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Sample records for academic chronic care

  1. Integrating Systematic Chronic Care for Diabetes into an Academic General Internal Medicine Resident-Faculty Practice

    PubMed Central

    Dorr, David A.; Kelso, Christine; Bowen, Judith L.

    2008-01-01

    Background The quality of care for diabetes continues to fall short of recommended guidelines and results. Models for improving the care of chronic illnesses advocate a multidisciplinary team approach. Yet little is known about the effectiveness of such models in an academic setting with a diverse patient population and resident physicians participating in clinical care. Objective To implement a chronic illness management (CIM) practice within an academic setting with part-time providers, and evaluate its impact on the completion of diabetes-specific care processes and on the achievement of recommended outcomes for patients with diabetes mellitus. Design Retrospective cohort study Subjects Patients with the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus who receive their primary care in an academic general internal medicine resident-faculty practice. Measurements Process and outcomes measures in patients exposed to the CIM practice were compared with non-exposed patients receiving usual care. Main Results Five hundred and sixty-five patients met inclusion criteria. Patients in the CIM practice experienced a significant increase in completion of care processes compared to control patients for measurement of annual low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (OR 3.1, 95% CI 1.7–5.7), urine microalbumin (OR 3.3, 95% CI 2.1–5.5), blood pressure (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.1–2.8), retinal examination (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.3–2.7), foot monofilament examination (OR 4.2, 95% CI 3.0–6.1) and administration of pneumococcal vaccination (OR 5.2, 95% CI 3.0–9.3). CIM-exposed patients were also more likely to achieve improvements in clinical outcomes of glycemic and blood pressure control reflected by hemoglobin A1c less than 7.0% (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.02–3) and blood pressure less than 130/80 (OR 2.8, 95% CI 2.1–4.5) compared to controls. Conclusions A systematic chronic care model can be successfully integrated into an academic general internal medicine practice and may result in improved

  2. A Collaborative Approach to a Chronic Care Problem: An Academic Mentor's Point of View.

    PubMed

    Vallis, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Atlantic Healthcare Collaboration for Innovation and Improvement in Chronic Disease (AHC) represents a social experiment of sorts. The AHC provided a platform to integrate regions, health issues, healthcare systems, providers and individuals/families living with chronic disease. As such, the scope of the AHC was very broad, providing a rich learning environment but also risking biting off more than it could chew. I participated in this experiment as an academic mentor to three of the improvement projects (IPs) with Health PEI, Central Health and Western Health and also was a member of the IP extended team at Nova Scotia Health Authority (formerly Capital Health) in Nova Scotia. My professional contribution was from the perspective of health behaviour change - change at the level of the patient and family living with chronic disease, at the level of the healthcare provider working within an expert-based, siloed system, and at the level of the healthcare system - the managers and decision-makers.

  3. Supportive Care for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Supportive Care for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Supportive care for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is ... Treating Hairy Cell Leukemia More In Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  4. Academic Health Centers and Health Care Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, Stephen H.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A discussion of the role of academic health centers in health care reform efforts looks at the following issues: balancing academic objectivity and social advocacy; managing sometimes divergent interests of centers, faculty, and society; and the challenge to develop infrastructure support for reform. Academic health centers' participation in…

  5. Improving Care for Chronic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Mattke, Soeren; Mengistu, Tewodaj; Klautzer, Lisa; Sloss, Elizabeth M.; Brook, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The need for better management of chronic conditions is urgent. About 141 million people in the United States were living with one or more chronic conditions in 2010, and this number is projected to increase to 171 million by 2030. To address this challenge, many health plans have piloted and rolled out innovative approaches to improving care for their members with chronic conditions. This article documents the current range of chronic care management services, identifies best practices and industry trends, and examines factors in the plans' operating environment that limit their ability to optimize chronic care programs. The authors conducted telephone surveys with a representative sample of health plans and made in-depth case studies of six plans. All plans in the sample provide a wide range of products and services around chronic care, including wellness/lifestyle management programs for healthy members, disease management for members with common chronic conditions, and case management for high-risk members regardless of their underlying condition. Health plans view these programs as a “win-win” situation and believe that they improve care for their most vulnerable members and reduce cost of coverage. Plans are making their existing programs more patient-centric and are integrating disease and case management, and sometimes lifestyle management and behavioral health, into a consolidated chronic care management program, believing that this will increase patient engagement and prevent duplication of services and missed opportunities. PMID:28083379

  6. Primary Care as an Academic Discipline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagin, Claire M.

    1978-01-01

    Aspects of the development of medical and nursing education make primary health care just one of medicine's specialities when it is actually the essence of the nursing profession. The author contends that primary care as an academic discipline within nursing is really the general discipline and should be so conceptualized. (MF)

  7. Vouchers for chronic disease care.

    PubMed

    Watts, Jennifer J; Segal, Leonie

    2008-08-01

    This paper explores the economic implications of vouchers for chronic disease management with respect to achieving objectives of equity and efficiency. Vouchers as a payment policy instrument for health care services have a set of properties that suggest they may address both demand-side and supply-side issues, and contribute to equity and efficiency. They provide a means whereby health care services can be targeted at selected groups, enabling consumer choice of provider, and encouraging competition in the supply of health services. This analysis suggests that, when structured appropriately, vouchers can support consumers to choose services that will meet their health care needs and encourage competition among providers. Although they may not be appropriate across the entire health care system, there are features of vouchers that make them a potentially attractive option, especially for the management of chronic disease.

  8. Medicare Pays for Chronic Care Management.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2015-09-01

    As of January, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services began paying for chronic care management of patients with two or more conditions under its Chronic Care Management program. The payment applies to patients in traditional fee-for-service and noncapitated Medicare Advantage plan arrangements. Texas Medical Association leaders caution the program has some hefty requirements.

  9. Health Care Reform and the Academic Health Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimmey, James R.

    1994-01-01

    A discussion of the implications of health care reform for academic health centers (a complex of institutions which educate health professionals) looks at problems in the current system, the role of academic health centers in the current system, financial pressures, revenue sources other than patient care, impact on health research, and human…

  10. Chronic Illness and the Academic Career

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Stephanie A.; Morgan, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss the hidden epidemic in higher education. They describe the stigma of chronic illness and argue that the invisibility of chronic illness may elicit particularly problematic responses from others, especially when faculty work in a context where people are expected to be highly productive and have unlimited…

  11. The Chronic Care Model and Diabetes Management in US Primary Care Settings: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Stellefson, Michael; Stopka, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The Chronic Care Model (CCM) uses a systematic approach to restructuring medical care to create partnerships between health systems and communities. The objective of this study was to describe how researchers have applied CCM in US primary care settings to provide care for people who have diabetes and to describe outcomes of CCM implementation. Methods We conducted a literature review by using the Cochrane database of systematic reviews, CINAHL, and Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition and the following search terms: “chronic care model” (and) “diabet*.” We included articles published between January 1999 and October 2011. We summarized details on CCM application and health outcomes for 16 studies. Results The 16 studies included various study designs, including 9 randomized controlled trials, and settings, including academic-affiliated primary care practices and private practices. We found evidence that CCM approaches have been effective in managing diabetes in US primary care settings. Organizational leaders in health care systems initiated system-level reorganizations that improved the coordination of diabetes care. Disease registries and electronic medical records were used to establish patient-centered goals, monitor patient progress, and identify lapses in care. Primary care physicians (PCPs) were trained to deliver evidence-based care, and PCP office–based diabetes self-management education improved patient outcomes. Only 7 studies described strategies for addressing community resources and policies. Conclusion CCM is being used for diabetes care in US primary care settings, and positive outcomes have been reported. Future research on integration of CCM into primary care settings for diabetes management should measure diabetes process indicators, such as self-efficacy for disease management and clinical decision making. PMID:23428085

  12. Evolution of the chronic care role of the registered nurse in primary care.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, Candia Baker; Beisel, Marie

    2010-01-01

    High-quality, accessible, and efficient primary care is needed as the U.S. health care system undergoes significant change. Advancing the role of registered nurses in the primary care setting is important to the solution. A large academic health center implemented five initiatives to improve the care of chronically ill patients through the expanded role of RNs in the context of the health care team. Role evolution of nurses in the pilots required some continuing education and some additional nursing support to release the pilot nurses from their usual duties. These strategies allowed the nurses to apply interventions that enhanced the coordination of care and promoted patient self-management skills. Some short-term improvements in health status were realized and barriers to self-care were identified and resolved.

  13. Chronic diarrhoea: investigation, treatment and nursing care.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Chris

    Chronic diarrhoea is a distressing symptom of a number of conditions. This article explains the assessment of patients at the initial outpatient visit through the various investigations and finally medical and surgical treatment. Emphasis is placed on the nursing management of chronic diarrhoea, particularly the treatment of physical effects such as dehydration and perianal skin soreness, and the psychological aspects of care.

  14. The role of academic medicine in improving health care quality.

    PubMed

    Brindis, Ralph G; Spertus, John

    2006-09-01

    Academic medicine, often entrenched in biomedical and clinical research, has largely ignored the development and application of quality metrics to ensure the delivery of high-quality health care. Nevertheless, academic medicine has substantial opportunities to lead the charge in building a quality infrastructure with the goal of delivering high-quality and cost-efficient health care to all Americans. The American College of Cardiology (ACC) and American Heart Association (AHA) have worked jointly to measure and improve the quality of cardiovascular care. This effort has led to the development of clinical practice guidelines, performance measures, data standards, national registries, and appropriateness criteria for cardiovascular care. Academic medicine should actively embrace and promote the type of quality metrics and criteria developed by ACC and AHA and apply this model across the entire academic medicine community. Academic medicine, with its many resources, could lead the way in the expanding field of quality science by supporting fundamental research in quality improvement, supporting academicians to improve quality at their own institutions, developing educational models for quality assessment and improvement, creating and implementing data registries, and serving as a conduit for developing the emerging science of quality assessment. In this and many other ways, academic medicine must offer the health care community leadership for improving our nation's health care quality with the same fervor presently exhibited for the advancement of basic science, the development of specialized and experimental therapy, and as centers for tertiary and quaternary patient care.

  15. Australian academic primary health-care careers: a scoping survey.

    PubMed

    Barton, Christopher; Reeve, Joanne; Adams, Ann; McIntyre, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    This study was undertaken to provide a snapshot of the academic primary health-care workforce in Australia and to provide some insight into research capacity in academic primary health care following changes to funding for this sector. A convenience sample of individuals self-identifying as working within academic primary health care (n=405) completed an anonymous online survey. Respondents were identified from several academic primary health-care mailing lists. The survey explored workforce demographics, clarity of career pathways, career trajectories and enablers/barriers to 'getting in' and 'getting on'. A mix of early career (41%), mid-career (25%) and senior academics (35%) responded. Early career academics tended to be female and younger than mid-career and senior academics, who tended to be male and working in 'balanced' (teaching and research) roles and listing medicine as their disciplinary background. Almost three-quarters (74%) indicated career pathways were either 'completely' or 'somewhat unclear', irrespective of gender and disciplinary backgrounds. Just over half (51%) had a permanent position. Males were more likely to have permanent positions, as were those with a medical background. Less than half (43%) reported having a mentor, and of the 57% without a mentor, more than two-thirds (69%) would like one. These results suggest a lack of clarity in career paths, uncertainty in employment and a large number of temporary (contract) or casual positions represent barriers to sustainable careers in academic primary health care, especially for women who are from non-medicine backgrounds. Professional development or a mentoring program for primary health-care academics was desired and may address some of the issues identified by survey respondents.

  16. Home care for horses with chronic laminitis.

    PubMed

    Orsini, James A; Wrigley, Jennifer; Riley, Patrick

    2010-04-01

    Home care for horses with chronic laminitis has been discussed rarely in the veterinary literature even though, at any given time, most of us have at least 1 chronic laminitis case in our care that is being managed at home by the owner. Almost all of our knowledge on this aspect of laminitis treatment has been gleaned through experience, by individually working through the medical, ethical, financial, and emotional challenges these cases can present. Much has already been presented on the medical management of the laminitic horse and on strategies for trimming and shoeing the laminitic foot. This article focuses on the other challenges so often faced when directing the home care of a horse with chronic laminitis.

  17. Satisfactory Academic Progress: Who Cares and Why?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blakey, William A.

    1985-01-01

    The author states that postsecondary institutions must implement their own minimum academic progress requirements to avoid a potentially punitive legislative requirement. Various General Accounting Office reports concerned with student progress statistics are quoted. (CT)

  18. Chronic care infrastructures and the home.

    PubMed

    Langstrup, Henriette

    2013-09-01

    In this article I argue that attention to the spatial and material dimensions of chronic disease management and its place-making effects is necessary if we are to understand the implications of the increased mobilisation--technologically or otherwise--of the home in chronic disease management. Analysing home treatment in asthma and haemophilia care, I argue that in relation to chronic disease management the home is not only always connected to the clinic but moreover, what the home is in part depends on the specificities of these attachments. Drawing primarily on the work of Susan Leigh Star and scholars of human geography I propose the concept of chronic care infrastructures designating the often inconspicuous socio-material elements (such as medication, control visits, phone calls, doses and daily routines), which are embedded in everyday life (of both the clinic and the home) and participate in producing the effect of treatment but also the effect of home. These chronic care infrastructures demand the emplacement of various objects and activities in everyday life and thus relate to negotiations of 'keepings'--hat to keep and care for and where to grant it room vis á vis other 'keepings'.

  19. Chronic care management coding for neurologists

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Chronic care management provides a way for neurologists to code for time spent by clinical office staff who coordinate services for patients with major chronic illnesses. Medicare allows payment for one such code; some third party payers accept 2 additional codes. When using these codes, the physician develops a Care Plan that organizes the patient's medical and psychosocial needs. Clinical office staff communicates among the patient's physicians, therapists, community services, the patient, family, and caregiver. The patient chooses only one physician whose office provides these coordination services. Rules include 24/7 access for urgent phone contact and use of an electronic health record system. PMID:26526602

  20. Disruptive innovation in academic medical centers: balancing accountable and academic care.

    PubMed

    Stein, Daniel; Chen, Christopher; Ackerly, D Clay

    2015-05-01

    Numerous academic medicine leaders have argued that academic referral centers must prepare for the growing importance of accountability-driven payment models by adopting population health initiatives. Although this shift has merit, execution of this strategy will prove significantly more problematic than most observers have appreciated. The authors describe how successful implementation of an accountable care health strategy within a referral academic medical center (AMC) requires navigating a critical tension: The academic referral business model, driven by tertiary-level care, is fundamentally in conflict with population health. Referral AMCs that create successful value-driven population health systems within their organizations will in effect disrupt their own existing tertiary care businesses. The theory of disruptive innovation suggests that balancing the push and pull of academic and accountable care within a single organization is achievable. However, it will require significant shifts in resource allocation and changes in management structure to enable AMCs to make the inherent difficult choices and trade-offs that will ensue. On the basis of the theories of disruptive innovation, the authors present recommendations for how academic health systems can successfully navigate these issues as they transition toward accountability-driven care.

  1. Care and Feeding of the Chief Academic Officer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holyer, Robert

    2010-01-01

    There is an adage common among deans and provosts: The board is concerned with the care and feeding of the president; the faculty is concerned with the care and feeding of the faculty. The implication--and why it brings a knowing smile to any chief academic officer's face--is that no one seems concerned with the care and feeding of the CAO. Small…

  2. [The quality of chronic care in Germany].

    PubMed

    Fullerton, Birgit; Nolte, Ellen; Erler, Antje

    2011-01-01

    Over the last ten years changes in the legal framework of the German health care system have promoted the development of new health service models to improve chronic care. Recent innovations include the nation-wide introduction of disease management programmes (DMPs), integrated care contracts, community nurse programmes, the introduction of General Practitioner (GP)-centred care contracts, and new opportunities to offer interdisciplinary outpatient care in polyclinics. The aim of this article is to describe the recent developments regarding both the implementation of new health care models by statutory health insurance companies and their evaluation. As part of a European project on the development and validation of disease management evaluation methods (DISMEVAL), we carried out a selective literature search to identify relevant models and evaluation studies. However, on the basis of the currently available evaluation and study results it is difficult to judge whether these developments have actually led to an improvement in the quality of chronic care in Germany. Only for DMPs, evaluation is legally mandatory; its methods are inappropriate, though, for studying the effectiveness of DMPs. Further study results on the effectiveness of DMPs mostly focus on the DMP Diabetes mellitus type II and show consistent improvements regarding process parameters such as regular routine examinations, adherence to treatment guidelines, and quality of life. More research will be needed to determine whether DMPs can also help reduce the incidence of secondary disease and mortality in the long term.

  3. Secondary Care Clinic for Chronic Disease: Protocol

    PubMed Central

    St-Pierre, Michèle; Juneau, Lucille; Legault-Mercier, Samuel; Bernardino, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background The complexity of chronic disease management activities and the associated financial burden have prompted the development of organizational models, based on the integration of care and services, which rely on primary care services. However, since the institutions providing these services are continually undergoing reorganization, the Centre hospitalier affilié universitaire de Québec wanted to innovate by adapting the Chronic Care Model to create a clinic for the integrated follow-up of chronic disease that relies on hospital-based specialty care. Objective The aim of the study is to follow the project in order to contribute to knowledge about the way in which professional and management practices are organized to ensure better care coordination and the successful integration of the various follow-ups implemented. Methods The research strategy adopted is based on the longitudinal comparative case study with embedded units of analysis. The case study uses a mixed research method. Results We are currently in the analysis phase of the project. The results will be available in 2015. Conclusions The project’s originality lies in its consideration of the macro, meso, and micro contexts structuring the creation of the clinic in order to ensure the integration process is successful and to allow a theoretical generalization of the reorganization of practices to be developed. PMID:25689840

  4. Chronic disease management: the primary care perspective.

    PubMed

    Bragaglia, Pauline; O'Brien, Lewis

    2007-01-01

    This response to the essay is a "view from the trenches" by two doctors who have worked over 23 years at the Group Health Centre in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario. We would agree wholeheartedly that reducing wait times for selected procedures will not transform our health system, although they are a start that does provide improved quality of life for a relatively small number of people. We have struggled with the care gap between known best practices and the reality of care provided, from the perspectives of both prevention and chronic disease management. This has resulted in an acute awareness of the need for an across-the-system, "bottom-up" approach to the prevention of disease and management of healthcare. Limited resources must be carefully leveraged in innovative ways if we are to eliminate this care gap, decrease morbidity and minimize expensive "rescue" procedures that make our system increasingly unaffordable.

  5. Outcomes of Care Systems for Chronic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Elizabeth B.; Egri, Gladys; Caton, Carol L.M.

    1984-01-01

    In a study of the postdischarge treatment of 119 comparable chronic schizophrenics hospitalized and treated after release in six community mental health care systems, it was found that lower rehospitalization rates and longer community survivorship correlated significantly with patients' compliance in early postdischarge treatment plans and the frequency of aftercare visits prescribed for them during the early postrelease period. Rehospitalization rates and community survivorship experience were substantially better for patients of two of the six systems, without disproportionate reduction of their clinical or social functioning in the community. Characteristics of the community care systems with better outcomes are described. PMID:6694221

  6. Palliative care in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Lilly, Evan J; Senderovich, Helen

    2016-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the only major worldwide cause of mortality that is currently increasing in prevalence. Furthermore, COPD is incurable, and the only therapy that has been shown to increase survival is oxygen therapy in selected patients. Compared to patients with cancer, patients with COPD experience similar levels of pain, breathlessness, fatigue, depression, and anxiety and have a worse quality of life but have comparatively little access to palliative care. When these patients do receive palliative care, they tend to be referred later than patients with cancer. Many disease, patient-, and provider-related factors contribute to this phenomenon, including COPD's unpredictable course, misperceptions of palliative care among patients and physicians, and lack of advance care planning discussions outside of crisis situations. A new paradigm for palliative care would introduce palliative treatments alongside, rather than at the exclusion of disease-modifying interventions. This integrated approach would circumvent the issue of difficult prognostication in COPD, as any patient would receive individualized palliative interventions from the time of diagnosis. These points will be covered in this review, which discusses the challenges in providing palliative care to COPD patients, the strategies to mitigate the challenges, management of common symptoms, and the evidence for integrated palliative care models as well as some suggestions for future development.

  7. [Chronic stress and epigenetics. Relation between academic sciences and theology].

    PubMed

    Simon, Kornél

    2012-04-08

    The author gives a short account on the principles of Selye's stress theory, and discusses similarities and dissimilarities of acute and chronic stress. Both the external, and the internal environment, as well as the psycho-mental status are involved in the notion of the environment. Basic principles of epigenetics are reviewed: interaction between environment and genes, neuroendocrine and enzymatic mechanisms involved in silencing and activation of genes, notions of phenotypic plasticity, and epigenetic reprogramming are discussed. Epigenetic mechanisms of interrelation between pathological clinical states (diseases) and the characteristic phenotypes, causative role of psycho-mental status in evoking pathological somatic alterations, and the potential therapeutic consequences are briefly discussed. The etiological role of chronic, civilization stress in producing the worldwide increment of cardiovascular morbidity is cited, argumentation and criticism of the current therapeutical practice is discussed. The author concludes that recent advances in epigenetic knowledge seem to solve the controversy between the academic and theological sciences.

  8. A Caring Attitude and Academic Advising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Jerry; Ford, Sheila Stoma

    1989-01-01

    A discussion of the value of a caring attitude in the advisor-advisee relationship is supported by a review of literature in the field. A list of 30 reminders for effective advising and an inventory for students to fill out concerning their perceptions of their advisor are appended. (MSE)

  9. Evolving Health Care System: Academic Implications for Content and Skill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartzema, Abraham G.

    1987-01-01

    The impact of changing health care systems on the content of pharmaceutical education is examined, including the relationship between basic and applied sciences and between the applied sciences and skill and attitude formation, in both academic and clinical education. The role of pharmacy administration in the curriculum is discussed. (MSE)

  10. Alberta's systems approach to chronic disease management and prevention utilizing the expanded chronic care model.

    PubMed

    Delon, Sandra; Mackinnon, Blair

    2009-01-01

    Alberta's integrated approach to chronic disease management programming embraces client-centred care, supports self-management and facilitates care across the continuum. This paper presents strategies implemented through collaboration with primary care to improve care of individuals with chronic conditions, evaluation evidence supporting success and lessons learned from the Alberta perspective.

  11. School Nurse Case Management for Children with Chronic Illness: Health, Academic, and Quality of Life Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelke, Martha Keehner; Guttu, Martha; Warren, Michelle B.; Swanson, Melvin

    2008-01-01

    More children with chronic illnesses are attending school, and some of them struggle academically because of issues related to their health. School-based case management has been suggested as one strategy to improve the academic success of these children. This study tracked the academic, health, and quality of life outcomes for 114 children with…

  12. Academic medicine amenities unit: developing a model to integrate academic medical care with luxury hotel services.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, David W; Kagan, Sarah H; Abramson, Kelly Brennen; Boberick, Cheryl; Kaiser, Larry R

    2009-02-01

    The interface between established values of academic medicine and the trend toward inpatient amenities units requires close examination. Opinions of such units can be polarized, reflecting traditional reservations about the ethical dilemma of offering exclusive services only to an elite patient group. An amenities unit was developed at the University of Pennsylvania Health System in 2007, using an approach that integrated academic medicine values with the benefits of philanthropy and service excellence to make amenities unit services available to all patients. Given inherent internal political concerns, a broadly based steering committee of academic and hospital leadership was developed. An academically appropriate model was conceived, anchored by four principles: (1) integration of academic values, (2) interdisciplinary senior leadership, (3) service excellence, and (4) recalibrated occupancy expectations based on multiple revenue streams. Foremost is ensuring the same health care is afforded all patients throughout the hospital, thereby overcoming ethical challenges and optimizing teaching experiences. Service excellence frames the service ethic for all staff, and this, in addition to luxury hotel-style amenities, differentiates the style and feel of the unit from others in the hospital. Recalibrated occupancy creates program viability given revenue streams redefined to encompass gifts and patient revenue, including both reimbursement and self-pay. The medical-surgical amenities patient-care unit has enjoyed a successful first year and a growing stream of returning patients and admitting physicians. Implications for other academic medical centers include opportunities to extrapolate service excellence throughout the hospital and to cultivate philanthropy to benefit services throughout the medical center.

  13. Accountable care organization readiness and academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, Scott A; Pahira, Jennifer J

    2014-09-01

    As academic medical centers (AMCs) consider becoming accountable care organizations (ACOs) under Medicare, they must assess their readiness for this transition. Of the 253 Medicare ACOs prior to 2014, 51 (20%) are AMCs. Three critical components of ACO readiness are institutional and ACO structure, leadership, and governance; robust information technology and analytic systems; and care coordination and management to improve care delivery and health at the population level. All of these must be viewed through the lens of unique AMC mission-driven goals.There is clear benefit to developing and maintaining a centralized internal leadership when it comes to driving change within an ACO, yet there is also the need for broad stakeholder involvement. Other important structural features are an extensive primary care foundation; concomitant operation of a managed care plan or risk-bearing entity; or maintaining a close relationship with post-acute-care or skilled nursing facilities, which provide valuable expertise in coordinating care across the continuum. ACOs also require comprehensive and integrated data and analytic systems that provide meaningful population data to inform care teams in real time, promote quality improvement, and monitor spending trends. AMCs will require proven care coordination and management strategies within a population health framework and deployment of an innovative workforce.AMC core functions of providing high-quality subspecialty and primary care, generating new knowledge, and training future health care leaders can be well aligned with a transition to an ACO model. Further study of results from Medicare-related ACO programs and commercial ACOs will help define best practices.

  14. Academic Care, Classroom Pedagogy and the House Group Teacher: "Making Hope Practical" in Uncertain Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Addison, Bruce Vincent

    2012-01-01

    The development of an ethos of academic care is about creating the structures, both formal and informal, that cater for the developmental learning needs of students. Such an approach celebrates individual difference in the belief that academic care will not only underpin improved academic performance but will also build confidence in the ability…

  15. Parental Involvement of Mothers with Chronic Illness and Children's Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yung-Chi; Fish, Marian C.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined how maternal chronic illnesses may affect children's academic achievement through parental involvement. A total of 189 mothers diagnosed with chronic illnesses, such as multiple sclerosis, diabetes, cancer, HIV/AIDS, chronic pain, asthma, myelodysplasic syndrome, and fibromyalgia, and with a child in middle school or high…

  16. Team effectiveness in academic primary health care teams.

    PubMed

    Delva, Dianne; Jamieson, Margaret; Lemieux, Melissa

    2008-12-01

    Primary health care is undergoing significant organizational change, including the development of interdisciplinary health care teams. Understanding how teams function effectively in primary care will assist training programs in teaching effective interprofessional practices. This study aimed to explore the views of members of primary health care teams regarding what constitutes a team, team effectiveness and the factors that affect team effectiveness in primary care. Focus group consultations from six teams in the Department of Family Medicine at Queen's University were recorded and transcribed and qualitative analysis was used to identify themes. Twelve themes were identified that related to the impact of dual goals/obligations of education and clinical/patient practice on team relationships and learners; the challenges of determining team membership including nonattendance of allied health professionals except nurses; and facilitators and barriers to effective team function. This study provides insight into some of the challenges of developing effective primary care teams in an academic department of family medicine. Clear goals and attention to teamwork at all levels of collaboration is needed if effective interprofessional education is to be achieved. Future research should clarify how best to support the changes required for increasingly effective teamwork.

  17. Health information technology: transforming chronic disease management and care transitions.

    PubMed

    Rao, Shaline; Brammer, Craig; McKethan, Aaron; Buntin, Melinda B

    2012-06-01

    Adoption of health information technology (HIT) is a key effort in improving care delivery, reducing costs of health care, and improving the quality of health care. Evidence from electronic health record (EHR) use suggests that HIT will play a significant role in transforming primary care practices and chronic disease management. This article shows that EHRs and HIT can be used effectively to manage chronic diseases, that HIT can facilitate communication and reduce efforts related to transitions in care, and that HIT can improve patient safety by increasing the information available to providers and patients, improving disease management and safety.

  18. Nonprofessional Care in Chronic Critically Ill Patient: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Dehkordi, Leila Mardanian; Babashahi, Monireh; Irajpour, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Decision-making about patients with critical condition transfer from Intensive Care Unit to the general wards be delegated to their families. The aim of the study was explaining the experiences of family caregiver's about care of chronic critically ill patient. Methods: This study was conducted with a qualitative content analysis using unstructured interview. Participants were selected purposively from May 2014 to May 2015 and data collection continued until data saturation. Analysis was based on conventional content analysis. Results: Participants’ experiences classified into three main categories as following: nonprofessional care, enhancing factors of care, and inhibiting factors of care. Conclusions: Finding of the current study showed different aspects of care. Care of chronic critically ill patients is a long-term process that affected by different factors. It seems that the exploration of caregivers needs and planning supportive interventions based on their needs improve the quality of care. PMID:28028426

  19. Collaborative Chronic Care Networks (C3Ns) to transform chronic illness care.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Peter A; Peterson, Laura E; Seid, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Despite significant gains by pediatric collaborative improvement networks, the overall US system of chronic illness care does not work well. A new paradigm is needed: a Collaborative Chronic Care Network (C3N). A C3N is a network-based production system that harnesses the collective intelligence of patients, clinicians, and researchers and distributes the production of knowledge, information, and know-how over large groups of people, dramatically accelerating the discovery process. A C3N is a platform of "operating systems" on which interconnected processes and interventions are designed, tested, and implemented. The social operating system is facilitated by community building, engaging all stakeholders and their expertise, and providing multiple ways to participate. Standard progress measures and a robust information technology infrastructure enable the technical operating system to reduce unwanted variation and adopt advances more rapidly. A structured approach to innovation design provides a scientific operating system or "laboratory" for what works and how to make it work. Data support testing and research on multiple levels: comparative effectiveness research for populations, evaluating care delivery processes at the care center level, and N-of-1 trials and other methods to select the best treatment of individual patient circumstances. Methods to reduce transactional costs to participate include a Federated IRB Model in which centers rely on a protocol approved at 1 central institutional review board and a "commons framework" for organizational copyright and intellectual property concerns. A fully realized C3N represents a discontinuous leap to a self-developing learning health system capable of producing a qualitatively different approach to improving health.

  20. Pathology Sections: The Four Chronic Diseases of Academic Corruption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinese Education and Society, 2007

    2007-01-01

    One might say that people bitterly detest "academic corruption" and call it immoral and dishonest academic conduct, and that the deliberate falsification, covert plagiarism, and empty rhetoric employed by certain scholars when expounding their theories and the various means they use when attempting to get their works published and…

  1. Health Care Autonomy in Children with Chronic Conditions: Implications for Self Care and Family Management

    PubMed Central

    Beacham, Barbara L.; Deatrick, Janet A.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis Health care autonomy typically occurs during late adolescence but health care providers and families often expect children with chronic health conditions to master self-care earlier. Few studies have examined the development of health care autonomy as it pertains to self-care and family management. This review will link the three concepts and discuss implications for families and health care providers. Case studies are provided as exemplars to highlight areas where intervention and research is needed. PMID:23659815

  2. The Academic and Functional Academic Skills of Youth Who Are at Risk for Language Impairment in Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagaman, Jessica L.; Trout, Alexandra L.; DeSalvo, Cathy; Gehringer, Robert; Epstein, Michael H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Undiagnosed language impairment (LI) for youth in residential care is a concern as similar populations have shown elevated levels of language delays. Therefore, the purposes of this study were to identify the percentage of youth in residential care who are at risk for LI and to compare the demographic, academic achievement, and functional…

  3. Implementation of a Chronic Illness Model for Diabetes Care in a Family Medicine Residency Program

    PubMed Central

    Beresford, Robin

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION While the Chronic Care Model (CCM) has been shown to improve the care of patients with chronic illnesses, primary care physicians have been unprepared in its use, and residencies have encountered challenges in introducing it into the academic environment. AIM Our residency program has implemented a diabetes management program modeled on the CCM to evaluate its impact on health outcomes of diabetic patients and educational outcomes of residents. SETTING University-affiliated, community-based family medicine residency program. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Six residents, two faculty clinicians, and clinic staff formed a diabetes management team. We redesigned the outpatient experience for diabetic patients by incorporating elements of the CCM: multidisciplinary team care through planned and group visits; creation of a diabetes registry; use of guidelines-based flow sheets; and incorporation of self-management goal-setting. Residents received extensive instruction in diabetes management, quality improvement, and patient self-management. PROGRAM EVALUATION We achieved overall improvement in all metabolic and process measures for patients, with the percentage achieving HbA1c, LDL, and BP goals simultaneously increasing from 5.7% to 17.1%. Educational outcomes for residents, as measured by compliance with review of provider performance reports and self-management goal-setting with patients, also significantly improved. DISCUSSION Through a learning collaborative experience, residency programs can successfully incorporate chronic care training for residents while addressing gaps in care for patients with diabetes. PMID:20737237

  4. Inadequate Palliative Care in Chronic Lung Disease. An Issue of Health Care Inequality

    PubMed Central

    Jecker, Nancy S.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic lung diseases suffer higher symptom burden, lower quality of life, and greater social isolation compared with patients with other diagnoses, such as cancer. These conditions may be alleviated by palliative care, yet palliative care is used less by patients with chronic lung disease compared with patients with cancer. Underuse is due, in part, to poor implementation of primary palliative care and inadequate referral to specialty palliative care. Lack of primary and specialty palliative care in patients with chronic lung disease falls short of the minimum standard of competent health care, and represents a disparity in health care and a social injustice. We invoke the ethical principles of justice and sufficiency to highlight the importance of this issue. We identify five barriers to implementing palliative care in patients with chronic lung disease: uncertainty in prognosis; lack of provider skill to engage in discussions about palliative care; fear of using opioids among patients with chronic lung disease; fear of diminishing hope; and perceived and implicit bias against patients with smoking-related lung diseases. We propose mechanisms for improving implementation of palliative care for patients with chronic lung disease with the goal of enhancing justice in health care. PMID:26730490

  5. Population change: friend or foe of the chronic care system?

    PubMed

    Wolf, D A

    2001-01-01

    The care needs of the "frail" elderly represent a large part of the chronic care system and are met through a variety of means, including the services of family members. Consequently, projected growth in the elderly population, combined with increasing demands on their shrinking families, seems to imply both demand- and supply-side pressures on the chronic care system. Yet recent downward trends in old-age disability suggest to some that care needs might not grow. I review evidence relevant to these demand- and supply-side factors, with particular attention to the distinction between trends and compositional change, the factors' respective contributions to declining disability, and their prospects for continuation in the future. I conclude that population change is more likely to be foe than friend of the chronic care system for several decades.

  6. Implementing chronic care for COPD: planned visits, care coordination, and patient empowerment for improved outcomes.

    PubMed

    Fromer, Len

    2011-01-01

    Current primary care patterns for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) focus on reactive care for acute exacerbations, often neglecting ongoing COPD management to the detriment of patient experience and outcomes. Proactive diagnosis and ongoing multifactorial COPD management, comprising smoking cessation, influenza and pneumonia vaccinations, pulmonary rehabilitation, and symptomatic and maintenance pharmacotherapy according to severity, can significantly improve a patient's health-related quality of life, reduce exacerbations and their consequences, and alleviate the functional, utilization, and financial burden of COPD. Redesign of primary care according to principles of the chronic care model, which is implemented in the patient-centered medical home, can shift COPD management from acute rescue to proactive maintenance. The chronic care model and patient-centered medical home combine delivery system redesign, clinical information systems, decision support, and self-management support within a practice, linked with health care organization and community resources beyond the practice. COPD care programs implementing two or more chronic care model components effectively reduce emergency room and inpatient utilization. This review guides primary care practices in improving COPD care workflows, highlighting the contributions of multidisciplinary collaborative team care, care coordination, and patient engagement. Each primary care practice can devise a COPD care workflow addressing risk awareness, spirometric diagnosis, guideline-based treatment and rehabilitation, and self-management support, to improve patient outcomes in COPD.

  7. The effect of health care reform on academic medicine in Canada. Editorial Committee of the Canadian Institute for Academic Medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Hollenberg, C H

    1996-01-01

    Although Canadian health care reform has constrained costs and improved efficiency, it has had a profound and mixed effect on Canadian academic medicine. Teaching hospitals have been reduced in number and size, and in patient programs have shifted to ambulatory and community settings. Specialized care programs are now multi-institutional and multidisciplinary. Furthermore, the influence of regional planning bodies has grown markedly. Although these changes have likely improved clinical service, their impact on the quality of clinical education is uncertain. Within the academic clinical department, recruitment of young faculty has been greatly complicated by constraints on licensing, billing numbers, fee-for-service income and research funding. The departmental practice plan based on university funds and fee-for-service income is being replaced by less favourable funding arrangements. However, emphasis on multidisciplinary programs has rendered these departments more flexible in structure. The future of Canadian academic medicine depends on an effective alliance with government. Academia and government must agree, particularly on human-resource requirements, research objectives and the delivery of clinical and academic programs in regional and community settings. The establishment of focal points for academic health sciences planning within academic health sciences centres and within governments would assist in these developments. Finally, government and the academic health sciences sector must work together to remove the current impediments to the recruitment of highly qualified young faculty. PMID:8624998

  8. The Chronic Responsibility: A Critical Discourse Analysis of Danish Chronic Care Policies.

    PubMed

    Ravn, Iben M; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Beedholm, Kirsten

    2016-03-01

    This article reports on the results of a Fairclough-inspired critical discourse analysis aiming to clarify how chronically ill patients are presented in contemporary Danish chronic care policies. Drawing on Fairclough's three-dimensional framework for analyzing discourse, and using Dean's concepts of governmentality as an interpretative lens, we analyzed and explained six policies published by the Danish Health and Medicines Authority between 2005 and 2013. The analysis revealed that discourses within the policy vision of chronic care consider chronically ill patients' active role, lifestyle, and health behavior to be the main factors influencing susceptibility to chronic diseases. We argue that this discursive construction naturalizes a division between people who can actively manage responsible self-care and those who cannot. Such discourses may serve the interests of those patients who are already activated, while others remain subjugated to certain roles. For example, they may be labeled as "vulnerable."

  9. Chronic Pain: The Impact on Academic, Social, and Emotional Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkins, Jason M.; Gfroerer, Susan D.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic pain is persistent and recurrent pain that tends to fluctuate in severity, quality, regularity, and predictability. It can occur in a single or multiple body regions or organ systems. Some of the most frequently reported types of chronic pain include headaches, recurrent abdominal pain (RAP), and musculoskeletal pain. In contrast to acute…

  10. Who are we and where are we going? Primary care academics in non-clinical posts.

    PubMed

    Macfarlane, Anne; O'Donnell, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    The development of a high-quality primary healthcare system requires multidisciplinary perspectives and collaborations between clinicians and non-clinicians. Academic primary care departments across the United Kingdom and Ireland employ academics from a range of disciplines. However, questions remain about the parity of opportunity for career progression with a consistent trend to focus more on clinicians than non-clinicians. In this paper, we analyse the employment and careers of non-clinical primary care academics working in Ireland and Scotland. We draw on survey data from the island of Ireland and conference workshop discussions among Irish- and Scottish-based academics. We highlight problems with career progression and identify some strategic actions. We argue for a renewed attempt to ensure that all academics who are contributing to the discipline of primary care are appropriately acknowledged and supported to continue their endeavours to develop high-quality primary care health systems.

  11. Protective Effect of Self-Compassion to Emotional Response among Students with Chronic Academic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yonghong; Luo, Xi; Che, Xianwei; Duan, Wenjie

    2016-01-01

    The literature has shown that self-compassion is a protective factor of an individual’s emotional response to chronic stress. However, this stress-buffering effect has not been completely analyzed in individuals who report significantly high academic stress. The present study explored the role of self-compassion in a group of undergraduate students who experience chronic academic stress. A total of 208 undergraduate students who were preparing for the Postgraduate Entrance Examination (PEE) were recruited and completed the Self-Compassion Scale, Adolescent Self-Rating Life Event Check List, and Positive and Negative Affect Schedule. Differences analysis confirmed that the participants reported significantly higher academic stress than their peers who were not preparing for PEE. Self-compassion positively related to positive affect but negatively related to negative affect and learning stress. Further analysis showed that self-compassion negatively mediated the relationship between chronic academic stress and negative affect. Findings imply that self-compassion-centered interventions can be developed in the educational context to assist students cope with chronic academic stress. PMID:27920736

  12. Protective Effect of Self-Compassion to Emotional Response among Students with Chronic Academic Stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yonghong; Luo, Xi; Che, Xianwei; Duan, Wenjie

    2016-01-01

    The literature has shown that self-compassion is a protective factor of an individual's emotional response to chronic stress. However, this stress-buffering effect has not been completely analyzed in individuals who report significantly high academic stress. The present study explored the role of self-compassion in a group of undergraduate students who experience chronic academic stress. A total of 208 undergraduate students who were preparing for the Postgraduate Entrance Examination (PEE) were recruited and completed the Self-Compassion Scale, Adolescent Self-Rating Life Event Check List, and Positive and Negative Affect Schedule. Differences analysis confirmed that the participants reported significantly higher academic stress than their peers who were not preparing for PEE. Self-compassion positively related to positive affect but negatively related to negative affect and learning stress. Further analysis showed that self-compassion negatively mediated the relationship between chronic academic stress and negative affect. Findings imply that self-compassion-centered interventions can be developed in the educational context to assist students cope with chronic academic stress.

  13. Health care 2020: reengineering health care delivery to combat chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Milani, Richard V; Lavie, Carl J

    2015-04-01

    Chronic disease has become the great epidemic of our times, responsible for 75% of total health care costs and the majority of deaths in the US. Our current delivery model is poorly constructed to manage chronic disease, as evidenced by low adherence to quality indicators and poor control of treatable conditions. New technologies have emerged that can engage patients and offer additional modalities in the treatment of chronic disease. Modifying our delivery model to include team-based care in concert with patient-centered technologies offers great promise in managing the chronic disease epidemic.

  14. A course on the transition to adult care of patients with childhood-onset chronic illnesses.

    PubMed

    Hagood, James S; Lenker, Claire V; Thrasher, Staci

    2005-04-01

    Children with special health care needs born today have a 90% chance of surviving into adulthood, making their transition to adult systems of care an issue that will affect almost all physicians. However, many adult generalists and specialists are not familiar with the management of chronic diseases that begin in childhood. While the public health system has made transition to appropriate adult care a priority, and many specialty organizations have endorsed this concept, there are no published studies addressing how the concept of transition can be taught to medical students or residents. The authors describe a one-week course for medical students, begun in 2001 at their institution, that addresses the transition for youth with special health care needs, emphasizing patient and family-centered care, cultural competence, and decision making in end-of-life issues. Cystic fibrosis, a common genetic disease with increasing life expectancy, is used as the model for the course. Involvement of interdisciplinary faculty, interviews with youth with special health care needs and family caregivers, readings from academic and nonacademic literature, and group discussions are presented as teaching methods. Key insights based on experience with the course are the need to include the voices of patients and families, the use of faculty from various professions and specialties to model interdisciplinary care, and the insight that problems specific to transition offer into contemporary health care financing. Future studies should measure the impact of such courses on students' knowledge of transition issues, and determine essential information required for physicians in practice.

  15. [Skillful care for chronic vascular wounds].

    PubMed

    Goullet de Rugy, C; Lazareth, I; You, C; Stansal, A; Priollet, P

    2016-09-01

    In vascular medicine, wound care requires pluridisciplinary expertise and nursing skill. Care must be perfectly adapted to each individual patient, the specificities of each particular wound, and the underlying vascular disease. The goal is to achieve wound healing. Inappropriate care can retard healing or even aggravate the wound. The skin should be cleaned with water a non-allergic detergent and should concern the entire limb in addition to the wound itself. Fibrin or necrosis detersion is an important step that can be painful. Different tools are available. The skin around the wound should be hydrated and protected, focusing on fragile areas, such as the tibial crest and heals, in order to prevent the development of new wounds. Other more complex interventions include tenosynovectomy, bone gouging and reduction of the necrotic toe that when properly performed can prevent a new passage in the operating room. If the ischemia becomes critical, the foot should be held warm with a carded cotton, taking care to separate the toes with dry dressings in order to preserve the healthy tissue and avoid induced wounds. Finally, compression bands are indispensable in cases with edema or venous hyperpressure. A skillful banding technique is essential, especially for legs with complex morphology.

  16. School nurse case management for children with chronic illness: health, academic, and quality of life outcomes.

    PubMed

    Keehner Engelke, Martha; Guttu, Martha; Warren, Michelle B; Swanson, Melvin

    2008-08-01

    More children with chronic illnesses are attending school, and some of them struggle academically because of issues related to their health. School-based case management has been suggested as one strategy to improve the academic success of these children. This study tracked the academic, health, and quality of life outcomes for 114 children with asthma, diabetes, severe allergies, seizures, or sickle-cell anemia in 5 different school districts who were provided case management by school nurses. The children ranged in age from 5 to 19 years. At the end of the school year, children experienced an improvement in quality of life and gained skills and knowledge to manage their illness more effectively. Classroom participation, grades, and participation in extracurricular activities also increased for many children. The study provides evidence of the positive impact school nurses have on children with chronic illness and suggests ways they can measure the outcomes of their interventions.

  17. Primary care access to computed tomography for chronic headache

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Ralph; Cook, Alan; Main, Gavin; Taylor, Tom; Caruana, Elizabeth Galizia; Swingler, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Background The diagnostic yield of neuroimaging in chronic headache is low, but can reduce the use of health services. Aim To determine whether primary care access to brain computed tomography (CT) referral for chronic headache reduces referral to secondary care. Design of study Prospective observational analysis of GP referrals to an open access CT brain scanning service. Setting Primary care, and outpatient radiology and neurology departments. Method GPs in Tayside and North East Fife, Scotland were given access to brain CT for patients with chronic headache. All referrals were analysed prospectively over 1 year, and questionnaires were sent to referrers to establish whether imaging had resulted in or stopped a referral to secondary care. The Tayside outpatient clinic database identified scanned patients referred to the neurology clinic for headache from the start of the study period to at least 1 year after their scan. Results There were 232 referrals (55.1/100 000/year, 95% confidence interval = 50.4 to 59.9) from GPs in 59 (82%) of 72 primary care practices. CT was performed on 215 patients. Significant abnormalities were noted in 3 (1.4%) patients; there were 22 (10.2%) non-significant findings, and 190 (88.4%) normal scans. Questionnaires of the referring GPs reported that 167 (88%) scans stopped a referral to secondary care. GPs referred 30 (14%) scanned patients to a neurologist because of headache. It is estimated that imaging reduced referrals to secondary care by 86% in the follow-up period. Conclusion An open access brain CT service for patients with chronic headache was used by most GP practices in Tayside, and reduced the number of referrals to secondary care. PMID:20529496

  18. Caring or Collusion? Academic Dishonesty in a School of Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wideman, Maureen

    2011-01-01

    Academic dishonesty is an issue that post-secondary institutions are having difficulty resolving. More than 100 studies have been conducted over the past 30 years, yet these studies have not provided data necessary to effectively address this problem. Indeed, research indicates that academic dishonesty is increasing. The purpose of this study was…

  19. The Role of Technology in Chronic Disease Care.

    PubMed

    Milani, Richard V; Bober, Robert M; Lavie, Carl J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic disease represents the epidemic of our time, present in half the adult population and responsible for 86% of United States (US) healthcare costs and 70% of deaths. The major chronic diseases are primarily due to health risk behaviors that are widely communicable across populations. As a nation, the US has performed poorly in managing chronic disease, in large part because of a failed delivery model of care. New opportunities exist as a result of recent advances in home-based wireless devices, apps and wearables, enabling health delivery systems to monitor disease metrics in near real time. These technologies provide a framework for patient engagement and a new model of care delivery utilizing integrated practice units, both of which are needed to navigate the healthcare needs of the 21st century.

  20. Luxury primary care, academic medical centers, and the erosion of science and professional ethics.

    PubMed

    Donohoe, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Medical schools and teaching hospitals have been hit particularly hard by the financial crisis affecting health care in the United States. To compete financially, many academic medical centers have recruited wealthy foreign patients and established luxury primary care clinics. At these clinics, patients are offered tests supported by little evidence of their clinical and/or cost effectiveness, which erodes the scientific underpinnings of medical practice. Given widespread disparities in health, wealth, and access to care, as well as growing cynicism and dissatisfaction with medicine among trainees, the promotion by these institutions of an overt, two-tiered system of care, which exacerbates inequities and injustice, erodes professional ethics. Academic medical centers should divert their intellectual and financial resources away from luxury primary care and toward more equitable and just programs designed to promote individual, community, and global health. The public and its legislators should, in turn, provide adequate funds to enable this. Ways for academic medicine to facilitate this largesse are discussed.

  1. Chronic Care Management evolves towards Integrated Care in Counties Manukau, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Rea, Harry; Kenealy, Tim; Wellingham, John; Moffitt, Allan; Sinclair, Gary; McAuley, Sue; Goodman, Meg; Arcus, Kim

    2007-04-13

    Despite anecdotes of many chronic care management and integrated care projects around New Zealand, there is no formal process to collect and share relevant learning within (but especially between) District Health Boards (DHBs). We wish to share our experiences and hope to stimulate a productive exchange of ongoing learning. We define chronic care management and integrated care, then summarise current theory and evidence. We describe national policy development (relevant to integrated care, since 2000) including the New Zealand Health Strategy, the NZ Primary Care Strategy, the development of Primary Health Organisations (PHOs), capitation payments, Care Plus, and Services to Improve Access funding. We then describe chronic care management in Counties Manukau, which evolved both prior to and during the international refinement of theory and evidence and the national policy development and implementation. We reflect on local progress to date and opportunities for (and barriers to) future improvements, aided by comparative reflections on the United Kingdom (UK). Our most important messages are addressed as follows: To policymakers and funders--a fragile culture change towards teamwork in the health system is taking place in New Zealand; this change needs to be specifically and actively supported. To PHOs--general practices need help to align their internal (within-practice) financial signals with the new world of capitation and integrated care. To primary and secondary care doctors, nurses, and other carers - systematic chronic care management and integrated care can improve patient quality of life; and if healthcare structures and systems are properly managed to support integration, then healthcare provider professional and personal satisfaction will improve.

  2. Quality of life for chronic psychiatric illnesses and home care

    PubMed Central

    Molu, Nesibe Gunay; Ozkan, Birgul; Icel, Sema

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, mental illnesses are gradually increasing and so does chronic psychiatric patients. As a result of this increase, chronic psychiatric disorders lead the burden of patients and their families. To reduce the burden of mental illnesses on individuals and their families, treatment and care are given including psychosocial, physiological and medical support and social services. To begin with, home care enables both the patient and his or her family to stay at their own houses and not to be bothered with residents or long-term, institutional-based nursing homes. In addition, the home care providers deliver services to the patient’s at their own house. The other advantages of taking care at home is that it eases financial issues in terms of reducing the cost, reduces the patient’s symptoms and improve the individual’s quality of life (QoL). In addition to these, home care also minimizes the burden on outpatient services and provides help for the patient and the family in order to solve their problems and give support. Home care services help patients to get their freedom back and enhance the quality of their lives. Thus, it is necessary to procure and implement these services and supply both the patient and his or her family a high-quality life. Sources of data/ study selection: Literature review was done by using the keywords “home care, patient with chronic mental illness, quality of life, home care nursing” from the sources including PsychINFO, PsychARTICLES, MEDLINE, PubMED, EBSCOHOST and The COCHRANE LIBRARY in the time period of 2005- 2015. PMID:27182272

  3. Prevalence of chronic wounds and structural quality indicators of chronic wound care in Dutch nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Rondas, Armand A L M; Schols, Jos M G A; Stobberingh, Ellen E; Halfens, Ruud J G

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the prevalence of (infected) chronic wounds in Dutch nursing homes and to explore which signs and symptoms are used to diagnose infected chronic wounds. Moreover, it was to determine which structural quality indicators related to chronic wound care at ward and institutional levels were fulfilled. In April 2012, as part of the annual National Prevalence Measurement of Care Problems of Maastricht University [Landelijke Prevalentiemeting Zorgproblemen (LPZ)], a multi-center cross-sectional point-prevalence measurement was carried out together with an assessment of relevant care quality indicators. The prevalence was 4·2%; 16 of 72 (22%) chronic wounds were considered to be infected. Increase of exudate (81·3%; n = 13), erythema (68·8%; n = 11), pain (56·3%; n = 9) and wound recalcitrance (56·3%; n = 9) were considered to be diagnostic signs and symptoms of a chronic wound infection. Although at institutional level most quality indicators were fulfilled, at ward level this was not the case. Despite the relatively low number of residents, we consider our population as representative for the nursing home population. It may be an advantage to appoint specific ward nurses and to provide them specifically with knowledge and skills concerning chronic wounds.

  4. [Complex chronic care situations and socio-health coordination].

    PubMed

    Morilla Herrera, Juan Carlos; Morales Asencio, José Miguel; Kaknani, Shakira; García Mayor, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Patient-centered healthcare is currently one of the most pursued goals in health services. It is necessary to ensure a sufficient level of cooperative and coordinated work between different providers and settings, including family and social and community resources. Clinical integration occurs when the care provided by health professionals and providers is integrated into a single coherent process through different professions using shared guidelines and protocols. Such coordination can be developed at three levels: macro, which involves the integration of one or more of the three basic elements that support health care (the health plan, primary care and specialty care), with the aim of reducing fragmentation of care; meso, where health and social services are coordinated to provide comprehensive care to elderly and chronic patients; and micro, aimed to improve coordination in individual patients and caregivers. The implementation of new roles, such as Advanced Practice Nursing, along with improvements in family physicians' problem-solving capacity in certain processes, or modifying the place of provision of certain services are key to ensure services adapted to the requirements of chronic patients.

  5. Eleven Years of Primary Health Care Delivery in an Academic Nursing Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildebrandt, Eugenie; Baisch, Mary Jo; Lundeen, Sally P.; Bell-Calvin, Jean; Kelber, Sheryl

    2003-01-01

    Client visits to an academic community nursing center (n=25,495) were coded and analyzed. Results show expansion of nursing practice and services, strong case management, and management of illness care. The usefulness of computerized clinical documentation system and of the Lundeen conceptional model of community nursing care was demonstrated.…

  6. Approach to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Todd, David C.; McIvor, R. Andrew; Pugsley, Stewart O.; Cox, Gerard

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To review the diagnosis, assessment of severity, and management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and to address the systemic manifestations associated with COPD. SOURCES OF INFORMATION PubMed was searched from January 2000 to December 2007 using the key words COPD, practice guidelines, randomized controlled trials, therapy, and health outcomes. The Canadian Thoracic Society guideline on management of COPD was carefully reviewed. The authors, who have extensive experience in care of patients with COPD, provided expert opinion. MAIN MESSAGE Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a common systemic disease caused primarily by smoking. Spirometry is essential for diagnosis of COPD and should be integrated into primary care practice. Pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic therapy improves symptoms, capacity for exercise, and quality of life. Smoking cessation is the only intervention shown to slow disease progression. The systemic manifestations and comorbidity associated with COPD need to be identified and addressed to optimize health and quality of life. CONCLUSION An evidence-based approach to managing COPD along with a primary care chronic disease management model could improve quality of life for patients with COPD. PMID:18474704

  7. Academic physicians' assessment of the effects of computers on health care.

    PubMed Central

    Detmer, W. M.; Friedman, C. P.

    1994-01-01

    We assessed the attitudes of academic physicians towards computers in health care at two academic medical centers that are in the early stages of clinical information-system deployment. We distributed a 4-page questionnaire to 470 subjects, and a total of 272 physicians (58%) responded. Our results show that respondents use computers frequently, primarily to perform academic-oriented tasks as opposed to clinical tasks. Overall, respondents viewed computers as being slightly beneficial to health care. They perceive self-education and access to up-to-date information as the most beneficial aspects of computers and are most concerned about privacy issues and the effect of computers on the doctor-patient relationship. Physicians with prior computer training and greater knowledge of informatics concepts had more favorable attitudes towards computers in health care. We suggest that negative attitudes towards computers can be addressed by careful system design as well as targeted educational activities. PMID:7949990

  8. Neighborhood crime and self-care: risks for aggression and lower academic performance.

    PubMed

    Lord, Heather; Mahoney, Joseph L

    2007-11-01

    This longitudinal study evaluated associations among official rates of neighborhood crime, academic performance, and aggression in a sample of 581 children in 1st-3rd grade (6.3-10.6 years old). It was hypothesized that the influence of crime depends on children's unsupervised exposure to the neighborhood context through self-care. Average weekly hours in self-care were trichotomized into low (0-3), moderate (4-9), and high (10-15). Moderate and high amounts of self-care were linked to increased aggression and decreased academic performance for children from high-crime areas (11,230 crimes per 100,000 persons) but not average-crime areas, when the authors controlled for neighborhood, family, and child covariates. In high-crime areas, academic outcomes were more favorable when self-care occurred in combination with after-school program participation.

  9. The Prevention of Global Chronic Disease: Academic Public Health's New Frontier

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Susan U.; Leeder, Stephen R.

    2011-01-01

    A confluence of stimuli is propelling academic public health to embrace the prevention of chronic disease in developing countries as its new frontier. These stimuli are a growing recognition of the epidemic, academia's call to reestablish public health as a mover of societal tectonics rather than a handmaiden to medicine's focus on the individual, and the turmoil in the US health system that makes change permissible. To enable graduating professionals to participate in the assault on chronic diseases, schools of public health must allocate budgets and other resources to this effort. The barriers to chronic disease prevention and risk factor modulation are cultural and political; confronting them will require public health to work with a wide variety of disciplines. Chronic disease will likely become the dominant global public health issue soon. In addressing this issue, academia needs to lead, not follow. PMID:21680924

  10. Childhood asthma: considerations for primary care practice and chronic disease management in the village of care.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Michael P

    2012-06-01

    Childhood asthma is at historically high levels, with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite more than two decades of improved understanding of childhood asthma care and the evolution of beneficial medications, widespread control remains poor, leading to suboptimal patient outcomes and quality of life. This lack of control results in excessive emergency department use, hospitalizations, and inappropriate and/or unnecessary costs to the health care system. Advanced practice models that incorporate community-based approaches and services for childhood asthma are needed. Innovative, community-included methods of care to address the burden of childhood asthma may provide examples for care of other chronic diseases.

  11. Academic Detailing in Diabetes: Using Outreach Education to Improve the Quality of Care.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Michael A

    2016-10-01

    Most diabetes care is provided in primary care settings, but typical primary care clinicians struggle to keep up with the latest evidence on diabetes screening, pharmacotherapy, and monitoring. Accordingly, many patients with diabetes are not receiving optimal guideline-based therapy. Relying on front-line clinicians on their own to assess the huge volume of new literature and incorporate it into their practice is unrealistic, and conventional continuing medical education has not proven adequate to address gaps in care. Academic detailing, direct educational outreach to clinicians that uses social marketing techniques to provide specific evidence-based recommendations, has been proven in clinical trials to improve the quality of care for a range of conditions. By directly engaging with clinicians to assess their needs, identify areas for change in practice, and provide them with specific tools to implement these changes, academic detailing can serve as a tool to improve care processes and outcomes for patients with diabetes.

  12. Adapting chronic care models for diabetes care delivery in low-and-middle-income countries: A review

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Grace Marie V; Kegels, Guy

    2015-01-01

    A contextual review of models for chronic care was done to develop a context-adapted chronic care model-based service delivery model for chronic conditions including diabetes. The Philippines was used as the setting of a low-to-middle-income country. A context-based narrative review of existing models for chronic care was conducted. A situational analysis was done at the grassroots level, involving the leaders and members of the community, the patients, the local health system and the healthcare providers. A second analysis making use of certain organizational theories was done to explore on improving feasibility and acceptability of organizing care for chronic conditions. The analyses indicated that care for chronic conditions may be introduced, considering the needs of people with diabetes in particular and the community in general as recipients of care, and the issues and factors that may affect the healthcare workers and the health system as providers of this care. The context-adapted chronic care model-based service delivery model was constructed accordingly. Key features are: incorporation of chronic care in the health system’s services; assimilation of chronic care delivery with the other responsibilities of the healthcare workers but with redistribution of certain tasks; and ensuring that the recipients of care experience the whole spectrum of basic chronic care that includes education and promotion in the general population, risk identification, screening, counseling including self-care development, and clinical management of the chronic condition and any co-morbidities, regardless of level of control of the condition. This way, low-to-middle income countries can introduce and improve care for chronic conditions without entailing much additional demand on their limited resources. PMID:25987954

  13. Chronic pain management as a barrier to pediatric palliative care.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lindsay A; Meinert, Elizabeth; Baker, Kimberly; Knapp, Caprice

    2013-12-01

    Pain is common as a presenting complaint to outpatient and emergency departments for children, yet pain management represents one of the children's largest unmet needs. A child may present with acute pain for an intermittent issue or may have acute or chronic pain in the setting of chronic illness. The mainstay of treatment for pain uses a stepwise approach for pain management, such as set up by the World Health Organization. For children with life-limiting illnesses, the Institute of Medicine guidelines recommends referral upon diagnosis for palliative care, meaning that the child receives comprehensive services that include pain control in coordination with curative therapies; yet barriers remain. From the provider perspective, pain can be better addressed through a careful assessment of one's own knowledge, skills, and attitudes. The key components of pain management in children are multimodal, regardless of the cause of the pain.

  14. Supporting Academic Middle Managers in Higher Education: Do We Care?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floyd, Alan

    2016-01-01

    In the current higher education environment, the need to develop and support good leaders and managers could hardly be more pressing. Yet, research on how academic middle managers are supported in their roles is surprisingly sparse. The purpose of this paper is to address this perceived gap in the literature by reporting on the findings from two…

  15. Kansas Primary Care Weighs In: A Pilot Randomized Trial of a Chronic Care Model Program for Obesity in 3 Rural Kansas Primary Care Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ely, Andrea C.; Banitt, Angela; Befort, Christie; Hou, Qing; Rhode, Paula C.; Grund, Chrysanne; Greiner, Allen; Jeffries, Shawn; Ellerbeck, Edward

    2008-01-01

    Context: Obesity is a chronic disease of epidemic proportions in the United States. Primary care providers are critical to timely diagnosis and treatment of obesity, and need better tools to deliver effective obesity care. Purpose: To conduct a pilot randomized trial of a chronic care model (CCM) program for obesity care in rural Kansas primary…

  16. Home-based chronic care. An expanded integrative model for home health professionals.

    PubMed

    Suter, Paula; Hennessey, Beth; Harrison, Gregory; Fagan, Martha; Norman, Barbara; Suter, W Newton

    2008-04-01

    The Chronic Care Model (CCM) developed by is an influential and accepted guide for the care of patients with chronic disease. Wagner acknowledges a current healthcare focus on acute care needs that often circumvents chronic care coordination. He identifies the need for a "division of labor" to assist the primary care physician with this neglected function. This article posits that the role of chronic care coordination assistance and disease management fits within the purview of home healthcare and should be central to home health chronic care delivery. An expanded Home-Based Chronic Care Model (HBCCM) is described that builds on Wagner's model and integrates salient theories from fields beyond medicine. The expanded model maximizes the potential for disease self-management success and is intended to provide a foundation for home health's integral role in chronic disease management.

