faculty as well as students. The implementation of the proposed design in an undergraduate BME program is still in process. However, a variant of the proposed IDPBL method has been attempted at a limited scale at the postgraduate level and has shown some success. Extrapolating the previous results, the adoption of the IDPBL to BME training seems to suggest promising outcomes. Despite numerous implementation challenges, with continued efforts, the proposed IDPBL will be valuable n academia for skill sets building for medical device R&D.

  18. Only an integrated approach across academia, enterprise, governments, and global agencies can tackle the public health impact of climate change

    PubMed Central

    Stordalen, Gunhild A.; Rocklöv, Joacim; Nilsson, Maria; Byass, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite considerable global attention to the issues of climate change, relatively little priority has been given to the likely effects on human health of current and future changes in the global climate. We identify three major societal determinants that influence the impact of climate change on human health, namely the application of scholarship and knowledge; economic and commercial considerations; and actions of governments and global agencies. Discussion The three major areas are each discussed in terms of the ways in which they facilitate and frustrate attempts to protect human health from the effects of climate change. Academia still pays very little attention to the effects of climate on health in poorer countries. Enterprise is starting to recognise that healthy commerce depends on healthy people, and so climate change presents long-term threats if it compromises health. Governments and international agencies are very active, but often face immovable vested interests in other sectors. Overall, there tends to be too little interaction between the three areas, and this means that potential synergies and co-benefits are not always realised. Conclusion More attention from academia, enterprise, and international agencies needs to be given to the potential threats the climate change presents to human health. However, there needs to also be much closer collaboration between all three areas in order to capitalise on possible synergies that can be achieved between them. PMID:23653920

  19. Swimmer-Training Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    This satirical essay proposes an institution of higher learning that would prepare students to become swimmers" and swimming instructors. Curriculum, teaching methods, student selection and evaluation are modelled on certain contemporary teacher-training institutes. (PD)

  20. Innovation in Neurosurgery: Intellectual Property Strategy and Academia/Industrial Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Yuichi

    2016-09-15

    Neurosurgery has tremendous possibilities for development of innovative medical devices. However, most of the neurosurgical devices used in Japan are imported products. Promotion and development of domestic medical devices is highly encouraged and it is one of the pillars of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's growth strategy of Japanese economy. Innovative "Made in Japan" medical devices can be developed by interdisciplinary collaboration between industries and academic institutions. Proper orientation of medical and engineering education, social and administrative awareness of the need of facilitating the medical devices creative process with corresponding regulatory changes, and appropriate medical and technological infrastructure establishment are needed for stimulating medical device innovation.

  1. Innovation in Neurosurgery: Intellectual Property Strategy and Academia/Industrial Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    MURAYAMA, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Neurosurgery has tremendous possibilities for development of innovative medical devices. However, most of the neurosurgical devices used in Japan are imported products. Promotion and development of domestic medical devices is highly encouraged and it is one of the pillars of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s growth strategy of Japanese economy. Innovative “Made in Japan” medical devices can be developed by interdisciplinary collaboration between industries and academic institutions. Proper orientation of medical and engineering education, social and administrative awareness of the need of facilitating the medical devices creative process with corresponding regulatory changes, and appropriate medical and technological infrastructure establishment are needed for stimulating medical device innovation. PMID:27298262

  2. Design Principles for Fragment Libraries: Maximizing the Value of Learnings from Pharma Fragment-Based Drug Discovery (FBDD) Programs for Use in Academia.

    PubMed

    Keserű, György M; Erlanson, Daniel A; Ferenczy, György G; Hann, Michael M; Murray, Christopher W; Pickett, Stephen D

    2016-09-22

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) is well suited for discovering both drug leads and chemical probes of protein function; it can cover broad swaths of chemical space and allows the use of creative chemistry. FBDD is widely implemented for lead discovery in industry but is sometimes used less systematically in academia. Design principles and implementation approaches for fragment libraries are continually evolving, and the lack of up-to-date guidance may prevent more effective application of FBDD in academia. This Perspective explores many of the theoretical, practical, and strategic considerations that occur within FBDD programs, including the optimal size, complexity, physicochemical profile, and shape profile of fragments in FBDD libraries, as well as compound storage, evaluation, and screening technologies. This compilation of industry experience in FBDD will hopefully be useful for those pursuing FBDD in academia.

  3. Canadian institute honours Hawking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrani, Matin

    2009-11-01

    The Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Canada, has announced that a major new extension to its campus will be known as the Stephen Hawking Centre. The extension, which is currently being built, is due to open in 2011 and will double the size of the institute. It will also provide a home for the institute's Masters students, the first of whom joined the Perimeter Institute this autumn as part of its Perimeter Scholars international programme.

  4. Astronomical Institute of Athens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Astronomical Institute of Athens is the oldest research institute of modern Greece (it faces the Parthenon). The Astronomical Institute (AI) of the National Observatory of Athens (NOA) started its observational projects in 1847. The modern computer and research center are housed at the Penteli Astronomical Station with major projects and international collaborations focused on extragalactic ...

  5. Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics (HIA) is the Institute within the NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL of Canada responsible for providing astronomical facilities, and developing related instrumentation and software for Canadian researchers. The Institute was established in 1975, and now operates 1.8 m and 1.2 m optical telescopes at the DOMINION ASTROPHYSICAL OBSERVATORY close to Victoria, BC, as we...

  6. Implementing Institutional Research Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blai, Boris, Jr.

    Although many agree that institutional research in higher education has come of age and is accepted as a part of institutional management, great variations exist in the extent to which institutional research findings are synthesized and utilized in management decision-making. A number of reasons can be identified as accounting for this phenomenon,…

  7. University of Washington's eScience Institute Promotes New Training and Career Pathways in Data Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, S.; Parker, M. S.; Howe, B.; Lazowska, E.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid advances in technology are transforming nearly every field from "data-poor" to "data-rich." The ability to extract knowledge from this abundance of data is the cornerstone of 21st century discovery. At the University of Washington eScience Institute, our mission is to engage researchers across disciplines in developing and applying advanced computational methods and tools to real world problems in data-intensive discovery. Our research team consists of individuals with diverse backgrounds in domain sciences such as astronomy, oceanography and geology, with complementary expertise in advanced statistical and computational techniques such as data management, visualization, and machine learning. Two key elements are necessary to foster careers in data science: individuals with cross-disciplinary training in both method and domain sciences, and career paths emphasizing alternative metrics for advancement. We see persistent and deep-rooted challenges for the career paths of people whose skills, activities and work patterns don't fit neatly into the traditional roles and success metrics of academia. To address these challenges the eScience Institute has developed training programs and established new career opportunities for data-intensive research in academia. Our graduate students and post-docs have mentors in both a methodology and an application field. They also participate in coursework and tutorials to advance technical skill and foster community. Professional Data Scientist positions were created to support research independence while encouraging the development and adoption of domain-specific tools and techniques. The eScience Institute also supports the appointment of faculty who are innovators in developing and applying data science methodologies to advance their field of discovery. Our ultimate goal is to create a supportive environment for data science in academia and to establish global recognition for data-intensive discovery across all fields.

  8. A Qualitative Analysis of Power Differentials in Ethical Situations in Academia

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Carter; Medeiros, Kelsey E.; Giorgini, Vincent; Mecca, Jensen T.; Devenport, Lynn D.; Connelly, Shane; Mumford, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Power and organizational hierarchies are ubiquitous to social institutions that form the foundation of modern society. Power differentials may act to constrain or enhance people's ability to make good ethical decisions. However, little scholarly work has examined perceptions of this important topic. The present effort seeks to address this issue by interviewing academics about hypothetical ethical problems that involve power differences among those involved. Academics discussed what they would do in these scenarios, often drawing on their own experiences. Using a think-aloud protocol, participants were prompted to discuss their reasoning and thinking behind their ethical decisions. These interview data were content analyzed using a semantic analysis program that identified a number of distinct ways that academics think about power differences and abuses in ethical situations. Implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:25356066

  9. Healthcare Commercialization Programs: Improving the Efficiency of Translating Healthcare Innovations From Academia Into Practice

    PubMed Central

    Reizes, Ofer; Dempsey, Michael K.

    2016-01-01

    Academic investigators are generating a plethora of insights and technologies that have the potential to significantly improve patient care. However, to address the imperative to improve the quality, cost and access to care with ever more constrained funding, the efficiency and the consistency with which they are translated into cost effective products and/or services need to improve. Healthcare commercialization programs (HCPs) are described and proposed as an option that institutions can add to their portfolio to improve translational research. In helping teams translate specific healthcare innovations into practice, HCPs expand the skillset of investigators and enhance an institution’s innovation capacity. Lessons learned are shared from configuring and delivering HCPs, which build on the fundamentals of the National Science Foundation’s Innovation Corps program, to address the unique challenges in supporting healthcare innovations and innovators. PMID:27766188

  10. The path to producing pharmaceuticals from natural products uncovered by academia-from the perspective of a science coordinator.

    PubMed

    Fujie, Akihiko

    2017-01-01

    To actualize the invention of all-Japanese medicines, the Department of Innovative Drug Discovery and Development (iD3) in the Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED) serves as the headquarters for the Drug Discovery Support Network. iD3 assists with creating research strategies for the seeds of medicines discovered by academia and provides technological support, intellectual property management, and aid for applying the seeds through industry-led efforts. In this review, from the perspective of a science coordinator, I will describe the current activities of the drug discovery support network and iD3 as well as the challenges and future developments of pharmaceutical research and development using the natural product drug discovery method.

  11. An Opportunity for Industry-Academia Partnership: Training the Next Generation of Industrial Researchers in Characterizing Higher Order Protein Structure.

    PubMed

    Bain, David L; Brenowitz, Michael; Roberts, Christopher J

    2016-12-01

    Training researchers for positions in the United States biopharmaceutical industry has long been driven by academia. This commentary explores how the changing landscape of academic training will impact the industrial workforce, particularly with regard to the development of protein therapeutics in the area of biophysical and higher order structural characterization. We discuss how to balance future training and employment opportunities, how academic-industrial partnerships can help young scientists acquire the skills needed by their future employer, and how an appropriately trained workforce can facilitate the translation of new technology from academic to industrial laboratories. We also present suggestions to facilitate the coordinated development of industrial-academic educational partnerships to develop new training programs, and the ability of students to locate these programs, through the development of authoritative public resources.

  12. Scientific integrity resource guide: Efforts by federal agencies, foundations, nonprofit organizations, professional societies, and academia in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Kretser, Alison; Murphy, Delia; Dwyer, Johanna

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Scientific integrity is at the forefront of the scientific research enterprise. This paper provides an overview of key existing efforts on scientific integrity by federal agencies, foundations, nonprofit organizations, professional societies, and academia from 1989 to April 2016. It serves as a resource for the scientific community on scientific integrity work and helps to identify areas in which more action is needed. Overall, there is tremendous activity in this area and there are clear linkages among the efforts of the five sectors. All the same, scientific integrity needs to remain visible in the scientific community and evolve along with new research paradigms. High priority in instilling these values falls upon all stakeholders. PMID:27748637

  13. Evaluation and Development of E-Learning Tools and Methods in Digital Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing for Non Experts from Academia and Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gülch, E.; Al-Ghorani, N.; Quedenfeldt, B.; Braun, J.

    2012-07-01

    There does already exist a wide variety of tutorials and on-line courses on Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing very often used in academia. Many of them are still rather static and tedious or target high-knowledge learners. E-learning is, however, increasingly applied by many organizations and companies for life-long learning (like e.g. the EduServ courses of EuroSDR), but also for training of resellers and in order to save the expenses and time of travelling. A new issue of this project when taking into account the ethnic mentality in some countries like Saudi Arabia where it is impossible to mix the females and males at any institution type or for instance to teach ladies by a male teacher face to face, many academic workshops have been done separately twice by foreign organizations to adapt this situation. This paper will focus on these issues and present experiences gathered from a Master Thesis on "E-learning in Digital Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing for Non Experts using Moodle" at HFT Stuttgart in co-operation with a software vendor and a reseller and experiences from a current European Tempus IV project GIDEC (Geographic information technology for sustainable development in Eastern neighouring countries). The aim of this research is to provide an overview on available methods and tools and classify and judge their feasibility for the above mentioned scenarios. A more detailed description is given on the development of e-learning applications for Digital Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing using the open source package Moodle as platform. A first item covers the experiences from setting up and handling of Moodle for non-experts. The major emphasis is then on developing and analyzing some few case studies for lectures, exercises, and software training in the fields of Digital Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing. Feedback from students and company staff will be evaluated and incorporated in an improved design and sample implementation. A further focus is on free

  14. Reclaiming academia from post-academia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriarty, Philip

    2008-02-01

    The increasing emphasis on commercialization and market forces in modern universities is fundamentally at odds with core academic principles. Publicly funded academics have an obligation to carry out science for the public good, and this responsibility is not compatible with the entrepreneurial ethos increasingly expected of university research by governments and funding agencies.

  15. A Case Study of an Academia-Industry Partnership to Meet the Education and Training Needs in a Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics (STEM) Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Joseph Carl

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this case study is to provide a description of the characteristics of an academia-industry partnership that works together with industry to meet the education and training needs in a Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) field. After the launch of Sputnik in 1957, U.S. pursued efforts to compete in STEM fields on…

  16. Power, Politics, Democracy and Reform: A Historical Review of Curriculum Reform, Academia and Government in British Columbia, Canada, 1920 to 2000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broom, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the interrelations between power, politics, academia and curriculum reform in British Columbia (BC) using social studies curriculum documents as a case study. It describes how curriculum reform occurred and argues that reform was undemocratic as it was largely the product of individuals with power who invited individuals with…

  17. Research on the Industry-Academia-Research Cooperation Mechanism of Local University and College--Take Changchun University of Science and Technology as an Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Qiong; Li, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Local university and college take as their own responsibilities to serve local economy and promote social development. For them, the cooperation mechanism "Industry-Academia-Research" is not only inevitable to keep up with the development of the times and education, but also necessary to adapt themselves to market demands. It is also the…

  18. [The environment of the first stage of the Academia Médica Matritense (2.0 third of the 18th century): determinant notes for a suitable valuation].

    PubMed

    González de Posada, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    The intrinsic nature of the written histories of the Real Academia Nacional de Medicina until the present is confirmed and the construction of a contextualized history of its first stage and in relation to the proliferation of contemporary health-related academies of pharmacists, surgeons and doctors is started.

  19. When Two Worlds Don't Collide: Can Social Curation Address the Marginalisation of Open Educational Practices and Resources from Outside Academia?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perryman, Leigh-Anne; Coughlan, Tony

    2014-01-01

    A canyonesque gulf has long existed between open academia and many external subject communities. Since 2011, we have been developing and piloting the public open scholar role (Coughlan and Perryman 2012)--involving open academics discovering, sharing and discussing open educational resources (OER) with online communities outside formal education…

  20. [Clinical guides in Mexico, emission of the Academia Mexicana de Cirugia].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-González, Jorge M; Tena-Tamayo, Carlos; Díaz-González, Norma Juárez; Vargas-Domínguez, Armando; Rivera-Cisneros, Antonio; Lozano-Alcázar, Jaime

    2004-01-01

    Today, these exist worldwide organizations related with the practice of medicine that are interested in marking recommendations and in formulating guidelines for better performance of physicians and health professionals. These organizations are headed by universities, associations, colleges, research center, and work groups and are made up of well-known physicians with academic prestige from the private and public sectors. This report presents a brief overview concerning the development of three clinical guides related with illnesses frequently observed in the physician's office: rhinosinusitis gastroesophageal reflux diseases (GERD), and prostate benign hyperplasia. These guides are issued by one of the most important academic institutions in the country. In the above-mentioned works, the efforts of specialist who are opinion leaders in these topics form different states of the country converge. Likewise, critical points to consider for producing clinical guides are provided mechanisms of diffusion, consultation, feedback and updating of these documents, have already been provided and focus on national medical practice quality of services, and the manner in which to carry out diagnosis and therapy at the different levels of medical care, with emphasis on preventing complications.

  1. Texas Heart Institute

    MedlinePlus

    ... Texas Heart Institute, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, MD Anderson Cancer Center, and The University of Houston. Held most ... for Physicians Fellowships & Residencies School ...

  2. Study on the EGG masses of 12 species of cypraeidae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhongyan; Ma, Xiutong

    1988-06-01

    Researchers of the Institute of Oceanology, Academia Sinica, collected 46 species and subspecies of Cypraeidae during their 1955 1978 surveys on the marine mollusks along the coasts of Guangdong, Guangxi and Hainan Provinces and Xisha (Paracels) Islands in the South China Sea. Twelve species belonging to 7 genera with their egg masses were collected mainly from the intertidal zone where the animals were laying their eggs. The collection dates of each of the species and a preliminary description of their egg masses are given in this paper.

