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Sample records for academic career advancement

  1. Predictors of Academics' Career Advancement at Malaysian Private Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arokiasamy, Lawrence; Ismail, Maimunah; Ahmad, Aminah; Othman, Jamilah

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine the influence of individual and organizational variables on the career advancement of academics in Malaysian private universities. Design/methodology/approach: A correlation study was conducted in six private universities. Data were collected using a structured self-administered questionnaire. The dependent…

  2. Career Advancement Outcomes in Academic Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM): Gender, Mentoring Resources, and Homophily

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Eun

    This dissertation examines gender differences in career advancement outcomes among academic science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) scientists. In particular, this research examines effects of gender, PhD advisors and postdoctoral supervisors mentoring resources and gender homophily in the mentoring dyads on the career advancement outcomes at early career stages. Female academic scientists have disadvantages in the career progress in the academic STEM. They tend to fall behind throughout their career paths and to leave the field compared to their male colleagues. Researchers have found that gender differences in the career advancement are shaped by gender-biased evaluations derived from gender stereotypes. Other studies demonstrate the positive impacts of mentoring and gender homophily in the mentoring dyads. To add greater insights to the current findings of female academic scientists' career disadvantages, this dissertation investigates comprehensive effects of gender, mentoring, and gender homophily in the mentoring dyads on female scientists' career advancement outcomes in academic science. Based on the Status Characteristics Theory, the concept of mentoring, Social Capital Theory, and Ingroup Bias Theory, causal path models are developed to test direct and indirect effects of gender, mentoring resources, and gender homophily on STEM faculty's career advancement. The research models were tested using structural equation modeling (SEM) with data collected from a national survey, funded by the National Science Foundation, completed in 2011 by tenured and tenure-track academic STEM faculty from higher education institutions in the United States. Findings suggest that there is no gender difference in career advancement controlling for mentoring resources and gender homophily in the mentoring dyads and other factors including research productivity and domestic caregiving responsibilities. Findings also show that the positive relationship between

  3. Career Advancement Outcomes in Academic Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM): Gender, Mentoring Resources, and Homophily

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sang Eun

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation examines gender differences in career advancement outcomes among academic science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) scientists. In particular, this research examines effects of gender, PhD advisors and postdoctoral supervisors mentoring resources and gender homophily in the mentoring dyads on the career advancement…

  4. Barriers to advancement in academic surgery: views of senior residents and early career faculty.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Amalia; Elder, William B; Crandall, Marie; Brasel, Karen; Hauschild, Tricia; Neumayer, Leigh

    2013-11-01

    A significant faculty attrition rate exists in academic surgery. The authors hypothesized that senior residents and early-career faculty members have different perceptions of advancement barriers in academic surgery. A modified version of the Career Barriers Inventory-Revised was administered electronically to surgical residents and early-career surgical faculty members at 8 academic medical centers. Residents identified a lack of mentorship as a career barrier about half as often as faculty members. Residents were twice as likely as faculty members to view childbearing as a career barrier. Many early-career faculty members cite a lack of mentors as a limitation to their career development in academic surgery. Childbearing remains a complex perceived influence for female faculty members in particular. Female faculty members commonly perceive differential treatment and barriers on the basis of their sex. Faculty development programs should address both systemic and sex-specific obstacles if academic surgery is to remain a vibrant field. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mediation Effect of Self-Efficacy on the Relationship between Mentoring Function and Career Advancement among Academics in Iran.

    PubMed

    Parsa, Bita; Parsa, Parisa; Parsa, Nakisa

    2016-10-01

    Despite the importance of social organizational factors in career advancement and promotion among academic employees, still some academic employees suffer from low career advancement and consequently low academic performance. Aim of this study was to examine the mediation effect of self-efficacy on relationship between mentoring and career advancement among academic employees in the two public universities in Iran. This survey research was done among 307 randomly selected academic employees to determine predictors of their career advancement. Self-administered questionnaires were used to collect data. The Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) methodology was applied to determine the best fitted model to predict career advancement. Analysis of data was performed using the Pearson's correlation analysis and SEM. The results show that self-efficacy was related to mentoring and career advancement (p<0.05). The effect of mentoring on career advancement was significant (p<0.05). Self-efficacy partially mediated the relationship between mentoring and career advancement (p<0.05). Academics need to be equipped with appropriate skills such as mentoring and enhance their self-efficacy to improve academic career advancement.

  6. Rank Advancement in Academic Careers: Sex Differences and the Effects of Productivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, J. Scott; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Presents evidence on sex differences in rank advancement in academic careers, and considers the relative importance of quality and quantity of publications. Results for 556 male and 450 female biochemists show the importance of time in rank and number of publications and that rates of promotion are lower for women. (SLD)

  7. Validating Student Satisfaction Related to Persistence, Academic Performance, Retention and Career Advancement within ODL Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sembiring, Maximus Gorky

    2015-01-01

    Student satisfaction associated with persistence, academic performance, retention, and its relations to career advancement were examined. It was aimed at measuring service quality (Servqual) dimensions as a foundation of satisfaction and how, in what comportments, they were interrelated. The study was conducted under explanatory-design. Data was…

  8. Innovative Practice in Advancement of Academic Nurse Educator Careers: Developing Scholarship From Program Grants.

    PubMed

    Eddy, Linda L; Hoeksel, Renee; Fitzgerald, Cindy; Doutrich, Dawn

    We describe an innovative practice in advancing careers of academic nurse educators: demonstrating scholarly productivity from program grants. Scholarly productivity is often narrowly defined, especially in research-intensive institutions. The expectation may be a career trajectory based on the traditional scholarship of discovery. However, nurse educators, especially at the associate and full professor ranks, are often involved in leadership activities that include writing and managing program grants. We encourage the academy to value and support the development of program grants that include significant scholarly components, and we offer exemplars of associate and full professor scholarship derived from these projects.

  9. Geographic mobility advances careers: study of the Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) program for women.

    PubMed

    McLean, Marsha R; Morahan, Page S; Dannels, Sharon A; McDade, Sharon A

    2013-11-01

    To explore whether geographic mobility is associated with career advancement of women in U.S. medical schools who are entering mid- to executive-level positions. Using an existing dataset of 351 participants in academic medicine who attended the Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) Program for Women (1996-2005) (adjusted to 345 participants in some analyses because data on initial faculty rank were missing), the authors conducted a quantitative study in 2009 to determine whether geographic mobility was associated with administrative promotion for those who relocated geographically (from employer while attending ELAM to employer at last job of record). Twenty-four percent of women (83/345) relocated geographically (movers) after attending ELAM. Moving had a positive association with career advancement (P = .001); odds for promotion were 168% higher for movers than for stayers [odds ratio Exp(β) = 2.684]. Movers attained higher administrative positions (P = .003), and more movers (60%) were promoted at the most recent job compared with stayers (40%) (P = .0001). Few movers changed city size; 70% already resided in large or urban cities where most medical schools are located. Age was not a barrier to mobility. Career advancement was not related to research reputation (National Institutes of Health grant award ranking) of participants' schools (either at time of attending ELAM or post-ELAM). Similar to findings outside academic medicine, 24% of women classified as geographic "movers" among midcareer faculty in medical schools attained career advantages. Psychosocial and socioeconomic factors underlying women's relocation decisions require additional study.

  10. Clinical pharmacy academic career transitions: Viewpoints from the fieldPart 1: Understanding feedback, evaluation, and advancement.

    PubMed

    Blackmer, Allison B; Thompson, Angela M; Jeffres, Meghan N; Glode, Ashley E; Mahyari, Nila; Thompson, Megan

    2018-02-01

    The six authors of this commentary series, who have recently transitioned into or within an academic career, discuss challenging aspects of an academic career change. This is a three-part commentary series that explores select challenges: 1) feedback, evaluation and advancement; 2) understanding and balancing of distribution of effort; 3) learning how and when to say yes. Faculty, or those interested in pursuing a career in pharmacy academia, can refer to this commentary series as a reference. Schools of pharmacy may utilize this as a tool for new faculty members during orientation in order to ensure smooth integration into the academic environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Academic career in medicine – requirements and conditions for successful advancement in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Buddeberg-Fischer, Barbara; Stamm, Martina; Buddeberg, Claus

    2009-01-01

    Background Within the framework of a prospective cohort study of Swiss medical school graduates a sample of young physicians aspiring to an academic career were surveyed on their career support and barriers experienced up to their sixth year of postgraduate training. Methods Thirty-one junior academics took part in semi-structured telephone interviews in 2007. The interview guideline focused on career paths to date, career support and barriers experienced, and recommendations for junior and senior academics. The qualitatively assessed data were evaluated according to Mayring's content analysis. Furthermore, quantitatively gained data from the total cohort sample on person- and career-related characteristics were analyzed in regard to differences between the junior academics and cohort doctors who aspire to another career in medicine. Results Junior academics differ in terms of instrumentality as a person-related factor, and in terms of intrinsic career motivation and mentoring as career-related factors from cohort doctors who follow other career paths in medicine; they also show higher scores in the Career-Success Scale. Four types of career path could be identified in junior academics: (1) focus on basic sciences, (2) strong focus on research (PhD programs) followed by clinical training, (3) one to two years in research followed by clinical training, (4) clinical training and research in parallel. The interview material revealed the following categories of career-supporting experience: making oneself out as a proactive junior physician, research resources provided by superior staff, and social network; statements concerning career barriers encompassed interference between clinical training and research activities, insufficient research coaching, and personality related barriers. Recommendations for junior academics focused on mentoring and professional networking, for senior academics on interest in human resource development and being role models. Conclusion The

  12. Academic career in medicine: requirements and conditions for successful advancement in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Buddeberg-Fischer, Barbara; Stamm, Martina; Buddeberg, Claus

    2009-04-29

    Within the framework of a prospective cohort study of Swiss medical school graduates a sample of young physicians aspiring to an academic career were surveyed on their career support and barriers experienced up to their sixth year of postgraduate training. Thirty-one junior academics took part in semi-structured telephone interviews in 2007. The interview guideline focused on career paths to date, career support and barriers experienced, and recommendations for junior and senior academics. The qualitatively assessed data were evaluated according to Mayring's content analysis. Furthermore, quantitatively gained data from the total cohort sample on person- and career-related characteristics were analyzed in regard to differences between the junior academics and cohort doctors who aspire to another career in medicine. Junior academics differ in terms of instrumentality as a person-related factor, and in terms of intrinsic career motivation and mentoring as career-related factors from cohort doctors who follow other career paths in medicine; they also show higher scores in the Career-Success Scale. Four types of career path could be identified in junior academics: (1) focus on basic sciences, (2) strong focus on research (PhD programs) followed by clinical training, (3) one to two years in research followed by clinical training, (4) clinical training and research in parallel. The interview material revealed the following categories of career-supporting experience: making oneself out as a proactive junior physician, research resources provided by superior staff, and social network; statements concerning career barriers encompassed interference between clinical training and research activities, insufficient research coaching, and personality related barriers. Recommendations for junior academics focused on mentoring and professional networking, for senior academics on interest in human resource development and being role models. The conditions for an academic career in

  13. The ADVANCE Program: Targeting the Increase in the Participation and Advancement of Women in Academic Science and Engineering Careers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esperanca, S.

    2003-12-01

    The goal of NSF's ADVANCE Program is to help increase the participation of women in the scientific and engineering workforce through the increased representation and advancement of women in academic science and engineering careers. The Program tries to address this under representation by focusing on support for men and women with three approaches: institutional (Institutional Transformation), grass-root (Leadership), and individual (Fellows) support. The ADVANCE Program alternates with a round of Institutional and Leadership awards in one year and a Fellows competition the next. Since its inception in 2001, NSF has had two competitive rounds for each of the three award types and will have spent approximately 75 M\\ by the end of the next fiscal year (2004). The first and second ADVANCE Institutional Transformation competitions (FY 2001 and 2003) received over 70 proposals each. These awards are for multi-year support in the amount of 3-4M\\ each. Details and access to the websites for the ADVANCE programs of each institution can be found in NSF's ADVANCE webpage at http://nsf.gov/home/crssprgm/advance/itwebsites.htm. The number of proposals submitted for the Leadership awards competition dropped from 35 in 2001 to 26 in 2003, despite an increase in the allowed award size for the second round. In terms of projected goals, this part of ADVANCE is perhaps the most eclectic. Some Leadership awards were made to professional societies to work specifically with their respective scientific communities in identifying needs that might be peculiar to a field of science. In the first round of the Leadership awards, PI Mary-Anne Holmes of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and collaborators received a grant to work with the Association of Women Geoscientists to determine the current status of women geoscientists in the US. These grantees hope to disseminate the information gathered under this award broadly in order to educate women students and faculty on strategies to

  14. Academe's Glass Ceiling: Societal, Professional-Organizational, and Institutional Barriers to the Career Advancement of Academic Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bain, Olga; Cummings, William

    2000-01-01

    A survey of 10 national systems of higher education found that less than 10 percent of professors were women, and the proportion of female professors was negatively related to institutional prestige. This academic "glass ceiling" was related to women's shorter careers, tenure issues during hard times, and women's lower level of academic…

  15. A National Survey on the Effect of the Geriatric Academic Career Award in Advancing Academic Geriatric Medicine.

    PubMed

    Foley, Kevin T; Luz, Clare C; Hanson, Katherine V; Hao, Yuning; Ray, Elisia M

    2017-05-01

    A workforce that understands principles of geriatric medicine is critical to addressing the care needs of the growing elderly population. This will be impossible without a substantial increase in academicians engaged in education and aging research. Limited support of early-career clinician-educators is a major barrier to attaining this goal. The Geriatric Academic Career Award (GACA) was a vital resource that benefitted 222 junior faculty members. GACA availability was interrupted in 2006, followed by permanent discontinuation after the Geriatrics Workforce Education Program (GWEP) subsumed it in 2015, leaving aspiring clinician-educators with no similar alternatives. GACA recipients were surveyed in this cross-sectional, multimethod study to assess the effect of the award on career development, creation and dissemination of educational products, funding discontinuation consequences, and implications of program closure for the future of geriatric health care. Uninterrupted funding resulted in fulfillment of GACA goals (94%) and overall career success (96%). Collectively, awardees reached more than 40,700 learners. Funding interruption led to 55% working additional hours over and above an increased clinical workload to continue their GACA-related research and scholarship. Others terminated GACA projects (36%) or abandoned academic medicine altogether. Of respondents currently at GWEP sites (43%), only 13% report a GWEP budget including GACA-like support. Those with GWEP roles attributed their current standing to experience gained through GACA funding. These consequences are alarming and represent a major setback to academic geriatrics. GACA's singular contribution to the mission of geriatric medicine must prompt vigorous efforts to restore it as a distinct funding opportunity. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  16. Analyzing the Relationship of Geographic Mobility and Institutional Prestige to Career Advancement of Women in Academic Medicine Pursuing Midcareer-, Senior-, or Executive-Level Administrative Positions: Implications for Career Advancement Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Marsha Renee

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship of geographic mobility and institutional prestige to career advancement defined as administrative promotions of women seeking midcareer-, senior-, or executive-level positions at academic health centers (AHCs) and their medical schools or in non-AHC related medical schools in the United…

  17. Comparison of College/Career Readiness Outcomes between the Advancement via Individual Determination (AVID) Program and the Traditional High School Academic Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Sandra K.

    2012-01-01

    This study compared selected college/career readiness outcomes for students attending an urban high school who voluntarily participated in an academic support program, Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID), to demographically similar/same school peers who completed the traditional academic program (TAP) of study. Grade point average,…

  18. Changing the academic culture: Valuing patents and commercialization toward tenure and career advancement

    PubMed Central

    Sanberg, Paul R.; Gharib, Morteza; Harker, Patrick T.; Kaler, Eric W.; Marchase, Richard B.; Sands, Timothy D.; Arshadi, Nasser; Sarkar, Sudeep

    2014-01-01

    There is national and international recognition of the importance of innovation, technology transfer, and entrepreneurship for sustained economic revival. With the decline of industrial research laboratories in the United States, research universities are being asked to play a central role in our knowledge-centered economy by the technology transfer of their discoveries, innovations, and inventions. In response to this challenge, innovation ecologies at and around universities are starting to change. However, the change has been slow and limited. The authors believe this can be attributed partially to a lack of change in incentives for the central stakeholder, the faculty member. The authors have taken the position that universities should expand their criteria to treat patents, licensing, and commercialization activity by faculty as an important consideration for merit, tenure, and career advancement, along with publishing, teaching, and service. This position is placed in a historical context with a look at the history of tenure in the United States, patents, and licensing at universities, the current status of university tenure and career advancement processes, and models for the future. PMID:24778248

  19. Changing the academic culture: valuing patents and commercialization toward tenure and career advancement.

    PubMed

    Sanberg, Paul R; Gharib, Morteza; Harker, Patrick T; Kaler, Eric W; Marchase, Richard B; Sands, Timothy D; Arshadi, Nasser; Sarkar, Sudeep

    2014-05-06

    There is national and international recognition of the importance of innovation, technology transfer, and entrepreneurship for sustained economic revival. With the decline of industrial research laboratories in the United States, research universities are being asked to play a central role in our knowledge-centered economy by the technology transfer of their discoveries, innovations, and inventions. In response to this challenge, innovation ecologies at and around universities are starting to change. However, the change has been slow and limited. The authors believe this can be attributed partially to a lack of change in incentives for the central stakeholder, the faculty member. The authors have taken the position that universities should expand their criteria to treat patents, licensing, and commercialization activity by faculty as an important consideration for merit, tenure, and career advancement, along with publishing, teaching, and service. This position is placed in a historical context with a look at the history of tenure in the United States, patents, and licensing at universities, the current status of university tenure and career advancement processes, and models for the future.

  20. Career development resource: academic career in surgical education.

    PubMed

    Sanfey, Hilary; Gantt, Nancy L

    2012-07-01

    Academic surgeons play an instrumental role in the training of our medical students and surgical residents. Although volunteer faculty often have an important role in the clinical development of surgeons-in-training, the tasks of curricular development, structured didactic sessions, professional advising, research sponsorship, and mentoring at all levels fall to the academic surgeon. Historically, the career advancement path for an academic physician favored grant acquisition and scholarly publication. Broader definitions of scholarship have emerged, along with corresponding modifications in academic award systems that allow advancement in faculty rank based on a surgeon's educational efforts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Warriors on the Path to Academic Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poodry, Clifton A.

    1996-01-01

    Electrical engineer Robert Whitman and microbiologist Gilbert John have pursued academic careers in order to advance their own research and serve as role models for Native American students. After receiving Ph.D.s, Whitman and John were appointed assistant professors at research-oriented universities. Sidebar addresses the role Native American…

  2. Career Advancement of Women Senior Academic Administrators in Indonesia: Supports and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murniati, Cecilia Titiek

    2012-01-01

    Increasing numbers of women have gained access to college and the college teaching profession worldwide. However, women continue to be underrepresented in academic, research, and leadership positions. Women who have aspirations for top leadership positions still encounter numerous internal and external challenges. Existent literature on women…

  3. Gender inequality in career advancement for females in Japanese academic surgery.

    PubMed

    Okoshi, Kae; Nomura, Kyoko; Fukami, Kayo; Tomizawa, Yasuko; Kobayashi, Katsutoshi; Kinoshita, Koichi; Sakai, Yoshiharu

    2014-11-01

    During the past three decades, the participation of women in medicine has increased from 10.6% (1986) to 19.7% (2012) in Japan. However, women continue to be underrepresented in the top tiers of academic medicine. We highlight gender inequality and discuss the difficulties faced by female surgeons in Japanese academic surgery. Using anonymous and aggregate employment data of medical doctors at Kyoto University Hospital from 2009 and 2013, and a commercially-published faculty roster in 2012-2013, we compared gender balance stratified by a professional and an academic rank. The numbers of total and female doctors who worked at Kyoto University Hospital were 656 and 132 (20.1%) in 2009 and 655 and 132 (20.2%) in 2013, respectively. Approximately half the men (n = 281) were in temporary track and the rest (n = 242) were in tenure track, but only one fifth of women (n = 24) were in tenure track compared to 108 women in temporary track (p < 0.0001) in 2013. There were three female associate professors in basic medicine (8.1%), two female professors in clinical non-surgical medicine (3.9%) and one female lecturer in clinical surgical medicine (2.3%) in 2012. Fewer female doctors were at senior positions and at tenure positions than male doctors at Kyoto University Hospital. There were no female associate and full professors in surgery. The status of faculty members indicates the gender differences in leadership opportunities in Japanese academic surgery.

  4. Career advancement of men and women in academic radiology: is the playing field level?

    PubMed

    Vydareny, K H; Waldrop, S M; Jackson, V P; Manaster, B J; Nazarian, G K; Reich, C A; Ruzal-Shapiro, C B

    2000-07-01

    The authors' purposes were to determine if there are gender differences in the speed of promotion and/or academic productivity in academic radiology and if this situation had changed since a previous study was performed in 1987. Surveys were distributed to faculty members of academic radiology departments in May 1997. A total of 707 surveys were analyzed according to gender for time at rank for assistant and associate professor levels, in relation to publication rate, grant funding rate, and distribution of professional time. There was no difference between genders in the time at assistant professor rank. Among all current professors, women had been associate professors longer than men, but there was no difference between genders for those who had been in academic radiology for less than 15 years. There was no gender difference at any rank in the rate of publishing original articles. There was no difference in funding rates, although men had more total grant support. Male associate professors reported spending more time in administration and slightly more time in total hours at work than did their female colleagues, and male professors spent slightly more time teaching residents. Otherwise, there is no difference in how men and women at any rank spend their professional time. There are, however, lower percentages of women in tenured positions and in the uppermost levels of departmental administration. The time at rank for men and women and their rate of publication appear to have equalized. Women still are underrepresented at the uppermost levels of departmental administration, however, and are less likely than men to hold tenured positions.

  5. [Women's academic careers in medicine].

    PubMed

    Schlichting, Ellen; Nielsen, Harriet Bjerrum; Fosså, Sophie Dorothea; Aasland, Olaf Gjerløw

    2007-08-23

    Few female doctors hold top academic positions at the University of Oslo. A working group was appointed by the Faculty of Medicine to investigate possible reasons for this and to come up with recommendations on how to increase the fraction of female professors. A questionnaire was sent to 875 medical graduates who had either completed or were taking a PhD at the University of Oslo. Two focus group interviews were also performed, one with female and one with male graduates. The questionnaire response rate was 42%. The genders did not differ concerning motivation to pursue academic careers, and they both wished to have better access to combined positions (academic and clinical work). Women needed more positive signals on being wanted as researchers. For women below 45 years of age, academic and clinical role models and a good network were considered to be especially important. Women emphasized the importance of equality at home and at work for pursuing an academic career more than men. The gender imbalance among medical professors will not resolve itself. Young women should be more actively identified and encouraged to pursue academic careers.

  6. Academic and Career Advancement for Black Male Athletes at NCAA Division I Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Ashley R.; Hawkins, Billy J.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter examines the structural arrangements and challenges many Black male athletes encounter as a result of their use of sport for upward social mobility. Recommendations to enhance their preparation and advancement are provided.

  7. Career-Success Scale – A new instrument to assess young physicians' academic career steps

    PubMed Central

    Buddeberg-Fischer, Barbara; Stamm, Martina; Buddeberg, Claus; Klaghofer, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Background Within the framework of a prospective cohort study of Swiss medical school graduates, a Career-Success Scale (CSS) was constructed in a sample of young physicians choosing different career paths in medicine. Furthermore the influence of personality factors, the participants' personal situation, and career related factors on their career success was investigated. Methods 406 residents were assessed in terms of career aspired to, and their career progress. The Career-Success Scale, consisting of 7 items, was developed and validated, addressing objective criteria of academic career advancement. The influence of gender and career aspiration was investigated by a two-factorial analysis of variance, the relationships between personality factors, personal situation, career related factors and the Career-Success Scale by a multivariate linear regression analysis. Results The unidimensional Career-Success Scale has an internal consistency of 0.76. It is significantly correlated at the bivariate level with gender, instrumentality, and all career related factors, particularly with academic career and received mentoring. In multiple regression, only gender, academic career, surgery as chosen specialty, and received mentoring are significant predictors. The highest values were observed in participants aspiring to an academic career, followed by those pursuing a hospital career and those wanting to run a private practice. Independent of the career aspired to, female residents have lower scores than their male colleagues. Conclusion The Career-Success Scale proved to be a short, reliable and valid instrument to measure career achievements. As mentoring is an independent predictor of career success, mentoring programs could be an important instrument to specifically enhance careers of female physicians in academia. PMID:18518972

  8. Career-success scale - a new instrument to assess young physicians' academic career steps.

    PubMed

    Buddeberg-Fischer, Barbara; Stamm, Martina; Buddeberg, Claus; Klaghofer, Richard

    2008-06-02

    Within the framework of a prospective cohort study of Swiss medical school graduates, a Career-Success Scale (CSS) was constructed in a sample of young physicians choosing different career paths in medicine. Furthermore the influence of personality factors, the participants' personal situation, and career related factors on their career success was investigated. 406 residents were assessed in terms of career aspired to, and their career progress. The Career-Success Scale, consisting of 7 items, was developed and validated, addressing objective criteria of academic career advancement. The influence of gender and career aspiration was investigated by a two-factorial analysis of variance, the relationships between personality factors, personal situation, career related factors and the Career-Success Scale by a multivariate linear regression analysis. The unidimensional Career-Success Scale has an internal consistency of 0.76. It is significantly correlated at the bivariate level with gender, instrumentality, and all career related factors, particularly with academic career and received mentoring. In multiple regression, only gender, academic career, surgery as chosen specialty, and received mentoring are significant predictors. The highest values were observed in participants aspiring to an academic career, followed by those pursuing a hospital career and those wanting to run a private practice. Independent of the career aspired to, female residents have lower scores than their male colleagues. The Career-Success Scale proved to be a short, reliable and valid instrument to measure career achievements. As mentoring is an independent predictor of career success, mentoring programs could be an important instrument to specifically enhance careers of female physicians in academia.

  9. Academic Couples, Parenthood and Women's Research Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vohlídalová, Marta

    2017-01-01

    The paper focuses on dual-career academic couples, how they combine careers and parenthood and how their strategies translate into employment pathways of researchers, and especially women researchers. Based on sixteen in-depth interviews with dual-career academic couples, the analysis identified two types of partnerships which differed in terms of…

  10. Clinical pharmacy academic career transitions: Viewpoints from the field.

    PubMed

    Blackmer, Allison B; Thompson, Angela M; Jeffres, Meghan N; Glode, Ashley E; Thompson, Megan; Mahyari, Nila

    2018-02-01

    The six authors of this commentary series, who have recently transitioned into or within an academic career, discuss challenging aspects of an academic career change. This is a three-part commentary series that explores select challenges: 1) feedback, evaluation, and advancement; 2) understanding and balancing of distribution of effort; 3) learning how and when to say yes. Faculty, or those interested in pursuing a career in pharmacy academia, can refer to this commentary series as a reference. Schools of pharmacy may utilize this as a tool for new faculty members during orientation in order to ensure smooth integration into the academic environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. What Is Career Success for Academic Hospitalists? A Qualitative Analysis of Early-Career Faculty Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Cumbler, Ethan; Yirdaw, Essey; Kneeland, Patrick; Pierce, Read; Rendon, Patrick; Herzke, Carrie; Jones, Christine D

    2018-06-01

    Understanding the concept of career success is critical for hospital medicine groups seeking to create sustainably rewarding faculty positions. Conceptual models of career success describe both extrinsic (compensation and advancement) and intrinsic (career satisfaction and job satisfaction) domains. How hospitalists define career success for themselves is not well understood. In this study, we qualitatively explore perspectives on how early-career clinician-educators define career success. We developed a semistructured interview tool of open-ended questions validated by using cognitive interviewing. Transcribed interviews were conducted with 17 early-career academic hospitalists from 3 medical centers to thematic saturation. A mixed deductiveinductive, qualitative, analytic approach was used to code and map themes to the theoretical framework. The single most dominant theme participants described was "excitement about daily work," which mapped to the job satisfaction organizing theme. Participants frequently expressed the importance of "being respected and recognized" and "dissemination of work," which were within the career satisfaction organizing theme. The extrinsic organizing themes of advancement and compensation were described as less important contributors to an individual's sense of career success. Ambivalence toward the "academic value of clinical work," "scholarship," and especially "promotion" represented unexpected themes. The future of academic hospital medicine is predicated upon faculty finding career success. Clinician-educator hospitalists view some traditional markers of career advancement as relevant to success. However, early-career faculty question the importance of some traditional external markers to their personal definitions of success. This work suggests that the selfconcept of career success is complex and may not be captured by traditional academic metrics and milestones. © 2018 Society of Hospital Medicine

  12. The declining interest in an academic career

    PubMed Central

    Sauermann, Henry

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that science & engineering PhD students lose interest in an academic career over the course of graduate training. It is not clear, however, whether this decline reflects students being discouraged from pursuing an academic career by the challenges of obtaining a faculty job or whether it reflects more fundamental changes in students’ career goals for reasons other than the academic labor market. We examine this question using a longitudinal survey that follows a cohort of PhD students from 39 U.S. research universities over the course of graduate training to document changes in career preferences and to explore potential drivers of such changes. We report two main results. First, although the vast majority of students start the PhD interested in an academic research career, over time 55% of all students remain interested while 25% lose interest entirely. In addition, 15% of all students were never interested in an academic career during their PhD program, while 5% become more interested. Thus, the declining interest in an academic career is not a general phenomenon across all PhD students, but rather reflects a divergence between those students who remain highly interested in an academic career and other students who are no longer interested in one. Second, we show that the decline we observe is not driven by expectations of academic job availability, nor by related factors such as postdoctoral requirements or the availability of research funding. Instead, the decline appears partly due to the misalignment between students’ changing preferences for specific job attributes on the one hand, and the nature of the academic research career itself on the other. Changes in students’ perceptions of their own research ability also play a role, while publications do not. We discuss implications for scientific labor markets, PhD career development programs, and science policy. PMID:28922403

  13. The declining interest in an academic career.

    PubMed

    Roach, Michael; Sauermann, Henry

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that science & engineering PhD students lose interest in an academic career over the course of graduate training. It is not clear, however, whether this decline reflects students being discouraged from pursuing an academic career by the challenges of obtaining a faculty job or whether it reflects more fundamental changes in students' career goals for reasons other than the academic labor market. We examine this question using a longitudinal survey that follows a cohort of PhD students from 39 U.S. research universities over the course of graduate training to document changes in career preferences and to explore potential drivers of such changes. We report two main results. First, although the vast majority of students start the PhD interested in an academic research career, over time 55% of all students remain interested while 25% lose interest entirely. In addition, 15% of all students were never interested in an academic career during their PhD program, while 5% become more interested. Thus, the declining interest in an academic career is not a general phenomenon across all PhD students, but rather reflects a divergence between those students who remain highly interested in an academic career and other students who are no longer interested in one. Second, we show that the decline we observe is not driven by expectations of academic job availability, nor by related factors such as postdoctoral requirements or the availability of research funding. Instead, the decline appears partly due to the misalignment between students' changing preferences for specific job attributes on the one hand, and the nature of the academic research career itself on the other. Changes in students' perceptions of their own research ability also play a role, while publications do not. We discuss implications for scientific labor markets, PhD career development programs, and science policy.

  14. Predictors of an academic career on radiology residency applications.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Lars J; Shapiro, Lauren M; Singhapricha, Terry; Mazurowski, Maciej A; Desser, Terry S; Maxfield, Charles M

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate radiology residency applications to determine if any variables are predictive of a future academic radiology career. Application materials from 336 radiology residency graduates between 1993 and 2010 from the Department of Radiology, Duke University and between 1990 and 2010 from the Department of Radiology, Stanford University were retrospectively reviewed. The institutional review boards approved this Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant study with a waiver of informed consent. Biographical (gender, age at application, advanced degrees, prior career), undergraduate school (school, degree, research experience, publications), and medical school (school, research experience, manuscript publications, Alpha Omega Alpha membership, clerkship grades, United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 and 2 scores, personal statement and letter of recommendation reference to academics, couples match status) data were recorded. Listing in the Association of American Medical Colleges Faculty Online Directory and postgraduation publications were used to determine academic status. There were 72 (21%) radiologists in an academic career and 264 (79%) in a nonacademic career. Variables associated with an academic career were elite undergraduate school (P = .003), undergraduate school publications (P = .018), additional advanced degrees (P = .027), elite medical school (P = .006), a research year in medical school (P < .001), and medical school publications (P < .001). A multivariate cross-validation analysis showed that these variables are jointly predictive of an academic career (P < .001). Undergraduate and medical school rankings and publications, as well as a medical school research year and an additional advanced degree, are associated with an academic career. Radiology residency selection committees should consider these factors in the context of the residency application if they wish to recruit future academic radiologists. Copyright

  15. Perspective: adopting an asset bundles model to support and advance minority students' careers in academic medicine and the scientific pipeline.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Japera; Bozeman, Barry

    2012-11-01

    The authors contend that increasing diversity in academic medicine, science, technology, engineering, and mathematics requires the adoption of a systematic approach to retain minority high school and college students as they navigate the scientific pipeline. Such an approach should focus on the interrelated and multilayered challenges that these students face. The authors fuse an alternative conceptualization of the scientific and technical human capital theoretical framework and the theory of social identity contingencies to offer a conceptual model for targeting the critical areas in which minority students may need additional support to continue toward careers in science. Their proposed asset bundles model is grounded in the central premise that making greater progress in recruiting and retaining minorities likely requires institutions to respond simultaneously to various social cues that signal devaluation of certain identities (e.g., gender, race, socioeconomic status). The authors define "asset bundles" as the specific sets of abilities and resources individuals develop that help them succeed in educational and professional tasks, including but not limited to science and research. The model consists of five asset bundles, each of which is supported in the research literature as a factor relevant to educational achievement and, the authors contend, may lead to improved and sustained diversity: educational endowments, science socialization, network development, family expectations, and material resources. Using this framework, they suggest possible ways of thinking about the task of achieving diversity as well as guideposts for next steps. Finally, they discuss the feasibility of implementing such an approach.

  16. Perspective: Adopting an Asset Bundle Model to Support and Advance Minority Students’ Careers in Academic Medicine and the Scientific Pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Japera; Bozeman, Barry

    2012-01-01

    The authors contend that increasing diversity in the scientific pipeline (e.g., academic medicine, science, technology, engineering and mathematics) requires a systematic approach to retain minority high school and college students. Such an approach should focus on the interrelated and multilayered challenges that these students face. The authors fuse an alternative conceptualization of the scientific and technical human capital theoretical framework and the theory of social identity contingencies to offer a conceptual model for targeting the critical areas in which minority students may need additional support in order to continue toward a career in science. Their proposed asset bundles model is grounded in the central premise that making greater progress in recruiting and retaining minorities likely requires institutions to respond simultaneously to various social cues that signal devaluation of certain identities (e.g., gender, race, or socioeconomic status). The authors define “asset bundles” as the specific sets of abilities and resources individuals develop that help them succeed in educational and professional tasks, including but not limited to science and research. The model consists of five asset bundles, each of which is supported in the research literature as a factor relevant to educational achievement and, the authors contend, may lead to improved and sustained diversity: educational endowments, science socialization, network development, family expectations, and material resources. Using this framework, they suggest possible ways of thinking about the task of achieving diversity as well as guideposts for next steps. Finally, they discuss the feasibility of implementing such an approach. PMID:23018329

  17. Challenges facing early career academic cardiologists.

    PubMed

    Tong, Carl W; Ahmad, Tariq; Brittain, Evan L; Bunch, T Jared; Damp, Julie B; Dardas, Todd; Hijar, Amalea; Hill, Joseph A; Hilliard, Anthony A; Houser, Steven R; Jahangir, Eiman; Kates, Andrew M; Kim, Darlene; Lindman, Brian R; Ryan, John J; Rzeszut, Anne K; Sivaram, Chittur A; Valente, Anne Marie; Freeman, Andrew M

    2014-06-03

    Early career academic cardiologists currently face unprecedented challenges that threaten a highly valued career path. A team consisting of early career professionals and senior leadership members of American College of Cardiology completed this white paper to inform the cardiovascular medicine profession regarding the plight of early career cardiologists and to suggest possible solutions. This paper includes: 1) definition of categories of early career academic cardiologists; 2) general challenges to all categories and specific challenges to each category; 3) obstacles as identified by a survey of current early career members of the American College of Cardiology; 4) major reasons for the failure of physician-scientists to receive funding from National Institute of Health/National Heart Lung and Blood Institute career development grants; 5) potential solutions; and 6) a call to action with specific recommendations. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Variables Impacting an Academic Pharmacy Career Choice

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Bonnie K.; Byrd, Debbie C.; Gupchup, Gireesh V.; Mark, Scott M.; Mobley Smith, Miriam A.; Rospond, Raylene M.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To identify the variables associated with an academic pharmacy career choice among the following groups: final professional-year doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students, pharmacy residents, pharmacy faculty members within the first 5 years of academic employment, and clinical pharmacy practitioners. Methods A cross-sectional design Web-based survey instrument was developed using the online tool SurveyMonkey. The survey link was distributed via e-mail and postcards, and data were collected anonymously. Quantitative analyses were used to describe the 2,494 survey respondents and compare their responses to 25 variables associated with an academic pharmacy career choice. Logistic regression models were used to predict the motivators/deterrents associated with an academic pharmacy career choice for each participant group. Results Across all participant groups, the potential need to generate one's salary was the primary deterrent and autonomy, flexibility, and the ability to shape the future of the profession were the primary motivators. Final-year pharmacy students who considered a career in academic pharmacy were significantly deterred by grant writing. The overall sample of participants who considered an academic pharmacy career was more likely to be motivated by the academic environment and opportunities to teach, conduct professional writing and reviews, and participate in course design and/or assessment. Conclusions This study demonstrates specific areas to consider for improved recruitment and retention of pharmacy faculty. For example, providing experiences related to pharmacy academia, such as allowing student participation in teaching and research, may stimulate those individuals' interest in pursuing an academic pharmacy career. PMID:18698388

  19. Academic career development in geriatric fellowship training.

    PubMed

    Medina-Walpole, Annette; Fonzi, Judith; Katz, Paul R

    2007-12-01

    Career development is rarely formalized in the curricula of geriatric fellowship programs, and the training of new generations of academic leaders is challenging in the 1 year of fellowship training. To effectively prepare fellows for academic leadership, the University of Rochester's Division of Geriatrics, in collaboration with the Warner School of Graduate Education, created a yearlong course to achieve excellence in teaching and career development during the 1-year geriatric fellowship. Nine interdisciplinary geriatric medicine, dentistry, and psychiatry fellows completed the course in its initial year (2005/06). As participants, fellows gained the knowledge and experience to successfully develop and implement educational initiatives in various formats. Fellows acquired teaching and leadership skills necessary to succeed as clinician-educators in an academic setting and to communicate effectively with patients, families, and colleagues. Fellows completed a series of individual and group education projects, including academic portfolio development, curriculum vitae revision, abstract submission and poster presentation at national meetings, lay lecture series development, and geriatric grand rounds presentation. One hundred percent of fellows reported that the course positively affected their career development, with six of nine fellows choosing academic careers. The course provided opportunities to teach and assess all six of the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education core competencies. This academic career development course was intended to prepare geriatric fellows as the next generation of academic leaders as clinician-teacher-scholars. It could set a new standard for academic development during fellowship training and provide a model for national dissemination in other geriatric and subspecialty fellowship programs.

  20. Guide to Academic Research Career Development

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Richard J.; Graboyes, Evan M.; Paniello, Randal C.; Paul Gubbels, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Development of an academic career easily follows a clinical course for which there are multiple role models; however, development of an academic research career involves few role models, and rarely do instructional guides reach out to the new faculty. The purpose of this article is to present the cumulative experiences of previously and currently funded authors to serve as a guide to young as well as older faculty for developing their research careers. Study Design Cumulative experiences of research‐dedicated faculty. Methods This article is the result of lessons learned from developing a Triological Society National Physician‐Scientist Program and Network, as well as the cumulative experiences of the authors. Results Table I illustrates key elements in developing a serious research career. Table II records the career courses of five surgeon‐scientists, highlighting the continued theme focus with theme‐specific publications and progressive grants. These cumulative experiences have face validity but have not been objectively tested. The value added is a composite of 50 years of experiences from authors committed to research career development for themselves and others. Conclusion Crucial elements in developing a research career are a desire for and commitment to high‐quality research, a focus on an overall theme of progressive hypothesis‐driven investigations, research guidance, a willingness to spend the time required, and an ability to learn from and withstand failure. Level of Evidence 5. PMID:28894799

  1. The physics of an academic career.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Merry L; de Castro Brás, Lisandra E

    2017-12-01

    We adopted well-known physics equations to illustrate concepts for developing a successful academic career plan. Formulas for distance, force, momentum, and power are used to explain how to define goals and set a pace that maximizes success potential. Formulas for synergy, balance, and stress are used to highlight common obstacles encountered by both junior (untenured and early career) and established faculty and provide ways to circumvent or limit damage from setbacks. Combined, these formulas provide tips for thriving in an academic environment.

  2. Career cartography: a conceptualization of career development to advance health and policy.

    PubMed

    Feetham, Suzanne; Doering, Jennifer J

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to propose a conceptualization of career development that emphasizes the interdependence between research, practice, and policy. Career cartography applies three decades of career development experience to lay out a systematic, comprehensive, and iterative approach for planning and communicating the outcomes of science at any career stage. To inform practice and policy, nurse researchers must be clear on the intended destination and trajectory of the science, and be skilled in communicating that science and vision to diverse stakeholders. Career cartography builds on the science of cartography, is developed within the context of public and health policy, and is composed of several components, including a destination statement, career mapping, a supportive career cartography team, and use of communication and dissemination strategies. The successful utilization of career cartography may accelerate advancement of individual careers, scientific impact, and the discipline as a whole by guiding nurse researchers to be deliberative in career planning and to communicate successfully the outcomes of research across a wide variety of stakeholders. Career cartography provides a framework for planning a nurse researcher's program of research and scholarship to advance science, policy, and health of the public. Career cartography guides nurse researchers to realize their full potential to advance the health of the public and inform public and health policy in academic and practice environments. © 2014 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  3. Self-Sabotage in the Academic Career

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sternberg, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Pogo recognized long ago that we often are our own worst enemies. Sure, he was a cartoon character, but he had a point--especially in higher education, where self-sabotage seems to be a standard characteristic of academic careers. In the author's 30 years as a professor, five years as a dean, and three years as a provost, he has observed many…

  4. Dual-Career Couples and Academic Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiler, Susan C.; Yancey, Paul H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes the major challenges of accommodating dual-career couples in academic science and some of the current responses to those challenges from institutions of higher learning. Discusses prevailing perceptions concerning household responsibility, the science work ethic, job procurement, continued discrimination against women, and future…

  5. Careers and Couples: An Academic Question.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffmann, Leonore, Ed.; DeSole, Gloria, Ed.

    The 20 articles in this collection concern issues faced by couples in academe. One group of articles considers part-time careers, independent scholarly work, or intermittent employment, which may be viable alternatives for women with families or those who feel less need for a full-time job. The need for institutional policies to support part-time…

  6. Getting Started in Your Academic Career

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniel, Kalmia E.

    An academic career is certainly one of great fulfillment and pride. After completing graduate school and postdoctoral work, perhaps even spending some time working in industry, it is now time to set up a laboratory, interview graduate students, find funding for these graduate students, adjust to becoming more of a lab manager than a researcher, write several grant proposals, write a syllabus or two, review manuscripts, and write a few of your own (or at least edit your students'), and serve on a myriad of university and departmental committees. Working in academia is a challenging and rewarding career. Being surrounded by the energy of students is contagious, and as you will discover an assistant professor needs that energy. An academic career at any level is the epitome of multitasking; juggling research, teaching, and service activities.

  7. Career Self-Management and Career Capital of Mid-Level Administrators in Higher Education Who Previously Served as Professional Academic Advisors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Elecia Cole

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the prerequisites for career advancement helps to keep employees motivated and engaged. However, in the higher education (H.E.) workplace, where formalized career ladders are sparse and ambiguous for staff personnel--especially those in professional academic advising--employees who are interested in career advancement into mid-level…

  8. Interdisciplinarity within an Academic Career

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackmore, Paul; Kandiko, Camille B.

    2011-01-01

    This project identified academics who have been involved with interdisciplinary leadership initiatives and sought to find out what had motivated them, what issues they had encountered and how they had resolved them. A powerful message emerging is the central importance of motivation in interdisciplinary work. Interviewees spoke of leaving their…

  9. The Economics of Academic Advancement Within Surgery.

    PubMed

    Baimas-George, Maria; Fleischer, Brian; Korndorffer, James R; Slakey, Douglas; DuCoin, Christopher

    The success of an academic surgeon's career is often viewed as directly related to academic appointment; therefore, the sequence of promotion is a demanding, rigorous process. This paper seeks to define the financial implication of academic advancement across different surgical subspecialties. Data was collected from the Association of American Medical College's 2015 report of average annual salaries. Assumptions included 30 years of practice, 5 years as assistant professor, and 10 years as associate professor before advancement. The base formula used was: (average annual salary) × (years of practice [30 years - fellowship/research years]) + ($50,000 × years of fellowship/research) = total adjusted lifetime salary income. There was a significant increase in lifetime salary income with advancement from assistant to associate professor in all subspecialties when compared to an increase from associate to full professor. The greatest increase in income from assistant to associate professor was seen in transplant and cardiothoracic surgery (35% and 27%, respectively). Trauma surgery and surgical oncology had the smallest increases of 8% and 9%, respectively. With advancement to full professor, the increase in lifetime salary income was significantly less across all subspecialties, ranging from 1% in plastic surgery to 8% in pediatric surgery. When analyzing the economics of career advancement in academic surgery, there is a substantial financial benefit in lifetime income to becoming an associate professor in all fields; whereas, advancement to full professor is associated with a drastically reduced economic benefit. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Persistence and uncertainty in the academic career

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Alexander M.; Riccaboni, Massimo; Stanley, H. Eugene; Pammolli, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how institutional changes within academia may affect the overall potential of science requires a better quantitative representation of how careers evolve over time. Because knowledge spillovers, cumulative advantage, competition, and collaboration are distinctive features of the academic profession, both the employment relationship and the procedures for assigning recognition and allocating funding should be designed to account for these factors. We study the annual production ni(t) of a given scientist i by analyzing longitudinal career data for 200 leading scientists and 100 assistant professors from the physics community. Our empirical analysis of individual productivity dynamics shows that (i) there are increasing returns for the top individuals within the competitive cohort, and that (ii) the distribution of production growth is a leptokurtic “tent-shaped” distribution that is remarkably symmetric. Our methodology is general, and we speculate that similar features appear in other disciplines where academic publication is essential and collaboration is a key feature. We introduce a model of proportional growth which reproduces these two observations, and additionally accounts for the significantly right-skewed distributions of career longevity and achievement in science. Using this theoretical model, we show that short-term contracts can amplify the effects of competition and uncertainty making careers more vulnerable to early termination, not necessarily due to lack of individual talent and persistence, but because of random negative production shocks. We show that fluctuations in scientific production are quantitatively related to a scientist’s collaboration radius and team efficiency. PMID:22431620

  11. Career Choice in Academic Medicine: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Straus, Sharon E; Straus, Christine; Tzanetos, Katina

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To review systematically the evidence about what factors influence the decision to choose or not choose a career in academic medicine. DESIGN A systematic review of relevant literature from 1990 to May 2005. DATA SOURCES Searches of The Cochrane Library, Medline (using Ovid and PubMed) from 1990 to May 2005, and EMBASE from 1990 to May 2005 were completed to identify relevant studies that explored the influential factors. Additional articles were identified from searching the bibliographies of retrieved articles. SELECTION OF STUDIES We attempted to identify studies that included residents, fellows, or staff physicians. No restrictions were placed on the study methodologies identified and all articles presenting empirical evidence were retrieved. For cohort, case-control, and cross-sectional studies, minimum inclusion criteria were the presence of defined groups, and the ability to extract relevant data. For surveys that involved case series, minimum inclusion criteria were a description of the population, and the availability of extractable data. Minimum inclusion criteria for qualitative studies were descriptions of the sampling strategy and methods. RESULTS The search identified 251 abstracts; 25 articles were included in this review. Completion of an MD with a graduate degree or fellowship program is associated with a career in academic medicine. Of the articles identified in this review, this finding is supported by the highest quality of evidence. Similarly, the completion of research and publication of this research in medical school and residency are associated with a career in academic medicine. The desire to teach, conduct research, and the intellectual stimulation and challenge provided in academia may also persuade people to choose this career path. The influence of a role model or a mentor was reported by physicians to impact their decision making. Trainees' interest in academic medicine wanes as they progress through their residency

  12. Career choice in academic medicine: systematic review.

    PubMed

    Straus, Sharon E; Straus, Christine; Tzanetos, Katina

    2006-12-01

    To review systematically the evidence about what factors influence the decision to choose or not choose a career in academic medicine. A systematic review of relevant literature from 1990 to May 2005. Searches of The Cochrane Library, Medline (using Ovid and PubMed) from 1990 to May 2005, and EMBASE from 1990 to May 2005 were completed to identify relevant studies that explored the influential factors. Additional articles were identified from searching the bibliographies of retrieved articles. We attempted to identify studies that included residents, fellows, or staff physicians. No restrictions were placed on the study methodologies identified and all articles presenting empirical evidence were retrieved. For cohort, case-control, and cross-sectional studies, minimum inclusion criteria were the presence of defined groups, and the ability to extract relevant data. For surveys that involved case series, minimum inclusion criteria were a description of the population, and the availability of extractable data. Minimum inclusion criteria for qualitative studies were descriptions of the sampling strategy and methods. The search identified 251 abstracts; 25 articles were included in this review. Completion of an MD with a graduate degree or fellowship program is associated with a career in academic medicine. Of the articles identified in this review, this finding is supported by the highest quality of evidence. Similarly, the completion of research and publication of this research in medical school and residency are associated with a career in academic medicine. The desire to teach, conduct research, and the intellectual stimulation and challenge provided in academia may also persuade people to choose this career path. The influence of a role model or a mentor was reported by physicians to impact their decision making. Trainees' interest in academic medicine wanes as they progress through their residency. In order to revitalize academic medicine, we must engage trainees

  13. Developing a career advancement program.

    PubMed

    Pinette, Shirley L

    2003-01-01

    Have you ever asked yourself, "What will I be doing five or ten years from now?" "Will I be doing the same thing I'm doing right now?" How would you feel if the answer were "yes"? I often wonder if any of my employees think the same thing. If they do, and the answer is "yes," just how does that make them feel? A day's work for managers can run the gamut--from billing and coding, to patient issues, to staff performance reviews, to CQI, to JCAHO-just to name a few. We're NEVER bored. Can we say the same of our employees, or do they do the same thing day in and day out? If so, it's no wonder that attitudes may become negative and motivation and productivity may decline. What are we as healthcare managers and administrators doing to value and continually train our employees so that staff morale, productivity and patient satisfaction remain high? What are we doing to keep those highly motivated employees motivated and challenged so that they don't get bored and want to move across town to our neighboring hospital or healthcare center? What are we doing to stop our employees from developing the "same job, different day" attitude? A Career Ladder program holds many benefits and opportunities for the motivated employee who seeks and needs additional challenges on the job. It affords them opportunities to learn new skills, demonstrate initiative, accept additional responsibilities and possibly advance into new positions. It also affords them opportunities to grow, to be challenged and to feel like an important and valued member of the radiology team and radiology department. For the manager, a Career Ladder program affords opportunities to retain valuable employees, attract new high-quality employees and maintain a workforce of well-trained highly motivated employees, which in turn will provide high quality products and services to our customers. A Career Ladder program is a "win-win" situation for everyone. For the last twelve months, I have been working with other

  14. The Reluctant Academic: Early-Career Academics in a Teaching-Orientated University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gale, Helen

    2011-01-01

    This paper is based on research into academic identities amongst early-career academics in a UK post-1992, teaching-orientated university. Literature around academic identity suggests five major academic roles: teaching, research, management, writing and networking. However, this appears to be a picture of an established mid-career academic in a…

  15. Making clinical academic careers more attractive: views from questionnaire surveys of senior UK doctors.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Trevor W; Smith, Fay; Goldacre, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    To report on doctors' reasons, as expressed to our research group, for choosing academic careers and on factors that would make a career in clinical academic medicine more attractive to them. Postal, email and web questionnaires. UK. A total of 6936 UK-trained doctors who graduated in 1996, 1999 and 2000. Open-ended comments about a career in clinical academic medicine. Of doctors who provided reasons for pursuing a long-term career in clinical academic medicine, the main reasons were enjoyment of academic work and personal satisfaction, whether expressed directly in those terms, or in terms of intellectual stimulation, enjoyment of research, teaching and the advancement of medicine, and the job being more varied than and preferable to clinical work alone. Doctors' suggestions for making clinical academic medicine more attractive included improved pay and job security, better funding of research, greater availability of academic posts, more dedicated time for research (and less service work) and more support and mentoring. Women were more likely than men to prioritise flexible working hours and part-time posts. Medical schools could provide more information, as part of student teaching, about the opportunities for and realities of a career in clinical academic medicine. Women, in particular, commented that they lacked the role models and information which would encourage them to consider seriously an academic career. Employers could increase academic opportunities by allowing more time for teaching, research and study and should assess whether job plans make adequate allowance for academic work.

