Science.gov

Sample records for academic career paths

  1. Career Paths of Academic Deans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolverton, Mimi; Gonzales, Mary Jo

    This paper examines various career paths leading to deanship and considers the implications of the findings for women and minorities who aspire to this position. The paper is part of a larger study of academic deanship conducted by the Center for Academic Leadership at Washington State University between October 1996 and January 1997. Data for the…

  2. Warriors on the Path to Academic Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poodry, Clifton A.

    1996-01-01

    Electrical engineer Robert Whitman and microbiologist Gilbert John have pursued academic careers in order to advance their own research and serve as role models for Native American students. After receiving Ph.D.s, Whitman and John were appointed assistant professors at research-oriented universities. Sidebar addresses the role Native American…

  3. Women Chief Academic Officers of Public Community Colleges: Career Paths and Mobility Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenney, Cynthia B.

    This study investigates the career paths and mobility factors of female chief academic officers (CAOs) in public community colleges. Analysis revealed the most significant predictors for the career paths to be entry port, number of higher education positions held, and the first prior position held. Gender did not significantly influence mobility…

  4. Women Chief Academic Officers of Public Community Colleges: Significant Predictors for Their Career Paths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenney, Cynthia B.; Cejda, Brent D.

    As women now comprise 39% of the chief academic officer (CAO) positions, the focus of this investigation was the career paths and mobility factors of women CAOs in public comprehensive community colleges. This survey of 142 women resulted in eight distinct, common pathways by which women attain this rank. The typical profile of a female CAO is a…

  5. The influence of parenting style on academic achievement and career path

    PubMed Central

    ZAHED ZAHEDANI, ZAHRA; REZAEE, RITA; YAZDANI, ZAHRA; BAGHERI, SINA; NABEIEI, PARISA

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Several factors affect the academic performance of college students and parenting style is one significant factor. The current study has been done with the purpose of investigating the relationship between parenting styles, academic achievement and career path of students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences.     Methods This is a correlation study carried out at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Among 1600 students, 310 students were selected randomly as the sample. Baumrind’s Parenting Style and Moqimi’s Career Path questionnaires were used and the obtained scores were correlated with the students' transcripts. To study the relation between variables Pearson correlation coefficient was used. Results There was a significant relationship between authoritarian parenting style and educational success (p=0.03). Also findings showed a significant relationship between firm parenting style and Career Path of the students, authoritarian parenting style and Career Path of the students, educational success and Career Path of the students (p=0.001). Conclusion Parents have an important role in identifying children’s talent and guiding them. Mutual understanding and close relationship between parents and children are recommended. Therefore, it is recommended that the methods of correct interaction of parents and children be more valued and parents familiarize their children with roles of businesses in society and the need for employment in legitimate businesses and this important affair should be more emphasized through mass media and family training classes. PMID:27382580

  6. Exploring the academic context for quality improvement: a scientific discipline in need of a career path.

    PubMed

    Aron, David C; Dittus, Robert S; Rosenthal, Gary E

    2002-01-01

    Physician training typically occurs in an academic context. We examine whether improvement should be a central element in academe--specifically medical school. We observe that quality improvement meets the criteria for a discipline, but that there are many obstacles to career development in this field. Whether the research agenda of quality improvement can be accomplished within centers or institutes or whether this discipline needs its own department to ensure the nurturing of new faculty is still an open question. What is not open is the necessity for a career path in this discipline to exist and flourish. PMID:12512467

  7. Career Path Guide for Adult Career Choices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Clydia

    Intended for adults who are considering career choices or changes, this booklet provides opportunities for self-study and reflection in six career paths. The booklet begins with tips for long-term career survival and myths and realities of career planning. After a brief career survey, readers are introduced to six career paths: arts and…

  8. Academic and Career Advising of Scanners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Arvid J.; Tripp, Philip R.; Shaffer, Leigh S.

    2011-01-01

    "Scanners" has become a common term for a recently identified category of people who find choosing just one interest or career path difficult (Sher, 2006). Academic and career advisors who work with scanners will likely find that these students have difficulty selecting an academic major or career path and that they seem to suffer anxiety and a…

  9. Different Worlds and Divergent Paths: Academic Careers Defined by Race and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson-Bailey, Juanita; Cervero, Ronald M.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, Juanita Johnson-Bailey, a Black female professor, and Ronald M. Cervero, a White male professor, examine and contrast their academic lives by exploring how race and gender have influenced their journeys and their experiences. Using journal excerpts, personal examples, and a comparative list of privileges, the authors present a…

  10. Challenges Facing Early Career Academic Cardiologists

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Carl W.; Ahmad, Tariq; Brittain, Evan L.; Bunch, T. Jared; Damp, Julie B.; Dardas, Todd; Hijar, Amalea; Hill, Joseph A.; Hilliard, Anthony A.; Houser, Steven R.; Jahangir, Eiman; Kates, Andrew M.; Kim, Darlene; Lindman, Brian R.; Ryan, John J.; Rzeszut, Anne K.; Sivaram, Chittur A.; Valente, Anne M.; Freeman, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    Early-career academic cardiologists currently face unprecedented challenges that threaten a highly valued career path. A team consisting of early career professionals and senior leadership members of American College of Cardiology (ACC) completed this white paper to inform the cardiovascular medicine profession regarding the plight of early career cardiologists and to suggest possible solutions. This paper includes: (1) definition of categories of early career academic cardiologists, (2) general challenges to all categories and specific challenges to each category, (3) obstacles as identified by a survey of current early career members of the ACC, (4) major reasons for the failure of physician-scientists to receive funding from National Institute of Health/National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NIH/NHLBI) career development grants, (5) potential solutions, and (6) a call to action with specific recommendations. PMID:24703919

  11. Career development resource: academic career in surgical education.

    PubMed

    Sanfey, Hilary; Gantt, Nancy L

    2012-07-01

    Academic surgeons play an instrumental role in the training of our medical students and surgical residents. Although volunteer faculty often have an important role in the clinical development of surgeons-in-training, the tasks of curricular development, structured didactic sessions, professional advising, research sponsorship, and mentoring at all levels fall to the academic surgeon. Historically, the career advancement path for an academic physician favored grant acquisition and scholarly publication. Broader definitions of scholarship have emerged, along with corresponding modifications in academic award systems that allow advancement in faculty rank based on a surgeon's educational efforts. PMID:22704713

  12. Career Paths in Environmental Sciences

    EPA Science Inventory

    Career paths, current and future, in the environmental sciences will be discussed, based on experiences and observations during the author's 40 + years in the field. An emphasis will be placed on the need for integrated, transdisciplinary systems thinking approaches toward achie...

  13. Gender differences in career paths in psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Krener, P

    1994-03-01

    Although psychiatry has one of the highest proportions of women entering its residency programs, women have not assumed a proportionate amount of academic or research leadership positions in the field. This literature review identifies three general groups of models that explain disparities between men's and women's careers, but these do not fully account for observed differences in psychiatric practice and academic progression of women in psychiatry. Gender differences in career paths in psychiatry are not only affected by individual traits and choices, but also by economic factors. Theories based on organizational discrimination, and systems and market factors are also reviewed. No single explanatory model accounts for disparities between the careers of men and those of women. Because psychiatric practice patterns may be broadly distributed across labor sectors, more diverse career patterns are possible in psychiatry than in more constrained and traditional fields. Research on gender differences in psychiatry careers must consider not only the individual work style and choice, but also the position of individuals within the organization and the position of those organizations across the labor market. PMID:24435498

  14. The career path choices of veterinary radiologists.

    PubMed

    Jelinski, Murray D; Silver, Tawni I

    2015-01-01

    Concerns of a shortage of board certified specialists willing to work in academia have shadowed the medical and veterinary communities for decades. As a result, a number of studies have been conducted to determine how to foster, attract, and retain specialists in academia. More recently, there has been a growing perception that it is difficult for academic institutions to hire board certified veterinary radiologists. The objective of this study was to describe the career paths (academia vs. private sector) of veterinary radiologists and to determine what factors influenced their career path decisions. A mixed mode cross-sectional survey was used to survey ACVR radiologists and residents-in-training, 48% (255/529) of which responded. There was a near unidirectional movement of radiologists from academia to the private sector: 45.7% (59/129) of the respondents who began their careers in academia had switched to the private sector while only 8% (7/88) had left the private sector for academia. If a shortage of academic radiologists exists, then perhaps the issue should be framed as a problem with retention vs. recruitment. The most influential factors in the decision to leave academia were remuneration (wages and benefits), lack of interest/enjoyment in research, geographical location, and family considerations. It is salient that average salaries increased by twofold after leaving academia for the private sector. PMID:24920350

  15. An Introduction to Career Path Employability Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvir, Howard P.

    An employability profile specifies employment opportunities for which an individual is qualified. A career path is the term applied to an employability profile that combines both the career ladder aspect of advancement and the career lattice element of wide selection. After a descriptive analysis of typical employability profiles, this document…

  16. Ambivalent Journey: Teacher Career Paths in Oman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, David W.; Al-Barwani, Thuwayba; Al Mawali, Fathiya; Green, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the career paths of 625 university graduates who prepared to be secondary school teachers in Oman, their assessment of their current work situation, and the extent to which their initial commitment to teaching was related to their subsequent career satisfaction and intention to remain in teaching. While nearly all graduates…

  17. Administrator Career Paths and Decision Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farley-Ripple, Elizabeth N.; Raffel, Jeffrey A.; Welch, Jennie Christine

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present qualitative evidence on the processes and forces that shape school administrator career paths. Design/methodology/approach: An embedded case study approach is used to understand more than 100 administrator career transitions within the Delaware education system. Semi-structured interview data were…

  18. Gender Differences in Career Paths in Banking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Sandra; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Analyzed career paths of middle managers in bank. Study of matched pairs found that men (n=25) advanced faster and reached middle management through fewer promotions and positions than did women (n=25). Men had significantly more work experience outside of banking. In banking careers, men held more jobs in lending, whereas women occupied more…

  19. Career Paths for Managers in the Arts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inglis, Loretta; Cray, David

    2012-01-01

    In this article we examine the career paths of top-level managers in the arts. By analysing the training and work history of 23 managers in a variety of arts organisations we evaluate the utility of several existing theories for understanding careers that are characterised by low levels of initial knowledge, the absence of a clear method of entry…

  20. Create three distinct career paths for innovators.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Gina Colarelli; Corbett, Andrew; Pierantozzi, Ron

    2009-12-01

    Large companies say they Create Three Distinct want to be Career Paths for Innovators innovative, but they fundamentally mismanage their talent. Expecting innovators to grow along with their projects-from discovery to incubation to acceleration--sets them up to fail. Most people excel at one of the phases, not all three. By allowing innovation employees to develop career paths suited to their strengths, companies will create a sustainable innovation function. PMID:19968059

  1. An Early Career Academic Network: What Worked and What Didn't

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Emma; Coffey, Brian; Nethery, Amy

    2015-01-01

    This article documents the experiences of three early career academics trying to establish a network of early career academics (ECAs) in a middle-ranked university in Australia. The changing context of academia means that ECAs face considerable challenges in understanding and negotiating effective career paths. Some of the issues encountered…

  2. Career Choice in Academic Medicine: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Straus, Sharon E; Straus, Christine; Tzanetos, Katina

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To review systematically the evidence about what factors influence the decision to choose or not choose a career in academic medicine. DESIGN A systematic review of relevant literature from 1990 to May 2005. DATA SOURCES Searches of The Cochrane Library, Medline (using Ovid and PubMed) from 1990 to May 2005, and EMBASE from 1990 to May 2005 were completed to identify relevant studies that explored the influential factors. Additional articles were identified from searching the bibliographies of retrieved articles. SELECTION OF STUDIES We attempted to identify studies that included residents, fellows, or staff physicians. No restrictions were placed on the study methodologies identified and all articles presenting empirical evidence were retrieved. For cohort, case-control, and cross-sectional studies, minimum inclusion criteria were the presence of defined groups, and the ability to extract relevant data. For surveys that involved case series, minimum inclusion criteria were a description of the population, and the availability of extractable data. Minimum inclusion criteria for qualitative studies were descriptions of the sampling strategy and methods. RESULTS The search identified 251 abstracts; 25 articles were included in this review. Completion of an MD with a graduate degree or fellowship program is associated with a career in academic medicine. Of the articles identified in this review, this finding is supported by the highest quality of evidence. Similarly, the completion of research and publication of this research in medical school and residency are associated with a career in academic medicine. The desire to teach, conduct research, and the intellectual stimulation and challenge provided in academia may also persuade people to choose this career path. The influence of a role model or a mentor was reported by physicians to impact their decision making. Trainees' interest in academic medicine wanes as they progress through their residency

  3. Comparing Career Options: Academic, Science Centers, and Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, A. E.

    2004-12-01

    The Employment Committee did a survey at the Atlanta AAS meeting, asking for input regarding topics for future employment sessions. The survey results indicated strong interest in more information about career paths. Thus, the Employment Committee is sponsoring a panel to present, discuss and contrast the three most common career directions that early-career astronomers consider: academic, science centers and industry. There also will be time for Q&A from the audience. The panelists: Academic - Vicky Kalogera, Northwestern; Science center - Deborah Levine, Spitzer Science Center; and Industry - John Miles, Lockheed-Martin.

  4. It's a Wonderful Life: A Career as an Academic Scientist

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Many years of training are required to obtain a job as an academic scientist. Is this investment of time and effort worthwhile? My answer is a resounding “yes.” Academic scientists enjoy tremendous freedom in choosing their research and career path, experience unusual camaraderie in their lab, school, and international community, and can contribute to and enjoy being part of this historical era of biological discovery. In this essay, I further elaborate by listing my top ten reasons why an academic job is a desirable career for young people who are interested in the life sciences. PMID:20048258

  5. Module for Business, Management, and Technology Career Path.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broeker, Arlene M.

    Designed for use with secondary students who have explored career paths and wish to pursue a career in business, management, and technology (BM&T), this module focuses on providing work-based learning experiences. Introductory materials include the following: career paths rationale and philosophy, benefits of using career paths, information on…

  6. Career Paths in Sport Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwab, Keri A.; Legg, Eric; Tanner, Preston; Timmerman, Danielle; Dustin, Daniel; Arthur-Banning, Skye G.

    2015-01-01

    Sport management alumni (N = 268) from five universities that offer undergraduate programs with an emphasis in sport management within departments of parks, recreation, and tourism were sampled via an electronic survey. The survey sought to learn where alumni were working, and how they felt about their career choice and undergraduate professional…

  7. Reinventing Your Career: Following the 5 New Paths to Career Fulfillment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, David C.; Kritzell, Bryan

    This book is designed to help individuals reinvent their careers by analyzing the current state of their careers, identifying career objectives suited to their individual and family needs, and developing personal strategic action plans for achieving career fulfillment in five new career path options: corporate climber, new entrepreneur,…

  8. Academic career in medicine – requirements and conditions for successful advancement in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Buddeberg-Fischer, Barbara; Stamm, Martina; Buddeberg, Claus

    2009-01-01

    Background Within the framework of a prospective cohort study of Swiss medical school graduates a sample of young physicians aspiring to an academic career were surveyed on their career support and barriers experienced up to their sixth year of postgraduate training. Methods Thirty-one junior academics took part in semi-structured telephone interviews in 2007. The interview guideline focused on career paths to date, career support and barriers experienced, and recommendations for junior and senior academics. The qualitatively assessed data were evaluated according to Mayring's content analysis. Furthermore, quantitatively gained data from the total cohort sample on person- and career-related characteristics were analyzed in regard to differences between the junior academics and cohort doctors who aspire to another career in medicine. Results Junior academics differ in terms of instrumentality as a person-related factor, and in terms of intrinsic career motivation and mentoring as career-related factors from cohort doctors who follow other career paths in medicine; they also show higher scores in the Career-Success Scale. Four types of career path could be identified in junior academics: (1) focus on basic sciences, (2) strong focus on research (PhD programs) followed by clinical training, (3) one to two years in research followed by clinical training, (4) clinical training and research in parallel. The interview material revealed the following categories of career-supporting experience: making oneself out as a proactive junior physician, research resources provided by superior staff, and social network; statements concerning career barriers encompassed interference between clinical training and research activities, insufficient research coaching, and personality related barriers. Recommendations for junior academics focused on mentoring and professional networking, for senior academics on interest in human resource development and being role models. Conclusion The

  9. Tenure Track Career System as a Strategic Instrument for Academic Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pietilä, Maria

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the purposes for which leaders in universities use academic career systems. It focuses on the tenure track system which is new to Finland. Tenure track represents a newly established internal career path in a situation in which Finnish universities' organizational autonomy increased via new legislation from 2010. Drawing…

  10. Self-Sabotage in the Academic Career

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sternberg, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Pogo recognized long ago that we often are our own worst enemies. Sure, he was a cartoon character, but he had a point--especially in higher education, where self-sabotage seems to be a standard characteristic of academic careers. In the author's 30 years as a professor, five years as a dean, and three years as a provost, he has observed many…

  11. Careers and Couples: An Academic Question.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffmann, Leonore, Ed.; DeSole, Gloria, Ed.

    The 20 articles in this collection concern issues faced by couples in academe. One group of articles considers part-time careers, independent scholarly work, or intermittent employment, which may be viable alternatives for women with families or those who feel less need for a full-time job. The need for institutional policies to support part-time…

  12. Getting Started in Your Academic Career

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniel, Kalmia E.

    An academic career is certainly one of great fulfillment and pride. After completing graduate school and postdoctoral work, perhaps even spending some time working in industry, it is now time to set up a laboratory, interview graduate students, find funding for these graduate students, adjust to becoming more of a lab manager than a researcher, write several grant proposals, write a syllabus or two, review manuscripts, and write a few of your own (or at least edit your students'), and serve on a myriad of university and departmental committees. Working in academia is a challenging and rewarding career. Being surrounded by the energy of students is contagious, and as you will discover an assistant professor needs that energy. An academic career at any level is the epitome of multitasking; juggling research, teaching, and service activities.

  13. Interdisciplinarity within an Academic Career

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackmore, Paul; Kandiko, Camille B.

    2011-01-01

    This project identified academics who have been involved with interdisciplinary leadership initiatives and sought to find out what had motivated them, what issues they had encountered and how they had resolved them. A powerful message emerging is the central importance of motivation in interdisciplinary work. Interviewees spoke of leaving their…

  14. A Path to Academic Excellence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grizzard, Clare; Woerner, Georgia K.

    2010-01-01

    Educators in Roland Park Elementary/Middle School in Baltimore recognize the essential role that the arts play in education. This K-8 urban public school, which serves a highly diverse population, focuses on academic excellence and high standards for students and faculty. They believe that teaching "in and through the arts" helps to achieve those…

  15. Career Paths and Choices Leading to the Senior Student Affairs Office (SSAO) for Women at Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biddix, J. Patrick; Giddens, Brandi M.; Darsey, Jessica; Fricks, Jodie Boney; Tucker, Barbara D.; Robertson, Joshua W.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined career paths and choices leading to the Senior Student Affairs Office (SSAO) for women at community colleges. Data were comprised of 57 resumes and 11 interviews from SSAOs during the 2008-2009 academic year. Network analysis paired with interviews offer career track and progression profiles with rationale for women aspirants.…

  16. A second career in academic medicine.

    PubMed

    Saunders, D E

    1984-03-01

    Career changes in all vocations are relatively common in the forties age group due to a variety of factors which include a crisis period caused by polarities of Generativity versus Stagnation as conceptualized by Erik H. Erikson. Generativity is served not only by procreativity but also by guiding the next generation through teaching. The result can be the strength of Care. Stagnation can result in unhappiness, irrational and destructive behavior, or withdrawal. Concepts of young, old and mortality also come into focus. A successful career change from private practice to academic medicine depends upon a combination of power, opportunity, and character. To be successful, the change should be made for positive reasons and be based upon youthful concepts in the cold reality of the financial and intellectual challenges of a new and competitive career. If properly done, both the personal rewards and the contribution to future medical care can be quite positive. PMID:6706448

  17. Perspectives on an alternative career path in regulatory science.

    PubMed

    Fields, F Owen

    2013-07-01

    Perspectives are provided on an alternative career path in regulatory science for those currently involved in basic biology research. This path is compared and contrasted with basic research, and factors to be examined if one is considering such a path are discussed. PMID:23846346

  18. Perspectives on an alternative career path in regulatory science

    PubMed Central

    Fields, F. Owen

    2013-01-01

    Perspectives are provided on an alternative career path in regulatory science for those currently involved in basic biology research. This path is compared and contrasted with basic research, and factors to be examined if one is considering such a path are discussed. PMID:23846346

  19. Persistence and uncertainty in the academic career

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Alexander M.; Riccaboni, Massimo; Stanley, H. Eugene; Pammolli, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how institutional changes within academia may affect the overall potential of science requires a better quantitative representation of how careers evolve over time. Because knowledge spillovers, cumulative advantage, competition, and collaboration are distinctive features of the academic profession, both the employment relationship and the procedures for assigning recognition and allocating funding should be designed to account for these factors. We study the annual production ni(t) of a given scientist i by analyzing longitudinal career data for 200 leading scientists and 100 assistant professors from the physics community. Our empirical analysis of individual productivity dynamics shows that (i) there are increasing returns for the top individuals within the competitive cohort, and that (ii) the distribution of production growth is a leptokurtic “tent-shaped” distribution that is remarkably symmetric. Our methodology is general, and we speculate that similar features appear in other disciplines where academic publication is essential and collaboration is a key feature. We introduce a model of proportional growth which reproduces these two observations, and additionally accounts for the significantly right-skewed distributions of career longevity and achievement in science. Using this theoretical model, we show that short-term contracts can amplify the effects of competition and uncertainty making careers more vulnerable to early termination, not necessarily due to lack of individual talent and persistence, but because of random negative production shocks. We show that fluctuations in scientific production are quantitatively related to a scientist’s collaboration radius and team efficiency. PMID:22431620

  20. The Reluctant Academic: Early-Career Academics in a Teaching-Orientated University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gale, Helen

    2011-01-01

    This paper is based on research into academic identities amongst early-career academics in a UK post-1992, teaching-orientated university. Literature around academic identity suggests five major academic roles: teaching, research, management, writing and networking. However, this appears to be a picture of an established mid-career academic in a…

  1. Career Paths, Career Aspirations, Networking, and Mentoring among Special Education Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irby, Beverly J.; And Others

    This paper examines the perceptions and experiences of rural special education administrators with regard to career advancement. A 31-item questionnaire was developed that focused on administrator attitudes and experiences regarding networking, mentoring, career paths, and career aspirations. The survey was completed by 15 special education…

  2. Home Economics Education Career Path Guide and Model Curriculum Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Northridge.

    This curriculum guide developed in California and organized in 10 chapters, provides a home economics education career path guide and model curriculum standards for high school home economics programs. The first chapter contains information on the following: home economics education in California, home economics careers for the future, home…

  3. Directors, Deans, Doctors, Divergers: The Four Career Paths of SSAOs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biddix, J. Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Career paths in student affairs generally follow a conventional course: graduate degree to entry-level position, progressive responsibility until middle management, and then a decision to remain, work to advance, or change fields. Studies on factors influencing career advancement have enlightened qualitative considerations individuals face when…

  4. Bridging the Gap: Career Paths in Telecommunications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    Interviews with three Native American telecommunications professionals explore careers in telecommunications for Native Americans. Included are discussions of the importance of telecommunications, courses and technical skills needed for various telecommunications careers, types of telecommunications degrees available, the importance of mentors and…

  5. Career development for early career academics: benefits of networking and the role of professional societies.

    PubMed

    Ansmann, Lena; Flickinger, Tabor E; Barello, Serena; Kunneman, Marleen; Mantwill, Sarah; Quilligan, Sally; Zanini, Claudia; Aelbrecht, Karolien

    2014-10-01

    Whilst effective networking is vitally important for early career academics, understanding and establishing useful networks is challenging. This paper provides an overview of the benefits and challenges of networking in the academic field, particularly for early career academics, and reflects on the role of professional societies in facilitating networking. PMID:25074842

  6. Early Career Academic Mentoring Using Twitter: The Case of #ECRchat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Hazel; Wheat, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Early career academics around the world frequently see themselves as being in need of targeted career support to navigate the years directly following PhD graduation. The growth of discussion groups on Twitter that target these users raises questions about their potential usefulness to address career development support needs. This paper reflects…

  7. Students' Perception of IS Academic Programs, IS Careers, and Outsourcing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martz, Ben; Cata, Teuta

    2008-01-01

    The authors compared the perceptions of information systems (IS) students with those of IS practitioners regarding IS careers, the practice of outsourcing, and academic programs. Results indicate that students and practitioners appreciate the integration of real-life practice in academic programs and that the general perception of IS careers is…

  8. Academic Advising and Career Services: A Collaborative Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledwith, Katherine E.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter describes how career services professionals and academic advising units can partner to serve college students. Observations are also provided regarding the role of advising and best practices to meet the growing need for a shared approach to the academic and career needs of students.

  9. Research Productivity by Career Stage among Korean Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Jisun

    2014-01-01

    This study explores Korean academics' changes in research productivity by career stage. Career stage in this study is defined as a specific cohort based on one's length of job experience, with those in the same stage sharing similar interests, values, needs, and tasks; it is categorized into fledglings, maturing academics, established…

  10. What Are Faculty Advisors To Do When Their Own Career Path Does Not Satisfy Their Students?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McManus, D. A.

    2001-12-01

    As graduate students seek advice on broad career options, many faculty advisors do not know what to do. It is easy for them to do nothing. They may do nothing because they assume that their own students are interested only in an academic research career like theirs. The mistake here can be that the advisors' verbal and non-verbal communication deters students from mentioning their interests in the first place or pursuing those interests, if mentioned. Or advisors may do nothing by assuming that it is not their responsibility to advise students about career options other than being an academic researcher. The advisors' lack of knowledge about other careers may lead them to avoid the issue. The mistake here is obvious. So what are advisors to do? They can encourage students to think of their graduate study as part of their career preparation, not just a task to obtain a research degree. Creating a risk-free environment for career discussion will enable faculty advisors to learn each student's career priorities and validate exploration of broad career options. Advisors should not feel inadequate by being unable to advise about everything. No one expects them to. They can encourage their students to meet together, on their own if necessary, to discuss common career concerns, even to invite speakers, including alums, to talk about different careers and the preparation required. They can encourage their students to seek additional mentors, people more knowledgeable about careers of interest to the students. They can encourage students to take courses for career preparation, particularly courses outside of science, even though these courses "take them away from their research." And advisors should not hold students at fault if they change their minds about career paths. More information often changes minds. These are a few of the many things that advisors can do. It is essential that faculty advisors not resent students' decisions to follow a career path different from

  11. Shortcuts to Long-Term Career Paths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Cynthia W.; Nelson, Gary L.

    In the continuing search for skilled workers, employers are increasingly looking to community colleges as the primary training providers for welfare recipients, unemployed workers, and those seeking to increase skills and improve careers. Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC) (North Carolina) provides individuals with the skills and education…

  12. Business & Management Career Cluster ITAC for Career-Focused Education. Integrated Technical & Academic Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Designed for Ohio educators responsible for planning programs to prepare high school students for careers in business and management, this document presents an overview of Ohio's Integrated Technical and Academic Competencies (ITAC) system of career-focused education and specific information about the business and management ITAC career cluster.…

  13. Preparing for an Academic Career Workshops: Resources for Graduate Students and Post-Doctoral Fellows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, R. W.; MacDonald, R.

    2004-12-01

    The professional development program, "On the Cutting Edge", offers annual multi-day workshops for graduate students and post-doctoral fellows interested in pursuing academic careers. Goals are to prepare participants to become more effective teachers, stronger candidates for academic positions, and more aware of the realities of academic jobs. Insights that participants especially hope to gain from these workshops include feedback on the application process, especially an understanding of how search committees work; the different realities of balancing teaching, research, and personal life in a range of academic institutions; and expectations for tenure. The ten-person leadership team represents, by design, a wide range of academic career paths and institutions, and provides approximately 1:6 leader: participant ratio. Specific sessions include research on learning, an introduction to course and lab design, effective teaching and assessment strategies, developing a teaching statement, time management and early career faculty success, and moving research forward into new settings. Optional workshop sessions and discussions include the following topics: dual-career couples; families and careers; teaching portfolios; effective negotiation strategies; tenure and promotion; effective field trips; getting started in undergraduate research; opportunities in K-12 education; career options beyond faculty positions. Highlights of the workshop are faculty panel discussions about career paths and the academic job search. By workshop end, participants complete a goal setting and action planning activity. Two years of evaluation data suggest our goals are being met. Participants particularly appreciate the practical ideas and the opportunity to interact with, and learn from, a diverse leadership team and other participants.

  14. The Career Path of the Postdoctoral Researcher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Karen L.; Yang, Lijing

    2015-01-01

    The number of recipients in the United States with postdoctoral research appointments in American universities is greater now than ever before (NSF, 2010). According to data from the 2010 National Science Foundation's "Survey of Graduate Students and Postdoctorates in Science and Engineering" (GSS, 2010), academic institutions in the…

  15. Mentoring and Leadership: A Practical Application for One's Career Path

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laughlin, Kevin; Moore, Holly

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores mentoring and mentorship at the beginning and ending of one's career path and the role of mentoring in the process. It frames the mentoring and leadership discussion using the lens of a first year teacher in a LaSallian elementary school in Browning, Montana, on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation. Topics examined in this paper…

  16. Tracking the Career Paths of Marketing and Business Education Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooney, Carol; Haltinner, Urs; Stanislawski, Debbie

    2006-01-01

    Marketing and business education faculty at the University of Wisconsin-Stout (UW-Stout) recently conducted a longitudinal study, spanning the entire 35 years of the program's existence, describing and analyzing its graduates' career paths. Data was collected through a questionnaire that utilized a combination of Likert-type responses, open-ended…

  17. Emotional Intelligence Abilities and Traits in Different Career Paths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kafetsios, Konstantinos; Maridaki-Kassotaki, Aikaterini; Zammuner, Vanda L.; Zampetakis, Leonidas A.; Vouzas, Fotios

    2009-01-01

    Two studies tested hypotheses about differences in emotional intelligence (EI) abilities and traits between followers of different career paths. Compared to their social science peers, science students had higher scores in adaptability and general mood traits measured with the Emotion Quotient Inventory, but lower scores in strategic EI abilities…

  18. Hispanic Women's Perceptions of Their Career Paths in Educational Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosario-Schoenfeld, Wanda I.

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to understand the perceptions of nine Latinas of Puerto Rican descent from an urban district in New York State about their career paths in the field of educational administration. Story narratives developed through semi-structured autobiographical interviews comprised the main data source. The findings indicated that interactions…

  19. Career Paths in Educational Leadership: Examining Principals' Narratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parylo, Oksana; Zepeda, Sally J.; Bengtson, Ed

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study analyzes the career path narratives of active principals. Structural narrative analysis was supplemented with sociolinguistic theory and thematic narrative analysis to discern the similarities and differences, as well as the patterns in the language used by participating principals. Thematic analysis found four major themes…

  20. In pursuit of balance: Why your career path is unique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbloom, N. A.; Phillips, A. S.; Hannay, C.

    2012-12-01

    When NASA's Curiosity rover landed on Mars in August 2012, the room at JPL erupted in applause. Among the onlookers were highly trained scientists, engineers, programmers, and technicians with a wide range of career paths. The individuals remain anonymous, but each had a key role in the success of the mission. Behind every successful scientific project are the individuals who support the mission with their knowledge, commitment and curiosity. Whether by preference, personality, or ambition, many highly trained and qualified scientists choose to support science from behind-the-scenes. For these scientists, a supporting role in research remains a satisfying career choice. Other scientists attempt to race up the position ladder, eagerly taking leadership and/or more public roles. How do you decide which role is right for you, and how do you find balance in your chosen career path?

  1. Developing a clinical academic career pathway for nursing.

    PubMed

    Coombs, Maureen; Latter, Sue; Richardson, Alison

    Since the publication of the UK Clinical Research Collaboration's (UKRC, 2007) recommendations on careers in clinical research, interest has grown in the concept of clinical academic nursing careers, with increased debate on how such roles might be developed and sustained (Department of Health, 2012). To embed clinical academic nursing roles in the NHS and universities, a clear understanding and appreciation of the contribution that such posts might make to organisational objectives and outcomes must be developed. This paper outlines an initiative to define the potential practice and research contribution of clinical academic roles through setting out role descriptors. This exercise was based on our experience of a clinical academic career initiative at the University of Southampton run in partnership with NHS organisations. Role descriptors were developed by a group of service providers, academics and two clinical academic award-holders from the local programme. This paper outlines clinical academic roles from novice to professor and describes examples of role descriptors at the different levels of a career pathway. These descriptors are informed by clinical academic posts in place at Southampton as well as others at the planning stage. Understanding the nature of clinical academic posts and the contribution that these roles can make to healthcare will enable them to become embedded into organisational structures and career pathways. PMID:23123839

  2. Internet Courses for Career Path Redirections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attwood, David

    2011-03-01

    The Internet provides a cost-efficient means to reach out to larger audiences, not only to graduate students soon to enter the work force, but also to practicing scientists and engineers who wish to update their own knowledge base and perhaps consider new career directions. In this presentation we describe experience with several graduate courses at the University of California, Berkeley, that were broadcast live over the internet and posted first as Google videos and later at www.youtube.com. Full graduate class lectures, typically 28 per class, together with all presentation materials available for download, plus homeworks (and solutions upon request) are found at www.coe.berkeley.edu/AST/srms and www.coe.berkeley.edu/AST/sxr2009. The video lectures are also available at www.youtube.com by clicking on ``videos'' and then searching ``david attwood''. Based on e-mail queries and personal feedback it is clear that the lectures are widely viewed, both as training lectures in industry and as classes at various universities worldwide.

  3. Partnerships: Integrating the Career Center and Academic Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Ruth; Kraning, Jonne

    This paper discusses the College Career Liaison (CCL) Model at Colorado State University nearly a decade after implementation. The CCL model has evolved into an effective and efficient method of delivering career services and has proved to be a method that bridges gaps within student and academic affairs; maximizes dollars; provides a stronger…

  4. Entrepreneurial Academics: Developing Scientific Careers in Changing University Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duberley, Joanne; Cohen, Laurie; Leeson, Elspeth

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of entrepreneurial initiatives within universities on scientific careers. Based on the career accounts of university-based bioscientists involved in a government-sponsored entrepreneurship training initiative, the paper explores the concept of academic entrepreneurialism. Three groups were identified in the data.…

  5. States Seek High School Pathways Weaving Academic, Career Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawchuk, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Every student at Wheeling High School takes a full academic courseload. Many of the graduates of this 2,000-student school in Wheeling, Illinois, however, also emerge with significant experience in a career field. Those interested in health careers, for example, can work with student-athletes in the school's athletic training facility, earn a…

  6. Preparing Graduate Students for Non-Academic Careers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolf, Lawrence

    2014-03-01

    One of the primary topics discussed at the conference concerned career development, since most graduate students will not have the academic careers of their advisors. Goals included reviewing the primary functions of physicists in industry, evaluating how students are currently prepared for these careers, and identifying how to fill gaps in preparation. A number of non-academic physicists provided insight into meeting these goals. Most physics graduate programs in general do not purposely prepare students for a non-academic career. Strategies for overcoming this shortcoming include advising students about these careers and providing training on broadly valued professional skills such as written and verbal communication, time and project management, leadership, working in teams, innovation, product development, and proposal writing. Alumni and others from industry could provide guidance on careers and skills and should be invited to talk to students. Academic training could also better prepare students for non-academic careers by including engineering and cross disciplinary problem solving as well as incorporating software and toolsets common in industry.

  7. Older Academics and Career Management: An Interdisciplinary Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larkin, Jacqui; Neumann, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    The academic workforce is among the oldest (Commonwealth of Australia, 2005) and arguably has the most highly qualified professionals within Australia. Yet career management for this group is seldom discussed. This paper considers Australia's ageing academic work-force and the human resource management challenges and implications this poses for…

  8. Mid-Career Change Options in Academe: Experience and Possibilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, David D.; Patton, Carl V.