  3. The Greenland Telescope: antenna retrofit status and future plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffin, Philippe; Ho, Paul T. P.; Asada, Keiichi; Blundell, Raymond; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Burgos, Roberto; Chang, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Ming-Tang; Christensen, Robert; Chu, You-Hua; Grimes, Paul K.; Han, C. C.; Huang, Chih-Wei L.; Huang, Yau-De; Hsieh, Fang-Chia; Inoue, Makoto; Koch, Patrick M.; Kubo, Derek; Leiker, Steve; Lin, Lupin; Liu, Ching-Tang; Lo, Shih-Hsiang; Martin-Cocher, Pierre; Matsushita, Satoki; Nakamura, Masanori; Meyer-Zhao, Zheng; Nishioka, Hiroaki; Norton, Tim; Nystrom, George; Paine, Scott N.; Patel, Nimesh A.; Pu, Hung-Yi; Snow, William; Sridharan, T. K.; Srinivasan, Ranjani; Wang, Jackie

    2016-07-01

    Since the ALMA North America Prototype Antenna was awarded to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO), SAO and the Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics (ASIAA) are working jointly to relocate the antenna to Greenland. This paper shows the status of the antenna retrofit and the work carried out after the recommissioning and subsequent disassembly of the antenna at the VLA has taken place. The next coming months will see the start of the antenna reassembly at Thule Air Base. These activities are expected to last until the fall of 2017 when commissioning should take place. In parallel, design, fabrication and testing of the last components are taking place in Taiwan.

  4. Control and monitoring software for the Greenland Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Nimesh A.; Nishioka, Hiroaki; Huang, Chih-Wei Locutus

    2016-08-01

    The Greenland Telescope (GLT) is a 12m diameter antenna that is being developed from the ALMA North America prototype antenna, for VLBI observations and single-dish science approaching THz, at the Summit station in Greenland. The GLT is a collaboration between the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and the Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics. We describe the control and monitoring software that is being developed for GLT. The present version of the software is ready for the initial tests of the antenna at Thule, including optical and radio pointing calibration, holography, and VLBI observations at 230 GHz.

  5. Biological effects of carbon ions with medium energy on plant seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Zengquan Wei; Yuyan Liu; Guiling Wang; Xuebing Chen; Huiling Li; Hanmin Yang; Lihong Wang; Qingxiang Gao; Chongying Wang; Yafu Wang

    1995-03-01

    The biological effects of 46.6 MeV/u {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ions on four kinds of plant seeds were studied at the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL), Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Academia Sinica. The results show that germination of the seeds is inhibited by exposure to ions. In root tip cells of irradiated seeds, a great variety of chromosomal aberrations were observed. Sensitivities in terms of inhibition of germination and induction of chromosomal aberrations in the four species are correlated. 7 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. Institutional Inbreeding Reexamined.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyer, Jean C.; Conrad, Clifton F.

    1984-01-01

    Data from the 1977 Survey of the American Professoriate were used to examine the relationship among institutional origin, productivity, and institutional rewards. When an adjustment was made for time allocation, inbred faculty were found to be more productive but are paid significantly less than noninbred faculty. (Author/BW)

  7. What Is Institutional Research?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Paul R.

    Institutional research (IR), defined as inquiry "directed toward data useful or necessary [for] intelligent decisions and/or for the successful maintenance, operation and/or improvement of a given collegiate institution," can be directly applied to soaring enrollment, greater administrative complexity, rising costs. The junior college…

  8. Engagement and Institutional Advancement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weerts, David; Hudson, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Research suggests that institutional commitment to community engagement can be understood by examining levels of student, faculty, and community involvement in engagement; organizational structure, rewards, and campus publications supporting engagement; and compatibility of an institution's mission with this work (Holland, 1997). Underlying all of…

  9. Educational Institutions: Terminology. Turkey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Cultural Cooperation, Strasbourg (France).

    Prepared from interviews with personnel of the Turkish Ministry of National Education, and other educational administrators in that country, this publication provides a guide to the terminology used to name the types of public educational institutions found in Turkey. Private educational institutions, military schools, higher schools attached to…

  10. Guiding Institutional Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Frank G.

    1997-01-01

    Looks at several ways that change comes about over which the institution has little or no control: by mandate, through legislation, or through the accreditation process. Offers the CAP method (Communication, Alternatives selection, and Participation) to guide the institution through the change process. (JOW)

  11. Energy and institution size

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Why do institutions grow? Despite nearly a century of scientific effort, there remains little consensus on this topic. This paper offers a new approach that focuses on energy consumption. A systematic relation exists between institution size and energy consumption per capita: as energy consumption increases, institutions become larger. I hypothesize that this relation results from the interplay between technological scale and human biological limitations. I also show how a simple stochastic model can be used to link energy consumption with firm dynamics. PMID:28178339

  12. Rethinking the Meaning of Success in Academia: Strategies of a Female Scientist from a Far - Away Land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekik, F.

    2007-12-01

    Earning and receiving tenure is essential for success in academia and there are obstacles, particularly for women in the sciences. Scholarly publications and formal reviews from peers and students make the road to tenure and promotion ambiguous and unpredictable. As a female scientist, I benefited from my upbringing in Turkey where women are raised to perceive themselves as both empowered and strong. Several recent studies on academicians in physics have shown that while in countries like Turkey, former Yugoslavia, Slovenia and Poland female scientists make up 20% or more of college faculty, they hold only 5% or less of faculty positions in universities in western Europe and the United States. Similar statistics prevail in earth science and geology departments world wide and will be discussed in my presentation. I also developed several strategies that helped me on the road to tenure, which I believe may have use to others--my part of this session will be to explain them more fully. They are: [1] Concentrate on your work, and do not be distracted by the multiple drains on time and energy such as competition with peers; [2] Wherever possible, develop a broader definition of "success," so that collaborations with other scientists, with students, and with the general public are valued; [3] Build your department by participating in searches and interviewing job candidates; [4] Seek colleagues who share your values about leadership and collegiality; and [5] Be confident about your own competence.

  13. Resolving complex research data management issues in biomedical laboratories: Qualitative study of an industry-academia collaboration.

    PubMed

    Myneni, Sahiti; Patel, Vimla L; Bova, G Steven; Wang, Jian; Ackerman, Christopher F; Berlinicke, Cynthia A; Chen, Steve H; Lindvall, Mikael; Zack, Donald J

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes a distributed collaborative effort between industry and academia to systematize data management in an academic biomedical laboratory. Heterogeneous and voluminous nature of research data created in biomedical laboratories make information management difficult and research unproductive. One such collaborative effort was evaluated over a period of four years using data collection methods including ethnographic observations, semi-structured interviews, web-based surveys, progress reports, conference call summaries, and face-to-face group discussions. Data were analyzed using qualitative methods of data analysis to (1) characterize specific problems faced by biomedical researchers with traditional information management practices, (2) identify intervention areas to introduce a new research information management system called Labmatrix, and finally to (3) evaluate and delineate important general collaboration (intervention) characteristics that can optimize outcomes of an implementation process in biomedical laboratories. Results emphasize the importance of end user perseverance, human-centric interoperability evaluation, and demonstration of return on investment of effort and time of laboratory members and industry personnel for success of implementation process. In addition, there is an intrinsic learning component associated with the implementation process of an information management system. Technology transfer experience in a complex environment such as the biomedical laboratory can be eased with use of information systems that support human and cognitive interoperability. Such informatics features can also contribute to successful collaboration and hopefully to scientific productivity.

  14. Resolving Complex Research Data Management Issues in Biomedical Laboratories: Qualitative Study of an Industry-Academia Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Myneni, Sahiti; Patel, Vimla L.; Bova, G. Steven; Wang, Jian; Ackerman, Christopher F.; Berlinicke, Cynthia A.; Chen, Steve H.; Lindvall, Mikael; Zack, Donald J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a distributed collaborative effort between industry and academia to systematize data management in an academic biomedical laboratory. Heterogeneous and voluminous nature of research data created in biomedical laboratories make information management difficult and research unproductive. One such collaborative effort was evaluated over a period of four years using data collection methods including ethnographic observations, semi-structured interviews, web-based surveys, progress reports, conference call summaries, and face-to-face group discussions. Data were analyzed using qualitative methods of data analysis to 1) characterize specific problems faced by biomedical researchers with traditional information management practices, 2) identify intervention areas to introduce a new research information management system called Labmatrix, and finally to 3) evaluate and delineate important general collaboration (intervention) characteristics that can optimize outcomes of an implementation process in biomedical laboratories. Results emphasize the importance of end user perseverance, human-centric interoperability evaluation, and demonstration of return on investment of effort and time of laboratory members and industry personnel for success of implementation process. In addition, there is an intrinsic learning component associated with the implementation process of an information management system. Technology transfer experience in a complex environment such as the biomedical laboratory can be eased with use of information systems that support human and cognitive interoperability. Such informatics features can also contribute to successful collaboration and hopefully to scientific productivity. PMID:26652980

  15. FPG Child Development Institute

    MedlinePlus

    ... and 'alternative facts,' science can reliably inform policy. Child development research advises that a sense of security provided ... Development, Teaching, and Learning The Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute will partner with Zero to Three to ...

  16. National Cancer Institute News

    MedlinePlus

    ... events from NCI-funded research and programs News & Events Featured News Studies Identify Potential Treatments for DIPG ... the National Cancer Institute. Latest blog posts Subscribe Events Scientific Meetings and Lectures Conferences Social Media Events ...

  17. Minority Innovation Challenges Institute

    NASA Video Gallery

    Do you want to learn more about how to compete in NASA’s technical challenges for both prestige and significant cash prizes? NASA’s Minority Innovation Challenges Institute trains and mentors mino...

  18. Critical Materials Institute

    ScienceCinema

    Alex King

    2016-07-12

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King talks about the goals of the Critical Materials Institute in diversifying the supply of critical materials, developing substitute materials, developing tools and techniques for recycling critical materials, and forecasting materials needs to avoid future shortages.

  19. Critical Materials Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Alex King

    2013-01-09

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King talks about the goals of the Critical Materials Institute in diversifying the supply of critical materials, developing substitute materials, developing tools and techniques for recycling critical materials, and forecasting materials needs to avoid future shortages.

  20. National Cancer Institute Perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Rosemary S.L. . E-mail: rw26f@nih.gov; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2006-10-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Perspectives this year presented information on the systemic targeted radionuclide therapy (STaRT) research projects: (1) being investigated at the NCI's Intramural Center for Cancer Research; (2) funded by NCI's Radiation Research Program and other extramural programs; and (3) the appropriate National Institutes of Health/NCI funding mechanisms applicable to researchers for obtaining funds for STaRT projects.

  1. Institutional Transformation Model

    SciTech Connect

    2015-10-19

    Reducing the energy consumption of large institutions with dozens to hundreds of existing buildings while maintaining and improving existing infrastructure is a critical economic and environmental challenge. SNL's Institutional Transformation (IX) work integrates facilities and infrastructure sustainability technology capabilities and collaborative decision support modeling approaches to help facilities managers at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) simulate different future energy reduction strategies and meet long term energy conservation goals.

  2. Great Lakes Energy Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J. Iwan

    2012-11-18

    The vision of the Great Lakes Energy Institute is to enable the transition to advanced, sustainable energy generation, storage, distribution and utilization through coordinated research, development, and education. The Institute will place emphasis on translating leading edge research into next generation energy technology. The Institute’s research thrusts focus on coordinated research in decentralized power generation devices (e.g. fuel cells, wind turbines, solar photovoltaic devices), management of electrical power transmission and distribution, energy storage, and energy efficiency.

  3. The Workplace Environment for African-American Faculty Employed in Predominately White Institutions.

    PubMed

    Whitfield-Harris, Lisa; Lockhart, Joan Such

    2016-01-01

    Diversity in academia requires attention, especially with the expected increase in minority populations in the United States (American Association of Colleges of Nursing, (AACN) 2014). Despite theoretical papers that suggest that several challenges are encountered by minority faculty employed in predominately White institutions, a dearth of research on this topic has been published. The purpose of this literature review was to analyze the published research that addressed the workplace environment of African-American faculty employed in predominately White institutions. In utilizing the keywords in various combinations, 236 articles were retrieved through multiple databases. After applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, 15 studies were reviewed with only three related to nursing. Two themes were extracted from the review: 1) the cultural climate of the workplace environment and, 2) underrepresentation of African-American faculty. It is apparent from this review that additional research is needed to understand the experiences of this group of faculty to target effective recruitment and retention strategies.

  4. The effects of integrating service learning into computer science: an inter-institutional longitudinal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payton, Jamie; Barnes, Tiffany; Buch, Kim; Rorrer, Audrey; Zuo, Huifang

    2015-07-01

    This study is a follow-up to one published in computer science education in 2010 that reported preliminary results showing a positive impact of service learning on student attitudes associated with success and retention in computer science. That paper described how service learning was incorporated into a computer science course in the context of the Students & Technology in Academia, Research, and Service (STARS) Alliance, an NSF-supported broadening participation in computing initiative that aims to diversify the computer science pipeline through innovative pedagogy and inter-institutional partnerships. The current paper describes how the STARS Alliance has expanded to diverse institutions, all using service learning as a vehicle for broadening participation in computing and enhancing attitudes and behaviors associated with student success. Results supported the STARS model of service learning for enhancing computing efficacy and computing commitment and for providing diverse students with many personal and professional development benefits.

  5. The Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine: a collaborative approach to Department of Defense-relevant research.

    PubMed

    Dean, Wendy

    2011-11-01

    The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have resulted in the most severe survivable war injuries ever seen in prolonged conflict. The Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine (AFIRM) was conceived as a way to deliver solutions to the existing gaps in military trauma care. The AFIRM is a collaborative effort between the Department of Defense, academia and private industry to accelerate the development of critically needed technology for the treatment of severely wounded warriors, and to restore to meaningful form and function those who have followed orders into harm's way.

  6. Acta Aeronautica et Astronautica Sinica (Selected Articles),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-09

    N.oreover, according to K.C. Wang’s analogue senaration criter- ion , under certain conditions, the two-dimensional unsteady flow can -- 5-I be...that the seoaration line is a convergent asymp- tote of the limiting streamlines in the vicinity of the separation line. In this sen:se, therefore

  7. Acta Aeronautica et Astronautica Sinica (Selected Articles),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-27

    Coefficients-of the Stability Augmentation System in Order to Improve Riding Qualities, by Gao Han 13 The Compilation and Application of a State-Time...34~%*** ... . Selection of the Longitudinal Feedback Coefficients /18 of the Stability Augmentation System in Order to Improve Riding Qualities...Northwestern Polytechnical University Gao Hao ABSTRACT The longitudinal feedback coefficients of a stability augmentation system (SAS) for a sample

  8. Acta Aeronautica et Astronautica Sinica (Selected Articles),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    located at the wing tip and under the wing using flexible hangers. Different span and chord positions as well as hanger pitches , yawing and sway flexibility...causing the bending of the wing surface and pitching of the external store, and (3) flutter causing the swaying of the external store and yawing. 27...almost bent by the pitch frequency of the external store *when the pitch rigidity of the external store is low. In this * case, wing bending and twisting

  9. Acta Aeronautica et Astronautica Sinica (Selected Articles)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-18

    tables, equations, etc. merged into this tra!,slation were extracted from the best quality copy available. I I iii ti New Content of Tactical-Technical...and Astronautics SubnmitteJ December 16, 1986 Abstrac t "This paper demionstrates the importance of stealth pane- tration ability for future military...niques, etc. The emphasis of this paper is placed on the anal- ysis of the new content of tactical-technical requirements for military aircrafts in

  10. Institutional Policy and Its Abuses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogue, E. G.; Riggs, R. O.

    1974-01-01

    Reviews the role of institutional policy, cites frequent abuses of institutional policy, and delineates several principles of policy management (development, communication, execution and evaluation). (Author/PG)

  11. Hurdles in tissue engineering/regenerative medicine product commercialization: a survey of North American academia and industry.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Peter C; Bertram, Timothy A; Tawil, Bill; Hellman, Kiki B

    2011-01-01

    The Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine International Society-North America (TERMIS-NA) Industry Committee was formed in February 2009 to address the common roadblocks (i.e., hurdles) in the commercialization of tissue engineering/regenerative medicine products for its members. A semiquantitative online opinion survey instrument that delineated potentially sensitive hurdles to commercialization in each of the TERMIS constituency groups that generally participate in the stream of technology commercialization (academia, startup companies, development-stage companies, and established companies) was developed. The survey was opened to each of the 863 members of TERMIS-NA for a period of 5 weeks from October to November 2009. By its conclusion, 215 members (25%) had responded. Their proportionate numbers were closely representative of TERMIS-NA constituencies. The resulting data delineate what each group considers to be its most difficult and also its easiest hurdles in taking a technology to full product development. In addition, each group ranked its perception of the difficult and easy hurdles for all other groups, enabling an assessment of the degree of understanding between groups. The data depict not only critical hurdles in the path to commercialization at each stage in product development but also a variable understanding of perceptions of hurdles between groups. This assessment has provided the Industry Committee with activity foci needed to assist individual groups in the technology-commercialization stream. Moreover, the analysis suggests that enhanced communication between groups engaged in commercialization will be critical to the successful development of products in the tissue engineering/regenerative medicine sector.