  17. Experience in Strategic Networking to Promote Palliative Care in a Clinical Academic Setting in India

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Shoba; Tarey, SD; Barathi, B; Mary, Thiophin Regina; Mathew, Lovely; Daniel, Sudha Pauline

    2016-01-01

    Background: Palliative care in low and middle-income countries is a new discipline, responding to a greater patient need, than in high-income countries. By its very nature, palliative as a specialty has to network with other specialties to provide quality care to patients. For any medical discipline to grow as a specialty, it should be well established in the teaching medical institutions of that country. Data show that palliative care is more likely to establish and grow in an academic health care institution. It is a necessity that multiple networking strategies are adopted to reach this goal. Objectives: (1) To describe a strategic approach to palliative care service development and integration into clinical academic setting. (2) To present the change in metrics to evaluate progress. Design and Setting: This is a descriptive study wherein, the different strategies that are adopted by the Department of Palliative Medicine for networking in an academic health care institution and outside the institution are scrutinized. Measurement: The impact of this networking was assessed, one, at the level of academics and the other, at the level of service. The number of people who attended various training programs conducted by the department and the number of patients who availed palliative care service over the years were assessed. Results: Ten different strategies were identified that helped with networking of palliative care in the institution. During this time, the referrals to the department increased both for malignant diseases (52–395) and nonmalignant diseases (5–353) from 2000 to 2013. The academic sessions conducted by the department for undergraduates also saw an increase in the number of hours from 6 to 12, apart from the increase in a number of courses conducted by the department for doctors and nurses. Conclusion: Networking is an essential strategy for the establishment of a relatively new medical discipline like palliative care in a developing and

  18. A Collaborative Approach to a Chronic Care Problem.

    PubMed

    Verma, Jennifer Y; Denis, Jean-Louis; Samis, Stephen; Champagne, François; O'Neil, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    Quality improvement collaboratives (QICs) are popular vehicles for supporting healthcare improvement; however, the effectiveness of these models and the factors associated with their success are not fully understood. This paper presents a QIC in the Canadian context, where provincial healthcare systems have historically faced difficulty in transcending their structural and political limitations as well as moving from reactive models of care (prioritizing illness treatment in a hospital-reliant system) to more proactive ones (prioritizing population health in a primary care-based system). In March 2012, in a move that has been described as "unprecedented," 17 health regions across four provinces in Atlantic Canada, together with the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI), developed a collaborative to improve chronic disease prevention and management. This paper introduces the Atlantic Healthcare Collaboration for Innovation and Improvement in Chronic Disease (AHC), reflecting on the experience of developing and implementing the model, which involved teams of front-line clinicians and managers working with CFHI faculty, coaches and staff to assess, design, implement, evaluate and share healthcare improvements for people living with chronic diseases. The paper shares key results and lessons learned from the AHC QIC experience, thus far, for improving chronic disease prevention and management in healthcare in Canada.

  19. Do telemonitoring projects of heart failure fit the Chronic Care Model?

    PubMed Central

    Willemse, Evi; Adriaenssens, Jef; Dilles, Tinne; Remmen, Roy

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the characteristics of extramural and transmural telemonitoring projects on chronic heart failure in Belgium. It describes to what extent these telemonitoring projects coincide with the Chronic Care Model of Wagner. Background The Chronic Care Model describes essential components for high-quality health care. Telemonitoring can be used to optimise home care for chronic heart failure. It provides a potential prospective to change the current care organisation. Methods This qualitative study describes seven non-invasive home-care telemonitoring projects in patients with heart failure in Belgium. A qualitative design, including interviews and literature review, was used to describe the correspondence of these home-care telemonitoring projects with the dimensions of the Chronic Care Model. Results The projects were situated in primary and secondary health care. Their primary goal was to reduce the number of readmissions for chronic heart failure. None of these projects succeeded in a final implementation of telemonitoring in home care after the pilot phase. Not all the projects were initiated to accomplish all of the dimensions of the Chronic Care Model. A central role for the patient was sparse. Conclusion Limited financial resources hampered continuation after the pilot phase. Cooperation and coordination in telemonitoring appears to be major barriers but are, within primary care as well as between the lines of care, important links in follow-up. This discrepancy can be prohibitive for deployment of good chronic care. Chronic Care Model is recommended as basis for future. PMID:25114664

  20. Academic retainer medicine: an innovative business model for cross-subsidizing primary care.

    PubMed

    Lucier, David J; Frisch, Nicholas B; Cohen, Brian J; Wagner, Michael; Salem, Deeb; Fairchild, David G

    2010-06-01

    Retainer-medicine primary care practices, commonly referred to as "luxury" or "concierge" practices, provide enhanced services to patients beyond those available in traditional practices for a yearly retainer fee. Adoption of retainer practices has been largely absent in academic health centers (AHCs). Reasons for this trend stem primarily from ethical concerns, such as the potential for patient abandonment when physicians downsize from larger, traditional practices to smaller, retainer-medicine practices.In 2004, the Department of Medicine at Tufts Medical Center developed an academic retainer-medicine primary care practice within the Division of General Medicine that not only generates financial support for the division but also incorporates a clinical and business model that is aligned with the mission and ethics of an academic institution.In contrast to private retainer-medicine practices, this unique business model addresses several of the ethical issues associated with traditional retainer practices-it does not restrict net access to care and it neutralizes concerns about patient abandonment. Addressing the growing primary care shortage, the model also presents the opportunity for a retainer practice to cross-subsidize the expansion of general medicine in an academic medical setting. The authors elucidate the benefits, as well as the inherent challenges, of embedding an academic retainer-medicine practice within an AHC.

  1. Palliative care in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Blackler, Laura; Mooney, Caroline; Jones, Christine

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a slow, debilitating, progressive disease and, as symptoms worsen, quality of life is affected and issues surrounding end of life arise. There are known difficulties about the healthcare professional's ability to manage this area and this is reflected in the literature. It is recognized that palliative care services for people with non-malignant diseases are not developed but this needs to be addressed. Within a London teaching hospital the COPD team has been working towards improving the standard of service offered to patients with advanced COPD using various strategies. The team's approach to this area of care focuses on quality of life by recognizing when an individual may need further support, and patients have reported that they feel their needs are being addressed. This article aims to review current evidence on the management of palliative care for patients with COPD and identify what steps have been taken by a London teaching hospital to address this issue.

  2. Chronic kidney disease: identification and management in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Simon DS; Blakeman, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important and common noncommunicable condition globally. In national and international guidelines, CKD is defined and staged according to measures of kidney function that allow for a degree of risk stratification using commonly available markers. It is often asymptomatic in its early stages, and early detection is important to reduce future risk. The risk of cardiovascular outcomes is greater than the risk of progression to end-stage kidney disease for most people with CKD. CKD also predisposes to acute kidney injury – a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although only a small proportion of people with CKD progress to end-stage kidney disease, renal replacement therapy (dialysis or transplantation) represents major costs for health care systems and burden for patients. Efforts in primary care to reduce the risks of cardiovascular disease, acute kidney injury, and progression are therefore required. Monitoring renal function is an important task, and primary care clinicians are well placed to oversee this aspect of care along with the management of modifiable risk factors, particularly blood pressure and proteinuria. Good primary care judgment is also essential in making decisions about referral for specialist nephrology opinion. As CKD commonly occurs alongside other conditions, consideration of comorbidities and patient wishes is important, and primary care clinicians have a key role in coordinating care while adopting a holistic, patient-centered approach and providing continuity. This review aims to summarize the vital role that primary care plays in predialysis CKD care and to outline the main considerations in its identification, monitoring, and clinical management in this context. PMID:27822135

  3. Continuity and the Costs of Care for Chronic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hussey, Peter S.; Schneider, Eric C.; Rudin, Robert S.; Fox, D. Steven; Lai, Julie; Pollack, Craig Evan

    2014-01-01

    Importance Better continuity of care is expected to improve patient outcomes and reduce health care costs, but patterns of utilization, costs, and clinical complications associated with the current patterns of care continuity have not been quantified. Objective To measure the association between care continuity, costs, and rates of hospitalizations, emergency department visits, and complications for Medicare beneficiaries with chronic disease. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Insurance claims data for a 5% sample of Medicare beneficiaries. Participants Medicare beneficiaries experiencing a 12-month episode of care for congestive heart failure (CHF, n=53,488), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, n=76,520) or diabetes mellitus (DM, n=166,654) in 2008–2009. Main outcomes and measures Hospitalizations, emergency department visits, complications, costs of care associated with the Bice-Boxerman Continuity of Care (COC) Index, a measure of the outpatient continuity of care related to conditions of interest. Results The mean COC index for CHF was 0.55 (standard deviation [SD] 0.31), for COPD 0.60 (SD 0.34), and for DM 0.50 (SD 0.32). After multivariable adjustment, higher levels of continuity were associated with lower odds of inpatient hospitalization (odds ratios [OR] for a 0.1 increase in COC were 0.94 [95% CI, 0.93–0.95] for CHF, 0.95 [95% CI, 0.94–0.96] for COPD, and 0.95 [95% CI, 0.95–0.96] for DM), lower odds of emergency department visits (ORs were 0.92 [95% CI, 0.91,0.92] for CHF, 0.93 [95% CI, 0.92–0.93] for COPD, and 0.94 [95% CI, 0.93–0.94] for DM), and lower odds of complications (OR range, 0.92–0.96 across the three complication types and three conditions; all p<0.0001). For every 0.1 increase in the COC index, episode costs of care were 4.7% lower for CHF (95% CI, 4.4%–5.0%), 6.3% lower for COPD (95% CI, 6.0%–6.5%), and 5.1% lower for DM (95% CI, 5.0%–5.2%) in adjusted analyses. Conclusions and Relevance Modest

  4. Naturopathic Care for Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Szczurko, Orest; Cooley, Kieran; Busse, Jason W.; Seely, Dugald; Bernhardt, Bob; Guyatt, Gordon H.; Zhou, Qi; Mills, Edward J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective Chronic low back pain represents a substantial cost to employers through benefits coverage and days missed due to incapacity. We sought to explore the effectiveness of Naturopathic care on chronic low back pain. Methods This study was a randomized clinical trial. We randomized 75 postal employees with low back pain of longer than six weeks duration to receive Naturopathic care (n = 39) or standardized physiotherapy (n = 36) over a period of 12 weeks. The study was conducted in clinics on-site in postal outlets. Participants in the Naturopathic care group received dietary counseling, deep breathing relaxation techniques and acupuncture. The control intervention received education and instruction on physiotherapy exercises using an approved education booklet. We measured low back pain using the Oswestry disability questionnaire as the primary outcome measure, and quality of life using the SF-36 in addition to low back range of motion, weight loss, and Body Mass Index as secondary outcomes. Results Sixty-nine participants (92%) completed eight weeks or greater of the trial. Participants in the Naturopathic care group reported significantly lower back pain (−6.89, 95% CI. −9.23 to −3.54, p = <0.0001) as measured by the Oswestry questionnaire. Quality of life was also significantly improved in the group receiving Naturopathic care in all domains except for vitality. Differences for the aggregate physical component of the SF-36 was 8.47 (95% CI, 5.05 to 11.87, p = <0.0001) and for the aggregate mental component was 7.0 (95% CI, 2.25 to 11.75, p = 0.0045). All secondary outcomes were also significantly improved in the group receiving Naturopathic care: spinal flexion (p<0.0001), weight-loss (p = 0.0052) and Body Mass Index (−0.52, 95% CI, −0.96 to −0.08, p = 0.01). Conclusions Naturopathic care provided significantly greater improvement than physiotherapy advice for patients with chronic low back pain. Trial Registration

  5. Overcoming fragmentation in health care: chronic care in Austria, Germany and The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Nolte, Ellen; Knai, Cécile; Hofmarcher, Maria; Conklin, Annalijn; Erler, Antje; Elissen, Arianne; Flamm, Maria; Fullerton, Brigit; Sönnichsen, Andreas; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J M

    2012-01-01

    The growing recognition of care fragmentation is causing many countries to explore new approaches to healthcare delivery that can bridge the boundaries between professions, providers and institutions and so better support the rising number of people with chronic health problems. This paper examines the role of the regulatory, funding and organisational context for the development and implementation of approaches to chronic care, using examples from Austria, Germany and the Netherlands. We find that the three countries have implemented a range of policies and approaches to achieve better coordination within and across the primary and secondary care interface and so better meet the needs of patients with chronic conditions. This has involved changes to the regulatory framework to support more coordinated approaches to care (Austria, Germany), coupled with financial incentives (Austria, Germany) or changes in payment systems (the Netherlands). What is common to the three countries is the comparative 'novelty' of policies and approaches aimed at fostering coordinated care; however, the evidence of their impact remains unclear.

  6. Barriers to successful care for chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Oliver; Mekala, Durga P; Patel, Daniel V; Fornoni, Alessia; Metz, David; Roth, David

    2005-01-01

    Background The National Kidney Foundation has formulated clinical practice guidelines for patients with chronic kidney disease (K/DOQI). However, little is know about how many patients actually achieve these goals in a dedicated clinic for chronic kidney disease. Methods We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 198 patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of less than 30 ml/min/1.73 m2 and determined whether K/DOQI goals were met for calcium, phosphate, calcium-phosphate product, parathyroid hormone, albumin, bicarbonate, hemoglobin, lipids, and blood pressure. Results We found that only a small number of patients achieved K/DOQI targets. Recent referral to the nephrologist, failure to attend scheduled clinic appointments, African American ethnicity, diabetes, and advanced renal failure were significant predictors of low achievement of K/DOQI goals. Conclusion We conclude that raising awareness of chronic kidney disease and K/DOQI goals among primary care providers, early referral to a nephrologist, the exploration of socioeconomic barriers and cultural differences, and both patient and physician education are critical to improve CKD care in patients with Stage 4 and 5 CKD. PMID:16250919

  7. Self-care and yoga-academic-practice collaboration for occupational health.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Gina

    2013-12-01

    High rates of stress and burnout among nurses and other health care providers justify the exploration of innovative interventions designed to reduce stress and promote self-care among this population. A growing body of evidence supports the physical and psychosocial benefits of yoga and suggests the potential for yoga to support self-care and reduce stress among health care providers. This article describes the formation of an academic-practice collaboration to use yoga as a model for occupational health and wellness among nurses employed at a tax-supported urban health system. In addition, recommendations for program sustainability over time are discussed.

  8. A feasibility study of a combined nurse/pharmacist-led chronic pain clinic in primary care.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Michelle; Closs, S José; Marczewski, Kath; Barratt, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    Chronic pain is common and management hampered by lack of resources in primary and secondary care. Nurse- or pharmacist-led clinics have been shown to lead to improvements in care for patients with chronic pain. This study showed that a combined nurse/pharmacist-led clinic for managing chronic pain in primary care can lead to improvements in management of pain, reduction in use of secondary care resources and high rates of satisfaction.

  9. From "retailers" to health care providers: Transforming the role of community pharmacists in chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Mossialos, Elias; Courtin, Emilie; Naci, Huseyin; Benrimoj, Shalom; Bouvy, Marcel; Farris, Karen; Noyce, Peter; Sketris, Ingrid

    2015-05-01

    Community pharmacists are the third largest healthcare professional group in the world after physicians and nurses. Despite their considerable training, community pharmacists are the only health professionals who are not primarily rewarded for delivering health care and hence are under-utilized as public health professionals. An emerging consensus among academics, professional organizations, and policymakers is that community pharmacists, who work outside of hospital settings, should adopt an expanded role in order to contribute to the safe, effective, and efficient use of drugs-particularly when caring for people with multiple chronic conditions. Community pharmacists could help to improve health by reducing drug-related adverse events and promoting better medication adherence, which in turn may help in reducing unnecessary provider visits, hospitalizations, and readmissions while strengthening integrated primary care delivery across the health system. This paper reviews recent strategies to expand the role of community pharmacists in Australia, Canada, England, the Netherlands, Scotland, and the United States. The developments achieved or under way in these countries carry lessons for policymakers world-wide, where progress thus far in expanding the role of community pharmacists has been more limited. Future policies should focus on effectively integrating community pharmacists into primary care; developing a shared vision for different levels of pharmacist services; and devising new incentive mechanisms for improving quality and outcomes.

  10. Features of the Chronic Care Model associated with behavioral counseling and diabetes care in community primary care

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Pamela A. Ohman; Hudson, Shawna V.; Piasecki, Alicja; Hahn, Karissa; Cohen, Deborah; Orzano, A. John; Parchman, Michael L.; Crabtree, Benjamin F.

    2010-01-01

    Background The Chronic Care Model (CCM) was developed to improve chronic disease care, but may also inform other types of preventive care delivery. Using hierarchical analyses of service delivery to patients, we explore associations of CCM implementation with diabetes care and counseling for diet or weight loss and physical activity in community-based primary care offices. Methods Secondary analysis focused on baseline data from 25 practices (with an average of four physicians per practice) participating in an intervention trial targeting improved colorectal cancer screening rates. This intervention made no reference to the CCM. CCM implementation (measured through staff and clinical management surveys) and was associated with patient care indicators (chart audits and patient questionnaires). Results Overall, practices had low levels of CCM implementation. However, higher levels of CCM implementation were associated with better diabetes assessment and treatment of patients (p=0.009, 0.015), particularly in practices open to “innovation”. Physical activity counseling for obese and particularly overweight patients was strongly associated with CCM implementation (p=0.0017), particularly among practices open to “innovation”; however, this association did not hold for overweight and obese patients with diabetes. Conclusions Very modest levels of CCM implementation in unsupported primary care practices are associated with improved care for patients with diabetes and higher rates of behavioral counseling. Incremental incorporation of CCM components is an option, especially for resource stretched community practices with cultures of “innovativeness.” PMID:20453175

  11. Coordinated Care Management For Dementia In A Large, Academic Health System

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Zaldy S.; Jennings, Lee; Reuben, David

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias are chronic, incurable diseases that require coordinated care that addresses the medical, behavioral, and social aspects of the disease. With funding from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (the Innovation Center), we launched a dementia care program in which a nurse practitioner acting as a dementia care manager worked with primary care physicians to develop and implement a dementia care plan that offers training and support to caregivers, manages care transitions, and facilitates access to community-based services. Post-visit surveys showed high levels of caregiver satisfaction. As program enrollment grows, outcomes will be tracked based on the triple aim developed by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement and adopted by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services: better care, better health, and lower cost and utilization. The program, if successful at achieving the triple aim, may serve as a national model for how dementia and other chronic diseases can be managed in partnership with primary care practices. The program may also inform policy and reimbursement decisions for the recently released transitional care management codes and the complex chronic care management codes to be released by Medicare in 2015. PMID:24711323

  12. Chronic disease management: improving care for people with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Brand, Caroline A; Ackerman, Ilana N; Tropea, Joanne

    2014-02-01

    Chronic disease management (CDM) service models are being developed for many conditions; however, there is limited evidence to support their effectiveness in osteoarthritis (OA). A systematic review was undertaken to examine effectiveness, cost effectiveness and barriers to the use of osteoarthritis-chronic disease management (OA-CDM) service models. Thirteen eligible studies (eight randomised controlled trial (RCTs)) were identified. The majority focussed on delivery system design (n = 9) and/or providing self-management support (SMS) (n = 8). Overall, reported model effectiveness varied, and where positive impacts on process or health outcomes were observed, they were of small to moderate effect. There was no information about cost effectiveness. There is some evidence to support the use of collaborative care/multidisciplinary case management models in primary and community care and evidence-based pathways/standardisation of care in hospital settings. Multiple barriers were identified. Future research should focus on identifying the effective components of multi-faceted interventions and evaluating cost-effectiveness to support clinical and policy decision-making.

  13. Auditing chronic disease care: Does it make a difference?

    PubMed Central

    van Vuuren, Unita; De Sa, Angela; Govender, Srini; Murie, Katie; Schlemmer, Arina; Gunst, Colette; Namane, Mosedi; Boulle, Andrew; de Vries, Elma

    2015-01-01

    Background An integrated audit tool was developed for five chronic diseases, namely diabetes, hypertension, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and epilepsy. Annual audits have been done in the Western Cape Metro district since 2009. The year 2012 was the first year that all six districts in South Africa's Western Cape Province participated in the audit process. Aim To determine whether clinical audits improve chronic disease care in health districts over time. Setting Western Cape Province, South Africa. Methods Internal audits were conducted of primary healthcare facility processes and equipment availability as well as a folder review of 10 folders per chronic condition per facility. Random systematic sampling was used to select the 10 folders for the folder review. Combined data for all facilities gave a provincial overview and allowed for comparison between districts. Analysis was done comparing districts that have been participating in the audit process from 2009 to 2010 (‘2012 old’) to districts that started auditing recently (‘2012 new’). Results The number of facilities audited has steadily increased from 29 in 2009 to 129 in 2012. Improvements between different years have been modest, and the overall provincial average seemed worse in 2012 compared to 2011. However, there was an improvement in the ‘2012 old’ districts compared to the ‘2012 new’ districts for both the facility audit and the folder review, including for eight clinical indicators, with ‘2012 new’ districts being less likely to record clinical processes (OR 0.25, 95% CI 0.21–0.31). Conclusion These findings are an indication of the value of audits to improve care processes over the long term. It is hoped that this improvement will lead to improved patient outcomes. PMID:26245615

  14. 25 CFR 36.90 - What recreation, academic tutoring, student safety, and health care services must homeliving...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What recreation, academic tutoring, student safety, and... What recreation, academic tutoring, student safety, and health care services must homeliving programs..., recreation, and health care services for their students, as deemed necessary by the local school board...

  15. 25 CFR 36.90 - What recreation, academic tutoring, student safety, and health care services must homeliving...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What recreation, academic tutoring, student safety, and... What recreation, academic tutoring, student safety, and health care services must homeliving programs..., recreation, and health care services for their students, as deemed necessary by the local school board...

  16. Wound healing and treating wounds: Chronic wound care and management.

    PubMed

    Powers, Jennifer G; Higham, Catherine; Broussard, Karen; Phillips, Tania J

    2016-04-01

    In the United States, chronic ulcers--including decubitus, vascular, inflammatory, and rheumatologic subtypes--affect >6 million people, with increasing numbers anticipated in our growing elderly and diabetic populations. These wounds cause significant morbidity and mortality and lead to significant medical costs. Preventative and treatment measures include disease-specific approaches and the use of moisture retentive dressings and adjunctive topical therapies to promote healing. In this article, we discuss recent advances in wound care technology and current management guidelines for the treatment of wounds and ulcers.

  17. Development of an Academic Consortium for Nurse-Managed Primary Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohl, Joanne M.; Bostrom, Andrea C.; Talarczyk, Geraldine; Cavanagh, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    The Michigan Academic Consortium brought together four universities' nursing schools to address advanced practice issues in nurse-managed primary health care. The collaboration enabled participants to leverage financial resources and take advantage of partnership opportunities. Challenges included multiple management practices, competition, and…

  18. Demographic, Educational, and Psychosocial Factors Influencing the Choices of Primary Care and Academic Medical Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubeck, Robert F.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A survey of 246 primary care and 90 academic physicians found that for the former, length of training, direct patient contact, and threats of malpractice suits were significant influences in career choice. For the latter, long-term research participation, intellectual stimulation, specialty content, and mentor or role model were more significant…

  19. Managing Academic Health Centers: Meeting the Challenges of the New Health Care World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commonwealth Fund, New York, NY.

    This report focuses on strategies documented by the Commonwealth Fund Task Force on Academic Health Centers (AHCs) concerning AHCs' management of patient care and research missions. Whatever challenges AHCs face in the future, their ability to respond effectively will be determined by the quality of their governance and management. To improve…

  20. Neighborhood Crime and Self-Care: Risks for Aggression and Lower Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lord, Heather; Mahoney, Joseph L.

    2007-01-01

    This longitudinal study evaluated associations among official rates of neighborhood crime, academic performance, and aggression in a sample of 581 children in 1st-3rd grade (6.3-10.6 years old). It was hypothesized that the influence of crime depends on children's unsupervised exposure to the neighborhood context through self-care. Average weekly…

  1. Academic Achievement and Aging out of Care: Foster Parents' Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mack, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    Foster children experience multiple barriers and challenges that, amongst other issues, prevent them from achieving academically. At the age of 18, foster youth are forced out of the Department of Children and Families care, leading many of them to become homeless or to return to the homes from which they were displaced. Scholarly literature and…

  2. Multiple chronic disorders - health care system’s modern challenge in the Maccabi Health Care System

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the major challenges health care systems face in modern time is treating chronic disorders. In recent years, the increasing occurrence of multiple chronic disorders (MCC) in single individuals has compounded the complexity of health care. In 2008, it was estimated that worldwide as many as one quarter of the population between the ages of sixty five to sixty nine suffered from two or more chronic conditions and this prevalence rose with age. Clinical guidelines provide guidance for management of single disorders, but not for MCC. The aim of the present study was the study of the prevalence, distribution and impact of MCC in a large Israeli health system. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of MCC in the Maccabi Healthcare System (MHS), Israel’s second largest healthcare service, providing care for approximately two million people. Data regarding chronic conditions was collected through electronic medical records and organizational records, as was demographic and socioeconomic data. Age and sex specific data were compared with previously published data from Scotland. Results Two thirds of the population had two or more chronic disorders. This is significantly higher than previously published rates. A correlation between patient age and number of chronic disorders was found, as was a correlation between number of chronic disorders and low socioeconomic status, with the exception of children due to a high prevalence of learning disabilities, asthma, and visual disturbances. Discussion MCC is very prevalent in the MHS population, increases with age, and except for children is more prevalent in lower socioeconomic classes, possibly due to the a combination of the structure of the Israeli universal insurance and requirements of the ministry of education for exemptions and benefits. A higher than previously reported prevalence of MCC may be due to the longtime use of use of integrated electronic medical records. Conclusions To effectively deal

  3. The family experience of care in chronic situation.

    PubMed

    Bellato, Roseney; Araújo, Laura Filomena Santos de; Dolina, Janderléia Valéria; Musquim, Cleciene Dos Anjos; Corrêa, Geovana Hagata de Lima Souza Thaines

    2016-06-01

    An essay that aims to reflect on the family experience of care in chronic situation, increasing the understanding of the family as the primary caregiver. It is based on comprehensive approach in studies conducted in three matrix searches from family care experiences. We have taken three axes to organize our reflections: a) conformation of family care in chronic situation, highlighting the multiple costs incurred to the family, which can exhaust the potential of care and establish or increase its vulnerability if it is not backed by networks support and sustenance; b) family rearrangements for the care, giving visibility to care cores in which many loved family members share the care, dynamic, plural and changeable way; c) self care modeling family care, pointing to the range of possibilities of the person taking care of diseased conditions supported by people close to them. We learn that the family takes care of itself in everyday life and in the illness experience, creating networks that can provide you support and sustenance. Thus, professionals in health practices should shape up in a longitudinal and very personal way, by reference to the family care, supporting him in what is his own. Ensaio que tem por objetivo refletir sobre a experiência familiar de cuidado na situação crônica, ampliando a compreensão da família como cuidadora primária. Embasa-se em estudos de abordagem compreensiva realizados em três pesquisas matriciais que abordaram experiências familiares de cuidado. Tomamos três eixos para organizar nossas reflexões: a) conformação do cuidado familiar na situação crônica, destacando os múltiplos custos gerados à família, que podem exaurir seus potenciais de cuidado, instaurando ou ampliando sua vulnerabilidade se não for amparada por redes de apoio e sustentação; b) rearranjos familiares para o cuidado, dando visibilidade aos núcleos de cuidado compartilhados pelos diversos entes familiares, de modo dinâmico, plural e mut

  4. Academic health centers and community health centers partnering to build a system of care for vulnerable patients: lessons from Carolina Health Net.

    PubMed

    Denham, Amy C; Hay, Sherry S; Steiner, Beat D; Newton, Warren P

    2013-05-01

    Academic health centers (AHCs) are challenged to meet their core missions in a time of strain on the health care system from rising costs, an aging population, increased rates of chronic disease, and growing numbers of uninsured patients. AHCs should be leaders in developing creative solutions to these challenges and training future leaders in new models of care. The authors present a case study describing the development, implementation, and early results of Carolina Health Net, a partnership between an AHC and a community health center to manage the most vulnerable uninsured by providing access to primary care medical homes and care management systems. This partnership was formed in 2008 to help transform the delivery of health care for the uninsured. As a result, 4,400 uninsured patients have been connected to primary care services. Emergency department use by enrolled patients has decreased. Patients have begun accessing subspecialty care within the medical home. More than 2,200 uninsured patients have been assisted to enroll in Medicaid. The experience of Carolina Health Net demonstrates that developing a system of care with primary care and wrap-around services such as pharmacy and case management can improve the cost-effectiveness and quality of care, thereby helping AHCs meet their broader missions. This project can serve as a model for other AHCs looking to partner with community-based providers to improve care and control costs for underserved populations.

  5. Luxury Primary Care, Academic Medical Centers, and the Erosion of Science and Professional Ethics

    PubMed Central

    Donohoe, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Medical schools and teaching hospitals have been hit particularly hard by the financial crisis affecting health care in the United States. To compete financially, many academic medical centers have recruited wealthy foreign patients and established luxury primary care clinics. At these clinics, patients are offered tests supported by little evidence of their clinical and/or cost effectiveness, which erodes the scientific underpinnings of medical practice. Given widespread disparities in health, wealth, and access to care, as well as growing cynicism and dissatisfaction with medicine among trainees, the promotion by these institutions of an overt, two-tiered system of care, which exacerbates inequities and injustice, erodes professional ethics. Academic medical centers should divert their intellectual and financial resources away from luxury primary care and toward more equitable and just programs designed to promote individual, community, and global health. The public and its legislators should, in turn, provide adequate funds to enable this. Ways for academic medicine to facilitate this largesse are discussed. PMID:14748866

  6. Concept of Care, Caring Expectations, and Caring Frustrations of the Elderly Suffering from Chronic Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Santos, Charisse Izobelle Q.; Santos, Ivan Benedict A.; Santos, Jedda A.; Santos, Justin E.; Santos, Justo Martin S.; Santos, Vincent Emmanuelle E.

    2012-01-01

    While it is true that elderly concepts of care and caring expectations have been ascertained in previous literatures, little is known about how the elderly population views caring frustrations--particularly that of the Filipino elderly. This study purports to surface the lebenswelt of healthcare expectations and frustrations based on the…

  7. How do patients with exacerbated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease experience care in the intensive care unit?

    PubMed Central

    Torheim, Henny; Kvangarsnes, Marit

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to gain insight into how patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) experience care in the acute phase. The study has a qualitative design with a phenomenological approach. The empirics consist of qualitative in-depth interviews with ten patients admitted to the intensive care units in two Norwegian hospitals. The interviews were carried out from November 2009 to June 2011. The data have been analysed through meaning condensation, in accordance with Amadeo Giorgi's four-step method. Kari Martinsen's phenomenological philosophy of nursing has inspired the study. An essential structure of the patients' experiences of care in the intensive care unit by acute COPD-exacerbation may be described as: Feelings of being trapped in a life-threatening situation in which the care system assumes control over their lives. This experience is conditioned not only by the medical treatment, but also by the entire interaction with the caregivers. The essence of the phenomenon is presented through three themes which describe the patient's lived experience: preserving the breath of life, vulnerable interactions and opportunities for better health. Acute COPD-exacerbation is a traumatic experience and the patients become particularly vulnerable when they depend on others for breathing support. The phenomenological analysis shows that the patients experience good care during breath of life preservation when the care is performed in a way that gives patients more insight into their illness and gives new opportunities for the future. PMID:24313779

  8. Primary Care-Specialist Collaboration in the Care of Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Powe, Neil R.; Jaar, Bernard G.; Greer, Raquel Charles; Troll, Misty U.; Boulware, L. Ebony

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Collaboration between primary care physicians (PCPs) and nephrologists in the care of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is widely advocated, but physician preferences regarding collaboration are unknown. Physicians' desires to collaborate in the care of a hypothetical patient with CKD, their preferred content of collaboration, and their perceived barriers to collaboration were assessed. Design, setting, participants, & measurements A questionnaire describing the care of a hypothetical patient with progressive CKD was administered to a national sample of U.S. PCPs and nephrologists. Physician characteristics and attitudes associated with desires to collaborate were identified. Results Among 124 PCPs and 120 nephrologists, most physicians (85% PCPs versus 94% nephrologists) desired collaboration. Nephrologists were more likely than PCPs to prefer collaboration focus on predialysis/renal replacement therapy preparation and electrolyte management (73% versus 52% and 81% versus 46%, respectively). PCPs were more likely to desire collaboration if the hypothetical patient had diabetes and hypertension (versus hypertension alone), if they believed the care they provide helps slow CKD disease progression, and if they did not perceive health insurance as a barrier to nephrology referral (adjusted percentages [95% confidence interval]: 94% [80 to 98] versus 75% [reference]), 92% [75 to 98] versus 75% [reference], 42% [9 to 85] versus 88% [reference], respectively). Conclusions Most PCPs and nephrologists favored collaborative care for a patient with progressive CKD, but their preferred content of collaboration differed. Collaborative models that explicitly include PCPs in the care of patients with CKD may help improve patients' clinical outcomes. PMID:21212420

  9. Academic Medicine's Critical Role in the "Third Curve" of Health Care.

    PubMed

    Paz, Harold L

    2016-05-01

    Over the last several years, the health care landscape has changed at an unprecedented rate due to new economic and regulatory forces ushered in by the Affordable Care Act and the introduction of innovative technologies, such as personalized medicine, that are poised to open the door to consumer-driven health care. Tremendous pressure exists on academic health centers to rapidly evolve clinically while not abandoning their unique academic mission. The convergence of personalized medicine, new digital technologies, and changes in health professionals' scope of practice alongside new payment structures will accelerate the move to a patient-centered health system. In this Commentary, the author argues that these new tools and resources must be embraced to improve the health of patients. With the traditional, fee-for-service model of care as "Curve I" and the post-Flexner era of population-based medicine as "Curve II," the author identifies the emergence of "Curve III," which is characterized by patient-centered, consumer-directed models of care. As the old models of health care undergo transition and the impact of technology and analytics grow, future practitioners must be trained to embrace this change and function effectively in the "third curve" of consumer-driven health care.

  10. Academic medicine: a key partner in strengthening the primary care infrastructure via teaching health centers.

    PubMed

    Rieselbach, Richard E; Crouse, Byron J; Neuhausen, Katherine; Nasca, Thomas J; Frohna, John G

    2013-12-01

    In the United States, a worsening shortage of primary care physicians, along with structural deficiencies in their training, threaten the primary care system that is essential to ensuring access to high-quality, cost-effective health care. Community health centers (CHCs) are an underused resource that could facilitate rapid expansion of the primary care workforce and simultaneously prepare trainees for 21st-century practice. The Teaching Health Center Graduate Medical Education (THCGME) program, currently funded by the Affordable Care Act, uses CHCs as training sites for primary-care-focused graduate medical education (GME).The authors propose that the goals of the THCGME program could be amplified by fostering partnerships between CHCs and teaching hospitals (academic medical centers [AMCs]). AMCs would encourage their primary care residency programs to expand by establishing teaching health center (THC) tracks. Modifications to the current THCGME model, facilitated by formal CHC and academic medicine partnerships (CHAMPs), would address the primary care physician shortage, produce physicians prepared for 21st-century practice, expose trainees to interprofessional education in a multidisciplinary environment, and facilitate the rapid expansion of CHC capacity.To succeed, CHAMP THCs require a comprehensive consortium agreement designed to ensure equity between the community and academic partners; conforming with this agreement will provide the high-quality GME necessary to ensure residency accreditation. CHAMP THCs also require a federal mechanism to ensure stable, long-term funding. CHAMP THCs would develop in select CHCs that desire a partnership with AMCs and have capacity for providing a community-based setting for both GME and health services research.

  11. Establishing a Viable Workforce Pipeline of Primary Care Nurse Practitioners: Benefits of a Health System and Academic Partnership.

    PubMed

    Madler, Billie; Helland, Mary

    Maldistribution and shortages of primary care providers, changing reimbursement structures, movement from inpatient to community-based models of care, an aging population, and health care reform lead to increased numbers of patients seeking care. All of these phenomena have a part in creating a health care landscape that requires industry leaders enlist innovative strategies to meet the health care needs of their communities. Delivery of high-quality, efficient care by qualified providers is essential for the success of any health care system. Partnerships between health systems and academic centers of learning to develop a pipeline of providers is one inventive approach that can address primary care workforce needs. The purpose of this article was to share an example of an academic/health care system partnership to address primary care workforce needs in a rural Midwestern region.

  12. Managing chronic myeloid leukemia: a coordinated team care perspective.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Stacie; Lord, Katharine; Bethelmie-Bryan, Beverly; Shepard, Marian W; Neely, Jessica; McLemore, Morgan; Reddy, Satyanarayan K; Montero, Aldemar; Jonas, William S; Gladney, Sara Pierson; Khanwani, Shyam L; Reddy, Silpa C; Lahiry, Anup K; Heffner, Leonard T; Winton, Elliott; Arellano, Martha; Khoury, Hanna Jean

    2012-04-01

    Treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has seen dramatic progress in recent years with the development of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). To take maximum advantage of therapy with TKIs, compliance and good understanding of monitoring response to therapy are essential. We established a team that included a hematologist, a physician assistant (PA), and a nurse who work closely with a social worker, a pharmacist, and a research coordinator to assist patients throughout their journey with CML. The patient and the referring community oncologist were incorporated into this team. This coordinated team care approach takes advantage of each member's specific skills to provide patients with education about CML, encourage patients' strong involvement in tracking/monitoring results/response to therapy, and support patients with issues that arise throughout the long course of the disease. A low rate of noncompliance with clinic visits (3%) was an indirect measure of the impact of this approach. The inclusion of the referring oncologist in the team extended the tracking of monitoring results to the community practice. We conclude that a coordinated team care approach is feasible in the management of patients with CML. This approach provided patients with education and a good understanding of response to therapy and improved relations with the health care team.

  13. In the Netherlands, rich interaction among professionals conducting disease management led to better chronic care.

    PubMed

    Cramm, Jane Murray; Nieboer, Anna Petra

    2012-11-01

    Disease management programs based on the Chronic Care Model are expected to improve the quality of chronic care delivery. However, evidence to date for such improvement and how it is achieved is scarce. In 2010 and again in 2011, we surveyed professionals in twenty-two primary care practices in the Netherlands that had implemented the Chronic Care Model of disease management beginning in 2009. The responses showed that, over time, chronic illness care delivery improved to advanced levels. The gains were attributed primarily to improved relational coordination-that is, raising the quality of communication and task integration among professionals from diverse disciplines who share common objectives. These findings may have implications for other disease management efforts by collaborative care teams, in that they suggest that diverse health care professionals must be strongly connected to provide effective, holistic care.

  14. Application of Orem's Self-Care Deficit Theory to the pediatric chronically ill population.

    PubMed

    Haas, D L

    1990-01-01

    The conditions under which children with long-term chronic health problems are cared for have changed dramatically in the past decade. These children are more often living longer and being cared for at home by their families and nursing supports. An effective tool allowing nurses to systematically assess, plan, implement, and evaluate the care needs of these children is a nursing theory. Orem's (1985) self- or dependent-care deficit theory is a useful basis from which the care of the chronically ill pediatric population can be planned. Attention is given to a caring relationship in which there is a dependent person in need of care and an individual who serves as that dependent person's agent of care. This article discusses several of the major concepts of the self- or dependent-care deficit theory and how it can be applied to guide clinical nursing practice aimed at meeting the care demands of the pediatric chronically ill population and their families.

  15. Value-Based Health Care for Chronic Care: Aligning Outcomes Measurement with the Patient Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, Helena Hvitfeldt; Essén, Anna; Ernestam, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Value-based health care is increasingly used for developing health care services by relating patient outcomes to costs. A hierarchical value scorecard for creating outcome measurements has been suggested: the 3-tier model. The objective of this study was to test the model against the patient's view of value in a chronic care setting. Methods: Semistructured interviews with 22 persons with rheumatoid arthritis were conducted, transcribed, and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Themes were extracted, and the model was critically applied and revised. Results: The study validates existing dimensions in the model but suggests adding information, social health, predictability, and continuity to make it more useful and representative of patients' preferences. Conclusion: Although the model aims to focus on outcomes relevant to patients, it lacks dimensions important to individuals with rheumatoid arthritis. The data illustrate difficulties in finding patients' preferred outcomes and imply tactics for arriving at meaningful measurements. PMID:27749717

  16. Stakeholders’ perception on the organization of chronic care: a SWOT analysis to draft avenues for health care reforms

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Adequate care for individuals living with chronic illnesses calls for a healthcare system redesign, moving from acute, disease-centered to patient-centered models. The aim of this study was to identify Belgian stakeholders’ perceptions on the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of the healthcare system for people with chronic diseases in Belgium. Methods Four focus groups were held with stakeholders from the micro and meso level, in addition to two interviews with stakeholders who could not attend the focus group sessions. Data collection and the discussion were based on the Chronic Care model. Thematic analysis of the transcripts allowed for the identification of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of the current health care system with focus on chronic care. Results Informants stressed the overall good quality of the acute health care system and the level of reimbursement of care as an important strength of the current system. In contrast, the lack of integration of care was identified as one of the biggest weaknesses of today’s health care system, along with the unclear definitions of the roles and functions of health professionals involved in care processes. Patient education to support self-management exists for patients with diabetes and/or terminal kidney failure but not for those living with other or multiple chronic conditions. The current overall fee-for-service system is a barrier to integrated care, as are the lack of incentives for integrated care. Attending multidisciplinary meetings, for example, is underfinanced to date. Finally, clinical information systems lack interoperability, which further impedes the information flow across settings and disciplines. Conclusion Our study’s methods allowed for the identification of problematic domains in the health system for people living with chronic conditions. These findings provided useful insights surrounding perceived priorities. This methodology may inspire

  17. Identifying patients with chronic widespread pain in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, Kathryn E.; Sim, Julius; Croft, Peter; Jordan, Kelvin P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Chronic widespread pain (CWP) is common in the general population. It is unclear how people reporting this problem present in primary care; they may regularly consult for regional pains without being recognized as having a generalized condition. Our objectives were to determine the prevalence of people consulting in primary care for musculoskeletal conditions in different body regions on different occasions (recurrent regional pain consultation), the proportion with diagnosed generalized pain and survey-reported widespread pain, and if they have features characteristic of CWP. Phase 1 used electronic records from 12 general practices in North Staffordshire (Consultations in Primary Care Archive) from 2005 to 2009. Phase 2 used linked self-reported health and primary health care data from 8286 people aged >50 years in 8 general practices (North Staffordshire Osteoarthritis Project) between 2002 and 2005. In Phase 1, 11% of registered patients fulfilled criteria for recurrent regional pain consultation. Three-quarters had no recorded CWP-related generalized pain condition (eg, fibromyalgia). In Phase 2, 53% of recurrent regional pain consulters had survey-reported widespread pain and 88% had consulted for somatic symptoms. Self-reported general health was worse in recurrent regional pain consulters than in single-region consulters and poorest in those who also reported persistent widespread pain. Recurrent regional pain consulters are a heterogeneous group of frequent consulters sharing features with CWP (eg, somatic symptoms) but including those less severely affected. They lie on the spectrum of polysymptomatic distress characteristic of CWP and represent a group whose needs may be better met by earlier diagnosis of multisite pain. PMID:27749607

  18. Associations between perceived chronic care quality, perceived patient centeredness, and illness representations among persons with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Joseph; Iyer, Neeraj N; Collins, William B

    2014-01-01

    Patient beliefs about their illness can motivate behaviors consistent with good disease management. Perceived high-quality chronic care would be expected to increase likelihood of having such beliefs. Associations between perceived quality of chronic care and illness representations, and associations between patient centeredness and illness representations were assessed among persons with diabetes. A mail survey of diabetic patients visiting a multispecialty physician network serving urban and suburban populations in a large midwestern city was conducted. The Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care-5A questionnaire was used to assess perceived chronic care quality and patient centeredness. The Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire was used to assess illness representations. Of 500 mailed surveys, 89 completed surveys were returned. The sample consisted mostly of retirees (61%), Whites (81%), and women (60%). Higher perceived chronic care quality was associated with better disease understanding of diabetes (0.24, p = .05). Patients reporting higher patient centeredness (or lower patient-centeredness scores) indicated better disease understanding (-0.26, p = .04) and those reporting higher patient centeredness (or lower patient-centeredness scores) perceived less impact of illness (0.29, p = .02). Chronic care quality as defined in the Chronic Care Model and consistency of chronic care with patient expectations (patient centeredness) was associated with illness representations favorable for good self-care management.

  19. Effectiveness of Stepped Care for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A Randomized Noninferiority Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tummers, Marcia; Knoop, Hans; Bleijenberg, Gijs

    2010-01-01

    Objective: In this randomized noninferiority study, the effectiveness and efficiency of stepped care for chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) was compared to care as usual. Stepped care was formed by guided self-instruction, followed by cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) if the patient desired it. Care as usual encompassed CBT after a waiting period.…

  20. Self-Care Among Chronically Ill African Americans: Culture, Health Disparities, and Health Insurance Status

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Gay; Gates, Rahima Jan; Newsom, Edwina

    2004-01-01

    Little is known about the self-care practices of chronically ill African Americans or how lack of access to health care affects self-care. Results from a qualitative interview study of 167 African Americans who had one or more chronic illnesses found that self-care practices were culturally based, and the insured reported more extensive programs of self-care. Those who had some form of health insurance much more frequently reported the influence of physicians and health education programs in self-care regimens than did those who were uninsured. It is concluded that the cultural components of self-care have been underemphasized, and further, that the potential to maximize chronic illness management through self-care strategies is not realized for those who lack access to health care. PMID:15569953

  1. TeamSTEPPS in Long-Term Care-An Academic Partnership: Part I.

    PubMed

    Roman, Tammy C; Abraham, Kylene; Dever, Kathleen

    2016-11-01

    In 2015, the Academy for Leadership in Long-Term Care received a grant to provide interprofessional training on the strategies and techniques of TeamSTEPPS(®). The results indicated significant changes in the participants' teamwork and communication strategies to improve resident safety. In part one of this article, the discussion includes the background, literature review, and design of this TeamSTEPPS academic partnership. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2016;47(11):490-492.

  2. Academic interventional nephrology: a model for training, research, and patient care.

    PubMed

    Roy-Chaudhury, Prabir; Yevzlin, Alexander; Bonventre, Joseph V; Agarwal, Anil; Almehmi, Ammar; Besarab, Anatole; Dwyer, Amy; Hentschel, Dirk M; Kraus, Michael; Maya, Ivan; Pflederer, Timothy; Schon, Donald; Wu, Steven; Work, Jack

    2012-03-01

    Dialysis vascular access dysfunction is currently a huge clinical problem. We believe that comprehensive academic-based dialysis vascular access programs that go all the way from basic and translational science investigation to clinical research to a dedicated curriculum and opportunities in vascular access for nephrologists in training are essential for improving dialysis vascular access care. This paper reviews the fundamental concepts and requirements for us to move toward this vision.

  3. [Prospects of the German Academic Health Science and Health Care System].

    PubMed

    Robra, Bernt-Peter

    2017-01-01

    The German Council of Science and Humanities (Wissenschaftsrat) wants to strengthen the university health system at the interface of the science and the health care systems. Its recent future-proofing recommendations are 2-fold: a) integrated academic structures, called "profile centers", designed to support joint clinical and research opportunities as well as to offer sustainable career tracks to junior scientists (clinician as well as medical scientists) and b) better financing and negotiating power of university health centers and their respective outpatient departments as agents of innovation and providers in the health care system [1].

  4. Systems medicine and integrated care to combat chronic noncommunicable diseases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We propose an innovative, integrated, cost-effective health system to combat major non-communicable diseases (NCDs), including cardiovascular, chronic respiratory, metabolic, rheumatologic and neurologic disorders and cancers, which together are the predominant health problem of the 21st century. This proposed holistic strategy involves comprehensive patient-centered integrated care and multi-scale, multi-modal and multi-level systems approaches to tackle NCDs as a common group of diseases. Rather than studying each disease individually, it will take into account their intertwined gene-environment, socio-economic interactions and co-morbidities that lead to individual-specific complex phenotypes. It will implement a road map for predictive, preventive, personalized and participatory (P4) medicine based on a robust and extensive knowledge management infrastructure that contains individual patient information. It will be supported by strategic partnerships involving all stakeholders, including general practitioners associated with patient-centered care. This systems medicine strategy, which will take a holistic approach to disease, is designed to allow the results to be used globally, taking into account the needs and specificities of local economies and health systems. PMID:21745417

  5. Patient autonomy in chronic care: solving a paradox

    PubMed Central

    Reach, Gérard

    2014-01-01

    The application of the principle of autonomy, which is considered a cornerstone of contemporary bioethics, is sometimes in obvious contradiction with the principle of beneficence. Indeed, it may happen in chronic care that the preferences of the health care provider (HCP), who is largely focused on the prevention of long term complications of diseases, differ from those, more present oriented, preferences of the patient. The aims of this narrative review are as follows: 1) to show that the exercise of autonomy by the patient is not always possible; 2) where the latter is not possible, to examine how, in the context of the autonomy principle, someone (a HCP) can decide what is good (a treatment) for someone else (a patient) without falling into paternalism. Actually this analysis leads to a paradox: not only is the principle of beneficence sometimes conflicting with the principle of autonomy, but physician’s beneficence may enter into conflict with the mere respect of the patient; and 3) to propose a solution to this paradox by revisiting the very concepts of the autonomous person, patient education, and trust in the patient–physician relationship: this article provides an ethical definition of patient education. PMID:24376345

  6. Patient autonomy in chronic care: solving a paradox.

    PubMed

    Reach, Gérard

    2013-12-12

    The application of the principle of autonomy, which is considered a cornerstone of contemporary bioethics, is sometimes in obvious contradiction with the principle of beneficence. Indeed, it may happen in chronic care that the preferences of the health care provider (HCP), who is largely focused on the prevention of long term complications of diseases, differ from those, more present oriented, preferences of the patient. The aims of this narrative review are as follows: 1) to show that the exercise of autonomy by the patient is not always possible; 2) where the latter is not possible, to examine how, in the context of the autonomy principle, someone (a HCP) can decide what is good (a treatment) for someone else (a patient) without falling into paternalism. Actually this analysis leads to a paradox: not only is the principle of beneficence sometimes conflicting with the principle of autonomy, but physician's beneficence may enter into conflict with the mere respect of the patient; and 3) to propose a solution to this paradox by revisiting the very concepts of the autonomous person, patient education, and trust in the patient-physician relationship: this article provides an ethical definition of patient education.

  7. Spanning boundaries and creating strong patient relationships to coordinate care are strategies used by experienced chronic condition care coordinators.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Carolyn; Kendall, Elizabeth; Muenchberger, Heidi

    2012-08-01

    People with complex chronic conditions frequently need to navigate their own way through and around a fragmented and siloed health care system. Care coordination is a defining principle of primary care and is frequently proposed as a solution to this problem. However, care coordination requires more time and effort than primary care physicians alone have the capacity to deliver. Although registered nurses (RNs) are skilled team members who can be included in the delivery of coordinated patient care, any model of care coordination that involves RNs needs to fit within the existing health care delivery system. In this study, which used qualitative techniques based on grounded theory and included face-to-face interviews and open coding and theoretical sampling until data saturation was achieved, and which was one component of a larger action research study, we aimed to gain an understanding of the difference between usual chronic condition care and the work of chronic condition care coordination. The researchers interviewed general practitioners and RNs from various general practice sites who were actively coordinating care. Four unique processes were found to define care coordination implementation, namely: (1) moving beyond usual practice by spanning boundaries; (2) relationship-based care; (3) agreed roles and routines among relevant parties; and (4) committing to chronic condition care coordination. The findings suggested that existing professional and organisational cultures required negotiation before care coordination could be integrated into existing contexts. The challenge, however, seems to be in acknowledging and overcoming professional practice boundaries that define existing care through reflective practice and shared resourcing.

  8. An Evaluation of Collaborative Interventions to Improve Chronic Illness Care: Framework and Study Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cretin, Shan; Shortell, Stephen M.; Keeler, Emmett B.

    2004-01-01

    The authors' dual-purpose evaluation assesses the effectiveness of formal collaboratives in stimulating organizational changes to improve chronic illness care (the chronic care model or CCM). Intervention and comparison sites are compared before and after introduction of the CCM. Multiple data sources are used to measure the degree of…

  9. Better for ourselves and better for our patients: chronic disease management in primary care networks.

    PubMed

    Every, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Capital Health in Edmonton, Alberta, implemented a system-wide chronic disease management model to support people with chronic disease and their primary care physicians. Groups of family physicians, in partnership with the health region, developed primary care networks to provide services that are customized to meet the priorities of the local community. Management of chronic disease is a cornerstone service, and diabetes management is the most fully developed program. Key to its success are standardized protocols, consistent follow-up and patient education by trained primary care nurses. This model will be used as a template for the management of other chronic diseases.

  10. Improving access to effective care for people with chronic respiratory symptoms in low and middle income countries

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chronic respiratory symptoms are amongst the most common complaints among low and middle-income country (LMICs) populations and they are expected to remain common over the 10 to 20 year horizon. The underlying diseases (predominantly chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma and tuberculosis) cause, and threaten to increasingly cause, substantial morbidity and mortality. Effective treatment is available for these conditions but LMICs health systems are not well set up to provide accessible clinical diagnostic pathways that lead to sustainable and affordable management plans especially for the chronic non communicable respiratory diseases. There is a need for clinical and academic capacity building together with well-conducted health systems research to underpin health service strengthening, policy and decision-making. There is an opportunity to integrate solutions for improving access to effective care for people with chronic respiratory symptoms with approaches to tackle other major population health issues that depend on well-functioning health services such as chronic communicable (e.g. HIV) and non-communicable (e.g. cardiovascular and metabolic) diseases.

  11. Fostering innovation in medicine and health care: what must academic health centers do?

    PubMed

    Dzau, Victor J; Yoediono, Ziggy; Ellaissi, William F; Cho, Alex H

    2013-10-01

    There is a real need for innovation in health care delivery, as well as in medicine, to address related challenges of access, quality, and affordability through new and creative approaches. Health care environments must foster innovation, not just allowing it but actively encouraging it to happen anywhere and at every level in health care and medicine-from the laboratory, to the operating room, bedside, and clinics. This paper reviews the essential elements and environmental factors important for health-related innovation to flourish in academic health systems.The authors maintain that innovation must be actively cultivated by teaching it, creating "space" for and supporting it, and providing opportunities for its implementation. The authors seek to show the importance of these three fundamental principles and how they can be implemented, highlighting examples from across the country and their own institution.Health innovation cannot be relegated to a second-class status by the urgency of day-to-day operations, patient care, and the requirements of traditional research. Innovation needs to be elevated to a committed endeavor and become a part of an organization's culture, particularly in academic health centers.

  12. Assessing family history of chronic disease in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, June C.; Campbell-Scherer, Denise; Permaul, Joanne A.; Myers, Jesse; Manca, Donna P.; Meaney, Christopher; Moineddin, Rahim; Grunfeld, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the proportion of primary care patients who report a family history (FH) of type 2 diabetes, coronary artery disease, breast cancer, or colorectal cancer (CRC); assess concordance of FH information derived from the electronic medical record (EMR) compared with patient-completed health questionnaires; and assess whether appropriate screening was informed by risk based solely on FH. Design Data from the BETTER (Building on Existing Tools to Improve Chronic Disease Prevention and Screening in Primary Care) trial were used. Patients were mailed questionnaires. Baseline FH and screening data were obtained for enrolled patients from the EMR and health questionnaires. Setting Ontario and Alberta. Participants Randomly selected patients from 8 family practices. Main outcome measures Agreement on FH between the EMR and questionnaire was determined; logistic regression was used to assess significant predictors of screening. Results In total, 775 of 789 (98%) patients completed the health questionnaire. The mean age of participants was 52.5 years and 72% were female. A minimum of 12% of patients (range 12% to 36%) had a reported FH of 1 of 4 chronic diseases. Among patients with positive FH, the following proportions of patients had that FH recorded in the EMR compared with the questionnaire: diabetes, 24% in the EMR versus 36% on the questionnaire, κ = 0.466; coronary artery disease, 35% in the EMR versus 22% on the questionnaire, κ = 0.225; breast cancer, 21% in the EMR versus 22% on the questionnaire, κ = 0.241; and CRC, 12% in the EMR versus 14% on the questionnaire, κ = 0.510. There was moderate agreement for diabetes and CRC. The presence of FH was a significant predictor of CRC screening (odds ratio 1.9, 95% CI 1.1 to 3.1). Conclusion A moderate prevalence of FH was found for 4 conditions for which screening recommendations vary with risk based on FH. Having patients self-complete an FH was thought to be feasible; however, questions

  13. Rehabilitation Needs of Chronic Female Inpatients Attending Day-care in a Tertiary Care Psychiatric Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Waghmare, Avinash; Sherine, Linda; Sivakumar, Thanapal; Kumar, C. Naveen; Thirthalli, Jagadisha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Female patients hospitalized for a long duration in psychiatric hospitals are a special population with unique needs. Aims and Objectives: To assess rehabilitation needs of chronic female inpatients attending psychiatric rehabilitation services in a tertiary care psychiatric hospital. Materials and Methods: Rehabilitation needs of nine chronic female inpatients were assessed with an interview schedule developed by expert consensus. The needs were elicited from the patients. Perspectives of nursing staff, vocational instructors, and treating psychiatrists were also sought. Results and Conclusion: Most patients expressed the need for more incentives for working in day-care, variety in food and grooming items. The nursing staff felt many patients could be placed outside, and the family members should come more frequently to meet them. Vocational instructors felt that patients need more incentives, variety in food and work. Treating psychiatrists said that major barriers in discharging and placing them were nonavailability or poor involvement of family members. Services like supported housing, supported education and supported employment are necessary to cater to their complex needs. PMID:27011400

  14. An academic health center sees both challenges and enabling forces as it creates an accountable care organization.

    PubMed

    Tallia, Alfred F; Howard, Jenna

    2012-11-01

    Health care reform presents academic health centers with an opportunity to test new systems of care, such as accountable care organizations (ACOs), that are intended to improve patients' health and well-being, mitigate the anticipated shortage in primary care providers, and bend the cost curve. In its ongoing efforts to develop an ACO, the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, an academic health center, has found helpful a rapidly evolving competitive environment and insurers willing to experiment with new models of care. But the center has also encountered six types of barriers: conceptual, financial, cultural, regulatory, organizational, and historical. How this academic health center has faced these barriers offers valuable lessons to other health systems engaged in creating ACOs.

  15. Getting what we pay for: innovations lacking in provider payment reform for chronic disease care.

    PubMed

    Tynan, Ann; Draper, Debra A

    2008-06-01

    Despite wide recognition that existing physician and hospital payment methods used by health plans and other payers do not foster high-quality and efficient care for people with chronic conditions, little innovation in provider payment strategies is occurring, according to a new study by the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC) commissioned by the California HealthCare Foundation. This is particularly disconcerting because the nation faces an increasing prevalence of chronic disease, resulting in continued escalation of related health care costs and diminished quality of life for more Americans. To date, most efforts to improve care of patients with chronic conditions have focused on paying vendors, such as disease management firms, to intervene with patients or redesigning care delivery without reforming underlying physician and hospital payment methods. While there is active discussion and anticipation of physician and hospital payment reform, current efforts are limited largely to experimental or small-scale pilot programs. More fundamental payment reform efforts in practice are virtually nonexistent. Existing payment systems, primarily fee for service, encourage a piecemeal approach to care delivery rather than a coordinated approach appropriate for patients with chronic conditions. While there is broad agreement that existing provider payment methods are not well aligned with optimal chronic disease care, there are significant barriers to reforming payment for chronic disease care, including: (1) fragmented care delivery; (2) lack of payment for non-physician providers and services supportive of chronic disease care; (3) potential for revenue reductions for some providers; and (4) lack of a viable reform champion. Absent such reform, however, efforts to improve the quality and efficiency of care for chronically ill patients are likely to be of limited success.

  16. Short and long term improvements in quality of chronic care delivery predict program sustainability.

    PubMed

    Cramm, Jane Murray; Nieboer, Anna Petra

    2014-01-01

    Empirical evidence on sustainability of programs that improve the quality of care delivery over time is lacking. Therefore, this study aims to identify the predictive role of short and long term improvements in quality of chronic care delivery on program sustainability. In this longitudinal study, professionals [2010 (T0): n=218, 55% response rate; 2011 (T1): n=300, 68% response rate; 2012 (T2): n=265, 63% response rate] from 22 Dutch disease-management programs completed surveys assessing quality of care and program sustainability. Our study findings indicated that quality of chronic care delivery improved significantly in the first 2 years after implementation of the disease-management programs. At T1, overall quality, self-management support, delivery system design, and integration of chronic care components, as well as health care delivery and clinical information systems and decision support, had improved. At T2, overall quality again improved significantly, as did community linkages, delivery system design, clinical information systems, decision support and integration of chronic care components, and self-management support. Multilevel regression analysis revealed that quality of chronic care delivery at T0 (p<0.001) and quality changes in the first (p<0.001) and second (p<0.01) years predicted program sustainability. In conclusion this study showed that disease-management programs based on the chronic care model improved the quality of chronic care delivery over time and that short and long term changes in the quality of chronic care delivery predicted the sustainability of the projects.

  17. Primary Care Management of Chronic Constipation in Asia: The ANMA Chronic Constipation Tool

    PubMed Central

    Ghoshal, Uday C; Gonlachanvit, Sutep; Chua, Andrew Seng Boon; Myung, Seung-Jae; Rajindrajith, Shaman; Patcharatrakul, Tanisa; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Wu, Justin C Y; Chen, Min-Hu; Gong, Xiao-Rong; Lu, Ching-Liang; Chen, Chien-Lin; Pratap, Nitesh; Abraham, Philip; Hou, Xiao-Hua; Ke, Meiyun; Ricaforte-Campos, Jane D; Syam, Ari Fahrial; Abdullah, Murdani

    2013-01-01

    Chronic constipation (CC) may impact on quality of life. There is substantial patient dissatisfaction; possible reasons are failure to recognize underlying constipation, inappropriate dietary advice and inadequate treatment. The aim of these practical guidelines intended for primary care physicians, and which are based on Asian perspectives, is to provide an approach to CC that is relevant to the existing health-care infrastructure. Physicians should not rely on infrequent bowel movements to diagnose CC as many patients have one or more bowel movement a day. More commonly, patients present with hard stool, straining, incomplete feeling, bloating and other dyspeptic symptoms. Physicians should consider CC in these situations and when patients are found to use laxative containing supplements. In the absence of alarm features physicians may start with a 2-4 week therapeutic trial of available pharmacological agents including osmotic, stimulant and enterokinetic agents. Where safe to do so, physicians should consider regular (as opposed to on demand dosing), combination treatment and continuous treatment for at least 4 weeks. If patients do not achieve satisfactory response, they should be referred to tertiary centers for physiological evaluation of colonic transit and pelvic floor function. Surgical referral is a last resort, which should be considered only after a thorough physiological and psychological evaluation. PMID:23667746

  18. The changing nature of chronic care and coproduction of care between primary care professionals and patients with COPD and their informal caregivers.