  16. Research Productivity by Career Stage among Korean Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Jisun

    2014-01-01

    This study explores Korean academics' changes in research productivity by career stage. Career stage in this study is defined as a specific cohort based on one's length of job experience, with those in the same stage sharing similar interests, values, needs, and tasks; it is categorized into fledglings, maturing academics, established academics,…

  17. Women physicians: choosing a career in academic medicine.

    PubMed

    Borges, Nicole J; Navarro, Anita M; Grover, Amelia C

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent efforts to understand the complex process of physician career development, the medical education community has a poor understanding of why, how, and when women physicians embark on careers in academic medicine. In 2010, the authors phone-interviewed women physicians in academic medicine regarding why, how, and when they chose academic medicine careers. Project investigators first individually and then collectively analyzed transcripts to identify themes in the data. Through analyzing the transcripts of the 53 interviews, the investigators identified five themes related to why women choose careers in academic medicine: fit, aspects of the academic health center environment, people, exposure, and clinical medicine. They identified five themes related to how women make the decision to enter academic medicine: change in specialty, dissatisfaction with former career, emotionality, parental influence, and decision-making styles. The authors also identified four themes regarding when women decide to enter academic medicine: as a practicing physician, fellow, resident, or medical student. Choosing a career in academic medicine is greatly influenced by the environment in which one trains and by people-be they faculty, mentors, role models, or family. An interest in teaching is a primary reason women choose a career in academic medicine. Many women physicians entering academic medicine chose to do so after or during fellowship, which is when they became more aware of academic medicine as a possible career. For many women, choosing academic medicine was not necessarily an active, planned decision; rather, it was serendipitous or circumstantial.

  18. Women Physicians: Choosing a Career in Academic Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Nicole J.; Navarro, Anita M.; Grover, Amelia C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Despite recent efforts to understand the complex process of physician career development, the medical education community has a poor understanding of why, how, and when women physicians embark on a career in academic medicine. Method In 2010, the authors phone-interviewed women physicians in academic medicine regarding why, how, and when they chose an academic medicine career. Project investigators first individually and then collectively analyzed transcripts to identify themes in the data. Results Through analyzing the transcripts of the 53 interviews, the investigators identified five themes related to why women choose careers in academic medicine: fit, aspects of the academic health center environment, people, exposure, and clincial medicine. They identified five themes related to how women make the decision to enter academic medicine: change in specialty, dissatisfaction with former career, emotionality, parental influence, and decision-making styles. The authors also identified four themes regarding when women decide to enter academic medicine: as a practicing phyisican, fellow, resident, or medical student. Conclusions Choosing a career in academic medicine is greatly influenced by the environment in which one trains and by people—be they faculty, mentors, role models, or family. An interest in teaching is a primary reason women choose a career in academic medicine. Many women physicians entering acadmic medicine chose this after or during fellowship, which is when they became more aware of academic medicine as a possible career. For many women, choosing academic medicine was not necessarily an active, planned decision; rather it was serendipitous or circumstantial. PMID:22104052

  19. Career development for early career academics: benefits of networking and the role of professional societies.

    PubMed

    Ansmann, Lena; Flickinger, Tabor E; Barello, Serena; Kunneman, Marleen; Mantwill, Sarah; Quilligan, Sally; Zanini, Claudia; Aelbrecht, Karolien

    2014-10-01

    Whilst effective networking is vitally important for early career academics, understanding and establishing useful networks is challenging. This paper provides an overview of the benefits and challenges of networking in the academic field, particularly for early career academics, and reflects on the role of professional societies in facilitating networking. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Jumpstarting Academic Careers: A Workshop and Tools for Career Development in Anesthesiology.

    PubMed

    Yanofsky, Samuel D; Voytko, Mary Lou; Tobin, Joseph R; Nyquist, Julie G

    2011-01-01

    Career development is essential and has the potential to assist in building a sustained faculty within academic departments of Anesthesiology. Career development is essential for growth in academic medicine. Close attention to the details involved in career management, goal setting as part of career planning, and professional networking are key elements. This article examines the specific educational strategies involved in a 120 minute workshop divided into four 25 minute segments with 20 minutes at the end for discussion for training junior faculty in career development. The teaching methods include 1) brief didactic presentations, 2) pre-workshop completion of two professional development tools, 3) facilitated small group discussion using trained facilitators and 4) use of a commitment to change format. Three major learning tools were utilized in conjunction with the above methods: a professional network survey, a career planning and development form and a commitment to change form. Forty one participants from 2009 reported 80 projected changes in their practice behaviors in relation to career management: Build or enhance professional network and professional mentoring (36.3%); Set career goals, make a plan, follow though, collaborate, publish (35.1%); Increase visibility locally or nationally (10.0%); Building core skills, such as clinical, teaching, leading (36.3%); Identify the criteria for promotion in own institution (5.0%); Improved methods of documentation (2.5%). Over the past two years, the workshop has been very well received by junior faculty, with over 95% marking each of the following items as excellent or good (presentation, content, audiovisuals and objectives met). The challenge for continuing development and promotion of academic anesthesiologists lies in the explicit training of faculty for career advancement. Designing workshops using educational tools to promote a reflective process of the faculty member is the one method to meet this

  1. Negotiation in academic medicine: a necessary career skill.

    PubMed

    Sarfaty, Suzanne; Kolb, Deborah; Barnett, Rosalind; Szalacha, Laura; Caswell, Cheryl; Inui, Thomas; Carr, Phyllis L

    2007-03-01

    Negotiation and its use in academic medicine have not been studied. Little is known about faculty experience with negotiation or its potential benefits for academe. Barriers to negotiation and how they can be addressed, especially for faculty without perceived skill in negotiation, are unknown. To better understand the problems that such faculty experience, we completed in-depth, individual telephone interviews of 20 academic medical faculty at 11 of the 24 medical schools in the National Faculty Survey, all of whom perceived difficulty in negotiation. Faculty were stratified by rank, gender, and degree. Semistructured interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed by five reviewers. We explored the role of negotiation in academe, barriers to negotiation, what faculty and institutions can do to improve the use of negotiation, and possible differences in negotiation by gender. Faculty were relatively unaware of the possible uses of negotiation to advance their work in academe. Women tended to see negotiation as less important to an academic career than did their male colleagues. The perceived hierarchy and secrecy of many academic medical centers was believed to create a difficult environment for negotiation. For effective negotiation to occur, faculty stated the need to prepare, gather information, especially on compensation and resources, and to know their priorities. Preparation was particularly important for women, correlating with greater comfort with the degree of aggressiveness in the negotiation and greater self-confidence after the negotiation. These informants suggested that institutions need to provide more transparent information on salary and promotion guidelines. Further, institutions need to empower faculty with a solid understanding of institutional policy, goals, and resource needs of academic life. Many medical faculty are insufficiently aware of, or skilled in, the negotiation process and find significant barriers to negotiate in academe

  2. Adaptation: paradigm for the gut and an academic career.

    PubMed

    Warner, Brad W

    2013-01-01

    Adaptation is an important compensatory response to environmental cues resulting in enhanced survival. In the gut, the abrupt loss of intestinal length is characterized by increased rates of enterocyte proliferation and apoptosis and culminates in adaptive villus and crypt growth. In the development of an academic pediatric surgical career, adaptation is also an important compensatory response to survive the ever changing research, clinical, and economic environment. The ability to adapt in both situations is critical for patients and a legacy of pediatric surgical contributions to advance our knowledge of multiple conditions and diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Early Career Academic Mentoring Using Twitter: The Case of #ECRchat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Hazel; Wheat, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Early career academics around the world frequently see themselves as being in need of targeted career support to navigate the years directly following PhD graduation. The growth of discussion groups on Twitter that target these users raises questions about their potential usefulness to address career development support needs. This paper reflects…

  4. Students' Perception of IS Academic Programs, IS Careers, and Outsourcing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martz, Ben; Cata, Teuta

    2008-01-01

    The authors compared the perceptions of information systems (IS) students with those of IS practitioners regarding IS careers, the practice of outsourcing, and academic programs. Results indicate that students and practitioners appreciate the integration of real-life practice in academic programs and that the general perception of IS careers is…

  5. Career, Family, and Institutional Variables in the Work Lives of Academic Women in the Chemical Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassinger, Ruth E.; Scantlebury, Kathryn; Richmond, Geraldine

    This article presents quantitative results of a study of 139 academic women in the chemical sciences who participated in a professional development program sponsored by the Committee on the Advancement of Women Chemists. The study investigated variables frequently examined in the vocational psychology of women: approaches to achievement, coping strategies, career advancement, the home-work interface, workplace climate, and mentoring. The article presents and discusses results in the context of unique issues faced by women in scientific careers.

  6. Building blocks for career advancement.

    PubMed

    Broomall, Thomas; Snyder, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    After attaining IAHSS certification, protective services officers at CCHMC continue on a Career Ladder Program designed to improve knowledge and performance and improve the chances of officer retention. That program is described in detail in this article.

  7. Toward late career transitioning: a proposal for academic surgeons.

    PubMed

    Richards, Robin; McLeod, Robin; Latter, David; Keshavjee, Shaf; Rotstein, Ori; Fehlings, Michael G; Ahmed, Najma; Nathens, Avery; Rutka, James

    2017-09-01

    In the absence of a defined retirement age, academic surgeons need to develop plans for transition as they approach the end of their academic surgical careers. The development of a plan for late career transition represents an opportunity for departments of surgery across Canada to initiate a constructive process in cooperation with the key stakeholders in the hospital or institution. The goal of the process is to develop an individual plan for each faculty member that is agreeable to the academic surgeon; informs the surgical leadership; and allows the late career surgeon, the hospital, the division and the department to make plans for the future. In this commentary, the literature on the science of aging is reviewed as it pertains to surgeons, and guidelines for late career transition planning are shared. It is hoped that these guidelines will be of some value to academic programs and surgeons across the country as late career transition models are developed and adopted.

  8. Australian academic primary health-care careers: a scoping survey.

    PubMed

    Barton, Christopher; Reeve, Joanne; Adams, Ann; McIntyre, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    This study was undertaken to provide a snapshot of the academic primary health-care workforce in Australia and to provide some insight into research capacity in academic primary health care following changes to funding for this sector. A convenience sample of individuals self-identifying as working within academic primary health care (n=405) completed an anonymous online survey. Respondents were identified from several academic primary health-care mailing lists. The survey explored workforce demographics, clarity of career pathways, career trajectories and enablers/barriers to 'getting in' and 'getting on'. A mix of early career (41%), mid-career (25%) and senior academics (35%) responded. Early career academics tended to be female and younger than mid-career and senior academics, who tended to be male and working in 'balanced' (teaching and research) roles and listing medicine as their disciplinary background. Almost three-quarters (74%) indicated career pathways were either 'completely' or 'somewhat unclear', irrespective of gender and disciplinary backgrounds. Just over half (51%) had a permanent position. Males were more likely to have permanent positions, as were those with a medical background. Less than half (43%) reported having a mentor, and of the 57% without a mentor, more than two-thirds (69%) would like one. These results suggest a lack of clarity in career paths, uncertainty in employment and a large number of temporary (contract) or casual positions represent barriers to sustainable careers in academic primary health care, especially for women who are from non-medicine backgrounds. Professional development or a mentoring program for primary health-care academics was desired and may address some of the issues identified by survey respondents.

  9. Does gender affect career satisfaction and advancement in gastroenterology? Results of an AGA institute-sponsored survey.

    PubMed

    Gerson, Lauren B; Twomey, Kay; Hecht, Gail; Lee, Linda; McQuaid, Ken; Pizarro, Theresa T; Street, Sarah; Yoshida, Cynthia; Early, Dayna

    2007-04-01

    Women comprise 19% of the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) membership. We performed a prospective study to determine whether female gastroenterologists were less likely to achieve career advancement and satisfaction. We administered an online survey to AGA members from 2004-2006. The survey contained questions regarding effects of gender on career advancement, satisfaction with career, promotional policies, and integration of family and career. A total of 457 individuals (response rate 9% after 2 major invitations) completed the survey, including 262 (57%) women (20% in private practice, 53% in academic careers, and 27% trainees) and 195 men (23% in private practice, 58% in academic careers, and 19% trainees). The male gastroenterologists were significantly older (P < .005) and in their careers for significantly more years (P = .002). There were no significant differences with respect to marital status, number of children, or number of hours worked between the genders. Men were more likely to achieve the rank of full professor (P = .035), and significantly more women reported that gender affected their career advancement (47% vs 9%; P < .001). Women in academic careers reported less satisfaction with their careers (P = .01) and perceived more difficulty in achieving promotion and tenure. Women were more likely to choose private practice careers because of part-time options (P = .025). Equal numbers of men and women in practice reported difficulty balancing work and family life. Significantly more female than male gastroenterologists perceive that gender has affected their career advancement. Female academic gastroenterologists reported less overall career satisfaction and promotion than male academic gastroenterologists.

  10. Nurses' self-efficacy and academic degree advancement.

    PubMed

    Winslow, Susan; DeGuzman, Pamela; Kulbok, Pamela; Jackson, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    The last decade has brought about a synergy of influences for registered nurses to advance their academic preparation. Literature indicates that there is correlation between self-efficacy and goal establishment and success. The purpose of this project was to evaluate the relationship between self-efficacy and advancing academic aspirations of registered nurses. Findings indicated that there was a trend toward a difference in the self-efficacy of nurses who began their career with a diploma or associate degree and went on for academic advancement and those who did not.

  11. Factors Influencing American Plastic Surgery Residents Toward an Academic Career.

    PubMed

    Chetta, Matthew D; Sugg, Kristoffer B; Diaz-Garcia, Rafael J; Kasten, Steven J

    2018-02-01

    Plastic surgery residency program directors have an interest in recruiting applicants who show an interest in an academic practice. Medical school achievements (ie, United States Medical Licensing Examination® scores, publications, and Alpha Omega Alpha status) are metrics assessed to grade applicants but may not correlate with ultimately choosing an academic career. This study was designed to investigate factors influencing residents' choices for or against academic careers. A 25-item online questionnaire was designed to measure baseline interest in academic plastic surgery and factors that influence decisions to continue on or abandon that career path. This questionnaire was disseminated to the integrated/combined plastic surgery residents during the 2013 to 2014 academic year. One hundred twenty-five respondents indicated that they were currently interested in pursuing academic practice (n = 78) or had lost interest in academic practice (n = 47). Among all respondents, 92.8% (n = 116) stated they were interested in academic careers at the time of residency application, but one-third (n = 41) subsequently lost interest. Those residents who retained interest in academic careers indicated resident/medical student educational opportunities (57%) and complexity of patients (52%) as reasons. Those who lost interest cited a lack of autonomy (43%), publishing requirements (32%), and income discrepancy (26%) as reasons. Many residents report losing interest in academics during residency. Traditional metrics valued in the recruitment process may not serve as positive predictors of an academic career path. Reasons why residents lose interest are not easily correctable, but mentorship, adequate career counseling, and research opportunities during training remain factors that can be addressed across all residency programs.

  12. Developing a clinical academic career pathway for nursing.

    PubMed

    Coombs, Maureen; Latter, Sue; Richardson, Alison

    Since the publication of the UK Clinical Research Collaboration's (UKRC, 2007) recommendations on careers in clinical research, interest has grown in the concept of clinical academic nursing careers, with increased debate on how such roles might be developed and sustained (Department of Health, 2012). To embed clinical academic nursing roles in the NHS and universities, a clear understanding and appreciation of the contribution that such posts might make to organisational objectives and outcomes must be developed. This paper outlines an initiative to define the potential practice and research contribution of clinical academic roles through setting out role descriptors. This exercise was based on our experience of a clinical academic career initiative at the University of Southampton run in partnership with NHS organisations. Role descriptors were developed by a group of service providers, academics and two clinical academic award-holders from the local programme. This paper outlines clinical academic roles from novice to professor and describes examples of role descriptors at the different levels of a career pathway. These descriptors are informed by clinical academic posts in place at Southampton as well as others at the planning stage. Understanding the nature of clinical academic posts and the contribution that these roles can make to healthcare will enable them to become embedded into organisational structures and career pathways.

  13. Making clinical academic careers more attractive: views from questionnaire surveys of senior UK doctors

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Trevor W; Goldacre, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives To report on doctors’ reasons, as expressed to our research group, for choosing academic careers and on factors that would make a career in clinical academic medicine more attractive to them. Design Postal, email and web questionnaires. Setting UK. Participants A total of 6936 UK-trained doctors who graduated in 1996, 1999 and 2000. Main outcome measures Open-ended comments about a career in clinical academic medicine. Results Of doctors who provided reasons for pursuing a long-term career in clinical academic medicine, the main reasons were enjoyment of academic work and personal satisfaction, whether expressed directly in those terms, or in terms of intellectual stimulation, enjoyment of research, teaching and the advancement of medicine, and the job being more varied than and preferable to clinical work alone. Doctors’ suggestions for making clinical academic medicine more attractive included improved pay and job security, better funding of research, greater availability of academic posts, more dedicated time for research (and less service work) and more support and mentoring. Women were more likely than men to prioritise flexible working hours and part-time posts. Conclusions Medical schools could provide more information, as part of student teaching, about the opportunities for and realities of a career in clinical academic medicine. Women, in particular, commented that they lacked the role models and information which would encourage them to consider seriously an academic career. Employers could increase academic opportunities by allowing more time for teaching, research and study and should assess whether job plans make adequate allowance for academic work. PMID:26380103

  14. [Postdoctoral lecturer thesis in medicine: academic competence or career booster?].

    PubMed

    Sorg, H; Betzler, C; Grieswald, C; Schwab, C G G; Tilkorn, D J; Hauser, J

    2016-06-01

    The postdoctoral lecturer thesis in medicine represents an essential success factor for the career of a physician; however, there is controversial discussion on whether this reflects academic competence or is more a career booster. In this context we conducted a survey among postdoctoral medical lecturers with the aim to evaluate the significance of this qualification. The online survey was performed using a questionnaire requesting biographical parameters and subjective ratings of topics concerning the postdoctoral lecturer thesis. Overall 628 questionnaires were included in the study. The significance of the postdoctoral qualification was rated high in 68.6 % and was seen to be necessary for professional advancement in 71.0 %. The chances of obtaining a full professorship after achieving a postdoctoral qualification were rated moderate to low (68.1 %); nevertheless, 92.3 % would do it again and 86.5 % would recommend it to colleagues. Accordingly, 78.8 % were against its abolishment. Wishes for reforms included standardized federal regulations, reduced dependency on professors and more transparency. The postdoctoral lecturer qualification in medicine is highly valued and the majority of responders did not want it to be abolished. Although the chances for a full professorship were only rated low, successful graduation seems to be beneficial for the career; however, there is a need for substantial structural and international changes.

  15. An index to characterize female career promotion in academic medicine.

    PubMed

    Brüggmann, Dörthe; Groneberg, David A

    2017-01-01

    Imbalances in female career promotion are a key factor of gender disparities at the workplace. They may lead to stress and stress-related diseases including burnout, depression or cardiovascular diseases. Since this problem cannot be generalized and varies between different fields, new approaches are needed to assess and describe the magnitude of the problem in single fields of work. To construct a new index, operating figures of female and male medical students were collected for Germany in a period over 15 years and their progression throughout their studies towards specialization and academic chair positions. By the use of different female to male ratios (f:m), we constructed an index that describes the extend by which women can ascent in their academic career by using the field of academic medicine as an example. A medical student f:m ratio of 1.54 (52,366 female vs. 34,010 male) was found for Germany in 2013. In 1998, this f:m ratio was 0.999. In the same year (2013), the OB/GYN hospital specialists' f:m ratio was 1.566 (3347 female vs. 2137 male physicians) and 0.577 (516 female vs 894 male physicians) for ENT hospital specialists, respectively. The f:m ratios concerning chairs of OB/GYN and ENT were 0.105 and 0.1, respectively. Then an index was generated that incorporated these operating figures with the student f:m ratio as denominator and the chair f:m ratio as numerator while the hospital specialist f:m ratio served as a corrector in the numerator in order to adjust to the attraction of a given field to female physicians. As a result, the index was 0.044 for OB/GYN and 0.113 for ENT instead of ideally ~1 in a completely gender harmonized situation. In summary, a new index to describe female career advancement was established for academic medicine. By the use of this index, different academic and medical fields can now be compared to each other and future benchmarks could be proposed. Also, country differences may be examined using the proposed index and

  16. The Impact of the Academic Revolution on Faculty Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Light, D. W., Jr.; And Others

    In this report a three-strand model for faculty careers is developed. These strands are the disciplinary, the institutional, and the external career of faculty. An attempt is made to determine the outcome of the "academic revolution" spoken of by Jencks and Reisman in their landmark study of that title. Some of the topics covered include faculty…

  17. States Seek High School Pathways Weaving Academic, Career Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawchuk, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Every student at Wheeling High School takes a full academic courseload. Many of the graduates of this 2,000-student school in Wheeling, Illinois, however, also emerge with significant experience in a career field. Those interested in health careers, for example, can work with student-athletes in the school's athletic training facility, earn a…

  18. Virginia's Academic and Career Plan Emphasizes Middle School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Virginia R.

    2010-01-01

    To have a meaningful, fulfilling career in the 21st century workplace, students need technical and academic skills as well as the ability to think and work collaboratively with others. Career education must begin in middle school or earlier to allow students time to develop the aptitudes, skills and attitudes necessary to develop an awareness of…

  19. Preparing Graduate Students for Non-Academic Careers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolf, Lawrence

    2014-03-01

    One of the primary topics discussed at the conference concerned career development, since most graduate students will not have the academic careers of their advisors. Goals included reviewing the primary functions of physicists in industry, evaluating how students are currently prepared for these careers, and identifying how to fill gaps in preparation. A number of non-academic physicists provided insight into meeting these goals. Most physics graduate programs in general do not purposely prepare students for a non-academic career. Strategies for overcoming this shortcoming include advising students about these careers and providing training on broadly valued professional skills such as written and verbal communication, time and project management, leadership, working in teams, innovation, product development, and proposal writing. Alumni and others from industry could provide guidance on careers and skills and should be invited to talk to students. Academic training could also better prepare students for non-academic careers by including engineering and cross disciplinary problem solving as well as incorporating software and toolsets common in industry.

  20. Beyond Career Collection Development: Academic Libraries Collaborating with Career Center for Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pun, Raymond; Kubo, Hiromi

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores a case study at Fresno State and how the library partners with the career center to support student success in career placement and advancement. The article will share opportunities and challenges in forming and maintaining such partnership and offer some best practices to deliver career research workshops collaboratively.

  1. What is the relationship between number of publications during orthopaedic residency and selection of an academic career?

    PubMed

    Namdari, Surena; Jani, Sunil; Baldwin, Keith; Mehta, Samir

    2013-04-03

    Although many residents partake in academic pursuits, including the publication of clinical studies, laboratory research, case reports, and review articles, it is uncertain whether such experiences are associated with a career-long interest in an academic orthopaedic career. This single-institution study was conducted with use of data from an urban academic university-based residency program. An academic career was defined as attainment of a teaching title signifying inclusion in, or affiliation with, a teaching department. Additionally, an academic career was subclassified as either full academic or semi-academic on the basis of employment characteristics. A PubMed search was conducted for publications by all 130 orthopaedic surgery residents who began their training in our residency program during the 1987-1988 through 2003-2004 academic years. An analysis was performed to determine whether the number or type of publications during residency or demographic variables were associated with selection of an academic career on completion of training. The mean total number of publications during residency was greater for individuals who chose an academic career (4.8) than for those who chose a nonacademic career (2.4). When the year of residency graduation was considered, a greater number of publications during residency correlated with a more recent year of graduation in residents who selected an academic position. There were no differences with regard to sex, possession of advanced degrees, or completion of an additional research year between individuals who selected an academic compared with a nonacademic career. Graduates of our orthopaedic residency program who pursued an academic career were likely to have published more articles during residency compared with their nonacademic peers.

  2. Dental students' knowledge about careers in academic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Jeffery K; Jones, Daniel L; Seale, N Sue

    2006-10-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine the knowledge of fourth-year dental students regarding certain issues related to an academic career and to ascertain their intent to pursue such a career. Factors contributing to the students' intent to pursue academia were assessed, including the effect of dental school programs designed to educate students about a career in dental education. Surveys were sent to twelve U.S. dental schools that reported having either a mandatory or elective academic career educational program or no program at all. The surveys were completed by fourth-year dental students who were queried as to their knowledge of selected academic issues. Surveys were returned by 561 students from eleven of the twelve selected dental schools. Knowledge level of academic issues among respondents was overwhelmingly low. Factors contributing to the intent to pursue some form of faculty career were gender, plans to specialize, knowledge of academic issues, having a parent in higher education, and personal teaching experience. The results of this study suggest that dental students in general do not possess the knowledge and information necessary to make an informed decision regarding a career in dental education.

  3. Early predictors of career achievement in academic medicine.

    PubMed

    Brancati, F L; Mead, L A; Levine, D M; Martin, D; Margolis, S; Klag, M J

    1992-03-11

    To identify early personal and scholastic factors that predict academic career choice and long-term career achievement among academic physicians. A longitudinal cohort study. Nine hundred forty-four male physicians who graduated from The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, from 1948 through 1964. Career achievement outcomes included attained faculty rank in 1990 and the number of citations (20 to 24 years after graduation) to published work. Of the 944 physicians, 424 (45%) had chosen academic careers. Scholastic performance and research experience in medical school were independently associated with having chosen an academic career (P less than .001). Among academicians, higher attained rank in 1990 was independently associated with the following: (1) membership in Alpha Omega Alpha (relative risk [RR] = 4.94, P = .0001); (2) rank in the top third of the graduating class (RR = 2.68, P = .01); and (3) research experience in medical school (RR = 3.11, P = .0001). These three factors were also independently associated with more citations to participants' published work (P less than .05). These data suggest that scholastic performance and research experience during medical school predict career achievement in academic medicine over 20 years in the future.

  4. LAUC Seminars on Career Development for Academic Librarians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleingartner, Archie; And Others

    During 1976-77, the Berkeley Division of the Librarians Association of the University of California sponsored four seminars on career development for academic librarians. The speakers and their topics were: Archie Kleingartner (Vice President for Academic and Staff Personnel Relations, University of California), "The professional in the…

  5. Conversations with Professors: An Exploration of Academic Career Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gladwin, Maree; McDonald, Gael; McKay, Jade

    2014-01-01

    What factors contribute most to career success in academia? Using qualitative methods, the study sought information from eighteen full and chaired professors in Australia, New Zealand, USA and Canada. Reflecting on factors that contributed to academic success, participants identified: an "inherent" attraction to academic work; ability to…

  6. A Career Success Model for Academics at Malaysian Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu Said, Al-Mansor; Mohd Rasdi, Roziah; Abu Samah, Bahaman; Silong, Abu Daud; Sulaiman, Suzaimah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop a career success model for academics at the Malaysian research universities. Design/methodology/approach: Self-administered and online surveys were used for data collection among 325 academics from Malaysian research universities. Findings: Based on the analysis of structural equation modeling, the…

  7. Older Academics and Career Management: An Interdisciplinary Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larkin, Jacqui; Neumann, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    The academic workforce is among the oldest (Commonwealth of Australia, 2005) and arguably has the most highly qualified professionals within Australia. Yet career management for this group is seldom discussed. This paper considers Australia's ageing academic work-force and the human resource management challenges and implications this poses for…

  8. The Influence of a Career Pathways Model and Career Counseling on Students' Career and Academic Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stipanovic, Natalie; Stringfield, Sam; Witherell, Eric

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the effects of career pathways programming and targeted career counseling services on 71 high school seniors across seven schools engaged in school reforms funded through South Carolina's Education and Economic Development Act (EEDA). EEDA is a statewide, multipronged effort to improve academic achievement,…

  9. It's a wonderful life: a career as an academic scientist.

    PubMed

    Vale, Ronald D

    2010-01-01

    Many years of training are required to obtain a job as an academic scientist. Is this investment of time and effort worthwhile? My answer is a resounding "yes." Academic scientists enjoy tremendous freedom in choosing their research and career path, experience unusual camaraderie in their lab, school, and international community, and can contribute to and enjoy being part of this historical era of biological discovery. In this essay, I further elaborate by listing my top ten reasons why an academic job is a desirable career for young people who are interested in the life sciences.

  10. The Rock Valley College Career Advancement Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rock Valley Coll., Rockford, IL.

    The Career Advancement Program (CAP) is a joint effort by a 2-year college and industrial firms in its district to expand educational opportunities, to match college programs to local needs, and to help industry meet its present and future technical manpower needs. CAP has worked to attract students, full- or part-time, to technical training.…

  11. Predicting Career Advancement with Structural Equation Modelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heimler, Ronald; Rosenberg, Stuart; Morote, Elsa-Sofia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to use the authors' prior findings concerning basic employability skills in order to determine which skills best predict career advancement potential. Design/methodology/approach: Utilizing survey responses of human resource managers, the employability skills showing the largest relationships to career…

  12. Determinants of Success in Academic Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Balen, Barbara; van Arensbergen, Pleun; van der Weijden, Inge; van den Besselaar, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The competition for top positions in university rankings has put a stronger emphasis on the quality of university staff. Recruitment of excellent scholars is a core activity for university HRM. In this study, we compare the careers of pairs of similar researchers that were considered as very talented in their early careers. Of every pair, one has…

  13. Mid-career faculty development in academic medicine: How does it impact faculty and institutional vitality?

    PubMed

    Campion, MaryAnn W; Bhasin, Robina M; Beaudette, Donald J; Shann, Mary H; Benjamin, Emelia J

    2016-09-01

    Faculty vitality is integral to the advancement of higher education. Strengthening vitality is particularly important for mid-career faculty, who represent the largest and most dissatisfied segment. The demands of academic medicine appear to be another factor that may put faculty at risk of attrition. To address these issues, we initiated a ten-month mid-career faculty development program. A mixed-methods quasi-experimental design was used to evaluate the program's impact on faculty and institutional vitality. Pre/post surveys compared participants with a matched reference group. Quantitative data were augmented by interviews and focus groups with multiple stakeholders. At the program's conclusion, participants showed statistically significant gains in knowledge, skills, attitudes, and connectivity when compared to the referents. Given that mid-career faculty development in academic medicine has not been extensively studied, our evaluation provides a useful perspective to guide future initiatives aimed at enhancing the vitality and leadership capacity of mid-career faculty.

  14. The Career Advancement Portfolio. Advancement for Low-Wage Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jobs for the Future, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Jobs for the Future created the "Career Advancement Portfolio" as central to its commitment to developing, implementing, and advocating for models, strategies, and policies that enable adults to advance toward economic self-sufficiency for themselves and their families. The "Portfolio" brings together the most innovative workforce development…

  15. The Influence of an Academic Pharmacy Mentorship Program on Mentees' Commitment to Pursue an Academic Career.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Caroline M; Adams, Jennifer

    2017-02-25

    The objective of this study was to determine the influence of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) Walmart Scholars Program on mentees' attitudes towards and decision to pursue a career in academia. Upon completion of the AACP Walmart Scholars Program, wherein mentor-mentee pairs attend the AACP Annual Meeting to learn about academic pharmacy careers, mentees wrote essays evaluating the program. Their views on academic pharmacy careers were analyzed for themes in the evaluations. Of the mentees who addressed the impact of the program on their perspectives on a career in academic pharmacy, over half stated the program positively influenced pursuit of such a career. This reinforces the importance of mentorship for those interested in or new to academic pharmacy.

  16. The Influence of an Academic Pharmacy Mentorship Program on Mentees’ Commitment to Pursue an Academic Career

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, Caroline M.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the influence of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) Walmart Scholars Program on mentees’ attitudes towards and decision to pursue a career in academia. Upon completion of the AACP Walmart* Scholars Program, wherein mentor-mentee pairs attend the AACP Annual Meeting to learn about academic pharmacy careers, mentees wrote essays evaluating the program. Their views on academic pharmacy careers were analyzed for themes in the evaluations. Of the mentees who addressed the impact of the program on their perspectives on a career in academic pharmacy, over half stated the program positively influenced pursuit of such a career. This reinforces the importance of mentorship for those interested in or new to academic pharmacy. PMID:28289293

  17. Collaboration in academic medicine: reflections on gender and advancement.

    PubMed

    Carr, Phyllis L; Pololi, Linda; Knight, Sharon; Conrad, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Collaboration in academic medicine is encouraged, yet no one has studied the environment in which faculty collaborate. The authors investigated how faculty experienced collaboration and the institutional atmosphere for collaboration. In 2007, as part of a qualitative study of faculty in five disparate U.S. medical schools, the authors interviewed 96 medical faculty at different career stages and in diverse specialties, with an oversampling of women, minorities, and generalists, regarding their perceptions and experiences of collaboration in academic medicine. Data analysis was inductive and driven by the grounded theory tradition. Female faculty expressed enthusiasm about the potential and process of collaboration; male faculty were more likely to focus on outcomes. Senior faculty experienced a more collaborative environment than early career faculty, who faced numerous barriers to collaboration: the hierarchy of medical academe, advancement criteria, and the lack of infrastructure supportive of collaboration. Research faculty appreciated shared ideas, knowledge, resources, and the increased productivity that could result from collaboration, but they were acutely aware that advancement requires an independent body of work, which was a major deterrent to collaboration among early career faculty. Academic medicine faculty have differing views on the impact and benefits of collaboration. Early career faculty face concerning obstacles to collaboration. Female faculty seemed more appreciative of the process of collaboration, which may be of importance for transitioning to a more collaborative academic environment. A reevaluation of effective benchmarks for promotion of faculty is warranted to address the often exclusive reliance on individualistic achievement.

  18. Career Advancement for Welfare Recipients and Low-Wage Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Relave, Nanette

    2000-01-01

    To help families leave public assistance and escape poverty, the public sector must invest in career advancement strategies that enable parents to access jobs with family-supporting wages, benefits, and opportunities for career advancement. Welfare time limits have made career advancement more important than ever. The following services promote…

  19. Systems of Career Influences: A Conceptual Model for Evaluating the Professional Development of Women in Academic Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Helitzer, Deborah; Morahan, Page; Chang, Shine; Gleason, Katharine; Cardinali, Gina; Wu, Chih-Chieh

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Surprisingly little research is available to explain the well-documented organizational and societal influences on persistent inequities in advancement of women faculty. Methods The Systems of Career Influences Model is a framework for exploring factors influencing women's progression to advanced academic rank, executive positions, and informal leadership roles in academic medicine. The model situates faculty as agents within a complex adaptive system consisting of a trajectory of career advancement with opportunities for formal professional development programming; a dynamic system of influences of organizational policies, practices, and culture; and a dynamic system of individual choices and decisions. These systems of influence may promote or inhibit career advancement. Within this system, women weigh competing influences to make career advancement decisions, and leaders of academic health centers prioritize limited resources to support the school's mission. Results and Conclusions The Systems of Career Influences Model proved useful to identify key research questions. We used the model to probe how research in academic career development might be applied to content and methods of formal professional development programs. We generated a series of questions and hypotheses about how professional development programs might influence professional development of health science faculty members. Using the model as a guide, we developed a study using a quantitative and qualitative design. These analyses should provide insight into what works in recruiting and supporting productive men and women faculty in academic medical centers. PMID:23101486

  20. Systems of career influences: a conceptual model for evaluating the professional development of women in academic medicine.

    PubMed

    Magrane, Diane; Helitzer, Deborah; Morahan, Page; Chang, Shine; Gleason, Katharine; Cardinali, Gina; Wu, Chih-Chieh

    2012-12-01

    Surprisingly little research is available to explain the well-documented organizational and societal influences on persistent inequities in advancement of women faculty. The Systems of Career Influences Model is a framework for exploring factors influencing women's progression to advanced academic rank, executive positions, and informal leadership roles in academic medicine. The model situates faculty as agents within a complex adaptive system consisting of a trajectory of career advancement with opportunities for formal professional development programming; a dynamic system of influences of organizational policies, practices, and culture; and a dynamic system of individual choices and decisions. These systems of influence may promote or inhibit career advancement. Within this system, women weigh competing influences to make career advancement decisions, and leaders of academic health centers prioritize limited resources to support the school's mission. The Systems of Career Influences Model proved useful to identify key research questions. We used the model to probe how research in academic career development might be applied to content and methods of formal professional development programs. We generated a series of questions and hypotheses about how professional development programs might influence professional development of health science faculty members. Using the model as a guide, we developed a study using a quantitative and qualitative design. These analyses should provide insight into what works in recruiting and supporting productive men and women faculty in academic medical centers.

  1. Perceived gender-based barriers to careers in academic surgery.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Amalia; Hauschild, Tricia; Elder, William B; Neumayer, Leigh A; Brasel, Karen J; Crandall, Marie L

    2013-08-01

    Women represent roughly 50% of US medical students and one third of US surgery residents. Within academic surgery departments, however, women are disproportionately underrepresented, particularly at senior levels. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that female surgeons perceive different barriers to academic careers relative to their male colleagues. A modified version of the Career Barriers Inventory-Revised was administered to senior surgical residents and early-career surgical faculty members at 8 academic medical centers using an online survey tool. Likert-type scales were used to measure respondents' agreement with each survey item. Fisher's exact test was used to identify significant differences on the basis of gender. Respondents included 70 women (44 residents, 26 faculty members) and 84 men (41 residents, 43 faculty members). Women anticipated or perceived active discrimination in the form of being treated differently and experiencing negative comments about their sex, findings that differed notably from those for male counterparts. Sex-based negative attitudes inhibited the career aspirations of female surgeons. The presence of overt and implicit bias resulted in a sense that sex is a barrier to female surgeons' career development in academic surgery. No differences were observed between male and female respondents with regard to career preparation or structural barriers. Female academic surgeons experience challenges that are perceived to differ from their male counterparts. Women who participated in this study reported feeling excluded from the dominant culture in departments of surgery. This study may help guide transformative initiatives within academic surgery departments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Early career professional development issues for military academic psychiatrists.

    PubMed

    Warner, Christopher H; Bobo, William V; Flynn, Julianne

    2005-01-01

    Academically motivated graduates of military psychiatric residency programs confront serious challenges. In this article, the authors present a junior faculty development model organized around four overlapping domains: mentorship, scholarship, research, and career planning/development. Using these four domains as a platform for discussion, the authors focus on challenges facing academically oriented early-career military psychiatrists and provide guidance. The authors believe that a proactive stance, skillful mentoring, self-awareness through conscious planning and effort, ability to capitalize on existing opportunities for growth, and attention to detail are all vital to the junior military psychiatrist.

  3. Mentoring, Gender, and Careers of Academic Scientists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Linda; And Others

    This study explores the dynamics and effects of mentoring relationships, with particular emphasis on the experiences of women and minorities as proteges. It draws upon quantitative and qualitative data gathered from a survey of 587 academic scientists and interviews with 55 academic scientists, in 3 disciplinary areas: physics and astronomy,…

  4. Reputation and impact in academic careers.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Alexander Michael; Fortunato, Santo; Pan, Raj K; Kaski, Kimmo; Penner, Orion; Rungi, Armando; Riccaboni, Massimo; Stanley, H Eugene; Pammolli, Fabio

    2014-10-28

    Reputation is an important social construct in science, which enables informed quality assessments of both publications and careers of scientists in the absence of complete systemic information. However, the relation between reputation and career growth of an individual remains poorly understood, despite recent proliferation of quantitative research evaluation methods. Here, we develop an original framework for measuring how a publication's citation rate Δc depends on the reputation of its central author i, in addition to its net citation count c. To estimate the strength of the reputation effect, we perform a longitudinal analysis on the careers of 450 highly cited scientists, using the total citations Ci of each scientist as his/her reputation measure. We find a citation crossover c×, which distinguishes the strength of the reputation effect. For publications with c < c×, the author's reputation is found to dominate the annual citation rate. Hence, a new publication may gain a significant early advantage corresponding to roughly a 66% increase in the citation rate for each tenfold increase in Ci. However, the reputation effect becomes negligible for highly cited publications meaning that, for c ≥ c×, the citation rate measures scientific impact more transparently. In addition, we have developed a stochastic reputation model, which is found to reproduce numerous statistical observations for real careers, thus providing insight into the microscopic mechanisms underlying cumulative advantage in science.

  5. Reputation and impact in academic careers

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Alexander Michael; Fortunato, Santo; Pan, Raj K.; Kaski, Kimmo; Penner, Orion; Rungi, Armando; Riccaboni, Massimo; Stanley, H. Eugene; Pammolli, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Reputation is an important social construct in science, which enables informed quality assessments of both publications and careers of scientists in the absence of complete systemic information. However, the relation between reputation and career growth of an individual remains poorly understood, despite recent proliferation of quantitative research evaluation methods. Here, we develop an original framework for measuring how a publication’s citation rate Δc depends on the reputation of its central author i, in addition to its net citation count c. To estimate the strength of the reputation effect, we perform a longitudinal analysis on the careers of 450 highly cited scientists, using the total citations Ci of each scientist as his/her reputation measure. We find a citation crossover c×, which distinguishes the strength of the reputation effect. For publications with c < c×, the author’s reputation is found to dominate the annual citation rate. Hence, a new publication may gain a significant early advantage corresponding to roughly a 66% increase in the citation rate for each tenfold increase in Ci. However, the reputation effect becomes negligible for highly cited publications meaning that, for c ≥ c×, the citation rate measures scientific impact more transparently. In addition, we have developed a stochastic reputation model, which is found to reproduce numerous statistical observations for real careers, thus providing insight into the microscopic mechanisms underlying cumulative advantage in science. PMID:25288774

  6. Persistency and Uncertainty Across the Academic Career

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Alexander; Riccaboni, Massimo; Stanley, H. Eugene; Pammolli, Fabio

    2012-02-01

    Recent shifts in the business structure of universities and a bottleneck in the supply of tenure track positions are two issues that threaten to change the longstanding patronage system in academia and affect the overall potential of science. We analyze the longitudinal publication rate ni(t) on the 1-year scale for 300 physicists i=1...300. For most careers analyzed, we observe cumulative production acceleration Ni(t) Ait^αi with αi>1, reflecting the benefits of learning and collaboration spillovers which constitute a cumulative advantage. We find that the variance in production scales with collaboration radius size Si as 2̂i˜Si^ψ with 0.4 < ψ< 0.8. We develop a preferential growth model to gain insight into the relation between career persistency and career uncertainty. This model shows that emphasis on nonstop production, a consequence of short-term contract systems, results in a significant number of ``sudden death'' careers that terminate due to unavoidable negative production shocks. Hence, short-term contracts may increase the strength of ``rich-get-richer'' mechanisms in competitive professions and hinder the upward mobility of young scientists.

  7. Views of academic dentists about careers in academic dentistry in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Goldacre, M; Lee, P; Stear, S; Sidebottom, E; Richards, R

    2000-02-12

    The aim of this paper is to report the views of academic dentists about careers in academic dentistry assessed by method of a postal questionnaire survey. The subjects of the survey were dentists in academic posts in the United Kingdom. The incentives in pursuing an academic career which respondents rated most highly were the opportunity to teach and the variety of work in an academic career. The greatest disincentives were competing pressures from service work, teaching and research, and the difficulty of getting research grants. Many would like to spend more time on research and less on service work and teaching. The length of time required for training, and the quality of training, was a concern, particularly for junior academics. Most respondents rated the enjoyment of their job highly but scored much lower on satisfaction with the time their job left for domestic and leisure activities. By contrast with academic medicine, in academic dentistry there is typically greater emphasis on teaching and less on research. In conclusion, the balance of activities in academic posts, particularly between service work, teaching and research, needs to be regularly reviewed. The development of a more structured training programme for junior academics, which does not disadvantage academic dentists when compared with their NHS colleagues, may be required.

  8. Status of Early-Career Academic Cardiology: A Global Perspective.

    PubMed

    Tong, Carl W; Madhur, Meena S; Rzeszut, Anne K; Abdalla, Marwah; Abudayyeh, Islam; Alexanderson, Erick; Buber, Jonathan; Feldman, Dmitriy N; Gopinathannair, Rakesh; Hira, Ravi S; Kates, Andrew M; Kessler, Thorsten; Leung, Steve; Raj, Satish R; Spatz, Erica S; Turner, Melanie B; Valente, Anne Marie; West, Kristin; Sivaram, Chittur A; Hill, Joseph A; Mann, Douglas L; Freeman, Andrew M

    2017-10-31

    Early-career academic cardiologists, who many believe are an important component of the future of cardiovascular care, face myriad challenges. The Early Career Section Academic Working Group of the American College of Cardiology, with senior leadership support, assessed the progress of this cohort from 2013 to 2016 with a global perspective. Data consisted of accessing National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute public information, data from the American Heart Association and international organizations, and a membership-wide survey. Although the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute increased funding of career development grants, only a small number of early-career American College of Cardiology members have benefited as funding of the entire cohort has decreased. Personal motivation, institutional support, and collaborators continued to be positive influential factors. Surprisingly, mentoring ceased to correlate positively with obtaining external grants. The totality of findings suggests that the status of early-career academic cardiologists remains challenging; therefore, the authors recommend a set of attainable solutions. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Structure and career advancement in cardiology in Italy].

    PubMed

    Modena, M G; Molinari, R; Lalla, M

    1999-03-01

    Women are less present on the labor market and many studies have demonstrated the existence of gender differences regarding participation rate and career advancement of women. The process through which job-, career- and research-related choices are structured within the realm of Italian cardiology, is described in this study emphasizing the effects of productivity, gender and family commitments. In June 1996, a questionnaire was mailed to all members of the Italian societies of cardiology. It included mainly (pre-coded) set-choice questions concerning individual characteristics, career-related data, and information pertaining to teaching, scientific and research activity. Returned questionnaires numbered 1715 (21.4% of the total mailed), 83% were completed by males and 17% by females. For both hospital and academic careers, advancement in rank was influenced by variables denoting productivity, family and individual characteristics. Promotion to the upper ranks of the hierarchy was highly dependent upon time (once the effects of the covariates were eliminated). This is a situation that is typical of the internal labor market, that is, of an institution in which staff members are ranked on a hierarchical scale according to formal criteria that are "rigid" and institutionalized, partially and totally sheltered from competition. Therefore, once a member has gained access to the first level of the hierarchy, his/her professional career is to a certain extent pre-determined and the seniority ends up taking on importance in promotion decisions to an appreciable extent; in this field, the weight of seniority on promotion ranges between 30 and 50%.

  10. A Conceptual Model of Career Development to Enhance Academic Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Nancy Creighton

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop, refine, and validate a conceptual model of career development to enhance the academic motivation of community college students. To achieve this end, a straw model was built from the theoretical and empirical research literature. The model was then refined and validated through three rounds of a Delphi…

  11. Residents' Perspectives on Careers in Academic Medicine: Obstacles and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Lin, Steven; Nguyen, Cathina; Walters, Emily; Gordon, Paul

    2018-03-01

    Worsening faculty shortages in medical schools and residency programs are threatening the US medical education infrastructure. Little is known about the factors that influence the decision of family medicine residents to choose or not choose academic careers. Our study objective was to answer the following question among family medicine residents: "What is your greatest concern or fear about pursuing a career in academic family medicine?" Participants were family medicine residents who attended the Faculty for Tomorrow Workshop at the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine Annual Spring Conference in 2016 and 2017. Free responses to the aforementioned prompt were analyzed using a constant comparative method and grounded theory approach. A total of 156 participants registered for the workshops and 95 (61%) answered the free response question. Eight distinct themes emerged from the analysis. The most frequently recurring theme was "lack of readiness or mentorship," which accounted for nearly one-third (31%) of the codes. Other themes included work-life balance and burnout (17%), job availability and logistics (15%), lack of autonomy or flexibility (11%), competing pressures/roles (10%), lower financial rewards (4%), politics and bureaucracy (4%), and research (3%). To our knowledge, this is the first study to identify barriers and disincentives to pursuing a career in academic medicine from the perspective of family medicine residents. There may be at least eight major obstacles, for which we summarize and consider potential interventions. More research is needed to understand why residents choose, or don't choose, academic careers.

  12. A Structured Career Intervention Program for Academically Challenged Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salleh, Amla; Abdullah, Syed Mohamad; Mahmud, Zuria; Ghavifekr, Simin; Ishak, Noriah

    2013-01-01

    A study was carried out to test the effects of a 2-week structured intervention program on academically challenged students' career development. A quasi-experimental study was designed using pre-tests, post-tests, and a control group approach to examine the effects of the intervention program. Data were collected from both the experimental and…

  13. Exploratory Honors Students: Academic Major and Career Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carduner, Jessie; Padak, Gary M.; Reynolds, Jamie

    2011-01-01

    In this qualitative study, we investigated the academic major and career decision-making processes of honors college students who were declared as "exploratory" students in their freshman year at a large, public, midwestern university. We used semistandardized interviews and document analysis as primary data collection methods to answer…

  14. Instructional Development for Early Career Academics: An Overview of Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stes, Ann; Van Petegem, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background: Over the past decades, the issue of improving teaching in higher education has been seriously addressed. Centres for instructional development, aimed at enhancing teaching, have been set up in many countries. Instructional development for early career academics is perceived to be of particular importance. Given the considerable…

  15. Academic and Career Development: Rethinking Advising for Asian American Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kodama, Corinne M.; Huynh, Jill

    2017-01-01

    Academic and career development for Asian American students is complicated by cultural influences, interdependence with family, and racial stereotyping. This chapter highlights research, theory, and practice to help educators rethink traditional advising approaches to more appropriately work with Asian American students as they navigate their…

  16. Early Career Academics Learning the Game in Whackademia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Loraine; Monk, Sue

    2017-01-01

    The initial years as an early career academic (ECA) are challenging times as those new to the academy attempt to balance the three aspects of their role: teaching, research and service, while also coming to terms with both overt and hidden expectations. Formal mentoring arrangements for ECAs are threatened by competing demands on time.…

  17. Strengthening the Teaching Self-Efficacy of Early Career Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmings, Brian Colin

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on a qualitative study exploring teaching self-efficacy (defined as a belief in capability to execute teaching-related tasks) in a higher education context. It is based on the views of 12 early career academics (ECAs) employed at Charles Sturt University who were interviewed to learn more about how their teaching self-efficacy…

  18. Career Development and Promotion in an Academic Health Center.

    PubMed

    Christophersen, Edward R

    2017-03-01

    This paper examines the successive stages of the career path for psychologists who commit to spending their professional lives working in academic health centers. Key factors for success at each stage are described, as are the steps required for progressing to subsequent stages of professional development. The paper breaks new ground by including consideration of a post-retirement stage, "Professor Emeritus status."

  19. Reciprocal Commitment in Academic Careers? Finnish Implications and International Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siekkinen, Taru; Kuoppala, Kari; Pekkola, Elias; Välimaa, Jussi

    2017-01-01

    This study explores the nature of reciprocal commitment in academic careers. The article is based on a survey conducted in autumn 2013 among fixed-term employees at eight major universities in Finland (N = 810). The analysis is focusing on researchers who have a doctoral degree and who are working on a fixed-term contract at their university (n =…

  20. Early Career Professional Development Issues for Military Academic Psychiatrists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Christopher H.; Bobo, William V.; Flynn, Julianne

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Academically motivated graduates of military psychiatric residency programs confront serious challenges. Method: In this article, the authors present a junior faculty development model organized around four overlapping domains: mentorship, scholarship, research, and career planning/development. Using these four domains as a platform for…

  1. Barriers to and Facilitators of Female Deans' Career Advancement in Higher Education: An Exploratory Study in Vietnam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Thi Lan Huong

    2013-01-01

    Although the slow progress of female academics compared to their male colleagues and the challenges that female academic leaders have to face in taking leadership roles have been well-documented, very little is known about female academic leaders and managers' career advancement in developing countries like Vietnam. This paper reports on an…

  2. Academic Career Making and the Double-Edged Role of Academic Housework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heijstra, Thamar Melanie; Steinthorsdóttir, Finnborg Salome; Einarsdóttir, Thorgerdur

    2017-01-01

    Internationalisation, competition and performance orientation are nowadays essential in the managing and financing of universities. This pattern has intensified with the austerity measures and fiscal consolidation that followed the financial crisis in 2008. This article examines the academic labour process and career making of academics from a…

  3. Rigor and academic achievement: Career academies versus traditional class structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyees, Linda L.