  12. Plagiarism in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shahabuddin, Syed

    2009-01-01

    Plagiarism sometimes creates legal and ethical problems for students and faculty. It can have serious consequences. Fortunately, there are ways to stop plagiarism. There are many tools available to detect plagiarism, e.g. using software for detecting submitted articles. Also, there are many ways to punish a plagiarist, e.g. banning plagiarists…

  13. Industrial plasmas in academia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollenstein, Ch; Howling, AA; Guittienne, Ph; Furno, I.

    2015-01-01

    The present review, written at the occasion of the 2014 EPS Innovation award, will give a short overview of the research and development of industrial plasmas within the last 30 years and will also provide a first glimpse into future developments of this important topic of plasma physics and plasma chemistry. In the present contribution, some of the industrial plasmas studied at the CRPP/EPFL at Lausanne are highlighted and their influence on modern plasma physics and also discharge physics is discussed. One of the most important problems is the treatment of large surfaces, such as that used in solar cells, but also in more daily applications, such as the packaging industry. In this contribution, the advantages and disadvantages of some of the most prominent plasmas such as capacitively- and inductively-coupled plasmas are discussed. Electromagnetic problems due to the related radio frequency and its consequences on the plasma reactor performance, and also dust formation due to chemical reactions in plasma, are highlighted. Arcing and parasitic discharges occurring in plasma reactors can lead to plasma reactor damages. Some specific problems, such as the gas supply of a large area reactor, are discussed in more detail. Other topics of interest have been dc discharges such as those used in plasma spraying where thermal plasmas are applied for advanced material processing. Modern plasma diagnostics make it possible to investigate sparks in electrical discharge machining, which surprisingly show properties of weakly-coupled plasmas. Nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge plasmas have been applied to more speculative topics such as applications in aerodynamics and will surely be important in the future for ignition and combustion. Most of the commonly-used plasma sources have been shown to be limited in their performance. Therefore new, more effective plasma sources are urgently required. With the recent development of novel resonant network antennas for new advanced large area or large volume plasma sources, an important step towards high performance plasmas and new fast processes is made.

  14. Bashing Pseudoscience in Academia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hameed, S.; Robinson, G. M.; Moulton, J.

    2003-12-01

    Belief in paranormal, supernatural and other new-age claims is increasing according to surveys by the NSF and others. Astronomy-related pseudo-scientific beliefs are especially common. For example, more than thirty percent of Americans consider astrology to be scientific and more than one-third believe that extraterrestrial beings have visited earth at some time in the past. Not only do such beliefs ignore sound reasoning and information but they compete as alternative explanations for the world around us. While a general education might be expected to reduce acceptance of unsound beliefs, the level of such belief is surprisingly high among those with a higher education. An astronomer, a philosopher and a psychologist cooperated in developing a brief college course designed to challenge unsound reasoning and information, and to inoculate the participants with skepticism. Pre- and post-course opinion surveys show significant changes in belief.

  15. From Industry to Academia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheldon, Keith A.

    1989-01-01

    Offers a personal account of a loaned executive program, whereby a Southern California Edison corporate communications employee served as interim chair of Cerritos College's journalism department. Reviews benefits to the firm and the college, and lessons learned during the experience. (DMM)

  16. Social Software in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Todd

    2006-01-01

    Considerable buzz has appeared on the Internet over a group of new tools labeled social software. These tools can expand discussion beyond the classroom and provide new ways for students to collaborate and communicate within their class or around the world. Dickinson College has implemented two of the best-known tools, the wiki and the blog, in…

  17. Embodying Parenthood in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guyas, Anniina Souminen; Poling, Linda Hoeptner

    2011-01-01

    Intrigued by Pillay's (2009) call for writing motherhood into one's scholarship and creating "liberatory intellectualism," the authors write this commentary to encourage exploration of and inquiry into viable metaphors of hands in poo and goo; performing paranoia, suspicion, and constant worry into one's scholarship; and moments that embody…

  18. Hypermedia in Academia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, J. Robert; Spicer, Donald Z.

    1988-01-01

    Briefly reviews the origins of the hypermedia concept, comments on its use in higher education, and describes a project at Dartmouth College that developed a training process to introduce a hypermedia authoring environment to the academic community. (CLB)

  19. Sleepless in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acker, Sandra; Armenti, Carmen

    2004-01-01

    The conditions under which women academics work provide the impetus for this article. Current trends in feminist and other writing are moving us away from dwelling on the disadvantages women experience in the academy. Yet the findings from the two Canadian studies reported here suggest that issues around children and career, anxieties about…

  20. Summer Youth Forestry Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roesch, Gabrielle E.; Neuffer, Tamara; Zobrist, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The Summer Youth Forestry Institute (SYFI) was developed to inspire youth through experiential learning opportunities and early work experience in the field of natural resources. Declining enrollments in forestry and other natural resource careers has made it necessary to actively engage youth and provide them with exposure to careers in these…

  1. The Francis Crick Institute.

    PubMed

    Peters, Keith; Smith, Jim

    2017-04-01

    The Francis Crick Institute Laboratory, opened in 2016, is supported by the Medical Research Council, Cancer Research UK, the Wellcome Trust, and University College London, King's College London and Imperial College London. The emphasis on research training and early independence of gifted scientists in a multidisciplinary environment provides unique opportunities for UK medical science, including clinical and translational research.

  2. Personnel Management Institutes, 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinman, Stanley B., Jr., Comp.

    This publication is a compilation of five papers presented at the 1975 Personnel Management Institutes held by the New York State School Boards Association. Although the meeting was intended to provide useful information about personnel matters specifically for school board members and school administrators from New York, much of the content of…

  3. Institute Born of Gratitude.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLellan, Vin

    1980-01-01

    The Wang Institute of Graduate Studies plans to offer a master's degree in software engineering. The development of an academic program to produce superior, technically qualified managers for the computer industry's software production is discussed. (Journal availability: Datamation, 666 Fifth Ave., New York, NY 10103.) (MLW)

  4. The Gesell Institute Responds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young Children, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Responding to Dr. Meisels' article concerning the uses and abuses of the Gesell readiness tests, the Gesell Institute of Child development maintains that the Gesell series of assessments are used by schools to gain a fuller developmental understanding of the child and have been predictive of school success. (BB)

  5. Implementing Sustainable Institutional Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, Joseph; Johnson, Lewis

    2009-01-01

    Recent research has found that few institutions of higher education implemented the necessary strategies to make their campuses sustainable (Thompson and Green 2005). Ironically, universities are the segment of society with the most access to the intellectual capital needed to provide sound sustainable practices and measurements. Having top…

  6. Institution-Sponsored Internships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ard, Anne K.

    1994-01-01

    Colleges can use institutionally-sponsored internships, in-house opportunities to participate in the daily activities of leadership, to let employees learn the culture of leadership and interact with staff currently in such positions. Administrative internships at Pennsylvania State University, Eastern Illinois University, and Arizona State…

  7. Personnel Management Institutes 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinman, Stanley B., Jr.

    This report is a compilation of presentations made at the Personnel Management Institutes held by the New York State School Boards Association in the fall of 1974. Included are the following six presentations: "New Laws Affecting School Boards and School Administration," by Bernard T. McGivern; "How to Prepare for Tenure Hearings,…

  8. Managing Institutional Image.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melchiori, Gerlinda S.

    1990-01-01

    A managerial process for enhancing the image and public reputation of a higher education institution is outlined. It consists of five stages: market research; data analysis and market positioning; communication of results and recommendations to the administration; development of a global image program; and impact evaluation. (MSE)

  9. The Institutes of Nations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Franklyn M.

    1972-01-01

    During the past ten years, the Institutes have presented a series of living and learning summer sessions in an outdoor setting among the redwoods near San Francisco. Young people from 16 to 20 have participated in the cross cultural studies, some involving foreign scholars studying in the United States. (Author)

  10. Model Reading Institute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dworkin, Nancy; Dworkin, Yehoash

    The 1978 Summer Reading Institute, which served 58 Washington, D.C., elementary school children, is described in this paper. Major characteristics of the program model are first identified, along with elements that were added to the model in the preplanning stage. Numerous aspects of the program are then described, including the make-up of the…

  11. Defense Language Institute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    Discussed in this Defense Language Institute (DLI) brochure are its intensive language programs' history, and its four schools, which are located in Monterey, California, Washington, D.C., Lackland Air Force Base, and Fort Bliss, Texas. Proficiency levels determined by the DLI and utilization of the audiolingual method are also described.…

  12. Leadership in Educational Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunko, Esmeralda

    2012-01-01

    Many questions concerning quality of functioning and effectiveness are connected with the management of education as a professional field in educational organizations. The role of educational leadership in an educational organization raises many questions related to legislative regulations of activities, issues of institutional placement,…

  13. A Contested Institutional Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morin, Stephanie A.

    2010-01-01

    The College of William and Mary (Williamsburg, Virginia) found itself at a crossroads in 2005. Their long-popular president Timothy J. Sullivan was retiring after 13 years at the helm of the world's second oldest institution of higher education (Petkofsky, 2004). Long known as a bastion of conservatism, William and Mary could now change their…

  14. Instituting the Greater Good

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Teachers, higher education administrators and financial planners are well acquainted with the work of TIAA-CREF. The insurance and investment company has been a central player in teacher retirement and financial planning for nearly a century. Twelve years ago, the organization spawned the TIAA-CREF Institute, a research-focused arm that brings…

  15. National Space Biomedical Research Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This report outlines the National Space Biomedical Research Institute's (NSBRI) activities during FY 2004, the Institute's seventh year. It is prepared in accordance with Cooperative Agreement NCC 9-58 between NASA's Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) and the Institute's lead institution, Baylor College of Medicine.

  16. Assessment and 2-Year Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Jama L.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes a national study of the current availability and use of commercially and institutionally developed educational assessment instruments. Indicates that two-year institutions reported less activity than four-year institutions in assessing the major fields of study but that 77% of all two-year institutions assessed basic skills. (MAB)

  17. Iowa State Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    This final report describes the activities of the Iowa State Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute (ISMMRRI) at Iowa State University for the period July 1, 1989, to June 30, 1990. Activities include research in mining- and mineral-related areas, education and training of scientists and engineers in these fields, administration of the Institute, and cooperative interactions with industry, government agencies, and other research centers. During this period, ISMMRRI has supported research efforts to: (1) Investigate methods of leaching zinc from sphalerite-containing ores. (2) Study the geochemistry and geology of an Archean gold deposit and of a gold-telluride deposit. (3) Enchance how-quality aggregates for use in construction. (4) Pre-clean coal by triboelectric charging in a fluidized-bed. (5) Characterize the crystal/grain alignment during processing of yttrium-barium-copper-perovskite (1-2-3) superconductors. (5) Study the fluid inclusion properties of a fluorite district. (6) Study the impacts of surface mining on community planning. (7) Assess the hydrophobicity of coal and pyrite for beneficiation. (8) Investigate the use of photoacoustic absorption spectroscopy for monitoring unburnt carbon in the exhaust gas from coal-fired boilers. The education and training program continued within the interdepartmental graduate minor in mineral resources includes courses in such areas as mining methods, mineral processing, industrial minerals, extractive metallurgy, coal science and technology, and reclamation of mined land. In addition, ISMMRRI hosted the 3rd International Conference on Processing and Utilization of High-Sulfur Coals in Ames, Iowa. The Institute continues to interact with industry in order to foster increased cooperation between academia and the mining and mineral community.

  18. Multitasking in academia: Effective combinations of research, education and public outreach illustrated by a volcanic ash warning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bye, B. L.; Plag, H.

    2011-12-01

    Science permeates our society. Its role and its perceived importance evolves with time. Scientists today are highly specialized, yet society demands they master a variety of skills requiring not only a number of different competencies but also a broad mindset. Scientists are subjected to a meritocracy in terms of having to produce scientific papers. Peer-reviewed scientific publications used to be sufficient to meet the various laws and regulations with respect to dissemination of scientific results. This has dramatically changed; both expressed directly through public voices (such as in the climate change discourses), but also by politicians and policy makers. In some countries research funding now comes with specific requirements concerning public outreach that go way beyond peer-reviewed publications and presentation at scientific conferences. Science policies encourage multidisciplinary cooperation and scientific questions themselves often cannot be answered without knowledge and information from several scientific areas. Scientists increasingly need to communicate knowledge and results in more general terms as well as educating future generations. A huge challenge lies in developing the knowledge, human capacity and mindset that will allow an individual academician to contribute to education, communicate across scientific fields and sectors in multidisciplinary cross sectoral cooperations and also reach out to the general public while succeeding within the scientific meritocracy. We demonstrate how research, education and communication within and outside academia can effectively be combined through a presentation of the International Airways Volcano Watch that encompasses an operational volcanic ash warning system for the aviation industry. This presentation will show the role of science throughout the information flow, from basic science to the pilots' decision-making. Furthermore, it will illustrate how one can connect specific scientific topics to societal

  19. Institute for Mechanical Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Institute of Mechanical Engineering has the objectives of supporting in Canada the following activities: improvement of vehicles, propulsion systems, and transportation-related facilities and services; improvements in the design and operation of maritime engineering works; protection of the environment; enhancement of energy flexibility; advancement of firms engaged in manufacturing and resource extraction; and related programs of other government departments and agencies. In 1990-91 the Institute, which had changed its name that year from the Division of Mechanical Engineering, consolidated its research activities from nine laboratories to six programs. Activities in these six programs are described: Advanced Manufacturing Technology, Coastal Zone Engineering, Cold Regions Engineering, Combustion and Fluids Engineering, Ground Transportation Technology, and Machinery and Engine Technology.

  20. Institutions and poverty.

    PubMed

    Tebaldi, Edinaldo; Mohan, Ramesh

    2010-01-01

    This study utilises eight alternative measures of institutions and the instrumental variable method to examine the impacts of institutions on poverty. The estimates show that an economy with a robust system to control corruption, an effective government, and a stable political system will create the conditions to promote economic growth, minimise income distribution conflicts, and reduce poverty. Corruption, ineffective governments, and political instability will not only hurt income levels through market inefficiencies, but also escalate poverty incidence via increased income inequality. The results also imply that the quality of the regulatory system, rule of law, voice and accountability, and expropriation risk are inversely related to poverty but their effect on poverty is via average income rather than income distribution.

  1. Transportation Institutional Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-08-01

    This Institutional Plan is divided into three chapters. Chapter 1 provides background information, discusses the purposes of the Plan and the policy guidance for establishing the transportation system, and describes the projected system and the plans for its integrated development. Chapter 2 discusses the major participants who must interact to build the system. Chapter 3 suggests mechanisms for interaction that will foster wide participation in program planning and implementation and provides a framework for managing and resolving the issues related to development and operation of the transportation system. A list of acronyms and a glossary are included for the reader's convenience. Also included in this Plan are four appendices. Of particular importance is Appendix A, which includes detailed discussion of specific transportation issues. Appendices B, C, and D provide supporting material to assist the reader in understanding the roles of the involved institutions.

  2. The Townes Laser Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Martin

    2009-06-01

    The State of Florida has recently established a new center of excellence in advanced core laser technologies, associated with the College of Optics & Photonics. This center, dedicated in 2007 in tribute to the pioneering work of Charles Townes, whose insight lead to the development of the maser and the laser, will invest in next generation laser technologies for applications to medicine, advanced manufacturing and defense. It joins the cluster of photonics-related centers at UCF, adding a focused national center for the education and training of scientists and engineers in laser technology. This paper describes the mission and objectives of the Townes Institute, the educational and training programs it is creating, its current investments and opportunities, and the future institutional and industrial partnerships and global reach it hopes to create.

  3. Ideology, "Truth" and Spin: Dialectic Relations between the Neoliberal Think-Tank Movement and Academia in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Lester; Wadley, David

    2017-01-01

    The context of contemporary universities restrains their ability to drive public policy. Yet, currently, they confront the relative success of a global network of neoliberal institutes, referred to as think-tanks, promoting freedoms derived from particular ideologies. Neoliberal reasoning has so moulded classical ideas of individual freedom into a…

  4. Globalisation of Researcher Mobility within the UK Higher Education: Explaining the Presence of Overseas Academics in the UK Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khattab, Nabil; Fenton, Steve

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we argue that the power structure that lies within the UK elite universities dictates a division of labour through which the inflows of overseas academics into the UK academic labour markets are skewed towards these elite academic institutions where they are employed primarily in research-only posts. These posts, are less valued and…

  5. Reconciling the Tension between the Tenure and Biological Clocks to Increase the Recruitment and Retention of Women in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Catherine D.; Hill, Janeen M.

    2010-01-01

    Most women entering tenure-track positions in the sciences do so in their late twenties or early thirties after completing a graduate degree and post-doctoral training. Tenure-track positions usually span a six or seven year probationary period during which time institutions expect unlimited commitment from the tenure-track candidates to their…

  6. Institutional Repositories in Indian Universities and Research Institutes: A Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krishnamurthy, M.; Kemparaju, T. D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on a study of the institutional repositories (IRs) in use in Indian universities and research institutes. Design/methodology/approach: Repositories in various institutions in India were accessed and described in a standardised way. Findings: The 20 repositories studied covered collections of diverse…

  7. International Security Institutions, Domestic Politics, and Institutional Legitimacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Terrence L.