    PubMed

    Cramm, Jane Murray; Nieboer, Anna Petra

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether care delivery in accordance with a care model is associated with co-productive relationships between professionals and COPD patients and their informal caregivers. A co-productive relationship refers to productive patient-professional interaction or shared decision making. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014 among 411 patients (out of 981) enrolled in the Dutch COPD care program Kennemer Lucht and 62 professionals treating them (out of 97). Kennemer Lucht COPD involved multicomponent interventions within all six dimensions of the chronic care model (organizational support, community, self-management, decision support, delivery system design, and information and communications technology) to improve the quality of care for patients with COPD. This approach was expected to improve relational coproduction of care between professionals and patients with COPD and their informal caregivers. Results show clearly that the perceived quality of chronic care delivery is related significantly to productive interaction/relational coproduction of care. The strength of the relationship between perceptions of quality of chronic care and relational coproduction among patients is strong (r=0.5; P≤0.001) and among professionals moderate (r=0.4; P≤0.001 relational coproduction with patients and informal caregivers). Furthermore, patients' perceptions of the quality of chronic care were associated with the existence of productive interaction with health care professionals (β=0.7; P≤0.001). The changing nature of chronic care is associated with coproduction of care, leading to the development of more productive relationships between primary care professionals and COPD patients and their informal caregivers. Further research is necessary to determine how best to sustain these developments.

  19. The changing nature of chronic care and coproduction of care between primary care professionals and patients with COPD and their informal caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Cramm, Jane Murray; Nieboer, Anna Petra

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether care delivery in accordance with a care model is associated with co-productive relationships between professionals and COPD patients and their informal caregivers. A co-productive relationship refers to productive patient–professional interaction or shared decision making. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014 among 411 patients (out of 981) enrolled in the Dutch COPD care program Kennemer Lucht and 62 professionals treating them (out of 97). Kennemer Lucht COPD involved multicomponent interventions within all six dimensions of the chronic care model (organizational support, community, self-management, decision support, delivery system design, and information and communications technology) to improve the quality of care for patients with COPD. This approach was expected to improve relational coproduction of care between professionals and patients with COPD and their informal caregivers. Results show clearly that the perceived quality of chronic care delivery is related significantly to productive interaction/relational coproduction of care. The strength of the relationship between perceptions of quality of chronic care and relational coproduction among patients is strong (r=0.5; P≤0.001) and among professionals moderate (r=0.4; P≤0.001 relational coproduction with patients and informal caregivers). Furthermore, patients’ perceptions of the quality of chronic care were associated with the existence of productive interaction with health care professionals (β=0.7; P≤0.001). The changing nature of chronic care is associated with coproduction of care, leading to the development of more productive relationships between primary care professionals and COPD patients and their informal caregivers. Further research is necessary to determine how best to sustain these developments. PMID:26869783

  20. Chronic care model strategies in the United States and Germany deliver patient-centered, high-quality diabetes care.

    PubMed

    Stock, Stephanie; Pitcavage, James M; Simic, Dusan; Altin, Sibel; Graf, Christian; Feng, Wen; Graf, Thomas R

    2014-09-01

    Improving the quality of care for chronic diseases is an important issue for most health care systems in industrialized nations. One widely adopted approach is the Chronic Care Model (CCM), which was first developed in the late 1990s. In this article we present the results from two large surveys in the United States and Germany that report patients' experiences in different models of patient-centered diabetes care, compared to the experiences of patients who received routine diabetes care in the same systems. The study populations were enrolled in either Geisinger Health System in Pennsylvania or Barmer, a German sickness fund that provides medical insurance nationwide. Our findings suggest that patients with type 2 diabetes who were enrolled in the care models that exhibited key features of the CCM were more likely to receive care that was patient-centered, high quality, and collaborative, compared to patients who received routine care. This study demonstrates that quality improvement can be realized through the application of the Chronic Care Model, regardless of the setting or distinct characteristics of the program.

  1. An answer to chronicity in the Basque Country: primary care-based population health management.

    PubMed

    Nuño-Solinís, Roberto; Orueta, Juan F; Mateos, Maider

    2012-01-01

    Chronic conditions have an impact on individuals since they represent a restraint on quality of life, functional status, and productivity of people who suffer from them but they also compromise the sustainability of health systems. In 2010, the Strategy for Tackling the Challenge of Chronicity in the Basque Country was published. It contains policies and projects aimed at reinventing the health delivery model with the purpose of improving the quality of care for chronic patients and advancing toward a more sustainable, proactive, and integrated model. We present 3 projects here: population stratification, integrated care initiatives, and innovation from health care staff.

  2. When Working Together Works: Academic Success for Students in Out-of-Home Care. Best Practices in Homeless Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The National Center for Homeless Education and the Legal Center for Foster Care and Education present this brief to help educators and child welfare advocates work together to support the academic success of children and youth in out-of-home care. The brief offers practical, proven strategies for implementing two federal laws collaboratively: The…

  3. Chronic disease management and the home-care alternative in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Tsasis, Peter

    2009-08-01

    The pressure on our health-care system to deliver efficient, quality and cost-effective care is increasing. The debate on its sustainability is also expanding. These challenges can be managed with revisions to our health-care policy frameworks governing how and what public health-care services are delivered. Chronic disease management and home care can together ease many of the present and future pressures facing the health-care system. However, the current level of investment and the present policy are not effectively supporting movement in this direction. Updating the Canada Health Act to reflect the realities of our health-care system, and developing policies to support the areas of interdisciplinary teamwork and system integration are needed to facilitate chronic disease management and home care in Canada. This article lays out the challenges, highlights the impending issues and suggests a framework for moving forward.

  4. [Part I. End-stage chronic organ failures: a position paper on shared care planning. The Integrated Care Pathway].

    PubMed

    Gristina, Giuseppe R; Orsi, Luciano; Carlucci, Annalisa; Causarano, Ignazio R; Formica, Marco; Romanò, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    In Italy the birth rate decrease together with the continuous improvement of living conditions on one hand, and the health care progress on the other hand, led in recent years to an increasing number of patients with chronic mono- or multi-organ failures and in an extension of their life expectancy. However, the natural history of chronic failures has not changed and the inescapable disease's worsening at the end makes more rare remissions, increasing hospital admissions rate and length of stay. Thus, when the "end-stage" get close clinicians have to engage the patient and his relatives in an advance care planning aimed to share a decision making process regarding all future treatments and related ethical choices such as patient's best interests, rights, values, and priorities. A right approach to the chronic organ failures end-stage patients consists therefore of a careful balance between the new powers of intervention provided by the biotechnology and pharmacology (intensive care), both with the quality of remaining life supplied by physicians to these patients (proportionality and beneficence) and the effective resources rationing and allocation (distributive justice). However, uncertainty still marks the criteria used by doctors to assess prognosis of these patients in order to make decisions concerning intensive or palliative care. The integrated care pathway suggested in this position paper shared by nine Italian medical societies, has to be intended as a guide focused to identify end-stage patients and choosing for them the best care option between intensive treatments and palliative care.

  5. The chronic care model versus disease management programs: a transaction cost analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Leeman, Jennifer; Mark, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    The present article applies transaction cost analysis as a framework for better understanding health plans' decisions to improve chronic illness management by using disease management programs versus redesigning care within physician practices.

  6. An Academic-Marketing Collaborative to Promote Depression Care: A Tale of Two Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Kravitz, Richard L.; Epstein, Ronald M.; Bell, Robert A.; Rochlen, Aaron B.; Duberstein, Paul; Riby, Caroline H.; Caccamo, Anthony F.; Slee, Christina K.; Cipri, Camille S.; Paterniti, Debora A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Commercial advertising and patient education have separate theoretical underpinnings, approaches, and practitioners. This paper aims to describe a collaboration between academic researchers and a marketing firm working to produce demographically targeted public service anouncements (PSAs) designed to enhance depression care-seeking in primary care. Methods An interdisciplinary group of academic researcherss contracted with a marketing firm in Rochester, NY to produce PSAs that would help patients with depressive symptoms engage more effectively with their primary care physicians (PCPs). The researchers brought perspectives derived from clinical experience and the social sciences and conducted empirical research using focus groups, conjoint analysis, and a population-based survey. Results were shared with the marketing firm, which produced four PSA variants targeted to gender and socioeconomic position. Results There was no simple, one-to-one relationship between research results and the form, content, or style of the PSAs. Instead, empirical findings served as a springboard for discussion and kept the creative process tethered to the experiences, attitudes, and opinions of actual patients. Reflecting research findings highlighting patients’ struggles to recognize, label, and disclose depressive symptoms, the marketing firm generated communication objectives that emphasized: a) educating the patient to consider and investigate the possibility of depression; b) creating the belief that the PCP is interested in discussing depression and capable of offering helpful treatment; and c) modelling different ways of communicating with physicians about depression. Before production, PSA prototypes were vetted with additional focus groups. The winning prototype, “Faces,” involved a multi-ethnic montage of formerly depressed persons talking about how depression affected them and how they improved with treatment, punctuated by a physician who provided clinical

  7. Chronic academic stress increases a group of microRNAs in peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Honda, Manami; Kuwano, Yuki; Katsuura-Kamano, Sakurako; Kamezaki, Yoshiko; Fujita, Kinuyo; Akaike, Yoko; Kano, Shizuka; Nishida, Kensei; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Rokutan, Kazuhito

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play key roles in regulation of cellular processes in response to changes in environment. In this study, we examined alterations in miRNA profiles in peripheral blood from 25 male medical students two months and two days before the National Examination for Medical Practitioners. Blood obtained one month after the examination were used as baseline controls. Levels of seven miRNAs (miR-16, -20b, -26b, -29a, -126, -144 and -144*) were significantly elevated during the pre-examination period in association with significant down-regulation of their target mRNAs (WNT4, CCM2, MAK, and FGFR1 mRNAs) two days before the examination. State anxiety assessed two months before the examination was positively and negatively correlated with miR-16 and its target WNT4 mRNA levels, respectively. Fold changes in miR-16 levels from two days before to one month after the examination were inversely correlated with those in WNT4 mRNA levels over the same time points. We also confirmed the interaction between miR-16 and WNT4 3'UTR in HEK293T cells overexpressing FLAG-tagged WNT4 3'UTR and miR-16. Thus, a distinct group of miRNAs in periheral blood may participate in the integrated response to chronic academic stress in healthy young men.

  8. Chronic Academic Stress Increases a Group of microRNAs in Peripheral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Manami; Kuwano, Yuki; Katsuura-Kamano, Sakurako; Kamezaki, Yoshiko; Fujita, Kinuyo; Akaike, Yoko; Kano, Shizuka; Nishida, Kensei; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Rokutan, Kazuhito

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play key roles in regulation of cellular processes in response to changes in environment. In this study, we examined alterations in miRNA profiles in peripheral blood from 25 male medical students two months and two days before the National Examination for Medical Practitioners. Blood obtained one month after the examination were used as baseline controls. Levels of seven miRNAs (miR-16, -20b, -26b, -29a, -126, -144 and -144*) were significantly elevated during the pre-examination period in association with significant down-regulation of their target mRNAs (WNT4, CCM2, MAK, and FGFR1 mRNAs) two days before the examination. State anxiety assessed two months before the examination was positively and negatively correlated with miR-16 and its target WNT4 mRNA levels, respectively. Fold changes in miR-16 levels from two days before to one month after the examination were inversely correlated with those in WNT4 mRNA levels over the same time points. We also confirmed the interaction between miR-16 and WNT4 3′UTR in HEK293T cells overexpressing FLAG-tagged WNT4 3′UTR and miR-16. Thus, a distinct group of miRNAs in periheral blood may participate in the integrated response to chronic academic stress in healthy young men. PMID:24130753

  9. Chronic pain disorders in HIV primary care: clinical characteristics and association with healthcare utilization.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jocelyn M; So, Eric; Jebakumar, Jebakaran; George, Mary Catherine; Simpson, David M; Robinson-Papp, Jessica

    2016-04-01

    Chronic pain is common in HIV, but incompletely characterized, including its underlying etiologies, its effect on healthcare utilization, and the characteristics of affected patients in the HIV primary care setting. These data are needed to design and justify appropriate clinic-based pain management services. Using a clinical data warehouse, we analyzed one year of data from 638 patients receiving standard-of-care antiretroviral therapy in a large primary care HIV clinic, located in the Harlem neighborhood of New York City. We found that 40% of patients carried one or more chronic pain diagnoses. The most common diagnoses were degenerative musculoskeletal disorders (eg, degenerative spinal disease and osteoarthritis), followed by neuropathic pain and headache disorders. Many patients (16%) had multiple chronic pain diagnoses. Women, older patients, and patients with greater burdens of medical illness, and psychiatric and substance use comorbidities were disproportionately represented among those with chronic pain diagnoses. Controlling for overall health status, HIV patients with chronic pain had greater healthcare utilization including emergency department visits and radiology procedures. In summary, our study demonstrates the high prevalence of chronic pain disorders in the primary care HIV clinic. Colocated interventions for chronic pain in this setting should not only focus on musculoskeletal pain but also account for complex multifaceted pain syndromes, and address the unique biopsychosocial features of this population. Furthermore, because chronic pain is prevalent in HIV and associated with increased healthcare utilization, developing clinic-based pain management programs could be cost-effective.

  10. Primary Care Management of Chronic Nonmalignant Pain in Veterans: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Jorge G.; Qadri, S. Sobiya; Nader, Samir; Wang, Jia; Lawler, Timothy; Hagenlocker, Brian; Roos, Bernard A.

    2010-01-01

    Clinicians managing older patients with chronic pain play an important role. This paper explores the attitudes of primary care clinicians (PCPs) toward chronic nonmalignant pain management and their experiences using a clinical decision support system. Our investigation followed a qualitative approach based on grounded theory. Twenty-one PCPs…

  11. Individualized Health Care Plans: Supporting Children With Chronic Conditions in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Amanda F.; Hughes, Mary-alayne

    2016-01-01

    Due to the major advances in technology and the sciences, advances in the medical treatment options for children with chronic conditions are being made at an astonishing rate. In the health care field, "children with chronic conditions" is a generic phrase that typically refers to children with physical, developmental, behavioral, or…

  12. [From chronic disease to multimorbidity: Which impact on organization of health care].

    PubMed

    Belche, Jean-Luc; Berrewaerts, Marie-Astrid; Ketterer, Frédéric; Henrard, Gilles; Vanmeerbeek, Marc; Giet, Didier

    2015-11-01

    Healthcare systems are concerned with the growing prevalence of chronic diseases. Single disease approach, based on the Chronic Care Model, is known to improve specific indicators for the targeted disease. However, the co-existence of several chronic disease, or multimorbidity, within a same patient is the most frequent situation. The fragmentation of care, as consequence of the single disease approach, has negative impact on the patient and healthcare professionals. A person centred approach is a method addressing the combination of health issues of each patient. The coordination and synthesis role is key to ensure continuity of care for the patient within a network of healthcare professionals from several settings of care. This function is the main characteristic of an organized first level of care.

  13. Re-designing Orem's Self-care Theory for Patients with Chronic Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hasanpour-Dehkordi, Ali; Mohammadi, Nooredin; Nikbakht-Nasrabadi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis is an inflammatory disease which has many adverse effects on patients’ life because of its chronic nature. Since Orem's theory of self-care is a grounded theory, the concepts and applications of this theory in patients with chronic hepatitis who have special needs may lead to some challenges. The purpose of this study was to explore self-care in patients with chronic hepatitis. Methods/Design: A directed content analysis was used in this qualitative study. Participants were recruited from a metropolitan area. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews. The verbatim transcripts of the participants’ interviews were analyzed according to directed content analysis. Results: In this study, four themes, suggested by Orem, were drawn from the data according to directed content analysis. The codes generated from the data were classified into concepts and then the concepts were assigned into these four themes. These themes were needs in the matrix of time and place, self-care agency, need for change in self-care and consequences of hepatitis. Conclusion: The use of Orem's self-care theory cannot meet the need for self-care in hepatitis patients because these patients have vital sexual, respect and belonging, physical, economical, and psychological-behavioral needs, and lack adequate knowledge about self-care. Consequently, the specific self-care model developed in this study helps health professionals identify self-care activities in patients with chronic hepatitis. PMID:27803560

  14. Implementation of chronic illness care in German primary care practices – how do multimorbid older patients view routine care? A cross-sectional study using multilevel hierarchical modeling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In primary care, patients with multiple chronic conditions are the rule rather than the exception. The Chronic Care Model (CCM) is an evidence-based framework for improving chronic illness care, but little is known about the extent to which it has been implemented in routine primary care. The aim of this study was to describe how multimorbid older patients assess the routine chronic care they receive in primary care practices in Germany, and to explore the extent to which factors at both the practice and patient level determine their views. Methods This cross-sectional study used baseline data from an observational cohort study involving 158 general practitioners (GP) and 3189 multimorbid patients. Standardized questionnaires were employed to collect data, and the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC) questionnaire used to assess the quality of care received. Multilevel hierarchical modeling was used to identify any existing association between the dependent variable, PACIC, and independent variables at the patient level (socio-economic factors, weighted count of chronic conditions, instrumental activities of daily living, health-related quality of life, graded chronic pain, no. of contacts with GP, existence of a disease management program (DMP) disease, self-efficacy, and social support) and the practice level (age and sex of GP, years in current practice, size and type of practice). Results The overall mean PACIC score was 2.4 (SD 0.8), with the mean subscale scores ranging from 2.0 (SD 1.0, subscale goal setting/tailoring) to 3.5 (SD 0.7, delivery system design). At the patient level, higher PACIC scores were associated with a DMP disease, more frequent GP contacts, higher social support, and higher autonomy of past occupation. At the practice level, solo practices were associated with higher PACIC values than other types of practice. Conclusions This study shows that from the perspective of multimorbid patients receiving care in German

  15. Expectations outpace reality: physicians' use of care management tools for patients with chronic conditions.

    PubMed

    Carrier, Emily; Reschovsky, James

    2009-12-01

    Use of care management tools--such as group visits or patient registries--varies widely among primary care physicians whose practices care for patients with four common chronic conditions--asthma, diabetes, congestive heart failure and depression--according to a new national study by the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC). For example, less than a third of these primary care physicians in 2008 reported their practices use nurse managers to coordinate care, and only four in 10 were in practices using registries to keep track of patients with chronic conditions. Physicians also used care management tools for patients with some chronic conditions but not others. Practice size and setting were strongly related to the likelihood that physicians used care management tools, with solo and smaller group practices least likely to use care management tools. The findings suggest that, along with experimenting with financial incentives for primary care physicians to adopt care management tools, policy makers might consider developing community-level care management resources, such as nurse managers, that could be shared among smaller physician practices.

  16. Sickness presenteeism among health care providers in an academic tertiary care center in Riyadh.

    PubMed

    Al Nuhait, Mohammed; Al Harbi, Khaled; Al Jarboa, Amjad; Bustami, Rami; Alharbi, Shmaylan; Albekairy, Abdulkareem; Almodaimegh, Hind

    2017-03-23

    The term sickness presenteeism (SP) has been described as the act of going to work despite having a state of health that may be regarded as poor enough to justify sick leave. SP has been observed to be prevalent among three-quarters of health care providers (HCPs). Working while sick not only puts patients at risk but also decreases productivity and increases the probability of medical errors. Moreover, SP has been identified as a risk factor for many negative health outcomes among the HCPs themselves, such as depression, burnout, and serious cardiac events. The aim of this study was to identify the reasons for and prevalence of SP and perceptions of the impact of this practice on patient safety among HCPs. A cross-sectional study was conducted, including 279 purposively selected healthcare professionals (doctors, nurses, dentists, pharmacists and other health care professionals) working at the Ministry of National Guard Health Affairs-King Abdulaziz Medical City (MNGHA-KAMC). While nearly all of the participants (91%) believed that working while sick exposed patients to risk, the rate of SP during the past year was reported as 74%, and one fourth of respondents reported working while sick 3-4 times during the past year. More than half of the participants were not aware of the existence of a departmental policy regarding sick leave. The most common reasons reported for working while sick were not wanting to burden co-workers (71%), feelings of duty toward patients (67%), and avoiding an increased future workload caused by absence (59%). A lack of awareness regarding the existing rules and polices related to sick leave was reported by more than half of the participants. Several predisposing and enabling factors were reported as determinants influencing SP, e.g., observation of the practice of SP by peers and feelings of sympathy towards coworkers, including not wanting to overburden them, were reported to be determinants informing the decision of whether to work

  17. Integrating research, clinical care, and education in academic health science centers.

    PubMed

    King, Gillian; Thomson, Nicole; Rothstein, Mitchell; Kingsnorth, Shauna; Parker, Kathryn

    2016-10-10

    Purpose One of the major issues faced by academic health science centers (AHSCs) is the need for mechanisms to foster the integration of research, clinical, and educational activities to achieve the vision of evidence-informed decision making (EIDM) and optimal client care. The paper aims to discuss this issue. Design/methodology/approach This paper synthesizes literature on organizational learning and collaboration, evidence-informed organizational decision making, and learning-based organizations to derive insights concerning the nature of effective workplace learning in AHSCs. Findings An evidence-informed model of collaborative workplace learning is proposed to aid the alignment of research, clinical, and educational functions in AHSCs. The model articulates relationships among AHSC academic functions and sub-functions, cross-functional activities, and collaborative learning processes, emphasizing the importance of cross-functional activities in enhancing collaborative learning processes and optimizing EIDM and client care. Cross-functional activities involving clinicians, researchers, and educators are hypothesized to be a primary vehicle for integration, supported by a learning-oriented workplace culture. These activities are distinct from interprofessional teams, which are clinical in nature. Four collaborative learning processes are specified that are enhanced in cross-functional activities or teamwork: co-constructing meaning, co-learning, co-producing knowledge, and co-using knowledge. Practical implications The model provides an aspirational vision and insight into the importance of cross-functional activities in enhancing workplace learning. The paper discusses the conceptual and empirical basis to the model, its contributions and limitations, and implications for AHSCs. Originality/value The model's potential utility for health care is discussed, with implications for organizational culture and the promotion of cross-functional activities.

  18. An Innovative Approach to Health Care Delivery for Patients with Chronic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Janice L; Bourn, Scott; Skoufalos, Alexis; Beck, Eric H; Castillo, Daniel J

    2017-02-01

    Although the health care reform movement has brought about positive changes, lingering inefficiencies and communication gaps continue to hamper system-wide progress toward achieving the overarching goal-higher quality health care and improved population health outcomes at a lower cost. The multiple interrelated barriers to improvement are most evident in care for the population of patients with multiple chronic conditions. During transitions of care, the lack of integration among various silos and inadequate communication among providers cause delays in delivering appropriate health care services to these vulnerable patients and their caregivers, diminishing positive health outcomes and driving costs ever higher. Long-entrenched acute care-focused treatment and reimbursement paradigms hamper more effective deployment of existing resources to improve the ongoing care of these patients. New models for care coordination during transitions, longitudinal high-risk care management, and unplanned acute episodic care have been conceived and piloted with promising results. Utilizing existing resources, Mobile Integrated Healthcare is an emerging model focused on closing these care gaps by means of a round-the-clock, technologically sophisticated, physician-led interprofessional team to manage care transitions and chronic care services on-site in patients' homes or workplaces.

  19. An Innovative Approach to Health Care Delivery for Patients with Chronic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bourn, Scott; Skoufalos, Alexis; Beck, Eric H.; Castillo, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Although the health care reform movement has brought about positive changes, lingering inefficiencies and communication gaps continue to hamper system-wide progress toward achieving the overarching goal—higher quality health care and improved population health outcomes at a lower cost. The multiple interrelated barriers to improvement are most evident in care for the population of patients with multiple chronic conditions. During transitions of care, the lack of integration among various silos and inadequate communication among providers cause delays in delivering appropriate health care services to these vulnerable patients and their caregivers, diminishing positive health outcomes and driving costs ever higher. Long-entrenched acute care-focused treatment and reimbursement paradigms hamper more effective deployment of existing resources to improve the ongoing care of these patients. New models for care coordination during transitions, longitudinal high-risk care management, and unplanned acute episodic care have been conceived and piloted with promising results. Utilizing existing resources, Mobile Integrated Healthcare is an emerging model focused on closing these care gaps by means of a round-the-clock, technologically sophisticated, physician-led interprofessional team to manage care transitions and chronic care services on-site in patients' homes or workplaces. PMID:27563751

  20. Academic-practice partnerships to promote evidence-based practice in long-term care: oral hygiene care practices as an exemplar.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Eleanor Schildwachter; Lekan, Deborah; Hebert, Catherine; Leatherwood, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    Learning in practice disciplines suffers when gaps exist between classroom instruction and students' observations of routine clinical practices.(1) Academic institutions, therefore, have a strong interest in fostering the rapid and effective translation of evidence-based care techniques into routine practice. Long-term care (LTC) practice sites are particularly vulnerable to gaps between classroom teaching and how daily care is implemented, owing to the recent rapid advances in the scientific bases of care for frail older adults, the relative isolation of most LTC sites from academic settings,(2) and the relatively small number of registered nurses (RNs) available in LTC settings who can facilitate translation of research-based practices into care.(3) The aim of this project was to demonstrate the feasibility and value of an academic practice partnership to implement evidence-based approaches to solving resident care problems in LTC, as many scientifically proven practices hold promise for improving resident outcomes yet adoption is often slow.(4) We developed and implemented a clinical practice improvement process, based on diffusion of innovations theory and research,(5-8) to serve as a new model of academic-practice collaboration between a university school of nursing, LTC facility management and direct-care staff, as a means of developing high quality clinical sites for student rotations. The goal was to implement a sustainable evidence-based oral care program as an exemplar of how scientific evidence can be translated into LTC practice. This project focused on oral hygiene because the staff was dissatisfied with their existing resident oral care program, and an evidence-base for oral care in LTC existed that had not yet been incorporated into care routines. This article describes a systematic, replicable process for linking advanced practice registered nurse expertise with staff insights about care systems to reduce the gap between teaching and practice in

  1. Caring for People with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Perceived Stress Versus Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrari, Joseph R.; Jason, Leonard A.

    1997-01-01

    Examined adult caregivers (N=96) caring for persons with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) on a long-term basis. Results indicate no significant sex difference regarding caregiver stress and satisfaction. The more life satisfaction caregivers reported, the less stress and more satisfaction they experienced in caring for a person with CFS. (RJM)

  2. [Care coordination for patients suffering from a chronic disease or cancer].

    PubMed

    Wulff, Christian; Søndergaard, Jens; Olesen, Frede; Vedsted, Peter

    2010-03-08

    Care coordination is a superordinate term for terms related to the optimization of care for people suffering from chronic diseases and cancer. In this article, we present Danish terms for "disease management programme" and "case management" among others, and effects are summarized. The central Danish terms explored are "forløbskoordinering", "forløbsprogram", "forløbskoordinator", and "tovholder".

  3. The Care Needs of Community-Dwelling Seniors Suffering from Advanced Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Donna M.; Ross, Carolyn; Goodridge, Donna; Davis, Penny; Landreville, Alison; Roebuck, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Aim: This study was undertaken to determine the care needs of Canadian seniors living at home with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Background: COPD is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although hospitalizations for illness exacerbations and end-stage care may be common, most persons with COPD live out…

  4. Commentary: "Who was caring for Mary?" revisited: a call for all academic physicians caring for patients to focus on systems and quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Southwick, Frederick S; Spear, Steven J

    2009-12-01

    Over 15 years have passed since Mary's near death (Annals of Internal Medicine. 1993;118:146-148). Disappointment in the care by fellow academic physicians persists; however, a reanalysis of her case through the lens of complex systems design and performance yields a more accurate and actionable perspective. Mary's suffering was not due to human failure alone. Human failure was provoked and exacerbated by broken processes including ambiguous assignments of responsibility; inadequate transfers of information and authority; unreliable or unavailable protocols for providing safe, effective treatment; and a failure to integrate the deep but narrow perspectives of individual specialists into a complete picture of Mary's condition. Her case exemplifies, in personal terms, many of the system challenges academic medical centers face: Faculty have other missions that can conflict with patient care; disease complexity is high, requiring input from multiple subspecialists; clinical departments serve as roadblocks to communication; and novice physicians, requiring close supervision, have primary responsibility for the day-to-day care of acutely ill patients. The academic physicians who first cared for Mary unwittingly accepted flawed systems, and they failed to work around them. At great monetary and emotional expense, last-minute heroics saved Mary. In a dysfunctional system, even the most conscientious physician may be viewed as uncaring. As Mary's case so clearly illustrates, patients and their families see the system and the physician as one. Only by working to improve the systems of delivery will academic physicians again be consistently viewed as caring.

  5. Legal, financial, and ethical ambiguities for Mexican American families: caring for children with chronic conditions.

    PubMed

    Rehm, Roberta S

    2003-05-01

    The author reports findings from a study about experiences of 17 Mexican American families caring for children with serious chronic conditions. Legal, financial, and ethical ambiguities arose when parents' desire to provide necessary care for their children and providers' professional commitment to offer this care conflicted with United States laws, including welfare reform initiatives, requiring providers to determine eligibility before providing care to immigrants and to report undocumented care seekers to authorities. Families frequently felt intimidated because health care systems are complex, and legal residency status often varied among family members. Findings imply that official policy and education of family members should aim to assure that children with chronic conditions receive needed services without relying on providers to enforce immigration laws.

  6. Complexity, comorbidity, and health care costs associated with chronic widespread pain in primary care.

    PubMed

    Morales-Espinoza, Enma Marianela; Kostov, Belchin; Salami, Daniel Cararach; Perez, Zoe Herreras; Rosalen, Anna Pereira; Molina, Jacinto Ortiz; Gonzalez-de Paz, Luis; Momblona, Josep Miquel Sotoca; Àreu, Jaume Benavent; Brito-Zerón, Pilar; Ramos-Casals, Manuel; Sisó-Almirall, Antoni

    2016-04-01

    The objective was to estimate the prevalence of chronic widespread pain (CWP) and compare the quality-of-life (QoL), cardiovascular risk factors, comorbidity, complexity, and health costs with the reference population. A multicenter case-control study was conducted at 3 primary care centers in Barcelona between January and December 2012: 3048 randomized patients were evaluated for CWP according to the American College of Rheumatology definition. Questionnaires on pain, QoL, disability, fatigue, anxiety, depression, and sleep quality were administered. Cardiovascular risk and the Charlson index were calculated. We compared the complexity of cases and controls using Clinical Risk Groups, severity and annual direct and indirect health care costs. CWP criteria were found in 168 patients (92.3% women, prevalence 5.51% [95% confidence interval: 4.75%-6.38%]). Patients with CWP had worse QoL (34.2 vs 44.1, P < 0.001), and greater disability (1.04 vs 0.35; P < 0.001), anxiety (43.9% vs 13.3%; P < 0.001), depression (27% vs 5.8%; P < 0.001), sleep disturbances, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, and number of cardiovascular events (13.1% vs 4.8%; P = 0.028) and higher rates of complexity, severity, hospitalization, and mortality. Costs were &OV0556;3751 per year in patients with CWP vs &OV0556;1397 in controls (P < 0.001). In conclusion, the average patient with CWP has a worse QoL and a greater burden of mental health disorders and cardiovascular risk. The average annual cost associated with CWP is nearly 3 times higher than that of patients without CWP, controlling for other clinical factors. These findings have implications for disease management and budgetary considerations.

  7. Physicians’ perceptions of capacity building for managing chronic disease in seniors using integrated interprofessional care models

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Linda; Heckman, George; McKelvie, Robert; Jong, Philip; D’Elia, Teresa; Hillier, Loretta M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the barriers to and facilitators of adapting and expanding a primary care memory clinic model to integrate care of additional complex chronic geriatric conditions (heart failure, falls, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and frailty) into care processes with the goal of improving outcomes for seniors. Design Mixed-methods study using quantitative (questionnaires) and qualitative (interviews) methods. Setting Ontario. Participants Family physicians currently working in primary care memory clinic teams and supporting geriatric specialists. Methods Family physicians currently working in memory clinic teams (n = 29) and supporting geriatric specialists (n = 9) were recruited as survey participants. Interviews were conducted with memory clinic lead physicians (n = 16). Statistical analysis was done to assess differences between family physician ratings and geriatric specialist ratings related to the capacity for managing complex chronic geriatric conditions, the role of interprofessional collaboration within primary care, and funding and staffing to support geriatric care. Results from both study methods were compared to identify common findings. Main findings Results indicate overall support for expanding the memory clinic model to integrate care for other complex conditions. However, the current primary care structure is challenged to support optimal management of patients with multiple comorbidities, particularly as related to limited funding and staffing resources. Structured training, interprofessional teams, and an active role of geriatric specialists within primary care were identified as important facilitators. Conclusion The memory clinic model, as applied to other complex chronic geriatric conditions, has the potential to build capacity for high-quality primary care, improve health outcomes, promote efficient use of health care resources, and reduce health care costs. PMID:25932482

  8. Managing multimorbidity in primary care in patients with chronic respiratory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Deborah; Agur, Karolina; Mercer, Stewart; Eiras, Andreia; González-Montalvo, Juan I; Gruffydd-Jones, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    The term multimorbidity is usually defined as the coexistence of two or more chronic conditions within an individual, whereas the term comorbidity traditionally describes patients with an index condition and one or more additional conditions. Multimorbidity of chronic conditions markedly worsens outcomes in patients, increases treatment burden and increases health service costs. Although patients with chronic respiratory disease often have physical comorbidities, they also commonly experience psychological problems such as depression and anxiety. Multimorbidity is associated with increased health-care utilisation and specifically with an increased number of prescription drugs in individuals with multiple chronic conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This npj Primary Care Respiratory Medicine Education Section case study involves a patient in a primary care consultation presenting several common diseases prevalent in people of this age. The patient takes nine different drugs at this moment, one or more pills for each condition, which amounts to polypharmacy. The problems related with polypharmacy recommend that a routine medication review by primary care physicians be performed to reduce the risk of adverse effects of polypharmacy among those with multiple chronic conditions. The primary care physician has the challenging role of integrating all of the clinical problems affecting the patient and reviewing all medicaments (including over-the-counter medications) taken by the patient at any point in time, and has the has the key to prevent the unwanted consequences of polypharmacy. Multimorbid chronic disease management can be achieved with the use of care planning, unified disease templates, use of information technology with appointment reminders and with the help of the wider primary care and community teams. PMID:27629064

  9. Adherence to a Depression Self-Care Intervention among Primary Care Patients with Chronic Physical Conditions: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCusker, Jane; Cole, Martin G.; Yaffe, Mark; Strumpf, Erin; Sewitch, Maida; Sussman, Tamara; Ciampi, Antonio; Lavoie, Kim; Belzile, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Among primary care patients with chronic physical conditions and comorbid depressive symptoms, to assess (1) the effect of lay telephone coaching on adherence to a psycho-educational intervention for depression, (2) demographic characteristics that predict adherence and (3) the association between adherence and 6-month outcomes. Design:…

  10. Bridging knowledge to develop an action plan for integrated care for chronic diseases in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Lionis, Christos; Yfantopoulos, John

    2015-01-01

    The health, social and economic impact of chronic diseases is well documented in Europe. However, chronic diseases threaten relatively more the ‘memorandum and peripheral’ Eurozone countries (i.e., Greece, Spain, Portugal and Ireland), which were under heavy recession after the economic crisis in 2009. Especially in Greece, where the crisis was the most severe across Europe, the austerity measures affected mainly people with chronic diseases. As a result, the urgency to tackle the threat of chronic diseases in Greece by promoting public health and providing effective chronic care while flattening the rising health care expenditure is eminent. In many European countries, integrated care is seen as a means to achieve this. The aim of this paper was to support Greek health policy makers to develop an action plan from 2015 onwards, to integrate care by bridging local policy context and needs with knowledge and experience from other European countries. To achieve this aim, we adopted a conceptual framework developed by the World Health Organization on one hand to analyse the status of integrated care in Greece, and on the other to develop an action plan for reform. The action plan was based on an analysis of the Greek health care system regarding prerequisite conditions to integrate care, a clear understanding of its context and successful examples of integrated care from other European countries. This study showed that chronic diseases are poorly addressed in Greece and integrated care is in embryonic stage. Greek policy makers have to realise that this is the opportunity to make substantial reforms in chronic care. Failing to reform towards integrated care would lead to the significant risk of collapse of the Greek health care system with all associated negative consequences. The action plan provided in this paper could support policy makers to make the first serious step to face this challenge. The details and specifications of the action plan can only be decided

  11. Chronic disease management: a review of current performance across quality of care domains and opportunities for improving osteoarthritis care.

    PubMed

    Brand, Caroline A; Ackerman, Ilana N; Bohensky, Megan A; Bennell, Kim L

    2013-02-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most prevalent chronic joint disease worldwide. The incidence and prevalence are increasing as the population ages and lifestyle risk factors such as obesity increase. There are several evidence-based clinical practice guidelines available to guide clinician decision making, but there is evidence that care provided is suboptimal across all domains of quality: effectiveness, safety, timeliness and appropriateness, patient-centered care, and efficiency. System, clinician, and patient barriers to optimizing care need to be addressed. Innovative models designed to meet patient needs and those that harness social networks must be developed, especially to support those with mild to moderate disease.

  12. Perceived Health Status and Utilization of Specialty Care: Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Patients with Chronic Diseases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glover, Saundra; Bellinger, Jessica D.; Bae, Sejong; Rivers, Patrick A.; Singh, Karan P.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to determine racial and ethnic variations in specialty care utilization based on (a) perceived health status and (b) chronic disease status. Methods: Variations in specialty care utilization, by perceived health and chronic disease status, were examined using the Commonwealth Fund Health Care Quality…

  13. Gender differences in acute and chronic pain in the emergency department: results of the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference pain section.

    PubMed

    Musey, Paul I; Linnstaedt, Sarah D; Platts-Mills, Timothy F; Miner, James R; Bortsov, Andrey V; Safdar, Basmah; Bijur, Polly; Rosenau, Alex; Tsze, Daniel S; Chang, Andrew K; Dorai, Suprina; Engel, Kirsten G; Feldman, James A; Fusaro, Angela M; Lee, David C; Rosenberg, Mark; Keefe, Francis J; Peak, David A; Nam, Catherine S; Patel, Roma G; Fillingim, Roger B; McLean, Samuel A

    2014-12-01

    Pain is a leading public health problem in the United States, with an annual economic burden of more than $630 billion, and is one of the most common reasons that individuals seek emergency department (ED) care. There is a paucity of data regarding sex differences in the assessment and treatment of acute and chronic pain conditions in the ED. The Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference convened in Dallas, Texas, in May 2014 to develop a research agenda to address this issue among others related to sex differences in the ED. Prior to the conference, experts and stakeholders from emergency medicine and the pain research field reviewed the current literature and identified eight candidate priority areas. At the conference, these eight areas were reviewed and all eight were ratified using a nominal group technique to build consensus. These priority areas were: 1) gender differences in the pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions for pain, including differences in opioid tolerance, side effects, or misuse; 2) gender differences in pain severity perceptions, clinically meaningful differences in acute pain, and pain treatment preferences; 3) gender differences in pain outcomes of ED patients across the life span; 4) gender differences in the relationship between acute pain and acute psychological responses; 5) the influence of physician-patient gender differences and characteristics on the assessment and treatment of pain; 6) gender differences in the influence of acute stress and chronic stress on acute pain responses; 7) gender differences in biological mechanisms and molecular pathways mediating acute pain in ED populations; and 8) gender differences in biological mechanisms and molecular pathways mediating chronic pain development after trauma, stress, or acute illness exposure. These areas represent priority areas for future scientific inquiry, and gaining understanding in these will be essential to improving our understanding of sex and gender

  14. Health Systems Innovation at Academic Health Centers: Leading in a New Era of Health Care Delivery.

    PubMed

    Ellner, Andrew L; Stout, Somava; Sullivan, Erin E; Griffiths, Elizabeth P; Mountjoy, Ashlin; Phillips, Russell S

    2015-07-01

    Challenged by demands to reduce costs and improve service delivery, the U.S. health care system requires transformational change. Health systems innovation is defined broadly as novel ideas, products, services, and processes-including new ways to promote healthy behaviors and better integrate health services with public health and other social services-which achieve better health outcomes and/or patient experience at equal or lower cost. Academic health centers (AHCs) have an opportunity to focus their considerable influence and expertise on health systems innovation to create new approaches to service delivery and to nurture leaders of transformation. AHCs have traditionally used their promotions criteria to signal their values; creating a health systems innovator promotion track could be a critical step towards creating opportunities for innovators in academic medicine. In this Perspective, the authors review publicly available promotions materials at top-ranked medical schools and find that while criteria for advancement increasingly recognize systems innovation, there is a lack of specificity on metrics beyond the traditional yardstick of peer-reviewed publications. In addition to new promotions pathways and alternative evidence for the impact of scholarship, other approaches to fostering health systems innovation at AHCs include more robust funding for career development in health systems innovation, new curricula to enable trainees to develop skills in health systems innovation, and new ways for innovators to disseminate their work. AHCs that foster health systems innovation could meet a critical need to contribute both to the sustainability of our health care system and to AHCs' continued leadership role within it.

  15. A Parent's Journey: Incorporating Principles of Palliative Care into Practice for Children with Chronic Neurologic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Brown, Allyson; Clark, Jonna D

    2015-09-01

    Rather than in conflict or in competition with the curative model of care, pediatric palliative care is a complementary and transdisciplinary approach used to optimize medical care for children with complex medical conditions. It provides care to the whole child, including physical, mental, and spiritual dimensions, in addition to support for the family. Through the voice of a parent, the following case-based discussion demonstrates how the fundamentals of palliative care medicine, when instituted early in the course of disease, can assist parents and families with shared medical decision making, ultimately improving the quality of life for children with life-limiting illnesses. Pediatric neurologists, as subspecialists who provide medical care for children with chronic and complex conditions, should consider invoking the principles of palliative care early in the course of a disease process, either through applying general facets or, if available, through consultation with a specialty palliative care service.

  16. Activating chronic kidney disease patients and family members through the Internet to promote integration of care

    PubMed Central

    Trisolini, Michael; Roussel, Amy; Zerhusen, Eileen; Schatell, Dorian; Harris, Shelly; Bandel, Karen; Salib, Philip; Klicko, Kristi

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Purpose To describe the potential role of the Internet as a vehicle for improving integration of care through activating chronic kidney disease patients and their family members. Also, to describe how that potential is being developed through a website sponsored by the Medicare program in the United States. Background The Internet is expanding at a rapid rate, and health-related websites are one of its most popular features. Efforts to promote integration of care have focused mainly on providers up to now, and more emphasis is needed on the potential roles of patients. Chronically ill patients have particular needs for improved education about their conditions and enhanced involvement in care planning and treatment decisions. Medicare developed the Dialysis Facility Compare website to serve those goals for people with chronic kidney disease. Methods We conducted qualitative research with 140 chronic kidney disease patients and family members, and 130 renal care professionals to evaluate and improve the Dialysis Facility Compare website. A series of 19 focus groups, 13 triads (small focus groups), and 56 individual interviews were conducted in four regions of the United States and by telephone. Results We found that the Dialysis Facility Compare website has the potential to improve integration of care for people with chronic kidney disease in at least three ways. First: by expanding the roles of patients as members of the multi-disciplinary team of caregivers treating their disease. Second: through better integration of the informal care provided in the home and community with the formal care provided by health professionals. Third: by improving coordination of between care provided in the pre-dialysis and dialysis phases of the disease. Discussion We developed recommendations for revising and enhancing the Dialysis Facility Compare website in a number of ways to better promote patient activation and integration of care. The unique features of the Internet

  17. Conceptualising health services in terms of level and location of care--a view from the academic health complex.

    PubMed

    Myers, J E; Pelteret, R

    1995-05-01

    The origin and characteristics of academic health complexes (AHCs) are briefly outlined, along with pressures for restructuring of health services towards primary levels of care within the primary health care (PHC) approach. Weaknesses and strengths of the AHCs together with imbalances in the overall health system of which they are part are discussed. The Cape Town AHC is used to exemplify a suggested framework for analysis and development of other AHCs in South Africa and their transformation in accordance with the PHC approach. A method of service mapping is employed to aid an appreciation of the complexity of AHC services. Planning for potential transformation may be facilitated by conceptualising services in two dimensions, viz. level and location of care. Two important additional dimensions of service component linkage are integration across levels of care along a vertical axis, and integration across different services at primary level along a horizontal axis (comprehensiveness). AHCs, however skewly developed in terms of level and location of care, are complex combinations of services. They encompass all levels of care provided both within and beyond the walls of multiple health care facilities which are located both centrally and peripherally. AHC services are managed by health professionals in specific academic disciplines. They include PHC functions at the interface between primary and specialist care provision, and community health functions which are principally located outside the health care facilities in the community.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Enhancing provider knowledge and patient screening for palliative care needs in chronic multimorbid patients receiving home-based primary care.

    PubMed

    Wharton, Tracy; Manu, Erika; Vitale, Caroline A

    2015-02-01

    This article describes a pilot model to increase palliative care (PC) knowledge and collaboration among providers and to systematically identify chronic multimorbid home care patients who would benefit from focused discussion of potential PC needs. Thirty health care providers from a home-based primary care team attended interdisciplinary trainings. The Palliative Performance Scale (PPS) tool was used to trigger discussions of potential palliative needs at team rounds for patients who scored below a cutoff point on the tool. Palliative Performance Scale implementation added little burden on nurses and triggered a discussion in 51 flagged patients. The tool successfully identified 75% of patients who died or were discharged. Screening was systematic and consistent and resulted in targeted discussions about PC needs without generating additional burden on our PC consult service. This model shows promise for enhancing collaborative patient care and access to PC.

  19. Multidisciplinary team approach to improved chronic care management for diabetic patients in an urban safety net ambulatory care clinic.

    PubMed

    Tapp, Hazel; Phillips, Shay E; Waxman, Dael; Alexander, Matthew; Brown, Rhett; Hall, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Since the care of patients with multiple chronic diseases such as diabetes and depression accounts for the majority of health care costs, effective team approaches to managing such complex care in primary care are needed, particularly since psychosocial and physical disorders coexist. Uncontrolled diabetes is a leading health risk for morbidity, disability and premature mortality with between 18-31% of patients also having undiagnosed or undertreated depression. Here we describe a team driven approach that initially focused on patients with poorly controlled diabetes (A1c > 9) that took place at a family medicare office. The team included: resident and faculty physicians, a pharmacist, social worker, nurses, behavioral medicine interns, office scheduler, and an information technologist. The team developed immediate integrative care for diabetic patients during routine office visits.

  20. [Care of the chronically ill: strategic challenge, macro-management and health policies].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Picard, Patricia; Fuster-Culebras, Juli

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic diseases is increasing, with the patients who suffer from them having greater need for healthcare. This fact forces a redirection in the health system, currently focused on the acute diseases, to achieve an efficient care. For this reason, it is necessary to work at all levels, starting with political decisions. These decisions should be based on the technical and scientific evidence available. Health planning is essential to establish care strategies, defining the actions to ensure the coordination and continuity of care, and also the redefinition of professional roles, where primary care nurses assume more competencies, becoming key professionals in the care of the chronic patient. The new model should include the professionalization of the management of health services. Information and communication technologies will play an important role in the development of strategies, but considering them as the tools that they are, allowing for the patient to be the focus of attention, and ensuring the privacy and the confidentiality.

  1. The missing link: improving quality with a chronic disease management intervention for the primary care office.

    PubMed

    Zweifler, John

    2007-01-01

    Bold steps are necessary to improve quality of care for patients with chronic diseases and increase satisfaction of both primary care physicians and patients. Office-based chronic disease management (CDM) workers can achieve these objectives by offering self-management support, maintaining disease registries, and monitoring compliance from the point of care. CDM workers can provide the missing link by connecting patients, primary care physicans, and CDM services sponsored by health plans or in the community. CDM workers should be supported financially by Medicare, Medicaid, and commercial health plans through reimbursements to physicians for units of service, analogous to California's Comprehensive Perinatal Services Program. Care provided by CDM workers should be standardized, and training requirements should be sufficiently flexible to ensure wide dissemination. CDM workers can potentially improve quality while reducing costs for preventable hospitalizations and emergency department visits, but evaluation at multiple levels is recommended.

  2. Development of a questionnaire to evaluate practitioners’ confidence and knowledge in primary care in managing chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In the UK, chronic disease, including chronic kidney disease (CKD) is largely managed in primary care. We developed a tool to assess practitioner confidence and knowledge in managing CKD compared to other chronic diseases. This questionnaire was part of a cluster randomised quality improvement interventions in chronic kidney disease (QICKD; ISRCTN56023731). Methods The questionnaire was developed by family physicians, primary care nurses, academics and renal specialists. We conducted three focus groups (n = 7, 6, and 8) to refine the questionnaire using groups of general practitioners, practice nurses and trainees in general practice. We used paper based versions to develop the questionnaire and online surveys to test it. Practitioners in a group of volunteer, trial practices received the questionnaire twice. We measured its reliability using Cohen’s Kappa (K). Results The practitioners in the focus groups reached a consensus as to the key elements to include in the instrument. We achieved a 73.1% (n = 57/78) initial response rate for our questionnaire; of these 57, 54 completed the questionnaire a second time. Family physicians made up the largest single group of respondents (47.4%, n = 27). Initial response showed more female (64.9%, n = 37) than male (35.1%, n = 20) respondents. The reliability results from retesting showed that there was moderate agreement (k > 0.4) on all questions; with many showing substantial agreement (k > 0.6). There was substantial agreement in the questions about loop diuretics (k = 0.608, CI 0.432-0.784, p < 0.001), confidence in managing hypertension (k = 0.628, 95%CI 0.452-0.804, p < 0.001), diastolic blood pressure treatment thresholds in CKD (k = 0.608, 95%CI 0.436-0.780, p < 0.001) and the rate of decline of eGFR that would prompt referral (k = 0.764, 95%CI 0.603-0.925, p < 0.001). Conclusion The QICKD-CCQ is a reliable instrument for measuring confidence and

  3. Forum on the Future of Academic Medicine: Session IV--The Realities of the Health Care Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iglehart, John

    1998-01-01

    Describes proceedings of a meeting of the Association of American Medical Schools' Forum on the Future of Academic Medicine, focusing on ways in which medical schools can and are responding to changing, more competitive marketplaces for health services while sustaining their missions; the health care industry perspective; and characteristics of…

  4. Using Online Health Communities to Deliver Patient-Centered Care to People With Chronic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Our health care system faces major threats as the number of people with multiple chronic conditions rises dramatically. Objective To study the use of Online Health Communities (OHCs) as a tool to facilitate high-quality and affordable health care for future generations. Methods OHCs are Internet-based platforms that unite either a group of patients, a group of professionals, or a mixture of both. Members interact using modern communication technologies such as blogs, chats, forums, and wikis. We illustrate the use of OHCs for ParkinsonNet, a professional network for Parkinson disease whose participants—both patients and professionals—use various types of OHCs to deliver patient-centered care. Results We discuss several potential applications in clinical practice. First, due to rapid advances in medical knowledge, many health professionals lack sufficient expertise to address the complex health care needs of chronic patients. OHCs can be used to share experiences, exchange knowledge, and increase disease-specific expertise. Second, current health care delivery is fragmented, as many patients acquire relationships with multiple professionals and institutions. OHCs can bridge geographical distances and enable interdisciplinary collaboration across institutions and traditional echelons. Third, chronic patients lack adequate tools to self-manage their disease. OHCs can be used to actively engage and empower patients in their health care process and to tailor care to their individual needs. Personal health communities of individual patients offer unique opportunities to store all medical information in one central place, while allowing transparent communication across all members of each patient’s health care team. Conclusions OHCs are a powerful tool to address some of the challenges chronic care faces today. OHCs help to facilitate communication among professionals and patients and support coordination of care across traditional echelons, which does

  5. Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) Treatment Burden Among Low-Income Primary Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Linda S.; Vest, Bonnie M.; Madurai, Nethra; Singh, Ranjit; York, Trevor R.M.; Cipparone, Charlotte W.; Reilly, Sarah; Malik, Khalid S.; Fox, Chester H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study explored the self-management strategies and treatment burden experienced by low income US primary care patients with chronic kidney disease. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 34 patients from two primary care practices on Buffalo’s East Side, a low-income community. Qualitative analysis was undertaken using an inductive thematic content analysis approach. We applied Normalization Process Theory (NPT) to the concept of treatment burden to interpret and categorize our findings. Results The sample was predominantly African-American (79%) and female (59%). Most patients (79%) had a diagnosis of Stage 3 CKD. Four major themes were identified corresponding to NPT and treatment burden: (1) Coherence – making sense of CKD; (2) Cognitive participation – enlisting support and organizing personal resources; (3) Collective action – self-management work; and (4) Reflexive monitoring – further refining chronic illness self-care in the context of CKD. For each component we identified barriers hindering patients’ ability to accomplish the necessary tasks. Conclusions Our findings highlight the substantial treatment burden faced by inner-city primary care patients self-managing CKD in combination with other chronic illnesses. Health care providers’ awareness of treatment burden can inform the development of person-centered care plans that can help patients to better manage their chronic illnesses. PMID:25416418

  6. Does trust in health care influence the use of complementary and alternative medicine by chronically ill people?

    PubMed Central

    van den Brink-Muinen, A; Rijken, PM

    2006-01-01

    Background People's trust in health care and health care professionals is essential for the effectiveness of health care, especially for chronically ill people, since chronic diseases are by definition (partly) incurable. Therefore, it may be understandable that chronically ill people turn to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), often in addition to regular care. Chronically ill people use CAM two to five times more often than non-chronically ill people. The trust of chronically ill people in health care and health care professionals and the relationship of this with CAM use have not been reported until now. In this study, we examine the influence of chronically ill people's trust in health care and health care professionals on CAM use. Methods The present sample comprises respondents of the 'Panel of Patients with Chronic Diseases' (PPCD). Patients (≥25 years) were selected by GPs. A total of 1,625 chronically ill people were included. Trust and CAM use was measured by a written questionnaire. Statistical analyses were t tests for independent samples, Chi-square and one-way analysis of variance, and logistic regression analysis. Results Chronically ill people have a relatively low level of trust in future health care. They trust certified alternative practitioners less than regular health care professionals, and non-certified alternative practitioners less still. The less trust patients have in future health care, the more they will be inclined to use CAM, when controlling for socio-demographic and disease characteristics. Conclusion Trust in future health care is a significant predictor of CAM use. Chronically ill people's use of CAM may increase in the near future. Health policy makers should, therefore, be alert to the quality of practising alternative practitioners, for example by insisting on professional certification. Equally, good quality may increase people's trust in public health care. PMID:16848897

  7. Management of adults with paediatric-onset chronic liver disease: strategic issues for transition care.

    PubMed

    Vajro, Pietro; Ferrante, Lorenza; Lenta, Selvaggia; Mandato, Claudia; Persico, Marcello

    2014-04-01

    Advances in the management of children with chronic liver disease have enabled many to survive into adulthood with or without their native livers, so that the most common of these conditions are becoming increasingly common in adult hepatology practice. Because the aetiologies of chronic liver disease in children may vary significantly from those in adulthood, adults with paediatric-onset chronic liver disease may often present with clinical manifestations unfamiliar to their adulthood physician. Transition of medical care to adult practice requires that the adulthood medical staff (primary physicians and subspecialists) have a comprehensive knowledge of childhood liver disease and their implications, and of the differences in caring for these patients. Pending still unavailable Scientific Society guidelines, this article examines causes, presentation modes, evaluation, management, and complications of the main paediatric-onset chronic liver diseases, and discusses key issues to aid in planning a program of transition from paediatric to adult patients.

  8. A Chronic Disease State Simulation in an Ambulatory Care Elective Course

    PubMed Central

    Roberson, Cindy Leslie A.; Prasad-Reddy, Lalita

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To implement a chronic disease state simulation in an ambulatory care elective course and to assess the simulation’s impact on students’ perceptions of their empathy toward patients and of their counseling skills. Design. The chronic disease state simulation occurred over 2 weeks. Students alternated playing the role of patient and pharmacist. As patients, students adhered to medication regimens, lifestyle modifications, and blood glucose or blood pressure monitoring. As pharmacists, students conducted patient interviews, and provided education and counseling. Empathy and counseling skills were assessed through course surveys, written reflections, and SOAP notes. Assessment. Results from a cohort of 130 students indicated the simulation enhanced students’ perceptions of their abilities to empathize with and counsel patients with chronic diseases. Conclusion. The chronic disease state simulation provides a novel approach to develop skills needed for working with complex patient cases in ambulatory care settings. PMID:26839423

  9. Integrated care in the management of chronic diseases: an Italian perspective.

    PubMed

    Stefani, Ilario; Scolari, Francesca; Croce, Davide; Mazzone, Antonino

    2016-12-01

    This letter provides a view on the issue of the organizational model of Primary Care Groups (PCGs), which represent a best practice in continuity and appropriateness of care for chronic patients. Our analysis aimed at estimating the impact of PCGs introduction in terms of efficiency and effectiveness. The results of our study showed a better performance of PCGs compared with the other General Practitioners of Local Health Authority Milano 1, supporting the conclusion that good care cannot be delivered without good organization of care.

  10. The relationship of individual comorbid chronic conditions to diabetes care quality

    PubMed Central

    Magnan, Elizabeth M; Palta, Mari; Mahoney, Jane E; Pandhi, Nancy; Bolt, Daniel M; Fink, Jennifer; Greenlee, Robert T; Smith, Maureen A

    2015-01-01

    Objective Multimorbidity affects 26 million persons with diabetes, and care for comorbid chronic conditions may impact diabetes care quality. The aim of this study was to determine which chronic conditions were related to lack of achievement or achievement of diabetes care quality goals to determine potential targets for future interventions. Research design and methods This is an exploratory retrospective analysis of electronic health record data for 23 430 adults, aged 18–75, with diabetes who were seen at seven Midwestern US health systems. The main outcome measures were achievement of six diabetes quality metrics in the reporting year, 2011 (glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) control and testing, low-density lipoprotein control and testing, blood pressure control, kidney testing). Explanatory variables were 62 chronic condition indicators. Analyses were adjusted for baseline patient sociodemographic and healthcare utilization factors. Results The 62 chronic conditions varied in their relationships to diabetes care goal achievement for specific care goals. Congestive heart failure was related to lack of achievement of cholesterol management goals. Obesity was related to lack of HbA1c and BP control. Mental health conditions were related to both lack of achievement and achievement of different care goals. Three conditions were related to lack of cholesterol testing, including congestive heart failure and substance-use disorders. Of 17 conditions related to achieving control goals, 16 were related to achieving HbA1c control. One-half of the comorbid conditions did not predict diabetes care quality. Conclusions Future interventions could target patients at risk for not achieving diabetes care for specific care goals based on their individual comorbidities. PMID:26217492

  11. Iron deficiency intravenous substitution in a Swiss academic primary care division: analysis of practices

    PubMed Central

    Varcher, Monica; Zisimopoulou, Sofia; Braillard, Olivia; Favrat, Bernard; Junod Perron, Noëlle

    2016-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency is a common problem in primary care and is usually treated with oral iron substitution. With the recent simplification of intravenous (IV) iron administration (ferric carboxymaltose) and its approval in many countries for iron deficiency, physicians may be inclined to overutilize it as a first-line substitution. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate iron deficiency management and substitution practices in an academic primary care division 5 years after ferric carboxymaltose was approved for treatment of iron deficiency in Switzerland. Methods All patients treated for iron deficiency during March and April 2012 at the Geneva University Division of Primary Care were identified. Their medical files were analyzed for information, including initial ferritin value, reasons for the investigation of iron levels, suspected etiology, type of treatment initiated, and clinical and biological follow-up. Findings were assessed using an algorithm for iron deficiency management based on a literature review. Results Out of 1,671 patients, 93 were treated for iron deficiency. Median patients’ age was 40 years and 92.5% (n=86) were female. The average ferritin value was 17.2 μg/L (standard deviation 13.3 μg/L). The reasons for the investigation of iron levels were documented in 82% and the suspected etiology for iron deficiency was reported in 67%. Seventy percent of the patients received oral treatment, 14% IV treatment, and 16% both. The reasons for IV treatment as first- and second-line treatment were reported in 57% and 95%, respectively. Clinical and biological follow-up was planned in less than two-thirds of the cases. Conclusion There was no clear overutilization of IV iron substitution. However, several steps of the iron deficiency management were not optimally documented, suggesting shortcuts in clinical reasoning. PMID:27445502

  12. Quality of chronic kidney disease management in primary care: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Van Gelder, Vincent A.; Scherpbier-De Haan, Nynke D.; De Grauw, Wim J.C.; Vervoort, Gerald M.M.; Van Weel, Chris; Biermans, Marion C.J.; Braspenning, Jozé C.C.; Wetzels, Jack F.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Early detection and appropriate management of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in primary care are essential to reduce morbidity and mortality. Aim To assess the quality of care (QoC) of CKD in primary healthcare in relation to patient and practice characteristics in order to tailor improvement strategies. Design and setting Retrospective study using data between 2008 and 2011 from 47 general practices (207 469 patients of whom 162 562 were adults). Method CKD management of patients under the care of their general practitioner (GP) was qualified using indicators derived from the Dutch interdisciplinary CKD guideline for primary care and nephrology and included (1) monitoring of renal function, albuminuria, blood pressure, and glucose, (2) monitoring of metabolic parameters, and alongside the guideline: (3) recognition of CKD. The outcome indicator was (4) achieving blood pressure targets. Multilevel logistic regression analysis was applied to identify associated patient and practice characteristics. Results Kidney function or albuminuria data were available for 59 728 adult patients; 9288 patients had CKD, of whom 8794 were under GP care. Monitoring of disease progression was complete in 42% of CKD patients, monitoring of metabolic parameters in 2%, and blood pressure target was reached in 43.1%. GPs documented CKD in 31.4% of CKD patients. High QoC was strongly associated with diabetes, and to a lesser extent with hypertension and male sex. Conclusion Room for improvement was found in all aspects of CKD management. As QoC was higher in patients who received structured diabetes care, future CKD care may profit from more structured primary care management, e.g. according to the chronic care model. Key pointsQuality of care for chronic kidney disease patients in primary care can be improved.In comparison with guideline advice, adequate monitoring of disease progression was observed in 42%, of metabolic parameters in 2%, correct recognition of impaired renal

  13. Describing and Modeling Workflow and Information Flow in Chronic Disease Care

    PubMed Central

    Unertl, Kim M.; Weinger, Matthew B.; Johnson, Kevin B.; Lorenzi, Nancy M.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The goal of the study was to develop an in-depth understanding of work practices, workflow, and information flow in chronic disease care, to facilitate development of context-appropriate informatics tools. Design The study was conducted over a 10-month period in three ambulatory clinics providing chronic disease care. The authors iteratively collected data using direct observation and semi-structured interviews. Measurements The authors observed all aspects of care in three different chronic disease clinics for over 150 hours, including 157 patient-provider interactions. Observation focused on interactions among people, processes, and technology. Observation data were analyzed through an open coding approach. The authors then developed models of workflow and information flow using Hierarchical Task Analysis and Soft Systems Methodology. The authors also conducted nine semi-structured interviews to confirm and refine the models. Results The study had three primary outcomes: models of workflow for each clinic, models of information flow for each clinic, and an in-depth description of work practices and the role of health information technology (HIT) in the clinics. The authors identified gaps between the existing HIT functionality and the needs of chronic disease providers. Conclusions In response to the analysis of workflow and information flow, the authors developed ten guidelines for design of HIT to support chronic disease care, including recommendations to pursue modular approaches to design that would support disease-specific needs. The study demonstrates the importance of evaluating workflow and information flow in HIT design and implementation. PMID:19717802

  14. Engaging Patients in Online Self-Care Technologies for Chronic Disease Management.

    PubMed

    Picton, Peter; Wiljer, David; Urowitz, Sara; Cafazzo, Joseph A

    2016-01-01

    A common perception is that the use of Internet-based self-care systems is best suited for a younger, tech-proficient population, and that these systems will increase the burden on patients with complex chronic conditions. The study stratified patients with diabetes into three regimens of use of an Internet-based diabetes self-care portal. Results show that patients were more likely to adhere to a diurnal regimen than a variable regimen, and older patients, over the age of 60, were more adherent than younger patients, regardless of regimen. This suggests that common misconceptions should be reconsidered when prescribing Internet-based interventions for patients with chronic illness.