    The purpose of this study was to determine if students who attended high school Career Academy classes, as part of Career and Technical Education, showed greater academic achievement than students who attended traditional high school classes. While all participants attended schools in the same school district, and were seeking the same goal of graduation with a standard diploma, the Career Academy students had the benefit of all classes being directed by a team of teachers who helped them connect their learning to their desired career through collaborative learning projects and assignments. The traditional high school classes taught each subject independent of other subjects and did not have specific connections to desired career goals of the students. The study used a causal-comparative research design and the participants included 1,142 students from 11th and 12th grades who attended 9 high schools in a diversely populated area of central Florida with 571 enrolled in the Career Academies and 571 enrolled in traditional classes. The 10th-grade FCAT scores served as the dependent variable. All students attended similar classes with similar content, making the primary variable the difference in academic gains between students participating in the Career Academy design and the traditional design classes. Using the Man-Whitney U Test resulted in the Career Academy group achieving the higher scores overall. This resulted in rejection of the first null-hypothesis. Further examination determined that the 10th-grade FCAT scores were greater for the average students group, which comprised the largest portion of the participant group, also resulted in rejection of the second null-hypothesis. The gifted and at-risk student group scores resulted in failure to reject the third and fourth null-hypotheses.

  4. Impact of a Constructivist Career Course on Academic Performance and Graduation Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grier-Reed, Tabitha; Chahla, Rose

    2015-01-01

    Career planning courses are one of the most effective ways to improve career development, and the benefits to career decision-making are well documented. The research base regarding whether career courses contribute to academic outcomes is less well-developed. Although recent findings suggest that career courses may improve retention in the first-…

  5. Academic Development for Careers in Management Consulting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Susan M.; Zanzi, Alberto

    2004-01-01

    Explores the extent to which academic offerings are serving the consulting industry and identifies ways that academia can help. The numbers of management consulting courses, field experiences in consulting and consulting concentrations by graduate business schools were tracked over a three-year period to assess the current state of offerings. A…

  6. Factors influencing young urologists' productivity and academic career choice.

    PubMed

    Resorlu, Berkan; Silay, Mesrur Selcuk; Onem, Kadir; Bayrak, Omer; Sonbahar, Adil Emrah; Acar, Omer; Ergun, Osman; Celik, Orcun; Tefik, Tzevat; Firdolas, Fatih; Tandogdu, Zafer

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify the variables that affect young urologists' productivity and academic career choice. We have conducted an internet-based national survey for urologists randomly sampled from the database of Turkish Urological Association and 110 physicians completed this survey. Participants were asked to answer three-page questionnaire including 37 questions, which takes around 5 min to complete. Questionnaire was consisting of four main sections: 'demography', 'education', 'working conditions' and 'quality of life'. Increased dedicated research time, being interested in an academic career, being Fellow of the European Board of Urology (FEBU), having English proficiency, and greater numbers of manuscript publication during residency were associated with increased productivity after residency (p = 0.001, p = 0.028, p = 0.046, p<0.001 and p<0.001, respectively). The remaining variables including age at marriage, age at having a child, monthly salary, length of residency, having a mentor or role model during residency showed no significant relationship with manuscript publications. Twenty-nine physicians (26.4%) stated that they had once been interested in their residency but were no longer interested in academic urology. Reasons for this loss of academic interest included lack of effective mentor or role model (27.2%), bureaucracy (17%), financial issues (13.6%), mandatory rule to work in public hospitals (18.2%) or military hospitals (9%) and language problems (21.6%). Our data indicate that increased time spent for research, being interested in an academic career, being an FEBU, having English proficiency, and greater publication during residency were associated with increased numbers of publications and academic career choice.

  7. Nurses of African descent and career advancement.

    PubMed

    Wesley, Yvonne; Dobal, May T

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate a leadership institute designed to promote career advancement and leadership in administration, education, and research among nurses of African descent. Government reports indicate that Black Americans receive lower quality health care than other racial groups even when insurance and income are equal. Moreover, the literature suggests that less than 10% of practicing professional nurses in America are Black-and of these, less than 1% are in senior executive leadership positions. However, the literature lacks detailed discussion of the effectiveness of leadership programs. This article provides an in-depth look at a leadership institute for Black nurses and outlines the impact of the program.

  8. Training Patterns and Lifetime Career Achievements of US Academic Cardiothoracic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Carlo Maria; Valsangkar, Nakul P; Gaudino, Mario; Blitzer, David; Vardas, Panos N; Girardi, Leonard N; Turrentine, Mark W; Brown, John W; Koniaris, Leonidas G

    2017-03-01

    We aimed to investigate the impact of taking dedicated time for research (DTR) during training and/or getting a PhD on subsequent career achievements of US academic cardiothoracic surgeons. Online resources (institutional Web sites, CTSNet, Scopus, NIH RePORTER) were queried to collect training information (timing of medical school/residency/fellowship graduation, DTR, PhD) and academic metrics (publications, citations, research funding) for 694 academic cardiothoracic surgeons practicing at 56 premiere US institutions. Excluding missing data, 464 (75 %) surgeons took DTR and 156 (25 %) did not; 629 (91 %) were MD only and 65 (9 %) also had a PhD. DTR was associated with higher number of ongoing publications (~5.6/year vs. ~3.8/year), with no difference for accrued number of total citations. History of DTR was more prevalent among surgeons with versus without NIH funding (87 vs. 71 %; p < 0.001), but no difference was seen across academic ranks and among those who were division/department chiefs. No overall increase in publications/citations, academic rank advancement, NIH funding, or leadership roles was found for those with a PhD. Among cardiothoracic surgeons, devoting time during the training years exclusively to research might be associated with higher career-long academic productivity in terms of annual number new publications and ability to get NIH funding, but without significant impact in terms of academic rank or institutional role advancement. No significant difference was found between those with versus without a PhD in terms of career-long number of publications/citations, academic rank, NIH funding, or leadership role, even though sample size might have been insufficient to identify any such potential difference.

  9. Beginning careers in academic psychiatry for women--"Bermuda Triangle"?

    PubMed

    Reiser, L W; Sledge, W H; Fenton, W; Leaf, P

    1993-09-01

    The proportion of women in leadership positions in academic psychiatry has not kept pace with the increase in the number of women entering the field. This study examines differences in career activities between women and men who graduated from the Yale University psychiatric residency training program and explores whether these differences can be explained by preresidency expectations, residency experiences, or training immediately after residency. Departmental educational records of the Yale residency program were reviewed to determine professional interests expressed before psychiatric residency and training focus during residency for 355 residents in the 1970-1983 graduating classes. A 1984 follow-up study focused on their postresidency career activities. Differences in preresidency interests and experiences, training activities, and career paths between all female and male graduates and between women and men who chose academic careers were examined. After residency, the female graduates' marital status differed from men's--more had never married or were divorced. Women's professional activities diverged from men's; their practice pattern was different, they spent more hours teaching, and they had fewer publications in peer-reviewed journals. This divergence was not accounted for by differences in pretraining interests or in training focus during residency. The authors present possible explanations. Further research is indicated to determine the underlying causes of career differences between women and men in psychiatric practice and academia so that effective strategies for correcting the present inequality of women in senior faculty positions can be implemented.

  10. Academic & Technical Skills + Life/Work Skills + Career Information & Guidance = Success in Career Building.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvis, Phillip S.

    There has been a renaissance in the thinking about career development. It is becoming accepted that information is not enough; in addition to academic and technical skills, youth and adults need to learn life/work designing and building skills to become healthy, productive, and self-reliant citizens. Despite the fact that Canadian students have…

  11. Expectations and Integration of Early Career Academics into the Teaching Career: Empirical Evidence from Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabi, Goski; Abdulai, Munkaila

    2016-01-01

    The preparation and induction of Early Career Academics (ECAs) in Ghana has been investigated using a qualitative study that employed an enumerative-ethnographic approach. The study combined reviews of policy documents, interviews of 50 Deans and Heads of Departments and surveys of ECAs in five purposively selected universities in Ghana to capture…

  12. Gender differences in academic productivity and leadership appointments of physicians throughout academic careers.

    PubMed

    Reed, Darcy A; Enders, Felicity; Lindor, Rachel; McClees, Martha; Lindor, Keith D

    2011-01-01

    Because those selected for leadership in academic medicine often have a record of academic productivity, publication disparities may help explain the gender imbalance in leadership roles. The authors aimed to compare the publication records, academic promotions, and leadership appointments of women and men physicians longitudinally throughout academic careers. In 2007, the authors conducted a retrospective, longitudinal cohort study of all 25 women physicians then employed at Mayo Clinic with ≥20 years of service at Mayo and of 50 male physician controls, matched 2:1 by appointment date and career category, to women. The authors recorded peer-reviewed publications, timing of promotion, and leadership appointments throughout their careers. Women published fewer articles throughout their careers than men (mean [standard deviation] 29.5 [28.8] versus 75.8 [60.3], P = .001). However, after 27 years, women produced a mean of 1.57 more publications annually than men (P < .001). Thirty-three men (66%) achieved an academic rank of professor compared with seven women (28%) (P = .01). Throughout their careers, women held fewer leadership roles than men (P < .001). Nearly half (no. = 11; 44%) of women attained no leadership position, compared with 15 men (30%). Women's publication rates increase and actually exceed those of men in the latter stages of careers, yet women hold fewer leadership positions than men overall, suggesting that academic productivity assessed midcareer may not be an appropriate measure of leadership skills and that factors other than publication record and academic rank should be considered in selecting leaders.

  13. Educators Who Work in Science: The Narratives of Women Negotiating Careers in Academic Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tullos, Kimberly C.

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this life story narrative study was to explore how women scientists develop views of self that enable them to negotiate careers within academic science. I framed the study using feminist standpoint theory as my theoretical foundation, and used possible selves theory as my conceptual framework. Eight women scientists working in academe described their journey regarding their views of self and career-related experiences. The study produced two key findings. First, seven themes emerged from my data analysis; these themes suggest that these women shared significant experiences in their quest to become scientists. Second, my feminist analysis of the participants' narratives indicates that distinct, but submerged gender-related tensions shaped their views of themselves as scientists and their science career decisions. These tensions include career choice and advancement constrained by family obligations, work environments that do not recognize or undervalue their skills and contributions to the profession, and perceived pressure to de-feminize their behavior to blend in to their work environment. Not unlike other women negotiating careers in academic science, they generally accepted their status as women to be an inherent part of their career pursuits and viewed workplace challenges as an opportunity to prove their competency. Seven of the eight women did not attribute their challenges to gender differences. However, the combined narratives revealed underlying conflicts between their views of self as women and as scientists resulting from their experiences in, and perceptions of, academic science environments. The study's principal theoretical contribution, from the feminist standpoint perspective, highlights the pervasive and unseen influence of gender dynamics. In this study, the participants developed views of themselves, not as scientists, but as "educators who work in science." This critical distinction enabled these participants, perhaps unknowingly

  14. Skills Required for Nursing Career Advancement: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhi, Mohammad Reza; Fallahi-Khoshnab, Masoud; Mohammadi, Farahnaz; Oskouie, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Nurses require certain skills for progression in their field. Identifying these skills can provide the context for nursing career advancement. Objectives This study aimed to identify the skills needed for nurses’ career advancement. Materials and Methods A qualitative approach using content analysis was adopted to study a purposive sample of eighteen nurses working in teaching hospitals affiliated with the Qazvin, Shahid Beheshti, and Iran Universities of Medical Sciences. The data were collected through semi-structured interviews, and analyzed using conventional content analysis. Results The three themes extracted from the data included interpersonal capabilities, competency for career success, and personal capacities. The results showed that acquiring a variety of skills is essential for career advancement. Conclusions The findings showed that personal, interpersonal, and functional skills can facilitate nurses’ career advancement. The effects of these skills on career advancement depend on a variety of conditions that require further studies. PMID:27556054

  15. Skills Required for Nursing Career Advancement: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Sheikhi, Mohammad Reza; Fallahi-Khoshnab, Masoud; Mohammadi, Farahnaz; Oskouie, Fatemeh

    2016-06-01

    Nurses require certain skills for progression in their field. Identifying these skills can provide the context for nursing career advancement. This study aimed to identify the skills needed for nurses' career advancement. A qualitative approach using content analysis was adopted to study a purposive sample of eighteen nurses working in teaching hospitals affiliated with the Qazvin, Shahid Beheshti, and Iran Universities of Medical Sciences. The data were collected through semi-structured interviews, and analyzed using conventional content analysis. The three themes extracted from the data included interpersonal capabilities, competency for career success, and personal capacities. The results showed that acquiring a variety of skills is essential for career advancement. The findings showed that personal, interpersonal, and functional skills can facilitate nurses' career advancement. The effects of these skills on career advancement depend on a variety of conditions that require further studies.

  16. Clinical academic careers: embracing the art and science of nursing.

    PubMed

    Masterson, Abigail; Robb, Liz

    2016-11-23

    Clinical academics make a unique contribution to health research and scholarship by undertaking practice-focused research that offers direct benefits to patient care. The Florence Nightingale Foundation supports the development of research skills in nursing and midwifery through its scholarships and by establishing a network of chairs in clinical nursing practice research. The Florence Nightingale Foundation also provides leadership scholarships to deans and aspiring deans of university faculties of health. It is from these perspectives that the case is made for investment in clinical academic roles and the development of career pathways that embrace the art and science of nursing.

  17. Toward a roadmap for interdisciplinary academic career success.

    PubMed

    McBride, Angela Barron

    2010-01-01

    The 21st century is a period of increased focus on interdisciplinary collaboration. To facilitate movement in the direction of interdisciplinary research, this article discusses some generic stumbling blocks, unique problems, and advantages that nurses experience, plus the rewards and hallmarks of well-functioning interdisciplinary research teams. The article ends with an overview of how interdisciplinary development can and should be part of each stage of academic career success.

  18. Academic Provenance: Mapping Geoscience Students' Academic Pathways to their Career Trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlton, H. R.; Gonzales, L. M.; Keane, C. M.

    2011-12-01

    Targeted recruitment and retention efforts for the geosciences have become increasingly important with the growing concerns about program visibility on campuses, and given that geoscience degree production remains low relative to the demand for new geoscience graduates. Furthermore, understanding the career trajectories of geoscience degree recipients is essential for proper occupational placement. A theoretical framework was developed by Houlton (2010) to focus recruitment and retention efforts. This "pathway model" explicitly maps undergraduate students' geoscience career trajectories, which can be used to refine existing methods for recruiting students into particular occupations. Houlton's (2010) framework identified three main student population groups: Natives, Immigrants or Refugees. Each student followed a unique pathway, which consisted of six pathway steps. Each pathway step was comprised of critical incidents that influenced students' overall career trajectories. An aggregate analysis of students' pathways (Academic Provenance Analysis) showed that different populations' pathways exhibited a deviation in career direction: Natives indicated intentions to pursue industry or government sectors, while Immigrants intended to pursue academic or research-based careers. We expanded on Houlton's (2010) research by conducting a follow-up study to determine if the original participants followed the career trajectories they initially indicated in the 2010 study. A voluntary, 5-question, short-answer survey was administered via email. We investigated students' current pathway steps, pathway deviations, students' goals for the near future and their ultimate career ambitions. This information may help refine Houlton's (2010) "pathway model" and may aid geoscience employers in recruiting the new generation of professionals for their respective sectors.

  19. Managing an academic career in science: What gender differences exist and why?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Gayle Patrice

    The present study examines the career trajectories of academic scientists during the period from 1993 to 2001 to explore gender differences in mobility. Data from the National Science Foundation's Survey of Doctorate Recipients are used to examine and compare gender differences in the odds of promotion. The effects of age, marital and family status, duration of time to complete doctorate, academic discipline, cumulative number of publications and time in the survey are considered as explanatory variables. Event history analyses are conducted for all scientists, for scientists in four major academic disciplines and for scientists in various academic ranks. While no overall gender differences were observed in the odds of promotion, several important similarities and differences were evident. Expectedly, publications had a significant and positive relationship with advancement for both women and men. The role of parent influenced promotions quite differently for women and men. Contrary to expectations based on prior research, academic women scientists who were mothers advanced at similar rates as women without children. Consistent with expectations based on traditional roles, married men and men with children generally advanced more quickly than single or childless men, respectively. Two surprising patterns emerged among subgroups of women. Marriage was associated with greater odds of advancement for women engineers and motherhood was associated with greater odds of advancement for among assistant professors. Possible explanations for these findings are presented.

  20. Impairment Effects as a Career Boundary: A Case Study of Disabled Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Jannine; Mavin, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Within the academic career literature, disabled academics are under-researched, despite calls for career theory development through the exploration of marginalized groups' career experiences and the boundaries which shape these experiences. Here, boundaries refer to the symbolic resources which become reified to construct social boundaries…

  1. Mentoring the Next Generation of Faculty: Supporting Academic Career Aspirations among Doctoral Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtin, Nicola; Malley, Janet; Stewart, Abigail J.

    2016-01-01

    We know little about the role of faculty mentoring in the development of interest in pursuing an academic career among doctoral students. Drawing on Social Cognitive Career Theory, this study examined the relationships between different kinds of mentoring (instrumental, psychosocial, and sponsorship) and academic career self-efficacy, interests,…

  2. Tribal, Proletarian and Entrepreneurial Career Stories: Junior Academics as a Case in Point

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ylijoki, Oili-Helena; Henriksson, Lea

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the career-building of junior academics in the current higher education environment, which is characterised by short-term employment conditions. The paper is based on focus group discussions with Finnish early career academics working in the social sciences. Drawing upon a narrative approach, five career stories are…

  3. Gender Differences in Academic Productivity and Academic Career Choice Among Urology Residents

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Glen; Villalta, Jacqueline D.; Weiss, Dana A.; Carroll, Peter R.; Breyer, Benjamin N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Gender disparities have long existed in medicine but they have not been well examined in urology. We analyzed a large cohort of graduating urology residents to investigate gender disparities in academic productivity, as measured by peer reviewed publications and academic career choice. Materials and Methods We assembled a list of urology residents who graduated from 2002 through 2008 who were affiliated with the top 50 urology hospitals, as ranked by 2009 U.S. News & World Report. PubMed® was queried to determine the publication output of each resident during the last 3 years of residency. We used an Internet search to determine the fellowship training, career choice and academic rank of each subject. Gender effects on each factor were evaluated. Results A total of 459 male (84.5%) and 84 female (15.5%) residents were included in analysis. During residency women produced fewer total publications (average 3.0 vs 4.8, p = 0.01) and fewer as first author (average 1.8 vs 2.5, p = 0.03) than men. A higher proportion of women than men underwent fellowship training (54.8% vs 48.5%, p =0.29) and ultimately chose an academic career (40.5% vs 33.3%, p = 0.20), although these differences were not statistically significant. Of residents who chose an academic career a higher proportion of men than women (24.7% vs 2.9%, p = 0.01) obtained associate vs assistant professor rank. Conclusions Women produced fewer peer reviewed publications than men during residency but they were equally likely to undergo fellowship training and choose an academic career. During the study period a higher proportion of men achieved associate professor rank. PMID:22902027

  4. Gender differences in academic productivity and academic career choice among urology residents.

    PubMed

    Yang, Glen; Villalta, Jacqueline D; Weiss, Dana A; Carroll, Peter R; Breyer, Benjamin N

    2012-10-01

    Gender disparities have long existed in medicine but they have not been well examined in urology. We analyzed a large cohort of graduating urology residents to investigate gender disparities in academic productivity, as measured by peer reviewed publications and academic career choice. We assembled a list of urology residents who graduated from 2002 through 2008 who were affiliated with the top 50 urology hospitals, as ranked by 2009 U.S. News & World Report. PubMed® was queried to determine the publication output of each resident during the last 3 years of residency. We used an Internet search to determine the fellowship training, career choice and academic rank of each subject. Gender effects on each factor were evaluated. A total of 459 male (84.5%) and 84 female (15.5%) residents were included in analysis. During residency women produced fewer total publications (average 3.0 vs 4.8, p = 0.01) and fewer as first author (average 1.8 vs 2.5, p = 0.03) than men. A higher proportion of women than men underwent fellowship training (54.8% vs 48.5%, p = 0.29) and ultimately chose an academic career (40.5% vs 33.3%, p = 0.20), although these differences were not statistically significant. Of residents who chose an academic career a higher proportion of men than women (24.7% vs 2.9%, p = 0.01) obtained associate vs assistant professor rank. Women produced fewer peer reviewed publications than men during residency but they were equally likely to undergo fellowship training and choose an academic career. During the study period a higher proportion of men achieved associate professor rank. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Web-based Academic Roadmaps for Careers in the Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, D. P.; Veeger, A. I.; Grossman-Garber, D.

    2007-12-01

    To a greater extent than most science programs, geology is underrepresented in K-12 curricula and the media. Thus potential majors have scant knowledge of academic requirements and career trajectories, and their idea of what geologists do--if they have one at all--is outdated. We have addressed these concerns by developing a dynamic, web-based academic roadmap for current and prospective students, their families, and others who are contemplating careers in the geosciences. The goals of this visually attractive "educational pathway" are to not only improve student recruitment and retention, but to empower student learning by creating better communication and advising tools that can render our undergraduate program transparent for learners and their families. Although we have developed academic roadmaps for four environmental and life science programs at the University of Rhode Island, we focus here on the roadmap for the geosciences, which illustrates educational pathways along the academic and early-career continuum for current and potential (i.e., high school) students who are considering the earth sciences. In essence, the Geosciences Academic Roadmap is a "one-stop'" portal to the discipline. It includes user- friendly information about our curriculum, outcomes (which at URI are tightly linked to performance in courses and the major), extracurricular activities (e.g., field camp, internships), careers, graduate programs, and training. In the presentation of this material extensive use is made of streaming video, interviews with students and earth scientists, and links to other relevant sites. Moreover, through the use of "Hot Topics", particular attention is made to insure that examples of geoscience activities are not only of relevance to today's students, but show geologists using the modern methods of the discipline in exciting ways. Although this is a "work-in-progress", evaluation of the sites, by high school through graduate students, has been strongly

  6. Narratives of Participants in National Career Development Programs for Women in Academic Medicine: Identifying the Opportunities for Strategic Investment.

    PubMed

    Helitzer, Deborah L; Newbill, Sharon L; Cardinali, Gina; Morahan, Page S; Chang, Shine; Magrane, Diane

    2016-04-01

    Academic medicine has initiated changes in policy, practice, and programs over the past several decades to address persistent gender disparity and other issues pertinent to its sociocultural context. Three career development programs were implemented to prepare women faculty to succeed in academic medicine: two sponsored by the Association of American Medical Colleges, which began a professional development program for early career women faculty in 1988. By 1995, it had evolved into two programs one for early career women and another for mid-career women. By 2012, more than 4000 women faculty from medical schools across the U.S and Canada had participated in these intensive 3-day programs. The third national program, the Hedwig van Ameringen Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine(®) (ELAM) program for women, was developed in 1995 at the Drexel University College of Medicine. Narratives from telephone interviews representing reflections on 78 career development seminars between 1988 and 2010 describe the dynamic relationships between individual, institutional, and sociocultural influences on participants' career advancement. The narratives illuminate the pathway from participating in a career development program to self-defined success in academic medicine in revealing a host of influences that promoted and/or hindered program attendance and participants' ability to benefit after the program in both individual and institutional systems. The context for understanding the importance of these career development programs to women's advancement is nestled in the sociocultural environment, which includes both the gender-related influences and the current status of institutional practices that support women faculty. The findings contribute to the growing evidence that career development programs, concurrent with strategic, intentional support of institutional leaders, are necessary to achieve gender equity and diversity inclusion.

  7. Narratives of Participants in National Career Development Programs for Women in Academic Medicine: Identifying the Opportunities for Strategic Investment

    PubMed Central

    Newbill, Sharon L.; Cardinali, Gina; Morahan, Page S.; Chang, Shine; Magrane, Diane

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Academic medicine has initiated changes in policy, practice, and programs over the past several decades to address persistent gender disparity and other issues pertinent to its sociocultural context. Three career development programs were implemented to prepare women faculty to succeed in academic medicine: two sponsored by the Association of American Medical Colleges, which began a professional development program for early career women faculty in 1988. By 1995, it had evolved into two programs one for early career women and another for mid-career women. By 2012, more than 4000 women faculty from medical schools across the U.S and Canada had participated in these intensive 3-day programs. The third national program, the Hedwig van Ameringen Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine® (ELAM) program for women, was developed in 1995 at the Drexel University College of Medicine. Methods: Narratives from telephone interviews representing reflections on 78 career development seminars between 1988 and 2010 describe the dynamic relationships between individual, institutional, and sociocultural influences on participants' career advancement. Results: The narratives illuminate the pathway from participating in a career development program to self-defined success in academic medicine in revealing a host of influences that promoted and/or hindered program attendance and participants' ability to benefit after the program in both individual and institutional systems. The context for understanding the importance of these career development programs to women's advancement is nestled in the sociocultural environment, which includes both the gender-related influences and the current status of institutional practices that support women faculty. Conclusions: The findings contribute to the growing evidence that career development programs, concurrent with strategic, intentional support of institutional leaders, are necessary to achieve gender equity and diversity

  8. Careers in Academe: The Academic Labour Market as an Eco-System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baruch, Yehuda

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore the contrast between stable and dynamic labour markets in academe in light of career theories that were originally developed for business environments. Design/methodology/approach: A conceptual design, offering the eco-system as a framework. Findings: It evaluates their relevance and applicability to dynamic and…

  9. Core ITAC for Career-Focused Education. Integrated Technical & Academic Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This document introduces the underlying principles and components of Ohio's Integrated Technical and Academic Competencies (ITAC) system of career-focused education, which combines high-level academics and technical skills with a real-life context for learning that maximizes students' present and future academic and career success. The document…

  10. More than just a hobby: building an academic career in global emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Martin, Ian B K; Levine, Adam C; Kayden, Stephanie; Hauswald, Mark

    2014-07-01

    As the specialty of emergency medicine (EM) continues to spread around the world, a growing number of academic emergency physicians have become involved in global EM development, research, and teaching. While academic departments have always found this work laudable, they have only recently begun to accept global EM as a rigorous academic pursuit in its own right. This article describes how emergency physicians can translate their global health work into "academic currency" within both the clinician-educator and clinician-researcher tracks. The authors discuss the impact of various types of additional training, including global EM fellowships, for launching a career in global EM. Clearly delineated clinician-researcher and clinician-educator tracks are important for documenting achievement in global EM. Reflecting a growing interest in global health, more of today's EM faculty members are ascending the academic ranks as global EM specialists. Whether attempting to climb the academic ladder as a clinician-educator or clinician-researcher, advanced planning and the firm support of one's academic chair is crucial to the success of the promotion process. Given the relative youth of the subspecialty of global EM, however, it will take time for the pathways to academic promotion to become well delineated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical pharmacy academic career transitions: Viewpoints from the field part 3: Learning when and how to say yes.

    PubMed

    Jeffres, Meghan N; Blackmer, Allison B; Thompson, Angela M; Glode, Ashley E; Mahyari, Nila; Thompson, Megan

    2018-02-01

    The six authors of this commentary series, who have recently transitioned into or within an academic career, discuss challenging aspects of an academic career change. This is Part 3 of a three-part commentary series that focuses on when and how to say yes to the multitude of opportunities available to pharmacy practice faculty. Part 1 discusses feedback, evaluation, and advancement. Part 2 explains distribution of effort (DOE) and how to marry the different components of teaching, research, and service. While the entire series is intended to be read in continuity, faculty, or those interested in pursuing a career in pharmacy academia, can refer to Part 3 as a reference on how to screen opportunities within academia to maximize professional and personal growth and minimize career burnout. Schools of pharmacy may utilize this as a tool for new faculty members during orientation to help ensure faculty success. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Coaching: a new model for academic and career achievement

    PubMed Central

    Deiorio, Nicole M.; Carney, Patricia A.; Kahl, Leslie E.; Bonura, Erin M.; Juve, Amy Miller

    2016-01-01

    Background Individualized education is emerging as an innovative model for physician training. This requires faculty coaching to guide learners’ achievements in academic performance, competency development, and career progression. In addition, coaching can foster self-reflection and self-monitoring using a data-guided approach to support lifelong learning. Context Coaching differs from mentoring or advising, and its application in medical education is novel. Because of this, definitions of the concept and the constructs of coaching as applied to medical education are needed to accurately assess the coaching relationship and coaching processes. These can then be linked to learner outcomes to inform how coaching serves as a modifier of academic and competency achievement and career satisfaction. Innovation We developed definitions and constructs for academic coaching in medical education based on review of existing education and non-education coaching literature. These constructs focus on 1) establishing relationship principles, 2) conducting learner assessments, 3) developing and implementing an action plan, and 4) assessing results and revising plans accordingly. Implication Coaching is emerging as an important construct in the context of medical education. This article lays the vital groundwork needed for evaluation of coaching programs aimed at producing outstanding physicians. PMID:27914193

  13. Coaching: a new model for academic and career achievement.

    PubMed

    Deiorio, Nicole M; Carney, Patricia A; Kahl, Leslie E; Bonura, Erin M; Juve, Amy Miller

    2016-01-01

    Individualized education is emerging as an innovative model for physician training. This requires faculty coaching to guide learners' achievements in academic performance, competency development, and career progression. In addition, coaching can foster self-reflection and self-monitoring using a data-guided approach to support lifelong learning. Coaching differs from mentoring or advising, and its application in medical education is novel. Because of this, definitions of the concept and the constructs of coaching as applied to medical education are needed to accurately assess the coaching relationship and coaching processes. These can then be linked to learner outcomes to inform how coaching serves as a modifier of academic and competency achievement and career satisfaction. We developed definitions and constructs for academic coaching in medical education based on review of existing education and non-education coaching literature. These constructs focus on 1) establishing relationship principles, 2) conducting learner assessments, 3) developing and implementing an action plan, and 4) assessing results and revising plans accordingly. Coaching is emerging as an important construct in the context of medical education. This article lays the vital groundwork needed for evaluation of coaching programs aimed at producing outstanding physicians.

  14. Three Pathways to Support the Professional and Career Development of Casual Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crimmins, Gail; Oprescu, Florin; Nash, Greg

    2017-01-01

    Almost half of current academic staff will need to be replaced within three years in the Australian academic workforce. Literature suggests that casual academics are a potential solution, yet they are frequently excluded from the career development opportunities that would allow them to fulfil an ongoing academic role. Most academic development…

  15. Mid-career faculty development in academic medicine: How does it impact faculty and institutional vitality?

    PubMed Central

    Campion, MaryAnn W.; Bhasin, Robina M.; Beaudette, Donald J.; Shann, Mary H.; Benjamin, Emelia J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Faculty vitality is integral to the advancement of higher education. Strengthening vitality is particularly important for mid-career faculty, who represent the largest and most dissatisfied segment. The demands of academic medicine appear to be another factor that may put faculty at risk of attrition. To address these issues, we initiated a ten-month mid-career faculty development program. Methods A mixed-methods quasi-experimental design was used to evaluate the program's impact on faculty and institutional vitality. Pre/post surveys compared participants with a matched reference group. Quantitative data were augmented by interviews and focus groups with multiple stakeholders. Results At the program's conclusion, participants showed statistically significant gains in knowledge, skills, attitudes, and connectivity when compared to the referents. Conclusion Given that mid-career faculty development in academic medicine has not been extensively studied, our evaluation provides a useful perspective to guide future initiatives aimed at enhancing the vitality and leadership capacity of mid-career faculty. PMID:27942418

  16. Female surgeons' mentoring experiences and success in an academic career in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Kaderli, Reto; Muff, Brigitte; Stefenelli, Ulrich; Businger, Adrian

    2011-07-18

    An increasing proportion of women are working in medicine, although only very few choose surgical specialties and the interest in an academic pursuit is generally smaller among women compared to their male colleagues. The aim of the present study was to analyse factors critical for a successful academic career for female surgeons in Switzerland and to assess the value of mentor-mentee relationships in this context. An anonymous national survey among board-certified female surgeons and female residents was conducted in Switzerland during spring 2008. The support in career advancement was investigated with five scales: networking, career planning, coaching, role model and emotional support scale. Career development was assessed based on the following criteria: number of talks at scientific conferences, number of peer-reviewed publications, participation in research projects, months of research as a fulltime activity, amount of awarded scholarships, amount of obtained third-party funds and number of research awards obtained. In total, 189/318 (59.4%) questionnaires were returned. Mentor-mentee relationships were reported by 109/189 (58%) respondents. The bivariate analysis showed a positive influence on the sum score regarding the respondents who were in a mentor-mentee relationship or who had support in doing household work (p = 0.09). A supporting network, especially in terms of a mentor, is crucial so that female physicians interested in an academic career get the opportunity to accomplish their purpose. There is considerable potential for improvement as almost half of the respondents did not have a mentor in this survey.

  17. Long-term Academic and Career Impacts of Undergraduate Research: Diverse Pathways to Geoscience Careers Following a Summer Atmospheric Science Research Internship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trott, C. D.; Sample McMeeking, L. B.; Boyd, K.; Bowker, C.

    2015-12-01

    Research experiences for undergraduates (REU) have been shown to support the success of STEM undergraduates through improving their research skills, ability to synthesize knowledge, and personal and professional development, all while socializing them into the nature of science. REUs are further intended to support STEM career choice and professional advancement, and have thus played a key role in diversity efforts. Recruiting and retaining diverse students in STEM through REUs is of particular importance in the geosciences, where women and ethnic minorities continue to be significantly underrepresented. However, few studies have examined the long-term impacts of these REUs on students' academic and career trajectories. Further, those that do exist primarily study the experiences of current graduate students, scientists, and faculty members—that is, those who have already persisted—which overlooks the multiple academic and career paths REU students might follow and may preclude a thorough examination of REUs' diversity impacts. In this long-term retrospective study of the academic and career impacts of a REU program at a large Western U.S. research university, we interviewed 17 former REU participants on their expectations prior to their REU participation, their experiences during the REU, the immediate outcomes from the experience, and its long-term impacts on their academic and career choices. To address gaps in the existing literature on REU impacts, we purposively sampled students who have taken a variety of educational and career paths, including those not engaged in science research. Despite varied trajectories, the majority of the students we interviewed have persisted in the geosciences and attest to the REU's profound impact on their career-related opportunities and choices. This presentation describes students' diverse STEM pathways and discusses how students' REU expectations, experiences, and immediate outcomes continued to make an impact long-term.

  18. Work-family balance and academic advancement in medical schools.

    PubMed

    Fox, Geri; Schwartz, Alan; Hart, Katherine M

    2006-01-01

    This study examines various options that a faculty member might exercise to achieve work-family balance in academic medicine and their consequences for academic advancement. Three data sets were analyzed: an anonymous web-administered survey of part-time tenure track-eligible University of Illinois College of Medicine (UI-COM) faculty members conducted in 2003; exogenous data regarding the entire UI-COM faculty; and tenure rollback ("stop-the-clock") usage by all tenure track-eligible UI-COM faculty from 1994 to 2003. The data reveal a gender split in career-family balance priorities that affect academic advancement among part-time faculty. Women select part-time status for child care; men choose part-time to moonlight. Similarly, among all faculty members seeking tenure rollbacks, women request rollback for child care; men request rollback for other reasons. Among all faculty members, full-time men were more likely to be on the tenure track than any other group. Needs identified by the part-time faculty survey include improved mentoring in track selection, heightened awareness of options, such as tenure rollback, and provision of equitable benefits and opportunities. Policy changes, such as a prorated tenure track, are needed to support a family-friendly culture with flexibility throughout the career lifespan for both men and women medical faculty.

  19. Career Advancement, Career Enhancement, and Personal Growth of Pepperdine University's Educational Leadership Academy Graduate Program Alumni

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Ruth I.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was two-fold: (a) to explore and describe the perceived impact of Pepperdine University's Educational Leadership Academy (ELA) on 2003-2006 ELA graduates' career advancement, career enhancement, and personal growth; and (b) to obtain ELA graduates' suggestions for ELA program improvement to better prepare…

  20. Clinical pharmacy academic career transitions: Viewpoints from the field Part 2: Understanding and balancing the distribution of effort.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Angela; Blackmer, Allison; Jeffres, Meghan; Glode, Ashley; Mahyari, Nila; Thompson, Megan

    2018-02-01

    The six authors of this commentary series, who have recently transitioned into or within an academic career, discuss challenging aspects of an academic career change. The authors represent faculty members teaching within a large, state-funded, research-intensive School of Pharmacy located within a large academic health center. The authors have various backgrounds and represent individuals making transitions at various points in their careers (from residency into academia, from a non-academic environment into academia, and from one academic environment to another). This is Part 2 of a three-part commentary series that focuses on understanding and balancing the distribution of effort. Parts 1 and 3 of this commentary series explore feedback, evaluation and advancement; and learning when and how to say yes, respectively. While the entire series is intended to be read in continuity, faculty, or those interested in pursuing a career in pharmacy academia, can refer to Part 2 as a reference to aid in understanding and balancing the different components and the distribution of effort associated with a position in academic pharmacy, specifically. Schools of Pharmacy may utilize this as a tool for new faculty members during orientation in order to help ensure faculty success. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. COAChing Women to Succeed in Academic Careers in the Chemical Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Geraldine L.

    2005-03-01

    COAChing (Committee on the Advancement of Women Chemists) was formed in 1998 by a group of senior women chemists to address issues related to the documented disparity in hiring, promotion, and advancement of women faculty in academic chemistry departments in the United States. Several national programs have been launched by COACh that are already showing a high degree of impact on the lives and careers of many women chemists in the academic arena. As word of the effectiveness of these programs has spread, other science disciplines (including physics, biology, mathematics, and computer science) have adopted COACh programs with similar goals in mind. This article describes several opportunities that COACh is providing to help increase the number and success of women scientists in academia.

  2. Linking Complex Problem Solving and General Mental Ability to Career Advancement: Does a Transversal Skill Reveal Incremental Predictive Validity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mainert, Jakob; Kretzschmar, André; Neubert, Jonas C.; Greiff, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Transversal skills, such as complex problem solving (CPS) are viewed as central twenty-first-century skills. Recent empirical findings have already supported the importance of CPS for early academic advancement. We wanted to determine whether CPS could also contribute to the understanding of career advancement later in life. Towards this end, we…

  3. Career-Focused Education for Ohio's Students: Sample Instructional Units. Integrated Technical and Academic Competencies (ITAC).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Career-Technical and Adult Education.

    This book is designed to help academic teachers in middle or secondary education develop an appreciation of career-focused education and begin the process of designing career-focused instruction. (Career-focused instruction is educational programming in which curriculum content and learning experiences clearly connect to the world of work.) For…

  4. Research Success and Structured Support: Developing Early Career Academics in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geber, H.

    2009-01-01

    Entry into a successful academic career is often an arduous process. From career preparation through to doctoral studies and beyond, the journey can be fraught with trials. Why do many academics find difficulty in completing their studies in the minimum time and publishing afterwards? As the University of the Witwatersrand has a strategic goal of…

  5. Critical Interactions Shaping Early Academic Career Development in Two Higher Education Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmings, Brian; Hill, Doug; Sharp, John G.

    2013-01-01

    This study was aimed at identifying the critical interactions within work environments that support the development of early career academics as researchers in institutions with lower order research profiles, that is, environments that differ from research-intensive universities. Ten early career academics, five from Australia and five from the…

  6. Academic-Career Integration in Magnet High Schools: Assessing the Level of Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tokarska, Barbara; And Others

    An ongoing study examined implementation and student response to academic career magnet (ACM) programs in New York City high schools. The programs emphasize both college preparation and career education, demonstrating one approach to the current emphasis on integrating academic and vocational education. New York City offers a wide array of magnet…

  7. Academic Career Development Stress and Mental Health of Higher Secondary Students--An Indian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Anjali; Halder, Santoshi; Goswami, Nibedita

    2012-01-01

    The authors explored the mental health of students with their academic career-related stressors collecting data from 400 students of different schools of Eastern part of India by using; namely General Information Schedule (GIS), the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ), and the Academic Career Development Stress Scale. The data was subjected to t…

  8. Career and Academic Guidance for American Indian and Alaska Native Youth. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shutiva, Charmaine L.

    American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) students strive to maintain their heritage while learning to be successful in the dominant culture. Although academic and career success are worthy goals, AI/AN students can pay a heavy price to achieve them. To provide effective and responsive career and academic guidance for AI/AN youth, teachers and…

  9. The Career Perceptions of Academic Staff and Human Resource Discourses in English Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strike, Tony; Taylor, John

    2009-01-01

    This paper sets out findings from research that considered the interplay between English national policy developments in human resources management in higher education and the personal stories of academic staff as career participants. Academic careers are pursued in an institutional and national policy context but it was not clear that the formal…

  10. Balancing Career and Technical Education with Academic Coursework: The Consequences for Mathematics Achievement in High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozick, Robert; Dalton, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Federal legislation has attempted to move career and technical education (CTE) from a segregated component of the high school curriculum to an integrated element that jointly improves both academic and career readiness. However, concerns remain about the ability of CTE to improve academic learning. Using a nationally representative sample of high…

  11. Academic Support Services and Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy in Student Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Gary N.; Jasinski, Dale; Dunn, Steve; Fletcher, Duncan

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between evaluations of academic support services and student athletes' career decision-making self-efficacy. One hundred and fifty-eight NCAA athletes (68% male) from 11 Division I teams completed measures of satisfaction with their academic support services, career decision-making self-efficacy, general…

  12. Designing Informal Learning Experiences for Early Career Academics Using a Knowledge Ecosystem Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Faye; Partridge, Helen; Bruce, Christine; Hemmings, Brian

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a "knowledge ecosystem" model of how early career academics experience using information to learn while building their social networks for developmental purposes. Developed using grounded theory methodology, the model offers a way of conceptualising how to empower early career academics through (1) agency…

  13. Women Academic and Career Administrators' Role Perceptions and Occupational Satisfaction: Implications for Appointment and Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schonwetter, Dieter J.; And Others

    This study was the first stage in an analysis of academic and career administrators' perceptions of their functioning in management and leadership capacities and focused in particular on the perceptions of female faculty and administrators. Volunteer participants included 179 male and female university academic and career administrators. Of…

  14. Attitudes of clinical faculty about career progress, career success and recognition, and commitment to academic medicine. Results of a survey.

    PubMed

    Buckley, L M; Sanders, K; Shih, M; Hampton, C L

    2000-09-25

    To assess attitudes about career progress, resources for career development, and commitment to academic medicine in physician faculty at an academic medical center who spend more than 50% of their time in clinical care. Faculty survey. Academic medical center and associated Veterans Affairs medical center. A total of 310 physician faculty responded to the survey. Half of the faculty reported spending 50% or less of their time in clinical care (mean, 31% of time) (group 1) and half reported spending more than 50% of their time in clinical care (mean, 72% of time) (group 2). Group 2 faculty had one third of the time for scholarly activities, reported slower career progress, and were less likely to be at the rank of professor (40% and 16% for groups 1 and 2, respectively; P<.001) or to be tenured (52% and 26%, respectively; P<.001) despite similar age and years on faculty. Group 2 faculty were 50% more likely to report that tenure and promotion criteria were not reviewed at their annual progress report (P =.003) and that they did not understand the criteria (P<.001). Group 2 faculty valued excellence in patient care over scholarship and national visibility. Group 2 faculty reported greater dissatisfaction with academic medicine and less commitment to a career in academic medicine. Physician faculty who spend more than 50% of their time in clinical care have less time, mentoring, and resources needed for development of an academic career. These obstacles plus differences in their attitudes about career success and recognition contribute to significant differences in promotion. These factors are associated with greater dissatisfaction with academic medicine and lower commitment to academic careers.

  15. Results of an academic promotion and career path survey of faculty at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Patricia A; Diener-West, Marie; Canto, Marcia I; Martin, Don R; Post, Wendy S; Streiff, Michael B

    2004-03-01

    Clinician-educator faculty are increasing in numbers in academic medical centers, but their academic advancement is slower than that of research faculty. The authors sought to quantify the magnitude of this difference in career advancement and to explore the characteristics of faculty that might explain the difference. In 1999, a questionnaire was administered to all MD faculty at the rank of instructor and above (259) in the Department of Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. A total of 180 (69%) faculty returned questionnaires. Of these, 178 identified with one of four career paths: basic researcher (46), clinical researcher (69), academic clinician (38), or teacher-clinician (25). Career path did not differ by age, gender, rank, years on faculty, hours worked per week, family responsibility, or global work satisfaction. After adjusting for age, gender, time at rank, and work satisfaction, the odds of being at a higher rank were 85% less for academic clinicians (odds ratio,.15; 95% confidence interval, 0.06-0.40) and 69% less for teacher-clinicians (odds ratio,.31; 95% confidence interval, 0.11-0.88) than for basic researchers. Clinical researchers did not differ from basic researchers in the likelihood of being at higher rank. Similarly, compared with basic research faculty, the adjusted odds of being more satisfied with progress towards academic promotion were 92% lower for academic clinicians and 87% lower for teacher-clinicians. Clinician-educator faculty were less likely to be at higher rank at this institution than were faculty in research paths. Differences in rank may be explained by lower rank at hire for faculty in these career paths, time available for scholarly activities, or other resources available to support scholarship. Retaining clinician-educators will require further exploration of barriers to promotion inherent to these career paths and methods of modifying these barriers.

  16. Career advancement and professional development in nursing.

    PubMed

    Adeniran, Rita K; Smith-Glasgow, Mary Ellen; Bhattacharya, Anand; Xu, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Excellence underscores the need for nurses to keep their skills and competencies current through participation in professional development and career advancement. Evidence suggests that internationally educated nurses (IENs) progress relatively slowly through the career ladder and participate less in professional development compared with nurses educated in the United States (UENs). Mentorship and self-efficacy are considered major determinants of career advancement. The aim of the study was to understand the differences in levels of mentorship function and self-efficacy as well as the differences in participation in professional development and career advancement between UENs and IENs. A descriptive survey design was implemented using a Web-based survey. Significant disparities were noted in the role model function of mentoring and some professional development and career advancement measures between UENs and IENs. Mentorship is essential for professional growth. Sociodemographic characteristics of mentors are important because mentors are role models. Standardized career advancement structures are needed to promote professional growth. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  17. Advancing in the Career Decision-Making Process: The Role of Coping Strategies and Career Decision-Making Profiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Maya; Gati, Itamar

    2017-01-01

    We tested the associations among the career decision-making difficulties, the career decision status, and either (a) the career decision-making profiles of 575 young adults, or (b) the coping strategies of 379 young adults. As hypothesized, a more advanced decision status was negatively associated with both career decision-making difficulties…

  18. Tracking the careers of academic general pediatric fellowship program graduates: academic productivity and leadership roles.

    PubMed

    Szilagyi, Peter G; Haggerty, Robert J; Baldwin, Constance D; Paradis, Heather A; Foltz, Jennifer L; Vincelli, Phyllis; Blumkin, Aaron; Cheng, Tina L

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the careers of graduates of academic general pediatric (AGP) fellowship programs. We evaluated the careers of 2 cohorts of AGP fellowship graduates: an early cohort trained during 1978 to 1988, and a later cohort trained during 1989 to 1999. We surveyed all known AGP fellowship graduates in both cohorts by using a confidential mailed survey. We assessed graduates' current professional work and analyzed curricula vitae for principal investigator (PI) grants; first-authored, peer-reviewed publications; and leadership positions. From the early cohort, 95 of 131 eligible graduates (73%) responded; from the later cohort, 93 of 133 (70%) responded. Two thirds of each cohort remain in academics; of these, nearly half are on tenure tracks and over half have major educational roles within their university. The percentage in the early cohort who have been PI on a research grant by 5, 10, and 15 years postfellowship was 44%, 53%, and 54%, respectively; in the later cohort, it was 62%, 75%, and 75%, respectively (P = .004 vs early cohort). During the 10 years postfellowship, the early and later cohorts averaged 5.5 and 7.4 first-authored, peer-reviewed papers, respectively (P = .4). By 10 years, a high proportion of both cohorts had become division chief (19% vs 16%), had other academic leadership positions (43% vs 59%), or were leaders in professional organizations (20% vs 30%; all P = NS). Graduates of AGP fellowship programs have achieved considerable academic success. Recently trained fellows appear even more successful. The academic outcomes of these AGP fellows bode well for the future of AGP. Copyright © 2011 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Factors influencing surgical career choices and advancement in Ireland and Britain.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Mark A; Shields, Conor J; Redmond, Henry P

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the factors that influence the advancement and the career choices of doctors and medical students. Using the combined databases of the iformix and surgent websites, 450 doctors and medical students were invited to complete an internet-based survey. Surgent (http://www.surgent.ie) and iformix (http://www.iformix.com) are two free internet services administered by the authors. Surgent is a medical educational website, while iformix facilitates the online submission of abstracts to surgical and medical conferences across Britain and Ireland. The combined database of these two websites is approximately 4500 entries. Four hundred and fifty users represented a 10% sample based on an expected 40%-45% response rate. This was anticipated to yield between 180 and 202 respondents, statistically sufficient to analyze the data. A detailed Likert scale assessed the importance of "academic," "clinical," and "lifestyle" factors in determining career choice and progression. Analysis included descriptive statistics and inferential testing. Fifty percent (N = 222) of surveys were returned; 142 men and 78 women. Thirty-seven percent of respondents were Irish, 28% British, and 35% non-European. Fifteen percent were undergraduates, 4% interns, 12% had 2-4 years of clinical experience, while 69% had completed more than 4 years. Fifty-six percent had decided upon a career in general surgery. Overall, the most important factors for career choice were intellectual challenge (95%), academic opportunities (61%), and research opportunities(54%). Doctors with more than 4 years of experience deemed duration of training (p = 0.002), lifestyle during training (p = 0.02), and stress (0.005) as less important factors when considering career choice. Correlation analyses demonstrated that prestige (p = 0.002), patient relationships (p = 0.006), and advice from friends or family (p = 0.01) were more important influencing factors for interns. In terms of career

  20. Academic or community practice? What is driving decision-making and career choices.

    PubMed

    Goudreau, Bernadette J; Hassinger, Taryn E; Hedrick, Traci L; Slingluff, Craig L; Schroen, Anneke T; Dengel, Lynn T

    2018-06-18

    Identifying factors that impact progression of surgery trainees into academic versus non-academic practices may permit tailoring residency experiences to promote academic careers in institutions charged with the training of future surgeon scientists. The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with progression of surgery trainees into academic versus non-academic practice. A survey was distributed to 135 surgeons graduating from the University of Virginia residency program from 1964-2016, a single academic institution. Questions addressed practice type, research productivity, work/life balance, mentorship, and overall sentiment toward research and academic surgery. A 5-point Likert scale measured career satisfaction and influence of factors in practice setting choice. Of the 135 surveys that were electronically distributed, 69 participants responded (response rate: 51%). Of the 54 with known current practice types, 34 (63%) were academic and 20 (37%) non-academic. Academic surgeons reported more publications by the conclusion of surgery training (56% vs 25% with >10 publications, P = .02). More academic surgeons reported >$100,000 in student debt at graduation (44% vs 25%, P < .05). Factors encouraging an academic career were similar for both types of surgeons, including involvement in education of trainees and access to mentorship. Both groups were discouraged from an academic practice by requirements of grant-writing and funding responsibilities. Surgeons in academic practice were more likely to recommend surgery as a career to a current medical student (100% vs 70%, P = .001). This knowledge may help to tailor training experiences to promote academic careers. By supporting funding mechanisms and grant-writing programs, while encouraging mentorship and productive research experiences, current surgical trainees may be more enthusiastic about a career in academic practice. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. An Examination of the Effects of Career Development Courses on Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy, Adjustment to College, Learning Integration, and Academic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Michele J.; Pedersen, Joan S.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of career development courses on career decision-making self-efficacy (CDMSE), college adjustment, learning integration, academic achievement, and retention among undecided undergraduates. It also investigated the effects of course format on career decision-making abilities and academic success outcomes and…

  2. Advanced Biology [Sahuarita High School Career Curriculum Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Larry

    This course in advanced biology is entitled "Advanced Genetics" and is one of a series of instructional guides prepared by teachers for the Sahuarita High School (Arizona) Career Curriculum Project. It consists of seven units of study, and 15 behavioral objectives relating to these units are stated. The topics covered include a review of genetics,…

  3. Advanced light microscopy core facilities: Balancing service, science and career

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Hella; Reymann, Jürgen; Ansari, Nariman; Utz, Nadine; Fried, Hans‐Ulrich; Kukat, Christian; Peychl, Jan; Liebig, Christian; Terjung, Stefan; Laketa, Vibor; Sporbert, Anje; Weidtkamp‐Peters, Stefanie; Schauss, Astrid; Zuschratter, Werner; Avilov, Sergiy

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Core Facilities (CF) for advanced light microscopy (ALM) have become indispensable support units for research in the life sciences. Their organizational structure and technical characteristics are quite diverse, although the tasks they pursue and the services they offer are similar. Therefore, throughout Europe, scientists from ALM‐CFs are forming networks to promote interactions and discuss best practice models. Here, we present recommendations for ALM‐CF operations elaborated by the workgroups of the German network of ALM‐CFs, German Bio‐Imaging (GerBI). We address technical aspects of CF planning and instrument maintainance, give advice on the organization and management of an ALM‐CF, propose a scheme for the training of CF users, and provide an overview of current resources for image processing and analysis. Further, we elaborate on the new challenges and opportunities for professional development and careers created by CFs. While some information specifically refers to the German academic system, most of the content of this article is of general interest for CFs in the life sciences. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:463–479, 2016. © 2016 THE AUTHORS MICROSCOPY RESEARCH AND TECHNIQUE PUBLISHED BY WILEY PERIODICALS, INC. PMID:27040755

  4. Advanced light microscopy core facilities: Balancing service, science and career.

    PubMed

    Ferrando-May, Elisa; Hartmann, Hella; Reymann, Jürgen; Ansari, Nariman; Utz, Nadine; Fried, Hans-Ulrich; Kukat, Christian; Peychl, Jan; Liebig, Christian; Terjung, Stefan; Laketa, Vibor; Sporbert, Anje; Weidtkamp-Peters, Stefanie; Schauss, Astrid; Zuschratter, Werner; Avilov, Sergiy

    2016-06-01

    Core Facilities (CF) for advanced light microscopy (ALM) have become indispensable support units for research in the life sciences. Their organizational structure and technical characteristics are quite diverse, although the tasks they pursue and the services they offer are similar. Therefore, throughout Europe, scientists from ALM-CFs are forming networks to promote interactions and discuss best practice models. Here, we present recommendations for ALM-CF operations elaborated by the workgroups of the German network of ALM-CFs, German Bio-Imaging (GerBI). We address technical aspects of CF planning and instrument maintainance, give advice on the organization and management of an ALM-CF, propose a scheme for the training of CF users, and provide an overview of current resources for image processing and analysis. Further, we elaborate on the new challenges and opportunities for professional development and careers created by CFs. While some information specifically refers to the German academic system, most of the content of this article is of general interest for CFs in the life sciences. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:463-479, 2016. © 2016 THE AUTHORS MICROSCOPY RESEARCH AND TECHNIQUE PUBLISHED BY WILEY PERIODICALS, INC. © 2016 The Authors Microscopy Research and Technique Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Student mistreatment in medical school and planning a career in academic medicine.