    2007-01-01

    Scholars have devoted considerable attention to the informational role of international institutions. However, several questions about the informational aspects of institutional behavior remain underexplored: What determines how audiences respond to institutional decisions? Through what channels does information provision affect foreign policy? To…

  8. Institutional Repositories at Small Institutions in America: Some Current Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nykanen, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    The research reported in this article was undertaken to determine the level of implementation of institutional repositories (IRs) at small institutions enrolling fewer than 10,000 students. The study analyzed quantitative and qualitative data from IRs at a number of small institutions with the aim of observing relevant patterns and trends that may…

  9. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the translation of cardiovascular discoveries into therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Galis, Zorina S; Black, Jodi B; Skarlatos, Sonia I

    2013-04-26

    The molecular causes of ≈4000 medical conditions have been described, yet only 5% have associated therapies. For decades, the average time for drug development through approval has taken 10 to 20 years. In recent years, the serious challenges that confront the private sector have made it difficult to capitalize on new opportunities presented by advances in genomics and cellular therapies. Current trends are disturbing. Pharmaceutical companies are reducing their investments in research, and biotechnology companies are struggling to obtain venture funds. To support early-stage translation of the discoveries in basic science, the National Institutes of Health and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute have developed new approaches to facilitating the translation of basic discoveries into clinical applications and will continue to develop a variety of programs that create teams of academic investigators and industry partners. The goal of these programs is to maximize the public benefit of investment of taxpayer dollars in biomedical research and to lessen the risk required for industry partners to make substantial investments. This article highlights several examples of National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-initiated translational programs and National Institutes of Health translational resources designed to catalyze and enable the earliest stages of the biomedical product development process. The translation of latest discoveries into therapeutic approaches depends on continued federal funding to enhance the early stages of the product development process and to stimulate and catalyze partnerships between academia, industry, and other sources of capital.

  10. The International Environmental Institute: Leveraging the investment in Hanford for economic growth

    SciTech Connect

    Atkin, S.D.; Schwenk, R.M.

    1994-02-01

    Billions of dollars are being invested to achieve environmental compliance at the Hanford Site. The 30-yr-plan for the Site calls for remediation and restoration followed by rampdown and closure of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) mission at the Site. The investment of the Federal government during this restoration period provides a real opportunity to go beyond the cleanup mission and convert the Site`s assets to other uses that benefit the region, nation, and world. The International Environmental Institute (Institute) was created to help realize this opportunity. This is accomplished by utilizing the assets of the Site -- it`s land, equipment, facilities, technologies, and people -- to achieve economic growth and worldwide spinoff benefits from the Hanford investment. The Institute is developing new ways of getting the private sector involved with the Hanford Site. We are working with local and state governments, academia, and the private sector, to jointly develop and commercialize environmental technologies and to redeploy, loan, or lease those assets that are no longer needed by the DOE. The Institute is also interacting with other communities around the world to assess models, issues, and performance measures for successful defense conversion. Through these various worldwide partnerships, the investment in Hanford can be successfully leveraged to help create the desired economic future for the Northwest and environmental industry for the world.

  11. Spaceborne Photonics Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venable, D. D.; Farrukh, U. O.; Han, K. S.; Hwang, I. H.; Jalufka, N. W.; Lowe, C. W.; Tabibi, B. M.; Lee, C. J.; Lyons, D.; Maclin, A.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes in chronological detail the development of the Spaceborne Photonics Institute as a sustained research effort at Hampton University in the area of optical physics. This provided the research expertise to initiate a PhD program in Physics. Research was carried out in the areas of: (1) modelling of spaceborne solid state laser systems; (2) amplified spontaneous emission in solar pumped iodine lasers; (3) closely simulated AM0 CW solar pumped iodine laser and repeatedly short pulsed iodine laser oscillator; (4) a materials spectroscopy and growth program; and (5) laser induced fluorescence and atomic and molecular spectroscopy.

  12. Institute for Sustainable Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Ajay

    2016-03-28

    Alternate fuels offer unique challenges and opportunities as energy source for power generation, vehicular transportation, and industrial applications. Institute for Sustainable Energy (ISE) at UA conducts innovative research to utilize the complex mix of domestically-produced alternate fuels to achieve low-emissions, high energy-efficiency, and fuel-flexibility. ISE also provides educational and advancement opportunities to students and researchers in the energy field. Basic research probing the physics and chemistry of alternative fuels has generated practical concepts investigated in a burner and engine test platforms.

  13. Career Development in Institutional Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mark D.

    1982-01-01

    The background, skills, and views of 20 distinguished professionals were surveyed to provide information about career development in institutional research and to provide ideas about program development. The respondents were members of the Association for Institutional Research and they included seven institutional researchers and planners, three…

  14. A Profile of TAFE Institutes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2006

    2006-01-01

    This report presents a profile of Australian technical and further education (TAFE) institutes for the 2003 calendar year. The project was undertaken to illustrate the extent of variation in the sector. The report also provides data on TAFE institutes that can be used by the institutes for planning, performance monitoring and marketing purposes.…

  15. Institutional Effectiveness and Student Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreider, Paul E.; And Others

    Since the early 1980's, the primary institutional mission of Mount Hood Community College (MHCC) in Gresham, Oregon, has been identified as student success. Toward that end, the college has instituted an ongoing systematic review of instructional program improvement and implemented institutional strategic planning directly linked to budget…

  16. National Space Biomedical Research Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This report outlines the activities of the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) during FY 2003, the sixth year of the NSBRI's programs. It is prepared in accordance with Cooperative Agreement NCC 9-58 between NASA's Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) and the Institute's lead institution, Baylor College of Medicine.

  17. Improving Institutional Report Card Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGowan, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Institutional report cards are increasingly being used by higher educational institutions to present academic outcomes to external audiences of prospective students and parents, as well as program and institutional evaluators. While some prospective students are served by national transparency measures most users mine information from the…

  18. The SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics’ resources: focus on curated databases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (www.isb-sib.ch) provides world-class bioinformatics databases, software tools, services and training to the international life science community in academia and industry. These solutions allow life scientists to turn the exponentially growing amount of data into knowledge. Here, we provide an overview of SIB's resources and competence areas, with a strong focus on curated databases and SIB's most popular and widely used resources. In particular, SIB's Bioinformatics resource portal ExPASy features over 150 resources, including UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot, ENZYME, PROSITE, neXtProt, STRING, UniCarbKB, SugarBindDB, SwissRegulon, EPD, arrayMap, Bgee, SWISS-MODEL Repository, OMA, OrthoDB and other databases, which are briefly described in this article. PMID:26615188

  19. The SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics' resources: focus on curated databases.

    PubMed

    2016-01-04

    The SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (www.isb-sib.ch) provides world-class bioinformatics databases, software tools, services and training to the international life science community in academia and industry. These solutions allow life scientists to turn the exponentially growing amount of data into knowledge. Here, we provide an overview of SIB's resources and competence areas, with a strong focus on curated databases and SIB's most popular and widely used resources. In particular, SIB's Bioinformatics resource portal ExPASy features over 150 resources, including UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot, ENZYME, PROSITE, neXtProt, STRING, UniCarbKB, SugarBindDB, SwissRegulon, EPD, arrayMap, Bgee, SWISS-MODEL Repository, OMA, OrthoDB and other databases, which are briefly described in this article.

  20. Draft Transportation Institutional Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-09-01

    The Department of Energy recognizes that the success of its program to develop and implement a national system for nuclear waste management and disposal depends on broad-based public understanding and acceptance. While each program element has its particular sensitivity, the transportation of the waste may potentially affect the greatest number of people, and accordingly is highly visible and potentially issue-laden. Therefore, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management has developed this Transportation Institutional Plan to lay the foundation for interaction among all interested parties for the purpose of identifying and resolving issues of concern. The Plan is divided into four chapters. Chapter 1 provides bachground information and discusses the purpose of the Plan and the policy guidance for establishing the transportation system. Chapter 2 introduces the major participants who must interact to build both the system itself and the consensus philosophy that is essential for effective operations. Chapter 3 suggests mechanisms for interaction that will ensure wide participation in program planning and implementation. And, finally, Chapter 4 suggests a framework for managing and resolving the issues related to development and operation of the transportation system. A list of acronyms and a glossary are included for the reader's convenience. The Plan's appendices provide supporting material to assist the reader in understanding the roles of the involved institutions. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. The National Cancer Institute's PREVENT Cancer Preclinical Drug Development Program: overview, current projects, animal models, agent development strategies, and molecular targets.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, Robert H; Suen, Chen S; Holmes, Cathy A; Fay, Judith R; Steele, Vernon E

    2016-02-01

    The PREVENT Cancer Preclinical Drug Development Program (PREVENT) is a National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Prevention (NCI, DCP)-supported program whose primary goal is to bring new cancer preventive interventions (small molecules and vaccines) and biomarkers through preclinical development towards clinical trials by creating partnerships between the public sector (eg, academia, industry) and DCP. PREVENT has a formalized structure for moving interventions forward in the prevention pipeline using a stage-gate process with go/no go decision points along the critical path for development. This review describes the structure of the program, its focus areas, and provides examples of projects currently in the pipeline.

  2. Institutional analysis for energy policy

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, F.A.; Cole, R.J.

    1980-07-01

    This report summarizes principles, techniques, and other information for doing institutional analyses in the area of energy policy. The report was prepared to support DOE's Regional Issues Identification and Assessment (RIIA) program. RIIA identifies environmental, health, safety, socioeconomic, and institutional issues that could accompany hypothetical future scenarios for energy consumption and production on a regional basis. Chapter 1 provides some theoretical grounding in institutional analysis. Chapter 2 provides information on constructing institutional maps of the processes for bringing on line energy technologies and facilities contemplated in RIIA scenarios. Chapter 3 assesses the institutional constraints, opportunities, and impacts that affect whether these technologies and facilities would in fact be developed. Chapters 4 and 5 show how institutional analysis can support use of exercises such as RIIA in planning institutional change and making energy policy choices.

  3. "It's like Tuskegee in reverse": a case study of ethical tensions in institutional review board review of community-based participatory research.

    PubMed

    Malone, Ruth E; Yerger, Valerie B; McGruder, Carol; Froelicher, Erika

    2006-11-01

    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) addresses the social justice dimensions of health disparities by engaging marginalized communities, building capacity for action, and encouraging more egalitarian relationships between researchers and communities. CBPR may challenge institutionalized academic practices and the understandings that inform institutional review board deliberations and, indirectly, prioritize particular kinds of research. We present our attempt to study, as part of a CBPR partnership, cigarette sales practices in an inner-city community. We use critical and communitarian perspectives to examine the implications of the refusal of the university institutional review board (in this case, the University of California, San Francisco) to approve the study. CBPR requires expanding ethical discourse beyond the procedural, principle-based approaches common in biomedical research settings. The current ethics culture of academia may sometimes serve to protect institutional power at the expense of community empowerment.

  4. Cyclotron Institute Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Henry; Yennello, Sherry; Tribble, Robert

    2014-08-26

    The Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University has upgraded its accelerator facilities to extend research capabilities with both stable and radioactive beams. The upgrade is divided into three major tasks: (1) re-commission the K-150 (88”) cyclotron, couple it to existing beam lines to provide intense stable beams into the K-500 experimental areas and use it as a driver to produce radioactive beams; (2) develop light ion and heavy ion guides for stopping radioactive ions created with the K-150 beams; and (3) transport 1+ ions from the ion guides into a charge-breeding electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source (CB-ECR) to produce highly-charged radioactive ions for acceleration in the K-500 cyclotron. When completed, the upgraded facility will provide high-quality re-accelerated secondary beams in a unique energy range in the world.

  5. The Karst Waters Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Karst Waters Institute (KWI) is a U.S. research organization that was formed to combine the skills of academic, governmental, and private sector specialists to solve existing karst water problems and anticipate future problems. KWI has been incorporated as a not-for-profit corporation in West Virginia to provide the human expertise and database needed to assist the nation in the preservation and utilization of its water resources. KWI plans to develop a core of resident and visiting scientists from across the nation and overseas, technicians, support staff, and graduate students. Its mission is to conduct research to improve our understanding of karst phenomena, to develop techniques to prevent environmental problems from occurring in karst areas, to assist in rectifying existing environmental problems, and to provide education and training for professionals and the general public on the risks and benefits of karst areas.

  6. Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute. Annual report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Bice, D.E.; Hahn, F.F.; Henderson, R.F.

    1996-12-01

    The Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI) is a Government-owned facility leased and operated by the Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Institute (LBERI) as a private, nonprofit research and testing laboratory. LBERI is an operating subsidiary of the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute. Through September 30, 1996, ITRI was a Federally Funded Research and Development Center operated by Lovelace for the US Department of Energy (DOE) as a {open_quotes}Single Program Laboratory{close_quotes} within the DOE Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research. Work for DOE continues in the privatized ITRI facility under a Cooperative Agreement. At the time of publication, approximately 70% of the Institute`s research is funded by DOE, and the remainder is funded by a variety of Federal agency, trade association, individual industry, and university customers. The principal mission of ITRI is to conduct basic and applied research to improve our understanding of the nature and magnitude of the human health impacts of inhaling airborne materials in the home, workplace, and general environment. Institute research programs have a strong basic science orientation with emphasis on the nature and behavior of airborne materials, the fundamental biology of the respiratory tract, the fate of inhaled materials and the mechanisms by which they cause disease, and the means by which data produced in the laboratory can be used to estimate risks to human health. Disorders of the respiratory tract continue to be a major health concern, and inhaled toxicants are thought to contribute substantially to respiratory morbidity. As the country`s largest facility dedicated to the study of basic inhalation toxicology, ITRI provides a national resource of specialized facilities, personnel, and educational activities serving the needs of government, academia, and industry.

  7. Teacher Enhancement Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall-Bradley, Tina

    1994-01-01

    During the 1980's, a period of intense concern over educational quality in the United States, few indicators of U.S. student achievement garnered the interest of policy makers and pundits as successfully as the results of international testing in mathematics and science. This concern was so great that as a part of the Goals 2000 initiative, President George Bush indicated that 'By the year 2000, U.S. students should be first in the world in mathematics and science.' The Clinton Administration is placing a major emphasis, not only on rigorous academic standards and creating a new system for assessing students' progress, but also including professional development as a major focus. The argument being that teachers need more sustained, intensive training to prepare them to teach to higher standards. Executive order 12821 mandates that national laboratories 'assist in the mathematics and science education of our Nation's students, teachers, parents and the public by establishing programs at their agency to provide for training elementary and secondary school teachers to improve their knowledge of mathematics and science'. These and other issues led to the development of ideas for a project that addresses the need for excellence in mathematics, science and technology instruction. In response to these initiatives the NASA/LaRC Teacher Enhancement Institute was proposed. The TEI incorporated systemic reform perspectives, enhanced content knowledge for teachers, and teacher preparation. Emphasis was also placed on recruiting those educators who teach in impoverished urban school districts with at-risk student populations who have been traditionally under represented in science, mathematics, technology and engineering. Participants in the Teacher Enhancement Institute were 37 teachers from grades K-8, teaching in Region 2 in the state of Virginia, as well as 2 preservice teachers from Norfolk State University and one teacher from Dublin, Virginia, where a Science

  8. NEWS: Institute news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-03-01

    Recognition for teachers The Institute of Physics has continued its programme of recognition for inspiring teachers with nine Teachers Awards in 2000, one at primary level and eight at secondary. The quality and quantity of nominations for secondary awards was very encouraging, especially those nominations made by students, but the number of nominations for teachers in the primary sector was disappointing. The award winners are: Teacher of Primary Science Graham Tomlinson, Cockermouth School, Cumbria Gill Stafford, Greens Norton Church of England Primary School, Towcester, Northants Teachers of Physics (Secondary) John Allen, All Hallows High School, Penwortham, Preston Tim Gamble, Lings Upper School, Northampton Denise Gault, Dalriada School, Ballymoney, Co Antrim Ian Lovat, Ampleforth College, North Yorkshire David Smith, Highgate School, North London Clive Thomas, Newcastle Emlyn Comprehensive School Graham Tomlinson, Cockermouth School, Cumbria Mark Travis, Cape Cornwall School, St Just, Cornwall If you know a teacher in a local primary school who is doing an exceptional job in motivating youngsters and colleagues in the teaching and learning of science, why not consider nominating them for an award? Further details can be obtained from the Institute's Education Department (Steven Chapman) by post or e-mail (schools.education@iop.org .) Annual Congress More details are now available on the various activities at this event taking place on 27 - 30 March 2000 at the Brighton Conference Centre. Among those organized by the Education Department are general science and technology hands-on activities for pupils aged 10 to 12 and more specific physics activities on Static Electricity for older students: * A series of short talks with hands-on demonstrations of music and musical instruments given by musicians, manufacturers and physicists. * A chance for students in years 9 to 13 to experience music making from the professionals' perspective. Mornings, 28 to 30 March

  9. The California Hazards Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundle, J. B.; Kellogg, L. H.; Turcotte, D. L.