    1981-01-01

    Mid-career change programs have the potential to open faculty positions during these times of decline. Most current programs are intended to shift faculty to a different specialty or discipline, but data indicate that academics would be receptive to opportunities to move out of academe. Specific options are identified. (Author/LB)

  9. A Career Success Model for Academics at Malaysian Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu Said, Al-Mansor; Mohd Rasdi, Roziah; Abu Samah, Bahaman; Silong, Abu Daud; Sulaiman, Suzaimah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop a career success model for academics at the Malaysian research universities. Design/methodology/approach: Self-administered and online surveys were used for data collection among 325 academics from Malaysian research universities. Findings: Based on the analysis of structural equation modeling, the…

  10. Encouraging Minority Undergraduates to Choose Science Careers: Career Paths Survey Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villarejo, Merna; Barlow, Amy E. L.; Kogan, Deborah; Veazey, Brian D.; Sweeney, Jennifer K.

    2008-01-01

    To explore the reasons for the dearth of minorities in Ph.D.-level biomedical research and identify opportunities to increase minority participation, we surveyed high-achieving alumni of an undergraduate biology enrichment program for underrepresented minorities. Respondents were asked to describe their career paths and to reflect on the…

  11. Training Future Dentists for an Academic Career: A Three-Tiered Model.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Zsuzsa; Albani, Sarah E; Wankiiri-Hale, Christine

    2016-05-01

    The anticipated shortage of dental faculty presents a challenge for dental education as it will greatly impact the training of the next generation of practicing dentists. One way to alleviate shortages is to identify students who are interested in an academic career at the predoctoral level and provide them with training in teaching, research, and leadership. Based on available evidence, formal programs offer the best way to introduce students to academia as a viable career path. A well-designed program can also equip interested students with the necessary skills and basic knowledge to facilitate starting an academic career. The University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine has developed a three-tiered model for providing its dental students with exposure to and training in academic dentistry. The three tiers reflect differing levels of commitment: 1) a two-year academic career track program, 2) academic career track elective courses, and 3) extracurricular activities. The aim of this study was to provide an initial assessment of the program's overall effectiveness. Data were collected using student and faculty surveys and student applications for the two-year academic career track program. The data gathered included characteristics of, and feedback from, students taking the elective courses, as well as student and faculty feedback about student teacher effectiveness. The study found overall positive responses to the three-tiered program from faculty, students, and student teachers at this initial stage. Whether these students ultimately become faculty members (the ultimate goal of the program) will be assessed in the future. PMID:27139201

  12. Balancing Two Cultures: American Indian/Alaska Native Medical Students' Perceptions of Academic Medicine Careers.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, John Paul; Poll-Hunter, Norma; Stern, Nicole; Garcia, Andrea N; Brewster, Cheryl

    2016-08-01

    American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) remain underrepresented in the academic medicine workforce and little is known about cultivating AI/AN medical students' interest in academic medicine careers. Five structured focus groups were conducted including 20 medical students and 18 physicians. The discussion guide explored factors influencing AI/AN trainees' academic medicine career interest and recommended approaches to increase their pursuit of academia. Consensual qualitative research was employed to analyze transcripts. Our research revealed six facilitating factors, nine dissuading factors, and five recommendations towards cultivating AI/AN pursuit of academia. Facilitators included the opportunity to teach, serving as a role model/mentor, enhancing the AI/AN medical education pipeline, opportunities to influence institution, collegiality, and financial stability. Dissuading factors included limited information on academic career paths, politics, lack of credit for teaching and community service, isolation, self-doubt, lower salary, lack of positions in rural areas, lack of focus on clinical care for AI/AN communities, and research obligations. Recommendations included heighten career awareness, recognize the challenges in balancing AI/AN and academic cultures, collaborate with IHS on faculty recruitment strategies, identify concordant role models/mentors, and identify loan forgiveness programs. Similar to other diverse medical students', raising awareness of academic career opportunities especially regarding teaching and community scholarship, access to concordant role models/mentors, and supportive institutional climates can also foster AI/AN medical students' pursuit of academia. Unique strategies for AI/AN trainees include learning how to balance AI/AN and academic cultures, collaborating with IHS on faculty recruitment strategies, and increasing faculty opportunities in rural areas. PMID:26896055

  13. Determinants of Success in Academic Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Balen, Barbara; van Arensbergen, Pleun; van der Weijden, Inge; van den Besselaar, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The competition for top positions in university rankings has put a stronger emphasis on the quality of university staff. Recruitment of excellent scholars is a core activity for university HRM. In this study, we compare the careers of pairs of similar researchers that were considered as very talented in their early careers. Of every pair, one has…

  14. Encouraging Minority Undergraduates to Choose Science Careers: Career Paths Survey Results

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Amy E. L.; Kogan, Deborah; Veazey, Brian D.; Sweeney, Jennifer K.

    2008-01-01

    To explore the reasons for the dearth of minorities in Ph.D.-level biomedical research and identify opportunities to increase minority participation, we surveyed high-achieving alumni of an undergraduate biology enrichment program for underrepresented minorities. Respondents were asked to describe their career paths and to reflect on the influences that guided their career choices. We particularly probed for attitudes and experiences that influenced students to pursue a research career, as well as factors relevant to their choice between medicine (the dominant career choice) and basic science. In agreement with earlier studies, alumni strongly endorsed supplemental instruction as a mechanism for achieving excellence in basic science courses. Undergraduate research was seen as broadening by many and was transformative for half of the alumni who ultimately decided to pursue Ph.D.s in biomedical research. That group had expressed no interest in research careers at college entry and credits their undergraduate research experience with putting them on track toward a research career. A policy implication of these results is that making undergraduate research opportunities widely available to biology students (including “premed” students) in the context of a structured educational enrichment program should increase the number of minority students who choose to pursue biomedical Ph.D.s. PMID:19047426

  15. Military Career Paths. Career Progression Patterns for Selected Occupations from the Military Career Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Military Entrance Processing Command (DOD), North Chicago, IL.

    This document was developed in response to requests from guidance professionals for information about career progression in the military. It presents descriptions of typical career development patterns over a 20-year period for 25 enlisted and 13 officer occupations. The enlisted occupations are: administrative support specialists, air crew…

  16. Junior Pharmacy Faculty Members’ Perceptions of Their Exposure to Postgraduate Training and Academic Careers During Pharmacy School

    PubMed Central

    Murawski, Matthew M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To determine the perceptions of junior pharmacy faculty members with US doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) degrees regarding their exposure to residency, fellowship, and graduate school training options in pharmacy school. Perceptions of exposure to career options and research were also sought. Methods. A mixed-mode survey instrument was developed and sent to assistant professors at US colleges and schools of pharmacy. Results. Usable responses were received from 735 pharmacy faculty members. Faculty members perceived decreased exposure to and awareness of fellowship and graduate education training as compared to residency training. Awareness of and exposure to academic careers and research-related fields was low from a faculty recruitment perspective. Conclusions. Ensuring adequate exposure of pharmacy students to career paths and postgraduate training opportunities could increase the number of PharmD graduates who choose academic careers or other pharmacy careers resulting from postgraduate training. PMID:22544956

  17. A Comparison of Role/Task/Environment Stress Experienced By Beginning Academic and Career-Technical Teachers in Southwestern Ohio Career-Technical Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerlin, Timothy F.

    This study investigated whether academic or career-technical teachers perceived greater role, task, and environmental stress in a career center setting. Participants were academic and career-technical teachers employed by a career center schools district in southwest Ohio. A total of 24 academic and 50 career-technical teachers, all of whom had…

  18. Tomorrow's Professor, Preparing for an Academic/Research Career

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, R. M.

    1998-12-01

    Richard M. Reis, author of Tomorrow's Professor: Preparing for Academic Careers in Science and Engineering, and a former executive officer of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, will discuss the essential elements in preparing for, finding, and succeeding at academic careers in today's higher education environment. He will begin with a no-hold-barred look at the academic enterprise and the important ways it differs for all other institutions in society. The unique nature engineering and science - with a particular emphasis on astronomy and astrophysics - in higher education and the special problems facing new professors in these fields will be looked at next. Dr. Reis will then describe a powerful preparation strategy to make graduate students and postdocs competitive for academic positions while maintaining their options for worthwhile careers in government and industry. He will then explain how to get the offer you want and the start-up package you need to ensure success in your first critical years on the job. Finally, Dr. Reis will summarize essential insights from experienced faculty in all areas of science and engineering on how to develop a rewarding academic career and a quality of life that is both balanced and fulfilling. Plenty of time will be set aside for active interaction and discussion.

  19. Japan Women's University Multi-Career Path Support Model for Female Researchers (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyama, Yoshikazu; Kodate, Kashiko

    2009-04-01

    The overall goal of this project, funded by MEXT-Japan (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, and Technology), is to implement prototypical programs to foster and proactively engage female researchers. The project aims to provide comprehensive support for female researchers who wish to raise a family and pursue an academic career, and increase opportunities for female researchers to play more active roles. To achieve these objectives, three core actions are taken. First, with out-of-office/out-of-lab research support (ubiquitous research support), an assistant researcher is provided to help perform experiments while the ubiquitous researcher is out of the laboratory. A communication network is introduced to connect the laboratory with home to facilitate in-home research. Second, with human resources support, researchers' career paths, abilities, and experiences are accumulated in e-portfolios. This enables researchers coming from different fields of employment to pursue other career paths. Third, a follow-up survey and project planning are conducted. We believe through science education, science can be demystified, and made more accessible and fascinating for children. This would bode well for future generations. Alumni questionnaires show that 80% of respondents were very satisfied to have graduated with a science background.

  20. Combining Academic and Technical Studies to Prepare Students for College and Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2009

    2009-01-01

    Students preparing for college and careers need access to career-focused programs of study that combine challenging academic content and intellectually demanding career/technical (CT) studies. Schools wanting to raise student achievement can create career-focused programs of study that connect a solid academic core with a sequence of CT courses.…

  1. Reputation and impact in academic careers.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Alexander Michael; Fortunato, Santo; Pan, Raj K; Kaski, Kimmo; Penner, Orion; Rungi, Armando; Riccaboni, Massimo; Stanley, H Eugene; Pammolli, Fabio

    2014-10-28

    Reputation is an important social construct in science, which enables informed quality assessments of both publications and careers of scientists in the absence of complete systemic information. However, the relation between reputation and career growth of an individual remains poorly understood, despite recent proliferation of quantitative research evaluation methods. Here, we develop an original framework for measuring how a publication's citation rate Δc depends on the reputation of its central author i, in addition to its net citation count c. To estimate the strength of the reputation effect, we perform a longitudinal analysis on the careers of 450 highly cited scientists, using the total citations Ci of each scientist as his/her reputation measure. We find a citation crossover c×, which distinguishes the strength of the reputation effect. For publications with c < c×, the author's reputation is found to dominate the annual citation rate. Hence, a new publication may gain a significant early advantage corresponding to roughly a 66% increase in the citation rate for each tenfold increase in Ci. However, the reputation effect becomes negligible for highly cited publications meaning that, for c ≥ c×, the citation rate measures scientific impact more transparently. In addition, we have developed a stochastic reputation model, which is found to reproduce numerous statistical observations for real careers, thus providing insight into the microscopic mechanisms underlying cumulative advantage in science. PMID:25288774

  2. Reputation and impact in academic careers

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Alexander Michael; Fortunato, Santo; Pan, Raj K.; Kaski, Kimmo; Penner, Orion; Rungi, Armando; Riccaboni, Massimo; Stanley, H. Eugene; Pammolli, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Reputation is an important social construct in science, which enables informed quality assessments of both publications and careers of scientists in the absence of complete systemic information. However, the relation between reputation and career growth of an individual remains poorly understood, despite recent proliferation of quantitative research evaluation methods. Here, we develop an original framework for measuring how a publication’s citation rate Δc depends on the reputation of its central author i, in addition to its net citation count c. To estimate the strength of the reputation effect, we perform a longitudinal analysis on the careers of 450 highly cited scientists, using the total citations Ci of each scientist as his/her reputation measure. We find a citation crossover c×, which distinguishes the strength of the reputation effect. For publications with c < c×, the author’s reputation is found to dominate the annual citation rate. Hence, a new publication may gain a significant early advantage corresponding to roughly a 66% increase in the citation rate for each tenfold increase in Ci. However, the reputation effect becomes negligible for highly cited publications meaning that, for c ≥ c×, the citation rate measures scientific impact more transparently. In addition, we have developed a stochastic reputation model, which is found to reproduce numerous statistical observations for real careers, thus providing insight into the microscopic mechanisms underlying cumulative advantage in science. PMID:25288774

  3. Persistency and Uncertainty Across the Academic Career

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Alexander; Riccaboni, Massimo; Stanley, H. Eugene; Pammolli, Fabio

    2012-02-01

    Recent shifts in the business structure of universities and a bottleneck in the supply of tenure track positions are two issues that threaten to change the longstanding patronage system in academia and affect the overall potential of science. We analyze the longitudinal publication rate ni(t) on the 1-year scale for 300 physicists i=1...300. For most careers analyzed, we observe cumulative production acceleration Ni(t) Ait^αi with αi>1, reflecting the benefits of learning and collaboration spillovers which constitute a cumulative advantage. We find that the variance in production scales with collaboration radius size Si as 2̂i˜Si^ψ with 0.4 < ψ< 0.8. We develop a preferential growth model to gain insight into the relation between career persistency and career uncertainty. This model shows that emphasis on nonstop production, a consequence of short-term contract systems, results in a significant number of ``sudden death'' careers that terminate due to unavoidable negative production shocks. Hence, short-term contracts may increase the strength of ``rich-get-richer'' mechanisms in competitive professions and hinder the upward mobility of young scientists.

  4. Exploratory Honors Students: Academic Major and Career Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carduner, Jessie; Padak, Gary M.; Reynolds, Jamie

    2011-01-01

    In this qualitative study, we investigated the academic major and career decision-making processes of honors college students who were declared as "exploratory" students in their freshman year at a large, public, midwestern university. We used semistandardized interviews and document analysis as primary data collection methods to answer four…

  5. Tomorrow's Professor: Preparing for Academic Careers in Science and Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reis, Richard M.

    Intended for students considering academic careers, beginning faculty, and professionals considering a return to academia as professors, this book provides a comprehensive guide to teaching at schools of science and engineering. The three chapters of Part 1 examine the unique characteristics of higher education, the place of science and…

  6. Identity-Trajectory: Reframing Early Career Academic Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlpine, Lynn; Amundsen, Cheryl; Turner, Gill

    2014-01-01

    Our longitudinal qualitative research program examining doctoral student, post-PhD researcher and new lecturer experience is situated in an international literature documenting how early career academics learn through experience. In common with others, our work is framed within an identity perspective. What makes our view of identity distinct is a…

  7. Academic, Career and Personal Needs of Nigerian University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aluede, Oyaziwo; Imhonde, Henry; Eguavoen, Agatha

    2006-01-01

    The academic, career and personal needs of students of Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma-Nigeria were surveyed. A total of 920 undergraduates participated in this study. The results of the study revealed that irrespective of students' residential status, gender, age and relationship status, the students ranked time-management as the most pressing…

  8. Strengthening the Teaching Self-Efficacy of Early Career Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmings, Brian Colin

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on a qualitative study exploring teaching self-efficacy (defined as a belief in capability to execute teaching-related tasks) in a higher education context. It is based on the views of 12 early career academics (ECAs) employed at Charles Sturt University who were interviewed to learn more about how their teaching self-efficacy…

  9. A Conceptual Model of Career Development to Enhance Academic Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Nancy Creighton

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop, refine, and validate a conceptual model of career development to enhance the academic motivation of community college students. To achieve this end, a straw model was built from the theoretical and empirical research literature. The model was then refined and validated through three rounds of a Delphi…

  10. Predictors of Academics' Career Advancement at Malaysian Private Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arokiasamy, Lawrence; Ismail, Maimunah; Ahmad, Aminah; Othman, Jamilah

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine the influence of individual and organizational variables on the career advancement of academics in Malaysian private universities. Design/methodology/approach: A correlation study was conducted in six private universities. Data were collected using a structured self-administered questionnaire. The dependent…

  11. A Structured Career Intervention Program for Academically Challenged Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salleh, Amla; Abdullah, Syed Mohamad; Mahmud, Zuria; Ghavifekr, Simin; Ishak, Noriah

    2013-01-01

    A study was carried out to test the effects of a 2-week structured intervention program on academically challenged students' career development. A quasi-experimental study was designed using pre-tests, post-tests, and a control group approach to examine the effects of the intervention program. Data were collected from both the experimental…

  12. Long-term Academic and Career Impacts of Undergraduate Research: Diverse Pathways to Geoscience Careers Following a Summer Atmospheric Science Research Internship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trott, C. D.; Sample McMeeking, L. B.; Boyd, K.; Bowker, C.

    2015-12-01

    Research experiences for undergraduates (REU) have been shown to support the success of STEM undergraduates through improving their research skills, ability to synthesize knowledge, and personal and professional development, all while socializing them into the nature of science. REUs are further intended to support STEM career choice and professional advancement, and have thus played a key role in diversity efforts. Recruiting and retaining diverse students in STEM through REUs is of particular importance in the geosciences, where women and ethnic minorities continue to be significantly underrepresented. However, few studies have examined the long-term impacts of these REUs on students' academic and career trajectories. Further, those that do exist primarily study the experiences of current graduate students, scientists, and faculty members—that is, those who have already persisted—which overlooks the multiple academic and career paths REU students might follow and may preclude a thorough examination of REUs' diversity impacts. In this long-term retrospective study of the academic and career impacts of a REU program at a large Western U.S. research university, we interviewed 17 former REU participants on their expectations prior to their REU participation, their experiences during the REU, the immediate outcomes from the experience, and its long-term impacts on their academic and career choices. To address gaps in the existing literature on REU impacts, we purposively sampled students who have taken a variety of educational and career paths, including those not engaged in science research. Despite varied trajectories, the majority of the students we interviewed have persisted in the geosciences and attest to the REU's profound impact on their career-related opportunities and choices. This presentation describes students' diverse STEM pathways and discusses how students' REU expectations, experiences, and immediate outcomes continued to make an impact long-term.

  13. Impact of a Constructivist Career Course on Academic Performance and Graduation Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grier-Reed, Tabitha; Chahla, Rose

    2015-01-01

    Career planning courses are one of the most effective ways to improve career development, and the benefits to career decision-making are well documented. The research base regarding whether career courses contribute to academic outcomes is less well-developed. Although recent findings suggest that career courses may improve retention in the first-…

  14. Rigor and academic achievement: Career academies versus traditional class structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyees, Linda L.

    The purpose of this study was to determine if students who attended high school Career Academy classes, as part of Career and Technical Education, showed greater academic achievement than students who attended traditional high school classes. While all participants attended schools in the same school district, and were seeking the same goal of graduation with a standard diploma, the Career Academy students had the benefit of all classes being directed by a team of teachers who helped them connect their learning to their desired career through collaborative learning projects and assignments. The traditional high school classes taught each subject independent of other subjects and did not have specific connections to desired career goals of the students. The study used a causal-comparative research design and the participants included 1,142 students from 11th and 12th grades who attended 9 high schools in a diversely populated area of central Florida with 571 enrolled in the Career Academies and 571 enrolled in traditional classes. The 10th-grade FCAT scores served as the dependent variable. All students attended similar classes with similar content, making the primary variable the difference in academic gains between students participating in the Career Academy design and the traditional design classes. Using the Man-Whitney U Test resulted in the Career Academy group achieving the higher scores overall. This resulted in rejection of the first null-hypothesis. Further examination determined that the 10th-grade FCAT scores were greater for the average students group, which comprised the largest portion of the participant group, also resulted in rejection of the second null-hypothesis. The gifted and at-risk student group scores resulted in failure to reject the third and fourth null-hypotheses.

  15. Early-Career Academics' Learning in Academic Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remmik, Marvi; Karm, Mari; Haamer, Anu; Lepp, Liina

    2011-01-01

    Communities of practice are generally known as places of engagement, learning and development. The current research aims to develop understanding of Estonian early-career university teachers' learning and developing possibilities as teachers in the community of practice (in the university). This paper is based on narrative interviews of 25…

  16. Careers of African Americans in Academic Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fikes, Robert Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Though traditionally the field of academic astronomy has belonged almost exclusively to whites, today several black scholars are beginning to make their mark in this scientific discipline. Profiles a group of contemporary African American scholars who are astronomers and astrophysicists, noting that there are at least four black graduate students…

  17. Academic Work and Careers: Relocation, Relocation, Relocation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlpine, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Increasingly PhD graduates who wish to take up traditional academic positions (full-time teaching and research leading to permanence) are unable to find such jobs. They end up in fixed-term appointments as post-doctoral fellows or researchers on others' grants. Few studies document their experiences and most that do draw on data from the late…

  18. Hidden Disability and an Academic Career

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beretz, Elaine M.

    2003-01-01

    Is fighting a serious illness or recovering from a major injury mutually exclusive with being a professor? Trends in academic employment and societal attitudes toward disability answer that question with a resounding yes. This disturbing state of affairs will continue until people develop ways to accommodate the "hidden" disability of serious…

  19. The Effect of Promotion on Career Path Choice amongst Secondary School Pupils.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Fred

    1992-01-01

    A survey of 2,006 students from 12 Perth (Australia) high schools (80 percent response) found positive attitudes toward military careers, a pragmatic view of career paths, family influence on career choice, and a positive impact of a promotional campaign for the armed forces. (SK)

  20. An Empirical Study of the Career Paths of Senior Educational Administrators in Manitoba, Canada: Implications for Career Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallin, Dawn C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper conceptualizes queue theory (Tallerico & Blount, 2004) to discuss a mixed-methods study that determined the career patterns of senior educational administrators in public school divisions in Manitoba, Canada, compared by position, context and sex. Findings indicate that queue theory has merit for describing the career paths of senior…

  1. Teacher Pay and Career Paths in an Opportunity Culture: A Practical Policy Guide--Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassel, Emily Ayscue; Holly, Christen; Locke, Gillian

    2014-01-01

    To help all students reach their potential, district leaders must ensure that every student has consistent access to excellent teaching. Opportunity Culture compensation and career path structures help make that possible, and this guide shows how. "Teacher Pay and Career Paths in an Opportunity Culture: A Practical Policy Guide" shows…

  2. Teacher Pay and Career Paths in an Opportunity Culture: A Practical Policy Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassel, Emily Ayscue; Holly, Christen; Locke, Gillian

    2014-01-01

    To help all students reach their potential, district leaders must ensure that every student has consistent access to excellent teaching. Opportunity Culture compensation and career path structures help make that possible, and this guide shows how. "Teacher Pay and Career Paths in an Opportunity Culture: A Practical Policy Guide" shows…

  3. Redesigning Schools to Reach Every Student with Excellent Teachers: Teacher, Leader, and Paraprofessional Career Paths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Impact, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This document provides an overview of multiple career paths that schools can use to expand opportunities for their teachers. These career paths match Public Impact's school models that use job redesign and technology to extend the reach of excellent teachers to more students, for more pay, within budget. Most of these school models create new…

  4. Career Path Processes as Perceived by African American Female School Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leathers, Sonja

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to improve our understanding of factors that influence the career paths of African American female school principals in North Carolina. Three pertinent research questions were addressed in this study: (1) What formative experiences influence the career path decisions of African American females who want to become school…

  5. Academic Provenance: Mapping Geoscience Students' Academic Pathways to their Career Trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlton, H. R.; Gonzales, L. M.; Keane, C. M.

    2011-12-01

    Targeted recruitment and retention efforts for the geosciences have become increasingly important with the growing concerns about program visibility on campuses, and given that geoscience degree production remains low relative to the demand for new geoscience graduates. Furthermore, understanding the career trajectories of geoscience degree recipients is essential for proper occupational placement. A theoretical framework was developed by Houlton (2010) to focus recruitment and retention efforts. This "pathway model" explicitly maps undergraduate students' geoscience career trajectories, which can be used to refine existing methods for recruiting students into particular occupations. Houlton's (2010) framework identified three main student population groups: Natives, Immigrants or Refugees. Each student followed a unique pathway, which consisted of six pathway steps. Each pathway step was comprised of critical incidents that influenced students' overall career trajectories. An aggregate analysis of students' pathways (Academic Provenance Analysis) showed that different populations' pathways exhibited a deviation in career direction: Natives indicated intentions to pursue industry or government sectors, while Immigrants intended to pursue academic or research-based careers. We expanded on Houlton's (2010) research by conducting a follow-up study to determine if the original participants followed the career trajectories they initially indicated in the 2010 study. A voluntary, 5-question, short-answer survey was administered via email. We investigated students' current pathway steps, pathway deviations, students' goals for the near future and their ultimate career ambitions. This information may help refine Houlton's (2010) "pathway model" and may aid geoscience employers in recruiting the new generation of professionals for their respective sectors.

  6. Impairment Effects as a Career Boundary: A Case Study of Disabled Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Jannine; Mavin, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Within the academic career literature, disabled academics are under-researched, despite calls for career theory development through the exploration of marginalized groups' career experiences and the boundaries which shape these experiences. Here, boundaries refer to the symbolic resources which become reified to construct social boundaries…

  7. Career progression of academic medical library directors.

    PubMed

    Newcomer, A P; Pisciotta, R A

    1989-04-01

    While females are still underrepresented as directors overall, the results of our survey indicate that in the past ten years female library directors have been hired in numbers nearly matching their overall percentage of the medical library profession. When the personal characteristics of medical library directors are compared by gender, male directors are more likely to be married, have children, and be somewhat younger upon attaining their first directorship. When the professional characteristics are compared, the only notable difference is that a greater portion of males hold a second master's degree. Despite the changing numbers of female library directors in the past ten years, these differences all held constant before and after 1977. Only the number of internal successions to directorship changed over time. The succession patterns of medical library directors now match more closely those of other academic library directors. PMID:2720221

  8. Addressing the "Global Health Tax" and "Wild Cards": Practical Challenges to Building Academic Careers in Global Health.

    PubMed

    Palazuelos, Daniel; Dhillon, Ranu

    2016-01-01

    Among many possible benefits, global health efforts can expand the skills and experience of U.S. clinicians, improve health for communities in need, and generate innovations in care delivery with relevance everywhere. Yet, despite high rates of interest among students and medical trainees to include global health opportunities in their training, there is still no clear understanding of how this interest will translate into viable and sustained global health careers after graduation. Building on a growing conversation about how to support careers in academic global health, this Perspective describes the practical challenges faced by physicians pursuing these careers after they complete training. Writing from their perspective as junior faculty at one U.S. academic health center with a dedicated focus on global health training, the authors describe a number of practical issues they have found to be critical both for their own career development and for the advice they provide their mentees. With a particular emphasis on the financial, personal, professional, and logistical challenges that young "expat" global health physicians in academic institutions face, they underscore the importance of finding ways to support these career paths, and propose possible solutions. Such investments would not only respond to the rational and moral imperatives of global health work and advance the mission of improving human health but also help to fully leverage the potential of what is already an unprecedented movement within academic medicine. PMID:26244256

  9. Web-based Academic Roadmaps for Careers in the Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, D. P.; Veeger, A. I.; Grossman-Garber, D.

    2007-12-01

    To a greater extent than most science programs, geology is underrepresented in K-12 curricula and the media. Thus potential majors have scant knowledge of academic requirements and career trajectories, and their idea of what geologists do--if they have one at all--is outdated. We have addressed these concerns by developing a dynamic, web-based academic roadmap for current and prospective students, their families, and others who are contemplating careers in the geosciences. The goals of this visually attractive "educational pathway" are to not only improve student recruitment and retention, but to empower student learning by creating better communication and advising tools that can render our undergraduate program transparent for learners and their families. Although we have developed academic roadmaps for four environmental and life science programs at the University of Rhode Island, we focus here on the roadmap for the geosciences, which illustrates educational pathways along the academic and early-career continuum for current and potential (i.e., high school) students who are considering the earth sciences. In essence, the Geosciences Academic Roadmap is a "one-stop'" portal to the discipline. It includes user- friendly information about our curriculum, outcomes (which at URI are tightly linked to performance in courses and the major), extracurricular activities (e.g., field camp, internships), careers, graduate programs, and training. In the presentation of this material extensive use is made of streaming video, interviews with students and earth scientists, and links to other relevant sites. Moreover, through the use of "Hot Topics", particular attention is made to insure that examples of geoscience activities are not only of relevance to today's students, but show geologists using the modern methods of the discipline in exciting ways. Although this is a "work-in-progress", evaluation of the sites, by high school through graduate students, has been strongly

  10. Careers in Academe: The Academic Labour Market as an Eco-System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baruch, Yehuda

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore the contrast between stable and dynamic labour markets in academe in light of career theories that were originally developed for business environments. Design/methodology/approach: A conceptual design, offering the eco-system as a framework. Findings: It evaluates their relevance and applicability to dynamic and…

  11. The Winding Path: Understanding the Career Cycle of Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynn, Susan K.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a career cycle for teachers, including the variables of enthusiasm, interactive teaching skills, attitudes towards students and teaching, and attitudes toward the teaching profession. Discusses the model's eight stages: preservice, induction, competency building, enthusiasm and growth, career frustration, career stability, career…

  12. Career Paths, Images and Anchors: A Study with Brazilian Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilimnik, Zelia Miranda; de Oliveira, Luiz Claudio Vieira; Sant'anna, Anderson De Souza; Barros, Delba Teixeira Rodrigues

    2011-01-01

    This article analyses career anchors changes associated to images and professionals trajectories. Its main question: Do anchors careers change through time? We conducted twelve interviews involving professionals from the Administration Area, applying Schein's Career Anchors Inventory (1993). We did the same two years later. In both of them, the…

  13. E-Learning as a Career Path in Information Systems Curricula: A Blue Ocean Opportunity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Robert J.; Fadel, Kelly J.

    2012-01-01

    E-learning is a rapidly growing industry with emerging career opportunities that require expertise in business, information technology, and instructional design. However, most academic institutions lack cohesive programs for preparing students for e-learning careers. We argue that information systems (IS) programs have a unique, "blue…

  14. Adaptation: paradigm for the gut and an academic career.

    PubMed

    Warner, Brad W

    2013-01-01

    Adaptation is an important compensatory response to environmental cues resulting in enhanced survival. In the gut, the abrupt loss of intestinal length is characterized by increased rates of enterocyte proliferation and apoptosis and culminates in adaptive villus and crypt growth. In the development of an academic pediatric surgical career, adaptation is also an important compensatory response to survive the ever changing research, clinical, and economic environment. The ability to adapt in both situations is critical for patients and a legacy of pediatric surgical contributions to advance our knowledge of multiple conditions and diseases. PMID:23331788

  15. Adaptation: Paradigm for the Gut and an Academic Career

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Brad W.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation is an important compensatory response to environmental cues resulting in enhanced survival. In the gut, the abrupt loss of intestinal length is characterized by increased rates of enterocyte proliferation and apoptosis and culminates in adaptive villus and crypt growth. In the development of an academic pediatric surgical career, adaptation is also an important compensatory response to survive the ever changing research, clinical, and economic environment. The ability to adapt in both situations is critical for patients and a legacy of pediatric surgical contributions to advance our knowledge of multiple conditions and diseases. PMID:23331788

  16. "Stepping Stones": Career Paths to the SSAO for Men and Women at Four-Year Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biddix, J. Patrick

    2011-01-01

    This study examined career paths to becoming the Senior Student Affairs Officer for men (n = 151) and women (n = 99) at 4-year institutions. Descriptive statistics and network analysis of resume data revealed that an average of 20 years and six job changes led to the position. Most started careers in residential life or student activities,…

  17. Career Paths of Former Apprentices. Making Work-Based Learning Work. Series 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez-del-Aguila, Rossana; Monteiro, Helen; Hughes, Maria

    2006-01-01

    This report investigates the career paths taken by apprentices after they complete their training, and the extent to which their apprenticeships has been influential in their future success. The project investigated what careers apprenticeship training secures access to; whether the method and quality of the learning experience in apprenticeships;…

  18. Career Paths and Work Patterns of Women in Mid-Management Roles in Busines and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funk, Carole

    To obtain more information about the characteristics, work patterns, and career paths of women in middle management roles, this study collected structured interview data from 45 managerial women in business and education. During summer 1987, each student in the Women and Careers class at Texas Woman's University interviewed two female managers,…

  19. Industrial & Engineering Systems Career Cluster ITAC for Career-Focused Education: Manufacturing Sub-Cluster. Integrated Technical & Academic Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Designed for Ohio educators responsible for planning programs to prepare high school students for careers in the manufacturing industry, this document presents an overview of Ohio's Integrated Technical and Academic Competencies (ITAC) system of career-focused education and specific information about the manufacturing subcluster of the industrial…

  20. Human Resource Management Careers: Different Paths for Men and Women?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackah, Carol; Heaton, Norma

    2003-01-01

    Responses from individuals with postgraduate human resource management qualifications (n=52, 60% women, 40% men) indicated that men received more internal promotions, women sought career advancement externally and received lower salaries. Women were much more likely to perceive career barriers such as lack of role models or self-confidence.…

  1. A Study Analyzing the Career Path of Librarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noh, Younghee

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to identify the career movement patterns of librarians, analyze factors influencing their career movements, and compare differences in such factors between librarians and chief librarians. Findings showed that the jobs with the highest retention rate were those in public libraries, that library automation system developers showed…

  2. Student Self-Efficacy in a Chosen Business Career Path: The Influence of Cognitive Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harder, Joseph T.; Czyzewski, Alan; Sherwood, Arthur L.

    2015-01-01

    An important dimension of university students' academic success is retention in their chosen major. When students do switch majors or interrupt their education, it is largely due to their lack of confidence about doing well academically, as well as perceived chances of success in the career area related to university major. A term often used for…

  3. The Apprenticeship of Observation in Career Contexts: A Typology for the Role of Modeling in Teachers' Career Paths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinke, Carol R.; Mawhinney, Lynnette; Park, Gloria

    2014-01-01

    This article extends the literature on teachers' career paths by attending to the experiences of educators when they were students in secondary classrooms. Grounded in the perspective that biography is central to teaching, we investigate undergraduate pre-service teachers' educational experiences, views on teaching and learning, and…

  4. Career-Focused Education for Ohio's Students: Sample Instructional Units. Integrated Technical and Academic Competencies (ITAC).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Career-Technical and Adult Education.

    This book is designed to help academic teachers in middle or secondary education develop an appreciation of career-focused education and begin the process of designing career-focused instruction. (Career-focused instruction is educational programming in which curriculum content and learning experiences clearly connect to the world of work.) For…

  5. Balancing Career and Technical Education with Academic Coursework: The Consequences for Mathematics Achievement in High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozick, Robert; Dalton, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Federal legislation has attempted to move career and technical education (CTE) from a segregated component of the high school curriculum to an integrated element that jointly improves both academic and career readiness. However, concerns remain about the ability of CTE to improve academic learning. Using a nationally representative sample of high…

  6. Research Success and Structured Support: Developing Early Career Academics in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geber, H.

    2009-01-01

    Entry into a successful academic career is often an arduous process. From career preparation through to doctoral studies and beyond, the journey can be fraught with trials. Why do many academics find difficulty in completing their studies in the minimum time and publishing afterwards? As the University of the Witwatersrand has a strategic goal of…

  7. Blending Academic, Career/Technical and Fine Arts Instruction to Increase Achievement and Graduation Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Teachers who work together to blend academic and career/technical (CT) instruction have found a key to motivating students to complete high school and prepare for college, advanced training and careers. This newsletter highlights key strategies schools are using to join academic and technical studies to advance student motivation and achievement.…

  8. Critical Interactions Shaping Early Academic Career Development in Two Higher Education Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmings, Brian; Hill, Doug; Sharp, John G.

    2013-01-01

    This study was aimed at identifying the critical interactions within work environments that support the development of early career academics as researchers in institutions with lower order research profiles, that is, environments that differ from research-intensive universities. Ten early career academics, five from Australia and five from the…

  9. The Career Perceptions of Academic Staff and Human Resource Discourses in English Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strike, Tony; Taylor, John

    2009-01-01

    This paper sets out findings from research that considered the interplay between English national policy developments in human resources management in higher education and the personal stories of academic staff as career participants. Academic careers are pursued in an institutional and national policy context but it was not clear that the formal…

  10. Career and Academic Guidance for American Indian and Alaska Native Youth. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shutiva, Charmaine L.

    American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) students strive to maintain their heritage while learning to be successful in the dominant culture. Although academic and career success are worthy goals, AI/AN students can pay a heavy price to achieve them. To provide effective and responsive career and academic guidance for AI/AN youth, teachers and…

  11. Academic-Career Integration in Magnet High Schools: Assessing the Level of Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tokarska, Barbara; And Others

    An ongoing study examined implementation and student response to academic career magnet (ACM) programs in New York City high schools. The programs emphasize both college preparation and career education, demonstrating one approach to the current emphasis on integrating academic and vocational education. New York City offers a wide array of magnet…

  12. The Effects of Academic Career Magnet Education on High Schools and Their Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crain, Robert L.; Allen, Anna; Thaler, Robert; Sullivan, Debora; Zellman, Gail L.; Little, Judith Warren; Quigley, Denise D.