    PubMed

    Haviland, Mark G; Yamagata, Hisashi; Werner, Leonard S; Zhang, Kehua; Dial, Thomas H; Sonne, Janet L

    2011-01-01

    Student mistreatment in medical school is a persistent problem with both known and unexplored consequences [corrected]. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a perception of having been mistreated in medical school had an association with planning a full-time career in academic medicine. Using Association of American Medical Colleges' 2000-2004 Medical School Graduation Questionnaire data, we evaluated the relationship between students' mistreatment experience and their career choice, academic versus nonacademic setting. Meta-analysis and regression were used to evaluate this relationship. At medical schools where relatively high percentages of graduating seniors were planning academic careers, students reporting mistreatment experiences were less likely at graduation to be planning careers in academic medicine. A perception of having been mistreated in medical school is related to students' career choices, a finding that may be useful to medical school administrators/faculty and students as mistreatment is addressed in program planning, counseling, and faculty recruitment.

  6. Update regarding the society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) grant distribution and impact on recipient's academic career.

    PubMed

    DuCoin, Christopher; Petersen, Rebecca P; Urbach, David; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Madan, Atul K; Pryor, Aurora D

    2018-07-01

    Small seed grants strongly impact academic careers, result in future funding, and lead to increased involvement in surgical societies. We hypothesize that, in accordance with the SAGES Research and Career Development committee mission, there has been a shift in grant support from senior faculty to residents and junior faculty. We hypothesize that these junior physician-researchers are subsequently remaining involved with SAGES and advancing within their academic institutions. All current and previous SAGES grant recipients were surveyed through Survey Monkey™. Questions included current academic status and status at time of grant, ensuing funding, publication and presentation of grant, and impact on career. Results were verified through a Medline query. SAGES database was examined for involvement within the society. Respondent data were compared to 2009 data. One hundred and ninety four grants were awarded to 167 recipients. Of those, 75 investigators responded for a response rate 44.9%. 32% were trainees, 43% assistant professors, 16% associate professors, 3% full professors, 3% professors with tenure, and 3% in private practice. This is a shift from 2009 data with a considerable increase in funding of trainees by 19% and assistant professors by 10% and a decrease in funding of associate professors by 5% and professors by 10%. 41% of responders who were awarded the grant as assistant or associate professors had advanced to full professor and 99% were currently in academic medicine. Eighty-two percent indicated that they had completed their project and 93% believed that the award helped their career. All responders remained active in SAGES. SAGES has chosen to reallocate an increased percentage of grant money to more junior faculty members and residents. It appears that these grants may play a role in keeping recipients interested in the academic surgical realm and involved in the society while simultaneously helping them advance in faculty rank.

  7. A Balancing Act: Facilitating a University Education Induction Programme for (Early Career) Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, Sarasvathie; Searle, Ruth L.; Shawa, Lester B.; Teferra, Damtew

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the University Education Induction Programme (UEIP), an academic development programme, delivered at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The authors, who developed and now facilitate the UEIP, deliver the programme to early career academics and senior academics as per a senate-mandated requirement. Drawing on…

  8. Early Career Academic Perceptions, Attitudes and Professional Development Activities: Questioning the Teaching and Research Gap to Further Academic Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Kelly E.; Lodge, Jason M.; Bosanquet, Agnes

    2014-01-01

    Early career academia is a challenging time, particularly as academics are facing increasing pressures to excel across a range of areas. Boyer argued for the "true scholar" versed in the overlapping areas of scholarship in research, teaching, integration and engagement. Academic developers have an important role to play in assisting the…

  9. Visualization of gender, race, citizenship and academic performance in association with career outcomes of 15-year biomedical doctoral alumni at a public research university

    PubMed Central

    Cano, Annmarie; Kohl, Michael; Muthunayake, Nisansala S.; Vaidyanathan, Prassanna; Wood, Mary E.; Ziyad, Mustafa

    2018-01-01

    It has long been thought that biomedical doctoral students pursue careers primarily as tenure-track/tenured faculty at research institutions. Recent reports showed, however, that the majority of biomedical doctoral alumni engage in a variety of careers. Wayne State University (WSU) undertook a project to understand the career trajectories of its biomedical doctoral alumni to create programs to better prepare its students for careers in multiple pathways. Data were collected on career outcomes of WSU’s biomedical doctoral alumni who graduated in a 15-year period from 1999–2014. Careers were classified into three tiers by Employment Sector, Career Types and Job Functions and career paths were examined by alumni gender, race, U.S. citizenship status, and association with certain academic characteristics. Several statistically significant differences in career paths among all demographics were found. For example, women were more likely to be in teaching and providing healthcare, men in faculty and research; Black alumni pursued careers in Government at higher rates and Whites in For-Profit careers; Asians and non-U.S. citizens spent more time in training positions than others. There was no association of academic characteristics such as GRE, GPA, and Time-to-Degree completion with careers in the two largest sectors of Academia or For-profit. Since our trainees are engaged in this rich variety of careers essential to advancing biomedical science and research nationally, it is imperative for the graduate training community to embrace all careers as successful, and transform the model for biomedical doctoral training to foster student success across this broad career spectrum. PMID:29771987

  10. Perceptions of Skill Development of Participants in Three National Career Development Programs For Women Faculty in Academic Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Helitzer, Deborah L.; Newbill, Sharon L.; Morahan, Page S.; Magrane, Diane; Cardinali, Gina; Wu, Chih-Chieh; Chang, Shine

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and Drexel University College of Medicine have designed and implemented national career development programs (CDPs) to help women faculty acquire and strengthen skills needed for success in academic medicine. The authors hypothesized that skills women acquired in CDPs would vary by career stage and program attended. Method In 2011, the authors surveyed a national cohort of 2,779 women listed in the AAMC Faculty Roster who also attended one of three CDPs (Early- and Mid-Career Women in Medicine Seminars, and/or Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine) between 1988 and 2010 to examine their characteristics and CDP experiences. Participants indicated from a list of 16 skills whether each skill was newly acquired, improved, or not improved as a result of their program participation. Results Of 2537 eligible CDP women, 942 clicked on the link in an invitation e-mail and 879 (35%) completed the survey. Respondents were representative of women faculty in academic medicine. Participants rated the CDPs highly. Almost all reported gaining and/or improving skills from the CDP. Four skills predominated across all three programs: interpersonal skills, leadership, negotiation, and networking. The skills that attendees endorsed differed by respondents’ career stages, more so than by program attended. Conclusions Women participants perceived varying skills gained or improved from their attendance at the CDPs. Determining ways in which CDPs can support women’s advancement in academic medicine requires a deeper understanding of what participants seek from CDPs and how they use program content to advance their careers. PMID:24871241

  11. Perceptions of skill development of participants in three national career development programs for women faculty in academic medicine.

    PubMed

    Helitzer, Deborah L; Newbill, Sharon L; Morahan, Page S; Magrane, Diane; Cardinali, Gina; Wu, Chih-Chieh; Chang, Shine

    2014-06-01

    The Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and Drexel University College of Medicine have designed and implemented national career development programs (CDPs) to help women faculty acquire and strengthen skills needed for success in academic medicine. The authors hypothesized that skills women acquired in CDPs would vary by career stage and program attended. In 2011, the authors surveyed a national cohort of 2,779 women listed in the AAMC Faculty Roster who also attended one of three CDPs (Early- and Mid-Career Women in Medicine Seminars, and/or Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine) between 1988 and 2010 to examine their characteristics and CDP experiences. Participants indicated from a list of 16 skills whether each skill was newly acquired, improved, or not improved as a result of their program participation. Of 2,537 eligible CDP women, 942 clicked on the link in an invitation e-mail, and 879 (93%) completed the survey. Respondents were representative of women faculty in academic medicine. Participants rated the CDPs highly. Almost all reported gaining and/or improving skills from the CDP. Four skills predominated across all three programs: interpersonal skills, leadership, negotiation, and networking. The skills that attendees endorsed differed by respondents' career stages, more so than by program attended. Women participants perceived varying skills gained or improved from their attendance at the CDPs. Determining ways in which CDPs can support women's advancement in academic medicine requires a deeper understanding of what participants seek from CDPs and how they use program content to advance their careers.

  12. Asilomar Leadership Skills Seminar: The Career Preparation, Advancement, and Enhancement of Women in California Community College Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castillo-Garrison, Estella M.

    2012-01-01

    This mixed-methods research study examined the effects on the career preparation, advancement, and enhancement of women from California community college leadership who participated in the Asilomar Leadership Skills Seminar (Asilomar) from 2005-2011. Data were collected during the 2011-2012 academic year and were gathered from the results of 67…

  13. Advancing the educational and career pathway for clinical trials nurses.

    PubMed

    Scott, Kathleen; White, Kathryn; Roydhouse, Jessica K

    2013-04-01

    Clinical trials nurses play a pivotal role in the conduct of clinical research, but the educational and career pathway for these nurses remains unclear. This article reports findings from a survey of nurses working in cancer clinical trials research in Australia. Most participants held postgraduate qualifications (42 of 61); however, clinical trials education was primarily attained through short professional development courses. Interest in pursuing trial-specific postgraduate education was high, but barriers were identified, including cost, time, and unclear benefit for career advancement. Job titles varied substantially, which is indicative of an unclear employment pathway. These findings suggest that initiatives to improve the educational and career pathway for clinical trials nurses are needed and should include the following: formal educational preparation, greater consistency in employment status, and clearer career progression. These strategies should be underpinned by broad professional recognition of the clinical trials nurse as a specialized nursing role. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. The Influence of Research on Career Development at Academic Colleges of Education in Israel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Eva; Coleman, Marianne

    2002-01-01

    Interviewed and surveyed Israeli teacher educators regarding links between research and career development. Young and ambitious respondents used research for extrinsic rewards and career advancement. Teacher educators toward the end of their careers looked for intrinsic rewards and viewed research as contributing to professional growth.…

  15. Investing in future pediatric subspecialists: a fellowship curriculum that prepares for the transition to academic careers

    PubMed Central

    Rama, Jennifer A.; Campbell, Judith R.; Balmer, Dorene F.; Turner, Teri L.; Hsu, Deborah C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The experience of transitioning to an academic faculty position can be improved with standardized educational interventions. Although a number of such interventions have been described, few utilize an evaluation framework, describe a robust evaluation process, and address why their interventions were successful. In this article, the authors apply a logic model to describe their efforts to develop, implement, evaluate, and revise a comprehensive academic career development curriculum among pediatric subspecialty fellows. They describe inputs, activities, outputs, and outcomes using quantitative data from fellow evaluations and qualitative data from faculty interviews. Methods Methods are described under the input and activities sections. The curriculum started with collaboration among educational leadership and conducting a needs assessment. Using the needs assessment results and targeted learning objectives, we piloted the curriculum and then implemented the full curriculum 1 year later. Results Results are described under the outputs and outcomes sections. We present immediate, short-term, and 6-month evaluation data. Cumulative data over 3 years reveal that fellows consistently acquired knowledge relevant to transitioning and that they applied acquired knowledge to prepare for finding jobs and career advancement. The curriculum also benefits faculty instructors who gain a sense of reward by filling a critical knowledge gap and fostering fellows’ professional growth. Conclusion The authors relate the success and effectiveness of the curriculum to principles of adult learning, and share lessons learned, including the importance of buy-in from junior and senior fellows and faculty, collaboration, and designating the time to teach and learn. PMID:25861876

  16. The Mock Academic Faculty Position Competition: A Pilot Professional and Career Development Opportunity for Postdoctoral Fellows.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Rita Isabel; Syed, Naweed

    2016-12-01

    Medical educators face a dilemma in countries like Canada, where policy makers and strategic planners have prioritized highly qualified personnel and expanded recruitment of advanced trainees at a time when early-career specialists face prolonged job insecurity as they transition to professional employment. The University of Calgary Cumming School of Medicine hatched the Mock Academic Faculty Position competition to test the school's existing capacity to address the pressing career development needs of highly trained graduates. The competition was piloted in May-June 2014. Approximately 180 postdoctoral fellows were invited to compete; 34 submitted portfolios. The Postdoctoral Program Office established a longlist of 12 applicants. Through reviews, a selection committee identified 3 finalists to participate in a daylong event consisting of a research presentation and committee interview. The event was followed by approximately 70 audience members at any given time who were invited to complete anonymous evaluation forms and/or exit interviews. The selection committee deduced a vast majority of applicants did not sell their skills effectively or demonstrate research programs independent from supervisors. Exit interviews conducted with 40 audience members indicated 36 (90%) picked the same finalist as the selection committee, 34 (85%) found the process "nerve racking," and 28 (70%) had no previous idea of what goes on inside an academic committee interview. A key recommendation for future iterations is early attention to systematizing feedback to ensure more direct impact for nonfinalists. Alternative initiatives for those gearing up for industry or public-sector work are being prepared.

  17. Academic Careers and the Valuation of Academics. A Discursive Perspective on Status Categories and Academic Salaries in France as Compared to the U.S., Germany and Great Britain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angermuller, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Academic careers are social processes which involve many members of large populations over long periods of time. This paper outlines a discursive perspective which looks into how academics are categorized in academic systems. From a discursive view, academic careers are organized by categories which can define who academics are (subjectivation)…

  18. Advancing the Careers of Women with Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metz, Isabel

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to assess whether differences exist in the barriers reported by, and in the person- and situation-centred factors related to the managerial advancement of, women with and without children. The study also seeks to examine whether having children influences womens advancement, by affecting person-situation factors such as…

  19. Landmarks in the Professional and Academic Development of Mid-Career Teacher Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Vivienne; Thompson, Simon; Hryniewicz, Liz

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the professional and academic development of mid-career teacher educators from two universities in England. The objectives of the study were to analyse and compare the career experiences of teacher educators; in particular, to identify stages of development, landmark events and contextual factors affecting professional…

  20. Comparing Two Groups of Student-Athletes: Implications for Academic and Career Advising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buzzetta, Mary E.; Lenz, Janet G.; Kennelly, Emily

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we explored the career variables of goal instability, vocational identity, and career decidedness levels in two groups of student-athletes. We compared scholarship student-athletes who had been selected to participate in a summer academic-support program designed for at-risk students to scholarship athletes who were not included in…

  1. The Effects of Career Academies on Academic Achievement and College Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Mandy J.

    2017-01-01

    This quantitative ex post facto study investigated the effects of career academies on academic achievement and college readiness. A total of 1,206 12th-grade participants (196 career academy and 1,010 nonacademy students) were used in this study. These participants came from six high schools located in one large urban school district. Each of the…

  2. Academic and Career Expectations of Ethnic Minority Youth in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Francis; Lai, Beatrice P. Y.; Wu, Anise M. S.; Ku, Lisbeth

    2015-01-01

    Based on social-cognitive career theory (SCCT), we explore how ethnic identity, parental occupation, efficacy in learning Chinese, and learning experience relate to ethnic minority adolescents' academic and career expectations. The participants are 632 Southeast Asian adolescents in Hong Kong. In accordance with SCCT, structural equation modeling…

  3. Advice and Reflections for a University Teacher Beginning an Academic Career

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hay, Iain; Bartlett-Trafford, Julie; Chang, T. C.; Kneale, Pauline; Szili, Gerti

    2013-01-01

    Although graduate programs typically prepare university students well for research activity, many have been less successful in educating for other aspects of academic careers. This article discusses Iain Hay's "Letter to a New University Teacher," which has been used internationally to help new lecturers beginning their career.…

  4. Rhythms of Academic Life. Personal Accounts of Careers in Academia. Foundations for Organizational Science Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Peter J., Ed.; Taylor, M. Susan, Ed.

    This book presents 52 essays by individuals in higher education on their own personal career paths and experiences. Part 1 contains essays focusing on suggestions for optimizing career success including one woman's journey to becoming a scholar, personal and cultural factors and cross-cultural influences, the transition to academic life from…

  5. Tenure Track Career System as a Strategic Instrument for Academic Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pietilä, Maria

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the purposes for which leaders in universities use academic career systems. It focuses on the tenure track system which is new to Finland. Tenure track represents a newly established internal career path in a situation in which Finnish universities' organizational autonomy increased via new legislation from 2010. Drawing…

  6. The Unacknowledged Value of Female Academic Labour Power for Male Research Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angervall, Petra; Beach, Dennis; Gustafsson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Academic work in Sweden's higher education system is changing character. Distinctly different career pathways are emerging, as facilities for developing research careers and capital have become both more restricted and more dependent on external funding. These developments are in focus in the present article. Based on ethnographic research and a…

  7. Being Prepared to Lead: The Management Preparation of Academic Leaders from a Private Career College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Abby L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine whether academic leaders from a private career college are prepared to lead. The objective was to determine if leaders in a private career college felt they have the skills necessary to fulfill the needs of the students, faculty, employment sector, and public. This research study is a replication of a…

  8. Academic Careers for Graduate Students: A Strong Attractor in a Changed Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gemme, Brigitte; Gingras, Yves

    2012-01-01

    Professorship has traditionally been the single most valued career path for graduates of PhD programs. Policies now encourage graduate students to directly or indirectly engage with non-academic organizations to encourage the next generation of researchers to explore alternative careers, including opportunities in industry and government. In this…

  9. Career Mobility of High-Flying Women Academics: A Study at Selected Universities in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ismail, Maimunah; Rasdi, Roziah Mohd

    2006-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the relationship between past experience and the career mobility of 31 high-flying female academics from eight established Malaysian universities. Based on data gathered from in-depth interviews, it is discerned that the respondents' career mobility at the "exploration" stage is influenced by early exposure…

  10. Career Development Interventions and Academic Self-Efficacy and Motivation: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dykeman, Cass; Wood, Chris; Ingram, Michael; Herr, Edwin L.

    The impact of career development interventions on career and technical education (CTE) students' academic self-efficacy and motivation was explored in a pilot study that elicited responses from 293 students at 20 high schools across the United States. The study included a literature review, survey of high school seniors that examined 44…

  11. The Economic Benefits of Academic and Career Preparation. Issues in College Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACT, Inc., 2008

    2008-01-01

    Students should start career planning as early as middle school by learning about their interests and their academic strengths and weaknesses as they begin to consider postsecondary and career options. This issue brief presents the results of a study that provides a financial rationale in finding that those students who engage in such long-term…

  12. New Perspectives for Women in Career Selection, in Return to Working Life, in Career Advancement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training, Berlin (West Germany).

    This booklet outlines existing and emerging career selection, reentry, and advancement opportunities for females throughout the European community. Existing educational and employment opportunities for males and females in various Western European nations are compared. New opportunities for girls and new occupations for women who are unemployed or…

  13. A Longitudinal Study on Learner Career Advancement in MOOCs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yuan; Paquette, Luc; Baker, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present progress towards a longitudinal study of the post-course career advancement of MOOC learners. We present initial results and analysis plans for how to link this to in-course behaviour, towards better understanding the goals of all MOOC learners.

  14. Advancing Your Career: Concepts of Professional Nursing. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearney, Rose

    This textbook, intended for registered nurses (RN's) returning to school, is designed to provide practicing RN's with professional concepts to advance their careers. The book contains 22 chapters organized in five sections. Each chapter includes chapter objectives, key terms, key points, chapter exercises, references, and a bibliography. Section I…

  15. Investigating the sustainability of careers in academic primary care: a UK survey.

    PubMed

    Calitri, Raff; Adams, Ann; Atherton, Helen; Reeve, Joanne; Hill, Nathan R

    2014-12-14

    The UK National Health Service (NHS) is undergoing institutional reorganisation due to the Health and Social Care Act-2012 with a continued restriction on funding within the NHS and clinically focused academic institutions. The UK Society for Academic Primary Care (SAPC) is examining the sustainability of academic primary care careers within this climate and preliminary qualitative work has highlighted individual and organisational barriers. This study seeks to quantify the current situation for academics within primary care. A survey of academic primary care staff was undertaken. Fifty-three academic primary care departments were selected. Members were invited to complete a survey which contained questions about an individual's career, clarity of career pathways, organisational culture, and general experience of working within the area. Data were analysed descriptively with cross-tabulations between survey responses and career position (early, mid-level, senior), disciplinary background (medical, scientist), and gender. Pearson chi-square test was used to determine likelihood that any observed difference between the sets arose by chance. Responses were received from 217 people. Career pathways were unclear for the majority of people (64%) and 43% of the workforce felt that the next step in their career was unclear. This was higher in women (52% vs. men 25%; χ(2)(3) = 14.76; p = 0.002) and higher in those in early career (50% vs. senior career, 25%) and mid-career(45%; vs. senior career; χ(2)(6) = 29.19, p < 0.001). The workforce appeared geographically static but unstable with only 50% of people having their contract renewed or extended. The majority of people (59%) have never been promoted by their institution. There were perceptions of gender equality even in the context of females being underrepresented in senior positions (19% vs. males 39%; χ(2)(3) = 8.43, p = 0.015). Despite these findings, the majority of the workforce reported positive organisational

  16. Racial and ethnic minority medical students' perceptions of and interest in careers in academic medicine.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, J P; Peters, Lutheria; Lee-Rey, Elizabeth; Strelnick, Hal; Garrison, Gwen; Zhang, Kehua; Spencer, Dennis; Ortega, Gezzer; Yehia, Baligh; Berlin, Anne; Castillo-Page, Laura

    2013-09-01

    To describe diverse medical students' perceptions of and interest in careers in academic medicine. In 2010, the authors invited students attending three national medical student conferences to respond to a survey and participate in six focus groups. The authors identified trends in data through bivariate analyses of the quantitative dataset and using a grounded theory approach in their analysis of focus group transcripts. The 601 survey respondents represented 103 U.S. medical schools. The majority (72%) were in their first or second year; 34% were black and 17% were Hispanic. Many respondents (64%) expressed interest in careers in academic medicine; teaching and research were viewed as positive influences on that interest. However, black and Hispanic respondents felt they would have a harder time succeeding in academia. The 73 focus group participants (25% black, 29% Hispanic) described individual- and institutional-level challenges to academic medicine careers and offered recommendations. They desired deliberate and coordinated exposure to academic career paths, research training, clarification of the promotion process, mentorship, protected time for faculty to provide teaching and research training, and an enhanced infrastructure to support diversity and inclusion. Medical students expressed an early interest in academic medicine but lacked clarity about the career path. Black and Hispanic students' perceptions of having greater difficulty succeeding in academia may be an obstacle to engaging them in the prospective pool of academicians. Strategic and dedicated institutional resources are needed to encourage racial and ethnic minority medical students to explore careers in academic medicine.

  17. Differences in medical students' academic interest and performance across career choice motivations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyong-Jee; Hwang, Jee Y; Kwon, Bum S

    2016-02-15

    To investigate medical students' career choice motivation and its relationship with their academic interest and performance. We conducted a cross-sectional study in a sample (n=207) of medical students at a private medical school in Korea, stratified by year of medical course. Data about participant demographics, career choice motivation and academic interest were collected using a self-report questionnaire. The item on career choice motivation enquired about the respondents' main reason for applying for medical school among 8 possible response options, which comprised two components of career choice motivation: intrinsic and extrinsic. The participants' levels of academic interest were measured in a Likert-type question. Participants' academic interest and Grade Point Averages (GPAs) were compared across the groups of different career motivations along with analyses of their admission scores for baseline comparisons. A total of 195 students completed the questionnaire (94%response rate). Seventy-four percent, (n=145; the intrinsic group) of the participants chose reasons related to intrinsic motivation, 22% (n=42; the extrinsic group) chose reasons pertaining to extrinsic motivation, and 4% (n = 8) chose other reasons for applying to medical school. The intrinsic group outperformed the extrinsic group in their GPAs, although their prior academic achievements did not differ significantly. The intrinsic group showed significantly higher levels of academic interest and also performed better in the admission interviews. Our study illustrates differences in medical students' academic interest and performance across career choice motivations. Further research is warranted to establish the predictive power of medical students' career choice motivation and academic interest on their academic performance.

  18. Differences in medical students’ academic interest and performance across career choice motivations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyong-Jee; Hwang, Jee Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate medical students’ career choice motivation and its relationship with their academic interest and performance. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study in a sample (n=207) of medical students at a private medical school in Korea, stratified by year of medical course. Data about participant demographics, career choice motivation and academic interest were collected using a self-report questionnaire. The item on career choice motivation enquired about the respondents’ main reason for applying for medical school among 8 possible response options, which comprised two components of career choice motivation: intrinsic and extrinsic. The participants’ levels of academic interest were measured in a Likert-type question. Participants’ academic interest and Grade Point Averages (GPAs) were compared across the groups of different career motivations along with analyses of their admission scores for baseline comparisons. Results A total of 195 students completed the questionnaire (94%response rate). Seventy-four percent, (n=145; the intrinsic group) of the participants chose reasons related to intrinsic motivation, 22% (n=42; the extrinsic group) chose reasons pertaining to extrinsic motivation, and 4% (n = 8) chose other reasons for applying to medical school. The intrinsic group outperformed the extrinsic group in their GPAs, although their prior academic achievements did not differ significantly. The intrinsic group showed significantly higher levels of academic interest and also performed better in the admission interviews. Conclusions Our study illustrates differences in medical students’ academic interest and performance across career choice motivations. Further research is warranted to establish the predictive power of medical students’ career choice motivation and academic interest on their academic performance. PMID:26878567

  19. Gender Differences in Publication Productivity, Academic Rank, and Career Duration Among U.S. Academic Gastroenterology Faculty.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Sarah J; Thomas, Charles R; Desai, Sima; Holliday, Emma B; Jagsi, Reshma; Schmitt, Colleen; Enestvedt, Brintha K

    2016-08-01

    Female representation in academic medicine is increasing without proportional increases in female representation at senior ranks. The purpose of this study is to describe the gender representation in academic gastroenterology (GI) and compare publication productivity, academic rank, and career duration between male and female gastroenterologists. In 2014, the authors collected data including number of publications, career duration, h-index, and m-index for faculty members at 114 U.S. academic GI programs. Of 2,440 academic faculty, 1,859 (76%) were men and 581 (24%) were women. Half (50%) of men held senior faculty position compared with 29% of women (P < .001). Compared with female faculty, male faculty had significantly (P < .001) longer careers (20 vs. 11 years), more publications (median 24 [0-949] vs. 9 [0-438]), and higher h-indices (8 vs. 4). Higher h-index correlated with higher academic rank (P < .001). The authors detected no difference in the h-index between men and women at the same rank for professor, associate professor, and instructor, nor any difference in the m-index between men and women (0.5 vs. 0.46, respectively, P = .214). A gender gap exists in the number and proportion of women in academic GI; however, after correcting for career duration, productivity measures that consider quantity and impact are similar for male and female faculty. Women holding senior faculty positions are equally productive as their male counterparts. Early and continued career mentorship will likely lead to continued increases in the rise of women in academic rank.

  20. Insights on leadership from early career nurse academics: findings from a mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Halcomb, Elizabeth; Jackson, Debra; Daly, John; Gray, Joanne; Salamonson, Yenna; Andrew, Sharon; Peters, Kath

    2016-03-01

    To explore the perceptions of early career nursing academics on leadership in academia. There is growing emphasis on leadership capacity building across all domains of nursing. However, there is limited evidence on leadership capacity in early career academics. This study tested an intervention to develop leadership capacity amongst early career nursing academics in two Australian universities. A sequential mixed methods design, using online surveys and semi-structured interviews, was used to collect data. Twenty-three early career nursing academics participated. Most had experience of formal leadership roles and were aware of its importance to them as they developed their academic careers. Participants were able to discuss their own views of themselves as leaders; their perceptions of their own needs for leadership development, and ways in which they could seek to develop further as leaders. There is a need to provide initial and ongoing opportunities for leadership development amongst nurse academics. These opportunities should be contextualised and recognise factors such as gender, and the effects of structural oppression. Nurse academics are involved in the preparation of the next generation of clinical leaders and it is imperative that they are able to articulate a clear view of leadership. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Take me where I want to go: Institutional prestige, advisor sponsorship, and academic career placement preferences.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Diogo L; Melkers, Julia; Newton, Sunni

    2017-01-01

    Placement in prestigious research institutions for STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) PhD recipients is generally considered to be optimal. Yet some doctoral recipients are not interested in intensive research careers and instead seek alternative careers, outside but also within academe (for example teaching positions in Liberal Arts Schools). Recent attention to non-academic pathways has expanded our understanding of alternative PhD careers. However, career preferences and placements are also nuanced along the academic pathway. Existing research on academic careers (mostly research-centric) has found that certain factors have a significant impact on the prestige of both the institutional placement and the salary of PhD recipients. We understand less, however, about the functioning of career preferences and related placements outside of the top academic research institutions. Our work builds on prior studies of academic career placement to explore the impact that prestige of PhD-granting institution, advisor involvement, and cultural capital have on the extent to which STEM PhDs are placed in their preferred academic institution types. What determines whether an individual with a preference for research oriented institutions works at a Research Extensive university? Or whether an individual with a preference for teaching works at a Liberal Arts college? Using survey data from a nationally representative sample of faculty in biology, biochemistry, civil engineering and mathematics at four different Carnegie Classified institution types (Research Extensive, Research Intensive, Master's I & II, and Liberal Arts Colleges), we examine the relative weight of different individual and institutional characteristics on institutional type placement. We find that doctoral institutional prestige plays a significant role in matching individuals with their preferred institutional type, but that advisor involvement only has an impact on those with a

  2. Take me where I want to go: Institutional prestige, advisor sponsorship, and academic career placement preferences

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Diogo L.; Newton, Sunni

    2017-01-01

    Placement in prestigious research institutions for STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) PhD recipients is generally considered to be optimal. Yet some doctoral recipients are not interested in intensive research careers and instead seek alternative careers, outside but also within academe (for example teaching positions in Liberal Arts Schools). Recent attention to non-academic pathways has expanded our understanding of alternative PhD careers. However, career preferences and placements are also nuanced along the academic pathway. Existing research on academic careers (mostly research-centric) has found that certain factors have a significant impact on the prestige of both the institutional placement and the salary of PhD recipients. We understand less, however, about the functioning of career preferences and related placements outside of the top academic research institutions. Our work builds on prior studies of academic career placement to explore the impact that prestige of PhD-granting institution, advisor involvement, and cultural capital have on the extent to which STEM PhDs are placed in their preferred academic institution types. What determines whether an individual with a preference for research oriented institutions works at a Research Extensive university? Or whether an individual with a preference for teaching works at a Liberal Arts college? Using survey data from a nationally representative sample of faculty in biology, biochemistry, civil engineering and mathematics at four different Carnegie Classified institution types (Research Extensive, Research Intensive, Master’s I & II, and Liberal Arts Colleges), we examine the relative weight of different individual and institutional characteristics on institutional type placement. We find that doctoral institutional prestige plays a significant role in matching individuals with their preferred institutional type, but that advisor involvement only has an impact on those with a

  3. A Qualitative Study of the Influences on Clinical Academic Physicians' Postdoctoral Career Decision-Making.

    PubMed

    Ranieri, Veronica F; Barratt, Helen; Rees, Geraint; Fulop, Naomi J

    2018-01-23

    To describe the influences on clinical academic physicians' postdoctoral career decision-making. Thirty-five doctoral trainee physicians from University College London took part in semi-structured interviews in 2015 and 2016. Participants were asked open-ended questions about their career to-date, their experiences undertaking a PhD, and their career plans post-PhD. The interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Thematic analysis was used to generate, review, and define themes from the transcripts. Emerging differences and similarities in participants' reasons for pursuing a PhD were then grouped to produce typologies to explore how their experiences influenced their career decision-making. Participants described four key reasons for undertaking a PhD, which formed the basis of the four typologies identified. These reasons included: to pursue a clinical academic career; to complete an extensive period of research to understand whether a clinical academic career was the desired path forward; to improve clinical career prospects; and to take a break from clinical training. These findings highlight the need to target efforts at retaining clinical academic physicians according to their reasons for pursuing a PhD and their subsequent experiences with the process. Those responsible for overseeing clinical training must be well-informed of the long-term benefits of training academically-qualified physicians. In light of current political uncertainty, universities, hospitals, and external agencies alike must increase their efforts to inspire and assuage early-career clinical academic physicians' fears regarding their academic future.This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 (CCBY), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  4. Advanced Math Equals Career Readiness. Math Works

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achieve, Inc., 2013

    2013-01-01

    The equation is simple: No matter their background, students who take challenging math courses in high school get better jobs and earn more money throughout their entire lives. This paper stresses that: (1) Higher-level math opens doors for any and all postsecondary programs and keeps it open for advancement beyond entry-level jobs; and (2)…

  5. Academic and non-academic career options for marine scientists. - Support measures for early career scientists offered at MARUM - Center for Marine Environmental Sciences, University of Bremen, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebbeln, Dierk; Klose, Christina

    2015-04-01

    Early career scientists at MARUM cover a wide range of research topics and disciplines including geosciences, biology, chemistry, social sciences and law. Just as colourful as the disciplinary background of the people, are their ideas for their personal careers. With our services and programmes, we aim to address some important career planning needs of PhD students and early career Postdocs, both, for careers in science and for careers outside academia. For PhD students aiming to stay in science, MARUM provides funding opportunities for a research stay abroad for a duration of up to 6 months. A range of courses is offered to prepare for the first Postdoc position. These include trainings in applying for research funding, proposal writing and interview skills. Following MARUM lectures which are held once a month, early career scientists are offered the opportunity to talk to senior scientists from all over the world in an informal Meet&Greet. Mentoring and coaching programmes for women in science are offered in cooperation with the office for equal opportunities at the University of Bremen. These programmes offer an additional opportunity to train interpersonal skills and to develop personal career strategies including a focus on special challenges that especially women might (have to) face in the scientific community. Early career scientists aiming for a non-academic career find support on different levels. MARUM provides funding opportunities for placements in industry, administration, consulting or similar. We offer trainings in e.g. job hunting strategies or interview skills. For a deeper insight into jobs outside the academic world, we regularly invite professionals for informal fireside chats and career days. These events are organised in cooperation with other graduate programmes in the region to broaden the focus of both, the lecturers and the participants. A fundamental component of our career programmes is the active involvement of alumni of MARUM and our

  6. Seizing the Future: How Ohio's Career-Technical Education Programs Fuse Academic Rigor and Real-World Experiences to Prepare Students for College and Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarino, Heidi; Yoder, Shaun

    2015-01-01

    "Seizing the Future: How Ohio's Career and Technical Education Programs Fuse Academic Rigor and Real-World Experiences to Prepare Students for College and Work," demonstrates Ohio's progress in developing strong policies for career and technical education (CTE) programs to promote rigor, including college- and career-ready graduation…

  7. Responding to University Policies and Initiatives: The Role of Reflexivity in the Mid-Career Academic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brew, Angela; Boud, David; Lucas, Lisa; Crawford, Karin

    2017-01-01

    How do academics make sense of university policies and strategic initiatives and act on them? Interviews were conducted with 27 mid-career academics in different disciplines, different research-intensive university environments and two countries (England and Australia). Data were analysed iteratively utilising a critical realist perspective,…

  8. The Academic Career: A Study of Subjectivity, Gender and Movement among Women University Lecturers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angervall, Petra

    2018-01-01

    Changes in the higher education system have resulted in increased demands on effectiveness and marketisation. These demands have changed what it means to do academic work. In this study, 19 female academic lecturers have been interviewed in order to get them to reflect upon their opportunities and conditions in career. The aim is to analyse how…

  9. Promoting Writing amongst Peers: Establishing a Community of Writing Practice for Early Career Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Alexandra; Berry, Donna M.; Budds, Kirsty; Skipper, Yvonne; Williams, Helen L.

    2017-01-01

    In the current research-focused climate, academics are facing increasing pressure to produce research outputs. This pressure can prove particularly daunting for early career (EC) academics, who are simultaneously attempting to master new teaching and administrative demands while establishing their own independent research trajectories. Previous…

  10. Pathways for Academic Career and Employment (PACE) Program: Fiscal Year 2015 Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Department of Education, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The pathways for academic career and employment program (PACE) is established to provide funding to community colleges for the development of projects that will lead to gainful, quality, in-state employment for members of target populations by providing them with both effective academic and employment training to ensure gain. This is the second…

  11. The Effects of Curriculum Integration on the Academic Achievement of Secondary Career and Technical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Patricia Anders

    2012-01-01

    Using a causal-comparative design, this quantitative study investigated whether or not the curriculum integration of academic subjects with career and technical education classes affected secondary students' academic performance as assessed by scores on standardized tests. The purposive sample was drawn from students in Trade and Industry classes…

  12. Personal Reflection: Rough Seas to Calmer Waters: The Journey of an Early Career Academic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruger, Mellissa L.

    2012-01-01

    As an early career academic I have had the opportunity to reflect on my early experiences in academia. This paper is a reflection on my journey through rough seas to calmer waters. This paper describes an uneasy voyage of experience, from confident practitioner to uncertain academic. Helping to steer me through uncharted waters on the high seas of…

  13. Early-Career Academics' Perceptions of Teaching and Learning in Hong Kong: Implications for Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Keith; McNaught, Carmel; Wong, Kin-Chi; Li, Yi-Ching

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses early-career academics' development at a university in Hong Kong. Reflecting the impact of local context, the paper explores cultural and structural influences that can impinge on teaching and learning strategies for new academics. Barriers such as student learning behaviour and publication pressure may discourage new…

  14. Target-Setting, Early-Career Academic Identities and the Measurement Culture of UK Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Early-career academics are subject to a barrage of formal measurements when they secure a first academic post in a UK university. To support this process, guidance is provided by universities on what is measured, though this can lack disciplinary nuance. This article analyses the perceptions of a sample of social scientists of the process of…

  15. A Reliable Sounding Board: Parent Involvement in Students' Academic and Career Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Andrew N.

    2008-01-01

    With concern over parental involvement in students' academic lives on the rise, research is needed to provide guidance for advisors and parents. In this article, student-parent interactions about academic and career decisions are examined. Data come from the Brown University Office of Institutional Research and semi-structured interviews with…

  16. A Comparison of Career Technical Education--16 Career Pathway High School Participants with Non-Participants on Academic Achievement, School Engagement, and Development of Technical Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orozco, Edith Aimee

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this research was to compare Career Technical Education--16 Career Pathway high school participants with non-participants on academic achievement, development of technical skills and school engagement. Academic achievement was measured by Exit Level Math and English Language Arts Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS)…

  17. Air Force Officer Accession Planning: Addressing Key Gaps in Meeting Career Field Academic Degree Requirements for Nonrated Officers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-09

    C O R P O R A T I O N Research Report Air Force Officer Accession Planning Addressing Key Gaps in Meeting Career Field Academic Degree Requirements...various Air Force missions in particular career fields. Key to this goal for nonrated officers is establishing and enforcing academic degree...35 Developing Accession Targets by Academic Degree Type

  18. Hierarchy as a barrier to advancement for women in academic medicine.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Peter; Carr, Phyllis; Knight, Sharon; Renfrew, Megan R; Dunn, Mary B; Pololi, Linda

    2010-04-01

    Research on barriers to professional advancement for women in academic medicine has not adequately considered the role of environmental factors and how the structure of organizations affects professional advancement and work experiences. This article examines the impact of the hierarchy, including both the organization's hierarchical structure and professionals' perceptions of this structure, in medical school organization on faculty members' experience and advancement in academic medicine. As part of an inductive qualitative study of faculty in five disparate U.S. medical schools, we interviewed 96 medical faculty at different career stages and in diverse specialties, using in-depth semistructured interviews, about their perceptions about and experiences in academic medicine. Data were coded and analysis was conducted in the grounded theory tradition. Our respondents saw the hierarchy of chairs, based on the indeterminate tenure of department chairs, as a central characteristic of the structure of academic medicine. Many faculty saw this hierarchy as affecting inclusion, reducing transparency in decision making, and impeding advancement. Indeterminate chair terms lessen turnover and may create a bottleneck for advancement. Both men and women faculty perceived this hierarchy, but women saw it as more consequential. The hierarchical structure of academic medicine has a significant impact on faculty work experiences, including advancement, especially for women. We suggest that medical schools consider alternative models of leadership and managerial styles, including fixed terms for chairs with a greater emphasis on inclusion. This is a structural reform that could increase opportunities for advancement especially for women in academic medicine.

  19. Assessment of residents' loss of interest in academic careers and identification of correctable factors.

    PubMed

    Reck, Samuel J; Stratman, Erik J; Vogel, Curt; Mukesh, Bickol N

    2006-07-01

    To quantify interest in an academic career at the dermatology resident and residency applicant level. Cross-sectional survey. Dermatology residents attending a basic science course and residency applicants applying to a single residency program. Self-reported level of interest in an academic dermatology career, reasons for losing interest in academics, and area of desired primary academic contribution. One hundred nine of 230 dermatology applicants and 130 of 190 dermatology residents completed the survey. Seventy-nine applicants (72.5%) and 48 residents (36.9%) were interested in an academic career. Thirty-three of 47 residents (70.2%) and 63 of 79 applicants (79.8%) interested in an academic career hoped to make their primary academic contribution as teacher-clinicians, while only 7 residents (14.9%) and 15 applicants (19.0%) planned to primarily contribute through basic or clinical research. Thirty-eight resident respondents (29.2%) reported losing interest in academics for the following primary reasons: bureaucracy, 24 (63.2%); salary differential/financial issues, 20 (52.6%); lack of effective mentorship, role model, or professional guidance, 19 (50.0%); and location or practice environment, 10 (26.3%). Many residents report losing interest in pursuing a career in academic dermatology. Many reasons for this are not easy to correct. However, half of those residents primarily lose interest because of a lack of mentors, role models, and career guidance. Methods to improve this perception and experience should be sought. Strategies should also be developed to cultivate future teacher-clinicians, where most of the interest lies.

  20. What Is Required to Develop Career Pathways for Teaching Academics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dawn; Roberts, Lynne; Ananthram, Subramaniam; Broughton, Michelle

    2018-01-01

    Despite the rise of teaching academic (teaching only) roles in Australia, the UK, the USA, and Canada, the experiences of teaching academics are not well documented in the literature. This article reports from a university-wide study that responded to the introduction of teaching academic roles during a major restructure of academic staff.…

  1. Early Career Boot Camp: a novel mechanism for enhancing early career development for psychologists in academic healthcare.

    PubMed

    Foran-Tuller, Kelly; Robiner, William N; Breland-Noble, Alfiee; Otey-Scott, Stacie; Wryobeck, John; King, Cheryl; Sanders, Kathryn

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a pilot mentoring program for Early Career Psychologists (ECPs) working in Academic Health Centers (AHCs) and synthesize the lessons learned to contribute to future ECP and AHC career development training programs. The authors describe an early career development model, named the Early Career Boot Camp. This intensive experience was conducted as a workshop meant to build a supportive network and to provide mentorship and survival tools for working in AHCs. Four major components were addressed: professional effectiveness, clinical supervision, strategic career planning, and academic research. Nineteen attendees who were currently less than 5 years post completion of doctoral graduate programs in psychology participated in the program. The majority of boot camp components were rated as good to excellent, with no component receiving below average ratings. Of the components offered within the boot camp, mentoring and research activities were rated the strongest, followed by educational activities, challenges in AHCS, and promotion and tenure. The article describes the purpose, development, implementation, and assessment of the program in detail in an effort to provide an established outline for future organizations to utilize when mentoring ECPs.

  2. Making High Schools Work through Blended Instruction. A Vision and Plan for the Integration of Academic and Career and Technology Education in Maryland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Education, Baltimore.

    A team consisting of Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) staff, local educators, and other representatives developed an action plan to assist in advancing the blending of academic, career, and technology education. The team prepared a vision statement, set strategic directions, analyzed barriers, and developed recommendations and actions…

  3. Evaluation of the interest in the academic career of physicians specializing in anesthesiology.

    PubMed

    Meurer, Gustavo Henrique; Kozuki, Henrique; Filho, Getúlio R de Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    A trend toward the lack of interest in academic careers has been observed in Medicine, including in the area of Anesthesiology. The objective of the present study was to research the interest of physicians specializing in Anesthesiology in following an academic career, as well as identify the determinant factors of this choice. The present was a prospective and cross-sectional study. A simple probabilistic sample of physicians specializing in Anesthesiology was selected and a questionnaire was sent to each participant. The answers were submitted to uni and multivariate analyses to determine the frequency of academic predisposition in the sample and to determine the independent predictive factors of academic predisposition. A total of 155 questionnaires were analyzed (rate of response = 38.7%). Sixty-nine participants (44.5%) manifested their interest in following an academic career. The multivariate analysis identified the following as independent predictive factors of academic predisposition: attending the first year of specialization (OR = 2.52; 95% CI = 1.19 - 5.38); presenting a scientific work at medical event (OR = 3.78; 95% CI = 1.84 - 7.78) and being located in the southeast region (OR = 2.66; 95% CI = 1.31 - 5.39). A significant number of Brazilian physicians attending a specialization course demonstrated interest in following an academic career after the end of the course. In comparison with the probability of not manifesting academic predisposition, the physicians attending the first-year specialization course presented a 2.5-fold higher chance of manifesting interest in an academic career; those presenting a scientific work at a medical event had a 3.78-fold higher chance; those associated to Teaching Centers in the southeast region had a 2.66-fold higher chance of manifesting academic interest. © 2010 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Self-promotion: a strategy for career advancement.

    PubMed

    Davidhizar, Ruth; Lonser, Giny Youngberg

    2004-01-01

    Self-promotion is a technique that many managers feel is contradictory to appropriate behavior. However, without self-promotion, many managers can cause their abilities to go unnoticed and to actually be their own worst enemy. This article presents strategies for self-promotion that can advance a manager's career and assist in marketing ideas and abilities to end the manager up in center stage.

  5. Career advancement opportunities and the ACVP/STP Coalition.

    PubMed

    Cockerell, Gary

    2014-07-01

    A new service to facilitate career advancement opportunities has been implemented by the American College of Veterinary Pathologists (ACVP)/Society of Toxicologic Pathology (STP) Coalition for Veterinary Pathology Fellows. This service will allow rapid communication of these opportunities between veterinary pathologists in academia, industry, and government, and will be useful to trainees as well as established pathologists. © 2014 by The Author(s).

  6. The Career Advancement for Registered Nurse Excellence Program.

    PubMed

    Fusilero, Jane; Lini, Linda; Prohaska, Priscilla; Szweda, Christine; Carney, Katie; Mion, Lorraine C

    2008-12-01

    Nurse administrators focus on factors that influence nurses' levels of satisfaction to reduce turnover and improve retention. One important determinant of nurses' satisfaction is the opportunity for professional development. On the basis of feedback from the nurses, a professional development program, Career Advancement for Registered Nurse Excellence, was instituted. The authors describe one approach to create opportunities to improve professional nurse development and the necessity for ongoing assessment of its impact on nurses' job satisfaction.

  7. Factors affecting career choice among the next generation of academic vascular surgeons.

    PubMed

    Danczyk, Rachel C; Sevdalis, Nick; Woo, Karen; Hingorani, Anil P; Landry, Gregory J; Liem, Timothy K; Moneta, Gregory L; Mitchell, Erica L

    2012-05-01

    Few studies have examined factors that influence an individual's decision to enter an academic medical career after residency training. We sought to evaluate whether sex, ethnicity, child care issues, and debt burden influenced residents' choice for a career in academic vascular surgery. A 39-item Web survey, designed to elucidate which factors motivated residents to seek a career in academic vascular surgery, was sent to 295 vascular surgery residents currently enrolled in Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education-accredited training programs. A total of 128 responses (43%) were received. Of these, 53% of respondents were white and 47% were nonwhite and 34 (27%) were women and 94 (73%) were men. Fifty-seven percent of minorities anticipate a career in academic vascular surgery. There were no statistical differences between sex and ethnicity for factors influencing career choice, including training paradigm, presence of a life partner or dependents, mentorship role, participation in research, service, and teaching, anticipated salary, and debt burden (P > .05). Seventy-seven percent of respondents carry significant debt; of those with debt, 81% owe >$100,000 and 40% owe >$200,000. Seventy-three percent of 0+5 trainees anticipated choosing an academic practice compared with 42% of 5+2 trainees (P < .01). Respondents planning an academic career cited procedural variation, breadth and depth of practice/tertiary referral experience, and research opportunities as the most important drivers of career choice. Income potential, strength of the job market, and child care needs were deemed less important. This study shows that academic vascular surgery is a popular career option for current vascular surgery trainees, especially those in 0+5 programs. Choosing a career in academic vascular surgery appears not to be influenced by sex, ethnicity, child care concerns, salary expectations, or debt burden, even though most trainees carry enormous debt. The data imply

  8. Preparing for an Academic Career Workshops: Resources for Graduate Students and Post-Doctoral Fellows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, R. W.; MacDonald, R.

    2004-12-01

    The professional development program, "On the Cutting Edge", offers annual multi-day workshops for graduate students and post-doctoral fellows interested in pursuing academic careers. Goals are to prepare participants to become more effective teachers, stronger candidates for academic positions, and more aware of the realities of academic jobs. Insights that participants especially hope to gain from these workshops include feedback on the application process, especially an understanding of how search committees work; the different realities of balancing teaching, research, and personal life in a range of academic institutions; and expectations for tenure. The ten-person leadership team represents, by design, a wide range of academic career paths and institutions, and provides approximately 1:6 leader: participant ratio. Specific sessions include research on learning, an introduction to course and lab design, effective teaching and assessment strategies, developing a teaching statement, time management and early career faculty success, and moving research forward into new settings. Optional workshop sessions and discussions include the following topics: dual-career couples; families and careers; teaching portfolios; effective negotiation strategies; tenure and promotion; effective field trips; getting started in undergraduate research; opportunities in K-12 education; career options beyond faculty positions. Highlights of the workshop are faculty panel discussions about career paths and the academic job search. By workshop end, participants complete a goal setting and action planning activity. Two years of evaluation data suggest our goals are being met. Participants particularly appreciate the practical ideas and the opportunity to interact with, and learn from, a diverse leadership team and other participants.

  9. Academic Career Selection and Retention in Radiation Oncology: The Joint Center for Radiation Therapy Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Balboni, Tracy A.; Chen, M.-H.; Harris, Jay R.