    2006-12-01

    California's abundant resources are linked with its natural hazards. Earthquakes, landslides, wildfires, floods, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, severe storms, fires, and droughts afflict the state regularly. These events have the potential to become great disasters, like the San Francisco earthquake and fire of 1906, that overwhelm the capacity of society to respond. At such times, the fabric of civic life is frayed, political leadership is tested, economic losses can dwarf available resources, and full recovery can take decades. A patchwork of Federal, state and local programs are in place to address individual hazards, but California lacks effective coordination to forecast, prevent, prepare for, mitigate, respond to, and recover from, the harmful effects of natural disasters. Moreover, we do not know enough about the frequency, size, time, or locations where they may strike, nor about how the natural environment and man-made structures would respond. As California's population grows and becomes more interdependent, even moderate events have the potential to trigger catastrophes. Natural hazards need not become natural disasters if they are addressed proactively and effectively, rather than reactively. The University of California, with 10 campuses distributed across the state, has world-class faculty and students engaged in research and education in all fields of direct relevance to hazards. For that reason, the UC can become a world leader in anticipating and managing natural hazards in order to prevent loss of life and property and degradation of environmental quality. The University of California, Office of the President, has therefore established a new system-wide Multicampus Research Project, the California Hazards Institute (CHI), as a mechanism to research innovative, effective solutions for California. The CHI will build on the rich intellectual capital and expertise of the Golden State to provide the best available science, knowledge and tools for

  10. Project STONE: A Partnership Between Academia, Business and Government to Build a Pathway to STEM Careers for K-12 Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slattery, W.; Jacomet, P.; Lunsford, S.; Suttle, C.; Grove, R. L.; Teed, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    In the US, more than 1,500 informal science venues (science centers, museums, aquariums, zoos, nature centers, national parks) are visited annually by 61% of the population. Research shows that these visitors are receptive to learning about climate change, and expect these institutions to provide reliable information about environmental issues and solutions. Given that we spend less than 5% of our lifetime in a classroom, informal science venues play a critical role in shaping public understanding. Since 2007, the New England Aquarium (NEAq) has led a national effort to increase the capacity of informal science education institutions (ISEIs) to effectively communicate about the impacts of climate change on the oceans. NEAq is now leading the NSF-funded National Network for Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation (NNOCCI), partnering with the Association of Zoos and Aquariums, FrameWorks Institute, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Monterey Bay Aquarium, and National Aquarium, with evaluation conducted by the New Knowledge Organization, Pennsylvania State University, and Ohio State University. NNOCCI's design is based on best practices in informal science learning, cognitive/social psychology, community and network building: Interpreters as Communication Strategists - Interpreters can serve not merely as educators disseminating information, but can also be leaders in influencing public perceptions, given their high level of commitment, knowledge, public trust, social networks, and visitor contact. Communities of Practice - Learning is a social activity that is created through engagement in a supportive community context. Social support is particularly important in addressing a complex, contentious and distressing subject. Diffusion of Innovation - Peer networks are of primary importance in spreading innovations. Leaders serve as 'early adopters' and influence others to achieve a critical mass of implementation. Over the next five years, NNOCCI will achieve a

  11. Integrative Bioengineering Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Eddington, David; Magin,L,Richard; Hetling, John; Cho, Michael

    2009-01-09

    Microfabrication enables many exciting experimental possibilities for medicine and biology that are not attainable through traditional methods. However, in order for microfabricated devices to have an impact they must not only provide a robust solution to a current unmet need, but also be simple enough to seamlessly integrate into standard protocols. Broad dissemination of bioMEMS has been stymied by the common aim of replacing established and well accepted protocols with equally or more complex devices, methods, or materials. The marriage of a complex, difficult to fabricate bioMEMS device with a highly variable biological system is rarely successful. Instead, the design philosophy of my lab aims to leverage a beneficial microscale phenomena (e.g. fast diffusion at the microscale) within a bioMEMS device and adapt to established methods (e.g. multiwell plate cell culture) and demonstrate a new paradigm for the field (adapt instead of replace). In order for the field of bioMEMS to mature beyond novel proof-of-concept demonstrations, researchers must focus on developing systems leveraging these phenomena and integrating into standard labs, which have largely been ignored. Towards this aim, the Integrative Bioengineering Institute has been established.

  12. Institutional Review Boards

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Institutional review boards (IRBs) or research ethics committees provide a core protection for human research participants through advance and periodic independent review of the ethical acceptability of proposals for human research. IRBs were codified in US regulation just over three decades ago and are widely required by law or regulation in jurisdictions globally. Since the inception of IRBs, the research landscape has grown and evolved, as has the system of IRB review and oversight. Evidence of inconsistencies in IRB review and in application of federal regulations has fueled dissatisfaction with the IRB system. Some complain that IRB review is time-consuming and burdensome without clear evidence of effectiveness at protecting human subjects. Multiple proposals have been offered to reform or update the current IRB system, and many alternative models are currently being tried. Current focus on centralizing and sharing reviews requires more attention and evidence. Proposed changes to the US federal regulations may bring more changes. Data and resourcefulness are needed to further develop and test review and oversight models that provide adequate and respectful protections of participant rights and welfare and that are appropriate, efficient, and adaptable for current and future research. PMID:26042632

  13. Coburning in institutional incinerators

    SciTech Connect

    Green, A.; Prine, G.; Yost, R.; Green, B.; Williams, D.; Schwartz, J.; Wagner, J.; Clauson, D.; Proctor, B.; Feinberg, A.

    1987-01-01

    Our program, initiated in 1980, originally sought to replace imported oil by coburning coal and natural gas in oil designed boilers. Success came in 1986 with the co-combustion of coal water slurries (CWS) and natural gas (G) in a 20 MMBtu/hr watertube oil designed boiler. We achieved stable flames over broad load levels, good boiler efficiencies, low emissions, benign ash and--by increasing the G/CWS ratio--full power rating. Our biomass-waste co-combustion experiments will utilize a two chamber ram fed incinerator. Advanced analytical techniques will be used to measure available energy and stack emissions from various waste-biomass-fossil fuel combinations. Heating values, H/C ratios, percent moisture, emissions, prices and tipping fees are discussed. Locally grown annual dry biomass yields of napiergrass and leucaena, energetically equivalent to 30-50 barrels of oil per acre, are reported. Abundant local sources of waste biomass are identified. Together community waste and cultivated and waste biomass constitute a substantial source of renewable energy of use in forested and agricultural regions. Modular waste to energy systems are available in the 10-100 ton per day range. With aggressive recycling and hazardous waste reduction measures and good combustion management and emission controls, emissions should be maintained at low levels. The results from our system, a small modular waste-biomass to energy system, should be applicable to many institutions and small communities. 41 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Psychology's dilemma: an institutional neurosis?

    PubMed

    Katzko, Michael W

    2004-12-01

    The term psychology refers both to an institutional discipline and to a subject matter. Henriques, in his article "Psychology Defined" (this issue) , emphasizes the second reference, and its focus can be sharpened by taking into account the first reference. On the one hand, epistemic progress in science is a dynamic process, which, as often as not, cuts across institutional divisions. However, on the other hand there are some problems of disunity that solely concern the institution. That the latter falls within the scope of the Tree of Knowledge is illustrated in how Henriques' "Justification Hypothesis" sheds light on the nature of institutional disunity.

  15. Education in Young Offender Institutions and Secure Youth Care Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smeets, Ed

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to gain a better insight into efforts made to provide optimum education to juveniles in young offender institutions and in secure youth care institutions, and into barriers with which educators are confronted in this process. Results show that for a substantial number of juveniles insufficient information is…

  16. Accredited Postsecondary Institutions and Programs. Including Institutions Holding Preaccredited Status.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Leslie, W.; Green, Yvonne W.

    This is the fifth edition of a list of postsecondary educational institutions and programs that are accredited by, or that have preaccredited status awarded by, the regional and national accrediting agencies formally recognized by the Secretary of Education. In addition to the lists of postsecondary specialized and vocational institutions and…

  17. NEWS: Institute news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-07-01

    When Mary took up her appointment in the Institute's Education Department in June 1997, she indicated that she wished to return to teaching in two or three years. We have just heard that in September she will be joining the staff of the Science Department at Camden Girls' School, London. Mary's departure from the Institute is a great loss to the Department, where she has worked tirelessly, and with great imagination, to support those who teach physics at all secondary levels - and at primary level too when the opportunity presented itself. She has made tremendous contributions to the careers side of the Department's work, supporting careers events, providing informal training for others willing to do the same, helping to develop new careers materials and identifying people whom the Institute could use as role models or as the subject of case studies in print or electronic publications. Mary has been equally happy and willing to support pupils, students and teachers, and has been a wonderful role model herself, coming from an industrial research background, training for teaching after a career break and willing and able to teach biology, chemistry and design technology as well as physics. Mary has also written and edited Phases virtually single-handed. We are delighted to hear that Mary will continue to support the department's work as one of its teacher `volunteers'. Ilya Eigenbrot We are pleased to report that Ilya Eigenbrot, who will be known to some through his work at the Royal Institution and his appearances at the Christmas Lectures in a technical support role, has agreed to give the IOP Schools (touring) Lecture next year. The subject will be Lasers and this will follow nicely on to Zbig's lecture this year. Resources (print) Physics on Course The tenth issue of the Institute's popular guide to higher education, Physics on Course 2001, will be published early in July and distributed to all schools and colleges in the United Kingdom and the Republic of

  18. GPCR structure, function, drug discovery and crystallography: report from Academia-Industry International Conference (UK Royal Society) Chicheley Hall, 1-2 September 2014.

    PubMed

    Heifetz, Alexander; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Seifert, Roland; Tate, Christopher G; Sexton, Patrick M; Gurevich, Vsevolod V; Fourmy, Daniel; Cherezov, Vadim; Marshall, Fiona H; Storer, R Ian; Moraes, Isabel; Tikhonova, Irina G; Tautermann, Christofer S; Hunt, Peter; Ceska, Tom; Hodgson, Simon; Bodkin, Mike J; Singh, Shweta; Law, Richard J; Biggin, Philip C

    2015-08-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the targets of over half of all prescribed drugs today. The UniProt database has records for about 800 proteins classified as GPCRs, but drugs have only been developed against 50 of these. Thus, there is huge potential in terms of the number of targets for new therapies to be designed. Several breakthroughs in GPCRs biased pharmacology, structural biology, modelling and scoring have resulted in a resurgence of interest in GPCRs as drug targets. Therefore, an international conference, sponsored by the Royal Society, with world-renowned researchers from industry and academia was recently held to discuss recent progress and highlight key areas of future research needed to accelerate GPCR drug discovery. Several key points emerged. Firstly, structures for all three major classes of GPCRs have now been solved and there is increasing coverage across the GPCR phylogenetic tree. This is likely to be substantially enhanced with data from x-ray free electron sources as they move beyond proof of concept. Secondly, the concept of biased signalling or functional selectivity is likely to be prevalent in many GPCRs, and this presents exciting new opportunities for selectivity and the control of side effects, especially when combined with increasing data regarding allosteric modulation. Thirdly, there will almost certainly be some GPCRs that will remain difficult targets because they exhibit complex ligand dependencies and have many metastable states rendering them difficult to resolve by crystallographic methods. Subtle effects within the packing of the transmembrane helices are likely to mask and contribute to this aspect, which may play a role in species dependent behaviour. This is particularly important because it has ramifications for how we interpret pre-clinical data. In summary, collaborative efforts between industry and academia have delivered significant progress in terms of structure and understanding of GPCRs and will be

  19. Canadian Institute for Historical Microreproductions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingles, Ernest B.; Montague, Robert J.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses preservation microfilming of pre-1900 Canadiana (works published in Canada, by Canadians, or about Canada) by the Canadian Institute for Historical Microreproductions, noting William J. Barrow's studies on paper deterioration, the formation of the institute, the working methodology, and future projects. Thirty-one references are listed.…

  20. Institutional Advertising in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kittle, Bart

    2000-01-01

    An exploratory study surveyed 59 colleges and universities concerning their advertising practices, specifically media usage, importance of communication objectives for institutional messages, and the importance of audiences targeted for advertising. All major media were used by most of the institutions. Communication objectives mentioned most…

  1. Africanizing Our Historically Black Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Pamela Safisha Nzingha

    2004-01-01

    "The Blacker the College the Sweeter the Knowledge," is a common saying heard among students who attend Black institutions, as well as many proud alumni. These institutions have, from their inception, served a unique mission in educating the masses of Black folk, thus creating the Black middle class. They have done much with little and have…

  2. Protocological Rhetoric: Intervening in Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Nathan R.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes protocological rhetoric as a conceptual tool for exploring and changing institutions. Protocological rhetoric is an extension of two lines of thought: Porter, Sullivan, Blythe, Grabill, and Miles's institutional critique and Science & Technology Studies's (STS) concept of information infrastructure. As a result,…

  3. Lotka's Law and Institutional Productivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Suresh; Sharma, Praveen; Garg, K. C.

    1998-01-01

    Examines the applicability of Lotka's Law, negative binomial distribution, and lognormal distribution for institutional productivity in the same way as it is to authors and their productivity. Results indicate that none of the distributions are applicable for institutional productivity in engineering sciences. (Author/LRW)

  4. Managing the Public Service Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drucker, Peter F.

    1976-01-01

    Important factors in managing a public service institution include knowing the publics served, phasing out an old program when introducing a new one, defining the roles of administrators and professionals, integrating individuals and the institution, and making the public aware of the value of the service performed. (PF)

  5. Recommendations for Institutional Prematriculation Immunizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of American College Health, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The "Recommendations for Institutional Prematriculation Immunizations" described in this article are provided to colleges and universities to facilitate the implementation of a comprehensive institutional prematriculation immunization policy. In response to changing epidemiology and the introduction of new vaccines, the American College Health…

  6. Journalism and Institutional Review Boards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dash, Leon

    2007-01-01

    The author opposes any Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) overseeing the work of journalism professors and journalism students in any academic institution. He argues that the tendency for IRBs to require anonymity for persons interviewed immediately reduces the credibility of any journalistic story. The composition of an IRB is questioned on…

  7. Assessing and Improving Institutional Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Kim S.

    Information to promote assessment of organizational effectiveness in colleges and universities is presented, along with an exercise to rank the effectiveness of 10 institutions. The exercise uses three types of criteria to indicate effectiveness: subjective ratings, data about students and activities, and institutional capacity and financial…

  8. One Institution's Quest for Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyer, Barbara A.; McClellan, Melanie A.

    2002-01-01

    This article describes one institution's efforts to improve the sense of campus community. Two years ago, the institution determined that this was a key to achieving the campus's goal of improving retention. The article details the planning process, examples of projects, and assessments. The report discusses how goals were achieved or not…

  9. Faculty Perceptions of Institutional Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoCascio, Susan H.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined (a) the differences in perceptions of faculty, full-time versus part-time, at a community college in northern Alabama on the importance of institutional effectiveness activities; (b) the factors that affect perceptions of the importance of institutional effectiveness activities; and (c) the effect of academic discipline,…

  10. Institutional Climate and Minority Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Richard C.

    This paper discusses ways that institutions can change the higher education system and environment to accommodate more minority students. The first section, "Institutional Climate and Minority Achievement," presents an overview of the problems facing colleges and universities with respect to recruiting and retaining minority students. In the…

  11. Budgetary Control Procedures for Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Ray M.

    Budgetary control procedures for not-for-profit institutions are presented in this compilation of budgetary materials and ideas gathered at the Program for Institutional Administrators at the University of Notre Dame. Budgetary reporting and control are suggested as the most effective tools for coordinating and controlling the acquisition and use…

  12. Performance Assessment Institute-NV

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, Joesph

    2012-12-31

    The National Supercomputing Center for Energy and the Environment’s intention is to purchase a multi-purpose computer cluster in support of the Performance Assessment Institute (PA Institute). The PA Institute will serve as a research consortium located in Las Vegas Nevada with membership that includes: national laboratories, universities, industry partners, and domestic and international governments. This center will provide a one-of-a-kind centralized facility for the accumulation of information for use by Institutions of Higher Learning, the U.S. Government, and Regulatory Agencies and approved users. This initiative will enhance and extend High Performance Computing (HPC) resources in Nevada to support critical national and international needs in "scientific confirmation". The PA Institute will be promoted as the leading Modeling, Learning and Research Center worldwide. The program proposes to utilize the existing supercomputing capabilities and alliances of the University of Nevada Las Vegas as a base, and to extend these resource and capabilities through a collaborative relationship with its membership. The PA Institute will provide an academic setting for interactive sharing, learning, mentoring and monitoring of multi-disciplinary performance assessment and performance confirmation information. The role of the PA Institute is to facilitate research, knowledge-increase, and knowledge-sharing among users.