    This book contains eight papers on a study of the effects of academic career magnetic education on high schools and their graduates. "Introduction" (Robert L. Crain) explains the study's objectives and methodology, which included an analysis of data files on 9,176 students who applied to 59 different academic career magnet education and interviews…

  13. Academic Support Services and Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy in Student Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Gary N.; Jasinski, Dale; Dunn, Steve; Fletcher, Duncan

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between evaluations of academic support services and student athletes' career decision-making self-efficacy. One hundred and fifty-eight NCAA athletes (68% male) from 11 Division I teams completed measures of satisfaction with their academic support services, career decision-making self-efficacy, general…

  14. How Did I Get Here? - The Role of Unconscious Bias in Career Paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knezek, Patricia

    2010-05-01

    I will discuss how an individual's implicit biases and those of the educators, mentors, and potential employers he or she interacts with can impact career decisions all along the career path. I will present ideas about how an individual can identify his or her own interests, skills, and talents, and promote those to potential employers as well as ideas for those serving on search committees to minimize the impact of unconscious bias during the entire hiring process.

  15. Alternative Career Paths in Physical Education: Sport Management. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stier, William F., Jr.

    Prior to the late 1960s, physical education professional preparation programs in the United States were principally concerned with preparing coaches of sport and teachers of physical education. However, in recent decades, the field has spawned a number of alternative career tracks of which none has proven to be more viable than sport management.…

  16. Understanding Teachers' Careers: Linking Professional Life to Professional Path

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinke, Carol R.

    2008-01-01

    This research synthesis aims to more fully understand the current teacher retention crisis in the United States through a re-conceptualization of what is meant by a teaching career. Currently, research is divided into two broad categories: traditional research on teacher retention and traditional research on teachers' professional lives. This…

  17. Discovery Path: a retention strategy for mid-career nurses.

    PubMed

    Donner, G J; Wheeler, M M

    2001-01-01

    As health care administrators, policymakers, nursing organizations, and nurses begin to deal with the reality of a looming (and to an increasing extent, existing) serious shortage of nurses both in Canada and globally, recruitment and retention issues are again in the news. Much attention has been directed towards two responses: (a) attracting young people into the profession and helping them integrate into and identify with nursing as a lifelong career, and (b) developing sustainable retention strategies to ensure that nurses remain in nursing. One population that requires particular attention is the mid-career group of nurses. Those nurses, in their late 30s and 40s with 15 and more years of experience, have the professional memory that employers count on, the expertise that patients and clients require, and the experience and wisdom that young nurses depend on for coaching, mentoring, and support. Retention strategies targeted to these mid-career nurses require a diverse set of activities that are focused on those nurses' specific stage of personal and professional development and that recognize their unique needs. The purpose of this article is to describe a program that targets mid-career nurses, predominantly women who, having spent much of their careers and lives caring for others-children, parents, patients-are beginning to question their own futures. The goals of the program and the experiences of one group of nurses in the program, as well as the results of a two-year follow up with them, will be discussed. Recommendations for future retention strategies will also be offered. PMID:15487311

  18. Military Careers: A Guide to Military Occupations and Selected Military Career Paths, 1992-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Defense, Washington, DC.

    This book was developed to help educators and youth learn about career opportunities in the military. It is a compendium of military occupational, training, and career information and is designed for use by students interested in the military. The first section, military occupations, contains descriptions of 197 enlisted and officer occupations.…

  19. Early Career Academic Perceptions, Attitudes and Professional Development Activities: Questioning the Teaching and Research Gap to Further Academic Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Kelly E.; Lodge, Jason M.; Bosanquet, Agnes

    2014-01-01

    Early career academia is a challenging time, particularly as academics are facing increasing pressures to excel across a range of areas. Boyer argued for the "true scholar" versed in the overlapping areas of scholarship in research, teaching, integration and engagement. Academic developers have an important role to play in assisting the…

  20. The career paths of women (and men) in French research.

    PubMed

    de Cheveigné, Suzanne

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents results from a qualitative study of perceptions of science careers in the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), the main research institution in France. Its aim is to understand the 'glass ceiling' effect, which reduces the proportion of women at the higher levels of the career hierarchy. Long interviews were carried out with men, as well as women, support staff and researchers. Factors such as tension between individual and collective dimensions of research activity, and long-term time-management problems, were identified: these affect both men and women but in different ways. Organizations bear an important responsibility through the way they reinforce or alleviate difficulties that women and men face in contributing to scientific research at all levels. PMID:19569427

  1. Women and Men of the Engineering Path: A Model for Analyses of Undergraduate Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, Clifford

    This monograph provides college academic administrators, institutional researchers, professional and learned societies, and academic advisors with information to improve understanding of the paths students take through engineering programs in higher education. The evidence used in this study comes principally from the 11-year college transcript…

  2. Gender Inequalities in Transnational Academic Mobility and the Ideal Type of Academic Entrepreneur

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leemann, Regula Julia

    2010-01-01

    Based on a study on academic career paths of PhD graduates in Switzerland, this paper is concerned with the individual and institutional factors that affect transnational academic mobility in the postdoctoral period. It will be argued that the institutionalisation of geographic mobility in academic career paths through research funding…

  3. Against the Tide: Career Paths of Women Leaders in American and British Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Karen Doyle, Ed.

    Women describe their personal journeys to top positions of leadership in higher education in the 20 essays collected in this book. Ten American and 10 British college and university heads tell their unique stories about passing through the "glass ceiling" that limits the career leadership opportunities for women in academe. Essays include: "Good…

  4. Career Paths of Postsecondary Honors Education Program Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humerickhouse, Kimberly D.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore the paths taken by individuals who hold administrative positions in post-secondary honors education programs. The research sought common professional and educational experiences that current honors education program administrators believe prepared them for the position. This study included the…

  5. Using the Curriculum Vita To Study the Career Paths of Scientists and Engineers: An Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Eliesh O'Neil; Dietz, James S.; Chompalov, Ivan; Bozeman, Barry; Park, Jongwon

    The usefulness of the curriculum vita (CV) as a data source for examining the career paths of scientists and engineers was studied. CVs were obtained in response to an e-mail message sent to researchers working in the area of biotechnology who were funded by the National Science Foundation (55 responses) or listed as authors (industry only) in the…

  6. Examining the Career Paths and Transition Services of Students with Disabilities Exiting High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baer, Robert M.; Flexer, Robert W.; Dennis, Lawrence

    2007-01-01

    Career paths and transition services were investigated for students with disabilities who were exiting special education for comparison with two models of transition developed by Siegel (1998) and Greene (2003). Teachers and parent-mentors from 52 local education agencies (LEAs) conducted a record review and an exit interview of 741 students with…

  7. Redesigning Schools to Reach Every Student with Excellent Teachers: Summary of Teacher Career Paths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Impact, 2012

    2012-01-01

    These career paths match Public Impact's school models that use job redesign and technology to extend the reach of excellent teachers to more students, for more pay, within budget. Most models create new roles and teams enabling all teachers and staff to develop and contribute to excellence. In "reach-extended roles," excellent teachers take…

  8. Social Cognitive Career Theory, Conscientiousness, and Work Performance: A Meta-Analytic Path Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Steven D.; Lent, Robert W.; Telander, Kyle; Tramayne, Selena

    2011-01-01

    We performed a meta-analytic path analysis of an abbreviated version of social cognitive career theory's (SCCT) model of work performance (Lent, Brown, & Hackett, 1994). The model we tested included the central cognitive predictors of performance (ability, self-efficacy, performance goals), with the exception of outcome expectations. Results…

  9. Nonstandard Career Paths and Profiles of Commitment to Life Roles: A Complex Relation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fournier, Genevieve; Lachance, Lise; Bujold, Charles

    2009-01-01

    The career paths (ascending, interesting, uninteresting, descending) of 124 White Canadian francophones (62 men, 62 women) who had experienced nonstandard and precarious work for the last three years were examined in relation to the participants' profiles of commitment to three life roles (work, family, and duality, that is, investment in both…

  10. Career Path Trends of Alumni from a U.S. TESOL Graduate Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priddis, Eimi; Tanner, Mark W.; Henrichsen, Lynn E.; Warner, Ben; Anderson, Neil J.; Dewey, Dan P.

    2013-01-01

    As English expands across the world, quality English teachers are increasingly needed. However, reports that even degree-holding TESOL professionals have a hard time obtaining stable employment are prevalent. This study sought to provide empirical evidence about career paths in TESOL based on survey responses from 250 alumni of a well-established…

  11. Undergraduate Music Program Alumni's Career Path, Retrospective Institutional Satisfaction, and Financial Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miksza, Peter; Hime, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine undergraduate music education and performance alumni's career path, retrospective institutional satisfaction, and financial status. Data for this study were drawn from respondents from the 2010 administration of the nationwide, multi-institutional survey conducted by the Strategic National Arts Alumni…

  12. Career Path Decisions of Masters-Level Mathematics Students: A Comparative Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piotrowski, Chris; Hemasinha, Rohan

    2012-01-01

    There has been a flurry of research activity, in recent years, on the various aspects of STEM programs in the U.S. Yet there is scant research on vocational selection and career path aspirations of mathematics (hereon, math) students during their graduate-level education. The current study, based on a mixed-design, from data obtained on a small…

  13. The Bands Culture in Victoria, Australia: Live Music Benefits Career Paths, Employment and Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Amanda; Forrest, David

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the career paths, employment, business opportunities and community contributions made available through the provision and development of the contemporary performance bands' culture in the State of Victoria. It is framed with the support given to live music performers by Arts Victoria, Small Business Victoria and Music Victoria.…

  14. Academic Motivation in Post-Secondary Students: Effects of Career Outcome Expectations and Type of Aspiration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domene, Jose F.; Socholotiuk, Krista D.; Woitowicz, Lyndsay A.

    2011-01-01

    Using a social cognitive theory framework, we examined the effects of career outcome expectations (COE) and aspiration to enter a science, technology, or math (STM) career on post-secondary academic motivation. Data were collected online from a sample of 380 post-secondary students in Canada and the United States. Analysis of covariance revealed…

  15. Career Mobility of High-Flying Women Academics: A Study at Selected Universities in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ismail, Maimunah; Rasdi, Roziah Mohd

    2006-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the relationship between past experience and the career mobility of 31 high-flying female academics from eight established Malaysian universities. Based on data gathered from in-depth interviews, it is discerned that the respondents' career mobility at the "exploration" stage is influenced by early exposure to…

  16. Linked Learning Demonstrates Blend of Academics and Career-Focused Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armistead, Lew

    2010-01-01

    Blending academic and career-focused instruction could be the key to reforming public high schools. That's the intent of Linked Learning, an initiative in California that was featured at an August briefing, "Building the Capacity of Teachers to Prepare Students for College and Careers," held by the Alliance for Excellent Education. While Linked…

  17. Advice and Reflections for a University Teacher Beginning an Academic Career

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hay, Iain; Bartlett-Trafford, Julie; Chang, T. C.; Kneale, Pauline; Szili, Gerti

    2013-01-01

    Although graduate programs typically prepare university students well for research activity, many have been less successful in educating for other aspects of academic careers. This article discusses Iain Hay's "Letter to a New University Teacher," which has been used internationally to help new lecturers beginning their career.…

  18. The Unacknowledged Value of Female Academic Labour Power for Male Research Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angervall, Petra; Beach, Dennis; Gustafsson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Academic work in Sweden's higher education system is changing character. Distinctly different career pathways are emerging, as facilities for developing research careers and capital have become both more restricted and more dependent on external funding. These developments are in focus in the present article. Based on ethnographic research and a…

  19. Interpersonal Influences on Students' Academic and Career Decisions: The Impact of Sexual Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nauta, Margaret M.; Saucier, Amy M.; Woodard, Leigh E.

    2001-01-01

    Investigates differences in interpersonal influences on career decision making between gay, lesbian, and bisexual (GLB) and heterosexual college students. Results reveal that GLB students reported having more career role models than did heterosexual students. GLB students perceived less support and guidance from others in their academic and career…

  20. Academic and Career Expectations of Ethnic Minority Youth in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Francis; Lai, Beatrice P. Y.; Wu, Anise M. S.; Ku, Lisbeth

    2015-01-01

    Based on social-cognitive career theory (SCCT), we explore how ethnic identity, parental occupation, efficacy in learning Chinese, and learning experience relate to ethnic minority adolescents' academic and career expectations. The participants are 632 Southeast Asian adolescents in Hong Kong. In accordance with SCCT, structural equation modeling…

  1. Two Different Worlds: The Academic Orientation of Graduate Education vs. the Realities of One Applied Career.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schellenberg, Kathryn

    1987-01-01

    Suggests that current academic orientation of graduate education in sociology poses a number of barriers in preparing students for applied careers and demonstrates problems of training versus career reality. Proposes that graduate programs offer a variety of options within a broadly defined applied track, expanding opportunities for students to…

  2. Making clinical academic careers more attractive: views from questionnaire surveys of senior UK doctors

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Trevor W; Goldacre, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives To report on doctors’ reasons, as expressed to our research group, for choosing academic careers and on factors that would make a career in clinical academic medicine more attractive to them. Design Postal, email and web questionnaires. Setting UK. Participants A total of 6936 UK-trained doctors who graduated in 1996, 1999 and 2000. Main outcome measures Open-ended comments about a career in clinical academic medicine. Results Of doctors who provided reasons for pursuing a long-term career in clinical academic medicine, the main reasons were enjoyment of academic work and personal satisfaction, whether expressed directly in those terms, or in terms of intellectual stimulation, enjoyment of research, teaching and the advancement of medicine, and the job being more varied than and preferable to clinical work alone. Doctors’ suggestions for making clinical academic medicine more attractive included improved pay and job security, better funding of research, greater availability of academic posts, more dedicated time for research (and less service work) and more support and mentoring. Women were more likely than men to prioritise flexible working hours and part-time posts. Conclusions Medical schools could provide more information, as part of student teaching, about the opportunities for and realities of a career in clinical academic medicine. Women, in particular, commented that they lacked the role models and information which would encourage them to consider seriously an academic career. Employers could increase academic opportunities by allowing more time for teaching, research and study and should assess whether job plans make adequate allowance for academic work. PMID:26380103

  3. Differences in medical students’ academic interest and performance across career choice motivations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyong-Jee; Hwang, Jee Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate medical students’ career choice motivation and its relationship with their academic interest and performance. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study in a sample (n=207) of medical students at a private medical school in Korea, stratified by year of medical course. Data about participant demographics, career choice motivation and academic interest were collected using a self-report questionnaire. The item on career choice motivation enquired about the respondents’ main reason for applying for medical school among 8 possible response options, which comprised two components of career choice motivation: intrinsic and extrinsic. The participants’ levels of academic interest were measured in a Likert-type question. Participants’ academic interest and Grade Point Averages (GPAs) were compared across the groups of different career motivations along with analyses of their admission scores for baseline comparisons. Results A total of 195 students completed the questionnaire (94%response rate). Seventy-four percent, (n=145; the intrinsic group) of the participants chose reasons related to intrinsic motivation, 22% (n=42; the extrinsic group) chose reasons pertaining to extrinsic motivation, and 4% (n = 8) chose other reasons for applying to medical school. The intrinsic group outperformed the extrinsic group in their GPAs, although their prior academic achievements did not differ significantly. The intrinsic group showed significantly higher levels of academic interest and also performed better in the admission interviews. Conclusions Our study illustrates differences in medical students’ academic interest and performance across career choice motivations. Further research is warranted to establish the predictive power of medical students’ career choice motivation and academic interest on their academic performance. PMID:26878567

  4. Women Using Physics: Alternate Career Paths, The Private Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tams, Jessica

    2006-12-01

    For those who have spent their careers inside the safe walls of academia, the word is a little scary. Can I compete? Will I fit in? What do I need to know? Am I prepared? Will I succeed? While many would say: Yes! You are ready to excel! This isn’t actually the case. The private sector comes with many unanticipated shocks to many of us, especially women. This isn’t a group project. This session will discuss entering a quickly growing and competitive technical field and what one can do to prepare for continued success. Preparing and Entering the Private Sector * Women with technical skills are a desired part of the private workforcein general women posses stronger people skills, are more reliable and often more well rounded than their male counterparts. Key factors we will discuss to landing that first job: · Expand your knowledge base with current applications of technology · Preparing a solid employment pitch to highlight strengths: Overcoming stereotypes · Don’t show them your bad side: Why some student projects may hurt you · The private sector attitude toward performance and entry level expectations Excelling in the Private Sector * Now that we have landed a job * for better or worse we are now all about making money and exerting control. What to keep in mind while working in the private sector: · The formative first years: focus on your weaknesses and practice, practice, practice · Men & Women in the workplace: what women subconsciously do to hurt their careers · Politics: Working in a team environment · Polish & Detail & Reliabilit

  5. Differences between first and fourth year medical students’ interest in pursuing careers in academic medicine

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the differences in the attitudes of first and fourth-year medical students regarding careers in academics. We also sought to identify any factors associated with an increased interest in academic medicine. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted during October 2013 at the University of Louisville.  All first and fourth year medical students were invited to complete an online survey utilizing a survey instrument developed through literature review.  Demographic data and information about background experiences were collected in addition to participants' perceptions regarding careers in academia using a 5-point Likert scale. Participants were also queried about their current interest in a career in academics and the likelihood they would pursue academic medicine. Results Of the 330 potential participants, 140 (42.4%) agreed to participate. Overall, fourth-years reported a higher likelihood of pursuing an academic career than first-years. Research experience, publications, distinction track interest or involvement, and belief that a career in academics would reduce salary potential were positively correlated with reported likelihood of pursuing academic medicine. Conclusions Findings from this pilot study demonstrate differences in interest in academic medicine between junior and senior medical students. Additionally, several factors were associated with a high likelihood of self-reported interest in academic. Based on these findings, efforts to increase medical students’ interest in academic medicine careers could be supported by providing more research and teaching opportunities or distinction track options as a structured part of the medical school curriculum. PMID:27219295

  6. Addressing the “Global Health Tax” and “Wild Cards”: Practical Challenges to Building Academic Careers in Global Health

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Ranu

    2016-01-01

    Among many possible benefits, global health efforts can expand the skills and experience of U.S. clinicians, improve health for communities in need, and generate innovations in care delivery with relevance everywhere. Yet, despite high rates of interest among students and medical trainees to include global health opportunities in their training, there is still no clear understanding of how this interest will translate into viable and sustained global health careers after graduation. Building on a growing conversation about how to support careers in academic global health, this Perspective describes the practical challenges faced by physicians pursuing these careers after they complete training. Writing from their perspective as junior faculty at one U.S. academic health center with a dedicated focus on global health training, the authors describe a number of practical issues they have found to be critical both for their own career development and for the advice they provide their mentees. With a particular emphasis on the financial, personal, professional, and logistical challenges that young “expat” global health physicians in academic institutions face, they underscore the importance of finding ways to support these career paths, and propose possible solutions. Such investments would not only respond to the rational and moral imperatives of global health work and advance the mission of improving human health but also help to fully leverage the potential of what is already an unprecedented movement within academic medicine. PMID:26244256

  7. Career Anchors and Career Paths: A Panel Study of Management School Graduates. Technical Report No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schein, Edgar H.

    The first of a series, this report describes a 10-year followup study of a sample of 44 graduates of the Sloan School of Management, analyzing the interaction of personal values and career events in the lives of managers in organizations. All 44 participants were located, interviewed, and given the same attitude surveys as in the early 1960's.…

  8. Seizing the Future: How Ohio's Career-Technical Education Programs Fuse Academic Rigor and Real-World Experiences to Prepare Students for College and Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarino, Heidi; Yoder, Shaun

    2015-01-01

    "Seizing the Future: How Ohio's Career and Technical Education Programs Fuse Academic Rigor and Real-World Experiences to Prepare Students for College and Work," demonstrates Ohio's progress in developing strong policies for career and technical education (CTE) programs to promote rigor, including college- and career-ready graduation…

  9. The career paths of mathematics and science teachers in high need schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchhoff, Allison Lynette

    High-poverty schools typically have higher levels of attrition than other schools, particularly in mathematics and science. Financial incentives have often been used to attract teachers to high need schools and subjects. Despite extensive investments in these incentives and extensive research regarding recruitment and retention, little is known about how these areas interact with one another over teachers' careers. The purpose of this study is to address the lack of integration of these areas by investigating the career paths of 38 Noyce scholars. Acceptance of the Noyce funding requires teaching in high-need schools for two years. Grounded theory methodology was guided by the research question: What are Noyce scholars' reasons for the decisions made on the career path of becoming and remaining teachers in high need schools? Analysis resulted in an explanatory model of the "pathway to retention in high need schools." The model indicates that the career paths of teachers in high need schools are complex and interactive. Interactions among the reasons the scholars chose to enter teaching, their school setting, community, teacher education and the Noyce funding appear to play a role in their eventual satisfaction and retention. The study has implications for the recruitment and retention of teachers in high need schools.

  10. A Comparison of Career Technical Education--16 Career Pathway High School Participants with Non-Participants on Academic Achievement, School Engagement, and Development of Technical Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orozco, Edith Aimee

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this research was to compare Career Technical Education--16 Career Pathway high school participants with non-participants on academic achievement, development of technical skills and school engagement. Academic achievement was measured by Exit Level Math and English Language Arts Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS)…

  11. Academic Careers from a European Perspective: The Declining Desirability of the Faculty Position.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huisman, Jeroen; de Weert, Egbert; Bartelse, Jeroen

    2002-01-01

    This comparative analysis examined the developments and state of the art with respect to the academic career in a number of European countries (The Netherlands, Germany, United Kingdom, and Sweden). It focused on the position of Ph.D. students and "advanced" academics and uncovered common developments, policies, problems, and possible solutions.…

  12. Early-Career Academics' Perceptions of Teaching and Learning in Hong Kong: Implications for Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Keith; McNaught, Carmel; Wong, Kin-Chi; Li, Yi-Ching

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses early-career academics' development at a university in Hong Kong. Reflecting the impact of local context, the paper explores cultural and structural influences that can impinge on teaching and learning strategies for new academics. Barriers such as student learning behaviour and publication pressure may discourage new…

  13. Work Volition, Career Decision Self-Efficacy, and Academic Satisfaction: An Examination of Mediators and Moderators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jadidian, Alex; Duffy, Ryan D.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the relation of work volition to career decision self-efficacy (CDSE) and academic satisfaction in a diverse sample of 447 undergraduate college students. Work volition was found to be moderately correlated with academic satisfaction and strongly correlated with CDSE. Potential mediators and moderators in the link of…

  14. Moving from Clinical Practice to Academe: An Analysis of Career Change for Physician Assistants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marciano, Gerard Jude

    2013-01-01

    Recruitment of qualified and motivated faculty for physician assistant education programs is difficult. While the causes of the difficulty may be many, the primary one is the physician assistants (PAs) must choose between clinical and academic practice in order to pursue a career in academe. Little if any research has been conducted in this area.…

  15. CSWP Panel Discussion: Women in Academic Science: Balancing Career and Family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppersmith, Susan; Drndic, Marija; Lee, Ka Yee; Mason, Nadya; Vollmayr-Lee, Katherina

    2007-03-01

    Many people who are considering pursuing academic careers in science worry about how to balance career with family. One challenge is the two-body problem, where partners are searching for jobs that are reasonably close together. Another challenge, particularly for women, is children: many women worry about whether they can have children as well as successful careers, and if so, when might be the best time to have them. This panel discussion will bring together five women who span a range of stages in their faculty careers and who all have children. Several of them have spouses who are also academic scientists. They will discuss practical strategies that they have adopted to address the challenges of career and family, as well as their views on what departments and institutions can/should do to help.

  16. Academic and non-academic career options for marine scientists. - Support measures for early career scientists offered at MARUM - Center for Marine Environmental Sciences, University of Bremen, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebbeln, Dierk; Klose, Christina

    2015-04-01

    Early career scientists at MARUM cover a wide range of research topics and disciplines including geosciences, biology, chemistry, social sciences and law. Just as colourful as the disciplinary background of the people, are their ideas for their personal careers. With our services and programmes, we aim to address some important career planning needs of PhD students and early career Postdocs, both, for careers in science and for careers outside academia. For PhD students aiming to stay in science, MARUM provides funding opportunities for a research stay abroad for a duration of up to 6 months. A range of courses is offered to prepare for the first Postdoc position. These include trainings in applying for research funding, proposal writing and interview skills. Following MARUM lectures which are held once a month, early career scientists are offered the opportunity to talk to senior scientists from all over the world in an informal Meet&Greet. Mentoring and coaching programmes for women in science are offered in cooperation with the office for equal opportunities at the University of Bremen. These programmes offer an additional opportunity to train interpersonal skills and to develop personal career strategies including a focus on special challenges that especially women might (have to) face in the scientific community. Early career scientists aiming for a non-academic career find support on different levels. MARUM provides funding opportunities for placements in industry, administration, consulting or similar. We offer trainings in e.g. job hunting strategies or interview skills. For a deeper insight into jobs outside the academic world, we regularly invite professionals for informal fireside chats and career days. These events are organised in cooperation with other graduate programmes in the region to broaden the focus of both, the lecturers and the participants. A fundamental component of our career programmes is the active involvement of alumni of MARUM and our

  17. Personal Journeys, Professional Paths: Persistence in Navigating the Crossroads of a Research Career

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Persistence in a research career can be readily understood within the trainee models that have emerged from undergraduate and graduate instruction. These models offer a common language for discussing training processes, serve as guides for assessing trainee needs, promise to render training programs that are more comprehensive and attentive than are current programs to the factors that contribute to academic and scientific persistence, and enable us to measure with greater precision, internal consistency, and generalizability the elements that logically belong in research career development programs. PMID:19246673

  18. College student perceptions of science teachers and the effect on science teaching as a career path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cost, Michael George

    2000-10-01

    Past research documented that student perceptions of scientists constituted a stereotypical image that had a negative effect on the students' attitudes towards science and resulted in low numbers of students studying to become scientists and engineers in college. The present study paralleled the research on student perceptions of scientists to investigate to what extent student perceptions of science teachers affect their willingness to consider science teaching as a career. This was accomplished by surveying 91 college students and 25 science teachers at the beginning, middle, and end of the collegiate career path of becoming a science teacher. Each survey contained quantitative data utilizing seven-point semantic differential scales and written open response questions. In-depth interviews with two members of each level were conducted to supplement the survey data. The study found that college students begin college with a positive perception of teaching as a career and highly rank teachers, especially science teachers, as having a positive influence on their career path. The qualities of job enjoyment, job stability, and helping others that are characteristic of teaching were also found to be of high importance. Perceptions of the personal, social, professional, and career qualities of a science teacher were found to differ from a scientist. While both science teachers and scientists were found to be responsible, persistent, and productive, science teachers were perceived as being a distinct career possessing qualities that make them more personable, sociable, and wise than scientists. Some gender differences were detected but there was no evidence of gender bias affecting students choosing a career path to science teaching. Science teachers were perceived to be very supportive of females pursuing scientific career paths. The study also found evidence that some introductory level college students steer away from science teaching because of low salary, the lack of

  19. Perceived Barriers and Facilitators for Academic Career in Geriatrics: Medical Students’ Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Maureen A.; Black, Michelle; Depp, Colin A.; Iglewicz, Alana; Reichstadt, Jennifer; Palinkas, Lawrence; Jeste, Dilip V.

    2014-01-01

    Objective There is a growing concern about a shortage of physician scientists. This problem is particularly severe in certain subspecialties such as geriatrics in general and geriatric psychiatry in particular. This study sought to obtain medical students’ perspectives on barriers and facilitators toward pursuing a career in academics and/or in geriatric psychiatry or medicine. Methods The study surveyed 27 first-year medical students from six US medical schools, who had demonstrated a clear interest in academic geriatrics by completing a mentored summer research training program in geriatric medicine or geriatric psychiatry, funded by the National Institute on Aging. The survey included open-ended and close-ended questions about likely career choice and factors affecting it. Results Sixty percent of students reported they were likely to pursue an academic career, 44% a career in geriatric psychiatry or medicine, and only 36% a career in academic geriatrics. The most frequently perceived barriers were a lack of knowledge about academic careers and lack of exposure to geriatrics, financial concerns due to loan debts and low compensation, and negative impressions of research and of working with older adults. Facilitators included positive experiences with or positive impressions of research and research mentors and of older adults, and the growing demand for geriatric care. Conclusions Attracting capable and motivated medical students to academic careers in fields such as geriatric psychiatry or medicine should be a priority in seeking to expand the numbers of physician scientists and to add to the healthcare workforce in underserved subspecialty areas. Necessary approaches should include opportunities to work in academic settings, availability of sustained and dedicated mentorship, early, consistent, and positive exposure to older adults, and financial incentives. PMID:25080223

  20. Women's attitudes toward careers in academic medicine at the University of California, San Francisco.

    PubMed

    Osborn, E H; Ernster, V L; Martin, J B

    1992-01-01

    In order to identify the concerns and possible barriers for women considering careers in academic medicine, in 1990 the authors surveyed both men and women medical students, housestaff, postdoctoral students, and junior faculty at The University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). The authors achieved a 58% response rate from students and faculty, a 21% response rate from postdoctoral students, and a 15% response rate from housestaff. Results indicated that women at all levels were less interested in academic careers than were their male colleagues. Concerns about balancing family responsibilities, clinical practice, and teaching in addition to the research required of an academic career were mentioned most frequently. Women, especially those among the housestaff and junior faculty, reported fewer mentor relationships and role models. The authors discuss these findings in relation to other studies and describe what they are doing to foster women's interest and success in academic medicine at UCSF. PMID:1729997

  1. Academe's Glass Ceiling: Societal, Professional-Organizational, and Institutional Barriers to the Career Advancement of Academic Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bain, Olga; Cummings, William

    2000-01-01

    A survey of 10 national systems of higher education found that less than 10 percent of professors were women, and the proportion of female professors was negatively related to institutional prestige. This academic "glass ceiling" was related to women's shorter careers, tenure issues during hard times, and women's lower level of academic…

  2. From Rumors to Facts: Career Outcomes of English PhDs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nerad, Maresi; Cerny, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    Studies career paths of doctorates, examining the actual employment patterns of English PhDs 10 years after finishing their degrees. Discusses the many career paths of this cohort of English PhDs; characteristics of respondents; career paths within and outside of academe; satisfaction with current employment and value of the PhD; advice from PhDs;…

  3. Demographic characteristics of doctors who intend to follow clinical academic careers: UK national questionnaire surveys

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Fay; Lambert, Trevor W; Goldacre, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Objectives It is well recognised that women are underrepresented in clinical academic posts. Our aim was to determine which of a number of characteristics—notably gender, but also ethnicity, possession of an intercalated degree, medical school attended, choice of specialty—were predictive of doctors’ intentions to follow clinical academic careers. Design Questionnaires to all UK-trained medical graduates of 2005 sent in 2006 and again in 2010, graduates of 2009 in 2010 and graduates of 2012 in 2013. Results At the end of their first year of medical work, 13.5% (368/2732) of men and 7.3% (358/4891) of women specified that they intended to apply for a clinical academic training post; and 6.0% (172/2873) of men and 2.2% (111/5044) of women specified that they intended to pursue clinical academic medicine as their eventual career. A higher percentage of Asian (4.8%) than White doctors (3.3%) wanted a long-term career as a clinical academic, as did a higher percentage of doctors who did an intercalated degree (5.6%) than others (2.2%) and a higher percentage of Oxbridge graduates (8.1%) than others (2.8%). Of the graduates of 2005, only 30% of those who in 2006 intended a clinical medicine career also did so when re-surveyed in 2010 (men 44%, women 12%). Conclusions There are noteworthy differences by gender and other demographic factors in doctors’ intentions to pursue academic training and careers. The gap between men and women in aspirations for a clinical academic career is present as early as the first year after qualification. PMID:25136138

  4. Competitive Research Grants and Their Impact on Career Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloch, Carter; Graversen, Ebbe Krogh; Pedersen, Heidi Skovgaard

    2014-01-01

    The role of competitive funds as a source of funding for academic research has increased in many countries. For the individual researcher, the receipt of a grant can influence both scientific production and career paths. This paper focuses on the importance of the receipt of a research grant for researchers' academic career paths utilizing a…

  5. Early Career Academic Staff Support: Evaluating Mentoring Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, J. Denard; Lunsford, Laura Gail; Rodrigues, Helena A.

    2015-01-01

    Which academics benefit from participation in formal mentoring programmes? This study examined the needs and mentoring networks of new academics with evaluative data from a pilot mentoring programme. Themes from these data point towards re-envisioning initiatives for academic staff development. First, an examination of the expansion of mentoring…

  6. Career, Family, and Institutional Variables in the Work Lives of Academic Women in the Chemical Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassinger, Ruth E.; Scantlebury, Kathryn; Richmond, Geraldine

    This article presents quantitative results of a study of 139 academic women in the chemical sciences who participated in a professional development program sponsored by the Committee on the Advancement of Women Chemists. The study investigated variables frequently examined in the vocational psychology of women: approaches to achievement, coping strategies, career advancement, the home-work interface, workplace climate, and mentoring. The article presents and discusses results in the context of unique issues faced by women in scientific careers.

  7. Defining Advancement Career Paths and Succession Plans: Critical Human Capital Retention Strategies for High-Performing Advancement Divisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croteau, Jon Derek; Wolk, Holly Gordon

    2010-01-01

    There are many factors that can influence whether a highly talented staff member will build a career within an institution or use it as a stepping stone. This article defines and explores the notions of developing career paths and succession planning and why they are critical human capital investment strategies in retaining the highest performers…

  8. "The Middle Found Me." Using a Life Story Approach to Guide the Career Paths of Future Middle Grades Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irvine, Colin

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the use of narrative identity analysis of the life-story theory approach to guide the career paths of middle grades teachers. It presents the views of middle grades teachers and education students on the integral role of narrative and on the impact of life-story approach in their careers and their identities. It explores how…

  9. Gender Differences in Publication Productivity, Academic Position, Career Duration and Funding Among U.S. Academic Radiation Oncology Faculty

    PubMed Central

    Holliday, Emma B.; Jagsi, Reshma; Wilson, Lynn D.; Choi, Mehee; Thomas, Charles R.; Fuller, Clifton. D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose There has been much recent interest in promoting gender equality in academic medicine. This study aims to analyze gender differences in rank, career duration, publication productivity and research funding among radiation oncologists at U.S. academic institutions. Methods For 82 domestic academic radiation oncology departments, the authors identified current faculty and recorded their academic rank, degree and gender. The authors recorded bibliographic metrics for physician faculty from a commercially available database (SCOPUS, Elsevier BV, Amsterdam, NL), including numbers of publications and h-indices. The authors then concatenated this data with National Institute of Health funding for each individual per Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (REPORTer). The authors performed descriptive and correlative analyses, stratifying by gender and rank. Results Of 1031 faculty, 293 (28%) women and 738 (72%) men, men had a higher median h-index (8 (0-59) versus 5 (0-39); P<.05) and publication number (26 (0-591) versus 13 (0-306); P<.05) overall, and were more likely to be senior faculty and receive NIH funding. However, after stratifying for rank, these differences were largely non-significant. On multivariate analysis, there were significant correlations between gender, career duration and academic position, and h-index (P<.01). Conclusions The determinants of a successful career in academic medicine are certainly multi-factorial, particularly in traditionally male-dominated fields. However, data from radiation oncologists show a systematic gender association withfewer women achieving senior faculty rank. However, women who achieve senior status have productivity metrics comparable to their male counterparts. This suggests early career development and mentorship of female faculty may narrow productivity disparities. PMID:24667510

  10. Getting Started in Academic Careers: On the Cutting Edge Resources for Graduate Students, Postdoctoral Fellows, and Early Career Faculty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, R.; Ormand, C.; Manduca, C. A.; Wright-Dunbar, R.; Allen-King, R.