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: The United States healthcare system has witnessed declining reimbursement and increasing documentation requirements for longer than 10 years. These have decreased the time available to academic faculty for teaching and mentorship. The impact of these changes on the career choices of residents is unknown. The purpose of this report was to determine whether changes have occurred during the past decade in the proportion of radiation oncology trainees from a single institution entering and staying in academic medicine. Methods and Materials: We performed a review of the resident employment experience of Harvard Joint Center for Radiation Therapy residents graduating duringmore » 13 recent consecutive years (n = 48 residents). The outcomes analyzed were the initial selection of an academic vs. nonacademic career and career changes during the first 3 years after graduation. Results: Of the 48 residents, 65% pursued an academic career immediately after graduation, and 44% remained in academics at the last follow-up, after a median of 6 years. A later graduation year was associated with a decrease in the proportion of graduates immediately entering academic medicine (odds ratio, 0.78; 95% confidence interval, 0.65-0.94). However, the retention rate at 3 years of those who did immediately enter academics increased with a later graduation year (p = 0.03). Conclusion: During a period marked by notable changes in the academic healthcare environment, the proportion of graduating Harvard Joint Center for Radiation Therapy residents pursuing academic careers has been declining; however, despite this decline, the retention rates in academia have increased.« less

  10. Demographic characteristics of doctors who intend to follow clinical academic careers: UK national questionnaire surveys.

    PubMed

    Smith, Fay; Lambert, Trevor W; Goldacre, Michael J

    2014-10-01

    It is well recognised that women are underrepresented in clinical academic posts. Our aim was to determine which of a number of characteristics-notably gender, but also ethnicity, possession of an intercalated degree, medical school attended, choice of specialty-were predictive of doctors' intentions to follow clinical academic careers. Questionnaires to all UK-trained medical graduates of 2005 sent in 2006 and again in 2010, graduates of 2009 in 2010 and graduates of 2012 in 2013. At the end of their first year of medical work, 13.5% (368/2732) of men and 7.3% (358/4891) of women specified that they intended to apply for a clinical academic training post; and 6.0% (172/2873) of men and 2.2% (111/5044) of women specified that they intended to pursue clinical academic medicine as their eventual career. A higher percentage of Asian (4.8%) than White doctors (3.3%) wanted a long-term career as a clinical academic, as did a higher percentage of doctors who did an intercalated degree (5.6%) than others (2.2%) and a higher percentage of Oxbridge graduates (8.1%) than others (2.8%). Of the graduates of 2005, only 30% of those who in 2006 intended a clinical medicine career also did so when re-surveyed in 2010 (men 44%, women 12%). There are noteworthy differences by gender and other demographic factors in doctors' intentions to pursue academic training and careers. The gap between men and women in aspirations for a clinical academic career is present as early as the first year after qualification. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. Demographic characteristics of doctors who intend to follow clinical academic careers: UK national questionnaire surveys

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Fay; Lambert, Trevor W; Goldacre, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Objectives It is well recognised that women are underrepresented in clinical academic posts. Our aim was to determine which of a number of characteristics—notably gender, but also ethnicity, possession of an intercalated degree, medical school attended, choice of specialty—were predictive of doctors’ intentions to follow clinical academic careers. Design Questionnaires to all UK-trained medical graduates of 2005 sent in 2006 and again in 2010, graduates of 2009 in 2010 and graduates of 2012 in 2013. Results At the end of their first year of medical work, 13.5% (368/2732) of men and 7.3% (358/4891) of women specified that they intended to apply for a clinical academic training post; and 6.0% (172/2873) of men and 2.2% (111/5044) of women specified that they intended to pursue clinical academic medicine as their eventual career. A higher percentage of Asian (4.8%) than White doctors (3.3%) wanted a long-term career as a clinical academic, as did a higher percentage of doctors who did an intercalated degree (5.6%) than others (2.2%) and a higher percentage of Oxbridge graduates (8.1%) than others (2.8%). Of the graduates of 2005, only 30% of those who in 2006 intended a clinical medicine career also did so when re-surveyed in 2010 (men 44%, women 12%). Conclusions There are noteworthy differences by gender and other demographic factors in doctors’ intentions to pursue academic training and careers. The gap between men and women in aspirations for a clinical academic career is present as early as the first year after qualification. PMID:25136138

  12. Culture Matters: The Pivotal Role of Culture for Women’s Careers in Academic Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Speck, Rebecca M.; Dupuis Sammel, Mary; Scott, Patricia; Conant, Emily F.; Tuton, Lucy Wolf; Abbuhl, Stephanie B.; Grisso, Jeane Ann

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Women in academic medicine are not achieving the same career advancement as men, and face unique challenges in managing work and family alongside intense work demands. The purpose of this study was to investigate how a supportive department/division culture buffered women from the impact of work demands on work-to-family conflict. Method As part of a larger intervention trial, the authors collected baseline survey data from 133 women assistant professors at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine in 2010. Validated measures of work demands, work-to-family conflict, and a department/division culture were employed. Pearson correlations and general linear mixed modeling were used to analyze the data. Authors investigated whether work culture moderated the association between work demands and work-to-family conflict. Results Heavy work demands were associated with increased levels of work-to-family conflict. There were significant interactions between work demands, work-to-family conflict, and department/division culture. A culture conducive to women’s academic success significantly moderated the effect of work hours on time-based work-to-family conflict and significantly moderated the effect of work overload on strain-based work-to-family conflict. At equivalent levels of work demands, women in more supportive cultures experienced lower levels of work-to-family conflict. Conclusions The culture of the department/division plays a crucial role in women’s work-to-family conflict and can exacerbate or alleviate the impact of extremely high work demands. This finding leads to important insights about strategies for more effectively supporting the careers of women assistant professors. PMID:24556773

  13. The impact of gendered organizational systems on women's career advancement.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Deborah A; Hopkins, Margaret M

    2015-01-01

    In this Perspective article we propose that in order to pave the way for women's career advancement into the senior ranks of organizations, attention must be directed at the systemic norms and structures that drive the gendered nature of the workplace. A focus on individual level issues, i.e., women lacking confidence and women opting out, detracts from the work that must be done at the organizational level in order to dismantle the system of pervasive, structural disadvantage facing women seeking to advance to senior leadership positions.

  14. Factors Associated With the Career Choices of Hematology and Medical Oncology Fellows Trained at Academic Institutions in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Leora; Koehler, Elizabeth; Gilbert, Jill; Johnson, David H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Factors that influence hematology-oncology fellows' choice of academic medicine as a career are not well defined. We undertook a survey of hematology-oncology fellows training at cancer centers designated by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) to understand the factors fellows consider when making career decisions. Methods Program directors at all NCI and NCCN cancer centers were invited to participate in the study. For the purpose of analysis, fellows were grouped into three groups on the basis of interest in an academic career. Demographic data were tested with the Kruskal-Wallis test and χ2 test, and nondemographic data were tested by using the multiscale bootstrap method. Results Twenty-eight of 56 eligible fellowship programs participated, and 236 fellows at participating institutions responded (62% response rate). Approximately 60% of fellows graduating from academic programs in the last 5 years chose academic career paths. Forty-nine percent of current fellows ranked an academic career as extremely important. Fellows choosing an academic career were more likely to have presented and published their research. Additional factors associated with choosing an academic career included factors related to mentorship, intellect, and practice type. Fellows selecting nonacademic careers prioritized lifestyle in their career decision. Conclusion Recruitment into academic medicine is essential for continued progress in the field. Our data suggest that fewer than half the current fellows training at academic centers believe a career in academic medicine is important. Efforts to improve retention in academics should include focusing on mentorship, research, and career development during fellowship training and improving the image of academic physicians. PMID:21911716

  15. Academic Self-Perceptions of Ability and Course Planning among Academically Advanced Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudasill, Kathleen Moritz; Callahan, Carolyn M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the contribution of gender to the academic self-perceptions of ability and related coursework plans for high school and college across academically advanced students. Participants were academically advanced students (N = 447) from grades 5 to 12. Findings revealed that (a) girls' self-perceptions of ability…

  16. Dual Career Faculty Appointments: A Successful Model from ADVANCE-Nebraska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, M.; Advance-Nebraska Evaluation Team

    2011-12-01

    At the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL), 20% of short list candidates for faculty openings in science, engineering and mathematics (STEM) brought an academic partner into the hiring picture between 2008 and 2010, with a peak of 38% in 2010. Having a process in place to address dual career opportunities is a key component in an overall strategy to increase the number of women STEM faculty: 83% of academic scientist women's partners are also academics in STEM, according to a 2009 Stanford report, and 54% of academic scientist men's are. Offering two positions to qualified couples benefits the institution by increasing the chances of recruitment and retention of both candidates. UNL's ADVANCE program, ADVANCE-Nebraska, developed a process to take advantage of dual career opportunities. Nine dual career couples have been hired in the last three years; we expected to hire eight during the five-year life of the grant. We increased the proportion of women in the Engineering College by twenty percent (from n=10 to n=12). The success of the program arises from four key components: early notification to short-list candidates of the dual career program, a point person to coordinate dual career requests across the campus, flexible faculty appointments that provide a variety of opportunities for the partner, and a funding stream to support the partner hire. The point person, the ADVANCE Program Director, was created by the provost through the ADVANCE program. The Director communicates with every short list candidate for each open faculty position and with department and search committee chairs across STEM colleges as soon as the candidate is selected. When there is an eligible partner of the candidate who receives the job offer, if there is approval from the Office of Academic Affairs, the Dean of the target college, and the chair and faculty of the partner's target department, the partner is brought to UNL to interview, and the faculty of the partner's target department

  17. Investigating the sustainability of careers in academic primary care in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Adams, Ann; Lester, Helen; Reeve, Joanne; Roberts, Jane; Wilson, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    The UK Society for Academic Primary Care (SAPC) is re-examining the sustainability of careers in academic primary care (APC). The motivation for this is a number of significant changes within the context of APC since the last such investigation (SAPC, 2003). It is now timely to review the current situation. As a first phase, semi-structured interviews were undertaken with 15 SAPC members from different disciplines and career stages. Findings show that lack of clarity about APC career pathways persist, but important factors linked with sustainability were identified at individual and organisational levels. These include being proactive, developing resilience, mentorship and a positive organisational culture with a strong shared vision about why APC is important. FURTHER RESEARCH: Sustainability is undermined by funding difficulties, lack of integration of members of different APC disciplines, leading to disparities in career progression and lack of clarity about what APC is. Phase 2 will comprise a UK-wide survey.

  18. Intraorganizational Career Advancement and Voluntary Turnover in a Multinational Bank in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Wei; Zhou, Xueguang

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate how various aspects of intraorganizational career advancement--current career attainments, recent pace of upward mobility, and future prospect of career advancement--affect voluntary turnover, drawing empirical evidence from a multinational corporation (MNC) in Taiwan's cultural and labor market environment.…

  19. A "ton of feathers": gender discrimination in academic medical careers and how to manage it.

    PubMed

    Carr, Phyllis L; Szalacha, Laura; Barnett, Rosalind; Caswell, Cheryl; Inui, Thomas

    2003-12-01

    To evaluate the experience of gender discrimination among a limited sample of women in academic medicine, specifically, the role of discrimination in hindering careers, coping mechanisms, and perceptions of what institutions and leaders of academic medicine can do to improve the professional workplace climate for women. In-depth, semistructured telephonic individual interviews of 18 women faculty who experienced or may have experienced discrimination in the course of their professional academic medical careers from 13 of the 24 institutions of the National Faculty Survey. A consensus taxonomy for classifying content evolved from comparisons of coding. Themes expressed by multiple faculty were studied for patterns of connection and grouped into broader categories. Forty percent of respondents ranked gender discrimination first out of 11 possible choices for hindering their career in academic medicine. Thirty-five percent ranked gender discrimination second to either "limited time for professional work" or "lack of mentoring." Respondents rated themselves as poorly prepared to deal with gender discrimination and noted effects on professional self-confidence, self-esteem, collegiality, isolation, and career satisfaction. The hierarchical structure in academe is perceived to work against women, as there are few women at the top. Women faculty who have experienced gender discrimination perceive that little can be done to directly address this issue. Institutions need to be proactive and recurrently evaluate the gender climate, as well as provide transparent information and fair scrutiny of promotion and salary decisions. According to this subset of women who perceive that they have been discriminated against based on gender, sexual bias and discrimination are subtly pervasive and powerful. Such environments may have consequences for both women faculty and academic medicine, affecting morale and dissuading younger trainees from entering academic careers. Medical schools

  20. Getting Started in Academic Careers: On the Cutting Edge Resources for Graduate Students, Postdoctoral Fellows, and Early Career Faculty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, R.; Ormand, C.; Manduca, C. A.; Wright-Dunbar, R.; Allen-King, R.

    2007-12-01

    The professional development program,'On the Cutting Edge', offers on-line resources and annual multi-day workshops for graduate students and post-doctoral fellows interested in pursuing academic careers. Pre- workshop surveys reveal that early career faculty, post-docs, and graduate students have many questions about teaching (e.g., what are effective teaching strategies, how to design a course, how to prepare a syllabus, how to teach large courses), research (e.g., initiate and fund future research, set up and manage a lab, obtain equipment), and career management (e.g., understand tenure requirements, balance all it all). The graduate students and post-docs also have questions about jobs and the job search process. Their questions show a lack of familiarity with the nature of academic positions at different kinds of educational institutions (two-year colleges, primarily undergraduate institutions, and research universities). In particular, they are uncertain about what educational setting will best fit their values and career goals and how teaching loads and research expectations vary by institution. Common questions related to the job search process include where to find job listings (the most common question in recent years), when to start the job search process, how to stand out as an applicant, and how to prepare for interviews. Both groups have questions about how to develop new skills: how to develop, plan and prepare a new course (without it taking all of their time), how to expand beyond their PhD (or postdoc) research projects, how to develop a research plan, and where to apply for funding. These are important topics for advisors to discuss with all of their students and postdocs who are planning on careers in academia. On the Cutting Edge offers workshops and web resources to help current and future faculty navigate these critical stages of their careers. The four-day workshop for Early Career Geoscience Faculty: Teaching, Research, and Managing Your

  1. An Elective Course to Foster Interest in Academic Pharmacy Career Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Spooner, Joshua J; Kennedy, Daniel R

    2017-02-25

    Objective. To create an elective course to foster student interest in pursuing a career in academic pharmacy. Design. The course met for two hours once weekly throughout the semester and required student attendance at the AACP Annual Meeting. The course included didactic instruction, a student-designed individual teaching seminar, design and implementation of a research project for presentation at a national meeting, and drafting of a manuscript suitable for publication in a peer-reviewed journal. Assessment. Student evaluations revealed strong agreement that the course met the stated objectives. Follow-up correspondence indicated that almost 70% were likely to pursue an academic career and felt the course gave them advantages over their peers in this regard. Conclusion. The outcomes from this elective course and follow-up surveys confirmed that the majority of participants were planning on pursuing an academic pharmacy career and felt the course increased their readiness to do so.

  2. An Elective Course to Foster Interest in Academic Pharmacy Career Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Spooner, Joshua J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To create an elective course to foster student interest in pursuing a career in academic pharmacy. Design. The course met for two hours once weekly throughout the semester and required student attendance at the AACP Annual Meeting. The course included didactic instruction, a student-designed individual teaching seminar, design and implementation of a research project for presentation at a national meeting, and drafting of a manuscript suitable for publication in a peer-reviewed journal. Assessment. Student evaluations revealed strong agreement that the course met the stated objectives. Follow-up correspondence indicated that almost 70% were likely to pursue an academic career and felt the course gave them advantages over their peers in this regard. Conclusion. The outcomes from this elective course and follow-up surveys confirmed that the majority of participants were planning on pursuing an academic pharmacy career and felt the course increased their readiness to do so. PMID:28289303

  3. Gender Differences in Publication Productivity, Academic Position, Career Duration and Funding Among U.S. Academic Radiation Oncology Faculty

    PubMed Central

    Holliday, Emma B.; Jagsi, Reshma; Wilson, Lynn D.; Choi, Mehee; Thomas, Charles R.; Fuller, Clifton. D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose There has been much recent interest in promoting gender equality in academic medicine. This study aims to analyze gender differences in rank, career duration, publication productivity and research funding among radiation oncologists at U.S. academic institutions. Methods For 82 domestic academic radiation oncology departments, the authors identified current faculty and recorded their academic rank, degree and gender. The authors recorded bibliographic metrics for physician faculty from a commercially available database (SCOPUS, Elsevier BV, Amsterdam, NL), including numbers of publications and h-indices. The authors then concatenated this data with National Institute of Health funding for each individual per Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (REPORTer). The authors performed descriptive and correlative analyses, stratifying by gender and rank. Results Of 1031 faculty, 293 (28%) women and 738 (72%) men, men had a higher median h-index (8 (0-59) versus 5 (0-39); P<.05) and publication number (26 (0-591) versus 13 (0-306); P<.05) overall, and were more likely to be senior faculty and receive NIH funding. However, after stratifying for rank, these differences were largely non-significant. On multivariate analysis, there were significant correlations between gender, career duration and academic position, and h-index (P<.01). Conclusions The determinants of a successful career in academic medicine are certainly multi-factorial, particularly in traditionally male-dominated fields. However, data from radiation oncologists show a systematic gender association withfewer women achieving senior faculty rank. However, women who achieve senior status have productivity metrics comparable to their male counterparts. This suggests early career development and mentorship of female faculty may narrow productivity disparities. PMID:24667510

  4. Perceptions of scientific research literature and strategies for reading papers depend on academic career stage.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Katharine E; Dunbar, Sonja D

    2017-01-01

    Reading primary research literature is an essential skill for all scientists and students on science degree programmes, however little is known about how researchers at different career stages interact with and interpret scientific papers. To explore this, we conducted a survey of 260 undergraduate students and researchers in Biological Sciences at a research intensive UK university. Responses to Likert scale questions demonstrated increases in confidence and skill with reading the literature between individuals at each career stage, including between postdoctoral researchers and faculty academics. The survey indicated that individuals at different career stages valued different sections of scientific papers, and skill in reading the results section develops slowly over the course of an academic career. Inexperienced readers found the methods and results sections of research papers the most difficult to read, and undervalued the importance of the results section and critical interpretation of data. These data highlight a need for structured support with reading scientific literature at multiple career stages, and for senior academics to be aware that junior colleagues may prioritise their reading differently. We propose a model for the development of literature processing skills, and consider the need for training strategies to help inexperienced readers engage with primary literature, and therefore develop important skills that underpin scientific careers. We also encourage researchers to be mindful of language used when writing papers, and to be more inclusive of diverse audiences when disseminating their work.

  5. Perceptions of scientific research literature and strategies for reading papers depend on academic career stage

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, Sonja D.

    2017-01-01

    Reading primary research literature is an essential skill for all scientists and students on science degree programmes, however little is known about how researchers at different career stages interact with and interpret scientific papers. To explore this, we conducted a survey of 260 undergraduate students and researchers in Biological Sciences at a research intensive UK university. Responses to Likert scale questions demonstrated increases in confidence and skill with reading the literature between individuals at each career stage, including between postdoctoral researchers and faculty academics. The survey indicated that individuals at different career stages valued different sections of scientific papers, and skill in reading the results section develops slowly over the course of an academic career. Inexperienced readers found the methods and results sections of research papers the most difficult to read, and undervalued the importance of the results section and critical interpretation of data. These data highlight a need for structured support with reading scientific literature at multiple career stages, and for senior academics to be aware that junior colleagues may prioritise their reading differently. We propose a model for the development of literature processing skills, and consider the need for training strategies to help inexperienced readers engage with primary literature, and therefore develop important skills that underpin scientific careers. We also encourage researchers to be mindful of language used when writing papers, and to be more inclusive of diverse audiences when disseminating their work. PMID:29284031

  6. Pathways to Success for Psychologists in Academic Health Centers: From Early Career to Emeritus

    PubMed Central

    Breland-Noble, Alfiee M.; King, Cheryl A.; Cubic, Barbara A.

    2017-01-01

    Careers in academic health centers (AHCs) come with a unique set of challenges and rewards. Building a stable and rewarding career as a psychologist in an AHC requires the efforts of a whole team of players and coaches. This paper outlines the characteristics of AHCs and the general skills psychologists need to thrive in this type of setting. Advice specific to each stage of career development (early, mid, and late) is offered, highlighting the themes of coaching and teamwork that are critical to success in an AHC. PMID:21132456

  7. Addressing the “Global Health Tax” and “Wild Cards”: Practical Challenges to Building Academic Careers in Global Health

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Ranu

    2016-01-01

    Among many possible benefits, global health efforts can expand the skills and experience of U.S. clinicians, improve health for communities in need, and generate innovations in care delivery with relevance everywhere. Yet, despite high rates of interest among students and medical trainees to include global health opportunities in their training, there is still no clear understanding of how this interest will translate into viable and sustained global health careers after graduation. Building on a growing conversation about how to support careers in academic global health, this Perspective describes the practical challenges faced by physicians pursuing these careers after they complete training. Writing from their perspective as junior faculty at one U.S. academic health center with a dedicated focus on global health training, the authors describe a number of practical issues they have found to be critical both for their own career development and for the advice they provide their mentees. With a particular emphasis on the financial, personal, professional, and logistical challenges that young “expat” global health physicians in academic institutions face, they underscore the importance of finding ways to support these career paths, and propose possible solutions. Such investments would not only respond to the rational and moral imperatives of global health work and advance the mission of improving human health but also help to fully leverage the potential of what is already an unprecedented movement within academic medicine. PMID:26244256

  8. Balancing Two Cultures: American Indian/Alaska Native Medical Students' Perceptions of Academic Medicine Careers.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, John Paul; Poll-Hunter, Norma; Stern, Nicole; Garcia, Andrea N; Brewster, Cheryl

    2016-08-01

    American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) remain underrepresented in the academic medicine workforce and little is known about cultivating AI/AN medical students' interest in academic medicine careers. Five structured focus groups were conducted including 20 medical students and 18 physicians. The discussion guide explored factors influencing AI/AN trainees' academic medicine career interest and recommended approaches to increase their pursuit of academia. Consensual qualitative research was employed to analyze transcripts. Our research revealed six facilitating factors, nine dissuading factors, and five recommendations towards cultivating AI/AN pursuit of academia. Facilitators included the opportunity to teach, serving as a role model/mentor, enhancing the AI/AN medical education pipeline, opportunities to influence institution, collegiality, and financial stability. Dissuading factors included limited information on academic career paths, politics, lack of credit for teaching and community service, isolation, self-doubt, lower salary, lack of positions in rural areas, lack of focus on clinical care for AI/AN communities, and research obligations. Recommendations included heighten career awareness, recognize the challenges in balancing AI/AN and academic cultures, collaborate with IHS on faculty recruitment strategies, identify concordant role models/mentors, and identify loan forgiveness programs. Similar to other diverse medical students', raising awareness of academic career opportunities especially regarding teaching and community scholarship, access to concordant role models/mentors, and supportive institutional climates can also foster AI/AN medical students' pursuit of academia. Unique strategies for AI/AN trainees include learning how to balance AI/AN and academic cultures, collaborating with IHS on faculty recruitment strategies, and increasing faculty opportunities in rural areas.

  9. Perceived obstacles to career success for women in academic surgery.

    PubMed

    Colletti, L M; Mulholland, M W; Sonnad, S S

    2000-08-01

    We conducted this study to determine whether concerns expressed by male and female surgeons at 1 academic center are generally reflective of broader concerns for academic surgery and academic medicine. We reviewed published studies concerning women in academic surgery within the context of reporting the results of a survey of both male and female surgeons at 1 academic center. We developed a survey that included demographic information, work experience, and social issues. The survey was distributed to the entire faculty. For key questions, we compared answers between male and female faculty. Additional data came from the published literature. We reviewed all available studies identified by a MEDLINE search with key words women and academic and medicine or physician. Included studies contained either data collection or editorial comment concerning women in academic medicine. Data and opinions from all included studies paralleling survey questions were extracted from each article. Male and female faculty members reported different experiences and perceptions, specifically relating to relationships between family and professional life and perceptions of subtle sex-related biases. Both men and women reported insufficient mentoring and difficulties in balancing personal and professional responsibilities. Attitudes, behaviors, and traditions surrounding how we structure work and evaluate participation in academic surgery are more difficult to change than just addressing obvious inequities in support for female surgeons. However, attempting the deeper changes is worthwhile, because addressing obstacles faced by female faculty, many of which also affect men, will allow progress toward environments that attract and retain the best physicians, regardless of sex.

  10. Nurse Leaders' Experiences of Implementing Career Advancement Programs for Nurses in Iran.

    PubMed

    Sheikhi, Mohammad Reza; Fallahi Khoshknab, Masoud; Mohammadi, Farahnaz; Oskouie, Fatemeh

    2015-02-24

    Career advancement programs are currently implemented in many countries. In Iran, the first career advancement program was Nurses' Career Advancement Pathway. The purpose of this study was to explore nurse leaders' experiences about implementing the Nurses' Career Advancement Pathway program in Iran. This exploratory qualitative study was conducted in 2013. Sixteen nurse managers were recruited from the teaching hospitals affiliated to Shahid Behesthi, Qazvin, and Iran Universities of Medical Sciences in Iran. Participants were recruited using purposive sampling method. Study data were collected through in-depth semi-structured interviews. The conventional content analysis approach was used for data analysis. participants' experiences about implementing the Nurses' Career Advancement Pathway fell into three main categories including: a) the shortcomings of performance evaluation, b) greater emphasis on point accumulation, c) the advancement-latitude mismatch. The Nurses' Career Advancement pathway has several shortcomings regarding both its content and its implementation. Therefore, it is recommended to revise the program.

  11. The Chicago Guide to Your Academic Career: A Portable Mentor for Scholars from Graduate School through Tenure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsmith, John A.; Komlos, John; Gold, Penny Schine

    Written as an informal conversation among colleagues, this book provides a guide to the academic career. It contains useful advice about finding a mentor, making it through the dissertation, getting a job, obtaining tenure, and other topics. The chapters of part 1, Becoming a Scholar, are: (1) Deciding on an Academic Career; (2) Entering Graduate…

  12. Bringing Career Support into the Undergraduate Academic Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Aimée Eubanks

    2017-01-01

    Braven partners with universities to help students put their hard-earned degrees to work. The credit-bearing career acceleration course is embedded within the undergraduate experience at San José State University and Rutgers-University Newark. This format allows students--many of whom are commuters and work full-time outside school--to fit career…

  13. Contingent Employment in Academic Careers: Relative Deprivation among Adjunct Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Daniel C.; Turnley, William H.

    2004-01-01

    This article utilizes relative deprivation theory to examine the careers of non-tenure-track instructors and research associates. Demographic status, motivations for accepting contingent employment, and standards of comparison used to assess the quality of the job were all related to the degree of relative deprivation experienced by adjunct…

  14. Gender differences in publication productivity, academic position, career duration, and funding among U.S. academic radiation oncology faculty.

    PubMed

    Holliday, Emma B; Jagsi, Reshma; Wilson, Lynn D; Choi, Mehee; Thomas, Charles R; Fuller, Clifton D

    2014-05-01

    This study aimed to analyze gender differences in rank, career duration, publication productivity, and research funding among radiation oncologists at U.S. academic institutions. For 82 domestic academic radiation oncology departments, the authors identified current faculty and recorded their academic rank, degree, and gender. The authors recorded bibliographic metrics for physician faculty from a commercially available database (Scopus, Elsevier BV), including numbers of publications from 1996 to 2012 and h-indices. The authors then concatenated these data with National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding per Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools. The authors performed descriptive and correlative analyses, stratifying by gender and rank. Of 1,031 faculty, 293 (28%) women and 738 (72%) men, men had a higher median m-index, 0.58 (range 0-3.23) versus 0.47 (0-2.5) (P < .05); h-index, 8 (0-59) versus 5 (0-39) (P < .05); and publication number, 26 (0-591) versus 13 (0-306) (P < .05). Men were more likely to be senior faculty and receive NIH funding. After stratifying for rank, these differences were largely nonsignificant. On multivariate analysis, there were correlations between gender, career duration and academic position, and h-index (P < .01). Determinants of a successful career in academic medicine are multifactorial. Data from radiation oncologists show a systematic gender association, with fewer women achieving senior faculty rank. However, women achieving seniority have productivity metrics comparable to those of male counterparts. This suggests that early career development and mentorship of female faculty may narrow productivity disparities.

  15. Part-time careers in academic internal medicine: a report from the association of specialty professors part-time careers task force on behalf of the alliance for academic internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Linzer, Mark; Warde, Carole; Alexander, R Wayne; Demarco, Deborah M; Haupt, Allison; Hicks, Leroi; Kutner, Jean; Mangione, Carol M; Mechaber, Hilit; Rentz, Meridith; Riley, Joanne; Schuster, Barbara; Solomon, Glen D; Volberding, Paul; Ibrahim, Tod

    2009-10-01

    To establish guidelines for more effectively incorporating part-time faculty into departments of internal medicine, a task force was convened in early 2007 by the Association of Specialty Professors. The task force used informal surveys, current literature, and consensus building among members of the Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine to produce a consensus statement and a series of recommendations. The task force agreed that part-time faculty could enrich a department of medicine, enhance workforce flexibility, and provide high-quality research, patient care, and education in a cost-effective manner. The task force provided a series of detailed steps for operationalizing part-time practice; to do so, key issues were addressed, such as fixed costs, malpractice insurance, space, cross-coverage, mentoring, career development, productivity targets, and flexible scheduling. Recommendations included (1) increasing respect for work-family balance, (2) allowing flexible time as well as part-time employment, (3) directly addressing negative perceptions about part-time faculty, (4) developing policies to allow flexibility in academic advancement, (5) considering part-time faculty as candidates for leadership positions, (6) encouraging granting agencies, including the National Institutes of Health and Veterans Administration, to consider part-time faculty as eligible for research career development awards, and (7) supporting future research in "best practices" for incorporating part-time faculty into academic departments of medicine.

  16. Gender differences regarding career issues and promotion in academic physical medicine and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Amy O; Kevorkian, C George; Rintala, Diana H

    2007-11-01

    To assess gender differences in academic progress and attitudes toward promotion in academic physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R). A survey was sent to members of the Association of Academic Physiatrists (AAP). Questions addressed demographics, job description, hours worked, childcare responsibilities, publications, career aspirations, mentoring, and familiarity with promotion and tenure policies. Respondents were also asked about the relative importance of career aspects including the perceived benefits of and obstacles to promotion. Responses were anonymous. Women spent less time on scholarly activities. Women considered the fact that they disliked writing and did not know how to do research to be more important obstacles to promotion than did men. Women were more likely to have part-time appointments and lower academic rank. They had fewer children at home but greater responsibility for child care. Women were less likely to aspire to become full professor, they met less often with their department chair/supervisor, and they published fewer papers. Men and women reported equal career satisfaction. There are several gender differences in the values, attitudes, and priorities in academic PM&R. Women respondents were generally less interested in traditional academic pursuits than were their male counterparts.

  17. Academic career and part-time working in medicine: a cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Hoesli, Irene; Engelhardt, Miriam; Schötzau, Andy; Huang, Dorothy; Laissue, Nathalie

    2013-02-15

    The aim of this exploratory survey was to assess predictors for an academic career in a population of physicians working full time (FT) or part time (PT) in the north-western part of Switzerland. We also asked for individual attitudes, influences and motivations towards PT work. In a cross-sectional study, resident and senior physicians were asked via hyperlink to complete an anonymous 91-item questionnaire. The completed questionnaires were collected anonymously online. Overall, 389 of 1104 (35%) questionnaires were returned for analysis. Of the respondents, 68.1% worked FT and 31.9% PT. More women than men (57.5% vs 42.5%) responded to the questionnaire and more women than men (68.2% vs 31.8%) were working as residents. Of the FT physicians, 88.9% favoured a work reduction to 60.0-90.0%; 82.9% FT and 97.0% PT physicians considered the introduction of PT work opportunities in their hospital as reasonable. A higher academic score was reached by men (mean 3.69, SD 3.39) than by women (mean 2.22, SD 2.77). Among senior physicians, PT work had a significant influence on the academic score. The possibility to do research, followed by male gender, were the two most significant factors positively influencing an academic career. The possibility to perform research remains the most important predictor for a successful academic career. Working PT diminishes the chance of academic success.

  18. Careers

    Science.gov Websites

    Vets & Transitioned Military Launch your career High School Undergrad & Post-Bac Graduate & ; Post-Master's Postdoc Explore a career Featured Careers Featured Careers Featured Professional Featured

  19. Exploring the Academic Achievement and Career Aspirations of College-Bound and Postsecondary Zulu Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Steven B.; Wallis, Amy Birtel; Dunston, Kwesi T.

    2003-01-01

    This article reports on a qualitative approach used to identify developmental and contextual factors associated with academic success and career aspirations of 13 Black Zulu South African students transitioning into college or in their first year of college. Students were queried on their aspirations and values, definitions of success, and…

  20. Developing Identity and Agency as an Early Career Academic: Lessons from Alice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monk, Sue; McKay, Loraine

    2017-01-01

    This paper draws on Lewis Carroll's character of Alice as a metaphor for interrogating identity construction and agency amongst early career academics, a process which can seem like Alice's pursuit of the White Rabbit in a strange land. Keeping in mind the effects of neoliberalism on the tertiary sector, we recognise the centrality of personal…

  1. Career Aspirations and Academic Achievement of BMTs in the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Betty

    2004-01-01

    Purpose of Study: This paper seeks to explore the relationship between career aspirations (CA) and academic achievement (AA) for business management technicians (BMTs) from state-run technical institutions (SRTIs) in The Republic of Trinidad and Tobago in the West Indies. Methodology: For the purposes of this study, AA was defined as "task…

  2. Academic Parenting: Work-Family Conflict and Strategies across Child Age, Disciplines and Career Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Anne; McDonald, Jan; Guijt, Rosanne; Leane, Elizabeth; Martin, Angela; James, Allison; Jones, Menna; Corban, Monica; Green, Bridget

    2018-01-01

    The research underpinning this article explores the impacts that parenting and primary caring responsibilities have upon academic careers. It takes an innovative approach by exploring three under-researched aspects of this issue: the longitudinal impacts that extend past the years immediately following the birth or adoption of a child; the…

  3. Shifting Academic Careers: Implications for Enhancing Professionalism in Teaching and Supporting Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locke, William

    2014-01-01

    This Higher Education Academy (HEA) commissioned report provides a brief review of literature focusing on the changing nature of academic careers in the higher education sector, including any shift towards "teaching only" contracts. It also identifies key issues in terms of teaching and learning, continuing professional development and…

  4. Motivation Orientations, Academic Achievement, and Career Goals of Undergraduate Music Education Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Charles P.; Zdzinski, Stephen F.; Ballard, Dennis L.

    2006-01-01

    This study is an examination of motivation orientations (mastery, intrinsic, cooperative, individual, competition, ego, approach success, avoid failure, hypercompetition, personal development competition) and musical self-concept in relation to measures of academic achievement and career goals of preservice music teachers. The research questions…

  5. Being Critical: An Account of an Early Career Academic Working within and against Neoliberalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLachlan, Fiona

    2017-01-01

    In 2014 I attended a symposium concerning Early Career Academics (ECAs) in the field of physical education and sport pedagogy. I was struck by the dominance of a particular theme at that symposium--that is, how to obtain a position and survive in academia. The aim of this paper is to use an inciting moment that occurred at this symposium as a…

  6. Letters from Early Career Academics: The Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy Field of Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alfrey, Laura; Enright, Eimear; Rynne, Steven

    2017-01-01

    Taking our lead from Rainer Maria Rilke's (1929) "Letters to a Young Poet", our broader project aimed to create a space for dialogue and intergenerational learning between Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy (PESP) Early Career Academics (ECAs) and members of the PESP professoriate. This paper focuses specifically on the experiences of…

  7. Preparedness to Teach: Experiences of the University of Ibadan Early Career Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Udegbe, I. Bola

    2016-01-01

    This research examined the experiences of early career academics (ECAs) in terms of their preparedness to teach. Using a survey design involving 104 ECAs in a large Nigeria university, quantitative and qualitative data were obtained to address the research questions raised. Findings showed that (1) prior experience and training impacted on…

  8. Effectiveness of Higher Diploma Program for Early Career Academics in Ethiopia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gebru, Demewoz Admasu

    2016-01-01

    Unprecedented expansion of the public higher education sector in Ethiopia has brought about masses of early career academics (ECAs) to take up teaching and research in the sector. In recognition of a multitude of responsibilities and challenges these ECAs would face, a higher diploma program (HDP) was introduced in 2004 both for ECAs and senior…

  9. The Effectiveness of Peer Review of Teaching When Performed between Early-Career Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodman, Richard J.; Parappilly, Maria B.

    2015-01-01

    The success of peer review of teaching (PRT) in shaping teaching practice during an academic's formative years may depend on the peers' teaching experience and the frequency of evaluation. Two Australian early-career University lecturers with no previous experience of peer review performed a single PRT on one another following a one week academic…

  10. Development and Initial Validation of a Measure of Academic Behaviors Associated with College and Career Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardi, Allison; Seburn, Mary; Conley, David

    2011-01-01

    In this cross-validation study, the authors examined the psychometric properties of a measure of academic behaviors associated with college and career readiness intended for high school students. An exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was conducted with a randomly selected portion of the sample (n = 413) and resulted in four reliable factors:…

  11. Women Chief Academic Officers of Public Community Colleges: Significant Predictors for Their Career Paths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenney, Cynthia B.; Cejda, Brent D.

    As women now comprise 39% of the chief academic officer (CAO) positions, the focus of this investigation was the career paths and mobility factors of women CAOs in public comprehensive community colleges. This survey of 142 women resulted in eight distinct, common pathways by which women attain this rank. The typical profile of a female CAO is a…

  12. Academic Motherhood: Mid-Career Perspectives and the Ideal Worker Norm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Kelly; Wolf-Wendel, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    This chapter explores how mid-career tenured women faculty, who are mothers and academics, manage multiple roles. The women represent faculty at a variety of institutional types and in a variety of disciplines. The chapter looks at these experiences in light of ideal worker norms.

  13. Institutional Limits: Christine Ladd-Franklin, Fellowships, and American Women's Academic Careers, 1880-1920

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spillman, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Christine Ladd-Franklin spent the first forty years of her life becoming one of the best-educated women in nineteenth-century America. She spent the rest of her life devising fellowship programs designed to enable educated women to have the same opportunities as men in their academic careers. The difficulty women had in becoming professors had a…

  14. Factors That Promote Motivation and Academic Engagement in a Career Technical Education Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loera, Gustavo; Nakamoto, Jonathan; Oh, Youn Joo; Rueda, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on social cognitive theory, this study examined the relationship between student and school-based factors (e.g., educational aspirations, quality of the program of study, and adults' impact on college enrollment) and students' academic engagement and satisfaction with student life in a career technical education (CTE) setting. This study…

  15. Early career academic researchers and community-based participatory research: wrestling match or dancing partners?

    PubMed

    Lowry, Kelly Walker; Ford-Paz, Rebecca

    2013-12-01

    Early career faculty members at academic medical centers face unique obstacles when engaging in community-based participatory research (CBPR). Challenges and opportunities for solutions pertaining to mentorship, time demands, unfamiliarity of colleagues with CBPR approaches, ethical review regulations, funding, and publication and promotion are discussed. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Managing the Process: The Intradepartmental Networks of Early-Career Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pifer, Meghan J.; Baker, Vicki L.

    2013-01-01

    This article relies on data from surveys and interviews to explore the networking behaviors and strategies of early-career faculty members within the contexts of their academic departments. Findings suggest that faculty members' approaches to interactions and relationships with colleagues may be conceptualized according to a continuum of…

  17. Communities of Practice in Higher Education: Professional Learning in an Academic Career

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Linet

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on the life history of a university academic, and the ways in which he learned in different communities of practice during his career. This account raises questions about the applicability of situated learning theory to a knowledge-based organisation, and argues that both the external context and the individuals within the…

  18. Learning and Developing as a University Teacher: Narratives of Early Career Academics in Estonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remmik, Marvi; Karm, Mari; Lepp, Liina

    2013-01-01

    In recent years the higher education context in Estonia, as in most European countries, has changed a lot. All changes have an impact on university teachers' practice and their work organisation, and are presenting new challenges. The current research aims at developing an understanding of Estonian early career academics' professional identity by…

  19. Women and Academic Workloads: Career Slow Lane or Cul-de-Sac?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Lucinda; Barrett, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Career progression for women academics to higher levels is not in proportion to their representation within the profession. This paper looks at theories about this and relates them to current practices within universities for allocating work. The management of workloads can disadvantage women through a number of interactive factors. Interruptions…

  20. The Impact of Communities of Practice in Support of Early-Career Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Milton D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper traces the history and impact of communities of practice (CoPs) in supporting early-career academics, although the primary focus here in the United States is on the faculty learning community (FLC) model, a special type of CoP in higher education. The initial development of this model, beginning in 1979, takes place over two decades at…

  1. A Comparison of Perceptions of Career and Technical Education Curriculum and Academic Core Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handy, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on identifying and categorizing the perceptions of teachers, counselors, and administrators related to career and technical education (CTE) and academic core (AC) curricula in a large school district. Control group actions' perceptual control theory (PCT) was used as the conceptual framework for the study. PCT is a model of…

  2. Professional Development in Teaching and Learning for Early Career Academic Geographers: Contexts, Practices and Tensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vajoczki, Susan; Biegas, Tamara C.; Crenshaw, Melody; Healey, Ruth L.; Osayomi, Tolulope; Bradford, Michael; Monk, Janice

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides a review of the practices and tensions informing approaches to professional development for early career academic geographers who are teaching in higher education. We offer examples from Britain, Canada, Nigeria and the USA. The tensions include: institutional and departmental cultures; models that offer generic and…

  3. Postdoctorals vs. Non-Postdoctorals: Career Performance Differentials Within Academic Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fribush, Stuart L.; Larson, Thomas A.

    The research methodology developed in this paper was intended to shed some light on the question of career performance differentials within academic medicine between persons who have undergone postdoctoral training and those who have not. Compared were two groups of medical school faculty members (including M. D.'s and Ph.D.'s). One group included…

  4. Pathways for Academic Career and Employment (PACE) Program: Fiscal Year 2014 Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Community colleges across Iowa are working with business and industry through sector boards to develop training programs for jobs that have applicant shortages. The state Pathways for Academic Career and Employment (PACE) program enables community colleges to offer in-demand training, making education affordable for low income or unemployed…

  5. The Bilingual Academic Services and Integrated Career Systems Program: Project BASICS, 1987-1988. OREA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berney, Tomi D.; Carey, Cecilia

    The Bilingual Academic Services and Integrated Career Systems Program (Project BASICS) is a federally-funded program of instructional and support services provided to 122 students at a Queens high school. The program's aim was to develop English literacy skills and appreciation of cultural diversity, and to prepare students for the psychosocial…

  6. Giving Students Extra Support to Meet Standards in Challenging Academic and Career Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Successful schools at all levels provide extra-help strategies to assist students in meeting high standards in both academic and career/technical courses. Some schools design a flexible schedule and offer virtual learning opportunities to enable at-risk students to complete high school. Middle grades schools can provide an accelerated curriculum…

  7. Academic and Career Trajectories of African American Males in San Bernardino

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyles, Lolita Laree

    2013-01-01

    A qualitative grounded theory approach is utilized to study the academic and career trajectories of twenty African American male collegiate students living in San Bernardino, California. There is limited research that explores the positive educational experiences of young adult African American males. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to…

  8. Impact of a Career Intervention on At-Risk Middle School Students' Career Maturity Levels, Academic Achievement, and Self-Esteem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legum, Harry L.; Hoare, Carol H.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of a 9-week career intervention program on at-risk middle school students' career maturity levels, self-esteem, and academic achievement. This study was based on a pretest and posttest design using a control group. Data were collected from 27 at-risk middle school students representing the…

  9. Doctors currently in jobs with academic content and their future intentions to pursue clinical academic careers: questionnaire surveys.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Trevor W; Smith, Fay; Goldacre, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    Our aim was to report on doctors' descriptions of their current post at about 12 years after qualification, in respect of academic content, and to compare this with their long-term intentions. By academic content, we mean posts that are designated as clinical academic posts or clinical service posts that include research and/or teaching commitments. Questionnaire survey. All UK medical graduates of 1996 contacted in 2007, graduates of 1999 in 2012, and graduates of 2000 in 2012. UK. Responses about current posts and future intentions. Postal and email questionnaires. The response rate was 61.9% (6713/10844). Twenty eight per cent were working in posts with academic content (3.3% as clinical academics, 25% in clinical posts with some academic content). Seventeen per cent of women were working in clinical posts with some teaching and research, compared with 29% of men. A higher percentage of men than women intended to be clinical academics as their eventual career choice (3.9% overall, 5.4% of men, 2.7% of women). More doctors wished to move to a job with an academic component than away from one (N = 824 compared with 236). This was true for both men (433 compared with 118) and women (391 compared with 118). Women are under-represented both in holding posts with academic content and in aspirations to do so. It is noteworthy that many more doctors hoped to move into an academic role than to move out of one. Policy should facilitate this wish in order to address current shortfalls in clinical academic medicine.

  10. The Coming of Age of the Academic Career: Differentiation and Professionalization of German Academic Positions from the 19th Century to the Present

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waaijer, Cathelijn J. F.

    2015-01-01

    In modern academic career systems there are a large number of entry positions, much smaller numbers of intermediate positions, and still fewer full professorships. We examine how this system has developed in Germany, the country where the modern academic system was introduced, tracing the historical development of academic positions since the…

  11. Factors that influence career progression among postdoctoral clinical academics: a scoping review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Ranieri, Veronica; Barratt, Helen; Fulop, Naomi; Rees, Geraint

    2016-01-01

    Background The future of academic medicine is uncertain. Concerns regarding the future availability of qualified and willing trainee clinical academics have been raised worldwide. Of significant concern is our failure to retain postdoctoral trainee clinical academics, who are likely to be our next generation of leaders in scientific discovery. Objectives To review the literature about factors that may influence postdoctoral career progression in early career clinical academics. Design This study employed a scoping review method. Three reviewers separately assessed whether the articles found fit the inclusion criteria. Data sources PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar (1991–2015). Article selection The review encompassed a broad search of English language studies published anytime up to November 2015. All articles were eligible for inclusion, including research papers employing either quantitative or qualitative methods, as well as editorials and other summary articles. Data extraction Data extracted from included publications were charted according to author(s), sample population, study design, key findings, country of origin and year of publication. Results Our review identified 6 key influences: intrinsic motivation, work–life balance, inclusiveness, work environment, mentorship and availability of funding. It also detected significant gaps within the literature about these influences. Conclusions Three key steps are proposed to help support postdoctoral trainee clinical academics. These focus on ensuring that researchers feel encouraged in their workplace, involved in collaborative dialogue with key stakeholders and able to access reliable information regarding their chosen career pathway. Finally, we highlight recommendations for future research. PMID:27798036

  12. Career and Technical Education Pathway Programs, Academic Performance, and the Transition to College and Career

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekes, Natasha; Bragg, Debra. D.; Loeb, Jane W.; Oleksiw, Catherine A.; Marszalek, Jacob; Brooks-LaRaviere, Margaret; Zhu, Rongchun; Kremidas, Chloe C.; Akukwe, Grace; Lee, Hyeong-Jong; Hood, Lisa K.

    2007-01-01

    This mixed method study examined secondary student matriculation to two selected community colleges offering career and technical education (CTE) transition programs through partnerships with K-12 and secondary districts having numerous high schools. The study had two distinct components: (1) a secondary study that compared CTE and non-CTE…

  13. Lean in or Opt Out: Career Pathways of Academic Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddy, Pamela L.; Ward, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Casual observers of academic environments might conclude that women's problems in higher education have been resolved. Colleges enroll more women than men on an overall basis. There is gender parity in entry-level faculty hires, and the number of women in senior administrative positions continues to rise. A closer look however at the work, lives,…

  14. Tenure, Academic Freedom, and the Career I Once Loved

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolodny, Annette

    2008-01-01

    Given the financial burden they are taking on, parents and students are not interested in debates over tenure or academic freedom lest these distract them from the immediate goal of preparing to earn a living. Overburdened undergraduates-- students working twenty to forty hours each week to pay the bills and still taking out student loans--greet…

  15. The Impact of a Junior Faculty Fellowship Award on Academic Advancement and Retention.

    PubMed

    Connelly, Maureen T; Sullivan, Amy M; Chinchilla, Manuel; Dale, Margaret L; Emans, S Jean; Nadelson, Carol Cooperman; Notman, Malkah Tolpin; Tarbell, Nancy J; Zigler, Corwin M; Shore, Eleanor G

    2017-08-01

    Academic faculty experience barriers to career development and promotion. In 1996, Harvard Medical School (HMS) initiated an intramural junior faculty fellowship to address these obstacles. The authors sought to understand whether receiving a fellowship was associated with more rapid academic promotion and retention. Junior faculty fellowship recipients and all other instructor and assistant professors at HMS between 1996 and 2011 were identified. Using propensity score modeling, the authors created a matched comparison group for the fellowship recipients based on educational background, training, academic rank, department, hospital affiliation, and demographics. Time to promotion and time to leaving were assessed by Kaplan-Meier curves. A total of 622 junior faculty received fellowships. Faculty who received fellowships while instructors (n = 480) had shorter times to promotion to assistant professor (P < .0001) and longer retention times (P < .0001) than matched controls. There were no significant differences in time to promotion for assistant professors who received fellowships (n = 142) compared with matched controls, but assistant professor fellowship recipients were significantly more likely to remain longer on the faculty (P = .0005). Women instructors advanced more quickly than matched controls, while male instructors' rates of promotions did not differ. Fellowships to support junior faculty were associated with shorter times to promotion for instructors and more sustained faculty retention for both instructors and assistant professors. This suggests that relatively small amounts of funding early in faculty careers can play a critical role in supporting academic advancement and retention.

  16. The influence of parenting style on academic achievement and career path

    PubMed Central

    ZAHED ZAHEDANI, ZAHRA; REZAEE, RITA; YAZDANI, ZAHRA; BAGHERI, SINA; NABEIEI, PARISA

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Several factors affect the academic performance of college students and parenting style is one significant factor. The current study has been done with the purpose of investigating the relationship between parenting styles, academic achievement and career path of students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences.     Methods This is a correlation study carried out at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Among 1600 students, 310 students were selected randomly as the sample. Baumrind’s Parenting Style and Moqimi’s Career Path questionnaires were used and the obtained scores were correlated with the students' transcripts. To study the relation between variables Pearson correlation coefficient was used. Results There was a significant relationship between authoritarian parenting style and educational success (p=0.03). Also findings showed a significant relationship between firm parenting style and Career Path of the students, authoritarian parenting style and Career Path of the students, educational success and Career Path of the students (p=0.001). Conclusion Parents have an important role in identifying children’s talent and guiding them. Mutual understanding and close relationship between parents and children are recommended. Therefore, it is recommended that the methods of correct interaction of parents and children be more valued and parents familiarize their children with roles of businesses in society and the need for employment in legitimate businesses and this important affair should be more emphasized through mass media and family training classes. PMID:27382580

  17. The influence of parenting style on academic achievement and career path.

    PubMed

    Zahed Zahedani, Zahra; Rezaee, Rita; Yazdani, Zahra; Bagheri, Sina; Nabeiei, Parisa

    2016-07-01

    Several factors affect the academic performance of college students and parenting style is one significant factor. The current study has been done with the purpose of investigating the relationship between parenting styles, academic achievement and career path of students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. This is a correlation study carried out at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Among 1600 students, 310 students were selected randomly as the sample. Baumrind's Parenting Style and Moqimi's Career Path questionnaires were used and the obtained scores were correlated with the students' transcripts. To study the relation between variables Pearson correlation coefficient was used. There was a significant relationship between authoritarian parenting style and educational success (p=0.03). Also findings showed a significant relationship between firm parenting style and Career Path of the students, authoritarian parenting style and Career Path of the students, educational success and Career Path of the students (p=0.001). Parents have an important role in identifying children's talent and guiding them. Mutual understanding and close relationship between parents and children are recommended. Therefore, it is recommended that the methods of correct interaction of parents and children be more valued and parents familiarize their children with roles of businesses in society and the need for employment in legitimate businesses and this important affair should be more emphasized through mass media and family training classes.

  18. Credit Quandaries: How Career and Technical Education Teachers Can Teach Courses That Include Academic Credit. Ask the Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacques, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Many career and technical education (CTE) courses not only provide students with vocational and technical skills and knowledge, but engage them in academic content as well. Designed thoughtfully, these courses can address rigorous academic content standards and be as intellectually demanding as traditional academic courses (Southern Regional…

  19. Reimagining the self at late-career transitions: how identity threat influences academic physicians' retirement considerations.