  13. National Space Biomedical Research Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    In June 1996, NASA released a Cooperative Agreement Notice (CAN) inviting proposals to establish a National Space Biomedical Research Institute (9-CAN-96-01). This CAN stated that: The Mission of the Institute will be to lead a National effort for accomplishing the integrated, critical path, biomedical research necessary to support the long term human presence, development, and exploration of space and to enhance life on Earth by applying the resultant advances in human knowledge and technology acquired through living and working in space. The Institute will be the focal point of NASA sponsored space biomedical research. This statement has not been amended by NASA and remains the mission of the NSBRI.

  14. Institutional computing (IC) information session

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Kenneth R; Lally, Bryan R

    2011-01-19

    The LANL Institutional Computing Program (IC) will host an information session about the current state of unclassified Institutional Computing at Los Alamos, exciting plans for the future, and the current call for proposals for science and engineering projects requiring computing. Program representatives will give short presentations and field questions about the call for proposals and future planned machines, and discuss technical support available to existing and future projects. Los Alamos has started making a serious institutional investment in open computing available to our science projects, and that investment is expected to increase even more.

  15. Institutional plan -- Institute of Nuclear Power Operations, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    The US nuclear electric utility industry established the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) in 1979 to promote the highest levels of safety and reliability -- to promote excellence -- in the operation of its nuclear plants. After its formation, the Institute grew from a handful of on-loan personnel in late 1979 to an established work force of more than 400 permanent and on-loan personnel. INPO`s early years were marked by growth and evolution of its programs and organization. The Institute now focuses primarily on the effectiveness and enhancement of established programs and activities. For INPO to carry out its role, it must have the support of its members and participants and a cooperative but independent relationship with the NRC. A basis for that support and cooperation is an understanding of INPO`s role. This Institutional Plan is intended to provide that understanding by defining the Institute`s role and its major programs. This plan considers the existing and projected needs of the industry and the overall environment in which INPO and its members and participants operate.

  16. A jump-start for astronomy education in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen-Ping

    Spurred by the leaping developments of research activities (SMA, TAOS, AMIBA), Taiwan is catching up its education in astronomy in virtually all aspects. The first astronomy research institute was established by the Academia Sinica about 10 years ago, which catalyzed within 2 years the first graduate school of astronomy, as well as an elaborative astronomy museum. Since then the astronomy education at all levels, from colleges to primary schools, has been booming. More than a dozen universities are offering astronomy courses, and two more graduate schools will soon be instituted. Textbooks get written, and books on popular sciences, either translated or composed by local authors, have mushroomed on the market. I will outline these ongoing activities along with plans in the horizon.

  17. The Institutional Tour: Some Reflections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeUnes, Arnold

    1984-01-01

    A rationale for using field trips to correctional institutions in an abnormal psychology class is presented. Also discussed are reasons why, over the years, student interest in these field trips has declined. (RM)

  18. Using Microcomputers for Institutional Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suttle, J. Lloyd

    1984-01-01

    Many institutional researchers will find that the microcomputer leads to greater efficiency in everything that they do, especially in the two most critical elements of their jobs: thinking and communicating. (Author/MLW)

  19. Governors' Institute on Community Design

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page describes the Governors' Institute on Community Design, which helps governors and their staff make informed decisions about investments and policy decisions that influence the economic health and physical development of their states.

  20. Commercial and Institutional Case Studies

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Throughout the country, commercial and institutional (CI) building owners and facility managers are taking actions to reduce their water use, implementing many of the operations and maintenance, retrofit, and replacement projects.

  1. Theory institute appoints new head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Hamish

    2008-06-01

    The cosmologist Neil Turok has been appointed as the next executive director of the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Canada. Turok, who is currently chair of mathematical physics at the University of Cambridge in the UK, will take over the reins in October. The 50- year-old cosmologist described the move as the "opportunity of a lifetime" and says he plans to make the institute "the leading centre in the world for theoretical physics".

  2. The Appeal of For-Profit Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard-Vital, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    The characteristics that students like in for-profit postsecondary institutions are present in many more traditional institutions as well. Yet most students who attend for-profit institutions are not convinced that they can fit into traditional institutions. In this article, the author examines the reasons why for-profit institutions appeal more…

  3. Time Dependent Fluid Occurrence Offshore Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.

    2010-12-01

    Time Dependent Fluid Occurrence Offshore Taiwan Liwen Chenab, Wu-Cheng Chia, Char-Shine Liuc (mma@earth.sinica.edu.tw)(wchi@gate.sinica.edu.tw) ; aInstitute of Earth Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan bInstitute of Geosciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan ; cInstitute of Oceanography, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan Earthquake-induced groundwater flows have been observed recently. Such fluid flow might temporarily change the temperature field in the crust. Here we used seismically detected gas hydrate under seafloor to study the temperature fields at a few hundred meters subbottom depth before, and after the 2006 Henchuan earthquake (Mw7.0). We used the hydrate-related bottom-simulating-reflector (BSR) in seismic profiles to study the effects of gas/fluid migration on the BSR attributes. We have conducted two seismic experiments before and after the earthquake across the same transects near the hypocenter of the earthquake using similar air gun arrays and streamers. By analyzing this unique dataset, we found enhanced BSR reflectivity in average after the earthquake (~0.03), but the Sea-floor reflectivity is very similar (~0.5). We also found changed amplitudes versus offset (AVO) in the dataset (the gradient of reflection coefficient versus the angles was ~-0.34). We interpret these results as a consequence of earthquake-induced gas and fluid migration, bringing the gases underneath the BSR, thus the enhanced reflection coefficients. Next we will explore new methods to use the BSR as a flow meter. Using time-dependent seismic attribute analyses across transects before and after a large earthquake, we found strong evidences of earthquake-related fluid migrations and possibly associated temperature perturbations. This is among the first studies to document such feature in the offshore region.

  4. Engaging Religious Institutions to Address Racial Disparities in HIV/AIDS: A Case of Academic-Community Partnership

    PubMed Central

    Szaflarski, Magdalena; Vaughn, Lisa M.; Chambers, Camisha; Harris, Mamie; Ruffner, Andrew; Wess, Yolanda; Mosley, LaSharon; Smith, Chandra

    2017-01-01

    African Americans face the most severe burden of HIV among all racial and ethnic groups. Direct involvement of faith leaders and faith communities is increasingly suggested as a primary strategy to reduce HIV-related disparities, and Black churches are uniquely positioned to address HIV stigma, prevention, and care in African American communities. The authors describe an academic-community partnership to engage Black churches to address HIV in a predominantly African American, urban, southern Midwest location. The opportunities, process, and challenges in forming this academic-community partnership with Black churches can be used to guide future efforts toward engaging faith institutions, academia, and other community partners in the fight against HIV. PMID:28239643

  5. For the safe use of lasers in educational institutions: elementary through university

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeber, Fredrick P.

    1995-10-01

    The use of lasers by the academic community continues to dramatically escalate. Academia is inundated with a profusion of lasers, each with a diverse function. Traditional departments such as biology, chemistry, and physics have introduced the use of lasers as an essential element of tutelage. Even the more distinctive departments such as Cancer Research, Civil Engineering, Earth and Planetary Science, Plasma Fusion, Spectroscopy, and so forth, have incorporated the laser in the composition of their educational mechanism. The literature indicates most ocular accidents happen during alignment procedures, which is an everyday activity for educational laboratories. Also, the improper use of laser safety eye wear is a major area of concern for laser safety in education institutions. More Class II, III, and IV lasers are used in universities, colleges, laser electro-optic technical colleges and high schools than probably any other area: for teaching, research, laboratory experiments, and demonstrations. Relatively large numbers of students work in laboratory groups in confined area, with various lasers of different wavelengths in the same laboratory. Open cavity and beam paths of Class IV lasers are common in these environments. Most educational institutions do not have laser safety officers or standard operation procedures. This paper will discuss the development of a new laser safety standard by an ANSI ad-hoc committee and by the executive committee of the ANSI Z-136 intended to provide adequate, reasonable, and practical guidance for educators, students, and spectators found in classrooms, lecture halls, and laboratories associated with universities, colleges, high, and elementary schools.

  6. Success factors of Black science, technology, engineering and mathematics faculty at predominantly White institutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, Michelle A.

    Black faculty at predominantly White institutions (PWIs) have historically been underrepresented and made to endure with academic isolation, scholarship marginalization and other challenges to the tenure process. When it comes to science, technology, engineering and math, also known as STEM, as it relates to race and success, little is known of how tenured Black STEM faculty have developed an interest in STEM, navigated the unfamiliar waters of academia and maintained longevity at their respective postsecondary institutions. The purpose of this study is to look at the similar experiences of this population and provide insight regarding any factors and or influences that have impacted their success. Grounded in critical race theory (CRT), this qualitative study will utilize a Delphi technique to determine the similar experiences and influences of 17 Black STEM, tenured (and tenure-track) faculty working at PWIs in a Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) states. The study highlighted the importance of: mentoring in college, graduate school and as a junior faculty and; STEM related opportunities such as summer camps or programs, internships, and research.

  7. 78 FR 64228 - National Institutes of Health

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Special...

  8. 78 FR 8153 - National Institutes of Health

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Proposed Collection; Comment Request: Recipient... Blood Institute (NHLBI), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has submitted to the Office...

  9. 75 FR 71134 - National Institutes of Health

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting..., Cancer Control, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: November 16, 2010. Jennifer S....

  10. 75 FR 6044 - National Institutes of Health

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Notice... and projects conducted by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences,...

  11. 78 FR 24427 - National Institutes of Health

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Proposed Collection; 60-Day Comment Request; Genomics and... Research Institute (NHGRI), National Institutes of Health (NIH), will publish periodic summaries...

  12. 78 FR 55751 - National Institutes of Health

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ... Institute, National Institutes of Health Bethesda, MD 20892, (301) 451-2020, mcnicoll@nei.nih.gov . Any... Nos. 93.867, Vision Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: September 5, 2013. Melanie...

  13. 75 FR 61220 - Massachusetts Institute of Technology: Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-04

    ... COMMISSION Massachusetts Institute of Technology: Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor... Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT, the licensee), which would authorize continued operation of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR-II, the facility), located in Cambridge,...

  14. Ecological economics and institutional change.

    PubMed

    Krall, Lisi; Klitgaard, Kent

    2011-02-01

    Ecological economics remains unfinished in its effort to provide a framework for transforming the economy so that it is compatible with biophysical limits. Great strides have been made in valuing natural capital and ecosystem services and recognizing the need to limit the scale of economic activity, but the question of how to effectively transform the economy to limit the scale of economic activity remains unclear. To gain clarity about the institutional changes necessary to limit the scale of economic activity, it is essential that ecological economics understands the limitations of its neoclassical roots and expands its theoretical framework to include how markets are embedded in social and institutional structures. This has long been the domain of institutional economics and heterodox political economy.

  15. The Petascale Data Storage Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, Garth; Long, Darrell; Honeyman, Peter; Grider, Gary; Kramer, William; Shalf, John; Roth, Philip; Felix, Evan; Ward, Lee

    2013-07-01

    Petascale computing infrastructures for scientific discovery make petascale demands on information storage capacity, performance, concurrency, reliability, availability, and manageability.The Petascale Data Storage Institute focuses on the data storage problems found in petascale scientific computing environments, with special attention to community issues such as interoperability, community buy-in, and shared tools.The Petascale Data Storage Institute is a collaboration between researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, University of Michigan, and the University of California at Santa Cruz.

  16. Presidential Leadership and Institutional Mission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fincher, Cameron

    This paper presents three case studies of presidential leadership at universities in Georgia, focusing on the difficulties of presidential searches and the importance of finding the right person for the position. The presidency of John Patrick Crecine (1987-1994) at the Georgia Institute of Technology was controversial from the start, in that…

  17. Recommendations for Institutional Prematriculation Immunizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of American College Health, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The recommendations presented in this article are provided to colleges and universities to facilitate the implementation of a comprehensive institutional prematriculation immunization policy. Vaccine-preventable diseases continue to occur on American campuses. In response to changing epidemiology and the introduction of new vaccines, the ACHA…

  18. Forecasting Methods for Institutional Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Linda W.; Young, Dean M.

    1988-01-01

    Increasing demands for accurate forecasts in such areas as student enrollment, energy expenditures, and facility capacity are placing new demands on the institutional researcher. A variety of forecasting models and methods are available, all to be used with caution in long-range forecasting. (Author/MSE)

  19. Institutional Racism and Community Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbarin, Oscar A., Ed.; And Others

    This is a collection of papers and research reports presented at a conference that focused on mental health issues and on individual, organizational, and community competence in relation to institutional racism. The report is divided into five sections. Section 1 discusses theoretical models of racism and community competence (community…

  20. Cultural Institutions and Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Edward W.

    2010-01-01

    On any given day, hundreds of thousands of individuals, groups, and families visit libraries, parks, zoos, museums, and arboretums. Although quite diverse in their holdings, these places are linked together as institutions that focus on collecting, preserving, and/or presenting a body of knowledge (e.g., manuscripts, artifacts, documents, animals,…

  1. Retention Tracking Using Institutional Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lillibridge, Fred

    2008-01-01

    This chapter presents a sophisticated approach for tracking student cohorts from entry through departure within an institution. It describes how a researcher can create a student tracking model to perform longitudinal research on student cohorts. (Contains 3 tables and 2 figures.)

  2. INSTITUTIONAL POLICIES ON CONTROVERSIAL TOPICS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DUTTON, THOMAS B.; AND OTHERS

    THIS STUDY WAS DESIGNED TO DETERMINE INSTITUTIONAL POLICIES WITH REGARD TO SELECTED CONTROVERSIAL TOPICS WHICH ARE FREQUENTLY THE FOCUS OF ADMINISTRATIVE CONCERN AND ACTION. THE STUDY WAS DESIGNED TO GAIN INFORMATION ABOUT THE NATURE AND PURPOSES OF THE POLICIES, THE FORMULATION AND IMPLEMENTATION PROCESSES, AND THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE ISSUES ON…

  3. Institutional Producers of Physics Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Marianne; Watterson, Hermine M.

    In order to identify producers of physics research and to determine their relative productivity, institutional affiliations of authors as given in nine physics journals were studied. Organizations were classified and analyzed by type and geographical location, and productivity established. Findings indicate that organizations differ in their rate…

  4. URBAN INSTITUTIONS AS UNIVERSITY CLIENTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KRAVITZ, SANFORD L.

    THE AUTHOR DISCUSSES THE WAYS IN WHICH THE UNIVERSITY CAN AND MUST HELP THE CITY SOLVE ITS PROBLEMS. HE SEES THE TWO MAJOR NEEDS OF URBAN INSTITUTIONS AS A MANPOWER SHORTAGE AND A KNOWLEDGE PROBLEM. THE UNIVERSITY MUST MOBILIZE ITS RESOURCES RAPIDLY AND RESPONSIBLY NOT ONLY TO INCREASE THE NUMBER OF WORKERS AVAILABLE BUT TO IMPROVE THE QUALITY AND…

  5. Institutional VVM Statements on Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calder, Wm. B.

    2011-01-01

    Educational leaders rely on compelling statements of institutional beliefs, strategic direction, and purpose (i.e., values, vision, and mission statements or VVM statements) as the three major pillars by which to launch new program/service initiatives, to enhance academic and administrative operations, and to chart sustainable options in building…

  6. Eye Protection in Educational Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey State Dept. of Education, Trenton. Div. of Vocational Education.

    Intended to help reduce the number of school eye injuries in New Jersey, this document begins with a brief review of existing legislation regarding eye protection in educational institutions and a list of elements essential in an eye safety program. Second, eye protection equipment is examined in terms of: the advantages of safety spectacles over…

  7. School Grading and Institutional Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dardanoni, Valentino; Modica, Salvatore; Pennisi, Aline

    2011-01-01

    We study how the relationship between students' cognitive ability and their school grades depends on institutional contexts. In a simple abstract model, we show that unless competence standards are set at above-school level or the variation of competence across schools is low, students' competence valuation will be heterogeneous, with weaker…

  8. Who's Who in Postsecondary Institutions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezar, Adrianna; Frank, Vikki; Lester, Jaime; Yang, Hannah

    2009-01-01

    In this document the authors provide practitioners offering education Independent Development Accounts (IDAs) with information about whom to partner with in a postsecondary institution. The authors gained this information through interviews, focus groups, and case studies with higher education and IDA practitioners. College campuses can sometimes…

  9. Joint BioEnergy Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Keasling, Jay; Simmons, Blake; Tartaglino, Virginia; Baidoo, Edward; Kothari, Ankita

    2015-06-15

    The Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Bioenergy Research Center dedicated to developing advanced biofuels—liquid fuels derived from the solar energy stored in plant biomass that can replace gasoline, diesel and jet fuels.