    2007-12-01

    The professional development program,'On the Cutting Edge', offers on-line resources and annual multi-day workshops for graduate students and post-doctoral fellows interested in pursuing academic careers. Pre- workshop surveys reveal that early career faculty, post-docs, and graduate students have many questions about teaching (e.g., what are effective teaching strategies, how to design a course, how to prepare a syllabus, how to teach large courses), research (e.g., initiate and fund future research, set up and manage a lab, obtain equipment), and career management (e.g., understand tenure requirements, balance all it all). The graduate students and post-docs also have questions about jobs and the job search process. Their questions show a lack of familiarity with the nature of academic positions at different kinds of educational institutions (two-year colleges, primarily undergraduate institutions, and research universities). In particular, they are uncertain about what educational setting will best fit their values and career goals and how teaching loads and research expectations vary by institution. Common questions related to the job search process include where to find job listings (the most common question in recent years), when to start the job search process, how to stand out as an applicant, and how to prepare for interviews. Both groups have questions about how to develop new skills: how to develop, plan and prepare a new course (without it taking all of their time), how to expand beyond their PhD (or postdoc) research projects, how to develop a research plan, and where to apply for funding. These are important topics for advisors to discuss with all of their students and postdocs who are planning on careers in academia. On the Cutting Edge offers workshops and web resources to help current and future faculty navigate these critical stages of their careers. The four-day workshop for Early Career Geoscience Faculty: Teaching, Research, and Managing Your

  11. An Assessment of Energy-Related Career Paths of Senior Industrial Assessment Center Program Alumni

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, M.A.

    2003-10-20

    The purpose of this study was to assess the career paths of alumni from the U.S. Department of Energy's Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) program. IAC was originally named the Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center (EADC) program when it began in association with four schools in 1976. The current IAC program provides funding to 26 engineering colleges, located in centers across the United States, to conduct energy, waste, and productivity assessments for small- to medium-sized manufacturing establishments within their respective regions. Through part-time employment with the university, students receive training and in turn conduct assessments for local manufacturers, under the direct supervision of engineering faculty. Annually, IAC participants conduct over 700 assessments, and each assessment generates recommendations for energy savings, energy cost savings, and waste and productivity cost savings customized for individual clients. An earlier study determined that energy savings could be attributed to alumni of the IAC program who take their IAC experiences with them to the professional workplace. During their careers, the alumni conduct additional energy assessments as well as influence energy efficiency through design, teaching and training, and other activities. Indeed, a significant level of program benefits can be attributed to the alumni. This project addressed such specific questions as: How many years after graduation are IAC alumni involved in energy-efficiency activities? What different methods do they use to influence energy-efficiency decisions? To answer these questions, the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UT) surveyed IAC senior alumni, defined as those who graduated in 1995 or earlier. Section 2 describes the survey used in this research. The actual survey can be found in Appendix A. Section 3 describes our approach to data collection. Section 4 presents descriptive statistics about the senior alumni who responded to the survey. Section 5

  12. The Chicago Guide to Your Academic Career: A Portable Mentor for Scholars from Graduate School through Tenure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsmith, John A.; Komlos, John; Gold, Penny Schine

    Written as an informal conversation among colleagues, this book provides a guide to the academic career. It contains useful advice about finding a mentor, making it through the dissertation, getting a job, obtaining tenure, and other topics. The chapters of part 1, Becoming a Scholar, are: (1) Deciding on an Academic Career; (2) Entering Graduate…

  13. Career Counseling as an Environmental Support: Exploring Influences on Career Choice, Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy, and Career Barriers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makela, Julia Panke

    2011-01-01

    This study was motivated by concerns regarding the difficult academic and career choices facing today's college students as they navigate higher education and encounter career barriers along their paths. Using Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT; Lent, Brown, & Hackett, 1994) as a primary framework, the study sought to understand the role that…

  14. The Science of a Life - Career Path of an African American Geoscientist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson Hawk, D.

    2002-12-01

    A career in the field of geophysical fluid dynamics is not an apparent choice for an African American woman from rural North Carolina. It was, however, the choice made. As a first generation college graduate, the catalyst to pursue such a career path was provided by those external to family; however, internally, the pursuit of education was valued, expected and required. It is this, the expectation and requirement, which serves as the foundation for the discussion of the balance of life in terms of family, education, and career. There are no scales in existence on which to measure the balance of life. The selected educational institutions, Spelman College, The George Washington University, and Princeton University; nor career positions, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, AT&T Bell Laboratories, institutions of higher education, consulting opportunities, discuss, promote or encourage such a balance. Defining this balance, however, is a science that can only be advanced and achieved by the individual in relationship and partnership with community. The science and balance of a life is the focus of this discussion.

  15. Exploring the Relationship between Intrapersonal Intelligence and University Students' Career Confusion: Implications for Counseling, Academic Success, and School-to-Career Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shearer, C. Branton

    2009-01-01

    The author describes the relationship between self-knowledge and career confusion among university students and discusses strategies to enhance career and academic planning. The multiple intelligences profiles of typical university students are compared with those of 82 students enrolled in 3 sequential semesters of a course titled Career…

  16. Impact of a Career Intervention on At-Risk Middle School Students' Career Maturity Levels, Academic Achievement, and Self-Esteem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legum, Harry L.; Hoare, Carol H.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of a 9-week career intervention program on at-risk middle school students' career maturity levels, self-esteem, and academic achievement. This study was based on a pretest and posttest design using a control group. Data were collected from 27 at-risk middle school students representing the…

  17. Staying or Going? Australian Early Career Researchers' Narratives of Academic Work, Exit Options and Coping Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Eva Bendix

    2011-01-01

    Australian universities will lose a substantial proportion of their staff through retirement over the next decade. A recent study has indicated that attrition of academic staff that are not at the end of their career may exacerbate the problem. To assist in developing appropriate retention strategies, this article examines the ways in which early…

  18. Faculty Writing Groups: A Support for Women Balancing Family and Career on the Academic Tightrope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penney, Sharon; Young, Gabrielle; Badenhorst, Cecile; Goodnough, Karen; Hesson, J.; Joy, Rhonda; McLeod, Heather; Pickett, Sarah; Stordy, Mary; Vaandering, Dorothy

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative research project explored the experiences of women who juggle the demands of family or parenthood while engaging in academic careers at a faculty of education. The researcher-participants consisted of 11 women; 9 women provided a written narrative, and all women participated in the data analysis. The data consisted of the…

  19. Institutional Limits: Christine Ladd-Franklin, Fellowships, and American Women's Academic Careers, 1880-1920

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spillman, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Christine Ladd-Franklin spent the first forty years of her life becoming one of the best-educated women in nineteenth-century America. She spent the rest of her life devising fellowship programs designed to enable educated women to have the same opportunities as men in their academic careers. The difficulty women had in becoming professors had a…

  20. A Comparison of Perceptions of Career and Technical Education Curriculum and Academic Core Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handy, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on identifying and categorizing the perceptions of teachers, counselors, and administrators related to career and technical education (CTE) and academic core (AC) curricula in a large school district. Control group actions' perceptual control theory (PCT) was used as the conceptual framework for the study. PCT is a model of…

  1. Managing the Process: The Intradepartmental Networks of Early-Career Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pifer, Meghan J.; Baker, Vicki L.

    2013-01-01

    This article relies on data from surveys and interviews to explore the networking behaviors and strategies of early-career faculty members within the contexts of their academic departments. Findings suggest that faculty members' approaches to interactions and relationships with colleagues may be conceptualized according to a continuum of…

  2. Impact of Technology on the Academic Self-Efficacy and Career Selection of African American Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Kevin

    2003-01-01

    With the continuing debate of the use and impact of technology on young children, this article examines the impact on technology on the academic self-efficacy and career intentions of African American students. The results from this study may be applicable to teaching, implementation, and use of technology with young children.

  3. The Professional Development Needs of Academic Teachers Adding Career-Technical Education Licenses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Patrick J.

    2012-01-01

    This study reports the results on the needs of an emerging population of Career-Technical Education (CTE) teachers in Ohio. The purposes of the study were to determine the needs of the teachers and the effectiveness of the teacher education program they completed to add the CTE license. Twenty six academic teachers added a CTE license through a…

  4. Academic and Career Trajectories of African American Males in San Bernardino

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyles, Lolita Laree

    2013-01-01

    A qualitative grounded theory approach is utilized to study the academic and career trajectories of twenty African American male collegiate students living in San Bernardino, California. There is limited research that explores the positive educational experiences of young adult African American males. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to…

  5. The Viability of Combining Academic and Career Pathways: A Study of Linked Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Lea; McDonald, Mary

    2014-01-01

    In an attempt to reform high schools and prepare students with the knowledge and skills needed for the 21st century, educators and policymakers have turned to programs that combine career and academic pathways. One such program, Linked Learning, has taken up the reform challenge by relying on technical adjustments, rearranging students'…

  6. Factors Considered by New Faculty in Their Decision To Choose Careers in Academic Dentistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schenkein, Harvey A.; Best, Al M.

    2001-01-01

    Surveyed new dental faculty about what factors influenced them to choose academic careers. Found that factors related to teaching and scholarship were the most important influences, while concerns about income and indebtedness were the most important negative considerations. Other positive factors included mentors and role models, long-term…

  7. Development and Initial Validation of a Measure of Academic Behaviors Associated with College and Career Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardi, Allison; Seburn, Mary; Conley, David

    2011-01-01

    In this cross-validation study, the authors examined the psychometric properties of a measure of academic behaviors associated with college and career readiness intended for high school students. An exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was conducted with a randomly selected portion of the sample (n = 413) and resulted in four reliable factors:…

  8. An Academic Career in a Basic Medical Science Department of Physiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saba, Thomas M.

    1981-01-01

    The availability of opportunities and the development of an academic career in a physiology department within a medical school or basic science department by graduates and postgraduates who intend to participate in physiology on a full-time basis are discussed, emphasizing typical background and job responsibilities. (Author/DC)

  9. Shifting Academic Careers: Implications for Enhancing Professionalism in Teaching and Supporting Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locke, William

    2014-01-01

    This Higher Education Academy (HEA) commissioned report provides a brief review of literature focusing on the changing nature of academic careers in the higher education sector, including any shift towards "teaching only" contracts. It also identifies key issues in terms of teaching and learning, continuing professional development and…

  10. Pathways for Academic Career and Employment (PACE) Program: Fiscal Year 2014 Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Community colleges across Iowa are working with business and industry through sector boards to develop training programs for jobs that have applicant shortages. The state Pathways for Academic Career and Employment (PACE) program enables community colleges to offer in-demand training, making education affordable for low income or unemployed…

  11. It's Always a Pleasure: Exploring Productivity and Pleasure in a Writing Group for Early Career Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, Angela; Lewis, Bridget; McDonald, Fiona; Burns, Marcelle

    2012-01-01

    The professional development needs of early career academics (ECAs) are increasingly subject to scrutiny. The literature notes writing groups can be successful in increasing research outputs and improving research track records--a core concern for ECAs. However, the pressure on ECAs to publish takes the pleasure out of writing for many. We argue…

  12. Creating a Community of Support for Graduate Students and Early Career Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foote, Kenneth E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on strategies for enhancing the preparation of geographers moving into academic careers. Based on research and experience gained from the Geography Faculty Development Alliance and Enhancing Departments and Graduate Education in geography projects, several suggestions for improved practice are detailed. These move beyond…

  13. Sources of Research Confidence for Early Career Academics: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmings, Brian

    2012-01-01

    There is a paucity of studies investigating how early career academics (ECAs) form attitudes towards aspects of their work and gain skills in research, teaching and service. This is especially the case with respect to research. A review of the pertinent literature revealed the prominence of a notion of research self-efficacy (or confidence) and…

  14. Learning and Developing as a University Teacher: Narratives of Early Career Academics in Estonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remmik, Marvi; Karm, Mari; Lepp, Liina

    2013-01-01

    In recent years the higher education context in Estonia, as in most European countries, has changed a lot. All changes have an impact on university teachers' practice and their work organisation, and are presenting new challenges. The current research aims at developing an understanding of Estonian early career academics' professional…

  15. Validating Student Satisfaction Related to Persistence, Academic Performance, Retention and Career Advancement within ODL Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sembiring, Maximus Gorky

    2015-01-01

    Student satisfaction associated with persistence, academic performance, retention, and its relations to career advancement were examined. It was aimed at measuring service quality (Servqual) dimensions as a foundation of satisfaction and how, in what comportments, they were interrelated. The study was conducted under explanatory-design. Data was…

  16. Across Academic Domains: Extensions of the Social-Cognitive Career Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fouad, Nadya A.; Smith, Philip L.; Zao, Kathryn E.

    2002-01-01

    In the present study, the authors investigated the academic subject matter domain specificity of the social-cognitive career choice model (R. W. Lent, S. D. Brown, & G. Hackett, 1994). The relationships between self-efficacy, goals, outcome expectations, and interests were examined across the subject areas of art, social science, math/science, and…

  17. Motivation Orientations, Academic Achievement, and Career Goals of Undergraduate Music Education Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Charles P.; Zdzinski, Stephen F.; Ballard, Dennis L.

    2006-01-01

    This study is an examination of motivation orientations (mastery, intrinsic, cooperative, individual, competition, ego, approach success, avoid failure, hypercompetition, personal development competition) and musical self-concept in relation to measures of academic achievement and career goals of preservice music teachers. The research questions…

  18. Professional Development in Teaching and Learning for Early Career Academic Geographers: Contexts, Practices and Tensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vajoczki, Susan; Biegas, Tamara C.; Crenshaw, Melody; Healey, Ruth L.; Osayomi, Tolulope; Bradford, Michael; Monk, Janice

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides a review of the practices and tensions informing approaches to professional development for early career academic geographers who are teaching in higher education. We offer examples from Britain, Canada, Nigeria and the USA. The tensions include: institutional and departmental cultures; models that offer generic and…

  19. Exploring the Academic Achievement and Career Aspirations of College-Bound and Postsecondary Zulu Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Steven B.; Wallis, Amy Birtel; Dunston, Kwesi T.

    2003-01-01

    This article reports on a qualitative approach used to identify developmental and contextual factors associated with academic success and career aspirations of 13 Black Zulu South African students transitioning into college or in their first year of college. Students were queried on their aspirations and values, definitions of success, and…

  20. Women and Academic Workloads: Career Slow Lane or Cul-de-Sac?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Lucinda; Barrett, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Career progression for women academics to higher levels is not in proportion to their representation within the profession. This paper looks at theories about this and relates them to current practices within universities for allocating work. The management of workloads can disadvantage women through a number of interactive factors. Interruptions…

  1. Early career academic researchers and community-based participatory research: wrestling match or dancing partners?

    PubMed

    Lowry, Kelly Walker; Ford-Paz, Rebecca

    2013-12-01

    Early career faculty members at academic medical centers face unique obstacles when engaging in community-based participatory research (CBPR). Challenges and opportunities for solutions pertaining to mentorship, time demands, unfamiliarity of colleagues with CBPR approaches, ethical review regulations, funding, and publication and promotion are discussed. PMID:24330696

  2. Factors That Promote Motivation and Academic Engagement in a Career Technical Education Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loera, Gustavo; Nakamoto, Jonathan; Oh, Youn Joo; Rueda, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on social cognitive theory, this study examined the relationship between student and school-based factors (e.g., educational aspirations, quality of the program of study, and adults' impact on college enrollment) and students' academic engagement and satisfaction with student life in a career technical education (CTE) setting.…

  3. The Effectiveness of Peer Review of Teaching When Performed between Early-Career Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodman, Richard J.; Parappilly, Maria B.

    2015-01-01

    The success of peer review of teaching (PRT) in shaping teaching practice during an academic's formative years may depend on the peers' teaching experience and the frequency of evaluation. Two Australian early-career University lecturers with no previous experience of peer review performed a single PRT on one another following a one week academic…

  4. Educators Who Work in Science: The Narratives of Women Negotiating Careers in Academic Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tullos, Kimberly C.

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this life story narrative study was to explore how women scientists develop views of self that enable them to negotiate careers within academic science. I framed the study using feminist standpoint theory as my theoretical foundation, and used possible selves theory as my conceptual framework. Eight women scientists working in academe described their journey regarding their views of self and career-related experiences. The study produced two key findings. First, seven themes emerged from my data analysis; these themes suggest that these women shared significant experiences in their quest to become scientists. Second, my feminist analysis of the participants' narratives indicates that distinct, but submerged gender-related tensions shaped their views of themselves as scientists and their science career decisions. These tensions include career choice and advancement constrained by family obligations, work environments that do not recognize or undervalue their skills and contributions to the profession, and perceived pressure to de-feminize their behavior to blend in to their work environment. Not unlike other women negotiating careers in academic science, they generally accepted their status as women to be an inherent part of their career pursuits and viewed workplace challenges as an opportunity to prove their competency. Seven of the eight women did not attribute their challenges to gender differences. However, the combined narratives revealed underlying conflicts between their views of self as women and as scientists resulting from their experiences in, and perceptions of, academic science environments. The study's principal theoretical contribution, from the feminist standpoint perspective, highlights the pervasive and unseen influence of gender dynamics. In this study, the participants developed views of themselves, not as scientists, but as "educators who work in science." This critical distinction enabled these participants, perhaps unknowingly

  5. The Coming of Age of the Academic Career: Differentiation and Professionalization of German Academic Positions from the 19th Century to the Present

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waaijer, Cathelijn J. F.

    2015-01-01

    In modern academic career systems there are a large number of entry positions, much smaller numbers of intermediate positions, and still fewer full professorships. We examine how this system has developed in Germany, the country where the modern academic system was introduced, tracing the historical development of academic positions since the…

  6. Social Cognitive Predictors of College Students' Academic Performance and Persistence: A Meta-Analytic Path Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Steven D.; Tramayne, Selena; Hoxha, Denada; Telander, Kyle; Fan, Xiaoyan; Lent, Robert W.

    2008-01-01

    This study tested Social Cognitive Career Theory's (SCCT) academic performance model using a two-stage approach that combined meta-analytic and structural equation modeling methodologies. Unbiased correlations obtained from a previously published meta-analysis [Robbins, S. B., Lauver, K., Le, H., Davis, D., & Langley, R. (2004). Do psychosocial…

  7. Credit Quandaries: How Career and Technical Education Teachers Can Teach Courses That Include Academic Credit. Ask the Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacques, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Many career and technical education (CTE) courses not only provide students with vocational and technical skills and knowledge, but engage them in academic content as well. Designed thoughtfully, these courses can address rigorous academic content standards and be as intellectually demanding as traditional academic courses (Southern Regional…

  8. The Path to Career Success: High School Achievement, Certainty of Career Choice, and College Readiness Make a Difference. Issues In College Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACT, Inc., 2009

    2009-01-01

    It is essential for all students to be ready for college and career when they graduate from high school. Postsecondary educators expect high school graduates to be prepared academically for success in postsecondary education, which in turn influences success in the work world. Employers continue to call for workers to have the tools needed to…

  9. Career Technical Education Instructors' Perceptions of Adult Students' Academic Ability in Career Technical Education Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helaire, Atlas, III

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative survey study was to explore the student performance expectations, classroom management and instructional practices, and related professional experiences and specialized training of Career Technical Education (CTE) instructors at a Regional Occupational Center in Southern California in order to learn more about how…

  10. Career and Technical Education Pathway Programs, Academic Performance, and the Transition to College and Career

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekes, Natasha; Bragg, Debra. D.; Loeb, Jane W.; Oleksiw, Catherine A.; Marszalek, Jacob; Brooks-LaRaviere, Margaret; Zhu, Rongchun; Kremidas, Chloe C.; Akukwe, Grace; Lee, Hyeong-Jong; Hood, Lisa K.

    2007-01-01

    This mixed method study examined secondary student matriculation to two selected community colleges offering career and technical education (CTE) transition programs through partnerships with K-12 and secondary districts having numerous high schools. The study had two distinct components: (1) a secondary study that compared CTE and non-CTE…

  11. Lean in or Opt Out: Career Pathways of Academic Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddy, Pamela L.; Ward, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Casual observers of academic environments might conclude that women's problems in higher education have been resolved. Colleges enroll more women than men on an overall basis. There is gender parity in entry-level faculty hires, and the number of women in senior administrative positions continues to rise. A closer look however at the work, lives,…

  12. Tenure, Academic Freedom, and the Career I Once Loved

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolodny, Annette

    2008-01-01

    Given the financial burden they are taking on, parents and students are not interested in debates over tenure or academic freedom lest these distract them from the immediate goal of preparing to earn a living. Overburdened undergraduates-- students working twenty to forty hours each week to pay the bills and still taking out student loans--greet…

  13. Challenges and opportunities for early-career Teaching-Focussed academics in the biosciences.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Katharine; Gretton, Sarah; Jones, Katherine; Tallents, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-seven percent of academics in UK Higher Education (HE) are in Teaching-Focussed positions, making major contributions to undergraduate programmes in an era of high student expectations when it comes to teaching quality. However, institutional support for Teaching-Focussed academics is often limited, both in terms of peer networking and opportunities for career development. As four early-career stage Teaching-Focussed academics working in a variety of institutions, we explore what motivated our choices to make teaching our primary academic activity, and the challenges that we have faced in doing so. In addition to highlighting the need for universities to fully recognise the achievements of teaching staff, we discuss the role that the various biosciences learned societies have in supporting Teaching-Focussed academics. We identify that there is a need for the learned societies to come together and pool their expertise in this area. The fragmented nature of the Teaching-Focussed academic community means that clear sources of national support are needed in order to best enable the next generation of bioscience educators to reach their full potential. PMID:25977754

  14. Challenges and opportunities for early-career Teaching-Focussed academics in the biosciences

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Katharine; Gretton, Sarah; Jones, Katherine; Tallents, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-seven percent of academics in UK Higher Education (HE) are in Teaching-Focussed positions, making major contributions to undergraduate programmes in an era of high student expectations when it comes to teaching quality. However, institutional support for Teaching-Focussed academics is often limited, both in terms of peer networking and opportunities for career development. As four early-career stage Teaching-Focussed academics working in a variety of institutions, we explore what motivated our choices to make teaching our primary academic activity, and the challenges that we have faced in doing so. In addition to highlighting the need for universities to fully recognise the achievements of teaching staff, we discuss the role that the various biosciences learned societies have in supporting Teaching-Focussed academics. We identify that there is a need for the learned societies to come together and pool their expertise in this area. The fragmented nature of the Teaching-Focussed academic community means that clear sources of national support are needed in order to best enable the next generation of bioscience educators to reach their full potential. PMID:25977754

  15. "I'm Not a Real Academic": A Career from Industry to Academe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santoro, Ninetta; Snead, Suzanne L.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past thirty years universities have increasingly extended their offerings of vocationally oriented degrees and have recruited into academe, practitioners from the professions. This paper reports on a qualitative study that investigated the experiences of 20 professionals-turned-academics in Australia; their expectations of academe and how…

  16. Intervention strategies in the academic and career development of at-risk undergraduate students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciccocioppo, Anna-Lisa

    This study had two primary purposes: (a) to learn more about the experiences and perceptions of students in science-related fields that have been placed on academic probation or academic warning, and (b) to learn about the impact of a course-based combined cognitive and career intervention on students' grade point averages, learning and study skills, and career decision-making self-efficacy. Participants (N=21) were second- to fourth-year students in a science-related faculty who were currently on academic probation (i.e., successfully appealed their 'required to withdraw' status due to unsatisfactory standing) or academic warning (those with marginal academic standing) and completed an intervention course. A matched-peer group of students from the previous academic year when the course was not available comprised the control group. Quantitative data collection included pre-, post-, and follow-up measures of participants' grade point averages (GPAs), scores on the Learning and Study Strategies Inventory (LASSI), and the Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale (CDMSE). Qualitative data collection included semi-structured interviews with a subset of the participants (N=13) as well as a pre-course questionnaire and the qualitative course evaluation. A repeated-measures ANCOVA showed no difference between the at-risk students who took the intervention course and the matched control group. Friedman results demonstrated significant increases in many subscales of the LASSI, the CDMSE, as well as the overall measure of career decision-making self-efficacy. In the qualitative findings, participants described various academic and non-academic factors that contributed to their at-risk academic standing and the majority described their experience in the course-based intervention as positive and helpful in improving their situation. The findings from this unique combined intervention approach provided a greater understanding of the experience of this often overlooked group

  17. Academic Career Planning: The Ivory Tower and the Crystal Ball. Report of the Joint COU/OCUFA Committee on the Study of Academic Career Development in Ontario Universities. Report No. 76-13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, G. W.; And Others

    The recognized need for institutions to make policy decisions about the hiring, career progress, and retention of highly qualified academic and nonacademic staff prompted this manpower study. A statement of some basic elements in Ontario universities pertaining especially to faculty career planning is presented followed by a quantitative…

  18. George Washington High School. Bilingual Academic and Career Orientation Program, 1981-1982. O.E.E. Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotayo, Armando; And Others

    The Bilingual Academic and Career Orientation Program (BACOP) at George Washington High School in New York City is a basic bilingual secondary education program with a career orientation focus. In 1981-82, the program offered bilingual instructional and supportive services to 250 Hispanic students of limited English proficiency in grades nine…

  19. Career Development among First-Year College Students: College Self-Efficacy, Student Persistence, and Academic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Stephen L.; Jenkins-Guarnieri, Michael A.; Murdock, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates the career development of college student persistence decisions through the theoretical lens of social cognitive career theory (SCCT). Specifically, the authors sought to understand the potential role of college self-efficacy in first-year student persistence and academic success at a medium size university. Using a…

  20. Batting 300 is Good: Perspectives of Faculty Researchers and their Mentors on Rejection, Resilience, and Persistence in Academic Medical Careers

    PubMed Central

    DeCastro, Rochelle; Sambuco, Dana; Ubel, Peter A.; Stewart, Abigail; Jagsi, Reshma

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Professional rejection is a frequent experience in an academic medical career. The authors sought to understand how rejection affects those pursuing such careers and why some individuals may be more resilient than others in a population of individuals with demonstrated ability and interest in research careers. Method Between February 2010 and August 2011, the authors conducted semi-structured, in-depth telephone interviews with 100 former recipients of National Institutes of Health mentored career development awards and 28 of their mentors. Purposive sampling ensured a diverse range of viewpoints. Multiple analysts thematically coded verbatim transcripts using qualitative data analysis software. Results Participants described a variety of experiences with criticism and rejection in their careers, as well as an acute need for persistence and resilience in the face of such challenges. Through their narratives, participants also vividly described a range of emotional and behavioral responses to their experiences of professional rejection. Their responses illuminated the important roles that various factors, including mentoring and gender, play in shaping the ultimate influence of rejection on their own careers and on the careers of those they have mentored. Conclusions Responses to rejection vary considerably, and negative responses can lead promising individuals to abandon careers in academic medicine. Resilience does not, however, appear to be immutable—it can be learned. Given the frequency of experiences with rejection in academic medicine, strategies such as training mentors to foster resilience may be particularly helpful in improving faculty retention in academic medicine. PMID:23425991

  1. Mind the Gap: Promoting Careers in Academic Research to Psychiatry Residents

    PubMed Central

    Posporelis, Sotirios; Sawa, Akira; Smith, Gwenn S.; Stitzer, Maxine L.; Lyketsos, Constantine G.; Chisolm, Margaret S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective With the shift of interest in psychiatry towards patient-oriented research with clinically relevant outcomes, there is a critical need for well-trained psychiatrist-scientists. The authors report on two developmentally-tailored, longitudinal research training curricula designed to use peer mentoring to bridge the gap between physicians and scientists, and to promote careers in academic research. Methods The authors instituted two independent research training curricula, one for first-year and one for second-to-fourth year psychiatry residents, spanning two campuses of one institutional residency training program. Each curriculum’s participants included psychiatry residents and peer scientific investigators, and both were attended by senior scientists and departmental leaders. The authors developed and administered an anonymous survey at the end of the first cycle of the first-year resident curriculum to assess participant attitudes. Results The first-year and second-to-fourth-year resident curricula have been implemented for 3and 2 years respectively. The authors observed overall participant satisfaction with the first-year curricula, independent of trainee status. Furthermore, first-year psychiatry residents reported increased interest in academic research careers after exposure to the curricula. Conclusions Results suggest it is possible to encourage academic research careers using peer mentoring, an innovative approach that requires minimal funding, little disruption to the residents’ schedule, and engages the gamut of individuals involved in psychiatry care and research: psychiatrists-in-training and young non-clinician scientists-in-training. PMID:24497181

  2. Sponsorship: a path to the academic medicine C-suite for women faculty?

    PubMed

    Travis, Elizabeth L; Doty, Leilani; Helitzer, Deborah L

    2013-10-01

    Despite increases in the percentages of women medical school graduates and faculty over the past decade, women physicians and scientists remain underrepresented in academic medicine's highest-level executive positions, known as the "C-suite." The challenges of today and the future require novel approaches and solutions that depend on having diverse leaders. Such diversity has been widely shown to be critical to creating initiatives and solving complex problems such as those facing academic medicine and science. However, neither formal mentoring programs focused on individual career development nor executive coaching programs focused on individual job performance have led to substantial increases in the proportion of women in academic medicine's top leadership positions.Faced with a similar dilemma, the corporate world has initiated sponsorship programs designed to accelerate the careers of women as leaders. Sponsors differ from mentors and coaches in one key area: They have the position and power to advocate publicly for the advancement of nascent talent, including women, in the organization. Although academic medicine differs from the corporate world, the strong sponsorship programs that have advanced women into corporations' upper levels of leadership can serve as models for sponsorship programs to launch new leaders in academic medicine. PMID:23969365

  3. Factors associated with veterinarians’ career path choices in the early postgraduate period

    PubMed Central

    Jelinski, Murray D.; Campbell, John R.; MacGregor, Michael W.; Watts, Jon M.

    2009-01-01

    Veterinarians who graduated between 2000 and 2004, inclusive, were surveyed to determine the factors associated with career path (job) switching in the early postgraduate period. The sampling frame consisted of 348 veterinarians, 285 of whom were contacted and of these, 192 (67.4%) responded to the survey. Only 28.4% of respondents had remained with their initial employer. Three main factors were associated with employee retention: the type of practice/caseload, the workload (hours worked and number of nights on-call), and the level of mentorship and support provided by the practice. Workload and mentorship were also cited as the main reasons for leaving a place of employment. More than a third (38.0%) of respondents reported leaving a position solely because of inadequate mentorship and support. A third (33.7%) of respondents who began their careers in mixed or food animal practice were no longer in these types of practice; the main reasons for leaving were related to workload and mentorship. PMID:19949554

  4. Support of marginalized students in science: An examination of successful lesbian individuals in science career paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Judith C.

    The initiative to increase highly qualified college STEM graduates coupled with the phrase "science for all" pushed by standards-based reform has opened an avenue for science education research. How can we increase students' interests in science careers? Specifically, do marginalized groups require differing instructional approaches to increase science interests? By closely examining individuals from marginalized groups that have been successful in following a science career path, we may understand how to further help these groups. Gloria Ladson-Billings' work on culturally relevant teaching was utilized as a guide to help understand potential responses about science experiences in the classroom. This study specifically examined six lesbian individuals' experiences with science while in high school and college. The information was collected via semi-structured, open-ended interviews and was analyzed for reoccurring themes. Most of the participants did not have access to lesbian science mentors/role models even though prior research has shown the importance of such. The participants also recommended identifying mentors/role models for potential future lesbians interested in science.

  5. Demographics and career path choices of graduates from three Canadian veterinary colleges

    PubMed Central

    Jelinski, Murray D.; Campbell, John R.; Lissemore, Kerry; Miller, Lisa M.

    2008-01-01

    The classes of 2007 from the Atlantic Veterinary College, Ontario Veterinary College, and Western College of Veterinary Medicine were surveyed to determine what factors influenced the respondents’ career path choices. Seventy percent (166/237) of those contacted participated in the survey of which 89.1% were female, 62.7% had an urban upbringing, and 33.0% expected to be employed in a small center (population ≤ 10 000). Half (52.5%) of the respondents reported that they were interested in mixed or food animal practice at the time of entry into veterinary college, but this proportion declined to 34.2% by the time of graduation. Three factors were significantly associated with choosing a career in mixed or food animal practice: having been raised in a small center, being a male, and having a good to excellent knowledge of food animal production at the time of entry into veterinary college, as determined by a self-assessment. PMID:19119368

  6. Academic Work in Canada: The Perceptions of Early-Career Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Glen; Weinrib, Julian; Metcalfe, Amy Scott; Fisher, Don; Rubenson, Kjell; Snee, Iain

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses junior academic staff's (assistant professors) perceptions of academic work in a highly decentralised Canadian "system". Drawing on recent work by the authors on Canadian university tenure processes and remuneration, the paper compares the perceptions of assistant professor respondents with senior (associate full professor)…

  7. The Link of Teacher Career Paths on the Distribution of High Qualified Teachers: A Chilean Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivero, María del Rosario

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses rich data of 79,418 elementary teachers from 5,521 schools in Chile to study the extent of teacher sorting and its association with teacher career paths. A complete analysis of ten measures of teacher quality shows that highly qualified teachers are unequally distributed across schools. Some schools present a large concentration of…

  8. The Impact of a University-Based School Science Outreach Program on Graduate Student Participants' Career Paths and Professional Socialization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laursen, Sandra L.; Thiry, Heather; Liston, Carrie S.

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on professional socialization theory, this study examined how immersive experiences as science outreach educators in K-12 schools influenced the career paths and professional identities of science and engineering graduate students. Semi-structured interviews with 24 outreach program alumni revealed that school outreach experiences provided…

  9. The Long and Winding Road: Grades, Psychological Disengagement and Motivation among Female Students in (Non-)Traditional Career Paths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinfret, Natalie; Tougas, Francine; Beaton, Ann M.; Laplante, Joelle; Ngo Manguelle, Christiane; Lagacé, Marie Claude

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the links between grades, psychological disengagement mechanisms (discounting evaluative feedback and devaluing school), and motivation among female students in traditional and non-traditional career paths. We predicted that the association between grades and discounting is affected by the importance of…

  10. Hand-Me-Down Dreams. How Families Influence Our Career Paths and How We Can Reclaim Them.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Mary H.

    This book concentrates on ways in which families influence their children's careers, especially on the barriers families may wittingly or unwittingly construct on the children's path toward satisfying work lives. The book is divided into five parts, each of which builds upon the previous ones. The chapters in Part One define what hand-me-down…

  11. Connecting Cultural Models of Home-Based Care and Childminders' Career Paths: An Eco-Cultural Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tonyan, Holli A.; Nuttall, Joce

    2014-01-01

    Family day care or childminding involves a particularly transient workforce. This paper introduces Eco(logical)-Cultural Theory (ECT) to examine the cultural organisation of childminding and presents an ECT analysis of pilot survey results: asking minders about their daily routines and their career paths. Reasons for becoming a minder and…

  12. Testing the Choice Model of Social Cognitive Career Theory across Holland Themes: A Meta-Analytic Path Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheu, Hung-Bin; Lent, Robert W.; Brown, Steven D.; Miller, Matthew J.; Hennessy, Kelly D.; Duffy, Ryan D.

    2010-01-01

    Social cognitive career theory (SCCT; Lent, Brown, & Hackett, 1994) seeks to explain the factors that shape educational and vocational interests and choices. We used meta-analytic path analyses to synthesize data (from 1981 to 2008) relevant to SCCT's interest and choice hypotheses, organizing the literature according to Holland's (1997) broad…

  13. Launching an Academic Career: On the Cutting Edge Resources for Geoscience Graduate Students, Post-doctoral Fellows, and Early Career Faculty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, R. M.; Ormand, C. J.; MacDonald, H.; Dunbar, R. W.; Allen-King, R. M.; Manduca, C. A.