  15. Remote patient management: technology-enabled innovation and evolving business models for chronic disease care.

    PubMed

    Coye, Molly Joel; Haselkorn, Ateret; DeMello, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Remote patient management (RPM) is a transformative technology that improves chronic care management while reducing net spending for chronic disease. Broadly deployed within the Veterans Health Administration and in many small trials elsewhere, RPM has been shown to support patient self-management, shift responsibilities to non-clinical providers, and reduce the use of emergency department and hospital services. Because transformative technologies offer major opportunities to advance national goals of improved quality and efficiency in health care, it is important to understand their evolution, the experiences of early adopters, and the business models that may support their deployment.

  16. [Adding value to the care at the final stage of chronic diseases].

    PubMed

    Vacas Guerrero, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing number of people with advanced chronic health conditions and with palliative care needs who die without their health and social needs satisfied. This is enough to redefine the traditional models of care in order to focus on the person, rather than on the disease. In these new models, the important role of nursing is unquestionably to promote an approach based on comprehensive care, coordination and continuity, and at a social health level appropriate to respond to the care of patients who require complex long-term care. The nurse contribution in the end stages of chronic conditions must be in the value of care. Taking care of someone is to be concerned about them. And this is related to attitude, commitment and responsibility. In the care of patients who live in a situation of extreme vulnerability, it is possible to help them feel warmth, confident, relieve their suffering, respect their autonomy, and help them them find sense and hope, through daily tasks. With gestures, words and facial expressions that go with this care, it is possible to preserve patient dignity.

  17. Contextual barriers to implementation in primary care: an ethnographic study of a programme to improve chronic kidney disease care

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Natalie; Herbert, Georgia; Brewster, Liz

    2016-01-01

    Background. Context is important in implementation—we know that what works in one setting may not work in the same way elsewhere. Primary care has been described as a unique context both in relation to the care delivered and efforts to carry out research and implementation of new evidence. Objective. To explore some of the distinctive features of the primary care environment that may influence implementation. Methods. We conducted an ethnographic study involving observations, interviews and documentary analysis of the ENABLE-CKD project, which involved general practices implementing a chronic kidney disease care bundle and offering self-management support tools to patients. Analysis was based on the constant comparative method. Results. Four elements of the primary care environment emerged as important influences on the extent to which implementation was successful. First, the nature of delivering care in this setting meant that prioritizing one condition over others was problematic. Second, the lack of alignment with financial and other incentives affected engagement. Third, the project team lacked mechanisms through which engagement could be mandated. Fourth, working relationships within practices impacted on engagement. Conclusions. Those seeking to implement interventions in primary care need to consider the particular context if they are to secure successful implementation. We suggest that there are particular kinds of interventions, which may be best suited to the primary care context. PMID:27297465

  18. Integrated care for chronic migraine patients: epidemiology, burden, diagnosis and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Diener, Hans-Christoph; Solbach, Kasja; Holle, Dagny; Gaul, Charly

    2015-08-01

    Migraine is a common neurological disorder, characterised by severe headaches. Epidemiological studies in the USA and Europe have identified a subgroup of migraine patients with chronic migraine. Chronic migraine is defined as ≥15 headache days per month for ≥3 months, in which ≥8 days of the month meet criteria for migraine with or without aura, or respond to treatment specifically for migraine. Chronic migraine is associated with a higher burden of disease, more severe psychiatric comorbidity, greater use of healthcare resources, and higher overall costs than episodic migraine (<15 headache days per month). There is a strong need to improve diagnosis and therapeutic treatment of chronic migraine. Primary care physicians, as well as hospital-based physicians, are integral to the identification and treatment of these patients. The latest epidemiological data, as well as treatment options for chronic migraine patients, are reviewed here.

  19. Medicare and chronic disease management: integrated care as an exceptional circumstance?

    PubMed

    Taylor, Michael J; Swerissen, Hal

    2010-05-01

    Chronic disease represents a significant challenge to the design and reform of the Australian healthcare system. The Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) provides a framework of numerous chronic disease management programs; however, their use at the patient level is complex. This analysis of the MBS chronic disease framework uses a hypothetical case study of a diabetic patient (with disease-related complications and a complex psychosocial background) to illustrate the difficulties in delivering appropriate multidisciplinary chronic disease care under the MBS. The complexities at each step - from care planning, service provision, and monitoring and review - are described, as are the intricacies involved in providing patient care under different MBS programs as well as those in the broader health and community care system. As demonstrated by this case study, under certain circumstances the provision of truly integrated care to this hypothetical patient would constitute an 'exceptional circumstance' under the MBS. Although quality improvement efforts can improve functioning within the limitations of the current system, system-wide reforms are necessary to overcome complexity and fragmentation.

  20. [Social and organizational innovation to tackle the challenge of integrated care of the chronically ill].

    PubMed

    Nuño-Solinís, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The increase in life expectancy, coupled with other factors, has led to an increase in the prevalence of chronic diseases and multiple morbidity. This has led to the need to develop new health and social care models, which will allow managing these efficiently and in a sustainable manner. In particular, there seems to be consensus on the need to move towards integrated, patient-centered, and more proactive care. Thus, in recent years, chronic care models have been developed at international, national and regional level, as well as introducing strategies to tackle the challenge of chronic illness. However, the implementation of actions facilitating the change towards this new model of care does not seem to be an easy task. This paper presents some of the strategic lines and initiatives carried out by the Department of Health of the Basque Government. These actions can be described within a social and organizational innovation framework, as a means for effective implementation of interventions and strategies that shape the model required for the improved care of chronic illnesses within a universal and tax-funded health system.

  1. Improving chronic care delivery and outcomes: the impact of the cystic fibrosis Care Center Network.

    PubMed

    Mogayzel, Peter J; Dunitz, Jordan; Marrow, Laura C; Hazle, Leslie A

    2014-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a multisystem, life-shortening genetic disease that requires complex care. To facilitate this expert, multidisciplinary care, the CF Foundation established a Care Center Network and accredited the first care centres in 1961. This model of care brings together physicians and specialists from other disciplines to provide care, facilitate basic and clinical research, and educate the next generation of providers. Although the Care Center Network has been invaluable in achieving substantial gains in survival and quality of life, additional opportunities for improvements in CF care exist. In 1999, analysis of data from the CF Foundation's Patient Registry detected variation in care practices and outcomes across centres, identifying opportunities for improvement. In 2002, the CF Foundation launched a comprehensive quality improvement (QI) initiative to enhance care by assembling national experts to develop a strategic plan to disseminate QI training and processes throughout the Care Center Network. The QI strategies included developing leadership (nationally and within each care centre), identifying best CF care practices, and incorporating people with CF and their families into improvement efforts. The goal was to improve the care for every person with CF in the USA. Multiple tactics were undertaken to implement the strategic plan and disseminate QI training and tools throughout the Care Center Network. In addition, strategies to foster collaboration between care centre staff and individuals with CF and their families became a cornerstone of QI efforts. Today it is clear that the application of QI principles within the CF Care Center Network has improved adherence to clinical guidelines and achievement of important health outcomes.

  2. Untangling practice redesign from disease management: how do we best care for the chronically ill?

    PubMed

    Coleman, Katie; Mattke, Soeren; Perrault, Patrick J; Wagner, Edward H

    2009-01-01

    In the past 10 years, a wide spectrum of chronic care improvement interventions has been tried and evaluated to improve health outcomes and reduce costs for chronically ill individuals. On one end of the spectrum are disease-management interventions--often organized by commercial vendors--that work with patients but do little to engage medical practice. On the other end are quality-improvement efforts aimed at redesigning the organization and delivery of primary care and better supporting patient self-management. This qualitative review finds that carve-out disease management interventions that target only patients may be less effective than those that also work to redesign care delivery. Imprecise nomenclature and poor study design methodology limit quantitative analysis. More innovation and research are needed to understand how disease-management components can be more meaningfully embedded within practice to improve patient care.

  3. Attitudes toward nurse practitioner-led chronic disease management to improve outpatient quality of care.

    PubMed

    Sciamanna, Christopher N; Alvarez, Kristy; Miller, Judith; Gary, Tiffany; Bowen, Mary

    2006-01-01

    To understand the acceptability for a model of chronic disease management, in which primary care patients see nurse practitioners for structured visits using an evidence-based encounter form, the authors sent a mailed survey to primary care physicians and nurse practitioners. A total of 212 subjects completed the survey, for a total response rate of 53% (physicians, 44%; nurse practitioners, 61%). Most physicians (79.5%) reported that nurse practitioners saw patients in their practice. Most physicians (80.0%) and nurse practitioners (95.7%) believed that the proposed model of care would improve the control of chronic illnesses. In addition, most physicians (73.8%) and nurse practitioners (87.6%) believed that the model of care would be of interest to similar providers. Overall, the high level of support for the model and the presence of nurse practitioners in most physician offices suggests that future studies are warranted to understand how best to implement this.

  4. Primary care for diabetes mellitus patients from the perspective of the care model for chronic conditions 1

    PubMed Central

    Salci, Maria Aparecida; Meirelles, Betina Hörner Schlindwein; da Silva, Denise Maria Guerreiro Vieira

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to assess the health care Primary Health Care professionals provide to diabetes mellitus patients from the perspective of the Modelo de Atenção às Condições Crônicas. Method: qualitative study, using the theoretical framework of Complex Thinking and the Modelo de Atenção às Condições Crônicas and the methodological framework of assessment research. To collect the data, 38 interviews were held with health professionals and managers; observation of the activities by the health teams; and analysis of 25 files of people who received this care. The data analysis was supported by the software ATLAS.ti, using the directed content analysis technique. Results: at the micro level, care was distant from the integrality of the actions needed to assist people with chronic conditions and was centered on the biomedical model. At the meso level, there was disarticulation among the professionals of the Family Health Strategy, between them and the users, family and community. At the macro level, there was a lack of guiding strategies to implement public policies for diabetes in care practice. Conclusion: the implementation of the Modelo de Atenção às Condições Crônicas represents a great challenge, mainly needing professionals and managers who are prepared to work with chronic conditions are who are open to break with the traditional model. PMID:28301037

  5. Approaches to chronic disease management for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: strategies through the continuum of care.

    PubMed

    Hart, Mary K; Millard, Mark W

    2010-07-01

    Investigator-initiated research in both asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease conducted at the Baylor Martha Foster Lung Care Center has sought to improve management throughout the continuum of respiratory care using a multidisciplinary approach. Respiratory care therapists employed in the primary care setting were shown to improve the quality of asthma care: rescue inhaler use decreased by 75% and respiratory symptom score decreased by 49% in patients who were seen by this midlevel specialty provider. In addition to similar results in a geriatric population, patients' diagnosis was changed in 48% of cases and treatment was changed in 76% of cases after the intervention. For pulmonary rehabilitation, an activity of daily living assessment form was created, and rehabilitation-whether traditional or water-based-was shown to improve patients' ability to perform activities of daily living and improve quality of life scores. The Rules of Two((R)), developed by Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas to simplify understanding of good asthma control, continues to be taught, and patient education has also been offered through asthma summer camps for children. Finally, a multidisciplinary team worked to develop a protocol for treatment of asthma patients in the emergency department and, through this effort, was able to reduce length of stay from an average of 278 minutes to an average of 168 minutes. These efforts aim to overcome the gap between recommended care and actual practice, so that patients benefit from evidence-based medicine and continuing refinements to diagnosis and treatment.

  6. Development and Implementation of a Collaborative Team Care Model for Effective Insulin Use in an Academic Medical Center Primary Care Network.

    PubMed

    Eisenstat, Stephanie A; Chang, Yuchiao; Porneala, Bianca C; Geagan, Elizabeth; Wilkins, Gianna; Chase, Barbara; O'Keefe, Sandra M; Delahanty, Linda M; Atlas, Steven J; Zai, Adrian H; Finn, David; Weil, Eric; Wexler, Deborah J

    2016-05-27

    Improving glycemic control across a primary care diabetes population is challenging. This article describes the development, implementation, and outcomes of the Diabetes Care Collaborative Model (DCCM), a collaborative team care process focused on promoting effective insulin use targeting patients with hyperglycemia in a patient-centered medical home model. After a pilot, the DCCM was implemented in 18 primary care practices affiliated with an academic medical center. Its implementation was associated with improvements in glycemic control and increase in insulin prescription longitudinally and across the entire population, with a >1% reduction in the proportion of glycated hemoglobin >9% at 2 years after the implementation compared with the 2 years prior (P < .001). Facilitating factors included diverse stakeholder engagement, institutional alignment of priorities, awarding various types of credits for participation and implementation to providers, and a strong theoretical foundation using the principles of the collaborative care model.

  7. SPARTACUS: underdiagnosis of chronic daily headache in primary care.

    PubMed

    Giannini, G; Favoni, V; Bauleo, S; Ferrante, T; Pierangeli, G; Albani, F; Bacchi Reggiani, M L; Baruzzi, A; Cortelli, P; Cevoli, S

    2012-05-01

    Despite the burden of chronic daily headache (CDH), general practitioners' (GPs) ability to recognize it is unknown. This work is a sub-study of a population-based study investigating GPs' knowledge on their CDH patients. Patients diagnosed with CDH through the screening questionnaire were interviewed by their GPs who indicated if subjects were known as patients suffering from CDH with medication overuse (MO), CDH without MO, episodic headache (EH) or non-headache sufferers. Our study showed that 64.37 % of CDH sufferers are misdiagnosed by their GPs. However, overusers are better known to GPs.

  8. Occupational Therapy and Management of Multiple Chronic Conditions in the Context of Health Care Reform

    PubMed Central

    Fogelberg, Donald J.; Halle, Ashley D.; Mroz, Tracy M.

    2017-01-01

    One in four individuals living in the United States has multiple chronic conditions (MCCs), and the already high prevalence of MCCs continues to grow. This population has high rates of health care utilization yet poor outcomes, leading to elevated concerns about fragmented, low-quality care provided within the current health care system. Several national initiatives endeavor to improve care for the population with MCCs, and occupational therapy is uniquely positioned to contribute to these efforts for more efficient, effective, client-centered management of care. By integrating findings from the literature with current policy and practice, we aim to highlight the potential role for occupational therapy in managing MCCs within the evolving health care system. PMID:28027031

  9. International care models for chronic kidney disease: methods and economics--United States.

    PubMed

    Crooks, Peter

    2004-01-01

    In the United States, there is a major chronic kidney disease (CKD) problem with over 8 million adults having stage 3 or 4 CKD. There is good medical evidence that many of these patients can benefit from focused interventions. And while there are strong theoretical reasons to believe these interventions are cost-effective, there are little published data to back up this assertion. However, despite the lack of financial data proving cost-effectiveness and against the background of a disorganized health care system in the US, some models of CKD care are being employed. At the present time, the most comprehensive models of care in the US are emerging in vertically integrated health care programs. Other models of care are developing in the setting of managed care health plans that employ CKD disease management programs, either developed internally or in partnership with renal disease management companies.

  10. Establishing and sustaining research partnerships in Africa: a case study of the UK-Africa Academic Partnership on Chronic Disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the challenges and opportunities in establishing and sustaining north–south research partnerships in Africa through a case study of the UK-Africa Academic Partnership on Chronic Disease. Established in 2006 with seed funding from the British Academy, the partnership aimed to bring together multidisciplinary chronic disease researchers based in the UK and Africa to collaborate on research, inform policymaking, train and support postgraduates and create a platform for research dissemination. We review the partnership’s achievements and challenges, applying established criteria for developing successful partnerships. During the funded period we achieved major success in creating a platform for research dissemination through international meetings and publications. Other goals, such as engaging in collaborative research and training postgraduates, were not as successfully realised. Enabling factors included trust and respect between core working group members, a shared commitment to achieving partnership goals, and the collective ability to develop creative strategies to overcome funding challenges. Barriers included limited funding, administrative support, and framework for monitoring and evaluating some goals. Chronic disease research partnerships in low-income regions operate within health research, practice, funding and policy environments that prioritise infectious diseases and other pressing public health and developmental challenges. Their long-term sustainability will therefore depend on integrated funding systems that provide a crucial capacity building bridge. Beyond the specific challenges of chronic disease research, we identify social capital, measurable goals, administrative support, creativity and innovation and funding as five key ingredients that are essential for sustaining research partnerships. PMID:22897937

  11. Establishing and sustaining research partnerships in Africa: a case study of the UK-Africa Academic Partnership on Chronic Disease.

    PubMed

    de-Graft Aikins, Ama; Arhinful, Daniel K; Pitchforth, Emma; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Allotey, Pascale; Agyemang, Charles

    2012-08-16

    This paper examines the challenges and opportunities in establishing and sustaining north-south research partnerships in Africa through a case study of the UK-Africa Academic Partnership on Chronic Disease. Established in 2006 with seed funding from the British Academy, the partnership aimed to bring together multidisciplinary chronic disease researchers based in the UK and Africa to collaborate on research, inform policymaking, train and support postgraduates and create a platform for research dissemination. We review the partnership's achievements and challenges, applying established criteria for developing successful partnerships. During the funded period we achieved major success in creating a platform for research dissemination through international meetings and publications. Other goals, such as engaging in collaborative research and training postgraduates, were not as successfully realised. Enabling factors included trust and respect between core working group members, a shared commitment to achieving partnership goals, and the collective ability to develop creative strategies to overcome funding challenges. Barriers included limited funding, administrative support, and framework for monitoring and evaluating some goals. Chronic disease research partnerships in low-income regions operate within health research, practice, funding and policy environments that prioritise infectious diseases and other pressing public health and developmental challenges. Their long-term sustainability will therefore depend on integrated funding systems that provide a crucial capacity building bridge. Beyond the specific challenges of chronic disease research, we identify social capital, measurable goals, administrative support, creativity and innovation and funding as five key ingredients that are essential for sustaining research partnerships.

  12. Mothers' and fathers' involvement with school-age children's care and academic activities in Navajo Indian families.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Ziarat; Anziano, Michael C

    2008-04-01

    This exploratory study examined mothers' and fathers' reports of time involvement in their school-age children's care and academic activities. The study also explored the relationship between parents' socioeconomic status (SES) variables (age, education, income, work hours, and length of marriage) and their relative involvement with children. Mother and father dyads from 34 two-parent Navajo (Diné) Indian families with a second- or third-grade child participated in the study. Repeated measures analysis of variance showed that mothers invested significantly more time in children's care on demand and academic activities than fathers, but the differences in maternal and paternal perceptions of time involvement in routine care were not significant. The gender of the child did not influence the amount of time parents invested in children's care and academic activities. Mothers' involvement with children was not related to any of the SES variables. Fathers' involvement was significantly associated with work hours and length of marriage, and work hours produced significant interaction with fathers' involvement with children. Findings are discussed in light of gender role differences in parental involvement with children within Navajo families.

  13. Patterns of Care Among Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy for Bone Metastases at a Large Academic Institution

    SciTech Connect

    Ellsworth, Susannah G.; Alcorn, Sara R.; Hales, Russell K.; McNutt, Todd R.; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: This study evaluates outcomes and patterns of care among patients receiving radiation therapy (RT) for bone metastases at a high-volume academic institution. Methods and Materials: Records of all patients whose final RT course was for bone metastases from April 2007 to July 2012 were identified from electronic medical records. Chart review yielded demographic and clinical data. Rates of complicated versus uncomplicated bone metastases were not analyzed. Results: We identified 339 patients whose final RT course was for bone metastases. Of these, 52.2% were male; median age was 65 years old. The most common primary was non-small-cell lung cancer (29%). Most patients (83%) were prescribed ≤10 fractions; 8% received single-fraction RT. Most patients (52%) had a documented goals of care (GOC) discussion with their radiation oncologist; hospice referral rates were higher when patients had such discussions (66% with vs 50% without GOC discussion, P=.004). Median life expectancy after RT was 96 days. Median survival after RT was shorter based on inpatient as opposed to outpatient status at the time of consultation (35 vs 136 days, respectively, P<.001). Hospice referrals occurred for 56% of patients, with a median interval between completion of RT and hospice referral of 29 days and a median hospice stay of 22 days. Conclusions: These data document excellent adherence to American Society for Radiation Oncolology Choosing Wisely recommendation to avoid routinely using >10 fractions of palliative RT for bone metastasis. Nonetheless, single-fraction RT remains relatively uncommon. Participating in GOC discussions with a radiation oncologist is associated with higher rates of hospice referral. Inpatient status at consultation is associated with short survival.

  14. Health Care Costs for Patients With Chronic Spinal Cord Injury in the Veterans Health Administration

    PubMed Central

    French, Dustin D; Campbell, Robert R; Sabharwal, Sunil; Nelson, Audrey L; Palacios, Polly A; Gavin-Dreschnack, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    Background/Objective: Recurring annual costs of caring for patients with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a large economic burden on health care systems, but information on costs of SCI care beyond the acute and initial postacute phase is sparse. The objective of this study was to establish a frame of reference and estimate of the annual direct medical costs associated with health care for a sample of patients with chronic SCI (ie, >2 years after injury). Methods: Patients were recruited from 3 Veterans Health Administration (VHA) SCI facilities; baseline patient information was cross-referenced to the Decision Support System (DSS) National Data Extracts (NDE) to obtain patient-specific health care costs in VHA. Descriptive statistical analysis of annual DSS-NDE cost of patients with SCI (N = 675) for fiscal year (FY) 2005 by level and completeness of injury was conducted. Results: Total (inpatient and outpatient) annual (FY 2005) direct medical costs for 675 patients with SCI exceeded $14.47 million or $21,450 per patient. Average annual total costs varied from $28,334 for cervical complete SCI to $16,792 for thoracic incomplete SCI. Two hundred thirty-three of the 675 patients with SCI who were hospitalized over the study period accounted for a total of 378 hospital discharges, costing in excess of $7.19 million. This approximated a cost of outpatient care received of $7.28 million for our entire sample. Conclusions: The comprehensive nature of health care delivery and related cost capture for people with chronic SCI in the VHA provided us the opportunity to accurately determine health care costs for this population. Future SCI postacute care cost analyses should consider case-mix adjusting patients at high risk for rehospitalization. PMID:18092564

  15. Chronic Absenteeism and Its Effects on Students' Academic and Socioemotional Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottfried, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent policy dialogue suggests that chronic absenteeism is not only underdocumented, but is also detrimental to the success of students as early as kindergarten. That said, almost no empirical research has examined the effects of chronic absenteeism on student outcomes. This study addresses this underresearched issue in more depth. Using a…

  16. Integrating the Chronic Care Model into a Novel Medical Student Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, Robert C.; Tran, Bill; McIntosh, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether integration of the Chronic Care Model into undergraduate medical education is associated with anticipated use of the Model and whether student perceptions match actual integration of the Model into their community projects. Design: This was a cross-sectional study using qualitative and quantitative data. Setting: A…

  17. Home Care for Children with Chronic Illnesses and Severe Disabilities: A Bibliography and Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Alice; And Others

    The bibliography and resource guide summarizes relevant research and information on home care for children with disabilities and chronic illnesses, including those with such diagnoses as spina bifida, cerebral palsy, severe mental retardation, acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), hemophilia, sickle cell anemia, autism, or failure-to-thrive…

  18. Web-Based Self-Management in Chronic Care: A Study of Change in Patient Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Web-based self-management interventions (W-SMIs) are designed to help a large number of chronically ill people become more actively engaged in their health care. Despite the potential to engage more patients in self-managing their health, the use of W-SMIs by patients and their clinicians is low. Using a self-management conceptual model based on…

  19. [Chronic obstructive lung disease management programmes do not benefit the coordination of care pathways].

    PubMed

    Gjersøe, Peter; Morsø, Lars; Jensen, Morten Sall; Qvist, Peter

    2014-09-29

    Chronic obstructive lung disease (COLD) is a challenging condition for both primary and secondary health-care providers. Disease management programmes (DMP's) have been expected to lead to evident improvements in the continuum of care for COLD. The utility of a COLD management programme was evaluated in a study based on interviews among general practitioners and COLD specialists. Clinicians preferred short practical guidelines to the DMP. The DMP was found useless as a tool to improve the coordination of care pathways. Complimentary interventions to improve clinical cooperation across sectors are recommended.

  20. Chronic care management of globesity: promoting healthier lifestyles in traditional and mHealth based settings

    PubMed Central

    Castelnuovo, Gianluca; Pietrabissa, Giada; Manzoni, Gian Mauro; Corti, Stefania; Ceccarini, Martina; Borrello, Maria; Giusti, Emanuele M.; Novelli, Margherita; Cattivelli, Roberto; Middleton, Nicole A.; Simpson, Susan G.; Molinari, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and being overweight could be real chronic conditions above all if there are other complications such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, hypertension, dyslipidemia, hypercholesterolemia, cancer, and various psychosocial and psychopathological disorders. Due to the multifactorial etiology of obesity, evidence-based interventions to improve weight loss, maintain a healthy weight, and reduce related comorbidities combine different treatment approaches: dietetic, nutritional, physical, behavioral, psychological, and, in some situations, pharmacological and surgical. There are significant limitations in this multidisciplinary chronic care management of obesity, most notably those regarding costs and long-term adherence and efficacy. Programs including eHealth platforms and new technologies could overcome limitations connected to the traditional in-patient chronic care management of obesity, thus providing promising opportunities in enhancing weight reduction and reducing complications in terms of long-term efficacy and effectiveness across clinical, organizational, and economic perspectives. PMID:26528215

  1. Partnerships to provide care and medicine for chronic diseases: a model for emerging markets.

    PubMed

    Goroff, Michael; Reich, Michael R

    2010-12-01

    The challenge of expanding access to treatment and medicine for chronic diseases in emerging markets is both a public health imperative and a commercial opportunity. Cross-sector partnerships-involving a pharmaceutical manufacturer; a local health care provider; and other private, public, and nonprofit entities-could address this challenge. Such partnerships would provide integrated, comprehensive care and medicines for a specific chronic disease, with medicines directly supplied to the partnership at preferential prices by the manufacturer. The model discussed here requires additional specification, using real numbers and specific contexts, to assess its feasibility. Still, we believe that this model has the potential for public health and private business to cooperate in addressing the rising problem of chronic diseases in emerging markets.

  2. The Use of Self-Care Agency To Meet the Need for Solitude and Social Interaction by Chronically Ill Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Margaret A.

    This study examined the effect of chronic illness on the individual's ability to meet his or her need for solitude and for social interaction by exploring how chronically ill individuals used their own ability (self-care agency) to meet these needs. Subjects were 90 chronically ill older persons, 30 of whom were living at home, 30 who lived in a…

  3. Nilotinib 300 mg twice daily: an academic single-arm study of newly diagnosed chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Castagnetti, Fausto; Breccia, Massimo; Gugliotta, Gabriele; Martino, Bruno; D'Adda, Mariella; Stagno, Fabio; Carella, Angelo Michele; Avanzini, Paolo; Tiribelli, Mario; Trabacchi, Elena; Visani, Giuseppe; Gobbi, Marco; Salvucci, Marzia; Levato, Luciano; Binotto, Gianni; Capalbo, Silvana Franca; Bochicchio, Maria Teresa; Soverini, Simona; Cavo, Michele; Martinelli, Giovanni; Alimena, Giuliana; Pane, Fabrizio; Saglio, Giuseppe; Rosti, Gianantonio; Baccarani, Michele

    2016-10-01

    The introduction and the extended clinical use of nilotinib in the first-line treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia have been based on company-sponsored trials. Independent confirmations are extremely important. We report an investigator-sponsored study of nilotinib 300 mg twice daily in 130 chronic myeloid leukemia patients in early chronic phase. A deep molecular response was achieved in 46% (MR(4.0)) and 17% (MR(4.5)) of patients at 2 years; 58% of the enrolled patients achieved a MR(4.0) at least once, with a sustained MR(4.0) in 52% of them. With a median observation of 29 months (range 24-37 months), 77% of patients were still on treatment with nilotinib. The reasons for permanent discontinuation were: 3% progression, 5% failure or suboptimal response, 8% adverse events, 1% treatment-free remission, and 5% other reasons. Thirteen thrombotic arterial events were reported in 12 patients. A prospective evaluation of metabolic effects showed an increase of fasting glucose without significant variations of glycated hemoglobin, an increase of total cholesterol (both low density lipoprotein and high density lipoprotein fractions) and a decrease of triglycerides. This study confirms a high and rapid efficacy of nilotinib 300 mg twice daily and provides detailed information on the type and incidence of non-hematologic and metabolic adverse events (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: 01535391).

  4. Nilotinib 300 mg twice daily: an academic single-arm study of newly diagnosed chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Castagnetti, Fausto; Breccia, Massimo; Gugliotta, Gabriele; Martino, Bruno; D’Adda, Mariella; Stagno, Fabio; Carella, Angelo Michele; Avanzini, Paolo; Tiribelli, Mario; Trabacchi, Elena; Visani, Giuseppe; Gobbi, Marco; Salvucci, Marzia; Levato, Luciano; Binotto, Gianni; Capalbo, Silvana Franca; Bochicchio, Maria Teresa; Soverini, Simona; Cavo, Michele; Martinelli, Giovanni; Alimena, Giuliana; Pane, Fabrizio; Saglio, Giuseppe; Rosti, Gianantonio; Baccarani, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The introduction and the extended clinical use of nilotinib in the first-line treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia have been based on company-sponsored trials. Independent confirmations are extremely important. We report an investigator-sponsored study of nilotinib 300 mg twice daily in 130 chronic myeloid leukemia patients in early chronic phase. A deep molecular response was achieved in 46% (MR4.0) and 17% (MR4.5) of patients at 2 years; 58% of the enrolled patients achieved a MR4.0 at least once, with a sustained MR4.0 in 52% of them. With a median observation of 29 months (range 24–37 months), 77% of patients were still on treatment with nilotinib. The reasons for permanent discontinuation were: 3% progression, 5% failure or suboptimal response, 8% adverse events, 1% treatment-free remission, and 5% other reasons. Thirteen thrombotic arterial events were reported in 12 patients. A prospective evaluation of metabolic effects showed an increase of fasting glucose without significant variations of glycated hemoglobin, an increase of total cholesterol (both low density lipoprotein and high density lipoprotein fractions) and a decrease of triglycerides. This study confirms a high and rapid efficacy of nilotinib 300 mg twice daily and provides detailed information on the type and incidence of non-hematologic and metabolic adverse events (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: 01535391). PMID:27470600

  5. Assessment of Chronic Illness Care with the German version of the ACIC in different primary care settings in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In Switzerland the extent to which patients with chronic illnesses receive care congruent with the Chronic Care Model (CCM) is unknown. Methods According to guidelines we translated the Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (ACIC) into German (G-ACIC). We tested the instrument in different primary care settings and compared subscales with the original testing. Results Difficulties encountered during the translation process consisted in the difference of health care settings in Switzerland and USA. However initial testing showed the G-ACIC to be a suitable instrument. The average ACIC subscale scores in Swiss managed care (MC)-, group (GP)- and single handed practices (SP) were higher for MC practices than for group- and single handed practices: Organization of the healthcare delivery system: MC mean (m) = 6.80 (SD 1.55), GP m = 5.42 (SD 0.99), SP m = 4.60 (SD 2.07); community linkages: MC m = 4.19 (SD 1.47), GP m = 4.83 (SD 1.81), SP m = 3.10 (SD 2.12); self-management support: MC m = 4.96 (SD 1.13), GP m = 4.73 (SD 1.40), SP m = 4.43 (SD 1.34); decision support: MC m = 4.75 (SD 1.06); GP m = 4.20 (SD 0.87), SP m = 3.25 (SD 1.59); delivery system design: MC m = 5.98 (SD 1.61), GP m = 5.05 (SD 2.05), SP m = 3.86 (SD 1.51) and clinical information systems: MC m = 4.34 (SD = 2.49), GP m = 2.06 (SD 1.35), SP m = 3.20 (SD 1.57). Conclusions The G-ACIC is applicable and useful for comparing different health care settings in German speaking countries. Managed care organizations seem to implement the different components of the CCM in a greater extend than group and single handed practices. However, much room exists for further improvement. PMID:20979632

  6. An overview of integrative care options for patients with chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Cathy

    2012-05-01

    Integrative care incorporates aspects of traditional and nontraditional medicine, also often referred to as holistic or complementary and alternative medicine. Providing integrative wound care involves addressing physical, psychosocial, and spiritual components of the whole person. Several care models, including the Seven Balance Point Model, include holistic considerations, as well as promotion of physical health recommendations involving nutrition, sleep, exercise, and emotional, social, and spiritual well-being. The quality of life of patients with chronic wounds may be negatively affected by chronic and procedural pain, sleep disturbance, social, and emotional concerns. Although research into the role of integrative medicine in wound care is limited, experiences from other disciplines suggest wound pain may be addressed using acupuncture, yoga, biofeedback, guided imagery, massage, healing touch and therapeutic touch, aromatherapy, and topical medical-grade honey. In addition, patients who are incontinent or have incontinence-related skin damage or peristomal complications may benefit from biofeedback to better control incontinence. Research to increase understanding about the role of holistic care for patients with wound, stoma, and continence-related problems in general, and its effect on the quality of life of palliative care patients in particular, will help clinicians provide evidence-based and patient-centered care.

  7. Integrated telehealth and care management program for Medicare beneficiaries with chronic disease linked to savings.

    PubMed

    Baker, Laurence C; Johnson, Scott J; Macaulay, Dendy; Birnbaum, Howard

    2011-09-01

    Treatment of chronically ill people constitutes nearly four-fifths of US health care spending, but it is hampered by a fragmented delivery system and discontinuities of care. We examined the impact of a care coordination approach called the Health Buddy Program, which integrates a telehealth tool with care management for chronically ill Medicare beneficiaries. We evaluated the program's impact on spending for patients of two clinics in the US Northwest who were exposed to the intervention, and we compared their experience with that of matched controls. We found significant savings among patients who used the Health Buddy telehealth program, which was associated with spending reductions of approximately 7.7-13.3 percent ($312-$542) per person per quarter. These results suggest that carefully designed and implemented care management and telehealth programs can help reduce health care spending and that such programs merit continued attention by Medicare. Meanwhile, mortality differences in the treatment and control groups suggest that the intervention may have produced noticeable changes in health outcomes, but we leave it to future research to explore these effects fully.

  8. Continuing professional development in HIV chronic disease management for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Kang, Helen; Yip, Benita; Chau, William; Nóhpal De La Rosa, Adriana; Hall, David; Barrios, Rolando; Montaner, Julio; Guillemi, Silvia

    2014-12-09

    Abstract Primary care providers need continuing professional development (CPD) in order to improve their knowledge and confidence in the care of patients with chronic conditions. We developed an intensive modular CPD program in the chronic disease management of HIV for primary care providers. The program combines self-directed learning, interactive tutorials with experts, small group discussions, case studies, clinical training, one-on-one mentoring and individualized learning objectives. We trained 27 family physicians and 7 nurse practitioners between 2011 and 2013. The trainees reported high levels of satisfaction with the program. There was a 136.76% increase in the number of distinct HIV-positive patients receiving HIV-related medication refills that were prescribed by the trainees.

  9. The Pursuit of Preventive Care for Chronic Illness: Turning Healthy People into Chronic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kreiner, Meta J.; Hunt, Linda M.

    2013-01-01

    Preventive health care has become prominent in clinical medicine in the United States, emphasizing risk assessment and control, rather than addressing the signs and symptoms of pathology. Current clinical guidelines, reinforced by evidence-based decision aids and quality of care assessment, encourage clinicians to focus on maintaining rigid test thresholds which are based on population norms. While achieving these goals may benefit the total population, this may be of no benefit or even harmful to individual patients. In order to explore how this phenomenon is manifest in clinical care, and consider some factors that promote and sustain this trend, we analyze observations of over 100 clinical consultations, and open-ended interviews with 58 primary care clinicians and 70 of their patients. Both clinicians and patients equated at-risk states with illness, and viewed the associated interventions not as prevention, but as treatment. This conflation of risk and disease redefines clinical success such that reducing the threat of anticipated future illness requires acceptance of aggressive treatments and any associated adverse effects in the present. While the expanding emphasis on preventive medicine may improve the health profile of the total population, the implications of these innovations for the well-being of individual patients merits careful reconsideration. PMID:24372285

  10. Providing Care for Patients with Chronic Migraine: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Management.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Carrie; Silberstein, Stephen D

    2015-09-01

    Chronic migraine, a subtype of migraine defined as ≥ 15 headache days per month for ≥ 3 months, in which ≥ 8 days per month meet criteria for migraine with or without aura or respond to migraine-specific treatment, is a disabling, underdiagnosed, and undertreated disorder associated with significant disability, poor health-related quality of life, and high economic burden. The keys to caring for chronic migraine patients include: (1) making a proper diagnosis; (2) identifying and eliminating exacerbating factors; (3) assessing for medication overuse (patients with chronic headache often overuse acute medications); and (4) continued management. Communication between patient and physician about treatment goals is important. The patient management guidelines presented in this article should help physicians improve treatment success and proactively address common comorbidities among their patients with chronic migraine.

  11. Defining Pediatric Chronic Critical Illness for Clinical Care, Research, and Policy.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Miriam C; Henderson, Carrie M; Hutton, Nancy; Boss, Renee D

    2017-04-01

    Chronically critically ill pediatric patients represent an emerging population in NICUs and PICUs. Chronic critical illness has been recognized and defined in the adult population, but the same attention has not been systematically applied to pediatrics. This article reviews what is currently known about pediatric chronic critical illness, highlighting the unique aspects of chronic critical illness in infants and children, including specific considerations of prognosis, outcomes, and decision-making. We propose a definition that incorporates NICU versus PICU stays, recurrent ICU admissions, dependence on life-sustaining technology, multiorgan dysfunction, underlying medical complexity, and the developmental implications of congenital versus acquired conditions. We propose a research agenda, highlighting existing knowledge gaps and targeting areas of improvement in clinical care, research, and policy.

  12. Breaking barriers to care: a community of solution for chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Jim; Solberg, Bill; Gauger, Michael

    2013-01-01

    For 10 years the Medical College of Wisconsin and Columbia St. Mary's Hospital have joined together in a partnership to work within some of Milwaukee's most impoverished neighborhoods. Beginning simply by providing health care through a free clinic, the partnership soon was confronted with numerous examples of barriers to care being experienced by patients. A community-based participatory action process allowed the local population to give voice to the local realities of barriers to care. Here we combine our anecdotal clinical experience, the neighborhood's input, and an example of a successful program from a low-resource international setting to create a novel approach to treating chronic disease in uninsured populations. This model of care has been successful for 2 reasons. First, the model shows good health outcomes at low cost. Second, solid community partnerships with care providers, churches, and other groups have been formed in support of the model, ensuring its credibility and sustainability.

  13. Disease management projects and the Chronic Care Model in action: baseline qualitative research

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Disease management programs, especially those based on the Chronic Care Model (CCM), are increasingly common in the Netherlands. While disease management programs have been well-researched quantitatively and economically, less qualitative research has been done. The overall aim of the study is to explore how disease management programs are implemented within primary care settings in the Netherlands; this paper focuses on the early development and implementation stages of five disease management programs in the primary care setting, based on interviews with project leadership teams. Methods Eleven semi-structured interviews were conducted at the five selected sites with sixteen professionals interviewed; all project directors and managers were interviewed. The interviews focused on each project’s chosen chronic illness (diabetes, eating disorders, COPD, multi-morbidity, CVRM) and project plan, barriers to development and implementation, the project leaders’ action and reactions, as well as their roles and responsibilities, and disease management strategies. Analysis was inductive and interpretive, based on the content of the interviews. After analysis, the results of this research on disease management programs and the Chronic Care Model are viewed from a traveling technology framework. Results This analysis uncovered four themes that can be mapped to disease management and the Chronic Care Model: (1) changing the health care system, (2) patient-centered care, (3) technological systems and barriers, and (4) integrating projects into the larger system. Project leaders discussed the paths, both direct and indirect, for transforming the health care system to one that addresses chronic illness. Patient-centered care was highlighted as needed and a paradigm shift for many. Challenges with technological systems were pervasive. Project leaders managed the expenses of a traveling technology, including the social, financial, and administration involved

  14. Achieving Effective Universal Health Coverage And Diagonal Approaches To Care For Chronic Illnesses.

    PubMed

    Knaul, Felicia Marie; Bhadelia, Afsan; Atun, Rifat; Frenk, Julio

    2015-09-01

    Health systems in low- and middle-income countries were designed to provide episodic care for acute conditions. However, the burden of disease has shifted to be overwhelmingly dominated by chronic conditions and illnesses that require health systems to function in an integrated manner across a spectrum of disease stages from prevention to palliation. Low- and middle-income countries are also aiming to ensure health care access for all through universal health coverage. This article proposes a framework of effective universal health coverage intended to meet the challenge of chronic illnesses. It outlines strategies to strengthen health systems through a "diagonal approach." We argue that the core challenge to health systems is chronicity of illness that requires ongoing and long-term health care. The example of breast cancer within the broader context of health system reform in Mexico is presented to illustrate effective universal health coverage along the chronic disease continuum and across health systems functions. The article concludes with recommendations to strengthen health systems in order to achieve effective universal health coverage.

  15. Managing Chronic Pain in Primary Care: It Really Does Take a Village.

    PubMed

    Seal, Karen; Becker, William; Tighe, Jennifer; Li, Yongmei; Rife, Tessa

    2017-03-23

    Some healthcare systems are relieving primary care providers (PCPs) of "the burden" of managing chronic pain and opioid prescribing, instead offloading chronic pain management to pain specialists. Last year the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended a biopsychosocial approach to pain management that discourages opioid use and promotes exercise therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy and non-opioid medications as first-line patient-centered, multi-modal treatments best delivered by an interdisciplinary team. In the private sector, interdisciplinary pain management services are challenging to assemble, separate from primary care and not typically reimbursed. In contrast, in a fully integrated health care system like the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), interdisciplinary clinics already exist, and one such clinic, the Integrated Pain Team (IPT) clinic, integrates and co-locates pain-trained PCPs, a psychologist and a pharmacist in primary care. The IPT clinic has demonstrated significant success in opioid risk reduction. Unfortunately, proposed legislation threatens to dismantle aspects of the VA such that these interdisciplinary services may be eliminated. This Perspective explains why it is critical not only to maintain interdisciplinary pain services in VHA, but also to consider disseminating this model to other health care systems in order to implement patient-centered, guideline-concordant care more broadly.

  16. Effects of Educational Interventions for Chronic Airway Disease on Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Yeon; Yoo, Kwang Ha; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Kim, Sang-Ha; Kim, Tae-Eun; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Rhee, Chin Kook; Park, Yong Bum; Yoon, Hyoung Kyu; Yum, Ho-Kee

    2016-07-01

    Education has been known to essential for management of chronic airway diseases. However the real benefits remain unclear. We evaluated the effectiveness of an organized educational intervention for chronic airway diseases directed at primary care physicians and patients. The intervention was a 1-month education program of three visits, during which subjects were taught about their disease, an action plan in acute exacerbation and inhaler technique. Asthma control tests (ACT) for asthma and, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) assessment tests (CAT) for COPD subjects were compared before and after education as an index of quality of life. Educational effectiveness was also measured associated with improvement of their knowledge for chronic airway disease itself, proper use of inhaler technique, and satisfaction of the subjects and clinicians before and after education. Among the 285 participants, 60.7% (n = 173) were men and the mean age was 62.2 ± 14.7. ACT for asthma and CAT in COPD patients were significantly improved by 49.7% (n = 79) and 51.2% (n = 65) more than MCID respectively after education (P < 0.05). In all individual items, knowledge about their disease, inhaler use and satisfaction of the patients and clinicians were also improved after education (P < 0.05). This study demonstrates the well-organized education program for primary care physicians and patients is a crucial process for management of chronic airway diseases.

  17. Practitioners' Perceptions of the Academic Preparation of Funeral Directors and Embalmers in the Context of Changing Death Care Preferences in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LuBrant, Michael Paul

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated practitioners' perceptions of the a) importance, b) academic preparation related to, and c) adequacy of, funeral service education at academic programs accredited by the American Board of Funeral Service Education (ABFSE) in the context of changing death care preferences in the United States. Participants in this…

  18. [Community resources prescription for self-care improvement in chronic illnesses. Clinical case management in Primary Health Care].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Vico-Díaz de Rada, Lucía; González-Suárez, Miriam; Duarte-Clíments, Gonzalo; Brito-Brito, Pedro Ruymán

    2014-01-01

    A case is presented of a 52 year-old male seen in a Primary Care nursing clinic for a type 2 diabetes mellitus metabolic control. The frequency of the visits increased due to perceived difficulties caused by changing the medical treatment. A focused interview was conducted under functional health patterns framework. The patient was unable to write or read, had not worked for the last 25 years, and expressed a lack of control over his self-care. An action plan was prepared, prioritizing Ineffective Health Maintenance, Powerlessness, and Impaired Social Interaction NANDA-I nursing diagnoses. The goals were set at improving knowledge and control over his disease and participating in leisure activities. To achieve these, the social health resources in the area were contacted, and agreed that the patient could attend activities that could improve his self-care and his quality of life. An improvement in his diabetes control was observed in the following evaluations, with an increase in his level of knowledge and self-care. The Primary Health care nurse should consider available community resources by using a comprehensive approach to chronic diseases for their therapeutic benefit and management, especially in those patients with adverse sociocultural conditions.

  19. Attachment in medical care: A review of the interpersonal model in chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Xavier F

    2017-03-01

    Objective Patient-physician interaction is continually examined in an era prioritizing patient-centered approaches, yet elaboration beyond aspects of communication and empathy is lacking. Major chronic conditions would benefit tremendously from understanding interpersonal aspects of patient-physician encounters. This review intends to provide a concise introduction to the interpersonal model of attachment theory and how it informs both the patient-physician interaction and medical outcomes in chronic care. Methods A narrative review of the theoretical, neurobiological, epidemiological, investigational, and clinical literature on attachment theory and its impact on medical outcomes was conducted, utilizing a variety of key words as searched on PubMed database. Studies and reviews included were of a variety of sources, including textbooks and peer-reviewed journals. Reports in languages other than English were excluded. Results Measurable, discrete attachment styles and behavioral patterns correlate with poor medical outcomes, including nonadherence in insecure dismissing attachment and care overutilization in insecure preoccupied attachment. Furthermore, insecure dismissing attachment is associated with significant mortality. These variables can be easily assessed, and their effects are reversible, as evidenced by collaborative care outcome data. Discussion Attachment theory is useful a model with application in clinical and investigational aspects of chronic illness care. Implications and guidelines are explored.

  20. Point-of-Care Diagnostics in Low-Resource Settings and Their Impact on Care in the Age of the Noncommunicable and Chronic Disease Epidemic.

    PubMed

    Weigl, Bernhard H; Neogi, Tina; McGuire, Helen

    2014-06-01

    The emergence of point-of-care (POC) diagnostics specifically designed for low-resource settings coupled with the rapid increase in need for routine care of patients with chronic diseases should prompt reconsideration of how health care can be delivered most beneficially and cost-effectively in developing countries. Bolstering support for primary care to provide rapid and appropriate integrated acute and chronic care treatment may be a possible solution. POC diagnostics can empower local and primary care providers and enable them to make better clinical decisions. This article explores the opportunity for POC diagnostics to strengthen primary care and chronic disease diagnosis and management in a low-resource setting (LRS) to deliver appropriate, consistent, and integrated care. We analyze the requirements of resource-appropriate chronic disease care, the characteristics of POC diagnostics in LRS versus the developed world, the many roles of diagnostics in the care continuum in LRS, and the process and economics of developing LRS-compatible POC diagnostics.

  1. Evaluation of a mentorship program to support chronic kidney disease care

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Jocelyn; Grill, Allan; Bhatt, Monisha; Woodward, Graham L.; Brimble, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Problem addressed Primary care providers (PCPs) are ideally situated to detect and manage patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), but they could use more support from nephrologists to accomplish this. Objective of program To improve early detection and management of CKD in primary care, and improve referrals to nephrologists through education and greater partnership between nephrologists and PCPs. Program description Nephrologists provided mentorship to PCPs in Ontario through a collaborative relationship. Nephrologists provided PCPs with educational orientation sessions and need-based advice on patient cases. Conclusion Primary care providers with more than 5 years of experience were more likely to use the program. Primary care providers expressed high satisfaction with the program and reported that it was effective in supporting routine CKD screening efforts, management of early CKD, appropriate referrals, and building a collaborative relationship with nephrologists. PMID:27521409

  2. Changes in salivary microbiota increase volatile sulfur compounds production in healthy male subjects with academic-related chronic stress

    PubMed Central

    Marcondes, Fernanda Klein; Groppo, Francisco Carlos; Rolim, Gustavo Sattolo; de Moraes, Antonio Bento Alves; Cogo-Müller, Karina; Franz-Montan, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the associations among salivary bacteria, oral emanations of volatile sulfur compounds, and academic-related chronic stress in healthy male subjects. Materials and methods Seventy-eight healthy male undergraduate dental students were classified as stressed or not by evaluation of burnout, a syndrome attributed to academic-related chronic stress. This evaluation was carried out using the Maslach Burnout Inventory—Student Survey questionnaire. Oral emanations of hydrogen sulfide, methyl mercaptan, and dimethyl sulfide were measured using an Oral Chroma™ portable gas chromatograph. The amounts in saliva of total bacteria and seven bacteria associated with halitosis were quantified by qPCR. The in vitro production of H2S by S. moorei and/or F. nucleatum was also measured with the Oral Chroma™ instrument. Results The stressed students group showed increased oral emanations of hydrogen sulfide and dimethyl sulfide, together with higher salivary Solobacterium moorei levels (p < 0.05, Mann Whitney test). There were moderate positive correlations between the following pairs of variables: Fusobacterium nucleatum and S. moorei; F. nucleatum and hydrogen sulfide; Tannerella forsythia and F. nucleatum; T. forsythia and S. moorei. These correlations only occurred for the stressed group (p < 0.05, Spearman correlation). The in vitro experiment demonstrated that S. moorei increased H2S production by F. nucleatum (p < 0.05, ANOVA and Tukey’s test). Conclusion The increased amount of S. moorei in saliva, and its coexistence with F. nucleatum and T. forsythia, seemed to be responsible for increased oral hydrogen sulfide in the healthy male stressed subjects. PMID:28319129

  3. A family nursing approach to the care of a child with a chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Whyte, D A

    1992-03-01

    Chronic illness in childhood affects family functioning, and professional support is required when the child is being cared for at home. The focus of concern for this study is the nursing contribution to the support of the family. A longitudinal ethnographic study of the experience of four families caring for a child with cystic fibrosis provided data. Analysis of the four case studies provides insight to the effect of cystic fibrosis on family interaction. The genetic aspects and the life-threatening nature of the illness are seen to have a profound effect on the parents' lives. The experience of crisis and the chronic burden of care are described. The context of long-term care requires the nurse to share the illness trajectory with the families and to help family members to travel it together. This is seen to require a high level of interpersonal skill and considerable emotional investment. The issues for nursing are examined. The research arose from practice, and it contributes to theoretical explanation of nursing interaction, and the relationship of systems thinking to understanding of the nursing situation. The case for the development of family nursing practice to meet contemporary health care needs is argued.

  4. Insuring continuity of care for chronic disease patients after a disaster: key preparedness elements

    PubMed Central

    Arrieta, Martha I.; Foreman, Rachel D.; Crook, Errol D.; Icenogle, Marjorie L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Care for patients with chronic diseases is a challenge after a disaster. This is particularly true for individuals from health disparate populations as they are less likely to evacuate, have less financial resources and often depend on resource-strapped institutions for their care. The specific aim of the study presented here was to elicit challenges and solutions in the provision of health care to those with chronic diseases after Hurricane Katrina in coastal Alabama and Mississippi. Methods Focusing on agencies providing care to health disparate populations, a qualitative methodology was employed using in-depth interviews with health and social service providers. Participants identified key elements essential to disaster preparedness. Results Pre-disaster issues were patient education and preparedness, evacuation, special needs shelters and health care provider preparedness. Post-disaster issues were communication, volunteer coordination and donation management. Conclusions Lessons learned from those on the ground administering healthcare during disasters should inform future disaster preparations. Furthermore, the methodological approach used in this study engendered collaboration between healthcare institutions and may enhance future inter-agency disaster preparedness. PMID:18703906

  5. Perceived Value of Academic and Physical Tasks: A Comparison of Healthy and Chronically Ill Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Christy L.

    Questionnaires were completed by parents and fifth- and sixth-grade children (1,180 healthy, 151 chronically ill, 54 hyperactive, and 54 with severe vision or hearing impairments). The instruments were designed to measure three types of value: utility value (how important success at a task is for achieving future goals); attainment value (the…

  6. The College Experience for Students with Chronic Illness: Implications for Academic Advising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houman, Katie M.; Stapley, Janice C.

    2013-01-01

    A purposive sample (2 males, 3 females) of students (aged 18-29 years) with chronic illness completed standardized measures and a semi-structured interview. Content analysis of the interview data revealed two themes: stress exacerbating symptoms of illness and a desire for a support group on campus. Viewed through the theory of emerging adulthood,…

  7. Optimal patterns of care in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Martin-Harris, B

    2000-01-01

    An intimate relationship exists between the physiological processes of respiration and swallowing at all levels of neuromotor control and peripheral function in healthy adults. Little is known regarding the potential alterations in these patterns in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), yet the impact of swallowing impairment and aspiration on the health outcomes of patients with COPD may be significant. COPD is a common comorbidity in patients with head and neck cancer and neurological disorders seen by swallowing clinicians, and warrants consideration during swallowing treatment. This article summarizes reports of alterations in the nutritional status, airway protective mechanisms, and swallowing efficiency that potentially contribute to or exacerbate the chronic and debilitating pulmonary condition. Care guidelines are given for modification of eating and swallowing behavior to optimize the health status of the patient with COPD. The need for controlled clinical trials for validation of the impact of these care guidelines on clinical outcomes is explained.

  8. Improving the management of chronic diseases using web-based technologies: an application in hemophilia care.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Leonor; Saavedra, Vasco; Ferreira, Carlos; Sousa Santos, Beatriz

    2010-01-01

    Modern methods of information and communication that use web technologies provide an opportunity to facilitate closer communication between patients and healthcare providers, allowing a joint management of chronic diseases. This paper describes a web-based technological solution to support the management of inherited bleeding disorders integrating, diffusing and archiving large sets of data relating to the clinical practice of hemophilia care, more specifically the clinical practice at the Hematology Service of Coimbra Hospital Center (a Hemophilia Treatment Center located in Portugal).

  9. Recognizing and caring for the medically compromised child: 4. Children with other chronic medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, S C; Barnard, K M; Harrison, V E

    1999-01-01

    This is the fourth and final part of a series on recognizing and caring for medically compromised children. In this article, an outline of appropriate dental management for children with other more commonly encountered chronic medical conditions is given, together with a description of the disorders and their significance in dentistry. This group includes children with physically handicapping conditions and children with learning difficulties, as well as those who are medically compromised.

  10. Impact of a Chronic Care Coordinator Intervention on Diabetes Quality of Care in a Community Health Center

    PubMed Central

    Solorio, Rosa; Bansal, Aasthaa; Comstock, Bryan; Ulatowski, Krista; Barker, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the impact of a clinic-based chronic care coordinator (CCC) intervention on quality of diabetes care, health outcomes and health service utilization within six community health centers serving predominantly low-income Hispanic and non-Hispanic white patients. Methods We used a retrospective cohort study design with a 12-month pre- and 12-month postintervention analysis to evaluate the effect of the CCC intervention and examined: (1) the frequency of testing for glycated hemoglobin (HbAIC), cholesterol LDL level, and microalbumin screen and frequency of retinal and foot exam; (2) outcomes for HbAIC levels, lipid, and blood pressure control; and (3) health care service utilization. Patients with diabetes who received the CCC intervention (n = 329) were compared to a propensity score adjusted control group who are not exposed to the CCC intervention (n = 329). All of the data came from Electronic Medical Record. Four separate sets of analyses were conducted to demonstrate the effect of propensity score matching on results. Results The CCC intervention led to improvements in process measures, including more laboratory checks for HbAIC levels, microalbuminuria screens, retinal and foot exams and also increased primary care visits. However, the intervention did not improve metabolic control. Conclusions CCC interventions offer promise in improving process measures within community health centers but need to be modified to improve metabolic control. PMID:25355532

  11. Divorce and Childhood Chronic Illness: A Grounded Theory of Trust, Gender, and Third-Party Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Russell, Luke T; Coleman, Marilyn; Ganong, Lawrence H; Gayer, Debra

    2016-05-01

    Divorced parents face distinct challenges in providing care for chronically ill children. Children's residence in two households necessitates the development of family-specific strategies to ensure coparents' supervision of regimen adherence and the management of children's health care. Utilizing a risk and resilience perspective, a grounded theory study was conducted with 14 divorced parents of children with chronic illnesses. The importance of trust, gender, and relationships with third-party care providers emerged as key themes related to the development of effective coparenting relationships for maintaining children's health. Divorced parents were best able to support the management of their children's chronic conditions when care providers operated as neutral third parties and intermediaries. Collaborative family care may require health care practitioners to avoid being drawn into contentious inter-parental conflicts.

  12. Impact on health-related quality of life and costs of managing chronic neuropathic pain in academic pain centres: Results from a one-year prospective observational Canadian study

    PubMed Central

    Tarride, J-E; Moulin, DE; Lynch, M; Clark, AJ; Stitt, L; Gordon, A; Morley-Forster, PK; Nathan, H; Smyth, C; Toth, C; Ware, MA

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The management of chronic pain, including neuropathic pain (NeP), is a major public health issue. However, there is a paucity of data evaluating pain management strategies in real-life settings. OBJECTIVE: To inform policy makers about the economic value of managing chronic NeP in academic centres by conducting a subeconomic assessment of a Canadian multicentre cohort study aimed at determining the long-term outcomes of the management of chronic NeP in academic pain centres. Specific questions regarding the economic value of this type of program were answered by a subset of patients to provide further information to policy makers. METHODS: Baseline demographic information and several pain-related measurements were collected at baseline, three, six and 12 months in the main study. A resource use questionnaire aimed at determining NeP-related costs and the EuroQoL-5 Dimension were collected in the subset study from consenting patients. Statistical analyses were conducted to compare outcomes over time and according to responder status. RESULTS: A total of 298 patients were evaluated in the present economic evaluation. The mean (± SD) age of the participants was 53.7±14.0 years, and 56% were female. At intake, the mean duration of NeP was >5 years. Statistically significant improvements in all pain and health-related quality of life outcomes were observed between the baseline and one-year visits. Use decreased over time for many health care resources (eg, visits to the emergency room decreased by one-half), which resulted in overall cost savings. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that increased access to academic pain centres should be facilitated in Canada. PMID:26474381

  13. Home Palliative Care for Patients with Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease: Preliminary Results.

    PubMed

    Teruel, José L; Rexach, Lourdes; Burguera, Victor; Gomis, Antonio; Fernandez-Lucas, Milagros; Rivera, Maite; Diaz, Alicia; Collazo, Sergio; Liaño, Fernando

    2015-10-28

    Healthcare for patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (ACKD) on conservative treatment very often poses healthcare problems that are difficult to solve. At the end of 2011, we began a program based on the care and monitoring of these patients by Primary Care Teams. ACKD patients who opted for conservative treatment were offered the chance to be cared for mainly at home by the Primary Care doctor and nurse, under the coordination of the Palliative Care Unit and the Nephrology Department. During 2012, 2013, and 2014, 76 patients received treatment in this program (mean age: 81 years; mean Charlson age-comorbidity index: 10, and mean glomerular filtration rate: 12.4 mL/min/1.73 m²). The median patient follow-up time (until death or until 31 December 2014) was 165 days. During this period, 51% of patients did not have to visit the hospital's emergency department and 58% did not require hospitalization. Forty-eight of the 76 patients died after a median time of 135 days in the program; 24 (50%) died at home. Our experience indicates that with the support of the Palliative Care Unit and the Nephrology Department, ACKD patients who are not dialysis candidates may be monitored at home by Primary Care Teams.

  14. Home Palliative Care for Patients with Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease: Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Teruel, José L.; Rexach, Lourdes; Burguera, Victor; Gomis, Antonio; Fernandez-Lucas, Milagros; Rivera, Maite; Diaz, Alicia; Collazo, Sergio; Liaño, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare for patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (ACKD) on conservative treatment very often poses healthcare problems that are difficult to solve. At the end of 2011, we began a program based on the care and monitoring of these patients by Primary Care Teams. ACKD patients who opted for conservative treatment were offered the chance to be cared for mainly at home by the Primary Care doctor and nurse, under the coordination of the Palliative Care Unit and the Nephrology Department. During 2012, 2013, and 2014, 76 patients received treatment in this program (mean age: 81 years; mean Charlson age-comorbidity index: 10, and mean glomerular filtration rate: 12.4 mL/min/1.73 m2). The median patient follow-up time (until death or until 31 December 2014) was 165 days. During this period, 51% of patients did not have to visit the hospital’s emergency department and 58% did not require hospitalization. Forty-eight of the 76 patients died after a median time of 135 days in the program; 24 (50%) died at home. Our experience indicates that with the support of the Palliative Care Unit and the Nephrology Department, ACKD patients who are not dialysis candidates may be monitored at home by Primary Care Teams. PMID:27417813

  15. Interprofessional teamwork and team interventions in chronic care: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Körner, Mirjam; Bütof, Sarah; Müller, Christian; Zimmermann, Linda; Becker, Sonja; Bengel, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    To identify key features of teamwork and interventions for enhancing interprofessional teamwork (IPT) in chronic care and to develop a framework for further research, we conducted a systematic literature review of IPT in chronic care for the years 2002-2014. Database searches yielded 3217 abstracts, 21 of which fulfilled inclusion criteria. We identified two more studies on the topic by scanning the reference lists of included articles, which resulted in a final total of 23 included studies. The key features identified in the articles (e.g., team member characteristics, common task, communication, cooperation, coordination, responsibility, participation, staff satisfaction, patient satisfaction, and efficiency) were structured in line with the input-process-output model, and evaluated interventions, such as tools, workshops, and changes in team structure, were added to the model. The most frequently evaluated team interventions were complex intervention programs. All but one of the 14 evaluation studies resulted in enhancement of teamwork and/or staff-related, patient-related, and organization-related outcome criteria. To date, there is no consensus about the main features of IPT and the most effective team interventions in chronic care. However, the findings may be used to standardize the implementation and evaluation of IPT and team interventions in practice and for further research.

  16. [Continuous medical education of general practitioners/family doctors in chronic wound care].