    PubMed

    Onyura, Betty; Bohnen, John; Wasylenki, Don; Jarvis, Anna; Giblon, Barney; Hyland, Robert; Silver, Ivan; Leslie, Karen

    2015-06-01

    There is scant empirical work exploring academic physicians' psychosocial adjustment during late-career transitions or on the factors that influence their retirement decisions. The authors examine these issues through the lens of sociopsychological identity theory, specifically examining how identity threat influences academic physicians' decisions about retirement. Participants were academic physicians at a Canadian medical school and were recruited via e-mail requests for clinical faculty interested in discussing late-career and retirement planning issues. Participants included 15 males and 6 females (N = 21; mean age = 63, standard deviation = 7.54), representing eight specialties (clinical and surgical). Data were collected in October and November 2012 via facilitated focus groups, which were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim, and anonymized, then analyzed using thematic analysis. Four primary themes were identified: centrality of occupational identity, experiences of identity threat, experiences of aging in an indifferent system, and coping with late-career transitions. Identity threats were manifested in apprehensions about self-esteem after retirement, practice continuity, and clinical competence, as well as in a loss of meaning and belonging. These identity challenges influenced decisions on whether to retire. Organizational and system support was perceived as wanting. Coping strategies included reimagining and revaluing various aspects of the self through assimilating new activities and reprioritizing others. Identity-related struggles are a significant feature of academic physicians' considerations about late-career transitions. Understanding these challenges, their antecedents, and their consequences can prepare faculty, and their institutions, to better manage late-career transitions. Individual- and institution-level implications are discussed.

  20. "I'm Not a Real Academic": A Career from Industry to Academe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santoro, Ninetta; Snead, Suzanne L.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past thirty years universities have increasingly extended their offerings of vocationally oriented degrees and have recruited into academe, practitioners from the professions. This paper reports on a qualitative study that investigated the experiences of 20 professionals-turned-academics in Australia; their expectations of academe and how…

  1. Productivity and career paths of previous recipients of Society for Academic Emergency Medicine research grant awards.

    PubMed

    Young, Kelly D

    2008-06-01

    The objective was to assess productivity of previous recipients of Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) grant awards. All previous recipients of SAEM Research Training Grants, Neuroscience Research Awards, Scholarly Sabbatical Awards, and Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Research Fellowship awards funded through 2004 were identified through SAEM's records and surveyed. Award categories assessed were those still offered by SAEM at the time of the survey and therefore excluded the Geriatric Research Award. The 2005-2006 SAEM Grants Committee developed a survey using previous publications assessing productivity of training grants and fellowship awards and refined it through consensus review and limited pilot testing. We assessed measures of academic productivity (numbers of publications and additional grants awarded), commitment to an academic career, satisfaction with the SAEM award, and basic demographic information. Overall response rate was 70%; usable data were returned by all seven Research Training Grant awardees, both Neuroscience awardees, four of five Scholarly Sabbatical awardees, and six of 14 EMS Research Fellowship awardees. Of those who gave demographic information, 78% (14/18) were male and 94% (16/17) were non-Hispanic white. All the respondents remained in academics, and 14 of 19 felt that they will definitely be in academics 5 years from the time of the survey. They have a median of 1.8 original research publications per year since the end of their grant period, and 74% (14/19) have received subsequent federal funding. All found the SAEM award to be helpful or very helpful to their careers. Previous recipients of the SAEM grant awards show evidence of academic productivity in the form of subsequent grant funding and research publications, and the majority remain committed to and satisfied with their academic research careers.

  2. Challenges and opportunities for early-career Teaching-Focussed academics in the biosciences.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Katharine; Gretton, Sarah; Jones, Katherine; Tallents, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-seven percent of academics in UK Higher Education (HE) are in Teaching-Focussed positions, making major contributions to undergraduate programmes in an era of high student expectations when it comes to teaching quality. However, institutional support for Teaching-Focussed academics is often limited, both in terms of peer networking and opportunities for career development. As four early-career stage Teaching-Focussed academics working in a variety of institutions, we explore what motivated our choices to make teaching our primary academic activity, and the challenges that we have faced in doing so. In addition to highlighting the need for universities to fully recognise the achievements of teaching staff, we discuss the role that the various biosciences learned societies have in supporting Teaching-Focussed academics. We identify that there is a need for the learned societies to come together and pool their expertise in this area. The fragmented nature of the Teaching-Focussed academic community means that clear sources of national support are needed in order to best enable the next generation of bioscience educators to reach their full potential.

  3. Challenges and opportunities for early-career Teaching-Focussed academics in the biosciences

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Katharine; Gretton, Sarah; Jones, Katherine; Tallents, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-seven percent of academics in UK Higher Education (HE) are in Teaching-Focussed positions, making major contributions to undergraduate programmes in an era of high student expectations when it comes to teaching quality. However, institutional support for Teaching-Focussed academics is often limited, both in terms of peer networking and opportunities for career development. As four early-career stage Teaching-Focussed academics working in a variety of institutions, we explore what motivated our choices to make teaching our primary academic activity, and the challenges that we have faced in doing so. In addition to highlighting the need for universities to fully recognise the achievements of teaching staff, we discuss the role that the various biosciences learned societies have in supporting Teaching-Focussed academics. We identify that there is a need for the learned societies to come together and pool their expertise in this area. The fragmented nature of the Teaching-Focussed academic community means that clear sources of national support are needed in order to best enable the next generation of bioscience educators to reach their full potential. PMID:25977754

  4. Scholarship, publication, and career advancement in health professions education: AMEE Guide No. 43.

    PubMed

    McGaghie, William C

    2009-07-01

    Scholarship and publication are key contributors to career advancement in health professions education worldwide. Scholarship is expressed in many ways including original research; integration and synthesis of ideas and data, often across disciplines; application of skill and knowledge to problems that have consequences for health professionals, students, and patients; and teaching in many forms. Professional publication also has diverse outlets ranging from empirical articles in peer reviewed journals, textbook chapters, videos, simulation technologies, and many other means of expression. Scholarship and publication are evaluated and judged using criteria that are consensual, public, and transparent. This three-part AMEE Guide presents advice about how to prepare and publish health professions education research reports and other forms of scholarship in professional journals and other outlets. Part One addresses scholarship-its varieties, assessment, and attributes of productive scholars and scholarly teams. Part Two maps the road to publication, beginning with what's important and reportable and moving to manuscript planning and writing, gauging manuscript quality, manuscript submission and review, and writing in English. Part Three offers 21 practical suggestions about how to advance a successful and satisfying career in the academic health professions. Concluding remarks encourage health professions educators to pursue scholarship with vision and reflection.

  5. Not choosing nursing: work experience and career choice of high academic achieving school leavers.

    PubMed

    Neilson, Gavin R; McNally, James G

    2010-01-01

    Work experience has been a feature of the secondary school curriculum in the United Kingdom for a number of years. Usually requested by the pupil, it aims to provide opportunities for school pupils to enhance their knowledge and understanding of an occupation. The main benefits are claimed to be that it can help pupils develop an insight into the skills and attitudes required for an occupation and an awareness of career opportunities. However the quality and choice of placements are considered to be of great importance in this process and in influencing career choice [Department for Education and Skills (DfES), 2002a. Work Experience: A Guide for Employers. Department for Education and Skills, London]. As university departments of nursing experience a decline in the number of school pupils entering student nurse education programmes, and with the competition for school leavers becoming even greater, it is important to consider whether school pupils have access to appropriate work placements in nursing and what influence their experience has on pursuing nursing as a career choice. This paper is based on interview data from 20 high academic achieving fifth and sixth year school pupils in Scotland, paradigmatic cases from a larger survey sample (n=1062), who had considered nursing as a possible career choice within their career preference cluster, but then later disregarded nursing and decided to pursue medicine or another health care profession. This was partly reported by Neilson and Lauder [Neilson, G.R., Lauder, W., 2008. What do high academic achieving school pupils really think about a career in nursing: analysis of the narrative from paradigmatic case interviews. Nurse Education Today 28(6), 680-690] which examined what high academic achieving school pupils really thought about a career in nursing. However, the data was particularly striking in revealing the poor quality of nursing work experience for the pupils, and also their proposal that there was a need

  6. Why do women choose or reject careers in academic medicine? A narrative review of empirical evidence.

    PubMed

    Edmunds, Laurel D; Ovseiko, Pavel V; Shepperd, Sasha; Greenhalgh, Trisha; Frith, Peggy; Roberts, Nia W; Pololi, Linda H; Buchan, Alastair M

    2016-12-10

    Women are under-represented in academic medicine. We reviewed the empirical evidence focusing on the reasons for women's choice or rejection of careers in academic medicine. Using a systematic search, we identified 52 studies published between 1985, and 2015. More than half had methodological limitations and most were from North America. Eight main themes were explored in these studies. There was consistent evidence for four of these themes: women are interested in teaching more than in research; participation in research can encourage women into academic medicine; women lack adequate mentors and role models; and women experience gender discrimination and bias. The evidence was conflicting on four themes: women are less interested in research than men; women lose commitment to research as their education and training progress; women are deterred from academic careers by financial considerations; and women are deterred by concerns about work-life balance. Inconsistency of findings across studies suggests significant opportunities to overcome barriers by providing a more enabling environment. We identified substantial gaps in the scientific literature that could form the focus of future research, including shifting the focus from individuals' career choices to the societal and organisational contexts and cultures within which those choices are made; extending the evidence base to include a wider range of countries and settings; and testing the efficacy of interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Preresidency Publication Number Does Not Predict Academic Career Placement in Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Marcus; Garzon-Muvdi, Tomas; Maxwell, Russell; Tamargo, Rafael J; Huang, Judy; Witham, Tim; Bettegowda, Chetan; Chaichana, Kaisorn L

    2017-05-01

    It is unclear if preresidency and/or residency research work impacts academic neurosurgery placement post residency. The goal of this study is to evaluate the impact that preresidency and residency research publication has on attaining academic faculty positions. Alumni information was collected from 65 of the 108 (60%) neurosurgery residency websites. Graduates from these programs between 2005 and 2015 (n = 949) were analyzed to determine factors associated with an academic career. Information on publications, citations, and H-index were obtained from Web of Science. Current position was designated as academic if the physician had a teaching position at a university hospital and private if the physician was not affiliated with a university hospital. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to identify factors associated with academic faculty positions post residency. Of the 949 physicians included in the analysis, 339 (36%) were in academic positions, 518 (55%) in private practice, and 92 (10%) were still in training. More than a fifth (212, or 22%) of physicians performed a research fellowship (8.2%) or attained a Ph.D. (14.1%) during medical school. Among those who had completed training, an academic career was associated with having 2 or more publications during residency (odds ratio [OR] [95% confidence interval, CI]: 3.87 [1.59-9.45]; P < 0.003), H-index ≥ 2 during residency (OR [95% CI]: 2.32 [1.40-1.69]; P < 0.0001) and having devoted research time before residency (OR [95% CI]: 1.56 [1.10-2.22]; P < 0.012). Notably, publications before residency were not an independent indicator of academic placement. These findings may help guide residency programs to identify and/or cultivate neurosurgeons to become academic neurosurgeons. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Enabling Possibility: Women Associate Professors' Sense of Agency in Career Advancement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terosky, Aimee LaPointe; O'Meara, KerryAnn; Campbell, Corbin M.

    2014-01-01

    In this multimethod, qualitative study we examined associate women professors' sense of agency in career advancement from the rank of associate to full. Defining agency as strategic perspectives or actions toward goals that matter to the professor, we explore the perceptions of what helps and/or hinders a sense of agency in career advancement. Our…

  9. Career Advancement through Bilingual Education Skills. Project CABES, 1987-1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berney, Tomi D.; Velazquez, Clara

    This report evaluates Project CABES (Career Advancement through Bilingual Education Skills) during its second year of extension of a federal funding cycle at New York's Seward Park High School. The major goal of Project CABES was to provide career advancement skills to 250 Hispanic 9th- through 12-grade students of limited English proficiency…

  10. Career outcomes of nondesignated preliminary general surgery residents at an academic surgical program.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Rima; Mullen, John T

    2013-01-01

    There remains a debate as to whether nondesignated preliminary (NDP) positions in surgery ultimately translate into successful surgical careers for those who pursue them. We sought to identify the success with which our NDP residents were able to transition to their desired career and what, if any, factors contributed to their success. The records of all NDP residents accepted into the Massachusetts General Hospital General Surgery Residency Program from 1995 to 2010 were examined and long-term follow-up was completed. Thirty-four NDP residents were identified, including 26.5% US graduates and 73.5% international medical graduates. At the end of the initial preliminary year, 30 (88%) got placed in a postgraduate residency program, whereas 4 (12%) pursued other career paths. Of those who got placed, 25 (83%) attained surgical residency positions, including 17 (57%) who continued as preliminary residents at our institution and 8 (27%) who got placed in categorical surgical positions at other programs. After multiple preliminary years, 15 of 17 achieved a categorical position, of which, 93% were in surgical fields. Overall, 64.7% of all entering NDP residents eventually went on to have careers in general surgery (50%) or surgical subspecialties (14.7%), and 24 of 34 (71%) fulfilled their desired career goals. No factor predicted success. From 1995 to 2012 there have been 15 midlevel (11 postgraduate year 4) vacancies in our program, 4 of which were filled by preliminary residents, 2 from our program and 2 from elsewhere. All have gone on to board certifications and careers in surgery. More than 70% of NDP residents in our program successfully transitioned to their desired career paths, many achieving categorical surgical positions and academic surgical careers, thus demonstrating the benefit of this track to both residency programs and trainees. © 2013 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Recruitment of Dual-Career Academic Medicine Couples.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Charles W; DiMarco, Judy; Cairns, Charles B

    2017-11-28

    Today it is not uncommon to discover that a candidate for a faculty position has a partner or spouse who is also an academician, adding complexity to the recruitment process. Here, the authors address two practical obstacles to the recruitment of faculty who have an academic partner: dual recruitment and conflict-of-interest. The authors have found that tandem recruitment works best when suitable positions for both spouses are first identified so that recruitment can proceed synchronously. This approach decreases misperceptions of favoritism toward either's candidacy. Managing conflict-of-interest, generated by the appointment of one spouse in a supervisory position over the other, requires a proactive, transparent, well-designed plan. After canvassing human resource policies and conducting interviews with national academic leaders, the authors have developed an administrative structure that places "key" decisions (hiring and retention; promotion and tenure; salary, bonuses, and benefits; performance evaluations; and disciplinary matters) regarding the supervised spouse in the jurisdiction of an alternate administrator or committee. The authors also offer suggestions both for mitigating misperceptions of bias in day-to-day decisions and for the support and mentoring of the supervised partner or spouse.

  12. Early Experiences After Adopting a Quality Improvement Portfolio Into the Academic Advancement Process.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Niraj L; Neeman, Naama; King, Talmadge E

    2017-01-01

    Academic medical centers (AMCs) and their academic departments are increasingly assuming leadership in the education, science, and implementation of quality improvement (QI) and patient safety efforts. Fostering, recognizing, and promoting faculty leading these efforts is challenging using traditional academic metrics for advancement. The authors adapted a nationally developed QI portfolio, adopted it into their own department's advancement process in 2012, and tracked its utilization and impact over the first two years of implementation. Sixty-seven QI portfolios were submitted with 100% of faculty receiving their requested academic advancement. Women represented 60% of the submitted portfolios, while the Divisions of General Internal Medicine and Hospital Medicine accounted for 60% of the submissions. The remaining 40% were from faculty in 10 different specialty divisions. Faculty attitudes about the QI portfolio were overwhelmingly positive, with 83% agreeing that it "was an effective tool for helping to better recognize faculty contributions in QI work" and 85% agreeing that it "was an effective tool for elevating the importance of QI work in our department." The QI portfolio was one part of a broader effort to create opportunities to recognize and support faculty involved in improvement work. Further adapting the tool to ensure that it complements-rather than duplicates-other elements of the advancement process is critical for continued utilization by faculty. This will also drive desired dissemination to other departments locally and other AMCs nationally who are similarly committed to cultivating faculty career paths in systems improvement.

  13. Work-Family Balance and Academic Advancement in Medical Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Geri; Schwartz, Alan; Hart, Katherine M.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study examines various options that a faculty member might exercise to achieve work-family balance in academic medicine and their consequences for academic advancement. Method: Three data sets were analyzed: an anonymous web-administered survey of part-time tenure track-eligible University of Illinois College of Medicine (UI-COM)…

  14. The academic tweet: Twitter as a tool to advance academic surgery.

    PubMed

    Logghe, Heather J; Selby, Luke V; Boeck, Marissa A; Stamp, Nikki L; Chuen, Jason; Jones, Christian

    2018-06-01

    Social media, Twitter in particular, has emerged as an essential tool for surgeons. In the realm of academic surgery, it enables surgeons to advance the core values of academic surgery, as outlined by the Association for Academic Surgery: inclusion, leadership, innovation, scholarship, and mentorship. This article details the ways in which surgeons are using Twitter to embody these values and how the Twitter account for the Association of Academic Surgeons accomplishes its goal of inspiring and developing young academic surgeons. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Advice for a career in academic gastroenterology: from fellowship application through job selection and contract negotiations to research and promotion.

    PubMed

    Cappell, M S

    2009-03-01

    This study aims to describe a comprehensive strategy for success in academic gastroenterology by reporting common sense, but mostly previously unpublished, recommendations. The recommendation are based on expert opinion from personal experience mentoring 125 gastroenterology fellows and residents as a program director for nine years and from mentoring research while publishing more than 160 articles in peer-reviewed journals and editing 11 books during a 23-year academic career. Primary criteria for fellowship applicant selection include board scores, clinical performance, interview performance, clinical training, and research productivity. For optimal chances, select the subspecialty of gastroenterology early during residency, consult a mentor, and develop a well-planned strategy. Faculty advancement depends upon publications, grants, national recognition, interpersonal skills, and recommendations. Article categories from highest-to-lowest in prestige are original investigations, review articles, book chapters, case reports, and letters/abstracts. Articles are judged by the prestige of the journal of publication. Resubmit rejected articles to successively less prestigious journals until accepted for publication. Articles in journals without peer-review have negligible career impact. Grant support creates protected time. Institutional reputation is important in academics. Do not accept a job without a written contract. Have a lawyer review your contract. An outside offer strengthens a negotiating position. Be sociable and nonconfrontational at work. Network with colleagues. Seek a mentor. Meet your supervisor regularly for feedback. Never express anger at your boss or patients. Avoid litigation with employers. Sub-subspecialize to develop expertise in one area. Focus on this area in your research and clinical practice. In conclusion, a well-planned strategy can help you achieve a senior academic position early and efficiently.

  16. Perspective: The missing link in academic career planning and development: pursuit of meaningful and aligned work.

    PubMed

    Lieff, Susan J

    2009-10-01

    Retention of faculty in academic medicine is a growing challenge. It has been suggested that inattention to the humanistic values of the faculty is contributing to this problem. Professional development should consider faculty members' search for meaning, purpose, and professional fulfillment and should support the development of an ability to reflect on these issues. Ensuring the alignment of academic physicians' inner direction with their outer context is critical to professional fulfillment and effectiveness. Personal reflection on the synergy of one's strengths, passions, and values can help faculty members define meaningful work so as to enable clearer career decision making. The premise of this article is that an awareness of and the pursuit of meaningful work and its alignment with the academic context are important considerations in the professional fulfillment and retention of academic faculty. A conceptual framework for understanding meaningful work and alignment and ways in which that framework can be applied and taught in development programs are presented and discussed.

  17. Shaping a career trajectory in academic administration: leadership development for the deanship.

    PubMed

    Green, Alexia; Ridenour, Nancy

    2004-11-01

    The nursing profession continues to face many challenges, one of which is an insufficient number of aspiring leaders. The role of an academic leader, specifically that of dean, brings with it unique challenges and opportunities. Shaping a career in academic administration requires careful consideration of the leadership skills necessary to perform in this complex and challenging role. However, it is critical to the future of nursing as a profession that ample numbers of aspiring leaders can successfully make this transition. One can be better prepared to take on this exciting and rewarding leadership opportunity when one understands the challenges deans face, asks questions such as "Do I really want a deanship?," identifies the required leadership skills, defines a career trajectory and pathway, and develops the leadership skills necessary for deans.

  18. Mentorship and pursuit of academic medicine careers: a mixed methods study of residents from diverse backgrounds

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mentorship influences career planning, academic productivity, professional satisfaction, and most notably, the pursuit of academic medicine careers. Little is known about the role of mentoring in recruiting Black/African American and Hispanic/Latino residents into academia. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of mentoring on academic medicine career choice among a cohort of racially and ethnically diverse residents. Methods A strategic convenience sample of U.S. residents attending national professional conferences between March and July 2010; residents completed a quantitative survey and a subset participated in focus groups. Results Of the 250 residents, 183 (73%) completed surveys and 48 participated in focus groups. Thirty-eight percent of residents were white, 31% Black/African American, 17% Asian/other, and 14% Hispanic/Latino. Most respondents (93%) reported that mentorship was important for entering academia, and 70% reported having sufficient mentorship to pursue academic careers. Three themes about mentorship emerged from focus groups: (1) qualities of successful mentorship models; (2) perceived benefits of mentorship; and (3) the value of racial/ethnic and gender concordance. Residents preferred mentors they selected rather than ones assigned to them, and expressed concern about faculty using checklists. Black/African American, Hispanic/Latino, and female residents described actively seeking out mentors of the same race/ethnicity and gender, but expressed difficulty finding such mentors. Lack of racial/ethnic concordance was perceived as an obstacle for minority mentees, requiring explanation of the context and nuances of their perspectives and situations to non-minority mentors. Conclusions The majority of residents in this study reported having access to mentors. However, data show that the lack of diverse faculty mentors may impede diverse residents’ satisfaction and benefit from mentorship relationships compared to

  19. Academic Careers and Post-College Employment of Young Men. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Herman P.; Garfinkle, Stuart

    This study of career goals, academic objectives and the relation of these to success in the job market involved a series of annual interviews with samples of people representing four different population groups: young men who were 14 to 24 years old in 1966; men who were 45 to 59 years old in 1966; young women who were 14 to 24 years old in 1968;…

  20. Batting 300 is Good: Perspectives of Faculty Researchers and their Mentors on Rejection, Resilience, and Persistence in Academic Medical Careers

    PubMed Central

    DeCastro, Rochelle; Sambuco, Dana; Ubel, Peter A.; Stewart, Abigail; Jagsi, Reshma

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Professional rejection is a frequent experience in an academic medical career. The authors sought to understand how rejection affects those pursuing such careers and why some individuals may be more resilient than others in a population of individuals with demonstrated ability and interest in research careers. Method Between February 2010 and August 2011, the authors conducted semi-structured, in-depth telephone interviews with 100 former recipients of National Institutes of Health mentored career development awards and 28 of their mentors. Purposive sampling ensured a diverse range of viewpoints. Multiple analysts thematically coded verbatim transcripts using qualitative data analysis software. Results Participants described a variety of experiences with criticism and rejection in their careers, as well as an acute need for persistence and resilience in the face of such challenges. Through their narratives, participants also vividly described a range of emotional and behavioral responses to their experiences of professional rejection. Their responses illuminated the important roles that various factors, including mentoring and gender, play in shaping the ultimate influence of rejection on their own careers and on the careers of those they have mentored. Conclusions Responses to rejection vary considerably, and negative responses can lead promising individuals to abandon careers in academic medicine. Resilience does not, however, appear to be immutable—it can be learned. Given the frequency of experiences with rejection in academic medicine, strategies such as training mentors to foster resilience may be particularly helpful in improving faculty retention in academic medicine. PMID:23425991

  1. George Washington High School. Bilingual Academic and Career Orientation Program, 1981-1982. O.E.E. Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotayo, Armando; And Others

    The Bilingual Academic and Career Orientation Program (BACOP) at George Washington High School in New York City is a basic bilingual secondary education program with a career orientation focus. In 1981-82, the program offered bilingual instructional and supportive services to 250 Hispanic students of limited English proficiency in grades nine…

  2. Fully Integrating Academic Advising with Career Coaching to Increase Student Retention, Graduation Rates and Future Job Satisfaction: An Industry Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tudor, Thomas R.

    2018-01-01

    Higher education institutions in the United States are under increasing pressure to retain and graduate more students. Traditionally, the academic advisor helps students to meet degree graduation requirements and may also do some minor career advising. A new approach is proposed, in which career coaching with industry help becomes just as…

  3. 'AN INCREDIBLY STEEP HILL:' HOW GENDER, RACE, AND CLASS SHAPE PERSPECTIVES ON ACADEMIC CAREERS AMONG BEGINNING BIOMEDICAL PHD STUDENTS.

    PubMed

    Wood, Christine V; Campbell, Patricia B; McGee, Richard

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyzes perspectives on academic careers among 60 beginning PhD students in the biomedical sciences. It presents seven perspectives on academic careers articulated by the students in the sample and explains the way that race/ethnicity, gender, and students' family education backgrounds are tied to those perspectives. The findings show that traditionally underrepresented students find the academic career path less navigable than students from well-represented groups. Among underrepresented students, even those from higher family education backgrounds, experiences related to race/ethnicity and gender often inform perceptions of the academic career even before they start their graduate research training. As the composition of the graduate population changes to include more women and underrepresented racial and ethnic minority men, it is important to note that not all graduate students enter with the same perspectives and views of the academic career and that there are meaningful differences in perspectives across demographic lines. Graduate programs can play a critical role in providing information and support for graduate students as they navigate their career choices, particularly at the earliest stages of training. By becoming sensitive to students' perspectives on career options, and understanding how differences in perspectives arise, mentors and others can align advising strategies with the experiences and views of students.

  4. Mentoring and the Career Satisfaction of Male and Female Academic Medical Faculty

    PubMed Central

    DeCastro, Rochelle; Griffith, Kent A.; Ubel, Peter A.; Stewart, Abigail; Jagsi, Reshma

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To explore aspects of mentoring that might influence medical faculty career satisfaction and to discover whether there are gender differences. Method In 2010–2011, the authors surveyed 1,708 clinician–researchers who received (in 2006–2009) National Institutes of Health K08 and K23 awards, which provided mentoring for career development. The authors compared, by gender, the development and nature of mentoring relationships, mentor characteristics, extent of mentoring in various mentor roles, and satisfaction with mentoring. They evaluated associations between mentoring and career satisfaction using multivariable linear regression analysis. Results The authors received 1,275 responses (75% response rate). Of these respondents, 1,227 (96%) were receiving K award support at the time and constituted the analytic sample. Many respondents had > 1 designated mentor (440/558 women, 79%; 410/668 men, 61%; P < .001). Few were dissatisfied with mentoring (122/1,220, 10.0%; no significant gender difference). Career dissatisfaction was generally low, but 289/553 women (52%) and 268/663 men (40%) were dissatisfied with work–life balance (P < .001). Time spent meeting or communicating with the mentor, mentor behaviors, mentor prestige, extent of mentoring in various roles, and collegiality of the mentoring relationship were significantly associated with career satisfaction. Mentor gender, gender concordance of the mentoring pair, and number of mentors were not significantly associated with satisfaction. Conclusions This study of junior faculty holding mentored career development awards showed strong associations between several aspects of mentoring and career satisfaction, indicating that those concerned about faculty attrition from academic medicine should consider mentor training and development. PMID:24362376

  5. Mentoring and the career satisfaction of male and female academic medical faculty.

    PubMed

    DeCastro, Rochelle; Griffith, Kent A; Ubel, Peter A; Stewart, Abigail; Jagsi, Reshma

    2014-02-01

    To explore aspects of mentoring that might influence medical faculty career satisfaction and to discover whether there are gender differences. In 2010-2011, the authors surveyed 1,708 clinician-researchers who received (in 2006-2009) National Institutes of Health K08 and K23 awards, which provided mentoring for career development. The authors compared, by gender, the development and nature of mentoring relationships, mentor characteristics, extent of mentoring in various mentor roles, and satisfaction with mentoring. They evaluated associations between mentoring and career satisfaction using multivariable linear regression analysis. The authors received 1,275 responses (75% response rate). Of these respondents, 1,227 (96%) were receiving K award support at the time and constituted the analytic sample. Many respondents had > 1 designated mentor (440/558 women, 79%; 410/668 men, 61%; P < .001). Few were dissatisfied with mentoring (122/1,220, 10.0%; no significant gender difference). Career dissatisfaction was generally low, but 289/553 women (52%) and 268/663 men (40%) were dissatisfied with work-life balance (P < .001). Time spent meeting or communicating with the mentor, mentor behaviors, mentor prestige, extent of mentoring in various roles, and collegiality of the mentoring relationship were significantly associated with career satisfaction. Mentor gender, gender concordance of the mentoring pair, and number of mentors were not significantly associated with satisfaction. This study of junior faculty holding mentored career development awards showed strong associations between several aspects of mentoring and career satisfaction, indicating that those concerned about faculty attrition from academic medicine should consider mentor training and development.

  6. Factors that influence career progression among postdoctoral clinical academics: a scoping review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ranieri, Veronica; Barratt, Helen; Fulop, Naomi; Rees, Geraint

    2016-10-21

    The future of academic medicine is uncertain. Concerns regarding the future availability of qualified and willing trainee clinical academics have been raised worldwide. Of significant concern is our failure to retain postdoctoral trainee clinical academics, who are likely to be our next generation of leaders in scientific discovery. To review the literature about factors that may influence postdoctoral career progression in early career clinical academics. This study employed a scoping review method. Three reviewers separately assessed whether the articles found fit the inclusion criteria. PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar (1991-2015). The review encompassed a broad search of English language studies published anytime up to November 2015. All articles were eligible for inclusion, including research papers employing either quantitative or qualitative methods, as well as editorials and other summary articles. Data extracted from included publications were charted according to author(s), sample population, study design, key findings, country of origin and year of publication. Our review identified 6 key influences: intrinsic motivation, work-life balance, inclusiveness, work environment, mentorship and availability of funding. It also detected significant gaps within the literature about these influences. Three key steps are proposed to help support postdoctoral trainee clinical academics. These focus on ensuring that researchers feel encouraged in their workplace, involved in collaborative dialogue with key stakeholders and able to access reliable information regarding their chosen career pathway. Finally, we highlight recommendations for future research. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. Acknowleding attributes that enable the career academic nurse to thrive in the tertiary education sector: A qualitative systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wyllie, Aileen; DiGiacomo, Michelle; Jackson, Debra; Davidson, Patricia; Phillips, Jane

    2016-10-01

    To optimise the career development in early career academic nurses by providing an overview of the attributes necessary for success. Evidence of early prospective career planning is necessary to optimise success in the tertiary sector. This is particularly important for nurse academics given the profession's later entry into academia, the ageing nursing workforce and the continuing global shortage of nurses. A qualitative systematic review. Academic Search Complete, CINAHL, Medline, ERIC, Professional Development Collection and Google Scholar databases were searched; resulting in the inclusion of nine qualitative nurse-only focussed studies published between 2004 and 2014. The studies were critically appraised and the data thematically analysed. Three abilities were identified as important to the early career academic nurse: a willingness to adapt to change, an intention to pursue support and embodying resilience. These abilities give rise to attributes that are recommended as key to successful academic career development for those employed on a continuing academic basis. The capacity to rely on one's own capabilities is becoming seen as increasingly important. It is proposed that recognition of these attributes, their skilful application and monitoring outlined in the review are recommended for a successful career in academia. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Stories from early-career women physicians who have left academic medicine: a qualitative study at a single institution.

    PubMed

    Levine, Rachel B; Lin, Fenny; Kern, David E; Wright, Scott M; Carrese, Joseph

    2011-06-01

    The number of women in academic medicine has steadily increased, although gender parity still does not exist and women leave academics at somewhat higher rates than men. The authors investigated the reasons why women leave careers in academic medicine. Semistructured, one-on-one interviews were conducted in 2007-2008 with 20 women physicians who had left a single academic institution to explore their reasons for opting out of academic careers. Data analysis was iterative, and an editing analysis style was used to derive themes. A lack of role models for combining career and family responsibilities, frustrations with research (funding difficulties, poor mentorship, competition), work-life balance, and the institutional environment (described as noncollaborative and biased in favor of male faculty) emerged as key factors associated with a decision to leave academic medicine for respondents. Faced with these challenges, respondents reevaluated their priorities and concluded that a discrepancy existed between their own and institutional priorities. Many respondents expressed divergent views with the institutional norms on how to measure success and, as a consequence, felt that they were undervalued at work. Participants report a disconnection between their own priorities and those of the dominant culture in academic medicine. Efforts to retain women faculty in academic medicine may include exploring the aspects of an academic career that they value most and providing support and recognition accordingly.

  9. Launching an Academic Career: On the Cutting Edge Resources for Geoscience Graduate Students, Post-doctoral Fellows, and Early Career Faculty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, R. M.; Ormand, C. J.; MacDonald, H.; Dunbar, R. W.; Allen-King, R. M.; Manduca, C. A.

    2010-12-01

    Launching an academic career presents a number of challenges. A recent article in the Chronicle of Higher Education depicts academia as an “ivory sweatshop,” citing rising standards for tenure. Most graduate programs provide minimal training for life beyond graduate school. The professional development program “On the Cutting Edge” fills this gap by providing workshops and web resources on academic careers for graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and early career faculty. These workshops and web resources address a wide range of topics related to teaching, research, and managing one’s career, tailored for each group. The Preparing for an Academic Career in the Geosciences workshop to help graduate students and postdoctoral fellows make the transition into an academic career has been offered annually since 2003. It provides a panel on academic careers in different institutional settings, sessions on research on learning, various teaching strategies, design of effective teaching activities, moving research forward to new settings, effective teaching and research statements, the job search process, negotiation, and presenting oneself to others. Complementary online resources (http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/careerprep/index.html) focus on these topics. The workshops and web resources offer guidance for each step of the job search process, for developing and teaching one’s own courses, and for making the transition from being a research student to being in charge of a research program. Online resources also include case studies of successful dual career couples, documenting their job search strategies. A four-day workshop for Early Career Geoscience Faculty: Teaching, Research, and Managing Your Career, offered annually since 1999, provides sessions on teaching strategies, course design, developing a strategic plan for research, supervising student researchers, navigating departmental and institutional politics, preparing for tenure, time and

  10. Job Stress and Burnout among Academic Career Anaesthesiologists at an Egyptian University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Shams, Tarek; El-Masry, Ragaa

    2013-05-01

    There is compelling evidence that anaesthesiology is a stressful occupation and, when this stressful occupation is associated with an academic career, the burnout level is high. This study aimed to assess the predictors and prevalence of stress and burnout, associated sociodemographic characteristics, and job-related features. A cross-sectional survey study was carried out at Mansoura University Hospital in Egypt among 98 anaesthesiologists who had academic careers. The English version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS) scale and the Workplace Stress Scale of the American Institute of Stress were used to measure job stress and burnout. Data were analysed according to the guidelines for data processing and an analysis of the scales used. The participation rate of this study was 73.1%, where 69.4% were encountering job stress, while 62.2% experienced emotional exhaustion, 56.1% depersonalisation, and 58.2% reduced personal capacity. There was a significant positive correlation between job stress and MBI-HSS subscales. Residents and assistant lecturers were the most affected group. The strongest significant single predictor of all burnout dimensions was a lack of job support. Stress and burnout among academic anaesthesiologists were caused by the lack of job support; this was especially true among residents and assistant lecturers. We can conclude that a well-organised institutional strategy to mitigate the heavy professional demands of academic anaesthesiologists' will relieve their stress and burnout.

  11. Job Stress and Burnout among Academic Career Anaesthesiologists at an Egyptian University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Shams, Tarek; El-Masry, Ragaa

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: There is compelling evidence that anaesthesiology is a stressful occupation and, when this stressful occupation is associated with an academic career, the burnout level is high. This study aimed to assess the predictors and prevalence of stress and burnout, associated sociodemographic characteristics, and job-related features. Methods: A cross-sectional survey study was carried out at Mansoura University Hospital in Egypt among 98 anaesthesiologists who had academic careers. The English version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS) scale and the Workplace Stress Scale of the American Institute of Stress were used to measure job stress and burnout. Data were analysed according to the guidelines for data processing and an analysis of the scales used. Results: The participation rate of this study was 73.1%, where 69.4% were encountering job stress, while 62.2% experienced emotional exhaustion, 56.1% depersonalisation, and 58.2% reduced personal capacity. There was a significant positive correlation between job stress and MBI-HSS subscales. Residents and assistant lecturers were the most affected group. The strongest significant single predictor of all burnout dimensions was a lack of job support. Conclusion: Stress and burnout among academic anaesthesiologists were caused by the lack of job support; this was especially true among residents and assistant lecturers. We can conclude that a well-organised institutional strategy to mitigate the heavy professional demands of academic anaesthesiologists’ will relieve their stress and burnout. PMID:23862036

  12. In-training factors predictive of choosing and sustaining a productive academic career path in neurological surgery.

    PubMed

    Crowley, R Webster; Asthagiri, Ashok R; Starke, Robert M; Zusman, Edie E; Chiocca, E Antonio; Lonser, Russell R

    2012-04-01

    Factors during neurosurgical residency that are predictive of an academic career path and promotion have not been defined. To determine factors associated with selecting and sustaining an academic career in neurosurgery by analyzing in-training factors for all graduates of American College of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited programs between 1985 and 1990. Neurological surgery residency graduates (between 1985 and 1990) from ACGME-approved training programs were analyzed to determine factors associated with choosing an academic career path and having academic success. Information was available for 717 of the 720 (99%) neurological surgery resident training graduates (678 male, 39 female). One hundred thirty-eight graduates (19.3%) held full-time academic positions. One hundred seven (14.9%) were professors and 35 (4.9%) were department chairs/chiefs. An academic career path/success was associated with more total (5.1 vs 1.9; P < .001) and first-author publications (3.0 vs 1.0; P < .001) during residency. Promotion to professor or chair/chief was associated with more publications during residency (P < .001). Total publications and first-author publications were independent predictors of holding a current academic position and becoming professor or chair/chief. Although male trainees published more than female trainees (2.6 vs 0.9 publications; P < .004) during training, no significant sex difference was observed regarding current academic position. Program size (≥ 2 graduates a year; P = .02) was predictive of an academic career but not predictive of becoming professor or chair/chief (P > .05). Defined in-training factors including number of total publications, number of first-author publications, and program size are predictive of residents choosing and succeeding in an academic career path.

  13. Combining clinical practice and academic work in nursing: A qualitative study about perceived importance, facilitators and barriers regarding clinical academic careers for nurses in university hospitals.

    PubMed

    van Oostveen, Catharina J; Goedhart, Nicole S; Francke, Anneke L; Vermeulen, Hester

    2017-12-01

    To obtain in-depth insight into the perceptions of nurse academics and other stakeholders regarding the importance, facilitators and barriers for nurses combining clinical and academic work in university hospitals. Combining clinical practice and academic work facilitates the use of research findings for high-quality patient care. However, nurse academics move away from the bedside because clinical academic careers for nurses have not yet been established in the Netherlands. This qualitative study was conducted in two Dutch university hospitals and their affiliated medical faculties and universities of applied sciences. Data were collected between May 2015 and August 2016. We used purposive sampling for 24 interviews. We asked 14 participants in two focus groups for their perceptions of importance, facilitators and barriers in nurses' combined clinical and academic work in education and research. We audiotaped, transcribed and thematically analysed the interviews and focus groups. Three themes related to perceived importance, facilitators and barriers: culture, leadership and infrastructure. These themes represent deficiencies in facilitating clinical academic careers for nurses. The current nursing culture emphasises direct patient care, which is perceived as an academic misfit. Leadership is lacking at all levels, resulting in the underuse of nurse academics and the absence of supporting structures for nurses who combine clinical and academic work. The present nursing culture appears to be the root cause of the dearth of academic positions and established clinical academic posts. A culture change would require a show of leadership that would promote and enable combined research, teaching and clinical practice and that would introduce clinical academic career pathways for nurses. Meanwhile, nurse academics should collaborate with established medical academics for whom combined roles are mainstream, and they should take advantage of their established infrastructure

  14. Academic performance, career potential, creativity, and job performance: can one construct predict them all?

    PubMed

    Kuncel, Nathan R; Hezlett, Sarah A; Ones, Deniz S

    2004-01-01

    This meta-analysis addresses the question of whether 1 general cognitive ability measure developed for predicting academic performance is valid for predicting performance in both educational and work domains. The validity of the Miller Analogies Test (MAT; W. S. Miller, 1960) for predicting 18 academic and work-related criteria was examined. MAT correlations with other cognitive tests (e.g., Raven's Matrices [J. C. Raven, 1965]; Graduate Record Examinations) also were meta-analyzed. The results indicate that the abilities measured by the MAT are shared with other cognitive ability instruments and that these abilities are generalizably valid predictors of academic and vocational criteria, as well as evaluations of career potential and creativity. These findings contradict the notion that intelligence at work is wholly different from intelligence at school, extending the voluminous literature that supports the broad importance of general cognitive ability (g).

  15. The transforming power of early career acute care surgery research scholarships on academic productivity.

    PubMed

    Zarzaur, Ben L; Valsangkar, Nakul; Feliciano, David F; Koniaris, Leonidas G

    2016-07-01

    More than 75% of respondents to an Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma survey felt that barriers to research had increased and that acute care surgeon (ACS) academic productivity had decreased. Recent data confirm this impression and show lower academic productivity of junior ACS faculty compared with peers in other general surgical fields. The purpose of this study was to determine if early career acute care surgery research scholarships are associated with improved ACS academic productivity. Faculty data at the Top 55 National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded departments of surgery (Top 55) were obtained using SCOPUS, NIH, department, and professional society databases. Academic productivity was measured using total publications, citations, and the Hirsch index. Scholarship recipients from the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma and Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma were identified. A total of 4,101 surgical faculty (8.3% ACS) who belong to the Top 55 NIH-funded departments of surgery and 85 scholarship recipients were identified. After merging, 34 scholarship recipients (40%) were current faculty at a Top 55 NIH-funded department of surgery, and 24 of those (71%) were ACS faculty. Scholarship recipients had higher median total publications compared with nonrecipients at assistant and associate ranks but not at full professor rank. For all ranks, scholarship recipients were more likely to have NIH funding compared with nonrecipients (33% vs. 11%, p < 0.05). On multivariable analysis, only NIH funding was associated with increased total publications, with an average of 89 more publications over a career (p < 0.05). Research scholarships granted by acute care surgery professional organizations remain largely among ACS faculty in Top 55 NIH-funded departments of surgery. Among junior ACS faculty, recipients are associated with increased academic productivity and NIH funding. To fill the academic productivity gap among junior ACSs

  16. Developing Advanced Academic Degree Educational Profiles for Career Fields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    use of the computer to enhance the decision-making capabilities of the logistics manager. This course provides the student with a working knowledge... the overall contracting process, and current ethical and reform issues . The objective of the course is to help students understand the role of ... used to analyze various acquisition

  17. The negative influence of significant others on high academic achieving school pupils' choice of nursing as a career.

    PubMed

    Neilson, Gavin R; McNally, Jim

    2013-03-01

    The International Council of Nurses proposes that the shortage of nurses is global in scale and is expected to become much worse in the years ahead. A major factor impacting on the worldwide nursing shortage is the diminishing number of young people choosing nursing as a career (International Council of Nurses, 2008). One important dimension of the school pupils' career choice process is their interactions with significant others and the influence of these significant others (Hodkinson and Sparkes, 1997). As Schools/Departments of Nursing endeavour to attract more intellectual school leavers it is important to examine what advice and opinions are significant others giving regarding nursing as a career choice and how influential is this advice. This paper is based on interview data from 20 high academic achieving 5th and 6th year school pupils in Scotland, paradigmatic cases from a larger sample, who had considered nursing as a possible career choice within their career preference cluster, but then later disregarded nursing and decided to pursue medicine or another health care profession. The data was particularly striking in revealing the negative influence of significant others on high academic achieving school pupils' choice of nursing as a career. The influence of significant others, these being specifically parents, guardians, guidance teachers and career advisors was very apparent in the data in that they had a very negative view regarding nursing as a career choice for high academic achieving school pupils. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Career development tips for today's nursing academic: bibliometrics, altmetrics and social media.

    PubMed

    Smith, Derek R; Watson, Roger

    2016-11-01

    A discussion of bibliometrics, altmetrics and social media for the contemporary nursing scholar and academic researcher. Today's nursing academic faces myriad challenges in balancing their daily life and, in recent years, academic survival has been increasingly challenged by the various research assessment exercises that evaluate the performance of knowledge institutions. As such, it is essential that today's nursing academic keep up to date with the core competencies needed for survival in a modern research career, particularly the intersecting triad of bibliometrics, altmetrics and social media. Discussion paper. Published literature and relevant websites. The rise of social media and altmetrics has important implications for contemporary nursing scholars who publish their research. Some fundamental questions when choosing a journal might be 'does it have a Twitter and/or Facebook site, or a blog (or all three)'; and 'does it have any other presence on social media, such as LinkedIn, Wikipedia, YouTube, ResearchGate and so on?' Another consequence of embracing social media is that individual academics should also develop their own strategies for promoting and disseminating their work as widely as possible. The rising importance of social media and altmetrics can no longer be ignored, and today's nursing academic now has another facet to consider in their scholarly activities. Despite the changing nature of research dissemination, however, it is still important to recognize the undoubted value of established knowledge dissemination routes (that being the peer-reviewed publication). © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. A new Model for the Preparing for an Academic Career in the Geosciences Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, L. A.; Marin-Spiotta, E.; LeMay, L.; Reed, D. E.; Desai, A. R.; Macdonald, H.

    2016-12-01

    The NAGT/On the Cutting Edge program has offered annual workshops on Preparing for an Academic Career in the Geosciences since 2003, providing professional development for more than 800 graduate students and post-docs. In July 2016, the multi-day workshop was modified to be integrated into a larger conference, the Earth Educators' Rendezvous. This new format brought both challenges and opportunities. Like prior workshops, participants engaged with peers and workshop leaders from a range of educational settings to improve their application and interview skills for academic jobs, become more effective at goal-setting and time management, and broaden their network of colleagues and resources to jump-start teaching and research as a faculty member. They learned about academic careers in different educational settings (two-year colleges, primarily undergraduate institutions, and research-focused universities), and developed plans and goals for their next career stage. The biggest challenge of the new workshop format was paring down material from 2.5 full days. Thus, in addition to the 3 morning sessions allocated for the workshop, leaders added a 3-hour teaching statement review dinner, an optional evening session to discuss finances and work-life balance, and optional small group lunch discussions on all 3 days, which were all well attended. Participants were then able to take advantage of afternoon sessions at the Rendezvous, including demonstrations of exemplary teaching, plenary talks, poster sessions, and mini-workshops on topics from curriculum design to proposal writing. Participant reviews were positive and nearly all aspects were ranked as most valuable, with an overall satisfaction mean of 9.1 on a scale from 1-10, with 10 being "Very satisfied." Participants particularly valued the sessions related to careers and the job search process. Some wished the workshop had been longer to cover more material. Participants enjoyed the opportunity to gain more skills at

  20. Advancing career counseling and employment support for survivors: an intervention evaluation.

    PubMed

    Davidson, M Meghan; Nitzel, Camie; Duke, Alysondra; Baker, Cynthia M; Bovaird, James A

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this research was to conduct a replication-based and extension study examining the effectiveness of a 5-week career group counseling intervention, Advancing Career Counseling and Employment Support for Survivors (ACCESS; Chronister, 2008). The present study was conducted in a markedly different geographic region within a larger community as compared with the original investigation conducted by Chronister and McWhirter (2006). Women survivors of intimate partner violence (N = 73) participated in ACCESS, with career-search self-efficacy, perceived career barriers, perceived career supports, anxiety, and depression assessed at preintervention, postintervention, and 8-week follow-up. Women survivors demonstrated significant improvements in career-search self-efficacy and perceived career barriers at postintervention. Moreover, these same improvements were maintained at the 8-week follow-up assessment with the addition of significant improvements in perceived future financial supports, anxiety, and depression compared with preintervention scores. This work replicates the initial findings regarding the effectiveness of ACCESS with respect to career-search self-efficacy (Chronister & McWhirter, 2006) as well as extends the initial research to include improvements in perceived career barriers and perceived career supports. Moreover, the present study extends the work to include the mental health outcomes of anxiety and depression; results demonstrated improvements in these areas at 8-week follow-up. This investigation begins to fill a critical need for evaluated career-focused interventions for the underserved population of women survivors of intimate partner violence.

  1. "Swim or Sink": State of Induction in the Deployment of Early Career Academics into Teaching at Makerere University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ssempebwa, Jude; Teferra, Damtew; Bakkabulindi, Fred Edward K.

    2016-01-01

    Conducted as part of a multi-country study of the teaching-related experiences and expectations of early career academics (ECAs) in Africa, this study investigated the major influences on the teaching practice of ECAs at Makerere University; the mechanisms by which these academics learn to teach; the teaching-related challenges they experience;…

  2. The importance of academic teaching competence for the career development of university teachers: A comment from higher education pedagogy.

    PubMed

    Merkt, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    This contribution to the discussion focuses on which conditions at universities need to be established so that academic teaching skills become relevant to the career of university teachers. To find an answer, current findings on academic teaching are summarized from the literature.

  3. Effect of a Career, Academic, Personal and Social Growth High School Transition Program Option on 9th-Grade Students' Achievement, Behavior, and Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauchat, Tiffanie A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a career, academic, personal, and social high school transition program option on 9th-grade students' achievement, behavior, and engagement. Students in the career, academic, personal, and social group (n = 30) and the comparison academic/elective course option programs group (n = 30)…

  4. Implementing New Career Structures for Teachers: A Study of the Advanced Skills Teacher in Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingvarson, Lawrence; And Others

    The absence of a professional career structure for teachers is not a new problem. In 1989, Australian unions, employers, and governments negotiated the Advanced Skills Teacher (AST) classification. Three levels of AST status involving salary increases were proposed to offer teachers a professional career path in teaching comparable in status to…

  5. Invisible but Essential: The Role of Professional Networks in Promoting Faculty Agency in Career Advancement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niehaus, Elizabeth; O'Meara, KerryAnn

    2015-01-01

    The benefits of professional networks are largely invisible to the people embedded in them (O'Reilly 1991), yet professional networks may provide key benefits for faculty careers. The purpose of the study reported here was to explore the role of professional networks in faculty agency in career advancement, specifically focusing on the overall…

  6. Advancing Career Counseling and Employment Support for Survivors: An Intervention Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, M. Meghan; Nitzel, Camie; Duke, Alysondra; Baker, Cynthia M.; Bovaird, James A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to conduct a replication-based and extension study examining the effectiveness of a 5-week career group counseling intervention, Advancing Career Counseling and Employment Support for Survivors (ACCESS; Chronister, 2008). The present study was conducted in a markedly different geographic region within a larger…

  7. A Survival Analysis of the Impact of Boundary Crossings on Managerial Career Advancement up to Midcareer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Zheng; Veiga, John F.; Powell, Gary N.

    2011-01-01

    Although managers and professionals still compete in a career tournament for advancement and pay, the career boundaries that they cross in order to compete have changed. Traditionally, such individuals came up through the ranks within the same company by specializing in one functional area and changing, as needed, the geographic location of work…

  8. Career Advancement Experiences of Hispanic Secondary Principals in Suburban School Districts: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Rick

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions and experiences of Hispanic secondary school principals who work in suburban school districts regarding their career advancement. Moreover, the objective of this research was to understand these Hispanic principals' motivational drivers and barriers regarding their career choices,…

  9. Problematising the `Career Academic' in UK construction and engineering education: does the system want what the system gets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilcher, Nick; Forster, Alan; Tennant, Stuart; Murray, Mike; Craig, Nigel

    2017-11-01

    'Career Academics' are principally research-led, entering academia with limited or no industrial or practical experience. UK Higher Education Institutions welcome them for their potential to attain research grant funding and publish world-leading journal papers, ultimately enhancing institutional reputation. This polemical paper problematises the Career Academic around three areas: their institutional appeal; their impact on the student experience, team dynamics and broader academic functions; and current strategic policy to employ them. We also argue that recent UK Government teaching-focused initiatives will not address needs to employ practical academics, or 'Pracademics' in predominantly vocational Construction and Engineering Education. We generate questions for policy-makers, institutions and those implementing strategy. We argue that research is key, but partial rebalancing will achieve a diverse academic skill base to achieve contextualised construction and engineering education. In wider European contexts, the paper resonates with issues of academic 'drift' and provides reflection for others on the UK context.