    2010-12-01

    Launching an academic career presents a number of challenges. A recent article in the Chronicle of Higher Education depicts academia as an “ivory sweatshop,” citing rising standards for tenure. Most graduate programs provide minimal training for life beyond graduate school. The professional development program “On the Cutting Edge” fills this gap by providing workshops and web resources on academic careers for graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and early career faculty. These workshops and web resources address a wide range of topics related to teaching, research, and managing one’s career, tailored for each group. The Preparing for an Academic Career in the Geosciences workshop to help graduate students and postdoctoral fellows make the transition into an academic career has been offered annually since 2003. It provides a panel on academic careers in different institutional settings, sessions on research on learning, various teaching strategies, design of effective teaching activities, moving research forward to new settings, effective teaching and research statements, the job search process, negotiation, and presenting oneself to others. Complementary online resources (http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/careerprep/index.html) focus on these topics. The workshops and web resources offer guidance for each step of the job search process, for developing and teaching one’s own courses, and for making the transition from being a research student to being in charge of a research program. Online resources also include case studies of successful dual career couples, documenting their job search strategies. A four-day workshop for Early Career Geoscience Faculty: Teaching, Research, and Managing Your Career, offered annually since 1999, provides sessions on teaching strategies, course design, developing a strategic plan for research, supervising student researchers, navigating departmental and institutional politics, preparing for tenure, time and

  14. Systems of Career Influences: A Conceptual Model for Evaluating the Professional Development of Women in Academic Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Helitzer, Deborah; Morahan, Page; Chang, Shine; Gleason, Katharine; Cardinali, Gina; Wu, Chih-Chieh

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Surprisingly little research is available to explain the well-documented organizational and societal influences on persistent inequities in advancement of women faculty. Methods The Systems of Career Influences Model is a framework for exploring factors influencing women's progression to advanced academic rank, executive positions, and informal leadership roles in academic medicine. The model situates faculty as agents within a complex adaptive system consisting of a trajectory of career advancement with opportunities for formal professional development programming; a dynamic system of influences of organizational policies, practices, and culture; and a dynamic system of individual choices and decisions. These systems of influence may promote or inhibit career advancement. Within this system, women weigh competing influences to make career advancement decisions, and leaders of academic health centers prioritize limited resources to support the school's mission. Results and Conclusions The Systems of Career Influences Model proved useful to identify key research questions. We used the model to probe how research in academic career development might be applied to content and methods of formal professional development programs. We generated a series of questions and hypotheses about how professional development programs might influence professional development of health science faculty members. Using the model as a guide, we developed a study using a quantitative and qualitative design. These analyses should provide insight into what works in recruiting and supporting productive men and women faculty in academic medical centers. PMID:23101486

  15. The negative influence of significant others on high academic achieving school pupils' choice of nursing as a career.

    PubMed

    Neilson, Gavin R; McNally, Jim

    2013-03-01

    The International Council of Nurses proposes that the shortage of nurses is global in scale and is expected to become much worse in the years ahead. A major factor impacting on the worldwide nursing shortage is the diminishing number of young people choosing nursing as a career (International Council of Nurses, 2008). One important dimension of the school pupils' career choice process is their interactions with significant others and the influence of these significant others (Hodkinson and Sparkes, 1997). As Schools/Departments of Nursing endeavour to attract more intellectual school leavers it is important to examine what advice and opinions are significant others giving regarding nursing as a career choice and how influential is this advice. This paper is based on interview data from 20 high academic achieving 5th and 6th year school pupils in Scotland, paradigmatic cases from a larger sample, who had considered nursing as a possible career choice within their career preference cluster, but then later disregarded nursing and decided to pursue medicine or another health care profession. The data was particularly striking in revealing the negative influence of significant others on high academic achieving school pupils' choice of nursing as a career. The influence of significant others, these being specifically parents, guardians, guidance teachers and career advisors was very apparent in the data in that they had a very negative view regarding nursing as a career choice for high academic achieving school pupils. PMID:22464633

  16. Career Tracks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Amy; Dillon, Robert; Immings, Natalie; Jensen, Crystal

    2014-01-01

    Additional career paths are an element of improvement on the traditional career ladder concept in education. A culture of growth offers teachers opportunities that can greatly expand their careers while substantially enhancing student learning. The career paths summarised in this article, describe some additional opportunities for education…

  17. Female Chief Academic Officers in Evangelical Christian Colleges and Universities: Part II-- Reflections on Careers, Marriage, and Faith

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreton, April L.; Newsom, Ron W.

    2004-01-01

    This article is the second in a two-part series of case studies of sixteen female chief academic officers (CAO) serving in evangelical colleges and universities. The earlier article discussed each administrator's personal and academic background. This continues the reflections of these women regarding their careers, marital status and faith as…

  18. Career and Technical Education in the Balance: An Analysis of High School Persistence, Academic Achievement, and Postsecondary Destinations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plank, Stephen

    A study examined the relationship between: (1) the balance struck between career and technical education (CTE) and academic course-taking during the high school years; and (2) academic achievement, persistence in high school, and postsecondary destinations. Data for the study were drawn from the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988. The…

  19. Academic and personality correlates of career indecision in medical students entering training.

    PubMed

    Walters, G D

    1982-11-01

    The academic and personality correlates of medical career indecision were investigated in two separate studies. In the first, the effect of career indecision on academic performance was examined in a group of ninety-eight (eighty male, eighteen female) medical students entering Texas Tech University School of Medicine over a 2-year period. These medical students voluntarily completed the Medical Specialty Preference Inventory (MSPI) as part of a routine preadmission test battery. Subjects were assigned to one of three conditions-decided, high-interest undecided and low-interest undecided--based on results from the MSPI. As predicted, 'low-interest undecided' students achieved significantly lower initial medical school grades relative to 'decided' students, whereas 'high-interest undecided' students did not differ from the 'decided' students. The second study investigated the influence of career indecision upon personality. Subjects for this study were eighty-eight (sixty-six male, twenty-two female) medical students entering Texas Tech University School of Medicine over a 1-year period. These students voluntarily completed the MSPI and several personality measures as part of a pre-admission test battery. The results only partially supported the stated hypotheses. Although 'low-interest undecided' students demonstrated less personal integration compared with 'decided' students, they were no more anxious. PMID:7176977

  20. Career Paths of Beginning Public School Teachers: Results from the First through Fifth Waves of the 2007-08 Beginning Teacher Longitudinal Study. Stats in Brief. NCES 2015-196

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raue, Kimberley; Gray, Lucinda

    2015-01-01

    This report examines the career paths of beginning public school teachers and how these career paths vary by characteristics during the teachers' first year of teaching and most recent year of teaching. The career paths in this report are based on those developed for the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) research and development…

  1. Managing an academic career in science: What gender differences exist and why?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Gayle Patrice

    The present study examines the career trajectories of academic scientists during the period from 1993 to 2001 to explore gender differences in mobility. Data from the National Science Foundation's Survey of Doctorate Recipients are used to examine and compare gender differences in the odds of promotion. The effects of age, marital and family status, duration of time to complete doctorate, academic discipline, cumulative number of publications and time in the survey are considered as explanatory variables. Event history analyses are conducted for all scientists, for scientists in four major academic disciplines and for scientists in various academic ranks. While no overall gender differences were observed in the odds of promotion, several important similarities and differences were evident. Expectedly, publications had a significant and positive relationship with advancement for both women and men. The role of parent influenced promotions quite differently for women and men. Contrary to expectations based on prior research, academic women scientists who were mothers advanced at similar rates as women without children. Consistent with expectations based on traditional roles, married men and men with children generally advanced more quickly than single or childless men, respectively. Two surprising patterns emerged among subgroups of women. Marriage was associated with greater odds of advancement for women engineers and motherhood was associated with greater odds of advancement for among assistant professors. Possible explanations for these findings are presented.

  2. Developing a Career in Global Health: Considerations for Physicians-in-Training and Academic Mentors

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Brett D.; Kasper, Jennifer; Hibberd, Patricia L.; Thea, Donald M.; Herlihy, Julie M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Global health is an expansive field, and global health careers are as diverse as the practice of medicine, with new paths being forged every year. Interest in global health among medical students, residents, and fellows has never been higher. As a result, a greater number of these physicians-in-training are participating in global health electives during their training. However, there is a gap between the level of trainee interest and the breadth and depth of educational opportunities that prepare them for a career in global health. Objective Global health experiences can complement and enhance each step of traditional physician training, from medical school through residency and fellowship. Global health experiences can expose trainees to patients with diverse pathologies, improve physical exam skills by decreasing reliance on laboratory tests and imaging, enhance awareness of costs and resource allocation in resource-poor settings, and foster cultural sensitivity. The aim of this article is to describe issues faced by physicians-in-training and the faculty who mentor them as trainees pursue careers in global health. Methods We conducted a narrative review that addresses opportunities and challenges, competing demands on learners' educational schedules, and the need for professional development for faculty mentors. Conclusions A widening gap between trainee interest and the available educational opportunities in global health may result in many medical students and residents participating in global health experiences without adequate preparation and mentorship. Without this essential support, global health training experiences may have detrimental consequences on both trainees and the communities hosting them. We discuss considerations at each training level, options for additional training, current career models in global health, and challenges and potential solutions during training and early career development. PMID:23997872

  3. COAChing Women to Succeed in Academic Careers in the Chemical Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Geraldine L.

    2005-03-01

    COAChing (Committee on the Advancement of Women Chemists) was formed in 1998 by a group of senior women chemists to address issues related to the documented disparity in hiring, promotion, and advancement of women faculty in academic chemistry departments in the United States. Several national programs have been launched by COACh that are already showing a high degree of impact on the lives and careers of many women chemists in the academic arena. As word of the effectiveness of these programs has spread, other science disciplines (including physics, biology, mathematics, and computer science) have adopted COACh programs with similar goals in mind. This article describes several opportunities that COACh is providing to help increase the number and success of women scientists in academia.

  4. Medical school faculty discontent: prevalence and predictors of intent to leave academic careers

    PubMed Central

    Lowenstein, Steven R; Fernandez, Genaro; Crane, Lori A

    2007-01-01

    Background Medical school faculty are less enthusiastic about their academic careers than ever before. In this study, we measured the prevalence and determinants of intent to leave academic medicine. Methods A 75-question survey was administered to faculty at a School of Medicine. Questions addressed quality of life, faculty responsibilities, support for teaching, clinical work and scholarship, mentoring and participation in governance. Results Of 1,408 eligible faculty members, 532 (38%) participated. Among respondents, 224 (40%; CI95: 0.35, 0.44) reported that their careers were not progressing satisfactorily; 236 (42%; CI95: 0.38, 0.46) were "seriously considering leaving academic medicine in the next five years." Members of clinical departments (OR = 1.71; CI95: 1.01, 2.91) were more likely to consider leaving; members of inter-disciplinary centers were less likely (OR = 0.68; CI95: 0.47, 0.98). The predictors of "serious intent to leave" included: Difficulties balancing work and family (OR = 3.52; CI95: 2.34, 5.30); inability to comment on performance of institutional leaders (OR = 3.08; CI95: 2.07, 4.72); absence of faculty development programs (OR = 3.03; CI95: 2.00, 4.60); lack of recognition of clinical work (OR = 2.73; CI95: 1.60, 4.68) and teaching (OR = 2.47; CI95: 1.59, 3.83) in promotion evaluations; absence of "academic community" (OR = 2.67; CI95: 1.86, 3.83); and failure of chairs to evaluate academic progress regularly (OR = 2.60; CI95: 1.80, 3.74). Conclusion Faculty are a medical school's key resource, but 42 percent are seriously considering leaving. Medical schools should refocus faculty retention efforts on professional development programs, regular performance feedback, balancing career and family, tangible recognition of teaching and clinical service and meaningful faculty participation in institutional governance. PMID:17935631

  5. Commentary: Missing the elephant in my office: recommendations for part-time careers in academic medicine.

    PubMed

    Helitzer, Deborah

    2009-10-01

    Several recent articles in this journal, including the article by Linzer and colleagues in this issue, discuss and promote the concept of part-time careers in academic medicine as a solution to the need to achieve a work-life balance and to address the changing demographics of academic medicine. The article by Linzer and colleagues presents the consensus of a task force that attempted to address practical considerations for part-time work in academic internal medicine. Missing from these discussions, however, are a consensus on the definition of part-time work, consideration of how such strategies would be available to single parents, how time or resources will be allocated to part-time faculty to participate in professional associations, develop professional networks, and maintain currency in their field, and how part-time work can allow for the development of expertise in research and scholarly activity. Most important, the discussions about the part-time solution do not address the root cause of dissatisfaction and attrition: the ever-increasing and unsustainable workload of full-time faculty. The realization that an academic full-time career requires a commitment of 80 hours per week begs the question of whether part-time faculty would agree to work 40 hours a week for part-time pay. The historical underpinnings of the current situation, the implications of part-time solutions for the academy, and the consequences of choosing part-time work as the primary solution are discussed. Alternative strategies for addressing some of the problems facing full-time faculty are proposed. PMID:19881414

  6. Academic achievement and career choice in science: Perceptions of African American urban high school students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Sheila Kay

    2007-12-01

    Low test scores in science and fewer career choices in science among African American high school students than their White counterparts has resulted in lower interest during high school and an underrepresentation of African Americans in science and engineering fields. Reasons for this underachievement are not known. This qualitative study used a grounded theory methodology to examine what influence parental involvement, ethnic identity, and early mentoring had on the academic achievement in science and career choice in science of African American urban high school 10th grade students. Using semi-structured open-ended questions in individual interviews and focus groups, twenty participants responded to questions about African American urban high school student achievement in science and their career choice in science. The median age of participants was 15 years; 85% had passed either high school biology or physical science. The findings of the study revealed influences and interactions of selected factors on African American urban high school achievement in science. Sensing potential emerged as the overarching theme with six subthemes; A Taste of Knowledge, Sounds I Hear, Aromatic Barriers, What Others See, The Touch of Others, and The Sixth Sense. These themes correlate to the natural senses of the human body. A disconnect between what science is, their own individual learning and success, and what their participation in science could mean for them and the future of the larger society. Insight into appropriate intervention strategies to improve African American urban high school achievement in science was gained.

  7. Investing in future pediatric subspecialists: a fellowship curriculum that prepares for the transition to academic careers

    PubMed Central

    Rama, Jennifer A.; Campbell, Judith R.; Balmer, Dorene F.; Turner, Teri L.; Hsu, Deborah C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The experience of transitioning to an academic faculty position can be improved with standardized educational interventions. Although a number of such interventions have been described, few utilize an evaluation framework, describe a robust evaluation process, and address why their interventions were successful. In this article, the authors apply a logic model to describe their efforts to develop, implement, evaluate, and revise a comprehensive academic career development curriculum among pediatric subspecialty fellows. They describe inputs, activities, outputs, and outcomes using quantitative data from fellow evaluations and qualitative data from faculty interviews. Methods Methods are described under the input and activities sections. The curriculum started with collaboration among educational leadership and conducting a needs assessment. Using the needs assessment results and targeted learning objectives, we piloted the curriculum and then implemented the full curriculum 1 year later. Results Results are described under the outputs and outcomes sections. We present immediate, short-term, and 6-month evaluation data. Cumulative data over 3 years reveal that fellows consistently acquired knowledge relevant to transitioning and that they applied acquired knowledge to prepare for finding jobs and career advancement. The curriculum also benefits faculty instructors who gain a sense of reward by filling a critical knowledge gap and fostering fellows’ professional growth. Conclusion The authors relate the success and effectiveness of the curriculum to principles of adult learning, and share lessons learned, including the importance of buy-in from junior and senior fellows and faculty, collaboration, and designating the time to teach and learn. PMID:25861876

  8. Career Guidance for Academically Gifted Female Students: A Coordination of Resources to Develop Human Potential. Final Report, October 1, 1978, to September 30, 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Frances

    A project designed and demonstrated a career guidance model for academically gifted female students to overcome problems associated with non-traditional career choices and sex-role stereotyping. Academically gifted females were identified in grades 6 and 10-12. Parent involvement was actively solicited to facilitate non-traditional career…

  9. Trends in Determinants of Entry into the Academic Career: The Case of South Korea, 1980-2010.

    PubMed

    Kim, Keuntae; Kim, Jong-Kil

    2015-01-01

    Substantial research documents the determinants of entry into the academic career, yet little is known about how these determinants have evolved over time. Using data from a large sample of Korean scholars who received their doctoral degrees between 1980 and 2010, we estimate discrete-time event history models of transitioning to an academic position in any academic field. Results indicate that universalistic characteristics, such as publication record, strongly affect subsequent career success, but so do particularistic factors, including doctoral institution prestige. Since the 1980s, the influence of doctoral degree prestige increased substantially more than the influence of one's publication record on higher education employment, implying that the rising importance of particularistic factors has outpaced growing consideration of universalistic characteristics in Korean academia. However, the importance of gender on academic employment has declined since the early 2000s, suggesting that the implementation of employment quotas for female professors may have stymied gender discrimination. PMID:26509268

  10. Trends in Determinants of Entry into the Academic Career: The Case of South Korea, 1980-2010

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Keuntae; Kim, Jong-Kil

    2015-01-01

    Substantial research documents the determinants of entry into the academic career, yet little is known about how these determinants have evolved over time. Using data from a large sample of Korean scholars who received their doctoral degrees between 1980 and 2010, we estimate discrete-time event history models of transitioning to an academic position in any academic field. Results indicate that universalistic characteristics, such as publication record, strongly affect subsequent career success, but so do particularistic factors, including doctoral institution prestige. Since the 1980s, the influence of doctoral degree prestige increased substantially more than the influence of one’s publication record on higher education employment, implying that the rising importance of particularistic factors has outpaced growing consideration of universalistic characteristics in Korean academia. However, the importance of gender on academic employment has declined since the early 2000s, suggesting that the implementation of employment quotas for female professors may have stymied gender discrimination. PMID:26509268

  11. Bifurcation of a Common Path: Gender Splitting on the Road to Engineering and Physical Science Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lips, Hilary M.

    1992-01-01

    Findings from 55 female and 42 male college students revealed that inclination toward mathematics/science was significantly, positively, and similarly related to likely careers in mathematical sciences. For physical and engineering science careers, however, there was little or no relationship between self-described interest in science and…

  12. Empirical Findings on the Career Paths of Aspiring Elementary School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobeth-Neumann, Wiebke

    2014-01-01

    This is a study about teacher careers to elementary school principals. The aim of this contribution is to reconstruct the strategies guiding aspiring elementary school principals in their careers and to analyse those in order to answer the question: How do elementary school teachers manage to become principals? To obtain qualitative data…

  13. Linking Socioeconomic Status to Social Cognitive Career Theory Factors: A Partial Least Squares Path Modeling Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Jie-Tsuen; Hsieh, Hui-Hsien

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the contributions of socioeconomic status (SES) in predicting social cognitive career theory (SCCT) factors. Data were collected from 738 college students in Taiwan. The results of the partial least squares (PLS) analyses indicated that SES significantly predicted career decision self-efficacy (CDSE);…

  14. Career Paths of Recipients of a Master's Degree in Health Communication: Understanding Employment Opportunities, Responsibilities, and Choices.

    PubMed

    Edgar, Timothy; Silk, Kami J; Abroms, Lorien C; Cruz, Tess Boley; Evans, W Douglas; Gallagher, Susan Scavo; Miller, Gregory A; Hoffman, Alice; Schindler-Ruwisch, Jennifer M; Sheff, Sarah E

    2016-01-01

    A growing number of institutions offer a master's degree in health communication to prepare individuals for applied work in the field, but there is very little literature on the career paths graduates pursue. The current study reports the results of a national survey that targeted the alumni of five institutions that offer the degree. Of the 522 total graduates to whom the survey was sent, 398 responded (76.2% response rate). Results show that the degree recipients have found employment in a wide variety of organizations across the country, including jobs within very prestigious organizations, such as the National Cancer Institute. Common job titles include manager, coordinator, communication associate/specialist, and program/project director. The most common job responsibilities include research activities, the development of health communication materials, project/program management, communication management, and social media/website management. The results also include stories of graduates across programs that illustrate details of career paths. The discussion of the findings addresses implications for career preparation, curriculum development, and advising. PMID:26735802

  15. The Academic Bilingual and Career Upgrading System (Project ABACUS). Final Evaluation Report, 1992-93. OER Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, Tim

    The Academic Bilingual and Career Upgrading System (Project ABACUS) was a federally-funded program in its fourth year at two Brooklyn and one Queens (New York) high schools. The program served 475 limited-English-speaking students who were native speakers of Chinese, Korean, and Spanish. Students received instruction in English as a second…

  16. Do Babies Matter? The Effect of Family Formation on the Lifelong Careers of Academic Men and Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Mary Ann; Goulden, Marc

    2002-01-01

    Examines family formation and its effects on the career lives of both women and men academics from the time they receive their doctorates until 20 years later. Finds that there is a consistent and large gap in achieving tenure between women who have early babies and men who have early babies. Discusses policy implications. (EV)

  17. Navigating Careers: Perceptions of Sciences Doctoral Students, Post-PhD Researchers and Pre-Tenure Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlpine, Lynn; Emmioglu, Esma

    2015-01-01

    While the doctorate was once perceived as preparation for an academic position, internationally more than half of all graduates leave the higher education sector by choice or lack of opportunity. We know little of how they perceive and navigate the transition from PhD to other career. This longitudinal study of 23 sciences doctoral students,…

  18. The Impact of Childhood Obesity upon Academic, Personal/Social, and Career Development: Implications for Professional School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, Mary B.; Alessi, Hunter D.

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the impact of childhood obesity upon the academic, career, and personal/social development of students. The four components of the American School Counselor Association's (ASCA) delivery model, (classroom guidance, consultation, responsive services, and system support), are utilized to offer suggestions to the professional…

  19. Project A.B.C. (Bronx Academic Bilingual Career Program). O.E.E. Evaluation Report, 1981-1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collazo-Levy, Dora; And Others

    Project A.B.C. (Academic Bilingual Career Program) is a multisite project serving new immigrant students at three different high schools in the Bronx, New York: Vietnamese (Chinese ethnics) at Theodore Roosevelt, Italians at Christopher Columbus, and Cubans and Dominicans at John F. Kennedy high schools. Project students are incorporated into the…

  20. Making Standards Work! A Teacher's Guide to Contextual Learning: Integrating Academic Content Standards with Career Development and Workplace Competencies. History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlonan, Susan; Longo, Pat; Hotchkiss, Heather; Roark, Kelli; Fitzgerald, Joy

    This handbook, intended for K-12 teachers in Colorado, is a tool to help educators weave academic content standards, assessments, and career development methods into an integrated and comprehensive educational strategy that prepares all students to meet their future goals. The examples contained in the handbook were created to provide a vision of…

  1. Comparing Career Awareness Opportunities of Academically At-Risk and Non At-Risk Freshman Engineering Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ernst, Jeremy V.; Bowen, Bradley

    2014-01-01

    This study explored how freshman engineering students utilized career awareness developmental opportunities prior to entry into post-secondary academics. Specifically, the study delved into separations and distinctions among students at-risk of non-continuation due to matriculation concerns and students non at-risk. Founded on the amended…

  2. Making Standards Work! A Teacher's Guide to Contextual Learning: Integrating Academic Content Standards with Career Development and Workplace Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado School to Career Partnership, Denver.

    This publication is a tool to help educators weave academic content standards, assessments, and school-to-career methods into an integrated and comprehensive educational strategy that prepares all students to meet their future goals. Examples included in the publication were created by Colorado educators to provide a vision of how teachers can…

  3. The Value of Professional Development Activities in Advancing the Careers of Women Chief Academic Officers in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cejda, Brent D.

    2006-01-01

    Previous research has shown that there are not distinct career lines leading to the chief academic officer (CAO) position in community colleges.Rather, it appears that a variety of skills and experiences contribute to advancement to this position. This paper examines the perceptions of women CAOs as to the importance of professional development…

  4. Family Background, Students' Academic Self-Efficacy, and Students' Career and Life Success Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Mihyeon

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the relationship of family background on students' academic self-efficacy and the impact of students' self-efficacy on their career and life success expectations. The study used the national dataset of the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS: 2002), funded by the U.S. Department of Education. Based on a path…

  5. Factors influencing the career and academic choices of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Margaret S; Dimito, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This is an empirical study of academic and career choices for 119 lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students using a questionnaire. Respondents who reported that their sexual orientation influenced their choices a great deal indicated that the influences were both positive and negative. This group was most likely to have experienced anti-LGBT discrimination in the past. In comparing lesbian, bisexual people, and gay males, gay males and respondents from visible minorities were the most likely to feel a negative impact, while bisexual respondents were the least likely. There were too few transgender respondents to include in these statistical comparisons; however, frequencies suggest that transgender people may be the most vulnerable of all. Results suggest that counselors need to take sexual orientation issues, particularly past experiences of discrimination, when working with LGBT clients. PMID:21058150

  6. The training, careers, and work of Ph.D. physical scientists: Not simply academic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Steven J.; Pedersen-Gallegos, Liane; Riegle-Crumb, Catherine

    2002-11-01

    We present an in-depth portrait of the training, careers, and work of recent Ph.D. physical scientists. Use of specialized training varies widely, with about half often using knowledge of their Ph.D. specialty area in their jobs. The use of specialized training does not, however, correlate with job satisfaction. In this and other important measures, there are relatively few differences between "academics" and "nonacademics." Important job skills for all employment sectors include writing, oral presentation, management, data analysis, designing projects, critical thinking, and working in an interdisciplinary context. Rankings given by respondents of graduate training in some of these skill areas were significantly lower than the importance of these skills in the workplace. We also found that the rated quality of graduate training varies relatively little by department or advisor. Finally, although nonacademic aspirations among graduate students are fairly common, these do not appear to be well supported while in graduate school.

  7. Retaining a Foothold on the Slippery Paths of Academia: University Women, Indirect Discrimination, and the Academic Marketplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Jacqueline Z.; Marks, Genee; Noone, Lynne; Hamilton-Mackenzie, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines indirect discrimination in Australian universities that tends to obstruct and delay women's academic careers. The topic is defined and contextualised via a 1998 speech by the Australian Human Rights Commission's Sex Discrimination Commissioner, juxtaposed with a brief contemporaneous exemplar. The paper discusses the prevalence…

  8. Building Paths to Health Careers | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... than 1,800 students (pre-high school through college) from the New York City metropolitan area. Special programs and exhibits for students and their parents helped them learn about career opportunities in medicine, nursing, and allied health fields. ...

  9. Measuring Academic Language Proficiency in School-Age English Language Proficiency Assessments under New College and Career Readiness Standards in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frantz, Roger S.; Bailey, Alison L.; Starr, Laura; Perea, Luis

    2014-01-01

    The current focus across the U.S. on student college and career readiness standards makes clear that both instruction and assessment of academic English will continue to be important for school-age English learner (EL) students. This article presents an overview and summary of key literature on academic language (usually academic English);…

  10. Breaking Out of the Academic Pipeline.

    PubMed

    Zusi, Karen

    2016-06-16

    For many graduate students, the academic path may not be the best fit, and with limited faculty positions available, many students are now looking to other career possibilities. University programs are helping students to explore and pursue alternative careers. PMID:27315467

  11. REVAMP: Revitalize the Vocational and Academic Multifarious Program through Career Education. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLeod, George H.

    The activities of the second year of a career education project in the South Portland School are reported in the document which covers the time period of July 1974 to June 1975. The project consisted of a career awareness component for grade levels K-6, a career orientation component for levels 7 and 8, a career exploration phase for grade 9, and…

  12. The Role of Key Qualifications in the Transition from a Comparison Of Role/Task/Environment Stress Experienced by Beginning Academic and Career-Technical Teachers in Southwestern Ohio Career-Technical Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerlin, Timothy F.

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-four academic and 50 career-technical teachers in southwestern Ohio high school career centers were studied to determine which group perceived greater role stress, task stress, and environment stress while teaching and prior to issuance of their professional license. Teachers completed the 67-item Teacher Stress Measure (TSM) developed by…

  13. Academic Standards in Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    A+ Education Partnership, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Education policymakers and educators in Alabama are committed to improving the state's public education system to ensure that students gain the knowledge and skills they need to graduate from high school ready for real life. The state is on the path to implementing higher academic standards--the College and Career Ready Standards--which lay a…

  14. Overconfidence and Career Choice.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Jonathan F; Thöni, Christian

    2016-01-01

    People self-assess their relative ability when making career choices. Thus, confidence in their own abilities is likely an important factor for selection into various career paths. In a sample of 711 first-year students we examine whether there are systematic differences in confidence levels across fields of study. We find that our experimental confidence measures significantly vary between fields of study: While students in business related academic disciplines (Political Science, Law, Economics, and Business Administration) exhibit the highest confidence levels, students of Humanities range at the other end of the scale. This may have important implications for subsequent earnings and professions students select themselves in. PMID:26808273

  15. Overconfidence and Career Choice

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Jonathan F.; Thöni, Christian

    2016-01-01

    People self-assess their relative ability when making career choices. Thus, confidence in their own abilities is likely an important factor for selection into various career paths. In a sample of 711 first-year students we examine whether there are systematic differences in confidence levels across fields of study. We find that our experimental confidence measures significantly vary between fields of study: While students in business related academic disciplines (Political Science, Law, Economics, and Business Administration) exhibit the highest confidence levels, students of Humanities range at the other end of the scale. This may have important implications for subsequent earnings and professions students select themselves in. PMID:26808273

  16. The Effects of a Lack of Career Pathing on Job Satisfaction among South African Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quan-Baffour, Kofi Poku; Arko-Achemfuor, Akwasi

    2014-01-01

    Education is an important ingredient for advancement in the knowledge-based economy of the contemporary world. Teachers therefore form the vehicle for provision and dissemination of relevant knowledge, skills and values for socio-economic development. In every career professionals are assured of moving through the ranks so long as they do their…

  17. Career Paths and Expectations of Recent Doctoral Graduates in Student Affairs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daddona, Mark F.; Cooper, Diane; Dunn, Merrily S.

    2006-01-01

    Personal issues and career development processes of individuals working in student affairs who have recently completed a doctorate were explored in this study. Results indicated that almost 70% were employed at the completion of their doctorate either by accepting a new position or remaining in their current position. New doctoral graduates…

  18. Alternative Career Paths in Physical Education: Fitness and Exercise. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zak, Janet L.; Sullivan, Patricia

    During the past 20 years, alternative professional preparation and certification programs have expanded within the field of physical education. Societal trends, the media, and demographics have dictated these changes. This digest examines factors leading to an increase in the scope of career opportunities for physical education professionals and…

  19. Lean in and Lift up: Female Superintendents Share Their Career Path Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelsey, Cheryl; Allen, Kathy; Coke, Kelly; Ballard, Glenda

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to inform professional practice pertaining to the preparation of female administrators as future school superintendents. Twenty female superintendents in Texas were interviewed using a qualitative research approach. Strategies, career experiences and perception of barriers were identified using open-ended questions.…

  20. Are Green Jobs Career Pathways a Path to a 21st-Century Workforce Development System?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scully-Russ, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    This article examines policy reports that advocate for new green jobs career pathways to help grow the green economy and create new opportunity structures in the green labor market. The reports are based on a series of propositions about the nature of green jobs and the existence of the political will to invest in new green education programs to…

  1. Lost in Transition: Building a Better Path from School to College and Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bottoms, Gene; Young, Marna

    2008-01-01

    In 2005 and 2006, the "High Schools That Work" ("HSTW") program of the Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) and the College and Career Transitions Initiative of the League for Innovation in the Community College (League) facilitated a series of 15 state-level forums aimed at identifying ways to foster collaboration between secondary and…

  2. Panel: Alternative Careers for Biomedical Informatics PhDs

    PubMed Central

    Tenenbaum, Jessica D.; Sorani, Marco; Maker, Monya; Torrance, Andrew; Horvitz, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The number of doctoral training programs in informatics increases every year, however not every doctoral candidate wishes to pursue a traditional career in academia. In addition, the knowledge and skills acquired through scientific training at the doctoral level can be valuable, even critical, for a number of career paths outside of academic research and teaching. This panel will present a diverse set of alternative career paths for which graduates of Informatics programs would be well suited, including patent law, research in industry, academic administration, and scientific journalism. Panelists will describe their own respective backgrounds and career paths, a day in the life in their current position, and how their training prepared them for their jobs. They will also touch on insights gained and lessons learned in exploring the professional landscape through non-traditional paths. PMID:24303329

  3. Developing a Model of Advanced Training to Promote Career Advancement for Certified Genetic Counselors: An Investigation of Expanded Skills, Advanced Training Paths, and Professional Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Baty, Bonnie J; Trepanier, Angela; Bennett, Robin L; Davis, Claire; Erby, Lori; Hippman, Catriona; Lerner, Barbara; Matthews, Anne; Myers, Melanie F; Robbins, Carol B; Singletary, Claire N

    2016-08-01

    There are currently multiple paths through which genetic counselors can acquire advanced knowledge and skills. However, outside of continuing education opportunities, there are few formal training programs designed specifically for the advanced training of genetic counselors. In the genetic counseling profession, there is currently considerable debate about the paths that should be available to attain advanced skills, as well as the skills that might be needed for practice in the future. The Association of Genetic Counseling Program Directors (AGCPD) convened a national committee, the Committee on Advanced Training for Certified Genetic Counselors (CATCGC), to investigate varied paths to post-master's training and career development. The committee began its work by developing three related grids that view career advancement from the viewpoints of the skills needed to advance (skills), ways to obtain these skills (paths), and existing genetic counselor positions that offer career change or advancement (positions). Here we describe previous work related to genetic counselor career advancement, the charge of the CATCGC, our preliminary work in developing a model through which to view genetic counselor advanced training and career advancement opportunities, and our next steps in further developing and disseminating the model. PMID:26739839

  4. The Influence of Research on Career Development at Academic Colleges of Education in Israel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Eva; Coleman, Marianne

    2002-01-01

    Interviewed and surveyed Israeli teacher educators regarding links between research and career development. Young and ambitious respondents used research for extrinsic rewards and career advancement. Teacher educators toward the end of their careers looked for intrinsic rewards and viewed research as contributing to professional growth.…

  5. Striking the Balance: Career Academies Combine Academic Rigor and Workplace Relevance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    Career Academies are small learning communities established at the high school level that use career strands as an organizing framework for learning and instruction, as well as for engaging the interest and energies of students. Standards common to well-designed Career Academy: (1) Central goal of preparing students for higher education and…

  6. Influence of an Academic Intervention Program on Minority Student Career Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Jennifer K.; Villarejo, Merna

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative, retrospective study explored how educational experiences provided as part of an undergraduate intervention program helped to shape career decisions for minority biology students. A key goal for the program is to increase minority entry into science research and teaching careers, yet actual career choice has not been studied.…

  7. Development of a career coaching model for medical students

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Yera

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Deciding on a future career path or choosing a career specialty is an important academic decision for medical students. The purpose of this study is to develop a career coaching model for medical students. Methods: This research was carried out in three steps. The first step was systematic review of previous studies. The second step was a need assessment of medical students. The third step was a career coaching model using the results acquired from the researched literature and the survey. Results: The career coaching stages were defined as three big phases: The career coaching stages were defined as the “crystallization” period (Pre-medical year 1 and 2), “specification” period (medical year 1 and 2), and “implementation” period (medical year 3 and 4). Conclusion: The career coaching model for medical students can be used in programming career coaching contents and also in identifying the outcomes of career coaching programs at an institutional level. PMID:26867586

  8. Academics' Attitudes towards PhD Students' Teaching: Preparing Research Higher Degree Students for an Academic Career

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jepsen, Denise M.; Varhegyi, Melinda M.; Edwards, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    An exploratory study of 473 academics in a metropolitan university investigated the attitudes of academic supervisors towards training for university teaching for doctoral students. The study investigated academic supervisors' levels of awareness and knowledge of teacher training opportunities, the relative importance of teaching--both lecturing…

  9. A Comparative Consideration of Career Paths into Middle Management in the Construction Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerhard Syben

    2008-01-01

    The article is based on a comparative investigation of the training and further training paths into middle management on building sites in eleven countries in Europe. Using as its primary examples a comparison between Hungary, where vocational training takes place predominantly within the state education system, and Germany, where the dual system…

  10. Socioeconomic Influences on the Educational and Career Paths of Kentucky High School Seniors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rever, Philip R.; And Others

    The report is a response to Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority's concern about limiting factors which constrain students' choices of paths to follow after leaving high school, specifically unacceptable factors that prohibit students (1) from pursuing postsecondary education and (2) from entering postsecondary institutions of their…

  11. Examination of the Relationship Amongst Parenting Dimensions, Academic Achievement, Career Decision Making, and Commitment Anxiety among African American High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett-Garraway, Jocelyn M.