    PubMed

    Sinozić, Tamara; Kovacević, Jadranka

    2014-10-01

    A number of healthcare professionals, specialists in different fields and with different levels of education, as well as non-healthcare professionals, are involved in the care of chronic wound patients, thus forming a multidisciplinary team that is not only responsible for the course and outcome of treatment, but also for the patient quality of life. Family doctor is also member of the team the task of which is to prevent, diagnose, monitor and anticipate complications and relapses, as well as complete recovery of chronic wound patients, with the overall care continuing even after the wound has healed, or is involved in palliative care. A family medicine practitioner with specialized education and their team of associates in the primary health care, along with material conditions and equipment improvement, can provide quality care for patients with peripheral cardiovascular diseases and chronic wounds, organized according to the holistic approach. It is essential that all professional associations of family medicine as well as professional associations of other specialties - fields that are involved in wound prevention and treatment - be included in developing the continuous medical education program. The benefits of modern information technology should be used to good advantage. The education should be adapted to the needs of family practitioners in terms of the form, place, time, volume, financial affordability and choice of topic. The interest shown in team education should be transformed into specialized programs in the creation of which it is essential to include both physicians and nurses and their respective professional associations. Special attention should be paid to education and training of young doctors/nurses, those with less work experience, those that have not yet been part of such education, those that lack experience in working with wound patients, those whose teams deal mostly with elderly patients, and also residents in family medicine and

  17. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010: Summary, Analysis, and Opportunities for Advocacy for the Academic Emergency Physician

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Jeffrey A.; Walthall, Jennifer D.H.

    2010-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Bill, commonly referred to as the “Health Care Bill” or the “Health Care Reform Bill,” became enacted in March, 2010. This article is a review and analysis of the sections of this Act that are relevant to researchers and teachers of emergency care. The purpose of this document is to serve as a citable reference for interested parties and a reference to quickly locate the sections of the Bill relevant to academic emergency physicians. When appropriate, text was copied verbatim from the bill. The source of the downloaded Act, and the page numbers of the text sections, are provided to help the reader to find the sections described. This review is presented in two parts. Part 1 presents 11 sections extirpated from the Act, with short interpretations of the significance of each section. Part II presents an analysis of the sections that the authors believe represent opportunities for emergency care researchers and teachers to make the most impact, through active involvement with the various departments and agencies of the federal government that will be charged with interpreting and implementing this Act. The Act contains sections that could lead to new funding opportunities for research in emergency care, especially for comparative clinical trials and clinical studies that focus on integration and efficiency of health care delivery. The Act will establish several new institutes, centers, and committees that will create policies highly relevant to emergency care. The authors conclude that this Act can be expected to have a profound influence on research and training in emergency care. PMID:20653573

  18. Suicide Risk in Adolescents with Chronic Illness: Implications for Primary Care and Specialty Pediatric Practice--A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greydanus, Donald; Patel, Dilip; Pratt, Helen

    2010-01-01

    Suicide in adolescents is a global tragedy. Research-identified correlates of suicide in youth include depression, academic failure, loss of friends, social isolation, and substance abuse, among others. This review focuses on the potential link between chronic illness in adolescents and increased suicide risk. Research suggests that chronic…

  19. Improving quality of care for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Deprez, Ronald; Kinner, Amy; Millard, Peter; Baggott, Leeann; Mellett, Jean; Loo, Jia Ling

    2009-08-01

    A chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) project was initiated at 18 primary care clinical practices located in rural areas of northeastern Maine to improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients with COPD through the adoption of evidence-based and best practice clinical guidelines for care management. Clinical guidelines based on the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) were implemented by the practices using the Institute for Healthcare Improvement Breakthrough Series learning session model. Practice barriers and patient barriers were identified through focus groups and were then addressed at the learning sessions and through direct contact with the practices. To evaluate the improvements that were a result of the project, changes in clinical practice and patient care were measured pre and post initiative. The greatest improvements in COPD patient care were in the areas of smoking cessation counseling, annual influenza vaccinations, discussion of self-management goals, and diet/exercise counseling. Participants reported that the collaborative nature of the project allowed for mutual learning, provided teams with support to identify and overcome barriers, and fostered teamwork to find solutions to shared problems.

  20. Integrating mental health into chronic care in South Africa: the development of a district mental healthcare plan

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Inge; Fairall, Lara; Bhana, Arvin; Kathree, Tasneem; Selohilwe, One; Brooke-Sumner, Carrie; Faris, Gill; Breuer, Erica; Sibanyoni, Nomvula; Lund, Crick; Patel, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    Background In South Africa, the escalating prevalence of chronic illness and its high comorbidity with mental disorders bring to the fore the need for integrating mental health into chronic care at district level. Aims To develop a district mental healthcare plan (MHCP) in South Africa that integrates mental healthcare for depression, alcohol use disorders and schizophrenia into chronic care. Method Mixed methods using a situation analysis, qualitative key informant interviews, theory of change workshops and piloting of the plan in one health facility informed the development of the MHCP. Results Collaborative care packages for the three conditions were developed to enable integration at the organisational, facility and community levels, supported by a human resource mix and implementation tools. Potential barriers to the feasibility of implementation at scale were identified. Conclusions The plan leverages resources and systems availed by the emerging chronic care service delivery platform for the integration of mental health. This strengthens the potential for future scale up. PMID:26447176

  1. Using Goal-Directed Design to Create a Novel System for Improving Chronic Illness Care

    PubMed Central

    Fore, David; Goldenhar, Linda M; Margolis, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    Background A learning health system enables patients, clinicians, and researchers to work together to choose care based on the best evidence, drive discovery as a natural outgrowth of patient care, and ensure innovation, quality, safety, and value in health care; all in a more real-time fashion. Objective Our paper describes how goal-directed design (GDD) methods were employed to understand the context and goals of potential participants in such a system as part of a design process to translate the concept of a learning health system into a prototype collaborative chronic care network (C3N), specifically for pediatric inflammatory bowel disease. Methods Thirty-six one-on-one in-depth interviews and observations were conducted with patients (10/36, 28%), caregivers (10/36, 28%), physicians/researchers (10/36, 28%), and nurses (6/36, 17%) from a pediatric gastroenterology center participating in the ImproveCareNow network. GDD methods were used to determine the context and goals of participants. These same methods were used in conjunction with idealized design process techniques to help determine characteristics of a learning health system for this pediatric health care ecology. Research was conducted in a clinic and, in the case of some patients and caregivers, at home. Results Thematic analysis revealed 3 parent-child dyad personas (ie, representations of interviewees’ behavior patterns, goals, skills, attitudes, and contextual information) that represented adaptation to a chronic illness over time. These were used as part of a design process to generate scenarios (potential interactions between personas and the learning health system under design) from which system requirements were derived. These scenarios in turn helped guide generation, prioritization, design, measurement, and implementation of approximately 100 prototype interventions consistent with the aim of C3N becoming a learning health network. Conclusions GDD methods help ensure human goals and

  2. Perceptions of the need for improvements in healthcare after implementation of the Chronic Care Model.

    PubMed

    Holm, Anne Lise; Severinsson, Elisabeth

    2014-12-01

    Older people with depression constitute a vulnerable group, and evidence from different parts of the world has demonstrated the need for healthcare improvements at the community level. In this study, we described team members' perceptions of improvements in the care of older people with depression living in the community after the implementation of the Chronic Care Model, with a focus on delivery-system design, self-management support, and teamwork. This follow-up study was based on focus-group interviews with healthcare team members. The data were analyzed by qualitative content analysis. Four themes emerged: (i) ensuring a pathway to the top level of the organization; (ii) the need for leadership from senior managers; (iii) the need to formalize collaboration; and (iv) increasing self-management. Senior managers should cooperate with specialist care givers and administrators in the community. They must also redesign the delivery system to facilitate teamwork and the self-management ability of older people with depression.

  3. Compassion in care: a qualitative study of older people with a chronic disease and nurses.

    PubMed

    van der Cingel, Margreet

    2011-09-01

    This article describes compassion as perceived within the relationship between nurses and older persons with a chronic disease. The aim of the study is to understand the benefit of compassion for nursing practice within the context of long-term care. The design of the study involves a qualitative analysis of in-depth interviews with nurses and patients in three different care-settings. Results show the nature of compassion in seven dimensions: attentiveness, listening, confronting, involvement, helping, presence and understanding. Analysis of the data also shows in what way opinions of participants relate to issues raised in a previous literature study, for example the difference between pity and compassion. The conclusion states that compassion is a valuable process which motivates patients as well as nurses to cooperate in achieving relevant outcomes of care. The discussion involves some methodological issues. For one thing, further confirmation of the dimensions found is recommended.

  4. Reengineering acute episodic and chronic care delivery: the Geisinger Health System experience.

    PubMed

    Slotkin, Jonathan R; Casale, Alfred S; Steele, Glenn D; Toms, Steven A

    2012-07-01

    Comparative effectiveness research (CER) represents an evolution in clinical decision-making research that allows for the study of heterogeneous groups of patients with complex diseases processes. It has foundations in decision science, reliability science, and health care policy research. Health care finance will increasingly rely on CER for guidance in the coming years. There is increasing awareness of the importance of decreasing unwarranted variation in health care delivery. In the past 7 years, Geisinger Health System has performed broad reengineering of its acute episodic and chronic care delivery models utilizing macrosystem-level application of CER principles. These provider-driven process initiatives have resulted in significant improvement across all segments of care delivery, improved patient outcomes, and notable cost containment. These programs have led to the creation of novel pricing models, and when "hardwired" throughout a care delivery system, they can lead to correct medical decision making by 100% of providers in all patient encounters. Neurosurgery as a specialty faces unique challenges and opportunities with respect to broad adoption and application of CER techniques.

  5. Pediatric Solid Organ Transplant Recipients: Transition to Home and Chronic Illness Care

    PubMed Central

    Lerret, Stacee M; Weiss, Marianne; Stendahl, Gail; Chapman, Shelley; Menendez, Jerome; Williams, Laurel; Nadler, Michelle; Neighbors, Katie; Amsden, Katie; Cao, Yumei; Nugent, Melodee; Alonso, Estella; Simpson, Pippa

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric solid organ transplant recipients are medically fragile and present with complex care issues requiring high-level management at home. Parents of hospitalized children have reported inadequate preparation for discharge, resulting in problems transitioning from hospital to home and independently self-managing their child’s complex care needs. The aim of this study was to investigate factors associated with the transition from hospital to home and chronic illness care for parents of heart, kidney, liver, lung, or multivisceral recipients. Fifty-one parents from five pediatric transplant centers completed questionnaires on the day of hospital discharge and telephone interviews at 3-week, 3-month, and 6-months following discharge from the hospital. Care coordination (p = .02) and quality of discharge teaching (p < .01) was significantly associated with parent readiness for discharge. Readiness for hospital discharge was subsequently significantly associated with post-discharge coping difficulty (p = .02) at 3-weeks, adherence with medication administration (p = .03) at 3-months, and post-discharge coping difficulty (p = .04) and family management (p = .02) at 6-months post-discharge. The results underscore the important aspect of education and care coordination in preparing patients and families to successfully self-manage after hospital discharge. Assessing parental readiness for hospital discharge is another critical component for identifying risk of difficulties in managing post-discharge care. PMID:25425201

  6. Transitional care interventions prevent hospital readmissions for adults with chronic illnesses.

    PubMed

    Verhaegh, Kim J; MacNeil-Vroomen, Janet L; Eslami, Saeid; Geerlings, Suzanne E; de Rooij, Sophia E; Buurman, Bianca M

    2014-09-01

    Transitional care interventions aim to improve care transitions from hospital to home and to reduce hospital readmissions for chronically ill patients. The objective of our study was to examine if these interventions were associated with a reduction of readmission rates in the short (30 days or less), intermediate (31-180 days), and long terms (181-365 days). We systematically reviewed twenty-six randomized controlled trials conducted in a variety of countries whose results were published in the period January 1, 1980-May 29, 2013. Our analysis showed that transitional care was effective in reducing all-cause intermediate-term and long-term readmissions. Only high-intensity interventions seemed to be effective in reducing short-term readmissions. Our findings suggest that to reduce short-term readmissions, transitional care should consist of high-intensity interventions that include care coordination by a nurse, communication between the primary care provider and the hospital, and a home visit within three days after discharge.

  7. Preconception care: screening and management of chronic disease and promoting psychological health

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A large proportion of women around the world suffer from chronic diseases including mental health diseases. In the United States alone, over 12% of women of reproductive age suffer from a chronic medical condition, especially diabetes and hypertension. Chronic diseases significantly increase the odds for poor maternal and newborn outcomes in pregnant women. Methods A systematic review and meta-analysis of the evidence was conducted to ascertain the possible impact of preconception care for preventing and managing chronic diseases and promoting psychological health on maternal, newborn and child health outcomes. A comprehensive strategy was used to search electronic reference libraries, and both observational and clinical controlled trials were included. Cross-referencing and a separate search strategy for each preconception risk and intervention ensured wider study capture. Results Maternal prepregnancy diabetic care is a significant intervention that reduces the occurrence of congenital malformations by 70% (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 59-78%) and perinatal mortality by 69% (95% CI: 47-81%). Furthermore, preconception management of epilepsy and phenylketonuria are essential and can optimize maternal, fetal and neonatal outcomes if given before conception. Ideally changes in antiepileptic drug therapy should be made at least 6 months before planned conception. Interventions specifically targeting women of reproductive age suffering from a psychiatric condition show that group-counseling and interventions leading to empowerment of women have reported non-significant reduction in depression (economic skill building: Mean Difference (MD) -7.53; 95% CI: -17.24, 2.18; counseling: MD-2.92; 95% CI: -13.17, 7.33). Conclusion While prevention and management of the chronic diseases like diabetes and hypertension, through counseling, and other dietary and pharmacological intervention, is important, delivering solutions to prevent and respond to women

  8. [Empowerment and power: their relationship in the proces of caring for the chronically ill in primary care].

    PubMed

    Riba Bellera, Lydia; Boixadera Vendrell, Mireia; Buendía Surroca, Carmen; Martorell Poveda, Maria Antònia; Piñeiro Méndez, Pilar; Zamora Sánchez, Juan José

    2014-06-01

    The concepts of "power" and "empowerment" are used in various disciplines, both political and social. Now are these terms frequently in the field of health. Our goal is to know its meaning as a synonym of expressions: "energy", "force", "domain", "vigour", "power", "capacity", "authority" and "control", which have been always within our practice nurse's own lexicon. Semantically analyzing them will help us in the understanding of its nuance. The literature review facilitates their understanding and allows us to link these words within the management of care. In this way we can propose diagnoses, interventions and outcomes specifically related to these concepts, which will help us optimize the efficiency in the management of care plans. The purpose of various collective nurses from different institutions is that the person is able to not generate dependencies and have the option of choosing your own lifestyle according to their culture and environment, independently or with the help. Generate knowledge is to generate power. The person should be educated and informed, to be expert and active and taking action to help control and minimize the progression of your health problem chronic and its possible complications. We are in the process of reformulation of the health system, whether it is private or public, and is necessary to know the power of the various actors involved in the management of the care to us. Each of these main actors--person ill, family/caregiver or nurse--has to know what is his role in this process.

  9. How do high cost-sharing policies for physician care affect inpatient care use and costs among people with chronic disease?

    PubMed

    Xin, Haichang

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly rising health care costs continue to be a significant concern in the United States. High cost-sharing strategies thus have been widely used to address rising health care costs. Since high cost-sharing policies can reduce needed care as well as unneeded care use, it raises the concern whether these policies for physician care are a good strategy for controlling costs among chronically ill patients, especially whether utilization and costs in inpatient care will increase in response. This study examined whether high cost sharing in physician care affects inpatient care utilization and costs differently between individuals with and without chronic conditions. Findings from this study will contribute to the insurance benefit design that can control care utilization and save costs of chronically ill individuals. Prior studies suffered from gaps that limit both internal validity and external validity of their findings. This study has its unique contributions by filling these gaps jointly. The study used data from the 2007 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, a nationally representative sample, with a cross-sectional study design. Instrumental variable technique was used to address the endogeneity between health care utilization and cost-sharing levels. We used negative binomial regression to analyze the count data and generalized linear models for costs data. To account for national survey sampling design, weight and variance were adjusted. The study compared the effects of high cost-sharing policies on inpatient care utilization and costs between individuals with and without chronic conditions to answer the research question. The final study sample consisted of 4523 individuals; among them, 752 had hospitalizations. The multivariate analysis demonstrated consistent patterns. Compared with low cost-sharing policies, high cost-sharing policies for physician care were not associated with a greater increase in inpatient care utilization (P = .86 for chronically ill

  10. The Effect of Foster Care Experience and Characteristics on Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calix, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effect of foster care experience and characteristics on educational outcomes. The typical strategy in examining the effect foster care has on educational outcomes is to compare the educational achievement of youth with foster care experience to that of their peers or to national norms. This strategy fails to take selection…

  11. Process Dimensions of Child Care Quality and Academic Achievement: An Instrumental Variables Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auger, Anamarie; Farkas, George; Duncan, Greg; Burchinal, Peg; Vandell, Deborah Lowe

    2012-01-01

    Child care quality is usually measured along two dimensions--structural and process. In this paper the authors focus on process quality--the quality of child care center instructional practices and teacher interactions with students. They use an instrumental variables technique to estimate the effect of child care center process quality on…

  12. Academic Health Centers and Care of Undocumented Immigrants in the United States: Servant Leaders or Uncourageous Followers?

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Public dialogue and debate about the health care overhaul in the United States is centered on one contentious question: Is there a moral obligation to ensure that all people (including undocumented immigrants) within its borders have access to affordable health care? For academic health centers (AHCs), which often provide safety-net care to the uninsured, this question has moral and social implications. An estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants living in the United States (80% of whom are Latino) are uninsured and currently prohibited from purchasing exchange coverage under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, even at full cost. The authors attempt to dispel the many misconceptions and distorted assumptions surrounding the use of health services by this vulnerable population. The authors also suggest that AHCs need to recalibrate their mission to focus on social accountability as well as the ethical and humanistic practice of medicine for all people, recognizing the significance of inclusion over exclusion in making progress on population health and health care. AHCs play a crucial role, both in educational policy and as a safety-net provider, in reducing health disparities that negatively impact vulnerable populations. Better health for all is possible through better alignment, collaboration, and partnering with other AHCs and safety-net providers. Through servant leadership, AHCs can be the leaders that this change imperative demands. PMID:24556781

  13. The Academic Medical System: Reinvention to Survive the Revolution in Health Care.

    PubMed

    Konstam, Marvin A; Hill, Joseph A; Kovacs, Richard J; Harrington, Robert A; Arrighi, James A; Khera, Amit

    2017-03-14

    Academic medical centers (AMCs) are presently facing enormous challenges arising from a prospective decline in government funding for research and education, shifting payment models emphasizing efficiency and value, and increasing competition. Left unabated, these challenges will drive many AMCs to de-emphasize or forsake their core missions in an effort to survive. Stemming from a symposium held at the 2015 Scientific Sessions of the American College of Cardiology titled, "The Academic Medical Center of the Future," we propose a series of changes, including internal restructuring, system-wide partnership, and novel approaches to support research and education, that are designed to better position AMCs to compete and face their growing challenges in a manner that preserves their essential missions. In aggregate, these changes will facilitate establishing the academic medical system of the future.

  14. Analysing the Costs of Integrated Care: A Case on Model Selection for Chronic Care Purposes

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Pérez, Inma; Ibern, Pere; Coderch, Jordi; Inoriza, José María

    2016-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study is to investigate whether the algorithm proposed by Manning and Mullahy, a consolidated health economics procedure, can also be used to estimate individual costs for different groups of healthcare services in the context of integrated care. Methods: A cross-sectional study focused on the population of the Baix Empordà (Catalonia-Spain) for the year 2012 (N = 92,498 individuals). A set of individual cost models as a function of sex, age and morbidity burden were adjusted and individual healthcare costs were calculated using a retrospective full-costing system. The individual morbidity burden was inferred using the Clinical Risk Groups (CRG) patient classification system. Results: Depending on the characteristics of the data, and according to the algorithm criteria, the choice of model was a linear model on the log of costs or a generalized linear model with a log link. We checked for goodness of fit, accuracy, linear structure and heteroscedasticity for the models obtained. Conclusion: The proposed algorithm identified a set of suitable cost models for the distinct groups of services integrated care entails. The individual morbidity burden was found to be indispensable when allocating appropriate resources to targeted individuals. PMID:28316542

  15. The use of CAM and conventional treatments among primary care consulters with chronic musculoskeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Artus, Majid; Croft, Peter; Lewis, Martyn

    2007-01-01

    Background Chronic musculoskeletal pain is the single most cited reason for use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Primary care is the most frequent conventional medical service used by patients with pain in the UK. We are unaware, however, of a direct evidence of the extent of CAM use by primary care patients, and how successful they perceive it to be. Methods Aims and objectives To determine CAM use among patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain who have consulted about their pain in primary care. Study design Face-to-face interview-based survey. Setting Three general practices in North Staffordshire. Participants Respondents to a population pain survey who had reported having musculoskeletal pain in the survey and who had consulted about their pain in primary care in the previous 12 months as well as consenting to further research and agreeing to an interview. Information was gathered about their pain and the use of all treatments for pain, including CAM, in the previous year. Results 138 interviews were completed. 116 participants (84%) had used at least one CAM treatment for pain in the previous year. 65% were current users of CAM. The ratio of over-the-counter CAM use to care from a CAM provider was 3:2. 111 participants (80%) had used conventional treatment. 95 (69%) were using a combination of CAM and conventional treatment. Glucosamine and fish oil were the most commonly used CAM treatments (38%, 35% respectively). Most CAM treatments were scored on average as being helpful, and users indicated that they intended to use again 87% of the CAM treatments they had already used. Conclusion We provide direct evidence that most primary care consulters with chronic musculoskeletal pain have used CAM in the previous year, usually in combination with conventional treatments. The high prevalence and wide range of users experiences of benefit and harm from CAM strengthen the argument for more research into this type of medicine to quantify benefit and

  16. Patient prioritization of comorbid chronic conditions in the Veteran population: Implications for patient-centered care

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Lorilei M; Hill, Jennifer N; Smith, Bridget M; Bauer, Erica; Weaver, Frances M; Gordon, Howard S; Stroupe, Kevin T; Hogan, Timothy P

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Patients with comorbid chronic conditions may prioritize some conditions over others; however, our understanding of factors influencing those prioritizations is limited. In this study, we sought to identify and elaborate a range of factors that influence how and why patients with comorbid chronic conditions prioritize their conditions. Methods: We conducted semi-structured, one-on-one interviews with 33 patients with comorbidities recruited from a single Veterans Health Administration Medical Center. Findings: The diverse factors influencing condition prioritization reflected three overarching themes: (1) the perceived role of a condition in the body, (2) self-management tasks, and (3) pain. In addition to these themes, participants described the rankings that they believed their healthcare providers would assign to their conditions as an influencing factor, although few reported having shared their priorities or explicitly talking with providers about the importance of their conditions. Conclusion: Studies that advance understanding of how and why patients prioritize their various conditions are essential to providing care that is patient-centered, reflecting what matters most to the individual while improving their health. This analysis informs guideline development efforts for the care of patients with comorbid chronic conditions as well as the creation of tools to promote patient–provider communication regarding the importance placed on different conditions. PMID:27928501

  17. Impact of Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act on academic radiology departments' clinical, research, and education missions.

    PubMed

    Mansoori, Bahar; Vidal, Lorenna L; Applegate, Kimberly; Rawson, James V; Novak, Ronald D; Ros, Pablo R

    2013-10-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) generated significant media attention since its inception. When the law was approved in 2010, the U.S. health care system began facing multiple changes to adapt and to incorporate measures to meet the new requirements. These mandatory changes will be challenging for academic radiology departments (ARDs) since they will need to promote a shift from a volume-focused to a value-focused practice. This will affect all components of the mission of ARDs, including clinical practice, education, and research. A unique key element to success in this transition is to focus on both quality and safety, thus improving the value of radiology in the post-ACA era. Given the changes ARDs will face during the implementation of ACA, suggestions are provided on how to adapt ARDs to this new environment.

  18. Quality of integrated chronic disease care in rural South Africa: user and provider perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ameh, Soter; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; D'ambruoso, Lucia; Kahn, Kathleen; Tollman, Stephen M; Gómez-Olivé, Francesc Xavier

    2016-09-01

    The integrated chronic disease management (ICDM) model was introduced as a response to the dual burden of HIV/AIDS and non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in South Africa, one of the first of such efforts by an African Ministry of Health. The aim of the ICDM model is to leverage HIV programme innovations to improve the quality of chronic disease care. There is a dearth of literature on the perspectives of healthcare providers and users on the quality of care in the novel ICDM model. This paper describes the viewpoints of operational managers and patients regarding quality of care in the ICDM model.In 2013, we conducted a case study of the seven PHC facilities in the rural Agincourt sub-district in northeast South Africa. Focus group discussions (n = 8) were used to obtain data from 56 purposively selected patients ≥18 years. In-depth interviews were conducted with operational managers of each facility and the sub-district health manager. Donabedian's structure, process and outcome theory for service quality evaluation underpinned the conceptual framework in this study. Qualitative data were analysed, with MAXQDA 2 software, to identify 17 a priori dimensions of care and unanticipated themes that emerged during the analysis.The manager and patient narratives showed the inadequacies in structure (malfunctioning blood pressure machines and staff shortage); process (irregular prepacking of drugs); and outcome (long waiting times). There was discordance between managers and patients regarding reasons for long patient waiting time which managers attributed to staff shortage and missed appointments, while patients ascribed it to late arrival of managers to the clinics. Patients reported anti-hypertension drug stock-outs (structure); sub-optimal defaulter-tracing (process); rigid clinic appointment system (process). Emerging themes showed that patients reported HIV stigmatisation in the community due to defaulter-tracing activities of home-based carers, while managers

  19. Multimorbidity in chronic disease: impact on health care resources and costs

    PubMed Central

    McPhail, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Effective and resource-efficient long-term management of multimorbidity is one of the greatest health-related challenges facing patients, health professionals, and society more broadly. The purpose of this review was to provide a synthesis of literature examining multimorbidity and resource utilization, including implications for cost-effectiveness estimates and resource allocation decision making. In summary, previous literature has reported substantially greater, near exponential, increases in health care costs and resource utilization when additional chronic comorbid conditions are present. Increased health care costs have been linked to elevated rates of primary care and specialist physician occasions of service, medication use, emergency department presentations, and hospital admissions (both frequency of admissions and bed days occupied). There is currently a paucity of cost-effectiveness information for chronic disease interventions originating from patient samples with multimorbidity. The scarcity of robust economic evaluations in the field represents a considerable challenge for resource allocation decision making intended to reduce the burden of multimorbidity in resource-constrained health care systems. Nonetheless, the few cost-effectiveness studies that are available provide valuable insight into the potential positive and cost-effective impact that interventions may have among patients with multiple comorbidities. These studies also highlight some of the pragmatic and methodological challenges underlying the conduct of economic evaluations among people who may have advanced age, frailty, and disadvantageous socioeconomic circumstances, and where long-term follow-up may be required to directly observe sustained and measurable health and quality of life benefits. Research in the field has indicated that the impact of multimorbidity on health care costs and resources will likely differ across health systems, regions, disease combinations, and person

  20. Connected health and integrated care: Toward new models for chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Chouvarda, Ioanna G; Goulis, Dimitrios G; Lambrinoudaki, Irene; Maglaveras, Nicos

    2015-09-01

    The increasingly aging population in Europe and worldwide brings up the need for the restructuring of healthcare. Technological advancements in electronic health can be a driving force for new health management models, especially in chronic care. In a patient-centered e-health management model, communication and coordination between patient, healthcare professionals in primary care and hospitals can be facilitated, and medical decisions can be made timely and easily communicated. Bringing the right information to the right person at the right time is what connected health aims at, and this may set the basis for the investigation and deployment of the integrated care models. In this framework, an overview of the main technological axes and challenges around connected health technologies in chronic disease management are presented and discussed. A central concept is personal health system for the patient/citizen and three main application areas are identified. The connected health ecosystem is making progress, already shows benefits in (a) new biosensors, (b) data management, (c) data analytics, integration and feedback. Examples are illustrated in each case, while open issues and challenges for further research and development are pinpointed.

  1. Advance care planning for fatal chronic illness: avoiding commonplace errors and unwarranted suffering.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Joanne; Goldstein, Nathan E

    2003-05-20

    Patients with eventually fatal illnesses often receive routine treatments in response to health problems rather than treatments arising from planning that incorporates the patient's situation and preferences. This paper considers the case of an elderly man with advanced lung disease who had mechanical ventilation and aggressive intensive care, in part because his nursing home clinicians did not complete an advance care plan and his do-not-resuscitate order did not accompany him to the hospital. The errors that led to his hospitalization and his unwanted treatment there demonstrate how the ordinary lack of advance care planning is deleterious for patients who are nearing the end of life. We discuss serious, recurring, and generally unnoticed errors in planning for care near the end of life and possible steps toward improvement. Repairing these shortcomings will require quality improvement and system redesign efforts, methods familiar from patient safety initiatives. Reliable improvement will also require making it unacceptable for clinicians to fail to plan ahead for care during fatal chronic illness.

  2. The Chronic Care Model: A Collaborative Approach to Preventing and Treating Asthma in Infants and Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wessel, Lois; Spain, Jacqueline

    2005-01-01

    The authors that a collaborative approach between parents and professionals is the best way to care for a young child with asthma. They use Ed Wagner's transdisciplinary 1998 Chronic Care Model as their preferred method for collaboration. More than 5 million children in the U.S. are currently affected by asthma, and a growing body of evidence…

  3. Policies and health care financing issues for dialysis in Latin America: extracts from the roundtable discussion on the economics of dialysis and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Pecoits-Filho, Roberto; Campos, Camilo; Cerdas-Calderon, Manuel; Fortes, Paulo; Jarpa, Cecilia; Just, Paul; Luconi, Paulo; Lugon, Jocemir R; Pacheco, Alejandro; Paniagua, Ramon; Rodriguez, Konniev; Sanabria, Mauricio; Sciaraffia, Vito; Velasco, Carlos; De Arteaga, Javier

    2009-02-01

    During the 2008 Congress of the International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis, academic nephrologists, nephrology societies, and government officials from Colombia, Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Central America, Ecuador, and Mexico participated in a roundtable discussion on the Economics of Dialysis and Chronic Kidney Disease in Latin America. The main focus was policy and health care financing. The roundtable promoted open discussion between policymakers and clinicians on how to find viable solutions to contain spending on treatment for end-stage renal disease into the future. A number of options were proposed, including early medical intervention (disease management programs) to slow the progression of chronic kidney disease in high-risk patients, promotion of pre-emptive renal transplantation, and use of the most cost-effective dialysis therapy that can be offered to a patient without compromising outcome. It was concluded that the burden of treating more patients in the future could be alleviated by wider utilization of peritoneal dialysis (PD). However, important changes in health care reimbursement systems and realignment of incentives in the region are required to support wider PD penetration.

  4. Assessment of a primary and tertiary care integrated management model for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Bolíbar, Ignasi; Plaza, Vicente; Llauger, Mariantònia; Amado, Ester; Antón, Pedro A; Espinosa, Ana; Domínguez, Leandra; Fraga, Mar; Freixas, Montserrat; de la Fuente, Josep A; Liguerre, Iskra; Medrano, Casimira; Peiro, Meritxell; Pou, Mariantònia; Sanchis, Joaquin; Solanes, Ingrid; Valero, Carles; Valverde, Pepi

    2009-01-01

    Background The diagnosis and treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in Spain continues to present challenges, and problems are exacerbated when there is a lack of coordinated follow-up between levels of care. This paper sets out the protocol for assessing the impact of an integrated management model for the care of patients with COPD. The new model will be evaluated in terms of 1) improvement in the rational utilization of health-care services and 2) benefits reflected in improved health status and quality of life for patients. Methods/Design A quasi-experimental study of the effectiveness of a COPD management model called COPD PROCESS. The patients in the study cohorts will be residents of neighborhoods served by two referral hospitals in Barcelona, Spain. One area comprises the intervention group (n = 32,248 patients) and the other the control group (n = 32,114 patients). The study will include pre- and post-intervention assessment 18 months after the program goes into effect. Analyses will be on two datasets: clinical and administrative data available for all patients, and clinical assessment information for a cohort of 440 patients sampled randomly from the intervention and control areas. The main endpoints will be the hospitalization rates in the two health-care areas and quality-of-life measures in the two cohorts. Discussion The COPD PROCESS model foresees the integrated multidisciplinary management of interventions at different levels of the health-care system through coordinated routine clinical practice. It will put into practice diagnostic and treatment procedures that are based on current evidence, multidisciplinary consensus, and efficient use of available resources. Care pathways in this model are defined in terms of patient characteristics, level of disease severity and the presence or absence of exacerbation. The protocol covers the full range of care from primary prevention to treatment of complex cases. PMID

  5. Preparing Adolescents With Chronic Disease for Transition to Adult Care: A Technology Program

    PubMed Central

    Terrones, Laura; Tompane, Trevor; Dillon, Lindsay; Pian, Mark; Gottschalk, Michael; Norman, Gregory J.; Bartholomew, L. Kay

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adolescents with chronic disease (ACD) must develop independent disease self-management and learn to communicate effectively with their health care team to transition from pediatric to adult-oriented health care systems. Disease-specific interventions have been implemented to aid specific ACD groups through transition. A generic approach might be effective and cost-saving. METHODS: Eighty-one ACD, aged 12 to 20 years, were recruited for a randomized clinical trial evaluating an 8-month transition intervention (MD2Me). MD2Me recipients received a 2-month intensive Web-based and text-delivered disease management and skill-based intervention followed by a 6-month review period. MD2Me recipients also had access to a texting algorithm for disease assessment and health care team contact. The intervention was applicable to adolescents with diverse chronic illnesses. Controls received mailed materials on general health topics. Disease management, health-related self-efficacy, and health assessments were performed at baseline and at 2 and 8 months. Frequency of patient-initiated communications was recorded over the study period. Outcomes were analyzed according to assigned treatment group over time. RESULTS: MD2Me recipients demonstrated significant improvements in performance of disease management tasks, health-related self-efficacy, and patient-initiated communications compared with controls. CONCLUSIONS: Outcomes in ACD improved significantly among recipients of a generic, technology-based intervention. Technology can deliver transition interventions to adolescents with diverse chronic illnesses, and a generic approach offers a cost-effective means of positively influencing transition outcomes. Further research is needed to determine whether improved short-term outcomes translate into an improved transition for ACD. PMID:24843066

  6. Using an integrated COC index and multilevel measurements to verify the care outcome of patients with multiple chronic conditions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The increasing prevalence of multiple chronic conditions has accentuated the importance of coordinating and integrating health care services. Patients with better continuity of care (COC) have a lower utilization rate of emergency department (ED) services, lower hospitalization and better care outcomes. Previous COC studies have focused on the care outcome of patients with a single chronic condition or that of physician-patient relationships; few studies have investigated the care outcome of patients with multiple chronic conditions. Using multi-chronic patients as subjects, this study proposes an integrated continuity of care (ICOC) index to verify the association between COC and care outcomes for two scopes of chronic conditions, at physician and medical facility levels. Methods This study used a dataset of 280,840 subjects, obtained from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database (LHID 2005), compiled by the National Health Research Institutes, of the National Health Insurance Bureau of Taiwan. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to integrate the indices of density, dispersion and sequence into ICOC to measure COC outcomes - the utilization rate of ED services and hospitalization. A Generalized Estimating Equations model was used to verify the care outcomes. Results We discovered that the higher the COC at medical facility level, the lower the utilization rate of ED services and hospitalization for patients; by contrast, the higher the COC at physician level, the higher the utilization rate of ED services (odds ratio > 1; Exp(β) = 2.116) and hospitalization (odds ratio > 1; Exp(β) = 1.688). When only those patients with major chronic conditions with the highest number of medical visits were considered, it was found that the higher the COC at both medical facility and physician levels, the lower the utilization rate of ED services and hospitalization. Conclusions The study shows that ICOC is more stable than single indices and

  7. Interdisciplinary expert consultation via a teleradiology platform--influence on therapeutic decision-making and patient referral rates to an academic tertiary care center.

    PubMed

    Helck, A; Matzko, M; Trumm, C G; Grosse, C; Piltz, S; Reiser, M; Ertl-Wagner, B

    2009-12-01

    In addition to teleradiological reporting as a nighthawking or a regular service, teleradiological communication can be used for interdisciplinary expert consultation. We intended to evaluate an interdisciplinary consultation system based on a teleradiology platform with regard to its impact on therapeutic decision-making, directed patient referrals to an academic tertiary care center and the economic benefit for the hospital providing the service. Therefore, consultations from five secondary care centers and consecutive admissions to an academic tertiary care center were prospectively evaluated over a time period of six months. A total of 69 interdisciplinary expert consultations were performed. In 54 % of the cases the patients were consecutively referred to the university hospital for further treatment. In all acutely life-threatening emergencies (n = 9), fast and focused treatment by referral to the academic tertiary care center was achieved (average time to treat 130 min). The admissions to the academic tertiary care center led to improved utilization of its facilities with additional revenue of more than 1,000000 euro p. a. An interdisciplinary expert consultation via a teleradiology platform enables fast and efficient expert care with improved and accelerated patient management and improved utilization of the service providing hospital.

  8. Creating and Maintaining a Successful Service Line in an Academic Medical Center at the Dawn of Value-Based Care: Lessons Learned From the Heart and Vascular Service Line at UMass Memorial Health Care.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Robert A; Cyr, Jay; Keaney, John F; Messina, Louis M; Meyer, Theo E; Tam, Stanley K C; Korenda, Kathleen; Darrigo, Melinda; Kumar, Pooja; Challapalli, Sailu

    2015-10-01

    The service line (SL) model has been proven to help shift health care toward value-based services, which is characterized by coordinated, multidisciplinary, high-quality, and cost-effective care. However, academic medical centers struggle with how to effectively set up SL structures that overcome the organizational and cultural challenges associated with simultaneously delivering the highest-value care for the patient and advancing the academic mission. In this article, the authors examine the evolution of UMass Memorial Health Care's heart and vascular service line (HVSL) from 2006 to 2011 and describe the impact on its success of multiple strategic decisions. These include key academic physician leadership recruitments and engagement via a matrixed governance and management model; development of multidisciplinary teams; empowerment of SL leadership through direct accountability and authority over programs and budgets; joint educational and training programs; incentives for academic achievement; and co-localization of faculty, personnel, and facilities. The authors also explore the barriers to success, including the need to overcome historical departmental-based silos, cultural and training differences among disciplines, confusion engendered by a matrixed reporting structure, and faculty's unfamiliarity with the financial and organizational skills required to operate a successful SL. Also described here is the impact that successful implementation of the SL has on creating high-quality services, increased profitability, and contribution to the financial stability and academic achievement of the academic medical center.

  9. Preschool Center Care Quality Effects on Academic Achievement: An Instrumental Variables Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auger, Anamarie; Farkas, George; Burchinal, Margaret R.; Duncan, Greg J.; Vandell, Deborah Lowe

    2014-01-01

    Much of child care research has focused on the effects of the quality of care in early childhood settings on children's school readiness skills. Although researchers increased the statistical rigor of their approaches over the past 15 years, researchers' ability to draw causal inferences has been limited because the studies are based on…

  10. “What we want”: chronically ill adolescents’ preferences and priorities for improving health care

    PubMed Central

    van Staa, AnneLoes; Jedeloo, Susan; van der Stege, Heleen

    2011-01-01

    Background: As important users of health care, adolescents with chronic conditions deserve to be consulted about their experiences and expectations. This study aimed to explore chronically ill adolescents’ preferences regarding providers’ qualities, and outpatient and inpatient care. Furthermore, suggestions for improvement of service delivery were collected. Methods: This research was a sequential mixed methods study in adolescents aged 12–19 years with various chronic conditions treated in a university children’s hospital. Methods comprised 31 face-to-face interviews at home, a hospital-based peer research project in which nine adolescents interviewed 34 fellow patients, and a web-based questionnaire (n = 990). Emerging qualitative themes were transformed into questionnaire items. Results: Having “a feeling of trust” and “voice and choice” in the hospital were central to these adolescents. Regarding providers’ qualities, “being an expert” and “being trustworthy and honest” were ranked highest, followed by “being caring and understanding”, “listening and showing respect”, and “being focused on me”. Regarding outpatient consultations, preferences were ranked as follows: “answering all questions”; “attending to my and my parents’ needs”; and “clear communication”, while “limited waiting times” and “attractive outpatient surroundings” scored lowest. Regarding hospitalization, adolescents most preferred to “avoid pain and discomfort”, “keep in touch with home”, and “be entertained”, while “being hospitalized with peers” and “being heard” were least important. Regarding priorities for improvement, 52% of the respondents felt that more attention should be paid to older children, followed by enabling more contact with family and friends (45%), shorter waiting times (43%), and more activities to meet fellow patients (35%). Conclusion: Adolescents prefer technically competent providers, who are

  11. Strengths of primary healthcare regarding care provided for chronic kidney disease 1

    PubMed Central

    de Paula, Elaine Amaral; Costa, Mônica Barros; Colugnati, Fernando Antonio Basile; Bastos, Rita Maria Rodrigues; Vanelli, Chislene Pereira; Leite, Christiane Chaves Augusto; Caminhas, Márcio Santos; de Paula, Rogério Baumgratz

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to assess the structure and results obtained by the "Chronic Renal Patients Care Program" in a Brazilian city. Method: epidemiological, cross-sectional study conducted in 14 PHC units and a secondary center from 2010 to 2013. The Donabedian Model was the methodological framework used. A total of 14 physicians, 13 supervisors, and 11 community health agents from primary healthcare were interviewed for the assessment of structure and process and 1,534 medical files from primary healthcare and 282 from secondary care were consulted to assess outcomes. Results: most units lacked sufficient offices for physicians and nurses to provide consultations, had incomplete staffing, and most professionals had not received proper qualification to provide care for chronic renal disease. Physicians from PHC units classified as capable more frequently referred patients to the secondary care service in the early stages of chronic renal disease (stage 3B) when compared to physicians of units considered not capable (58% vs. 36%) (p=0.049). Capable PHC units also more frequently presented stabilized glomerular filtration rates (51%) when compared to partially capable units (36%) and not capable units (44%) (p=0.046). Conclusion: patients cared for by primary healthcare units that scored higher in structure and process criteria presented better clinical outcomes. Objective: to identify the coping strategies of family members of patients with mental disorders and relate them to family member sociodemographic variables and to the patient's clinical variables. Method: this was a descriptive study conducted at a psychiatric hospital in the interior of the state of São Paulo, with 40 family members of hospitalized patients over the age of 18, and who followed the patient before and during hospitalization. We used tools to characterize the subjects and the Folkman and Lazarus Inventory of Coping Strategies. Results: the coping strategies most often used by family members

  12. Palliative care or end-of-life care in advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease A prospective community survey

    PubMed Central

    White, Patrick; White, Suzanne; Edmonds, Polly; Gysels, Marjolein; Moxham, John; Seed, Paul; Shipman, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    Background Calls for better end-of-life care for advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) reflect the large number who die from the disease and their considerable unmet needs. Aim To determine palliative care needs in advanced COPD. Design Cross-sectional interview study in patients’ homes using structured questionnaires generated from 44 south London general practices. Method One hundred and sixty-three (61% response) patients were interviewed, mean age 72 years, 50% female, with diagnosis of COPD and at least two of: forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) <40% predicted, hospital admissions or acute severe exacerbations with COPD, long-term oxygen therapy, cor pulmonale, use of oral steroids, and being housebound. Patients with advanced cancer, severe alcohol-related or mental health problems, or learning difficulties, were excluded; 145 patients were included in the analysis. Results One hundred and twenty-eight (88%) participants reported shortness of breath most days/every day, 45% were housebound, 75% had a carer. Medical records indicated that participants were at least as severe as non-participants. Eighty-two (57%) had severe breathlessness; 134 (92%) said breathlessness was their most important problem; 31 (21%) were on suboptimal treatment; 42 (30%) who were severely affected had not been admitted to hospital in the previous 2 years; 86 of 102 who had been admitted would want admission again if unwell to the same extent. None expressed existential concerns and few discussed need in terms of end-of-life care, despite severe breathlessness and impairment. Conclusion Needs in advanced COPD were considerable, with many reporting severe intractable breathlessness. Palliation of breathlessness was a priority, but discussion of need was seldom in terms of ‘end-of-life care’. PMID:21801516

  13. A comparison of how four countries use health IT to support care for people with chronic conditions.

    PubMed

    Adler-Milstein, Julia; Sarma, Nandini; Woskie, Liana R; Jha, Ashish K

    2014-09-01

    Countries around the globe are investing in health information and communications technologies (ICTs) as critical tools for improving care for chronically ill patients. We profiled four high-income nations with varied health ICT strategies--Australia, Canada, Denmark, and the United States--to describe their use of ICTs to improve chronic care. Our goal was to identify common challenges and opportunities for cross-national learning. We found four key themes. First, although all four countries have a national strategy for health ICT adoption, strategies are implemented and adapted to chronic care needs regionally, which creates the challenge of spreading successful efforts across regions. Second, each country struggles with how to ensure that clinical information follows patients seamlessly between care settings. Third, although each nation is pursuing telehealth solutions as a component of chronic care, the telehealth initiatives are usually stand-alone efforts that are not well integrated into other ICT solutions, such as electronic health records. Finally, countries have made progress in improving patients' access to their clinical data but have not fully succeeded in engaging patients to apply the data to improve care. These common themes suggest that although the four nations have different health care systems and ICT strategies, all of them face a similar set of challenges, creating an opportunity for cross-national learning.

  14. Population management, systems-based practice, and planned chronic illness care: integrating disease management competencies into primary care to improve composite diabetes quality measures.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Joe; DaSilva, Karen; Marshall, Richard

    2008-02-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic illnesses in the United States requires a fundamental redesign of the primary care delivery system's structure and processes in order to meet the changing needs and expectations of patients. Population management, systems-based practice, and planned chronic illness care are 3 potential processes that can be integrated into primary care and are compatible with the Chronic Care Model. In 2003, Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates, a multispecialty ambulatory physician group practice based in Boston, Massachusetts, began implementing all 3 processes across its primary care practices. From 2004 to 2006, the overall diabetes composite quality measures improved from 51% to 58% for screening (HgA1c x 2, low-density lipoprotein, blood pressure in 12 months) and from 13% to 17% for intermediate outcomes (HgA1c care and the positive impact of those changes on overall diabetes quality of care.

  15. Chronic kidney disease guideline implementation in primary care: a qualitative report from the TRANSLATE CKD study

    PubMed Central

    Vest, Bonnie M.; York, Trevor R.M.; Sand, Jessica; Fox, Chester H.; Kahn, Linda S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Primary care physicians (PCPs) are optimally situated to identify and manage early-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD). Nonetheless, studies have documented suboptimal PCP understanding, awareness, and management of early CKD. The TRANSLATE CKD study is an ongoing national mixed-methods cluster randomized control trial that examines the implementation of evidence-based guidelines for CKD into primary care practice. Methods As part of mixed-methods process evaluation, semi-structured interviews were conducted by phone with 27 providers participating in the study. Interviews were audio-taped and transcribed. Thematic content analysis was used to identify themes. Themes were categorized according to the four domains of Normalization Process Theory (NPT). Results Identified themes illuminated the complex work undertaken in primary care practices to manage CKD. Barriers to guideline implementation were identified in each of the four NPT domains, including: 1) lack of knowledge and understanding around CKD (coherence), 2) difficulties engaging providers and patients in CKD management (cognitive participation), 3) limited time and competing demands (collective action), and 4) challenges obtaining and utilizing data to monitor progress (reflexive monitoring). Conclusions Addressing the barriers to implementation with concrete interventions at the levels at which they occur, informed by NPT, will ultimately improve the quality of CKD patient care. PMID:26355134

  16. Managing chronic illness: physician practices increased the use of care management and medical home processes.

    PubMed

    Wiley, James A; Rittenhouse, Diane R; Shortell, Stephen M; Casalino, Lawrence P; Ramsay, Patricia P; Bibi, Salma; Ryan, Andrew M; Copeland, Kennon R; Alexander, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    The effective management of patients with chronic illnesses is critical to bending the curve of health care spending in the United States and is a crucial test for health care reform. In this article we used data from three national surveys of physician practices between 2006 and 2013 to determine the extent to which practices of all sizes have increased their use of evidence-based care management processes associated with patient-centered medical homes for patients with asthma, congestive heart failure, depression, and diabetes. We found relatively large increases over time in the overall use of these processes for small and medium-size practices as well as for large practices. However, the large practices used fewer than half of the recommended processes, on average. We also identified the individual processes whose use increased the most and show that greater use of care management processes is positively associated with public reporting of patient experience and clinical quality and with pay-for-performance.

  17. ‘Reality and desire’ in the care of advanced chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Marrón, Belén; Craver, Lourdes; Remón, César; Prieto, Mario; Gutiérrez, Josep Mª; Ortiz, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    There is a long distance between the actual worldwide reality in advanced chronic kidney disease care and the desire of how these patients should be managed to decrease cardiovascular and general morbidity and mortality. Implementation of adequate infrastructures may improve clinical outcomes and increase the use of home renal replacement therapies (RRT). Current pitfalls should be addressed to optimise care: inadequate medical training for nephrological referral and RRT selection, late referral to nephrologists, inadequate patient education for choice of RRT modality, lack of multidisciplinary advanced kidney disease clinics and lack of programmed RRT initiation. These deficiencies generate unintended consequences, such as inequality of care and limitations in patient education and selection-choice for RRT technique with limited use of peritoneal dialysis. Multidisciplinary advanced kidney disease clinics may have a direct impact on patient survival, morbidity and quality of life. There is a common need to reduce health care costs and scenarios increasing PD incidence show better efficiency. The following proposals may help to improve the current situation: defining the scope of the problem, disseminating guidelines with specific targets and quality indicators, optimising medical speciality training, providing adequate patient education, specially through the use of general decision making tools that will allow patients to choose the best possible RRT in accordance with their values, preferences and medical advice, increasing planned dialysis starts and involving all stakeholders in the process. PMID:25984045

  18. GPs’ views on managing advanced chronic kidney disease in primary care: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Tonkin-Crine, Sarah; Santer, Miriam; Leydon, Geraldine M; Murtagh, Fliss EM; Farrington, Ken; Caskey, Fergus; Rayner, Hugh; Roderick, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a significant part of the GP’s workload since the introduction of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines in 2008. Patients with advanced CKD (stages G4 and G5) often have comorbidities, varied disease progression, and are likely to be older. GPs may experience difficulties with management decisions for patients with advanced CKD, including when to refer to nephrology. Aim To explore GPs’ views of managing patients with advanced CKD and referral to secondary care. Design and setting Qualitative study with GPs in four areas of England: London, Bristol, Birmingham, and Stevenage. Method Semi-structured interviews with 19 GPs. Transcribed interviews were thematically analysed. Results GPs had little experience of managing patients with advanced CKD, including those on dialysis or having conservative care (treatment without dialysis or a transplant), and welcomed guidance. Some GPs referred patients based on renal function alone and some used wider criteria including age and multimorbidity. GPs reported a tension between national guidance and local advice, and some had learnt from experience that patients were discharged back to primary care. GPs with more experience of managing CKD referred patients later, or sometimes not at all, if there were no additional problems and if dialysis was seen as not in the patient’s interests. Conclusion GPs want guidance on managing older patients with advanced CKD and comorbidities, which better incorporates agreement between local and national recommendations to clarify referral criteria. GPs are not generally aware of conservative care programmes provided by renal units, however, they appear happy to contribute to such care or alternatively, lead conservative management with input from renal teams. PMID:26120137

  19. A study protocol for performance evaluation of a new academic intensive care unit facility: impact on patient care

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Mauricio; Zygun, David A; Harrison, Alexandra; Stelfox, Henry T

    2013-01-01

    Background Healthcare facility construction is increasing because of population demand and the need to replace ageing infrastructure. Research suggests that there may be a relationship between healthcare environment and patient care. To date, most evaluations of new healthcare facilities are derived from techniques used in other industries and focus on physical, financial and architectural performance. However, few studies have evaluated the impact of healthcare facility design on processes and outcomes of patient care. Study aims The primary objective of this study was to investigate the impact of relocation to a new intensive care unit (ICU) facility on clinical performance measures. This study also proposes to develop and test a framework for facility performance evaluation using accepted ICU design guidelines and Donabedian's model for healthcare quality. Methods and analysis We will utilise a mixed-methods, observational, retrospective, controlled, before-and-after design to take advantage of the quasiexperimental conditions created with the construction of a new ICU facility in Calgary, Canada. For the qualitative substudy, we will conduct individual interviews with end-users to understand their impressions and experiences with the new environment and perform thematic analysis. For the quantitative substudy, we will compare process of care indicators and patient outcomes for the 12-month period before and after relocation to the new facility. Two other local ICU facilities that did not undergo structural change during the study period will serve as controls. We will triangulate qualitative and quantitative results utilising a novel framework. Ethics and dissemination The results of this study will contribute in understanding the impact of new ICU facilities on clinical performance measures centred on patients, their families and healthcare providers. The framework will complement existing building performance evaluation techniques and help healthcare

  20. New avenues for reducing intensive care needs in patients with chronic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Guertin, Pierre A

    2016-01-01

    Relatively soon after their accident, patients suffering a spinal cord injury (SCI) begin generally experiencing the development of significant, often life-threatening secondary complications. Many of which are associated with chronic physical inactivity-related immune function problems and increasing susceptibility to infection that repeatedly requires intensive care treatment. Therapies capable of repairing the spinal cord or restoring ambulation would normally prevent many of these problems but, as of now, there is no cure for SCI. Thus, management strategies and antibiotics remain the standard of care although antimicrobial resistance constitutes a significant challenge for patients with chronic SCI facing recurrent infections of the urinary tract and respiratory systems. Identifying alternative therapies capable of safe and potent actions upon these serious health concerns should therefore be considered a priority. This editorial presents some of the novel approaches currently in development for the prevention of specific infections after SCI. Among them, brain-permeable small molecule therapeutics acting centrally on spinal cord circuits that can augment respiratory capabilities or bladder functions. If eventually approved by regulatory authorities, some of these new avenues may potentially become clinically-relevant therapies capable of indirectly preventing the occurrence and/or severity of these life-threatening complications in people with paraplegic or tetraplegic injuries. PMID:27896143

  1. Home healthcare settop-box for senior chronic care using ISO/IEEE 11073 PHD standard.

    PubMed

    Lim, Joon-Ho; Park, Chanyong; Park, Soo-Jun

    2010-01-01

    As the number of seniors with chronic disease increases, the need of home healthcare settop-box is increased to manage their chronic disease in their home environment. Using the home healthcare settop-box, the patients can regularly check their health data, and finally, it can lead the decrease of medical expenses. For the home healthcare settop-box, the most important factor is the standard compatibility, which can interoperate with standard devices of any other companies. In this paper, we propose a home healthcare settop-box using ISO/IEEE 11073 PHD standard. It collects health data according to the PHD standard, and provides a chronic-care service based on the collected data. The proposed settop-box is connected with 3 devices of weigh scale, blood pressure monitor, and glucose meter, and tested at 10 homes for a month. Lastly, the proposed settop-box can be used for various healthcare services such as Google Health and Telemedicine Services using a healthcare platform server.

  2. Effect of communication style and physician-family relationships on satisfaction with pediatric chronic disease care.

    PubMed

    Swedlund, Matthew P; Schumacher, Jayna B; Young, Henry N; Cox, Elizabeth D

    2012-01-01

    Over 8% of children have a chronic disease and many are unable to adhere to treatment. Satisfaction with chronic disease care can impact adherence. We examine how visit satisfaction is associated with physician communication style and ongoing physician-family relationships. We collected surveys and visit videos for 75 children ages 9-16 years visiting for asthma, diabetes, or sickle cell disease management. Raters assessed physician communication style (friendliness, interest, responsiveness, and dominance) from visit videos. Quality of the ongoing relationship was measured with four survey items (parent-physician relationship, child-physician relationship, comfort asking questions, and trust in the physician), while a single item assessed satisfaction. Correlations and chi square were used to assess association of satisfaction with communication style or quality of the ongoing relationship. Satisfaction was positively associated with physician to parent (p < 0.05) friendliness. Satisfaction was also associated with the quality of the ongoing parent-physician (p < 0.001) and child-physician relationships (p < 0.05), comfort asking questions (p < 0.001), and trust (p < 0.01). This shows that both the communication style and the quality of the ongoing relationship contribute to pediatric chronic disease visit satisfaction.

  3. Development and Validation of the Chinese Health Literacy Scale for Chronic Care

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Angela Yee Man; Cheung, Mike Kwun Ting; Lou, Vivian Wei Qun; Chan, Felix Hon Wai; Ho, Celina Kit Yee; Do, Tsui Ling; Chan, Sophia Siu Chee; Chi, Iris

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to develop and test the psychometric properties of the Chinese Health Literacy Scale for Chronic Care (CHLCC). This is a methodological study with a sample of 262 patients 65 years of age and older who had chronic illnesses. Pearson's correlation, independent sample t tests, and analyses of variance were used. The CHLCC showed a significant positive correlation with Chinese literacy levels (r = 0.80; p < .001) but was negatively correlated with age (r = −0.31; p < .001). Respondents who were male (t = 4.34; p < .001) and who had reached Grade 12 or higher in school (F = 51.80; p < .001) had higher CHLCC scores than did their counterparts. Individuals with high levels of health literacy had fewer hospitalizations than did their counterparts (β = −0.31; incidence rate ratio = 0.73; p < .05). The CHLCC also displayed good internal reliability (Cronbach's α = 0.91) and good test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.77; p < .01). The CHLCC is a valid and reliable measure for assessing health literacy among Chinese patients with chronic illness. The scale could be used by practitioners before implementing health promotion and education. PMID:24093357

  4. CAM therapies among primary care patients using opioid therapy for chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Sara; Rabago, David P; Mundt, Marlon P; Fleming, Michael F

    2007-01-01

    Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is an increasingly common therapy used to treat chronic pain syndromes. However; there is limited information on the utilization and efficacy of CAM therapy in primary care patients receiving long-term opioid therapy. Method A survey of CAM therapy was conducted with a systematic sample of 908 primary care patients receiving opioids as a primary treatment method for chronic pain. Subjects completed a questionnaire designed to assess utilization, efficacy and costs of CAM therapies in this population. Results Patients were treated for a variety of pain problems including low back pain (38.4%), headaches (9.9%), and knee pain (6.5%); the average duration of pain was 16 years. The median morphine equivalent opioid dose was 41 mg/day, and the mean dose was 92 mg/day. Forty-four percent of the sample reported CAM therapy use in the past 12 months. Therapies utilized included massage therapy (27.3%, n = 248), chiropractic treatment (17.8%, n = 162), acupuncture (7.6%, n = 69), yoga (6.1%, n = 55), herbs and supplements (6.8%, n = 62), and prolotherapy (5.9%, n = 54). CAM utilization was significantly related to age female gender, pain severity income pain diagnosis of neck and upper back pain, and illicit drug use. Medical insurance covered chiropractic treatment (81.8%) and prolotherapy (87.7%), whereas patients primarily paid for other CAM therapies. Over half the sample reported that one or more of the CAM therapies were helpful. Conclusion This study suggests CAM therapy is widely used by patients receiving opioids for chronic pain. Whether opioids can be reduced by introducing such therapies remains to be studied. PMID:17506893

  5. Acupuncture for chronic headache in primary care: large, pragmatic, randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Andrew J; Rees, Rebecca W; Zollman, Catherine E; McCarney, Rob; Smith, Claire M; Ellis, Nadia; Fisher, Peter; Van Haselen, Robbert

    2004-01-01

    Objective To determine the effects of a policy of “use acupuncture” on headache, health status, days off sick, and use of resources in patients with chronic headache compared with a policy of “avoid acupuncture.” Design Randomised, controlled trial. Setting General practices in England and Wales. Participants 401 patients with chronic headache, predominantly migraine. Interventions Patients were randomly allocated to receive up to 12 acupuncture treatments over three months or to a control intervention offering usual care. Main outcome measures Headache score, SF-36 health status, and use of medication were assessed at baseline, three, and 12 months. Use of resources was assessed every three months. Results Headache score at 12 months, the primary end point, was lower in the acupuncture group (16.2, SD 13.7, n = 161, 34% reduction from baseline) than in controls (22.3, SD 17.0, n = 140, 16% reduction from baseline). The adjusted difference between means is 4.6 (95% confidence interval 2.2 to 7.0; P = 0.0002). This result is robust to sensitivity analysis incorporating imputation for missing data. Patients in the acupuncture group experienced the equivalent of 22 fewer days of headache per year (8 to 38). SF-36 data favoured acupuncture, although differences reached significance only for physical role functioning, energy, and change in health. Compared with controls, patients randomised to acupuncture used 15% less medication (P = 0.02), made 25% fewer visits to general practitioners (P = 0.10), and took 15% fewer days off sick (P = 0.2). Conclusions Acupuncture leads to persisting, clinically relevant benefits for primary care patients with chronic headache, particularly migraine. Expansion of NHS acupuncture services should be considered. PMID:15023828

  6. Health Care Workers’ Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice About Chronic Pain Management, Shiraz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Kheshti, Raziyeh; Namazi, Soha; Mehrabi, Manoosh; Firouzabadi, Dena

    2016-01-01

    Background Pain can adversely affect every aspect of a patient’s daily activity, and consequently, it has a great influence on the quality of life. Studies have shown that health care professionals have little knowledge of and inadequate attitudes toward the assessment of pain and its treatment with analgesics. Objectives This cross-sectional study was designed to evaluate the knowledge, attitudes, and practice of health care professionals regarding chronic pain management. It was carried out in six different educational hospitals affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in Shiraz, Iran. Patients and Methods Participants were given a questionnaire containing 46 questions and demographic characteristics to fill out independently. In total, 213 health care professionals (114 nurses and 99 medical residents) volunteered to take part in this study. In order to ease further analysis, the questions were grouped into three categories: narcotic drugs, non-narcotic drugs, and non-drug-related questions. Results The mean correct response rate was 43.13% ± 11.10. Medical residents scored 51.23% ± 9.02% and nurses 36.10% ± 7.31% (P < 0.001). There was no statistically significant relation between field of specialty and the mean scores of medical residents. Narcotic drug questions received the lowest (39.02%) and non-narcotic drug questions received the highest (57.32%) percentages of correct responses. Only 9.3% of participants believed that they had received adequate education about pain and its management. Conclusions The findings of this study support concern about inadequate knowledge, attitudes, and practice regarding chronic pain management. We believe that further education and practical training will be needed for adequate pain management. PMID:27843775

  7. Symptoms of Depression in a Hispanic Primary Care Population With and Without Chronic Medical Illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Reinschmidt, Kerstin M.; Moreno, Francisco A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To describe somatic and psychiatric symptoms reported by Hispanic primary care patients with and without depression and/or chronic medical illnesses. Method: Adult Hispanic patients (n = 104) in a Mobile Health Program in underserved southern Arizona participated in a survey conducted between September 2006 and February 2007 to obtain information about the somatic and psychiatric symptoms that they were experiencing. They were asked to rate the severity of their symptoms listed in the depression screen Personal Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R), and 5 new symptoms described by patients in focus groups conducted in the first phase of the project. Patients were categorized as depressed if their PHQ-9 scores were 10 or above, and they were further categorized as having or not having chronic illnesses based on self-report. Analyses of variance were conducted for each SCL-90-R symptom dimension to compare across the 4 groups (group 1: not depressed and not medically ill; group 2: medically ill but not depressed; group 3: depressed but not medically ill; and group 4: depressed and medically ill). Results: Patients with chronic medical illnesses comorbid with depression were found to report significantly more somatic symptoms than those with only chronic medical illnesses or depression alone (P ≤ .001). They also reported significantly more psychopathology than patients with depression alone (P ≤ .05 or better). Conclusions: Patients with medical illnesses comorbid with depression are more likely to exhibit psychopathology than patients with medical illnesses or depression alone. PMID:20944771

  8. Mental Health Service Use for Patients with Co-occurring Mental and Physical Chronic Health Care Needs in Primary Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Haynes-Maslow, Lindsey; Roberts, Megan C.; Dusetzina, Stacie B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Individuals with mental illness experience poor health and may die prematurely from chronic illness. Understanding whether the presence of co-occurring chronic physical health conditions complicates mental health treatment is important, particularly among patients seeking treatment in primary care settings. Objectives Examine (1) whether the presence of chronic physical conditions is associated with mental health service use for individuals with depression who visit a primary care physician, and (2) whether race modifies this relationship. Research Design Secondary analysis of the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, a survey of patient-visits collected annually from a random sample of 3,000 physicians in office-based settings. Subjects Office visits from 2007–2010 were pooled for adults ages 35–85 with a depression diagnosis at the time of visit (N=3,659 visits). Measures Mental health services were measured using a dichotomous variable indicating whether mental health services were provided during the office visit or a referral made for: (1) counseling, including psychotherapy and other mental health counseling and/or (2) prescribing of psychotropic medications. Results Most patient office visits (70%) where a depression diagnosis was recorded also had co-occurring chronic physical conditions recorded. The presence of at least one physical chronic condition was associated with a 6% decrease in the probability of receiving any mental health services (p<0.05). There were no differences in service use by race/ethnicity after controlling for other factors. Conclusions Additional research is needed on medical care delivery among patients with co-occurring health conditions, particularly as the health care system moves towards an integrated care model. PMID:26147863

  9. Within-team Patterns of Communication and Referral in Multimodal Treatment of Chronic Low Back Pain Patients by an Integrative Care Team

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Bonnie B.; Eisenberg, David M.; Buring, Julie E.; Liang, Catherine L.; Osypiuk, Kamila; Levy, Donald B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nonspecific chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a highly prevalent and costly public health problem with few treatment options that provide consistent and greater than modest benefits. Treatment of CLBP is shifting from unimodal to multimodal and multidisciplinary approaches, including biopsychosocially-based complementary and integrative care. Multidisciplinary approaches require unique levels of communication and coordination amongst clinicians; however, to date few studies have evaluated patterns of communication and decision making amongst clinicians collaborating in the care of challenging patients with CLBP. Methods: As part of an observational study evaluating the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of an integrative, team-based care model for the treatment of CLBP, we used multiple qualitative research methods to characterize within-team cross-referral and communication amongst jointly-trained practitioners representing diverse biomedical and complementary disciplines. Patterns of communication and coordinated care are summarized for 3 cases of CLBP treated by multiple members (≥3) of an integrative medical team embedded within an academic hospital. Results: Patients were aged from 36 to 88 years with varied comorbidities. Qualitative content analysis revealed 5 emergent themes regarding integrative patient care and treatment decision in this clinic: (1) the fundamental importance of the clinic's formal teamwork training; (2) the critical communicative and collaborative function of regular team meetings; (3) the importance to patient care goals of having the varied disciplines practicing “under one roof”; (4) a universal commitment to understanding and treating patients as whole persons; and (5) a shared philosophy of helping patients to help themselves. These key themes are all interconnected and form the foundation of the clinic's culture. Conclusions: Our qualitative findings provide context for current trends in enhancing patient

  10. TigerPlace, A State-Academic-Private Project to Revolutionize Traditional Long-Term Care

    PubMed Central

    Rantz, Marilyn J.; Porter, Rosemary T.; Cheshier, Debra; Otto, Donna; Servey, Charles H.; Johnson, Rebecca A.; Aud, Myra; Skubic, Marjorie; Tyrer, Harry; He, Zhihai; Demiris, George; Alexander, Gregory L.; Taylor, Gene

    2011-01-01

    The Aging in Place Project at the University of Missouri (MU) required legislation in 1999 and 2001 to be fully realized. An innovative home health agency was initiated by the Sinclair School of Nursing specifically to help older adults age in place in the environment of their choice. In 2004, an innovative independent living environment was built and is operated by a private long term care company, as a special facility where residents can truly age in place and never fear being moved to a traditional nursing home unless they choose to do so. With care provided by the home care agency with registered nurse care coordination services, residents receive preventative and early illness recognition assistance that have markedly improved their lives. Evaluation of aging in place reveal registered nurse care coordination improves outcomes of cognition, depression, activities of daily living, incontinence, pain, and shortness of breath as well as delaying or preventing nursing home placement. Links with MU students, faculty, and nearly every school or college on campus enrich the lives of the students and residents of the housing environment. Research projects are encouraged and residents who choose to participate are enjoying helping with developing cutting technology to help other seniors age in place. PMID:21566729

  11. Developing iCare v.1.0: an academic electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Tami H; Li, Xueping; Indranoi, Chayawat; Bell, Matthew

    2012-06-01

    An electronic health record application, iCare v.1.0, was developed and tested that allows data input and retrieval while tracking student performance over time. The development and usability testing of iCare v.1.0 followed a rapid prototyping software development and testing model. Once the functionality was tested by engineers, the usability and feasibility testing began with a convenience sample of focus group members including undergraduate and graduate students and faculty. Three focus groups were created, and four subjects participated in each focus group (n = 12). Nielsen's usability heuristics and methods of evaluation were used to evaluate data captured from each focus group. Overall, users wanted a full-featured electronic health record with features that coached or guided users. The earliest versions of iCare v.1.0 did not provide help features and prompts to guide students but were later added. Future versions will incorporate a full-featured help section. The interface and design of iCare v.1.0 are similar to professional electronic health record applications. As a result of this usability study, future versions of iCare will include more robust help features along with advanced reporting and elements specific to specialty populations such as pediatrics and mental health services.