  10. Institutional Consequences of Quality Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joao Rosa, Maria; Tavares, Diana; Amaral, Alberto

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyses the opinions of Portuguese university rectors and academics on the quality assessment system and its consequences at the institutional level. The results obtained show that university staff (rectors and academics, with more of the former than the latter) held optimistic views of the positive consequences of quality assessment…

  11. Institutional Effectiveness Summary Report, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burless, Bridget

    This document discusses institutional effectiveness at Florence-Darlington Technical College (FDTC) (South Carolina) for the 2000-2001 academic year. Full and/or interim report summaries are provided for advising procedures, library resources, and for the following departments: Accounting, Automated Office, Office Systems Technology, Health Care…

  12. Institutional Change and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loomis, Steven; Rodriguez, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Institutional change includes the supplanting of the old model of production with a new one, the elimination of old markets and the emergence of new ones. As higher education around the world shifts from national markets to an integrated transnational market, and possibly toward a virtual market, Christian higher education, like other market…

  13. Inter-Institutional Communications Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starlin, Glen

    Can and should television broadcasts and distribution services act as links between institutions of higher education? Educational broadcasting in general has grown slowly since National Educational Television (NET) initiated "network" service in 1954, but now other groups are experimenting in telecommunications interconnection and the…

  14. Joint BioEnergy Institute

    ScienceCinema

    Keasling, Jay; Simmons, Blake; Tartaglino, Virginia; Baidoo, Edward; Kothari, Ankita

    2016-07-12

    The Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Bioenergy Research Center dedicated to developing advanced biofuels—liquid fuels derived from the solar energy stored in plant biomass that can replace gasoline, diesel and jet fuels.

  15. The Conditions of Institutional Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caskey, Owen L.

    The author proposes a method of examining and organizing the principles relating to the conditions of institutional change. Those conditions of change involve principles which relate to three elements--people, places, and things. Within these categories, principles may be enumerated which operate to facilitate or restrain change or innovation…

  16. National Space Biomedical Research Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This report outlines National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) activities during FY 2001, the fourth year of the NSBRI's programs. It is prepared in accordance with Cooperative Agreement NCC 9-58 between NASA's Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center and Baylor College of Medicine (NSBRI).

  17. Fact Sheets on Institutional Racism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foundation for Change, Inc., New York, NY.

    This fact sheet on institutional racism contains statistics on white control of the economy, health, housing, education, the media, and government. It also shows the oppression of minorities in these areas. The areas of wealth, the stock exchange, business, banks, unions, poverty, and unemployment, are discussed in terms of economy. Health matters…

  18. Why Do Institutions Offer MOOCs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollands, Fiona M.; Tirthali, Devayani

    2014-01-01

    By reviewing the literature and interviewing 83 individuals knowledgeable about massive open online courses (MOOCs), we investigate the goals of institutions of higher education that are currently developing and delivering such courses. We identify six major goals for MOOC initiatives: extending reach and access, building and maintaining brand,…

  19. 76 FR 21386 - National Institute on Aging

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute on Aging Notice of Closed Meetings... Committee: National Institute on Aging Special Emphasis Panel; Organelle Lifespan Mechanism II. Date: June... Institute on Aging, Gateway Building, 7201 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 2C212, Bethesda, MD 20892...

  20. 76 FR 65203 - National Institute on Aging

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute on Aging ACTION: Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute on Aging Special Emphasis Panel; Mechanisms of Osteoporosis II. Date...: National Institute on Aging, Gateway Building, 7201 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 2C212, Bethesda, MD...

  1. 7 CFR 250.67 - Charitable institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... foods as charitable institutions: (1) Schools, summer camps, service institutions, and child and adult... charitable institution in a fiscal year are used in the charitable institution's food service. However, the... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT...

  2. A New Vision for Institutional Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swing, Randy L.; Ross, Leah Ewing

    2016-01-01

    A new vision for institutional research is urgently needed if colleges and universities are to achieve their institutional missions, goals, and purposes. The authors advocate for a move away from the traditional service model of institutional research to an institutional research function via a federated network model or matrix network model. When…

  3. Accreditation and Its Influence on Institutional Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Head, Ronald B.; Johnson, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    The term "institutional effectiveness" was developed in response to accreditation, and this emphasizes the large extent to which accreditation drives institutional effectiveness efforts on community college campuses. There are two general types of accreditation. "Institutional accreditation" is the process by which institutions of higher education…

  4. 34 CFR 691.7 - Institutional participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Institutional participation. 691.7 Section 691.7... Definitions § 691.7 Institutional participation. (a) An institution that offers one or more eligible programs... the National SMART Grant Program. (c) If an institution begins participation in the ACG or...

  5. 45 CFR 233.60 - Institutional status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... patient in an institution for tuberculosis or mental diseases. (ii) Federal financial participation under... has not attained 65 years of age and who is a patient in an institution for tuberculosis or mental..., or a patient in an institution for tuberculosis or mental diseases; (ii) Whether an institution...

  6. 45 CFR 233.60 - Institutional status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... patient in an institution for tuberculosis or mental diseases. (ii) Federal financial participation under... has not attained 65 years of age and who is a patient in an institution for tuberculosis or mental..., or a patient in an institution for tuberculosis or mental diseases; (ii) Whether an institution...

  7. 45 CFR 233.60 - Institutional status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... patient in an institution for tuberculosis or mental diseases. (ii) Federal financial participation under... has not attained 65 years of age and who is a patient in an institution for tuberculosis or mental..., or a patient in an institution for tuberculosis or mental diseases; (ii) Whether an institution...

  8. 45 CFR 233.60 - Institutional status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... patient in an institution for tuberculosis or mental diseases. (ii) Federal financial participation under... has not attained 65 years of age and who is a patient in an institution for tuberculosis or mental..., or a patient in an institution for tuberculosis or mental diseases; (ii) Whether an institution...

  9. 34 CFR 691.7 - Institutional participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Institutional participation. 691.7 Section 691.7... Definitions § 691.7 Institutional participation. (a) An institution that offers one or more eligible programs... the National SMART Grant Program. (c) If an institution begins participation in the ACG or...

  10. 34 CFR 691.7 - Institutional participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Institutional participation. 691.7 Section 691.7... Definitions § 691.7 Institutional participation. (a) An institution that offers one or more eligible programs... the National SMART Grant Program. (c) If an institution begins participation in the ACG or...

  11. A Model for Assessing Institutional Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volkwein, J. Fredericks

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter, the author proposes a model for assessing institutional effectiveness. The Volkwein model for assessing institutional effectiveness consists of five parts that summarize the steps for assessing institutions, programs, faculty, and students. The first step in the model distinguishes the dual purposes of institutional effectiveness:…

  12. Institutional Conflicts of Interest in Academic Research.

    PubMed

    Resnik, David B

    2015-10-07

    Financial relationships in academic research can create institutional conflicts of interest (COIs) because the financial interests of the institution or institutional officials may inappropriately influence decision-making. Strategies for dealing with institutional COIs include establishing institutional COI committees that involve the board of trustees in conflict review and management, developing policies that shield institutional decisions from inappropriate influences, and establishing private foundations that are independent of the institution to own stock and intellectual property and to provide capital to start-up companies.

  13. Beyond the Institution: Institutional Research for Inter-institutional Action. AIR Forum 1981 Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martorana, S. V.; Kuhns, Eileen

    The role of institutional research in postsecondary education in view of the trend toward consortia, regionalism, and other manifestations of "communiversity" or interinstitutional action is evaluated. Attention is also directed to new modes for policy planning and decision-making. Four activities were conducted in order to better…

  14. Computer technologies and institutional memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Christopher; Lachman, Roy

    1989-01-01

    NASA programs for manned space flight are in their 27th year. Scientists and engineers who worked continuously on the development of aerospace technology during that period are approaching retirement. The resulting loss to the organization will be considerable. Although this problem is general to the NASA community, the problem was explored in terms of the institutional memory and technical expertise of a single individual in the Man-Systems division. The main domain of the expert was spacecraft lighting, which became the subject area for analysis in these studies. The report starts with an analysis of the cumulative expertise and institutional memory of technical employees of organizations such as NASA. A set of solutions to this problem are examined and found inadequate. Two solutions were investigated at length: hypertext and expert systems. Illustrative examples were provided of hypertext and expert system representation of spacecraft lighting. These computer technologies can be used to ameliorate the problem of the loss of invaluable personnel.

  15. [The institutional risk analyst nurse].

    PubMed

    Feldman, Liliane Bauer

    2004-01-01

    The study reports the experience developed by the risk analysis nurse by a process of identification, evaluation and treatment of the professional and institutional risks, to which each hospital is exposed. Besides the liability related to quality, there is another regarding the Professional Liability, related to the work of the professionals within the institution. The data collection is done with the filling up of a form, formal and informal interview with the responsible for the services rendered. The result obtained identifies the potential risk factors, which can generate hospital and professional damages. The nurse elaborates the report, and, as a preventive strategy, lists recommendations. By carefully analyzing each risk, is possible to recommend the best way of managing it.

  16. Tolya Larkin at the Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shifman, M.

    2013-06-01

    The Institute I've been a part of since 1990 is unusual even for the U.S., with its whirlpool of foreign postdocs and researchers from all over the world. Out of six permanent members, only one - Keith Olive - is a genuine American. The rest of the faculty came in the early 1990s from the former Soviet Union, toward the beginning of a Great Exodus of physicists and mathematicians from the collapsed Soviet Empire. Our high proportion of researchers with Soviet back-ground came about as a matter of timing. The Institute officially came into existence in 1987, but its faculty search didn't start in earnest until 1989, when Larry McLerran was appointed Director...

  17. Surviving Scientific Academia . . . and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Conlin, Jeremy Lloyd

    2016-02-03

    It's been 16 years since I first took a physics class at Weber State University. Since them, I've survived graduate school in Nuclear Engineering, and a postdoc appointment doing nuclear nonproliferation. Now I'm a Technical Staff Member at Los Alamos National Laboratory working with nuclear data, the physics behind the numerical simulations of nuclear reactors and nuclear weapons. Along the way, I've learned a few things. First, scientific computing is everywhere in science. If you are not writing codes, you will be analyzing their output, and generally there will be more output than a human can correctly and accurately interpret in a timely manner. Second, a career in science or engineering can be very rewarding with opportunities to collaborate with and generate friendships with very bright people from all over the world.

  18. Membranes from academia to industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2017-02-01

    Andrew Livingston (Imperial College London) and Richard Baker (Membrane Technology and Research) talk to Nature Materials about the perks and pitfalls of membrane research and development, and how activities at the new Barrer Centre might lead to next-generation separation technologies.

  19. Subject Matter Experts from Academia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-06

    Books in the field Academic Library – catalog search Amazon.com Worldcat Graduate School Locators (Princeton Review, Educational Testing Service) Fi...Names of graduates from their department UNCLASSIFIED – Approved for Public Release Finding SME’s: Databases S h Di i li D t b• earc sc p ne a...Public Release Databases will give you: Authors of articles – social scientists Click on author’s name and automatically access other works

  20. Empowering versus Enabling in Academia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espeland, Karen; Shanta, Linda

    2001-01-01

    Enabling behaviors that encourage dependence should be avoided by nursing faculty. An empowerment model that includes collegiality, communication, accountability, and autonomy is more suited to the professional preparation of nurses. (Contains 30 references.) (SK)

  1. University of Delaware Energy Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Michael T

    2012-09-30

    The main goal of this project funded through this DOE grant is to help in the establishment of the University of Delaware Energy Institute (UDEI) which is designed to be a long-term, on-going project. The broad mission of UDEI is to develop collaborative programs encouraging research activities in the new and emerging energy technologies and to partner with industry and government in meeting the challenges posed by the nation's pressing energy needs.

  2. Pre-Service Teachers Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Pre-Service Teachers Institute sponsored by Jackson (Miss.) State University participated in an agencywide Hubble Space Telescope workshop at Stennis Space Center on July 18. Twenty-five JSU junior education majors participated in the workshop, a site tour and educational presentations by Karma Snyder of the NASA SSC Engineering & Safety Center and Anne Peek of the NASA SSC Deputy Science & Technology Division.

  3. Strenghening Safeguards Authorities and Institutions

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman,M.; Lockwood, d.; Rosenthal, M.D.; Tape, J.W.

    2008-06-06

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards system has changed in major ways from the establishment of the IAEA in 1957 until the present. Changes include strengthening the legal framework of safeguards; improvements in concepts and approaches for safeguards implementation; and significant improvements in the technical tools available to inspectors. In this paper, we explore three broad areas related to strengthening safeguards authorities and institutions: integrated safeguards and State-Level Approaches; special inspections; and NPT withdrawal and the continuation of safeguards.

  4. Next generation receivers for the submillimeter array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimes, Paul; Blundell, Ray; Paine, Scott; Tong, C.-Y. Edward; Zeng, Lingzhen

    2016-07-01

    The Submillimeter Array (SMA) is an 8-element mm/sub-mm interferometer on the summit of Maunakea, Hawaii that is operated jointly by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) and the Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics (ASIAA). After nearly 13 years of operation, we are undertaking a major upgrade of the array's cryogenics, receivers and other systems that will enhance the science capabilities of the array and replace components reaching end-of-life. Here we describe the new receivers, containing dual-polarization, ultra-wideband SIS mixers operating at 230 and 345 GHz, the new ultra-wideband IF signal transport and correlator system, and the enhanced observing capabilities that will be enabled by this upgrade.

  5. Status of the Transneptunian Automated Occultation Survey (TAOS II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Ruiz, Mauricio

    2014-11-01

    TAOS II is a next generation occultation survey with the goal of measuring the size distribution of the small objects (diameters between 0.5 and 30 km) in the Kuiper Belt. The project is a collaboration between the Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, and the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, The survey will operate three 1.3 m telescopes at San Pedro Martir Observatory in Baja California, Mexico. Each telescope will be equipped with a custom camera comprising a focal plane array of CMOS imagers. Each camera will be capable of reading out image data from 10,000 stars at a cadence of 20 Hz. All telescopes will monitor the same set of stars simultaneously to search for coincident occultation events while minimizing the false positive rate. This poster describes the project and reports on the progress of the development of the survey infrastructure.

  6. Progress of the array of microwave background anisotropy (AMiBA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffin, Philippe; Koch, Patrick; Huang, Yau-De; Chang, Chia-Hao; Chang, Joshua; Chen, Ming-Tang; Chen, Ke-Yung; Ho, Paul T. P.; Huang, Chih-Wie; Ibañez Roman, Fabiola; Jiang, Homin; Kesteven, Michael; Lin, Kai-Yang; Liu, Guo-Chin; Nishioka, Hiroaki; Umetsu, Keiichi

    2006-06-01

    The Academia Sinica, Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics (ASIAA) is installing the AMiBA interferometric array telescope at the Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii. The 6-meter carbon fiber fully steerable platform is mounted on the Hexapod Mount. After integration and equipment with dummy weights, the platform has been measured by photogrammetry to verify its behavior predicted by Finite Element Analysis. The Hexapod servo control is now operational and equipment of the platform with the initial 7 60-cm dishes, the correlator and electronics is underway. Pointing has started with the aid of the optical telescope. We present the status of the telescope after the servo and initial pointing tests have been carried out. We also present the results of platform measurements by photogrammetry.

  7. The Puerto Rico Photonics Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Jonathan S.

    2014-07-01

    We have founded the Puerto Rico Photonics Institute (PRPI) in the Barceloneta, Puerto Rico campus of the Universidad Metropolitana. PRPI is established to provide opportunities in education, training and research and is unique in Puerto Rico. There are two initial focus areas of research and education: aerospace photonics and remote sensing. In particular, we will conduct studies and research and development in two particular fields: laser gyroscopes and similar technologies, and atmospheric remote sensing. PRPI has established local collaborations with the Arecibo Observatory and Honeywell Aerospace. Outside of Puerto Rico, PRPI collaborators include the University of Central Florida (CREOL), University of Arizona (OSC), University of Dayton (UD), Georgia Institute of Technology (GT), Scientific Solutions, Inc. (SSI), Atmospheric and Space Technology Research Associates (ASTRA), and the MIT Draper Laboratory. These organizations will help PRPI to: 1) establish its curriculum, provide research opportunities for PRPI students, 2) participate in faculty exchange programs, and 3) build its own research and development programs. PRPI will have educational and training programs for both Associate and Masters degrees, as well as a Certificate in Optics and Photonics for undergraduate science and engineering majors and professional engineers. PRPI is supported by UMET's parent institution, the Ana G. Mendez University System (SUAGM), the Puerto Rico Science, Technology and Research Trust (PRST), and the Puerto Rico Industrial Development Company (PRIDCO).