    2011-01-01

    Do parents play a significant role in the academic achievement and career decision making process of African American children? Studies have confirmed the importance of the role of parents and have even identified preferred parenting styles as having the best academic achievement (Dornbusch, Ritter, Leiderman, Roberts, & Fraleigh, 1987;…

  12. Using Knowledge, Skill and Ability (KSA) Data to Identify Career Pathing Opportunities: An Application of Job Analysis to Internal Manpower Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooten, William

    1993-01-01

    When knowledge, skills, and abilities of four job classes (secretarial/clerical, managerial/administrative, professional/technical, service) were identified, 68% of those determined important for managerial/administrative were also important for secretarial/clerical. Job analysis proved useful in identifying possible career paths, and potential…

  13. The Use of Grounded Theory to Investigate the Role of Teacher Education on STEM Teachers' Career Paths in High-Need Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirchhoff, Allison; Lawrenz, Frances

    2011-01-01

    An inductive grounded theory approach was used to investigate the role of teacher education on the career paths of 38 Noyce scholarship recipients ("scholars"), most of whom were teaching in high-need schools. The emergent research design was guided by the initial research question: "What are Noyce scholars' reasons for the decisions made on the…

  14. Social Reproduction and the Student Decision to Follow the Louisiana Career/Basic Core Diploma Path at a Large, Affluent High School in Northeastern Louisiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittock, Tammy

    2013-01-01

    Through this mixed-method study, the researcher investigated social reproduction in a student's decision to follow the Louisiana Career/Basic Core Diploma Path. In 2008-2009, Louisiana's cohort graduation rate was 67.3%, which was well below the national average of 75.5%, ranking Louisiana forty-sixth in the country. This rate led to the…

  15. Reflexivity and Self-Development of Competencies as Key Drivers in Individuals' Learning and Career Paths: Cases from Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomassini, Massimo; Zanazzi, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    The article is aimed at analysing the qualitative interviews (in the form of short life stories) carried out within the Learning and Career Paths (LCP) project in Italy. Theories, such as those of reflexivity, agency, self-construction, competencies, and transformation put forward by relevant authors in the sociological and educational field, are…

  16. Who We Are: An In-Depth Look at the Educational Backgrounds, Career Paths and Development Needs of Chief Admission Officers and Enrollment Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, Scott Andrew; Lucido, Jerome A.

    2011-01-01

    The University of Southern California (USC) Center for Enrollment Research, Policy, and Practice, dedicated to research and action that advances the societal benefit of enrollment policies and practices in higher education, sought to shed light on professional preparation, career path and development issues related to chief admission officers and…

  17. "Opt-Out" Rates at Motherhood across High-Education Career Paths: Selection versus Work Environment. NBER Working Paper No. 14717

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herr, Jane Leber; Wolfram, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the propensity of highly educated women to exit the labor force at motherhood. We focus on systematic differences across women with various graduate degrees to analyze whether these speak to differences in the capacity to combine children with work over a variety of high-education career paths. Working with a sample of Harvard…

  18. Career Pathing among General Administrative and Support Services Employees Based on Holland?s Typology of Personality Theory and Personal Style Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Catalino N.

    2009-01-01

    The study is about the prevailing differences, commonalities and significant contributions of the career pathing among the general administrative and support services employees based on Holland's Typology of Personality Theory and Personal Style Inventory of selected higher educational institutions in Metro Manila.

  19. Improving Graduate Education to Support a Branching Career Pipeline: Recommendations Based on a Survey of Doctoral Students in the Basic Biomedical Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuhrmann, C. N.; Halme, D. G.; O'Sullivan, P. S.; Lindstaedt, B.

    2011-01-01

    Today's doctoral programs continue to prepare students for a traditional academic career path despite the inadequate supply of research-focused faculty positions. We advocate for a broader doctoral curriculum that prepares trainees for a wide range of science-related career paths. In support of this argument, we describe data from our survey of…

  20. Gender, Academic Careers and the Sabbatical: A New Zealand Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, D.; Spronken-Smith, R.; Stringer, R.; Wilson, C. A.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines academics' access to and perceptions of sabbaticals at a research-intensive university in New Zealand. Statistical and inductive analysis of survey data from 915 academics (47% of all academics employed) revealed inequalities in access to and experience of sabbaticals, and highlighted academic, personal and gender issues. Men…

  1. From the Other Side of the Academy to Academic Leadership Roles: Crossing the Great Divide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Land, Patricia C.

    2003-01-01

    Evolutionary paths for faculty are no longer sacred routes to chief academic officer (CAO) roles. Instead, CAOs are being drawn from a variety of other arenas. This being the case, college and university officials must address the following areas: (1) alternative career paths to academic affairs; (2) how to identify future leaders from other…

  2. Sex differences in career progression and satisfaction in an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Lynn C

    2002-01-01

    Are differences in men's and women's career progression and satisfaction in academia related to their sex? This article discusses the variables that contribute to sex-based career differentials and the implications both for the individual and for society. PMID:12405235

  3. Twists and Turns: My Career Path and Concerns About the Future

    PubMed Central

    Ausubel, Frederick M.

    2014-01-01

    THE Genetics Society of America’s Thomas Hunt Morgan Medal is awarded to an individual GSA member for lifetime achievement in the field of genetics. The 2014 recipient is Frederick Ausubel, whose 40-year career has centered on host–microbe interactions and host innate immunity. He is widely recognized as a key scientist responsible for establishing the modern postrecombinant DNA field of host–microbe interactions using simple nonvertebrate hosts. He has used genetic approaches to conduct pioneering work that spawned six related areas of research: the evolution and regulation of Rhizobium genes involved in symbiotic nitrogen fixation; the regulation of Rhizobium genes by two-component regulatory systems involving histidine kinases; the establishment of Arabidopsis thaliana as a worldwide model system; the identification of a large family of plant disease resistance genes; the identification of so-called multi-host bacterial pathogens; and the demonstration that Caenorhabditis elegans has an evolutionarily conserved innate immune system that shares features of both plant and mammalian immunity. PMID:25316778

  4. Twists and turns: my career path and concerns about the future.

    PubMed

    Ausubel, Frederick M

    2014-10-01

    THE Genetics Society of America's Thomas Hunt Morgan Medal is awarded to an individual GSA member for lifetime achievement in the field of genetics. The 2014 recipient is Frederick Ausubel, whose 40-year career has centered on host-microbe interactions and host innate immunity. He is widely recognized as a key scientist responsible for establishing the modern postrecombinant DNA field of host-microbe interactions using simple nonvertebrate hosts. He has used genetic approaches to conduct pioneering work that spawned six related areas of research: the evolution and regulation of Rhizobium genes involved in symbiotic nitrogen fixation; the regulation of Rhizobium genes by two-component regulatory systems involving histidine kinases; the establishment of Arabidopsis thaliana as a worldwide model system; the identification of a large family of plant disease resistance genes; the identification of so-called multi-host bacterial pathogens; and the demonstration that Caenorhabditis elegans has an evolutionarily conserved innate immune system that shares features of both plant and mammalian immunity. PMID:25316778

  5. Affirmatives and Negatives of Space-Career Prospects-Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bole-Becker, Luanne C.

    1990-01-01

    The second part of a two-part series on careers in the space program discusses the academic credentials and experience required for various career paths within the space industry. NASA-sponsored cooperative training and research programs for undergraduate and graduate students are listed and discussed. (TE)

  6. The Battle over Professorship: Reform of Human Resource Management and Academic Careers in a Comparative Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majcher, Agnieszka

    2008-01-01

    Changing conditions of academic and scientific labour markets challenge the current conceptual thinking about the mechanisms of academic promotion, selection and recruitment. This paper explores the models of academic promotion and recruitment of professors in a comparative perspective using the examples of Poland and Germany, and addresses the…

  7. Advice for a career in academic gastroenterology: from fellowship application through job selection and contract negotiations to research and promotion.

    PubMed

    Cappell, M S

    2009-03-01

    This study aims to describe a comprehensive strategy for success in academic gastroenterology by reporting common sense, but mostly previously unpublished, recommendations. The recommendation are based on expert opinion from personal experience mentoring 125 gastroenterology fellows and residents as a program director for nine years and from mentoring research while publishing more than 160 articles in peer-reviewed journals and editing 11 books during a 23-year academic career. Primary criteria for fellowship applicant selection include board scores, clinical performance, interview performance, clinical training, and research productivity. For optimal chances, select the subspecialty of gastroenterology early during residency, consult a mentor, and develop a well-planned strategy. Faculty advancement depends upon publications, grants, national recognition, interpersonal skills, and recommendations. Article categories from highest-to-lowest in prestige are original investigations, review articles, book chapters, case reports, and letters/abstracts. Articles are judged by the prestige of the journal of publication. Resubmit rejected articles to successively less prestigious journals until accepted for publication. Articles in journals without peer-review have negligible career impact. Grant support creates protected time. Institutional reputation is important in academics. Do not accept a job without a written contract. Have a lawyer review your contract. An outside offer strengthens a negotiating position. Be sociable and nonconfrontational at work. Network with colleagues. Seek a mentor. Meet your supervisor regularly for feedback. Never express anger at your boss or patients. Avoid litigation with employers. Sub-subspecialize to develop expertise in one area. Focus on this area in your research and clinical practice. In conclusion, a well-planned strategy can help you achieve a senior academic position early and efficiently. PMID:19212312

  8. The BMET (biomedical equipment technician) career: academic curricula, hospital needs, & employee perceptions.

    PubMed

    Majercik, S M

    1991-01-01

    Research conducted over a two-year (1988-1989) period compared the concepts of job performance of Biomedical Equipment Technicians (BMETs) with the job descriptions and academic requirements of healthcare organizations and the current academic curricula used to teach biomedical equipment technology. This study indicated that, while the BMETs and healthcare organizations held similar views of job performance requirements, there was disparity concerning the BMET's academic requirements as viewed by healthcare organizations when compared to the BMET's perception of academic preparedness. There was an even greater disparity between those perceptions and requirements when compared to the academic programs currently in place. PMID:10115433

  9. Practical advice to support mid-career doctoral students in nursing: some considerations for academic supervisors.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Debra; Cleary, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Mid-career students who undertake doctoral studies have often achieved standing and success in their careers and may already hold quite senior leadership positions in the profession. In view of this, mid-career students may struggle with the transition to student, particularly if they have not studied for a number of years and have multiple pressures on their time. Supervisors on the other hand, operate within cultures of performance based indicators, and are under pressure to facilitate timely student completions. While students must take ultimate responsibility for their doctoral work, it is possible for supervisors to identify problems early, and offer practical solutions to assist mid-career students overcome their problems, and facilitate optimal engagement. In this paper we highlight some of the challenges this vulnerable student group can present, and identify some practical strategies supervisors can suggest to assist in the timely and successful completion of doctorate degrees. PMID:21854248

  10. Class, Ability, Mobility: Economic and Academic Paths from Middle School to Early Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Joe G.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines academic and economic progression of 8th graders using the National Educational Longitudinal Study of 1988 (NELS 88). In terms of educational mobility, this analysis indicates it is clearly better to possess academic ability--middle-school students who have high-academic ability but low family socioeconomic status (SES)…

  11. [Strategies to ensure careers of young academics in plastic surgery - analysis of the current situation and future perspectives].

    PubMed

    Horch, R E; Vogt, P M; Schaller, H E; Stark, G B; Lehnhardt, M; Kneser, U; Giunta, R E

    2013-08-01

    Recruitment problems in surgical disciplines have become an increasingly debated topic. On the one hand current career prospects appear to be less attractive than those were seen for the previous generation. On the other hand the demands for a so-called "work-life balance" have changed and the proportion of female students and colleagues in medicine has risen and will continue to increase. Although Plastic Surgery currently seems to be less affected by these problems than other surgical disciplines, securing a qualified supply of young academics in Plastic Surgery is a prerequisite for the further development of this discipline. The traditional model of mentoring is discussed and the role of coaching in a sense of helping the mentorees examine what they are doing in the light of their intentions and goals is reflected. The present article tries to analyze the current status of academic Plastic Surgery from the viewpoint of German university senior surgeons in academic plastic surgery, and aims to highlight the specific prospects for young academics against the backdrop of an often one-sided and superficial perception of this profession. PMID:23881363

  12. The possible role of resource requirements and academic career-choice risk on gender differences in publication rate and impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiaohan; Duch, Jordi; Sales-Pardo, Marta; Radicchi, Filippo; Otis, Shayna; Woodruff, Teresa; Amaral, Luis

    2013-03-01

    Many studies demonstrate that there is still a significant gender bias, especially at higher career levels, in many areas including science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). We investigated field-dependent, gender-specific effects of the selective pressures individuals experience as they pursue a career in academia within seven STEM disciplines. We built a unique database that comprises 437,787 publications authored by 4,292 faculty members at top United States research universities. Our analyses reveal that gender differences in publication rate and impact are discipline-specific. Our results also support two hypotheses. First, the widely-reported lower publication rates of female faculty are correlated with the amount of research resources typically needed in the discipline considered, and thus may be explained by the lower level of institutional support historically received by females. Second, in disciplines where pursuing an academic position incurs greater career risk, female faculty tend to have a greater fraction of higher impact publications than males. Our findings have significant, field-specific, policy implications for achieving diversity at the faculty level within the STEM disciplines. L. A. N. Amaral gratefully acknowledges the support of NSF awards SBE 0624318 and 0830388, and ThomsonReuters for access to the WoS data. J. Duch and M. Sales-Pardo's work have been partially supported by the Spanish DGICYT under project FIS2010-18639.

  13. The ADVANCE Program: Targeting the Increase in the Participation and Advancement of Women in Academic Science and Engineering Careers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esperanca, S.

    2003-12-01

    The goal of NSF's ADVANCE Program is to help increase the participation of women in the scientific and engineering workforce through the increased representation and advancement of women in academic science and engineering careers. The Program tries to address this under representation by focusing on support for men and women with three approaches: institutional (Institutional Transformation), grass-root (Leadership), and individual (Fellows) support. The ADVANCE Program alternates with a round of Institutional and Leadership awards in one year and a Fellows competition the next. Since its inception in 2001, NSF has had two competitive rounds for each of the three award types and will have spent approximately 75 M\\ by the end of the next fiscal year (2004). The first and second ADVANCE Institutional Transformation competitions (FY 2001 and 2003) received over 70 proposals each. These awards are for multi-year support in the amount of 3-4M\\ each. Details and access to the websites for the ADVANCE programs of each institution can be found in NSF's ADVANCE webpage at http://nsf.gov/home/crssprgm/advance/itwebsites.htm. The number of proposals submitted for the Leadership awards competition dropped from 35 in 2001 to 26 in 2003, despite an increase in the allowed award size for the second round. In terms of projected goals, this part of ADVANCE is perhaps the most eclectic. Some Leadership awards were made to professional societies to work specifically with their respective scientific communities in identifying needs that might be peculiar to a field of science. In the first round of the Leadership awards, PI Mary-Anne Holmes of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and collaborators received a grant to work with the Association of Women Geoscientists to determine the current status of women geoscientists in the US. These grantees hope to disseminate the information gathered under this award broadly in order to educate women students and faculty on strategies to

  14. Analyzing the Relationship of Geographic Mobility and Institutional Prestige to Career Advancement of Women in Academic Medicine Pursuing Midcareer-, Senior-, or Executive-Level Administrative Positions: Implications for Career Advancement Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Marsha Renee

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship of geographic mobility and institutional prestige to career advancement defined as administrative promotions of women seeking midcareer-, senior-, or executive-level positions at academic health centers (AHCs) and their medical schools or in non-AHC related medical schools in the United…

  15. Career Success, Mobility and Extrinsic Career Satisfaction: Studying Corporate Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gattiker, Urs E.; Larwood, Laurie

    Research into career success has usually dealt with objective aspects of career paths such as income and job title. Cognitive variables can also be used to assess career success, career mobility, and career satisfaction. This study examined demographics, job properties, and personal attributes as well as the relationship between career strategies…

  16. Radiation oncology career decision variables for graduating trainees seeking positions in 2003-2004

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Lynn D. . E-mail: lynn.wilson@yale.edu; Flynn, Daniel F.; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2005-06-01

    Purpose: Radiation oncology trainees must consider an array of variables when deciding upon an academic or private practice career path. This prospective evaluation of the 2004 graduating radiation oncology trainees, evaluates such variables and provides additional descriptive data. Methods: A survey that included 15 questions (one subjective, eleven categorical, and 3 continuous variables) was mailed to the 144 graduating radiation oncology trainees in United States programs in January of 2004. Questions were designed to gather information regarding factors that may have influenced career path choices. The responses were anonymous, and no identifying information was sought. Survey data were collated and analyzed for differences in both categorical and continuous variables as they related to choice of academic or private practice career path. Results: Sixty seven (47%) of the surveys were returned. Forty-five percent of respondents indicated pursuit of an academic career. All respondents participated in research during training with 73% participating in research publication authorship. Post graduate year-3 was the median in which career path was chosen, and 20% thought that a fellowship position was 'perhaps' necessary to secure an academic position. Thirty percent of the respondents revealed that the timing of the American Board of Radiology examination influenced their career path decision. Eighteen variables were offered as possibly influencing career path choice within the survey, and the top five identified by those seeking an academic path were: (1) colleagues, (2) clinical research, (3) teaching, (4) geography, (5) and support staff. For those seeking private practice, the top choices were: (1) lifestyle, (2) practice environment, (3) patient care, (4) geography, (5) colleagues. Female gender (p = 0.064), oral meeting presentation (p = 0.053), and international meeting presentation (p 0.066) were the variables most significantly associated with pursuing an

  17. Using Stakeholders as Career Bridges to Advance Students' Academic Performance: How Would You Like Your Stake?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olguin, David L.; Keim, Jeanmarie

    2009-01-01

    The New Mexico Next Step Plan, a postsecondary career transition plan for grades 8 through 12, aims to enhance relationships between all educational stakeholders: students, parents/caregivers, community, and administrators. These stakeholder relationships are intended to close the achievement gap among all students, in particular, ethnic youth.…

  18. In Their Own Words: Women Chief Academic Officers Discuss the Community College and Their Career Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cejda, Brent D.

    2008-01-01

    Previous research has shown that a variety of skills and experiences contribute to the career advancement of community college leaders. With the increased representation of women in senior-level positions, this paper answers the call to move beyond male-versus-female comparisons. Through in-depth interviews and follow-up conversations, six female…

  19. Falling through the Cracks: Academic and Career Challenges Faced by Immigrant Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinacore, Ada L.; Park-Saltzman, Jeeseon; Mikhail, Anne Marie; Wada, Kaori

    2011-01-01

    The goals of this study are twofold. First, it aims to understand immigrant graduate students' experiences in higher education and how these influence cultural transitioning and social integration to Quebec society. Second, the study examines the career counselling and mentoring needs of immigrant graduate students while attending university.…

  20. Catching up to College and Career Readiness: The Challenge Is Greater for At-Risk Students. Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Chrys

    2014-01-01

    Educators and policymakers have set a goal that all students graduate from high school ready for college and careers. A substantial body of research supports the idea that the path to college and career readiness begins well before middle and high school. In an earlier policy report, ACT examined the percentage of academically far off track…

  1. A career in government: my experiences working for the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The agricultural sector provides highly diverse career opportunities that include private companies, academic institutions, non-government organizations, and government agencies. One possible career path is with the Federal government which is one of the largest employers of scientists and engineers...

  2. Predicting the STEM outcomes of academically qualified women: A longitudinal examination of social cognitive career theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasson, Jillian Woodford

    There is a well-documented gender disparity in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields, which has been the focus of research for several decades (i.e., Betz & Hackett, 1981; Ceci & Williams, 2009, 2010; Wang, Eccles, & Kenny, 2013). Questions as to why this is the case are not new; however, with the growing body of research, there seem to be more questions than answers. This study drew primarily from the vocational psychology literature, particularly Social Cognitive Career Theory, building on previous literature in this area by examining differences in career choices made over time by qualified women across different stages in the education-to-career pathway. The results of the present study indicate that among qualified women many of the SCCT personal and contextual variables are relevant to STEM career development. Moreover, findings from the present study support the hypothesis (Lent et al., 1994) that personal, environmental, and behavioral variables affect one another. An important aspect of the SCCT model is the acknowledgment that at any given point in time, certain variables will carry different weight (Lent et al., 1994). The current study provides further support for this and underscores the necessity of understanding and framing career development as a process, unfolding across several developmental stages. These findings, their generalizability, and implications for practice should be carefully considered in the context of several limitations that this sample was influenced by: limitations in reliability and selection of variables, lack of diversity within the sample, as well as the extraneous variables related to overall economic and political backdrop.

  3. "Disqus" Website-Based Commenting as an e-Research Method: Engaging Doctoral and Early-Career Academic Learners in Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilburn, Daniel; Earley, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an adaptation of established qualitative research methods for online focus groups by using the "Disqus" website-based commenting platform as a medium for discussion among doctoral and early-career academic learners. Facilities allowing Internet users to comment on the content of web pages are increasingly popular on…

  4. The Relationship of Career Decision Self-Efficacy and Perceived Barriers to Academic Preparedness for Community College Students of African Descent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twomey, Joshua Patrick

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the relationship of career decision self-efficacy and perception of barriers to the outcome variables perception of academic reality (i.e., a construct for student perceived college readiness) and college GPA. The sample consisted of students of African descent (n = 85) attending a northeastern community college located in an…

  5. Cognitive Academic Learning Approaches through ESL Content Area Instruction with Career Exploration Strategies (Project CALA). Final Evaluation Report, 1992-93. OER Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guadalupe, Deana R.

    This report presents an evaluation of the Cognitive Academic Learning Approaches through ESL Content Area Instruction with Career Exploration Strategies (Project CALA)), an Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title VII-funded project in its fifth and last year of operation at International High School, a bilingual special alternative high…

  6. Field Dependence-Field Independence Cognitive Style, Gender, Career Choice and Academic Achievement of Secondary School Students in Emohua Local Government Area of Rivers State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onyekuru, Bruno Uchenna

    2015-01-01

    This is a descriptive study that investigated the relationships among field dependence-field independence cognitive style and gender, career choice and academic achievement of secondary school students in Emohua Local Government Area of Rivers State, Nigeria. From the initial sample of 320 senior secondary school one (SS1) students drawn from the…

  7. Making Standards Work! A Teacher's Guide to Integrating Academic Content Standards and Assessments with Workplace Competencies and School-to-Career Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver.

    This handbook, which is intended for K-12 teachers in Colorado, explains how to integrate academic content standards and assessments with workplace competencies and school-to-career activities. The handbook is divided into four sections. The first presents the Colorado General Workplace Competencies, which describe the skills and knowledge…

  8. Bilingual Academic and Career Education Services for Hispanic High School Students (Project BACES). Final Evaluation Report, 1992-93. OER Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Candice

    This report presents an evaluation of the Bilingual Academic and Career Education Services for Hispanic High School Students (Project BACES), an Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title VII-funded project in its third year of operation at DeWitt Clinton High School in the Bronx and George Washington High School in Manhattan. The project served…

  9. Fostering Student Awareness in Observatory STEM Careers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keonaonaokalauae Acohido, Alexis Ann; Michaud, Peter D.; Gemini Public Information and Outreach Staff

    2016-01-01

    It takes more than scientists to run an observatory. Like most observatories, only about 20% of Gemini Observatory's staff is PhD. Scientists, but 100% of those scientists would not be able to do their jobs without the help of engineers, administrators, and other support staff that make things run smoothly. Gemini's Career Brochure was first published in 2014 to show that there are many different career paths available (especially in local host communities) at an astronomical observatory. Along with the printed career brochure, there are supplementary videos available on Gemini's website and Youtube pages that provide a more detailed and personal glimpse into the day-in-the-life of a wide assortment of Gemini employees. A weakness in most observatory's outreach programming point to the notion that students (and teachers) feel there is a disconnect between academics and where students would like to end up in their career future. This project is one of the ways Gemini addresses these concerns. During my 6-month internship at Gemini, I have updated the Career Brochure website conducted more in-depth interviews with Gemini staff to include as inserts with the brochure, and expanded the array of featured careers. The goal of my work is to provide readers with detailed and individualized employee career paths to show; 1) that there are many ways to establish a career in the STEM fields, and 2), that the STEM fields are vastly diverse.

  10. Employability Skills, the Student Path, and the Role of the Academic Library and Partners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyrer, Gwyneth; Ives, Joanne; Corke, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    This case study explores the introduction of a university wide employability program by the World of Work Careers Centre (WOWCC) at Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU). The article reports the background against which an employability program was implemented; the justification and growing demand for more emphasis on employability skills in…

  11. Supporting Geoscience Students at Two-Year Colleges: Career Preparation and Academic Success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDaris, J. R.; Kirk, K. B.; Layou, K.; Macdonald, H.; Baer, E. M.; Blodgett, R. H.; Hodder, J.

    2013-12-01

    Two-year colleges play an important role in developing a competent and creative geoscience workforce, teaching science to pre-service K-12 teachers, producing earth-science literate citizens, and providing a foundation for broadening participation in the geosciences. The Supporting and Advancing Geoscience Education in Two-Year Colleges (SAGE 2YC) project has developed web resources for geoscience faculty on the preparation and support of students in two-year colleges (2YCs). Online resources developed from two topical workshops and several national, regional, and local workshops around the country focus on two main categories: Career Preparation and Workforce Development, and Supporting Student Success in Geoscience at Two-year Colleges. The Career Preparation and Workforce Development resources were developed to help faculty make the case that careers in the geosciences provide a range of possibilities for students and to support preparation for the geoscience workforce and for transfer to four-year programs as geoscience majors. Many two-year college students are unaware of geoscience career opportunities and these materials help illuminate possible futures for them. Resources include an overview of what geoscientists do; profiles of possible careers along with the preparation necessary to qualify for them; geoscience employer perspectives about jobs and the knowledge, skills, abilities and attitudes they are looking for in their employees; employment trends in sectors of the economy that employ geoscience professionals; examples of geotechnician workforce programs (e.g. Advanced Technological Education Centers, environmental technology programs, marine technician programs); and career resources available from professional societies. The website also provides information to support student recruitment into the geosciences and facilitate student transfer to geoscience programs at four- year colleges and universities, including sections on advising support before

  12. Physics Careers: To the Bachelor's Degree and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Crystal

    2012-03-01

    In our current era, society needs an increased representation of physicists in the workforce to help solve the growing number of societal and environment problems we collectively face. And even though a physics bachelor's degree opens the door to an incredible diversity of high-paying and rewarding careers, most undergraduates are only aware of academic career paths (having mostly encountered only physics professors during their lifetime). This talk will provide in-depth information about physics career paths outside of academia which available to those with a bachelor's degree in physics, and will discuss how these options change as one moves through an advanced degree in physics. The talk will include real-life examples of working physicists at all stages of the degree path, and salary and employment sector statistics for physics bachelors, masters, and PhD recipients. The talk will also include information on additional careers and professional development resources for students.

  13. Forging Career Paths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLester, Susan

    2005-01-01

    This brief article describes how one young man who once was unmotivated and uninterested in learning more than just the minimum required for graduation transformed into an active, motivated student through a program called MOUSE (Making Opportunities for Upgrading Schools and Education), a NYC based non-profit dedicated to empowering students…

  14. Chief Academic Officers at Black Colleges and Universities: A Comparison by Gender.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Lea E.

    1986-01-01

    Causes of women's underrepresentation among education administrators are explored. The following points are considered: (1) career paths of men and women chief academic officers (CAOs); (2) career aspirations; (3) responsibilities of male and female CAOs; (4) general profile of men and women CAOs; (5) salaries and compensation inequities; and (6)…

  15. Factors that Determine Academic Versus Private Practice Career Interest in Radiation Oncology Residents in the United States: Results of a Nationwide Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Daniel T.; Shaffer, Jenny L.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Wilson, Lynn D.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To determine what factors US radiation oncology residents consider when choosing academic or nonacademic careers. Methods and Materials: A 20-question online survey was developed and sent to all US radiation oncology residents to assess factors that influence their career interest. Residents were asked to rate their interest in academics (A) versus private practice (PP) on a 0 (strong interest in A) to 100 (strong interest in PP) scale. Responses were classified as A (0-30), undecided (40-60), and PP (70-100). Residents were also asked to rank 10 factors that most strongly influenced their career interest. Results: Three hundred thirty-one responses were collected, of which 264 were complete and form the basis for this analysis. Factors that correlated with interest in A included having a PhD (P=.018), postgraduate year level (P=.0006), research elective time (P=.0003), obtaining grant funding during residency (P=.012), and number of publications before residency (P=.0001), but not number of abstracts accepted in the past year (P=.65) or publications during residency (P=.67). The 3 most influential factors for residents interested in A were: (1) baseline interest before residency; (2) academic role models; and (3) research opportunities during residency. The 3 most influential factors for residents interested in PP were: (1) baseline interest before residency; (2) academic role models; and (3) academic pressure and obligations. Conclusions: Interest in A correlated with postgraduate year level, degree, and research time during residency. Publications before but not during residency correlated with academic interest, and baseline interest was the most influential factor. These data can be used by residency program directors to better understand what influences residents' career interest.

  16. Career Exploration among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fouad, Nadya A.; Ghosh, Arpita; Chang, Wen-hsin; Figueiredo, Catia; Bachhuber, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    College is a significant time for undergraduates to declare majors and choose career paths. For many undergraduates, choosing both a major and a career path is challenging. Research shows that many universities deliver career interventions through dedicated career decision-making courses (Mead & Korschgen, 1994). However, there has been…

  17. Initial Teacher Education: Does Self-Efficacy Influence Candidate Teacher Academic Achievement and Future Career Performance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shawer, Saad F.

    2013-01-01

    This quantitative investigation examined the influence of low and high self-efficacy on candidate teacher academic performance in a foreign language teaching methodology course through testing the speculation that high self-efficacy levels would improve pedagogical-content knowledge (PCK). Positivism guided the research design at the levels of…

  18. Career Advancement of Women Senior Academic Administrators in Indonesia: Supports and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murniati, Cecilia Titiek

    2012-01-01

    Increasing numbers of women have gained access to college and the college teaching profession worldwide. However, women continue to be underrepresented in academic, research, and leadership positions. Women who have aspirations for top leadership positions still encounter numerous internal and external challenges. Existent literature on women…

  19. Career-Related Success-Learning Experiences of Academically Underachieving Urban Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Margo A.; Perolini, Claudia M.; Fietzer, Alexander W.; Altschuler, Elizabeth; Woerner, Scott; Hashimoto, Naoko

    2011-01-01

    Evidence has supported the effectiveness of educational and psychosocial interventions that include strengths and promote the competence enhancement of schoolchildren. Nevertheless, students in low-income, culturally diverse urban schools who are academically underachieving may be the least likely but most in need to experience feedback about…

  20. Finding FRiENDs: Creating a Community of Support for Early Career Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pegg, Jerine M.; Adams, Anne E.; Risser, Hilary Smith; Bottoms, SueAnn I.; Kern, Anne L.; Wu, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Starting on an academic journey can be a stressful and isolating experience. Although some universities have formal mentoring structures to facilitate this transition for new faculty, these structures do not always provide the variety of supports that may be needed to navigate the complexities of transitioning to the world of academia. As we (the…

  1. Learning Environment, Learning Process, Academic Outcomes and Career Success of University Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermeulen, Lyanda; Schmidt, Henk G.

    2008-01-01

    This study expands on literature covering models on educational productivity, student integration and effectiveness of instruction. An expansion of the literature concerning the impact of higher education on workplace performance is also covered. Relationships were examined between the quality of the academic learning environment, the process of…

  2. Faculty Attitudes and Perceptions of Academic Dishonesty at a Career College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Iris

    2013-01-01

    Academic dishonesty in postsecondary education can often transfer to dishonesty in the workplace. Dishonest behavior by students undermines the integrity of the entire institution, including its faculty. The purpose of this study was to explore faculty perceptions of goal orientation and its impact on student cheating behavior, faculty experiences…

  3. Cognitive Skills Training Improves Listening and Visual Memory for Academic and Career Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erland, Jan

    The Mem-ExSpan Accelerative Cognitive Training System (MESACTS) is described as a cognitive skills training program for schools, businesses, and industry. The program achieves extraordinary academic results in reading and mathematics with 1 semester of input 4 days a week for 30 minutes a day. Intensive versions of the program accelerate…

  4. A Comparison of Career Success between Graduates of Vocational and Academic Tertiary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backes-Gellner, Uschi; Geel, Regula

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyses whether tertiary education of different types, i.e., academic or vocational tertiary education, leads to more or less favorable labor market outcomes. We study the problem for Switzerland, where more than two thirds of the workforce gain vocational secondary degrees and a substantial number go on to a vocational tertiary degree…

  5. Becoming Part of the Academy: Factors Affecting the Academic Career Success of Foreign-Born Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Switzer, Teri R.

    2012-01-01

    The entire diversity landscape of our university campuses is changing. As American colleges and universities address their need for more globally aware campuses, academic institutions are hiring well-qualified foreign-born scholars to teach in their programs. Both non-resident alien faculty as well as those who are foreign-born but are classified…

  6. Undergraduate Enrollments in Academic, Career, and Vocational Education. Issue Brief. NCES 2004?018

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Lisa; Shafer, Linda

    2004-01-01

    This Issue Brief examines postsecondary vocational education within the context of all undergraduate education. The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) has traditionally reported data on postsecondary vocational education using a taxonomy that divides subbaccalaureate postsecondary education into academic and vocational areas of study…

  7. College Student Engagement and Early Career Earnings: Differences by Gender, Race/Ethnicity, and Academic Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Shouping; Wolniak, Gregory C.

    2013-01-01

    Using longitudinal data from the 2001 cohort of applicants to the Gates Millennium Scholars (GMS) program, the authors examined scaled measures of academic and social engagement in relation to labor market earnings to test whether the economic value of student engagement among high-achieving students of color differs by student characteristics.…

  8. Striving for Gender Equity in Academic Medicine Careers: A Call to Action.

    PubMed

    Bates, Carol; Gordon, Lynn; Travis, Elizabeth; Chatterjee, Archana; Chaudron, Linda; Fivush, Barbara; Gulati, Martha; Jagsi, Reshma; Sharma, Poonam; Gillis, Marin; Ganetzky, Rebecca; Grover, Amelia; Lautenberger, Diana; Moses, Ashleigh

    2016-08-01

    Women represent approximately half of students entering medical schools and more than half of those entering PhD programs. When advancing through the academic and professional fields, however, women continually face barriers that men do not. In this Commentary, the authors offer ideas for coordinating the efforts of organizations, academic institutions, and leaders throughout the scientific and medical professions to reduce barriers that result in inequities and, instead, strive for gender parity. Specific areas of focus outlined by the authors include facilitating women's access to formal and informal professional networks, acknowledging and addressing the gender pay gap as well as the lack of research funding awarded to women in the field, and updating workplace policies that have not evolved to accommodate women's lifestyles. As academic institutions seek access to top talent and the means to develop those individuals capable of generating the change medicine and science needs, the authors urge leaders and change agents within academic medicine to address the systemic barriers to gender equity that impede us from achieving the mission to improve the health of all. PMID:27332868

  9. Academic careers: choice and activity of graduates of a pediatric residency program 1974-1986.

    PubMed Central

    Lovejoy, F. H.; Ledley, F. D.; Nathan, D. G.

    1993-01-01

    In summary, our data suggest that the playing field for academic medicine is changing. It is more patient care oriented, more multifaceted and supported more by clinical dollars than in the past. Greater flexibility in what constitutes "academic success" is necessary to assure a supportive environment in which tomorrow's academic faculty can develop and flourish. To accomplish these goals promotion systems that reward not only research but also teaching and clinical care accomplishments will be necessary. Clinicians will need to be compared with clinicians, teachers with teachers, clinical investigators with clinical investigators and basic investigators with basic investigators. Sources of support will need to be more clearly targeted along activity lines with clinical dollars supporting the clinician, medical education dollars supporting the teacher-educators and federal and foundation dollars supporting research. In our department, time and effort for research (45%) approximates dollar support for this activity (44%), while clinical dollars (43%) fund to a greater degree time and effort committed to clinical care (34%), and administration and teaching dollars (13%) under fund time and effort committed to these activities (21%). This suggests the need to identify increased funding to support teaching and education. Promotion expectations for women will need to be more flexible and adjusted to family responsibilities and demands. Most of all, however, we academic faculty must support enthusiastically the importance and joy of our work. We must be encouraging to our colleagues and our students and continue to recognize that for all of the difficulties and challenges, academic life is a rewarding and fulfilling enterprise. PMID:1343441

  10. Changing the academic culture: Valuing patents and commercialization toward tenure and career advancement

    PubMed Central

    Sanberg, Paul R.; Gharib, Morteza; Harker, Patrick T.; Kaler, Eric W.; Marchase, Richard B.; Sands, Timothy D.; Arshadi, Nasser; Sarkar, Sudeep

    2014-01-01

    There is national and international recognition of the importance of innovation, technology transfer, and entrepreneurship for sustained economic revival. With the decline of industrial research laboratories in the United States, research universities are being asked to play a central role in our knowledge-centered economy by the technology transfer of their discoveries, innovations, and inventions. In response to this challenge, innovation ecologies at and around universities are starting to change. However, the change has been slow and limited. The authors believe this can be attributed partially to a lack of change in incentives for the central stakeholder, the faculty member. The authors have taken the position that universities should expand their criteria to treat patents, licensing, and commercialization activity by faculty as an important consideration for merit, tenure, and career advancement, along with publishing, teaching, and service. This position is placed in a historical context with a look at the history of tenure in the United States, patents, and licensing at universities, the current status of university tenure and career advancement processes, and models for the future. PMID:24778248

  11. Changing the academic culture: valuing patents and commercialization toward tenure and career advancement.

    PubMed

    Sanberg, Paul R; Gharib, Morteza; Harker, Patrick T; Kaler, Eric W; Marchase, Richard B; Sands, Timothy D; Arshadi, Nasser; Sarkar, Sudeep

    2014-05-01

    There is national and international recognition of the importance of innovation, technology transfer, and entrepreneurship for sustained economic revival. With the decline of industrial research laboratories in the United States, research universities are being asked to play a central role in our knowledge-centered economy by the technology transfer of their discoveries, innovations, and inventions. In response to this challenge, innovation ecologies at and around universities are starting to change. However, the change has been slow and limited. The authors believe this can be attributed partially to a lack of change in incentives for the central stakeholder, the faculty member. The authors have taken the position that universities should expand their criteria to treat patents, licensing, and commercialization activity by faculty as an important consideration for merit, tenure, and career advancement, along with publishing, teaching, and service. This position is placed in a historical context with a look at the history of tenure in the United States, patents, and licensing at universities, the current status of university tenure and career advancement processes, and models for the future. PMID:24778248

  12. Diasporic Lakou: A Haitian Academic Explores Her Path to Haiti Pre- and Post-Earthquake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desir, Charlene

    2011-01-01

    In this essay, Charlene Desir reflects on her role as an academic from the Haitian diaspora and her journey to reconnect to her Haitian roots after the 2010 earthquake. Desir begins by exploring her family background and the centrality of "lakou"--a sacred family space in which to connect to her ancestors and cultural ways of knowing. By centering…

  13. The Path to Academic Access for Students with Significant Cognitive Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timberlake, Maria T.