  12. [Integration of mental health and chronic non-communicable diseases in Peru: challenges and opportunities for primary care settings].

    PubMed

    Diez-Canseco, Francisco; Ipince, Alessandra; Toyama, Mauricio; Benate-Galvez, Ysabel; Galán-Rodas, Edén; Medina-Verástegui, Julio César; Sánchez-Moreno, David; Araya, Ricardo; Miranda, J Jaime

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the relationship between mental health and chronic non-communicable diseases is discussed as well as the possibility to address them in a comprehensive manner in the Peruvian health system. First, the prevalence estimates and the burden of chronic non-communicable diseases and mental disorders worldwide and in Peru are reviewed. Then, the detrimental impact of depression in the early stages as well as the progress of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases is described. Additionally, the gap between access to mental health care in Peru is analyzed. Lastly, the alternatives to reduce the gap are explored. Of these alternatives, the integration of mental health into primary care services is emphasized; as a feasible way to meet the care needs of the general population, and people with chronic diseases in particular, in the Peruvian context.

  13. Acupuncture and chiropractic care for chronic pain in an integrated health plan: a mixed methods study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Substantial recent research examines the efficacy of many types of complementary and alternative (CAM) therapies. However, outcomes associated with the "real-world" use of CAM has been largely overlooked, despite calls for CAM therapies to be studied in the manner in which they are practiced. Americans seek CAM treatments far more often for chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) than for any other condition. Among CAM treatments for CMP, acupuncture and chiropractic (A/C) care are among those with the highest acceptance by physician groups and the best evidence to support their use. Further, recent alarming increases in delivery of opioid treatment and surgical interventions for chronic pain--despite their high costs, potential adverse effects, and modest efficacy--suggests the need to evaluate real world outcomes associated with promising non-pharmacological/non-surgical CAM treatments for CMP, which are often well accepted by patients and increasingly used in the community. Methods/Design This multi-phase, mixed methods study will: (1) conduct a retrospective study using information from electronic medical records (EMRs) of a large HMO to identify unique clusters of patients with CMP (e.g., those with differing demographics, histories of pain condition, use of allopathic and CAM health services, and comorbidity profiles) that may be associated with different propensities for A/C utilization and/or differential outcomes associated with such care; (2) use qualitative interviews to explore allopathic providers' recommendations for A/C and patients' decisions to pursue and retain CAM care; and (3) prospectively evaluate health services/costs and broader clinical and functional outcomes associated with the receipt of A/C relative to carefully matched comparison participants receiving traditional CMP services. Sensitivity analyses will compare methods relying solely on EMR-derived data versus analyses supplementing EMR data with conventionally collected patient

  14. Implementing the chronic care model for frail older adults in the Netherlands: study protocol of ACT (frail older adults: care in transition)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Care for older adults is facing a number of challenges: health problems are not consistently identified at a timely stage, older adults report a lack of autonomy in their care process, and care systems are often confronted with the need for better coordination between health care professionals. We aim to address these challenges by introducing the geriatric care model, based on the chronic care model, and to evaluate its effects on the quality of life of community-dwelling frail older adults. Methods/design In a 2-year stepped-wedge cluster randomised clinical trial with 6-monthly measurements, the chronic care model will be compared with usual care. The trial will be carried out among 35 primary care practices in two regions in the Netherlands. Per region, practices will be randomly allocated to four allocation arms designating the starting point of the intervention. Participants: 1200 community-dwelling older adults aged 65 or over and their primary informal caregivers. Primary care physicians will identify frail individuals based on a composite definition of frailty and a polypharmacy criterion. Final inclusion criterion: scoring 3 or more on a disability case-finding tool. Intervention: Every 6 months patients will receive a geriatric in-home assessment by a practice nurse, followed by a tailored care plan. Expert teams will manage and train practice nurses. Patients with complex care needs will be reviewed in interdisciplinary consultations. Evaluation: We will perform an effect evaluation, an economic evaluation, and a process evaluation. Primary outcome is quality of life as measured with the Short Form-12 questionnaire. Effect analyses will be based on the “intention-to-treat” principle, using multilevel regression analysis. Cost measurements will be administered continually during the study period. A cost-effectiveness analysis and cost-utility analysis will be conducted comparing mean total costs to functional status, care needs and QALYs

  15. [Integrated approach to a complex chronic case through an interdisciplinary team in primary care].

    PubMed

    Reina Campos, M Remedios; Carrasco Rodríguez, Amalia

    2016-01-01

    This article tends to illustrate the coordination mechanisms used through an example centred on a case study of a 65 year-old patient who presents obesity, hypertension, high cardiovascular risk, alcoholism, smoking and silent ischaemic strokes; divorced twice and with five children. After his last separation 8 years ago he moved to his father's house. While his father was still alive his health situation was stable and monitored by professionals of the primary care team. He was recently referred to the Social Worker at the Health Centre due to his lack of personal hygiene and housing. The interdisciplinary work of the Social Worker and Community Nurse Case Manager resulted in a shared action plan. His father died a year ago and since then there was no news of the patient in the health centre and also he did not collect his medication from the pharmacy. The house was owned by inheritance by the smallest of the four brothers, who had threatened to expel him. In the interview, the brother claimed that he didn't want to be helped and only received visits from one of his sons occasionally to receive money. Primary care professionals visited him several times at home. The patient was cooperative and engaged when preparing a joint plan with the professionals involved. This joint plan allowed to activate the care coordination for a successful management of his chronic conditions.

  16. Office-Based Case Finding for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Older Adults in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is underdiagnosed in primary care. Aim. To explore the utility of proactive identification of COPD in patients 75 years of age and older in a Canadian primary care setting. Methods. Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) screening questions were administered to patients with a smoking history of 20 pack-years or more; those with a positive screen were referred for postbronchodilator spirometry. Results. A total of 107 patients (21%), of 499 screened, had a 20-pack-year smoking history; 105 patients completed the CTS screening. Forty-four (42%) patients were positive on one or more questions on the screening; significantly more patients with a previous diagnosis of COPD (64%) were positive on the CTS compared to those without a previous diagnosis of COPD (30%). Of those who were not previously diagnosed with COPD (N = 11), four (36%) were newly diagnosed with COPD. Conclusion. A systematic two-stage method of screening for COPD, using CTS screening questions followed by spirometric confirmation, is feasible in the context of a busy primary care setting. More research is needed to assess the value of restricting screening to patients with a smoking history of 20 pack-years and on the sensitivity and specificity of these measures. PMID:27445513

  17. Chronic widespread pain, including fibromyalgia: a pathway for care developed by the British Pain Society.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Ellis, B; Price, C; Baranowski, A P

    2014-01-01

    Chronic widespread pain (CWP), including fibromyalgia, is a highly prevalent condition with a range of disabling symptoms, both physical and psychological. The British Pain Society (BPS) is supporting the treatment of this group of patients through a care pathway and this article describes the rationale and discussion points relevant to the CWP and fibromyalgia pathway. There are several aims in producing this pathway: to reduce variation in the standards of care, to reduce delays at all stages of care, and in particular, to enable clinicians to help patients accept a diagnosis of CWP. This diagnosis should be based on the presence and distribution of symptoms in the absence of another defined pathological process: the features in the history or clinical examination are generally more important than laboratory investigations. There is an emphasis on addressing all aspects of symptomatology (physical, psychological, social, and personal needs) without an overemphasis on any one treatment modality. The pathway has focused on the potential pitfalls in the use of long-term opioids and the rationale is provided why these are not recommended. Patients with CWP value explanation and education and although clinicians may be unfamiliar with the condition, the majority of clinicians have generic skills in managing long-term conditions which can be supplemented by the interventions and actions detailed in this pathway.

  18. INSIGHT potentially prevents and treats depressive and anxiety symptoms in black women caring for chronic hemodialysis recipients.

    PubMed

    Wicks, Mona N; Bolden, Lois; Mynatt, Sarah; Rice, Muriel Curry; Acchiardo, Sergio R

    2007-01-01

    End stage renal disease (ESRD) unduly affects black families in the U.S., including black women who are the family caregivers of affected patients. Nephrology nurses who support chronic hemodialysis recipients may be the first to recognize depressive and anxiety symptoms in this understudied caregiver population. This article describes the risk factors for depression in black women who care for persons receiving chronic hemodialysis therapy and INSIGHT therapy as a potential intervention to reduce depressive symptoms.

  19. Quality of integrated chronic care measured by patient survey: identification, selection and application of most appropriate instruments

    PubMed Central

    Vrijhoef, Hubertus J. M.; Berbee, Rieneke; Wagner, Edward H.; Steuten, Lotte M. G.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Objective  To identify the most appropriate generic instrument to measure experience and/or satisfaction of people receiving integrated chronic care. Background  Health care is becoming more user‐centred and, as a result, the experience of users of care and evaluation of their experience and/or satisfaction is taken more seriously. It is unclear to what extent existing instruments are appropriate in measuring the experience and/or satisfaction of people using integrated chronic care. Methods  Instruments were identified by means of a systematic literature review. Appropriateness of instruments was analysed on seven criteria. The two most promising instruments were translated into Dutch, if necessary, and administered to a convenience sample of 109 people with a chronic illness. Data derived from respondents were analysed statistically. Focus‐group interviews were conducted to assess the semantic and technical equivalence as well as opinions of people about the applicability and relevance of the translated instruments. Results  From 37 instruments identified, the Patients’ Assessment of Care for chronIc Conditions (PACIC) and the short form of the Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire III (PSQ‐18) were selected as most promising instruments. Both instruments produced similar median scores across people with different chronic conditions. The overall PACIC and its subscales and the overall PSQ‐18 were highly internally consistent, but not the PSQ‐18 subscales. Overall, the PACIC demonstrated better psychometric characteristics. PACIC and PSQ‐18 scores were found to be moderately correlated. Whereas more respondents preferred the PSQ‐18, focus‐group participants regarded the PACIC to be more applicable and relevant. The technical and semantic equivalence of both instruments were sufficient. Conclusions  Because of its psychometric characteristics, perceived applicability and relevance, the PACIC is the most appropriate instrument to

  20. A rural cancer outreach program lowers patient care costs and benefits both the rural hospitals and sponsoring academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Desch, C E; Grasso, M A; McCue, M J; Buonaiuto, D; Grasso, K; Johantgen, M K; Shaw, J E; Smith, T J

    1999-01-01

    The Rural Cancer Outreach Program (RCOP) between two rural hospitals and the Medical College of Virginia's Massey Cancer Center (MCC) was developed to bring state-of-the-art cancer care to medically underserved rural patients. The financial impact of the RCOP on both the rural hospitals and the MCC was analyzed. Pre- and post-RCOP financial data were collected on 1,745 cancer patients treated at the participating centers, two rural community hospitals and the MCC. The main outcome measures were costs (estimated reimbursement from all sources), revenues, contribution margins and profit (or loss) of the program. The RCOP may have enhanced access to cancer care for rural patients at less cost to society. The net annual cost per patient fell from $10,233 to $3,862 associated with more use of outpatient services, more efficient use of resources, and the shift to a less expensive locus of care. The cost for each rural patient admitted to the Medical College of Virginia fell by more than 40 percent compared with only an 8 percent decrease for all other cancer patients. The rural hospitals experienced rapid growth of their programs to more than 200 new patients yearly, and the RCOP generated significant profits for them. MCC benefited from increased referrals from RCOP service areas by 330 percent for cancer patients and by 9 percent for non-cancer patients during the same time period. While it did not generate a major profit for the MCC, the RCOP generated enough revenue to cover costs of the program. The RCOP had a positive financial impact on the rural and academic medical center hospitals, provided state-of-the-art care near home for rural patients and was associated with lower overall cancer treatment costs.

  1. Overview of methodological issues in the study of chronic care populations.

    PubMed

    Teresi, J

    1994-01-01

    The intent of the methodology section of this volume was to provide an overview of recent thinking about analytic techniques that can be used to study chronic care populations, particularly dementia SCUs. As discussed earlier in this article, although not unique to these populations, longitudinal analysis of chronic care populations frequently involves several problems: nonequivalent comparison groups, unbalanced designs, censoring and attrition, autocorrelation (correlated repeated measures) and heterogeneous correlations across repeated measures. The last 5 years has witnessed considerable change and growth in the development of longitudinal modelling methodologies. Although developments in modelling cut across disciplines, there has been a focus on certain types of methods in several fields of applied statistics: psychometrics (e.g., analysis of change, item response theory, Rasch modelling of binary outcomes), mathematical sociology (e.g., structural equation modelling), demography (e.g., transition modelling), epidemiology (e.g., risk modelling), and biostatistics (e.g., examination of intervention effects using marginal and random effects modelling of repeated measures). An important issue is the interrelationship between measurement and outcome assessment. Source of measurement error must be considered (see Zimmerman and Magaziner in this volume), as must bias in assessments (see Teresi and Golden in this volume). While it has long been known that poor measurement can attenuate and bias estimates of longitudinal effects, the answer is not to attempt artificial solutions through use of corrections for attenuation (unreliability). Design and sampling issues are also critical to the correct conduct of any longitudinal study. Otherwise, estimates of prevalence, incidence, and intervention effects will be in error (see Beckett and Evans, in this volume). Several modelling approaches have been reviewed. Different points of view regarding change analysis have been

  2. Addressing the challenges of improving primary care quality in Uzbekistan: a qualitative study of chronic heart failure management.

    PubMed

    Ahmedov, Mohir; Green, Judith; Azimov, Ravshan; Avezova, Guloyim; Inakov, Sherzod; Mamatkulov, Bahrom

    2013-08-01

    Uzbekistan has a well-developed primary care system, with universal access to care, but faces challenges in improving the quality of clinical care provided. This study aimed to identify barriers to quality improvement by focusing on one common condition, Chronic Heart Failure (CHF), for which there are evidence-based international guidelines for management. To identify the challenges to improving the quality of care for CHF in line with such guidelines we took a qualitative approach, interviewing 15 physicians and 30 patients in detail about their experiences of CHF management. Despite recent improvements to the training of primary care physicians, their access to up-to-date information was limited, and they were disproportionately reliant on information from pharmaceutical companies. The main barriers to implementing international standards of care were: reluctance of physicians (and patients) to abandon ineffective interventions; enduring, system-wide incentives for clinically unnecessary hospitalization; and the lack of structural support for evidence-based health services improvement. Patients were in general positive about adherence to medications, but faced some problems in affording drugs and hospital care. Future interventions to strengthen primary care should be implemented with evaluations of their impact on the processes and outcomes of care for chronic conditions.

  3. Integrating Education into Primary Care Quality and Cost Improvement at an Academic Medical Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, R. Van; Standiford, Connie J.; Green, Lee A.; Bernstein, Steven J.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: In 1996 the University of Michigan Health System created the Guidelines Utilization, Implementation, Development, and Evaluation Studies (GUIDES) unit to improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of primary care for common medical problems. GUIDES's primary functions are to oversee the development of evidence-based, practical…

  4. Creating an Academic and Rural Community Network To Improve Diabetes Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Carol A.; Kennedy, Diane M.; Lahoz, Monina Rasay; Hislop, David A.; Erkel, Elizabeth E.

    The South Carolina Rural Interdisciplinary Program in Training (SCRIPT) provides practical educational experiences for students from multiple health care majors in rural communities in the Low Country (Southern region) of South Carolina. Faculty from the Medical University of South Carolina joined with staff from the Low Country Area Health…

  5. Attachment Theory, Teacher Motivation & Pastoral Care: A Challenge for Teachers and Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Philip

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that an unconscious need for a corrective emotional experience (CEE) drives the choice to care for others was investigated via attachment style and feelings of anger at students and staff. Data were obtained from 750 pre-service and experienced teachers, including 179 principals, who completed one of two versions of the Experiences…

  6. Predicting Kindergarten Academic Skills: Interactions among Child Care, Maternal Education, and Family Literacy Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christian, Kate; Morrison, Frederick J.; Bryant, Fred B.

    1998-01-01

    Examined sources of children's reading, vocabulary, general information, mathematics, and letter-recognition skills upon entrance to kindergarten. Predictors included ethnicity, gender, child IQ, family environment, maternal education, and months in child care. Found the need for strong parental involvement in children's development and subsidized…

  7. Academic and Cognitive Functioning in First Grade: Associations with Earlier Home and Child Care Predictors and with Concurrent Home and Classroom Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downer, Jason T.; Pianta, Robert C.

    2006-01-01

    Family and child care experiences from birth to 54 months, achievement and social competence at entry to school, maternal sensitivity at first grade, and qualities of first-grade classrooms were used to predict academic and cognitive functioning at first grade for 832 children enrolled in the National Institute of Child Health and Human…

  8. Academic and Mental Health Outcomes of Youth Placed in Out-of-Home Care: The Role of School Stability and Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Skyler S.; Gudiño, Omar G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Youth placed in out-of-home care are at significant risk of low academic achievement and poor mental health. Few studies have considered the potential effects of school-related factors, such as school placement stability and school engagement, on youth outcomes. Objective: The current study examined the potential main effects of school…

  9. A meta-analysis of hypnosis for chronic pain problems: a comparison between hypnosis, standard care, and other psychological interventions.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Tomonori; Fujino, Haruo; Nakae, Aya; Mashimo, Takashi; Sasaki, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Hypnosis is regarded as an effective treatment for psychological and physical ailments. However, its efficacy as a strategy for managing chronic pain has not been assessed through meta-analytical methods. The objective of the current study was to conduct a meta-analysis to assess the efficacy of hypnosis for managing chronic pain. When compared with standard care, hypnosis provided moderate treatment benefit. Hypnosis also showed a moderate superior effect as compared to other psychological interventions for a nonheadache group. The results suggest that hypnosis is efficacious for managing chronic pain. Given that large heterogeneity among the included studies was identified, the nature of hypnosis treatment is further discussed.

  10. The impact of poverty, chronic illnesses, and health insurance status on out-of-pocket health care expenditures in later life.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinhyun; Richardson, Virginia

    2014-10-01

    This study aims to examine poverty, chronic illnesses, health insurance, and health care expenditures, within the context of a political economy of aging perspective. Subsamples of 1,773 older adults from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey were selected for analyses. The results showed that chronic illnesses influenced out-of-pocket health care costs. Older persons with more than one health insurance spent less on out-of-pocket health care costs. The results have implications for health care social workers concerned with the growing costs of chronic illnesses, implementing integrated care, and advocating for extending public health insurance coverage especially for our most impoverished older adults.

  11. Assessing the responsiveness of chronic disease care - is the World Health Organization's concept of health system responsiveness applicable?

    PubMed

    Röttger, Julia; Blümel, Miriam; Fuchs, Sabine; Busse, Reinhard

    2014-07-01

    The concept of health system responsiveness is an important dimension of health system performance assessment. Further efforts have been made in recent years to improve the analysis of responsiveness measurements, yet few studies have applied the responsiveness concept to the evaluation of specific health care delivery structures. The objective of this study was to test the World Health Organization's (WHO's) responsiveness concept for an application in the evaluation of chronic disease care. In September and October 2012 we conducted four focus groups of chronically ill people (n = 38) in Germany, in which participants discussed their experiences and expectations regarding health care. The data was analyzed deductively (on the basis of the WHO responsiveness concept) and inductively using directed content analysis. Ten themes related to health system responsiveness and one theme (finances) not directly related to health system responsiveness, but of high importance to the focus group participants, could be identified. Eight of the ten responsiveness themes are consistent with the WHO concept. Additionally, two new themes were identified: trust (consultation and treatment are not led by any motive other than the patients' wellbeing) and coordination (treatment involving different providers is coordinated and different actors communicate with each other). These findings indicate the suitability of the WHO responsiveness concept for the evaluation of chronic disease care. However, some amendments, in particular an extension of the concept to include the two domains trust and coordination, are necessary for a thorough assessment of the responsiveness of chronic disease care.

  12. Determinants of access to chronic illness care: a mixed-methods evaluation of a national multifaceted chronic disease package for Indigenous Australians

    PubMed Central

    Bailie, Jodie; Schierhout, Gill; Laycock, Alison; Kelaher, Margaret; Percival, Nikki; O'Donoghue, Lynette; McNeair, Tracy; Bailie, Ross

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Indigenous Australians have a disproportionately high burden of chronic illness, and relatively poor access to healthcare. This paper examines how a national multicomponent programme aimed at improving prevention and management of chronic disease among Australian Indigenous people addressed various dimensions of access. Design Data from a place-based, mixed-methods formative evaluation were analysed against a framework that defines supply and demand-side dimensions to access. The evaluation included 24 geographically bounded ‘sentinel sites’ that included a range of primary care service organisations. It drew on administrative data on service utilisation, focus group and interview data on community members’ and service providers’ perceptions of chronic illness care between 2010 and 2013. Setting Urban, regional and remote areas of Australia that have relatively large Indigenous populations. Participants 670 community members participated in focus groups; 374 practitioners and representatives of regional primary care support organisations participated in in-depth interviews. Results The programme largely addressed supply-side dimensions of access with less focus or impact on demand-side dimensions. Application of the access framework highlighted the complex inter-relationships between dimensions of access. Key ongoing challenges are achieving population coverage through a national programme, reaching high-need groups and ensuring provision of ongoing care. Conclusions Strategies to improve access to chronic illness care for this population need to be tailored to local circumstances and address the range of dimensions of access on both the demand and supply sides. These findings highlight the importance of flexibility in national programme guidelines to support locally determined strategies. PMID:26614617

  13. Informal care for people with chronic psychotic symptoms: four case studies in a San community in South Africa.

    PubMed

    den Hertog, Thijs N; Gilmoor, Andrew R

    2017-03-01

    Despite the internationally recognised importance of informal care, especially in settings with limited services, few studies focus on the informal care for people with mental health problems in low- and middle-income countries. Making informal care visible is important for understanding the challenges and identifying the needs to be addressed. This ethnographic case study explored the dynamics of informal care for people with chronic psychotic symptoms in a group of San living in poor socioeconomic circumstances in a township near Kimberley, Northern Cape, South Africa. Data were collected in 2013 and 2014 and included semi-structured interviews, informal conversations and observations. Using local terminology, four individuals with chronic psychotic symptoms were identified and selected during the research process. A total of 33 semi-structured interviews took place with their caregivers. Data were analysed using descriptive, interpretive and pattern coding to identify core themes and interrelations across the four cases. Results indicate that informal care is characterised by shared and fragmented care structures. Care was shared among family members from various households and unrelated community members. This allowed for an adaptive process that responded to local dynamics and the care recipients' needs. However, informal care was fragmented as it was generally uncoordinated, which increased the recipients' vulnerability as caregivers could redirect care-giving responsibility and withdraw care. Specific challenges for providing care were related to poverty and care resistance. To improve the living conditions of people suffering from psychosis-related mental health problems, community-based mental healthcare should broaden its scope and incorporate local strengths and challenges.

  14. Quality of life and use of health care resources among patients with chronic depression

    PubMed Central

    Villoro, Renata; Merino, María; Hidalgo-Vega, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study estimates the health-related quality of life and the health care resource utilization of patients diagnosed with chronic depression (CD) in Spain. Patients and methods We used the Spanish National Health Survey 2011–2012, a cross-sectional survey representative at the national level, that selects people aged between 18 and 64 years (n=14,691). We estimated utility indices through the EuroQol five-dimensional descriptive system questionnaire included in the survey. We calculated percentage use of health care resources (medical visits, hospitalizations, emergency services, and drug consumption) and average number of resources used when available. A systematic comparison was made between people diagnosed with CD and other chronic conditions (OCCs). The chi-square test, Mann–Whitney U-test, and Kruskal–Wallis test were used to determine the statistical significance of differences between comparison groups. Multivariate analyses (Poisson regression, logistic regression, and linear regression) were also carried out to assess the relationship between quality of life and consumption of health care resources. Results Approximately, 6.1% of the subjects aged between 18 and 64 years were diagnosed with CD (average age 48.3±11 years, 71.7% females). After controlling for age, sex, and total number of comorbidities, a diagnosis of CD reduced utility scores by 0.09 (P<0.05) vs OCCs, and increased the average number of hospitalizations by 15%, the average number of days at hospital by 51%, and the average number of visits to emergency services by 15% (P<0.05). CD also increased the average number of visits to secondary care by 14% and visits to general practitioners by 4%. People with CD had a higher probability of consuming drugs than people with OCCs (odds ratio [OR]: 1.24, P<0.05), but only 38.6% took antidepressants. Conclusion People with CD had significantly lower health-related quality of life than people with OCCs. CD was associated with

  15. A New Multidisciplinary Home Care Telemedicine System to Monitor Stable Chronic Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients: A Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    León, Agathe; Cáceres, César; Fernández, Emma; Chausa, Paloma; Martin, Maite; Codina, Carles; Rousaud, Araceli; Blanch, Jordi; Mallolas, Josep; Martinez, Esteban; Blanco, Jose L.; Laguno, Montserrat; Larrousse, Maria; Milinkovic, Ana; Zamora, Laura; Canal, Neus; Miró, Josep M.; Gatell, Josep M.; Gómez, Enrique J.; García, Felipe

    2011-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral therapy has changed the natural history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in developed countries, where it has become a chronic disease. This clinical scenario requires a new approach to simplify follow-up appointments and facilitate access to healthcare professionals. Methodology We developed a new internet-based home care model covering the entire management of chronic HIV-infected patients. This was called Virtual Hospital. We report the results of a prospective randomised study performed over two years, comparing standard care received by HIV-infected patients with Virtual Hospital care. HIV-infected patients with access to a computer and broadband were randomised to be monitored either through Virtual Hospital (Arm I) or through standard care at the day hospital (Arm II). After one year of follow up, patients switched their care to the other arm. Virtual Hospital offered four main services: Virtual Consultations, Telepharmacy, Virtual Library and Virtual Community. A technical and clinical evaluation of Virtual Hospital was carried out. Findings Of the 83 randomised patients, 42 were monitored during the first year through Virtual Hospital (Arm I) and 41 through standard care (Arm II). Baseline characteristics of patients were similar in the two arms. The level of technical satisfaction with the virtual system was high: 85% of patients considered that Virtual Hospital improved their access to clinical data and they felt comfortable with the videoconference system. Neither clinical parameters [level of CD4+ T lymphocytes, proportion of patients with an undetectable level of viral load (p = 0.21) and compliance levels >90% (p = 0.58)] nor the evaluation of quality of life or psychological questionnaires changed significantly between the two types of care. Conclusions Virtual Hospital is a feasible and safe tool for the multidisciplinary home care of chronic HIV patients. Telemedicine should be considered as an

  16. Practical Approach to Detection and Management of Chronic Kidney Disease for the Primary Care Clinician.

    PubMed

    Vassalotti, Joseph A; Centor, Robert; Turner, Barbara J; Greer, Raquel C; Choi, Michael; Sequist, Thomas D

    2016-02-01

    A panel of internists and nephrologists developed this practical approach for the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative to guide assessment and care of chronic kidney disease (CKD) by primary care clinicians. Chronic kidney disease is defined as a glomerular filtration rate (GFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and/or markers of kidney damage for at least 3 months. In clinical practice the most common tests for CKD include GFR estimated from the serum creatinine concentration (eGFR) and albuminuria from the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Assessment of eGFR and albuminuria should be performed for persons with diabetes and/or hypertension but is not recommended for the general population. Management of CKD includes reducing the patient's risk of CKD progression and risk of associated complications, such as acute kidney injury and cardiovascular disease, anemia, and metabolic acidosis, as well as mineral and bone disorder. Prevention of CKD progression requires blood pressure <140/90 mm Hg, use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers for patients with albuminuria and hypertension, hemoglobin A1c ≤7% for patients with diabetes, and correction of CKD-associated metabolic acidosis. To reduce patient safety hazards from medications, the level of eGFR should be considered when prescribing, and nephrotoxins should be avoided, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The main reasons to refer to nephrology specialists are eGFR <30 mL/min/1.73 m(2), severe albuminuria, and acute kidney injury. The ultimate goal of CKD management is to prevent disease progression, minimize complications, and promote quality of life.

  17. Multimorbidity Patterns in Primary Care: Interactions among Chronic Diseases Using Factor Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Prados-Torres, Alexandra; Poblador-Plou, Beatriz; Calderón-Larrañaga, Amaia; Gimeno-Feliu, Luis Andrés; González-Rubio, Francisca; Poncel-Falcó, Antonio; Sicras-Mainar, Antoni; Alcalá-Nalvaiz, José Tomás

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The primary objective of this study was to identify the existence of chronic disease multimorbidity patterns in the primary care population, describing their clinical components and analysing how these patterns change and evolve over time both in women and men. The secondary objective of this study was to generate evidence regarding the pathophysiological processes underlying multimorbidity and to understand the interactions and synergies among the various diseases. Methods This observational, retrospective, multicentre study utilised information from the electronic medical records of 19 primary care centres from 2008. To identify multimorbidity patterns, an exploratory factor analysis was carried out based on the tetra-choric correlations between the diagnostic information of 275,682 patients who were over 14 years of age. The analysis was stratified by age group and sex. Results Multimorbidity was found in all age groups, and its prevalence ranged from 13% in the 15 to 44 year age group to 67% in those 65 years of age or older. Goodness-of-fit indicators revealed sample values between 0.50 and 0.71. We identified five patterns of multimorbidity: cardio-metabolic, psychiatric-substance abuse, mechanical-obesity-thyroidal, psychogeriatric and depressive. Some of these patterns were found to evolve with age, and there were differences between men and women. Conclusions Non-random associations between chronic diseases result in clinically consistent multimorbidity patterns affecting a significant proportion of the population. Underlying pathophysiological phenomena were observed upon which action can be taken both from a clinical, individual-level perspective and from a public health or population-level perspective. PMID:22393389

  18. Role of the Chronic Dental Disease Scheme in Enhanced Primary Care: allied health or allied outlier?

    PubMed

    Lam, Raymond; Kruger, Estie; Tennant, Marc

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to provide a comparative analysis of the Chronic Dental Disease Scheme (CDSS) and the Allied Health Profession (AHP) program as they related to the greater Enhanced Primary Care Scheme introduced by the Australian Government to manage patients with chronic and complex diseases. A retrospective analysis of data pertaining to Medicare items related to dentistry and the allied health professions were extracted from the Medicare Benefits Schedule database online, and formed the basis of this study. The highest proportion of services was provided in the state of New South Wales. There appears to be synergy in the utilisation of services with jurisdictions either overutilising or underutilising services. Costs to the Enhanced Primary Care Scheme under the CDSS model (fee for service) were up to 40 times more expensive compared with the AHP model (fee per visit). Costs and treatment associated with the CDSS experienced an increase of 13350% during the period 2007-08, coincident with an increase in subsidization. Reconstructive dentistry accounted for the majority of the increase. Gender disparities in dentistry were less distinct when compared with AHPs and were postulated to be due to males presenting with conditions that were more progressive requiring more invasive treatment. A comparative analysis indicates significant differences in costs, nature of treatment and the manner of remuneration between dentistry and the AHPs. A fee for service schedule as evidenced by the CDSS is dependent on the degree of financial incentive as indicated by patterns in utilisation over time. The amount of treatment considered necessary may be influenced by the level of subsidy with treatment that may not reflect disease management. The AHP model, which is based around a fee for visit schedule, is not without its deficiencies but has not experienced significant rises in cost compared with the CDSS.

  19. TeamSTEPPS in Long-Term Care-An Academic Partnership: Part II.

    PubMed

    Roman, Tammy C; Abraham, Kylene; Dever, Kathleen

    2016-12-01

    In 2015, the Academy for Leadership in Long-Term Care received a grant to provide interprofessional training on the strategies and techniques of TeamSTEPPS(®). The results indicated significant changes in the participants' teamwork and communication strategies to improve resident safety. In part two of this article, the discussion includes the implementation, evaluation results, and implications from this worthy initiative. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2016;47(12):534-535.

  20. Costs and health care resource utilization among chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with newly acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Junji; Li, Yunfeng; Tian, Haijun; Goodman, Michael J; Gabriel, Susan; Nazareth, Tara; Turner, Stuart J; Arcona, Stephen; Kahler, Kristijan H

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are at increased risk for lung infections and other pathologies (eg, pneumonia); however, few studies have evaluated the impact of pneumonia on health care resource utilization and costs in this population. The purpose of this study was to estimate health care resource utilization and costs among COPD patients with newly acquired pneumonia compared to those without pneumonia. Methods A retrospective claims analysis using Truven MarketScan® Commercial and Medicare databases was conducted. COPD patients with and without newly acquired pneumonia diagnosed between January 1, 2004 and September 30, 2011 were identified. Propensity score matching was used to create a 1:1 matched cohort. Patient demographics, comorbidities (measured by Charlson Comorbidity Index), and medication use were evaluated before and after matching. Health care resource utilization (ie, hospitalizations, emergency room [ER] and outpatient visits), and associated health care costs were assessed during the 12-month follow-up. Logistic regression was conducted to evaluate the risk of hospitalization and ER visits, and gamma regression models and two-part models compared health care costs between groups after matching. Results In the baseline cohort (N=467,578), patients with newly acquired pneumonia were older (mean age: 70 versus [vs] 63 years) and had higher Charlson Comorbidity Index scores (3.3 vs 2.6) than patients without pneumonia. After propensity score matching, the pneumonia cohort was nine times more likely to have a hospitalization (odds ratio; 95% confidence intervals [CI] =9.2; 8.9, 9.4) and four times more likely to have an ER visit (odds ratio; 95% CI =4.4; 4.3, 4.5) over the 12-month follow-up period compared to the control cohort. The estimated 12-month mean hospitalization costs ($14,353 [95% CI: $14,037–$14,690]), outpatient costs ($6,891 [95% CI: $6,706–$7,070]), and prescription drug costs ($1,104 [95% CI

  1. Integrative cancer care in a US academic cancer centre: The Memorial Sloan-Kettering Experience.

    PubMed

    Deng, G

    2008-08-01

    Various surveys show that interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is high among cancer patients. Patients want to explore all options that may help their treatment. Many CAM modalities offer patients an active role in their self-care, and the resulting sense of empowerment is very appealing. On the other hand, many unscrupulous marketeers promote alternative cancer "cures," targeting cancer patients who are particularly vulnerable. Some alternative therapies can hurt patients by delaying effective treatment or by causing adverse effects or detrimental interactions with other medications. It is not in the best interest of cancer patients if they cannot get appropriate guidance on the use of CAM from the health care professionals who are part of their cancer care team. The Integrative Medicine Service at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York was established in 1999 to address patient interest in cam, to incorporate helpful complementary therapies into each patient's overall treatment management, to guide patients in avoiding harmful alternative therapies, and to develop prospective research to evaluate the efficacy of CAM modalities.

  2. Integrative Cancer Care in a US Academic Cancer Centre: The Memorial Sloan–Kettering Experience

    PubMed Central

    Deng, G.

    2008-01-01

    Various surveys show that interest in complementary and alternative medicine (cam) is high among cancer patients. Patients want to explore all options that may help their treatment. Many cam modalities offer patients an active role in their self-care, and the resulting sense of empowerment is very appealing. On the other hand, many unscrupulous marketeers promote alternative cancer “cures,” targeting cancer patients who are particularly vulnerable. Some alternative therapies can hurt patients by delaying effective treatment or by causing adverse effects or detrimental interactions with other medications. It is not in the best interest of cancer patients if they cannot get appropriate guidance on the use of cam from the health care professionals who are part of their cancer care team. The Integrative Medicine Service at Memorial Sloan–Kettering Cancer Center in New York was established in 1999 to address patient interest in cam, to incorporate helpful complementary therapies into each patient’s overall treatment management, to guide patients in avoiding harmful alternative therapies, and to develop prospective research to evaluate the efficacy of cam modalities. PMID:18769574

  3. A mHealth Application for Chronic Wound Care: Findings of a User Trial

    PubMed Central

    Friesen, Marcia R.; Hamel, Carole; McLeod, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the findings of a user trial of a mHealth application for pressure ulcer (bedsore) documentation. Pressure ulcers are a leading iatrogenic cause of death in developed countries and significantly impact quality of life for those affected. Pressure ulcers will be an increasing public health concern as the population ages. Electronic information systems are being explored to improve consistency and accuracy of documentation, improve patient and caregiver experience and ultimately improve patient outcomes. A software application was developed for Android Smartphones and tablets and was trialed in a personal care home in Western Canada. The software application provides an electronic medical record for chronic wounds, replacing nurses’ paper-based charting and is positioned for integration with facility’s larger eHealth framework. The mHealth application offers three intended benefits over paper-based charting of chronic wounds, including: (1) the capacity for remote consultation (telehealth between facilities, practitioners, and/or remote communities), (2) data organization and analysis, including built-in alerts, automatically-generated text-based and graph-based wound histories including wound images, and (3) tutorial support for non-specialized caregivers. The user trial yielded insights regarding the software application’s design and functionality in the clinical setting, and highlighted the key role of wound photographs in enhancing patient and caregiver experiences, enhancing communication between multiple healthcare professionals, and leveraging the software’s telehealth capacities. PMID:24256739

  4. The Family Challenge of Caring for the Chronically Mentally Ill: A Phenomenological Study

    PubMed Central

    Shamsaei, Farshid; Cheraghi, Fatemeh; Esmaeilli, Ravanbakhsh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Family caregiving for patients with chronic mental illness is influenced by various factors such as political, socioeconomic, and cultural contexts as well as related policies and health services. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore the challenges with which the family caregivers of patients with chronic mental illness have to contend. Materials and Methods: The research design was qualitative with a phenomenological approach. The research population consisted of 16 long-term carers expressing interest in participating in the project. The carers were the family members of mentally ill relatives who collected their monthly medications at Farshchian Psychiatry Hospital in Hamadan in 2012. Purposive sampling was used to draw the sample. Data were collected by individual in-depth semi-structured interviews, which were tape-recorded and analyzed via Colaizzi’s phenomenological method. Rigor was assessed regarding credibility, dependability, conformability, and transferability. Results: Our findings highlighted 4 main themes, namely stress and emotional distress, need for education and information, socioeconomic effects and support, and physical strain. Conclusions: Families experience frustrations when providing support and care to their mentally ill relatives. They, therefore, need appropriate support and intervention by mental health services. PMID:26576169

  5. Prescribing opioids for chronic noncancer pain in primary care: risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Allan; Cone, Edward J; DePriest, Anne Z; Axford-Gatley, Robert A; Passik, Steven D

    2014-09-01

    The use of opioids for patients with chronic noncancer pain has increased dramatically, and with increasing use there is increasing concern about the potential for abuse and addiction during long-term treatment. Clinicians should avoid viewing formal or subjective risk assessment as a means of classifying patients into 2 distinct categories: compliant patients and substance abusers. The provider who perceives a patient as compliant may have a complacent attitude toward aberrant drug-related behavior, presuming that these signs reflect inadequately controlled pain, to be addressed by dose escalation. The provider who perceives a patient as a substance abuser may refuse to provide treatment for pain, leaving the patient to seek either illicit drugs or prescribed treatment from another provider. In fact, in seemingly compliant patients, any noncompliant use of opioids presents a safety risk regardless of the explanations offered. Even in known or suspected drug abusers, chronic pain warrants the use of adequate pharmacotherapy, although treatment in such cases may exclude drugs with high abuse potential. Thus, all aberrant drug-related behavior should be addressed within a treatment plan that combines adequate pain care with suitable interventions for the aberrant behavior, following current best practice strategies. This approach is consistent with the approach taken with other health conditions, such as diabetes or hypertension, for which it is understood that noncompliance with therapy presents a risk of harm.

  6. Strategies and tactics for successful implementation of bundled payments: bundled payment for care improvement at a large, urban, academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Richard

    2015-03-01

    As health care reform continues to evolve, there will need to be an emphasis on generating value, quality improvement, and cost control. In 2011, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) initiated a new Bundled Payment for Care Improvement initiative. Early results from this CMS bundled payment initiative at an urban, tertiary, academic medical center demonstrate decreased length of stay and increased discharge to home, with decreasing readmission rates, which can result in cost-savings without compromise of the quality of care. Changes in care coordination, clinical care pathways, and evidence-based protocols are the key to improving the quality metrics and cost effectiveness within the implementation of the bundled payment for care initiative, thus bringing increased value to our total joint arthroplasty patients.

  7. The Nexus Between Patient-Centered Care and Complementary Medicine: Allies in the Era of Chronic Disease?

    PubMed

    Foley, Hope; Steel, Amie

    2017-03-03

    Complementary medicine (CM) holds an established place of value for health care consumers around the world. Consumers seek CM specifically for the type of clinical care provided by CM practitioners, which is perceived as holistic and individualized. The holistic approach of CM has been described as patient-centered and there are indeed many parallels between the philosophy of holism and the paradigm of patient-centered care (PCC). In light of the contemporary movement toward PCC as a means of improving health care delivery, it is worth exploring CM as a potential existing resource of PCC. This is of particular interest with consideration to the growing burden of chronic disease, the emphasis of PCC in chronic disease management, and the high representation of chronic disease sufferers among CM users. However, there has been minimal investigation into the question of whether the holistic philosophies of CM are translated by CM practitioners into practical, clinical application. The changing landscape of CM practice necessitates a deeper understanding of the nature of CM clinical care to assess the role of CM in the contemporary health care environment.

  8. Effects of chronic academic stress on mental state and expression of glucocorticoid receptor α and β isoforms in healthy Japanese medical students.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Ken; Tanahashi, Toshihito; Murata, Akiho; Akaike, Yoko; Katsuura, Sakurako; Nishida, Kensei; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Kuwano, Yuki; Kawai, Tomoko; Rokutan, Kazuhito

    2011-07-01

    Chronic academic stress responses were assessed by measuring mental state, salivary cortisol levels, and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene expression in healthy Japanese medical students challenging the national medical license examination. Mental states of 17 male and 9 female medical undergraduates, aged 25.0 ± 1.2 years (mean ± SD), were assessed by the State and Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and the Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) 2 months before, 2 days before, and 1 month after the examination. At the same time points, saliva and blood were collected. STAI-state scores peaked 2 days before the examination. Scores on STAI-trait and SDS, and salivary cortisol levels were consistently higher during the pre-examination period. One month after the examination, all these measures had significantly decreased to baseline levels. Real-time reverse transcription PCR showed that this chronic anxious state did not change the expression of the functional GRα mRNA isoform in peripheral leukocytes, while it resulted in reduced expression of the GRβ isoform 2 days before the examination. Our results replicate and extend a significant impact of chronic academic stressors on the mental state of healthy Japanese medical students and suggest a possible association of GRβ gene in response to psychological stress.

  9. Inequality and inequity in access to health care and treatment for chronic conditions in China: the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Elwell-Sutton, Timothy M; Jiang, Chao Qiang; Zhang, Wei Sen; Cheng, Kar Keung; Lam, Tai H; Leung, Gabriel M; Schooling, C M

    2013-08-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are a large and rapidly-growing problem in China and other middle-income countries. Clinical treatment of NCDs is long-term and expensive, so it may present particular problems for equality and horizontal equity (equal treatment for equal need) in access to health care, although little is known about this at present in low- and middle-income countries. To address this gap, and inform policy for a substantial proportion of the global population, we examined inequality and inequity in general health care utilization (doctor consultations and hospital admissions) and in treatment of chronic conditions (hypertension, hyperglycaemia and dyslipidaemia), in 30 499 Chinese adults aged ≥50 years from one of China's richest provinces, using the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study (2003-2008). We used concentration indices to test for inequality and inequity in utilization by household income per head. Inequality was decomposed to show the contributions of income, indicators of 'need for health care' (age, sex, self-rated health, coronary heart disease risk and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) and non-need factors (education, occupation, out-of-pocket health care payments and health insurance). We found inequality and inequity in treatment of chronic conditions but not in general health care utilization. Using more objective and specific measures of 'need for health care' increased estimates of inequity for treatment of chronic conditions. Income and non-need factors (especially health insurance, education and occupation) made the largest contributions to inequality. Further work is needed on why access to treatment for chronic conditions in China is restricted for those on low incomes and how these inequities can be mitigated.

  10. Barriers and enablers to good communication and information-sharing practices in care planning for chronic condition management.

    PubMed

    Lawn, Sharon; Delany, Toni; Sweet, Linda; Battersby, Malcolm; Skinner, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to document current communication and information-sharing practices and to identify the barriers and enablers to good practices within the context of care planning for chronic condition management. Further aims were to make recommendations about how changes to policy and practice can improve communication and information sharing in primary health care. A mixed-method approach was applied to seek the perspectives of patients and primary health-care workers across Australia. Data was collected via interviews, focus groups, non-participant observations and a national survey. Data analysis was performed using a mix of thematic, discourse and statistical approaches. Central barriers to effective communication and information sharing included fragmented communication, uncertainty around client and interagency consent, and the unacknowledged existence of overlapping care plans. To be most effective, communication and information sharing should be open, two-way and inclusive of all members of health-care teams. It must also only be undertaken with the appropriate participant consent, otherwise this has the potential to cause patients harm. Improvements in care planning as a communication and information-sharing tool may be achieved through practice initiatives that reflect the rhetoric of collaborative person-centred care, which is already supported through existing policy in Australia. General practitioners and other primary care providers should operationalise care planning, and the expectation of collaborative and effective communication of care that underpins it, within their practice with patients and all members of the care team. To assist in meeting these aims, we make several recommendations.

  11. Managing and monitoring chronic non-communicable diseases in a primary health care clinic, Lilongwe, Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Manjomo, R. C.; Mwagomba, B.; Ade, S.; Ali, E.; Ben-Smith, A.; Khomani, P.; Bondwe, P.; Nkhoma, D.; Douglas, G. P.; Tayler-Smith, K.; Chikosi, L.; Gadabu, O. J.

    2016-01-01

    Setting: Patients with chronic non-communicable diseases attending a primary health care centre, Lilongwe, Malawi. Objective: Using an electronic medical record monitoring system, to describe the quarterly and cumulative disease burden, management and outcomes of patients registered between March 2014 and June 2015. Design: A cross-sectional study. Results: Of 1135 patients, with new registrations increasing each quarter, 66% were female, 21% were aged ⩾65 years, 20% were obese, 53% had hypertension alone, 18% had diabetes alone, 12% had asthma, 10% had epilepsy and 7% had both hypertension and diabetes. In every quarter, about 30% of patients did not attend the clinic and 19% were registered as lost to follow-up (not seen for ⩾1 year) in the last quarter. Of those attending, over 90% were prescribed medication, and 80–90% with hypertension and/or diabetes had blood pressure/blood glucose measured. Over 85% of those with epilepsy had no seizures and 60–75% with asthma had no severe attacks. Control of blood pressure (41–51%) and diabetes (15–38%) was poor. Conclusion: It is feasible to manage patients with non-communicable diseases in a primary health care setting in Malawi, although more attention is needed to improve clinic attendance and the control of hypertension and diabetes. PMID:27358797

  12. A review of chronic pain impact on patients, their social environment and the health care system

    PubMed Central

    Dueñas, María; Ojeda, Begoña; Salazar, Alejandro; Mico, Juan Antonio; Failde, Inmaculada

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain (CP) seriously affects the patient’s daily activities and quality of life, but few studies on CP have considered its effects on the patient’s social and family environment. In this work, through a review of the literature, we assessed several aspects of how CP influences the patient’s daily activities and quality of life, as well as its repercussions in the workplace, and on the family and social environment. Finally, the consequences of pain on the health care system are discussed. On the basis of the results, we concluded that in addition to the serious consequences on the patient’s life, CP has a severe detrimental effect on their social and family environment, as well as on health care services. Thus, we want to emphasize on the need to adopt a multidisciplinary approach to treatment so as to obtain more comprehensive improvements for patients in familial and social contexts. Accordingly, it would be beneficial to promote more social- and family-oriented research initiatives. PMID:27418853

  13. Achieving high quality in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction care: one urban academic medical center experience.

    PubMed

    Purim-Shem-Tov, Yanina A; Melgoza, Normal; Haw, Janet; Schaer, Gary L; Calvin, James E; Rumoro, Dino P

    2012-03-01

    Management of acute myocardial infarction with ST elevation (STEMI) remains a challenge for academic institutions. There are numerous factors at play from the time electrocardiogram is obtained to the time the patient arrives to a catheterization laboratory and the balloon is inflated. Academic hospitals that are located in large urban centers have to deal with staff living long distances from the facility, and therefore, assembling the catheterization team after-hours and on the weekends becomes a difficult task to achieve. There are other factors that contribute to time delays, such as, administering electrocardiograms in timely fashion, having emergency physicians activate the catheterization team, instead of contacting the cardiologist to discuss the case, and other time-sensitive factors. All of the aforementioned issues contribute to the delay. Yet, primary percutaneous coronary intervention is clearly demonstrated as the modality of choice in treatment of STEMI, which improves patient's morbidity and mortality. Therefore, it is imperative that institutions do all they can to improve their protocols and meet the core measures in the treatment of STEMI patients, including the door-to-balloon time of less than 90 minutes. Our institution started a quality improvement program for STEMI care in 1993 and has showed progressive improvement in use of aspirin, beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and other medication, culminating in 95% to 100% use of these medications in 2003-2004, when we operated in accordance with the Get With The Guidelines program. Door-to-balloon time in less than 90 minutes became a new phase in our quality improvement process, and we achieved 100% compliance in the last 2 years.

  14. Depression in patients with chronic pain attending a specialised pain treatment centre: prevalence and impact on health care costs.

    PubMed

    Rayner, Lauren; Hotopf, Matthew; Petkova, Hristina; Matcham, Faith; Simpson, Anna; McCracken, Lance M

    2016-07-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the prevalence and impact of depression on health care costs in patients with complex chronic pain. The sample included 1204 patients attending a tertiary pain management service for people with chronic disabling pain, unresponsive to medical treatment. As part of routine care, patients completed a web-based questionnaire assessing mental and physical health, functioning, and service use in the preceding 3 months. Depression was assessed using the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire. Self-report health care utilisation was measured across 4 domains: general practitioner contacts, contacts with secondary/tertiary care doctors, accident and emergency department visits, and days hospitalised. The participation rate was 89%. Seven hundred and thirty-two patients (60.8%; 95% CI 58.0-63.6) met criteria for probable depression, and 407 (33.8%) met the threshold for severe depression. Patients with depression were more likely to be unable to work because of ill health and reported greater work absence, greater pain-related interference with functioning, lower pain acceptance, and more generalised pain. Mean total health care costs per 3-month period were £731 (95% CI £646-£817) for patients with depression, compared with £448 (95% CI £366-£530) for patients without depression. A positive association between severe depression and total health care costs persisted after controlling for key demographic, functional, and clinical covariates using multiple linear regression models. These findings reveal the extent, severity, and impact of depression in patients with chronic pain and make evident a need for action. Effective treatment of depression may improve patient health and functioning and reduce the burden of chronic pain on health care services.

  15. Health utilities in people with chronic pain using a population-level survey and linked health care administrative data.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Mary-Ellen; Taddio, Anna; Katz, Joel; Shah, Vibhuti; Krahn, Murray

    2017-03-01

    Health utilities are a preference-based measure of health-related quality of life that facilitates comparison of disease burden across conditions. We estimated utilities using a population-based, matched sample of adolescents and adults with and without chronic pain, controlling for comorbidity. Ontarians aged ≥12 years with and without chronic pain were identified from the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) 2000-2001 and 2009-2010 and linked to their provincial health care administrative data. Individuals with chronic pain were matched to those without using age, sex, survey year, and a propensity score for having chronic pain estimated from a rurality index, income quintile, and comorbidity. The Health Utilities Index Mark 3 instrument, included in the Canadian Community Health Survey, was used. Mean utilities were calculated for each group. Utility decrement for chronic pain was also calculated for each matched pair. A total of 65,246 responses were available for analysis. After matching, there were 12,146 matched pairs with and without pain. In the matched cohort, mean age was 54 years (SD 12); 61% were female. The matched cohort with chronic pain had a mean utility of 0.59 (95% confidence interval 0.58-0.59), and the decrement associated with chronic pain was 0.32 (95% confidence interval 0.31-0.32). Utilities in people with chronic pain were lower than, and decrements larger than, those seen with most other chronic diseases including heart disease, diabetes, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. These data will be useful to inform priorities and future strategies for the prevention and control of chronic pain.

  16. Roles, Responsibilities, and Relationships among Older Husbands Caring for Wives with Progressive Dementia and Other Chronic Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Sara; Power, James

    2009-01-01

    Men are playing greater roles in the provision of care for older adults with chronic health conditions. Husbands, in particular, encounter many role transformations as they witness their wives grow in levels of dependence as a result of their illnesses. This qualitative study examines the changes that occurred in the roles, responsibilities, and…

  17. 38 CFR 17.44 - Hospital care for certain retirees with chronic disability (Executive Orders 10122, 10400 and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hospital care for certain retirees with chronic disability (Executive Orders 10122, 10400 and 11733). 17.44 Section 17.44 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and...

  18. Development of My Health Companion to enhance self-care management of chronic health conditions in rural dwellers.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Clarann; Cudney, Shirley; Kinion, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Appropriate self-management support is needed to help individuals and their families meet the challenges of living with chronic health conditions. Such support is characterized by productive interactions between informed, active individuals, and their health care providers. The purposes of this paper are to describe the challenges to achieving self-management support and a tool, My Health Companion (MHC), which was developed to meet that challenge. The MHC is a paper personal health record designed to help rural women with chronic health conditions to better manage and understand their health information. The selection of content for the MHC was based on the literature, input from health care experts, and chronically ill individuals, and its development incorporated principles of personal health record and clear communication. The MHC was anecdotally shown to be useful to rural women with chronic health conditions in preparing for and enhancing their visits with health care providers. As a source of information, the MHC had potential for: being beneficial to providers in recommending appropriate treatment; contributing to more informed health decision making by ill individuals; and serving as a vehicle for the establishment of more productive interactions that contributed to the achievement of true client-provider partnerships in health care.

  19. Multidisciplinary care for poor patients with chronic kidney disease in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Martinez-Castellanos, Yolanda; Renoirte-Lopez, Karina; Barajas-Murguia, Alberto; de la Torre-Campos, Librado; Becerra-Muñoz, Laura E; Gonzalez-Alvarez, Jaime A; Tonelli, Marcello

    2013-01-01

    Coordinated multidisciplinary care (MDC) could improve management and outcomes of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We opened a nurse-led, MDC CKD clinic in Guadalajara, Mexico. We report the clinic's results between March 2008 and July 2011. The records of 353 patients with CKD stage 3 and 4 were reviewed. Data were collected prospectively. Mean age was 59.1±15.5 years; 54.4% were female and 63.7% were diabetic. We observed significant changes in the quality of care between baseline and follow-up. Compliance with practice guidelines for angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) and beta blockers increased from 30.6% to 46.6%, and from 11% to 19%, respectively; for statins from 41.4% to 80.3% for erythropoietin and calcium binders from 10.5% to 23.4%, and from 41.9 to 82.6%, respectively. At last visit, 90% of patients were on ACE inhibitors/ARB. Blood pressure <130/80 mm Hg increased from 23% to 38%. Serum glucose ⩽130 mg/dl increased from 54.4% to 67.7%. Serum cholesterol >160 mg/dl decreased from 64.8% to 60.3%. At last visit, 70% of the patients had a serum Hgb ⩾11.0 g/dl, and 80.1% and 65.1% had a normal serum calcium and serum phosphate, respectively. In conclusion, we observed a trend in the improvement of quality of care of CKD patients similar to those reported by other MDC programs in the developed world. Our study demonstrated that a nurse-led MDC program could be successfully implemented in developing countries. PMID:25018984

  20. Comparison of primary health-care models in the management of chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Cueto-Manzano, Alfonso M; Martínez-Ramírez, Héctor R; Cortés-Sanabria, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Negative lifestyle habits (potential risks for chronic kidney disease, CKD) are rarely modified by physicians in a conventional health-care model (CHCM). Multidisciplinary strategies may have better results; however, there is no information on their application in the early stages of CKD. Thus, the aim of this study was to compare a multiple intervention model versus CHCM on lifestyle and renal function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and CKD stage 1–2. In a prospective cohort study, a family medicine unit (FMU) was assigned a multiple intervention model (MIM) and another continued with conventional health-care model (CHCM). MIM patients received an educational intervention guided by a multidisciplinary team (family physician (FP), social worker, dietitian, physical trainer); self-help groups functioned with free activities throughout the study. CHCM patients were managed only by the FP, who decided if patients needed referral to other professionals. Thirty-nine patients were studied in each cohort. According to a lifestyle questionnaire, no baseline differences were found between cohorts, but results reflected an unhealthy lifestyle. After 6 months of follow-up, both cohorts showed significant improvement in their dietary habits. Compared to CHCM diet, exercise, emotional management, knowledge of disease, and adherence to treatment showed greater improvement in the MIM. Blood pressure decreased in both cohorts, but body mass index, waist circumference, and HbA1C significantly decreased only in MIM. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was maintained equally in both cohorts, but albuminuria significantly decreased only in MIM. In conclusion, MIM achieves better control of lifestyle-related variables and CKD risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) patients with CKD stage 1–2. Broadly, implementation of a MIM in primary health care may produce superior results that might assist in preventing the progression of CKD. PMID:25018986

  1. Agreement between self-reported and general practitioner-reported chronic conditions among multimorbid patients in primary care - results of the MultiCare Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Multimorbidity is a common phenomenon in primary care. Until now, no clinical guidelines for multimorbidity exist. For the development of these guidelines, it is necessary to know whether or not patients are aware of their diseases and to what extent they agree with their doctor. The objectives of this paper are to analyze the agreement of self-reported and general practitioner-reported chronic conditions among multimorbid patients in primary care, and to discover which patient characteristics are associated with positive agreement. Methods The MultiCare Cohort Study is a multicenter, prospective, observational cohort study of 3,189 multimorbid patients, ages 65 to 85. Data was collected in personal interviews with patients and GPs. The prevalence proportions for 32 diagnosis groups, kappa coefficients and proportions of specific agreement were calculated in order to examine the agreement of patient self-reported and general practitioner-reported chronic conditions. Logistic regression models were calculated to analyze which patient characteristics can be associated with positive agreement. Results We identified four chronic conditions with good agreement (e.g. diabetes mellitus κ = 0.80;PA = 0,87), seven with moderate agreement (e.g. cerebral ischemia/chronic stroke κ = 0.55;PA = 0.60), seventeen with fair agreement (e.g. cardiac insufficiency κ = 0.24;PA = 0.36) and four with poor agreement (e.g. gynecological problems κ = 0.05;PA = 0.10). Factors associated with positive agreement concerning different chronic diseases were sex, age, education, income, disease count, depression, EQ VAS score and nursing care dependency. For example: Women had higher odds ratios for positive agreement with their GP regarding osteoporosis (OR = 7.16). The odds ratios for positive agreement increase with increasing multimorbidity in almost all of the observed chronic conditions (OR = 1.22-2.41). Conclusions For multimorbidity research, the

  2. A tool to measure whether business management capacity in general practice impacts on the quality of chronic illness care.