  8. Homogenisation in project management for large German research projects in the Earth system sciences: overcoming the institutional coordination bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauser, Florian; Vamborg, Freja

    2016-04-01

    The interdisciplinary project on High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing climate prediction HD(CP)2 (hdcp2.eu) is an example for the trend in fundamental research in Europe to increasingly focus on large national and international research programs that require strong scientific coordination. The current system has traditionally been host-based: project coordination activities and funding is placed at the host institute of the central lead PI of the project. This approach is simple and has the advantage of strong collaboration between project coordinator and lead PI, while exhibiting a list of strong, inherent disadvantages that are also mentioned in this session's description: no community best practice development, lack of integration between similar projects, inefficient methodology development and usage, and finally poor career development opportunities for the coordinators. Project coordinators often leave the project before it is finalized, leaving some of the fundamentally important closing processes to the PIs. This systematically prevents the creation of professional science management expertise within academia, which leads to an automatic imbalance that hinders the outcome of large research programs to help future funding decisions. Project coordinators in academia often do not work in a professional project office environment that could distribute activities and use professional tools and methods between different projects. Instead, every new project manager has to focus on methodological work anew (communication infrastructure, meetings, reporting), even though the technological needs of large research projects are similar. This decreases the efficiency of the coordination and leads to funding that is effectively misallocated. We propose to challenge this system by creating a permanent, virtual "Centre for Earth System Science Management CESSMA" (cessma.com), and changing the approach from host- based to centre-based. This should

  9. 76 FR 62149 - American Chemistry Council, The Chlorine Institute, Inc., the Fertilizer Institute, and PPG...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board American Chemistry Council, The Chlorine Institute, Inc., the Fertilizer... American Chemistry Council, The Chlorine Institute, Inc., The Fertilizer Institute (TFI), and...

  10. Political institutions and their historical dynamics.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Mikael; Lundberg, Per

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, political scientists define political institutions deductively. This approach may prevent from discovery of existing institutions beyond the definitions. Here, a principal component analysis was used for an inductive extraction of dimensions in Polity IV data on the political institutions of all nations in the world the last two centuries. Three dimensions of institutions were revealed: core institutions of democracy, oligarchy, and despotism. We show that, historically and on a world scale, the dominance of the core institutions of despotism has first been replaced by a dominance of the core institutions of oligarchy, which in turn is now being followed by an increasing dominance by the core institutions of democracy. Nations do not take steps from despotic, to oligarchic and then to democratic institutions, however. Rather, nations hosting the core democracy institutions have succeeded in historically avoiding both the core institutions of despotism and those of oligarchy. On the other hand, some nations have not been influenced by any of these dimensions, while new institutional combinations are increasingly influencing others. We show that the extracted institutional dimensions do not correspond to the Polity scores for autocracy, "anocracy" and democracy, suggesting that changes in regime types occur at one level, while institutional dynamics work on another. Political regime types in that sense seem "canalized", i.e., underlying institutional architectures can and do vary, but to a considerable extent independently of regime types and their transitions. The inductive approach adds to the deductive regime type studies in that it produces results in line with modern studies of cultural evolution and memetic institutionalism in which institutions are the units of observation, not the nations that acts as host for them.

  11. 76 FR 42718 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Cancer Therapies. Date: October 13-14, 2011...: Delia Tang, MD, Scientific Review Officer, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of...

  12. 77 FR 15783 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel Nanotechnology Sensing Platforms. Date: March 26... Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, 6116 Executive Blvd., Conference Room 611, Rockville,...

  13. 34 CFR 600.6 - Postsecondary vocational institution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION INSTITUTIONAL ELIGIBILITY UNDER THE HIGHER EDUCATION ACT OF... applicant institution qualified as an eligible institution of higher education; (ii) Counts any period during which the applicant institution was part of another eligible institution of higher...

  14. 34 CFR 600.6 - Postsecondary vocational institution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION INSTITUTIONAL ELIGIBILITY UNDER THE HIGHER EDUCATION ACT OF... applicant institution qualified as an eligible institution of higher education; (ii) Counts any period during which the applicant institution was part of another eligible institution of higher...

  15. 34 CFR 600.6 - Postsecondary vocational institution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION INSTITUTIONAL ELIGIBILITY UNDER THE HIGHER EDUCATION ACT OF... applicant institution qualified as an eligible institution of higher education; (ii) Counts any period during which the applicant institution was part of another eligible institution of higher...

  16. 34 CFR 600.6 - Postsecondary vocational institution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION INSTITUTIONAL ELIGIBILITY UNDER THE HIGHER EDUCATION ACT OF... applicant institution qualified as an eligible institution of higher education; (ii) Counts any period during which the applicant institution was part of another eligible institution of higher...

  17. Beyond 'flood hotspots': co-production of knowledge between academia and stakeholders for improved resilience of emergency response to flood disasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, D.; Green, D. L.; Wilby, R.; Pattison, I.; Yang, L.; Bosher, L.; Ryley, T.

    2015-12-01

    useful information to implement strategic adaptation measures for mitigating the potential impacts of flooding. In addition to the key findings, the abstract will also present the process of engagement and lessons learned for successful academia-stakeholder engagement.

  18. 76 FR 40383 - National Institutes of Health

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Government-Owned Inventions; Availability for Licensing AGENCY: Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY:...

  19. Blended Learning as Transformational Institutional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanDerLinden, Kim

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews institutional approaches to blended learning and the ways in which institutions support faculty in the intentional redesign of courses to produce optimal learning. The chapter positions blended learning as a strategic opportunity to engage in organizational learning.

  20. Disjointed Governance in University Centers and Institutes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallon, William

    2004-01-01

    Research centers and institutes are one example of how institutional governance has become increasingly disjointed; as the "suburbs" of the university expand, core governance structures lose influence. (Contains 1 table and 1 figure.)

  1. Institution-Wide Coordination of Decentralized Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alley, Lee; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The concept of distributed computing is discussed and reasons for coordinating decentralized computing at an institutional level are presented. Ten coordinative actions that an institution might decide upon are offered. (MLW)

  2. A Rebuttal of NTL Institute's Learning Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Letrud, Kare

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the learning pyramid corroborated by National Training Laboratories Institute. It present and compliment historical and methodological critique against the learning pyramid, and call upon NTL Institute ought to retract their model.

  3. Synthetic Environments at the Enterprise Level: Overview of a Government of Canada (GoC), Academia and Industry Distributed Synthetic Environment Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    niveau des entreprises et de la nation, et comment les leçons apprises et les meilleures pratiques techniques laissent entrevoir un avenir brillant pour...purview of well-equipped and financed institutions: in some cases, like the present one, M&S/SE can be easy enough or “fit for the purpose”, and almost

  4. "It Enables Me to Realise My Fantasies Regarding the Practicum": A Preliminary Study of an Academia-School Partnership in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Gila; Avissar, Gilada

    2009-01-01

    Models of collaboration between teacher training institutions and Professional Development Schools have become commonplace in general teacher education. These partnerships are less well documented when it comes to special education teacher training, and are particularly scarce with regard to models of collaboration with special education schools.…

  5. [Biological research and security institutes].

    PubMed

    Darsie, G; Falczuk, A J; Bergmann, I E

    2006-04-01

    The threat of using biological material for ago-bioterrorist ends has risen in recent years, which means that research and diagnostic laboratories, biological agent banks and other institutions authorised to carry out scientific activities have had to implement biosafety and biosecurity measures to counter the threat, while carrying out activities to help prevent and monitor the accidental or intentional introduction of exotic animal diseases. This article briefly sets outthe basic components of biosafety and biosecurity, as well as recommendations on organisational strategies to consider in laboratories that support agro-bioterrorist surveillance and prevention programs.

  6. [Dialogical leadership in hospitals institutions].

    PubMed

    Amestoy, Simone Coelho; Trindade, Letícia de Lima; Waterkemper, Roberta; Heidman, Ivonete Teresinha Schülter; Boehs, Astrid Egged; Backes, Vânia Marli Schubert

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is make a theorical-reflection about the importance of using dialogical leadership in hospital institutions through Freirean referencial. The dialogical leadership pattern differs from the coercive and autocratic methods, for being reasoned on the establishment of an efficient communicational process, able to stimulate autonomy, co-responsibility and appreciation of each member from nurse team. The dialogical leadership, unlike the directive one, is a management instrument, that pursuits to minimize the conflicts and stimulate the formation of healthy interpersonal relationships, which can contribute to the improvement of organizational atmosphere and quality care provided to health services users.

  7. National Space Biomedical Research Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) during FY 1999, the second full year of existence of the NSBRI's research program, and is prepared in accordance with Cooperative Agreement NCC9-58 between NASA's Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center and Baylor College of Medicine (NSBRI). The report consists of progress reports on projects related to the effects of microgravity and space on physiology. The research is broken up in nine areas: (1) Bone loss, (2) Cardiovascular alterations, (3) human performance, (3) immunology, infection and hematology, (4) muscle alterations and atrophy,(5) Neurovestibular adaptation, radiation effects, (6) technology development, and (7) synergy projects.

  8. MATCHING IN INFORMAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Eeckhout, Jan; Munshi, Kaivan

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes an informal financial institution that brings heterogeneous agents together in groups. We analyze decentralized matching into these groups, and the equilibrium composition of participants that consequently arises. We find that participants sort remarkably well across the competing groups, and that they re-sort immediately following an unexpected exogenous regulatory change. These findings suggest that the competitive matching model might have applicability and bite in other settings where matching is an important equilibrium phenomenon. (JEL: O12, O17, G20, D40) PMID:24027491

  9. Analysis of Municipal Pipe Network Franchise Institution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Sun; Haichuan, Tian; Feng, Xu; Huixia, Zhou

    Franchise institution of municipal pipe network has some particularity due to the characteristic of itself. According to the exposition of Chinese municipal pipe network industry franchise institution, the article investigates the necessity of implementing municipal pipe network franchise institution in China, the role of government in the process and so on. And this offers support for the successful implementation of municipal pipe network franchise institution in China.

  10. Mapping to Curricular and Institutional Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oaks, D'Arcy J.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter will discuss how institutional research professionals might integrate co-curricular learning outcomes into larger measures of institutional effectiveness. By mapping co-curricular learning outcomes to align with curricular and institutional goals, linkages can be made that demonstrate mission-congruent activities and outcomes across…

  11. 10 CFR 61.14 - Institutional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Institutional information. 61.14 Section 61.14 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Licenses § 61.14 Institutional information. The institutional information must include: (a) A...

  12. 10 CFR 61.14 - Institutional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Institutional information. 61.14 Section 61.14 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Licenses § 61.14 Institutional information. The institutional information must include: (a) A...

  13. 10 CFR 61.14 - Institutional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Institutional information. 61.14 Section 61.14 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Licenses § 61.14 Institutional information. The institutional information must include: (a) A...

  14. 10 CFR 61.14 - Institutional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Institutional information. 61.14 Section 61.14 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Licenses § 61.14 Institutional information. The institutional information must include: (a) A...

  15. 10 CFR 61.14 - Institutional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Institutional information. 61.14 Section 61.14 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Licenses § 61.14 Institutional information. The institutional information must include: (a) A...

  16. Institute for International Public Policy Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Postsecondary Education, US Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Institute for International Public Policy program provides a single grant to assist a consortia of institutions of higher education in establishing an institute designed to increase the representation of minorities in international service, including private international voluntary organizations and the Foreign Service of the United States. A…

  17. Q&A: What Is Institutional Citizenship?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, David

    2000-01-01

    This interview with David Pierce, the President of the American Association of Community Colleges, addresses a series of questions related to institutional citizenship. Topics include: what institutional citizenship means; colleges can be effective institutional citizens; whether extra money or staff are required; and why it is important and what…

  18. Emerging Educational Institutional Decision-Making Matrix

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashford-Rowe, Kevin H.; Holt, Marnie

    2011-01-01

    The "emerging educational institutional decision-making matrix" is developed to allow educational institutions to adopt a rigorous and consistent methodology of determining which of the myriad of emerging educational technologies will be the most compelling for the institution, particularly ensuring that it is the educational or pedagogical but…

  19. Applied Research at Canadian Colleges and Institutes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Canadian Community Colleges, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Canada has a national network of over 150 colleges and institutes in over 900 communities in all regions of the country. These institutions are mandated to support the socio-economic development of the communities and regions. Colleges and institutes develop education and training programs to meet employer needs with direct input from business,…

  20. Rapid Expansion Strains Elite Indian Institutes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neelakantan, Shailaja

    2009-01-01

    In India's beleaguered higher-education system, the Indian Institutes of Technology (IIT) stand apart. The seven institutions have turned out some of the world's finest engineers and computer scientists, eagerly recruited by top graduate schools in the United States. Many of the institutes' graduates have gone on to become the chief executives of…

  1. 34 CFR 690.7 - Institutional participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Institutional participation. 690.7 Section 690.7... Definitions § 690.7 Institutional participation. (a) An institution may not participate in the Federal Pell... participation in the Federal Pell Grant Program during an award year, a student enrolled and attending...

  2. Stakeholders in the Institutional Effectiveness Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hom, Willard C.

    2011-01-01

    Policymakers, administrators, and institutional researchers should recognize the critical stakeholders in the area of institutional effectiveness at the community college, their differences in perceptions about institutional effectiveness, and ways to negotiate these differences in perception. This article identifies the different stakeholders in…

  3. 78 FR 42967 - National Institutes of Health

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed... Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: July 12, 2013. Michelle Trout, Program Analyst, Office of Federal...

  4. 76 FR 44597 - National Institutes of Health

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed...; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: July...

  5. 76 FR 71047 - National Institutes of Health

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Notice... EPRB, NIAAA, National Institutes of Health, 5365 Fishers Lane, Room 2085, Rockville, MD 20852,...

  6. 75 FR 42758 - National Institutes of Health

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to... Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Building 31, C Wing, 6th Floor, Conference Room 10, Bethesda,...

  7. 34 CFR 690.7 - Institutional participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Institutional participation. 690.7 Section 690.7... Definitions § 690.7 Institutional participation. (a) An institution may not participate in the Federal Pell... participation in the Federal Pell Grant Program during an award year, a student enrolled and attending...

  8. 34 CFR 690.7 - Institutional participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Institutional participation. 690.7 Section 690.7... Definitions § 690.7 Institutional participation. (a) An institution may not participate in the Federal Pell... participation in the Federal Pell Grant Program during an award year, a student enrolled and attending...

  9. 34 CFR 690.7 - Institutional participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Institutional participation. 690.7 Section 690.7... Definitions § 690.7 Institutional participation. (a) An institution may not participate in the Federal Pell... participation in the Federal Pell Grant Program during an award year, a student enrolled and attending...

  10. Expanding the Role of Institutional Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matlock, John; Hogg, Richard

    The merger of the Tennessee State University's institutional research office and the planning, management, and evaluation offices is described. The roles of the institutional research office before the merger were the collection and dissemination of institutional data, storing of data collected from other sources, and conducting special studies.…

  11. Institutional Obligations in an Age of Wealth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botstein, Leon

    2007-01-01

    America is home to a diverse set of institutions that range from the fabulously well endowed to those that are very poorly funded. Yet many of our poorer institutions provide educations that are just as good as--and in some cases even better than--their richer counter-parts. In this article, the author argues that wealthy institutions of higher…

  12. 28 CFR 540.62 - Institutional visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Institutional visits. 540.62 Section 540.62 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT CONTACT WITH PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Contact With News Media § 540.62 Institutional visits. (a) A...

  13. 28 CFR 540.62 - Institutional visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Institutional visits. 540.62 Section 540.62 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT CONTACT WITH PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Contact With News Media § 540.62 Institutional visits. (a) A...

  14. 28 CFR 540.62 - Institutional visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Institutional visits. 540.62 Section 540.62 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT CONTACT WITH PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Contact With News Media § 540.62 Institutional visits. (a) A...

  15. 28 CFR 540.62 - Institutional visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Institutional visits. 540.62 Section 540.62 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT CONTACT WITH PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Contact With News Media § 540.62 Institutional visits. (a) A...

  16. 28 CFR 540.62 - Institutional visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Institutional visits. 540.62 Section 540.62 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT CONTACT WITH PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Contact With News Media § 540.62 Institutional visits. (a) A...

  17. Self-Directed Learning in Cultural Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, David

    1985-01-01

    Museums, libraries, zoos, parks, historical sites, and other cultural institutions can be vehicles for much self-directed learning. This article reviews these opportunities and efforts to utilize them. It discusses cultural institutions as invitational environments, conditions of learning in cultural institutions, and tools and initiatives for…

  18. Geophysical Institute. Biennial report, 1993-1994

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    The 1993-1994 Geophysical Institute Biennial Report was published in November 1995 by the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. It contains an overview of the Geophysical Institute, the Director`s Note, and research presentations concerning the following subjects: Scientific Predictions, Space Physics, Atmospheric Sciences, Snow, Ice and Permafrost, Tectonics and Sedimentation, Seismology, Volcanology, Remote Sensing, and other projects.

  19. Collective Awareness and the New Institution Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitt, Jeremy; Nowak, Andrzej

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Challenges for Institutions * Collective Awareness * A New Science of Institutions * Complex social ensembles * Interoceptive collective awareness * Planned emergence * Self-organising electronic institutions * Transformative Impact on Society * Social attitudes and processes * Innovative service creation and social innovation * Scientific impact * Big data * Self-regulation * Summary and Conclusions

  20. 12 CFR 390.292 - Financial institution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Financial institution. 390.292 Section 390.292 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY... Savings Associations § 390.292 Financial institution. The term financial institution has the same...