    2016-01-01

    Federal special education law (Individuals With Disabilities Education Act) guarantees, but does not define, access to the general education curriculum for all students with disabilities. In-depth qualitative telephone interviews were conducted with special educators (n = 33) about their academic decision making for students with significant…

  14. Knowledge Monitoring, Goal Orientations, Self-Efficacy, and Academic Performance: A Path Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Harthy, Ibrahim S.; Was, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between knowledge monitoring and motivation as defined by self-efficacy and goal orientations. A path model was proposed to hypothesize the causal relations among predictors of the students' total score in the Educational Psychology course. The sample consisted of undergraduate…

  15. Innovative Programs Promoting Careers in OR Nursing.

    PubMed

    Ceschini, Donna

    2016-06-01

    Much of the baby boomer workforce is approaching retirement, and nurses who are part of this generation will need to be replaced. The strain is especially notable in the perioperative nursing environment. To assist in recruiting new perioperative nurses, three programs were introduced at a rural academic medical center. Leaders at this facility developed a perioperative nursing course to train new graduate nurses and nurses without OR experience, an introduction to perioperative nursing course for junior and senior undergraduate nursing students, and an intraoperative learning experience for high school students interested in a career in nursing. These three programs provide an opportunity to expose new nurses, nursing students, and high school students to an OR nursing career path. The programs and their successful outcomes are shared as exemplars for enhancing the education of new OR nurses and generating interest in OR nursing as a career path. PMID:27234797

  16. Impact of a Dual PharmD/MBA Degree on Graduates' Academic Performance, Career Opportunities, and Earning Potential

    PubMed Central

    Chumney, Elinor C.G.; Jones, Kathy J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the academic experience and satisfaction of students who completed a dual PharmD/MBA degree program and the program's long-term impact on the students' career choice and earning potential. Methods GPAs, job placement, and starting job salaries were compared between graduates who completed the dual PharmD/MBA program and those who completed only the PharmD program. A satisfaction survey instrument was administered to 17 students who completed the dual PharmD/MBA degree program in May 2007. Data from a standardized job placement and starting salary survey instrument completed by all PharmD graduates were also obtained, as well as all students' final grade point averages (GPAs). GPAs, job placement, and starting job salaries were compared between graduates who had completed the dual PharmD/MBA program and those who had completed only the PharmD program. Results The graduating GPAs of dual-degree students were higher than those of both pharmacy (3.52 vs 3.41, p > 0.10) and business (3.82 vs. 3.68, p = 0.018) students not enrolled in the dual-degree program. Dual-degree students were slightly less likely to enter a residency (17% vs. 27%, p = 0.44) than other pharmacy graduates. Among those who elected not to pursue a residency, both mean starting salaries ($111,090 vs. $101,965) and mean total first-year compensation ($127,290 vs. $110,388) were significantly higher for dual-degree graduates compared to the PharmD graduates. Conclusions Students enrolled in the dual-degree program did slightly better academically than students who completed only the MBA or PharmD programs and indicated a high level of satisfaction with the program. Dual-degree graduates reported increased career opportunities and were slated to earn significantly more during their first year in the workforce. These results affirm continuation of our program and make the case for support of similar programs across the nation. PMID:18483594

  17. Career Opportunities for Physicists: Panel Discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-03-01

    We live in a world full of opportunity for physics graduates. Join us for a unique opportunity to learn about some of these opportunities from our diverse panel of working physicists from industrial, national lab, and academic sectors. Topics of discussion will include panelists' daily experiences, how physics serves them in their career, and advice to students interested in following a similar path. Light refreshments will be served.

  18. Crafting a career in molecular animation

    PubMed Central

    Iwasa, Janet

    2014-01-01

    When I first set out on a path to becoming a cell biologist, I would have never imagined that it would lead to a career in molecular animation. I had always thought I would follow a more traditional route. What happened? In this essay, I will describe the experiences that led to my decision to forge a career as an academic molecular animator, and how my work has evolved over the years. I will also provide some resources and advice for those who may be considering following a similar route. PMID:25267313

  19. A Collaborative Alternative Path Program for Career-Changing Mathematics and Science Professionals: Context, Design, and Replication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selke, Mary J.; Fero, George J.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide insights useful to readers involved in or considering the design and delivery of alternative path programs by presenting (a) a chronology of the multiple definitions of alternative certification, (b) key components of quality alternative path programs, viewed through the example of a program for…

  20. Misconduct Policies, Academic Culture and Career Stage, Not Gender or Pressures to Publish, Affect Scientific Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Fanelli, Daniele; Costas, Rodrigo; Larivière, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    The honesty and integrity of scientists is widely believed to be threatened by pressures to publish, unsupportive research environments, and other structural, sociological and psychological factors. Belief in the importance of these factors has inspired major policy initiatives, but evidence to support them is either non-existent or derived from self-reports and other sources that have known limitations. We used a retrospective study design to verify whether risk factors for scientific misconduct could predict the occurrence of retractions, which are usually the consequence of research misconduct, or corrections, which are honest rectifications of minor mistakes. Bibliographic and personal information were collected on all co-authors of papers that have been retracted or corrected in 2010-2011 (N=611 and N=2226 papers, respectively) and authors of control papers matched by journal and issue (N=1181 and N=4285 papers, respectively), and were analysed with conditional logistic regression. Results, which avoided several limitations of past studies and are robust to different sampling strategies, support the notion that scientific misconduct is more likely in countries that lack research integrity policies, in countries where individual publication performance is rewarded with cash, in cultures and situations were mutual criticism is hampered, and in the earliest phases of a researcher’s career. The hypothesis that males might be prone to scientific misconduct was not supported, and the widespread belief that pressures to publish are a major driver of misconduct was largely contradicted: high-impact and productive researchers, and those working in countries in which pressures to publish are believed to be higher, are less-likely to produce retracted papers, and more likely to correct them. Efforts to reduce and prevent misconduct, therefore, might be most effective if focused on promoting research integrity policies, improving mentoring and training, and encouraging

  1. Misconduct Policies, Academic Culture and Career Stage, Not Gender or Pressures to Publish, Affect Scientific Integrity.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, Daniele; Costas, Rodrigo; Larivière, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    The honesty and integrity of scientists is widely believed to be threatened by pressures to publish, unsupportive research environments, and other structural, sociological and psychological factors. Belief in the importance of these factors has inspired major policy initiatives, but evidence to support them is either non-existent or derived from self-reports and other sources that have known limitations. We used a retrospective study design to verify whether risk factors for scientific misconduct could predict the occurrence of retractions, which are usually the consequence of research misconduct, or corrections, which are honest rectifications of minor mistakes. Bibliographic and personal information were collected on all co-authors of papers that have been retracted or corrected in 2010-2011 (N=611 and N=2226 papers, respectively) and authors of control papers matched by journal and issue (N=1181 and N=4285 papers, respectively), and were analysed with conditional logistic regression. Results, which avoided several limitations of past studies and are robust to different sampling strategies, support the notion that scientific misconduct is more likely in countries that lack research integrity policies, in countries where individual publication performance is rewarded with cash, in cultures and situations were mutual criticism is hampered, and in the earliest phases of a researcher's career. The hypothesis that males might be prone to scientific misconduct was not supported, and the widespread belief that pressures to publish are a major driver of misconduct was largely contradicted: high-impact and productive researchers, and those working in countries in which pressures to publish are believed to be higher, are less-likely to produce retracted papers, and more likely to correct them. Efforts to reduce and prevent misconduct, therefore, might be most effective if focused on promoting research integrity policies, improving mentoring and training, and encouraging

  2. "3 . . 2 . . 1 . . Impact [factor]: target [academic career] destroyed!": just another statistical casualty.

    PubMed

    Brumback, Roger A

    2012-12-01

    "Publish or perish" is the time-honored "principle" for academicians who race to accumulate lines under the "publications" section of a curriculum vitae. The original intent of publication-to inform others of findings and further scientific knowledge-has been corrupted by factors including (1) exponential growth of journals and the journal industry, fueled in part by intrusion of the Internet into all aspects of academic life; and (2) adoption of journal metrics (rather than written content) as the measure of scientific quality. The proprietary Thomson Reuters Impact Factor is the most pernicious metric, having caused editors and publishers to change editorial practices to boost the number. At the same time, gullible administrators and government agencies have been persuaded that metrics for the journal in which materials are published can be used as a measure of the worth of individual investigators (and institutions) and their research efforts: simple numbers can be substituted for the burdensome effort required to read and assess research quality. Thus, granting of research funds, awarding of academic rank and tenure, and determination of salaries (including bonus payments) have become tied to manipulable journal metrics rather than the significance or quality of reported research. Therefore, it is no wonder that the integrity of science is more often being questioned. How should a young investigator approach the "publish or perish" dilemma? Performing sound research and preparing optimal materials for publication must remain the overriding goals: properly articulate the question addressed by the study; thoroughly document all methods and case information; carefully describe results including any conflicting or negative findings; discuss the importance of the findings along with how the results address the initial question and whether findings refute or confirm previous studies; prepare properly cited bibliographic references; list all author contributions

  3. Career Readiness: Has Its Time Finally Come?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWitt, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, the Association for Career and Technical Education (ACTE) released a "What Is Career Ready?" definition. As the career-readiness definition explains, there is much overlap between "college readiness" and "career readiness," but academic preparedness for college alone is not enough to be truly career-ready. Career readiness requires…

  4. The effect of GK-12 graduate fellow interactions on high school student attitudes toward science and career path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytle, Rachel Renee

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of biology graduate student interactions on high school student attitudes toward science and career choice. Through the National Science Foundation GK-12 program at Middle Tennessee State University, Graduate Fellows (GFs) partnered with a science teacher (PT) ten hours a week during the school year to serve as a scientist-in-residence, engage students in inquiry-based laboratory experiences, and mentor research projects. A multi-method design compared PT classes with and without a GF using the Student Attitude Inventory- II (SAI-II), interviews, and student artifacts. Although small positive differences were present in GF classes, repeated measures MANOVA found no significant differences between SAI-II categories. Both groups decreased in STEM career interest; however, student interviews with GF classes conveyed increased understanding of the scientific process and a desire to continue practicing science. Although GF classes actively participated in documented STEM experiences, this study supports the challenges in changing student attitude about science and increased pursuance of STEM careers.

  5. Investigating factors influencing 4th-year physiotherapy students' opinions of cardiorespiratory physiotherapy as a career path.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Julie; Skinner, Margot; Lee, Annemarie; Wilson, Lisa; Alison, Jennifer A

    2012-07-01

    Recruitment and retention issues in cardiorespiratory physiotherapy (CRP) have led to concerns for the future of this specialist area of physiotherapy. This study evaluated the career choices of student physiotherapists and elicited factors that influenced their perceptions of CRP. A postal questionnaire to two schools of physiotherapy in New Zealand and two in Australia was administered. Final year students were randomly selected and invited to complete the questionnaire. Details of respondents' clinical experience, future career intentions, and perceptions of CRP as a specialism were ascertained. A response rate of 61% (n=149) was obtained. Although the majority of respondents had undertaken cardiorespiratory placements, only 3% of respondents reported being "extremely interested" in specializing in CRP. The variety and timing of clinical placements and educational and clinical supervision were key factors that had the potential to both positively and negatively influence students' opinions of CRP. An understanding of the role of CRP beyond that of inpatient care appeared limited. To promote uptake of CRP as a career option, clinicians, educators, and managers should strive to provide positive clinical placements and educational opportunities. The extensive scope of clinical practice of cardiorespiratory physiotherapists could be a greater focus within physiotherapy curricula. PMID:22007799

  6. What Is "Career Ready"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Career and Technical Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    All too often, the terms "career ready" and "college ready" are used interchangeably, and discussions around career readiness are limited to traditional academic skills that allow students to successfully enroll in postsecondary education. While there is no debate that a rigorous level of academic proficiency, especially in math and literacy, is…

  7. Improving Graduate Education to Support a Branching Career Pipeline: Recommendations Based on a Survey of Doctoral Students in the Basic Biomedical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Fuhrmann, C. N.; Halme, D. G.; O’Sullivan, P. S.; Lindstaedt, B.

    2011-01-01

    Today's doctoral programs continue to prepare students for a traditional academic career path despite the inadequate supply of research-focused faculty positions. We advocate for a broader doctoral curriculum that prepares trainees for a wide range of science-related career paths. In support of this argument, we describe data from our survey of doctoral students in the basic biomedical sciences at University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). Midway through graduate training, UCSF students are already considering a broad range of career options, with one-third intending to pursue a non–research career path. To better support this branching career pipeline, we recommend that national standards for training and mentoring include emphasis on career planning and professional skills development to ensure the success of PhD-level scientists as they contribute to a broadly defined global scientific enterprise. PMID:21885820

  8. MS PHD'S: Bridging the Gap of Academic and Career Success Through Educational and Professional Development for Minorities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D.; Vargas, W.; Padilla, E.; Strickland, J.; Echols, E.; Johnson, A.; Williamson Whitney, V.; Ithier-Guzman, W.; Ricciardi, L.; Johnson, A.; Braxton, L.

    2011-12-01

    Historically, there has been a lack of ethnic and gender diversity in the geo-sciences. The Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Earth System Science (MS PHD'S) Professional Development Program provides a bridge to young scientists of diverse backgrounds who in turn will impact many. In a process of 3 phases, the program introduces the students to the scientific community through participation in professional and society meetings and networking with scientists and personnel within federal agencies, academic institutions and STEM-based industries. The program builds confidence, offers role models for professional development and provides students support during their education. Upon completion, students achieve a high level of self-actualization and self-esteem combined with individual growth. They become part of a community that continuously provides support and security to each other. This support is tangible through the mentor/mentee relationships which will help with individual growth throughout the mentoring cycle. Having role models and familiar faces to whom mentees can relate to will encourage our students to succeed in the STEM's field. To date, 159 students have participated in the program: 26 have successfully completed their PhD and 56 are currently enrolled in the PhD programs nationwide. The MS PHD'S Program creates a forum of diverse peoples by diverse peoples with diverse interest and strength, where the ongoing goal is to continually raise the bar for each individual. MS PHD'S establishes a nurturing goal-oriented environment for the geo scientist of the future who in turn will make profound contributions on a local, national and global scale. To conclude, MSPHD'S not only bridges the gap of unrepresented minorities in STEM careers, but also generates educational approaches to make the earth system sciences available to more, impacting all.

  9. Interactive Career Counseling on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Ginger; Horan, John J.; Tompkins-Bjorkman, Amy; Kovalski, Theresa; Hackett, Gail

    2000-01-01

    Describes three interactive career counseling Internet programs based on cognitive restructuring and differential diagnosis: changing career beliefs of young women, helping parents facilitate children's career development, and altering attributions related to academic motivation for at-risk students. (SK)

  10. The Possibilities for Career and Technology Centers when Academic Standards and Accountability Requirements Are Integrated into Competency Based Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damon, Toni

    2010-01-01

    As with other fields in education, career and technical education (CTE) has experienced a dramatic transformation since its inception in the 19th century. Since the reauthorization of the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006, there has been limited research on the impact, or possibilities, that recent legislation has had on…

  11. Evaluation of Factors that Contribute to Improving Academic Achievement of Career and Technical Education Students in Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsella, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of career and technical education in Rhode Island utilizing Program Approval Process: Standards, Instruments, and Protocols. The process establishes standards for quality career and technical education. The population surveyed provided data on Standard Two: Curriculum and…

  12. Information-seeking Behavior During Residency Is Associated With Quality of Theoretical Learning, Academic Career Achievements, and Evidence-based Medical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Oussalah, Abderrahim; Fournier, Jean-Paul; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Braun, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Data regarding knowledge acquisition during residency training are sparse. Predictors of theoretical learning quality, academic career achievements and evidence-based medical practice during residency are unknown. We performed a cross-sectional study on residents and attending physicians across several residency programs in 2 French faculties of medicine. We comprehensively evaluated the information-seeking behavior (I-SB) during residency using a standardized questionnaire and looked for independent predictors of theoretical learning quality, academic career achievements, and evidence-based medical practice among I-SB components using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Between February 2013 and May 2013, 338 fellows and attending physicians were included in the study. Textbooks and international medical journals were reported to be used on a regular basis by 24% and 57% of the respondents, respectively. Among the respondents, 47% refer systematically (4.4%) or frequently (42.6%) to published guidelines from scientific societies upon their publication. The median self-reported theoretical learning quality score was 5/10 (interquartile range, 3–6; range, 1–10). A high theoretical learning quality score (upper quartile) was independently and strongly associated with the following I-SB components: systematic reading of clinical guidelines upon their publication (odds ratio [OR], 5.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.77–17.44); having access to a library that offers the leading textbooks of the specialty in the medical department (OR, 2.45, 95% CI, 1.33–4.52); knowledge of the specialty leading textbooks (OR, 2.12; 95% CI, 1.09–4.10); and PubMed search skill score ≥5/10 (OR, 1.94; 95% CI, 1.01–3.73). Research Master (M2) and/or PhD thesis enrolment were independently and strongly associated with the following predictors: PubMed search skill score ≥5/10 (OR, 4.10; 95% CI, 1.46–11.53); knowledge of the leading medical journals of the

  13. Creating a path: American Indian/Alaska Native high school students pursuing college and a career in nursing.

    PubMed

    Katz, Janet R; Smart, Denise; Paul, Robbie Nez Perce

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative descriptive pre- and post-survey study was to analyze four years of data documenting differences in pre- and post-test responses by American Indian/Alaska Native high school students attending a weeklong residency program. The program was designed to provide information and role models to motivate students to go to college and pursue a career in nursing. The survey measured student perceptions of college and nursing. In addition, the analysis included comparisons of responses between students who lived on reservations and those who did not. Results demonstrated that students changed their views of nursing as a profession, how they would be perceived by their tribe, and the financial security they could gain. Students living on their reservations were concerned that college might be too far from home. Recommendations include the need to provide indigenous students with role models and accurate information as well as mentors to support them. PMID:20678078

  14. Changing Career Patterns. ERIC Digest No. 219.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Bettina Lankard

    The linear career path that once kept people working in the same job is not the standard career route for today's workers. Instead, many workers are now pursuing varied career paths that reflect sequential career changes. Although job mobility no longer carries the stigma once associated with job change, it can still be emotionally stressful. Job…

  15. Reaching the Top in Canadian Librarianship: A Biographical Study of Sex Differences in Career Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Roma M.; Tague, Jean M.

    1989-01-01

    Presents results of intensive biographical interviews with male and female directors of academic, government, and large public library systems across Canada to examine differences in career paths. Topics discussed include publication record; professional associations; mobility; preprofessional library work experience; administrative preparation;…

  16. The Roles of Negative Career Thinking and Career Problem-Solving Self-Efficacy in Career Exploratory Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullock-Yowell, Emily; Katz, Sheba P.; Reardon, Robert C.; Peterson, Gary W.

    2012-01-01

    The respective roles of social cognitive career theory and cognitive information processing in career exploratory behavior were analyzed. A verified path model shows cognitive information processing theory's negative career thoughts inversely predict social cognitive career theory's career problem-solving self-efficacy, which predicts career…

  17. Student-Athletes' Perceptions of Their Academic and Athletic Roles: Intersections Amongst Their Athletic Role, Academic Motivation, Choice of Major, and Career Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Michelle L.

    2011-01-01

    Student-athletes' academic and athletic roles both require commitment, time, energy, and effort. Managing and balancing these multiple roles not only impacts student-athletes' use of time, but also their overall college experience. The purpose of this study was to explore how collegiate student-athletes perceive their academic and athletic roles.…

  18. Expanding the Focus of Career Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lock, Jared D.; Hogan, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Issues affecting career assessment include change in the focus and definition of career, emphasis on quality of work life, expansion of career paths, increased amount of career information available on the Internet, and questionable quality of online assessment. An expanded model of career assessment now includes technical fit, personal fit,…

  19. High School Career Academies: A 40-Year Proven Model for Improving College and Career Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Betsy

    2009-01-01

    High school career academies are a time-tested model for improving academic outcomes and preparing students for both college and careers. Career academies (1) are smaller learning communities taught by a team of interdisciplinary teachers, (2) provide a rigorous academic curriculum based on a career theme that demonstrates how knowledge is used…

  20. Does Sedentary Behavior Predict Academic Performance in Adolescents or the Other Way Round? A Longitudinal Path Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lizandra, Jorge; Devís-Devís, José; Pérez-Gimeno, Esther; Valencia-Peris, Alexandra; Peiró-Velert, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether adolescents' time spent on sedentary behaviors (academic, technological-based and social-based activities) was a better predictor of academic performance than the reverse. A cohort of 755 adolescents participated in a three-year period study. Structural Equation Modeling techniques were used to test plausible causal hypotheses. Four competing models were analyzed to determine which model best fitted the data. The Best Model was separately tested by gender. The Best Model showed that academic performance was a better predictor of sedentary behaviors than the other way round. It also indicated that students who obtained excellent academic results were more likely to succeed academically three years later. Moreover, adolescents who spent more time in the three different types of sedentary behaviors were more likely to engage longer in those sedentary behaviors after the three-year period. The better the adolescents performed academically, the less time they devoted to social-based activities and more to academic activities. An inverse relationship emerged between time dedicated to technological-based activities and academic sedentary activities. A moderating auto-regressive effect by gender indicated that boys were more likely to spend more time on technological-based activities three years later than girls. To conclude, previous academic performance predicts better sedentary behaviors three years later than the reverse. The positive longitudinal auto-regressive effects on the four variables under study reinforce the 'success breeds success' hypothesis, with academic performance and social-based activities emerging as the strongest ones. Technological-based activities showed a moderating effect by gender and a negative longitudinal association with academic activities that supports a displacement hypothesis. Other longitudinal and covariate effects reflect the complex relationships among sedentary behaviors and academic performance and the

  1. Does Sedentary Behavior Predict Academic Performance in Adolescents or the Other Way Round? A Longitudinal Path Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lizandra, Jorge; Devís-Devís, José; Pérez-Gimeno, Esther; Valencia-Peris, Alexandra; Peiró-Velert, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether adolescents’ time spent on sedentary behaviors (academic, technological-based and social-based activities) was a better predictor of academic performance than the reverse. A cohort of 755 adolescents participated in a three-year period study. Structural Equation Modeling techniques were used to test plausible causal hypotheses. Four competing models were analyzed to determine which model best fitted the data. The Best Model was separately tested by gender. The Best Model showed that academic performance was a better predictor of sedentary behaviors than the other way round. It also indicated that students who obtained excellent academic results were more likely to succeed academically three years later. Moreover, adolescents who spent more time in the three different types of sedentary behaviors were more likely to engage longer in those sedentary behaviors after the three-year period. The better the adolescents performed academically, the less time they devoted to social-based activities and more to academic activities. An inverse relationship emerged between time dedicated to technological-based activities and academic sedentary activities. A moderating auto-regressive effect by gender indicated that boys were more likely to spend more time on technological-based activities three years later than girls. To conclude, previous academic performance predicts better sedentary behaviors three years later than the reverse. The positive longitudinal auto-regressive effects on the four variables under study reinforce the ‘success breeds success’ hypothesis, with academic performance and social-based activities emerging as the strongest ones. Technological-based activities showed a moderating effect by gender and a negative longitudinal association with academic activities that supports a displacement hypothesis. Other longitudinal and covariate effects reflect the complex relationships among sedentary behaviors and academic performance

  2. Academic and Professional Career Outcomes of Medical School Graduates Who Failed USMLE Step 1 on the First Attempt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDougle, Leon; Mavis, Brian E.; Jeffe, Donna B.; Roberts, Nicole K.; Ephgrave, Kimberly; Hageman, Heather L.; Lypson, Monica L.; Thomas, Lauree; Andriole, Dorothy A.

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to determine the academic and professional outcomes of medical school graduates who failed the United States Licensing Examination Step 1 on the first attempt. This retrospective cohort study was based on pooled data from 2,003 graduates of six Midwestern medical schools in the classes of 1997-2002. Demographic, academic, and…

  3. The Academic Spin-Offs as an Engine of Economic Transition in Eastern Europe. A Path-Dependent Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tchalakov, Ivan; Mitev, Tihomir; Petrov, Venelin

    2010-01-01

    The paper questions some of the premises in studying academic spin-offs in developed countries, claiming that when taken as characteristics of "academic spin-offs per se," they are of little help in understanding the phenomenon in the Eastern European countries during the transitional and post-transitional periods after 1989. It argues for the…

  4. George Washington High School Bilingual Academic and Career Orientation Program, 1982-1983. O.E.E. Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotayo, Armando; Collins, Carla

    This program, in its final year of a two-year funding cycle, offered bilingual instruction and supportive services with a career orientation focus to 250 Hispanic students in grades 9-12. The major program goal was to expedite the acquisition of the English language skills necessary for full mainstreaming within an average period of three years.…

  5. We Walk by Faith, Not by Sight: An Inquiry of Spirituality and Career Development of Black Women Leaders in Academe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown McManus, Kecia Chivonne

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore, with eleven Black women leaders in higher education, their perception of spirituality and its impact on their career development. A purposive sample of Black women leaders at research-intensive institutions along the Eastern seaboard was examined in order to understand: (1) How do participants define…

  6. Clinical careers film.

    PubMed

    2015-09-01

    Those interested in developing clinical academic careers might be interested in a short animated film by Health Education England (HEE) and the National Institute for Health Research. The three-minute film, a frame from which is shown below, describes the sort of opportunities that are on offer to all professionals as part of the HEE's clinical academic careers framework. You can view the film on YouTube at tinyurl.com/pelb95c. PMID:26309005

  7. Developing POS via a Statewide Career-Focused Reform Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mobley, Catherine; Hammond, Cathy; Withington, Cairen; Stringfield, Sam; Stipanovic, Natalie; Sharp, Julia L.; Drew, Sam

    2012-01-01

    Career-focused education offered through programs of study (POS), career pathways, and career and technical education (CTE) can provide students with opportunities to engage in career exploration and development, to establish career goals, to increase academic knowledge and skills, to test career preferences in applied settings, and to make links…

  8. Careers in Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman-Vargas, Madeline; Estrada, Ricardo A.

    2008-01-01

    Carreras en Salud (Careers in Health) provides bilingual/bicultural individuals with a fully-supported customized career path for nursing and other allied health occupations bridging individuals from unemployment/underemployment to high-demand healthcare positions. Healthcare providers, elected officials, and community leaders have partnered with…

  9. Internship Handbook for Career Academies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winthrop, Jerauld

    Career academies are high school programs that frame academic learning around a career focus in order to increase student motivation and achievement. They generally have three defining features: a school-within-a-school structure, a college preparation curriculum with a career theme, and partnerships with employers, the community, and higher…

  10. Meaningful Credentials for Career Academies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, John R.; Cheney, Gretchen R.; Kraemer, Jackie

    2001-01-01

    Most school-to-career initiatives are limited to career education and applied learning, combining academic basics and workplace readiness skills. A high-school credentialing system would offer a structured pathway to academic and technical credentials, requiring that students earn a college-placement readiness credential and industry-recognized…

  11. Business Alliances Improve Career Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkpatrick, Megan E.; Droessler, Christopher L.

    2007-01-01

    Preparing every student to make knowledgeable career choices through academic rigor and work-based learning experiences requires a systematic, comprehensive and community-wide effort. Schools cannot truly prepare their students for productive and rewarding careers in an academic vacuum. Engaging business and community leaders, who may someday hire…

  12. Physical activity status of academic professors during their early career transition: an application of the theory of planned behavior.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Megan A; Rhodes, Ryan E

    2012-01-01

    Life-transitions (e.g. parenthood) have been linked to physical inactivity, yet the topic requires further exploration. In this study, we evaluated changes in the physical activity (PA) of adults during their early career transition using retrospective analysis and the theory of planned behavior. Recruitment from January to March 2010 yielded a random sample of 267 assistant professors, ages 25-44, employed within the last five years. Repeated measures analysis of variance (RM ANOVA) concluded that PA declined across the transition (d = 0.36-0.43) and was further attenuated by marriage, work hours, and parenthood status. Discriminant function analysis (DFA) identified specific behavioral and control correlates about PA enjoyment, limited time, inconsistent schedule, work demands, and job pressures to distinguish between those who remained active from those who did not across the transition. PA interventions administered prior to career transitions may be needed to prevent physical inactivity. PMID:22348598

  13. Biological Systems and Career Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiemann, Francis C.

    Neither a review of the literature nor three data displays (showing career paths, general influence patterns, and predecessor and successor influence patterns) yield a generative or explanatory theory by which to understand data collected on the professional career paths of Alberta (Canada) educational administrators. The data came from a survey…

  14. Relationship between anticipatory socialization experiences and first-year veterinary students' career interests.

    PubMed

    Kedrowicz, April A; Fish, Richard E; Hammond, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to explore first-year veterinary students' anticipatory socialization-life, education, and social experiences that assist in preparation for professional occupations-and determine what relationship exists between those experiences and career interests. Seventy-three first-year veterinary students enrolled in the Careers in Veterinary Medicine course completed the Veterinary Careers survey. Results show that students' anticipatory vocational socialization experiences are significantly related to their stated career interests. The career interests with the highest percentage of students expressing "a great deal of interest" included specialty private practice (37%), research and teaching in an academic setting (33%), and international veterinary medicine (31%). The career interests with the highest percentage of students expressing "no interest at all" included the military (50%), equine private practice (42%), and the pharmaceutical industry (41%). Less than half of the students (42%) stated that they reconsidered their career path after the first semester of veterinary school, but the majority (87%) developed a better understanding of how to pursue a nontraditional career path should they choose to do so. PMID:25572335

  15. Do Social Capital and Project Type Vary across Career Paths in Project-Based Work?: The Case of Hollywood Personal Assistants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skilton, Paul F.; Bravo, Jesus

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the extent to which project preferences and social capital constrain mobility in project-based careers. Design/methodology/approach: The paper analyzes the careers of 352 individuals who entered the motion picture industry between 1988 and 1990. It uses motion picture credit histories to generate…

  16. Relationships between the quality of blended learning experience, self-regulated learning, and academic achievement of medical students: a path analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kassab, Salah Eldin; Al-Shafei, Ahmad I; Salem, Abdel Halim; Otoom, Sameer

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study examined the relationships between the different aspects of students’ course experience, self-regulated learning, and academic achievement of medical students in a blended learning curriculum. Methods Perceptions of medical students (n=171) from the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Medical University of Bahrain (RCSI Bahrain), on the blended learning experience were measured using the Student Course Experience Questionnaire (SCEQ), with an added e-Learning scale. In addition, self-regulated learning was measured using the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ). Academic achievement was measured by the scores of the students at the end of the course. A path analysis was created to test the relationships between the different study variables. Results Path analysis indicated that the perceived quality of the face-to-face component of the blended experience directly affected the motivation of students. The SCEQ scale “quality of teaching” directly affected two aspects of motivation: control of learning and intrinsic goal orientation. Furthermore, appropriate course workload directly affected the self-efficacy of students. Moreover, the e-Learning scale directly affected students’ peer learning and critical thinking but indirectly affected metacognitive regulation. The resource management regulation strategies, time and study environment, and effort regulation directly affected students’ examination scores (17% of the variance explained). However, there were no significant direct relationships between the SCEQ scales and cognitive learning strategies or examination scores. Conclusion The results of this study will have important implications for designing blended learning courses in medical schools. PMID:25610011

  17. Female Academic Department Chairs at a Public, Very High Research Activity University: Exploring Their Career Pathways to Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Marthe, Tamara Jaslene Marcelle

    2012-01-01

    The advancement of women into academic leadership remains a problem facing public, high-research activity universities. While there are more women who are qualified to assume the position of department chair in research institutions today than there were 30 years ago, women still lag behind their male counterparts in holding these academic…

  18. Influential Structures: Understanding the Role of the Head of Department in Relation to Women Academics' Research Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obers, Noëlle

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted at a small "research-led" institution in South Africa. The data indicate that women produce less research than men and have low levels of professional self-esteem. Factors such as accrual of social capital, family responsibilities and self-esteem are constraints experienced by women academics in pursuing research…

  19. Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps Career Academies and Their Impact on Academic Achievement in Urban Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neely, Sheryl Austin

    2012-01-01

    Low attendance, poor behavior, low test scores, and low graduation rates among at-risk students have created a concern in urban school districts. The purpose of this study was to illuminate the impact of Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC) Academy programs on students' academic performance. The theoretical foundation of the research…

  20. The Path through Math: Course Sequences and Academic Performance at the Intersection of Race-Ethnicity and Gender

    PubMed Central

    RIEGLE-CRUMB, CATHERINE

    2010-01-01

    Using new national data from Adolescent Health and Academic Achievement (AHAA), this article examines high school math patterns for students of different race-ethnicity and gender. Compared with white males, African American and Latino males receive lower returns from taking Algebra I during their freshman year, reaching lower levels of the math course sequence when they begin in the same position. This pattern is not explained by academic performance, and, furthermore, African American males receive less benefit from high math grades. Lower returns are not observed for minority female students, suggesting that more attention to racial-ethnic inequality in math among male students is needed. PMID:20574544

  1. The Path through Math: Course Sequences and Academic Performance at the Intersection of Race-Ethnicity and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riegle-Crumb, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    Using new national data from Adolescent Health and Academic Achievement (AHAA), this article examines high school math patterns for students of different race-ethnicity and gender. Compared with white males, African American and Latino males receive lower returns from taking Algebra I during their freshman year, reaching lower levels of the math…

  2. Exploring Spaces for Learning: Using Narrative Mediation Path to Improve the Academic Performance of Underachieving Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, Una; Mahon, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Learning to learn has been identified as a key educational competence. Over the next two years, as part of the INSTALL project, NUI Maynooth is testing the effectiveness of an exploratory group technique, the Narrative Mediation Path (NMP), which has been developed to promote reflective thinking skills. To date, interviews have been conducted with…

  3. [Rehabilitation medicine, laboratory medicine, and hypertension--my 38-year academic career in Tohoku University and Hirosaki University].

    PubMed

    Yasujima, Minoru

    2012-02-01

    Hypertension is a major contributor to the risks for cardiovascular diseases. The cause of approximately 90% of hypertension cases is unknown, despite decades of research and debate. Many factors including renal mechanisms and the renin-angiotensin system are involved in the regulatory mechanisms of blood pressure. Genetic and environmental factors interact to affect multiple factors related to hypertensive mechanisms. Recent data suggested that genetic risk factors have been useful in clinical practice. The evidence that treatment of hypertension reduces cardiovascular diseases come from the results of large-scale therapeutic trials. Significant progress has been made during the last several decades in the treatment of hypertension through the use of inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system, with either angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor type 1 blockers. In this review, I summarize my personal career related to hypertension research. PMID:22568097

  4. Physics and Hard Disk Drives-A Career in Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Steven

    2014-03-01

    I will participate in a panel discussion about ``Career Opportunities for Physicists.'' I enjoyed 27 years doing technology development and product support in the hard disk drive business. My PhD in low temperature physics was excellent training for this career since I learned how to work in a lab, analyze data, write and present technical information, and define experiments that got to the heart of a problem. An academic position did not appeal to me because I had no passion to pursue a particular topic in basic physics. My work in industry provided an unending stream of challenging problems to solve, and it was a rich and rewarding experience. I'm now employed by the APS to focus on our interactions with physicists in industry. I welcome the chance to share my industrial experience with students, post-docs, and others who are making decisions about their career path. Industrial Physics Fellow, APS Headquarters.