    PubMed

    Holton, Christine H; Proudfoot, Judith G; Jayasinghe, Upali W; Grimm, Jane; Bubner, Tanya K; Winstanley, Julie; Harris, Mark F; Beilby, Justin J

    2010-11-01

    Our aim was to develop a tool to identify specific features of the business and financial management of practices that facilitate better quality care for chronic illness in primary care. Domains of management were identified, resulting in the development of a structured interview tool that was administered in 97 primary care practices in Australia. Interview items were screened and subjected to factor analysis, subscales identified and the overall model fit determined. The instrument's validity was assessed against another measure of quality of care. Analysis provided a four-factor solution containing 21 items, which explained 42.5% of the variance in the total scores. The factors related to administrative processes, human resources, marketing analysis and business development. All scores increased significantly with practice size. The business development subscale and total score were higher for rural practices. There was a significant correlation between the business development subscale and quality of care. The indicators of business and financial management in the final tool appear to be useful predictors of the quality of care. The instrument may help inform policy regarding the structure of general practice and implementation of a systems approach to chronic illness care. It can provide information to practices about areas for further development.

  3. Physician - nurse practitioner teams in chronic disease management: the impact on costs, clinical effectiveness, and patients' perception of care.

    PubMed

    Litaker, David; Mion, Lorraine; Planavsky, Loretta; Kippes, Christopher; Mehta, Neil; Frolkis, Joseph

    2003-08-01

    Increasing demand to deliver and document therapeutic and preventive care sharpens the need for disease management strategies that accomplish these goals efficiently while preserving quality of care. The purpose of this study was to compare selected outcomes for a new chronic disease management program involving a nurse practitioner - physician team with those of an existing model of care. One hundred fifty-seven patients with hypertension and diabetes mellitus were randomly assigned to their primary care physician and a nurse practitioner or their primary care physician alone. Costs for personnel directly involved in patient management, calculated from hourly rates and encounter time with patients, and pre- and post-study glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), satisfaction with care and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) were assessed. Although 1-year costs for personnel were higher in the team-treated group, participants experienced significant improvements in mean HbA(1c) ( - 0.7%, p = 0.02) and HDL-c ( + 2.6 mg dL( - 1), p = 0.02). Additionally, satisfaction with care improved significantly for team-treated subjects in several sub-scales whereas the mean change over time in HRQoL did not differ significantly between groups. This study demonstrates the value of a complementary team approach to chronic disease management in improving patient-derived and clinical outcomes at modest incremental costs.

  4. Implementation of an agency to improve chronic kidney disease care in Ontario: lessons learned by the Ontario Renal Network.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Graham L; Iverson, Alex; Harvey, Rebecca; Blake, Peter G

    2015-01-01

    In 2009, Ontario's Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care initiated the transfer of oversight and coordination of chronic kidney disease (CKD) care to the Ontario Renal Network (ORN) under the auspices of Cancer Care Ontario (CCO). The aim was to replicate the quality improvement and change management practices used for cancer control within CKD. Much of the ORN's first three years were dedicated to building the infrastructure necessary to bridge the gap between provincial policy and clinical practice. This article explores the accomplishments, challenges and lessons learned over that period. The results, which are applicable to the management of chronic diseases in Ontario, Canada, and internationally, confirm that sustainable change takes time and requires strong leadership, transparency, accountability and communication, supported by a solid foundation of data and evidence.

  5. Teaching high-value, cost-conscious care to residents: the Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine–American College of Physicians Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Smith, Cynthia D

    2012-08-21

    Health care expenditures are projected to reach nearly 20% of the U.S. gross domestic product by 2020. Up to $765 billion of this spending has been identified as potentially avoidable; many of the avoidable costs have been attributed to unnecessary services. Postgraduate trainees have historically received little specific training in the stewardship of health care resources and minimal feedback on resource utilization and its effect on the cost of care. This article describes a new curriculum that was developed collaboratively by the Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine and the American College of Physicians to address this training gap. The curriculum introduces a simple, stepwise framework for delivering high-value care and focuses on teaching trainees to incorporate high-value, cost-conscious care principles into their clinical practice. It consists of ten 1-hour, case-based, interactive sessions designed to be flexibly incorporated into the existing conference structure of a residency training program.

  6. Forum on the future of academic medicine: Session VI--Issues of change and quality in U.S. health care.

    PubMed

    Iglehart, J

    1999-07-01

    The sixth meeting of the AAMC's Forum on the Future of Academic Medicine, on September 10, 1998, opened with a talk by Paul B. Ginsburg, PhD, president of the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC). He described a major longitudinal study by the HSC of the changing U.S. health care system and reviewed some preliminary findings on topics such as the variety of ways communities are responding to relatively uniform forces driving health care markets; the reasons that uninsured individuals have a much harder time securing needed care in some communities than in others; the changing role of employers as sponsors of workers' insurance; consumers' frequently limited knowledge of their health care plans; the continuing importance consumers attach to having access to a broad choice of providers and the effects of this on the marketplace (e.g., broadening of networks); the different organizational models of care that are evolving; and the changing relationships between primary care physicians and specialists. The second presentation was by Janet M. Corrigan, MD, MBA, who served as executive director of the President's Advisory Commission on Consumer Protection and Quality in the Health Care Industry. She discussed the commission's findings about the state of quality in the health care industry and the commission's strategy to address serious shortcomings (e.g., unevenness of quality; avoidable errors; misuse of services). She also commented on the exponential increase in medical knowledge and the need for systems to help practitioners obtain and use it, and discussed the quality of care inside and outside managed care settings (about the same). Both Dr. Ginsburg and Dr. Corrigan discussed how some of the issues and findings they presented apply to academic medical centers, and responded to penetrating questions and statements of forum members.

  7. The Impact of a Flexible Care Area on Throughput Measures in an Academic Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Jayne; LeGare, Anne; Hermanson, Leigh; Repplinger, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Crowding in emergency departments is a multifaceted problem. We hypothesized that implementing an on-call “Flexible Care Area” (FCA), utilizing multiple front-end throughput solutions, would reduce emergency department (ED) length of stay (LOS). Methods This retrospective study evaluates the impact of an FCA on ED throughput at one hospital over a two-year period (2011–2012). The average arrival-to-room time, arrival-to-physician time, LOS, number of inpatient admissions, and number of discharges during FCA hours were collected, comparing days with and without FCA functionality. Results The FCA was open 165 days in 2011 and 252 days in 2012. The mean daily ED census as well as number of ED visits and inpatient admissions during FCA hours were higher on days with FCA functionality than without. Total ED LOS was shorter for Emergency Severity Index (ESI) 3 patients on days with FCA than days without it in 2011, but this finding was not repeated in 2012. ESI 4 patients had shorter LOS on FCA days in both years. The arrival-to-room and arrival-to-physician times showed variable improvement for ESI 3 and 4 patients over the study period. There was no statistically significant difference for these measures when evaluating ESI levels 2 and 5. Discussion Implementing upfront throughput solutions through use of the FCA correlated with reduced ED LOS for all ESI 3–4 patients, not just those who were seen in FCA. PMID:26296717

  8. Students’ Attitudes, Academic Performance and Preferences for Content Delivery in a Very Large Self-Care Course Redesign

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Amee; Schnee, David; Tataronis, Gary; Taglieri, Catherine; Zaiken, Kathy; Patel, Dhiren; Nigro, Stefanie; Jacobson, Susan; Goldman, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate students’ performance/attitudes toward a flipped team-based learning (TBL) format in a “very large” self-care course based on student content delivery preference. Design. Third-year students enrolled in the course were surveyed regarding elements of redesign and homework completion. Additionally, their performance and incoming grade point average were evaluated. Assessment. A survey was completed by 286 of 305 students. Nineteen percent of respondents preferred traditional content delivery, whereas 30% preferred flipped TBL, 48% preferred a mixed format, and 3% had no preference. The grades achieved in the course were: A (49%), B (48%), C (3%) and D (0%). The majority completed “all” or “most” of the homework, appreciated attributes of course redesign, felt home preparation and in-class activities engaged them, and reported improved communication/evaluation skills. Content delivery preference significantly affected attitudes. Conclusion. Students positively received a flipped team-based learning classroom format, especially those who preferred flipped TBL or mixed content delivery. A minority with preference for traditional teaching style did not enjoy the new format; however, their academic performance did not differ significantly from those who did. PMID:27293234

  9. Evaluation of a Psychological Intervention for Patients with Chronic Pain in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Cano-García, Francisco J.; González-Ortega, María del Carmen; Sanduvete-Chaves, Susana; Chacón-Moscoso, Salvador; Moreno-Borrego, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    According to evidence from recent decades, multicomponent programs of psychological intervention in people with chronic pain have reached the highest levels of efficacy. However, there are still many questions left to answer since efficacy has mainly been shown among upper-middle class patients in English-speaking countries and in controlled studies, with expert professionals guiding the intervention and with a limited number of domains of painful experience evaluated. For this study, a program of multicomponent psychological intervention was implemented: (a) based on techniques with empirical evidence, but developed in Spain; (b) at a public primary care center; (c) among patients with limited financial resources and lower education; (d) by a novice psychologist; and (e) evaluating all domains of painful experience using the instruments recommended by the Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT). The aim of this study was to evaluate this program. We selected a consecutive sample of 40 patients treated for chronic non-cancer pain at a primary care center in Utrera (Seville, Spain), adults who were not in any employment dispute, not suffering from psychopathology, and not receiving psychological treatment. The patients participated in 10 psychological intervention sessions, one per week, in groups of 13–14 people, which addressed psychoeducation for pain; breathing and relaxation; attention management; cognitive restructuring; problem-solving; emotional management; social skills; life values and goal setting; time organization and behavioral activation; physical exercise promotion; postural and sleep hygiene; and relapse prevention. In addition to the initial assessment, measures were taken after the intervention and at a 6-month follow-up. We assessed the program throughout the process: before, during and after the implementation. Results were analyzed statistically (significance and effect size) and from a clinical

  10. Transitions of Care Between Acute and Chronic Heart Failure: Critical Steps in the Design of a Multidisciplinary Care Model for the Prevention of Rehospitalization.

    PubMed

    Comín-Colet, Josep; Enjuanes, Cristina; Lupón, Josep; Cainzos-Achirica, Miguel; Badosa, Neus; Verdú, José María

    2016-10-01

    Despite advances in the treatment of heart failure, mortality, the number of readmissions, and their associated health care costs are very high. Heart failure care models inspired by the chronic care model, also known as heart failure programs or heart failure units, have shown clinical benefits in high-risk patients. However, while traditional heart failure units have focused on patients detected in the outpatient phase, the increasing pressure from hospital admissions is shifting the focus of interest toward multidisciplinary programs that concentrate on transitions of care, particularly between the acute phase and the postdischarge phase. These new integrated care models for heart failure revolve around interventions at the time of transitions of care. They are multidisciplinary and patient-centered, designed to ensure continuity of care, and have been demonstrated to reduce potentially avoidable hospital admissions. Key components of these models are early intervention during the inpatient phase, discharge planning, early postdischarge review and structured follow-up, advanced transition planning, and the involvement of physicians and nurses specialized in heart failure. It is hoped that such models will be progressively implemented across the country.

  11. "A Body Like a Baby": Social Self-Care among Older People with Chronic HIV in Mombasa.

    PubMed

    de Klerk, Josien; Moyer, Eileen

    2016-09-20

    As part of the chronic disease paradigm now widely used for HIV in sub-Saharan Africa, antiretroviral treatment programs emphasize self-care. In the informal settlements of Mombasa, Kenya, the management of stress-associated with economic precariousness-plays a significant role in self-care practices and ideologies. Based on ethnographic fieldwork, we examine how local narratives of stress and self-care intertwine with social responsibilities of older HIV-positive people. For older Mombassans, living with 'chronic' HIV means living with an unpredictable body, which affects how they are able to care for their kin. The physical reality of living with HIV thus shapes relational networks, making self-care a social practice. While, for some self-care entails managing the body so that its needs are hidden from loved ones, a kind of 'protective secrecy,' others enlist the support of their children and grandchildren in managing their body, and in that process subtly redefine generational expectations and responsibilities. [Figure: see text].

  12. Comparative Effectiveness of Risk-Stratified Care Management in Reducing Readmissions in Medicaid Adults With Chronic Disease.

    PubMed

    Hewner, Sharon; Wu, Yow-Wu Bill; Castner, Jessica

    2015-03-06

    Hospitalized adult Medicaid recipients with chronic disease are at risk for rehospitalization within 90 days of discharge, but most research has focused on the Medicare population. The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of population-based care management intensity on inpatient readmissions in Medicaid adults with pre-existing chronic disease. Retrospective analyses of 2,868 index hospital admissions from 2012 New York State Medicaid Data Warehouse claims compared 90-day post-discharge utilization in populations with and without transitional care management interventions. High intensity managed care organization interventions were associated with higher outpatient and lower emergency department post-discharge utilization than low intensity fee-for-service management. However, readmission rates were higher for the managed care cases. Shorter time to readmission was associated with managed care, diagnoses that include heart and kidney failure, shorter length of stay for index hospitalization, and male sex; with no relationship to age. This unexpected result flags the need to re-evaluate readmission as a quality indicator in the complex Medicaid population. Quality improvement efforts should focus on care continuity during transitions and consider population-specific factors that influence readmission. Optimum post-discharge utilization in the Medicaid population requires a balance between outpatient, emergency and inpatient services to improve access and continuity.

  13. Comparative Effectiveness of Risk-Stratified Care Management in Reducing Readmissions in Medicaid Adults With Chronic Disease.

    PubMed

    Hewner, Sharon; Wu, Yow-Wu Bill; Castner, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Hospitalized adult Medicaid recipients with chronic disease are at risk for rehospitalization within 90 days of discharge, but most research has focused on the Medicare population. The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of population-based care management intensity on inpatient readmissions in Medicaid adults with pre-existing chronic disease. Retrospective analyses of 2,868 index hospital admissions from 2012 New York State Medicaid Data Warehouse claims compared 90-day post-discharge utilization in populations with and without transitional care management interventions. High intensity managed care organization interventions were associated with higher outpatient and lower emergency department post-discharge utilization than low intensity fee-for-service management. However, readmission rates were higher for the managed care cases. Shorter time to readmission was associated with managed care, diagnoses that include heart and kidney failure, shorter length of stay for index hospitalization, and male sex; with no relationship to age. This unexpected result flags the need to re-evaluate readmission as a quality indicator in the complex Medicaid population. Quality improvement efforts should focus on care continuity during transitions and consider population-specific factors that influence readmission. Optimum post-discharge utilization in the Medicaid population requires a balance between outpatient, emergency and inpatient services to improve access and continuity.

  14. Acute drug prescribing to children on chronic antiepilepsy therapy and the potential for adverse drug interactions in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Philipp H; Ekins-Daukes, Suzie; Simpson, Colin R; Milne, Robert M; Helms, Peter; McLay, James S

    2005-01-01

    Aims To investigate the extent of acute coprescribing in primary care to children on chronic antiepileptic therapy, which could give rise to potentially harmful drug–drug interactions. Design Acute coprescribing to children on chronic antiepileptic drug therapy in primary care was assessed in 178 324 children aged 0–17 years for the year 1 November 1999 to 31 October 2000. Computerized prescribing data were retrieved from 161 representative general practices in Scotland. Setting One hundred and sixty-one general practices throughout Scotland. Results During the study year 723 (0.41%) children chronically prescribed antiepileptic therapy were identified. Fourteen antiepileptic agents were prescribed, with carbamazepine, sodium valproate and lamotrigine accounting for 80% of the total. During the year children on chronic antiepileptic therapy were prescribed 4895 acute coprescriptions for 269 different medicines. The average number of acute coprescriptions for non-epileptic drug therapy were eight, 11, six, and six for the 0–1, 2–4, 5–11, and 12–17-year-olds, respectively. Of these acute coprescriptions 72 (1.5%) prescribed to 22 (3.0%) children were identified as a potential source of clinically serious interactions. The age-adjusted prevalence rates for potentially serious coprescribing were 86, 26, 22, and 33/1000 children chronically prescribed antiepileptic therapy in the 0–1, 2–4, 5–11, and 12–17-year-old age groups, respectively. The drugs most commonly coprescribed which could give rise to such interactions were antacids, erythromycin, ciprofloxacin, theophylline and the low-dose oral contraceptive. For 10 (45.5%0 of the 20 children identified at risk of a potentially clinically serious adverse drug interaction, the acute coprescription was prescribed off label because of age or specific contraindication/warning. Conclusions In primary care, 3.0% of children on chronic antiepileptic therapy are coprescribed therapeutic agents, which could

  15. Agency Collaboration in the Care of Children with Complex Chronic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Nageswaran, Savithri; Ip, Edward H.; Golden, Shannon L.; O’Shea, T. Michael; Easterling, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To describe the network of collaboration among agencies that serve children with complex chronic conditions (CCC) and identify gaps in the network. Methods We surveyed representatives from agencies that serve children with CCC in Forsyth County, North Carolina about their agencies’ existing and desired collaborations with other agencies in the network. We used Social Network Analytical methods to describe gaps in the network. Mean out- and in-degree centrality (number of collaborative ties extending from or directed towards an agency) and density (ratio of extant ties to all possible ties) were measured. Results In this network with 3,658 possible collaborative ties, care-coordination agencies and pediatric practices reported the highest existing collaborations with other agencies (out-degree centrality: 32 and 30 respectively). Pediatric practices reported strong ties with subspecialty clinics (density: 73%), but weak ties with family support services (density: 3%). Pediatric practices and subspecialty clinics (in-degree: 26) received the highest collaborative ties from other agencies. Support services and durable medical equipment companies reported low ties with other agencies (out-degree: 7 and 10 respectively). Nursing agencies reported the highest desired collaborations (out-degree: 18). Support services, pediatric practices and care-coordination programs had the highest in-degree centrality (7, 6 and 6 respectively) for desired collaborations. Nursing agencies and support services had the greatest gaps in collaboration. Conclusions Although collaboration exists among agencies serving children with CCC, there are many gaps in the network. Future studies should explore barriers and facilitators to inter-agency collaborations and whether increased collaboration in the network improves patient-level outcomes. PMID:22583632

  16. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: hospital and intensive care unit outcomes in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alaithan, Abdulsalam M; Memon, Javed I; Rehmani, Rifat S; Qureshi, Arif A; Salam, Abdul

    2012-01-01

    Background There is little data surrounding the survival of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who are admitted to the critical care unit with exacerbation of symptoms. We conducted a study to measure the in-hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) outcomes of patients admitted with COPD exacerbation, and identified the related prognostic factors. Method We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients who were admitted to the adult ICU between January 2006 and July 2011 for COPD exacerbation in King Abdulaziz National Guard Hospital, Al-Hasa, Saudi Arabia. Results During the study period, a total of 119 patients were admitted to the ICU with acute respiratory failure attributed to COPD exacerbation. The mean age was 72 ± 13 years, and 44 (37%) were females. The main cause of respiratory failure was infection, which occurred in 102 (86%) patients. Thirty-nine (33%) of the admitted patients were mechanically ventilated, and the median duration was 2.6 (1–42) days. The median lengths of the ICU and hospital stays were 3 (1–40) and 9 (2–43) days, respectively. The ICU mortality was 6%, and hospital mortality was 11%. Low Glasgow Coma Scale on admission, intubation, duration of mechanical ventilation, current smoking, tracheostomy, cardiopulmonary arrest, and the development of acute renal failure were associated with higher hospital mortality. Conclusion Early ICU and hospital mortality is low for COPD patients who have been admitted to the ICU with exacerbation. Low Glasgow Coma Scale scores on admission, intubation, prolonged use of mechanical ventilation, and the development of acute renal failure were identified as risk factors associated with increased hospital mortality. PMID:23269866

  17. Effects of multiple chronic conditions on health care costs: an analysis based on an advanced tree-based regression model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To analyze the impact of multimorbidity (MM) on health care costs taking into account data heterogeneity. Methods Data come from a multicenter prospective cohort study of 1,050 randomly selected primary care patients aged 65 to 85 years suffering from MM in Germany. MM was defined as co-occurrence of ≥3 conditions from a list of 29 chronic diseases. A conditional inference tree (CTREE) algorithm was used to detect the underlying structure and most influential variables on costs of inpatient care, outpatient care, medications as well as formal and informal nursing care. Results Irrespective of the number and combination of co-morbidities, a limited number of factors influential on costs were detected. Parkinson’s disease (PD) and cardiac insufficiency (CI) were the most influential variables for total costs. Compared to patients not suffering from any of the two conditions, PD increases predicted mean total costs 3.5-fold to approximately € 11,000 per 6 months, and CI two-fold to approximately € 6,100. The high total costs of PD are largely due to costs of nursing care. Costs of inpatient care were significantly influenced by cerebral ischemia/chronic stroke, whereas medication costs were associated with COPD, insomnia, PD and Diabetes. Except for costs of nursing care, socio-demographic variables did not significantly influence costs. Conclusions Irrespective of any combination and number of co-occurring diseases, PD and CI appear to be most influential on total health care costs in elderly patients with MM, and only a limited number of factors significantly influenced cost. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN89818205 PMID:23768192

  18. Effectiveness of psychological interventions for chronic pain on health care use and work absence: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Pike, Andrew; Hearn, Leslie; Williams, Amanda C de C

    2016-04-01

    Psychological interventions for chronic pain and its consequences have been shown to improve mood, disability, pain, and catastrophic thinking, but there has been no systematic review specifically of their effects on health care use or time lost from work as treatment outcomes in mixed chronic pain. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the effectiveness of psychological therapies for chronic pain (excluding headache) in adults for these outcomes. We used searches from 2 previous systematic reviews and updated them. Eighteen randomized controlled trials were found that reported health care use (15 studies) and work loss (9 studies) as outcomes. Fourteen studies provided data for meta-analysis. There were moderate effects for psychological interventions compared with active controls, treatment as usual and waiting list controls in reducing health care use, with confidence in the findings. No benefits were found for medication reduction, but with less confidence in this result. Analysis of work loss showed no significant effects of psychological interventions over comparisons, but the use of many different metrics necessitated fragmenting the planned analyses, making summary difficult. The results are encouraging for the potential of routine psychological intervention to reduce posttreatment health care use, with associated cost savings, but it is likely that the range and complexity of problems affecting work necessitate additional intervention over standard group psychological intervention.

  19. Relevance of Hypersexual Disorder to Family Medicine and Primary Care as a Complex Multidimensional Chronic Disease Construct

    PubMed Central

    Vrijhoef, Bert; De Maeseneer, Jan; Vansintejan, Johan; Devroey, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Hypersexual disorder (HD) is not defined in a uniform way in the psychiatric literature. In the absence of solid evidence on prevalence, causes, empirically validated diagnostic criteria, instruments for diagnosis, consistent guidelines on treatment options, medical and psychosocial consequences, and type of caregivers that need to be involved, HD remains a controversial and relatively poorly understood chronic disease construct. The role of family medicine in the detection, treatment, and followup of HD is not well studied. The purpose of this paper is to describe the complexity of HD as a multidimensional chronic disease construct and its relevance to family medicine and primary care. PMID:24066230

  20. Care of HIV patients with chronic hepatitis B: updated recommendations from the HIV-Hepatitis B Virus International Panel.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Vincent; Puoti, Massimo; Peters, Marion; Benhamou, Yves; Sulkowski, Mark; Zoulim, Fabien; Mauss, Stefan; Rockstroh, Juergen

    2008-07-31

    Nearly 10% of the estimated 36 million people having HIV worldwide suffer from chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The advent of new antiviral agents against HBV and the recent availability of improved molecular diagnostic tools have revolutioned the management of HIV/HBV coinfected patients. The present study represents an update of the current knowledge about HBV/HIV coinfection and an intent to provide practical advise about how to give the best care to HIV-infected persons with chronic hepatitis B.

  1. A Randomized Trial Comparing Yoga, Stretching, and a Self-care Book for Chronic Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Karen J.; Cherkin, Daniel C.; Wellman, Robert D.; Cook, Andrea J.; Hawkes, Rene J.; Delaney, Kristin; Deyo, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic low back pain is a common problem lacking highly effective treatment options. Small trials suggest that yoga may have benefits for this condition. This trial was designed to determine whether yoga is more effective than conventional stretching exercises or a self-care book for primary care patients with chronic low back pain. Methods 228 adults with chronic low back pain were randomized to 12 weekly classes of yoga (n=92) or conventional stretching exercises (n=91) or a self-care book (n=45). Back-related functional status (modified Roland Disability Questionnaire, 23-point scale) and bothersomeness of pain (11-point numerical scale) at 12 weeks were the primary outcomes. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, 6, 12 and 26 weeks by interviewers unaware of treatment group. Results After adjustment for baseline values, 12-week outcomes for the yoga group were superior to those for the self-care group (mean difference for function = −2.5 [95% CI= −3.7 to −1.3; P<0.001]; mean difference for symptoms = −1.1 [95% CI= −1.7 to −0.4; P<0.001]). At 26 weeks, function for the yoga group remained superior (mean difference = −1.8 [95% CI= − 3.1 to −0.5; P<0.0001]). Yoga was not superior to conventional stretching exercises at any time point. Conclusions Yoga classes were more effective than a self-care book, but not stretching classes, in improving function and reducing symptoms due to chronic low back pain, with benefits lasting at least several months. PMID:22025101

  2. Self-reported chronic pain is associated with physical performance in older people leaving aged care rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Leani Souza Máximo; Sherrington, Catherine; Ferreira, Manuela L; Tiedemann, Anne; Ferreira, Paulo H; Blyth, Fiona M; Close, Jacqueline CT; Taylor, Morag; Lord, Stephen R

    2014-01-01

    Background/objectives The impact of pain on the physical performance of patients in aged care rehabilitation is not known. The study sought to assess 1) the prevalence of pain in older people being discharged from inpatient rehabilitation; 2) the association between self-reported pain and physical performance in people being discharged from inpatient rehabilitation; and 3) the association between self-reported pain and physical performance in this population, after adjusting for potential confounding factors. Methods This was an observational cross-sectional study of 420 older people at two inpatient aged care rehabilitation units. Physical performance was assessed using the Lower Limb Summary Performance Score. Pain was assessed with questions about the extent to which participants were troubled by pain, the duration of symptoms, and the impact of chronic pain on everyday activity. Depression and the number of comorbidities were assessed by questionnaire and medical file audit. Cognition was assessed with the Mini-Mental State Examination. Results Thirty percent of participants reported chronic pain (pain lasting more than 3 months), and 17% reported that this pain interfered with daily activities to a moderate or greater extent. Chronic pain (P=0.013) and chronic pain affecting daily activities (P<0.001) were associated with a poorer Lower Limb Summary Performance Score. The relationship between chronic pain affecting daily activities and Lower Limb Summary Performance Score remained significant (P=0.001) after adjusting for depression, age, comorbidities, and Mini-Mental State Examination score. This model explained 10% of the variability in physical performance. Conclusion One-third of participants reported chronic pain, and close to one-fifth reported that this pain interfered with daily activities. Chronic pain was associated with impaired physical performance, and this relationship persisted after adjusting for likely confounding factors. PMID:24523583

  3. Clinical decision rule for primary care patient with acute low back pain at risk of developing chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Mehling, Wolf E.; Ebell, Mark H.; Avins, Andrew L.; Hecht, Frederick M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Context Primary care clinicians need to identify candidates for early interventions to prevent patients with acute pain from developing chronic pain. Purpose We conducted a 2-year prospective cohort study of risk factors for the progression to chronic pain and developed and internally validated a clinical decision rule (CDR) that stratifies patients into low, medium and high-risk groups for chronic pain. Study Design/Setting Prospective cohort study in primary care. Patient Sample Patients with acute low back pain (LBP; ≤30 days duration) Outcome measures Self-reported perceived non-recovery and chronic pain. Methods Patients were surveyed at baseline, 6 months and 2 years. We conducted bivariate and multivariate regression analyses of demographic, clinical and psychosocial variables for chronic pain outcomes, developed a CDR and assessed its performance by calculating the bootstrapped areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and likelihood ratios. This study was supported by NIH/NCCAM grants K23 AT002298, R21 AT004467, NIH/NCCAM K24 AT007827, the Research Evaluation and Allocation Committee (REAC) of the University of California San Francisco, and the Mount Zion Health Fund, San Francisco. The funding agencies played no role in design and conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis, and interpretation of the data; and preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript. The authors report no conflict of interests. Results 605 patients enrolled. 13% had chronic pain at 6 months, 19% at 2 years. An eight-item CDR was most parsimonious for classifying patients into three risk levels. Bootstrapped AUC was 0.76 (0.70–0.82) for the 6-month CDR. Each 10-point score increase (60-point range) was associated with an odds ratio of 11.1 (10.8–11.4) for developing chronic pain. Using a <5% probability of chronic pain as the cutoff for low risk and a >40% probability for high risk, likelihood ratios were 0.26 (0.14–0.48) and 4

  4. Telemedicine system for the care of patients with neuromuscular disease and chronic respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Morete, Emilio; González, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Neuromuscular diseases cause a number of limitations which may be improved by using a telemedicine system. These include functional impairment and dependence associated with muscle weakness, the insidious development of respiratory failure and episodes of exacerbation. Material and methods The present study involved three patients with severe neuromuscular disease, chronic respiratory failure and long-term mechanical ventilation, who were followed up using a telemedicine platform. The telemedicine system is based on videoconferencing and telemonitoring of cardiorespiratory variables (oxygen saturation, heart rate, blood pressure and electrocardiogram). Two different protocols were followed depending on whether the patient condition was stable or unstable. Results Over a period of 5 years, we analyzed a series of variables including use of the system, patient satisfaction and clinical impact. Overall we performed 290 videoconference sessions, 269 short monitoring oximetry measurements and 110 blood pressure measurements. With respect to the clinical impact, after enrolment in the telemedicine program, the total number of hospital admissions fell from 18 to 3. Conclusions Our findings indicate that the system was user friendly for patients and care givers. Patient satisfaction scores were acceptable. The telemedicine system was effective for the home treatment of three patients with severe neuromuscular diseases and reduced the need for hospital admissions. PMID:25395959

  5. Towards a wireless patient: chronic illness, scarce care and technological innovation in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    May, Carl; Finch, Tracy; Mair, Frances; Mort, Maggie

    2005-10-01

    'Modernization' is a key health policy objective in the UK. It extends across a range of public service delivery and organizational contexts, and also means there are radical changes in perspective on professional behaviour and practice. New information and communications technologies have been seen as one of the key mechanisms by which these changes can be engendered. In particular, massive investment in information technologies promises the rapid distribution and deployment of patient-centred information across internal organizational boundaries. While the National Health Service (NHS) sits on the edge of a pound sterling 6 billion investment in electronic patient records, other technologies find their status as innovative vehicles for professional behaviour change and service delivery in question. In this paper, we consider the ways that telemedicine and telehealthcare systems have been constructed first as a field of technological innovation, and more recently, as management solutions to problems around the distribution of health care. We use NHS responses to chronic illness as a medium for understanding these shifts. In particular, we draw attention to the shifting definitions of 'innovation' and to the ways that these shifts define a move away from notions of technological advance towards management control.

  6. Sustainability of the integrated chronic disease management model at primary care clinics in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Asmall, Shaidah

    2016-01-01

    Background An integrated chronic disease management (ICDM) model consisting of four components (facility reorganisation, clinical supportive management, assisted self-supportive management and strengthening of support systems and structures outside the facility) has been implemented across 42 primary health care clinics in South Africa with a view to improve the operational efficiency and patient clinical outcomes. Aim The aim of this study was to assess the sustainability of the facility reorganisation and clinical support components 18 months after the initiation. Setting The study was conducted at 37 of the initiating clinics across three districts in three provinces of South Africa. Methods The National Health Service (NHS) Institute for Innovation and Improvement Sustainability Model (SM) self-assessment tool was used to assess sustainability. Results Bushbuckridge had the highest mean sustainability score of 71.79 (95% CI: 63.70–79.89) followed by West Rand Health District (70.25 (95% CI: 63.96–76.53)) and Dr Kenneth Kaunda District (66.50 (95% CI: 55.17–77.83)). Four facilities (11%) had an overall sustainability score of less than 55. Conclusion The less than optimal involvement of clinical leadership (doctors), negative staff behaviour towards the ICDM, adaptability or flexibility of the model to adapt to external factors and infrastructure limitation have the potential to negatively affect the sustainability and scale-up of the model. PMID:28155314

  7. A multiagent system enhancing home-care health services for chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Koutkias, Vassilis G; Chouvarda, Ioanna; Maglaveras, Nicos

    2005-12-01

    In this paper, a multiagent system (MAS) is presented, aiming to enhance monitoring, surveillance, and educational services of a generic medical contact center (MCC) for chronic disease management. In such a home-care scenario, a persistent need arises for efficiently monitoring the patient contacts and the MCC's functionality, in order to effectively manage and interpret the large volume of medical data collected during the patient sessions with the system, and to assess the use of MCC resources. Software agents were adopted to provide the means to accomplish such real-time information-processing tasks, due to their autonomous, reactive and/or proactive nature, and their effectiveness in dynamic environments by incorporating coordination strategies. Specifically, the objective of the MAS is to monitor the MCC environment, detect important cases, and inform the healthcare and administrative personnel via alert messages, notifications, recommendations, and reports, prompting them for actions. The main aim of this paper is to present the overall design and implementation of a proposed MAS, emphasizing its functional model and architecture, as well as on the agent interactions and the knowledge-sharing mechanism incorporated, in the context of a generic MCC.

  8. Case Management in Primary Care for Frequent Users of Health Care Services With Chronic Diseases: A Qualitative Study of Patient and Family Experience

    PubMed Central

    Hudon, Catherine; Chouinard, Maud-Christine; Diadiou, Fatoumata; Lambert, Mireille; Bouliane, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Although case management (CM) is increasingly being implemented to address the complex needs of vulnerable clienteles, few studies have examined the patient experience of CM. This study aimed to examine the experience of patients and their family members with care integration as part of a primary care CM intervention. Patients in the study were frequent users of health care services who had chronic diseases. METHODS A descriptive, qualitative approach was conducted involving 25 patients and 8 of their family members. Data were collected through in-depth interviews of the patients and 2 focus groups of family members and were analyzed thematically. RESULTS While some participants did not fully understand the CM intervention and a few believed that it involved too many appointments, the CM nurses were patients’ preferred contact with primary care. The nurses actively involved the patients in developing and carrying out their individualized services plans (ISPs) with other health care partners. Patients felt that their needs were taken into consideration, especially regarding access to the health care system. The case manager facilitated access to information as well as communication and coordination among health care and community partners. This improved communication comforted the patients and nurtured a relationship of trust. Participants were actively involved in decision-making. Their ISPs helped them know where they were going and improved transitions between services. CONCLUSIONS The experience of patients and family members was overall very positive regarding care integration. They reported improved access, communication, coordination, and involvement in decision-making as well as better health care transitions. PMID:26553891

  9. Academic Achievement Trajectories of Homeless and Highly Mobile Students: Resilience in the Context of Chronic and Acute Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutuli, J. J.; Desjardins, Christopher David; Herbers, Janette E.; Long, Jeffrey D.; Heistad, David; Chan, Chi-Keung; Hinz, Elizabeth; Masten, Ann S.

    2013-01-01

    Analyses examined academic achievement data across third through eighth grades ("N" = 26,474), comparing students identified as homeless or highly mobile (HHM) with other students in the federal free meal program (FM), reduced price meals (RM), or neither (General). Achievement was lower as a function of rising risk status (General…

  10. [Design of an educational tool for Primary Care patients with chronic non-specific low back pain].

    PubMed

    Díaz-Cerrillo, Juan Luis; Rondón-Ramos, Antonio

    2015-02-01

    Current scientific evidence on the management of chronic non-specific low back pain highlights the benefits of physical exercise. This goal is frequently undermined due to lack of education of the subjects on the multifactorial, benign, and non-specific nature of low back pain, which can lead to a chronic disease with genuine psychosocial risk factors. Its influence may not only interfere with individual decision to adopt more adaptive coping behaviors, but also with the endogenous mechanisms of pain neuromodulation. Thus, the educational strategies and control of these factors have become important objectives to be incorporated into the management of the disorder and research guidelines. This paper presents the theoretical models and the scientific basis on which it has based the design of an educational tool for patients with chronic non-specific low back pain treated in Primary Care physiotherapy. Structure, content and objectives are also presented.

  11. Spinal Epidural Abscess in Adults: A 10-Year Clinical Experience at a Tertiary Care Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Artenstein, Andrew W; Friderici, Jennifer; Holers, Adam; Lewis, Deirdre; Fitzgerald, Jan; Visintainer, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Background.  Delayed recognition of spinal epidural abscess (SEA) contributes to poor outcomes from this highly morbid and potentially lethal infection. We performed a case-control study in a regional, high-volume, tertiary care, academic medical center over the years 2005-2015 to assess the potential changing epidemiology, clinical and laboratory manifestations, and course of this disorder and to identify factors that might lead to early identification of SEA. Methods.  Diagnostic billing codes consistent with SEA were used to identify inpatient admissions for abstraction. Subjects were categorized as cases or controls based on the results of spinal imaging studies. Characteristics were compared using Fisher's exact or Kruskal-Wallis tests. All P values were 2-sided with a critical threshold of <.05. Results.  We identified 162 cases and 88 controls during the study period. The incidence of SEA increased from 2.5 to 8.0 per 10 000 admissions, a 3.3-fold change from 2005 to 2015 (P < .001 for the linear trend). Compared with controls, cases were significantly more likely to have experienced at least 1 previous healthcare visit or received antimicrobials within 30 days of admission; to have comorbidities of injection drug use, alcohol abuse, or obesity; and to manifest fever or rigors. Cases were also more likely to harbor coinfection at a noncontiguous site. When available, inflammatory markers were noted to be markedly elevated in cases. Focal neurologic deficits were seen with similar frequencies in both groups. Conclusions.  Based on our analysis, it appears that selected factors noted at the time of clinical presentation may facilitate early recognition of SEA.

  12. Spinal Epidural Abscess in Adults: A 10-Year Clinical Experience at a Tertiary Care Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Artenstein, Andrew W.; Friderici, Jennifer; Holers, Adam; Lewis, Deirdre; Fitzgerald, Jan; Visintainer, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background. Delayed recognition of spinal epidural abscess (SEA) contributes to poor outcomes from this highly morbid and potentially lethal infection. We performed a case-control study in a regional, high-volume, tertiary care, academic medical center over the years 2005–2015 to assess the potential changing epidemiology, clinical and laboratory manifestations, and course of this disorder and to identify factors that might lead to early identification of SEA. Methods. Diagnostic billing codes consistent with SEA were used to identify inpatient admissions for abstraction. Subjects were categorized as cases or controls based on the results of spinal imaging studies. Characteristics were compared using Fisher's exact or Kruskal-Wallis tests. All P values were 2-sided with a critical threshold of <.05. Results. We identified 162 cases and 88 controls during the study period. The incidence of SEA increased from 2.5 to 8.0 per 10 000 admissions, a 3.3-fold change from 2005 to 2015 (P < .001 for the linear trend). Compared with controls, cases were significantly more likely to have experienced at least 1 previous healthcare visit or received antimicrobials within 30 days of admission; to have comorbidities of injection drug use, alcohol abuse, or obesity; and to manifest fever or rigors. Cases were also more likely to harbor coinfection at a noncontiguous site. When available, inflammatory markers were noted to be markedly elevated in cases. Focal neurologic deficits were seen with similar frequencies in both groups. Conclusions. Based on our analysis, it appears that selected factors noted at the time of clinical presentation may facilitate early recognition of SEA. PMID:28018923

  13. Impact of Changes in Urine Culture Ordering Practice on Antimicrobial Utilization in Intensive Care Units at an Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Sarg, Mohamed; Waldrop, Greer E; Beier, Mona A; Heil, Emily L; Thom, Kerri A; Preas, Michael Anne; Johnson, J Kristie; Harris, Anthony D; Leekha, Surbhi

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess antimicrobial utilization before and after a change in urine culture ordering practice in adult intensive care units (ICUs) whereby urine cultures were only performed when pyuria was detected. DESIGN Quasi-experimental study SETTING A 700-bed academic medical center PATIENTS Patients admitted to any adult ICU METHODS Aggregate data for all adult ICUs were obtained for population-level antimicrobial use (days of therapy [DOT]), urine cultures performed, and bacteriuria, all measured per 1,000 patient days before the intervention (January-December 2012) and after the intervention (January-December 2013). These data were compared using interrupted time series negative binomial regression. Randomly selected patient charts from the population of adult ICU patients with orders for urine culture in the presence of indwelling or recently removed urinary catheters were reviewed for demographic, clinical, and antimicrobial use characteristics, and pre- and post-intervention data were compared. RESULTS Statistically significant reductions were observed in aggregate monthly rates of urine cultures performed and bacteriuria detected but not in DOT. At the patient level, compared with the pre-intervention group (n=250), in the post-intervention group (n=250), fewer patients started a new antimicrobial therapy based on urine culture results (23% vs 41%, P=.002), but no difference in the mean total DOT was observed. CONCLUSION A change in urine-culture ordering practice was associated with a decrease in the percentage of patients starting a new antimicrobial therapy based on the index urine-culture order but not in total duration of antimicrobial use in adult ICUs. Other drivers of antimicrobial use in ICU patients need to be evaluated by antimicrobial stewardship teams. Infect.

  14. Prevalence and factors predictive of intraocular fungal infection in patients with fungemia at an academic urban tertiary care center

    PubMed Central

    Geraymovych, Elena; Conduff, Joseph H; Braich, Puneet S; Leffler, Christopher T; Brar, Vikram S

    2015-01-01

    Objective To report the prevalence and to identify factors predictive of intraocular infection in patients with fungemia receiving prophylactic antifungal therapy. Methods A retrospective review of patients who received prophylactic antifungal therapy and a dilated fundus examination at an academic urban tertiary care center from 2000 to 2007. Basic demographic information, fungal species grown, antifungal agent(s) used, number of positive blood culture specimens, visual acuity, visual symptoms, and known risks of disseminated candidiasis were noted. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the factors significantly associated with intraocular fungal infection. Results A total of 132 patients with positive fungemia culture were requested to have ophthalmology consults. The prevalence of ocular infection was 6.9% (N=9). All nine patients were infected with Candida species. Undergoing gastrointestinal (GI) surgery within the prior 6 months was significantly related to developing intraocular infection, with an odds ratio of 18.5 (95% confidence interval, 15.1–24.3; P=0.002). Having ≥3 positive fungal blood cultures was also a significant risk factor, with an odds ratio of 2.6 (95% confidence interval, 1.8–3.7; P=0.03). Among 40 patients having GI surgery, eight (20.0%) had intraocular fungal disease, compared with one of 92 patients (1.1%) not having GI surgery. Among 125 patients with a negative baseline examination result, two of 32 patients (6.3%), who had recent GI surgery, subsequently developed fungal ocular disease, compared with 0 of 93 patients (0%), who did not have recent GI surgery. Conclusion Recent GI surgery and higher numbers of positive fungal blood culture specimens may be predictive of candida ocular infections. Normal baseline fundoscopy examination results in patients with such risks may require repeat evaluations to detect delayed manifestations. PMID:26491246

  15. Patient and primary care provider attitudes and adherence towards lung cancer screening at an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Duong, Duy K; Shariff-Marco, Salma; Cheng, Iona; Naemi, Harris; Moy, Lisa M; Haile, Robert; Singh, Baldeep; Leung, Ann; Hsing, Ann; Nair, Viswam S

    2017-06-01

    Low dose CT (LDCT) for lung cancer screening is an evidence-based, guideline recommended, and Medicare approved test but uptake requires further study. We therefore conducted patient and provider surveys to elucidate factors associated with utilization. Patients referred for LDCT at an academic medical center were questioned about their attitudes, knowledge, and beliefs on lung cancer screening. Adherent patients were defined as those who met screening eligibility criteria and completed a LDCT. Referring primary care providers within this same medical system were surveyed in parallel about their practice patterns, attitudes, knowledge and beliefs about screening. Eighty patients responded (36%), 48 of whom were adherent. Among responders, non-Hispanic patients (p = 0.04) were more adherent. Adherent respondents believed that CT technology is accurate and early detection is useful, and they trusted their providers. A majority of non-adherent patients (79%) self-reported an intention to obtain a LDCT in the future. Of 36 of 87 (41%) responding providers, only 31% knew the correct lung cancer screening eligibility criteria, which led to a 37% inappropriate referral rate from 2013 to 2015. Yet, 75% had initiated lung cancer screening discussions, 64% thought screening was at least moderately effective, and 82% were interested in learning more of the 33 providers responding to these questions. Overall, patients were motivated and providers engaged to screen for lung cancer by LDCT. Non-adherent patient "procrastinators" were motivated to undergo screening in the future. Additional follow through on non-adherence may enhance screening uptake, and raising awareness for screening eligibility through provider education may reduce inappropriate referrals.

  16. Selected Aspects of Mental Health of Elderly Patients with Chronic Back Pain Treated in Primary Care Centers

    PubMed Central

    Cabak, Anna; Dąbrowska-Zimakowska, Anna; Tomaszewski, Paweł; Łyp, Marek; Kaczor, Ryszard; Tomaszewski, Wiesław; Fijałkowska, Barbara; Kotela, Ireneusz

    2015-01-01

    Background Improvement of the effectiveness and efficiency of chronic back pain therapy is a continuing challenge on an international scale. The aim of the present study was to tentatively assess mental health of patients with chronic back pain treated in primary care centers. Material/Methods The study enrolled 100 persons over 50 years of age. The back pain group consisted of 53 patients with chronic back pain and the control group consisted of 47 pain-free persons. The assessment of mental health used a Polish version of the international Goldberger’s General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28). ANOVA (1- and 2-factor) analysis of variance, Tukey’s test, and Pearson’s simple correlation were used to analyze the significance of differences, with the significance level set at α=0.05. Results All patients with chronic back pain, regardless of their age and gender, displayed poorer mental well-being compared to the control group: their overall score was higher by over 7 points than in persons without back pain (F1.96=14.8; p<0.001). Men with back pain were significantly more susceptible to depression than women (F2.96=5.5; p<0.05), compared to the control group. The duration of back pain also showed a significant (p<0.05) direct correlation with the overall mental health score from the questionnaire. Mental health was considerably poorer among patients occasionally (p<0.001) and regularly (p<0.05) consuming analgesics than among persons who did not do so. Conclusions The study revealed that mental health was markedly poorer in patients with chronic back pain than in healthy controls. A preliminary assessment of aspects of mental health should be given more attention in the rehabilitation of patients with chronic back pain treated in primary care center outpatient clinics. PMID:26522877

  17. [Important aspects in pediatric care of children and adolescents with chronic disease using the example of bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Steiß, J-O; Lindemann, H; Brosig, B; Zimmer, K P

    2013-12-01

    When treating children or adolescents with chronic disease one should take the specific age-related features of the course of disease, differential diagnosis, and the psychosocial environment, as well as the avoidance of complications and side effects of therapy into account. These may impair the patient's physical and psychosocial development and quality of life in the context of family, school and occupational life. Continued care of growing children from the start of the disease when they are infants to the point when they assume personal responsibility as adults is one of the major concerns of the pediatrician. This concept requires interdisciplinary cooperation and a large body of personnel which would include training programs, inclusion of family members and in some cases psychosomatic therapy. Given the increasing prevalence of chronic diseases in this age group and their sociopolitical significance it is important to activate preventive potentials in terms of content and structure - by quality assurance - especially to avoid long-term complications. Various care structures are used in Europe to achieve this goal. Asthma is the most common chronic disease in children and adolescents. It influences quality of life as well as the child's personal, educational and occupational development to a significant extent. The special aspects of the treatment of these patients will be addressed to illustrate the therapy of chronic disease.

  18. Health service pathways for patients with chronic leg ulcers: identifying effective pathways for facilitation of evidence based wound care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic leg ulcers cause long term ill-health for older adults and the condition places a significant burden on health service resources. Although evidence on effective management of the condition is available, a significant evidence-practice gap is known to exist, with many suggested reasons e.g. multiple care providers, costs of care and treatments. This study aimed to identify effective health service pathways of care which facilitated evidence-based management of chronic leg ulcers. Methods A sample of 70 patients presenting with a lower limb leg or foot ulcer at specialist wound clinics in Queensland, Australia were recruited for an observational study and survey. Retrospective data were collected on demographics, health, medical history, treatments, costs and health service pathways in the previous 12 months. Prospective data were collected on health service pathways, pain, functional ability, quality of life, treatments, wound healing and recurrence outcomes for 24 weeks from admission. Results Retrospective data indicated that evidence based guidelines were poorly implemented prior to admission to the study, e.g. only 31% of participants with a lower limb ulcer had an ABPI or duplex assessment in the previous 12 months. On average, participants accessed care 2–3 times/week for 17 weeks from multiple health service providers in the twelve months before admission to the study clinics. Following admission to specialist wound clinics, participants accessed care on average once per week for 12 weeks from a smaller range of providers. The median ulcer duration on admission to the study was 22 weeks (range 2–728 weeks). Following admission to wound clinics, implementation of key indicators of evidence based care increased (p < 0.001) and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis found the median time to healing was 12 weeks (95% CI 9.3–14.7). Implementation of evidence based care was significantly related to improved healing outcomes (p < 0

  19. Regular Primary Care Lowers Hospitalisation Risk and Mortality in Seniors with Chronic Respiratory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Preen, David B.; Emery, Jon D.; Kelman, Christopher; Holman, C. D’Arcy J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Exacerbations in chronic respiratory diseases (CRDs) are sensitive to seasonal variations in exposure to respiratory infectious agents and allergens and patient factors such as non-adherence. Hence, regular general practitioner (GP) contact is likely to be important in order to recognise symptom escalation early and adjust treatment. OBJECTIVE To examine the association of regularity of GP visits with all-cause mortality and first CRD hospitalisation overall and within groups of pharmacotherapy level in older CRD patients. DESIGN A retrospective cohort design using linked hospital, mortality, Medicare and pharmaceutical data for participant, exposure and outcome ascertainment. GP visit pattern was measured during the first 3 years of the observation period. Patients were then followed for a maximum of 11.5 years for ascertainment of hospitalisations and deaths. PARTICIPANTS We studied 108,455 patients aged ≥65 years with CRD in Western Australia (WA) during 1992–2006. MAIN MEASURES A GP visit regularity score (range 0–1) was calculated and divided into quintiles. A clinician consensus panel classified levels of pharmacotherapy. Cox proportional hazards models, controlling for multiple factors including GP visit frequency, were used to calculate hazard ratios and confidence intervals. KEY RESULTS Differences in survival curves and hospital avoidance pattern between the GP visit regularity quintiles were statistically significant (p = 0.0279 and p < 0.0001, respectively). The protective association between GP visit regularity and death appeared to be confined to the highest pharmacotherapy level group (P for interaction = 0.0001). Higher GP visit regularity protected against first CRD hospitalisation compared with the least regular quintile regardless of pharmacotherapy level (medium regular: HR = 0.84, 95% CI = 0.77–0.92; 2nd most regular: HR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.67–0.82; most regular HR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.68

  20. Major care gaps in asthma, sleep and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A road map for knowledge translation

    PubMed Central

    Boulet, Louis-Philippe; Bourbeau, Jean; Skomro, Robert; Gupta, Samir

    2013-01-01

    Large gaps between best evidence-based care and actual clinical practice exist in respiratory medicine, and carry a significant health burden. The authors reviewed two key care gaps in each of asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and obstructive sleep apnea. Using the ‘Knowledge-to-Action Framework’, the nature of each gap, its magnitude, the barriers that cause and perpetuate it, and past and future strategies that might address the problem were considered. In asthma: disease control is ascertained inadequately, leading to a prevalence of poor asthma control of approximately 50%; and asthma action plans, a key component of asthma management, are provided by only 22% of physicians. In obstructive sleep apnea: disease is under-recognized, with sleep histories ascertained in only 10% of patients; and Canadian polysomnography wait times remain longer than recommended, leading to unnecessary morbidity and societal cost. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a large proportion of patients seen in primary care remain undiagnosed, mainly due to underuse of spirometry; and <10% of patients are referred for pulmonary rehabilitation, despite strong evidence demonstrating its cost effectiveness. Given the prevalence of these chronic conditions and the size and nature of these gaps, the latter exact an important toll on patients, the health care system and society. In turn, complex barriers at the patient, provider and health care system levels contribute to each gap. There have been few previous attempts to bridge these gaps. Innovative and multifaceted implementation approaches are needed and have the potential to make a large impact on Canadian respiratory health. PMID:23936884

  1. Exploring Robust Methods for Evaluating Treatment and Comparison Groups in Chronic Care Management Programs

    PubMed Central

    Hamar, Brent; Bradley, Chastity; Gandy, William M.; Harrison, Patricia L.; Sidney, James A.; Coberley, Carter R.; Rula, Elizabeth Y.; Pope, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Evaluation of chronic care management (CCM) programs is necessary to determine the behavioral, clinical, and financial value of the programs. Financial outcomes of members who are exposed to interventions (treatment group) typically are compared to those not exposed (comparison group) in a quasi-experimental study design. However, because member assignment is not randomized, outcomes reported from these designs may be biased or inefficient if study groups are not comparable or balanced prior to analysis. Two matching techniques used to achieve balanced groups are Propensity Score Matching (PSM) and Coarsened Exact Matching (CEM). Unlike PSM, CEM has been shown to yield estimates of causal (program) effects that are lowest in variance and bias for any given sample size. The objective of this case study was to provide a comprehensive comparison of these 2 matching methods within an evaluation of a CCM program administered to a large health plan during a 2-year time period. Descriptive and statistical methods were used to assess the level of balance between comparison and treatment members pre matching. Compared with PSM, CEM retained more members, achieved better balance between matched members, and resulted in a statistically insignificant Wald test statistic for group aggregation. In terms of program performance, the results showed an overall higher medical cost savings among treatment members matched using CEM compared with those matched using PSM (-$25.57 versus -$19.78, respectively). Collectively, the results suggest CEM is a viable alternative, if not the most appropriate matching method, to apply when evaluating CCM program performance. (Population Health Management 2013;16:35–45) PMID:22788834

  2. Effectiveness of a new health care organization model in primary care for chronic cardiovascular disease patients based on a multifactorial intervention: the PROPRESE randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluate the effectiveness of a new multifactorial intervention to improve health care for chronic ischemic heart disease patients in primary care. The strategy has two components: a) organizational for the patient/professional relationship and b) training for professionals. Methods/design Experimental study. Randomized clinical trial. Follow-up period: one year. Study setting: primary care, multicenter (15 health centers). For the intervention group 15 health centers are selected from those participating in ESCARVAL study. Once the center agreed to participate patients are randomly selected from the total amount of patients with ischemic heart disease registered in the electronic health records. For the control group a random sample of patients with ischemic heart disease is selected from all 72 health centers electronic records. Intervention components: a) Organizational intervention on the patient/professional relationship. Centered on the Chronic Care Model, the Stanford Expert Patient Program and the Kaiser Permanente model: Teamwork, informed and active patient, decision making shared with the patient, recommendations based on clinical guidelines, single electronic medical history per patient that allows the use of indicators for risk monitoring and stratification. b) Formative strategy for professionals: 4 face-to-face training workshops (one every 3 months), monthly update clinical sessions, online tutorial by a cardiologist, availability through the intranet of the action protocol and related documents. Measurements: Blood pressure, blood glucose, HbA1c, lipid profile and smoking. Frequent health care visits. Number of hospitalizations related to vascular disease. Therapeutic compliance. Drug use. Discussion This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of a multifactorial intervention strategy involving patients with ischemic heart disease for the improvement of the degree of control of the cardiovascular risk factors and of the quality of life

  3. Academic Achievement Trajectories of Homeless and Highly Mobile Students: Resilience in the Context of Chronic and Acute Risk

    PubMed Central

    Cutuli, J. J.; Desjardins, Christopher David; Herbers, Janette E.; Long, Jeffrey D.; Heistad, David; Chan, Chi-Keung; Hinz, Elizabeth; Masten, Ann S.

    2012-01-01

    Analyses examined academic achievement data across 3rd through 8th grades (N = 26,474), comparing students identified as homeless or highly mobile (HHM) to other students in the federal free meal program (FM), reduced-price meals (RM), or neither (General). Achievement was lower as a function of rising risk status (General > RM > FM > HHM). Achievement gaps appeared stable or widened between HHM students and lower-risk groups. Math and reading achievement were lower and growth in math was slower in years of HHM identification, suggesting acute consequences of residential instability. Nonetheless, 45% of HHM students scored within or above the average range, suggesting academic resilience. Results underscore the need for research on risk and resilience processes among HHM students to address achievement disparities. PMID:23110492

  4. Further Effort is Needed to Improve Management of Chronic Pain in Primary Care. Results from the Arkys Project

    PubMed Central

    Piccinocchi, Gaetano; Piccinocchi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of chronic pain is challenging. The Arkys project was initiated in Italy to assist general practitioners (GPs) in the management of chronic pain. The main objective of this study was to determine the usefulness of Arkys for selecting new therapeutic strategies. An online interactive questionnaire for assessing pain and guiding therapeutic decisions was made available to GPs participating to Arkys. The GPs were invited to complete the questionnaire for each patient who presented moderate-severe chronic pain, and to decide on a new analgesic treatment based on the information provided by the questionnaire. Two hundred and forty four GPs participated with a total of 3035 patients. Patients (mean age 68.9 years) had mostly chronic non-cancer pain (87.7%). In 42.3%, pain had neuropathic components. Only 53.6% of patients were in treatment with analgesics (strong opioids, 38.9%; NSAIDs, 32.6%; weak opioids, 25.6%; anti-epileptics, 17.3%; paracetamol, 14.9%). Use of the questionnaire resulted in the prescription of analgesics to all patients and in increased prescription of strong opioids (69.7%). NSAID prescription decreased (12.8%), while anti-epileptics use remained stable. These findings show that current management of chronic pain in primary care is far from optimal and that efforts are needed to educate GPs and improve guideline implementation. PMID:27478585

  5. A feasibility study of a telephone-supported self-care intervention for depression among adults with a comorbid chronic physical illness in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective We assessed the feasibility and acceptability to patients of a telephone-supported self-care intervention for depression among adults aged 40 years or over with one of six targeted chronic physical illnesses and comorbid depressive symptoms in family practice settings. Methods An open, uncontrolled trial (feasibility study) was conducted among patients treated in Montreal family practices. Eligible patients were aged 40 years or over, had one or more of the targeted chronic physical illnesses for at least 6 months (arthritis, hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) and were evaluated as having at least mild depressive symptoms (a score of ≥ 5 on the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire, PHQ-9). Participants received a package of six self-care tools (information booklet, video, Internet programme, action plan, workbook and mood-monitoring tool) with telephone support by a lay coach for up to 6 months. Results In total, 63 eligible patients provided written consent and completed the baseline interview; 57 (90%) and 55 (87%) patients completed 2-month and 6-month follow-up interviews, respectively. The mean number of telephone calls made by coaches to participants was 10.5 (SD 4.0), and the average length of these calls was 10.6 minutes. At the 6-month follow-up, 83.6% of the participants reported that one or more of the tools were helpful. Clinically significant improvements were seen in depressive symptoms (as assessed by the PHQ-9) at 6 months, with an effect size of 0.88 (95% CI, 0.55, 1.14). Conclusion A telephone-supported self-care intervention for depression was feasible, was acceptable to patients, and was associated with a significant 6-month improvement in depressive symptoms. A randomised trial of this intervention is justified. PMID:24294301

  6. Distinguishing the preparation and roles of Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of Nursing Practice graduates: national implications for academic curricula and health care systems.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek

    2013-08-01

    Although the American Association of Colleges of Nursing was clear in defining the role of individuals with the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree when it endorsed the DNP as the single-entry degree for advanced practice nurses in 2004, confusion about educational curricula to prepare DNPs continues to exist in academic programs throughout the United States. Further, health care systems are unsure about the role DNP graduates should fulfill in comparison with PhD-prepared individuals. This article discusses the importance of DNP- and PhD-prepared individuals in improving the quality of health care and the health of Americans, how best to resolve the confusion in preparation of DNP and PhD students, and the various roles DNP and PhD graduates should fulfill in real-world settings. A national call to action and future implications for research, academia, and health care settings are highlighted.

  7. Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... a problem you need to take care of. Chronic pain is different. The pain signals go on for ... there is no clear cause. Problems that cause chronic pain include Headache Low back strain Cancer Arthritis Pain ...