  10. Nurse Leaders’ Experiences of Implementing Career Advancement Programs for Nurses in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhi, Mohammad Reza; Khoshknab, Masoud Fallahi; Mohammadi, Farahnaz; Oskouie, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: Career advancement programs are currently implemented in many countries. In Iran, the first career advancement program was Nurses’ Career Advancement Pathway. The purpose of this study was to explore nurse leaders’ experiences about implementing the Nurses’ Career Advancement Pathway program in Iran. Methods: This exploratory qualitative study was conducted in 2013. Sixteen nurse managers were recruited from the teaching hospitals affiliated to Shahid Behesthi, Qazvin, and Iran Universities of Medical Sciences in Iran. Participants were recruited using purposive sampling method. Study data were collected through in-depth semi-structured interviews. The conventional content analysis approach was used for data analysis. Results: participants’ experiences about implementing the Nurses’ Career Advancement Pathway fell into three main categories including: a) the shortcomings of performance evaluation, b) greater emphasis on point accumulation, c) the advancement-latitude mismatch. Conclusion: The Nurses’ Career Advancement pathway has several shortcomings regarding both its content and its implementation. Therefore, it is recommended to revise the program. PMID:26156907

  11. Medical school and residency influence on choice of an academic career and academic productivity among neurosurgery faculty in the United States. Clinical article.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Peter G; Awe, Olatilewa O; Maltenfort, Mitchell G; Moshfeghi, Darius M; Leng, Theodore; Moshfeghi, Andrew A; Ratliff, John K

    2011-08-01

    Factors determining choice of an academic career in neurological surgery are unclear. This study seeks to evaluate the graduates of medical schools and US residency programs to determine those programs that produce a high number of graduates remaining within academic programs and the contribution of these graduates to academic neurosurgery as determined by h-index valuation. Biographical information from current faculty members of all accredited neurosurgery training programs in the US with departmental websites was obtained. Any individual who did not have an American Board of Neurological Surgery certificate (or was not board eligible) was excluded. The variables collected included medical school attended, residency program completed, and current academic rank. For each faculty member, Web of Science and Scopus h-indices were also collected. Ninety-seven academic neurosurgery departments with 986 faculty members were analyzed. All data regarding training program and medical school education were compiled and analyzed by center from which each faculty member graduated. The 20 medical schools and neurosurgical residency training programs producing the greatest number of graduates remaining in academic practice, and the respective individuals' h-indices, are reported. Medical school graduates of the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons chose to enter academics the most frequently. The neurosurgery training program at the University of Pittsburgh produced the highest number of academic neurosurgeons in this sample. The use of quantitative measures to evaluate the academic productivity of medical school and residency graduates may provide objective measurements by which the subjective influence of training experiences on choice of an academic career may be inferred. The top 3 residency training programs were responsible for 10% of all academic neurosurgeons. The influence of medical school and residency experiences on choice of an academic career may

  12. [Career structure and advancement in cardiology in Italy. The Group for the Study of the Italian Status of Cardiologists].

    PubMed

    Modena, M G; Molinari, R; Lalla, M

    1999-03-01

    Women are less present on the labor market and many studies have demonstrated the existence of gender differences regarding the participation rate and career advancement of women. The processes through which job-, career- and research-related choices are structured within the realm of Italian cardiology is described in this study, emphasizing the effects of productivity, gender and family commitments. In June of 1996, a questionnaire was mailed to all members of the Italian societies of cardiology. It included mainly (pre-coded) set-choice questions concerning individual characteristics, career-related data and information pertaining to teaching, scientific and research activity. Returned questionnaires numbered 1715 (21.4% of the total mailed), with 83% completed by males and 17% by females. For both hospital and academic careers, advancement in rank was influenced by variables denoting productivity, family and individual characteristics. Promotion to the upper ranks of the hierarchy was highly dependent upon time (once the effects of the covariates were eliminated). This is a situation that is typical of the internal labor market or in other words, of an institution in which staff members are ranked on a hierarchical scale according to formal criteria that are "rigid" and institutionalized, partially or totally sheltered from competition. Therefore, once a member has gained access to the first level of the hierarchy, his/her professional career is pre-determined to a certain extent and seniority ends up taking on importance in promotion decisions to an appreciable extent; in this field, the weight of seniority on promotion ranges between 30 and 50%.

  13. Association of preresidency peer-reviewed publications with radiation oncology resident choice of academic versus private practice career.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Shearwood; Thomas, Charles R; Wilson, Lynn D; Holliday, Emma B; Jaboin, Jerry J

    The decision of radiation oncology residents to pursue academic versus private practice careers plays a central role in shaping the present and future of the field, but factors that are potentially predictive of this decision are lacking. This study was performed to examine the role of several factors publicly available before residency on postresidency career choice, including preresidency peer-reviewed publications (PRPs), which have been associated with resident career choice in comparably competitive subspecialties such as neurosurgery. Using a combination of Internet searches, telephone interviews, and the 2015 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology directory, a list of 2016 radiation oncology resident graduates was compiled, along with their postresidency career choice. PRP was defined as the number of PubMed publications encompassing the end of the calendar year (2010) in which residency applications were due; this number was then correlated with career choice. A total of 163 residents from 76 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-certified programs were examined: 78% were male, 22% were MDs/PhDs, and 79 graduates (48%) chose academic careers. Fifty-two percent of graduates had at least 1 PRP at the time of application to radiation oncology residency; 35% had more than 1 PRP. Regarding career choice, the difference between 0 and 1+ PRP was statistically significant (odds ratio, 3.3; P < .01), but not between 1 and >1 PRP. Sex, PhD, or non-PhD dual degree status were not associated with career choice. Radiation oncology residency graduates with 1 or more PRPs at the time of residency application were roughly 2 times more likely to choose an academic career as their initial career choice than graduates with no preresidency PRPs. This information may prove useful to medical students, medical school advisors, and residency program directors and deserves further prospective investigation. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Radiation

  14. Medical school faculty discontent: prevalence and predictors of intent to leave academic careers

    PubMed Central

    Lowenstein, Steven R; Fernandez, Genaro; Crane, Lori A

    2007-01-01

    Background Medical school faculty are less enthusiastic about their academic careers than ever before. In this study, we measured the prevalence and determinants of intent to leave academic medicine. Methods A 75-question survey was administered to faculty at a School of Medicine. Questions addressed quality of life, faculty responsibilities, support for teaching, clinical work and scholarship, mentoring and participation in governance. Results Of 1,408 eligible faculty members, 532 (38%) participated. Among respondents, 224 (40%; CI95: 0.35, 0.44) reported that their careers were not progressing satisfactorily; 236 (42%; CI95: 0.38, 0.46) were "seriously considering leaving academic medicine in the next five years." Members of clinical departments (OR = 1.71; CI95: 1.01, 2.91) were more likely to consider leaving; members of inter-disciplinary centers were less likely (OR = 0.68; CI95: 0.47, 0.98). The predictors of "serious intent to leave" included: Difficulties balancing work and family (OR = 3.52; CI95: 2.34, 5.30); inability to comment on performance of institutional leaders (OR = 3.08; CI95: 2.07, 4.72); absence of faculty development programs (OR = 3.03; CI95: 2.00, 4.60); lack of recognition of clinical work (OR = 2.73; CI95: 1.60, 4.68) and teaching (OR = 2.47; CI95: 1.59, 3.83) in promotion evaluations; absence of "academic community" (OR = 2.67; CI95: 1.86, 3.83); and failure of chairs to evaluate academic progress regularly (OR = 2.60; CI95: 1.80, 3.74). Conclusion Faculty are a medical school's key resource, but 42 percent are seriously considering leaving. Medical schools should refocus faculty retention efforts on professional development programs, regular performance feedback, balancing career and family, tangible recognition of teaching and clinical service and meaningful faculty participation in institutional governance. PMID:17935631

  15. Retaining Faculty in Academic Medicine: The Impact of Career Development Programs for Women

    PubMed Central

    Morahan, Page S.; Magrane, Diane; Helitzer, Deborah; Lee, Hwa Young; Newbill, Sharon; Peng, Ho-Lan; Guindani, Michele; Cardinali, Gina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: For more than two decades, national career development programs (CDPs) have addressed underrepresentation of women faculty in academic medicine through career and leadership curricula. We evaluated CDP participation impact on retention. Methods: We used Association of American Medical Colleges data to compare 3268 women attending CDPs from 1988 to 2008 with 17,834 women and 40,319 men nonparticipant faculty similar to CDP participants in degree, academic rank, first year of appointment in rank, and home institution. Measuring from first year in rank to departure from last position held or December 2009 (study end date), we used Kaplan–Meier curves; Cox survival analysis adjusted for age, degree, tenure, and department; and 10-year rates to compare retention. Results: CDP participants were significantly less likely to leave academic medicine than their peers for up to 8 years after appointment as Assistant and Associate Professors. Full Professor participants were significantly less likely to leave than non-CDP women. Men left less often than non-CDP women at every rank. Participants attending more than one CDP left less often than those attending one, but results varied by rank. Patterns of switching institutions after 10 years varied by rank; CDP participants switched significantly less often than men at Assistant and Associate Professor levels and significantly less often than non-CDP women among Assistant Professors. Full Professors switched at equal rates. Conclusion: National CDPs appear to offer retention advantage to women faculty, with implications for faculty performance and capacity building within academic medicine. Intervals of retention advantage for CDP participants suggest vulnerable periods for intervention. PMID:27058451

  16. Commentary: Missing the elephant in my office: recommendations for part-time careers in academic medicine.

    PubMed

    Helitzer, Deborah

    2009-10-01

    Several recent articles in this journal, including the article by Linzer and colleagues in this issue, discuss and promote the concept of part-time careers in academic medicine as a solution to the need to achieve a work-life balance and to address the changing demographics of academic medicine. The article by Linzer and colleagues presents the consensus of a task force that attempted to address practical considerations for part-time work in academic internal medicine. Missing from these discussions, however, are a consensus on the definition of part-time work, consideration of how such strategies would be available to single parents, how time or resources will be allocated to part-time faculty to participate in professional associations, develop professional networks, and maintain currency in their field, and how part-time work can allow for the development of expertise in research and scholarly activity. Most important, the discussions about the part-time solution do not address the root cause of dissatisfaction and attrition: the ever-increasing and unsustainable workload of full-time faculty. The realization that an academic full-time career requires a commitment of 80 hours per week begs the question of whether part-time faculty would agree to work 40 hours a week for part-time pay. The historical underpinnings of the current situation, the implications of part-time solutions for the academy, and the consequences of choosing part-time work as the primary solution are discussed. Alternative strategies for addressing some of the problems facing full-time faculty are proposed.

  17. LGBT Trainee and Health Professional Perspectives on Academic Careers--Facilitators and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Nelson F; Rankin, Susan; Callahan, Edward; Ng, Henry; Holaday, Louisa; McIntosh, Kadian; Poll-Hunter, Norma; Sánchez, John Paul

    2015-12-01

    Diversity efforts in the academic medicine workforce have often neglected the identification and inclusion of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) health professionals. Many of these professionals have served as educators, researchers, administrators, and leaders at their academic institutions, but their perspectives on the barriers to and facilitators of pursuing academic careers, as well as the perspectives of trainees, have not been explored. We applied a purposeful convenience sampling strategy to collect quantitative and qualitative data among LGBT health care professionals (HCP) and trainees. The authors identified trends in data using bivariate analyses and consensual qualitative research methods. We analyzed data from 252 surveys completed by HCPs and trainees and a subset of 41 individuals participated in 8 focus groups. Among survey participants, 100% identified as lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) or queer; 4.5% identified along the trans-spectrum; 31.2% identified as a racial or ethnic minority; 34.1% identified as faculty; and 27.4% as trainees. Eighty-one percent of trainees were interested in academia and 47% of HCPs held faculty appointments. Overall, 79.4% were involved in LGBT-related educational, research, service, or clinical activities. Facilitators of academic careers included engagement in scholarly activities, mentorship, LGBT-specific networking opportunities, personal desire to be visible, campus opportunities for involvement in LGBT activities, and campus climate inclusive of LGBT people. Barriers included poor recognition of LGBT scholarship, a paucity of concordant mentors or LGBT networking opportunities, and hostile or non-inclusive institutional climates. LGBT trainees and HCPs contribute significantly to services, programs, and scholarship focused on LGBT communities. LGBT individuals report a desire for a workplace environment that encourages and supports diversity across sexual orientation and gender identities

  18. Retaining Faculty in Academic Medicine: The Impact of Career Development Programs for Women.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shine; Morahan, Page S; Magrane, Diane; Helitzer, Deborah; Lee, Hwa Young; Newbill, Sharon; Peng, Ho-Lan; Guindani, Michele; Cardinali, Gina

    2016-07-01

    For more than two decades, national career development programs (CDPs) have addressed underrepresentation of women faculty in academic medicine through career and leadership curricula. We evaluated CDP participation impact on retention. We used Association of American Medical Colleges data to compare 3268 women attending CDPs from 1988 to 2008 with 17,834 women and 40,319 men nonparticipant faculty similar to CDP participants in degree, academic rank, first year of appointment in rank, and home institution. Measuring from first year in rank to departure from last position held or December 2009 (study end date), we used Kaplan-Meier curves; Cox survival analysis adjusted for age, degree, tenure, and department; and 10-year rates to compare retention. CDP participants were significantly less likely to leave academic medicine than their peers for up to 8 years after appointment as Assistant and Associate Professors. Full Professor participants were significantly less likely to leave than non-CDP women. Men left less often than non-CDP women at every rank. Participants attending more than one CDP left less often than those attending one, but results varied by rank. Patterns of switching institutions after 10 years varied by rank; CDP participants switched significantly less often than men at Assistant and Associate Professor levels and significantly less often than non-CDP women among Assistant Professors. Full Professors switched at equal rates. National CDPs appear to offer retention advantage to women faculty, with implications for faculty performance and capacity building within academic medicine. Intervals of retention advantage for CDP participants suggest vulnerable periods for intervention.

  19. Women in academic medicine: perceived obstacles to advancement.

    PubMed

    Bennett, N M; Nickerson, K G

    1992-01-01

    To investigate perceived obstacles to the advancement of women in academic medicine, we sent a questionnaire assessing perceptions of the fairness and supportiveness of the academic environment to the 229 female teaching and research faculty of the School of Physicians & Surgeons at Columbia University. The overall response rate was 85%. Forty-six percent believed that they had not had the same professional opportunities as their male colleagues, 52% believed that salaries were not equivalent for men and women in similar positions, and 50% believed that promotions were awarded in a biased manner. Thirty percent reported that sexist behavior was common and that sexual harassment occurred in the workplace. Eighty-one percent experienced conflicts between their professional and personal lives and most believed that the institution failed to adequately address the needs of women with children. This survey indicates that there are significant perceived obstacles to the advancement of women in academic medicine that must be addressed.

  20. Goal Orientations in an EFL Advanced Academic Writing Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dehghan, Farzaneh; Razmjoo, Seyyed Ayatollah

    2015-01-01

    Academic writing at advanced levels is the most important way of demonstrating one's expertise in a discipline. Developing this kind of competence is especially a challenging effort for students in foreign language contexts. Many factors may be involved in determining why some students are more and some are less motivated in writing successful,…

  1. Should Dental Schools Invest in Training Predoctoral Students for Academic Careers? Two Viewpoints: Viewpoint 1: Dental Schools Should Add Academic Careers Training to Their Predoctoral Curricula to Enhance Faculty Recruitment and Viewpoint 2: Addition of Academic Careers Training for All Predoctoral Students Would Be Inefficient and Ineffective.

    PubMed

    Fung, Brent; Fatahzadeh, Mahnaz; Kirkwood, Keith L; Hicks, Jeffery; Timmons, Sherry R

    2018-04-01

    This Point/Counterpoint considers whether providing dental students with academic career training and teaching experiences during their predoctoral education would be valuable to recruit dental academicians. While training the next generation of dentists continues to be the primary focus for dental schools, the cultivation and recruitment of dental faculty members from the pool of dental students remain challenges. Viewpoint 1 supports the position that providing dental students with exposure to academic career opportunities has positive value in recruiting new dental faculty. The advantages of academic careers training as a required educational experience in dental schools and as a potential means to recruit dental students into the ranks of faculty are described in this viewpoint. In contrast, Viewpoint 2 contends that such career exposure has limited value and argues that, across the board, allocation of resources to support preparation for academic careers would have a poor cost-benefit return on investment. Adding a requirement for educational experiences for all students would overburden institutions, students, and faculty according to this viewpoint. The authors agree that research is needed to determine how and where to make predoctoral curricular changes that will have maximum impact on academic recruitment.

  2. Academic achievement and career choice in science: Perceptions of African American urban high school students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Sheila Kay

    2007-12-01

    Low test scores in science and fewer career choices in science among African American high school students than their White counterparts has resulted in lower interest during high school and an underrepresentation of African Americans in science and engineering fields. Reasons for this underachievement are not known. This qualitative study used a grounded theory methodology to examine what influence parental involvement, ethnic identity, and early mentoring had on the academic achievement in science and career choice in science of African American urban high school 10th grade students. Using semi-structured open-ended questions in individual interviews and focus groups, twenty participants responded to questions about African American urban high school student achievement in science and their career choice in science. The median age of participants was 15 years; 85% had passed either high school biology or physical science. The findings of the study revealed influences and interactions of selected factors on African American urban high school achievement in science. Sensing potential emerged as the overarching theme with six subthemes; A Taste of Knowledge, Sounds I Hear, Aromatic Barriers, What Others See, The Touch of Others, and The Sixth Sense. These themes correlate to the natural senses of the human body. A disconnect between what science is, their own individual learning and success, and what their participation in science could mean for them and the future of the larger society. Insight into appropriate intervention strategies to improve African American urban high school achievement in science was gained.

  3. Can motivations for studying dentistry inform us about gender and BME differences in dental academic careers?

    PubMed

    Waylen, A; Barnes, O; Kenyon, P; Neville, P

    2017-01-13

    There are various motivators that prompt people to study dentistry but there is evidence that the salience of each varies according to gender and black and minority ethnic (BME) group. Given the current focus on inequality within the science, technology, engineering, medicine and mathematics (STEMM) academic disciplines where dentistry sits, it is important to understand the relevance of different motivators to different social groups if inequality is to be overcome. We carried out a survey of dental students from 11 out of the 18 dental schools in the UK to find out what prompted them to study dentistry. Our findings showed that most people make a personal choice to study dentistry and follow a patient-focused career while the prospect of an academic career was important for less than half of our sample. Differences according to gender and BME group were apparent but did not follow these trends. In order to continue to improve the diversity within dental academia dental schools should consider the different preferences of the workforce and work to broaden its potential.

  4. Dual Career Couples in Academia, International Mobility and Dual Career Services in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tzanakou, Charikleia

    2017-01-01

    The number of dual career couples in academia is growing due to the increasing proportion of women with a doctoral degree and the greater propensity of women to choose another academic as their partner. At the same time, international mobility is required for career advancement in academia, creating challenges for dual career couples where both…

  5. Reaching their potential: Perceived impact of a collaborative academic-clinical partnership programme for early career nurses in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    McKillop, Ann; Doughty, Lesley; Atherfold, Cheryl; Shaw, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic nature of healthcare ensures that early career nurses enter an uncertain and complex world of practice and consequently require support to develop their practice, build confidence and reach their potential. The New Zealand Nurse Entry to Practice programme for registered nurses in their first year of practice has been operating since 2005 to enable safe and confident practice, improve the quality of care, and positively impact on recruitment and retention. This academic and clinical programme was offered as a partnership between a university and a clinical provider with postgraduate academic credits gained. The aim of this study was to explore the perceived impact of postgraduate university education for early career nurses in one regional health area of New Zealand. Participants were registered nurses who had completed the early career nurse programme and their clinical preceptors. The research was conducted via an online survey of 248 nurses and three focus groups to explore how the programme was experienced and its impact on knowledge and practice. Early career nurses and their preceptors found that the programme enables improved knowledge and skills of patient assessment, application of critical thinking to clinical practice, perceived improvement in patient care delivery and outcomes, enhanced interprofessional communication and knowledge sharing, and had a positive impact on professional awareness and career planning. This clinical-academic partnership positively impacted on the clinical practice and transition experience of early career nurses and was closely aligned to an organization's strategic plan for nursing workforce development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Mid-Career Faculty Development in Academic Medicine: How Does It Impact Faculty and Institutional Vitality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campion, MaryAnn W.; Bhasin, Robina M.; Beaudette, Donald J.; Shann, Mary H.; Benjamin, Emelia J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Faculty vitality is integral to the advancement of higher education. Strengthening vitality is particularly important for midcareer faculty, who represent the largest and most dissatisfied segment. The demands of academic medicine appear to be another factor that may put faculty at risk of attrition. To address these issues, we initiated…

  7. The Medical Academic Advancement Program at the University of Virginia School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Fang, W L; Woode, M K; Carey, R M; Apprey, M; Schuyler, J M; Atkins-Brady, T L

    1999-04-01

    Since 1984 the University of Virginia School of Medicine has conducted the Medical Academic Advancement Program for minority and disadvantaged students interested in careers in medicine. The program is a six-week residential program for approximately 130 undergraduate and post-baccalaureate students per year. It emphasizes academic course work--biology, chemistry, physics, and essay writing--to prepare the participants for the Medical College Admission Test. Non-graded activities, such as a clinical medicine lecture series, clinical experiences, and a special lecture series, and special workshops are also offered. The participants take two simulated MCAT exams. Between 1984 and 1998, 1,497 students have participated in the program, with complete follow-up information available for 690 (46%). Of the 1,487 participants, 80 (5%) have graduated from the University of Virginia School of Medicine and 174 (12%) from other medical schools; 44 (3%) are attending the medical school now, and 237 (16%) are at other medical schools; 44 (3%) have graduated from other health professions schools, and 54 (3%) are attending such schools. The retention rate for participants at the University of Virginia School of Medicine is 91% (that is, all but seven of the 80 who matriculated have been retained past the first year). The Medical Academic Advancement Program has been successful in increasing the number of underrepresented minority students matriculating into and continuing in medical education. Such programs warrant continued support and encouragement.

  8. Developing a Model of Advanced Training to Promote Career Advancement for Certified Genetic Counselors: An Investigation of Expanded Skills, Advanced Training Paths, and Professional Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Baty, Bonnie J; Trepanier, Angela; Bennett, Robin L; Davis, Claire; Erby, Lori; Hippman, Catriona; Lerner, Barbara; Matthews, Anne; Myers, Melanie F; Robbins, Carol B; Singletary, Claire N

    2016-08-01

    There are currently multiple paths through which genetic counselors can acquire advanced knowledge and skills. However, outside of continuing education opportunities, there are few formal training programs designed specifically for the advanced training of genetic counselors. In the genetic counseling profession, there is currently considerable debate about the paths that should be available to attain advanced skills, as well as the skills that might be needed for practice in the future. The Association of Genetic Counseling Program Directors (AGCPD) convened a national committee, the Committee on Advanced Training for Certified Genetic Counselors (CATCGC), to investigate varied paths to post-master's training and career development. The committee began its work by developing three related grids that view career advancement from the viewpoints of the skills needed to advance (skills), ways to obtain these skills (paths), and existing genetic counselor positions that offer career change or advancement (positions). Here we describe previous work related to genetic counselor career advancement, the charge of the CATCGC, our preliminary work in developing a model through which to view genetic counselor advanced training and career advancement opportunities, and our next steps in further developing and disseminating the model.

  9. Supporting Geoscience Students at Two-Year Colleges: Career Preparation and Academic Success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDaris, J. R.; Kirk, K. B.; Layou, K.; Macdonald, H.; Baer, E. M.; Blodgett, R. H.; Hodder, J.

    2013-12-01

    Two-year colleges play an important role in developing a competent and creative geoscience workforce, teaching science to pre-service K-12 teachers, producing earth-science literate citizens, and providing a foundation for broadening participation in the geosciences. The Supporting and Advancing Geoscience Education in Two-Year Colleges (SAGE 2YC) project has developed web resources for geoscience faculty on the preparation and support of students in two-year colleges (2YCs). Online resources developed from two topical workshops and several national, regional, and local workshops around the country focus on two main categories: Career Preparation and Workforce Development, and Supporting Student Success in Geoscience at Two-year Colleges. The Career Preparation and Workforce Development resources were developed to help faculty make the case that careers in the geosciences provide a range of possibilities for students and to support preparation for the geoscience workforce and for transfer to four-year programs as geoscience majors. Many two-year college students are unaware of geoscience career opportunities and these materials help illuminate possible futures for them. Resources include an overview of what geoscientists do; profiles of possible careers along with the preparation necessary to qualify for them; geoscience employer perspectives about jobs and the knowledge, skills, abilities and attitudes they are looking for in their employees; employment trends in sectors of the economy that employ geoscience professionals; examples of geotechnician workforce programs (e.g. Advanced Technological Education Centers, environmental technology programs, marine technician programs); and career resources available from professional societies. The website also provides information to support student recruitment into the geosciences and facilitate student transfer to geoscience programs at four- year colleges and universities, including sections on advising support before

  10. Social Networks and Career Advancement of People with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulkarni, Mukta

    2012-01-01

    Although organizational social networks are known to influence career mobility, the specific direction of this influence is different for diverse employee groups. Diversity in organizational network research has been operationalized on various dimensions such as race and ethnicity, age, religion, education, occupation, and gender. Missing in this…

  11. Black Women and Career Advancement: Preparing for the New Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Leslie

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the status of black women, and examines what they need to do to strengthen their positions in the workplace. In the face of existing career obstacles, both individual initiatives such as securing training and finding mentors, and public policy initiatives are needed. (SLD)

  12. Career Guidance for Academically Gifted Female Students: A Coordination of Resources to Develop Human Potential. Final Report, October 1, 1978, to September 30, 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Frances

    A project designed and demonstrated a career guidance model for academically gifted female students to overcome problems associated with non-traditional career choices and sex-role stereotyping. Academically gifted females were identified in grades 6 and 10-12. Parent involvement was actively solicited to facilitate non-traditional career…

  13. Trends in Determinants of Entry into the Academic Career: The Case of South Korea, 1980-2010

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Keuntae; Kim, Jong-Kil

    2015-01-01

    Substantial research documents the determinants of entry into the academic career, yet little is known about how these determinants have evolved over time. Using data from a large sample of Korean scholars who received their doctoral degrees between 1980 and 2010, we estimate discrete-time event history models of transitioning to an academic position in any academic field. Results indicate that universalistic characteristics, such as publication record, strongly affect subsequent career success, but so do particularistic factors, including doctoral institution prestige. Since the 1980s, the influence of doctoral degree prestige increased substantially more than the influence of one’s publication record on higher education employment, implying that the rising importance of particularistic factors has outpaced growing consideration of universalistic characteristics in Korean academia. However, the importance of gender on academic employment has declined since the early 2000s, suggesting that the implementation of employment quotas for female professors may have stymied gender discrimination. PMID:26509268

  14. Trends in Determinants of Entry into the Academic Career: The Case of South Korea, 1980-2010.

    PubMed

    Kim, Keuntae; Kim, Jong-Kil

    2015-01-01

    Substantial research documents the determinants of entry into the academic career, yet little is known about how these determinants have evolved over time. Using data from a large sample of Korean scholars who received their doctoral degrees between 1980 and 2010, we estimate discrete-time event history models of transitioning to an academic position in any academic field. Results indicate that universalistic characteristics, such as publication record, strongly affect subsequent career success, but so do particularistic factors, including doctoral institution prestige. Since the 1980s, the influence of doctoral degree prestige increased substantially more than the influence of one's publication record on higher education employment, implying that the rising importance of particularistic factors has outpaced growing consideration of universalistic characteristics in Korean academia. However, the importance of gender on academic employment has declined since the early 2000s, suggesting that the implementation of employment quotas for female professors may have stymied gender discrimination.

  15. Professional excellence and career advancement in nursing: a conceptual framework for clinical leadership development.

    PubMed

    Adeniran, Rita Kudirat; Bhattacharya, Anand; Adeniran, Anthony A

    2012-01-01

    Increasingly, stakeholders in the health care community are recognizing nursing as key to solving the nation's health care issues. This acknowledgment provides a unique opportunity for nursing to demonstrate leadership by developing clinical nurse leaders to collaborate with the multidisciplinary care team in driving evidence-based, safe quality, cost-effective health care services. One approach for nursing success is standardizing the entry-level education for nurses and developing a uniform professional development and career advancement trajectory with appropriate incentives to encourage participation. A framework to guide and provide scientific evidence of how frontline nurses can be engaged will be paramount. The model for professional excellence and career advancement provides a framework that offers a clear path for researchers to examine variables influencing nurses' professional development and career advancement in a systematic manner. Professional Excellence and Career Advancement in Nursing underscores professional preparedness of a registered nurse as central to leadership development. It also describes the elements that influence nurses' participation in professional development and career advancement under 4 main categories emphasizing mentorship and self-efficacy as essential variables.

  16. A survey of U.S. dental school programs that help students consider academic careers.

    PubMed

    McAndrew, Maureen; Brunson, W David; Kamboj, Karanjit

    2011-11-01

    The faculty shortage in dental education has been reported for many years and is expected to increase. Some dental schools have developed "grow your own" programs that introduce students to academic careers and give them teaching experiences. These programs generally consist of teaching assistant, fellowship, and peer tutoring opportunities. In this study, a nineteen-item survey was sent to fifty-six U.S. dental schools to determine the extent to which such programs were being implemented. Thirty-six out of fifty-six dental schools responded, a response rate of 64 percent. Twenty-five schools or 69 percent of the respondents reported the existence of a formal teaching assistant, fellowship, or peer tutoring program in which students teach in some capacity. The main reasons reported for implementing these programs were to expose students to academia and to address faculty shortages. The respondents reported that positive outcomes for dental student teachers and their students were academic benefits and increased interest in academic life. Among the barriers reported were securing faculty and financial support and problems with scheduling.

  17. Facilitating career advancement for women in the Geosciences through the Earth Science Women's Network (ESWN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastings, M. G.; Kontak, R.; Holloway, T.; Kogan, M.; Laursen, S. L.; Marin-Spiotta, E.; Steiner, A. L.; Wiedinmyer, C.

    2011-12-01

    The Earth Science Women's Network (ESWN) is a network of women geoscientists, many of who are in the early stages of their careers. The mission of ESWN is to promote career development, build community, provide informal mentoring and support, and facilitate professional collaborations, all towards making women successful in their scientific careers. ESWN currently connects over 1000 women across the globe, and includes graduate students, postdoctoral associates, faculty from a diversity of colleges and universities, program managers, and government, non-government and industry researchers. ESWN facilitates communication between its members via an email listserv and in-person networking events, and also provides resources to the broader community through the public Earth Science Jobs Listserv that hosts over 1800 subscribers. With funding from a NSF ADVANCE PAID grant, our primary goals include growing our membership to serve a wider section of the geosciences community, designing and administering career development workshops, promoting professional networking at major scientific conferences, and developing web resources to build connections, collaborations, and peer mentoring for and among women in the Earth Sciences. Recognizing that women in particular face a number of direct and indirect biases while navigating their careers, we aim to provide a range of opportunities for professional development that emphasize different skills at different stages of career. For example, ESWN-hosted mini-workshops at national scientific conferences have targeted skill building for early career researchers (e.g., postdocs, tenure-track faculty), with a recent focus on raising extramural research funding and best practices for publishing in the geosciences literature. More concentrated, multi-day professional development workshops are offered annually with varying themes such as Defining Your Research Identity and Building Leadership Skills for Success in Scientific Organizations

  18. How Women in Biomedical PhD Programs Manage Gender Consciousness as They Persist Toward Academic Research Careers.

    PubMed

    Remich, Robin; Jones, Remi; Wood, Christine V; Campbell, Patricia B; McGee, Richard

    2016-08-01

    Women remain underrepresented as biomedical faculty and are more likely than white and Asian men to lose interest in faculty careers in graduate school. However, some women maintain interest in academic research careers during PhD training and are the most likely candidates for faculty positions. This study explored how these women described and interpreted gender issues at early stages in their training. Annual interviews from 2009 to 2014 with 22 female PhD students aspiring to research faculty careers were analyzed using an iterative, content analysis approach rooted in the interview data. Focusing on career intentions and experiences with gender, race, and ethnicity, authors arrived at 11 themes which describe a range of gendered experiences and strategies. Of the 22 women, 19 (86%) acknowl edged systemic gender inequities in science and/or reported instances of bias, while 15 of them also said they had not yet experienced unequal treatment. All 22 described using at least one "gender-explicit strategy," where they based decisions on gender or in response to perceived biases. "Gender-agnostic strategies" emerged for 12 (55%) who doubted that gender will affect their career. Findings show that women biomedical PhD students continue to face conditions that can lead to unequal treatment; gender biases continue to persist. Students displayed a range of perceptions and strategies in response to these conditions at this early training stage. Following these students over time will determine whether these or other strategies are required and sufficient to enable persistence toward academic careers.

  19. Career advancement and educational opportunities: experiences and perceptions of internationally educated nurses.

    PubMed

    Salma, Jordana; Hegadoren, Kathleen M; Ogilvie, Linda

    2012-01-01

    The number of internationally educated nurses is increasing in the Canadian workforce. Recruitment of internationally educated nurses is often seen as a solution to ongoing nursing shortages. However, international recruitment needs to be accompanied by strategies to ensure long-term retention. One of the criteria for successful retention is the availability and accessibility of career advancement and educational opportunities. Little research exists on the opportunities for career advancement and education for internationally educated nurses in Canada. This interpretive descriptive study was conducted to look at the perceptions of internationally educated nurses regarding career advancement and educational opportunities in Alberta, Canada. Eleven internationally educated nurses, working as registered nurses in Alberta, were interviewed using semi-structured interviews. Five themes were identified: motherhood as a priority, communication and cultural challenges, process of skill recognition, perceptions of opportunity and need for mentorship.

  20. Goals and potential career advancement of licensed practical nurses in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Mari; Inoue, Katsuya; Kamibeppu, Kiyoko

    2008-10-01

    To investigate the effects of personal and professional variables on career advancement intentions of working Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs). In Japan, two levels of professional nursing licensures, the LPN and the registered nurse (RN), are likely to be integrated in the future. Therefore, it is important to know the career advancement intentions of LPNs. Questionnaires were sent to a sample of 356 LPNs. Analysis of variance (anova) and discriminative analysis were used. We found that those who had a positive image of LPNs along with a positive image of RNs were identified as showing interest in career advancement. The results of anova showed that age had a negative effect; however, discriminative analysis suggested that age is not as significant compared with other variables. Our results indicate that the 'image of RNs', and 'role-acceptance factors' have an effect on career advancement intentions of LPNs. Our results suggest that Nursing Managers should create a supportive working environment where the LPN would feel encouraged to carry out the nursing role, thereby creating a positive image of nursing in general which would lead to career motivation and pursuing RN status.

  1. Teaching Experience and Expectations of Early-Career Academics in Mozambique: The Case of Universidade Eduardo Mondlane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cossa, Eugénia Flora Rosa; Buque, Domingos Carlos; Fringe, Jorge Jaime dos Santos

    2016-01-01

    This mixed-methods study explored how early-career academics (ECA) at the Universidade Eduardo Mondlane (UEM) acquire pedagogical knowledge, develop their teaching experience as well as examine their expectations regarding the teaching profession. A questionnaire, composed mostly of closed questions and one open-ended question, was applied to 71…

  2. Work-Life Interferences in the Early Stages of Academic Careers: The Case of Precarious Researchers in Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozzon, Rossella; Murgia, Annalisa; Poggio, Barbara; Rapetti, Elisa

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses the topic of work-life interferences in academic contexts. More specifically, it focuses on early career researchers in the Italian university system. The total availability required from those who work in the research sector is leading to significant transformations of the temporalities of work, especially among the new…

  3. Separate and Unequal at Hillsborough High: A Principal's Challenges in Integrating "Academic" and Career and Technical Education Coursework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malin, Joel R.; Hackmann, Donald G.

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Edward White, Hillsborough High School principal, has decided to allocate faculty in-service time to address an unproductive chasm between academic and career and technical education programming within the school, which has created tensions among the faculty. On returning to his office after the professional development session, which was…

  4. "Letters to an Early Career Academic": Learning from the Advice of the Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy Professoriate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enright, Eimear; Rynne, Steven B.; Alfrey, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Taking our lead from Rilke's "Letters to a Young Poet," this project represents our attempt to stimulate dialogue between 30 physical education and sport pedagogy (PESP) early career academics (ECAs) and 11 PESP professors. First, the ECAs were invited to write a narrative around their experiences as PESP ECAs. Second, a narrative…

  5. Navigating Careers: Perceptions of Sciences Doctoral Students, Post-PhD Researchers and Pre-Tenure Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlpine, Lynn; Emmioglu, Esma

    2015-01-01

    While the doctorate was once perceived as preparation for an academic position, internationally more than half of all graduates leave the higher education sector by choice or lack of opportunity. We know little of how they perceive and navigate the transition from PhD to other career. This longitudinal study of 23 sciences doctoral students,…

  6. Higher Education Perspectives: The Role Magic the Gathering Plays in Whole-Person, Academic, and Career Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Bob Ellsworth

    2016-01-01

    Games contribute to the whole-person, academic, and career development of college-aged individuals (Alderman, 2015). However, many higher-education institutions do not sponsor gaming as a collegiate extracurricular activity, thereby possibly eliminating the opportunity of an all-inclusive environment (Alderman, 2015). To elucidate the problem,…

  7. Tinkering through Transition: On "Doctoring" as an Early-Career Academic in Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Benjamin; Christensen, Erin; Occhino, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    This article addresses the notion of "making it" as an early-career academic in physical education and sport pedagogy. In it, we draw on the tradition of material semiotics to reflect on our shared journeys from doctoral student to beginning scholar and beyond. By attuning ourselves to the relationality, materiality and precariousness of…

  8. Project A.B.C. (Bronx Academic Bilingual Career Program). O.E.E. Evaluation Report, 1981-1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collazo-Levy, Dora; And Others

    Project A.B.C. (Academic Bilingual Career Program) is a multisite project serving new immigrant students at three different high schools in the Bronx, New York: Vietnamese (Chinese ethnics) at Theodore Roosevelt, Italians at Christopher Columbus, and Cubans and Dominicans at John F. Kennedy high schools. Project students are incorporated into the…

  9. Problematising the "Career Academic" in UK Construction and Engineering Education: Does the System Want What the System Gets?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilcher, Nick; Forster, Alan; Tennant, Stuart; Murray, Mike; Craig, Nigel

    2017-01-01

    "Career Academics" are principally research-led, entering academia with limited or no industrial or practical experience. UK Higher Education Institutions welcome them for their potential to attain research grant funding and publish world-leading journal papers, ultimately enhancing institutional reputation. This polemical paper…

  10. Family Background, Students' Academic Self-Efficacy, and Students' Career and Life Success Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Mihyeon

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the relationship of family background on students' academic self-efficacy and the impact of students' self-efficacy on their career and life success expectations. The study used the national dataset of the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS: 2002), funded by the U.S. Department of Education. Based on a path…

  11. Do Babies Matter? The Effect of Family Formation on the Lifelong Careers of Academic Men and Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Mary Ann; Goulden, Marc

    2002-01-01

    Examines family formation and its effects on the career lives of both women and men academics from the time they receive their doctorates until 20 years later. Finds that there is a consistent and large gap in achieving tenure between women who have early babies and men who have early babies. Discusses policy implications. (EV)

  12. The Bilingual Academic Services and Integrated Career Systems Program, BASICS 1988-1989. OREA Evaluation Section Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berney, Tomi D.; Barrera, Marbella

    In its second year, the Bilingual Academic Services and Integrated Career Systems (BASICS) Program served 104 limited-English-proficient students at Bayside High School in Queens (New York City). Project goals were to develop English literacy skills, produce an organizing framework of thinking and language skills across the curriculum, generate a…

  13. Bilingual Education and Academic/Career Outreach for Newcomers: Project BEACON, 1988-89. Evaluation Section Report. OREA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berney, Tomi D.; Gritzer, Glenn

    The Bilingual Education Academic/Career Outreach for Newcomers Program (Project BEACON) completed its fourth year. The goals of Project BEACON are to facilitate acquisition of English proficiency, develop native language literacy skills, and provide instruction in bilingual and English content area/vocational classes. The project served 753…

  14. The training, careers, and work of Ph.D. physical scientists: Not simply academic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Steven J.; Pedersen-Gallegos, Liane; Riegle-Crumb, Catherine

    2002-11-01

    We present an in-depth portrait of the training, careers, and work of recent Ph.D. physical scientists. Use of specialized training varies widely, with about half often using knowledge of their Ph.D. specialty area in their jobs. The use of specialized training does not, however, correlate with job satisfaction. In this and other important measures, there are relatively few differences between "academics" and "nonacademics." Important job skills for all employment sectors include writing, oral presentation, management, data analysis, designing projects, critical thinking, and working in an interdisciplinary context. Rankings given by respondents of graduate training in some of these skill areas were significantly lower than the importance of these skills in the workplace. We also found that the rated quality of graduate training varies relatively little by department or advisor. Finally, although nonacademic aspirations among graduate students are fairly common, these do not appear to be well supported while in graduate school.

  15. The Least Interesting Unit: A New Concept for Enhancing One's Academic Career Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Cabbolet, Marcoen J T F

    2016-12-01

    Motivated by a current development in the physics community, this paper introduces the notion of a least interesting unit (LIU) in research as an investigation that is just interesting enough to pursue. A new general maxim for science is then that a researcher should pursue as many LIUs as possible. Although fulfilling this maxim enhances one's perspective for a career in the present publish-or-perish academic world, in particular when simultaneously publishing one's results in the form of as many least publishable units as possible, this paper concludes that it is an example of an unethical practice: it may undermine scientific progress, it may lead to a waste of valuable resources, and it may contribute to an erosion of norms and values in science.

  16. "Flipped classroom" for academic and career advising: an innovative technique for medical student advising.

    PubMed

    Amini, Richard; Laughlin, Brady S; Smith, Kathy W; Siwik, Violet P; Adamas-Rappaport, William J; Fantry, George T

    2018-01-01

    Career advising for medical students can be challenging for both the student and the adviser. Our objective was to design, implement, and evaluate a "flipped classroom" style advising session. We performed a single-center cross-sectional study at an academic medical center, where a novel flipped classroom style student advising model was implemented and evaluated. In this model, students were provided a document to review and fill out prior to their one-on-one advising session. Ninety-four percent (95% CI, 88%-100%) of the medical students surveyed felt that the advising session was more effective as a result of the outline provided and completed before the session and that the pre-advising document helped them gain a better understanding of the content to be discussed at the session. Utilization of the flipped classroom style advising document was an engaging advising technique that was well received by students at our institution.

  17. Perceptions of Challenges and Barriers to Career Advancement by Women Administrators in the University of North Carolina System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blue, Katina Michelle

    2014-01-01

    While women have made significant inroads and gains in the twentieth century, there remain challenges and barriers in regard to their satisfaction with career advancement opportunities. This mixed-method research study investigated perceptions of challenges and barriers to career advancement by women administrators at Group 2 institutions in the…

  18. Career Maturity of Students in Accelerated versus Traditional Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borges, Nicole J.; Richard, George V.; Duffy, Ryan D.

    2007-01-01

    The authors assessed the career maturity of students in accelerated versus traditional academic programs. Students in traditional programs were hypothesized to be more advanced regarding their career decision making and development when compared with students in accelerated programs. The Medical Career Development Inventory (see M. L. Savickas,…

  19. Achieving Gender Equity in Physician Compensation and Career Advancement: A Position Paper of the American College of Physicians.

    PubMed

    Butkus, Renee; Serchen, Joshua; Moyer, Darilyn V; Bornstein, Sue S; Hingle, Susan Thompson

    2018-05-15

    Women comprise more than one third of the active physician workforce, an estimated 46% of all physicians-in-training, and more than half of all medical students in the United States. Although progress has been made toward gender diversity in the physician workforce, disparities in compensation exist and inequities have contributed to a disproportionately low number of female physicians achieving academic advancement and serving in leadership positions. Women in medicine face other challenges, including a lack of mentors, discrimination, gender bias, cultural environment of the workplace, imposter syndrome, and the need for better work-life integration. In this position paper, the American College of Physicians summarizes the unique challenges female physicians face over the course of their careers and provides recommendations to improve gender equity and ensure that the full potential of female physicians is realized.

  20. Striving for Gender Equity in Academic Medicine Careers: A Call to Action.

    PubMed

    Bates, Carol; Gordon, Lynn; Travis, Elizabeth; Chatterjee, Archana; Chaudron, Linda; Fivush, Barbara; Gulati, Martha; Jagsi, Reshma; Sharma, Poonam; Gillis, Marin; Ganetzky, Rebecca; Grover, Amelia; Lautenberger, Diana; Moses, Ashleigh

    2016-08-01

    Women represent approximately half of students entering medical schools and more than half of those entering PhD programs. When advancing through the academic and professional fields, however, women continually face barriers that men do not. In this Commentary, the authors offer ideas for coordinating the efforts of organizations, academic institutions, and leaders throughout the scientific and medical professions to reduce barriers that result in inequities and, instead, strive for gender parity. Specific areas of focus outlined by the authors include facilitating women's access to formal and informal professional networks, acknowledging and addressing the gender pay gap as well as the lack of research funding awarded to women in the field, and updating workplace policies that have not evolved to accommodate women's lifestyles. As academic institutions seek access to top talent and the means to develop those individuals capable of generating the change medicine and science needs, the authors urge leaders and change agents within academic medicine to address the systemic barriers to gender equity that impede us from achieving the mission to improve the health of all.

  1. Striving for Gender Equity in Academic Medicine Careers: A Call to Action

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Carol; Gordon, Lynn; Travis, Elizabeth; Chatterjee, Archana; Chaudron, Linda; Fivush, Barbara; Gulati, Martha; Jagsi, Reshma; Sharma, Poonam; Gillis, Marin; Ganetzky, Rebecca; Grover, Amelia; Lautenberger, Diana; Moses, Ashleigh

    2018-01-01

    Women represent approximately half of students entering medical schools and more than half of those entering PhD programs. When advancing through the academic and professional fields, however, women continually face barriers that men do not. In this Commentary, the authors offer ideas for coordinating the efforts of organizations, academic institutions, and leaders throughout the scientific and medical professions to reduce barriers that result in inequities and, instead, strive for gender parity. Specific areas of focus outlined by the authors include facilitating women’s access to formal and informal professional networks, acknowledging and addressing the gender pay gap as well as the lack of research funding awarded to women in the field, and updating workplace policies that have not evolved to accommodate women’s lifestyles. As academic institutions seek access to top talent and the means to develop those individuals capable of generating the change medicine and science needs, the authors urge leaders and change agents within academic medicine to address the systemic barriers to gender equity that impede us from achieving the mission to improve the health of all. PMID:27332868

  2. Career Advancement for Low-Income Workers through Community College and Community-Based Organization Partnerships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Brandon

    An increasing number of community colleges (CCs) and community-based organizations (CBOs) are now working in partnership to develop education and training programs enabling low-income workers to gain the education and skills necessary to obtain higher-wage jobs and develop a foundation for lifelong learning and career advancement. The following…

  3. Coming Soon: CADRE (Career Advancement and Development Resources and Education) website for all APS members

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Council of the American Phytopathological Society (APS) approved an initiative in February 2013 to create a web resource called CADRE (Career Advancement and Development Resources and Education). CADRE is to provide APS members an archive of articles, videos, and webinars about a variety of prof...

  4. The Importance of Mentoring Programs to Women's Career Advancement in Biotechnology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Daun Robin

    2005-01-01

    Mentoring programs provide benefits to mentors, proteges, and organizations, but not all organizations have such programs in place. In those that do, women's exclusion from informal networks limits their visibility and, in turn, their chances of acquiring a mentor. This poses a barrier to women's career advancement, as does the absence of female…

  5. Women Being Coached to Advance Their Careers to Positions of Power and Influence: A Narrative Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theune, Doris P.

    2010-01-01

    This study presents the discipline of executive coaching as a form of contemporary adult education informed by transformative learning theory appropriate for the education, support, and empowerment of adult women seeking to identify, understand, and break through the obstacles and barriers to career advancement to achieve positions of power and…

  6. The Impact of Utilizing a Flexible Work Schedule on the Perceived Career Advancement Potential of Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogier, Sara A.; Padgett, Margaret Y.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined whether a woman working a flexible schedule would be perceived as having less career advancement potential than a woman on a regular schedule. Participants reviewed a packet of materials simulating the personnel file of a female employee in an accounting firm who was seeking promotion from manager to senior manager. Results…

  7. The Supervision and Career Advancement of Women in Community College Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donohue-Mendoza, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the specific issue of supervision as an important administrative gate keeping function that facilitates or impedes women's career advancement, and promotes gender equity at the executive leadership level in community colleges. The very nature of supervision mirrors the historical purpose of higher education, employee learning…

  8. Advancing Your Career at LLNL: Meet NIF’s Radiation Control Technicians

    SciTech Connect

    Zarco, Judy; Gutierrez, Myrna; Beale, Richard

    2017-04-26

    Myrna Gutierrez and Judy Zarco took advantage of LLNL's legacy of encouraging continuing education to get the necessary degrees and training to advance their careers at the Lab. As Radiation Control Technicians, they help maintain safety at the National Ignition Facility.

  9. Academic career intentions in the life sciences: Can research self-efficacy beliefs explain low numbers of aspiring physician and female scientists?

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nurith; Fischer, Martin R.

    2017-01-01

    A lack of physician scientists as well as a high female dropout rate from academic medicine and basic life sciences is a concern in many countries. The current study analyzes academic career intentions within a sample of recent doctoral graduates from medicine and basic life sciences (N = 1109), focusing on research self-efficacy beliefs as explanatory variable of gender and disciplinary differences. To ensure that differences in research self-efficacy could not be attributed solely to objective scientific performance, we controlled for number of publications and dissertation grade. The results of multivariate analyses pointed to a strong and significant association between research self-efficacy and academic career intentions (ß = 0.49, p<0.001). The lower academic career intentions of medical doctoral graduates were no longer significant when controlling for research self-efficacy. Within the field of medicine, female doctoral graduates expressed lower research self-efficacy beliefs and academic career intentions. When controlling for research self-efficacy, the correlation between gender and academic career intention was no longer significant. In contrast, no gender differences were found within the basic life sciences with respect to neither academic career intentions nor research self-efficacy. PMID:28910334

  10. Academic career intentions in the life sciences: Can research self-efficacy beliefs explain low numbers of aspiring physician and female scientists?

    PubMed

    Epstein, Nurith; Fischer, Martin R

    2017-01-01

    A lack of physician scientists as well as a high female dropout rate from academic medicine and basic life sciences is a concern in many countries. The current study analyzes academic career intentions within a sample of recent doctoral graduates from medicine and basic life sciences (N = 1109), focusing on research self-efficacy beliefs as explanatory variable of gender and disciplinary differences. To ensure that differences in research self-efficacy could not be attributed solely to objective scientific performance, we controlled for number of publications and dissertation grade. The results of multivariate analyses pointed to a strong and significant association between research self-efficacy and academic career intentions (ß = 0.49, p<0.001). The lower academic career intentions of medical doctoral graduates were no longer significant when controlling for research self-efficacy. Within the field of medicine, female doctoral graduates expressed lower research self-efficacy beliefs and academic career intentions. When controlling for research self-efficacy, the correlation between gender and academic career intention was no longer significant. In contrast, no gender differences were found within the basic life sciences with respect to neither academic career intentions nor research self-efficacy.

  11. Introducing a primer for career development and promotion: succeeding as a psychologist in an academic health center.

    PubMed

    Christophersen, Edward; Butt, Zeeshan

    2012-12-01

    Noting a lack of such a resource, the authors developed a primer summarizing key concepts for career development and promotion for psychologists working in an academic health center. The present article presents a brief summary of the primer; however, the full version is available as an APAHC membership benefit (or for a small fee for non-members) by visiting http://www.div12.org/section8/index.html and is a supplement to the December issue of Volume 19 of the Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings (Supplementary material 1). The primer complements other APAHC membership benefits, which may be helpful for early career or more seasoned psychologists planning for career transitions.