  5. Academic Performance and Learning Style Self-Predictions by Second Language Students in an Introductory Biology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breckler, Jennifer; Teoh, Chia Shan; Role, Kemi

    2011-01-01

    Academic success in first-year college science coursework can strongly influence future career paths and usually includes a solid performance in introductory biology. We wanted to know whether factors affecting biology student performance might include learning style preferences and one's ability and confidence in self-assessing those learning…

  6. Unseen Workers in the Academic Factory: Perceptions of Neoracism among International Postdocs in the United States and the United Kingdom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantwell, Brendan; Lee, Jenny J.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, Brendan Cantwell and Jenny J. Lee examine the experiences of international postdocs and their varying career paths in the current political economy of academic capitalism through the lens of neoracism. Using in-depth interviews with science and engineering faculty and international postdocs in the United States and the United…

  7. Air Force academic medicine: a climate survey.

    PubMed

    Jones, Woodson S; Yun, Heather C

    2011-12-01

    Air Force (AF) Medical Service leadership considers education, training, and research as key priorities. However, AF academic physicians' perceptions about the academic environment and challenges to success are not well described. AF faculty physicians were surveyed in autumn 2009. One hundred seventy-two responded and rated the academic environment as needing improvement (median Likert-like score 2 [interquartile range 1] on 1-5 scale). The impact of stepping away from an academically oriented career path for other executive positions was rated negatively (median Likert-like score 2, interquartile range 1). Concerns included loss of clinical skills, career disruption, and the challenge of returning to and/or competing for positions within the academic pathway. New policies limiting deployment of Program Directors and/or key teaching faculty were viewed favorably. Most physicians (59%) completing this survey expressed concerns about the AF academic environment and identified numerous challenges. Information from this survey can guide future initiatives to enhance leadership's goals. PMID:22338353

  8. The Reality of "New" Careers for Men and for Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackah, Carol; Heaton, Norma

    2004-01-01

    The research for this paper focused on the career paths and career progression of men and women in management occupations. The study set out to explore the extent to which the traditional career has been replaced by the so-called "boundaryless" career. In particular it sought to establish whether such new career patterns have been more readily…

  9. Utilizing a Web-Based Career Development Workshop to Address Career Decision-Making Difficulty among Community College Distance Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Johanna Michele

    2011-01-01

    Career decision making difficulty, as it relates to undecided college students and career indecision, has been a concern for counselors and academic advisors for decades (Gordon, 2006; Mau, 2004). Individuals struggling with career indecision often seek assistance via career counseling, self-help tools, and/or computer-assisted career guidance…

  10. The role of mentoring in academic career progression: a cross-sectional survey of the Academy of Medical Sciences mentoring scheme.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Amy C; Eady, Nigel Aj; Wessely, Simon C

    2014-04-16

    Summary OBJECTIVES: To describe a successful mentoring scheme designed for mid-career clinician scientists and to examine factors associated with mentee report of positive career impact. PMID:24739382

  11. First-grade retention in the Flemish educational context: Effects on children's academic growth, psychosocial growth, and school career throughout primary education.

    PubMed

    Goos, Mieke; Van Damme, Jan; Onghena, Patrick; Petry, Katja; de Bilde, Jerissa

    2013-06-01

    This study examined the effects of first-grade retention on children's academic growth, psychosocial growth, and future school career by following a cohort of first graders until the start of secondary school. The study took place in the Flemish educational context where primary school students are taught in uniform curricular year groups; the same curricular goals are set for all students, irrespective of ability; and grade retention is used as the main way to cater for students not reaching these goals. Propensity score stratification was used to deal with selection bias. Three-level curvilinear growth curve models, encompassing both grade and age comparisons, were used to model children's growth in math skills, reading fluency skills, and psychosocial skills. Two-level logistic regression models were used to model children's likelihood of repeating any grade between Grades 2 and 6, transitioning to a special education primary school, moving to another primary school, and transitioning to the A (versus B) track in secondary education. Overall, results showed that first-grade retention was less helpful for struggling students than generally thought by parents and educators. Limitations of the study and further research suggestions are provided, and practical implications are discussed. PMID:23816228

  12. “We Make the Path by Walking It”: Building an Academic Community Partnership With Boston Chinatown

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Carolyn Leung; Allukian, Nathan; Wang, Xingyue; Ghosh, Sujata; Huang, Chien-Chi; Wang, Jacy; Brugge, Doug; Wong, John B.; Mark, Shirley; Dong, Sherry; Koch-Weser, Susan; Parsons, Susan K.; Leslie, Laurel K.; Freund, Karen M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The potential for academic community partnerships are challenged in places where there is a history of conflict and mistrust. Addressing Disparities in Asian Populations through Translational Research (ADAPT) represents an academic community partnership between researchers and clinicians from Tufts Medical Center and Tufts University and community partners from Boston Chinatown. Based in principles of community-based participatory research and partnership research, this partnership is seeking to build a trusting relationship between Tufts and Boston Chinatown. Objectives This case study aims to provides a narrative story of the development and formation of ADAPT as well as discuss challenges to its future viability. Methods Using case study research tools, this study draws upon a variety of data sources including interviews, program evaluation data and documents. Results Several contextual factors laid the foundation for ADAPT. Weaving these factors together helped to create synergy and led to ADAPT’s formation. In its first year, ADAPT has conducted formative research, piloted an educational program for community partners and held stakeholder forums to build a broad base of support. Conclusions ADAPT recognizes that long term sustainability requires bringing multiple stakeholders to the table even before a funding opportunity is released and attempting to build a diversified funding base. PMID:25435562

  13. Examining the Relationship between Career Decision Self-Efficacy, Ethnic Identity, and Academic Self-Concept and Achievement of African American High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bounds, Patrice Sheri Robinson

    2013-01-01

    The exploration of African American adolescents' career development has gained increasing attention in light of literature describing various barriers impacting their educational and career development and goals. Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT) was used as a theoretical framework to help shed light on the contextual factors that influence…

  14. The Career Coach: Winning Strategies for Getting Ahead in Today's Job Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Gordon

    This book is intended to serve as a career coach to individuals interested in setting a career goal, formulating a career path, and identifying and using strategies to follow the path to the career goal. The book is designed to be used in conjunction with the author's career coaching Web site, which is referred to throughout the book and which…

  15. Libraries and Information Science: the Profession. Alternative Career Opportunities for Atmospheric, Earth, and Geo-scientists.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, A. M.

    2003-12-01

    Many graduate students, researchers and scientists may not be aware that there are other career opportunities available to them as scientists besides the traditional academic, government, industrial and private sector tracks. Subject specialists with science backgrounds are in great demand. Knowledge management and information services affiliated with science and research is an exciting and creative profession. Contributing to, finding and delivering the range of information now emerging from new and established disciplines in all formats defines Information Science and Librarianship with a multitude of opportunities. This poster will offer information to encourage students and researchers with these skills and backgrounds to consider Information and Library Science as an exciting career path.

  16. NEW PASS: Nontraditional Education for Women, Paths to Economic Self-Sufficiency. A Career Awareness Program for Economically Disadvantaged Girls and Young Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohler, Judith

    This manual is designed for social service agencies, educational institutions, and other organizations who want to strengthen their programming for economicaly disadvantaged teenage girls and young women. It provides materials for the development and implementation of NEW PASS, a unique career awareness program that uses nontraditional employment…

  17. Understanding the Influence Career Paths Have on Community and Technical College Chief Business Officers' Satisfaction with Their Position: A Mixed Method Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    File, Carter L.

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to understand whether a community or technical college chief business officer's career line influenced the lived experience of job satisfaction. This mixed method study was conducted in a two-phase approach using the Explanatory Design: Participant Selection Model variant. An initial quantitative survey was conducted from…

  18. A Model of Factors Contributing to STEM Learning and Career Orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugent, Gwen; Barker, Bradley; Welch, Greg; Grandgenett, Neal; Wu, ChaoRong; Nelson, Carl

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop and test a model of factors contributing to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learning and career orientation, examining the complex paths and relationships among social, motivational, and instructional factors underlying these outcomes for middle school youth. Social cognitive career theory provided the foundation for the research because of its emphasis on explaining mechanisms which influence both career orientations and academic performance. Key constructs investigated were youth STEM interest, self-efficacy, and career outcome expectancy (consequences of particular actions). The study also investigated the effects of prior knowledge, use of problem-solving learning strategies, and the support and influence of informal educators, family members, and peers. A structural equation model was developed, and structural equation modeling procedures were used to test proposed relationships between these constructs. Results showed that educators, peers, and family-influenced youth STEM interest, which in turn predicted their STEM self-efficacy and career outcome expectancy. STEM career orientation was fostered by youth-expected outcomes for such careers. Results suggest that students' pathways to STEM careers and learning can be largely explained by these constructs, and underscore the importance of youth STEM interest.

  19. "Where There Is a Will, There Is an A": Examining the Roles of Self-Efficacy and Self-Concept in College Students' Current Educational Attainment and Career Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenning, Breanne E.; May, Laura Negel

    2013-01-01

    As previous research indicates self-efficacy and self-concept have similar effects on achievement outcomes, the current study investigated the differential effects of both constructs on academic performance and career path certainty in college freshmen. Results indicated high school GPA was best predicted by general self-efficacy, whereas current…

  20. Your 50-Year Career Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlmutter, David D.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the meaning and importance of the long-term view in the academic profession. Taking the half-century view of a career allows everyone to conceptualize his/her work as both a solitary venture and a group effort. As your career develops and you build alliances and partnerships with colleagues--and then with…

  1. V-TECS Career Cluster Frameworks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vocational Technical Education Consortium of States, Decatur, GA.

    This document includes 16 vocational-technical crosswalk wheels relating the 14 Vocational Technical Education Consortium of States (V-TECS) Career Families to the 16 Career Clusters developed by the U.S. Department of Education. The career clusters are based on the common academic, workplace, and technical knowledge and skills that cut across all…

  2. Integrating Career Development into the Accounting Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wessels, Susan B.; Sumner, Dana F.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a series of integrated career development activities offered in several required courses which are designed to help accounting majors gain a competitive edge in the job market. Supported by a partnership between the School of Business and the Academic and Career Planning Office, the Career Tool Kit program consists of…

  3. The Condition of College & Career Readiness, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACT, Inc., 2010

    2010-01-01

    Since 1959, ACT has collected and reported data on students' academic readiness for college. Because becoming ready for college and career is a process that occurs throughout elementary and secondary education, measuring academic performance over time in the context of college and career readiness provides meaningful and compelling information…

  4. Is Your Spouse Hurting Your Career?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlmutter, David D.

    2007-01-01

    The politics of dual-career academic couples, and the policies directed toward them, have been dissected and debated at length. Rarely mentioned, however, is how an academic career can be affected by a husband, wife, or significant other who is not on the professorial track. Most pairings of professor and nonprofessor work just fine. The partners…

  5. Career Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forte, Enis; Goodfriend, Audrey

    1977-01-01

    Describes the career education program implemented into the specialized secretarial courses at Queensborough Community College (New York); discusses how the career library is organized and how career-development activities are incorporated into classes and evaluated. (TA)

  6. The Career Is Dead--Long Live the Career. A Relational Approach to Careers. The Jossey-Bass Business & Management Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Douglas T.; And Others

    This book contains 14 research-based chapters on adult career development in the age of downsizing, outsourcing, and new career paths. The introduction (Douglas T. Hall) describes the relational approach to careers as the recognition that career development and growth take place in a context of interdependence and mutuality. The following chapters…

  7. Career Maturity in Relation to Differences in School Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Sar B.; Alvi, Sabir A.

    1985-01-01

    Examined differences in career maturity among four curriculum groups: academic, business, technical, and general. In Study I, administered Crites' Career Maturity Inventory to students in grades 9-12. In Study II, administered a specially developed measure of career development to students in grade 12. Results indicated that the academic group…

  8. Corporate Career Demonstration Project: Impact of a Thirteen-Week Training Program on the Personal, Interpersonal, and Academic Skills of Economically Disadvantaged Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berneman, Louis P.; And Others

    The Corporate Career Demonstration Project is a Federally funded program designed to provide economically disadvantaged young adults with specialized training, counseling and educational experiences. The project's major goal is to prepare these youth for entry level corporate career positions they would otherwise be unable to obtain. Applicants…

  9. Academic Delay of Gratification and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bembenutty, Hefer

    2011-01-01

    The ability to delay gratification is the cornerstone of all academic achievement and education. It is by delaying gratification that learners can pursue long-term academic and career goals. In general, "delay of gratification" refers to an individual's ability to forgo immediate rewards for the sake of more valuable ones later (Mischel, 1996).…

  10. The Career of Metaphor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowdle, Brian F.; Gentner, Dedre

    2005-01-01

    A central question in metaphor research is how metaphors establish mappings between concepts from different domains. The authors propose an evolutionary path based on structure-mapping theory. This hypothesis--the career of metaphor--postulates a shift in mode of mapping from comparison to categorization as metaphors are conventionalized.…

  11. News Report: The career paths of physics graduates Education: Network day to hold workshops for teaching ideas Experiments: PhysHOME brings innovators together Meeting: Physics Education Networks collaborate at WCPE Workshop: World experts in physics education meet Training: Something for everyone at SPEED 2012 Conference: Sun, cocktails and physics create a buzz at WCPE Students: The physics paralympian 2012 Forthcoming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-09-01

    Report: The career paths of physics graduates Education: Network day to hold workshops for teaching ideas Experiments: PhysHOME brings innovators together Meeting: Physics Education Networks collaborate at WCPE Workshop: World experts in physics education meet Training: Something for everyone at SPEED 2012 Conference: Sun, cocktails and physics create a buzz at WCPE Students: The physics paralympian 2012 Forthcoming events

  12. Insights on STEM Careers

    SciTech Connect

    Wendelberger, Joanne Roth

    2014-11-05

    This presentation will provide career advice for individuals seeking to go beyond just having a job to building a successful career in the areas of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. Careful planning can be used to turn a job into a springboard for professional advancement and personal satisfaction. Topics to be addressed include setting priorities, understanding career ladders, making tough choices, overcoming stereotypes and assumptions by others, networking, developing a professional identify, and balancing a career with family and other personal responsibilities. Insights on the transition from individual technical work to leadership will also be provided. The author will draw upon experiences gained in academic, industrial, and government laboratory settings, as well as extensive professional service and community involvement.

  13. Authentic science experiences as a vehicle to change students' orientations toward science and scientific career choices: Learning from the path followed by Brad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eijck, Michiel; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2009-09-01

    Bringing a greater number of students into science is one of, if not the most fundamental goals of science education for all, especially for heretofore-neglected groups of society such as women and Aboriginal students. Providing students with opportunities to experience how science really is enacted—i.e., authentic science—has been advocated as an important means to allow students to know and learn about science. The purpose of this paper is to problematize how "authentic" science experiences may mediate students' orientations towards science and scientific career choices. Based on a larger ethnographic study, we present the case of an Aboriginal student who engaged in a scientific internship program. We draw on cultural-historical activity theory to understand the intersection between science as practice and the mundane practices in which students participate as part of their daily lives. Following Brad, we articulate our understanding of the ways in which he hybridized the various mundane and scientific practices that intersected in and through his participation and by which he realized his cultural identity as an Aboriginal. Mediated by this hybridization, we observe changes in his orientation towards science and his career choices. We use this case study to revisit methodological implications for understanding the role of "authentic science experiences" in science education.

  14. How to Market Career and Technical Education: Student Ambassadors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard, Rosalie

    2007-01-01

    The Miami Valley Career Technology Center (MVCTC) uses its Student Ambassador Team to help market career and technical education to other students. The MVCTC Ambassador Team is made up of 34 senior students nominated in their junior year by their career-tech and academic instructors. The students represent a cross section of career/technical…

  15. College and Career Readiness in the Middle Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaefer, Mary Beth; Rivera, Lourdes M.

    2012-01-01

    The development and implementation of a comprehensive and systemic career development program, The Career Institute, provided the mechanism through which one school community addressed students' career development and college readiness needs while also attending to their academic and personal-social development. The Career Institute consisted of a…

  16. Dental Assistants, Technicians and Hygienists. Career Focus, volume 5, no. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Includes three articles: "Lending a Hand for Good Dental Health,""A Promising Career Path," and "Dental Laboratory Technicians." Describes careers related to the dental field and the dental programs at various career centers, community colleges, and universities. (JOW)

  17. Career Development and Emerging Managerial Career Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grzeda, Maurice

    1999-01-01

    Career-motivation theory provides a new framework for managerial careers in the context of contemporary career patterns. The framework includes the concepts of career resilience, career insight, and career identity. (SK)

  18. The Role of Scientific Communication Skills in Trainees' Intention to Pursue Biomedical Research Careers: A Social Cognitive Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Carrie; Lee, Hwa Young; Anderson, Cheryl; Byars-Winston, Angela; Baldwin, Constance D; Chang, Shine

    2015-01-01

    Scientific communication (SciComm) skills are indispensable for success in biomedical research, but many trainees may not have fully considered the necessity of regular writing and speaking for research career progression. Our purpose was to investigate the relationship between SciComm skill acquisition and research trainees' intentions to remain in research careers. We used social cognitive career theory (SCCT) to test a model of the relationship of SciComm skills to SciComm-related cognitive variables in explaining career intentions. A sample of 510 graduate students and postdoctoral fellows at major academic health science centers in the Texas Medical Center, Houston, Texas, were surveyed online. Results suggested that interest in performing SciComm tasks, SciComm outcome expectations (SCOEs), and SciComm productivity predicted intention to remain in a research career, while SciComm self-efficacy did not directly predict career intention. SCOEs also predicted interest in performing SciComm tasks. As in other SCCT studies, SciComm self-efficacy predicted SCOEs. We conclude that social cognitive factors of SciComm skill acquisition and SciComm productivity significantly predict biomedical trainees' intentions to pursue research careers whether within or outside academia. While further studies are needed, these findings may lead to evidence-based interventions to help trainees remain in their chosen career paths. PMID:26628562

  19. The Role of Scientific Communication Skills in Trainees’ Intention to Pursue Biomedical Research Careers: A Social Cognitive Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Carrie; Lee, Hwa Young; Anderson, Cheryl; Byars-Winston, Angela; Baldwin, Constance D.; Chang, Shine

    2015-01-01

    Scientific communication (SciComm) skills are indispensable for success in biomedical research, but many trainees may not have fully considered the necessity of regular writing and speaking for research career progression. Our purpose was to investigate the relationship between SciComm skill acquisition and research trainees’ intentions to remain in research careers. We used social cognitive career theory (SCCT) to test a model of the relationship of SciComm skills to SciComm-related cognitive variables in explaining career intentions. A sample of 510 graduate students and postdoctoral fellows at major academic health science centers in the Texas Medical Center, Houston, Texas, were surveyed online. Results suggested that interest in performing SciComm tasks, SciComm outcome expectations (SCOEs), and SciComm productivity predicted intention to remain in a research career, while SciComm self-efficacy did not directly predict career intention. SCOEs also predicted interest in performing SciComm tasks. As in other SCCT studies, SciComm self-efficacy predicted SCOEs. We conclude that social cognitive factors of SciComm skill acquisition and SciComm productivity significantly predict biomedical trainees’ intentions to pursue research careers whether within or outside academia. While further studies are needed, these findings may lead to evidence-based interventions to help trainees remain in their chosen career paths. PMID:26628562

  20. The Career Intern Program: Preliminary Results of an Experiment in Career Education. Technical Appendix. Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Opportunities Industrialization Centers of America, Inc., Philadelphia, PA.

    The technical appendix to "The Career Intern Program: Preliminary Results of an Experiment in Career Education," Volume 1, reports on the research designs used for evaluating the Career Intern Program's (CIP) effectiveness in increasing the student's cognitive skills, academic achievement, vocational adjustment, future orientation, and self-image…

  1. Occupational Resources: Career Information. CHOICE (Challenging Options in Career Education). [Grade 5].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mid-Hudson Migrant Education Center, New Paltz, NY.

    Designed to teach migrant students about the world of work and how academic subjects relate to jobs and careers, this illustrated CHOICE (Challenging Options in Career Education) Occupational Resources text provides career and job information and basic job market entry skills information for junior and senior high school students written at a…

  2. Occupational Resources: Career Information. CHOICE (Challenging Options in Career Education). [Grade 3].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mid-Hudson Migrant Education Center, New Paltz, NY.

    Designed to teach migrant students about the world of work and how academic subjects relate to jobs and careers, this illustrated CHOICE (Challenging Options in Career Education) Occupational Resources text provides career and job information and basic job market entry skills information for junior and senior high school students written at a…

  3. Changing Career Orientations in Higher Education: Can HE Be a Breeding Ground for Entrepreneurial Careers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schenk, H. W.

    2003-01-01

    This article reports on a study of the career orientations of the academic staff complement of a tertiary education institution that underwent an intensive organisational transformation process. Career orientation profiles were obtained from a sample of academic staff at the beginning of the organisational change process and five tears later the…

  4. Tradition meets innovation: transforming academic medical culture at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Pati, Susmita; Reum, Josef; Conant, Emily; Tuton, Lucy Wolf; Scott, Patricia; Abbuhl, Stephanie; Grisso, Jeane Ann

    2013-04-01

    Traditional performance expectations and career advancement paths for academic physicians persist despite dramatic transformations in the academic workflow, workload, and workforce over the past 20 years. Although the academic physician's triple role as clinician, researcher, and educator has been lauded as the ideal by academic health centers, current standards of excellence for promotion and tenure are based on outdated models. These models fail to reward collaboration and center around rigid career advancement plans that do little to accommodate the changing needs of individuals and organizations. The authors describe an innovative, comprehensive, multipronged initiative at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania to initiate change in the culture of academic medicine and improve academic productivity, job satisfaction, and overall quality of life for junior faculty. As a key part of this intervention, task forces from each of the 13 participating departments/divisions met five times between September 2010 and January 2011 to produce recommendations for institutional change. The authors discuss how this initiative, using principles adopted from business transformation, generated themes and techniques that can potentially guide workforce environment innovation in academic health centers across the United States. Recommendations include embracing a promotion/tenure/evaluation system that supports and rewards tailored individual academic career plans; ensuring leadership, decision-making roles, and recognition for junior faculty; deepening administrative and team supports for junior faculty; and solidifying and rewarding mentorship for junior faculty. By doing so, academic health centers can ensure the retention and commitment of faculty throughout all stages of their careers. PMID:23425986

  5. The Career Development of Mexican American Adolescent Women: A Test of Social Cognitive Career Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Lisa Y.; O'Brien, Karen M.

    2002-01-01

    This study tested R. W. Lent, S. D. Brown, and G. Hackett's (1994) model of career choice with 364 Mexican American adolescent women. Path analyses were run to determine the influence of contextual and social cognitive variables on career aspiration, career choice prestige, and traditionality. Partial support for the model was evidenced as…

  6. Preparing Students for the Future: Making Career Development a Priority.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughey, Kenneth F.; Hughey, Judith K.

    1999-01-01

    Presents information relevant to school counseling about the implications of work changes. Outlines foundational guides for student success: improving decision making, learning about career paths, acquiring employability skills, and developing lifelong learning attitudes. Describes activities to facilitate career development. (SK)

  7. Career Education for Handicapped Students: A Suggested Approach. Technical Assistance Services: Illinois Special Needs Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Sidney R.; And Others

    This monograph describes a suggested approach to career education for handicapped students that focuses on two aspects of the career development process, career exploration and development of an academic program reflecting vocational needs. Discussed in the section on career exploration are career goals, the teacher-counselor role, individual…

  8. The Academic Generation Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dronzek, Anna

    2008-01-01

    The current generation gap in academia is different--fundamentally shaped by the structural problems of academic employment. The job market has especially exacerbated tensions between senior and junior faculty by ratcheting up expectations and requirements at every stage of the academic career. The disparities have been mentioned often enough to…

  9. Academic Freedom and Me

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, Ian

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a personal history of the author's own relationships with the concept of academic freedom. The article is subdivided into 3 prehistories, 7 incidents, 3 disjunctions, and 3 myths. The author discusses the complications of politics, culture, and academic freedom in one career.

  10. Informal Conversations about Teaching and Their Relationship to a Formal Development Program: Learning Opportunities for Novice and Mid-Career Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Engaging in informal activities, like conversations with colleagues, is one way that professionals can learn within workplace contexts. Informal conversations present opportunities for academics to learn about teaching. The current study investigated academics' experience of informal conversations, and their experience of the relations between…

  11. Careers and people

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-02-01

    DARE to be different Stanford University in the US has launched a programme intended to prepare doctoral students from diverse backgrounds for academic careers. Known as DARE - for Diversifying Academia, Recruiting Excellence - the new 4.5m programme will provide 36 successful candidates over the next four years with two-year postdoctoral fellowships, faculty mentors and seminars on the academic profession. DARE aims to help young researchers from underrepresented areas of society - including racial and ethnic minorities - launch successful careers in academia by cultivating their communication and leadership skills, building their confidence and helping them to establish networks of contacts. Each candidate will also be given up to 2000 for a small project that will help increase postgraduate diversity, such as visiting an undergraduate institution to give a talk about their research. The programme is open to students in the last two years of their PhD.

  12. Onto, up, off the Academic Faculty Ladder: The Gendered Effects of Family on Career Transitions for a Cohort of Social Science Ph.D.s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Emory; Rudd, Elizabeth; Nerad, Maresi

    2011-01-01

    With event history analysis, we examine the impact of gender, marital status and spouse type, and parenting at key transition points in the early careers of more than 2,000 social science Ph.D. graduates. This analysis (a) uses data from recent Ph.D. graduates; (b) disentangles the effects of marriage and parenting; and (c) observes the effects of…

  13. Academic and Vocational Teachers Can Improve the Reading Achievement of Male Career-Bound Students. High Schools That Work Research Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forget, Mark; Bottoms, Gene

    The disparity between male and female career-bound students' abilities to read, comprehend, and use written information is a problem for high schools and their feeder middle grades. A primary reason for the difference is that teachers and administrators expect too little of male students. Educators need to recognize the importance of communication…

  14. Senior Female Academics in the UK Academy: Theoretical Perspectives for Understanding the Impact of Education and Familial Influences on Career Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoskins, Kate

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the theoretical perspectives I utilised in my doctoral research to uncover the role of class and gender in my respondents' stories and experiences of their career success. I argue that adopting an economic model for conceptualising the influence of social class and gender in the respondents' stories and experiences of their…

  15. Adolescents' Motivation to Select an Academic Science-Related Career: The Role of School Factors, Individual Interest, and Science Self-Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taskinen, Päivi H.; Schütte, Kerstin; Prenzel, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Many researchers consider a lacking interest in science and the students' belief that science is too demanding as major reasons why young people do not strive for science-related careers. In this article, we first delineated a theoretical framework to investigate the importance of interest, self-concept, and school factors regarding…

  16. Insider Perspectives vs. Public Perceptions of ICT: Toward Policy for Enhancing Female Student Participation in Academic Pathways to Professional Careers in ICT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtney, Lyn; Lankshear, Colin; Anderson, Neil; Timms, Carolyn

    2009-01-01

    This article reports findings of a national online survey of Australian women employed in Information and Communication Technology (ICT)-related careers. The Women in ICT Industry Survey was the culminating stage of a larger Australian Research Council Linkage Grant project investigating factors associated with low and declining female…

  17. Two Views of the Academic Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Elof; Kimball, Bruce

    1994-01-01

    Two college faculty members offer thoughts about their own academic careers, the nature of academic life, faculty compensation, and social and educational changes. The comments reflect views emerging from different generational experiences. (MSE)

  18. Meditation: Future Vehicle for Career Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordberg, Robert B.

    1974-01-01

    Meditation and other forms of mysticism can provide a means of career exploration through the path of heightened self-understanding; methods and circumstances will depend on one's theory of mystical experience. (Author)

  19. Chief Liberal Arts Academic Officers: The Limits of Power and Authority.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, David M.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Results of a 1984 national survey of chief liberal arts academic officers (department heads, deans, and chief academic officers) are used to examine aspects of administrator careers and behavior, including grant administration, job satisfactions and frustrations, and career success. (MSE)

  20. Career Technical Education and Labor Market Demand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Current data indicates that Career Technical Education (CTE) graduates with high school diplomas or postsecondary skills are preparing for careers in fields that are growing or in high-demand. Matching employability skills with workforce demand has been an issue among industries across the nation. CTE provides relevant academic and technical…

  1. A Career Development General Education Seminar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoddard, Kathleen B.

    This paper presents an example of the implementation of the elements of developmental career counseling within an academic setting. A ten-week seminar, attended by 49 university student subjects, was evaluated, before and after, with the Vocational Development Inventory (VDI), the Career Activities Survey (CAS, an information seeking checklist),…

  2. Dual-Career Couples in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weishaar, Marjorie; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Surveyed 45 dual-career couples to identify conflicts and solutions of professinals pursuing academic careers and bearing family responsibilities. Compared males and females, couples with children and those without, couples under 40 years of age and older couples, and this sample with one from business and industry. (Author/JAC)

  3. Elementary Career Intervention Programs: Social Action Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palladino Schultheiss, Donna E.

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines several conceptual frameworks that can inform elementary career intervention programming. Equity, social justice, and the development of intrinsic motivation are key concepts in the promotion of social action initiatives aimed at improving academic achievement and expanding future career options for all students. Early career…

  4. The Career Academy Concept. OJJDP Fact Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffee, Joseph N.; Pestridge, Scott

    Career academies are schools within schools that link students with peers, teachers, and community partners in a disciplined environment, thereby fostering academic success and mental and emotional health. The career academy concept includes the following three key elements: (1) small learning communities; (2) a college preparatory curriculum with…

  5. The New Career and Technical School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2005-01-01

    The 21st century career tech school brings together academics and career skills for a complete education. This article describes the new Romeo Engineering & Technology Center (RETC) in Romeo, Michigan. The 90,288-square-foot facility accommodates up to 720 students in grades 9-12, and sports a building design that evolved through a detailed,…

  6. Becoming a Successful Early Career Researcher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eley, Adrian; Wellington, Jerry; Pitts, Stephanie; Biggs, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Not that long ago there were fairly clear divisions between researchers at different stages throughout their career, starting with doctoral students then progressing to postdoctoral workers and finishing with academic staff. However, more recently the term Early Career Researcher (ECR) has been introduced partly as a response to their growing…

  7. The Condition of College & Career Readiness, 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACT, Inc., 2011

    2011-01-01

    Since 1959, ACT has collected and reported data on students' academic readiness for college. This report provides a college and career readiness snapshot of the ACT-tested high school class of 2011. ACT has long defined college and career readiness as the acquisition of the knowledge and skills a student needs to enroll and succeed in…

  8. Planning School Improvement for Student Career Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lotto, Linda S.

    1986-01-01

    Presents recommendations for developing the content of career development activities in secondary schools, including basic academic skills, occupational skills, job-seeking skills, world of work knowledge, and work values. Also presents recommendations to improve the delivery of career development activities in secondary schools and discusses the…

  9. Career Education: Gateway to Better Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorton, Patricia C.

    Career education is a vehicle which can capitalize on the interests of learning disabled students and, at the same time, show the relevance of academic skills. Project SELECT (Special Education Learning Experiences for Career Training), funded by the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, Title III, was implemented in order to develop a…

  10. Leveraging Advantage: Career Education for Disenfranchised Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Darryl T.; Guest, Michael

    Collaboration between secondary and post secondary schools can provide systematic, recursive assessment models that will benefit students, inform teachers, strengthen institutions, and add to the knowledge base regarding career development. This document outlines the framework used for the Academic Studies and Career Planning (ASCP) class at…

  11. The Influence of Faculty Mentors on Junior Pharmacy Faculty Members’ Career Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Murawski, Matthew M.; Popovich, Nicholas G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To assess junior faculty members’ perceptions regarding the impact of past faculty-mentoring relationships in their career decisions, including the decision to pursue postgraduate training and ultimately an academic career. Methods. A mixed-mode survey instrument was developed and an invitation to participate in the survey was sent to 2,634 pharmacy faculty members designated as assistant professors in the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) directory data. Results. Usable responses were received from 1,059 pharmacy faculty members. Approximately 59% of respondents indicated that they had received encouragement from 1 or more faculty mentors that was very or extremely influential in their decision to pursue postgraduate training. Mentor and mentee pharmacy training characteristics and postgraduate training paths tended to be similar. US pharmacy degree earners rated the likelihood that they would have pursued an academic career without mentor encouragement significantly lower than did their foreign pharmacy and nonpharmacy degree colleagues (p = 0.006, p = 0.021, respectively). Conclusions. For the majority of junior pharmacy faculty members, faculty mentoring received prior to completing their doctor of pharmacy degree or nonpharmacy undergraduate degree influenced their subsequent career decisions. PMID:23610469

  12. Age, and Midcareer Crisis: An Empirical Study of Academics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Entrekin, L.V.; Everett, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the midlife career/crisis transition period of academic staff surveyed in four Australian Universities. Supports a generalized career stage model and a specific career stage model of academic staff, who are shown to be particularly susceptible to the midlife crisis/transition phenomenon. (Author/JAC)

  13. Career Transitions and Career Success in the "New" Career Era

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chudzikowski, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    The "new" career, most notably the boundaryless career, is associated with high career mobility, which is in turn associated with employability and career success of individuals. The current study examined how frequency, form (organisational, horizontal or vertical) and impact (objective career success) of career transitions have changed across…

  14. Facilitating Students' Career Development in Psychology Courses: A Portfolio Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larkin, Judith E.; Pines, Harvey A.; Bechtel, Kate M.

    2002-01-01

    We describe the use of a career exploration portfolio in an Industrial/Organizational psychology course (n = 22) to address students' career needs and to develop academic competencies. Students independently completed a series of assignments outside of class, which led to the construction of a personalized career development portfolio. Evaluations…

  15. Career Exploration Program: A Composite Systematic Functional Objective Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohamed, Othman

    The composite systematic functional objective career exploration program model integrates various career development theoretical approaches. These approaches emphasize self-concept, life values, personality, the environment, and academic achievement and training as separate functions in explaining career development. Current social development in…

  16. Systematic, Systemic and Motivating: The K-12 Career Development Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Deborah; Jackson, Sherry

    2006-01-01

    In Butler County, Ohio, Butler Technology and Career Development Schools (Butler Tech) firmly believes that systematic delivery of career development theory and practice integrated with academic content standards will enable students to do all of the above. Because of this, Butler Tech's Career Initiatives division delivers a countywide career…

  17. Professional School Counselors' Career Development Practices and Continuing Education Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anctil, Tina M.; Smith, Carol Klose; Schenck, Paulette; Dahir, Carol

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the practices of professional school counselors in their delivery of career counseling. School counselors were found to spend significantly less time on career development than on personal-social and academic development. In addition, new professionals placed more priority on career counseling compared with their more…

  18. Career Maturity of Students in Accelerated versus Traditional Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borges, Nicole J.; Richard, George V.; Duffy, Ryan D.

    2007-01-01

    The authors assessed the career maturity of students in accelerated versus traditional academic programs. Students in traditional programs were hypothesized to be more advanced regarding their career decision making and development when compared with students in accelerated programs. The Medical Career Development Inventory (see M. L. Savickas,…

  19. Developing the Careers of Clinician-Educators in Psychiatry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Aurora J.; Clardy, James A.; Cargile, Christopher S.; Thrush, Carol R.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This article describes initial efforts by the newly developed Clinician-Educator Section (CES) of the Association for Academic Psychiatry (AAP) to support the career advancement of academic faculty within psychiatry. The CES provided its first workshop at the 2005 AAP annual meeting, focusing on early career development and academic…

  20. Postdoctoral Training Aligned with the Academic Professoriate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rybarczyk, Brian; Lerea, Leslie; Lund, P. Kay; Whittington, Dawayne; Dykstra, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Postdoctoral training in the biological sciences continues to be an important credential for academic careers. Traditionally, this training is focused on an independent research experience. In this article, we describe a postdoctoral training program designed to prepare postdoctoral scholars for the responsibilities of an academic career that…