  8. Integrating chronic care with primary care activities: enriching healthcare staff knowledge and skills and improving glycemic control of a cohort of people with diabetes through the First Line Diabetes Care Project in the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Grace Marie V.; Kegels, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Background This study investigated the effects of integrating primary chronic care with current healthcare activities in two local government health units (LGHU) of the Philippines on knowledge and skills of the LGHU staff and clinical outcomes for people with diabetes. Design Integration was accomplished through health service reorganization, (re)distribution of chronic care tasks, and training of LGHU staff. Levels of the staff's pre- and post-training diabetes knowledge and of their self-assessment of diabetes care-related skills were measured. Primary diabetes care with emphasis on self-care development was provided to a cohort of people with diabetes. Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and obesity measures were collected prior to and one year after full project implementation. Results The training workshop improved diabetes knowledge (p<0.001) and self-assessed skills (p<0.001) of the LGHU staff. Significant reductions in HbA1c (p<0.001), waist–hip ratio (p<0.001) and waist circumference (p=0.011) of the cohort were noted. Although the reduction in HbA1c was somewhat greater among those whose community-based care providers showed improvement in knowledge and self-assessed skills, the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusions Primary care for chronic conditions such as diabetes may be integrated with other healthcare activities in health services of low-to-middle-income countries such as the Philippines, utilizing pre-existing human resources for health, and may improve clinical endpoints. PMID:25361726

  9. Improving Physical Health in Patients with Chronic Mental Disorders: 12-Month Results from a Randomized Controlled Collaborative Care Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kilbourne, Amy M.; Barbaresso, Michelle M.; Lai, Zongshan; Nord, Kristina M.; Bramlet, Margretta; Goodrich, David E.; Post, Edward P.; Almirall, Daniel; Bauer, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Persons with chronic mental disorders are disproportionately burdened with physical health conditions. We determined whether Life Goals Collaborative Care compared to usual care improves physical health in patients with mental disorders within 12 months. Method This single-blind randomized controlled effectiveness study of a collaborative care model was conducted at a mid-western Veterans Affairs urban outpatient mental health clinic. Patients (N=293 out of 474 eligible approached) with an ICD-9-CM diagnosis of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depressive disorder and at least one cardiovascular disease risk factor were consented and randomized (02/24/10 to 04/29/15) to Life Goals (N=146) or usual care (N=147). A total of 287 completed baseline assessments and 245 completed 12-month follow-up assessments. Life Goals included five weekly sessions that provided semi-structured guidance on managing physical and mental health symptoms through healthy behavior changes, augmented by ongoing care coordination. The primary outcome was change in physical health-related quality of life score (VR-12 physical health component score). Secondary outcomes included control of cardiovascular risk factors from baseline to 12 months (blood pressure, lipids, weight), mental health-related quality of life, and mental health symptoms. Results Among patients completing baseline and 12-month outcomes assessments (N=245), the mean age was 55.3 (SD=10.8; range 28-75 years) and 15.4% were female. Intent-to-treat analysis revealed that compared to those in usual care, patients randomized to Life Goals had slightly increased VR-12 physical health scores (coefficient=3.21;p=0.01). Conclusion Patients with chronic mental disorders and cardiovascular disease risk who received Life Goals had improved physical health-related quality of life. PMID:27780336

  10. A longitudinal study to identify the influence of quality of chronic care delivery on productive interactions between patients and (teams of) healthcare professionals within disease management programmes

    PubMed Central

    Cramm, Jane Murray; Nieboer, Anna Petra

    2014-01-01

    Objective The chronic care model is an increasingly used approach to improve the quality of care through system changes in care delivery. While theoretically these system changes are expected to increase productive patient–professional interaction empirical evidence is lacking. This study aims to identify the influence of quality of care on productive patient–professional interaction. Setting Longitudinal study in 18 Dutch regions. Participants Questionnaires were sent to all 5076 patients participating in 18 Disease Management Programmes (DMPs) in 2010 (2676 (53%) respondents). One year later (T1), 4693 patients still participating in the DMPs received a questionnaire (2191 (47%) respondents) and 2 years later (in 2012; T2) 1722 patients responded (out of 4350; 40% response). Interventions DMPs Primary outcome measure Patients’ perceptions of the productivity of interactions (measured as relational coordination/coproduction of care) with professionals. Patients were asked about communication dimensions (frequent, accurate, and problem-solving communication) and relationship dimensions (shared goals and mutual respect). Findings After controlling for background characteristics these results clearly show that quality of chronic care (T0), first-year changes in quality of chronic care (T1—T0) and second-year changes in quality of chronic care (T2—T1) predicted productive interactions between patients and professionals at T2 (all at p≤0.001). Furthermore, we found a negative relationship between lower educational level and productive interactions between patients and professionals 2 years later. Conclusions We can conclude that successfully dealing with the consequences of chronic illnesses requires proactive patients who are able to make productive decisions together with their healthcare providers. Since patients and professionals share responsibility for management of the chronic illness, they must also share control of interactions and decisions

  11. Associations and Synergistic Effects for Psychological Distress and Chronic Back Pain on the Utilization of Different Levels of Ambulatory Health Care. A Cross-Sectional Study from Austria.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Kathryn; Peersman, Wim; George, Aaron; Dorner, Thomas Ernst

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this analysis was to assess the impact of chronic back pain and psychological distress on the utilization of primary and secondary levels of care in the ambulatory health care sector in Austria - a country without a gatekeeping system. Additionally, we aimed to determine if the joint effect of chronic back pain and psychological distress was higher than the impact of the sum of the two single conditions. The database used for this analysis was the Austrian Health Interview Survey, with data from 15,474 individuals. Statistical methods used were descriptive tests, regression models and the calculation of synergistic effects. Both chronic back pain and psychological distress had a positive association with the utilization of the primary (OR for chronic back pain 1.53 and psychological distress 1.33) and secondary (OR for chronic back pain 1.32 and psychological distress 1.24) levels of the health care sector. In the fully adjusted model, the synergistic effect of chronic back pain and psychological distress was significant for the secondary level of care (S 1.99, PAF 0.20), but not for the primary level of care (S 1.16, PAF 0.07). Synergistic effects and associations for chronic back pain and psychological distress on the utilization of both the primary and secondary levels of the ambulatory health care sector were observed, particularly for the secondary level of care. Our results demonstrate the utilization of health care services settings by individuals with these conditions, and offer opportunities to consider reorganization and structuring of the Austrian health care system.

  12. Opinions and Beliefs About Telemedicine for Emergency Treatment During Ambulance Transportation and for Chronic Care at Home

    PubMed Central

    Guldolf, Kaat; Vandervorst, Fenne; Van Hooff, Robbert-Jan; Fernandez Tellez, Helio; Desmaele, Sara; Cambron, Melissa; Hubloue, Ives

    2016-01-01

    Background Telemedicine is a valid alternative to face-to-face patient care in many areas. However, the opinion of all stakeholders is decisive for successful adoption of this technique, especially as telemedicine expands into novel domains such as emergency teleconsultations during ambulance transportation and chronic care at home. Objective We evaluate the viewpoints of the broad public, patients, and professional caregivers in these situations. Methods A 10-question survey was developed and obtained via face-to-face interviews of visitors at the Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (UZB). The online questionnaire was also distributed among professional caregivers via the intranet of the UZB and among the broad public using social media. Results In total, 607 individuals responded to the questionnaire, expressing a positive opinion regarding telemedicine for in-ambulance emergency treatment and for chronic care at home. Privacy issues were not perceived as relevant, and most respondents were ready to participate in future teleconsultations. Lack of telecommunication knowledge (213/566, 37.6%) was the only independent factor associated with rejection of telemedicine at home and respondents via social media (250/607, 41.2%) were less concerned about privacy issues than respondents via face-to-face interviews (visitors, 234/607, 38.6%). The visitors were more positive towards in-ambulance telemedicine and more likely to agree with future participation in teleconsultations than respondents via social media. Conclusions The broad public, professional caregivers, and patients reported a positive attitude towards telemedicine for emergency treatment during ambulance transportation and for chronic care at home. These results support further improvement of telemedicine solutions in these domains. PMID:27029999

  13. Life after the Shock! The Impact on Families of Caring for Young Children with Chronic Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashton, Jean

    2004-01-01

    The stresses experienced by most families include limitations on time, conditions of employment, financial burdens and sibling rivalry. For the families of a child with a chronic illness, these stresses are often compounded, making family functioning problematic. Chronic illness is marked by permanency and the need for ongoing vigilance with…

  14. Affordability, availability and acceptability barriers to health care for the chronically ill: Longitudinal case studies from South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Goudge, Jane; Gilson, Lucy; Russell, Steven; Gumede, Tebogo; Mills, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Background There is an increasing burden of chronic illness in low and middle income countries, driven by TB/HIV, as well as non-communicable diseases. Few health systems are organized to meet the needs of chronically ill patients, and patients' perspectives on the difficulties of accessing care need to be better understood, particularly in poor resourced settings, to achieve this end. This paper describes the experience of poor households attempting to access chronic care in a rural area of South Africa. Methods A household survey (n = 1446 individuals) was combined with qualitative longitudinal research that followed 30 case study households over 10 months. Illness narratives and diaries provided descriptive textual data of household interactions with the health system. Results In the survey 74% of reported health problems were 'chronic', 48% of which had no treatment action taken in the previous month. Amongst the case study households, of the 34 cases of chronic illness, only 21 (62%) cases had an allopathic diagnosis and only 12 (35%) were receiving regular treatment. Livelihoods exhausted from previous illness and death, low income, and limited social networks, prevented consultation with monthly expenditure for repeated consultations as high as 60% of income. Interrupted drug supplies, insufficient clinical services at the clinic level necessitating referral, and a lack of ambulances further hampered access to care. Poor provider-patient interaction led to inadequate understanding of illness, inappropriate treatment action, 'healer shopping', and at times a break down in cooperation, with the patient 'giving up' on the public health system. However, productive patient-provider interactions not only facilitated appropriate treatment action but enabled patients to justify their need for financial assistance to family and neighbours, and so access care. In addition, patients and their families with understanding of a disease became a community resource drawn on

  15. The Effect of Home Caregiving Program for Family Members Providing Care for Chronically Ill Relative Client

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammed, Hussein Jassim; Kamel, Andaleeb Abu

    2015-01-01

    Health care systems in many countries are moving towards outpatient care in which family members are central in providing care for patients with life-threatening illness. Family members and friends haven't knowledge and skills to become caregivers as many studies found that, the need to involve in such program to enhance their ability to be…

  16. Excess body weight increases the burden of age-associated chronic diseases and their associated health care expenditures

    PubMed Central

    Atella, Vincenzo; Kopinska, Joanna; Medea, Gerardo; Belotti, Federico; Tosti, Valeria; Mortari, Andrea Piano; Cricelli, Claudio; Fontana, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Aging and excessive adiposity are both associated with an increased risk of developing multiple chronic diseases, which drive ever increasing health costs. The main aim of this study was to determine the net (non‐estimated) health costs of excessive adiposity and associated age‐related chronic diseases. We used a prevalence‐based approach that combines accurate data from the Health Search CSD‐LPD, an observational dataset with patient records collected by Italian general practitioners and up‐to‐date health care expenditures data from the SiSSI Project. In this very large study, 557,145 men and women older than 18 years were observed at different points in time between 2004 and 2010. The proportion of younger and older adults reporting no chronic disease decreased with increasing BMI. After adjustment for age, sex, geographic residence, and GPs heterogeneity, a strong J‐shaped association was found between BMI and total health care costs, more pronounced in middle‐aged and older adults. Relative to normal weight, in the 45‐64 age group, the per‐capita total cost was 10% higher in overweight individuals, and 27 to 68% greater in patients with obesity and very severe obesity, respectively. The association between BMI and diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease largely explained these elevated costs. PMID:26540605

  17. The Perspectives of Patients on Health-Care for Co-Morbid Diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Clement; Ilic, Dragan; Teede, Helena; Cass, Alan; Fulcher, Greg; Gallagher, Martin; Johnson, Greg; Kerr, Peter G.; Mathew, Tim; Murphy, Kerry; Polkinghorne, Kevan; Walker, Rowan; Zoungas, Sophia

    2016-01-01

    Background Multi-morbidity due to diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD) remains challenging for current health-systems, which focus on single diseases. As a first step toward health-care improvement, we explored the perspectives of patients and their carers on factors influencing the health-care of those with co-morbid diabetes and CKD. Methods In this qualitative study participants with co-morbid diabetes and CKD were purposively recruited using maximal variation sampling from 4 major tertiary health-services from 2 of Australia’s largest cities. Separate focus groups were conducted for patients with CKD stages 3, 4 and 5. Findings were triangulated with semi-structured interviews of carers of patients. Discussions were transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed. Results Twelve focus groups with 58 participants and 8 semi-structured interviews of carers were conducted. Factors influencing health-care of co-morbid diabetes and CKD grouped into patient and health service level factors. Key patient level factors identified were patient self-management, socio-economic situation, and adverse experiences related to co-morbid diabetes and CKD and its treatment. Key health service level factors were prevention and awareness of co-morbid diabetes and CKD, poor continuity and coordination of care, patient and carer empowerment, access and poor recognition of psychological co-morbidity. Health-service level factors varied according to CKD stage with poor continuity and coordination of care and patient and carer empowerment emphasized by participants with CKD stage 4 and 5, and access and poor recognition of psychological co-morbidity emphasised by participants with CKD stage 5 and carers. Conclusions According to patients and their carers the health-care of co-morbid diabetes and CKD may be improved via a preventive, patient-centred health-care model which promotes self-management and that has good access, continuity and coordination of care and identifies and

  18. Costs of moderate to severe chronic pain in primary care patients – a study of the ACCORD Program

    PubMed Central

    Lalonde, Lyne; Choinière, Manon; Martin, Élisabeth; Berbiche, Djamal; Perreault, Sylvie; Lussier, David

    2014-01-01

    Background The economic burden of chronic noncancer pain (CNCP) remains insufficiently documented in primary care. Purpose To evaluate the annual direct health care costs and productivity costs associated with moderate to severe CNCP in primary care patients taking into account their pain disability. Materials and methods Patients reporting noncancer pain for at least 6 months, at a pain intensity of 4 or more on a 0 (no pain) to 10 (worst possible pain) intensity scale, and at a frequency of at least 2 days a week, were recruited from community pharmacies. Patients’ characteristics, health care utilization, and productivity losses (absenteeism and presenteeism) were documented using administrative databases, pharmacies’ renewal charts, telephone, and self-administered questionnaires. Patients were stratified by tertile of pain disability measured by the Brief Pain Inventory questionnaire. Results Patients (number =483) were, on average, 59 years old, mainly women (67.5%), and suffered from CNCP for a mean of 12 years at an average pain intensity of 6.5±1.9. The annual direct health care costs and productivity costs averaged CAD $9,565 (±$13,993) and CAD $7,072 (±$11,716), respectively. The use of complementary health care services accounted for almost 50% of the direct health care costs. The mean adjusted total direct health care costs (considering pain-related hospitalizations only) and productivity costs increased with more pain disability: low disability, CAD $12,118; moderate, CAD $18,278; and severe, CAD $19,216; P=0.001. Conclusion The economic burden of CNCP is substantial and increases with the level of pain disability, which suggests the need for and potential benefits of improving CNCP management through specific and adapted treatment plans targeting the impact of pain on daily functioning. PMID:25045282

  19. School Nurses and Care Coordination for Children with Complex Needs: An Integrative Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClanahan, Rachel; Weismuller, Penny C.

    2015-01-01

    Health care for students with chronic needs can be complex and specialized, resulting in fragmentation, duplication, and inefficiencies. Students who miss school due to chronic conditions lose valuable educational exposure that contributes to academic success. As health-related disabilities increase in prevalence so does the need for the…

  20. Strengthening the delivery of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease care at primary health-care facilities: study design of a cluster randomized controlled trial in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Amir; Ahmed, Maqsood; Anil, Shirin; Walley, John

    2015-01-01

    Background Respiratory diseases, namely asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), account for one-fourth of the patients at the primary health-care (PHC) facilities in Pakistan. Standard care practices to manage these diseases are necessary to reduce the morbidity and mortality rate associated with non-communicable diseases in developing countries. Objective To develop and measure the effectiveness of operational guidelines and implementation materials, with sound scientific evidence, for expanding lung health care, especially asthma and COPD through PHC facilities already strengthened for tuberculosis (TB) care in Pakistan. Design A cluster randomized controlled trial with two arms (intervention and control), with qualitative and costing study components, is being conducted in 34 clusters; 17 clusters per arm (428 asthma and 306 COPD patients), in three districts in Pakistan from October 2014 to December 2016. The intervention consists of enhanced case management of asthma and COPD patients through strengthening of PHC facilities. The main outcomes to be measured are asthma and COPD control among the registered cases at 6 months. Cluster- and individual-level analyses will be done according to intention to treat. Residual confounding will be addressed by multivariable logistic and linear regression models for asthma and COPD control, respectively. The trial is registered with ISRCTN registry (ISRCTN 17409338). Conclusions Currently, only about 20% of the estimated prevalent asthma and COPD cases are being identified and reported through the respective PHC network. Lung health care and prevention has not been effectively integrated into the core PHC package, although a very well-functioning TB program exists at the PHC level. Inclusion of these diseases in the already existent TB program is expected to increase detection rates and care for asthma and COPD. PMID:26578109

  1. The Role of Information and Communication Technology in Community Outreach, Academic and Research Collaboration, and Education and Support Services (IT-CARES)

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Ashish; Meza, Jane; Costa, Sergio; Puricelli Perin, Douglas Marcel; Trout, Kate; Rayamajih, Atul

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study is to examine the role of information and communication technology (ICT) in enhancing community outreach, academic and research collaboration, and education and support services (IT-CARES) in an academic setting. Methods A survey was deployed to assess the ICT needs in an academic setting. The survey was developed using the Delphi methodology. Questionnaire development was initiated by asking key stakeholders involved in community outreach, academic, research, education, and support to provide feedback on current ICT issues and future recommendations for relevant ICT tools that would be beneficial to them in their job, and to capture current ICT issues. Participants were asked to rate the level of importance of each ICT question on five-point Likert scales. Results The survey was sent to 359 participants, including faculty, staff, and students. The total number of respondents was 96, for a 27 percent response rate. The majority of the participants (54.1 percent, n = 46) placed a high importance on learning the available research capabilities of the college. The majority of the participants placed moderate (43.5 percent, n = 37) to high importance (40 percent, n = 34) on having an intranet that could support collaborative grant writing. A majority of the participants attributed high importance to learning to interact with the online learning management system Blackboard. A majority of the participants agreed that social media should being more actively utilized for diverse activities for academic and research purposes. Conclusion The study helped to identify the current needs and challenges faced by professionals and students when interacting with ICT. More research is needed in order to effectively integrate the use of ICT in the field of higher education, especially related to the modern global public health context. PMID:24159275

  2. Healthy Reasoning: The Role of Effective Argumentation for Enhancing Elderly Patients' Self-management Abilities in Chronic Care.

    PubMed

    Bigi, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges for doctors working in chronic care is the correct management of the argumentation phases during the encounters with their patients. During these phases doctors should provide patients with acceptable reasons for being adherent to treatment and for changing certain unhealthy behaviors and lifestyles, something which is particularly difficult for elderly patients, for whom changing life long habits can be extremely hard. However, the medical literature on the subject of communication in the chronic care encounter shows lack of theoretical models and methodological approaches that can highlight which specific linguistic structures or elements in different communication styles favor or impede patient commitment, trust in the relationship and adherence to treatment. The contribution describes ongoing research on argumentative strategies in the encounter with diabetes patients. I describe one recently concluded research project on the argumentation phases of medical encounters in diabetes care, which highlighted critical areas in need of improvement. I also describe the design and aims of a new research project, aimed at testing the effectiveness and usability of certain argumentation schemes in the medical encounter.

  3. Factors Associated with Women's Chronic Disease Management: Associations of Healthcare Frustrations, Physician Support, and Self-Care Needs.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew Lee; Ory, Marcia G; Ahn, Sangnam; Miles, Toni P

    2013-01-01

    Previous research emphasizes the importance of reducing healthcare frustrations and enhancing physician supports to help patients engage in recommended healthcare regimens. However, less is known about how these factors are associated with aging women's knowledge about self-care behavior. This study examined the sociodemographics, health indicators, healthcare-related frustrations, and perceptions of physician support associated with middle-aged and older adult females' self-reported need for help to learn how to take better care of their health. Data were analyzed from 287 females with one or more chronic conditions who completed The National Council on Aging (NCOA) Chronic Care Survey. A logistic regression model was developed. Women who were non-White (OR = 2.26, P = 0.049) were more likely to need help learning how to better manage their health. Those who had some college education or more (OR = 0.55, P = 0.044) and lower healthcare-related frustrations (OR = 0.44, P = 0.017) and perceived to have more physician support (OR = 0.49, P = 0.033) were less likely to need help learning how to better manage their health. Findings can inform the planning, implementation, assessment, and dissemination of evidence-based self-management programs for middle-aged and older women within and outside of clinical settings.

  4. [Development of a Conceptual Framework for the Assessment of Chronic Care in the Spanish National Health System].

    PubMed

    Espallargues, Mireia; Serra-Sutton, Vicky; Solans-Domènech, Maite; Torrente, Elena; Moharra, Montse; Benítez, Dolors; Robles, Noemí; Domíngo, Laia; Escarrabill Sanglas, Joan

    2016-07-07

    The aim was to develop a conceptual framework for the assessment of new healthcare initiatives on chronic diseases within the Spanish National Health System. A comprehensive literature review between 2002 and 2013, including systematic reviews, meta-analysis, and reports with evaluation frameworks and/or assessment of initiatives was carried out; integrated care initiatives established in Catalonia were studied and described; and semistructured interviews with key stakeholders were performed. The scope and conceptual framework were defined by using the brainstorming approach.Of 910 abstracts identified, a total of 116 studies were included. They referred to several conceptual frameworks and/or assessment indicators at a national and international level. An overall of 24 established chronic care initiatives were identified (9 integrated care initiatives); 10 in-depth interviews were carried out. The proposed conceptual framework envisages: 1)the target population according to complexity levels; 2)an evaluation approach of the structure, processes, and outcomes considering the health status achieved, the recovery process and the maintenance of health; and 3)the dimensions or attributes to be assessed. The proposed conceptual framework will be helpful has been useful to develop indicators and implement them with a community-based and result-oriented approach and a territorial or population-based perspective within the Spanish Health System. This will be essential to know which are the most effective strategies, what are the key elements that determine greater success and what are the groups of patients who can most benefit.

  5. Community Care of the Chronically Mentally Ill. Proceedings of the Robert Lee Sutherland Seminar in Mental Health (6th, Austin, TX, September 30-October 1, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonjean, Charles M., Ed.; And Others

    This volume presents the proceedings of a seminar concerned with community care for the chronically mentally ill. After an introductory overview by Ira Iscoe, the first section consists of the following major addresses, presentations, and commissioned papers: (1) "The Community as the Primary Locus of Care for Persons with Serious Long-Term…

  6. Challenges to Providing End-of-Life Care to Low-Income Elders with Advanced Chronic Disease: Lessons Learned from a Model Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Betty J.; Auer, Casey

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study explored the challenges in providing end-of-life care to low-income elders with multiple comorbid chronic conditions in a fully "integrated" managed care program, and it highlighted essential recommendations. Design and Methods: A case-study design was used that involved an extensive analysis of qualitative data from five focus…

  7. Improving chronic disease prevention and screening in primary care: results of the BETTER pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Primary care provides most of the evidence-based chronic disease prevention and screening services offered by the healthcare system. However, there remains a gap between recommended preventive services and actual practice. This trial (the BETTER Trial) aimed to improve preventive care of heart disease, diabetes, colorectal, breast and cervical cancers, and relevant lifestyle factors through a practice facilitation intervention set in primary care. Methods Pragmatic two-way factorial cluster RCT with Primary Care Physicians’ practices as the unit of allocation and individual patients as the unit of analysis. The setting was urban Primary Care Team practices in two Canadian provinces. Eight Primary Care Team practices were randomly assigned to receive the practice-level intervention or wait-list control; 4 physicians in each team (32 physicians) were randomly assigned to receive the patient-level intervention or wait-list control. Patients randomly selected from physicians’ rosters were stratified into two groups: 1) general and 2) moderate mental illness. The interventions involved a multifaceted, evidence-based, tailored practice-level intervention with a Practice Facilitator, and a patient-level intervention involving a one-hour visit with a Prevention Practitioner where patients received a tailored ‘prevention prescription’. The primary outcome was a composite Summary Quality Index of 28 evidence-based chronic disease prevention and screening actions with pre-defined targets, expressed as the ratio of eligible actions at baseline that were met at follow-up. A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted. Results 789 of 1,260 (63%) eligible patients participated. On average, patients were eligible for 8.96 (SD 3.2) actions at baseline. In the adjusted analysis, control patients met 23.1% (95% CI: 19.2% to 27.1%) of target actions, compared to 28.5% (95% CI: 20.9% to 36.0%) receiving the practice-level intervention, 55.6% (95% CI: 49.0% to 62

  8. Income level and chronic ambulatory care sensitive conditions in adults: a multicity population-based study in Italy

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background A relationship between quality of primary health care and preventable hospitalizations has been described in the US, especially among the elderly. In Europe, there has been a recent increase in the evaluation of Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions (ACSC) as an indicator of health care quality, but evidence is still limited. The aim of this study was to determine whether income level is associated with higher hospitalization rates for ACSC in adults in a country with universal health care coverage. Methods From the hospital registries in four Italian cities (Turin, Milan, Bologna, Rome), we identified 9384 hospital admissions for six chronic conditions (diabetes, hypertension, congestive heart failure, angina pectoris, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and asthma) among 20-64 year-olds in 2000. Case definition was based on the ICD-9-CM coding algorithm suggested by the Agency for Health Research and Quality - Prevention Quality Indicators. An area-based (census block) income index was used for each individual. All hospitalization rates were directly standardised for gender and age using the Italian population. Poisson regression analysis was performed to assess the relationship between income level (quintiles) and hospitalization rates (RR, 95% CI) separately for the selected conditions controlling for age, gender and city of residence. Results Overall, the ACSC age-standardized rate was 26.1 per 10.000 inhabitants. All conditions showed a statistically significant socioeconomic gradient, with low income people being more likely to be hospitalized than their well off counterparts. The association was particularly strong for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (level V low income vs. level I high income RR = 4.23 95%CI 3.37-5.31) and for congestive heart failure (RR = 3.78, 95% CI = 3.09-4.62). With the exception of asthma, males were more vulnerable to ACSC hospitalizations than females. The risks were higher among 45-64 year olds than in younger

  9. The role of disease management in pay-for-performance programs for improving the care of chronically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Beich, Jeff; Scanlon, Dennis P; Ulbrecht, Jan; Ford, Eric W; Ibrahim, Ibrahim A

    2006-02-01

    To date, pay-for-performance programs targeting the care of persons with chronic conditions have primarily been directed at physicians and provide an alternative to health plan-sponsored chronic disease management (DM) programs. Both approaches require similar infrastructure, and each has its own advantages and disadvantages for program implementation. Pay-for-performance programs use incentives based on patient outcomes; however, an alternative system might incorporate measures of structure and process. Using a conceptual framework, the authors explore the variation in 50 diabetes DM programs using data from the 2002 National Business Coalition on Health's eValue8 Request for Information (RFI). The authors raise issues relevant to the assignment of accountability for patient outcomes to either health plans or physicians. They analyze the association between RFI scores measuring structures and processes, and HEDIS diabetes intermediate outcome measures. Finally, the strengths and weaknesses of using the RFI scores as an alternative metric for pay-for-performance programs are discussed.

  10. The Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario (CAHO) Adopting Research to Improve Care (ARTIC) Program: Reach, Sustainability, Spread and Lessons Learned from an Implementation Funding Model.

    PubMed

    Moore, Julia E; Grouchy, Michelle; Graham, Ian D; Shandling, Maureen; Doyle, Winnie; Straus, Sharon E

    2016-05-01

    Despite evidence on what works in healthcare, there is a significant gap in the time it takes to bring research into practice. The Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario's Adopting Research to Improve Care program addresses this research-to-practice gap by incorporating the following components into its funding program: strategic selection of evidence for implementation, education and training for implementation, implementation supports, executive champions and governance, and evaluation. Funded projects have been sustained (76% reported full sustainability) and spread to over 200 new sites. Lessons learned include the following: assess readiness, develop tailored implementation materials, consider characteristics of implementation supports, protect champion time and consider evaluation feasibility.

  11. The Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario (CAHO) Adopting Research to Improve Care (ARTIC) Program: Reach, Sustainability, Spread and Lessons Learned from an Implementation Funding Model

    PubMed Central

    Grouchy, Michelle; Graham, Ian D.; Shandling, Maureen; Doyle, Winnie; Straus, Sharon E.

    2016-01-01

    Despite evidence on what works in healthcare, there is a significant gap in the time it takes to bring research into practice. The Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario's Adopting Research to Improve Care program addresses this research-to-practice gap by incorporating the following components into its funding program: strategic selection of evidence for implementation, education and training for implementation, implementation supports, executive champions and governance, and evaluation. Funded projects have been sustained (76% reported full sustainability) and spread to over 200 new sites. Lessons learned include the following: assess readiness, develop tailored implementation materials, consider characteristics of implementation supports, protect champion time and consider evaluation feasibility. PMID:27232234

  12. Academic Buoyancy and Academic Resilience: Exploring "Everyday" and "Classic" Resilience in the Face of Academic Adversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Academic buoyancy has been defined as a capacity to overcome setbacks, challenges, and difficulties that are part of everyday academic life. Academic resilience has been defined as a capacity to overcome acute and/or chronic adversity that is seen as a major threat to a student's educational development. This study is the first to examine the…

  13. Using an electronic self-management tool to support patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD): a CKD clinic self-care model.

    PubMed

    Ong, Stephanie W; Jassal, Sarbjit V; Porter, Eveline; Logan, Alexander G; Miller, Judith A

    2013-01-01

    New healthcare delivery models are needed to enhance the patient experience and improve quality of care for individuals with chronic conditions such as kidney disease. One potential avenue is to implement self-management strategies. There is growing evidence that self-management interventions help optimize various aspects of chronic disease management. With the increasing use of information technology (IT) in health care, chronic disease management programs are incorporating IT solutions to support patient self-management practices. IT solutions have the ability to promote key principles of self-management, namely education, empowerment, and collaboration. Positive clinical outcomes have been demonstrated for a number of chronic conditions when IT solutions were incorporated into self-management programs. There is a paucity of evidence for self-management in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Furthermore, IT strategies have not been tested in this patient population to the same extent as other chronic conditions (e.g., diabetes, hypertension). Therefore, it is currently unknown if IT strategies will promote self-management behaviors and lead to improvements in overall patient care. We designed and developed an IT solution called My KidneyCare Centre to support self-management strategies for patients with CKD. In this review, we discuss the rationale and vision of incorporating an electronic self-management tool to support the care of patients with CKD.

  14. Non-disclosure of chronic kidney disease in primary care and the limits of instrumental rationality in chronic illness self-management.

    PubMed

    Daker-White, Gavin; Rogers, Anne; Kennedy, Anne; Blakeman, Thomas; Blickem, Christian; Chew-Graham, Carolyn

    2015-04-01

    Early detection of long term conditions is predicated on assumptions that lifestyle changes and medications can be used to reduce or manage the risk of condition progression. However, ambiguity remains about the nature and place of diagnostic disclosure to people in newly recognised or asymptomatic 'pre' conditions such as early stage chronic kidney disease (CKD). The disclosure of a diagnosis is relevant to instigating strategies which rely on actively engaging patients as self-managers of their own care. Whilst primary care routinely records a diagnosis of early stage CKD, little is known about how patients learn about the fact that they have CKD or how they respond to this. This study aimed to explore patients' experiences of disclosure of CKD in primary care settings. A nested qualitative study of participants recruited to a trial of an intervention for CKD patients in Greater Manchester, UK was undertaken. A purposive sample of 26 patients, with a mean age of 72 years (range 59-89, median 71), were interviewed during 2012. Interview transcripts were analysed using constant comparative techniques. Narrative accounts reflected limited or partial disclosure of CKD; often cast in vague terms as "nothing to worry about". How patients described themselves in terms of participation and their tendencies towards 'active' or 'passive' involvement in consultations emerged as important components of narratives around disclosure. The findings illuminate the ways in which diagnosis is oriented in a context where it is possible to meet the requirements for remuneration under a pay for performance system of primary care, whilst apparently not disclosing a label or a diagnosis to patients. This challenges the presumptions inherent in wider health policy objectives that are increasingly built on the notion of responsible patients and the ethos of the active support of self-management for pre-conditions.

  15. Less money, less care: how nurses in long-term care allocate hours of needed care in a context of chronic shortage.

    PubMed

    Morin, Diane; Leblanc, Nancy

    2005-10-01

    The average funding of long-term care in Quebec, Canada, currently covers < 70% of the care hours required, which means that 30% of needs are unmet. The aims of this study were to understand how nurses, when they are in a position to do so, assign care hours, which needs are unmet by care dimensions and whether dimensions with unmet needs vary with client profiles. One-hundred-and-four nurses working in long-term care facilities participated in the study. They filled out individual questionnaires containing three case studies in the form of vignettes. When obliged to cut 30% of the care hours, the nurses ensured that treatment and diagnostic methods were done as prescribed and that vital feeding and elimination functions were preserved. However, they made the choice to cut some mobility and personal-care activities and, especially, communication with patients, families and other professionals. In this, they partly follow the theoretical care prioritization approach of Lefebvre and Dupuis, who take into account the degree of discomfort caused by the situation, the problem's place in Maslow's hierarchy of needs and the availability of a solution. Thus, although the choices made by the nurses follow a logical pattern, they could result in medium-term deterioration in the functional autonomy of their older patients. The overall consequences of these decisions are discussed.

  16. In their own words: the value of qualitative research to improve the care of children with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Camilla S; Craig, Jonathan C; Tong, Allison

    2016-10-15

    Patient- and family-centered care is hailed as a hallmark of high-quality pediatric care. This partnership between patients, families and their healthcare providers is central to caring for children with chronic kidney disease (CKD), given the long-term and profound impact of the disease and its treatment on the development and quality of life of these children. This paradigm hinges on a comprehensive and detailed understanding of the needs, beliefs and values of children with CKD and their families. However, their perspectives may remain undisclosed during time-limited clinical consultations and because of beliefs that if they did disclose their concerns, their care would be jeopardized. Qualitative research provides an avenue for children and families to articulate their perspectives and experiences and thereby to generate relevant, in-depth and often compelling insights to inform care. Yet, qualitative studies remain sparse in biomedical journals. Increasing both our awareness of the role of qualitative research in improving care and outcomes for children and adolescents with CKD and our understanding of the conduct and rigor of qualitative studies is required. This article will outline how qualitative research can generate relevant evidence to inform practice and policy in children with CKD, provide an overview of qualitative methods and introduce a framework to appraise qualitative research. More evidence derived from qualitative research is needed to inform shared decision-making and the development of interventions and policies that address the preferences and priorities of children with CKD and their families. Ultimately, this strategy may help to improve the outcomes that they regard as critical to their care.

  17. Validating the 8 CPCSSN Case Definitions for Chronic Disease Surveillance in a Primary Care Database of Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Tyler; Green, Michael E.; Birtwhistle, Richard; Khan, Shahriar; Garies, Stephanie; Wong, Sabrina T.; Natarajan, Nandini; Manca, Donna; Drummond, Neil

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network (CPCSSN) is Canada’s first national chronic disease surveillance system based on electronic health record (EHR) data. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate case definitions and case-finding algorithms used to identify 8 common chronic conditions in primary care: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), dementia, depression, diabetes, hypertension, osteoarthritis, parkinsonism, and epilepsy. METHODS Using a cross-sectional data validation study design, regional and local CPCSSN networks from British Columbia, Alberta (2), Ontario, Nova Scotia, and Newfoundland participated in validating EHR case-finding algorithms. A random sample of EHR charts were reviewed, oversampling for patients older than 60 years and for those with epilepsy or parkinsonism. Charts were reviewed by trained research assistants and residents who were blinded to the algorithmic diagnosis. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values (PPVs, NPVs) were calculated. RESULTS We obtained data from 1,920 charts from 4 different EHR systems (Wolf, Med Access, Nightingale, and PS Suite). For the total sample, sensitivity ranged from 78% (osteoarthritis) to more than 95% (diabetes, epilepsy, and parkinsonism); specificity was greater than 94% for all diseases; PPV ranged from 72% (dementia) to 93% (hypertension); NPV ranged from 86% (hypertension) to greater than 99% (diabetes, dementia, epilepsy, and parkinsonism). CONCLUSIONS The CPCSSN diagnostic algorithms showed excellent sensitivity and specificity for hypertension, diabetes, epilepsy, and parkinsonism and acceptable values for the other conditions. CPCSSN data are appropriate for use in public health surveillance, primary care, and health services research, as well as to inform policy for these diseases. PMID:25024246

  18. Acceptable Care? Illness Constructions, Healthworlds, and Accessible Chronic Treatment in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Bronwyn; Eyles, John; Moshabela, Mosa

    2015-01-01

    Achieving equitable access to health care is an important policy goal, with access influenced by affordability, availability, and acceptability of specific services. We explore patient narratives from a 5-year program of research on health care access to examine relationships between social constructions of illness and the acceptability of health services in the context of tuberculosis treatment and antiretroviral therapy in South Africa. Acceptability of services seems particularly important to the meanings patients attach to illness and care, whereas—conversely—these constructions appear to influence what constitutes acceptability and hence affect access to care. We highlight the underestimated role of individually, socially, and politically constructed healthworlds; traditional and biomedical beliefs; and social support networks. Suggested policy implications for improving acceptability and hence overall health care access include abandoning patronizing approaches to care and refocusing from treating “disease” to responding to “illness” by acknowledging and incorporating patients’ healthworlds in patient–provider interactions. PMID:25829509

  19. The coronary artery disease quality dashboard: a chronic care disease management tool in an electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eunice; Schnipper, Jeffrey L; Li, Qi; Linder, Jeffrey A; Rose, Alan F; Li, Ruzhuo; Eskin, Michael S; Housman, Dan; Middleton, Blackford; Einbinder, Jonathan S

    2007-10-11

    Quality reporting tools, integrated with ambulatory electronic health records (EHRs), may help clinicians understand performance, manage populations, and improve quality. The Coronary Artery Disease Quality Dash board (CAD QD) is a secure web report for performance measurement of a chronic care condition delivered through a central data warehouse and custom-built reporting tool. Pilot evaluation of the CAD Quality Dash board indicates that clinicians prefer a quality report that combines not only structured data from EHRs but one that facilitates actions to be taken on individual patients or on a population, i.e., for case management.

  20. Effectiveness of a School- and Community-based Academic Asthma Health Education Program on Use of Effective Asthma Self-care Behaviors in Older School-age Students

    PubMed Central

    Kintner, Eileen K.; Cook, Gwendolyn; Marti, C. Nathan; Allen, April; Stoddard, Debbie; Harmon, Phyllis; Gomes, Melissa; Meeder, Linda; Van Egeren, Laurie A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of SHARP, an academic asthma health education and counseling program, on fostering use of effective asthma self-care behaviors. Design and Methods This was a phase III, two-group, cluster randomized, single-blinded, longitudinal design guided the study. Caregivers of 205 fourth- and fifth-grade students completed the asthma health behaviors survey at pre-intervention and 1, 12, and 24 months post-intervention. Analysis involved multilevel modeling. Results All students demonstrated improvement in episode management, risk-reduction/prevention, and health promotion behaviors; SHARP students demonstrated increased improvement in episode management and risk-reduction/prevention behaviors. Practice Implications Working with schoolteachers, nurses can improve use of effective asthma self-care behaviors. PMID:25443867

  1. Chronicity of Voice-Related Health Care Utilization in the General Medicine Community.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Seth M; Lee, Hui-Jie; Roy, Nelson; Misono, Stephanie

    2017-04-01

    Objectives To examine voice-related health care utilization of patients in the general medical community without otolaryngology evaluation and explore factors associated with prolonged voice-related health care. Study Design Retrospective cohort analysis. Setting Large, national administrative US claims database. Subjects and Methods Patients with voice disorders per International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification ( ICD-9-CM) codes from January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2012, seen by a general medical physician, and who did not see an otolaryngologist in the subsequent year were included. Voice-related health care utilization, patient demographics, comorbid conditions, and index laryngeal diagnosis were collected. Logistic regression with variable selection was performed to evaluate the association between predictors and ≥30 days of voice-related health care use. Results In total, 46,205 unique voice-disordered patients met inclusion criteria. Of these patients, 8.5%, 10.0%, and 12.5% had voice-related health care use of ≥90, ≥60, and ≥30 days, respectively. Of the ≥30-day subset, 80.3% and 68.5%, respectively, had ≥60 and ≥90 days of voice-related health care utilization. The ≥30-day subset had more general medicine and nonotolaryngology specialty physician visits, more prescriptions and procedures, and 4 times the voice-related health care costs compared with those in the <30-day subset. Age, sex, employment status, initial voice disorder diagnosis, and comorbid conditions were related to ≥30 days of voice-related health care utilization. Conclusions Thirty days of nonotolaryngology-based care for a voice disorder may represent a threshold beyond which patients are more likely to experience prolonged voice-related health care utilization. Specific factors were associated with extended voice-related health care.

  2. Does integrated care reduce hospital activity for patients with chronic diseases? An umbrella review of systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    Damery, Sarah; Flanagan, Sarah; Combes, Gill

    2016-01-01

    Objective To summarise the evidence regarding the effectiveness of integrated care interventions in reducing hospital activity. Design Umbrella review of systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Setting Interventions must have delivered care crossing the boundary between at least two health and/or social care settings. Participants Adult patients with one or more chronic diseases. Data sources MEDLINE, Embase, ASSIA, PsycINFO, HMIC, CINAHL, Cochrane Library (HTA database, DARE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews), EPPI-Centre, TRIP, HEED, manual screening of references. Outcome measures Any measure of hospital admission or readmission, length of stay (LoS), accident and emergency use, healthcare costs. Results 50 reviews were included. Interventions focused on case management (n=8), chronic care model (CCM) (n=9), discharge management (n=15), complex interventions (n=3), multidisciplinary teams (MDT) (n=10) and self-management (n=5). 29 reviews reported statistically significant improvements in at least one outcome. 11/21 reviews reported significantly reduced emergency admissions (15–50%); 11/24 showed significant reductions in all-cause (10–30%) or condition-specific (15–50%) readmissions; 9/16 reported LoS reductions of 1–7 days and 4/9 showed significantly lower A&E use (30–40%). 10/25 reviews reported significant cost reductions but provided little robust evidence. Effective interventions included discharge management with postdischarge support, MDT care with teams that include condition-specific expertise, specialist nurses and/or pharmacists and self-management as an adjunct to broader interventions. Interventions were most effective when targeting single conditions such as heart failure, and when care was provided in patients’ homes. Conclusions Although all outcomes showed some significant reductions, and a number of potentially effective interventions were found, interventions rarely demonstrated unequivocally positive effects. Despite the

  3. Development of a conceptual framework for understanding financial barriers to care among patients with cardiovascular-related chronic disease: a protocol for a qualitative (grounded theory) study

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, David J.T.; Manns, Braden J.; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.; Sanmartin, Claudia; King-Shier, Kathryn M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with cardiovascular-related chronic diseases may face financial barriers to accessing health care, even in Canada, where universal health care insurance is in place. No current theory or framework is adequate for understanding the impact of financial barriers to care on these patients or how they experience financial barriers. The overall objective of this study is to develop a framework for understanding the role of financial barriers to care in the lives of patients with cardiovascular-related chronic diseases and the impact of such barriers on their health. Methods: We will perform an inductive qualitative grounded theory study to develop a framework to understand the effect of financial barriers to care on patients with cardiovascular-related chronic diseases. We will use semistructured interviews (face-to-face and telephone) with a purposive sample of adult patients from Alberta with at least 1 of hypertension, diabetes, heart disease or stroke. We will analyze interview transcripts in triplicate using grounded theory coding techniques, including open, focused and axial coding, following the principle of constant comparison. Interviews and analysis will be done iteratively to theoretical saturation. Member checking will be used to enhance rigour. Interpretation: A comprehensive framework for understanding financial barriers to accessing health care is instrumental for both researchers and clinicians who care for patients with chronic diseases. Such a framework would enable a better understanding of patient behaviour and nonadherence to recommended medical therapies and lifestyle modifications. PMID:27398378

  4. Organization, execution and evaluation of the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference on Gender-Specific Research in Emergency Care - an executive summary.

    PubMed

    Safdar, Basmah; Greenberg, Marna R

    2014-12-01

    With the goal of reducing inequalities in patient care, the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) consensus conference, "Gender-Specific Research in Emergency Care: Investigate, Understand, and Translate How Gender Affects Patient Outcomes," convened a diverse group of researchers, clinicians, health care providers, patients, and representatives of federal agencies and policy-makers in Dallas, Texas, in May 2014. The executive and steering committees identified seven clinical domains as key to gender-specific emergency care: cardiovascular, neurological, trauma/injury, substance abuse, pain, mental health, and diagnostic imaging. The main aims of the conference were to: 1) summarize and consolidate current data related to sex- and gender-specific research for acute care and identify critical gender-related gaps in knowledge to inform an EM research agenda; 2) create a consensus-driven research agenda that advances sex- and gender-specific research in the prevention, diagnosis, and management of acute diseases and identify strategies to investigate them; and 3) build a multinational interdisciplinary consortium to disseminate and study the sex and gender medicine of acute conditions. Over a 2-year period, this collaborative network of stakeholders identified key areas where sex- and gender-specific research is most likely to improve clinical care and ultimately patient outcomes. The iterative consensus process culminated in a daylong conference on May 13, 2014, with a total of 133 registrants, with the majority being between ages 31 and 50 years (57%), females (71%), and whites (79%). Content experts led the consensus-building workshops at the conference and used the nominal group technique to consolidate consensus recommendations for priority research. In addition, panel sessions addressed funding mechanisms for gender-specific research as well as gender-specific regulatory challenges to product development and approval. This special issue of AEM reports the

  5. A literature review on self-care of chronic illness: definition, assessment and related outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ausili, Davide; Masotto, Matteo; Dall'Ora, Chiara; Salvini, Lorena; Di Mauro, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUZIONE. L’assistenza alle persone con malattie croniche rappresenta una sfida per il benessere della popolazione e per la futura sostenibilità dei sistemi sanitari. La promozione del self-care è considerata un aspetto chiave dell’assistenza ai malati cronici. Lo scopo di questa revisione della letteratura è stato quello di esplorare: come il self-care nelle malattie croniche è stato definito dal punto di vista teorico; come il self-care può essere valutato nella pratica clinica e nella ricerca; quali associazioni esistono tra il livello di self-care e i risultati di salute dei pazienti con malattie croniche. RISULTATI. In letteratura si è riscontrata un’ampia gamma di definizioni e terminologie connesse con il self-care nelle malattie croniche. Sebbene nei diversi approcci siano stati identificati alcuni elementi comuni utili a spiegare il concetto di self-care, le variabili fisiche, cognitive, emotive e socioculturali sottese al self-care nelle malattie croniche risultano controverse e scarsamente definite. Un crescente numero di studi ha sviluppato o impiegato strumenti di valutazione del self-care validi ed affidabili per una specifica malattia cronica; tuttavia molti autori riportano la mancanza di utilizzo di strumenti di valutazione nella pratica clinica standard. Un numero limitato di studi ha mostrato delle correlazioni significative tra il self-care nelle malattie croniche e alcune misure di risultato come lo stato generale di salute, la qualità di vita e i costi dell’assistenza sanitaria. CONCLUSIONI. Favorire lo sviluppo del self-care è riconosciuto come un aspetto cruciale dell’assistenza ai malati cronici. Un’analisi più approfondita delle variabili e dei processi che influenzano il self-care potrebbe contribuire ad una più completa descrizione di questo fenomeno. La valutazione sistematica del self-care nella pratica clinica dei professionisti sanitari è fortemente raccomandata. Lo sviluppo di strumenti generali e non

  6. Education of patients with chronic kidney disease at the interface of primary care providers and nephrologists.

    PubMed

    Wright Nunes, Julie A

    2013-07-01

    Patient education is promoted as an integral part of effective kidney disease management. Programs and tools are available for providers and patients to support patient CKD education in primary care and nephrology. Challenges to providing patient education across practice settings include patients' lack of awareness of CKD as a medical entity, physician perceptions of their own lack of skill and ability to educate patients, differences in how primary care and nephrology physicians perceive collaborative care, and shortage of staff and time to support educational efforts. In addition, there is little research available to guide evidence-based practices for implementing early patient CKD education interventions across medical disciplines. Development and testing of patient education programs using early CKD multidisciplinary care, educational websites, and phone-based applications are all areas of growing research. More work is needed to provide evidence and support that physicians and other health professionals need to ensure a seamless patient education experience across the continuum of care.

  7. Screening for determinants of self-care in patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Jan; Ski, Chantal F; Thompson, David R

    2012-12-01

    Heart failure self-care is vital to achieving clinical stability and improved health outcomes. Yet despite the attention it has been given, in both research and clinical practice, effective self-care remains elusive. It is recognised that there are many patient factors that impact on attaining effective self-care skills. Systematic research is warranted to resolve the knowledge gap of how patients process information and develop the necessary self-care skills. In addition, sound screening tools are needed to assess factors that hinder the development of effective heart failure self-care skills. In this manner, education and support strategies can be applied on an individualised needs basis to enhance health outcomes.

  8. Discipline Policies in Early Childhood Care and Education Programs: Building an Infrastructure for Social and Academic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longstreth, Sascha; Brady, Sharon; Kay, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Research Findings: Preventing challenging behavior in young children is a national priority. The number of young children with behavioral problems is on the rise. Discipline policies can help early childhood programs build an infrastructure that promotes social and academic success. This study sought to document the extent to which existing early…

  9. The Academic Background of Gerontologists and Client Satisfaction in Long-Term Residential Care for Older Persons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falcão, Ana; Pereira, Fernando; Pimentel, Helena; Teixeira, Cristina; Rodrigues, Vitor

    2017-01-01

    In contemporary Western societies, the aging population poses new challenges both to the policies and to the support systems for older persons. In Portugal, where the phenomena have a major impact, a new professional profile, the gerontologist, has emerged. These professionals have an academic background that corresponds to the 1st cycle degree at…

  10. Impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on Valve Academic Research Consortium-defined outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (from the FRANCE 2 Registry).

    PubMed

    Chopard, Romain; Meneveau, Nicolas; Chocron, Sidney; Gilard, Martine; Laskar, Marc; Eltchaninoff, Hélène; Iung, Bernard; Leprince, Pascal; Teiger, Emmanuel; Chevreul, Karine; Prat, Alain; Lievre, Michel; Leguerrier, Alain; Donzeau-Gouge, Patrick; Fajadet, Jean; Schiele, Francois

    2014-05-01

    The purposes of the present study were to determine the impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) on Valve Academic Research Consortium-defined outcomes in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). A total of 3,933 consecutive patients underwent TAVI from January 2010 to December 2011 in 34 centers and were included in the French national TAVI registry "FRANCE 2"; 895 (22.7%) had concomitant COPD, 3,038 (77.3%) did not. There were no significant differences in procedural characteristics or 30-day Valve Academic Research Consortium-defined outcomes between those with and without COPD. Multivariate regression analysis showed COPD to be an independent predictor of 1-year mortality and combined efficacy end point after adjustment for concomitant co-morbidities (hazard ratio 1.19, 95% confidence interval 1.005 to 1.41, p = 0.03 and hazard ratio 1.52, 95% confidence interval 1.29 to 1.79, p <0.001, respectively). The higher mortality rate at 1 year in patients with COPD was related to cardiovascular deaths (COPD 10.0% vs non-COPD 6.2%, p = 0.008). Subgroup analysis found that the effect of COPD on 1-year mortality rate was constant across different subgroups, especially the type of approach and the type of anesthesia subgroups. In conclusion, concomitant COPD in patients referred for TAVI characterizes a high-risk population. The excess in mortality is largely determined by a higher rate of cardiovascular deaths and exists regardless of the type of procedure performed and its results.

  11. Shifting chronic disease management from hospitals to primary care in Estonian health system: analysis of national panel data

    PubMed Central

    Atun, Rifat; Gurol–Urganci, Ipek; Hone, Thomas; Pell, Lisa; Stokes, Jonathan; Habicht, Triin; Lukka, Kaija; Raaper, Elin; Habicht, Jarno

    2016-01-01

    Background Following independence from the Soviet Union in 1991, Estonia introduced a national insurance system, consolidated the number of health care providers, and introduced family medicine centred primary health care (PHC) to strengthen the health system. Methods Using routinely collected health billing records for 2005–2012, we examine health system utilisation for seven ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs) (asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD], depression, Type 2 diabetes, heart failure, hypertension, and ischemic heart disease [IHD]), and by patient characteristics (gender, age, and number of co–morbidities). The data set contained 552 822 individuals. We use patient level data to test the significance of trends, and employ multivariate regression analysis to evaluate the probability of inpatient admission while controlling for patient characteristics, health system supply–side variables, and PHC use. Findings Over the study period, utilisation of PHC increased, whilst inpatient admissions fell. Service mix in PHC changed with increases in phone, email, nurse, and follow–up (vs initial) consultations. Healthcare utilisation for diabetes, depression, IHD and hypertension shifted to PHC, whilst for COPD, heart failure and asthma utilisation in outpatient and inpatient settings increased. Multivariate regression indicates higher probability of inpatient admission for males, older patient and especially those with multimorbidity, but protective effect for PHC, with significantly lower hospital admission for those utilising PHC services. Interpretation Our findings suggest health system reforms in Estonia have influenced the shift of ACSCs from secondary to primary care, with PHC having a protective effect in reducing hospital admissions. PMID:27648258

  12. Evidence-based chronic ulcer care and lower limb outcomes among Pacific Northwest veterans.

    PubMed

    Karavan, Mahsa; Olerud, John; Bouldin, Erin; Taylor, Leslie; Reiber, Gayle E

    2015-09-01

    Evidence-based ulcer care guidelines detail optimal components of care for treatment of ulcers of different etiologies. We investigated the impact of providing specific evidence-based ulcer treatment components on healing outcomes for lower limb ulcers (LLU) among veterans in the Pacific Northwest. Components of evidence-based ulcer care for venous, arterial, diabetic foot ulcers/neuropathic ulcers were abstracted from medical records. The outcome was ulcer healing. Our analysis assessed the relationship between evidence-based ulcer care by etiology, components of care provided, and healing, while accounting for veteran characteristics. A minority of veterans in all three ulcer-etiology groups received the recommended components of evidence-based care in at least 80% of visits. The likelihood of healing improved when assessment for edema and infection were performed on at least 80% of visits (hazard ratio [HR] = 3.20, p = 0.009 and HR = 3.54, p = 0.006, respectively) in patients with venous ulcers. There was no significant association between frequency of care components provided and healing among patients with arterial ulcers. Among patients with diabetic/neuropathic ulcers, the chance of healing increased 2.5-fold when debridement was performed at 80% of visits (p = 0.03), and doubled when ischemia was assessed at the first visit (p = 0.045). Veterans in the Pacific Northwest did not uniformly receive evidence-based ulcer care. Not all evidence-based ulcer care components were significantly associated with healing. At a minimum, clinicians need to address components of ulcer care associated with improved ulcer healing.

  13. The association between use of chiropractic care and costs of care among older Medicare patients with chronic low back pain and multiple comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, William B; Leininger, Brent; Whedon, James M; Lurie, Jon D; Tosteson, Tor D; Swenson, Rand; O’Malley, Alistair J; Goertz, Christine M

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine whether use of chiropractic manipulative treatment (CMT) was associated with lower healthcare costs among multiply-comorbid Medicare beneficiaries with an episode of chronic low back pain (cLBP). Methods We conducted an observational, retrospective study of 2006–2012 Medicare fee-for-service reimbursements for 72,326 multiply-comorbid patients aged 66 and older with cLBP episodes and 1 of 4 treatment exposures: chiropractic manipulative treatment (CMT) alone, CMT followed or preceded by conventional medical care, or conventional medical care alone. We used propensity score weighting to address selection bias. Results After propensity score weighting, total and per-episode day Part A, Part B, and Part D Medicare reimbursements during the cLBP treatment episode were lowest for patients who used CMT alone; these patients had higher rates of healthcare use for low back pain but lower rates of back surgery in the year following the treatment episode. Expenditures were greatest for patients receiving medical care alone; order was irrelevant when both CMT and medical treatment were provided. Patients who used only CMT had the lowest annual growth rates in almost all Medicare expenditure categories. While patients who used only CMT had the lowest Part A and Part B expenditures per episode day, we found no indication of lower psychiatric or pain medication expenditures associated with CMT. Conclusions This study found that older multiply-comorbid patients who used only CMT during their cLBP episodes had lower overall costs of care, shorter episodes, and lower cost of care per episode day than patients in the other treatment groups. Further, costs of care for the episode and per episode day were lower for patients who used a combination of CMT and conventional medical care than for patients who did not use any CMT. These findings support initial CMT use in the treatment of, and possibly broader chiropractic management of

  14. Self Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Care Connections Experiences Research Learning Evaluation Print Email Self Care If you are living with a chronic ... help you cope can make a real difference. Self-care techniques are things you can do for ...

  15. Caring for Individuals with Chronic Illness and Minor Depression: Latino Perceptions of Caregiver Burden.

    PubMed

    Corvin, Jaime; Chan, Isabella; Tezak, Ann; Carpenter, Kelly; Aguado Loi, Claudia; Gonzales, Junius; Hoare, Ismael

    2017-01-01

    Informal caregiving can be fundamental to disease management. Yet, the psychosocial, physical, and financial burden experienced by caregivers can be significant. In the US, Latinos experience increasing rates of chronic conditions, the highest uninsured rates in the country, and a growing dependence on informal caregivers. This article explores the impact of caregiving on caregivers of individuals with comorbid chronic disease and depression. Findings highlight the impact of caregiving on financial insecurity, balancing competing demands, increased emotional distress, and community supports. Findings support the inclusion of caregivers in disease management programs to enhance psychosocial outcomes for both caregivers and their patients.

  16. Bridging the chronic care gap: HealthOne Mt Druitt, Australia

    PubMed Central

    McNab, Justin; Gillespie, James A.

    2015-01-01

    HealthOne was part of a state-wide initiative to invest in new community-based facilities for collocating services. The HealthOne Mount Druitt is a virtual hub and spoke organisation established in 2006 in a socially disadvantaged part of Western Sydney based out of a new community health hub. The model is based on ‘virtual’ care planning and aims to improve coordination of care for older people with complex health needs, reduce unnecessary hospitalisations and ensure appropriate referral to community and specialist health services. General practitioner liaison nurses (GPLNs) work closely with clients as well as general practitioners (GPs) and other health care providers. Primary health care providers reported improved communication and coordination of services, and there have been lower levels of utilisation of the emergency department (ED) for patients following enrolment in the programme. HealthOne provides an example of how a virtual organisation together with highly skilled care coordinators can overcome some of the barriers to providing integrated care created by fragmented funding streams and care delivery systems. PMID:26417210

  17. Incremental health care costs for chronic pain in Ontario, Canada: a population-based matched cohort study of adolescents and adults using administrative data.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Mary-Ellen; Taddio, Anna; Katz, Joel; Shah, Vibhuti; Krahn, Murray

    2016-08-01

    Little is known about the economic burden of chronic pain and how chronic pain affects health care utilization. We aimed to estimate the annual per-person incremental medical cost and health care utilization for chronic pain in the Ontario population from the perspective of the public payer. We performed a retrospective cohort study using Ontario health care databases and the electronically linked Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) from 2000 to 2011. We identified subjects aged ≥12 years from the CCHS with chronic pain and closely matched them to individuals without pain using propensity score matching methods. We used linked data to determine mean 1-year per-person health care costs and utilization for each group and mean incremental cost for chronic pain. All costs are reported in 2014 Canadian dollars. After matching, we had 19,138 pairs of CCHS respondents with and without chronic pain. The average age was 55 years (SD = 18) and 61% were female. The incremental cost to manage chronic pain was $1742 per person (95% confidence interval [CI], $1488-$2020), 51% more than the control group. The largest contributor to the incremental cost was hospitalization ($514; 95% CI, $364-$683). Incremental costs were the highest in those with severe pain ($3960; 95% CI, $3186-$4680) and in those with most activity limitation ($4365; 95% CI, $3631-$5147). The per-person cost to manage chronic pain is substantial and more than 50% higher than a comparable patient without chronic pain. Costs are higher in people with more severe pain and activity limitations.

  18. Genes, race, and culture in clinical care: racial profiling in the management of chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Linda M; Truesdell, Nicole D; Kreiner, Meta J

    2013-06-01

    Race, although an unscientific concept, remains prominent in health research and clinical guidelines, and is routinely invoked in clinical practice. In interviews with 58 primary care clinicians we explored how they understand and apply concepts of racial difference. We found wide agreement that race is important to consider in clinical care. They explained the effect of race on health, drawing on common assumptions about the biological, class, and cultural characteristics of racial minorities. They identified specific race-based clinical strategies for only a handful of conditions and were inconsistent in the details of what they said should be done for minority patients. We conclude that using race in clinical medicine promotes and maintains the illusion of inherent racial differences and may result in minority patients receiving care aimed at presumed racial group characteristics, rather than care selected as specifically appropriate for them as individuals.

  19. Catastrophic Health Care Expenditure among Older People with Chronic Diseases in 15 European Countries

    PubMed Central

    Arsenijevic, Jelena; Pavlova, Milena; Rechel, Bernd; Groot, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction It is well-known that the prevalence of chronic diseases is high among older people, especially those who are poor. Moreover, chronic diseases can result in catastrophic health expenditure. The relationship between chronic diseases and their financial burden on households is thus double-sided, as financial difficulties can give rise to, and result from, chronic diseases. Our aim was to examine the levels of catastrophic health expenditure imposed by private out-of-pocket payments among older people diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases and cancer in 15 European countries. Methods The SHARE dataset for individuals aged 50+ and their households, collected in 2010–2012 was used. The total number of participants included in this study was N = 51,661. The sample consisted of 43.8% male and 56.2% female participants. The average age was 67 years. We applied an instrumental variable approach for binary instrumented variables known as a treatment-effect model. Results We found that being diagnosed with diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases was associated with catastrophic health expenditure among older people even in comparatively wealthy countries with developed risk-pooling mechanisms. When compared to the Netherlands (the country with the lowest share of out-of-pocket payments as a percentage of total health expenditure in our study), older people diagnosed with diabetes mellitus in Portugal, Poland, Denmark, Italy, Switzerland, Belgium, the Czech Republic and Hungary were more likely to experience catastrophic health expenditure. Similar results were observed for diagnosed cardiovascular diseases. In contrast, cancer was not associated with catastrophic health expenditure. Discussion Our study shows that older people with diagnosed chronic diseases face catastrophic health expenditure even in some of the wealthiest countries in Europe. The effect differs across chronic diseases and countries. This may be due to different socio

  20. Loving your child to death: Considerations of the care of chronically ill children and euthanasia in Emil Sher’s Mourning Dove

    PubMed Central

    Mukhida, Karim

    2007-01-01

    How do parents cope when their child is ill or dying, and when he or she is experiencing constant pain or suffering? What do parents think of the contributions that medical professionals make to the care of their chronically or terminally ill child? Is it possible for a parent to love a child so much that they wish their child to be dead? The purpose of the present paper is to explore these questions and aspects of the care of chronically or terminally ill children using Mourning Dove’s portrayal of one family’s attempt to care for their ill daughter. Mourning Dove, a play written by Canadian playwright Emil Sher, was inspired by the case of Saskatchewan wheat farmer Robert Latimer who killed his 12-year-old daughter, Tracy, who suffered with cerebral palsy and had begun to experience tremendous pain. Rather than focusing on the medical or legal aspects of the care of a chronically ill child, the play offers a glimpse into how a family copes with the care of such a child and the effect the child’s illness has on the family. The reading and examination of nonmedical literature, such as Mourning Dove, serves as a useful means for medical professionals to better understand how illness affects and is responded to by patients and their families. This understanding is a prerequisite for them to be able to provide complete care of children with chronic or terminal illnesses and their families. PMID:19043501