  12. How Women in Biomedical PhD Programs Manage Gender Consciousness as They Persist toward Academic Research Careers

    PubMed Central

    Remich, Robin; Jones, Remi; Wood, Christine V.; Campbell, Patricia B.; McGee, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Women remain underrepresented as biomedical faculty and are more likely than White and Asian men to lose interest in faculty careers in graduate school. However, some women maintain interest in academic research careers during PhD training and are the most likely candidates for faculty positions. This study explored how these women described and interpreted gender issues at early stages in their training. Method Annual interviews from 2009–14 with 22 female PhD students aspiring to research faculty careers were analyzed using an iterative, content analysis approach rooted in the interview data. Focusing on career intentions and experiences with gender, race, and ethnicity, authors arrived at 11 themes which describe a range of gendered experiences and strategies. Results Of the 22 women, 19 (86%) acknowledged systemic gender inequities in science and/or reported instances of bias while 15 of them also said they had not yet experienced unequal treatment. All 22 described using at least one “gender explicit strategy,” where they based decisions on gender or in response to perceived biases. “Gender agnostic strategies” emerged for 12 (55%) who doubted that gender will affect their career. Conclusions Findings show that women biomedical PhD students continue to face conditions that can lead to unequal treatment; gender biases continue to persist. Students displayed a range of perceptions and strategies in response to these conditions at this early training stage. Following these students over time will determine if these or other strategies are required and sufficient to enable persistence toward academic careers. PMID:27254008

  13. “Flipped classroom” for academic and career advising: an innovative technique for medical student advising

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Richard; Laughlin, Brady S; Smith, Kathy W; Siwik, Violet P; Adamas-Rappaport, William J; Fantry, George T

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Career advising for medical students can be challenging for both the student and the adviser. Our objective was to design, implement, and evaluate a “flipped classroom” style advising session. Methods We performed a single-center cross-sectional study at an academic medical center, where a novel flipped classroom style student advising model was implemented and evaluated. In this model, students were provided a document to review and fill out prior to their one-on-one advising session. Results Ninety-four percent (95% CI, 88%–100%) of the medical students surveyed felt that the advising session was more effective as a result of the outline provided and completed before the session and that the pre-advising document helped them gain a better understanding of the content to be discussed at the session. Conclusion Utilization of the flipped classroom style advising document was an engaging advising technique that was well received by students at our institution. PMID:29785150

  14. Academic performance and career choices of older medical students at the University of Otago.

    PubMed

    Shelker, William; Belton, Alison; Glue, Paul

    2011-11-25

    To compare the academic performance and postgraduate career choices of a cohort of medical students who are older and more life experienced at time of medical school entry ("Other Category" students) with students admitted through standard entry admission pathways. Examination performance, graduation rates, postgraduate specialisation and geographical location were compared between Other Category students and students entering via Standard Entry admission (including competitive first year entry and competitive graduate entry immediately after completing a Bachelor's degree). Compared with Standard Entry students, Other Category students had equivalent examination pass rates, significantly higher rates of distinction passes in examinations in Year 2 (OR 1.86; 95% CI 1.05, 3.29; p=0.03) and Year 5 (OR 2.36; 95% CI 1.27, 4.37; p=0.005), and equivalent graduation rates. Retention of Other Category graduates in New Zealand was 14% higher than Standard Entry students over 10 years post-graduation (p<0.0001), and a higher proportion had specialised in General Practice (p=0.04). Compared with Standard Entry students, Other Category medical students had higher rates of distinction grades in examination results, higher rates of retention in NZ post-graduation, and a higher proportion taking up general practice as a specialty. These findings may be relevant in planning for recruitment and training of the future medical workforce in New Zealand.

  15. Impact of Professional Student Mentored Research Fellowship on Medical Education and Academic Medicine Career Path.

    PubMed

    Areephanthu, Christopher James; Bole, Raevti; Stratton, Terry; Kelly, Thomas H; Starnes, Catherine P; Sawaya, B Peter

    2015-10-01

    This study explores the long-term impact of the Professional Student Mentored Research Fellowship (PSMRF) program at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine (UKCOM) on medical students' research productivity and career paths. Demographic characteristics, academic profiles, number of publications and residency placements from 2007 to 2012 were used to assess 119 PSMRF graduates against a comparison cohort of 898 UKCOM (non-PSMRF) students. PSMRF students had higher MCAT scores at admission (31.5 ± 0.6 vs. 30.6 ± 0.2, p = 0.007) and achieved higher USMLE Step 1 scores (228 ± 4.2 vs. 223 ± 1.5, p = 0.03) than comparison group. PSMRF students were more likely to publish PubMed-indexed papers (36.7% vs. 17.9%, p < 0.0001), achieve AOA status (19.3% vs. 8.5%, p = 0.0002) and match to top 25 US News and World Report residency programs (23.4% vs. 12.1%, p = 0.008). A greater proportion of PSMRF fellows matched to top tier competitive specialties (23% vs. 14.2%, p = 0.07), however this difference was not statistically significant. The PSMRF program shows a significant increase in enrollment, as well as positive associations with indicators of success in medical school and subsequent quality of residency program. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Influence of an Academic Intervention Program on Minority Student Career Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Jennifer K.; Villarejo, Merna

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative, retrospective study explored how educational experiences provided as part of an undergraduate intervention program helped to shape career decisions for minority biology students. A key goal for the program is to increase minority entry into science research and teaching careers, yet actual career choice has not been studied.…

  17. ‘AN INCREDIBLY STEEP HILL:’ HOW GENDER, RACE, AND CLASS SHAPE PERSPECTIVES ON ACADEMIC CAREERS AMONG BEGINNING BIOMEDICAL PHD STUDENTS

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Christine V.; Campbell, Patricia B.; McGee, Richard

    2017-01-01

    This paper analyzes perspectives on academic careers among 60 beginning PhD students in the biomedical sciences. It presents seven perspectives on academic careers articulated by the students in the sample and explains the way that race/ethnicity, gender, and students’ family education backgrounds are tied to those perspectives. The findings show that traditionally underrepresented students find the academic career path less navigable than students from well-represented groups. Among underrepresented students, even those from higher family education backgrounds, experiences related to race/ethnicity and gender often inform perceptions of the academic career even before they start their graduate research training. As the composition of the graduate population changes to include more women and underrepresented racial and ethnic minority men, it is important to note that not all graduate students enter with the same perspectives and views of the academic career and that there are meaningful differences in perspectives across demographic lines. Graduate programs can play a critical role in providing information and support for graduate students as they navigate their career choices, particularly at the earliest stages of training. By becoming sensitive to students’ perspectives on career options, and understanding how differences in perspectives arise, mentors and others can align advising strategies with the experiences and views of students. PMID:28239250

  18. Sex differences in academic advancement. Results of a national study of pediatricians.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, S H; Sullivan, L M; Dukes, K A; Phillips, C F; Kelch, R P; Schaller, J G

    1996-10-24

    Although the numbers of women in training and in entry-level academic positions in medicine have increased substantially in recent years, the proportion of women in senior faculty positions has not changed. We conducted a study to determine the contributions of background and training, academic productivity, distribution of work time, institutional support, career attitudes, and family responsibilities to sex differences in academic rank and salary among faculty members of academic pediatric departments. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of all salaried physicians in 126 academic departments of pediatrics in the United States in January 1992. Of the 6441 questionnaires distributed, 4285 (67 percent) were returned. The sample was representative of U.S. pediatric faculty members. Multivariate models were used to relate academic rank and salary to 16 independent variables. Significantly fewer women than men achieved the rank of associate professor or higher. For both men and women, higher salaries and ranks were related to greater academic productivity (more publications and grants), more hours worked, more institutional support of research, greater overall career satisfaction, and fewer career problems. Less time spent in teaching and patient care was related to greater academic productivity for both sexes. Women in the low ranks were less academically productive and spent significantly more time in teaching and patient care than men in those ranks. Adjustment for all independent variables eliminated sex differences in academic rank but not in salary. Lower rates of academic productivity, more time spent in teaching and patient care and less time spent in research, less institutional support for research, and lower rates of specialization in highly paid subspecialties contributed to the lower ranks and salaries of female faculty members.

  19. Identifying Core Competencies to Advance Female Professors' Careers: An Exploratory Study in United States Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seo, Ga-eun; Hedayati Mehdiabadi, Amir; Huang, Wenhao

    2017-01-01

    This exploratory study aims to identify the core competencies necessary to successfully advance the careers of female associate professors in higher education. To ascertain these core career competencies, a critical incident interview technique was employed. One-to-one semi-structured interviews with six female full professors at a major research…

  20. Examining the Satisfaction of Educational Leaders and Their Intent to Pursue Career Advancement in Public School Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, Tracey L.; Rosser, Vicki J.

    2007-01-01

    This statewide study examined selected demographic characteristics, worklife experiences, and personal issues that influence the satisfaction of administrators (assistant principals, principals, assistant superintendents) and their intent to leave their positions and careers or pursue career advancement in public school administration. The results…

  1. Career prospects and professional landscape after advanced endoscopy fellowship training: a survey assessing graduates from 2009 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Granato, Christine M; Kaul, Vivek; Kothari, Truptesh; Damania, Dushyant; Kothari, Shivangi

    2016-08-01

    The advanced endoscopy (AE) fellowship is a popular career track for graduating gastroenterology fellows. The number of fellows completing AE fellowships and the number of programs offering this training have increased in the past 5 years. Despite this, we suspect that the number of AE attending (staff physician) positions have decreased (relative to the number of fellows graduating), raising concerns regarding AE job market saturation. Our aim was to survey practicing gastroenterology physicians who completed an AE fellowship within the past 5 years regarding their current professional status. A 16-question survey was distributed using Research Electronic Data Capture by e-mail to practicing gastroenterologists who completed an AE fellowship between 2009 and 2013. The survey questions elicited information regarding demographics, professional status, and additional information. A total of 96 invitations were distributed via e-mail. Forty-one of 96 respondents (43%) replied to the survey. Approximately half of the respondents were employed in an academic practice, with the remainder in private practice (56% and 44%, respectively). Nearly half (46%) of the respondents found it "difficult" to find an AE position after training. Thirty-nine percent of private-practice endoscopists were performing > 200 ERCPs/year, whereas 65% were doing so in academic settings (P = .09). Fifty-six percent of respondents were in small practices (0 to 1 partner), with a significantly smaller group size in private versus academic practice (72% versus 43%, P = .021). Seventy-eight percent of respondents believed the AE job market was saturated; most responded that the AE job market was saturated in both academic and private practice (44%), whereas 34% believed the job market was saturated in academics only. Most respondents (73%) who were training AE fellows found it difficult to place them in AE attending positions. Respondents from academic practice found it significantly more

  2. The impact of gendered organizational systems on women’s career advancement

    PubMed Central

    O’Neil, Deborah A.; Hopkins, Margaret M.

    2015-01-01

    In this Perspective article we propose that in order to pave the way for women’s career advancement into the senior ranks of organizations, attention must be directed at the systemic norms and structures that drive the gendered nature of the workplace. A focus on individual level issues, i.e., women lacking confidence and women opting out, detracts from the work that must be done at the organizational level in order to dismantle the system of pervasive, structural disadvantage facing women seeking to advance to senior leadership positions. PMID:26175708

  3. Intellectual Estuaries: Connecting Learning and Creativity in Programs of Advanced Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beghetto, Ronald A.; Kaufman, James C.

    2009-01-01

    Academic learning and creativity should be overlapping goals that can be simultaneously pursued in programs of advanced academics. However, efforts aimed at nurturing creativity and academic learning sometimes are represented as two related but separate paths; this separation is unnecessary and can undermine the development of creative and…

  4. A Phenomenological Study of the Preparation and Career Paths of Academic Deans in Church of God Institutions of Theological Education in Latin America and the Caribbean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Contreras Flores, Jenniffer

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the preparation and career paths of academic deans in Church of God (COG) theological institutions located in Latin American and Caribbean. This study used a qualitative research approach and the in-depth interview method for data collection. A group of 14 academic deans that serve in COG theological schools and that…

  5. Examination of the Relationship Amongst Parenting Dimensions, Academic Achievement, Career Decision Making, and Commitment Anxiety among African American High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett-Garraway, Jocelyn M.

    2011-01-01

    Do parents play a significant role in the academic achievement and career decision making process of African American children? Studies have confirmed the importance of the role of parents and have even identified preferred parenting styles as having the best academic achievement (Dornbusch, Ritter, Leiderman, Roberts, & Fraleigh, 1987;…

  6. Gender, Academic Careers and the Sabbatical: A New Zealand Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, D.; Spronken-Smith, R.; Stringer, R.; Wilson, C. A.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines academics' access to and perceptions of sabbaticals at a research-intensive university in New Zealand. Statistical and inductive analysis of survey data from 915 academics (47% of all academics employed) revealed inequalities in access to and experience of sabbaticals, and highlighted academic, personal and gender issues. Men…

  7. Determinants of career structure and advancement among Italian cardiologists. An example of segregation and discrimination against women? SCIC Group. Studio Condizione Italiana Cardiologi.

    PubMed

    Modena, M G; Lalla, M; Molinari, R

    1999-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the processes through which job, career and research-related choices are determined in Italian cardiology, focusing on characteristics such as productivity, gender and family. In June 1996, a questionnaire surveying individual and career-related data was mailed to all members (8000) of the Italian societies of cardiology. Returned questionnaires numbered 1715 (21.4% of the total mailed), 83% were completed by men and 17% by women. For both hospital and academic careers, advancement in rank was influenced by variables denoting productivity, family and individual characteristics. However, men and women showed slightly different patterns. Promotion to the upper ranks of the hierarchy was highly dependent upon time (once the effects of the covariates were eliminated). This situation is typical of the internal labour market, that is, in institutions in which staff members are ranked on a hierarchical scale according to formal criteria that are 'rigid' and institutionalized, partially sheltered from competition. Therefore, once a member has gained access to the bottom of the hierarchy, the professional career is 'pre-determined' and seniority has an appreciable influence on promotion decisions; in this context, women appear to be at a disadvantage. Copyright 1999 The European Society of Cardiology.

  8. Gender Differences in the Careers of Academic Scientists and Engineers: A Literature Review. Special Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentley, Jerome T.; Adamson, Rebecca

    The literature on women in science and engineering is extensive and addresses such issues as early education, decision to study and pursue careers in science, and how women fair in their jobs. This review used the literature on the careers of women scientists and engineers employed in academia to examine how women in these disciplines fare…

  9. WE-G-204-01: Building a Career in Academic Medical Physics: The Hardest and Best Job You Will Ever Have!

    SciTech Connect

    Hazle, J.

    While many indicators for academic medical physics are distressing – jobs are tight, demands on clinical time are high (and getting worse) and national funding has been flat for several years (meaning less money in reality) the present is perhaps one of the most exciting times in cancer research history, and medical physicists have an opportunity to make a difference. Many of us predict the impact of medical physics on cancer research over the next decade to be more significant than ever. Why is that? First, medical imaging is used for every cancer patient in developed countries. Every improvement inmore » the acquisition, processing or analysis of radiological images has the potential to impact patients. The use of radiation therapy is at an all-time high – and virtually cannot be performed without medical physics. Many of the advances in both biomedical imaging and radiation oncology are the result of the hard work of academic medical physicists who are thinking of the next generation of technologies that will be used against cancer or an even broader spectrum of diseases. A career in academic medical physics is demanding, particularly for those with clinical responsibilities. As the demands for justification of their clinical effort become increasingly metricized, the ability to do “unfunded research” will become even more difficult. This means that many will have to generate external salary support to justify their efforts in research and development. This comes at a time when funding for research is compressed and harder to obtain. Generally speaking, if you are not contributing 50% or more of your effort to research, you are competing at a disadvantage and it is very unlikely you will get an NIH/NCI/NIBIB grant. Furthermore, in the ongoing effort to improve patient care and safety, we have developed credentialing pathways that now require at least two-years of residency training. This full-time clinical training creates a gap in the research

  10. CAEP 2014 Academic Symposium: "How to make research succeed in your emergency department: How to develop and train career researchers in emergency medicine".

    PubMed

    Perry, Jeffrey J; Snider, Carolyn E; Artz, Jennifer D; Stiell, Ian G; Shaeri, Sedigheh; McLeod, Shelley; Le Sage, Natalie; Hohl, Corinne; Calder, Lisa A; Vaillancourt, Christian; Holroyd, Brian; Hollander, Judd E; Morrison, Laurie J

    2015-05-01

    We sought to 1) identify best practices for training and mentoring clinician researchers, 2) characterize facilitators and barriers for Canadian emergency medicine researchers, and 3) develop pragmatic recommendations to improve and standardize emergency medicine postgraduate research training programs to build research capacity. We performed a systematic review of MEDLINE and Embase using search terms relevant to emergency medicine research fellowship/graduate training. We conducted an email survey of all Canadian emergency physician researchers. The Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) research fellowship program was analysed, and other similar international programs were sought. An expert panel reviewed these data and presented recommendations at the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians (CAEP) 2014 Academic Symposium. We refined our recommendations based on feedback received. Of 1,246 potentially relevant citations, we included 10 articles. We identified five key themes: 1) creating training opportunities; 2) ensuring adequate protected time; 3) salary support; 4) infrastructure; and 5) mentorship. Our survey achieved a 72% (67/93) response rate. From these responses, 42 (63%) consider themselves clinical researchers (i.e., spend a significant proportion of their career conducting research). The single largest constraint to conducting research was funding. Factors felt to be positive contributors to a clinical research career included salary support, research training (including an advanced graduate degree), mentorship, and infrastructure. The SAEM research fellowship was the only emergency medicine research fellowship program identified. This 2-year program requires approval of both the teaching centre and each applying fellow. This program requires training in 15 core competencies, manuscript preparation, and submission of a large grant to a national peer-review funding organization. We recommend that the CAEP Academic Section create a

  11. Teacher Career Advancement Initiatives: Lessons Learned from Eight Case Studies. Phase II of Creating Sustainable Teacher Career Pathways: A 21st Century Imperative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natale, Catherine Fisk; Gaddis, Lynn; Bassett, Katherine; McKnight, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe what the authors learned from studying eight teacher career advancement initiatives implemented across a variety of contexts, including urban, suburban, and rural districts; high poverty and affluent districts; and in schools/districts both with and without strong union presence. They describe key…

  12. Relationship Between Citation-Based Scholarly Activity of United States Radiation Oncology Residents and Subsequent Choice of Academic Versus Private-Practice Career.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Shearwood; Mitin, Timur; Wilson, Lynn D; Thomas, Charles R; Jaboin, Jerry J

    2018-05-01

    To assess h-index data and their association with radiation oncology resident choice of academic versus private-practice career, using a recent resident graduating class. A list of 2016 radiation oncology resident graduates (163 residents from 76 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-certified programs) and their postresidency career choice (academic vs private practice) was compiled. The Scopus bibliometric citation database was then searched to collect h-index data for each resident. Demographics included in analyses were gender and PhD degree status. Mean h-index score for all resident graduates was 4.15. Residents with a PhD had significantly higher h-index scores (6.75 vs 3.42; P < .01), whereas there was no statistically significant difference in h-index scores between male and female residents (4.38 vs 3.36; P = .06). With regard to career choice, residents choosing academic careers had higher h-index scores than those choosing private practice (5.41 vs 2.96; P < .01). There was no significant difference in mean h-index scores between male and female residents regardless of private-practice (3.15 vs 2.19; P = .25) or academic (5.80 vs 4.30; P = .13) career choice. The average radiation oncology resident graduate published a minimum of 4 manuscripts cited at least 4 times. Graduates with a PhD are significantly more likely to have higher h-index scores, as are residents who choose academic over private-practice careers. There is no significant difference in h-index score between male and female residents, regardless of career choice. These results offer up-to-date benchmarks for evaluating radiation oncology resident productivity and have potential utility in predicting postresidency career choices. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Insights on STEM Careers

    SciTech Connect

    Wendelberger, Joanne Roth

    2014-11-05

    This presentation will provide career advice for individuals seeking to go beyond just having a job to building a successful career in the areas of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. Careful planning can be used to turn a job into a springboard for professional advancement and personal satisfaction. Topics to be addressed include setting priorities, understanding career ladders, making tough choices, overcoming stereotypes and assumptions by others, networking, developing a professional identify, and balancing a career with family and other personal responsibilities. Insights on the transition from individual technical work to leadership will also be provided. The author will drawmore » upon experiences gained in academic, industrial, and government laboratory settings, as well as extensive professional service and community involvement.« less

  14. The Battle over Professorship: Reform of Human Resource Management and Academic Careers in a Comparative Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majcher, Agnieszka

    2008-01-01

    Changing conditions of academic and scientific labour markets challenge the current conceptual thinking about the mechanisms of academic promotion, selection and recruitment. This paper explores the models of academic promotion and recruitment of professors in a comparative perspective using the examples of Poland and Germany, and addresses the…

  15. Interest and perceived barriers toward careers in academic medicine among medical students at Alfaisal University - College of Medicine: A Saudi Arabian perspective.

    PubMed

    Abu-Zaid, Ahmed; Altinawi, Basmah; Eshaq, Abdulaziz M; Alkhatib, Lynn; Hoilat, Judie; Kadan, Sana; Alshammari, Mai; Farfour, Aya; Obeidat, Akef; Alkattan, Khaled

    2018-05-02

    [1] Identify the percentage of undergraduate students who are interested in academic medicine (AM) careers, [2] Explore the relationship between students' characteristics, previous experiences and interest in AM careers and [3] Determine students' perceived barriers toward AM careers at Alfaisal University - College of Medicine. An online, anonymous, random, self-rating survey was administered during spring 2013-2014 to second-year and third-year students (n = 302). Chi-square test was used to correlate between interest in AM careers and students' characteristics. Mann-Whitney U-test was used to compare the mean 5-point Likert scale responses between male and female students. A total of 231 students participated in the survey (response rate: 76.5%). A total of 32 students (13.9%) expressed interest in AM careers, and this percentage significantly differed by gender, academic year, interest in teaching and research and previous research experiences (p < 0.05). The top three barriers were "lower income" (77.5%), "competing pressures to fulfill clinical-teaching-research duties" (73.6%) and "lack of career advising" (69.7%). As opposed to males, females achieved higher statistically significant differences of means regarding: "competing pressures to fulfill clinical-teaching-research duties" (p < 0.001) and "lack of same-gender role models in AM careers" (p < 0.000). AM careers were unpopular by students. Curricular, extracurricular and institutional measures should be implemented to rectify this dilemma.

  16. Finding Fulfillment: Women's Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Career Choices in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grunert, Megan L.; Bodner, George M.

    2011-01-01

    Research has shown that self-efficacy beliefs are effective predictors of academic major and career choices in middle school, high school, and early college populations. There is little understanding, however, of how these beliefs develop and what influence they have on academic and career choices in women at the advanced undergraduate and…

  17. [Strategies to ensure careers of young academics in plastic surgery - analysis of the current situation and future perspectives].

    PubMed

    Horch, R E; Vogt, P M; Schaller, H E; Stark, G B; Lehnhardt, M; Kneser, U; Giunta, R E

    2013-08-01

    Recruitment problems in surgical disciplines have become an increasingly debated topic. On the one hand current career prospects appear to be less attractive than those were seen for the previous generation. On the other hand the demands for a so-called "work-life balance" have changed and the proportion of female students and colleagues in medicine has risen and will continue to increase. Although Plastic Surgery currently seems to be less affected by these problems than other surgical disciplines, securing a qualified supply of young academics in Plastic Surgery is a prerequisite for the further development of this discipline. The traditional model of mentoring is discussed and the role of coaching in a sense of helping the mentorees examine what they are doing in the light of their intentions and goals is reflected. The present article tries to analyze the current status of academic Plastic Surgery from the viewpoint of German university senior surgeons in academic plastic surgery, and aims to highlight the specific prospects for young academics against the backdrop of an often one-sided and superficial perception of this profession. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. The possible role of resource requirements and academic career-choice risk on gender differences in publication rate and impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiaohan; Duch, Jordi; Sales-Pardo, Marta; Radicchi, Filippo; Otis, Shayna; Woodruff, Teresa; Amaral, Luis

    2013-03-01

    Many studies demonstrate that there is still a significant gender bias, especially at higher career levels, in many areas including science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). We investigated field-dependent, gender-specific effects of the selective pressures individuals experience as they pursue a career in academia within seven STEM disciplines. We built a unique database that comprises 437,787 publications authored by 4,292 faculty members at top United States research universities. Our analyses reveal that gender differences in publication rate and impact are discipline-specific. Our results also support two hypotheses. First, the widely-reported lower publication rates of female faculty are correlated with the amount of research resources typically needed in the discipline considered, and thus may be explained by the lower level of institutional support historically received by females. Second, in disciplines where pursuing an academic position incurs greater career risk, female faculty tend to have a greater fraction of higher impact publications than males. Our findings have significant, field-specific, policy implications for achieving diversity at the faculty level within the STEM disciplines. L. A. N. Amaral gratefully acknowledges the support of NSF awards SBE 0624318 and 0830388, and ThomsonReuters for access to the WoS data. J. Duch and M. Sales-Pardo's work have been partially supported by the Spanish DGICYT under project FIS2010-18639.

  19. The Possible Role of Resource Requirements and Academic Career-Choice Risk on Gender Differences in Publication Rate and Impact

    PubMed Central

    Sales-Pardo, Marta; Radicchi, Filippo; Otis, Shayna; Woodruff, Teresa K.; Nunes Amaral, Luís A.

    2012-01-01

    Many studies demonstrate that there is still a significant gender bias, especially at higher career levels, in many areas including science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). We investigated field-dependent, gender-specific effects of the selective pressures individuals experience as they pursue a career in academia within seven STEM disciplines. We built a unique database that comprises 437,787 publications authored by 4,292 faculty members at top United States research universities. Our analyses reveal that gender differences in publication rate and impact are discipline-specific. Our results also support two hypotheses. First, the widely-reported lower publication rates of female faculty are correlated with the amount of research resources typically needed in the discipline considered, and thus may be explained by the lower level of institutional support historically received by females. Second, in disciplines where pursuing an academic position incurs greater career risk, female faculty tend to have a greater fraction of higher impact publications than males. Our findings have significant, field-specific, policy implications for achieving diversity at the faculty level within the STEM disciplines. PMID:23251502

  20. Women in academic surgery: why is the playing field still not level?

    PubMed

    Seemann, Natashia M; Webster, Fiona; Holden, Helen Alyx; Moulton, Carol-Anne E; Baxter, Nancy; Desjardins, Christine; Cil, Tulin

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore career satisfaction and advancement for women in academic surgery. A 48-item web-based survey was emailed to women surgeons in academic centers across Canada, exploring career advancement, family planning, mentorship, discrimination, and career satisfaction. The survey response rate was 38% (81 of 212); 18% of participants felt they experienced gender discrimination in medical school, 36% in residency, 12% in fellowship, and 41% as staff surgeons. More than half felt that their gender had played a role in the career challenges they faced. Responses to open-ended questions suggested that many surgeons struggled to balance their academic careers with family life. Despite this, participants rated their career satisfaction very highly. There remain ongoing challenges for women in academic surgery including lack of gender equality, appropriate mentorship, and accommodations for surgeons with families. Continued advancement of women in academic surgery is dependent on addressing these concerns. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Academic Library Spaces: Advancing Student Success and Helping Students Thrive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Mary Ellen; Watstein, Sarah Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Are today's academic libraries really designed for learning? Do library spaces impact student learning? Intending to spark broader and more informed dialogue about the relationship between the quality of learning and the quality of academic library spaces in higher education, the authors consider the concept of space as service; student learning…

  2. Paying the Piper: The Costs and Consequences of Academic Advancement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Ashley; Fletcher, Tim

    2017-01-01

    In many professions there are qualifications to gain and professional standards to achieve. Lawyers pass the bar and doctors pass their boards. In academic life the equivalent is a doctorate, closely followed by a profile of peer-reviewed publication. To hold a doctoral degree is the common requirement to become "academic" but does it…

  3. Academic Anesthesiology Career Development: A Mixed-Methods Evaluation of the Role of Foundation for Anesthesiology Education and Research Funding.

    PubMed

    Speck, Rebecca M; Ward, Denham S; Fleisher, Lee A

    2018-06-01

    In 1986, the American Society of Anesthesiologists created the Foundation for Anesthesiology Education and Research (FAER) to fund young anesthesiology investigators toward the goal of helping launch their academic careers. Determining the impact of the FAER grant program has been of importance. This mixed-methods study included quantitative data collection through a Research Electronic Data Capture survey and curriculum vitae (CV) submission and qualitative interviews. CVs were abstracted for education history, faculty appointment(s), first and last author peer-reviewed publications, grant funding, and leadership positions. Survey nonrespondents were sent up to 3 reminders. Interview questions elicited details about the experience of submitting a FAER grant. Quantitative data were summarized descriptively, and qualitative data were analyzed with NVivo. Of 830 eligible participants, 38.3% (N = 318) completed surveys, 170 submitted CVs, and 21 participated in interviews. Roughly 85% held an academic appointment. Funded applicants were more likely than unfunded applicants to apply for National Institutes of Health funding (60% vs 35%, respectively; P < .01), but the probability of successfully receiving an National Institutes of Health grant did not differ (83% vs 85%, respectively; P = .82). The peer-reviewed publication rate (publications per year since attending medical school) did not differ between funded and unfunded applicants, with an estimated difference in means (95% confidence interval) of 1.3 (-0.3 to 2.9) publications per year. The primary FAER grant mentor for over one-third of interview participants was a nonanesthesiologist. Interview participants commonly discussed the value of having multiple mentors. Key mentor attributes mentioned were availability, guidance, reputation, and history of success. This cross-sectional data demonstrated career success in publications, grants, and leadership positions for faculty who apply for a FAER grant. A FAER

  4. Female Academic Department Chairs at a Public, Very High Research Activity University: Exploring Their Career Pathways to Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Marthe, Tamara Jaslene Marcelle

    2012-01-01

    The advancement of women into academic leadership remains a problem facing public, high-research activity universities. While there are more women who are qualified to assume the position of department chair in research institutions today than there were 30 years ago, women still lag behind their male counterparts in holding these academic…

  5. Using a natural abilities battery for academic and career guidance: a ten-year study.

    PubMed

    Brown, Corrie C; Harvey, Stephen B; Stiles, Dori

    2011-01-01

    Over a period of 10 years, first-year students from 11 consecutive veterinary classes conducted a self-assessment using a natural abilities survey. The present study analyzes the data compiled from students' self-assessment results. As a group, veterinary students are exceptional problem solvers, either through inductive or deductive reasoning, and have strong spatial relations capacities. Veterinary students have a range of learning styles with design memory being the primary vehicle for information delivery and tonal memory being the least frequently used style overall. Information gained on each student's natural abilities can be used to guide effective career decision making and enhance prospects for long-term career satisfaction.

  6. Conclusion: The Era of Mass Early Career Academics and Aging Faculty--Africa's Paradox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teferra, Damtew

    2016-01-01

    African higher education has witnessed phenomenal enrollment growth in the last decade--and this trend is expected to continue well into the future owing to the continent's youth bulge. In this "massifying" system, the academic profession faces a paradox: as the academic profession at the senior level is aging it is also concurrently…

  7. The Conditions of Movement: A Discussion of Academic Mobility between Two Early Career Scholars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gopaul, Bryan; Pifer, Meghan J.

    2016-01-01

    Academic mobility is an increasingly crucial topic to the current and future dynamics of doctoral study and the professoriate. Much of the research has focused on US, UK and European contexts. This research explores academic mobility and the manifold issues that arise between the jurisdictions of Canada and the US, in ways that parallel and…

  8. Made to Measure: Early Career Academics in the Canadian University Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acker, Sandra; Webber, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    While Canada lacks explicit central directives towards research productivity, academics experience frequent and intense reviews of their research, teaching and service through mechanisms such as elaborate tenure and promotion procedures and annual performance reviews. Given that newer academics are sometimes thought to be especially susceptible to…

  9. Women in academic general surgery.

    PubMed

    Schroen, Anneke T; Brownstein, Michelle R; Sheldon, George F

    2004-04-01

    To portray the professional experiences of men and women in academic general surgery with specific attention to factors associated with differing academic productivity and with leaving academia. A 131-question survey was mailed to all female (1,076) and a random 2:1 sample of male (2,152) members of the American College of Surgeons in three mailings between September 1998 and March 1999. Detailed questions regarding academic rank, career aspirations, publication rate, grant funding, workload, harassment, income, marriage and parenthood were asked. A five-point Likert scale measured influences on career satisfaction. Responses from strictly academic and tenure-track surgeons were analyzed and interpreted by gender, age, and rank. Overall, 317 surgeons in academic practice (168 men, 149 women) responded, of which 150 were in tenure-track positions (86 men, 64 women). Men and women differed in academic rank, tenure status, career aspirations, and income. Women surgeons had published a median of ten articles compared with 25 articles for men (p <.001). Marriage or parenthood did not influence numbers of publications for women. Overall career satisfaction was high, but women reported feeling career advancement opportunities were not equally available to them as to their male colleagues and feeling isolation from surgical peers. Ten percent to 20% of surgeons considered leaving academia, with women assistant professors (29%) contemplating this most commonly. Addressing the differences between men and women academic general surgeons is critical in fostering career development and in recruiting competitive candidates of both sexes to general surgery.

  10. Predicting the STEM outcomes of academically qualified women: A longitudinal examination of social cognitive career theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasson, Jillian Woodford

    There is a well-documented gender disparity in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields, which has been the focus of research for several decades (i.e., Betz & Hackett, 1981; Ceci & Williams, 2009, 2010; Wang, Eccles, & Kenny, 2013). Questions as to why this is the case are not new; however, with the growing body of research, there seem to be more questions than answers. This study drew primarily from the vocational psychology literature, particularly Social Cognitive Career Theory, building on previous literature in this area by examining differences in career choices made over time by qualified women across different stages in the education-to-career pathway. The results of the present study indicate that among qualified women many of the SCCT personal and contextual variables are relevant to STEM career development. Moreover, findings from the present study support the hypothesis (Lent et al., 1994) that personal, environmental, and behavioral variables affect one another. An important aspect of the SCCT model is the acknowledgment that at any given point in time, certain variables will carry different weight (Lent et al., 1994). The current study provides further support for this and underscores the necessity of understanding and framing career development as a process, unfolding across several developmental stages. These findings, their generalizability, and implications for practice should be carefully considered in the context of several limitations that this sample was influenced by: limitations in reliability and selection of variables, lack of diversity within the sample, as well as the extraneous variables related to overall economic and political backdrop.

  11. Career Preparedness and School Achievement of Portuguese Children: Longitudinal Trend Articulations

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Íris M.; Taveira, Maria do Céu; Porfeli, Erik J.

    2017-01-01

    Social Cognitive Career Theory suggests that students' preparedness for the school-to-work transition is a developmental process. Middle school children explore various careers, obtain feedback about their academic progress, and develop career self-efficacy and outcome expectations. These processes advance provisional educational/occupational goals. The literature has suggested articulations between career and academic development and how both vary across demographic characteristics, but longitudinal studies linking these processes are scarce. This study tested articulations between career preparedness and academic achievement during middle school years and employed gender and geographical location as potential moderators affecting the linkage between career and school domains. Participants included 429 children (47.8% girls) from northern (69.5%) and central Portugal (30.5%) followed across four occasions of measurement (MageWave1 = 10.23, SD = 0.50). Data was collected with school records, the Multidimensional Scales of Perceived Self-Efficacy, Career Exploratory Outcome Expectations Scale, Childhood Career Exploration Inventory and Childhood Career Development Scale. Average and orthnormalized linear, quadratic and cubic trends were computed. Pearson correlation coefficients suggested positive and statistically significant associations between career exploratory outcome expectations and academic achievement average trends. Career planning and self-efficacy expectations were negatively associated with academic achievement quadratic trends. Multiple linear regression models suggested that career exploratory outcome expectations and career planning were respectively statistically significant predictors of the average and quadratic trends of academic achievement. Gender moderated the association between the career variables and academic achievement linear trends as well as the relation of career planning and self-efficacy with academic achievement cubic trends

  12. Career Preparedness and School Achievement of Portuguese Children: Longitudinal Trend Articulations.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Íris M; Taveira, Maria do Céu; Porfeli, Erik J

    2017-01-01

    Social Cognitive Career Theory suggests that students' preparedness for the school-to-work transition is a developmental process. Middle school children explore various careers, obtain feedback about their academic progress, and develop career self-efficacy and outcome expectations. These processes advance provisional educational/occupational goals. The literature has suggested articulations between career and academic development and how both vary across demographic characteristics, but longitudinal studies linking these processes are scarce. This study tested articulations between career preparedness and academic achievement during middle school years and employed gender and geographical location as potential moderators affecting the linkage between career and school domains. Participants included 429 children (47.8% girls) from northern (69.5%) and central Portugal (30.5%) followed across four occasions of measurement ( M ageWave1 = 10.23, SD = 0.50). Data was collected with school records, the Multidimensional Scales of Perceived Self-Efficacy, Career Exploratory Outcome Expectations Scale, Childhood Career Exploration Inventory and Childhood Career Development Scale. Average and orthnormalized linear, quadratic and cubic trends were computed. Pearson correlation coefficients suggested positive and statistically significant associations between career exploratory outcome expectations and academic achievement average trends. Career planning and self-efficacy expectations were negatively associated with academic achievement quadratic trends. Multiple linear regression models suggested that career exploratory outcome expectations and career planning were respectively statistically significant predictors of the average and quadratic trends of academic achievement. Gender moderated the association between the career variables and academic achievement linear trends as well as the relation of career planning and self-efficacy with academic achievement cubic trends

  13. Factors related to choosing an academic career track among spine fellowship applicants.

    PubMed

    Park, Daniel K; Rhee, John M; Wu, Baohua; Easley, Kirk

    2013-03-01

    Retrospective review. To identify factors associated with the likelihood of spine surgery fellowship applicants choosing an academic job upon fellowship completion. Training academic spine surgeons is an important goal of many spine fellowships. However, there are no established criteria associated with academic job choice to guide selection committees. Two hundred three consecutive applications of candidates who were granted an interview to a single spine surgical fellowship from 2005 to 2010 were analyzed. Factors investigated included the following: membership in honor societies; number of publications, presentations, and book chapters; age; completion of an additional degree; completion of a research fellowship; teaching experience; marital status; graduation from a top-20 school; attendance in a residency with a spine fellowship; and comments made in personal statements and letters of recommendation. The job taken upon graduation from fellowship was determined. The χ2 test or Fisher exact test was used to estimate the strength of the association between the covariates and response. Significant variables were selected for further multivariate analysis. The following were significantly associated in a univariable analysis with academia: 5 or more national presentations; completion of a research fellowship; attendance in a top-20 medical school; stated desire in the personal statement to become an academic surgeon; and letters of reference stating likelihood of pursuing academics on hiring the applicant. When significant variables were selected for multivariable analysis, completion of a research fellowship, graduation from a top-20 medical school, and stated desire in the personal statement to become an academic surgeon were most strongly associated with choice of academia. Although job choice is multifactorial, the present study demonstrates that there are objective factors listed on spine fellowship applications associated with a significantly higher

  14. Preparing for a Career at a Research University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, Michael

    An academic position at a research university involves a combination of teaching, research, administration, and service. Faculty come to their academic positions from a variety of career paths, but the requirements for academic advancement at a research university are frequently quite similar. I will describe some of the advantages, opportunities, and challenges of an academic position at a research university, together with the kinds of expectations that a faculty member might typically encounter.

  15. Cognitive Academic Learning Approaches through ESL Content Area Instruction with Career Exploration Strategies (Project CALA). Final Evaluation Report, 1992-93. OER Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guadalupe, Deana R.

    This report presents an evaluation of the Cognitive Academic Learning Approaches through ESL Content Area Instruction with Career Exploration Strategies (Project CALA)), an Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title VII-funded project in its fifth and last year of operation at International High School, a bilingual special alternative high…

  16. Bilingual Academic and Career Education Services for Hispanic High School Students (Project BACES). Final Evaluation Report, 1992-93. OER Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Candice

    This report presents an evaluation of the Bilingual Academic and Career Education Services for Hispanic High School Students (Project BACES), an Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title VII-funded project in its third year of operation at DeWitt Clinton High School in the Bronx and George Washington High School in Manhattan. The project served…

  17. Field Dependence-Field Independence Cognitive Style, Gender, Career Choice and Academic Achievement of Secondary School Students in Emohua Local Government Area of Rivers State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onyekuru, Bruno Uchenna

    2015-01-01

    This is a descriptive study that investigated the relationships among field dependence-field independence cognitive style and gender, career choice and academic achievement of secondary school students in Emohua Local Government Area of Rivers State, Nigeria. From the initial sample of 320 senior secondary school one (SS1) students drawn from the…

  18. Mentor Perspectives on the Place of Undergraduate Research Mentoring in Academic Identity and Career Development: An Analysis of Award Winning Mentors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Eric E.; Walkington, Helen; Shanahan, Jenny Olin; Ackley, Elizabeth; Stewart, Kearsley A.

    2018-01-01

    This study examines how Undergraduate Research (UR) mentoring fits into the career profile of award-winning UR mentors and the factors that motivate engagement as UR mentors. Twenty-four award-winning UR mentors in four countries were interviewed about their mentoring practices. Six themes emerged: (1) Academic Identity and Motivations; (2)…

  19. "Disqus" Website-Based Commenting as an e-Research Method: Engaging Doctoral and Early-Career Academic Learners in Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilburn, Daniel; Earley, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an adaptation of established qualitative research methods for online focus groups by using the "Disqus" website-based commenting platform as a medium for discussion among doctoral and early-career academic learners. Facilities allowing Internet users to comment on the content of web pages are increasingly popular on…

  20. Cognitive Flexibility and Its Relationship to Academic Achievement and Career Choice of College Students with and without Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kercood, Suneeta; Lineweaver, Tara T.; Frank, Colleen C.; Fromm, Erik D.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between cognitive flexibility, academic skills, educational trajectories, and career goals of college students with and without Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Participants completed a demographic questionnaire, objective and subjective measures of cognitive…

  1. A Longitudinal Examination of Career Expectations and Outcomes of Academically Talented Students 10 and 20 Years Post-High School Graduation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrone, Kristin M.; Tschopp, Molly K.; Snyder, Erin R.; Boo, Jenelle N.; Hyatt, Claudine

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine career expectations and outcomes for individuals who were identified as academically talented high school students. Data for this study were collected at two different time periods: 10 years and 20 years after participants' high school graduation. A decade after graduation from high school, participants…

  2. A 25-year analysis of the American College of Gastroenterology research grant program: factors associated with publication and advancement in academics.

    PubMed

    Crockett, Seth D; Dellon, Evan S; Bright, Stephanie D; Shaheen, Nicholas J

    2009-05-01

    The American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) has awarded research grants for 25 years. We assessed the characteristics of grant recipients, their current academic status, and the likelihood of publication resulting from the grant. Demographic data, the year and amount of award, title of project, and recipient's institution were extracted from ACG databases. Using ACG reports and medical literature search engines, we assessed publication based on grant-funded research, as well as career publication record. We also determined the current position of awardees. A similar analysis was performed for recipients of junior investigator awards. A total of 396 clinical research awards totaling $5,374,497 ($6,867,937 in 2008 dollars) were awarded to 341 recipients in the 25 years between 1983 and 2008. The most commonly funded areas of research were endoscopy (22% of awards) and motility/functional disorders (21%). At least one peer-reviewed publication based on grant-funded research occurred with 255 of the 368 awards (69%) for 1983-2006 [corrected]. Higher award value was associated with subsequent publication. Of the 313 awardees over the same period, 195 (62%) are currently in academic positions [corrected]. Factors associated with staying in academics included higher award value (P < 0.01), a Master's degree (P = 0.02), and publishing grant-funded research (P < 0.01). The junior faculty career development award was granted to 27 individuals for a total of $3,000,000 (3,398,004 in 2008 dollars). Publication resulted from 90% of the funded projects, and 95% of awardees have remained in academics. Overall, the mean cost in grant dollars per published paper based on the research was $14,875. The majority of ACG grant recipients published the results of their research and remained in academics. Higher amount of award, holding an advanced degree, and publication were associated with careers in academics. The ACG research grant award program is an important engine of

  3. The road to an academic medicine career: a national cohort study of male and female U.S. medical graduates.

    PubMed

    Andriole, Dorothy A; Jeffe, Donna B

    2012-12-01

    To explore the relationship between gender and full-time faculty appointment in a national cohort of contemporary U.S. medical school graduates. The authors analyzed deidentified, individual records for the 1998-2004 national cohort of U.S. medical graduates using multivariate logistic regression to identify predictors of full-time faculty appointment through July 2009. They reported adjusted odds ratios (aOR) significant at P < .05. Of 66,889 graduates, 12,038 (18.0%) had held full-time faculty appointments. Among all graduates, women (aOR = 1.21) were more likely than men to have held faculty appointments. Among only male graduates, those who participated in research during college (aOR = 1.08), who entered medical school with greater planned career involvement in research (aOR = 1.08), and who authored/coauthored a research paper during medical school (aOR = 1.12) were more likely, and those with higher debt were less likely (aOR = 0.96), to have held faculty appointments. Among only faculty appointees, higher proportions of men than women had participated in medical school research electives (63.5% [3,899/6,138] versus 54.2% [3,197/5,900]; P < .001) and authored/coauthored research papers during medical school (44.1% [2,707/6,138] versus 33.6% [1,981/5,900]; P < .001); female faculty had reported higher debt at medical school graduation than had male faculty (P = .014). In this national cohort of U.S. medical graduates, women were more likely than men to have held full-time faculty appointments. However, male and female faculty appointees entered academic medicine with different research experiences and debt, possibly impacting their academic medicine career trajectories.

  4. The Russian Academic Profession and the Creation of Advanced Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yudkevich, Maria M.

    2015-01-01

    The author reflects upon the issue of the global education market, where leading universities turn into a matter of national prestige. But what could the specifics of Russian academic profession be, and are we ready to develop world-class universities? By analyzing data from surveys, conducted in Russian universities with the methodology of the…

  5. Peers for Promotion: Achieving Academic Advancement through Facilitated Peer Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ockene, Judith K.; Milner, Robert J.; Thorndyke, Luanne E.; Congdon, John; Cain, Joanna M.

    2017-01-01

    The promotion process is challenging, particularly for non-tenure track faculty in academic medicine. To address this challenge, we implemented a facilitated peer mentoring program that included a structured curriculum with regular meetings, guided by two senior faculty mentors. Participants expressed satisfaction with the program, showed…

  6. Examining the role of gender in career advancement at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhuo; Roy, Kakoli; Gotway Crawford, Carol A

    2010-03-01

    During the past decade, efforts to promote gender parity in the healing and public health professions have met with only partial success. We provide a critical update regarding the status of women in the public health profession by exploring gender-related differences in promotion rates at the nation's leading public health agency, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Using personnel data drawn from CDC, we found that the gender gap in promotion has diminished across time and that this reduction can be attributed to changes in individual characteristics (e.g., higher educational levels and more federal work experience). However, a substantial gap in promotion that cannot be explained by such characteristics has persisted, indicating continuing barriers in women's career advancement.

  7. Examining the Role of Gender in Career Advancement at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Kakoli; Gotway Crawford, Carol A.

    2010-01-01

    During the past decade, efforts to promote gender parity in the healing and public health professions have met with only partial success. We provide a critical update regarding the status of women in the public health profession by exploring gender-related differences in promotion rates at the nation's leading public health agency, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Using personnel data drawn from CDC, we found that the gender gap in promotion has diminished across time and that this reduction can be attributed to changes in individual characteristics (e.g., higher educational levels and more federal work experience). However, a substantial gap in promotion that cannot be explained by such characteristics has persisted, indicating continuing barriers in women's career advancement. PMID:20075327

  8. Advanced Academic Participation: A Longitudinal Analysis of Ethnicity Gaps in Suburban Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kettler, Todd; Hurst, Luke T.

    2017-01-01

    Participation in advanced academic programs such as Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB) has been associated with higher student achievement and college readiness. In addition, AP and IB are widely recommended and implemented as services for gifted and talented students. Students who participate in these programs tend to be…

  9. Can a manager have a life and a career? International and multisource perspectives on work-life balance and career advancement potential.

    PubMed

    Lyness, Karen S; Judiesch, Michael K

    2008-07-01

    The present study was the first cross-national examination of whether managers who were perceived to be high in work-life balance were expected to be more or less likely to advance in their careers than were less balanced, more work-focused managers. Using self ratings, peer ratings, and supervisor ratings of 9,627 managers in 33 countries, the authors examined within-source and multisource relationships with multilevel analyses. The authors generally found that managers who were rated higher in work-life balance were rated higher in career advancement potential than were managers who were rated lower in work-life balance. However, national gender egalitarianism, measured with Project GLOBE scores, moderated relationships based on supervisor and self ratings, with stronger positive relationships in low egalitarian cultures. The authors also found 3-way interactions of work-life balance ratings, ratee gender, and gender egalitarianism in multisource analyses in which self balance ratings predicted supervisor and peer ratings of advancement potential. Work-life balance ratings were positively related to advancement potential ratings for women in high egalitarian cultures and men in low gender egalitarian cultures, but relationships were nonsignificant for men in high egalitarian cultures and women in low egalitarian cultures.

  10. Learning Environment, Learning Process, Academic Outcomes and Career Success of University Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermeulen, Lyanda; Schmidt, Henk G.

    2008-01-01

    This study expands on literature covering models on educational productivity, student integration and effectiveness of instruction. An expansion of the literature concerning the impact of higher education on workplace performance is also covered. Relationships were examined between the quality of the academic learning environment, the process of…

  11. Different Worlds and Divergent Paths: Academic Careers Defined by Race and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson-Bailey, Juanita; Cervero, Ronald M.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, Juanita Johnson-Bailey, a Black female professor, and Ronald M. Cervero, a White male professor, examine and contrast their academic lives by exploring how race and gender have influenced their journeys and their experiences. Using journal excerpts, personal examples, and a comparative list of privileges, the authors present a…

  12. A Comparison of Career Success between Graduates of Vocational and Academic Tertiary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backes-Gellner, Uschi; Geel, Regula

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyses whether tertiary education of different types, i.e., academic or vocational tertiary education, leads to more or less favorable labor market outcomes. We study the problem for Switzerland, where more than two thirds of the workforce gain vocational secondary degrees and a substantial number go on to a vocational tertiary degree…

  13. DREAMing Big: Understanding the Current Context of Academic and Career Decision-Making for Undocumented Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantamneni, Neeta; Dharmalingam, Kavitha; Tate, Jessica M.; Perlman, Beth L.; Majmudar, Chaitasi R.; Shada, Nichole

    2016-01-01

    Undocumented student immigrants in the United States face substantial challenges in higher education including systemic, institutional, and cultural barriers that often impede access to and success in higher education. These barriers directly influence academic and work opportunities. The purpose of this article is to discuss the myriad of factors…

  14. Academic Careers of Immigrant Women Professors in the U.S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skachkova, Penka

    2007-01-01

    The article draws on the narratives of 34 immigrant women professors from 22 different countries who teach in a major research university in the U.S. First, the article presents immigrant women professors' voices of experiencing traditional academic activities in terms of teaching, research, and administration/service. Second, the paper voices…

  15. Pathways to the Professoriate: The Role of Self, Others, and Environment in Shaping Academic Career Aspirations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindholm, Jennifer A.

    2004-01-01

    The findings reported here are part of a larger study that examined how faculty view the linkages between themselves and their institutional work environments; how they create a sense of personal space and belonging within their academic units and the larger university; and how their self-perceptions of organizational fit affect their professional…

  16. Initial Teacher Education: Does Self-Efficacy Influence Candidate Teacher Academic Achievement and Future Career Performance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shawer, Saad F.

    2013-01-01

    This quantitative investigation examined the influence of low and high self-efficacy on candidate teacher academic performance in a foreign language teaching methodology course through testing the speculation that high self-efficacy levels would improve pedagogical-content knowledge (PCK). Positivism guided the research design at the levels of…

  17. High School Work and Family Life ITAC [Integrated Technical & Academic Competencies] for Career-Focused Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This document contains a guide to implementing the Ohio Work and Family Life ITAC (Integrated Technical and Academic Competencies), which connects to the Ohio Model Competency-Based Program documents in arts, foreign languages, language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies, as well as the Core ITAC document. The Work and Family Life ITAC…

  18. Cognitive Skills Training Improves Listening and Visual Memory for Academic and Career Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erland, Jan

    The Mem-ExSpan Accelerative Cognitive Training System (MESACTS) is described as a cognitive skills training program for schools, businesses, and industry. The program achieves extraordinary academic results in reading and mathematics with 1 semester of input 4 days a week for 30 minutes a day. Intensive versions of the program accelerate…

  19. College Student Engagement and Early Career Earnings: Differences by Gender, Race/Ethnicity, and Academic Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Shouping; Wolniak, Gregory C.

    2013-01-01

    Using longitudinal data from the 2001 cohort of applicants to the Gates Millennium Scholars (GMS) program, the authors examined scaled measures of academic and social engagement in relation to labor market earnings to test whether the economic value of student engagement among high-achieving students of color differs by student characteristics.…

  20. Becoming Part of the Academy: Factors Affecting the Academic Career Success of Foreign-Born Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Switzer, Teri R.

    2012-01-01

    The entire diversity landscape of our university campuses is changing. As American colleges and universities address their need for more globally aware campuses, academic institutions are hiring well-qualified foreign-born scholars to teach in their programs. Both non-resident alien faculty as well as those who are foreign-born but are classified…